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Sample records for 30s ribosome assembly

  1. Visualizing ribosome biogenesis: parallel assembly pathways for the 30S subunit.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Anke M; Yoshioka, Craig; Beck, Andrea H; Bunner, Anne E; Milligan, Ronald A; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2010-10-29

    Ribosomes are self-assembling macromolecular machines that translate DNA into proteins, and an understanding of ribosome biogenesis is central to cellular physiology. Previous studies on the Escherichia coli 30S subunit suggest that ribosome assembly occurs via multiple parallel pathways rather than through a single rate-limiting step, but little mechanistic information is known about this process. Discovery single-particle profiling (DSP), an application of time-resolved electron microscopy, was used to obtain more than 1 million snapshots of assembling 30S subunits, identify and visualize the structures of 14 assembly intermediates, and monitor the population flux of these intermediates over time. DSP results were integrated with mass spectrometry data to construct the first ribosome-assembly mechanism that incorporates binding dependencies, rate constants, and structural characterization of populated intermediates. PMID:21030658

  2. Concurrent Nucleation of 16S Folding and Induced Fit in 30S Ribosome Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Adilakshmi, T.; Bellur, D; Woodson, S

    2008-01-01

    Rapidly growing cells produce thousands of new ribosomes each minute, in a tightly regulated process that is essential to cell growth. How the Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA and the 20 proteins that make up the 30S ribosomal subunit can assemble correctly in a few minutes remains a challenging problem, partly because of the lack of real-time data on the earliest stages of assembly. By providing snapshots of individual RNA and protein interactions as they emerge in real time, here we show that 30S assembly nucleates concurrently from different points along the rRNA. Time-resolved hydroxyl radical footprinting3 was used to map changes in the structure of the rRNA within 20 milliseconds after the addition of total 30S proteins. Helical junctions in each domain fold within 100 ms. In contrast, interactions surrounding the decoding site and between the 5', the central and the 3' domains require 2-200 seconds to form. Unexpectedly, nucleotides contacted by the same protein are protected at different rates, indicating that initial RNA-protein encounter complexes refold during assembly. Although early steps in assembly are linked to intrinsically stable rRNA structure, later steps correspond to regions of induced fit between the proteins and the rRNA.

  3. Differential effects of ribosomal proteins and Mg2+ ions on a conformational switch during 30S ribosome 5'-domain assembly.

    PubMed

    Abeysirigunawardena, Sanjaya C; Woodson, Sarah A

    2015-11-01

    Ribosomal protein S4 nucleates assembly of the 30S ribosome 5' and central domains, which is crucial for the survival of cells. Protein S4 changes the structure of its 16S rRNA binding site, passing through a non-native intermediate complex before forming native S4-rRNA contacts. Ensemble FRET was used to measure the thermodynamic stability of non-native and native S4 complexes in the presence of Mg(2+) ions and other 5'-domain proteins. Equilibrium titrations of Cy3-labeled 5'-domain RNA with Cy5-labeled protein S4 showed that Mg(2+) ions preferentially stabilize the native S4-rRNA complex. In contrast, ribosomal proteins S20 and S16 act by destabilizing the non-native S4-rRNA complex. The full cooperative switch to the native complex requires S4, S16, and S20 and is achieved to a lesser degree by S4 and S16. The resulting thermodynamic model for assembly of the 30S body illustrates how ribosomal proteins selectively bias the equilibrium between alternative rRNA conformations, increasing the cooperativity of rRNA folding beyond what can be achieved by Mg(2+) ions alone. PMID:26354770

  4. A combined quantitative mass spectrometry and electron microscopy analysis of ribosomal 30S subunit assembly in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Sashital, Dipali G; Greeman, Candacia A; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Williamson, James R

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is a complex process involving the folding and processing of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), concomitant binding of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), and participation of numerous accessory cofactors. Here, we use a quantitative mass spectrometry/electron microscopy hybrid approach to determine the r-protein composition and conformation of 30S ribosome assembly intermediates in Escherichia coli. The relative timing of assembly of the 3′ domain and the formation of the central pseudoknot (PK) structure depends on the presence of the assembly factor RimP. The central PK is unstable in the absence of RimP, resulting in the accumulation of intermediates in which the 3′-domain is unanchored and the 5′-domain is depleted for r-proteins S5 and S12 that contact the central PK. Our results reveal the importance of the cofactor RimP in central PK formation, and introduce a broadly applicable method for characterizing macromolecular assembly in cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04491.001 PMID:25313868

  5. Protein-RNA Dynamics in the Central Junction Control 30S Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kris Ann; Lamichhane, Rajan; Lamichhane, Tek; Rueda, David; Cunningham, Philip R

    2016-09-11

    Interactions between ribosomal proteins (rproteins) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) facilitate the formation of functional ribosomes. S15 is a central domain primary binding protein that has been shown to trigger a cascade of conformational changes in 16S rRNA, forming the functional structure of the central domain. Previous biochemical and structural studies in vitro have revealed that S15 binds a three-way junction of helices 20, 21, and 22, including nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754. All junction nucleotides except 653 are highly conserved among the Bacteria. To identify functionally important motifs within the junction, we subjected nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754 to saturation mutagenesis and selected and analyzed functional mutants. Only 64 mutants with greater than 10% ribosome function in vivo were isolated. S15 overexpression complemented mutations in the junction loop in each of the partially active mutants, although mutations that produced inactive ribosomes were not complemented by overexpression of S15. Single-molecule Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) was used to study the Mg(2+)- and S15-induced conformational dynamics of selected junction mutants. Comparison of the structural dynamics of these mutants with the wild type in the presence and absence of S15 revealed specific sequence and structural motifs in the central junction that are important in ribosome function. PMID:27192112

  6. The ribosomal subunit assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur

    2005-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified nearly 200 proteins, other than the structural ribosomal proteins, that participate in the assembly of ribosomal subunits and their transport from the nucleus. In a separate line of research, proteomic studies of mature plant ribosomes have revealed considerable variability in the protein composition of individual ribosomes. PMID:16207363

  7. Ribosome Assembly as Antimicrobial Target.

    PubMed

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schmidt, Sabine; Schlömer, Renate; Deuerling, Elke; Nierhaus, Knud H

    2016-01-01

    Many antibiotics target the ribosome and interfere with its translation cycle. Since translation is the source of all cellular proteins including ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and ribosome assembly are interdependent. As a consequence, the activity of translation inhibitors might indirectly cause defective ribosome assembly. Due to the difficulty in distinguishing between direct and indirect effects, and because assembly is probably a target in its own right, concepts are needed to identify small molecules that directly inhibit ribosome assembly. Here, we summarize the basic facts of ribosome targeting antibiotics. Furthermore, we present an in vivo screening strategy that focuses on ribosome assembly by a direct fluorescence based read-out that aims to identify and characterize small molecules acting as primary assembly inhibitors. PMID:27240412

  8. Ribosome Assembly as Antimicrobial Target

    PubMed Central

    Nikolay, Rainer; Schmidt, Sabine; Schlömer, Renate; Deuerling, Elke; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2016-01-01

    Many antibiotics target the ribosome and interfere with its translation cycle. Since translation is the source of all cellular proteins including ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and ribosome assembly are interdependent. As a consequence, the activity of translation inhibitors might indirectly cause defective ribosome assembly. Due to the difficulty in distinguishing between direct and indirect effects, and because assembly is probably a target in its own right, concepts are needed to identify small molecules that directly inhibit ribosome assembly. Here, we summarize the basic facts of ribosome targeting antibiotics. Furthermore, we present an in vivo screening strategy that focuses on ribosome assembly by a direct fluorescence based read-out that aims to identify and characterize small molecules acting as primary assembly inhibitors. PMID:27240412

  9. All-atom homology model of the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chang-Shung; Joseph, Simpson; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y

    2002-10-01

    Understanding the structural basis of ribosomal function requires close comparison between biochemical and structural data. Although a large amount of biochemical data are available for the Escherichia coli ribosome, the structure has not been solved to atomic resolution. Using a new RNA homology procedure, we have modeled the all-atom structure of the E. coli 30S ribosomal subunit. We find that the tertiary structure of the ribosome core, including the A-, P- and E-sites, is highly conserved. The hypervariable regions in our structure, which differ from the structure of the 30S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus, are consistent with the cryo-EM map of the E. coli ribosome. PMID:12244297

  10. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals.

    PubMed

    Dao, E Han; Sierra, Raymond G; Laksmono, Hartawan; Lemke, Henrik T; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Coey, Aaron; Larsen, Kevin; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Cohen, Aina E; Soltis, S Michael; DeMirci, Hasan

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser. PMID:26798805

  11. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Lemke, Henrik T.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Coey, Aaron; Larsen, Kevin; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; DeMirci, Hasan

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  12. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Lemke, Henrik T.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Coey, Aaron; Larsen, Kevin; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; et al

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecondmore » X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.« less

  13. Mutations in the leader region of ribosomal RNA operons cause structurally defective 30 S ribosomes as revealed by in vivo structural probing.

    PubMed

    Balzer, M; Wagner, R

    1998-02-27

    The biogenesis of functional ribosomes is regulated in a very complex manner, involving different proteins and RNA molecules. RNAs are not only essential components of both ribosomal subunits but also transiently interacting factors during particle formation. In eukaryotes snoRNAs act as molecular chaperones to assist maturation, modification and assembly. In a very similar way highly conserved leader sequences of bacterial rRNA operons are involved in the correct formation of 30 S ribosomal subunits. Certain mutations in the rRNA leader region cause severe growth defects due to malfunction of ribosomes which are assembled from such transcription units. To understand how the leader sequences act to facilitate the formation of the correct 30 S subunits we performed in vivo chemical probing to assess structural differences between ribosomes assembled either from rRNA transcribed from wild-type operons or from operons which contain mutations in the rRNA leader region. Cells transformed with plasmids containing the respective rRNA operons were reacted with dimethylsulphate (DMS). Ribosomes were isolated by sucrose gradient centrifugation and modified nucleotides within the 16 S rRNA were identified by primer extension reaction. Structural differences between ribosomes from wild-type and mutant rRNA operons occur in several clusters within the 16 S rRNA secondary structure. The most prominent differences are located in the central domain including the universally conserved pseudoknot structure which connects the 5', the central and the 3' domain of 16 S rRNA. Two other clusters with structural differences fall in the 5' domain where the leader had been shown to interact with mature 16 S rRNA and within the ribosomal protein S4 binding site. The other differences in structure are located in sites which are also known as sites for the action of several antibiotics. The data explain the functional defects of ribosomes from rRNA operons with leader mutations and help to

  14. Characterization of GE82832, a peptide inhibitor of translocation interacting with bacterial 30S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Brandi, Letizia; Fabbretti, Attilio; Stefano, Michele Di; Lazzarini, Ameriga; Abbondi, Monica; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2006-01-01

    GE82832, a secondary metabolite produced by Streptosporangium cinnabarinum (strain GE82832), has been identified as a translational inhibitor by in vitro screening of a library of natural products. Secondary functional tests specific for individual steps of the translational pathway demonstrated that translocation is the specific target of GE82832. Chemical probing in situ demonstrated that this antibiotic protects bases A1324 and A1333 and exposes C1336 of 16S rRNA, thereby indicating that its binding site is located on the head of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The ribosomal location of GE82832, near ribosomal protein S13 and G1338, two elements of the small subunit that are part of or close to the B1a intrasubunit bridge, suggests that translocation inhibition results from an altered dynamics of 30S–50S ribosomal subunit interaction. PMID:16699167

  15. Neutron Scattering and the 30 S Ribosomal Subunit of E. Coli

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Moore, P. B.; Engelman, D. M.; Langer, J. A.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Schindler, D. G.; Schoenborn, B. P.; Sillers, I. Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-06-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today.

  16. Seeing is Believing in Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jonathan R

    2016-07-14

    Many proteins have been implicated genetically and biochemically in the assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes. Now, Kornprobst et al. show us how they are put together with a cryoEM structure of the 90S processome that initiates ribosome assembly, revealing the arrangement of U3 RNA and the several UTP complexes that form a chaperone-like structure around and within the developing 40S ribosomal subunit. PMID:27419867

  17. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawarden, Sanjaya C.; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-02-01

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the ribosomal RNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to observe real-time encounters between Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5' domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free-energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-colour FRET and molecular dynamics simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. These protein-guided dynamics offer an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes.

  18. Crystal Structure of the 30S Ribosomal Subunit from Thermus Thermophilus. Purification, Crystallization and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, William M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; McCutcheonn, John P.; May, Joanna L.C.; Carter, Andrew P.; Morgan-Warren, Robert J.; Wimberly, Brian T.; Ramakrishnan, Venki

    2009-10-07

    We describe the crystallization and structure determination of the 30 S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus. Previous reports of crystals that diffracted to 10 {angstrom} resolution were used as a starting point to improve the quality of the diffraction. Eventually, ideas such as the addition of substrates or factors to eliminate conformational heterogeneity proved less important than attention to detail in yielding crystals that diffracted beyond 3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite improvements in technology and methodology in the last decade, the structure determination of the 30 S subunit presented some very challenging technical problems because of the size of the asymmetric unit, crystal variability and sensitivity to radiation damage. Some steps that were useful for determination of the atomic structure were: the use of anomalous scattering from the LIII edges of osmium and lutetium to obtain the necessary phasing signal; the use of tunable, third-generation synchrotron sources to obtain data of reasonable quality at high resolution; collection of derivative data precisely about a mirror plane to preserve small anomalous differences between Bijvoet mates despite extensive radiation damage and multi-crystal scaling; the pre-screening of crystals to ensure quality, isomorphism and the efficient use of scarce third-generation synchrotron time; pre-incubation of crystals in cobalt hexaammine to ensure isomorphism with other derivatives; and finally, the placement of proteins whose structures had been previously solved in isolation, in conjunction with biochemical data on protein-RNA interactions, to map out the architecture of the 30 S subunit prior to the construction of a detailed atomic-resolution model.

  19. Conformation of 4.5S RNA in the signal recognition particle and on the 30S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    GU, SHAN-QING; JÖCKEL, JOHANNES; BEINKER, PHILIPP; WARNECKE, JENS; SEMENKOV, YURI P.; RODNINA, MARINA V.; WINTERMEYER, WOLFGANG

    2005-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) from Escherichia coli consists of 4.5S RNA and protein Ffh. It is essential for targeting ribosomes that are translating integral membrane proteins to the translocation pore in the plasma membrane. Independently of Ffh, 4.5S RNA also interacts with elongation factor G (EF-G) and the 30S ribosomal subunit. Here we use a cross-linking approach to probe the conformation of 4.5S RNA in SRP and in the complex with the 30S ribosomal subunit and to map the binding site. The UV-activatable cross-linker p-azidophenacyl bromide (AzP) was attached to positions 1, 21, and 54 of wild-type or modified 4.5S RNA. In SRP, cross-links to Ffh were formed from AzP in all three positions in 4.5S RNA, indicating a strongly bent conformation in which the 5′ end (position 1) and the tetraloop region (including position 54) of the molecule are close to one another and to Ffh. In ribosomal complexes of 4.5S RNA, AzP in both positions 1 and 54 formed cross-links to the 30S ribosomal subunit, independently of the presence of Ffh. The major cross-linking target on the ribosome was protein S7; minor cross-links were formed to S2, S18, and S21. There were no cross-links from 4.5S RNA to the 50S subunit, where the primary binding site of SRP is located close to the peptide exit. The functional role of 4.5S RNA binding to the 30S subunit is unclear, as the RNA had no effect on translation or tRNA translocation on the ribosome. PMID:16043501

  20. Mitochondrial ribosome assembly in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Tu, Ya-Ting; Amunts, Alexey; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally and functionally conserved macromolecular machine universally responsible for catalyzing protein synthesis. Within eukaryotic cells, mitochondria contain their own ribosomes (mitoribosomes), which synthesize a handful of proteins, all essential for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation system. High-resolution cryo-EM structures of the yeast, porcine and human mitoribosomal subunits and of the entire human mitoribosome have uncovered a wealth of new information to illustrate their evolutionary divergence from their bacterial ancestors and their adaptation to synthesis of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. With such structural data becoming available, one of the most important remaining questions is that of the mitoribosome assembly pathway and factors involved. The regulation of mitoribosome biogenesis is paramount to mitochondrial respiration, and thus to cell viability, growth and differentiation. Moreover, mutations affecting the rRNA and protein components produce severe human mitochondrial disorders. Despite its biological and biomedical significance, knowledge on mitoribosome biogenesis and its deviations from the much-studied bacterial ribosome assembly processes is scarce, especially the order of rRNA processing and assembly events and the regulatory factors required to achieve fully functional particles. This article focuses on summarizing the current available information on mitoribosome assembly pathway, factors that form the mitoribosome assembly machinery, and the effect of defective mitoribosome assembly on human health. PMID:26030272

  1. Depletion of Free 30S Ribosomal Subunits in Escherichia coli by Expression of RNA Containing Shine-Dalgarno-Like Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mawn, Mary V.; Fournier, Maurille J.; Tirrell, David A.; Mason, Thomas L.

    2002-01-01

    We have constructed synthetic coding sequences for the expression of poly(α,l-glutamic acid) (PLGA) as fusion proteins with dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) in Escherichia coli. These PLGA coding sequences use both GAA and GAG codons for glutamic acid and contain sequence elements (5′-GAGGAGG-3′) that resemble the consensus Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence found at translation initiation sites in bacterial mRNAs. An unusual feature of DHFR-PLGA expression is that accumulation of the protein is inversely related to the level of induction of its mRNA. Cellular protein synthesis was inhibited >95% by induction of constructs for either translatable or untranslatable PLGA RNAs. Induction of PLGA RNA resulted in the depletion of free 30S ribosomal subunits and the appearance of new complexes in the polyribosome region of the gradient. Unlike normal polyribosomes, these complexes were resistant to breakdown in the presence of puromycin. The novel complexes contained 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and PLGA RNA. We conclude that multiple noninitiator SD-like sequences in the PLGA RNA inhibit cellular protein synthesis by sequestering 30S small ribosomal subunits and 70S ribosomes in nonfunctional complexes on the PLGA mRNA. PMID:11751827

  2. S-adenosylmethionine directly inhibits binding of 30S ribosomal subunits to the SMK box translational riboswitch RNA

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Ryan T.; Grundy, Frank J.; Henkin, Tina M.

    2007-01-01

    The SMK box is a conserved riboswitch motif found in the 5′ untranslated region of metK genes [encoding S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthetase] in lactic acid bacteria, including Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Lactococcus sp. Previous studies showed that this RNA element binds SAM in vitro, and SAM binding causes a structural rearrangement that sequesters the Shine–Dalgarno (SD) sequence by pairing with an anti-SD (ASD) element. A model was proposed in which SAM binding inhibits metK translation by preventing binding of the ribosome to the SD region of the mRNA. In the current work, the addition of SAM was shown to inhibit binding of 30S ribosomal subunits to SMK box RNA; in contrast, the addition of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) had no effect. A mutant RNA, which has a disrupted SD-ASD pairing, was defective in SAM binding and showed no reduction of ribosome binding in the presence of SAM, whereas a compensatory mutation that restored SD-ASD pairing restored the response to SAM. Primer extension inhibition assays provided further evidence for SD-ASD pairing in the presence of SAM. These results strongly support the model that SMK box translational repression operates through occlusion of the ribosome binding site and that SAM binding requires the SD-ASD pairing. PMID:17360376

  3. Positions of S2, S13, S16, S17, S19 and S21 in the 30 S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Capel, M S; Kjeldgaard, M; Engelman, D M; Moore, P B

    1988-03-01

    Neutron scattering distance data are presented for 33 protein pairs in the 30 S ribosomal subunit from Escherichia coli, along with the methods used for measuring distances between its exchangeable components. When combined with prior data, these new results permit the positioning of S2, S13, S16, S17, S19 and S21 in the 30 S ribosomal subunit, completing the mapping of its proteins by neutron scattering. Comparisons with other data suggest that the neutron map is a reliable guide to the quaternary structure of the 30 S subunit. PMID:3288761

  4. Functions of ribosomal proteins in assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Jesús; Karbstein, Katrin; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79-80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type-specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. PMID:25706898

  5. Functions of Ribosomal Proteins in Assembly of Eukaryotic Ribosomes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79–80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type–specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. PMID:25706898

  6. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature using an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Hasan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Botha, Sabine; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R. Bruce; Gati, Cornelius; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Jogl, Gerwald; Dahlberg, Albert E.; Gregory, Steven T.; Bogan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution ribosome structures determined by X-ray crystallography have provided important insights into the mechanism of translation. Such studies have thus far relied on large ribosome crystals kept at cryogenic temperatures to reduce radiation damage. Here, the application of serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain diffraction data from ribosome microcrystals in liquid suspension at ambient temperature is described. 30S ribosomal subunit microcrystals diffracted to beyond 6 Å resolution, demonstrating the feasibility of using SFX for ribosome structural studies. The ability to collect diffraction data at near-physiological temperatures promises to provide fundamental insights into the structural dynamics of the ribosome and its functional complexes. PMID:23989164

  7. Physical and biochemical nature of the bacterial cytoplasm: movement and localization of mRNA and the 30S subunits of ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Trevors, J T

    2012-05-01

    There is a paucity of knowledge on how mRNA transcripts in the spatially crowded, but molecularly organized bacterial cytoplasm contact the 30S ribosomal subunits. Does simple diffusion in the cytoplasm account for transcript-ribosome interactions given that a large number of ribosomes (e.g., about 72,000 in Escherichia coli during exponential growth) can be present in the cytoplasm? Or are undiscovered mechanisms present where specific transcripts are directed to specific ribosomes at specific cytoplasmic locations, while others are mobilized in a random manner? Moreover, is it possible that cytoplasmic mobilization occurs in bacteria, driven possibly by thermal infrared (IR) radiation and the generation of exclusion zone (EZ) water? These aspects will be discussed in this article and hypotheses presented. PMID:22710107

  8. Effects of induction of rRNA overproduction on ribosomal protein synthesis and ribosome subunit assembly in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, M; Nomura, M

    1988-01-01

    Overproduction of rRNA was artificially induced in Escherichia coli cells to test whether the synthesis of ribosomal protein (r-protein) is normally repressed by feedback regulation. When rRNA was overproduced more than twofold from a hybrid plasmid carrying the rrnB operon fused to the lambda pL promoter (pL-rrnB), synthesis of individual r-proteins increased by an average of about 60%. This demonstrates that the synthesis of r-proteins is repressed under normal conditions. The increase of r-protein production, however, for unknown reasons, was not as great as the increase in rRNA synthesis and resulted in an imbalance between the amounts of rRNA and r-protein synthesis. Therefore, only a small (less than 20%) increase in the synthesis of complete 30S and 50S ribosome subunits was detected, and a considerable fraction of the excess rRNA was degraded. Lack of complete cooperativity in the assembly of ribosome subunits in vivo is discussed as a possible explanation for the absence of a large stimulation of ribosome synthesis observed under these conditions. In addition to the induction of intact rRNA overproduction from the pL-rrnB operon, the effects of unbalanced overproduction of each of the two large rRNAs, 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA, on r-protein synthesis were examined using pL-rrnB derivatives carrying a large deletion in either the 23S rRNA gene or the 16S rRNA gene. Operon-specific derepression after 23S or 16S rRNA overproduction correlated with the overproduction of rRNA containing the target site for the operon-specific repressor r-protein. These results are discussed to explain the apparent coupling of the assembly of one ribosomal subunit with that of the other which was observed in earlier studies on conditionally lethal mutants with defects in ribosome assembly. PMID:3053641

  9. Structural aspects of RbfA action during small ribosomal subunit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Partha P.; Wilson, Daniel N.; Kawazoe, Masahito; Swami, Neil K.; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Sharma, Manjuli R.; Booth, Timothy M.; Takemoto, Chie; Fucini, Paola; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Agrawal, Rajendra K.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Ribosome binding factor A (RbfA) is a bacterial cold-shock response protein, required for an efficient processing of the 5′end of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) during assembly of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit. Here we present a crystal structure of Thermus thermophilus RbfA and a three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopic (EM) map of the T. thermophilus 30S·RbfA complex. RbfA binds to the 30S subunit in a position overlapping the binding sites of the A- and P-site tRNAs, and RbfA’s functionally important C-terminus extends toward the 5′ end of the 16S rRNA. In the presence of RbfA, a portion of the 16S rRNA encompassing helix 44, which is known to be directly involved in mRNA decoding and tRNA binding, is displaced. These results shed light on the role played by RbfA during maturation of the 30S subunit, and also indicate how RbfA provides cells with a translational advantage under conditions of cold shock. PMID:17996707

  10. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-01-01

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers—termed here escortins—to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03473.001 PMID:25144938

  11. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-01-01

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers-termed here escortins-to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:25144938

  12. Incorporation of single dinitrophenyl-modified proteins in to the 30S subunit of Escherichia coli ribosomes by total reconstitution for localization by immune electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, T.V.

    1989-01-01

    The ribosome is a structurally defined organelle whose function is central to the existence of all organisms. It is the unique site of protein biosynthesis in all cells. A detailed understanding of ribosome structure is essential in understanding the process of translation. This thesis represents a new approach to the systematic localization of individual proteins contained in the small subunit of Escherichia coli ribosomes using immunoelectron microscopy. All 30S proteins were purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and eight isolated proteins (S12,S21,S14,S19,S18,S17,S16 and S13) were derivatized with 2,4-(3,5-{sup 3}H)dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB). The extent of modification of these proteins was estimated by both radioactivity and integrated peak areas, using dual wavelength monitoring at 214nm to detect protein and 360nm (to detect dinitrophenyl groups). Each dinitrophenylated protein was introduced in place of the corresponding unmodified protein into totally reconstituted 30S subunits. Antibodies raised against the DNP-hapten bound effectively to such reconstituted subunits and did not cause dissociation of the modified protein from the subunit. Electron microscopy of the immune complexes was used to localize the modified protein on the subunit surface. Incorporation of any of the DNP-modified proteins, with the exception of DNP-S18, does not interfere with the functionality of the ribosome as measure by the binding of Phe-tRNA{sup Phe} or the synthesis of poly(Phe) in a poly(U)-dependent manner. Results show that unmodified protein competes with DNP-protein and that DNP-protein can function, as its native counterpart, in stimulating uptake of specific proteins during reconstitution. This data provides evidence that each DNP-protein occupies the same position in 30S subunits as does the corresponding unmodified protein.

  13. Structural change induced by removal of magnesium ions on E. coli 70S ribosomes and 30S and 50S separated subunits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briganti, G.; Giansanti, A.; Bonincontro, A.; Mengoni, M.; Giordano, R.

    1996-09-01

    To clarify the intra- and inter-particle effects of magnesium ions on E. coli ribosomes we have performed measurements of light scattering intensity, index of refraction and small-angle neutron scattering on the 70S complex and 30S and 50S subunits with and without magnesium. The results indicate that magnesium has a specific intra-particle effect on the subunits as well as on the 70S complex. Besides, the distance distribution function shows that magnesium has an effect on the supra-ribosomal aggregation. The combination of these intra- and inter-particle effects completely hides, in the scattering experiments, any effect of magnesium on the degree of association of the two subunits into the 70S complex.

  14. The antibiotic Furvina® targets the P-site of 30S ribosomal subunits and inhibits translation initiation displaying start codon bias

    PubMed Central

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Brandi, Letizia; Petrelli, Dezemona; Pon, Cynthia L.; Castañedo, Nilo R.; Medina, Ricardo; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2012-01-01

    Furvina®, also denominated G1 (MW 297), is a synthetic nitrovinylfuran [2-bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl)-furan] antibiotic with a broad antimicrobial spectrum. An ointment (Dermofural®) containing G1 as the only active principle is currently marketed in Cuba and successfully used to treat dermatological infections. Here we describe the molecular target and mechanism of action of G1 in bacteria and demonstrate that in vivo G1 preferentially inhibits protein synthesis over RNA, DNA and cell wall synthesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that G1 targets the small ribosomal subunit, binds at or near the P-decoding site and inhibits its function interfering with the ribosomal binding of fMet-tRNA during 30S initiation complex (IC) formation ultimately inhibiting translation. Notably, this G1 inhibition displays a bias for the nature (purine vs. pyrimidine) of the 3′-base of the codon, occurring efficiently only when the mRNA directing 30S IC formation and translation contains the canonical AUG initiation triplet or the rarely found AUA triplet, but hardly occurs when the mRNA start codon is either one of the non-canonical triplets AUU or AUC. This codon discrimination by G1 is reminiscent, though of opposite type of that displayed by IF3 in its fidelity function, and remarkably does not occur in the absence of this factor. PMID:22941660

  15. The antibiotic Furvina® targets the P-site of 30S ribosomal subunits and inhibits translation initiation displaying start codon bias.

    PubMed

    Fabbretti, Attilio; Brandi, Letizia; Petrelli, Dezemona; Pon, Cynthia L; Castañedo, Nilo R; Medina, Ricardo; Gualerzi, Claudio O

    2012-11-01

    Furvina®, also denominated G1 (MW 297), is a synthetic nitrovinylfuran [2-bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl)-furan] antibiotic with a broad antimicrobial spectrum. An ointment (Dermofural®) containing G1 as the only active principle is currently marketed in Cuba and successfully used to treat dermatological infections. Here we describe the molecular target and mechanism of action of G1 in bacteria and demonstrate that in vivo G1 preferentially inhibits protein synthesis over RNA, DNA and cell wall synthesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that G1 targets the small ribosomal subunit, binds at or near the P-decoding site and inhibits its function interfering with the ribosomal binding of fMet-tRNA during 30S initiation complex (IC) formation ultimately inhibiting translation. Notably, this G1 inhibition displays a bias for the nature (purine vs. pyrimidine) of the 3'-base of the codon, occurring efficiently only when the mRNA directing 30S IC formation and translation contains the canonical AUG initiation triplet or the rarely found AUA triplet, but hardly occurs when the mRNA start codon is either one of the non-canonical triplets AUU or AUC. This codon discrimination by G1 is reminiscent, though of opposite type of that displayed by IF3 in its fidelity function, and remarkably does not occur in the absence of this factor. PMID:22941660

  16. Essential ribosome assembly factor Fap7 regulates a hierarchy of RNA-protein interactions during small ribosomal subunit biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hellmich, Ute A; Weis, Benjamin L; Lioutikov, Anatoli; Wurm, Jan Philip; Kaiser, Marco; Christ, Nina A; Hantke, Katharina; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico; Wöhnert, Jens

    2013-09-17

    Factor activating Pos9 (Fap7) is an essential ribosome biogenesis factor important for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit with an uncommon dual ATPase and adenylate kinase activity. Depletion of Fap7 or mutations in its ATPase motifs lead to defects in small ribosomal subunit rRNA maturation, the absence of ribosomal protein Rps14 from the assembled subunit, and retention of the nascent small subunit in a quality control complex with the large ribosomal subunit. The molecular basis for the role of Fap7 in ribosome biogenesis is, however, not yet understood. Here we show that Fap7 regulates multiple interactions between the precursor rRNA, ribosomal proteins, and ribosome assembly factors in a hierarchical manner. Fap7 binds to Rps14 with a very high affinity. Fap7 binding blocks both rRNA-binding elements of Rps14, suggesting that Fap7 inhibits premature interactions of Rps14 with RNA. The Fap7/Rps14 interaction is modulated by nucleotide binding to Fap7. Rps14 strongly activates the ATPase activity but not the adenylate kinase activity of Fap7, identifying Rps14 as an example of a ribosomal protein functioning as an ATPase-activating factor. In addition, Fap7 inhibits the RNA cleavage activity of Nob1, the endonuclease responsible for the final maturation step of the small subunit rRNA, in a nucleotide independent manner. Thus, Fap7 may regulate small subunit biogenesis at multiple stages. PMID:24003121

  17. Hierarchical RNA Processing Is Required for Mitochondrial Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Oliver; Busch, Jakob D; Matic, Stanka; Siira, Stefan J; Kuznetsova, Irina; Atanassov, Ilian; Ermer, Judith A; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J; Richman, Tara R; Stewart, James B; Mourier, Arnaud; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2016-08-16

    The regulation of mitochondrial RNA processing and its importance for ribosome biogenesis and energy metabolism are not clear. We generated conditional knockout mice of the endoribonuclease component of the RNase P complex, MRPP3, and report that it is essential for life and that heart and skeletal-muscle-specific knockout leads to severe cardiomyopathy, indicating that its activity is non-redundant. Transcriptome-wide parallel analyses of RNA ends (PARE) and RNA-seq enabled us to identify that in vivo 5' tRNA cleavage precedes 3' tRNA processing, and this is required for the correct biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosomal subunits. We identify that mitoribosomal biogenesis proceeds co-transcriptionally because large mitoribosomal proteins can form a subcomplex on an unprocessed RNA containing the 16S rRNA. Taken together, our data show that RNA processing links transcription to translation via assembly of the mitoribosome. PMID:27498866

  18. Ribosomal Protein Rps26 Influences 80S Ribosome Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Levanova, Nadezhda; Tabakova, Irina; Rospert, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The eukaryotic ribosome consists of a small (40S) and a large (60S) subunit. Rps26 is one of the essential ribosomal proteins of the 40S subunit and is encoded by two almost identical genes, RPS26a and RPS26b. Previous studies demonstrated that Rps26 interacts with the 5′ untranslated region of mRNA via the eukaryote-specific 62-YXXPKXYXK-70 (Y62–K70) motif. Those observations suggested that this peptide within Rps26 might play an important and specific role during translation initiation. By using alanine-scanning mutagenesis and engineered strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that single amino acid substitutions within the Y62–K70 motif of Rps26 did not affect the in vivo function of the protein. In contrast, complete deletion of the Y62–K70 segment was lethal. The simultaneous replacement of five conserved residues within the Y62–K70 segment by alanines resulted in growth defects under stress conditions and produced distinct changes in polysome profiles that were indicative of the accumulation of free 60S subunits. Human Rps26 (Rps26-Hs), which displays significant homology with yeast Rps26, supported the growth of an S. cerevisiae Δrps26a Δrps26b strain. However, the Δrps26a Δrps26b double deletion strain expressing Rps26-Hs displayed substantial growth defects and an altered ratio of 40S/60S ribosomal subunits. The combined data strongly suggest that the eukaryote-specific motif within Rps26 does not play a specific role in translation initiation. Rather, the data indicate that Rps26 as a whole is necessary for proper assembly of the 40S subunit and the 80S ribosome in yeast. IMPORTANCE Rps26 is an essential protein of the eukaryotic small ribosomal subunit. Previous experiments demonstrated an interaction between the eukaryote-specific Y62–K70 segment of Rps26 and the 5′ untranslated region of mRNA. The data suggested a specific role of the Y62–K70 motif during translation initiation. Here, we report that single

  19. Structural change of E. coli separated and complexed 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits due to Mg 2+ ions: SANS experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briganti, G.; Pedone, F.; Giansanti, A.; Giordano, R.

    1995-02-01

    Small-angle neutron-scattering experiments have been performed on E. Coli 70S ribosomes and on 50S and 30S separated subunits in the presence and absence of magnesium ions. In the 70S complex in presence of magnesium, the scattering intensity at Q = 0 ( I(0)) is roughly two times higher than without magnesium, in apparent agreement with the general view of an association-dissociation of the subunits induced by magnesium. But a similar increment is observed in both separated subunits too. The probability distribution functions of the intra-particle distance p( r), obtained by Fourier transforming, the experimental data, indicate that, even at low temperature (5°C) and concentration (0.1 wt%), the 70S and the separated subunits form aggregates. In all samples, the absence of Mg 2+ ions shifts and shrinks p( r) in the single-particle region, below 200 Å, and affects the shape of the curve in the aggregate region. Our results suggest that the presence of Mg 2+ ions does not strongly affect the degree of complexation of the subunits: the 70S complex retains its individuality even in the absence of magnesium, but undergoes structural rearrangements similar to those in 30S and 50S.

  20. Yeast Ribosomal Protein L40 Assembles Late into Precursor 60 S Ribosomes and Is Required for Their Cytoplasmic Maturation*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Most ribosomal proteins play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and function. Here, we have examined the contribution of the essential ribosomal protein L40 in these processes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletion of either the RPL40A or RPL40B gene and in vivo depletion of L40 impair 60 S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Polysome profile analyses reveal the accumulation of half-mers and a moderate reduction in free 60 S ribosomal subunits. Pulse-chase, Northern blotting, and primer extension analyses in the L40-depleted strain clearly indicate that L40 is not strictly required for the precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing reactions but contributes to optimal 27 SB pre-rRNA maturation. Moreover, depletion of L40 hinders the nucleo-cytoplasmic export of pre-60 S ribosomal particles. Importantly, all these defects most likely appear as the direct consequence of impaired Nmd3 and Rlp24 release from cytoplasmic pre-60 S ribosomal subunits and their inefficient recycling back into the nucle(ol)us. In agreement, we show that hemagglutinin epitope-tagged L40A assembles in the cytoplasm into almost mature pre-60 S ribosomal particles. Finally, we have identified that the hemagglutinin epitope-tagged L40A confers resistance to sordarin, a translation inhibitor that impairs the function of eukaryotic elongation factor 2, whereas the rpl40a and rpl40b null mutants are hypersensitive to this antibiotic. We conclude that L40 is assembled at a very late stage into pre-60 S ribosomal subunits and that its incorporation into 60 S ribosomal subunits is a prerequisite for subunit joining and may ensure proper functioning of the translocation process. PMID:22995916

  1. Protein-RNA crosslinking in Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits. Identification of a 16S rRNA fragment crosslinked to protein S12 by the use of the chemical crosslinking reagent 1-ethyl-3-dimethyl-aminopropylcarbodiimide.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaruttini, C; Expert-Bezançon, A; Hayes, D; Ehresmann, B

    1982-01-01

    1-ethyl-3-dimethyl aminopropylcarbodiimide (EDC) was used to cross-link 30S ribosomal proteins to 16S rRNA within the E. coli 3OS ribosomal subunit. Covalently linked complexes containing 30S proteins and 16S rRNA, isolated by sedimentation of dissociated crosslinked 30S subunits through SDS containing sucrose gradients, were digested with RNase T1, and the resulting oligonucleotide-protein complexes were fractionated on SDS containing polyacrylamide gels. Eluted complexes containing 30S proteins S9 and S12 linked to oligonucleotides were obtained in pure form. Oligonucleotide 5'terminal labelling was successful in the case of S12 containing but not of the S9 containing complex and led to identification of the S12 bound oligonucleotide as CAACUCG which is located at positions 1316-1322 in the 16S rRNA sequence. Protein S12 is crosslinked to the terminal G of this heptanucleotide. Images PMID:6760129

  2. The NMR solution structure of the 30S ribosomal protein S27e encoded in gene RS27_ARCFU of Archaeoglobus fulgidis reveals a novel protein fold

    PubMed Central

    Herve du Penhoat, Catherine; Atreya, Hanudatta S.; Shen, Yang; Liu, Gaohua; Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Li, Zhaohui; Murray, Diana; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Szyperski, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The Archaeoglobus fulgidis gene RS27_ARCFU encodes the 30S ribosomal protein S27e. Here, we present the high-quality NMR solution structure of this archaeal protein, which comprises a C4 zinc finger motif of the CX2CX14-16CX2C class. S27e was selected as a target of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (target ID: GR2), and its three-dimensional structure is the first representative of a family of more than 116 homologous proteins occurring in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. As a salient feature of its molecular architecture, S27e exhibits a β-sandwich consisting of two three-stranded sheets with topology B(↓), A(↑), F(↓), and C(↑), D(↓), E(↑). Due to the uniqueness of the arrangement of the strands, the resulting fold was found to be novel. Residues that are highly conserved among the S27 proteins allowed identification of a structural motif of putative functional importance; a conserved hydrophobic patch may well play a pivotal role for functioning of S27 proteins, be it in archaeal or eukaryotic cells. The structure of human S27, which possesses a 26-residue amino-terminal extension when compared with the archaeal S27e, was modeled on the basis of two structural templates, S27e for the carboxy-terminal core and the amino-terminal segment of the archaeal ribosomal protein L37Ae for the extension. Remarkably, the electrostatic surface properties of archaeal and human proteins are predicted to be entirely different, pointing at either functional variations among archaeal and eukaryotic S27 proteins, or, assuming that the function remained invariant, to a concerted evolutionary change of the surface potential of proteins interacting with S27. PMID:15096641

  3. Assembly and nuclear export of pre-ribosomal particles in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Gerhardy, Stefan; Menet, Anna Maria; Peña, Cohue; Petkowski, Janusz Jurand; Panse, Vikram Govind

    2014-08-01

    The ribosome is responsible for the final step of decoding genetic information into proteins. Therefore, correct assembly of ribosomes is a fundamental task for all living cells. In eukaryotes, the construction of the ribosome which begins in the nucleolus requires coordinated efforts of >350 specialized factors that associate with pre-ribosomal particles at distinct stages to perform specific assembly steps. On their way through the nucleus, diverse energy-consuming enzymes are thought to release assembly factors from maturing pre-ribosomal particles after accomplishing their task(s). Subsequently, recruitment of export factors prepares pre-ribosomal particles for transport through nuclear pore complexes. Pre-ribosomes are exported into the cytoplasm in a functionally inactive state, where they undergo final maturation before initiating translation. Accumulating evidence indicates a tight coupling between nuclear export, cytoplasmic maturation, and final proofreading of the ribosome. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of nuclear export of pre-ribosomal subunits and cytoplasmic maturation steps that render pre-ribosomal subunits translation-competent. PMID:24817020

  4. Assembly of the 5′ and the 3′ minor domains of 16S rRNA as monitored by tethered probing from ribosomal protein S20

    PubMed Central

    Dutca, Laura M.; Culver, Gloria M.

    2008-01-01

    The ribosomal protein (r-protein) S20 is a primary binding protein. As such it interacts directly and independently with the 5′ domain and the 3′ minor domain of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in minimal particles and the fully assembled 30S subunit. The interactions observed between r-protein S20 and the 5′ domain of 16S rRNA are quite extensive, while the interactions with the 3′ minor domain are significantly more limited. In this study directed hydroxyl radical probing mediated by Fe(II)-derivatized S20 proteins was used to monitor the folding of 16S rRNA during r-protein association and 30S subunit assembly. An analysis of the cleavage patterns in the minimal complexes [16S rRNA and Fe(II)-S20] and the fully assembled 30S subunit containing the same Fe(II)-derivatized proteins shows intriguing similarities and differences. These results suggest that the two domains, the 5′ and 3′ minor, are organized relative to S20 at different stages of assembly. The 5′ domain acquires, in a less complex ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) than the 3′ minor domain, the same architecture as observed in mature subunits. These results are similar to what would be predicted of subunit assembly by the 5′ to 3′ direction assembly model. PMID:18155048

  5. Interconversion of active and inactive 30 S ribosomal subunits is accompanied by a conformational change in the decoding region of 16 S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Moazed, D; Van Stolk, B J; Douthwaite, S; Noller, H F

    1986-10-01

    Zamir, Elson and their co-workers have shown that 30 S ribosomal subunits are reversibly inactivated by depletion of monovalent or divalent cations. We have re-investigated the conformation of 16 S rRNA in the active and inactive forms of the 30 S subunit, using a strategy that is designed to eliminate reversible ion-dependent conformational effects that are unrelated to the heat-dependent Zamir-Elson transition. A combination of structure-specific chemical probes enables us to monitor the accessibility of pyrimidines at N-3 and purines at N-1 and N-7. Chemically modified bases are identified by end-labeling followed by analine-induced strand scission (in some cases preceded by hybrid selection), or by primer extension using synthetic DNA oligomers. These studies show the following: The transition from the active to the inactive state cannot be described as a simple loosening or unfolding of native structure, such as that which is observed under conditions of more severe ion depletion. Instead, it has the appearance of a reciprocal interconversion between two differently structured states; some bases become more reactive toward the probes, whilst others become less reactive as a result of inactivation. Changes in reactivity are almost exclusively confined to the "decoding site" centered at positions 1400 and 1500, but significant differences are also detected at U723 and G791 in the central domain. This may reflect possible structural and functional interactions between the central and 3' regions of 16 S rRNA. The inactive form also shows significantly decreased reactivity at positions 1533 to 1538 (the Shine-Dalgarno region), in agreement with earlier findings. The principal changes in reactivity involve the universally conserved nucleotides G926, C1395, A1398 and G1401. The three purines show reciprocal behavior at their N-1 versus N-7 positions. G926 loses its reactivity at N-1, but becomes highly reactive at N-7 as a result of the transition of the inactive

  6. Diverse roles of assembly factors revealed by structures of late nuclear pre-60S ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shan; Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Yan, Kaige; Brown, Hailey; Zhang, Yixiao; Tan, Dan; Gamalinda, Michael; Yuan, Yi; Li, Zhifei; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Ma, Chengying; Lei, Jianlin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Woolford, John L; Gao, Ning

    2016-06-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex process in eukaryotes, involving temporally and spatially regulated ribosomal protein (r-protein) binding and ribosomal RNA remodelling events in the nucleolus, nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Hundreds of assembly factors, organized into sequential functional groups, facilitate and guide the maturation process into productive assembly branches in and across different cellular compartments. However, the precise mechanisms by which these assembly factors function are largely unknown. Here we use cryo-electron microscopy to characterize the structures of yeast nucleoplasmic pre-60S particles affinity-purified using the epitope-tagged assembly factor Nog2. Our data pinpoint the locations and determine the structures of over 20 assembly factors, which are enriched in two areas: an arc region extending from the central protuberance to the polypeptide tunnel exit, and the domain including the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) that separates 5.8S and 25S ribosomal RNAs. In particular, two regulatory GTPases, Nog2 and Nog1, act as hub proteins to interact with multiple, distant assembly factors and functional ribosomal RNA elements, manifesting their critical roles in structural remodelling checkpoints and nuclear export. Moreover, our snapshots of compositionally and structurally different pre-60S intermediates provide essential mechanistic details for three major remodelling events before nuclear export: rotation of the 5S ribonucleoprotein, construction of the active centre and ITS2 removal. The rich structural information in our structures provides a framework to dissect molecular roles of diverse assembly factors in eukaryotic ribosome assembly. PMID:27251291

  7. Sequential domain assembly of ribosomal protein S3 drives 40S subunit maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Murat, Guillaume; Réty, Stéphane; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Stanborough, Tamsyn; Bergler, Helmut; Leulliot, Nicolas; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes assemble by association of ribosomal RNA with ribosomal proteins into nuclear precursor particles, which undergo a complex maturation pathway coordinated by non-ribosomal assembly factors. Here, we provide functional insights into how successive structural re-arrangements in ribosomal protein S3 promote maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit. We show that S3 dimerizes and is imported into the nucleus with its N-domain in a rotated conformation and associated with the chaperone Yar1. Initial assembly of S3 with 40S precursors occurs via its C-domain, while the N-domain protrudes from the 40S surface. Yar1 is replaced by the assembly factor Ltv1, thereby fixing the S3 N-domain in the rotated orientation and preventing its 40S association. Finally, Ltv1 release, triggered by phosphorylation, and flipping of the S3 N-domain into its final position results in the stable integration of S3. Such a stepwise assembly may represent a new paradigm for the incorporation of ribosomal proteins. PMID:26831757

  8. Probing the structure of ribosome assembly intermediates in vivo using DMS and hydroxyl radical footprinting.

    PubMed

    Hulscher, Ryan M; Bohon, Jen; Rappé, Mollie C; Gupta, Sayan; D'Mello, Rhijuta; Sullivan, Michael; Ralston, Corie Y; Chance, Mark R; Woodson, Sarah A

    2016-07-01

    The assembly of the Escherichia coli ribosome has been widely studied and characterized in vitro. Despite this, ribosome biogenesis in living cells is only partly understood because assembly is coupled with transcription, modification and processing of the pre-ribosomal RNA. We present a method for footprinting and isolating pre-rRNA as it is synthesized in E. coli cells. Pre-rRNA synthesis is synchronized by starvation, followed by nutrient upshift. RNA synthesized during outgrowth is metabolically labeled to facilitate isolation of recent transcripts. Combining this technique with two in vivo RNA probing methods, hydroxyl radical and DMS footprinting, allows the structure of nascent RNA to be probed over time. Together, these can be used to determine changes in the structures of ribosome assembly intermediates as they fold in vivo. PMID:27016143

  9. Three distinct ribosome assemblies modulated by translation are the building blocks of polysomes.

    PubMed

    Viero, Gabriella; Lunelli, Lorenzo; Passerini, Andrea; Bianchini, Paolo; Gilbert, Robert J; Bernabò, Paola; Tebaldi, Toma; Diaspro, Alberto; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    Translation is increasingly recognized as a central control layer of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The overall organization of mRNA and ribosomes within polysomes, as well as the possible role of this organization in translation are poorly understood. Here we show that polysomes are primarily formed by three distinct classes of ribosome assemblies. We observe that these assemblies can be connected by naked RNA regions of the transcript. We show that the relative proportions of the three classes of ribosome assemblies reflect, and probably dictate, the level of translational activity. These results reveal the existence of recurrent supra-ribosomal building blocks forming polysomes and suggest the presence of unexplored translational controls embedded in the polysome structure. PMID:25713412

  10. Three distinct ribosome assemblies modulated by translation are the building blocks of polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Lunelli, Lorenzo; Passerini, Andrea; Bianchini, Paolo; Gilbert, Robert J.; Bernabò, Paola; Tebaldi, Toma; Diaspro, Alberto; Pederzolli, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Translation is increasingly recognized as a central control layer of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The overall organization of mRNA and ribosomes within polysomes, as well as the possible role of this organization in translation are poorly understood. Here we show that polysomes are primarily formed by three distinct classes of ribosome assemblies. We observe that these assemblies can be connected by naked RNA regions of the transcript. We show that the relative proportions of the three classes of ribosome assemblies reflect, and probably dictate, the level of translational activity. These results reveal the existence of recurrent supra-ribosomal building blocks forming polysomes and suggest the presence of unexplored translational controls embedded in the polysome structure. PMID:25713412

  11. Disruption of ribosome assembly in yeast blocks cotranscriptional pre-rRNA processing and affects the global hierarchy of ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Talkish, Jason; Biedka, Stephanie; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Zhang, Jingyu; Tang, Lan; Strahler, John R; Andrews, Philip C; Maddock, Janine R; Woolford, John L

    2016-06-01

    In higher eukaryotes, pre-rRNA processing occurs almost exclusively post-transcriptionally. This is not the case in rapidly dividing yeast, as the majority of nascent pre-rRNAs are processed cotranscriptionally, with cleavage at the A2 site first releasing a pre-40S ribosomal subunit followed by release of a pre-60S ribosomal subunit upon transcription termination. Ribosome assembly is driven in part by hierarchical association of assembly factors and r-proteins. Groups of proteins are thought to associate with pre-ribosomes cotranscriptionally during early assembly steps, whereas others associate later, after transcription is completed. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized phenotype observed upon disruption of ribosome assembly, in which normally late-binding proteins associate earlier, with pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA. As previously observed by many other groups, we show that disruption of 60S subunit biogenesis results in increased amounts of 35S pre-rRNA, suggesting that a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally. Surprisingly, we found that early pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA also contain proteins previously thought to only associate with pre-ribosomes after early pre-rRNA processing steps have separated maturation of the two subunits. We believe the shift to post-transcriptional processing is ultimately due to decreased cellular division upon disruption of ribosome assembly. When cells are grown under stress or to high density, a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally and follow an alternative processing pathway. Together, these results affirm the principle that ribosome assembly occurs through different, parallel assembly pathways and suggest that there is a kinetic foot-race between the formation of protein binding sites and pre-rRNA processing events. PMID:27036125

  12. The extended loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 and uL22 of Escherichia coli contribute to ribosome assembly and protein translation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Marlon G; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Kondopaka, Maithri; Pascual, Clarence; Zengel, Janice M; Lindahl, Lasse

    2016-07-01

    Nearly half of ribosomal proteins are composed of a domain on the ribosome surface and a loop or extension that penetrates into the organelle's RNA core. Our previous work showed that ribosomes lacking the loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 or uL22 are still capable of entering polysomes. However, in those experiments we could not address the formation of mutant ribosomes, because we used strains that also expressed wild-type uL4 and uL22. Here, we have focused on ribosome assembly and function in strains in which loop deletion mutant genes are the ONLY: sources of uL4 or uL22 protein. The uL4 and uL22 loop deletions have different effects, but both mutations result in accumulation of immature particles that do not accumulate in detectable amounts in wild-type strains. Thus, our results suggest that deleting the loops creates kinetic barriers in the normal assembly pathway, possibly resulting in assembly via alternate pathway(s). Furthermore, deletion of the uL4 loop results in cold-sensitive ribosome assembly and function. Finally, ribosomes carrying either of the loop-deleted proteins responded normally to the secM translation pausing peptide, but the uL4 mutant responded very inefficiently to the cmlA(crb) pause peptide. PMID:27257065

  13. The extended loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 and uL22 of Escherichia coli contribute to ribosome assembly and protein translation

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Marlon G.; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Kondopaka, Maithri; Pascual, Clarence; Zengel, Janice M.; Lindahl, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of ribosomal proteins are composed of a domain on the ribosome surface and a loop or extension that penetrates into the organelle's RNA core. Our previous work showed that ribosomes lacking the loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 or uL22 are still capable of entering polysomes. However, in those experiments we could not address the formation of mutant ribosomes, because we used strains that also expressed wild-type uL4 and uL22. Here, we have focused on ribosome assembly and function in strains in which loop deletion mutant genes are the only sources of uL4 or uL22 protein. The uL4 and uL22 loop deletions have different effects, but both mutations result in accumulation of immature particles that do not accumulate in detectable amounts in wild-type strains. Thus, our results suggest that deleting the loops creates kinetic barriers in the normal assembly pathway, possibly resulting in assembly via alternate pathway(s). Furthermore, deletion of the uL4 loop results in cold-sensitive ribosome assembly and function. Finally, ribosomes carrying either of the loop-deleted proteins responded normally to the secM translation pausing peptide, but the uL4 mutant responded very inefficiently to the cmlAcrb pause peptide. PMID:27257065

  14. The N-terminal extension of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L20 is important for ribosome assembly, but dispensable for translational feedback control

    PubMed Central

    GUILLIER, MAUDE; ALLEMAND, FRÉDÉRIC; GRAFFE, MONIQUE; RAIBAUD, SOPHIE; DARDEL, FRÉDÉRIC; SPRINGER, MATHIAS; CHIARUTTINI, CLAUDE

    2005-01-01

    The Escherichia coli autoregulatory ribosomal protein L20 consists of two structurally distinct domains. The C-terminal domain is globular and sits on the surface of the large ribosomal subunit whereas the N-terminal domain has an extended shape and penetrates deep into the RNA-rich core of the subunit. Many other ribosomal proteins have analogous internal or terminal extensions. However, the biological functions of these extended domains remain obscure. Here we show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is important for ribosome assembly in vivo. Indeed, a truncated version of L20 without its N-terminal tail is unable to complement the deletion of rplT, the gene encoding L20. In addition, this L20 truncation confers a lethal-dominant phenotype, suggesting that the N-terminal domain is essential for cell growth because it could be required for ribosome assembly. Supporting this hypothesis, partial deletions of the N-terminal tail of the protein are shown to cause a slow-growth phenotype due to altered ribosome assembly in vivo as large amounts of intermediate 40S ribosomal particles accumulate. In addition to being a ribosomal protein, L20 also acts as an autogenous repressor. Using L20 truncations, we also show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is dispensable for autogenous control. PMID:15840820

  15. Studies on the Coordination of Ribosomal Protein Assembly Events Involved in Processing and Stabilization of Yeast Early Large Ribosomal Subunit Precursors.

    PubMed

    Ohmayer, Uli; Gil-Hernández, Álvaro; Sauert, Martina; Martín-Marcos, Pilar; Tamame, Mercedes; Tschochner, Herbert; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Milkereit, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Cellular production of ribosomes involves the formation of highly defined interactions between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). Moreover in eukaryotic cells, efficient ribosome maturation requires the transient association of a large number of ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs) with newly forming ribosomal subunits. Here, we investigated how r-protein assembly events in the large ribosomal subunit (LSU) rRNA domain II are coordinated with each other and with the association of RBFs in early LSU precursors of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specific effects on the pre-ribosomal association of RBFs could be observed in yeast mutants blocked in LSU rRNA domain II assembly. Moreover, formation of a cluster of r-proteins was identified as a downstream event in LSU rRNA domain II assembly. We analyzed in more detail the functional relevance of eukaryote specific bridges established by this r-protein cluster between LSU rRNA domain II and VI and discuss how they can support the stabilization and efficient processing of yeast early LSU precursor RNAs. PMID:26642313

  16. Studies on the Coordination of Ribosomal Protein Assembly Events Involved in Processing and Stabilization of Yeast Early Large Ribosomal Subunit Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Sauert, Martina; Martín-Marcos, Pilar; Tamame, Mercedes; Tschochner, Herbert; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Milkereit, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Cellular production of ribosomes involves the formation of highly defined interactions between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). Moreover in eukaryotic cells, efficient ribosome maturation requires the transient association of a large number of ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs) with newly forming ribosomal subunits. Here, we investigated how r-protein assembly events in the large ribosomal subunit (LSU) rRNA domain II are coordinated with each other and with the association of RBFs in early LSU precursors of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specific effects on the pre-ribosomal association of RBFs could be observed in yeast mutants blocked in LSU rRNA domain II assembly. Moreover, formation of a cluster of r-proteins was identified as a downstream event in LSU rRNA domain II assembly. We analyzed in more detail the functional relevance of eukaryote specific bridges established by this r-protein cluster between LSU rRNA domain II and VI and discuss how they can support the stabilization and efficient processing of yeast early LSU precursor RNAs. PMID:26642313

  17. Stage-specific assembly events of the 6-MDa small-subunit processome initiate eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chaker-Margot, Malik; Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Dill, Brian D; Klinge, Sebastian

    2015-11-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves a plethora of ribosome-assembly factors, and their temporal order of association with preribosomal RNA is largely unknown. By using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, we developed a system that recapitulates and arrests ribosome assembly at early stages, thus providing in vivo snapshots of nascent preribosomal particles. Here we report the stage-specific order in which 70 ribosome-assembly factors associate with preribosomal RNA domains, thereby forming the 6-MDa small-subunit processome. PMID:26479197

  18. YsxC, an essential protein in Staphylococcus aureus crucial for ribosome assembly/stability

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacterial growth and division requires a core set of essential proteins, several of which are still of unknown function. They are also attractive targets for the development of new antibiotics. YsxC is a member of a family of GTPases highly conserved across eubacteria with a possible ribosome associated function. Results Here, we demonstrate by the creation of a conditional lethal mutant that ysxC is apparently essential for growth in S. aureus. To begin to elucidate YsxC function, a translational fusion of YsxC to the CBP-ProteinA tag in the staphylococcal chromosome was made, enabling Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) of YsxC-interacting partners. These included the ribosomal proteins S2, S10 and L17, as well as the β' subunit of the RNA polymerase. YsxC was then shown to copurify with ribosomes as an accessory protein specifically localizing to the 50 S subunit. YsxC depletion led to a decrease in the presence of mature ribosomes, indicating a role in ribosome assembly and/or stability in S. aureus. Conclusions In this study we demonstrate that YsxC of S. aureus localizes to the ribosomes, is crucial for ribosomal stability and is apparently essential for the life of S. aureus. PMID:20021644

  19. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2016-09-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo-that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling. PMID:27390266

  20. MPV17L2 is required for ribosome assembly in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Durigon, Romina; Pearce, Sarah F.; Rorbach, Joanna; Hirst, Elizabeth M.A.; Vidoni, Sara; Reyes, Aurelio; Brea-Calvo, Gloria; Minczuk, Michal; Woellhaf, Michael W.; Herrmann, Johannes M.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Holt, Ian J.; Spinazzola, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    MPV17 is a mitochondrial protein of unknown function, and mutations in MPV17 are associated with mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) maintenance disorders. Here we investigated its most similar relative, MPV17L2, which is also annotated as a mitochondrial protein. Mitochondrial fractionation analyses demonstrate MPV17L2 is an integral inner membrane protein, like MPV17. However, unlike MPV17, MPV17L2 is dependent on mitochondrial DNA, as it is absent from ρ0 cells, and co-sediments on sucrose gradients with the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome and the monosome. Gene silencing of MPV17L2 results in marked decreases in the monosome and both subunits of the mitochondrial ribosome, leading to impaired protein synthesis in the mitochondria. Depletion of MPV17L2 also induces mitochondrial DNA aggregation. The DNA and ribosome phenotypes are linked, as in the absence of MPV17L2 proteins of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome are trapped in the enlarged nucleoids, in contrast to a component of the large subunit. These findings suggest MPV17L2 contributes to the biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosome, uniting the two subunits to create the translationally competent monosome, and provide evidence that assembly of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome occurs at the nucleoid. PMID:24948607

  1. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-03-15

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3'-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5'ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis. PMID:26980190

  2. Studies on the kinetic sequence of in vitro ribosome assembly using cibacron blue F3GA as a general assembly inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Datta, D; Changchien, L M; Craven, G R

    1986-01-01

    We have found that all E. coli ribosomal proteins strongly bind to an agarose affinity column derivatized with the dye Cibacron Blue F3GA. We have also shown that the capacity to bind the dye is lost when the proteins are organized within the structure of the ribosome or are members of pre-formed protein-RNA complexes. We conclude that the binding of ribosomal proteins to this dye involves specific protein-RNA recognition sites. These observations led us to discover that Cibacron Blue can be used to inhibit in vitro ribosome assembly at any stage of the assembly process. This has allowed us to determine a kinetic order of ribosome assembly. Images PMID:3520481

  3. UtpA and UtpB chaperone nascent pre-ribosomal RNA and U3 snoRNA to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tan, Dongyan; Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Molloy, Kelly R.; Kim, Kelly H.; Dunn-Davies, Hywel; Shi, Yi; Chaker-Margot, Malik; Chait, Brian T.; Walz, Thomas; Tollervey, David; Klinge, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Early eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves large multi-protein complexes, which co-transcriptionally associate with pre-ribosomal RNA to form the small subunit processome. The precise mechanisms by which two of the largest multi-protein complexes—UtpA and UtpB—interact with nascent pre-ribosomal RNA are poorly understood. Here, we combined biochemical and structural biology approaches with ensembles of RNA–protein cross-linking data to elucidate the essential functions of both complexes. We show that UtpA contains a large composite RNA-binding site and captures the 5′ end of pre-ribosomal RNA. UtpB forms an extended structure that binds early pre-ribosomal intermediates in close proximity to architectural sites such as an RNA duplex formed by the 5′ ETS and U3 snoRNA as well as the 3′ boundary of the 18S rRNA. Both complexes therefore act as vital RNA chaperones to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly. PMID:27354316

  4. UtpA and UtpB chaperone nascent pre-ribosomal RNA and U3 snoRNA to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tan, Dongyan; Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Molloy, Kelly R.; Kim, Kelly H.; Dunn-Davies, Hywel; Shi, Yi; Chaker-Margot, Malik; Chait, Brian T.; Walz, Thomas; Tollervey, David; Klinge, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Early eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves large multi-protein complexes, which co-transcriptionally associate with pre-ribosomal RNA to form the small subunit processome. The precise mechanisms by which two of the largest multi-protein complexes--UtpA and UtpB--interact with nascent pre-ribosomal RNA are poorly understood. Here, we combined biochemical and structural biology approaches with ensembles of RNA-protein cross-linking data to elucidate the essential functions of both complexes. We show that UtpA contains a large composite RNA-binding site and captures the 5' end of pre-ribosomal RNA. UtpB forms an extended structure that binds early pre-ribosomal intermediates in close proximity to architectural sites such as an RNA duplex formed by the 5' ETS and U3 snoRNA as well as the 3' boundary of the 18S rRNA. Both complexes therefore act as vital RNA chaperones to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  5. Protein L5 is crucial for in vivo assembly of the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit central protuberance

    PubMed Central

    Korepanov, Alexey P.; Korobeinikova, Anna V.; Shestakov, Sergey A.; Garber, Maria B.; Gongadze, George M.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, ribosomes assembled in bacterial cells in the absence of essential ribosomal protein L5 were obtained. After arresting L5 synthesis, Escherichia coli cells divide a limited number of times. During this time, accumulation of defective large ribosomal subunits occurs. These 45S particles lack most of the central protuberance (CP) components (5S rRNA and proteins L5, L16, L18, L25, L27, L31, L33 and L35) and are not able to associate with the small ribosomal subunit. At the same time, 5S rRNA is found in the cytoplasm in complex with ribosomal proteins L18 and L25 at quantities equal to the amount of ribosomes. Thus, it is the first demonstration that protein L5 plays a key role in formation of the CP during assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in the bacterial cell. A possible model for the CP assembly in vivo is discussed in view of the data obtained. PMID:22821559

  6. Cyclization of polyketides and non-ribosomal peptides on and off their assembly lines.

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Wang, Min; Liu, Wen

    2016-02-01

    Modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are multifunctional megaenzymes that serve as templates to program the assembly of short carboxylic acids and amino acids in a primarily co-linear manner. The variation, combination, permutation and evolution of their functional units (e.g., modules, domains and proteins) along with their association with external enzymes have resulted in the generation of numerous versions of templates, the roles of which have not been fully recognized in the structural diversification of polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides and their hybrids present in nature. In this Highlight, we focus on the assembly-line enzymology and associated chemistry by providing examples of some newly characterized cyclization reactions that occur on and off the assembly lines during and after chain elongation for the purpose of elucidating the template effects of PKSs and NRPSs. A fundamental understanding of the underlying biosynthetic logic would facilitate the elucidation of chemical information contained within the PKS or NRPS templates and benefit the development of strategies for genome mining, biosynthesis-inspired chemical synthesis and combinatorial biosynthesis. PMID:26604034

  7. Hrr25/CK1δ-directed release of Ltv1 from pre-40S ribosomes is necessary for ribosome assembly and cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Ghalei, Homa; Schaub, Franz X.; Doherty, Joanne R.; Noguchi, Yoshihiko; Roush, William R.; Cleveland, John L.; Stroupe, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Casein kinase 1δ/ε (CK1δ/ε) and their yeast homologue Hrr25 are essential for cell growth. Further, CK1δ is overexpressed in several malignancies, and CK1δ inhibitors have shown promise in several preclinical animal studies. However, the substrates of Hrr25 and CK1δ/ε that are necessary for cell growth and survival are unknown. We show that Hrr25 is essential for ribosome assembly, where it phosphorylates the assembly factor Ltv1, which causes its release from nascent 40S subunits and allows subunit maturation. Hrr25 inactivation or expression of a nonphosphorylatable Ltv1 variant blocked Ltv1 release in vitro and in vivo, and prevented entry into the translation-like quality control cycle. Conversely, phosphomimetic Ltv1 variants rescued viability after Hrr25 depletion. Finally, Ltv1 knockdown in human breast cancer cells impaired apoptosis induced by CK1δ/ε inhibitors, establishing that the antiproliferative activity of these inhibitors is due, at least in part, to disruption of ribosome assembly. These findings validate the ribosome assembly pathway as a novel target for the development of anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25778921

  8. Functional Role of Ribosomal Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Eargle, John; Sarkar, Krishnarjun; Gruebele, Martin; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2010-01-01

    Although structure and sequence signatures in ribosomal RNA and proteins are defining characteristics of the three domains of life and instrumental in constructing the modern phylogeny, little is known about their functional roles in the ribosome. In this work, the largest coevolving RNA/protein signatures in the bacterial 30S ribosome are investigated both experimentally and computationally through all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations. The complex includes the N-terminal fragment of the ribosomal protein S4, which is a primary binding protein that initiates 30S small subunit assembly from the 5′ domain, and helix 16 (h16), which is part of the five-way junction in 16S rRNA. Our results show that the S4 N-terminus signature is intrinsically disordered in solution, whereas h16 is relatively stable by itself. The dynamic disordered property of the protein is exploited to couple the folding and binding process to the five-way junction, and the results provide insight into the mechanism for the early and fast binding of S4 in the assembly of the ribosomal small subunit. PMID:21156135

  9. Integrative structural analysis of the UTPB complex, an early assembly factor for eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Qi; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Xining; Lin, Jinzhong; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential and conserved cellular process in eukaryotes that requires numerous assembly factors. The six-subunit UTPB complex is an essential component of the 90S precursor of the small ribosomal subunit. Here, we analyzed the molecular architecture of UTPB using an integrative structural biology approach. We mapped the major interactions that associate each of six UTPB proteins. Crystallographic studies showed that Utp1, Utp21, Utp12 and Utp13 are evolutionarily related and form a dimer of dimers (Utp1–Utp21, Utp12–Utp13) through their homologous helical C-terminal domains. Molecular docking with crosslinking restraints showed that the WD domains of Utp12 and Utp13 are associated, as are the WD domains of Utp1, Utp21 and Utp18. Electron microscopy images of the entire UTPB complex revealed that it predominantly adopts elongated conformations and possesses internal flexibility. We also determined crystal structures of the WD domain of Utp18 and the HAT and deviant HAT domains of Utp6. A structural model of UTPB was derived based on these data. PMID:27330138

  10. Inferring the Ancient History of the Translation Machinery and Genetic Code via Recapitulation of Ribosomal Subunit Assembly Orders

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Gregory P.; Neumann, Justin E.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2010-01-01

    Universally conserved positions in ribosomal proteins have significant biases in amino acid usage, likely indicating the expansion of the genetic code at the time leading up to the most recent common ancestor(s) (MRCA). Here, we apply this principle to the evolutionary history of the ribosome before the MRCA. It has been proposed that the experimentally determined order of assembly for ribosomal subunits recapitulates their evolutionary chronology. Given this model, we produce a probabilistic evolutionary ordering of the universally conserved small subunit (SSU) and large subunit (LSU) ribosomal proteins. Optimizing the relative ordering of SSU and LSU evolutionary chronologies with respect to minimizing differences in amino acid usage bias, we find strong compositional evidence for a more ancient origin for early LSU proteins. Furthermore, we find that this ordering produces several trends in specific amino acid usages compatible with models of genetic code evolution. PMID:20208990

  11. A unique combination of rare mitochondrial ribosomal RNA variants affects the kinetics of complex I assembly.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Anna Maria; Calvaruso, Maria Antonietta; Iommarini, Luisa; Kurelac, Ivana; Zuntini, Roberta; Ferrari, Simona; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in respiratory complexes subunits contribute to a large spectrum of human diseases. Nonetheless, ribosomal RNA variants remain largely under-investigated from a functional point of view. We here report a unique combination of two rare mitochondrial rRNA variants detected by serendipity in a subject with chronic granulomatous disease and never reported to co-occur within the same mitochondrial haplotype. In silico prediction of the mitochondrial ribosomal structure showed a dramatic rearrangement of the rRNA secondary structure. Functional investigation of cybrids carrying this unique haplotype demonstrated that the co-occurrence of the two rRNA variants determines a slow-down of the mitochondrial protein synthesis, especially in cells with an elevated metabolic rate, which impairs the assembly kinetics of Complex I, induces a bioenergetic defect and stimulates reactive oxygen species production. In conclusion, our results point to a sub-pathogenic role for these two rare mitochondrial rRNA variants, when found in the unique combination here reported in a single individual. PMID:27102412

  12. Ribosomal proteins: functions beyond the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Liao, Wen-Juan; Liao, Jun-Ming; Liao, Peng; Lu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Although ribosomal proteins are known for playing an essential role in ribosome assembly and protein translation, their ribosome-independent functions have also been greatly appreciated. Over the past decade, more than a dozen of ribosomal proteins have been found to activate the tumor suppressor p53 pathway in response to ribosomal stress. In addition, these ribosomal proteins are involved in various physiological and pathological processes. This review is composed to overview the current understanding of how ribosomal stress provokes the accumulation of ribosome-free ribosomal proteins, as well as the ribosome-independent functions of ribosomal proteins in tumorigenesis, immune signaling, and development. We also propose the potential of applying these pieces of knowledge to the development of ribosomal stress-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:25735597

  13. Structural insights into the function of a unique tandem GTPase EngA in bacterial ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Yan, Kaige; Zhang, Yixiao; Li, Ningning; Ma, Chengying; Li, Zhifei; Zhang, Yanqing; Feng, Boya; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yadong; Xu, Yanji; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Many ribosome-interacting GTPases, with proposed functions in ribosome biogenesis, are also implicated in the cellular regulatory coupling between ribosome assembly process and various growth control pathways. EngA is an essential GTPase in bacteria, and intriguingly, it contains two consecutive GTPase domains (GD), being one-of-a-kind among all known GTPases. EngA is required for the 50S subunit maturation. However, its molecular role remains elusive. Here, we present the structure of EngA bound to the 50S subunit. Our data show that EngA binds to the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) and induces dramatic conformational changes on the 50S subunit, which virtually returns the 50S subunit to a state similar to that of the late-stage 50S assembly intermediates. Very interestingly, our data show that the two GDs exhibit a pseudo-two-fold symmetry in the 50S-bound conformation. Our results indicate that EngA recognizes certain forms of the 50S assembly intermediates, and likely facilitates the conformational maturation of the PTC of the 23S rRNA in a direct manner. Furthermore, in a broad context, our data also suggest that EngA might be a sensor of the cellular GTP/GDP ratio, endowed with multiple conformational states, in response to fluctuations in cellular nucleotide pool, to facilitate and regulate ribosome assembly. PMID:25389271

  14. Late-assembly of human ribosomal protein S20 in the cytoplasm is essential for the functioning of the small subunit ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Wu, Jing-Ying; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-11-15

    Using immuno-fluorescent probing and Western blotting analysis, we reveal the exclusive cytoplasm nature of the small subunit ribosomal protein S20. To illustrate the importance of the cellular compartmentation of S20 to the function of small subunit 40S, we created a nuclear resident S20{sub NLS} mutant gene and examined polysome profile of cells that had been transfected with the S20{sub NLS} gene. As a result, we observed the formation of recombinant 40S carried S20{sub NLS} but this recombinant 40S was never found in the polysome, suggesting such a recombinant 40S was translation incompetent. Moreover, by the tactic of the energy depletion and restoration, we were able to restrain the nuclear-resided S20{sub NLS} in the cytoplasm. Yet, along a progressive energy restoration, we observed the presence of recombinant 40S subunits carrying the S20{sub NLS} in the polysome. This proves that S20 needs to be cytoplasmic in order to make a functional 40S subunit. Furthermore, it also implies that the assembly order of ribosomal protein in eukaryote is orderly regulated. - Highlights: • The step of S20 assembled on 40S is happened in the cytoplasm. • A small subunit assembled with a nuclear S20{sub NLS} is translational incompetence. • Using energy depletion and recovery to manipulate the cellular compartment of S20{sub NLS}. • Cytoplasm-retained S20{sub NLS} is crucial for creating a functional small subunit.

  15. Histidine Methylation of Yeast Ribosomal Protein Rpl3p Is Required for Proper 60S Subunit Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadid, Qais; Roy, Kevin; Munroe, William; Dzialo, Maria C.; Chanfreau, Guillaume F.

    2014-01-01

    Histidine protein methylation is an unusual posttranslational modification. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the large ribosomal subunit protein Rpl3p is methylated at histidine 243, a residue that contacts the 25S rRNA near the P site. Rpl3p methylation is dependent upon the presence of Hpm1p, a candidate seven-beta-strand methyltransferase. In this study, we elucidated the biological activities of Hpm1p in vitro and in vivo. Amino acid analyses reveal that Hpm1p is responsible for all of the detectable protein histidine methylation in yeast. The modification is found on a polypeptide corresponding to the size of Rpl3p in ribosomes and in a nucleus-containing organelle fraction but was not detected in proteins of the ribosome-free cytosol fraction. In vitro assays demonstrate that Hpm1p has methyltransferase activity on ribosome-associated but not free Rpl3p, suggesting that its activity depends on interactions with ribosomal components. hpm1 null cells are defective in early rRNA processing, resulting in a deficiency of 60S subunits and translation initiation defects that are exacerbated in minimal medium. Cells lacking Hpm1p are resistant to cycloheximide and verrucarin A and have decreased translational fidelity. We propose that Hpm1p plays a role in the orchestration of the early assembly of the large ribosomal subunit and in faithful protein production. PMID:24865971

  16. Time course of large ribosomal subunit assembly in E. coli cells overexpressing a helicase inactive DbpA protein.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Riley C; Childs, Jared J; Gevorkyan, Jirair; Gerasimova, Yulia V; Koculi, Eda

    2016-07-01

    DbpA is a DEAD-box RNA helicase implicated in Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit assembly. Previous studies have shown that when the ATPase and helicase inactive DbpA construct, R331A, is expressed in E. coli cells, a large ribosomal subunit intermediate accumulates. The large subunit intermediate migrates as a 45S particle in a sucrose gradient. Here, using a number of structural and fluorescent assays, we investigate the ribosome profiles of cells lacking wild-type DbpA and overexpressing the R331A DbpA construct. Our data show that in addition to the 45S particle previously described, 27S and 35S particles are also present in the ribosome profiles of cells overexpressing R331A DbpA. The 27S, 35S, and 45S independently convert to the 50S subunit, suggesting that ribosome assembly in the presence of R331A and the absence of wild-type DbpA occurs via multiple pathways. PMID:27194011

  17. Cross-linking of initiation factor IF3 to Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit by trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II): characterization of two cross-linking sites in 16S rRNA; a possible way of functioning for IF3.

    PubMed Central

    Ehresmann, C; Moine, H; Mougel, M; Dondon, J; Grunberg-Manago, M; Ebel, J P; Ehresmann, B

    1986-01-01

    The initiation factor IF3 is platinated with trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) and cross-linked to Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit. Two cross-linking sites are unambiguously identified on the 16S rRNA: a major one, in the region 819-859 in the central domain, and a minor one, in the region 1506-1529 in the 3'-terminal domain. Specific features of these sequences together with their particular location within the 30S subunit lead us to postulate a role for IF3, that conciliates topographical and functional observations made so far. Images PMID:2425339

  18. Nucleotide excision repair of the 5 S ribosomal RNA gene assembled into a nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Smerdon, M J

    2000-08-01

    A-175-base pair fragment containing the Xenopus borealis somatic 5 S ribosomal RNA gene was used as a model system to determine the effect of nucleosome assembly on nucleotide excision repair (NER) of the major UV photoproduct (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD)) in DNA. Xenopus oocyte nuclear extracts were used to carry out repair in vitro on reconstituted, positioned 5 S rDNA nucleosomes. Nucleosome structure strongly inhibits NER at many CPD sites in the 5 S rDNA fragment while having little effect at a few sites. The time course of CPD removal at 35 different sites indicates that >85% of the CPDs in the naked DNA fragment have t(12) values <2 h, whereas <26% of the t(12) values in nucleosomes are <2 h, and 15% are >8 h. Moreover, removal of histone tails from these mononucleosomes has little effect on the repair rates. Finally, nucleosome inhibition of repair shows no correlation with the rotational setting of a 14-nucleotide-long pyrimidine tract located 30 base pairs from the nucleosome dyad. These results suggest that inhibition of NER by mononucleosomes is not significantly influenced by the rotational orientation of CPDs on the histone surface, and histone tails play little (or no) role in this inhibition. PMID:10821833

  19. The Dedicated Chaperone Acl4 Escorts Ribosomal Protein Rpl4 to Its Nuclear Pre-60S Assembly Site

    PubMed Central

    Pillet, Benjamin; García-Gómez, Juan J.; Pausch, Patrick; Falquet, Laurent; Bange, Gert; de la Cruz, Jesús; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are the highly complex macromolecular assemblies dedicated to the synthesis of all cellular proteins from mRNA templates. The main principles underlying the making of ribosomes are conserved across eukaryotic organisms and this process has been studied in most detail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast ribosomes are composed of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 79 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins). Most r-proteins need to be transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they get incorporated into the evolving pre-ribosomal particles. Due to the high abundance and difficult physicochemical properties of r-proteins, their correct folding and fail-safe targeting to the assembly site depends largely on general, as well as highly specialized, chaperone and transport systems. Many r-proteins contain universally conserved or eukaryote-specific internal loops and/or terminal extensions, which were shown to mediate their nuclear targeting and association with dedicated chaperones in a growing number of cases. The 60S r-protein Rpl4 is particularly interesting since it harbours a conserved long internal loop and a prominent C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension. Here we show that both the long internal loop and the C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension are strictly required for the functionality of Rpl4. While Rpl4 contains at least five distinct nuclear localization signals (NLS), the C-terminal part of the long internal loop associates with a specific binding partner, termed Acl4. Absence of Acl4 confers a severe slow-growth phenotype and a deficiency in the production of 60S subunits. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that Acl4 can be considered as a dedicated chaperone of Rpl4. Notably, Acl4 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus and it has the capacity to capture nascent Rpl4 in a co-translational manner. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dedicated chaperone Acl4 accompanies Rpl4 from the cytoplasm to its pre-60S

  20. The Dedicated Chaperone Acl4 Escorts Ribosomal Protein Rpl4 to Its Nuclear Pre-60S Assembly Site.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Benjamin; García-Gómez, Juan J; Pausch, Patrick; Falquet, Laurent; Bange, Gert; de la Cruz, Jesús; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Ribosomes are the highly complex macromolecular assemblies dedicated to the synthesis of all cellular proteins from mRNA templates. The main principles underlying the making of ribosomes are conserved across eukaryotic organisms and this process has been studied in most detail in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast ribosomes are composed of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 79 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins). Most r-proteins need to be transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus where they get incorporated into the evolving pre-ribosomal particles. Due to the high abundance and difficult physicochemical properties of r-proteins, their correct folding and fail-safe targeting to the assembly site depends largely on general, as well as highly specialized, chaperone and transport systems. Many r-proteins contain universally conserved or eukaryote-specific internal loops and/or terminal extensions, which were shown to mediate their nuclear targeting and association with dedicated chaperones in a growing number of cases. The 60S r-protein Rpl4 is particularly interesting since it harbours a conserved long internal loop and a prominent C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension. Here we show that both the long internal loop and the C-terminal eukaryote-specific extension are strictly required for the functionality of Rpl4. While Rpl4 contains at least five distinct nuclear localization signals (NLS), the C-terminal part of the long internal loop associates with a specific binding partner, termed Acl4. Absence of Acl4 confers a severe slow-growth phenotype and a deficiency in the production of 60S subunits. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that Acl4 can be considered as a dedicated chaperone of Rpl4. Notably, Acl4 localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus and it has the capacity to capture nascent Rpl4 in a co-translational manner. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dedicated chaperone Acl4 accompanies Rpl4 from the cytoplasm to its pre-60S

  1. LIMITED PROTEOLYSIS ANALYSIS OF THE RIBOSOME IS AFFECTED BY SUBUNIT ASSOCIATION

    PubMed Central

    Hamburg, Daisy-Malloy; Suh, Moo-Jin; Limbach, Patrick A.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the structural organization of ribosome assembly intermediates, in particular those intermediates that result from mis-folding leading to their eventual degradation within the cell, is limited due to the lack of methods available to characterize assembly intermediate structures. Because conventional structural approaches, such as NMR, X-ray crystallography and cryo-EM, are not ideally suited to characterize the structural organization of these flexible and sometimes heterogeneous assembly intermediates, we have set out to develop an approach combining limited proteolysis with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) that might be applicable to ribonucleoprotein complexes as large as the ribosome. This study focuses on the limited proteolysis behavior of appropriately assembled ribosome subunits. Isolated subunits were analyzed using limited proteolysis and MALDI-MS and the results were compared to previous data obtained from 70S ribosomes. Generally, ribosomal proteins were found to be more stable in 70S ribosomes than in their isolated subunits, consistent with a reduction in conformational flexibility upon subunit assembly. This approach demonstrates that limited proteolysis combined with MALDI-MS can reveal structural changes to ribosomes upon subunit assembly or disassembly, and provides the appropriate benchmark data from 30S, 50S and 70S proteins to enable studies of ribosome assembly intermediates. PMID:19213046

  2. Single methylation of 23S rRNA triggers late steps of 50S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Arai, Taiga; Ishiguro, Kensuke; Kimura, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2015-08-25

    Ribosome biogenesis requires multiple assembly factors. In Escherichia coli, deletion of RlmE, the methyltransferase responsible for the 2'-O-methyluridine modification at position 2552 (Um2552) in helix 92 of the 23S rRNA, results in slow growth and accumulation of the 45S particle. We demonstrate that the 45S particle that accumulates in ΔrlmE is a genuine precursor that can be assembled into the 50S subunit. Indeed, 50S formation from the 45S precursor could be promoted by RlmE-mediated Um2552 formation in vitro. Ribosomal protein L36 (encoded by rpmJ) was completely absent from the 45S precursor in ΔrlmE, and we observed a strong genetic interaction between rlmE and rpmJ. Structural probing of 23S rRNA and high-salt stripping of 45S components revealed that RlmE-mediated methylation promotes interdomain interactions via the association between helices 92 and 71, stabilized by the single 2'-O-methylation of Um2552, in concert with the incorporation of L36, triggering late steps of 50S subunit assembly. PMID:26261349

  3. Single methylation of 23S rRNA triggers late steps of 50S ribosomal subunit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Taiga; Ishiguro, Kensuke; Kimura, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires multiple assembly factors. In Escherichia coli, deletion of RlmE, the methyltransferase responsible for the 2′-O-methyluridine modification at position 2552 (Um2552) in helix 92 of the 23S rRNA, results in slow growth and accumulation of the 45S particle. We demonstrate that the 45S particle that accumulates in ΔrlmE is a genuine precursor that can be assembled into the 50S subunit. Indeed, 50S formation from the 45S precursor could be promoted by RlmE-mediated Um2552 formation in vitro. Ribosomal protein L36 (encoded by rpmJ) was completely absent from the 45S precursor in ΔrlmE, and we observed a strong genetic interaction between rlmE and rpmJ. Structural probing of 23S rRNA and high-salt stripping of 45S components revealed that RlmE-mediated methylation promotes interdomain interactions via the association between helices 92 and 71, stabilized by the single 2′-O-methylation of Um2552, in concert with the incorporation of L36, triggering late steps of 50S subunit assembly. PMID:26261349

  4. ppGpp negatively impacts ribosome assembly affecting growth and antimicrobial tolerance in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Rebecca M.; Bellows, Lauren E.; Wood, Alison

    2016-01-01

    The stringent response is a survival mechanism used by bacteria to deal with stress. It is coordinated by the nucleotides guanosine tetraphosphate and pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp], which interact with target proteins to promote bacterial survival. Although this response has been well characterized in proteobacteria, very little is known about the effectors of this signaling system in Gram-positive species. Here, we report on the identification of seven target proteins for the stringent response nucleotides in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. We demonstrate that the GTP synthesis enzymes HprT and Gmk bind with a high affinity, leading to an inhibition of GTP production. In addition, we identified five putative GTPases—RsgA, RbgA, Era, HflX, and ObgE—as (p)ppGpp target proteins. We show that RsgA, RbgA, Era, and HflX are functional GTPases and that their activity is promoted in the presence of ribosomes but strongly inhibited by the stringent response nucleotides. By characterizing the function of RsgA in vivo, we ascertain that this protein is involved in ribosome assembly, with an rsgA deletion strain, or a strain inactivated for GTPase activity, displaying decreased growth, a decrease in the amount of mature 70S ribosomes, and an increased level of tolerance to antimicrobials. We additionally demonstrate that the interaction of ppGpp with cellular GTPases is not unique to the staphylococci, as homologs from Bacillus subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis retain this ability. Taken together, this study reveals ribosome inactivation as a previously unidentified mechanism through which the stringent response functions in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26951678

  5. Paradigms of ribosome synthesis: Lessons learned from ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome in all cells is manufactured via the intricate process of translation by multimolecular factories called ribosomes. Nevertheless, these ribonucleoprotein particles, the largest of their kind, also have an elaborate assembly line of their own. Groundbreaking discoveries that bacterial ribosomal subunits can be self-assembled in vitro jumpstarted studies on how ribosomes are constructed. Until recently, ribosome assembly has been investigated almost entirely in vitro with bacterial small subunits under equilibrium conditions. In light of high-resolution ribosome structures and a more sophisticated toolkit, the past decade has been defined by a burst of kinetic studies in vitro and, importantly, also a shift to examining ribosome maturation in living cells, especially in eukaryotes. In this review, we summarize the principles governing ribosome assembly that emerged from studies focusing on ribosomal proteins and their interactions with rRNA. Understanding these paradigms has taken center stage, given the linkage between anomalous ribosome biogenesis and proliferative disorders. PMID:26779413

  6. Backbone and side chain NMR assignments for the ribosome assembly factor Nop6 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Jan Philip; Lioutikov, Anatoli; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Wöhnert, Jens

    2014-10-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nop6 protein is involved in the maturation of the small ribosomal subunit. It contains a central RNA binding domain and a predicted C-terminal coiled-coil domain. Here we report the almost complete (>90%) (1)H,(13)C,(15)N backbone and side chain NMR assignment of a 15 kDa Nop6 construct comprising the RNA binding and coiled-coil domains. PMID:23921755

  7. Symportin 1 chaperones 5S RNP assembly during ribosome biogenesis by occupying an essential rRNA-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Calviño, Fabiola R.; Kharde, Satyavati; Ori, Alessandro; Hendricks, Astrid; Wild, Klemens; Kressler, Dieter; Bange, Gert; Hurt, Ed; Beck, Martin; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    During 60S biogenesis, mature 5S RNP consisting of 5S RNA, RpL5 and RpL11, assembles into a pre-60S particle, where docking relies on RpL11 interacting with helix 84 (H84) of the 25S RNA. How 5S RNP is assembled for recruitment into the pre-60S is not known. Here we report the crystal structure of a ternary symportin Syo1–RpL5-N–RpL11 complex and provide biochemical and structural insights into 5S RNP assembly. Syo1 guards the 25S RNA-binding surface on RpL11 and competes with H84 for binding. Pull-down experiments show that H84 releases RpL11 from the ternary complex, but not in the presence of 5S RNA. Crosslinking mass spectrometry visualizes structural rearrangements on incorporation of 5S RNA into the Syo1–RpL5–RpL11 complex supporting the formation of a pre-5S RNP. Our data underline the dual role of Syo1 in ribosomal protein transport and as an assembly platform for 5S RNP. PMID:25849277

  8. Symportin 1 chaperones 5S RNP assembly during ribosome biogenesis by occupying an essential rRNA-binding site.

    PubMed

    Calviño, Fabiola R; Kharde, Satyavati; Ori, Alessandro; Hendricks, Astrid; Wild, Klemens; Kressler, Dieter; Bange, Gert; Hurt, Ed; Beck, Martin; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    During 60S biogenesis, mature 5S RNP consisting of 5S RNA, RpL5 and RpL11, assembles into a pre-60S particle, where docking relies on RpL11 interacting with helix 84 (H84) of the 25S RNA. How 5S RNP is assembled for recruitment into the pre-60S is not known. Here we report the crystal structure of a ternary symportin Syo1-RpL5-N-RpL11 complex and provide biochemical and structural insights into 5S RNP assembly. Syo1 guards the 25S RNA-binding surface on RpL11 and competes with H84 for binding. Pull-down experiments show that H84 releases RpL11 from the ternary complex, but not in the presence of 5S RNA. Crosslinking mass spectrometry visualizes structural rearrangements on incorporation of 5S RNA into the Syo1-RpL5-RpL11 complex supporting the formation of a pre-5S RNP. Our data underline the dual role of Syo1 in ribosomal protein transport and as an assembly platform for 5S RNP. PMID:25849277

  9. De novo Synthesis and Assembly of rRNA into Ribosomal Subunits during Cold Acclimation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Piersimoni, Lolita; Giangrossi, Mara; Marchi, Paolo; Brandi, Anna; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Pon, Cynthia L

    2016-04-24

    During the cold adaptation that follows a cold stress, bacterial cells undergo many physiological changes and extensive reprogramming of their gene expression pattern. Bulk gene expression is drastically reduced, while a set of cold shock genes is selectively and transiently expressed. The initial stage of cold acclimation is characterized by the establishment of a stoichiometric imbalance of the translation initiation factors (IFs)/ribosomes ratio that contributes to the preferential translation of cold shock transcripts. Whereas de novo synthesis of the IFs following cold stress has been documented, nothing was known concerning the activity of the rrn operons during the cold acclimation period. In this work, we focus on the expression of the rrn operons and the fate of rRNA after temperature downshift. We demonstrate that in Escherichia coli, rRNA synthesis does not stop during the cold acclimation phase, but continues with greater contribution of the P2 compared to the P1 promoter and all seven rrn operons are active, although their expression levels change with respect to pre-stress conditions. Eight hours after the 37°→10°C temperature downshift, the newly transcribed rRNA represents up to 20% of total rRNA and is preferentially found in the polysomes. However, with respect to the de novo synthesis of the IFs, both rRNA transcription and maturation are slowed down drastically by cold stress, thereby accounting in part for the stoichiometric imbalance of the IFs/ribosomes. Overall, our data indicate that new ribosomes, which are possibly suitable to function at low temperature, are slowly assembled during cold acclimation. PMID:26953262

  10. Dependency Map of Proteins in the Small Ribosomal Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Hamacher, Kay; Trylska, Joanna; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The assembly of the ribosome has recently become an interesting target for antibiotics in several bacteria. In this work, we extended an analytical procedure to determine native state fluctuations and contact breaking to investigate the protein stability dependence in the 30S small ribosomal subunit of Thermus thermophilus. We determined the causal influence of the presence and absence of proteins in the 30S complex on the binding free energies of other proteins. The predicted dependencies are in overall agreement with the experimentally determined assembly map for another organism, Escherichia coli. We found that the causal influences result from two distinct mechanisms: one is pure internal energy change, the other originates from the entropy change. We discuss the implications on how to target the ribosomal assembly most effectively by suggesting six proteins as targets for mutations or other hindering of their binding. Our results show that by blocking one out of this set of proteins, the association of other proteins is eventually reduced, thus reducing the translation efficiency even more. We could additionally determine the binding dependency of THX—a peptide not present in the ribosome of E. coli—and suggest its assembly path. PMID:16485038

  11. Escherichia coli rimM and yjeQ null strains accumulate immature 30S subunits of similar structure and protein complement

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Vivian; Kent, Meredith; Jomaa, Ahmad; Ortega, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits proceeds through multiple parallel pathways. The protein factors RimM, YjeQ, RbfA, and Era work in conjunction to assist at the late stages of the maturation process of the small subunit. However, it is unclear how the functional interplay between these factors occurs in the context of multiple parallel pathways. To understand how these factors work together, we have characterized the immature 30S subunits that accumulate in ΔrimM cells and compared them with immature 30S subunits from a ΔyjeQ strain. The cryo-EM maps obtained from these particles showed that the densities representing helices 44 and 45 in the rRNA were partially missing, suggesting mobility of these motifs. These 30S subunits were also partially depleted in all tertiary ribosomal proteins, particularly those binding in the head domain. Using image classification, we identified four subpopulations of ΔrimM immature 30S subunits differing in the amount of missing density for helices 44 and 45, as well as the amount of density existing in these maps for the underrepresented proteins. The structural defects found in these immature subunits resembled those of the 30S subunits that accumulate in the ΔyjeQ strain. These findings are consistent with an “early convergency model” in which multiple parallel assembly pathways of the 30S subunit converge into a late assembly intermediate, as opposed to the mature state. Functionally related factors will bind to this intermediate to catalyze the last steps of maturation leading to the mature 30S subunit. PMID:23611982

  12. Deconstructing ribosome construction

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Keith; Culver, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    The ribosome is an essential ribonucleoprotein enzyme, and its biogenesis is a fundamental process in all living cells. Recent X-ray crystal structures of the bacterial ribosome and new technologies have allowed a greater interrogation of in vitro ribosome assembly; however, substantially less is known about ribosome biogenesis in vivo. Ongoing investigations are focused on elucidating the cellular processes that facilitate biogenesis of the ribosomal subunits, and many extraribosomal factors, including modification enzymes, remodeling enzymes and GTPases, are being uncovered. Moreover, specific roles for ribosome biogenesis factors in subunit maturation are now being elaborated. Ultimately, such studies will reveal a more complete understanding of processes at work in in vivo ribosome biogenesis. PMID:19376708

  13. Cooperative assembly of proteins in the ribosomal GTPase centre demonstrated by their interactions with mutant 23S rRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, G; Douthwaite, S

    1995-01-01

    The ribosomal protein L11 binds to the region of 23S rRNA associated with the GTPase-dependent steps of protein synthesis. Nucleotides 1054-1107 within this region of the Escherichia coli 23S rRNA gene were mutagenized with bisulphite. Twenty point mutations (G-->A and C-->T transitions) and numerous multiple mutations were generated. Expression of mutant 23S rRNAs in vivo shows that all the mutations detectably alter the phenotype, with effects ranging from a slight growth rate reduction to lack of viability. Temperature sensitivity is conferred by 1071G-->A and 1092C-->U substitutions. These effects are relieved by point mutations at other sites, indicating functional interconnections within the higher order structure of this 23S rRNA region. Several mutations prevent direct binding of r-protein L11 to 23S rRNA in vitro. These mutations are mainly in a short irregular stem (1087-1102) and within a hairpin loop (1068-1072), where the protein probably makes nucleotide contacts. Some of these mutations also interfere with binding of the r-protein complex L10.(L12)4 to an adjacent site on the rRNA. When added together to rRNA, proteins L10.(L12)4 and L11 bind cooperatively to overcome the effects of mutations at 1091 and 1099. The proteins also stimulate each others binding to rRNA mutated at 1087 or 1092, although in these cases binding remains clearly substoichiometric. Surprisingly, none of the mutations prevents incorporation of L11 into ribosomes in vivo, indicating that other, as yet unidentified, factors are involved in the cooperative assembly process. Images PMID:7630717

  14. The DEAD-box Protein Rok1 Orchestrates 40S and 60S Ribosome Assembly by Promoting the Release of Rrp5 from Pre-40S Ribosomes to Allow for 60S Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnevis, Sohail; Askenasy, Isabel; Dattolo, Maria D.; Young-Erdos, Crystal L.; Stroupe, M. Elizabeth; Karbstein, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins are ubiquitous regulators of RNA biology. While commonly dubbed “helicases,” their activities also include duplex annealing, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent RNA binding, and RNA-protein complex remodeling. Rok1, an essential DEAD-box protein, and its cofactor Rrp5 are required for ribosome assembly. Here, we use in vivo and in vitro biochemical analyses to demonstrate that ATP-bound Rok1, but not adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound Rok1, stabilizes Rrp5 binding to 40S ribosomes. Interconversion between these two forms by ATP hydrolysis is required for release of Rrp5 from pre-40S ribosomes in vivo, thereby allowing Rrp5 to carry out its role in 60S subunit assembly. Furthermore, our data also strongly suggest that the previously described accumulation of snR30 upon Rok1 inactivation arises because Rrp5 release is blocked and implicate a previously undescribed interaction between Rrp5 and the DEAD-box protein Has1 in mediating snR30 accumulation when Rrp5 release from pre-40S subunits is blocked. PMID:27280440

  15. The DEAD-box Protein Rok1 Orchestrates 40S and 60S Ribosome Assembly by Promoting the Release of Rrp5 from Pre-40S Ribosomes to Allow for 60S Maturation.

    PubMed

    Khoshnevis, Sohail; Askenasy, Isabel; Johnson, Matthew C; Dattolo, Maria D; Young-Erdos, Crystal L; Stroupe, M Elizabeth; Karbstein, Katrin

    2016-06-01

    DEAD-box proteins are ubiquitous regulators of RNA biology. While commonly dubbed "helicases," their activities also include duplex annealing, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent RNA binding, and RNA-protein complex remodeling. Rok1, an essential DEAD-box protein, and its cofactor Rrp5 are required for ribosome assembly. Here, we use in vivo and in vitro biochemical analyses to demonstrate that ATP-bound Rok1, but not adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-bound Rok1, stabilizes Rrp5 binding to 40S ribosomes. Interconversion between these two forms by ATP hydrolysis is required for release of Rrp5 from pre-40S ribosomes in vivo, thereby allowing Rrp5 to carry out its role in 60S subunit assembly. Furthermore, our data also strongly suggest that the previously described accumulation of snR30 upon Rok1 inactivation arises because Rrp5 release is blocked and implicate a previously undescribed interaction between Rrp5 and the DEAD-box protein Has1 in mediating snR30 accumulation when Rrp5 release from pre-40S subunits is blocked. PMID:27280440

  16. Yeast polypeptide exit tunnel ribosomal proteins L17, L35 and L37 are necessary to recruit late-assembling factors required for 27SB pre-rRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Babiano, Reyes; Talkish, Jason; de la Cruz, Jesús; Woolford, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis involves the coordinated folding and processing of pre-rRNAs with assembly of ribosomal proteins. In eukaryotes, these events are facilitated by trans-acting factors that propel ribosome maturation from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. However, there is a gap in understanding how ribosomal proteins configure pre-ribosomes in vivo to enable processing to occur. Here, we have examined the role of adjacent yeast r-proteins L17, L35 and L37 in folding and processing of pre-rRNAs, and binding of other proteins within assembling ribosomes. These three essential ribosomal proteins, which surround the polypeptide exit tunnel, are required for 60S subunit formation as a consequence of their role in removal of the ITS2 spacer from 27SB pre-rRNA. L17-, L35- and L37-depleted cells exhibit turnover of aberrant pre-60S assembly intermediates. Although the structure of ITS2 does not appear to be grossly affected in their absence, these three ribosomal proteins are necessary for efficient recruitment of factors required for 27SB pre-rRNA processing, namely, Nsa2 and Nog2, which associate with pre-60S ribosomal particles containing 27SB pre-rRNAs. Altogether, these data support that L17, L35 and L37 are specifically required for a recruiting step immediately preceding removal of ITS2. PMID:23268442

  17. 16Stimator: statistical estimation of ribosomal gene copy numbers from draft genome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Perisin, Matthew; Vetter, Madlen; Gilbert, Jack A; Bergelson, Joy

    2016-04-01

    The 16S rRNA gene (16S) is an accepted marker of bacterial taxonomic diversity, even though differences in copy number obscure the relationship between amplicon and organismal abundances. Ancestral state reconstruction methods can predict 16S copy numbers through comparisons with closely related reference genomes; however, the database of closed genomes is limited. Here, we extend the reference database of 16S copy numbers to de novo assembled draft genomes by developing 16Stimator, a method to estimate 16S copy numbers when these repetitive regions collapse during assembly. Using a read depth approach, we estimate 16S copy numbers for 12 endophytic isolates from Arabidopsis thaliana and confirm estimates by qPCR. We further apply this approach to draft genomes deposited in NCBI and demonstrate accurate copy number estimation regardless of sequencing platform, with an overall median deviation of 14%. The expanded database of isolates with 16S copy number estimates increases the power of phylogenetic correction methods for determining organismal abundances from 16S amplicon surveys. PMID:26359911

  18. Rrp12 and the Exportin Crm1 Participate in Late Assembly Events in the Nucleolus during 40S Ribosomal Subunit Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moriggi, Giulia; Nieto, Blanca; Dosil, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    During the biogenesis of small ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes, the pre-40S particles formed in the nucleolus are rapidly transported to the cytoplasm. The mechanisms underlying the nuclear export of these particles and its coordination with other biogenesis steps are mostly unknown. Here we show that yeast Rrp12 is required for the exit of pre-40S particles to the cytoplasm and for proper maturation dynamics of upstream 90S pre-ribosomes. Due to this, in vivo elimination of Rrp12 leads to an accumulation of nucleoplasmic 90S to pre-40S transitional particles, abnormal 35S pre-rRNA processing, delayed elimination of processing byproducts, and no export of intermediate pre-40S complexes. The exportin Crm1 is also required for the same pre-ribosome maturation events that involve Rrp12. Thus, in addition to their implication in nuclear export, Rrp12 and Crm1 participate in earlier biosynthetic steps that take place in the nucleolus. Our results indicate that, in the 40S subunit synthesis pathway, the completion of early pre-40S particle assembly, the initiation of byproduct degradation and the priming for nuclear export occur in an integrated manner in late 90S pre-ribosomes. PMID:25474739

  19. Position of the CrPV IRES on the 40S subunit and factor dependence of IRES/80S ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Pestova, Tatyana V; Lomakin, Ivan B; Hellen, Christopher U T

    2004-09-01

    The cricket paralysis virus intergenic region internal ribosomal entry site (CrPV IGR IRES) can assemble translation initiation complexes by binding to 40S subunits without Met-tRNA(Met)(i) and initiation factors (eIFs) and then by joining directly with 60S subunits, yielding elongation-competent 80S ribosomes. Here, we report that eIF1, eIF1A and eIF3 do not significantly influence IRES/40S subunit binding but strongly inhibit subunit joining and the first elongation cycle. The IRES can avoid their inhibitory effect by its ability to bind directly to 80S ribosomes. The IRES's ability to bind to 40S subunits simultaneously with eIF1 allowed us to use directed hydroxyl radical cleavage to map its position relative to the known position of eIF1. A connecting loop in the IRES's pseudoknot (PK) III domain, part of PK II and the entire domain containing PK I are solvent-exposed and occupy the E site and regions of the P site that are usually occupied by Met-tRNA(Met)(i). PMID:15332113

  20. Human acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins P0, P1, and P2: Analysis of cDNA clones, in vitro synthesis, and assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, B.E.; Steitz, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    cDNA clones encoding three antigenically related human ribosomal phosophoproteins (P-proteins) P0, P1, and P2 were isolated and sequenced. P1 and P2 are analogous to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L7/L12, and P0 is likely to be an analog of L10. The three proteins have a nearly identical carboxy-terminal 17-amino-acid sequence (KEESEESD(D/E)DMGFGLFD-COOH) that is the basis of their immunological cross-reactivity. The identifies of the P1 and P2 cDNAs were confirmed by the strong similarities of their encoded amino acid sequences to published primary structures of the homologous rat, brine shrimp, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins. The P0 cDNA was initially identified by translation of hybrid-selected mRNA and immunoprecipitation of the products. To demonstrate that the coding sequences are full length, the P0, P1, and P2 cDNAs were transcribed in vitro by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and the resulting mRNAs were translated in vitro. The synthetic P0, P1, and P2 proteins were serologically and electrophoretically identical to P-proteins extracted from HeLa cells. These synthetic P-proteins were incorporated into 60S but not 40S ribosomes and also assembled into a complex similar to that described for E. coli L7/L12 and L10.

  1. Development, Antibiotic Production, and Ribosome Assembly in Streptomyces venezuelae Are Impacted by RNase J and RNase III Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephanie E.; Leong, Vivian; Ortega, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    RNA metabolism is a critical but frequently overlooked control element affecting virtually every cellular process in bacteria. RNA processing and degradation is mediated by a suite of ribonucleases having distinct cleavage and substrate specificity. Here, we probe the role of two ribonucleases (RNase III and RNase J) in the emerging model system Streptomyces venezuelae. We show that each enzyme makes a unique contribution to the growth and development of S. venezuelae and further affects the secondary metabolism and antibiotic production of this bacterium. We demonstrate a connection between the action of these ribonucleases and translation, with both enzymes being required for the formation of functional ribosomes. RNase III mutants in particular fail to properly process 23S rRNA, form fewer 70S ribosomes, and show reduced translational processivity. The loss of either RNase III or RNase J additionally led to the appearance of a new ribosomal species (the 100S ribosome dimer) during exponential growth and dramatically sensitized these mutants to a range of antibiotics. PMID:25266378

  2. Structural Insights Into Ribosome Recycling Factor Interactions with the 70S Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Raj D.; Zhang, Wen; Schuwirth, Barbara S.; Hirokawa, Go; Kaji, Hideko; Kaji, Akira; Cate, Jamie H.D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY At the end of translation in bacteria, ribosome recycling factor (RRF) is used together with Elongation Factor G (EF-G) to recycle the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits for the next round of translation. In x-ray crystal structures of RRF with the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome, RRF binds to the large ribosomal subunit in the cleft that contains the peptidyl transferase center (PTC). Upon binding of either E. coli or T. thermophilus RRF to the E. coli ribosome, the tip of ribosomal RNA helix H69 in the large subunit moves away from the small subunit toward RRF by 8 Å, thereby disrupting a key contact between the small and large ribosomal subunits, termed bridge B2a. In the ribosome crystals, the ability of RRF to destabilize bridge B2a is influenced by crystal packing forces. Movement of H69 involves an ordered to disordered transition upon binding of RRF to the ribosome. The disruption of bridge B2a upon RRF binding to the ribosome seen in the present structures reveals one of the key roles that RRF plays in ribosome recycling, the dissociation of 70S ribosomes into subunits. The structures also reveal contacts between Domain II of RRF and protein S12 in the 30S subunit that may also play a role in ribosome recycling. PMID:18234219

  3. Effect of an uncE ribosome-binding site mutation on the synthesis and assembly of the Escherichia coli proton-translocating ATPase.

    PubMed

    Solomon, K A; Brusilow, W S

    1988-04-15

    Plasmid pRPG54, which carries the genes for the eight subunits of the proton-translocating ATPase of Escherichia coli, has been found to carry a single base change of a G to an A in the ribosome-binding site for uncE, the gene which codes for the N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding subunit c of the Fo. This noncoding region mutation both lowers expression of uncE by a factor of 2-3 and affects the function of the ATPase, specifically of the Fo sector. The presence of the mutation results in a decrease in the proton permeability of the Fo or of the entire F1Fo-ATPase complex when either is synthesized from genes on a multicopy plasmid. Expression of uncE from an F1Fo plasmid carrying the wild type ribosome binding site results in increased membrane proton permeability and decreased ability of the resultant ATPase to couple a transmembrane proton gradient to ATP synthesis both in vitro and in vivo. Also, although an Fo plasmid carrying the correct ribosome-binding site causes harmful, F1-dependent proton permeability in unc+ cells (Brusilow, W. S. S. (1987) J. Bacteriol. 169, 4984-4990), an identical plasmid carrying the mutation does not, even though it still codes for a functional reconstitutable Fo. The results show a relationship between the relative level of expression of uncE from a multicopy plasmid and the assembly pathway, proton permeability, and energy-coupling characteristics of the ATPase. PMID:2895768

  4. Intersubunit movement is required for ribosomal translocation

    PubMed Central

    Horan, Lucas H.; Noller, Harry F.

    2007-01-01

    Translocation of tRNA and mRNA during protein synthesis is believed to be coupled to structural changes in the ribosome. The “ratchet model,” based on cryo-EM reconstructions of ribosome complexes, invokes relative movement of the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits in this process; however, evidence that directly demonstrates a requirement for intersubunit movement during translocation is lacking. To address this problem, we created an intersubunit disulfide cross-link to restrict potential movement. The cross-linked ribosomes were unable to carry out polypeptide synthesis; this inhibition was completely reversed upon reduction of the disulfide bridge. In vitro assays showed that the cross-linked ribosomes were specifically blocked in elongation factor G-dependent translocation. These findings show that intersubunit movement is required for ribosomal translocation, accounting for the universal two-subunit architecture of ribosomes. PMID:17360328

  5. Mutation at position 791 in Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA affects processes involved in the initiation of protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Tapprich, W E; Goss, D J; Dahlberg, A E

    1989-01-01

    A single base was mutated from guanine to adenine at position 791 in 16S rRNA in the Escherichia coli rrnB operon on the multicopy plasmid pKK3535. The plasmid-coded rRNA was processed and assembled into 30S ribosomal subunits in E. coli and caused a retardation of cell growth. The mutation affected crucial functional roles of the 30S subunit in the initiation of protein synthesis. The affinity of the mutant 30S subunits for 50S subunits was reduced and the association equilibrium constant for initiation factor 3 was decreased by a factor of 10 compared to wild-type 30S subunits. The interrelationship among the region of residue 790 in 16S rRNA, subunit association, and initiation factor 3 binding during initiation complex formation, as revealed by this study, offers insights into the functional role of rRNA in protein synthesis. PMID:2662189

  6. Ribosome recycling defects modify the balance between the synthesis and assembly of specific subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Jelena; Panozzo, Cristina; Bourand-Plantefol, Alexa; Herbert, Christopher J; Dujardin, Geneviève; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria have their own translation machinery that produces key subunits of the OXPHOS complexes. This machinery relies on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded factors of bacterial origin that are well conserved between humans and yeast. In humans, mutations in these factors can cause diseases; in yeast, mutations abolishing mitochondrial translation destabilize the mitochondrial DNA. We show that when the mitochondrial genome contains no introns, the loss of the yeast factors Mif3 and Rrf1 involved in ribosome recycling neither blocks translation nor destabilizes mitochondrial DNA. Rather, the absence of these factors increases the synthesis of the mitochondrially-encoded subunits Cox1, Cytb and Atp9, while strongly impairing the assembly of OXPHOS complexes IV and V. We further show that in the absence of Rrf1, the COX1 specific translation activator Mss51 accumulates in low molecular weight forms, thought to be the source of the translationally-active form, explaining the increased synthesis of Cox1. We propose that Rrf1 takes part in the coordination between translation and OXPHOS assembly in yeast mitochondria. These interactions between general and specific translation factors might reveal an evolutionary adaptation of the bacterial translation machinery to the set of integral membrane proteins that are translated within mitochondria. PMID:27257059

  7. Ribosome recycling defects modify the balance between the synthesis and assembly of specific subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes in yeast mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Ostojić, Jelena; Panozzo, Cristina; Bourand-Plantefol, Alexa; Herbert, Christopher J.; Dujardin, Geneviève; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria have their own translation machinery that produces key subunits of the OXPHOS complexes. This machinery relies on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded factors of bacterial origin that are well conserved between humans and yeast. In humans, mutations in these factors can cause diseases; in yeast, mutations abolishing mitochondrial translation destabilize the mitochondrial DNA. We show that when the mitochondrial genome contains no introns, the loss of the yeast factors Mif3 and Rrf1 involved in ribosome recycling neither blocks translation nor destabilizes mitochondrial DNA. Rather, the absence of these factors increases the synthesis of the mitochondrially-encoded subunits Cox1, Cytb and Atp9, while strongly impairing the assembly of OXPHOS complexes IV and V. We further show that in the absence of Rrf1, the COX1 specific translation activator Mss51 accumulates in low molecular weight forms, thought to be the source of the translationally-active form, explaining the increased synthesis of Cox1. We propose that Rrf1 takes part in the coordination between translation and OXPHOS assembly in yeast mitochondria. These interactions between general and specific translation factors might reveal an evolutionary adaptation of the bacterial translation machinery to the set of integral membrane proteins that are translated within mitochondria. PMID:27257059

  8. Ribosome biogenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Woolford, John L; Baserga, Susan J

    2013-11-01

    Ribosomes are highly conserved ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that translate information in the genome to create the proteome in all cells. In yeast these complex particles contain four RNAs (>5400 nucleotides) and 79 different proteins. During the past 25 years, studies in yeast have led the way to understanding how these molecules are assembled into ribosomes in vivo. Assembly begins with transcription of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus, where the RNA then undergoes complex pathways of folding, coupled with nucleotide modification, removal of spacer sequences, and binding to ribosomal proteins. More than 200 assembly factors and 76 small nucleolar RNAs transiently associate with assembling ribosomes, to enable their accurate and efficient construction. Following export of preribosomes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, they undergo final stages of maturation before entering the pool of functioning ribosomes. Elaborate mechanisms exist to monitor the formation of correct structural and functional neighborhoods within ribosomes and to destroy preribosomes that fail to assemble properly. Studies of yeast ribosome biogenesis provide useful models for ribosomopathies, diseases in humans that result from failure to properly assemble ribosomes. PMID:24190922

  9. The structure of Erb1-Ytm1 complex reveals the functional importance of a high-affinity binding between two β-propellers during the assembly of large ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; de la Cruz, Jesús; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is one of the most essential pathways in eukaryotes although it is still not fully characterized. Given the importance of this process in proliferating cells, it is obvious that understanding the macromolecular details of the interactions that take place between the assembly factors, ribosomal proteins and nascent pre-rRNAs is essentially required for the development of new non-genotoxic treatments for cancer. Herein, we have studied the association between the WD40-repeat domains of Erb1 and Ytm1 proteins. These are essential factors for the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes that form a heterotrimeric complex together with the also essential Nop7 protein. We provide the crystal structure of a dimer formed by the C-terminal part of Erb1 and Ytm1 from Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.1 Å resolution. Using a multidisciplinary approach we show that the β-propeller domains of these proteins interact in a novel manner that leads to a high-affinity binding. We prove that a point mutation within the interface of the complex impairs the interaction between the two proteins and negatively affects growth and ribosome production in yeast. Our study suggests insights into the association of the Erb1-Ytm1 dimer with pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:26476442

  10. The structure of Erb1-Ytm1 complex reveals the functional importance of a high-affinity binding between two β-propellers during the assembly of large ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; de la Cruz, Jesús; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-12-15

    Ribosome biogenesis is one of the most essential pathways in eukaryotes although it is still not fully characterized. Given the importance of this process in proliferating cells, it is obvious that understanding the macromolecular details of the interactions that take place between the assembly factors, ribosomal proteins and nascent pre-rRNAs is essentially required for the development of new non-genotoxic treatments for cancer. Herein, we have studied the association between the WD40-repeat domains of Erb1 and Ytm1 proteins. These are essential factors for the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in eukaryotes that form a heterotrimeric complex together with the also essential Nop7 protein. We provide the crystal structure of a dimer formed by the C-terminal part of Erb1 and Ytm1 from Chaetomium thermophilum at 2.1 Å resolution. Using a multidisciplinary approach we show that the β-propeller domains of these proteins interact in a novel manner that leads to a high-affinity binding. We prove that a point mutation within the interface of the complex impairs the interaction between the two proteins and negatively affects growth and ribosome production in yeast. Our study suggests insights into the association of the Erb1-Ytm1 dimer with pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:26476442

  11. Ribosome-omics of the human ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Varun; Warner, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    The torrent of RNA-seq data becoming available not only furnishes an overview of the entire transcriptome but also provides tools to focus on specific areas of interest. Our focus on the synthesis of ribosomes asked whether the abundance of mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins (RPs) matched the equimolar need for the RPs in the assembly of ribosomes. We were at first surprised to find, in the mapping data of ENCODE and other sources, that there were nearly 100-fold differences in the level of the mRNAs encoding the different RPs. However, after correcting for the mapping ambiguities introduced by the presence of more than 2000 pseudogenes derived from RP mRNAs, we show that for 80%–90% of the RP genes, the molar ratio of mRNAs varies less than threefold, with little tissue specificity. Nevertheless, since the RPs are needed in equimolar amounts, there must be sluggish or regulated translation of the more abundant RP mRNAs and/or substantial turnover of unused RPs. In addition, seven of the RPs have subsidiary genes, three of which are pseudogenes that have been “rescued” by the introduction of promoters and/or upstream introns. Several of these are transcribed in a tissue-specific manner, e.g., RPL10L in testis and RPL3L in muscle, leading to potential variation in ribosome structure from one tissue to another. Of the 376 introns in the RP genes, a single one is alternatively spliced in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:24860015

  12. [About the ribosomal biogenesis in human].

    PubMed

    Tafforeau, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are cellular ribonucleoprotein particles required for a fundamental mechanism, translation of the genetic information into proteins. Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex pathway involving many maturation steps: ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, rRNA processing, pre-rRNA modifications, its assembly with ribosomal proteins in the nuceolus, export of the subunit precursors to the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm. Ribosome biogenesis has mainly being investigated in yeast during these last 25 years. However, recent works have shown that, despite many similarities between yeast and human ribosome structure and biogenesis, human pre-rRNA processing is far more complex than in yeast. In order to better understand diseases related to a malfunction in ribosome synthesis, the ribosomopathies, research should be conducted directly in human cells and animal models. PMID:26152166

  13. Slow formation of stable complexes during coincubation of a minimal rRNA and ribosomal protein S4

    PubMed Central

    Mayerle, Megan; Bellur, Deepti L.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S4 binds and stabilizes a five-helix junction in the 5’ domain of the 16S rRNA, and is one of two proteins responsible for nucleating 30S ribosome assembly. Upon binding, both protein S4 and the five-helix junction reorganize their structures. We show that labile S4 complexes rearrange to stable complexes within a few minutes at 42°C, with longer coincubation leading to an increased population of stable complexes. In contrast, prefolding the rRNA has a smaller effect on stable S4 binding. Experiments with minimal rRNA fragments show this structural change depends only on 16S residues within the S4 binding site. SHAPE chemical-probing experiments showed that S4 strongly stabilizes the five-helix junction and helix 18 pseudoknot, which become tightly folded within the first minute of S4 binding. However, a kink in helix 16 that makes specific contacts with the S4 N-terminal extension, and a right angle motif between helices 3, 4 and 18, require a minute or more to become fully structured. Surprisingly, S4 structurally reorganizes the 530-loop and increases the flexibility of helix 3, which is proposed to undergo a conformational switch during 30S assembly. These elements of the S4 binding site may require other 30S proteins to reach a stable conformation. PMID:21821049

  14. A role for the 30S subunit E site in maintenance of the translational reading frame

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, Aishwarya; Shoji, Shinichiro; Holbrook, Eric D.; Fredrick, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    The exit (E) site has been implicated in several ribosomal activities, including translocation, decoding, and maintenance of the translational reading frame. Here, we target the 30S subunit E site by introducing a deletion in rpsG that truncates the β-hairpin of ribosomal protein S7. This mutation (S7ΔR77–Y84) increases both −1 and +1 frameshifting but does not increase miscoding, providing evidence that the 30S E site plays a specific role in frame maintenance. Mutation S7ΔR77–Y84 also stimulates +1 programmed frameshifting during prfB′-lacZ translation in many synthetic contexts. However, no effect is seen when the E codon of the frameshift site corresponds to those found in nature, suggesting that E-tRNA release does not normally limit the rate of prfB frameshifting. Ribosomes containing S7ΔR77–Y84 exhibit an elevated rate of spontaneous reverse translocation and an increased K 1/2 for E-tRNA. These effects are of similar magnitude, suggesting that both result from destabilization of E-tRNA. Finally, this mutation of the 30S E site does not inhibit EF-G-dependent translocation, consistent with a primary role for the 50S E site in the mechanism. PMID:19095617

  15. Modular domains of the Dicistroviridae intergenic internal ribosome entry site

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Christopher J.; Jan, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The intergenic region internal ribosome entry site (IGR IRES) of the Dicistroviridae viral family can directly assemble 80S ribosomes and initiate translation at a non-AUG codon from the ribosomal A-site. These functions are directed by two independently folded domains of the IGR IRES. One domain, composed of overlapping pseudoknots II and III (PKII/III), mediates ribosome recruitment. The second domain, composed of PKI, mimics a tRNA anticodon–codon interaction to position the ribosome at the ribosomal A-site. Although adopting a common secondary structure, the dicistrovirus IGR IRESs can be grouped into two classes based on distinct features within each domain. In this study, we report on the modularity of the IGR IRESs and show that the ribosome-binding domain and the tRNA anticodon mimicry domain are functionally interchangeable between the Type I and the Type II IGR IRESs. Using structural probing, ribosome-binding assays, and ribosome positioning analysis by toeprinting assays, we show that the chimeric IRESs fold properly, assemble 80S ribosomes, and can mediate IRES translation in rabbit reticulocyte lysates. We also demonstrate that the chimeric IRESs can stimulate the ribosome-dependent GTPase activity of eEF2, which suggests that the ribosome is primed for a step downstream from IRES binding. Overall, the results demonstrate that the dicistrovirus IGR IRESs are composed of two modular domains that work in concert to manipulate the ribosome and direct translation initiation. PMID:20423979

  16. Analysis of r-protein and RNA conformation of 30S subunit intermediates in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Napper, Nathan; Culver, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a large macromolecular complex that must be assembled efficiently and accurately for the viability of all organisms. In bacteria, this process must be robust and tunable to support life in diverse conditions from the ice of arctic glaciers to thermal hot springs. Assembly of the Small ribosomal SUbunit (SSU) of Escherichia coli has been extensively studied and is highly temperature-dependent. However, a lack of data on SSU assembly for other bacteria is problematic given the importance of the ribosome in bacterial physiology. To broaden the understanding of how optimal growth temperature may affect SSU assembly, in vitro SSU assembly of two thermophilic bacteria, Geobacillus kaustophilus and Thermus thermophilus, was compared with that of E. coli. Using these phylogenetically, morphologically, and environmentally diverse bacteria, we show that SSU assembly is highly temperature-dependent and efficient SSU assembly occurs at different temperatures for each organism. Surprisingly, the assembly landscape is characterized by at least two distinct intermediate populations in the organisms tested. This novel, second intermediate, is formed in the presence of the full complement of r-proteins, unlike the previously observed RI* particle formed in the absence of late-binding r-proteins in E. coli. This work reveals multiple distinct intermediate populations are present during SSU assembly in vitro for several bacteria, yielding insights into RNP formation and possible antimicrobial development toward this common SSU target. PMID:25999315

  17. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Shin, Yun-jeong; Kim, Woo-Young; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. - Highlights: • Nucleosome assembly protein 1 (AtNAP1) interacts with RPS6 as well as with AtHD2B. • rDNA transcription is regulated S6K1. • Overexpression or down regulation of AtNAP1 results in concomitant increase or decrease in rDNA transcription.

  18. The Crystal Structure of the Ubiquitin-like Domain of Ribosome Assembly Factor Ytm1 and Characterization of Its Interaction with the AAA-ATPase Midasin.

    PubMed

    Romes, Erin M; Sobhany, Mack; Stanley, Robin E

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of eukaryotic ribosomes is a complex, energetically demanding process requiring the aid of numerous non-ribosomal factors, such as the PeBoW complex. The mammalian PeBoW complex, composed of Pes1, Bop1, and WDR12, is essential for the processing of the 32S preribosomal RNA. Previous work in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that release of the homologous proteins in this complex (Nop7, Erb1, and Ytm1, respectively) from preribosomal particles requires Rea1 (midasin or MDN1 in humans), a large dynein-like protein. Midasin contains a C-terminal metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) domain that interacts with the N-terminal ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain of Ytm1/WDR12 as well as the UBL domain of Rsa4/Nle1 in a later step in the ribosome maturation pathway. Here we present the crystal structure of the UBL domain of the WDR12 homologue from S. cerevisiae at 1.7 Å resolution and demonstrate that human midasin binds to WDR12 as well as Nle1 through their respective UBL domains. Midasin contains a well conserved extension region upstream of the MIDAS domain required for binding WDR12 and Nle1, and the interaction is dependent upon metal ion coordination because removal of the metal or mutation of residues that coordinate the metal ion diminishes the interaction. Mammalian WDR12 displays prominent nucleolar localization that is dependent upon active ribosomal RNA transcription. Based upon these results, we propose that release of the PeBoW complex and subsequent release of Nle1 by midasin is a well conserved step in the ribosome maturation pathway in both yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:26601951

  19. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E H; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles in protein synthesis. This review is concerned primarily with the RNAs and proteins that constitute the chloroplast ribosome, the genes that encode these components, and their expression. It begins with an overview of chloroplast genome structure in land plants and algae and then presents a brief comparison of chloroplast and prokaryotic protein-synthesizing systems and a more detailed analysis of chloroplast rRNAs and ribosomal proteins. A description of the synthesis and assembly of chloroplast ribosomes follows. The review concludes with discussion of whether chloroplast protein synthesis is essential for cell survival. PMID:7854253

  20. Synthesis of ribosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J R

    1989-01-01

    The assembly of a eucaryotic ribosome requires the synthesis of four ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules and more than 75 ribosomal proteins. It utilizes all three RNA polymerases; it requires the cooperation of the nucleus and the cytoplasm, the processing of RNA, and the specific interaction of RNA and protein molecules. It is carried out efficiently and is exquisitely sensitive to the needs of the cell. Our current understanding of this process in the genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed. The ribosomal RNA genes are arranged in a tandem array of 100 to 200 copies. This tandem array has led to unique ways of carrying out a number of functions. Replication is asymmetric and does not initiate from every autonomously replicating sequence. Recombination is suppressed. Transcription of the major ribosomal RNA appears to involve coupling between adjacent transcription units, which are separated by the 5S RNA transcription unit. Genes for many ribosomal proteins have been cloned and sequenced. Few are linked; most are duplicated; most have an intron. There is extensive homology between yeast ribosomal proteins and those of other species. Most, but not all, of the ribosomal protein genes have one or two sites that are essential for their transcription and that bind a common transcription factor. This factor binds also to many other places in the genome, including the telomeres. There is coordinated transcription of the ribosomal protein genes under a variety of conditions. However, the cell seems to possess no mechanism for regulating the transcription of individual ribosomal protein genes in response either to a deficiency or an excess of a particular ribosomal protein. A deficiency causes slow growth. Any excess ribosomal protein is degraded very rapidly, with a half-life of 1 to 5 min. Unlike most types of cells, yeast cells appear not to regulate the translation of ribosomal proteins. However, in the case of ribosomal protein L32

  1. Structure of ERA in complex with the 3′ end of 16S rRNA: Implications for ribosome biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Chao; Zhou, Xiaomei; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.; Court, Donald L.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-10-09

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the {sub 1531}AUCACCUCCUUA{sub 1542} sequence at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  2. Structure of ERA in Complex with the 3 End of 16s rRNBA Implications for Ribosome Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, C.; Zhou, X; Tropea, J; Austin, B; Waugh, D; Court, D; Ji, X

    2009-01-01

    ERA, composed of an N-terminal GTPase domain followed by an RNA-binding KH domain, is essential for bacterial cell viability. It binds to 16S rRNA and the 30S ribosomal subunit. However, its RNA-binding site, the functional relationship between the two domains, and its role in ribosome biogenesis remain unclear. We have determined two crystal structures of ERA, a binary complex with GDP and a ternary complex with a GTP-analog and the 1531AUCACCUCCUUA1542 sequence at the 3? end of 16S rRNA. In the ternary complex, the first nine of the 12 nucleotides are recognized by the protein. We show that GTP binding is a prerequisite for RNA recognition by ERA and that RNA recognition stimulates its GTP-hydrolyzing activity. Based on these and other data, we propose a functional cycle of ERA, suggesting that the protein serves as a chaperone for processing and maturation of 16S rRNA and a checkpoint for assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The AUCA sequence is highly conserved among bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, whereas the CCUCC, known as the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence, is conserved in noneukaryotes only. Therefore, these data suggest a common mechanism for a highly conserved ERA function in all three kingdoms of life by recognizing the AUCA, with a 'twist' for noneukaryotic ERA proteins by also recognizing the CCUCC.

  3. Slow formation of stable complexes during coincubation of minimal rRNA and ribosomal protein S4.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Megan; Bellur, Deepti L; Woodson, Sarah A

    2011-09-23

    Ribosomal protein S4 binds and stabilizes a five-helix junction or five-way junction (5WJ) in the 5' domain of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and is one of two proteins responsible for nucleating 30S ribosome assembly. Upon binding, both protein S4 and 5WJ reorganize their structures. We show that labile S4 complexes rearrange into stable complexes within a few minutes at 42 °C, with longer coincubation leading to an increased population of stable complexes. In contrast, prefolding the rRNA has a smaller effect on stable S4 binding. Experiments with minimal rRNA fragments show that this structural change depends only on 16S residues within the S4 binding site. SHAPE (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) chemical probing experiments showed that S4 strongly stabilizes 5WJ and the helix (H) 18 pseudoknot, which become tightly folded within the first minute of S4 binding. However, a kink in H16 that makes specific contacts with the S4 N-terminal extension, as well as a right-angle motif between H3, H4, and H18, requires a minute or more to become fully structured. Surprisingly, S4 structurally reorganizes the 530-loop and increases the flexibility of H3, which is proposed to undergo a conformational switch during 30S assembly. These elements of the S4 binding site may require other 30S proteins to reach a stable conformation. PMID:21821049

  4. SuhB Associates with Nus Factors To Facilitate 30S Ribosome Biogenesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Navjot; Bubunenko, Mikhail; Smith, Carol; Abbott, David M.; Stringer, Anne M.; Shi, Ronald; Court, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A complex of highly conserved proteins consisting of NusB, NusE, NusA, and NusG is required for robust expression of rRNA in Escherichia coli. This complex is proposed to prevent Rho-dependent transcription termination by a process known as “antitermination.” The mechanism of this antitermination in rRNA is poorly understood but requires association of NusB and NusE with a specific RNA sequence in rRNA known as BoxA. Here, we identify a novel member of the rRNA antitermination machinery: the inositol monophosphatase SuhB. We show that SuhB associates with elongating RNA polymerase (RNAP) at rRNA in a NusB-dependent manner. Although we show that SuhB is required for BoxA-mediated antitermination in a reporter system, our data indicate that the major function of the NusB/E/A/G/SuhB complex is not to prevent Rho-dependent termination of rRNA but rather to promote correct rRNA maturation. This occurs through formation of a SuhB-mediated loop between NusB/E/BoxA and RNAP/NusA/G. Thus, we have reassigned the function of these proteins at rRNA and identified another key player in this complex. PMID:26980831

  5. Chemical modulators of ribosome biogenesis as biological probes.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jonathan M; Brown, Eric D

    2015-12-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of protein biosynthesis have been instrumental in the dissection of the complexities of ribosome structure and function. Ribosome biogenesis, on the other hand, is a complex and largely enigmatic process for which there is a paucity of chemical probes. Indeed, ribosome biogenesis has been studied almost exclusively using genetic and biochemical approaches without the benefit of small-molecule inhibitors of this process. Here, we provide a perspective on the promise of chemical inhibitors of ribosome assembly for future research. We explore key obstacles that complicate the interpretation of studies aimed at perturbing ribosome biogenesis in vivo using genetic methods, and we argue that chemical inhibitors are especially powerful because they can be used to induce perturbations in a manner that obviates these difficulties. Thus, in combination with leading-edge biochemical and structural methods, chemical probes offer unique advantages toward elucidating the molecular events that define the assembly of ribosomes. PMID:26575239

  6. The ribosome filter redux.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Vincent P; Edelman, Gerald M

    2007-09-15

    The ribosome filter hypothesis postulates that ribosomes are not simply translation machines but also function as regulatory elements that differentially affect or filter the translation of particular mRNAs. On the basis of new information, we take the opportunity here to review the ribosome filter hypothesis, suggest specific mechanisms of action, and discuss recent examples from the literature that support it. PMID:17890902

  7. Precursor ribosomal ribonucleic acid and ribosome accumulation in vivo during the recovery of Salmonella typhimurium from thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Tomlins, R I; Ordal, Z J

    1971-07-01

    When cells of S. typhimurium were heated at 48 C for 30 min in phosphate buffer (pH 6.0), they became sensitive to Levine Eosin Methylene Blue Agar containing 2% NaCl (EMB-NaCl). The inoculation of injured cells into fresh growth medium supported the return of their normal tolerance to EMB-NaCl within 6 hr. The fractionation of ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) from unheated and heat-injured cells by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that after injury the 16S RNA species was totally degraded and the 23S RNA was partially degraded. Sucrose gradient analysis demonstrated that after injury the 30S ribosomal subunit was totally destroyed and the sedimentation coefficient of the 50S particle was decreased to 47S. During the recovery of cells from thermal injury, four species of rRNA accumulated which were demonstrated to have the following sedimentation coefficients: 16, 17, 23, and 24S. Under identical recovery conditions, 22, 26, and 28S precursors of the 30S ribosomal subunit and 31 and 48S precursors of the 50S ribosomal subunit accumulated along with both the 30 and 50S mature particles. The addition of chloramphenicol to the recovery medium inhibited both the maturation of 17S RNA and the production of mature 30S ribosomal subunits, but permitted the accumulation of a single 22S precursor particle. Chloramphenicol did not affect either the maturation of 24S RNA or the mechanism of formation of 50S ribosomal subunits during recovery. Very little old ribosomal protein was associated with the new rRNA synthesized during recovery. New ribosomal proteins were synthesized during recovery and they were found associated with the new rRNA in ribosomal particles. The rate-limiting step in the recovery of S. typhimurium from thermal injury was in the maturation of the newly synthesized rRNA. PMID:4935315

  8. Features of 80S mammalian ribosome and its subunits

    PubMed Central

    Budkevich, Tatyana V.; El'skaya, Anna V.; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2008-01-01

    It is generally believed that basic features of ribosomal functions are universally valid, but a systematic test still stands out for higher eukaryotic 80S ribosomes. Here we report: (i) differences in tRNA and mRNA binding capabilities of eukaryotic and bacterial ribosomes and their subunits. Eukaryotic 40S subunits bind mRNA exclusively in the presence of cognate tRNA, whereas bacterial 30S do bind mRNA already in the absence of tRNA. 80S ribosomes bind mRNA efficiently in the absence of tRNA. In contrast, bacterial 70S interact with mRNA more productively in the presence rather than in the absence of tRNA. (ii) States of initiation (Pi), pre-translocation (PRE) and post-translocation (POST) of the ribosome were checked and no significant functional differences to the prokaryotic counterpart were observed including the reciprocal linkage between A and E sites. (iii) Eukaryotic ribosomes bind tetracycline with an affinity 15 times lower than that of bacterial ribosomes (Kd 30 μM and 1–2 μM, respectively). The drug does not effect enzymatic A-site occupation of 80S ribosomes in contrast to non-enzymatic tRNA binding to the A-site. Both observations explain the relative resistance of eukaryotic ribosomes to this antibiotic. PMID:18632761

  9. Illuminating Parasite Protein Production by Ribosome Profiling.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Marilyn; Myler, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    While technologies for global enumeration of transcript abundance are well-developed, those that assess protein abundance require tailoring to penetrate to low-abundance proteins. Ribosome profiling circumvents this challenge by measuring global protein production via sequencing small mRNA fragments protected by the assembled ribosome. This powerful approach is now being applied to protozoan parasites including trypanosomes and Plasmodium. It has been used to identify new protein-coding sequences (CDSs) and clarify the boundaries of previously annotated CDSs in Trypanosoma brucei. Ribosome profiling has demonstrated that translation efficiencies vary widely between genes and, for trypanosomes at least, for the same gene across stages. The ribosomal proteins are themselves subjected to translational control, suggesting a means of reinforcing global translational regulation. PMID:27061497

  10. The ribosomal database project.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, N; Olsen, G J; Maidak, B L; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Macke, T J; Marsh, T L; Woese, C R

    1993-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome data along with related programs and services. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via ftp and electronic mail. Certain analytic services are also provided by the electronic mail server. PMID:8332524

  11. The Ribosomal Database Project.

    PubMed Central

    Maidak, B L; Larsen, N; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Olsen, G J; Fogel, K; Blandy, J; Woese, C R

    1994-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services, and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server/rdp.life.uiuc.edu) and gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu). The electronic mail server also provides ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for chimeric nature of newly sequenced rRNAs, and automated alignment. PMID:7524021

  12. An overview of pre-ribosomal RNA processing in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Henras, Anthony K; Plisson-Chastang, Célia; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Chakraborty, Anirban; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs are the most abundant and universal noncoding RNAs in living organisms. In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs forming the 40S and 60S subunits are borne by a long polycistronic pre-ribosomal RNA. A complex sequence of processing steps is required to gradually release the mature RNAs from this precursor, concomitant with the assembly of the 79 ribosomal proteins. A large set of trans-acting factors chaperone this process, including small nucleolar ribonucleoparticles. While yeast has been the gold standard for studying the molecular basis of this process, recent technical advances have allowed to further define the mechanisms of ribosome biogenesis in animals and plants. This renewed interest for a long-lasting question has been fueled by the association of several genetic diseases with mutations in genes encoding both ribosomal proteins and ribosome biogenesis factors, and by the perspective of new anticancer treatments targeting the mechanisms of ribosome synthesis. A consensus scheme of pre-ribosomal RNA maturation is emerging from studies in various kinds of eukaryotic organisms. However, major differences between mammalian and yeast pre-ribosomal RNA processing have recently come to light. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:225–242. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1269 PMID:25346433

  13. The Ribosomal Database Project

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Gary J.; Overbeek, Ross; Larsen, Niels; Marsh, Terry L.; McCaughey, Michael J.; Maciukenas, Michael A.; Kuan, Wen-Min; Macke, Thomas J.; Xing, Yuqing; Woese, Carl R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) compiles ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development. PMID:1598241

  14. {sup 30}S Beam Development and X-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Ohshiro, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Chen, A. A.; Chen, J.; Setoodeh nia, K.; Kaji, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kim, A.; Lee, N. H.; Wakabayashi, Y.

    2010-03-01

    Over the past three years, we have worked on developing a well-characterized {sup 30}S radioactive beam to be used in a future experiment aiming to directly measure to extrapolate the {sup 30}S(alpha,p) stellar reaction rate within the Gamow window of Type I X-ray bursts. The importance of the {sup 30}S(alpha,p) reaction to X-ray bursts is discussed. Given the astrophysical motivation, the successful results of and challenges involved in the production of a low-energy {sup 30}S beam are detailed. Finally, an overview of our future plans regarding this on-going project are presented.

  15. Ribosomal proteins produced in excess are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Sung, Min-Kyung; Reitsma, Justin M; Sweredoski, Michael J; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-09-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential process that consumes prodigious quantities of cellular resources. Ribosomal proteins cannot be overproduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because the excess proteins are rapidly degraded. However, the responsible quality control (QC) mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of multiple proteins of the small and large yeast ribosomal subunits is suppressed. Rpl26 overexpressed from a plasmid can be detected in the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, but it largely fails to assemble into ribosomes and is rapidly degraded. However, if the endogenous RPL26 loci are deleted, plasmid-encoded Rpl26 assembles into ribosomes and localizes to the cytosol. Chemical and genetic perturbation studies indicate that overexpressed ribosomal proteins are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and not by autophagy. Inhibition of the proteasome led to accumulation of multiple endogenous ribosomal proteins in insoluble aggregates, consistent with the operation of this QC mechanism in the absence of ribosomal protein overexpression. Our studies reveal that ribosomal proteins that fail to assemble into ribosomes are rapidly distinguished from their assembled counterparts and ubiquitinated and degraded within the nuclear compartment. PMID:27385339

  16. Sharing of mitotic pre-ribosomal particles between daughter cells.

    PubMed

    Sirri, Valentina; Jourdan, Nathalie; Hernandez-Verdun, Danièle; Roussel, Pascal

    2016-04-15

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental multistep process initiated by the synthesis of 90S pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleoli of higher eukaryotes. Even though synthesis of ribosomes stops during mitosis while nucleoli disappear, mitotic pre-ribosomal particles persist as observed in pre-nucleolar bodies (PNBs) during telophase. To further understand the relationship between the nucleolus and the PNBs, the presence and the fate of the mitotic pre-ribosomal particles during cell division were investigated. We demonstrate that the recently synthesized 45S precursor ribosomal RNAs (pre-rRNAs) as well as the 32S and 30S pre-rRNAs are maintained during mitosis and associated with the chromosome periphery together with pre-rRNA processing factors. Maturation of the mitotic pre-ribosomal particles, as assessed by the stability of the mitotic pre-rRNAs, is transiently arrested during mitosis by a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)1-cyclin-B-dependent mechanism and can be restored by CDK inhibitor treatments. At the M-G1 transition, the resumption of mitotic pre-rRNA processing in PNBs does not induce the disappearance of PNBs; this only occurs when functional nucleoli reform. Strikingly, during their maturation process, mitotic pre-rRNAs localize in reforming nucleoli. PMID:26929073

  17. When ribosomes go bad: diseases of ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Emily F.; Bleichert, Franziska; Dutca, Laura M.; Baserga, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    Ribosomes are vital for cell growth and survival. Until recently, it was believed that mutations in ribosomes or ribosome biogenesis factors would be lethal, due to the essential nature of these complexes. However, in the last few decades, a number of diseases of ribosome biogenesis have been discovered. It remains a challenge in the field to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying them. PMID:20174677

  18. The ribosome returned

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Peter B

    2009-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, insights obtained from electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography have transformed our understanding of how the most important ribozyme in the cell, the ribosome, catalyzes protein synthesis. This review provides a brief account of how this structural revolution came to pass, and the impact it has had on our understanding of how the ribosome decodes messenger RNAs. PMID:19222865

  19. Arabidopsis protein arginine methyltransferase 3 is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting precursor ribosomal RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Runlai; Liu, Chunyan; Ahmad, Ayaz; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Falong; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental and tightly regulated cellular process, including synthesis, processing, and assembly of rRNAs with ribosomal proteins. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) have been implicated in many important biological processes, such as ribosome biogenesis. Two alternative precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing pathways coexist in yeast and mammals; however, how PRMT affects ribosome biogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis PRMT3 (AtPRMT3) is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting pre-rRNA processing. Disruption of AtPRMT3 results in pleiotropic developmental defects, imbalanced polyribosome profiles, and aberrant pre-rRNA processing. We further identify an alternative pre-rRNA processing pathway in Arabidopsis and demonstrate that AtPRMT3 is required for the balance of these two pathways to promote normal growth and development. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified function of PRMT in posttranscriptional regulation of rRNA, revealing an extra layer of complexity in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25352672

  20. DExD/H-box RNA helicases in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Roman; Straub, Annika U.; Doebele, Carmen; Bohnsack, Markus T.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis requires a multitude of cofactors, among them DExD/H-box RNA helicases. Bacterial RNA helicases involved in ribosome assembly are not essential, while eukaryotes strictly require multiple DExD/H-box proteins that are involved in the much more complex ribosome biogenesis pathway. Here, RNA helicases are thought to act in structural remodeling of the RNPs including the modulation of protein binding, and they are required for allowing access or the release of specific snoRNPs from pre-ribosomes. Interestingly, helicase action is modulated by specific cofactors that can regulate recruitment and enzymatic activity. This review summarizes the current knowledge and focuses on recent findings and open questions on RNA helicase function and regulation in ribosome synthesis. PMID:22922795

  1. A protein residing at the subunit interface of the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Agafonov, D E; Kolb, V A; Nazimov, I V; Spirin, A S

    1999-10-26

    Surface labeling of Escherichia coli ribosomes with the use of the tritium bombardment technique has revealed a minor unidentified ribosome-bound protein (spot Y) that is hidden in the 70S ribosome and becomes highly labeled on dissociation of the 70S ribosome into subunits. In the present work, the N-terminal sequence of the protein Y was determined and its gene was identified as yfia, an ORF located upstream the phe operon of E. coli. This 12.7-kDa protein was isolated and characterized. An affinity of the purified protein Y for the 30S subunit, but not for the 50S ribosomal subunit, was shown. The protein proved to be exposed on the surface of the 30S subunit. The attachment of the 50S subunit resulted in hiding the protein Y, thus suggesting the protein location at the subunit interface in the 70S ribosome. The protein was shown to stabilize ribosomes against dissociation. The possible role of the protein Y as ribosome association factor in translation is discussed. PMID:10535924

  2. Comprehensive analysis of phosphorylated proteins of Escherichia coli ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Soung, George Y; Miller, Jennifer L; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C

    2009-07-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in 24 Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining, and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr; or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, and L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given phosphorylation sites in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  3. The impact of transcriptional tuning on in vitro integrated rRNA transcription and ribosome construction

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Brian R.; Jewett, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro ribosome construction could enable studies of ribosome assembly and function, provide a route toward constructing minimal cells for synthetic biology, and permit the construction of ribosome variants with new functions. Toward these long-term goals, we recently reported on an integrated, one-pot ribosomal RNA synthesis (rRNA), ribosome assembly, and translation technology (termed iSAT) for the construction of Escherichia coli ribosomes in crude ribosome-free S150 extracts. Here, we aimed to improve the activity of iSAT through transcriptional tuning. Specifically, we increased transcriptional efficiency through 3′ modifications to the rRNA gene sequences, optimized plasmid and polymerase concentrations, and demonstrated the use of a T7-promoted rRNA operon for stoichiometrically balanced rRNA synthesis and native rRNA processing. Our modifications produced a 45-fold improvement in iSAT protein synthesis activity, enabling synthesis of 429 ± 15 nmol/l green fluorescent protein in 6 h batch reactions. Further, we show that the translational activity of ribosomes purified from iSAT reactions is about 20% the activity of native ribosomes purified directly from E. coli cells. Looking forward, we believe iSAT will enable unique studies to unravel the systems biology of ribosome biogenesis and open the way to new methods for making and studying ribosomal variants. PMID:24792158

  4. Crystallography of ribosomal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonath, A.; Frolow, F.; Shoham, M.; Müssig, J.; Makowski, I.; Glotz, C.; Jahn, W.; Weinstein, S.; Wittmann, H. G.

    1988-07-01

    Several forms of three-dimensional crystals and two-dimensional sheets of intact ribosomes and their subunits have been obtained as a result of: (a) an extensive systematic investigation of the parameters involved in crystallization, (b) a development of an experimental procedure for controlling the volumes of the crystallization droplets, (c) a study of the nucleation process, and (d) introducing a delicate seeding procedure coupled with variations in the ratios of mono- and divalent ions in the crystallization medium. In all cases only biologically active particles could be crystallized, and the crystalline material retains its integrity and activity. Crystallographic data have been collected from crystals of 50S ribosomal subunits, using synchrotron radiation at temperatures between + 19 and - 180°C. Although at 4°C the higher resolution reflections decay within minutes in the synchrotron beam, at cryo-temperature there was hardly any radiation damage, and a complete set of data to about 6Åresolution could be collected from a single crystal. Heavy-atom clusters were used for soaking as well as for specific binding to the surface of the ribosomal subunits prior to crystallization. The 50S ribosomal subunits from a mutant of B. stearothermophilus which lacks the ribosomal protein BL11 crystallize isomorphously with in the native ones. Models, aimed to be used for low resolution phasing, have been reconstructed from two-dimensional sheets of 70S ribosomes and 50S subunits at 47 and 30Å, respectively. These models show the overall structure of these particles, the contact areas between the large and small subunits, the space where protein synthesis might take place and a tunnel which may provide the path for the nascent protein chain.

  5. The Ribosome Comes Alive

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This essay is a reflection on the ways the X-ray structures of the ribosome are helping in the interpretation of cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) density maps showing the translating ribosome in motion. Through advances in classification methods, cryo-EM and single-particle reconstruction methods have recently evolved to the point where they can yield an array of structures from a single sample (“story in a sample”), providing snapshots of an entire subprocess of translation, such as translocation or decoding. PMID:21072331

  6. The Ribosome Comes Alive.

    PubMed

    Frank, Joachim

    2010-06-18

    This essay is a reflection on the ways the X-ray structures of the ribosome are helping in the interpretation of cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) density maps showing the translating ribosome in motion. Through advances in classification methods, cryo-EM and single-particle reconstruction methods have recently evolved to the point where they can yield an array of structures from a single sample ("story in a sample"), providing snapshots of an entire subprocess of translation, such as translocation or decoding. PMID:21072331

  7. The structure of Aquifex aeolicus ribosomal protein S8 reveals a unique subdomain that contributes to an extremely tight association with 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Menichelli, Elena; Edgcomb, Stephen P; Recht, Michael I; Williamson, James R

    2012-01-20

    The assembly of ribonucleoprotein complexes occurs under a broad range of conditions, but the principles that promote assembly and allow function at high temperature are poorly understood. The ribosomal protein S8 from Aquifex aeolicus (AS8) is unique in that there is a 41-residue insertion in the consensus S8 sequence. In addition, AS8 exhibits an unusually high affinity for the 16S ribosomal RNA, characterized by a picomolar dissociation constant that is approximately 26,000-fold tighter than the equivalent interaction from Escherichia coli. Deletion analysis demonstrated that binding to the minimal site on helix 21 occurred at the same nanomolar affinity found for other bacterial species. The additional affinity required the presence of a three-helix junction between helices 20, 21, and 22. The crystal structure of AS8 was solved, revealing the helix-loop-helix geometry of the unique AS8 insertion region, while the core of the molecule is conserved with known S8 structures. The AS8 structure was modeled onto the structure of the 30S ribosomal subunit from E. coli, suggesting the possibility that the unique subdomain provides additional backbone and side-chain contacts between the protein and an unpaired base within the three-way junction of helices 20, 21, and 22. Point mutations in the protein insertion subdomain resulted in a significantly reduced RNA binding affinity with respect to wild-type AS8. These results indicate that the AS8-specific subdomain provides additional interactions with the three-way junction that contribute to the extremely tight binding to ribosomal RNA. PMID:22079365

  8. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms. PMID:24071927

  9. SANS measurements on sulfolobus solfataricus ribosome as a function of temperature and magnesium concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briganti, G.; Giordano, R.; Londei, P.; Pedone, F.

    1997-02-01

    The ribosomes of the extremely thermophylic archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus (optimal growth at T = 87°C) are stable and active at temperatures close to 90°C, in spite of the fact that their composition is very similar to the ribosomes of the mesophilic bacterium E. coli, growing at 37°C. We present the first SANS analysis of the intact S. solfataricus 70S monomers as well as of the isolated 30S and 50S subunits as a function of the temperature and the magnesium ion concentration. Our results indicate that, under conditions similar to those employed for the analysis of E. coli ribosomes, supramolecular aggregates are present in S. solfataricus, their extent depending on temperature, ribosome concentration and magnesium ion content. Only above 70°C changes in the scattering profile are observed, concomitant with the specific biological activation of this kind of ribosome.

  10. Yeast ribosomal protein L7 and its homologue Rlp7 are simultaneously present at distinct sites on pre-60S ribosomal particles

    PubMed Central

    Babiano, Reyes; Badis, Gwenael; Saveanu, Cosmin; Namane, Abdelkader; Doyen, Antonia; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Jacquier, Alain; Fromont-Racine, Micheline; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires >300 assembly factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ribosome assembly factors Imp3, Mrt4, Rlp7 and Rlp24 have sequence similarity to ribosomal proteins S9, P0, L7 and L24, suggesting that these pre-ribosomal factors could be placeholders that prevent premature assembly of the corresponding ribosomal proteins to nascent ribosomes. However, we found L7 to be a highly specific component of Rlp7-associated complexes, revealing that the two proteins can bind simultaneously to pre-ribosomal particles. Cross-linking and cDNA analysis experiments showed that Rlp7 binds to the ITS2 region of 27S pre-rRNAs, at two sites, in helix III and in a region adjacent to the pre-rRNA processing sites C1 and E. However, L7 binds to mature 25S and 5S rRNAs and cross-linked predominantly to helix ES7Lb within 25S rRNA. Thus, despite their predicted structural similarity, our data show that Rlp7 and L7 clearly bind at different positions on the same pre-60S particles. Our results also suggest that Rlp7 facilitates the formation of the hairpin structure of ITS2 during 60S ribosomal subunit maturation. PMID:23945946

  11. Head swivel on the ribosome facilitates translocation via intra-subunit tRNA hybrid sites

    PubMed Central

    Ratje, Andreas H.; Loerke, Justus; Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Brünner, Matthias; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Starosta, Agata L.; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Connell, Sean R.; Fucini, Paola; Mielke, Thorsten; Whitford, Paul C.; Onuchic, Jose’ N; Yu, Yanan; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.; Hartmann, Roland K.; Penczek, Pawel A.; Wilson, Daniel N.; Spahn, Christian M.T.

    2011-01-01

    The elongation cycle of protein synthesis involves the delivery of aminoacyl-tRNAs to the A-site of the ribosome, followed by peptide-bond formation and translocation of the tRNAs through the ribosome to reopen the A-site1,2. The translocation reaction is catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G) in a GTP-dependent fashion3. Despite the availability of structures of various EF-G-ribosome complexes, the precise mechanism by which tRNAs move through the ribosome still remains unclear. Here we use multiparticle cryo-EM analysis to resolve two previously unseen subpopulations within EF-G-ribosome complexes at sub-nanometer resolution, one of them with a partially translocated tRNA. Comparison of these sub-states reveals that translocation of tRNA on the 30S subunit parallels the swiveling of the 30S-head and is coupled to un-ratcheting of the 30S-body. Since the tRNA maintains contact with the P-site on the 30S-head and simultaneously establishes interaction with the E-site on the 30S-platform, a novel intra-subunit pe/E hybrid state is formed. This state is stabilized by domain IV of EF-G, which interacts with the swiveled 30S-head conformation. These findings provide direct structural and mechanistic insight into the “missing link” in terms of tRNA intermediates involved in the universally conserved translocation process. PMID:21124459

  12. Structural insights into ribosome translocation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Clarence; Ermolenko, Dmitri N

    2016-09-01

    During protein synthesis, tRNA and mRNA are translocated from the A to P to E sites of the ribosome thus enabling the ribosome to translate one codon of mRNA after the other. Ribosome translocation along mRNA is induced by the universally conserved ribosome GTPase, elongation factor G (EF-G) in bacteria and elongation factor 2 (EF-2) in eukaryotes. Recent structural and single-molecule studies revealed that tRNA and mRNA translocation within the ribosome is accompanied by cyclic forward and reverse rotations between the large and small ribosomal subunits parallel to the plane of the intersubunit interface. In addition, during ribosome translocation, the 'head' domain of small ribosomal subunit undergoes forward- and back-swiveling motions relative to the rest of the small ribosomal subunit around the axis that is orthogonal to the axis of intersubunit rotation. tRNA/mRNA translocation is also coupled to the docking of domain IV of EF-G into the A site of the small ribosomal subunit that converts the thermally driven motions of the ribosome and tRNA into the forward translocation of tRNA/mRNA inside the ribosome. Despite recent and enormous progress made in the understanding of the molecular mechanism of ribosome translocation, the sequence of structural rearrangements of the ribosome, EF-G and tRNA during translocation is still not fully established and awaits further investigation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:620-636. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27117863

  13. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  14. Structural Basis for the Rescue of Stalled Ribosomes: Structure of YaeJ Bound to the Ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Matthieu G.; Seetharaman, Sai V.; Bulkley, David; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2012-06-19

    In bacteria, the hybrid transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) rescues ribosomes stalled on defective messenger RNAs (mRNAs). However, certain gram-negative bacteria have evolved proteins that are capable of rescuing stalled ribosomes in a tmRNA-independent manner. Here, we report a 3.2 angstrom-resolution crystal structure of the rescue factor YaeJ bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome in complex with the initiator tRNA{sub i}{sup fMet} and a short mRNA. The structure reveals that the C-terminal tail of YaeJ functions as a sensor to discriminate between stalled and actively translating ribosomes by binding in the mRNA entry channel downstream of the A site between the head and shoulder of the 30S subunit. This allows the N-terminal globular domain to sample different conformations, so that its conserved GGQ motif is optimally positioned to catalyze the hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNA. This structure gives insights into the mechanism of YaeJ function and provides a basis for understanding how it rescues stalled ribosomes.

  15. Ribosomal crystallography: peptide bond formation and its inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bashan, Anat; Zarivach, Raz; Schluenzen, Frank; Agmon, Ilana; Harms, Joerg; Auerbach, Tamar; Baram, David; Berisio, Rita; Bartels, Heike; Hansen, Harly A S; Fucini, Paola; Wilson, Daniel; Peretz, Moshe; Kessler, Maggie; Yonath, Ada

    2003-09-01

    Ribosomes, the universal cellular organelles catalyzing the translation of genetic code into proteins, are protein/RNA assemblies, of a molecular weight 2.5 mega Daltons or higher. They are built of two subunits that associate for performing protein biosynthesis. The large subunit creates the peptide bond and provides the path for emerging proteins. The small has key roles in initiating the process and controlling its fidelity. Crystallographic studies on complexes of the small and the large eubacterial ribosomal subunits with substrate analogs, antibiotics, and inhibitors confirmed that the ribosomal RNA governs most of its activities, and indicated that the main catalytic contribution of the ribosome is the precise positioning and alignment of its substrates, the tRNA molecules. A symmetry-related region of a significant size, containing about two hundred nucleotides, was revealed in all known structures of the large ribosomal subunit, despite the asymmetric nature of the ribosome. The symmetry rotation axis, identified in the middle of the peptide-bond formation site, coincides with the bond connecting the tRNA double-helical features with its single-stranded 3' end, which is the moiety carrying the amino acids. This thus implies sovereign movements of tRNA features and suggests that tRNA translocation involves a rotatory motion within the ribosomal active site. This motion is guided and anchored by ribosomal nucleotides belonging to the active site walls, and results in geometry suitable for peptide-bond formation with no significant rearrangements. The sole geometrical requirement for this proposed mechanism is that the initial P-site tRNA adopts the flipped orientation. The rotatory motion is the major component of unified machinery for peptide-bond formation, translocation, and nascent protein progression, since its spiral nature ensures the entrance of the nascent peptide into the ribosomal exit tunnel. This tunnel, assumed to be a passive path for the

  16. Ribosome recycling induces optimal translation rate at low ribosomal availability.

    PubMed

    Marshall, E; Stansfield, I; Romano, M C

    2014-09-01

    During eukaryotic cellular protein synthesis, ribosomal translation is made more efficient through interaction between the two ends of the messenger RNA (mRNA). Ribosomes reaching the 3' end of the mRNA can thus recycle and begin translation again on the same mRNA, the so-called 'closed-loop' model. Using a driven diffusion lattice model of translation, we study the effects of ribosome recycling on the dynamics of ribosome flow and density on the mRNA. We show that ribosome recycling induces a substantial increase in ribosome current. Furthermore, for sufficiently large values of the recycling rate, the lattice does not transition directly from low to high ribosome density, as seen in lattice models without recycling. Instead, a maximal current phase becomes accessible for much lower values of the initiation rate, and multiple phase transitions occur over a wide region of the phase plane. Crucially, we show that in the presence of ribosome recycling, mRNAs can exhibit a peak in protein production at low values of the initiation rate, beyond which translation rate decreases. This has important implications for translation of certain mRNAs, suggesting that there is an optimal concentration of ribosomes at which protein synthesis is maximal, and beyond which translational efficiency is impaired. PMID:25008084

  17. Ribosome recycling induces optimal translation rate at low ribosomal availability

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, E.; Stansfield, I.; Romano, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    During eukaryotic cellular protein synthesis, ribosomal translation is made more efficient through interaction between the two ends of the messenger RNA (mRNA). Ribosomes reaching the 3′ end of the mRNA can thus recycle and begin translation again on the same mRNA, the so-called ‘closed-loop’ model. Using a driven diffusion lattice model of translation, we study the effects of ribosome recycling on the dynamics of ribosome flow and density on the mRNA. We show that ribosome recycling induces a substantial increase in ribosome current. Furthermore, for sufficiently large values of the recycling rate, the lattice does not transition directly from low to high ribosome density, as seen in lattice models without recycling. Instead, a maximal current phase becomes accessible for much lower values of the initiation rate, and multiple phase transitions occur over a wide region of the phase plane. Crucially, we show that in the presence of ribosome recycling, mRNAs can exhibit a peak in protein production at low values of the initiation rate, beyond which translation rate decreases. This has important implications for translation of certain mRNAs, suggesting that there is an optimal concentration of ribosomes at which protein synthesis is maximal, and beyond which translational efficiency is impaired. PMID:25008084

  18. Structural studies of E. coli ribosomes by spectroscopic techniques: A specialized review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonicontro, Adalberto; Risuleo, Gianfranco

    2005-12-01

    We present a review on our interdisciplinary line of research based on strategies of molecular biology and biophysics. These have been applied to the study of the prokaryotic ribosome of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Our investigations on this organelle have continued for more than a decade and we have adopted different spectroscopic biophysical techniques such as: dielectric and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as light scattering (photon correlation spectroscopy). Here we report studies on the whole 70S ribosomes and on the separated subunits 30S and 50S. Our results evidence intrinsic structural features of the subunits: the small shows a more "floppy" structure, while the large one appears to be more rigid. Also, an inner "kernel" formed by the RNA/protein association is found within the ribosome. This kernel is surrounded by a ribonucleoprotein complex more exposed to the solvent. Initial analyses were done on the so called Kaldtschmit-Wittmann ribosome: more recently we have extended the studies to the "tight couple" ribosome known for its better functional performance in vitro. Data evidence a phenomenological correlation between the differential biological activity and the intrinsic structural properties of the two-ribosome species. Finally, investigations were also conducted on particles treated at sub-denaturing temperatures and on ribosomes partially deproteinized by salt treatment (ribosomal cores). Results suggest that the thermal treatment and the selective removal of proteins cause analogous structural alterations.

  19. On the expansion of ribosomal proteins and RNAs in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael S; Sah, Renu; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Sallee, Floyd R; Park, Edwards A; Parker, Steven L

    2014-07-01

    While the ribosome constitution is similar in all biota, there is a considerable increase in size of both ribosomal proteins (RPs) and RNAs in eukaryotes as compared to archaea and bacteria. This is pronounced in the large (60S) ribosomal subunit (LSU). In addition to enlargement (apparently maximized already in lower eukarya), the RP changes include increases in fraction, segregation and clustering of basic residues, and decrease in hydrophobicity. The acidic fraction is lower in eukaryote as compared to prokaryote RPs. In all eukaryote groups tested, the LSU RPs have significantly higher content of basic residues and homobasic segments than the SSU RPs. The vertebrate LSU RPs have much higher sequestration of basic residues than those of bacteria, archaea and even of the lower eukarya. The basic clusters are highly aligned in the vertebrate, but less in the lower eukarya, and only within families in archaea and bacteria. Increase in the basicity of RPs, besides helping transport to the nucleus, should promote stability of the assembled ribosome as well as the association with translocons and other intracellular matrix proteins. The size and GC nucleotide bias of the expansion segments of large LSU rRNAs also culminate in the vertebrate, and should support ribosome association with the endoplasmic reticulum and other intracellular networks. However, the expansion and nucleotide bias of eukaryote LSU rRNAs do not clearly correlate with changes in ionic parameters of LSU ribosomal proteins. PMID:24633358

  20. Yeast Rrp14p is a nucleolar protein involved in both ribosome biogenesis and cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hiroko; Horigome, Chihiro; Okada, Takafumi; Shirai, Chiharu; Mizuta, Keiko

    2007-01-01

    We previously cloned RRP14/YKL082c, whose product exhibits two-hybrid interaction with Ebp2p, a regulatory factor of assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits. Depletion of Rrp14p results in shortage of 60S ribosomal subunits and retardation of processing from 27S pre-rRNA to 25S rRNA. Furthermore, 35S pre-rRNA synthesis appears to decline in Rrp14p-depleted cells. Rrp14p interacts with regulatory factors of 60S subunit assembly and also with Utp11p and Faf1p, which are regulatory factors required for assembly of 40S ribosomal subunits. We propose that Rrp14p is involved in ribosome synthesis from the beginning of 35S pre-rRNA synthesis to assembly of the 60S ribosomal subunit. Disruption of RRP14 causes an extremely slow growth rate of the cell, a severe defect in ribosome synthesis, and a depolarized localization of cortical actin patches throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that Rrp14p has dual functions in ribosome synthesis and polarized cell growth. PMID:17804645

  1. Ribosomes in a Stacked Array

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yui; Kadokura, Yoshitomo; Sotta, Naoyuki; Fujiwara, Toru; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Satake, Akiko; Onouchi, Hitoshi; Naito, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Expression of CGS1, which codes for an enzyme of methionine biosynthesis, is feedback-regulated by mRNA degradation in response to S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet). In vitro studies revealed that AdoMet induces translation arrest at Ser-94, upon which several ribosomes stack behind the arrested one, and mRNA degradation occurs at multiple sites that presumably correspond to individual ribosomes in a stacked array. Despite the significant contribution of stacked ribosomes to inducing mRNA degradation, little is known about the ribosomes in the stacked array. Here, we assigned the peptidyl-tRNA species of the stacked second and third ribosomes to their respective codons and showed that they are arranged at nine-codon intervals behind the Ser-94 codon, indicating tight stacking. Puromycin reacts with peptidyl-tRNA in the P-site, releasing the nascent peptide as peptidyl-puromycin. This reaction is used to monitor the activity of the peptidyltransferase center (PTC) in arrested ribosomes. Puromycin reaction of peptidyl-tRNA on the AdoMet-arrested ribosome, which is stalled at the pre-translocation step, was slow. This limited reactivity can be attributed to the peptidyl-tRNA occupying the A-site at this step rather than to suppression of PTC activity. In contrast, puromycin reactions of peptidyl-tRNA with the stacked second and third ribosomes were slow but were not as slow as pre-translocation step ribosomes. We propose that the anticodon end of peptidyl-tRNA resides in the A-site of the stacked ribosomes and that the stacked ribosomes are stalled at an early step of translocation, possibly at the P/E hybrid state. PMID:24652291

  2. Exploring Ribosome Positioning on Translating Transcripts with Ribosome Profiling.

    PubMed

    Spealman, Pieter; Wang, Hao; May, Gemma; Kingsford, Carl; McManus, C Joel

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological advances (e.g., microarrays and massively parallel sequencing) have facilitated genome-wide measurement of many aspects of gene regulation. Ribosome profiling is a high-throughput sequencing method used to measure gene expression at the level of translation. This is accomplished by quantifying both the number of translating ribosomes and their locations on mRNA transcripts. The inventors of this approach have published several methods papers detailing its implementation and addressing the basics of ribosome profiling data analysis. Here we describe our lab's procedure, which differs in some respects from those published previously. In addition, we describe a data analysis pipeline, Ribomap, for ribosome profiling data. Ribomap allocates sequence reads to alternative mRNA isoforms, normalizes sequencing bias along transcripts using RNA-seq data, and outputs count vectors of per-codon ribosome occupancy for each transcript. PMID:26463378

  3. Ribosome Shut-Down by 16S rRNA Fragmentation in Stationary-Phase Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Luidalepp, Hannes; Berger, Stefan; Joss, Oliver; Tenson, Tanel; Polacek, Norbert

    2016-05-22

    Stationary-phase bacterial cells are characterized by vastly reduced metabolic activities yielding a dormant-like phenotype. Several hibernation programs ensure the establishment and maintenance of this resting growth state. Some of the stationary phase-specific modulations affect the ribosome and its translational activity directly. In stationary-phase Escherichia coli, we observed the appearance of a 16S rRNA fragmentation event at the tip of helix 6 within the small ribosomal subunit (30S). Stationary-phase 30S subunits showed markedly reduced activities in protein biosynthesis. On the other hand, the functional performance of stationary-phase large ribosomal subunits (50S) was indistinguishable from particles isolated from exponentially growing cells. Introduction of the 16S rRNA cut in vitro at helix 6 of exponential phase 30S subunits renders them less efficient in protein biosynthesis. This indicates that the helix 6 fragmentation is necessary and sufficient to attenuate translational activities of 30S ribosomal subunits. These results suggest that stationary phase-specific cleavage of 16S rRNA within the 30S subunit is an efficient means to reduce global translation activities under non-proliferating growth conditions. PMID:27067112

  4. Structural Basis for Translation Termination on the 70S Ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Laurberg, M.; Asahara, H.; Korostelev, A.; Zhu, J.; Trakhanov, S.; Noller, H.F.

    2009-05-20

    At termination of protein synthesis, type I release factors promote hydrolysis of the peptidyl-transfer RNA linkage in response to recognition of a stop codon. Here we describe the crystal structure of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome in complex with the release factor RF1, tRNA and a messenger RNA containing a UAA stop codon, at 3.2 {angstrom} resolution. The stop codon is recognized in a pocket formed by conserved elements of RF1, including its PxT recognition motif, and 16S ribosomal RNA. The codon and the 30S subunit A site undergo an induced fit that results in stabilization of a conformation of RF1 that promotes its interaction with the peptidyl transferase centre. Unexpectedly, the main-chain amide group of Gln 230 in the universally conserved GGQ motif of the factor is positioned to contribute directly to peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis.

  5. The quaternary structure of the ribosome from E. coli. A neutron small-angle scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, V.; Nowotny, P.; Voß, H.; Nierhaus, K. H.; May, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    Ribosomes synthesize proteins in living cells. The E. coli ribosome is composed of a small (30S) and a large subunit (50S). They consist of different proteins (21 or 34, respectively) and of ribosomal RNAs (16S or 23S and 5S). The inter-protein distances within the ribosomal subunits can be measured from scattering experiments with selectively labeled protein pairs from which the quaternary distribution of the proteins is reconstructed. We have developed the strategy of the “glassy ribosome”: the rRNAs and the proteins are deuterated such that they reach the same scattering density and are “invisible” in a corresponding buffer solution. A preliminary quaternary map of the 50S subunit which is the result of our new method for the extraction of the distances from the scattering data as well as shape parameters of proteins in situ will be presented.

  6. Ribosomes in the balance: structural equilibrium ensures translational fidelity and proper gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    At equilibrium, empty ribosomes freely transit between the rotated and un-rotated states. In the cell, the binding of two translation elongation factors to the same general region of the ribosome stabilizes one state over the other. These stabilized states are resolved by expenditure of energy in the form of GTP hydrolysis. A prior study employing mutants of a late assembling peripheral ribosomal protein suggested that ribosome rotational status determines its affinity for elongation factors, and hence translational fidelity and gene expression. Here, mutants of the early assembling integral ribosomal protein uL2 are used to test the generality of this hypothesis. rRNA structure probing analyses reveal that mutations in the uL2 B7b bridge region shift the equilibrium toward the rotated state, propagating rRNA structural changes to all of the functional centers of ribosome. Structural disequilibrium unbalances ribosome biochemically: rotated ribosomes favor binding of the eEF2 translocase and disfavor that of the elongation ternary complex. This manifests as specific translational fidelity defects, impacting the expression of genes involved in telomere maintenance. A model is presented describing how cyclic intersubunit rotation ensures the unidirectionality of translational elongation, and how perturbation of rotational equilibrium affects specific aspects of translational fidelity and cellular gene expression. PMID:25389262

  7. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V.; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2015-01-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5′-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5′ exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8SC and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8SC rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes. PMID:25995445

  8. Linezolid-Dependent Function and Structure Adaptation of Ribosomes in a Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain Exhibiting Linezolid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Kokkori, Sofia; Apostolidi, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios; Pournaras, Spyros

    2014-01-01

    Linezolid-dependent growth was recently reported in Staphylococcus epidermidis clinical strains carrying mutations associated with linezolid resistance. To investigate this unexpected behavior at the molecular level, we isolated active ribosomes from one of the linezolid-dependent strains and we compared them with ribosomes isolated from a wild-type strain. Both strains were grown in the absence and presence of linezolid. Detailed biochemical and structural analyses revealed essential differences in the function and structure of isolated ribosomes which were assembled in the presence of linezolid. The catalytic activity of peptidyltransferase was found to be significantly higher in the ribosomes derived from the linezolid-dependent strain. Interestingly, the same ribosomes exhibited an abnormal ribosomal subunit dissociation profile on a sucrose gradient in the absence of linezolid, but the profile was restored after treatment of the ribosomes with an excess of the antibiotic. Our study suggests that linezolid most likely modified the ribosomal assembly procedure, leading to a new functional ribosomal population active only in the presence of linezolid. Therefore, the higher growth rate of the partially linezolid-dependent strains could be attributed to the functional and structural adaptations of ribosomes to linezolid. PMID:24890589

  9. Head swivel on the ribosome facilitates translocation by means of intra-subunit tRNA hybrid sites.

    PubMed

    Ratje, Andreas H; Loerke, Justus; Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Brünner, Matthias; Hildebrand, Peter W; Starosta, Agata L; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Connell, Sean R; Fucini, Paola; Mielke, Thorsten; Whitford, Paul C; Onuchic, José N; Yu, Yanan; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y; Hartmann, Roland K; Penczek, Pawel A; Wilson, Daniel N; Spahn, Christian M T

    2010-12-01

    The elongation cycle of protein synthesis involves the delivery of aminoacyl-transfer RNAs to the aminoacyl-tRNA-binding site (A site) of the ribosome, followed by peptide-bond formation and translocation of the tRNAs through the ribosome to reopen the A site. The translocation reaction is catalysed by elongation factor G (EF-G) in a GTP-dependent manner. Despite the availability of structures of various EF-G-ribosome complexes, the precise mechanism by which tRNAs move through the ribosome still remains unclear. Here we use multiparticle cryoelectron microscopy analysis to resolve two previously unseen subpopulations within Thermus thermophilus EF-G-ribosome complexes at subnanometre resolution, one of them with a partly translocated tRNA. Comparison of these substates reveals that translocation of tRNA on the 30S subunit parallels the swivelling of the 30S head and is coupled to unratcheting of the 30S body. Because the tRNA maintains contact with the peptidyl-tRNA-binding site (P site) on the 30S head and simultaneously establishes interaction with the exit site (E site) on the 30S platform, a novel intra-subunit 'pe/E' hybrid state is formed. This state is stabilized by domain IV of EF-G, which interacts with the swivelled 30S-head conformation. These findings provide direct structural and mechanistic insight into the 'missing link' in terms of tRNA intermediates involved in the universally conserved translocation process. PMID:21124459

  10. Recycling of eukaryotic post-termination ribosomal complexes

    PubMed Central

    Pisarev, Andrey V.; Hellen, Christopher U. T.; Pestova, Tatyana V.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY After translational termination, mRNA and P site deacylated tRNA remain associated with ribosomes in post-termination complexes (post-TCs), which must therefore be recycled by releasing mRNA and deacylated tRNA and by dissociating ribosomes into subunits. Recycling of bacterial post-TCs requires elongation factor EF-G and a ribosome recycling factor RRF. Eukaryotes do not encode a RRF homologue and their mechanism of ribosomal recycling is unknown. We investigated eukaryotic recycling using post-TCs assembled on a model mRNA encoding a tetrapeptide followed by a UAA stop codon and report that initiation factors eIF3, eIF1, eIF1A and eIF3j, a loosely associated subunit of eIF3, can promote recycling of eukaryotic post-TCs. eIF3 is the principal factor that promotes splitting of post-termination ribosomes into 60S subunits and tRNA- and mRNA-bound 40S subunits. Its activity is enhanced by eIF3j, eIF1 and eIF1A. eIF1 also mediates release of P-site tRNA, whereas eIF3j ensures subsequent dissociation of mRNA. PMID:17956730

  11. The mechanics of ribosomal translocation.

    PubMed

    Achenbach, John; Nierhaus, Knud H

    2015-07-01

    The ribosome translates the sequence of codons of an mRNA into the corresponding sequence of amino acids as it moves along the mRNA with a codon-step width of about 10 Å. The movement of the million-dalton complex ribosome is triggered by the universal elongation factor G (EF2 in archaea and eukaryotes) and is termed translocation. Unraveling the molecular details of translocation is one of the most challenging tasks of current ribosome research. In the last two years, enormous progress has been obtained by highly-resolved X-ray and cryo-electron microscopic structures as well as by sophisticated biochemical approaches concerning the trigger and control of the movement of the tRNA2·mRNA complex inside the ribosome during translocation. This review inspects and surveys these achievements. PMID:25514765

  12. The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP).

    PubMed Central

    Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R

    1996-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and World Wide Web (WWW)(http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment and approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences on an existing phylogenetic tree. PMID:8594608

  13. The toxin GraT inhibits ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ainelo, Andres; Tamman, Hedvig; Leppik, Margus; Remme, Jaanus; Hõrak, Rita

    2016-05-01

    Most bacteria encode numerous chromosomal toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems that are proposed to contribute to stress tolerance, as they are able to shift the cells to a dormant state. Toxins act on a variety of targets with the majority attacking the translational apparatus. Intriguingly, the toxicity mechanisms of even closely related toxins may differ essentially. Here, we report on a new type of TA toxin that inhibits ribosome biogenesis. GraT of the GraTA system has previously been described in Pseudomonas putida as an unusually moderate toxin at optimal growth temperatures. However, GraT causes a severe growth defect at lower temperatures. Here, we demonstrate that GraT causes the accumulation of free ribosomal subunits. Mapping the rRNA 5' ends reveals incomplete processing of the free subunits and quantification of modified nucleosides shows an underrepresentation of late subunit assembly specific modifications. This indicates that GraT inhibits ribosome subunit assembly. Interestingly, GraT effects can be alleviated by modification of the chaperone DnaK, a known facilitator of late stages in ribosome biogenesis. We show that GraT directly interacts with DnaK and suggest two possible models for the role of this interaction in GraT toxicity. PMID:26833678

  14. Sites of Synthesis and Processing of Ribosomal RNA Precursors within the Nucleolus of Urechis caupo Eggs*

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nirmal K.; Micou-Eastwood, Julie; Ramamurthy, Gollu; Alfert, Max

    1970-01-01

    Nucleoli from unfertilized Urechis eggs, labeled with tritiated RNA precursors, have been isolated for simultaneous autoradiographic localization and biochemical analysis of labeled RNA. The production of the ribosomal RNA precursor (38S) and its first cleavage occur at the fibrillar core region of the nucleolus. The products, predominantly 30S RNA, are then rapidly transported and stored in the granular cortex of the nucleolus. The formation of the nucleolar cortex, therefore, seems to result from an accumulation of partially processed ribosomal RNA with its associated proteins. Images PMID:5289033

  15. Architecture of the 90S Pre-ribosome: A Structural View on the Birth of the Eukaryotic Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Kornprobst, Markus; Turk, Martin; Kellner, Nikola; Cheng, Jingdong; Flemming, Dirk; Koš-Braun, Isabelle; Koš, Martin; Thoms, Matthias; Berninghausen, Otto; Beckmann, Roland; Hurt, Ed

    2016-07-14

    The 90S pre-ribosome is an early biogenesis intermediate formed during co-transcriptional ribosome formation, composed of ∼70 assembly factors and several small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) that associate with nascent pre-rRNA. We report the cryo-EM structure of the Chaetomium thermophilum 90S pre-ribosome, revealing how a network of biogenesis factors including 19 β-propellers and large α-solenoid proteins engulfs the pre-rRNA. Within the 90S pre-ribosome, we identify the UTP-A, UTP-B, Mpp10-Imp3-Imp4, Bms1-Rcl1, and U3 snoRNP modules, which are organized around 5'-ETS and partially folded 18S rRNA. The U3 snoRNP is strategically positioned at the center of the 90S particle to perform its multiple tasks during pre-rRNA folding and processing. The architecture of the elusive 90S pre-ribosome gives unprecedented structural insight into the early steps of pre-rRNA maturation. Nascent rRNA that is co-transcriptionally folded and given a particular shape by encapsulation within a dedicated mold-like structure is reminiscent of how polypeptides use chaperone chambers for their protein folding. PMID:27419870

  16. Ribosome dynamics and the evolutionary history of ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, George E.; Paci, Maxim; Tran, Quyen; Petrov, Anton S.; Williams, Loren D.

    2015-09-01

    The ribosome is a dynamic nanomachine responsible for coded protein synthesis. Its major subsystems were essentially in place at the time of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). Ribosome evolutionary history thus potentially provides a window into the pre- LUCA world. This history begins with the origins of the peptidyl transferase center where the actual peptide is synthesized and then continues over an extended timeframe as additional functional centers including the GTPase center are added. The large ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) have grown over time by an accretion process and a model exists that proposes a relative age of each accreted element. We have compared atomic resolution ribosome structures before and after EF-G bound GTP hydrolysis and thereby identified the location of 23 pivot points in the large rRNAs that facilitate ribosome dynamics. Pivots in small subunit helices h28 and h44 appear to be especially central to the process and according to the accretion model significantly older than the other helices containing pivots. Overall, the results suggest that ribosomal dynamics occurred in two phases. In the first phase, an inherently mobile h28/h44 combination provided the flexibility needed to create a dynamic ribosome that was essentially a Brownian machine. This addition likely made coded peptide synthesis possible by facilitating movement of a primitive mRNA. During the second phase, addition of pivoting elements and the creation of a factor binding site allowed the regulation of the inherent motion created by h28/h44. All of these events likely occurred before LUCA.

  17. [Ribosomal RNA Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    It is generally believed that an RNA World existed at an early stage in the history of life. During this early period, RNA molecules are seen to be potentially involved in both catalysis and the storage of genetic information. Translation presents several interrelated themes of inquiry for exobiology. First, it is essential, for understanding the very origin of life, how peptides and eventually proteins might have come to be made on the early Earth in a template directed manner. Second, it is necessary to understand how a machinery of similar complexity to that found in the ribosomes of modern organisms came to exist by the time of the last common ancestor (as detected by 16S rRNA sequence studies). Third, the ribosomal RNAs themselves likely had a very early origin and studies of their history may be very informative about the nature of the RNA World. Moreover, studies of these RNAs will contribute to a better understanding of the potential roles of RNA in early evolution.During the past year we have ave conducted a comparative study of four completely sequenced bacterial genoames. We have focused initially on conservation of gene order. The second component of the project continues to build on the model system for studying the validity of variant 5S rRNA sequences in the vicinity of the modern Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA that we established earlier. This system has made it possible to conduct a detailed and extensive analysis of a local portion of the sequence space. These core methods have been used to construct numerous mutants during the last several years. Although it has been a secondary focus, this work has continued over the last year such that we now have in excess of 125 V. proteolyticus derived constructs which have been made and characterized. We have also continued high resolution NMR work on RNA oligomers originally initiated by G. Kenneth Smith who was funded by a NASA Graduate Student Researcher's Fellowship Award until May of 1996. Mr. Smith

  18. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-01-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through “molecular synapses”, ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the “sensory-proteins” innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the “inter-proteins” interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing. PMID:27225526

  19. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-01-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through "molecular synapses", ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the "sensory-proteins" innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the "inter-proteins" interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing. PMID:27225526

  20. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation.

  1. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation. PMID:26112308

  2. Time-dependent Effects of Transcription- and Translation-halting Drugs on the Spatial Distributions of the E. coli Chromosome and Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Somenath; Choi, Heejun; Mondal, Jagannath; Weisshaar, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Previously observed effects of rifampicin and chloramphenicol indicate that transcription and translation activity strongly affect the coarse spatial organization of the bacterial cytoplasm. Single-cell, time-resolved, quantitative imaging of chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions and ribosome diffusion in live E. coli provides insight into the underlying mechanisms. Monte Carlo simulations of model DNA-ribosome mixtures support a novel nucleoid-ribosome mixing hypothesis. In normal conditions, 70S-polysomes and the chromosomal DNA segregate, while 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits are able to penetrate the nucleoids. Growth conditions and drug treatments determine the partitioning of ribosomes into 70S-polysomes vs free 30S and 50S subunits. Entropic and excluded volume effects then dictate the resulting chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions. Direct observation of radial contraction of the nucleoids 0-5 min after treatment with either transcription- or translation-halting drugs supports the hypothesis that simultaneous transcription, translation, and insertion of proteins into the membrane (“transertion”) exerts an expanding force on the chromosomal DNA. Breaking of the DNA-RNA polymerase-mRNA-ribosome-membrane chain in either of two ways causes similar nucleoid contraction on a similar timescale. We suggest that chromosomal expansion due to transertion enables co-transcriptional translation throughout the nucleoids. PMID:25250841

  3. Maize reas1 Mutant Stimulates Ribosome Use Efficiency and Triggers Distinct Transcriptional and Translational Responses.

    PubMed

    Qi, Weiwei; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Qun; Li, Xia; Yao, Dongsheng; Jin, Ying; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guifeng; Song, Rentao

    2016-02-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental cellular process in all cells. Impaired ribosome biogenesis causes developmental defects; however, its molecular and cellular bases are not fully understood. We cloned a gene responsible for a maize (Zea mays) small seed mutant, dek* (for defective kernel), and found that it encodes Ribosome export associated1 (ZmReas1). Reas1 is an AAA-ATPase that controls 60S ribosome export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after ribosome maturation. dek* is a weak mutant allele with decreased Reas1 function. In dek* cells, mature 60S ribosome subunits are reduced in the nucleus and cytoplasm, but the proportion of actively translating polyribosomes in cytosol is significantly increased. Reduced phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and the increased elongation factor 1α level indicate an enhancement of general translational efficiency in dek* cells. The mutation also triggers dramatic changes in differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs. Discrepancy was observed between differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs, indicating distinct cellular responses at transcription and translation levels to the stress of defective ribosome processing. DNA replication and nucleosome assembly-related gene expression are selectively suppressed at the translational level, resulting in inhibited cell growth and proliferation in dek* cells. This study provides insight into cellular responses due to impaired ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26645456

  4. The importance of ribosome production, and the 5S RNP-MDM2 pathway, in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Pelava, Andria; Schneider, Claudia; Watkins, Nicholas J

    2016-08-15

    Ribosomes are abundant, large RNA-protein complexes that are the source of all protein synthesis in the cell. The production of ribosomes is an extremely energetically expensive cellular process that has long been linked to human health and disease. More recently, it has been shown that ribosome biogenesis is intimately linked to multiple cellular signalling pathways and that defects in ribosome production can lead to a wide variety of human diseases. Furthermore, changes in ribosome production in response to nutrient levels in the diet lead to metabolic re-programming of the liver. Reduced or abnormal ribosome production in response to cellular stress or mutations in genes encoding factors critical for ribosome biogenesis causes the activation of the tumour suppressor p53, which leads to re-programming of cellular transcription. The ribosomal assembly intermediate 5S RNP (ribonucleoprotein particle), containing RPL5, RPL11 and the 5S rRNA, accumulates when ribosome biogenesis is blocked. The excess 5S RNP binds to murine double minute 2 (MDM2), the main p53-suppressor in the cell, inhibiting its function and leading to p53 activation. Here, we discuss the involvement of ribosome biogenesis in the homoeostasis of p53 in the cell and in human health and disease. PMID:27528756

  5. The importance of ribosome production, and the 5S RNP–MDM2 pathway, in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Pelava, Andria; Schneider, Claudia; Watkins, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomes are abundant, large RNA–protein complexes that are the source of all protein synthesis in the cell. The production of ribosomes is an extremely energetically expensive cellular process that has long been linked to human health and disease. More recently, it has been shown that ribosome biogenesis is intimately linked to multiple cellular signalling pathways and that defects in ribosome production can lead to a wide variety of human diseases. Furthermore, changes in ribosome production in response to nutrient levels in the diet lead to metabolic re-programming of the liver. Reduced or abnormal ribosome production in response to cellular stress or mutations in genes encoding factors critical for ribosome biogenesis causes the activation of the tumour suppressor p53, which leads to re-programming of cellular transcription. The ribosomal assembly intermediate 5S RNP (ribonucleoprotein particle), containing RPL5, RPL11 and the 5S rRNA, accumulates when ribosome biogenesis is blocked. The excess 5S RNP binds to murine double minute 2 (MDM2), the main p53-suppressor in the cell, inhibiting its function and leading to p53 activation. Here, we discuss the involvement of ribosome biogenesis in the homoeostasis of p53 in the cell and in human health and disease. PMID:27528756

  6. Profiling of Mycoplasma gallisepticum Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Fisunov, G. Y.; Evsyutina, D. V.; Arzamasov, A. A.; Butenko, I. O.; Govorun, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    The development of high-throughput technologies is increasingly resulting in identification of numerous cases of low correlation between mRNA and the protein level in cells. These controversial observations were made on various bacteria, such as E. coli, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, and Lactococcus lactis. Thus, it is important to develop technologies, including high-throughput techniques, aimed at studying gene expression regulation at the level of translation. In the current study, we performed proteomic profiling of M. gallisepticum ribosomes and identified high abundant noncanonical proteins. We found that binding of mRNAs to ribosomes is mainly determined by two parameters: (1) abundance of mRNA itself and (2) complimentary interactions between the 3’ end of 16S rRNA and the ribosome binding site in the 5’-untranslated region of mRNA. PMID:26798497

  7. Profiling of Mycoplasma gallisepticum Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Fisunov, G Y; Evsyutina, D V; Arzamasov, A A; Butenko, I O; Govorun, V M

    2015-01-01

    The development of high-throughput technologies is increasingly resulting in identification of numerous cases of low correlation between mRNA and the protein level in cells. These controversial observations were made on various bacteria, such as E. coli, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, and Lactococcus lactis. Thus, it is important to develop technologies, including high-throughput techniques, aimed at studying gene expression regulation at the level of translation. In the current study, we performed proteomic profiling of M. gallisepticum ribosomes and identified high abundant noncanonical proteins. We found that binding of mRNAs to ribosomes is mainly determined by two parameters: (1) abundance of mRNA itself and (2) complimentary interactions between the 3' end of 16S rRNA and the ribosome binding site in the 5'-untranslated region of mRNA. PMID:26798497

  8. Comprehensive Molecular Structure of the Eukaryotic Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Derek J.; Devkota, Batsal; Huang, Andrew D.; Topf, Maya; Narayanan, Eswar; Sali, Andrej; Harvey, Stephen C.; Frank, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Despite the emergence of a large number of X-ray crystallographic models of the bacterial 70S ribosome over the past decade, an accurate atomic model of the eukaryotic 80S ribosome is still not available. Eukaryotic ribosomes possess more ribosomal proteins and ribosomal RNA than bacterial ribosomes, which are implicated in extra-ribosomal functions in the eukaryotic cells. By combining cryo-EM with RNA and protein homology modeling, we obtained an atomic model of the yeast 80S ribosome complete with all ribosomal RNA expansion segments and all ribosomal proteins for which a structural homolog can be identified. Mutation or deletion of 80S ribosomal proteins can abrogate maturation of the ribosome, leading to several human diseases. We have localized one such protein unique to eukaryotes, rpS19e, whose mutations are associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia in humans. Additionally, we characterize crucial and novel interactions between the dynamic stalk base of the ribosome with eukaryotic elongation factor 2. PMID:20004163

  9. New ribosomes for new memories?

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, A Iván; Alarcon, Juan M; Allen, Kim D

    2015-01-01

    Widely thought to be a housekeeping process, the regulation and synthesis of rRNA emerges as a potentially central mechanism for the maintenance of synaptic plasticity and memory. We have recently shown that an essential component of late-phase synaptic plasticity is rRNA biosynthesis — the rate-limiting step in the production of new ribosomes. We hypothesize that a particular population of ribosomes is generated upon learning-associated neural activity to alter the rate of synthesis of plasticity factors at tagged synapses that will support the maintenance of synaptic plasticity and memory. PMID:26479998

  10. Chromatographic Purification of Highly Active Yeast Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Meskauskas, Arturas; Leshin, Jonathan A.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are much more labile as compared to their eubacterial and archael counterparts, thus posing a significant challenge to researchers. Particularly troublesome is the fact that lysis of cells releases a large number of proteases and nucleases which can degrade ribosomes. Thus, it is important to separate ribosomes from these enzymes as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, conventional differential ultracentrifugation methods leaves ribosomes exposed to these enzymes for unacceptably long periods of time, impacting their structural integrity and functionality. To address this problem, we utilize a chromatographic method using a cysteine charged Sulfolink resin. This simple and rapid application significantly reduces co-purifying proteolytic and nucleolytic activities, producing high yields of intact, highly biochemically active yeast ribosomes. We suggest that this method should also be applicable to mammalian ribosomes. The simplicity of the method, and the enhanced purity and activity of chromatographically purified ribosome represents a significant technical advancement for the study of eukaryotic ribosomes. PMID:22042245

  11. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  12. Studies on Pea Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chu-Yung; Chia, Subrina Li-Li; Travis, Robert L.; Key, Joe L.

    1975-01-01

    Ribosomal subunits prepared by NH4Cl dissociation (0.5 m) of the monomeric ribosomes were much less active in in vitro protein synthesis than those prepared by KCl dissociation. The decrease in activity correlated with a detachment of some proteins (L2 and L9 as shown by gel electrophoresis) within the 60S ribosomal subunits. Subunits prepared with 0.3 m NH4Cl retained L2 and L9, but the activity remained low. Incubation of these 60S subunits in TKM buffer (50 mm tris [pH 7.5], 20 mm KCl, and 5 mm MgCl2) for 20 min at 37 C restored the activity almost to the level of those obtained by KCl dissociation. Treatment of the 0.3 m NH4Cl-derived 60S subunits with a protein reagent, Procion brilliant blue, prior to extraction of the ribosomal proteins resulted in the loss of L2 and L9, showing that these proteins were made accessible for dye binding. These observations suggest that a considerable degree of unfolding of the 60S subunit occurs at 0.3 m NH4Cl (this apparently leads to a preferential detachment of L2 and L9 at 0.5 m NH4Cl) and that the activity of the purified subunits depends not only on the presence of L2 and L9 but also on the organization of these proteins within the 60S subunits. Images PMID:16659254

  13. Visualization of the joining of ribosomal subunits reveals the presence of 80S ribosomes in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jubran, Khalid; Wen, Jikai; Abdullahi, Akilu; Roy Chaudhury, Subhendu; Li, Min; Ramanathan, Preethi; Matina, Annunziata; De, Sandip; Piechocki, Kim; Rugjee, Kushal Nivriti; Brogna, Saverio

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes the 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits are assembled in the nucleolus, but there appear to be mechanisms preventing mRNA binding, 80S formation, and initiation of translation in the nucleus. To visualize association between ribosomal subunits, we tagged pairs of Drosophila ribosomal proteins (RPs) located in different subunits with mutually complementing halves of fluorescent proteins. Pairs of tagged RPs expected to interact, or be adjacent in the 80S structure, showed strong fluorescence, while pairs that were not in close proximity did not. Moreover, the complementation signal is found in ribosomal fractions and it was enhanced by translation elongation inhibitors and reduced by initiation inhibitors. Our technique achieved 80S visualization both in cultured cells and in fly tissues in vivo. Notably, while the main 80S signal was in the cytoplasm, clear signals were also seen in the nucleolus and at other nuclear sites. Furthermore, we detected rapid puromycin incorporation in the nucleolus and at transcription sites, providing an independent indication of functional 80S in the nucleolus and 80S association with nascent transcripts. PMID:24129492

  14. Interplay of the Bacterial Ribosomal A-Site, S12 Protein Mutations and Paromomycin Binding: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Panecka, Joanna; Mura, Cameron; Trylska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The conformational properties of the aminoacyl-tRNA binding site (A-site), and its surroundings in the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit, are of great relevance in designing antibacterial agents. The 30S subunit A-site is near ribosomal protein S12, which neighbors helices h27 and H69; this latter helix, of the 50S subunit, is a functionally important component of an intersubunit bridge. Experimental work has shown that specific point mutations in S12 (K42A, R53A) yield hyper-accurate ribosomes, which in turn confers resistance to the antibiotic ‘paromomycin’ (even when this aminoglycoside is bound to the A-site). Suspecting that these effects can be elucidated in terms of the local atomic interactions and detailed dynamics of this region of the bacterial ribosome, we have used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the motion of a fragment of the E. coli ribosome, including the A-site. We found that the ribosomal regions surrounding the A-site modify the conformational space of the flexible A-site adenines 1492/93. Specifically, we found that A-site mobility is affected by stacking interactions between adenines A1493 and A1913, and by contacts between A1492 and a flexible side-chain (K43) from the S12 protein. In addition, our simulations reveal possible indirect pathways by which the R53A and K42A mutations in S12 are coupled to the dynamical properties of the A-site. Our work extends what is known about the atomistic dynamics of the A-site, and suggests possible links between the biological effects of hyper-accurate mutations in the S12 protein and conformational properties of the ribosome; the implications for S12 dynamics help elucidate how the miscoding effects of paromomycin may be evaded in antibiotic-resistant mutants of the bacterial ribosome. PMID:25379961

  15. Binding of Dihydrostreptomycin to Escherichia coli Ribosomes: Characteristics and Equilibrium of the Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, F. N.; Flaks, Joel G.

    1972-01-01

    The binding of dihydrostreptomycin to ribosomes and ribosomal subunits of a number of different Escherichia coli strains was studied, and the Mg2+ and pH dependence, as well as the effect of salts and polynucleotides, was determined. The only requirement for binding with ribosomes and subunits from susceptible strains was 10 mm Mg2+. Monovalent salts weakened the binding in a manner similar to the effects on ribonucleic acid secondary structure, and this was antagonized to some extent by increased amounts of Mg2+. Bound dihydrostreptomycin could be readily exchanged by streptomycin and any antibiotically active derivative, but not by fragments of the antibiotic or any other aminoglycoside. With native (run-off) 70S ribosomes from streptomycin-susceptible strains, the binding was rapid and relatively temperature independent over the range from 0 to 37 C. Polynucleotides did not stimulate the binding. With concentrations of dihydrostreptomycin up to 10−5m, greater than 95% of native 70S ribosomes bound exactly 1 molecule of the antibiotic tightly, with a Kdiss for the bound complex at 25 C of 9.4 × 10−8m. The following thermodynamic parameters were found for the binding with 70S ribosomes at 25 C:ΔG° = −9.6 kcal/mole, ΔH° = −6.2 kcal/mole, and ΔS° = +11.4 entropy units/mole. Differences in affinity for the antibiotic were found between ribosomes of K-12 strains and those of other E. coli strains. There was insignificant binding to 70S ribosomes or subunits from streptomycin-resistant or -dependent strains, and to 50S subunits from susceptible strains. The binding to 30S subunits from susceptible strains was weaker by an order of magnitude than that to the 70S particle, with a Kdiss at 25 C of 10−6m. Polyuridylic acid stimulated this binding slightly but did not influence the affinity of the bound molecule. At antibiotic concentrations above 10−5m, streptomycin-susceptible 70S and 30S particles bound additional molecules of the antibiotic, and

  16. Recognition of the 70S ribosome and polysome by the RNA degradosome in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Chun; Du, Dijun; Domínguez-Malfavón, Lilianha; Dimastrogiovanni, Daniela; Cross, Jonathan; Callaghan, Anastasia J.; García-Mena, Jaime; Luisi, Ben F.

    2012-01-01

    The RNA degradosome is a multi-enzyme assembly that contributes to key processes of RNA metabolism, and it engages numerous partners in serving its varied functional roles. Small domains within the assembly recognize collectively a diverse range of macromolecules, including the core protein components, the cytoplasmic lipid membrane, mRNAs, non-coding regulatory RNAs and precursors of structured RNAs. We present evidence that the degradosome can form a stable complex with the 70S ribosome and polysomes, and we demonstrate the proximity in vivo of ribosomal proteins and the scaffold of the degradosome, RNase E. The principal interactions are mapped to two, independent, RNA-binding domains from RNase E. RhlB, the RNA helicase component of the degradosome, also contributes to ribosome binding, and this is favoured through an activating interaction with RNase E. The catalytic activity of RNase E for processing 9S RNA (the ribosomal 5S RNA precursor) is repressed in the presence of the ribosome, whereas there is little affect on the cleavage of single-stranded substrates mediated by non-coding RNA, suggestings that the enzyme retains capacity to cleave unstructured substrates when associated with the ribosome. We propose that polysomes may act as antennae that enhance the rates of capture of the limited number of degradosomes, so that they become recruited to sites of active translation to act on mRNAs as they become exposed or tagged for degradation. PMID:22923520

  17. Eukaryote-specific rRNA expansion segments function in ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Madhumitha; Woolford, John L

    2016-08-01

    The secondary structure of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is largely conserved across all kingdoms of life. However, eukaryotes have evolved extra blocks of rRNA sequences, relative to those of prokaryotes, called expansion segments (ES). A thorough characterization of the potential roles of ES remains to be done, possibly because of limitations in the availability of robust systems to study rRNA mutants. We sought to systematically investigate the potential functions, if any, of the ES in 25S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by deletion mutagenesis. We deleted 14 of the 16 different eukaryote-specific ES in yeast 25S rRNA individually and assayed their phenotypes. Our results show that all but two of the ES tested are necessary for optimal growth and are required for production of 25S rRNA, suggesting that ES play roles in ribosome biogenesis. Further, we classified expansion segments into groups that participate in early nucleolar, middle, and late nucleoplasmic steps of ribosome biogenesis, by assaying their pre-rRNA processing phenotypes. This study is the first of its kind to systematically identify the functions of eukaryote-specific expansion segments by showing that they play roles in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. The catalog of phenotypes we identified, combined with previous investigations of the roles ribosomal proteins in large subunit biogenesis, leads us to infer that assembling ribosomes are composed of distinct RNA and protein structural neighborhood clusters that participate in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27317789

  18. Rational Extension of the Ribosome Biogenesis Pathway Using Network-Guided Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhihua; Lee, Insuk; Moradi, Emily; Hung, Nai-Jung; Johnson, Arlen W.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    Biogenesis of ribosomes is an essential cellular process conserved across all eukaryotes and is known to require >170 genes for the assembly, modification, and trafficking of ribosome components through multiple cellular compartments. Despite intensive study, this pathway likely involves many additional genes. Here, we employ network-guided genetics—an approach for associating candidate genes with biological processes that capitalizes on recent advances in functional genomic and proteomic studies—to computationally identify additional ribosomal biogenesis genes. We experimentally evaluated >100 candidate yeast genes in a battery of assays, confirming involvement of at least 15 new genes, including previously uncharacterized genes (YDL063C, YIL091C, YOR287C, YOR006C/TSR3, YOL022C/TSR4). We associate the new genes with specific aspects of ribosomal subunit maturation, ribosomal particle association, and ribosomal subunit nuclear export, and we identify genes specifically required for the processing of 5S, 7S, 20S, 27S, and 35S rRNAs. These results reveal new connections between ribosome biogenesis and mRNA splicing and add >10% new genes—most with human orthologs—to the biogenesis pathway, significantly extending our understanding of a universally conserved eukaryotic process. PMID:19806183

  19. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA-tRNA translocation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA-tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P-P/E and P/P-E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P-pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ∼18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ∼10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements. PMID:26838673

  20. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA-tRNA translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C.

    2016-02-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA-tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P-P/E and P/P-E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P-pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ~18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ~10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements.

  1. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA–tRNA translocation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA–tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P–P/E and P/P–E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P–pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ∼18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ∼10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements. PMID:26838673

  2. Ribosomal Slowdown Mediates Translational Arrest during Cellular Division▿

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Gilad; Kedersha, Nancy; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2007-01-01

    Global mRNA translation is transiently inhibited during cellular division. We demonstrate that mitotic cells contain heavy polysomes, but these are significantly less translationally active than polysomes in cycling cells. Several observations indicate that mitotic translational attenuation occurs during the elongation stage: (i) in cycling nonsynchronized cultures, only mitotic cells fail to assemble stress granules when treated with agents that inhibit translational initiation; (ii) mitotic cells contain fewer free 80S complexes, which are less sensitive to high salt disassembly; (iii) mitotic polysomes are more resistant to enforced disassembly using puromycin; and (iv) ribosome transit time increases during mitosis. Elongation slowdown guarantees that polysomes are retained even if initiation is inhibited at the same time. Stalling translating ribosomes during mitosis may protect mRNAs and allow rapid resumption of translation immediately upon entry into the G1 phase. PMID:17664278

  3. A reconstituted cell-free assay for the evaluation of the intrinsic activity of purified human ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Marianna; Carnicelli, Domenica; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Brigotti, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    We describe a cell-free translation system for evaluating the activity of ribosomes stringently purified from human cells. This system is based on in vitro reconstitution of the cellular translation machinery, in which a ribosome-free rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) is reassembled with human ribosomes and in vitro-transcribed reporter mRNAs. The protocol describes the preparation of the RRL-derived fractions, purification of ribosomes devoid of detectable nonribosomal-associated factors, and assembly of the reactions to evaluate ribosomal translational efficiency and fidelity using appropriate reporter transcripts. The whole procedure can be completed in ∼2.5 d (plus 2 weeks for RRL preparation and cell expansion time). This protocol can be applied to study intrinsic functional properties (cis-acting element-mediated translation initiation or translational fidelity) of ribosome populations from different sources (including nonhuman origin). It is therefore useful for the characterization of ribosomal function in ribosomopathies and cancer, and it will be applicable in the emerging fields of ribosome diversity and specialized ribosomes. PMID:27336708

  4. The unfolded protein response triggers site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rising, Lisa; Mak, Raymond; Webb, Kristofor; Kaiser, Stephen E.; Zuzow, Nathan; Riviere, Paul; Yang, Bing; Fenech, Emma; Tang, Xin; Lindsay, Scott A.; Christianson, John C.; Hampton, Randolph Y.; Wasserman, Steven A.; Bennett, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Insults to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis activate the unfolded protein response (UPR), which elevates protein folding and degradation capacity and attenuates protein synthesis. While a role for ubiquitin in regulating the degradation of misfolded ER-resident proteins is well described, ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translational reprogramming during the UPR remains uncharacterized. Using global quantitative ubiquitin proteomics, we identify evolutionarily conserved, site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins. We demonstrate that these events occur on assembled cytoplasmic ribosomes and are stimulated by both UPR activation and translation inhibition. We further show that ER stress-stimulated regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation occurs on a timescale similar to eIF2α phosphorylation, is dependent upon PERK signaling, and is required for optimal cell survival during chronic UPR activation. In total, these results reveal regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation as a previously uncharacterized and important facet of eukaryotic translational control. PMID:26051182

  5. Characterizing inactive ribosomes in translational profiling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Botao; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    The broad impact of translational regulation has emerged explosively in the last few years in part due to the technological advance in genome-wide interrogation of gene expression. During mRNA translation, the majority of actively translating ribosomes exist as polysomes in cells with multiple ribosomes loaded on a single transcript. The importance of the monosome, however, has been less appreciated in translational profiling analysis. Here we report that the monosome fraction isolated by sucrose sedimentation contains a large quantity of inactive ribosomes that do not engage on mRNAs to direct translation. We found that the elongation factor eEF2, but not eEF1A, stably resides in these non-translating ribosomes. This unique feature permits direct evaluation of ribosome status under various stress conditions and in the presence of translation inhibitors. Ribosome profiling reveals that the monosome has a similar but not identical pattern of ribosome footprints compared to the polysome. We show that the association of free ribosomal subunits minimally contributes to ribosome occupancy outside of the coding region. Our results not only offer a quantitative method to monitor ribosome availability, but also uncover additional layers of ribosome status needed to be considered in translational profiling analysis. PMID:27335722

  6. Alcoholic Liver Disease and the Mitochondrial Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Alan; Sykora, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chronic alcohol consumption has been shown to severely compromise mitochondrial protein synthesis. Hepatic mitochondria isolated from alcoholic animals contain decreased levels of respiratory complexes and display depressed respiration rates when compared to pair-fed controls. One underlying mechanism for this involves ethanol-elicited alterations in the structural and functional integrity of the mitochondrial ribosome. Ethanol feeding results in ribosomal changes that include decreased sedimentation rates, larger hydrodynamic volumes, increased levels of unassociated subunits and changes in the levels of specific ribosomal proteins. The methods presented in this chapter detail how to isolate mitochondrial ribosomes, determine ribosomal activity, separate ribosomes into nucleic acid and protein, and perform two-dimensional nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoretic polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to separate and subsequently identify mitochondrial ribosomal proteins. PMID:18369931

  7. NEDDylation promotes stress granule assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jayabalan, Aravinth Kumar; Sanchez, Anthony; Park, Ra Young; Yoon, Sang Pil; Kang, Gum-Yong; Baek, Je-Hyun; Anderson, Paul; Kee, Younghoon; Ohn, Takbum

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) harbour translationally stalled messenger ribonucleoproteins and play important roles in regulating gene expression and cell fate. Here we show that neddylation promotes SG assembly in response to arsenite-induced oxidative stress. Inhibition or depletion of key components of the neddylation machinery concomitantly inhibits stress-induced polysome disassembly and SG assembly. Affinity purification and subsequent mass-spectrometric analysis of Nedd8-conjugated proteins from translationally stalled ribosomal fractions identified ribosomal proteins, translation factors and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), including SRSF3, a previously known SG regulator. We show that SRSF3 is selectively neddylated at Lys85 in response to arsenite. A non-neddylatable SRSF3 (K85R) mutant do not prevent arsenite-induced polysome disassembly, but fails to support the SG assembly, suggesting that the neddylation pathway plays an important role in SG assembly. PMID:27381497

  8. Chaperoning 5S RNA assembly

    PubMed Central

    Madru, Clément; Lebaron, Simon; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Pipoli, Juliana; Pasmant, Eric; Réty, Stéphane; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs)—the 5.8S, 18S, and 25S/28S rRNAs—are processed from a single pre-rRNA transcript and assembled into ribosomes. The fourth rRNA, the 5S rRNA, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and is assembled into the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), containing ribosomal proteins Rpl5/uL18 and Rpl11/uL5, prior to its incorporation into preribosomes. In mammals, the 5S RNP is also a central regulator of the homeostasis of the tumor suppressor p53. The nucleolar localization of the 5S RNP and its assembly into preribosomes are performed by a specialized complex composed of Rpf2 and Rrs1 in yeast or Bxdc1 and hRrs1 in humans. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex alone, in complex with the 5S RNA, and within pre-60S ribosomes. We show that the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex contains a specialized 5S RNA E-loop-binding module, contacts the Rpl5 protein, and also contacts the ribosome assembly factor Rsa4 and the 25S RNA. We propose that the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex establishes a network of interactions that guide the incorporation of the 5S RNP in preribosomes in the initial conformation prior to its rotation to form the central protuberance found in the mature large ribosomal subunit. PMID:26159998

  9. {sup 30}S({alpha}, p) in X-Ray Bursts at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, D.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kurihara, Y.; Ohshiro, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Chen, A. A.; Chen, J.; Setoodeh nia, K.; Kaji, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kim, A.; Lee, N. H.; Wakabayashi, Y.

    2010-08-12

    Over the past three years, we have worked on developing a well-characterized {sup 30}S radioactive beam to be used in a future experiment aiming to directly measure the {sup 30}S({alpha}, p) stellar reaction rate within the Gamow window of Type I X-ray bursts.

  10. Ribosome engineering to promote new crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Selmer, Maria; Gao, Yong-Gui; Weixlbaumer, Albert; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2012-05-01

    Truncation of ribosomal protein L9 in T. thermophilus allows the generation of new crystal forms and the crystallization of ribosome–GTPase complexes. Crystallographic studies of the ribosome have provided molecular details of protein synthesis. However, the crystallization of functional complexes of ribosomes with GTPase translation factors proved to be elusive for a decade after the first ribosome structures were determined. Analysis of the packing in different 70S ribosome crystal forms revealed that regardless of the species or space group, a contact between ribosomal protein L9 from the large subunit and 16S rRNA in the shoulder of a neighbouring small subunit in the crystal lattice competes with the binding of GTPase elongation factors to this region of 16S rRNA. To prevent the formation of this preferred crystal contact, a mutant strain of Thermus thermophilus, HB8-MRCMSAW1, in which the ribosomal protein L9 gene has been truncated was constructed by homologous recombination. Mutant 70S ribosomes were used to crystallize and solve the structure of the ribosome with EF-G, GDP and fusidic acid in a previously unobserved crystal form. Subsequent work has shown the usefulness of this strain for crystallization of the ribosome with other GTPase factors.

  11. Neutron scattering in the ribosome structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdyuk, Igor N.

    1997-02-01

    Thermal neutron scattering has become a powerful instrument for studying the ribosome and its components. The application of neutron scattering allowed to establish some principal features of the ribosome structure: non-homogeneous distribution of the RNA and protein within ribosomal particles, the RNA role as a framework in the arrangement and maintenance of the structure of ribosomal particles, and the globular character of ribosomal proteins. The use of selective deuteration of separate ribosomal proteins in combination with the triangulation method revealed mutual spatial arrangement (the 3D-map) of all the ribosomal proteins within the small particle and in the most part of the large ribosomal particle. An essential impact has been made in the structural studies of ribosomes with the development of novel experimental approaches: triple isotopic substitution and spin contrast variation. These approaches with direct interpretation of spherical harmonics provide new possibilities for constructing models of ribosomal particles, opening principally new perspectives for joint use of X-ray synchrotron diffraction in crystals and small-angle neutron scattering in solution.

  12. Control of ribosome formation in rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Diabetes of 9 days duration produced a 17% diminution in the rate of total protein synthesis in rat hearts perfused as Langendorff preparations supplied with glucose, plasma levels of amino acids, and 400 ..mu..U/ml insulin. This reduction was attributable to a decrease in efficiency of protein synthesis and total RNA content. Total messenger RNA content decreased in diabetic hearts in proportion to the reduction in total RNA. Diabetes also resulted in diminished ribosome content as reflected by the induction in total RNA. Ribosome production was investigated by monitoring incorporation of (/sup 3/H)phenylalanine into the proteins of cytoplasmic ribosomes. Rates of ribosome formation in diabetic hearts were as fast as control rates in the presence of insulin, and were faster than control rates in the absence of the hormone. These results indicated that ribosome content fell in diabetic hearts despite unchanged or faster rates of ribosome formation.

  13. Dual use of GTP hydrolysis by elongation factor G on the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Carlos E.; Belardinelli, Riccardo; Peske, Frank; Holtkamp, Wolf; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2013-01-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) is a GTPase that catalyzes tRNA and mRNA translocation during the elongation cycle of protein synthesis. The GTP-bound state of the factor on the ribosome has been studied mainly with non-hydrolyzable analogs of GTP, which led to controversial conclusions about the role of GTP hydrolysis in translocation. Here we describe a mutant of EF-G in which the catalytic His91 is replaced with Ala. The mutant EF-G does not hydrolyze GTP, but binds GTP with unchanged affinity, allowing us to study the function of the authentic GTP-bound form of EF-G in translocation. Utilizing fluorescent reporter groups attached to the tRNAs, mRNA, and the ribosome we compile the velocity map of translocation seen from different perspectives. The data suggest that GTP hydrolysis accelerates translocation up to 30-fold and facilitates conformational rearrangements of both 30S subunit (presumably the backward rotation of the 30S head) and EF-G that lead to the dissociation of the factor. Thus, EF-G combines the energy regime characteristic for motor proteins, accelerating movement by a conformational change induced by GTP hydrolysis, with that of a switch GTPase, which upon Pi release switches the conformations of EF-G and the ribosome to low affinity, allowing the dissociation of the factor. PMID:26824016

  14. Dual use of GTP hydrolysis by elongation factor G on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Carlos E; Belardinelli, Riccardo; Peske, Frank; Holtkamp, Wolf; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V

    2013-01-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) is a GTPase that catalyzes tRNA and mRNA translocation during the elongation cycle of protein synthesis. The GTP-bound state of the factor on the ribosome has been studied mainly with non-hydrolyzable analogs of GTP, which led to controversial conclusions about the role of GTP hydrolysis in translocation. Here we describe a mutant of EF-G in which the catalytic His91 is replaced with Ala. The mutant EF-G does not hydrolyze GTP, but binds GTP with unchanged affinity, allowing us to study the function of the authentic GTP-bound form of EF-G in translocation. Utilizing fluorescent reporter groups attached to the tRNAs, mRNA, and the ribosome we compile the velocity map of translocation seen from different perspectives. The data suggest that GTP hydrolysis accelerates translocation up to 30-fold and facilitates conformational rearrangements of both 30S subunit (presumably the backward rotation of the 30S head) and EF-G that lead to the dissociation of the factor. Thus, EF-G combines the energy regime characteristic for motor proteins, accelerating movement by a conformational change induced by GTP hydrolysis, with that of a switch GTPase, which upon Pi release switches the conformations of EF-G and the ribosome to low affinity, allowing the dissociation of the factor. PMID:26824016

  15. Molecular mechanisms of ribosomal protein gene coregulation.

    PubMed

    Reja, Rohit; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Ghosh, Sujana; Pugh, B Franklin

    2015-09-15

    The 137 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) of Saccharomyces provide a model for gene coregulation. We examined the positional and functional organization of their regulators (Rap1 [repressor activator protein 1], Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1), the transcription machinery (TFIIB, TFIID, and RNA polymerase II), and chromatin at near-base-pair resolution using ChIP-exo, as RPGs are coordinately reprogrammed. Where Hmo1 is enriched, Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1 cross-linked broadly to promoter DNA in an RPG-specific manner and demarcated by general minor groove widening. Importantly, Hmo1 extended 20-50 base pairs (bp) downstream from Fhl1. Upon RPG repression, Fhl1 remained in place. Hmo1 dissociated, which was coupled to an upstream shift of the +1 nucleosome, as reflected by the Hmo1 extension and core promoter region. Fhl1 and Hmo1 may create two regulatable and positionally distinct barriers, against which chromatin remodelers position the +1 nucleosome into either an activating or a repressive state. Consistent with in vitro studies, we found that specific TFIID subunits, in addition to cross-linking at the core promoter, made precise cross-links at Rap1 sites, which we interpret to reflect native Rap1-TFIID interactions. Our findings suggest how sequence-specific DNA binding regulates nucleosome positioning and transcription complex assembly >300 bp away and how coregulation coevolved with coding sequences. PMID:26385964

  16. Tricks an IRES uses to enslave ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, mRNAs are primarily translated through a cap-dependent mechanism whereby initiation factors recruit the 40S ribosomal subunit to a cap structure at the 5’ end of the mRNA. However, some viral and cellular messages initiate protein synthesis without a cap. They use a structured RNA element termed an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to recruit the 40S ribosomal subunit. IRESs were discovered over 20 years ago but only recently have studies using a model IRES from dicistroviruses expanded our understanding of how a three dimensional RNA structure can capture and manipulate the ribosome to initiate translation. PMID:22944245

  17. Scattering studies on ribosomes in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, V.

    1986-02-01

    Ribosomes are organelles that play a central role in protein synthesis. They are complexes of protein and nucleic acid, and can be analysed as two-component systems by neutron scattering. Moreover, ribosomes can be biochemically prepared that have specific proteins deuterated. Both these properties have been exploited to study the structure of the ribosome by neutron scattering. This article reviews the studies carried out on the small ribosomal subunit, and describes a recent study that has resolved a conflict between the results of two classes of experiments.

  18. The Cryo-EM structure of a complete 30S translation initiation complex from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Julián, Patricia; Milon, Pohl; Agirrezabala, Xabier; Lasso, Gorka; Gil, David; Rodnina, Marina V; Valle, Mikel

    2011-07-01

    Formation of the 30S initiation complex (30S IC) is an important checkpoint in regulation of gene expression. The selection of mRNA, correct start codon, and the initiator fMet-tRNA(fMet) requires the presence of three initiation factors (IF1, IF2, IF3) of which IF3 and IF1 control the fidelity of the process, while IF2 recruits fMet-tRNA(fMet). Here we present a cryo-EM reconstruction of the complete 30S IC, containing mRNA, fMet-tRNA(fMet), IF1, IF2, and IF3. In the 30S IC, IF2 contacts IF1, the 30S subunit shoulder, and the CCA end of fMet-tRNA(fMet), which occupies a novel P/I position (P/I1). The N-terminal domain of IF3 contacts the tRNA, whereas the C-terminal domain is bound to the platform of the 30S subunit. Binding of initiation factors and fMet-tRNA(fMet) induces a rotation of the head relative to the body of the 30S subunit, which is likely to prevail through 50S subunit joining until GTP hydrolysis and dissociation of IF2 take place. The structure provides insights into the mechanism of mRNA selection during translation initiation. PMID:21750663

  19. The Cryo-EM Structure of a Complete 30S Translation Initiation Complex from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Julián, Patricia; Milon, Pohl; Agirrezabala, Xabier; Lasso, Gorka; Gil, David; Rodnina, Marina V.; Valle, Mikel

    2011-01-01

    Formation of the 30S initiation complex (30S IC) is an important checkpoint in regulation of gene expression. The selection of mRNA, correct start codon, and the initiator fMet-tRNAfMet requires the presence of three initiation factors (IF1, IF2, IF3) of which IF3 and IF1 control the fidelity of the process, while IF2 recruits fMet-tRNAfMet. Here we present a cryo-EM reconstruction of the complete 30S IC, containing mRNA, fMet-tRNAfMet, IF1, IF2, and IF3. In the 30S IC, IF2 contacts IF1, the 30S subunit shoulder, and the CCA end of fMet-tRNAfMet, which occupies a novel P/I position (P/I1). The N-terminal domain of IF3 contacts the tRNA, whereas the C-terminal domain is bound to the platform of the 30S subunit. Binding of initiation factors and fMet-tRNAfMet induces a rotation of the head relative to the body of the 30S subunit, which is likely to prevail through 50S subunit joining until GTP hydrolysis and dissociation of IF2 take place. The structure provides insights into the mechanism of mRNA selection during translation initiation. PMID:21750663

  20. Plastid ribosomal protein S5 is involved in photosynthesis, plant development, and cold stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junxiang; Yuan, Hui; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Lyi, Sangbom M; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Zhang, Lugang; Li, Li

    2016-04-01

    Plastid ribosomal proteins are essential components of protein synthesis machinery and have diverse roles in plant growth and development. Mutations in plastid ribosomal proteins lead to a range of developmental phenotypes in plants. However, how they regulate these processes is not fully understood, and the functions of some individual plastid ribosomal proteins remain unknown. To identify genes responsible for chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized a mutant that exhibited pale yellow inner leaves with a reduced growth rate in Arabidopsis. The mutant (rps5) contained a missense mutation of plastid ribosomal protein S5 (RPS5), which caused a dramatically reduced abundance of chloroplast 16S rRNA and seriously impaired 16S rRNA processing to affect ribosome function and plastid translation. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed that the rps5 mutation suppressed the expression of a large number of core components involved in photosystems I and II as well as many plastid ribosomal proteins. Unexpectedly, a number of proteins associated with cold stress responses were greatly decreased in rps5, and overexpression of the plastid RPS5 improved plant cold stress tolerance. Our results indicate that RPS5 is an important constituent of the plastid 30S subunit and affects proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold stress responses to mediate plant growth and development. PMID:27006483

  1. Function and ribosomal localization of aIF6, a translational regulator shared by archaea and eukarya

    PubMed Central

    Benelli, Dario; Marzi, Stefano; Mancone, Carmine; Alonzi, Tonino; la Teana, Anna; Londei, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The translation factor IF6 is shared by the Archaea and the Eukarya, but is not found in Bacteria. The properties of eukaryal IF6 (eIF6) have been extensively studied, but remain somewhat elusive. eIF6 behaves as a ribosome-anti-association factor and is involved in miRNA-mediated gene silencing; however, it also seems to participate in ribosome synthesis and export. Here we have determined the function and ribosomal localization of the archaeal (Sulfolobus solfataricus) IF6 homologue (aIF6). We find that aIF6 binds specifically to the 50S ribosomal subunits, hindering the formation of 70S ribosomes and strongly inhibiting translation. aIF6 is uniformly expressed along the cell cycle, but it is upregulated following both cold- and heat shock. The aIF6 ribosomal binding site lies in the middle of the 30-S interacting surface of the 50S subunit, including a number of critical RNA and protein determinants involved in subunit association. The data suggest that the IF6 protein evolved in the archaeal–eukaryal lineage to modulate translational efficiency under unfavourable environmental conditions, perhaps acquiring additional functions during eukaryotic evolution. PMID:19036786

  2. Plastid ribosomal protein S5 is involved in photosynthesis, plant development, and cold stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junxiang; Yuan, Hui; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Lyi, Sangbom M.; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Zhang, Lugang; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Plastid ribosomal proteins are essential components of protein synthesis machinery and have diverse roles in plant growth and development. Mutations in plastid ribosomal proteins lead to a range of developmental phenotypes in plants. However, how they regulate these processes is not fully understood, and the functions of some individual plastid ribosomal proteins remain unknown. To identify genes responsible for chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized a mutant that exhibited pale yellow inner leaves with a reduced growth rate in Arabidopsis. The mutant (rps5) contained a missense mutation of plastid ribosomal protein S5 (RPS5), which caused a dramatically reduced abundance of chloroplast 16S rRNA and seriously impaired 16S rRNA processing to affect ribosome function and plastid translation. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed that the rps5 mutation suppressed the expression of a large number of core components involved in photosystems I and II as well as many plastid ribosomal proteins. Unexpectedly, a number of proteins associated with cold stress responses were greatly decreased in rps5, and overexpression of the plastid RPS5 improved plant cold stress tolerance. Our results indicate that RPS5 is an important constituent of the plastid 30S subunit and affects proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold stress responses to mediate plant growth and development. PMID:27006483

  3. A tRNA methyltransferase paralog is important for ribosome stability and cell division in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ian M C; Paris, Zdeněk; Gaston, Kirk W; Balakrishnan, R; Fredrick, Kurt; Rubio, Mary Anne T; Alfonzo, Juan D

    2016-01-01

    Most eukaryotic ribosomes contain 26/28S, 5S, and 5.8S large subunit ribosomal RNAs (LSU rRNAs) in addition to the 18S rRNA of the small subunit (SSU rRNA). However, in kinetoplastids, a group of organisms that include medically important members of the genus Trypanosoma and Leishmania, the 26/28S large subunit ribosomal RNA is uniquely composed of 6 rRNA fragments. In addition, recent studies have shown the presence of expansion segments in the large ribosomal subunit (60S) of Trypanosoma brucei. Given these differences in structure, processing and assembly, T. brucei ribosomes may require biogenesis factors not found in other organisms. Here, we show that one of two putative 3-methylcytidine methyltransferases, TbMTase37 (a homolog of human methyltransferase-like 6, METTL6), is important for ribosome stability in T. brucei. TbMTase37 localizes to the nucleolus and depletion of the protein results in accumulation of ribosomal particles lacking srRNA 4 and reduced levels of polysome associated ribosomes. We also find that TbMTase37 plays a role in cytokinesis, as loss of the protein leads to multi-flagellated and multi-nucleated cells. PMID:26888608

  4. Maize reas1 Mutant Stimulates Ribosome Use Efficiency and Triggers Distinct Transcriptional and Translational Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Weiwei; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Qun; Li, Xia; Yao, Dongsheng; Jin, Ying; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental cellular process in all cells. Impaired ribosome biogenesis causes developmental defects; however, its molecular and cellular bases are not fully understood. We cloned a gene responsible for a maize (Zea mays) small seed mutant, dek* (for defective kernel), and found that it encodes Ribosome export associated1 (ZmReas1). Reas1 is an AAA-ATPase that controls 60S ribosome export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after ribosome maturation. dek* is a weak mutant allele with decreased Reas1 function. In dek* cells, mature 60S ribosome subunits are reduced in the nucleus and cytoplasm, but the proportion of actively translating polyribosomes in cytosol is significantly increased. Reduced phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and the increased elongation factor 1α level indicate an enhancement of general translational efficiency in dek* cells. The mutation also triggers dramatic changes in differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs. Discrepancy was observed between differentially transcribed genes and differentially translated RNAs, indicating distinct cellular responses at transcription and translation levels to the stress of defective ribosome processing. DNA replication and nucleosome assembly-related gene expression are selectively suppressed at the translational level, resulting in inhibited cell growth and proliferation in dek* cells. This study provides insight into cellular responses due to impaired ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26645456

  5. The Ribosome-Sec61 Translocon Complex Forms a Cytosolically Restricted Environment for Early Polytopic Membrane Protein Folding.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Melissa A; Bandyopadhyay, Anannya; Devaraneni, Prasanna K; Woodward, Josha; Rooney, LeeAnn; Yang, Zhongying; Skach, William R

    2015-11-27

    Transmembrane topology of polytopic membrane proteins (PMPs) is established in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by the ribosome Sec61-translocon complex (RTC) through iterative cycles of translocation initiation and termination. It remains unknown, however, whether tertiary folding of transmembrane domains begins after the nascent polypeptide integrates into the lipid bilayer or within a proteinaceous environment proximal to translocon components. To address this question, we used cysteine scanning mutagenesis to monitor aqueous accessibility of stalled translation intermediates to determine when, during biogenesis, hydrophilic peptide loops of the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel are delivered to cytosolic and lumenal compartments. Results showed that following ribosome docking on the ER membrane, the nascent polypeptide was shielded from the cytosol as it emerged from the ribosome exit tunnel. Extracellular loops followed a well defined path through the ribosome, the ribosome translocon junction, the Sec61-translocon pore, and into the ER lumen coincident with chain elongation. In contrast, intracellular loops (ICLs) and C-terminalresidues exited the ribosome into a cytosolically shielded environment and remained inaccessible to both cytosolic and lumenal compartments until translation was terminated. Shielding of ICL1 and ICL2, but not the C terminus, became resistant to maneuvers that disrupt electrostatic ribosome interactions. Thus, the early folding landscape of polytopic proteins is shaped by a spatially restricted environment localized within the assembled ribosome translocon complex. PMID:26254469

  6. A tRNA methyltransferase paralog is important for ribosome stability and cell division in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Ian M. C.; Paris, Zdeněk; Gaston, Kirk W.; Balakrishnan, R.; Fredrick, Kurt; Rubio, Mary Anne T.; Alfonzo, Juan D.

    2016-01-01

    Most eukaryotic ribosomes contain 26/28S, 5S, and 5.8S large subunit ribosomal RNAs (LSU rRNAs) in addition to the 18S rRNA of the small subunit (SSU rRNA). However, in kinetoplastids, a group of organisms that include medically important members of the genus Trypanosoma and Leishmania, the 26/28S large subunit ribosomal RNA is uniquely composed of 6 rRNA fragments. In addition, recent studies have shown the presence of expansion segments in the large ribosomal subunit (60S) of Trypanosoma brucei. Given these differences in structure, processing and assembly, T. brucei ribosomes may require biogenesis factors not found in other organisms. Here, we show that one of two putative 3-methylcytidine methyltransferases, TbMTase37 (a homolog of human methyltransferase-like 6, METTL6), is important for ribosome stability in T. brucei. TbMTase37 localizes to the nucleolus and depletion of the protein results in accumulation of ribosomal particles lacking srRNA 4 and reduced levels of polysome associated ribosomes. We also find that TbMTase37 plays a role in cytokinesis, as loss of the protein leads to multi-flagellated and multi-nucleated cells. PMID:26888608

  7. Translation Initiation is Controlled by RNA Folding Kinetics via a Ribosome Drafting Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Espah Borujeni, Amin; Salis, Howard M

    2016-06-01

    RNA folding plays an important role in controlling protein synthesis as well as other cellular processes. Existing models have focused on how RNA folding energetics control translation initiation rate under equilibrium conditions but have largely ignored the effects of nonequilibrium RNA folding. We introduce a new mechanism, called "ribosome drafting", that explains how a mRNA's folding kinetics and the ribosome's binding rate collectively control its translation initiation rate. During cycles of translation, ribosome drafting emerges whenever successive ribosomes bind to a mRNA faster than the mRNA can refold, maintaining it in a nonequilibrium state with an acceleration of protein synthesis. Using computational design, time-correlated single photon counting, and expression measurements, we demonstrate that slow-folding and fast-folding RNA structures with equivalent folding energetics can vary protein synthesis rates by 1000-fold. We determine the necessary conditions for ribosome drafting by characterizing mRNAs with rationally designed ribosome binding rates, folding kinetics, and folding energetics, confirming the predictions of a nonequilibrium Markov model of translation. Our results have widespread implications, illustrating how competitive folding and assembly kinetics can shape the gene expression machinery's sequence-structure-function relationship inside cells. PMID:27199273

  8. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation. PMID:26801560

  9. Ribosome biogenesis in replicating cells: Integration of experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Earnest, Tyler M; Cole, John A; Peterson, Joseph R; Hallock, Michael J; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2016-10-01

    Ribosomes-the primary macromolecular machines responsible for translating the genetic code into proteins-are complexes of precisely folded RNA and proteins. The ways in which their production and assembly are managed by the living cell is of deep biological importance. Here we extend a recent spatially resolved whole-cell model of ribosome biogenesis in a fixed volume [Earnest et al., Biophys J 2015, 109, 1117-1135] to include the effects of growth, DNA replication, and cell division. All biological processes are described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations and solved stochastically using the Lattice Microbes simulation software. In order to determine the replication parameters, we construct and analyze a series of Escherichia coli strains with fluorescently labeled genes distributed evenly throughout their chromosomes. By measuring these cells' lengths and number of gene copies at the single-cell level, we could fit a statistical model of the initiation and duration of chromosome replication. We found that for our slow-growing (120 min doubling time) E. coli cells, replication was initiated 42 min into the cell cycle and completed after an additional 42 min. While simulations of the biogenesis model produce the correct ribosome and mRNA counts over the cell cycle, the kinetic parameters for transcription and degradation are lower than anticipated from a recent analytical time dependent model of in vivo mRNA production. Describing expression in terms of a simple chemical master equation, we show that the discrepancies are due to the lack of nonribosomal genes in the extended biogenesis model which effects the competition of mRNA for ribosome binding, and suggest corrections to parameters to be used in the whole-cell model when modeling expression of the entire transcriptome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 735-751, 2016. PMID:27294303

  10. Biphasic character of ribosomal translocation and non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics of translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ping

    2014-12-01

    We study theoretically the kinetics of mRNA translocation in the wild-type (WT) Escherichia coli ribosome, which is composed of a small 30 S and large 50 S subunit, and the ribosomes with mutations to some intersubunit bridges such as B1a, B4, B7a, and B8. The theoretical results reproduce well the available in vitro experimental data on the biphasic kinetics of the forward mRNA translocation catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G) hydrolyzing GTP, which can be best fit by the sum of two exponentials, and the monophasic kinetics of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation in the absence of the elongation factor, which can be best fit by a single-exponential function, in both the WT and mutant ribosomes. We show that both the mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the slow phase for the forward mRNA translocation and that in the rate of the spontaneous reverse mRNA translocation result from a reduction in the intrinsic energy barrier to resist the rotational movements between the two subunits, giving the same degree of increase in the two rates. The mutation-induced increase in the maximal rate of the fast phase for the forward mRNA translocation results mainly from the increase in the rate of the ribosomal unlocking, a conformational change in the ribosome that widens the mRNA channel for the mRNA translocation to take place, which could be partly due to the effect of the mutation on the intrasubunit 30S head rotation. Moreover, we study the translation rate of the WT and mutant ribosomes. It is shown that the translation rate versus the concentration of EF-G-GTP does not follow the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics, which is in sharp contrast to the general property of other enzymes that the rate of the enzymatic reaction versus the concentration of a substrate follows the MM kinetics. The physical origin of this non-MM kinetics for the ribosome is revealed.

  11. Mutational robustness of 16S ribosomal RNA, shown by experimental horizontal gene transfer in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Kei; Yasutake, Yoshiaki; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial ribosome consists of three rRNA molecules and 57 proteins and plays a crucial role in translating mRNA-encoded information into proteins. Because of the ribosome’s structural and mechanistic complexity, it is believed that each ribosomal component coevolves to maintain its function. Unlike 5S rRNA, 16S and 23S rRNAs appear to lack mutational robustness, because they form the structural core of the ribosome. However, using Escherichia coli Δ7 (null mutant of operons) as a host, we have recently shown that an active hybrid ribosome whose 16S rRNA has been specifically substituted with that from non–E. coli bacteria can be reconstituted in vivo. To investigate the mutational robustness of 16S rRNA and the structural basis for its functionality, we used a metagenomic approach to screen for 16S rRNA genes that complement the growth of E. coli Δ7. Various functional genes were obtained from the Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria lineages. Despite the large sequence diversity (80.9–99.0% identity with E. coli 16S rRNA) of the functional 16S rRNA molecules, the doubling times (DTs) of each mutant increased only modestly with decreasing sequence identity (average increase in DT, 4.6 s per mutation). The three-dimensional structure of the 30S ribosome showed that at least 40.7% (628/1,542) of the nucleotides were variable, even at ribosomal protein-binding sites, provided that the secondary structures were properly conserved. Our results clearly demonstrate that 16S rRNA functionality largely depends on the secondary structure but not on the sequence itself. PMID:23112186

  12. Ribosome Mechanics Informs about Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael T; Jia, Kejue; Jernigan, Robert L

    2016-02-27

    The essential aspects of the ribosome's mechanism can be extracted from coarse-grained simulations, including the ratchet motion, the movement together of critical bases at the decoding center, and movements of the peptide tunnel lining that assist in the expulsion of the synthesized peptide. Because of its large size, coarse graining helps to simplify and to aid in the understanding of its mechanism. Results presented here utilize coarse-grained elastic network modeling to extract the dynamics, and both RNAs and proteins are coarse grained. We review our previous results, showing the well-known ratchet motions and the motions in the peptide tunnel and in the mRNA tunnel. The motions of the lining of the peptide tunnel appear to assist in the expulsion of the growing peptide chain, and clamps at the ends of the mRNA tunnel with three proteins ensure that the mRNA is held tightly during decoding and essential for the helicase activity at the entrance. The entry clamp may also assist in base recognition to ensure proper selection of the incoming tRNA. The overall precision of the ribosome machine-like motions is remarkable. PMID:26687034

  13. Mitomycin C Inhibits Ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Snodgrass, Ryan G.; Collier, Abby C.; Coon, Amy E.; Pritsos, Chris A.

    2010-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is a commonly used and extensively studied chemotherapeutic agent requiring biological reduction for activity. Damage to nuclear DNA is thought to be its primary mechanism of cell death. Due to a lack of evidence for significant MMC activation in the nucleus and for in vivo studies demonstrating the formation of MMC-DNA adducts, we chose to investigate alternative nucleic acid targets. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR was used to determine changes in mitochondrial gene expression induced by MMC treatment. Although no consistent effects on mitochondrial mRNA expression were observed, complementary results from reverse transcription-PCR experiments and gel-shift and binding assays demonstrated that MMC rapidly decreased the transcript levels of 18S ribosomal RNA in a concentration-dependent manner. Under hypoxic conditions, transcript levels of 18S rRNA decreased by 1.5-fold compared with untreated controls within 30 min. Recovery to base line required several hours, indicating that de novo synthesis of 18S was necessary. Addition of MMC to an in vitro translation reaction significantly decreased protein production in the cell-free system. Functional assays performed using a luciferase reporter construct in vivo determined that protein translation was inhibited, further confirming this mechanism of toxicity. The interaction of MMC with ribosomal RNA and subsequent inhibition of protein translation is consistent with mechanisms proposed for other natural compounds. PMID:20418373

  14. Ribosome hijacking: a role for small protein B during trans-translation

    PubMed Central

    Nonin-Lecomte, Sylvie; Germain-Amiot, Noella; Gillet, Reynald; Hallier, Marc; Ponchon, Luc; Dardel, Frédéric; Felden, Brice

    2009-01-01

    Tight recognition of codon–anticodon pairings by the ribosome ensures the accuracy and fidelity of protein synthesis. In eubacteria, translational surveillance and ribosome rescue are performed by the ‘tmRNA–SmpB' system (transfer messenger RNA–small protein B). Remarkably, entry and accommodation of aminoacylated-tmRNA into stalled ribosomes occur without a codon–anticodon interaction but in the presence of SmpB. Here, we show that within a stalled ribosome, SmpB interacts with the three universally conserved bases G530, A1492 and A1493 that form the 30S subunit decoding centre, in which canonical codon–anticodon pairing occurs. The footprints at positions A1492 and A1493 of a small decoding centre, as well as on a set of conserved SmpB amino acids, were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance. Mutants at these residues display the same growth defects as for ΔsmpB strains. The SmpB protein has functional and structural similarities with initiation factor 1, and is proposed to be a functional mimic of the pairing between a codon and an anticodon. PMID:19132006

  15. Biochemical characterization of three mycobacterial ribosomal fractions.

    PubMed

    Portelance, V; Beaudet, R

    1983-02-01

    The induction of antituberculous immunity by crude ribosomal fractions isolated from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Ra, M. bovis strain BCG, and M. smegmatis was studied in CF-1 mice. Levels of antituberculous immunity similar to that induced by live BCG were induced by the BCG and H37Ra ribosomal fractions whereas that isolated from M. smegmatis was found to be inactive. Electrophoresis of the three ribosomal fractions in sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacylamide gels followed by differential staining showed the two active ribosomal fractions to be similar in their proteins, carbohydrate-containing substances, and lipid profiles. The inactive smegmatis ribosomal fraction differed mainly from the active ones on the basis of its carbohydrate-containing substances profile and by the absence of lipids. The polysaccharides and the ribosomes present in the H37Ra ribosomal fractions were purified by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A - Sepharose 4B. Each purified preparation showed no or only low antituberculous activity when injected separately, but when mixed together a high protection was observed. The formation of complexes between the ribosomes and the polysaccharide fraction was suggested and appears to be necessary for the induction of antituberculous immunity. PMID:6189570

  16. Ribosome flow model with positive feedback

    PubMed Central

    Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs usually form a circular structure; thus, ribosomes that terminatae translation at the 3′ end can diffuse with increased probability to the 5′ end of the transcript, initiating another cycle of translation. This phenomenon describes ribosomal flow with positive feedback—an increase in the flow of ribosomes terminating translating the open reading frame increases the ribosomal initiation rate. The aim of this paper is to model and rigorously analyse translation with feedback. We suggest a modified version of the ribosome flow model, called the ribosome flow model with input and output. In this model, the input is the initiation rate and the output is the translation rate. We analyse this model after closing the loop with a positive linear feedback. We show that the closed-loop system admits a unique globally asymptotically stable equilibrium point. From a biophysical point of view, this means that there exists a unique steady state of ribosome distributions along the mRNA, and thus a unique steady-state translation rate. The solution from any initial distribution will converge to this steady state. The steady-state distribution demonstrates a decrease in ribosome density along the coding sequence. For the case of constant elongation rates, we obtain expressions relating the model parameters to the equilibrium point. These results may perhaps be used to re-engineer the biological system in order to obtain a desired translation rate. PMID:23720534

  17. Evolution of the ribosome at atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton S.; Bernier, Chad R.; Hsiao, Chiaolong; Norris, Ashlyn M.; Kovacs, Nicholas A.; Waterbury, Chris C.; Stepanov, Victor G.; Harvey, Stephen C.; Fox, George E.; Wartell, Roger M.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2014-01-01

    The origins and evolution of the ribosome, 3–4 billion years ago, remain imprinted in the biochemistry of extant life and in the structure of the ribosome. Processes of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) expansion can be “observed” by comparing 3D rRNA structures of bacteria (small), yeast (medium), and metazoans (large). rRNA size correlates well with species complexity. Differences in ribosomes across species reveal that rRNA expansion segments have been added to rRNAs without perturbing the preexisting core. Here we show that rRNA growth occurs by a limited number of processes that include inserting a branch helix onto a preexisting trunk helix and elongation of a helix. rRNA expansions can leave distinctive atomic resolution fingerprints, which we call “insertion fingerprints.” Observation of insertion fingerprints in the ribosomal common core allows identification of probable ancestral expansion segments. Conceptually reversing these expansions allows extrapolation backward in time to generate models of primordial ribosomes. The approach presented here provides insight to the structure of pre-last universal common ancestor rRNAs and the subsequent expansions that shaped the peptidyl transferase center and the conserved core. We infer distinct phases of ribosomal evolution through which ribosomal particles evolve, acquiring coding and translocation, and extending and elaborating the exit tunnel. PMID:24982194

  18. Specific interaction between EF-G and RRF and its implication for GTP-dependent ribosome splitting into subunits

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ning; Zavialov, Andrey V.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Frank, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Summary After termination of protein synthesis, the bacterial ribosome is split into its 30S and 50S subunits by the action of ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G) in a GTP-hydrolysis dependent manner. Based on a previous cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) study of ribosomal complexes, we have proposed that the binding of EF-G to an RRF containing post-termination ribosome triggers an inter-domain rotation of RRF, which destabilizes two strong intersubunit bridges (B2a and B3) and, ultimately, separates the two subunits. Here, we present a 9 Å (FSC at 0.5 cutoff) cryo-EM map of a 50S EFG GDPNP RRF complex and a quasi-atomic model derived from it, showing the interaction between EF-G and RRF on the 50S subunit in the presence of the non-cleavable GTP analogue GDPNP. The detailed information in this model and a comparative analysis of EF-G structures in various nucleotide- and ribosome-bound states show how rotation of the RRF head domain may be triggered by various domains of EF-G. For validation of our structural model, all known mutations in EF-G and RRF that relate to ribosome recycling have been taken into account. More importantly, our results indicate a substantial conformational change in the Switch I region of EF-G, suggesting that a conformational signal transduction mechanism, similar to that employed in tRNA translocation on the ribosome by EF-G, translates a large-scale movement of EF-G’s domain IV, induced by GTP hydrolysis, into the domain rotation of RRF that eventually splits the ribosome into subunits. PMID:17996252

  19. Scanning of 16S Ribosomal RNA for Peptide Nucleic Acid Targets.

    PubMed

    Górska, Anna; Markowska-Zagrajek, Agnieszka; Równicki, Marcin; Trylska, Joanna

    2016-08-25

    We have designed a protocol and server to aid in the search for putative binding sites in 16S rRNA that could be targeted by peptide nucleic acid oligomers. Various features of 16S rRNA were considered to score its regions as potential targets for sequence-specific binding that could result in inhibition of ribosome function. Specifically, apart from the functional importance of a particular rRNA region, we calculated its accessibility, flexibility, energetics of strand invasion by an oligomer, as well as similarity to human rRNA. To determine 16S rRNA flexibility in the ribosome context, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the 30S subunit in explicit solvent. We proposed a few 16S RNA target sites, and one of them was tested experimentally to verify inhibition of bacterial growth by a peptide nucleic acid oligomer. PMID:27105576

  20. Complementary roles of initiation factor 1 and ribosome recycling factor in 70S ribosome splitting

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Antoun, Ayman; Lovmar, Martin; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that ribosomes containing a messenger RNA (mRNA) with a strong Shine–Dalgarno sequence are rapidly split into subunits by initiation factors 1 (IF1) and 3 (IF3), but slowly split by ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G). Post-termination-like (PTL) ribosomes containing mRNA and a P-site-bound deacylated transfer RNA (tRNA) are split very rapidly by RRF and EF-G, but extremely slowly by IF1 and IF3. Vacant ribosomes are split by RRF/EF-G much more slowly than PTL ribosomes and by IF1/IF3 much more slowly than mRNA-containing ribosomes. These observations reveal complementary splitting of different ribosomal complexes by IF1/IF3 and RRF/EF-G, and suggest the existence of two major pathways for ribosome splitting into subunits in the living cell. We show that the identity of the deacylated tRNA in the PTL ribosome strongly affects the rate by which it is split by RRF/EF-G and that IF3 is involved in the mechanism of ribosome splitting by IF1/IF3 but not by RRF/EF-G. With support from our experimental data, we discuss the principally different mechanisms of ribosome splitting by IF1/IF3 and by RRF/EF-G. PMID:18497739

  1. Interaction of Chloramphenicol Tripeptide Analogs with Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Tereshchenkov, A G; Shishkina, A V; Tashlitsky, V N; Korshunova, G A; Bogdanov, A A; Sumbatyan, N V

    2016-04-01

    Chloramphenicol amine peptide derivatives containing tripeptide fragments of regulatory "stop peptides" - MRL, IRA, IWP - were synthesized. The ability of the compounds to form ribosomal complexes was studied by displacement of the fluorescent erythromycin analog from its complex with E. coli ribosomes. It was found that peptide chloramphenicol analogs are able to bind to bacterial ribosomes. The dissociation constants were 4.3-10 µM, which is 100-fold lower than the corresponding values for chloramphenicol amine-ribosome complex. Interaction of the chloramphenicol peptide analogs with ribosomes was simulated by molecular docking, and the most probable contacts of "stop peptide" motifs with the elements of nascent peptide exit tunnel were identified. PMID:27293096

  2. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  3. Viral IRES RNA structures and ribosome interactions.

    PubMed

    Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2008-06-01

    In eukaryotes, protein synthesis initiates primarily by a mechanism that requires a modified nucleotide 'cap' on the mRNA and also proteins that recruit and position the ribosome. Many pathogenic viruses use an alternative, cap-independent mechanism that substitutes RNA structure for the cap and many proteins. The RNAs driving this process are called internal ribosome-entry sites (IRESs) and some are able to bind the ribosome directly using a specific 3D RNA structure. Recent structures of IRES RNAs and IRES-ribosome complexes are revealing the structural basis of viral IRES' 'hijacking' of the protein-making machinery. It now seems that there are fundamental differences in the 3D structures used by different IRESs, although there are some common features in how they interact with ribosomes. PMID:18468443

  4. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  5. Ribosome defects in disorders of erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Narla, Anupama; Hurst, Slater N; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2011-02-01

    Over the past decade, genetic lesions that cause ribosome dysfunction have been identified in both congenital and acquired human disorders. These discoveries have established a new category of disorders, known as ribosomopathies, in which the primary pathophysiology is related to impaired ribosome function. The protoptypical disorders are Diamond-Blackfan anemia, a congenital bone marrow failure syndrome, and the 5q- syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome. In both of these disorders, impaired ribosome function causes a severe macrocytic anemia. In this review, we will discuss the evidence that defects in ribosomal biogenesis cause the hematologic phenotype of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and the 5q- syndrome. We will also explore the potential mechanisms by which a ribosomal defect, which would be expected to have widespread consequences, may lead to specific defects in erythropoiesis. PMID:21279816

  6. Viral IRES RNA structures and ribosome interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotes, protein synthesis initiates primarily by a mechanism that requires a modified nucleotide ‘cap’ on the mRNA and also proteins that recruit and position the ribosome. Many pathogenic viruses use an alternative, cap-independent mechanism that substitutes RNA structure for the cap and many proteins. The RNAs driving this process are called internal ribosome-entry sites (IRESs) and some are able to bind the ribosome directly using a specific 3D RNA structure. Recent structures of IRES RNAs and IRES–ribosome complexes are revealing the structural basis of viral IRES’ ‘hijacking’ of the protein-making machinery. It now seems that there are fundamental differences in the 3D structures used by different IRESs, although there are some common features in how they interact with ribosomes. PMID:18468443

  7. Aggregation of Ribosomal Protein S6 at Nucleolus Is Cell Cycle-Controlled and Its Function in Pre-rRNA Processing Is Phosphorylation Dependent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duo; Chen, Hui-Peng; Duan, Hai-Feng; Gao, Li-Hua; Shao, Yong; Chen, Ke-Yan; Wang, You-Liang; Lan, Feng-Hua; Hu, Xian-Wen

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) has long been regarded as one of the primary r-proteins that functions in the early stage of 40S subunit assembly, but its actual role is still obscure. The correct forming of 18S rRNA is a key step in the nuclear synthesis of 40S subunit. In this study, we demonstrate that rpS6 participates in the processing of 30S pre-rRNA to 18S rRNA only when its C-terminal five serines are phosphorylated, however, the process of entering the nucleus and then targeting the nucleolus does not dependent its phosphorylation. Remarkably, we also find that the aggregation of rpS6 at the nucleolus correlates to the phasing of cell cycle, beginning to concentrate in the nucleolus at later S phase and disaggregate at M phase. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1649-1657, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26639987

  8. Concentric-Flow Electrokinetic Injector Enables Serial Crystallography of Ribosome and Photosystem-II

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Raymond G.; Gati, Cornelius; Laksmono, Hartawan; Dao, E. Han; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Kern, Jan; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Brewster, Aaron S.; Young, Iris D.; Michels-Clark, Tara; Aquila, Andrew; Liang, Mengning; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Junco, Elia A.; Hayes, Brandon; Bogan, Michael J.; Hampton, Christina Y.; Puglisi, Elisabetta V.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Stan, Claudiu A.; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Soltis, S. Michael; Puglisi, Joseph D.; DeMirci, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a concentric-flow electrokinetic injector delivered microcrystals of Geobacillus stearothermophilus thermolysin (2.2 Å structure), Thermosynechococcus elongatus photosystem II (< 3 Å diffraction) and Thermus thermophilus small ribosomal subunit (3.4 Å structure). The first ambient-temperature X-ray crystal structure of the 30S subunit bound to the antibiotic paromomycin was obtained in its native mother liquor. Compared to previous cryo-cooled structures, this new structure showed that paromomycin binds to the decoding center in a different conformation. PMID:26619013

  9. GTP hydrolysis by EF-G synchronizes tRNA movement on small and large ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Holtkamp, Wolf; Cunha, Carlos E; Peske, Frank; Konevega, Andrey L; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V

    2014-01-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) promotes the movement of two tRNAs and the mRNA through the ribosome in each cycle of peptide elongation. During translocation, the tRNAs transiently occupy intermediate positions on both small (30S) and large (50S) ribosomal subunits. How EF-G and GTP hydrolysis control these movements is still unclear. We used fluorescence labels that specifically monitor movements on either 30S or 50S subunits in combination with EF-G mutants and translocation-specific antibiotics to investigate timing and energetics of translocation. We show that EF-G–GTP facilitates synchronous movements of peptidyl-tRNA on the two subunits into an early post-translocation state, which resembles a chimeric state identified by structural studies. EF-G binding without GTP hydrolysis promotes only partial tRNA movement on the 50S subunit. However, rapid 30S translocation and the concomitant completion of 50S translocation require GTP hydrolysis and a functional domain 4 of EF-G. Our results reveal two distinct modes for utilizing the energy of EF-G binding and GTP hydrolysis and suggest that coupling of GTP hydrolysis to translocation is mediated through rearrangements of the 30S subunit. PMID:24614227

  10. GTP hydrolysis by EF-G synchronizes tRNA movement on small and large ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Wolf; Cunha, Carlos E; Peske, Frank; Konevega, Andrey L; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V

    2014-05-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) promotes the movement of two tRNAs and the mRNA through the ribosome in each cycle of peptide elongation. During translocation, the tRNAs transiently occupy intermediate positions on both small (30S) and large (50S) ribosomal subunits. How EF-G and GTP hydrolysis control these movements is still unclear. We used fluorescence labels that specifically monitor movements on either 30S or 50S subunits in combination with EF-G mutants and translocation-specific antibiotics to investigate timing and energetics of translocation. We show that EF-G-GTP facilitates synchronous movements of peptidyl-tRNA on the two subunits into an early post-translocation state, which resembles a chimeric state identified by structural studies. EF-G binding without GTP hydrolysis promotes only partial tRNA movement on the 50S subunit. However, rapid 30S translocation and the concomitant completion of 50S translocation require GTP hydrolysis and a functional domain 4 of EF-G. Our results reveal two distinct modes for utilizing the energy of EF-G binding and GTP hydrolysis and suggest that coupling of GTP hydrolysis to translocation is mediated through rearrangements of the 30S subunit. PMID:24614227