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Sample records for 315mj 2-micrometers double-pulsed

  1. Laser Energy Monitor for Double-Pulsed 2-Micrometer IPDA Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is a remote sensing technique for monitoring different atmospheric species. The technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features normalized to the transmitted energy. 2-micron double-pulsed IPDA lidar is best suited for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements. In such case, the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by short interval (200 microseconds), with low repetition rate (10Hz). Conventional laser energy monitors, based on thermal detectors, are suitable for low repetition rate single pulse lasers. Due to the short pulse interval in double-pulsed lasers, thermal energy monitors underestimate the total transmitted energy. This leads to measurement biases and errors in double-pulsed IPDA technique. The design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on a high-speed, extended range InGaAs pin quantum detectors suitable for separating the two pulse events. Pulse integration is applied for converting the detected pulse power into energy. Results are compared to a photo-electro-magnetic (PEM) detector for impulse response verification. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in single-pulsed mode, then comparing the pin and PEM detectors in double-pulsed mode. Energy monitor linearity will be addressed.

  2. Double-Pulsed 2-Micrometer Lidar Validation for Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    A double-pulsed, 2-micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements is successfully developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Based on direct detection technique, the instrument can be operated on ground or onboard a small aircraft. Key features of this compact, rugged and reliable IPDA lidar includes high transmitted laser energy, wavelength tuning, switching and locking, and sensitive detection. As a proof of concept, the IPDA ground and airborne CO2 measurement and validation will be presented. IPDA lidar CO2 measurements ground validation were conducted at NASA LaRC using hard targets and a calibrated in-situ sensor. Airborne validation, conducted onboard the NASA B-200 aircraft, included CO2 plum detection from power stations incinerators, comparison to in-flight CO2 in-situ sensor and comparison to air sampling at different altitude conducted by NOAA at the same site. Airborne measurements, spanning for 20 hours, were obtained from different target conditions. Ground targets included soil, vegetation, sand, snow and ocean. In addition, cloud slicing was examined over the ocean. These flight validations were conducted at different altitudes, up to 7 km, with different wavelength controlled weighing functions. CO2 measurement results agree with modeling conducted through the different sensors, as will be discussed.

  3. 315mJ, 2-micrometers Double-Pulsed Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar Transmitter for Atmospheric CO2 Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Koch, Grady; Chen, Songsheng; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The design of a double pulsed, injection seeded, 2-micrometer compact coherent Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) transmitter for CO2 sensing is presented. This system is hardened for ground and airborne applications. The design architecture includes three continuous wave lasers which provide controlled on and off line seeding, injection seeded power oscillator and a single amplifier operating in double pass configuration. As the derivative a coherent Doppler wind lidar, this instrument has the added benefit of providing wind information. The active laser material used for this application is a Ho: Tm:YLF crystal operates at the eye-safe wavelength. The 3-meter long folded ring resonator produces energy of 130-mJ (90/40) with a temporal pulse length around 220 nanoseconds and 530 nanosecond pulses for on and off lines respectively. The separation between the two pulses is on the order of 200 microseconds. The line width is in the order of 2.5MHz and the beam quality has an M(sup 2) of 1.1 times diffraction limited beam. A final output energy for a pair of both on and off pulses as high as 315 mJ (190/125) at a repetition rate of 10 Hz is achieved. The operating temperature is set around 20 C for the pump diode lasers and 10 C for the rod. Since the laser design has to meet high-energy as well as high beam quality requirements, close attention is paid to the laser head design to avoid thermal distortion in the rod. A side-pumped configuration is used and heat is removed uniformly by passing coolant through a tube slightly larger than the rod to reduce thermal gradient. This paper also discusses the advantage of using a long upper laser level life time laser crystal for DIAL application. In addition issues related to injection seeding with two different frequencies to achieve a transform limited line width will be presented.

  4. High Energy Double-Pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF Laser Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Braud, Alain; Petros, Mulugeta; Singh, Upendra N.

    2002-01-01

    A high energy double-pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF 2-micrometer laser amplifier has been demonstrated. 600 mJ per pulse pair under Q-switch operation is achieved with the gain of 4.4. This solid-state laser source can be used as lidar transmitter for multiple lidar applications such as coherent wind and carbon dioxide measurements.

  5. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  6. BLOCKING OSCILLATOR DOUBLE PULSE GENERATOR CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Haase, J.A.

    1961-01-24

    A double-pulse generator, particuiarly a double-pulse generator comprising a blocking oscillator utilizing a feedback circuit to provide means for producing a second pulse within the recovery time of the blocking oscillator, is described. The invention utilized a passive network which permits adjustment of the spacing between the original pulses derived from the blocking oscillator and further utilizes the original pulses to trigger a circuit from which other pulses are initiated. These other pulses are delayed and then applied to the input of the blocking oscillator, with the result that the output from the oscillator circuit contains twice the number of pulses originally initiated by the blocking oscillator itself.

  7. Simulation of Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Levashov, Pavel R.; Itina, Tatian E.

    2010-10-08

    We investigate the physical reasons of a strange decrease in the ablation depth observed in femtosecond double-pulse experiments with increasing delay between the pulses. Two ultrashort pulses of the same energy produce the crater which is less than that created by a single pulse. Hydrodynamic simulation shows that the ablation mechanism is suppressed when the delay between the pulses exceeds the electron-ion relaxation time. In this case, the interaction of the second laser pulse with the expanding target material leads to the formation of the second shock wave suppressing the rarefaction wave created by the first pulse. The modeling of the double-pulse ablation for different delays between pulses confirms this explanation.

  8. Dynamics of double-pulse photoacoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkashin, Maxim; Brenner, Carsten; Göring, Lena; Döpke, Benjamin; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-03-01

    In contrast to the well-established and widely used theory of photoacoustic signal generation by single delta-like pulses, the field of multiple pulse excitation is not yet studied well. Using double-pulse excitation can be beneficial, but as ultrasound transducers have a certain waveform duration, the inter-pulse delays used might be limited. In order to assess the strength of the transducer influence at short delay times and develop data analysis procedure, we investigate the photoacoustic responses of a phantom sample to double-pulse excitation measured with different transducers. Both focused and flat surface single element transducers are used in the study. The central frequencies are chosen in the low-frequency band as they are most widely used in clinical ultrasound and one higher frequency transducer is taken for comparison. Despite not observing signal amplification due to Grueneisen relaxation effect, we show that transducer influence is not exceeding measurement error. Additionally we prove that single pulse subtraction procedure can be used to restore the second pulse waveform in double pulse excitation scheme. We believe using this procedure can be beneficial when transducer's waveform duration is longer than used inter-pulse delays.

  9. High-Energy 2-Micrometers Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    High-energy 2-micrometer wavelength lasers have been incorporated in a prototype coherent Doppler lidar to test component technologies and explore applications for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Design of the lidar is presented including aspects in the laser transmitter, receiver, photodetector, and signal processing. Calibration tests and sample atmospheric data are presented on wind and aerosol profiling.

  10. 2 Micrometers InAsSb Quantum-dot Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Yueming; Uhl, David; Keo, Sam

    2004-01-01

    InAsSb quantum-dot lasers near 2 micrometers were demonstrated in cw operation at room temperature with a threshold current density of 733 A,/cm(sup 2), output power of 3 mW/facet and a differential quantum efficiency of 13%.

  11. Laser lithotripsy using double pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfmann, Juergen; Doerschel, Klaus; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1990-07-01

    There are currntly several methods in the field of laser lithotripsy which operate not only at different wavelengths and pulse lengths but also with various types of optical front ends and various irrigation fluids'6. The methods can be divided into two main groups: First, those which utilize stone absorption and plasma formation on the stone surface to initiate stone fragmentation, such as dye lasers. Second, those which generate shock waves and caviatation in the surrounding fluid and which require additional means to produce aplasma (e.g. irrigation, focussing fiber end or metal surfaces). The pulsed Nd:YAG laser belongs to this group. The method presented here is the double pulse technique which is a combination of both methods. It uses two laser pulses with a short time delay transmitted by means of a fiber to destroy body concrements. The first pulse is the first harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser (532nm) which improves the coupling efficiency of the laser radiation with the stone. The second pulse is in the fundamental mode of the laser (1064 nm) delivering the high energy for the stone disruption.

  12. Effective desynchronization by means of double-pulse phase resetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tass, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    A double-pulse stimulation technique is presented here for the first time which makes it possible to effectively desynchronize a synchronized cluster of globally coupled phase oscillators in the presence of noise. The first, stronger pulse of the double pulse restarts the cluster independently of its initial dynamic state. The second, weaker pulse desynchronizes the cluster by hitting it in a vulnerable state. After the desynchronization the cluster tends to resynchronize since the incoherent state is unstable. Nevertheless, repeated administration of double pulses blocks the cluster's resynchronization. This approach can directly be applied to real data. Accordingly, a demand-controlled deep-brain double-pulse stimulation technique is suggested for the therapy of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease or essential tremor.

  13. Physics constraints on double-pulse LIA engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2015-05-20

    The options for advanced-radiography double-pulse linear induction accelerators (LIA) under consideration naturally fall into three categories that differ by the number of cells required. Since the two major physics issues, beam breakup (BBU) and corkscrew, are also dependent on the number of cells, it may be useful for the decision process to review the engineering consequences of beam physics constraints for each class. The LIAs can be categorized three different ways, and this report compares the different categories based upon the physics of their beams.

  14. Photometry of 433 Eros from 0.65 to 2.2 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Bergstralh, J. T.; Johnson, T. V.

    1976-01-01

    Lightcurves of 433 Eros are reported for 11 bandpasses ranging from 0.65 to 2.2 micrometer in wavelength. The relative spectral reflectance was not seen to vary during our observations. Eros has a reflectance at 1.6 micrometers of about 1.5 and at 2.2 micrometers of about 1.7, where the spectral reflectance is scaled to unity at 0.56 micrometers. This spectral reflectance is suggestive of a mixture of silicates and material with high infrared reflectance, perhaps a metallic phase such as meteoritic 'iron'.

  15. Efficient Single-Frequency Thulium Doped Fiber Laser Near 2-micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jihong; Wu, Jianfeng; Jiang, Shibin; Yu, Jirong

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate highly efficient diode-pumped single-frequency fiber laser with 35% slope efficiency and 50mW output power operating near 2 micrometers, which generated from a 2-cm long piece of highly Tm(3+)-doped germanate glass fiber pumped at 800nm.

  16. Single And Double Pulse Irradiation And Comparison With Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fornarini, L.; Fantoni, R.; Colao, F.; Santagata, A.; Teghil, R.

    2009-09-27

    A theoretical model of laser ablation has been previously developed and applied to Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of bronzes with the aim to improve quantitative results and to focus on problems arising in the interpretation of experimental data. The model describes laser-solid matter interaction, plume expansion, plasma formation and laser-plasma interaction. A two temperature approach has been also introduced to take into account the initial temperature dynamics of the alloy surface upon ultra-short laser irradiation. We examined various target compositions, typical of archaeological artworks, and different laser characteristics such as wavelength (355 nm, 530 nm, 1064 nm) and pulse duration (8 ns, 250 fs). In this work, the model has been extended to simulate double pulse LIBS configuration in order to clarify the mechanism involved in the process and for better interpreting the experimental data. Plasma composition, relevant parameters (temperature, electron density) and their kinetic evolutions have been measured. Results have been compared with the simulation obtained using the same irradiation conditions and set of targets.

  17. Analysis of femtosecond quantum control mechanisms with colored double pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Gerhard; Nuernberger, Patrick; Selle, Reimer; Dimler, Frank; Brixner, Tobias; Gerber, Gustav

    2006-09-15

    Fitness landscapes based on a limited number of laser pulse shape parameters can elucidate reaction pathways and can help to find the underlying control mechanism of optimal pulses determined by adaptive femtosecond quantum control. In a first experiment, we employ colored double pulses and systematically scan both the temporal subpulse separation and the relative amplitude of the two subpulses to acquire fitness landscapes. Comparison with results obtained from a closed-loop experiment demonstrates the capability of fitness landscapes for the revelation of possible control mechanisms. In a second experiment, using transient absorption spectroscopy, we investigate and compare the dependence of the excitation efficiency of the solvated dye molecule 5,5{sup '}-dichloro-11-diphenylamino-3,3{sup '}-diethyl-10,12-ethylene thiatricarbocyanine perchlorate (IR140) on selected pulse shapes in two parametrizations. The results show that very different pulse profiles can be equivalently adequate to maximize a given control objective. Fitness landscapes thus provide valuable information about different pathways along which a molecular system can be controlled with shaped laser pulses.

  18. Drilling of aluminum and copper films with femtosecond double-pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinxin; Luo, Sizuo; Chen, Zhou; Qi, Hongxia; Deng, Jiannan; Hu, Zhan

    2016-06-01

    Aluminum and copper films are drilled with femtosecond double-pulse laser. The double-pulse delay is scanned from -75 ps to 90 ps. The drilling process is monitored by recording the light transmitted through the sample, and the morphology of the drilled holes is analyzed by optical microscopy. It is found that, the breakthrough time, the hole evolution during drilling, the redeposited material, the diameters of the redeposited area and the hole, change as functions of double-pulse delay, and are different for the two metals. Along the double-pulse delay axis, three different time constants are observed, a slow one of a few tens of picoseconds, a fast one of a few picoseconds, and an oscillation pattern. Results are discussed based on the mechanisms of plasma shielding, electron-phonon coupling, strong coupling of laser with liquid phase, oxidation of aluminum, laser induced temperature and pressure oscillations, and the atomization of plume particles.

  19. Performance of a 2-micrometer coherent Doppler lidar for wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod; Hannon, Stephen M.; Henderson, Sammy W.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of boundary layer winds are presented using a 2-micrometer coherent Doppler lidar and the optimal performance of the maximum likelihood estimator. The systematic error for single-shot estimates was estimated as 3.6 cm/s using measurements from a stationary hard target. The estimation error for measurements of the radial component of the wind field was determined, as well as the fraction of the estimates that are randomly distributed over the velocity search space, when the signal power is low and speckle fading is important. The results from actual data are compared with the results from ideal simulations. The first direct estimation of the spatial structure function of the radial wind field and of the energy dissipation rate is presented for both horizontal and vertical directions of propagation. The rms estimation error of the velocity estimates is found to be within 30% of ideal performance based on simulation.

  20. Ultrafast thermal dynamics of nano-ripples formation via laser double pulses excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guangqing; Wu, Yanmin; Uddin, Noor; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Lu, Yu; Bian, Hao; Hou, Xun

    2016-09-01

    The ultrafast thermal dynamics of nano-ripples formation on gold film via ultrafast laser double pulses excitation is theoretically investigated by numerical simulations. The non-equilibrium thermal modulations with respect to the electron and phonon energy transfers within gold film is proposed for predicting the nano-ripples formation. It is revealed that the nano-ripples contrast on gold film surface can be well controlled via tuning the pulse energy ratio, pulse separation and pulse exchange of ultrafast laser double-pulse. It is attributed to the tunable energy transfer routes between the electron thermal diffusion and the electron-phonon coupling via tuning double pulses parameters. The study provides theoretical basis for producing high-contrast ripples for a wide range application in the fields such as high-absorptive solar cells, surface friction devices and super-hydrophobic surface.

  1. Double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of explosives: Initial study towards improved discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Frank C.; Gottfried, Jennifer L.; Munson, Chase A.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2007-12-01

    Detecting trace explosive residues at standoff distances in real-time is a difficult problem. One method ideally suited for real-time standoff detection is laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). However, atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen contributes to the LIBS signal from the oxygen- and nitrogen-containing explosive compounds, complicating the discrimination of explosives from other organic materials. While bathing the sample in an inert gas will remove atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen interference, it cannot practically be applied for standoff LIBS. Alternatively, we have investigated the potential of double pulse LIBS to improve the discrimination of explosives by diminishing the contribution of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen to the LIBS signal. These initial studies compare the close-contact (< 1 m) LIBS spectra of explosives using single pulse LIBS in argon with double pulse LIBS in atmosphere. We have demonstrated improved discrimination of an explosive and an organic interferent using double pulse LIBS to reduce the air entrained in the analytical plasma.

  2. Effect of frequency-doubling pulse Nd:YAG laser on microbial mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yansheng; Wang, Luyan; Zheng, Heng; Yin, Hongping; Chen, Xiangdong; Tan, Zheng; Wu, Wutong

    1999-09-01

    We are going to report the mutagenic effect of frequency-doubling pulse Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) on microbe. After irradiation with pulse laser, mutants of abscisic acid producing strains and erythromycin producing strains were obtained, one of which could produce 62.1% and 57% more products than control, respectively. In the study of mutagenization of Spirulina platensis caused by pulse laser, we selected a high photosynthetic strains, with improved productivity of protein and exocellular ploysaccharides of 12% and 246%, respectively. The experimental results indicate that frequency-doubling pulse laser (532 nm) is a potential new type of physical mutagenic factor.

  3. Double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for versatile hazardous materials detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Munson, Chase A.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (ST-LIBS) system capable of detecting a variety of hazardous materials at tens of meters. The use of a double-pulse laser improves the sensitivity and selectivity of ST-LIBS, especially for the detection of energetic materials. In addition to various metallic and plastic materials, the system has been used to detect bulk explosives RDX and Composition-B, explosive residues, biological species such as the anthrax surrogate Bacillus subtilis, and chemical warfare simulants at 20 m. We have also demonstrated the discrimination of explosive residues from various interferents on an aluminum substrate.

  4. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced air plasma by femtosecond double-pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Anmin; Li, Suyu; Li, Shuchang; Jiang, Yuanfei; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng; Huang, Xuri; Jin, Mingxing; Ding, Dajun

    2013-10-01

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, a femtosecond double-pulse laser was used to induce air plasma. The plasma spectroscopy was observed to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to femtosecond single-pulse laser. In particular, the optical emission intensity can be optimized by adjusting the delay time of femtosecond double-pulse. An appropriate pulse-to-pulse delay was selected, that was typically about 50 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, plasma channel, and so on.

  5. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced air plasma by femtosecond double-pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Anmin; Li, Suyu; Li, Shuchang; Jiang, Yuanfei; Ding, Dajun; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng; Huang, Xuri; Jin, Mingxing

    2013-10-15

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, a femtosecond double-pulse laser was used to induce air plasma. The plasma spectroscopy was observed to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to femtosecond single-pulse laser. In particular, the optical emission intensity can be optimized by adjusting the delay time of femtosecond double-pulse. An appropriate pulse-to-pulse delay was selected, that was typically about 50 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, plasma channel, and so on.

  6. Double-Pulsed 2-micron Laser Transmitter for Multiple Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2002-01-01

    A high energy double-pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF 2-micron laser amplifier has been demonstrated. 600 mJ per pulse pair under Q-switch operation is achieved with the gain of 4.4. This solid-state laser source can be used as lidar transmitter for multiple lidar applications such as coherent wind and carbon dioxide measurements.

  7. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2016-06-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new instrument has been flown in spring of 2014 for a total of ten flights with 27 flight hours. This IPDA lidar provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the results.

  8. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2015-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new 2-miron pulsed IPDA lidar has been flown in spring of 2014 for total ten flights with 27 flight hours. It provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  9. Addition of HCl to the double-pulse copper chloride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, A. A.; Nerheim, N. M.

    1977-01-01

    Addition of small amounts of hydrogen chloride to the buffer gas of a double-pulse CuCl laser causes an increase in the production of copper atoms in the ground state. A maximum laser energy increase of 15% was observed and the span of delay times for which laser action occurred increased.

  10. Experimental study on double-pulse laser ablation of steel upon multiple parallel-polarized ultrashort-pulse irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Kraft, Sebastian; Hartwig, Lars; Loeschner, Udo

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, double-pulse laser processing is experimentally studied with the aim to explore the influence of ultrashort pulses with very short time intervals on ablation efficiency and quality. For this, sequences of 50 double pulses of varied energy and inter-pulse delay, as adjusted between 400 fs and 18 ns by splitting the laser beam into two optical paths of different length, were irradiated to technical-grade stainless steel. The depth and the volume of the craters produced were measured in order to evaluate the efficiency of the ablation process; the crater quality was analyzed by SEM micrographs. The results obtained were compared with craters produced with sequences of 50 single pulses and energies equal to the double pulse. It is demonstrated that double-pulse processing cannot exceed the ablation efficiency of single pulses of optimal fluence, but the ablation crater surface formed smoother if inter-pulse delay was in the range between 10 ns and 18 ns. In addition, the influence of pulse duration and energy distribution between the individual pulses of the double pulse on ablation was studied. For very short inter-pulse delay, no significant effect of energy variation within the double pulse on removal rate was found, indicating that the double pulse acts as a big single pulse of equal energy. Further, the higher removal efficiency was achieved when double-pulse processing using femtosecond pulses instead of picosecond pulses.

  11. Modeling double pulsing of ion beams for HEDP target heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth; Barnard, John; Stoltz, Peter; Henestroza, Enrique

    2008-04-01

    Recent research on direct drive targets using heavy ion beams suggests optimal coupling will occur when the energy of the ions increases over the course of the pulse. In order to experimentally explore issues involving the interaction of the beam with the outflowing blowoff from the target, double pulse experiments have been proposed whereby a first pulse heats a planar target producing an outflow of material, and a second pulse (˜10 ns later) of higher ion energy (and hence larger projected range) interacts with this outflow before reaching and further heating the target. We report here results for simulations of double pulsing experiments using HYDRA for beam and target parameters relevant to the proposed Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) II at LBNL.

  12. Ablation enhancement of silicon by ultrashort double-pulse laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Shin, Yung C.

    2014-09-15

    In this study, the ultrashort double-pulse ablation of silicon is investigated. An atomistic simulation model is developed to analyze the underlying physics. It is revealed that the double-pulse ablation could significantly increase the ablation rate of silicon, compared with the single pulse ablation with the same total pulse energy, which is totally different from the case of metals. In the long pulse delay range (over 1 ps), the enhancement is caused by the metallic transition of melted silicon with the corresponding absorption efficiency. At ultrashort pulse delay (below 1 ps), the enhancement is due to the electron excitation by the first pulse. The enhancement only occurs at low and moderate laser fluence. The ablation is suppressed at high fluence due to the strong plasma shielding effect.

  13. Nonlinear 6-fold enhancement of laser drilling efficiency by double pulse mode: prospective in medicine application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershina, N. S.; Pershin, S. M.; Cech, M.; Prochazka, I.

    2009-05-01

    The efficiency of laser ablation drilling of metal and dielectric (ceramic, glasses, etc.) samples with single and multiple laser pulses per one laser shot was experimentally studied. The laser is operated on the fundamental (1064 nm) wavelength of Nd:YAG laser with 30 ns pulse length or its second (532 nm) and third (351 nm) harmonics, respectively. The laser shot repletion rate was 1 Hz. The pulses in train were separated by 25-45 μs interval. The crater depth and drilling speed dependence increasing on pulse number in multipulse train was studied. The laser ablation normalized per pulse energy in train dependence is not linear function. The strong ablation enhancement was observed. The optimal (in sense the total pulse energy using) drilling can be obtained with double pulse mode compared with 3 - 5 pulses. Nonlinear more than 6 fold increasing of crater depth produced by the second pulse in train was detected. The mechanism of selective increasing of the second pulse interaction efficiency with the hard target is discussed. Experimental results explained in terms of double pulse mode laser ablation model. Spectroscopy study of laser plasma was observed to confirm discussed model of high efficiency for two laser pulse laser ablation. Efficiency of double pulse mode compared with multipulse mode is discussed to be more perspective for various applications of laser ablation. The medicine (surgery, dentist, ophthalmology and so on) application is the most prospective, for instance, the teeth drilling or glaucoma perforation, can be done with smaller energy value.

  14. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  15. Investigation of lasing in lead vapor by the double pulse method

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, V.V.; Markova, S.V.; Molchanova, L.V.; Petrash, G.G.

    1983-05-01

    The double pulse method was to study the 722.9 nm line emitted by a lead vapor laser. The parameters of the second excitation pulse were measured simultaneously with the lasing characteristics. It was found that the main factor determining a decrease in the laser output power in the second pulse was the residual population of the lower active level. Variations in the excitation pulse had a relatively weak influence on the form of this dependence and were essentially manifested when there was a relatively long delay between the excitation pulses.

  16. Quantitative effect of initial current rise on pumping the double-pulsed copper chloride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    The laser energy at optimum time delay of a double-pulsed CuCl laser was experimentally determined to be a logarithmic function of the initial current rise of the pumping pulse over the total circuit inductance range 1 to 12 microhenrys. The minimum delay was found to decrease with initial current rise, which implies that faster rising current pulses are more efficient at pumping copper atoms from the ground state to the upper laser level because lasing threshold occurs with a higher population in the lower laser level.

  17. Demonstration of periodic nanostructure formation with less ablation by double-pulse laser irradiation on titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yuki; Sakata, Ryoichi; Konishi, Kazuki; Ono, Koki; Matsuoka, Shusaku; Watanabe, Kota; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji

    2016-06-01

    By pairing femtosecond laser pulses (duration ˜40 fs and central wavelength ˜810 nm) at an appropriate time interval, a laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is formed with much less ablation than one formed with a single pulse. On a titanium plate, a pair of laser pulses with fluences of 70 and 140 mJ/cm2 and a rather large time interval (>10 ps) creates a LIPSS with an interspace of 600 nm, the same as that formed by a single pulse of 210 mJ/cm2, while the double pulse ablates only 4 nm, a quarter of the ablation depth of a single pulse.

  18. Double-Pulse Two-Micron IPDA Lidar Simulation for Airborne Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    An advanced double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide. The instrument utilizes a state-of-the-art 2-micron laser transmitter with tunable on-line wavelength and advanced receiver. Instrument modeling and airborne simulations are presented in this paper. Focusing on random errors, results demonstrate instrument capabilities of performing precise carbon dioxide differential optical depth measurement with less than 3% random error for single-shot operation from up to 11 km altitude. This study is useful for defining CO2 measurement weighting, instrument setting, validation and sensitivity trade-offs.

  19. The 2 micrometer plasmid stability system: analyses of the interactions among plasmid- and host-encoded components.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, S; Ahn, Y T; Yang, X M; Wu, X L; Jayaram, M

    1998-12-01

    The stable inheritance of the 2 micrometer plasmid in a growing population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is dependent on two plasmid-encoded proteins (Rep1p and Rep2p), together with the cis-acting locus REP3 (STB). In this study we demonstrate that short carboxy-terminal deletions of Rep1p and Rep2p severely diminish their normal capacity to localize to the yeast nucleus. The nuclear targeting, as well as their functional role in plasmid partitioning, can be restored by the addition of a nuclear localization sequence to the amino or the carboxy terminus of the shortened Rep proteins. Analyses of deletion derivatives of the Rep proteins by using the in vivo dihybrid genetic test in yeast, as well as by glutathione S-transferase fusion trapping assays in vitro demonstrate that the amino-terminal portion of Rep1p (ca. 150 amino acids long) is responsible for its interactions with Rep2p. In a monohybrid in vivo assay, we have identified Rep1p, Rep2p, and a host-encoded protein, Shf1p, as being capable of interacting with the STB locus. The Shf1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli can bind with high specificity to the STB sequence in vitro. In a yeast strain deleted for the SHF1 locus, a 2 micrometer circle-derived plasmid shows relatively poor stability. PMID:9819432

  20. Rippled area formed by surface plasmon polaritons upon femtosecond laser double-pulse irradiation of silicon.

    PubMed

    Derrien, Thibault J-Y; Krüger, Jörg; Itina, Tatiana E; Höhm, Sandra; Rosenfeld, Arkadi; Bonse, Jörn

    2013-12-01

    The formation of near-wavelength laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on silicon upon irradiation with sequences of Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser pulse pairs (pulse duration 150 fs, central wavelength 800 nm) is studied theoretically. For this purpose, the nonlinear generation of conduction band electrons in silicon and their relaxation is numerically calculated using a two-temperature model approach including intrapulse changes of optical properties, transport, diffusion and recombination effects. Following the idea that surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) can be excited when the material turns from semiconducting to metallic state, the "SPP active area" is calculated as function of fluence and double-pulse delay up to several picoseconds and compared to the experimentally observed rippled surface areas. Evidence is presented that multi-photon absorption explains the large increase of the rippled area for temporally overlapping pulses. For longer double-pulse delays, relevant relaxation processes are identified. The results demonstrate that femtosecond LIPSS on silicon are caused by the excitation of SPP and can be controlled by temporal pulse shaping. PMID:24514516

  1. Quantitative analysis of arsenic in mine tailing soils using double pulse-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Ji-hyun; Lenth, Christoph; Salb, Christian; Ko, Eun-Joung; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Park, Kihong

    2009-10-01

    A double pulse-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) was used to determine arsenic (As) concentration in 16 soil samples collected from 5 different mine tailing sites in Korea. We showed that the use of double pulse laser led to enhancements of signal intensity (by 13% on average) and signal-to-noise ratio of As emission lines (by 165% on average) with smaller relative standard deviation compared to single pulse laser approach. We believe this occurred because the second laser pulse in the rarefied atmosphere produced by the first pulse led to the increase of plasma temperature and populations of exited levels. An internal standardization method using a Fe emission line provided a better correlation and sensitivity between As concentration and the DP-LIBS signal than any other elements used. The Fe was known as one of the major components in current soil samples, and its concentration varied not substantially. The As concentration determined by the DP-LIBS was compared with that obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) to evaluate the current LIBS system. They are correlated with a correlation coefficient of 0.94. The As concentration by the DP-LIBS was underestimated in the high concentration range (>1000 mg-As/kg). The loss of sensitivity that occurred at high concentrations could be explained by self-absorption in the generated plasma.

  2. Double-Pulse Two-micron LPDA Lidar Simulation for Airborne Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    2016-06-01

    An advanced double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide. The instrument utilizes a state-of-the-art 2-μm laser transmitter with tunable on-line wavelength and advanced receiver. Instrument modeling and airborne simulations are presented in this paper. Focusing on random errors, results demonstrate instrument capabilities of performing precise carbon dioxide differential optical depth measurement with less than 3% random error for single-shot operation up to 11 km altitude. This study is useful for defining CO2 measurement weighting function for adaptive targeting, instrument setting, validation and sensitivity trade-offs.

  3. LLNL flash x-ray radiography machine (FXR) double-pulse upgrade diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, M.; Avalee, C.; Richardson, R.; Zentler, J.

    1997-06-26

    When the FXR machine was first tuned on the 1980`s, a minimal amount of diagnostics was available and consisted mostly of power monitors. During the recent accelerator upgrade, additional beam diagnostics were added. The sensor upgrades included beam bugs (resistive wall beam motion sensors) and high-frequency B-dot. Even with this suite of measurement tools, tuning was difficult. For the current Double- Pulse Upgrade, beam transport is a more complex problem--the beam characteristics must be measured better. Streak and framing cameras, which measure beam size and motions, are being added. Characterization of the beam along the entire accelerator is expected and other techniques will be evaluated also. Each sensor has limitations and only provides a piece of the puzzle. Besides providing more beam data, the set of diagnostics used should be broad enough so results can be cross validated. Results will also be compared to theoretical calculations and computer models, and successes and difficulties will be reported.

  4. Chemical etching method assisted double-pulse LIBS for the analysis of silicon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, A. A. I.

    2015-06-01

    Two Nd:YAG lasers working in pulsed modes are combined in the same direction (collinear arrangement) to focus on silicon (Si) crystals in reduced oxygen atmosphere (0.1 mbar) for double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) system. Silicon crystals of (100) and (111) orientations were investigated, and Si samples were measured either without prior treatment ("untreated") or after fabrication of nano-pores ("treated"). Nano-pores are produced by metal coating and by chemical etching. DP-LIBS spectra were compared for different Si samples (untreated, treated, (100) and (111) orientations), for double-pulse (DP) (with 266 nm pulse followed by 1064 nm pulse) excitation and for different delay times (times between the excitation laser pulse and the detection ICCD gate); treatment by chemical etching has been studied as well. The intensity of the atomic line Si I at 288.16 nm was enhanced by a factor of about three by using the DP-LIBS signals as compared to the single-pulse (SP) signal which could increase the sensitivity of the LIBS technique. This study proved that an optimized value of the etching time of Si during etching by chemical processes and short delay times are required. Plasma parameters [the electron temperature ( T e) and the electron number density ( N e)] were calculated from measured SP- and DP-LIBS spectra. The most important result of this study is the much higher DP-LIBS intensity observed on Si (100) as compared to Si (111) for measurements under the same experimental conditions. This study could provide important reference data for the design and optimization of DP-LIBS systems involved in plasma-facing components diagnostics.

  5. Development of double-pulse lasers ablation system for generating gold ion source under applying an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, A. A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Double-pulse lasers ablation (DPLA) technique was developed to generate gold (Au) ion source and produce high current under applying an electric potential in an argon ambient gas environment. Two Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers operating at 1064 and 266 nm wavelengths are combined in an unconventional orthogonal (crossed-beam) double-pulse configuration with 45° angle to focus on a gold target along with a spectrometer for spectral analysis of gold plasma. The properties of gold plasma produced under double-pulse lasers excitation were studied. The velocity distribution function (VDF) of the emitted plasma was studied using a dedicated Faraday-cup ion probe (FCIP) under argon gas discharge. The experimental parameters were optimized to attain the best signal to noise (S/N) ratio. The results depicted that the VDF and current signals depend on the discharge applied voltage, laser intensity, laser wavelength and ambient argon gas pressure. A seven-fold increases in the current signal by increasing the discharge applied voltage and ion velocity under applying double-pulse lasers field. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and density) were also studied and their dependence on the delay (times between the excitation laser pulse and the opening of camera shutter) was investigated as well. This study could provide significant reference data for the optimization and design of DPLA systems engaged in laser induced plasma deposition thin films and facing components diagnostics.

  6. The effect of the laser wavelength on collinear double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Lin, Yanqing; Liu, Jing; Fan, Shuang; Xu, Zhuopin; Huang, Qing; Wu, Yuejin

    2016-05-01

    The pulsed lasers at wavelengths of 532 nm and 1064 nm were used as two beams of light for collinear double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS). By changing the time sequence of two beams of different lasers, we studied the effect of the interval of two pulses of DP-LIBS on spectral signals compared with single pulsed (SP) LIBS.

  7. Experimental investigations of argon spark gap recovery times by developing a high voltage double pulse generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, C. S.; Patel, A. S.; Naresh, P.; Sharma, Archana; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-06-01

    The voltage recovery in a spark gap for repetitive switching has been a long research interest. A two-pulse technique is used to determine the voltage recovery times of gas spark gap switch with argon gas. First pulse is applied to the spark gap to over-volt the gap and initiate the breakdown and second pulse is used to determine the recovery voltage of the gap . A pulse transformer based double pulse generator capable of generating 40 kV peak pulses with rise time of 300 ns and 1.5 μs FWHM and with a delay of 10 μs-1 s was developed. A matrix transformer topology is used to get fast rise times by reducing LlCd product in the circuit. Recovery Experiments have been conducted for 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm gap length with 0-2 bars pressure for argon gas. Electrodes of a sparkgap chamber are of rogowsky profile type, made up of stainless steel material, and thickness of 15 mm are used in the recovery study. The variation in the distance and pressure effects the recovery rate of the spark gap. An intermediate plateu is observed in the spark gap recovery curves. Recovery time decreases with increase in pressure and shorter gaps in length are recovering faster than longer gaps.

  8. Improvements in discrimination of bulk and trace elements in long-wavelength double pulse LIBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, J. R.; Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we study the effectiveness of long-wavelength heating in double pulse (DP) LIBS, quantitatively comparing figures of merit with those from traditional single pulse (SP) LIBS. The first laser pulse serves as the source of sample ablation, creating an aerosol-like plume that is subsequently reheated by the second laser pulse. At power densities used, the long-wavelength CO2 laser pulse does not ablate any of the solid sample in the atmospheric conditions investigated, meaning plasma emission and enhanced signal can be entirely attributed to the reheated plume rather than increased sample ablation. The signal discrimination was improved significantly using long-wavelength DP-LIBS. For bulk elemental analysis, DP-LIBS provided maximum enhancements of about 14 and 15 times for S/N and S/B, respectively, compared to SP-LIBS using the same quantity of ablated sample. For trace elemental analysis, maximum enhancements of about 7 and 4 times for S/N and S/B, respectively, were observed. These improvements are attributed to effective coupling between the second heating pulse and expanding plume and more efficient excitation of plume species than from the single pulse alone. Most significant improvements were observed in the case of low prepulse energy and minimal sample ablation. While bulk elemental analysis observed improvements for all prepulse energies studied, trace element discrimination only significantly improved for the lowest prepulse energy studied.

  9. Characterization of MeV proton acceleration from double pulse irradiation of foil targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, S.; Mo, M. Z.; Masud, R.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; McLean, H. S.; Hazi, A.; Chen, H.; Ceurvorst, L.; Norreys, P.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the experimental characterization of proton acceleration from double-pulse irradiation of um-scale foil targets. Temporally separated sub-picosecond pulses have been shown to increase the conversion efficiency of laser energy to MeV protons. Here, two 700 fs, 1 ω pulses were separated by 1 to 5 ps; total beam energy was 100 J, with 5-20% of the total energy contained within the first pulse. In contrast to the ultraclean beams used in previous experiments, prepulse energies on the order of 10 mJ were present in the current experiments which appear to have a moderating effect on the enhancement. Proton beam measurements were made with radiochromic film stacks, as well as magnetic spectrometers. The effect on electron generation was measured using Kα emission from buried Cu tracer layers, while specular light diagnostics (FROG, reflection spectralon) indicated the laser coupling efficiency into the target. The results obtained will be presented and compared to PIC simulations. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Estimation of pore size distribution using concentric double pulsed-field gradient NMR.

    PubMed

    Benjamini, Dan; Nevo, Uri

    2013-05-01

    Estimation of pore size distribution of well calibrated phantoms using NMR is demonstrated here for the first time. Porous materials are a central constituent in fields as diverse as biology, geology, and oil drilling. Noninvasive characterization of monodisperse porous samples using conventional pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR is a well-established method. However, estimation of pore size distribution of heterogeneous polydisperse systems, which comprise most of the materials found in nature, remains extremely challenging. Concentric double pulsed-field gradient (CDPFG) is a 2-D technique where both q (the amplitude of the diffusion gradient) and φ (the relative angle between the gradient pairs) are varied. A recent prediction indicates this method should produce a more accurate and robust estimation of pore size distribution than its conventional 1-D versions. Five well defined size distribution phantoms, consisting of 1-5 different pore sizes in the range of 5-25 μm were used. The estimated pore size distributions were all in good agreement with the known theoretical size distributions, and were obtained without any a priori assumption on the size distribution model. These findings support that in addition to its theoretical benefits, the CDPFG method is experimentally reliable. Furthermore, by adding the angle parameter, sensitivity to small compartment sizes is increased without the use of strong gradients, thus making CDPFG safe for biological applications. PMID:23548563

  11. Double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñon, V.; Fotakis, C.; Nicolas, G.; Anglos, D.

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents results obtained in a study of collinear geometry double pulse femtosecond LIBS analysis of solids in ambient environment. LIBS signal enhancement of 3-10 fold, accompanied by significant improvement of signal reproducibility, in comparison with the single pulse case, has been found in different samples such as brass, iron, silicon, barium sulfate and aluminum when an optimum temporal separation between the two ablating pulses is used. The influence of the delay between pulses in the LIBS signal intensity was investigated and two intervals of interaction were established. A first transient regime from 0 to 50 ps, in which the LIBS signal increases until reaching a maximum, and a second regime that ranges from 50 to 1000 ps (maximum inter-pulse delay investigated) in which the signal enhancement remains constant. Emissions from both ionized and neutral atoms show the same pattern of enhancement with a clear tendency of lines arising from higher energy emissive states to exhibit higher enhancement factors.

  12. Experimental investigations of argon spark gap recovery times by developing a high voltage double pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Reddy, C S; Patel, A S; Naresh, P; Sharma, Archana; Mittal, K C

    2014-06-01

    The voltage recovery in a spark gap for repetitive switching has been a long research interest. A two-pulse technique is used to determine the voltage recovery times of gas spark gap switch with argon gas. First pulse is applied to the spark gap to over-volt the gap and initiate the breakdown and second pulse is used to determine the recovery voltage of the gap. A pulse transformer based double pulse generator capable of generating 40 kV peak pulses with rise time of 300 ns and 1.5 μs FWHM and with a delay of 10 μs-1 s was developed. A matrix transformer topology is used to get fast rise times by reducing L(l)C(d) product in the circuit. Recovery Experiments have been conducted for 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm gap length with 0-2 bars pressure for argon gas. Electrodes of a sparkgap chamber are of rogowsky profile type, made up of stainless steel material, and thickness of 15 mm are used in the recovery study. The variation in the distance and pressure effects the recovery rate of the spark gap. An intermediate plateu is observed in the spark gap recovery curves. Recovery time decreases with increase in pressure and shorter gaps in length are recovering faster than longer gaps. PMID:24985833

  13. Measurements of deuterium retention and surface elemental composition with double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaviva, Salvatore; Caneve, Luisa; Colao, Francesco; Maddaluno, Giorgio; Krawczyk, Natalia; Czarnecka, Agata; Gasior, Pawel; Kubkowska, Monica; Lepek, Michal

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the tritium amount retained in the plasma facing components and their surface layer composition is of crucial importance for ITER. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical technique suitable for in situ measurements of both these quantities. For improving its sensitivity, the double pulse (DP) variant can be used, instead of the standard single pulse (SP). In this work Mo samples coated with 1.5-1.8 μm thick W-Al (as a proxy for Be) mixed layer, with co-deposited deuterium were analyzed under vacuum (˜5 × 10-5 mbar) by SP and DP LIBS, showing enhancement of the spectral intensity for the latter. Calibration free method was applied to the LIBS data for getting the elemental concentration of W and Al. Results are in satisfactory agreement with those obtained from preliminary, ion beam analysis measurements. Deuterium concentration was tentatively estimated by accounting for the intensity ratio between Dα and nearby WI lines.

  14. Signal enhancement in collinear double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy applied to different soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolodelli, Gustavo; Senesi, Giorgio Saverio; Romano, Renan Arnon; de Oliveira Perazzoli, Ivan Luiz; Milori, Débora Marcondes Bastos Pereira

    2015-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a well-known consolidated analytical technique employed successfully for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of solid, liquid, gaseous and aerosol samples of very different nature and origin. Several techniques, such as dual-pulse excitation setup, have been used in order to improve LIBS's sensitivity. The purpose of this paper was to optimize the key parameters as excitation wavelength, delay time and interpulse, that influence the double pulse (DP) LIBS technique in the collinear beam geometry when applied to the analysis at atmospheric air pressure of soil samples of different origin and texture from extreme regions of Brazil. Additionally, a comparative study between conventional single pulse (SP) LIBS and DP LIBS was performed. An optimization of DP LIBS system, choosing the correct delay time between the two pulses, was performed allowing its use for different soil types and the use of different emission lines. In general, the collinear DP LIBS system improved the analytical performances of the technique by enhancing the intensity of emission lines of some elements up to about 5 times, when compared with conventional SP-LIBS, and reduced the continuum emission. Further, the IR laser provided the best performance in re-heating the plasma.

  15. Characterization and mechanism of glass microwelding by double-pulse ultrafast laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sizhu; Wu, Dong; Xu, Jian; Hanada, Yasutaka; Suganuma, Ryo; Wang, Haiyu; Makimura, Testuya; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2012-12-17

    We investigated the physical mechanism of high-efficiency glass microwelding by double-pulse ultrafast laser irradiation by measuring the dependences of the size of the heat-affected zone and the bonding strength on the delay time between the two pulses for delay time up to 80 ns. The size of the heat-affected zone increases rapidly when the delay time is increased from 0 to 12.5 ps. It then decreases dramatically when the delay time is further increased to 30 ps. It has a small peak around 100 ps. For delay time up to 40 ns, the size of the heat-affected zone exceeds that for a delay time of 0 ps, whereas for delay time over 60 ps, it becomes smaller than that for a delay time of 0 ps. The bonding strength exhibits the same tendency. The underlying physical mechanism is discussed in terms of initial electron excitation by the first pulse and subsequent excitation by the second pulse: specifically, the first pulse induces multiphoton ionization or tunneling ionization, while the second pulse induces electron heating or avalanche ionization or the second pulse is absorbed by the localized state. Transient absorption of glass induced by the ultrafast laser pulse was analyzed by an ultrafast pump-probe technique. We found that the optimum pulse energy ratio is unity. These results provide new insights into high-efficiency ultrafast laser microwelding of glass and suggest new possibilities for further development of other ultrafast laser processing techniques. PMID:23263129

  16. Controlling explosion dynamics in mixed He/Xe clusters with X-ray double pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemkiewicz, M.; Bacellar, C.; Chatterley, A.; Cryan, J.; Gessner, O.; Mueller, M.; Rupp, D.; Moeller, T.; Jones, C.; Tanyag, R. M. P.; Bernando, C.; Gomez, L.; Kwok, J.; Vilesov, A.; Ferguson, K.; Bucher, M.; Gorkhover, T.; Carron, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T.; Turner, J.; Decker, F.-J.; Bostedt, C.

    2015-05-01

    Intense X-ray induced fragmentation dynamics of hybrid systems consisting of Xe structures embedded in large superfluid helium nanodroplets are studied by femtosecond time-resolved ion mass spectrometry. The clusters are photoionized by a pair of intense X-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), resulting in fragmentation and ejection of ions with kinetic energies of up to several keV. The production of He++ is of particular interest as this cation is only formed in the mixed system and not upon X-ray illumination of pure He nanodroplets. It is found that the He++ product kinetic energy distribution varies sensitively with the relative timing of the X-ray double pulse, exhibiting complex dynamics as a function of pump-probe delay. Existing models describing similar results for experiments using intense infrared laser pulses are not applicable to this study due to the disparate interactions of intense optical and X-ray fields with matter. Possible phenomena underlying the observed trends are discussed.

  17. High-resolution three-dimensional compositional imaging by double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavo, C.; Menichetti, L.; Grifoni, E.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Poggialini, F.; Pagnotta, S.; Palleschi, V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present a new instrument specifically realized for high-resolution three-dimensional compositional analysis and mapping of materials. The instrument is based on the coupling of a Double-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument with an optical microscope. The compositional mapping of the samples is obtained by scanning the laser beam across the surface of the sample, while the in depth analysis is performed by sending multiple laser pulses on the same point. Depths of analysis of several tens of microns can be obtained. The instrument presented has definite advantages with respect to Laser Ablation-ICP Mass Spectrometry in many applications related to material analysis, biomedicine and environmental diagnostics. An application to the diagnostics of industrial ceramics is presented, demonstrating the feasibility of Double-Pulse LIBS Imaging and its advantages with respect to conventional single-pulse LIBS imaging.

  18. Physics Design of the Eta-II Double Pulse Target Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Ho, Darwin D.-H.; McCarrick, James; Paul, Arthur; Sampayan, Stephen; Wang, Li-Fang; Weir, John

    2000-10-01

    The second-axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility will provide four 2.1 mm spot size, x-ray pulses within 2 ms with their x-doses in the range of several hundred rads at a meter for x-ray imaging. To achieve its performance specifications, there should be a sufficient amount of the DARHT-II x-ray converter material remaining while it turns into plasma and expands rapidly due to the heating of previous beam pulses. Furthermore, the beam-target interactions, such as the unwanted focusing by the backstreaming ions from the desorbed gas from the target surface for the first pulse and by those from the target plasma for the subsequent pulses, and the instability of the beam propagating in dense plasma, should be mitigated. We have modified the single pulse target experimental facility on the Experimental Test Accelerator II (ETA-II) to perform the double pulse target experiments to validate the DARHT-II multi-pulse target concept. The 1.15 MeV, 2 kA Snowtron injector will be used to provide the first electron pulse. The 6 MeV, 2 kA ETA-II beam will be used as the probe beam, i.e., the second pulse. The ETA-II target is located inside a focusing magnet (near the center). To use the same ETA-II final focus lens, an iron sleeve will be inserted from the downstream side of the magnet to reduce the downstream side’s magnetic field, and the Snowtron beam will strike the x-ray converter from the back. The physics design of the final focus area will be presented. We have modeled the hydrodynamics of the target expansion for the Snowtron beam. Comparison against the DARHT-II target will be presented.

  19. Effect of atmosphere on collinear double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew J. Effenberger, Jr.; Jill R. Scott

    2010-09-01

    Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) has been shown to enhance LIBS spectra. Several researches have reported significant increases in signal-to-noise and or spectral intensity [1-4]. In addition to DP-LIBS, atmospheric conditions can also increase spectra intensity. For example, Iida [5] found that He and Ar both increase LIBS intensity compared to air at one 1 atm. It was also found that as the pressure was decreased to 100 Torr, LIBS intensity increased in Ar and air for single pulse (SP) LIBS. In this study, a collinear DP-LIBS scheme is used along with manipulation of the atmospheric conditions. The DP-LIBS scheme consists of a 355 nm ablative pulse fired into a sample contained in a vacuum chamber. A second analytical 1064 nm pulse is then fired 100 ns to 10 µs after and along the same path of the first pulse. Ar, He and air at pressures ranging from atmospheric pressure (630 Torr at elevation) to 10-5 Torr are introduced during DP-LIBS and SP-LIBS experiments. For a brass sample, a significant increase in spectral intensity of Cu and Zn lines were observed in DP-LIBS under Ar compared to DP-LIBS in air (Figure 1). It was also found that Cu and Zn lines acquired with SP-LIBS in Ar are nearly as intense as DP-LIBS in air. Signal-to-noise for lines from various samples will be reported for both DP-LIBS and SP-LIBS in Ar, He, and air at pressures ranging from 630 Torr to 10-5 Torr.

  20. Effect of Atmosphere on Collinear Double-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew J. Effenberger, Jr; Jill R. Scott

    2011-07-01

    Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) has been shown to enhance LIBS spectra. Several researches have reported significant increases in signal-to-noise and or spectral intensity. In addition to DP-LIBS, atmospheric conditions can also increase spectra intensity. For example, He and Ar both increase LIBS intensity compared to air at one 1 atm. It was also found that as the pressure was decreased to 100 Torr, LIBS intensity increased in Ar and air for single pulse (SP) LIBS. In this study, a collinear DP-LIBS scheme is used along with manipulation of the atmospheric conditions. The DP-LIBS scheme consists of a 355 nm ablative pulse fired into a sample contained in a vacuum chamber. A second analytical 1064 nm pulse is then fired 100 ns to 10 {micro}s after and along the same path of the first pulse. Ar, He and air at pressures ranging from atmospheric pressure (630 Torr at elevation) to 10{sup -5} Torr are introduced during DP-LIBS and SP-LIBS experiments. For a brass sample, a significant increase in spectral intensity of Cu and Zn lines were observed in DP-LIBS under Ar compared to DP-LIBS in air. It was also found that Cu and Zn lines acquired with SP-LIBS in Ar are nearly as intense as DP-LIBS in air. Signal-to-noise for lines from various samples will be reported for both DP-LIBS and SP-LIBS in Ar, He, and air at pressures ranging from 630 Torr to 10{sup -5} Torr.

  1. 2-micron Double Pulsed IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke; Scola, Tory

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a high energy pulsed 2-micron IPDA lidar instrument to measure the atmospheric CO2 column density. The IPDA lidar is operated on the long wavelength wing of R(30) CO2 line at 2050.967 nm (4875.749 cm-1) in the side-line operation mode. The R(30) line is an excellent absorption line for the measurements of CO2 in 2µm wavelength region with regard to the strength of the absorption lines, low susceptibility to atmospheric temperature variability, and freedom from problematic interference with other absorption lines. The Ho:Tm:YLF laser transmitter is designed to be operated in a unique double pulse format that can produce two-pulse pair in 10 Hz operation. Typically, the output energies of the laser transmitter are 100mJ and 45mJ for the first pulse and the second pulse, respectively. We injection seed the first pulse with on-line frequency and the second pulse with off-line frequency. The IPDA lidar instrument size, weight and power consumption were restricted to small research aircraft payload requirements. The airborne IPDA lidar instrument measures the total integrated column content of CO2 from the instrument to the ground but with weighting that can be tuned by controlling the transmitted wavelengths. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. The 2-μm CO2 IPDA lidar airborne demonstration was conducted during March 20, 2014 through April 10, 2014. IPDA lidar airborne flights included various operating and environmental conditions. Environmental conditions included different flight altitude up to 8.3 km, different ground target conditions such as vegetation, soil, ocean, snow and sand and different cloud conditions. Besides, some flights targeted power plant incinerators for investigating the IPDA sensitivity to CO2 plums. The lidar instrument is robust during all of the flights. This paper describes

  2. Comparative Study of Two Methods of Orthogonal Double-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi, A.; Bahreini, M.; Tavassoli, S. H.

    2016-03-01

    Double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) of aluminum sample is studied experimentally in orthogonal configuration in air. In this configuration, two schemes of reheating and pre-ablation are examined and the results are compared with single pulse one. The effect of delay time between two laser pulses on emission line intensities of plasma is investigated. Some of the parameters that have been involved in different mechanism of signal enhancement such as plasma temperature, sample heating effects, atmospheric effects, and modification of the ablation dynamics are more discussed. Investigation of the effect of laser pulse energy on emission line intensities in single pulse LIBS experiment demonstrate that because of saturation effects the intensities will not increase necessarily by increasing the laser pulse energy. Moreover, the results show that the electron temperature and rate of mass removal in orthogonal configuration of DP-LIBS is higher than that of single pulse with the same total energy. It is suggested that for correct comparison between single and double pulse results, the optimum pulse energy in single pulse should be considered. Overall, our results demonstrate that under optimized conditions the signal enhancement is much more in pre-ablation configuration than re-heating configuration.

  3. Observations of far-infrared fine structure lines: o III88.35 micrometer and oI 63.2 micrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storey, J. W. V.; Watson, D. M.; Townes, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of the O III 88.35 micrometer line and the O I63.2 micrometer were made with a far infrared spectrometer. The sources M17, NGC 7538, and W51 were mapped in the O III line with 1 arc minute resolution and the emission is found to be quite widespread. In all cases the peak of the emission coincides with the maximum radio continuum. The far infrared continuum was mapped simultaneously and in M17, NGC 7538, and W51 the continuum peak is found to be distinct from the center of ionization. The O III line was also detected in W3, W49, and in a number of positions in the Orion nebula. Upper limits were obtained on NGS 7027, NGC 6572, DR21, G29.9-0.0 and M82. The 63.2 micrometer O I line was detected in M17, M42, and marginally in DR21. A partial map of M42 in this line shows that most of the emission observed arises from the Trapezium and from the bright optical bar to the southeast.

  4. Detection of microscopic anisotropy in gray matter and in a novel tissue phantom using double Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo MR.

    PubMed

    Komlosh, M E; Horkay, F; Freidlin, R Z; Nevo, U; Assaf, Y; Basser, P J

    2007-11-01

    A double Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo (d-PGSE) MR experiment was used to measure and assess the degree of local diffusion anisotropy in brain gray matter, and in a novel "gray matter" phantom that consists of randomly oriented tubes filled with water. In both samples, isotropic diffusion was observed at a macroscopic scale while anisotropic diffusion was observed at a microscopic scale, however, the nature of the resulting echo attenuation profiles were qualitatively different. Gray matter, which contains multiple cell types and fibers, exhibits a more complicated echo attenuation profile than the phantom. Since microscopic anisotropy was observed in both samples in the low q regime comparable to that achievable in clinical scanner, it may offer a new potential contrast mechanism for characterizing gray matter microstructure in medical and biological applications. PMID:17869147

  5. Testing of a Two-Micron Double-Pulse IPDA Lidar Instrument for Airborne Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Singh, U. N.

    2015-12-01

    Utilizing a tunable two-micron double-pulse laser transmitter, an airborne IPDA lidar system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for atmospheric carbon dioxide column measurements. The instrument comprises a receiver with 0.4 m telescope and InGaAs pin detectors coupled to 12-bit, 200 MS/s waveform digitizers. For on-site ground testing, the 2-μm CO2 IPDA lidar was installed inside a trailer located where meteorological data and CO2 mixing ratio profiles were obtained from CAPABLE and LiCoR in-suite sampling, respectively. IPDA horizontal ground testing with 860 m target distance indicated CO2 sensitivity of 2.24 ppm with -0.43 ppm offset, while operating at 3 GHz on-line position from the R30 line center. Then, the IPDA lidar was integrated inside the NASA B-200 aircraft, with supporting instrumentation, for airborne testing and validation. Supporting instruments included in-situ LiCoR sensor, GPS and video recorder for target identification. Besides, aircraft built-in sensors provided altitude, pressure, temperature and relative humidity sampling during flights. The 2-mm CO2 IPDA lidar airborne testing was conducted through ten daytime flights (27 hours flight time). Airborne testing included different operating and environmental conditions for flight altitude up to 7 km, different ground target conditions such as vegetation, soil, ocean, snow and sand and different cloud conditions. Some flights targeted power plant incinerators for investigating IPDA sensitivity to CO2 plums. Relying on independent CO2 in-situ sampling, conducted through NOAA, airborne IPDA CO2 sensitivity of 4.15 ppm with 1.14 ppm offset were observed at 6 km altitude and 4 GHz on-line offset frequency. This validates the 2-μm double-pulse IPDA lidar for atmospheric CO2 measurement.

  6. Double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of bulk aqueous solutions at oceanic pressures: interrelationship of gate delay, pulse energies, interpulse delay, and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, Anna P. M.; Chave, Alan D

    2008-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been identified as an analytical chemistry technique suitable for field use. We use double pulse LIBS to detect five analytes (sodium, manganese, calcium, magnesium, and potassium) that are of key importance in understanding the chemistry of deep ocean hydrothermal vent fluids as well as mixtures of vent fluids and seawater. The high pressure aqueous environment of the deep ocean is simulated in the laboratory, and the key double pulse experimental parameters (laser pulse energies, gate delay time, and interpulse delay time) are studied at pressures up to 2.76x10{sup 7} Pa. Each element is found to have a unique optimal set of parameters for detection. For all pressures and energies, a short ({<=}100 ns) gate delay is necessary. As pressure increases, a shorter interpulse delay is needed and the double pulse conditions effectively become single pulse for both the 1.38x10{sup 7} Pa and the 2.76x10{sup 7} Pa conditions tested. Calibration curves reveal the limits of detection of the elements (5000 ppm Mg, 500 ppm K, 500 ppm Ca, 1000 ppm Mn, and 50 ppm Na) in aqueous solutions at 2.76x10{sup 7} Pa for the experimental setup used. When compared to our previous single pulse LIBS work for Ca, Mn, and Na, the use of double pulse LIBS for analyte detection in high pressure aqueous solutions did not improve the limits of detection.

  7. Effect of inter-pulse delay time on production and size properties of colloidal nanoparticles prepared by collinear double-pulse laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, Behzad; Mahdieh, Mohammah Hossein

    2016-08-01

    The influence of inter-pulse delay times (0–20 ns) between two collinear sequential nanosecond pulses on the production and size properties (mean size and size distribution) of colloidal nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a silver target in a distilled water medium has been studied. Various laser fluences at different inter-pulse delay times between two collinear pulses were used. Furthermore, for a better understanding of the effect of the double-pulse and single-pulse mode, experiments were performed. The characterization of the synthesized colloidal nanoparticles was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. Our results showed that 5 ns time-delayed double-pulse laser ablation results in the production of nanoparticles with the highest concentration among the other time-delayed ablation experiments and even more than single-pulse-mode experiments. It also found that using a double-pulse approach with inter-pulse delay times in the range of 0–20 ns leads to the production of nanoparticles with smaller mean sizes and narrower size distributions in comparison to single-pulse-mode laser ablation. The effect of time overlapping between two pulses in the case of double-pulse ablation was analyzed.

  8. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  9. Quantitative determination of copper in a glass matrix using double pulse laser induced breakdown and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ahmed A I; Morsy, Mohamed A

    2016-07-01

    A series of lithium-lead-borate glasses of a variable copper oxide loading were quantitatively analyzed in this work using two distinct spectroscopic techniques, namely double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). DP-LIBS results measured upon a combined nanosecond lasers irradiation running at 266nm and 1064nm pulses of a collinear configuration directed to the surface of borate glass samples with a known composition. This arrangement was employed to predict the electron's temperature (Te) and density (Ne) of the excited plasma from the recorded spectra. The intensity of elements' responses using this scheme is higher than that of single-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (SP-LIBS) setup under the same experimental conditions. On the other hand, the EPR data shows typical Cu (II) EPR-signals in the borate glass system that is networked at a distorted tetragonal Borate-arrangement. The signal intensity of the Cu (II) peak at g⊥=2.0596 has been used to quantify the Cu-content accurately in the glass matrix. Both techniques produced linear calibration curves of Cu-metals in glasses with excellent linear regression coefficient (R(2)) values. This study establishes a good correlation between DP-LIBS analysis of glass and the results obtained using EPR spectroscopy. The proposed protocols prove the great advantage of DP-LIBS system for the detection of a trace copper on the surface of glasses. PMID:27154655

  10. Optical time of flight studies of lithium plasma in double pulse laser ablation: Evidence of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-06-15

    The early stage of formation of lithium plasma in a collinear—double pulse laser ablation mode has been studied using optical time of flight (OTOF) spectroscopy as a function of inter-pulse delay time, the distance from the target surface and the fluence of the ablation lasers. The experimental TOF measurements were carried out for lithium neutral (670.8 nm and 610.3 nm), and ionic (548.4 nm and 478.8 nm) lines. These experimental observations have been compared with that for single pulse laser ablation mode. It is found that depending on the fluence and laser pulse shape of the first pre-ablation laser and the second main ablation laser, the plasma plume formation and its characteristic features can be described in terms of plume-plume or laser-plume interaction processes. Moreover, the enhancement in the intensity of Li neutral and ionic lines is observed when the laser-plume interaction is the dominant process. Here, we see the evidence of the role of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption process in the initial stage of formation of lithium plasma in this case.

  11. Determination of chlorine, sulfur and carbon in reinforced concrete structures by double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labutin, Timur A.; Popov, Andrey M.; Zaytsev, Sergey M.; Zorov, Nikita B.; Belkov, Mikhail V.; Kiris, Vasilii V.; Raikov, Sergey N.

    2014-09-01

    Accurate and reliable quantitative determination of non-metal corrosion agents in concrete is still an actual task of analytical use of LIBS. Two double-pulse LIBS systems were tested as a tool for the determination of chlorine, sulfur and carbon in concretes. Both systems had collinear configuration; a laboratory setup was equipped with an ICCD and two lasers (355/532 nm + 540 nm), but a CCD was a detector for a mobile system with one laser (1064 nm). Analytical lines of Cl I at 837.59 nm, S I at 921 nm and C I at 247.86 nm were used to plot calibration curves. Optimal interpulse delays for the laboratory setup were 4 μs for chlorine and 2.8 μs for carbon, while an interpulse delay of 2 μs was optimal for chlorine and sulfur determination with the mobile system. We suggested the normalization of the Cl I line at 837.59 nm to the Mg II line at 279.08 nm (visible at 837.23 nm in the third order) to compensate for pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of chlorine lines. It provided the decrease of the detection limit of chlorine from 400 ppm to 50 ppm. Therefore, we reported that LIBS can be used to determine main corrosive active substances under ambient conditions in concrete below critical threshold values. Moreover, the application of the mobile system for in-situ qualitative assessment of corrosion way of a steel cage of a swimming pool dome was also demonstrated. It was found that chloride corrosion due to the disinfection of water was the main way for corrosion of the open part steel and the steel rebar inside the concrete.

  12. Effect of target composition on the emission enhancement observed in Double-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristo Foretti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.; Salvetti, A.; Tognoni, E.

    2008-02-01

    The effect of the matrix composition on the emission enhancement observed in Double-Pulse (DP) Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was studied for several pure metal targets (Al, Au, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Pt, Si and W). The measurements were performed in air by using a dual-pulse Nd:YAG ns laser emitting 60mJ pulses at 1064nm wavelength. The measurement of the emission enhancement for neutral and ionic lines of all the samples showed a wide range of results. Very low enhancement was observed in Pb, Ni and Mn while the highest values of enhancement were obtained in Cu, Al and Au. The space-averaged thermodynamic parameters of the induced plasmas in DP and in SP LIBS were calculated and the enhancement of ablated atomized mass in DP case was spectroscopically estimated in all the targets. A correlation seems to exist between the ablated atomized mass enhancement and the plasma temperature increase in the DP configuration. An attempt was made to correlate the increase of these two quantities with the melting point and heat, boiling point and heat, reflectivity and ionization energy of the metal. No evident correlation was found. At the opposite, a correlation was observed between the ablated atomized mass enhancement and the thermal diffusivity of the metal. A simple picture is proposed to explain the experimental findings. It is hypothesized that different mass ablation mechanisms prevail depending on the experimental configuration. It may be expected that in the SP case mass ablation is dominated by vaporization, while in the DP case it is dominated by phase explosion and/or melt expulsion.

  13. ADJUSTABLE DOUBLE PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Gratian, J.W.; Gratian, A.C.

    1961-08-01

    >A modulator pulse source having adjustable pulse width and adjustable pulse spacing is described. The generator consists of a cross coupled multivibrator having adjustable time constant circuitry in each leg, an adjustable differentiating circuit in the output of each leg, a mixing and rectifying circuit for combining the differentiated pulses and generating in its output a resultant sequence of negative pulses, and a final amplifying circuit for inverting and square-topping the pulses. (AEC)

  14. New narrow infrared absorption features in the spectrum of Io between 3600 and 3100 cm (2.8-3.2 micrometers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Salama, Farid; Goorvitch, David

    1994-01-01

    We report the discovery of a series of infrared absorption bands between 3600 and 3100/cm (2.8-3.2 micrometers) in the spectrum of Io. Individual narrow bands are detected at 3553, 3514.5, 3438, 3423, 3411.5, and 3401/cm (2.815, 2.845, 2.909, 2.921, 2.931, and 2.940 micrometers, respectively). The positions and relative strengths of these bands, and the difference of their absolute strengths between the leading and trailing faces of Io, indicate that they are due to SO2. The band at 3438/cm (2.909 micrometers) could potentially have a contribution from an additional molecular species. The existence of these bands in the spectrum of Io indicates that a substantial fraction of the SO2 on Io must reside in transparent ices having relatively large crystal sizes. The decrease in the continuum observed at the high frequency ends of the spectra is probably due to the low frequency side of the recently detected, strong 3590/cm (2.79 micrometer) feature. This band is likely due to the combination of a moderately strong SO2 band and an additional absorption from another molecular species, perhaps H2O isolated in SO2 at low concentrations. A broad (FWHM approximately = 40-60/cm), weak band is seen near 3160/cm (3.16 micrometers) and is consistent with the presence of small quantities of H2O isolated in SO2-rich ices. There is no evidence in the spectra for the presence of H2O vapor on Io. Thus, the spectra presented here neither provide unequivocal evidence for the presence of H2O on Io nor preclude it at the low concentrations suggested by past studies.

  15. Double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar airborne validation for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurement.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Ismail, Syed

    2016-05-20

    Field experiments were conducted to test and evaluate the initial atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement capability of airborne, high-energy, double-pulsed, 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. This IPDA was designed, integrated, and operated at the NASA Langley Research Center on-board the NASA B-200 aircraft. The IPDA was tuned to the CO2 strong absorption line at 2050.9670 nm, which is the optimum for lower tropospheric weighted column measurements. Flights were conducted over land and ocean under different conditions. The first validation experiments of the IPDA for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing, focusing on low surface reflectivity oceanic surface returns during full day background conditions, are presented. In these experiments, the IPDA measurements were validated by comparison to airborne flask air-sampling measurements conducted by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. IPDA performance modeling was conducted to evaluate measurement sensitivity and bias errors. The IPDA signals and their variation with altitude compare well with predicted model results. In addition, off-off-line testing was conducted, with fixed instrument settings, to evaluate the IPDA systematic and random errors. Analysis shows an altitude-independent differential optical depth offset of 0.0769. Optical depth measurement uncertainty of 0.0918 compares well with the predicted value of 0.0761. IPDA CO2 column measurement compares well with model-driven, near-simultaneous air-sampling measurements from the NOAA aircraft at different altitudes. With a 10-s shot average, CO2 differential optical depth measurement of 1.0054±0.0103 was retrieved from a 6-km altitude and a 4-GHz on-line operation. As compared to CO2 weighted-average column dry-air volume mixing ratio of 404.08 ppm, derived from air sampling, IPDA measurement resulted in a value of 405.22±4.15  ppm with 1.02% uncertainty and

  16. Dynamics of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon femtosecond two-color double-pulse irradiation of metals, semiconductors, and dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhm, S.; Herzlieb, M.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2016-06-01

    In order to address the dynamics and physical mechanisms of LIPSS formation for three different classes of materials (metals, semiconductors, and dielectrics), two-color double-fs-pulse experiments were performed on Titanium, Silicon and Fused Silica. For that purpose a Mach-Zehnder interferometer generated polarization controlled (parallel or cross-polarized) double-pulse sequences at 400 nm and 800 nm wavelength, with inter-pulse delays up to a few picoseconds. Multiple of these two-color double-pulse sequences were collinearly focused by a spherical mirror to the sample surfaces. The fluence of each individual pulse (400 nm and 800 nm) was always kept below its respective ablation threshold and only the joint action of both pulses lead to the formation of LIPSS. Their resulting characteristics (periods, areas) were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The periods along with the LIPSS orientation allow a clear identification of the pulse which dominates the energy coupling to the material. For strong absorbing materials (Silicon, Titanium), a wavelength-dependent plasmonic mechanism can explain the delay-dependence of the LIPSS. In contrast, for dielectrics (Fused Silica) the first pulse always dominates the energy deposition and LIPSS orientation, supporting a non-plasmonic formation scenario. For all materials, these two-color experiments confirm the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition stage for LIPSS formation.

  17. Laser-induced periodic surface structures on 6H-SiC single crystals using temporally delayed femtosecond laser double-pulse trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Juan; Tao, Wenjun; Song, Hui; Gong, Min; Ma, Guohong; Dai, Ye; Zhao, Quanzhong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a time-delay-adjustable double-pulse train with 800-nm wavelength, 200-fs pulse duration and a repetition rate of 1 kHz, produced by a collinear two-beam optical system like a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, was employed for irradiation of 6H-SiC crystal. The dependence of the induced structures on time delay of double-pulse train for parallel-polarization configuration was studied. The results show that as the time delay of collinear parallel-polarization dual-pulse train increased, the induced near-subwavelength ripples (NSWRs) turn from irregular rippled pattern to regularly periodic pattern and have their grooves much deepened. The characteristics timescale for this transition is about 6.24 ps. Besides, the areas of NSWR were found to decay exponentially for time delay from 0 to 1.24 ps and then slowly increase for time delay from 1.24 to 14.24 ps. Analysis shows that multiphoton ionization effect, grating-assisted surface plasmon coupling effect, and timely intervene of second pulse in a certain physical stage experienced by 6H-SiC excited upon first pulse irradiation may contribute to the transition of morphology details.

  18. Potential of M-Wave Elicited by Double Pulse for Muscle Fatigue Evaluation in Intermittent Muscle Activation by Functional Electrical Stimulation for Motor Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Naoto; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies on application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to motor rehabilitation have been increasing. However, muscle fatigue appears early in the course of repetitive movement production training by FES. Although M-wave variables were suggested to be reliable indices of muscle fatigue in long lasting constant electrical stimulation under the isometric condition, the ability of M-wave needs more studies under intermittent stimulation condition, because the intervals between electrical stimulations help recovery of muscle activation level. In this paper, M-waves elicited by double pulses were examined in muscle fatigue evaluation during repetitive movements considering rehabilitation training with surface electrical stimulation. M-waves were measured under the two conditions of repetitive stimulation: knee extension force production under the isometric condition and the dynamic movement condition by knee joint angle control. Amplitude of M-wave elicited by the 2nd pulse of a double pulse decreased during muscle fatigue in both measurement conditions, while the change in M-waves elicited by single pulses in a stimulation burst was not relevant to muscle fatigue in repeated activation with stimulation interval of 1 s. Fatigue index obtained from M-waves elicited by 2nd pulses was suggested to provide good estimation of muscle fatigue during repetitive movements with FES. PMID:27110556

  19. A Comparative Study of Single-pulse and Double-pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy with Uranium-containing Samples.

    PubMed

    Skrodzki, Patrick J; Becker, Jason R; Diwakar, Prasoon K; Harilal, Sivanandan S; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) holds potential advantages in special nuclear material (SNM) sensing and nuclear forensics, which require rapid analysis, minimal sample preparation, and stand-off distance capability. SNM, such as U, however, result in crowded emission spectra with LIBS, and characteristic emission lines are challenging to discern. It is well-known that double-pulse LIBS (DPLIBS) improves the signal intensity for analytes over conventional single-pulse LIBS (SPLIBS). This study investigates the U signal in a glass matrix using DPLIBS and compares it to signal obtained using SPLIBS. Double-pulse LIBS involves sequential firing of a 1.06 µm Nd:YAG pre-pulse and 10.6 µm TEA CO2 heating pulse in a near collinear geometry. Optimization of experimental parameters including inter-pulse delay and energy follows identification of characteristic lines for the bulk analyte Ca and the minor constituent analyte U for both DPLIBS and SPLIBS. Spatial and temporal coupling of the two pulses in the proposed DPLIBS technique yields improvements in analytical merits with a negligible increase in damage to the sample compared to SPLIBS. Subsequently, the study discusses optimum plasma emission conditions of U lines and relative figures of merit in both SPLIBS and DPLIBS. Investigation into plasma characteristics also addresses plausible mechanisms related to the observed U analyte signal variation between SPLIBS and DPLIBS. PMID:26810184

  20. Effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Study by short-interval double pulses with different pulse durations

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Ayaka Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo; Nakajima, Takashi; Ogata, Yukio H.; Fukami, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-14

    We investigate the effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra of laser ablation plasma in water. We use short-interval (76 ns) double pulses with different pulse durations of the composing two pulses for the irradiation of underwater target. Narrow atomic spectral lines in emission spectra are obtained by the irradiation, where the two pulses are wide enough to be merged into a single-pulse-like temporal profile, while deformed spectra are obtained when the two pulses are fully separated. The behavior of the atomic spectral lines for the different pulse durations is consistent with that of the temporal profiles of the optical emission intensities of the plasma. All these results suggest that continuous excitation of the plasma during the laser irradiation for ∼100 ns is a key to obtain narrow emission spectral lines.

  1. Toward the optimization of double-pulse LIBS underwater: effects of experimental parameters on the reproducibility and dynamics of laser-induced cavitation bubble.

    PubMed

    Cristoforetti, Gabriele; Tiberi, Marco; Simonelli, Andrea; Marsili, Paolo; Giammanco, Francesco

    2012-03-01

    Double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was recently proposed for the analysis of underwater samples, since it overcomes the drawbacks of rapid plasma quenching and of large continuum emission, typical of single-pulse ablation. Despite the attractiveness of the method, this approach suffers nevertheless from a poor spectroscopic reproducibility, which is partially due to the scarce reproducibility of the cavitation bubble induced by the first laser pulse, since pressure and dimensions of the bubble strongly affect plasma emission. In this work, we investigated the reproducibility and the dynamics of the cavitation bubble induced on a solid target in water, and how they depend on pulse duration, energy, and wavelength, as well as on target composition. Results are discussed in terms of the effects on the laser ablation process produced by the crater formation and by the interaction of the laser pulse with floating particles and gas bubbles. This work, preliminary to the optimization of the spectroscopic signal, provides an insight of the phenomena occurring during laser ablation in water, together with useful information for the choice of the laser source to be used in the apparatus. PMID:22410923

  2. Stimulated crystallization of melt-quenched Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} films employing femtosecond laser double pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, Rebecca L.; Siegel, Jan

    2012-12-15

    The phase transformation of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} films from the melt-quenched amorphous phase into the crystalline phase induced by 800 nm, 100 fs laser pulses has been studied. For partly amorphized films, progressive crystallization could be induced by single pulses, which can be explained by growth of already existing crystalline embryos. For completely amorphized films, it was not possible to induce crystallization with one or two consecutive pulses; three pulses being the threshold for the onset of crystallization. By employing a fs laser double pulse with an adjustable inter-pulse delay, partial crystallization could be triggered for a delay range of 200 fs-100 ps, while for longer delays no crystallization was possible. The time window for stimulated crystallization can be related to the relaxation dynamics of free electrons excited by the first pulse, which are further excited by the second pulse still remaining in the excited state. Our results indicate that the lifetime of excited electrons in melt-quenched amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} is Almost-Equal-To 100 ps.

  3. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy: A potential tool for the analysis of contaminants and macro/micronutrients in organic mineral fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Nicolodelli, Gustavo; Senesi, Giorgio Saverio; de Oliveira Perazzoli, Ivan Luiz; Marangoni, Bruno Spolon; De Melo Benites, Vinícius; Milori, Débora Marcondes Bastos Pereira

    2016-09-15

    Organic fertilizers are obtained from waste of plant or animal origin. One of the advantages of organic fertilizers is that, from the composting, it recycles waste-organic of urban and agriculture origin, whose disposal would cause environmental impacts. Fast and accurate analysis of both major and minor/trace elements contained in organic mineral and inorganic fertilizers of new generation have promoted the application of modern analytical techniques. In particular, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is showing to be a very promising, quick and practical technique to detect and measure contaminants and nutrients in fertilizers. Although, this technique presents some limitations, such as a low sensitivity, if compared to other spectroscopic techniques, the use of double pulse (DP) LIBS is an alternative to the conventional LIBS in single pulse (SP). The macronutrients (Ca, Mg, K, P), micronutrients (Cu, Fe, Na, Mn, Zn) and contaminant (Cr) in fertilizer using LIBS in SP and DP configurations were evaluated. A comparative study for both configurations was performed using optimized key parameters for improving LIBS performance. The limit of detection (LOD) values obtained by DP LIBS increased up to seven times as compared to SP LIBS. In general, the marked improvement obtained when using DP system in the simultaneous LIBS quantitative determination for fertilizers analysis could be ascribed to the larger ablated mass of the sample. The results presented in this study show the promising potential of the DP LIBS technique for a qualitative analysis in fertilizers, without requiring sample preparation with chemical reagents. PMID:27261426

  4. Direct electron-impact mechanism of excitation of mercury monobromide in a double-pulse dielectric-barrier-discharge HgBr lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datsyuk, V. V.; Izmailov, I. A.; Naumov, V. V.; Kochelap, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    In a nonequlibrium plasma of a gas-discharge HgBr lamp, the terminal electronic state of the HgBr(B–X) radiative transition with a peak wavelength of 502 nm remains populated for a relatively long time and is repeatedly excited to the B state in collisions with plasma electrons. This transfer of the HgBr molecules from the ground state X to the excited state B is the main mechanism of formation of the light-emitting molecules especially when the lamp is excited by double current pulses. According to our simulations, due to the electron-induced transitions between HgBr(X) and HgBr(B), the output characteristics of the DBD lamp operating in a double-pulse regime are better than those of the lamp operating in a single-pulse regime. In the considered case, the peak power is calculated to increase by a factor of about 2 and the lamp efficiency increases by about 50%.

  5. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy applied to natural and artificial materials from cultural heritages. A comparison with micro-X-ray fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brai, Maria; Gennaro, Gaetano; Schillaci, Tiziano; Tranchina, Luigi

    2009-10-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an applied physical technique that has shown in recent years its great potential for rapid qualitative analysis of materials. Thanks to the possibility to implement a portable instrument that perform LIBS analysis, this technique is revealed to be particularly useful for in situ analysis in the field of cultural heritages. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the potentiality of LIBS technique in the field of cultural heritages, with respect to the chemical characterization of complex matrix as calcareous and refractory materials for further quantitative analyses on cultural heritages. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses were used as reference. Calibration curves of certified materials used as standards were obtained by XRF analyses. The LIBS measurements were performed with a new mobile instrument called Modì (Mobile Double pulse Instrument for LIBS Analysis). The XRF analyses were performed with a portable instrument ArtTAX. LIBS and XRF measurement were performed on both reference materials and samples (bricks and mortars) sampled in the ancient Greek-Roman Theatre of Taormina. Although LIBS measurements performed on reference materials have shown non linear response to concentrations, and so we were not able to obtain quantitative results, an integrated study of XRF and LIBS signals permitted us to distinguish among chemical features and degradation state of measured building materials.

  6. Enhancement of Photoinduced Charge-Order Melting via Anisotropy Control by Double-Pulse Excitation in Perovskite Manganites: Pr_{0.6}Ca_{0.4}MnO_{3}.

    PubMed

    Yada, H; Ijiri, Y; Uemura, H; Tomioka, Y; Okamoto, H

    2016-02-19

    To control the efficiency of photoinduced charge-order melting in perovskite manganites, we performed femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy using double-pulse excitation on Pr_{0.6}Ca_{0.4}MnO_{3}. The results revealed that the transfer of the spectral weight from the near-infrared to infrared region by the second pump pulse is considerably enhanced by the first pump pulse and that the suppression of crystal anisotropy, that is, the decrease of long-range lattice deformations due to the charge order by the first pump pulse is a key factor to enhance the charge-order melting. This double-pulse excitation method can be applied to various photoinduced transitions in complex materials with electronic and structural instabilities. PMID:26943548

  7. First 2.2 micrometer results from the iota interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyck, H. M.; Benson, J. A.; Carlton, N. P.; Coldwell, C.; Lacasse, M. G.; Nisenson, P.; Panasyuk, A.; Papaliolios, C.; Pearlman, R. D.; Reasenberg, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first infrared fringe visibility measurements made with the Infrared Optical Telescope Array on Mt. Hopkins. Effective temperatures are derived for RX Boo, RS Cnc, and Beta Peg. RX Boo is the coolest small-amplitude variable giant star to have an effective temperature determination. We compare the size of its photosphere at infrared wavelengths with the sizes of its SiO and H20 radio emission regions. We also discuss initial performance parameters for the interferometer.

  8. Demonstration of ultralow-threshold 2 micrometer microlasers on chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, HuiBo; Jiang, XiaoShun; Ding, Yang; Xiao, Min

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate ultralow-threshold thulium-doped, as well as thulium-holmium-codoped, microtoroid lasers on silicon chips, operating at the wavelength of around 2 μm. High quality factor whispering gallery mode (WGM) microtoroid cavities with proper thulium and holmium concentrations are fabricated from the silica sol-gel films. The highly confined WGMs make the microcavity lasers operate with ultralow thresholds, approximately 2.8 μW and 2.7 μW for the thulium-doped and the thulium-holmium-codoped microlasers, respectively.

  9. Recovery of CVD Diamond Detectors using Laser Double Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dauffy, L S; Lerche, R A; Schmid, G J; Koch, J A; Silbenagel, C

    2005-09-27

    A 5 x 0.25 mm Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond detector, with a voltage bias of + 250V, was excited by a 400 nm laser (3.1 eV photons) in order to study the saturation of the wafer and its associated electronics. In a first experiment, the laser beam energy was increased from a few tens of a pJ to about 100 {micro}J, and the signal from the diamond was recorded until full saturation of the detection system was achieved. Clear saturation of the detection system was observed at about 40 V, which corresponds with the expected saturation at 10% of the applied bias (250V). The results indicate that the interaction mechanism of the 3.1 eV photons in the diamond (E{sub bandgap} = 5.45 eV) is not a multi-photon process but is linked to the impurities and defects of the crystal. In a second experiment, the detector was irradiated by a saturating first laser pulse and then by a delayed laser pulse of equal or smaller amplitude with delays of 5, 10, and 20 ns. The results suggest that the diamond and associated electronics recover within 10 to 20 ns after a strong saturating pulse.

  10. Scaling Relationship and Optimization of Double-Pulse Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Sadik, Mohamed M.; Yu, Miao; Zheng, Mingde; Zahn, Jeffrey D.; Shan, Jerry W.; Shreiber, David I.; Lin, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of electroporation is known to vary significantly across a wide variety of biological research and clinical applications, but as of this writing, a generalized approach to simultaneously improve efficiency and maintain viability has not been available in the literature. To address that discrepancy, we here outline an approach that is based on the mapping of the scaling relationships among electroporation-mediated molecular delivery, cellular viability, and electric pulse parameters. The delivery of Fluorescein-Dextran into 3T3 mouse fibroblast cells was used as a model system. The pulse was rationally split into two sequential phases: a first precursor for permeabilization, followed by a second one for molecular delivery. Extensive data in the parameter space of the second pulse strength and duration were collected and analyzed with flow cytometry. The fluorescence intensity correlated linearly with the second pulse duration, confirming the dominant role of electrophoresis in delivery. The delivery efficiency exhibited a characteristic sigmoidal dependence on the field strength. An examination of short-term cell death using 7-Aminoactinomycin D demonstrated a convincing linear correlation with respect to the electrical energy. Based on these scaling relationships, an optimal field strength becomes identifiable. A model study was also performed, and the results were compared with the experimental data to elucidate underlying mechanisms. The comparison reveals the existence of a critical transmembrane potential above which delivery with the second pulse becomes effective. Together, these efforts establish a general route to enhance the functionality of electroporation. PMID:24559983

  11. Structural Analysis Using Phase-Stepped, Double Pulsed ESPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrer, John R.

    1990-04-01

    Optical whole-field testing techniques have been carrots dangled in front of engineers' noses for a considerable period of time. The promise of acquiring meaningful data without upsetting the component nor its environment, has significant attractions. ESPI technology has been modified and pursued with these goals in mind. This paper presents some of the recent work containing several developments which now make the engineering realisations a near term possibility. An overview of the correlation imaging mechanism is presented with a discussion on how this principle type of optical interferometer can be configured to provide the data necessary for analytical use. Attempts to produce instrumentation able to function outside the laboratory have required replacement of continuous wave lasers with Nd.YAG pulsed lasers. The new pulsed lasers are able to be combined with the computer based fringe pattern analysis which has been produced to suit the requirements of the engineer. Experimental results using such equipment are presented and further work is included which demonstrates the ability for speckle interferometry to produce three-dimensional analysis with the data being presented in conventional cartesian form.

  12. Suppression of Ablation in Femtosecond Double-Pulse Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Povarnitsyn, M. E.; Khishchenko, K. V.; Levashov, P. R.; Itina, T. E.

    2009-11-06

    We report the physical reasons of a curious decrease in the crater depth observed for long delays in experiments with two successive femtosecond pulses. Detailed hydrodynamic modeling demonstrates that the ablation mechanism is dumped when the delay between the pulses exceeds the electron-ion relaxation time. In this case, the interaction of the second laser pulse with the expanding target material leads to the formation of the second shock wave suppressing the rarefaction wave created by the first pulse. The evidence of this effect follows from the pressure and density profiles obtained at different delays after the first laser pulse.

  13. Recent Development of Component Technologies for 2 micrometer LIDAR at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forouhar, Siamak; Briggs, Ryan; Frez, Clifford; Bagheri, Mahmood; Ksendzov, Alexander; Menzies, Robert; Hyon, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Objective::Global-scale atmospheric measurements of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and other Green House Gases with full diurnal, full latitude, all season coverage capability. Implementation: Use of the laser- based Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) method at 1.57 and 2.05 microns. Airborne lasers are needed to demonstrate instrument capabilities, risk reduction and satellite measurement validation.

  14. Sub-kHz Linewidth GaSb Semiconductor Diode Lasers Operating Near 2 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagheri, Mahmood; Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Ksendzov, Alexander; Forouhar, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    We report on the phase noise properties of DFB lasers operating near 2.0 microns. Measured noise spectra indicate intrinsic laser linewidths below 1 kHz. An effective linewidth of less than 200 kHz for 5 ms measurement times is estimated.

  15. 2.5 MHz Line-Width High-energy, 2 Micrometer Coherent Wind Lidar Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2007-01-01

    2 micron solid-state lasers are the primary choice for coherent Doppler wind detection. As wind lidars, they are used for wake vortex and clear air turbulence detection providing air transport safety. In addition, 2 micron lasers are one of the candidates for CO2 detection lidars. The rich CO2 absorption line around 2 micron, combined with the long upper state life of time, has made Ho based 2 micron lasers a viable candidate for CO2 sensing DIAL instrument. The design and fabrication of a compact coherent laser radar transmitter for Troposphere wind sensing is under way. This system is hardened for ground as well as airborne applications. As a transmitter for a coherent wind lidar, this laser has stringent spectral line width and beam quality requirements. Although the absolute wavelength does not have to be fixed for wind detection, to maximize return signal, the output wavelength should avoid atmospheric CO2 and H2O absorption lines. The base line laser material is Ho:Tm:LuLF which is an isomorph of Ho:Tm:YLF. LuLF produces 20% more output power than Ho:Tm:YLF. In these materials the Tm absorption cross-section, the Ho emission cross-section, the Tm to Ho energy transfer parameters and the Ho (sup 5) I (sub 7) radiative life time are all identical. However, the improved performance of the LuLF is attributed to the lower thermal population in the (sup 5) I (sub 8) manifold. It also provides higher normal mode to Q-switch conversion than YLF at high pump energy indicating a lower up-conversion. The laser architecture is composed of a seed laser, a ring oscillator, and a double pass amplifier. The seed laser is a single longitudinal mode with a line width of 13 KHz. The 100mJ class oscillator is stretched to 3 meters to accommodate the line-width requirement without compromising the range resolution of the instrument. The amplifier is double passed to produce greater than 300mJ energy.

  16. The 0.5 micrometer-2.2 micrometer Scattered Light Spectrum of the Disk Around TW Hya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debes, John H.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Roberg, Aki; Schneider, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    We present a 0.5-2.2micron scattered light spectrum of the circumstellar disk around TW Hya from a combination of spatially resolved HST STIS spectroscopy and NICMOS coronagraphic images of the disk. \\Ve investigate the morphology at the disk at distances> 40 AU over this wide range of wavelengths. We measure the surface brightness, azimuthal symmetry, and spectral character of the disk as a function of radius. We find that the scattering efficiency of the dust is largely neutral to blue over the observed wavelengths. We find a good fit to the data over a wide range of distances from the star if we use a model disk with a partial gap of 30% depth at 80 AU and with steep disk truncation exterior to 100 AU. If the gap is caused by a planetary companion in the process of accreting disk gas, it must be less than 20 Solar mass.

  17. Efficient Tm:Fiber Pumped Solid-State Ho:YLF 2-micrometer Laser for Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    2012-01-01

    An efficient 19 W, TEM(sub 00) mode, Ho:YLF laser pumped by continuous wave Tm:fiber laser has been demonstrated at the room temperature. The slope efficiency and optical-to-optical efficiency are 65% and 55%, respectively.

  18. Surface bidirectional reflectance properties of two southwestern Arizona deserts for wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.2 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, Charles H.; Purgold, G. Carlton; Lecroy, Stuart R.

    1987-01-01

    Surface bidirectional reflectance characteristics are presented for the Sonora Desert and the Mohawk Valley at solar zenith angles of 13, 31, and 57 degs at wavelengths between 0.4 and 1.6 microns. Nadir reflectance values are presented for wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.2 microns for solar zenith angles of 13, 17.5, 27, 31, 45, 57, and 62 degs. Data were taken from a helicopter during May l985 in support of an Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), a Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE II), and an Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite validation experiment.

  19. Atmospheric-water absorption features near 2.2 micrometers and their importance in high spectral resolution remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, F. A.; Clark, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    Selective absorption of electromagnetic radiation by atmospheric gases and water vapor is an accepted fact in terrestrial remote sensing. Until recently, only a general knowledge of atmospheric effects was required for analysis of remote sensing data; however, with the advent of high spectral resolution imaging devices, detailed knowledge of atmospheric absorption bands has become increasingly important for accurate analysis. Detailed study of high spectral resolution aircraft data at the U.S. Geological Survey has disclosed narrow absorption features centered at approximately 2.17 and 2.20 micrometers not caused by surface mineralogy. Published atmospheric transmission spectra and atmospheric spectra derived using the LOWTRAN-5 computer model indicate that these absorption features are probably water vapor. Spectral modeling indicates that the effects of atmospheric absorption in this region are most pronounced in spectrally flat materials with only weak absorption bands. Without correction and detailed knowledge of the atmospheric effects, accurate mapping of surface mineralogy (particularly at low mineral concentrations) is not possible.

  20. A single-frequency double-pulse Ho:YLF laser for CO2-lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucirek, P.; Meissner, A.; Eiselt, P.; Höfer, M.; Hoffmann, D.

    2016-03-01

    A single-frequency q-switched Ho:YLF laser oscillator with a bow-tie ring resonator, specifically designed for highspectral stability, is reported. It is pumped with a dedicated Tm:YLF laser at 1.9 μm. The ramp-and-fire method with a DFB-diode laser as a reference is employed for generating single-frequency emission at 2051 nm. The laser is tested with different operating modes, including cw-pumping at different pulse repetition frequencies and gain-switched pumping. The standard deviation of the emission wavelength of the laser pulses is measured with the heterodyne technique at the different operating modes. Its dependence on the single-pass gain in the crystal and on the cavity finesse is investigated. At specific operating points the spectral stability of the laser pulses is 1.5 MHz (rms over 10 s). Under gain-switched pumping with 20% duty cycle and 2 W of average pump power, stable single-frequency pulse pairs with a temporal separation of 580 μs are produced at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. The measured pulse energy is 2 mJ (<2 % rms error on the pulse energy over 10 s) and the measured pulse duration is approx. 20 ns for each of the two pulses in the burst.

  1. Growth kinetics and island evolution during double-pulsed molecular beam epitaxy of InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, A.; Hein, C.; Bremers, H.; Rossow, U.; Hangleiter, A.

    2016-06-01

    The kinetic processes of InN growth using alternating source fluxes with sub-monolayer In pulses in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy have been investigated. Growth at various temperatures reveals the existence of two growth regimes. While growth at low temperatures is solely governed by surface diffusion, a combination of decomposition, desorption, and diffusion becomes decisive at growth temperatures of 470 °C and above. At this critical temperature, the surface morphology changes from a grainy structure to a structure made of huge islands. The formation of those islands is attributed to the development of an indium adlayer, which can be observed via reflection high energy electron diffraction monitoring. Based on the growth experiments conducted at temperatures below TGrowth = 470 °C, an activation energy for diffusion of 0.54 ± 0.02 eV has been determined from the decreasing InN island density. A comparison between growth on metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy GaN templates and pseudo bulk GaN indicates that step edges and dislocations are favorable nucleation sites. Based on the results, we developed a growth model, which describes the main mechanisms of the growth.

  2. Velocity Interferometer blanking due to preheating in a double pulse planar experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laffite, S.; Baton, S. D.; Combis, P.; Clerouin, J.; Koenig, M.; Recoules, V.; Rousseaux, C.; Videau, L.

    2014-08-01

    Optical diagnostics, such as VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) or SOP (Streaked Optical Pyrometry), have become essential in shock timing experiments. Their high precision allows for accurate measurements of shock velocities, chronometry, and brightness temperature. However, in some instances, these measurements can be compromised. In planar shock coalescence experiments recently performed at the LULI facility [Baton et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 195002 (2012)], VISAR signal loss was observed. In these experiments, a strong shock launched by a high-intensity spike catches up with a previously shock launched by an earlier, low-intensity beam. The disappearance of the VISAR signal is attributed to a preheating of the coronal plasma by x-rays generated by the high intensity spike. The signal does not disappear if the high-intensity spike starts after VISAR probe beam begins to reflect off of the first shock. The VISAR diagnostic, modeled using an assessment of the optical index in quartz, compares favorably to experimental results. This provides evidence that x-ray preheating can cause blanking of the VISAR signal in quartz.

  3. Velocity Interferometer blanking due to preheating in a double pulse planar experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Laffite, S.; Combis, P.; Clerouin, J.; Recoules, V.; Rousseaux, C.; Videau, L.; Baton, S. D.; Koenig, M.

    2014-08-15

    Optical diagnostics, such as VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) or SOP (Streaked Optical Pyrometry), have become essential in shock timing experiments. Their high precision allows for accurate measurements of shock velocities, chronometry, and brightness temperature. However, in some instances, these measurements can be compromised. In planar shock coalescence experiments recently performed at the LULI facility [Baton et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 195002 (2012)], VISAR signal loss was observed. In these experiments, a strong shock launched by a high-intensity spike catches up with a previously shock launched by an earlier, low-intensity beam. The disappearance of the VISAR signal is attributed to a preheating of the coronal plasma by x-rays generated by the high intensity spike. The signal does not disappear if the high-intensity spike starts after VISAR probe beam begins to reflect off of the first shock. The VISAR diagnostic, modeled using an assessment of the optical index in quartz, compares favorably to experimental results. This provides evidence that x-ray preheating can cause blanking of the VISAR signal in quartz.

  4. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore » in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  5. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T. J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  6. Compartment shape anisotropy (CSA) revealed by double pulsed field gradient MR.

    PubMed

    Ozarslan, Evren

    2009-07-01

    The multiple scattering extensions of the pulsed field gradient (PFG) experiments can be used to characterize restriction-induced anisotropy at different length scales. In double-PFG acquisitions that involve two pairs of diffusion gradient pulses, the dependence of the MR signal attenuation on the angle between the two gradients is a signature of restriction that can be observed even at low gradient strengths. In this article, a comprehensive theoretical treatment of the double-PFG observation of restricted diffusion is presented. In the first part of the article, the problem is treated for arbitrarily shaped pores under idealized experimental conditions, comprising infinitesimally narrow gradient pulses with long separation times and long or vanishing mixing times. New insights are obtained when the treatment is applied to simple pore shapes of spheres, ellipsoids, and capped cylinders. The capped cylinder geometry is considered in the second part of the article where the solution for a double-PFG experiment with arbitrary experimental parameters is introduced. Although compartment shape anisotropy (CSA) is emphasized here, the findings of this article can be used in gleaning the volume, eccentricity, and orientation distribution function associated with ensembles of anisotropic compartments using double-PFG acquisitions with arbitrary experimental parameters. PMID:19398210

  7. Advanced double-pulse UV source for laser-induced fluorescence of bioaerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feugnet, Gilles; Grisard, Arnaud; Lallier, Eric; McIntosh, Lee; Hellström, Jonas

    2008-10-01

    To enhance discrimination of UV-laser-induced-fluorescence based bio-aerosol-detection-system, a UV-laser is described that allows multiple wavelength excitation of bio-aerosols and both fluorescence spectral and time-decay analysis. The latter requiring sub-ns pulse duration, a two-stage-amplifier boosts a 20-µJ-1064-nm-500-ps-actively-Q-Switch microchip-oscillator output energy up to 2.5 mJ. After frequency doubling and beam splitting, 20-µJ-293-and-337-nm pulses are generated by two different periodically-poled-KTP (parametric generation) and BBO (frequency doubling) crystal arrangements. In order to get distinct fluorescence signals for each wavelength, the beams are then time-delayed with two optical fibers of different lengths and launched into a chamber for bio-aerosol excitation connected to a fast detection system.

  8. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F.-J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T.J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion. PMID:25744344

  9. Photoconductivity of CdTe Nanocrystal-Based Thin Films. Te2- Ligands Lead To Charge Carrier Diffusion Lengths Over 2 Micrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, Ryan W.; Callahan, Rebecca; Reid, Obadiah G.; Dolzhnikov, Dmitriy S.; Talapin, Dmitri V.; Rumbles, Garry; Luther, Joseph M.; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2015-11-16

    We report on photoconductivity of films of CdTe nanocrystals (NCs) using time-resolved microwave photoconductivity (TRMC). Spherical and tetrapodal CdTe NCs with tunable size-dependent properties are studied as a function of surface ligand (including inorganic molecular chalcogenide species) and annealing temperature. Relatively high carrier mobility is measured for films of sintered tetrapod NCs (4 cm2/(V s)). Our TRMC findings show that Te2- capped CdTe NCs show a marked improvement in carrier mobility (11 cm2/(V s)), indicating that NC surface termination can be altered to play a crucial role in charge-carrier mobility even after the NC solids are sintered into bulk films.

  10. High efficiency 2 micrometer laser utilizing wing-pumped Tm.sup.3+ and a laser diode array end-pumping architecture

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    Wing pumping a Tm.sup.3+ doped, end pumped solid state laser generates 2 .mu.m laser radiation at high average powers with high efficiency. Using laser diode arrays to end-pump the laser rod or slab in the wing of the Tm.sup.3+ absorption band near 785 nm results in 2-for-1 quantum efficiency in Tm.sup.3+ because high Tm.sup.3+ concentrations can be used. Wing pumping allows the thermal power generated in the rod or slab to be distributed over a large enough volume to make thermal management practical in the laser gain medium even at high average power operation. The approach is applicable to CW, Q-switched, and rep-pulsed free-laser operation.

  11. High efficiency 2 micrometer laser utilizing wing-pumped Tm{sup 3+} and a laser diode array end-pumping architecture

    DOEpatents

    Beach, R.J.

    1997-11-18

    Wing pumping a Tm{sup 3+} doped, end pumped solid state laser generates 2 {micro}m laser radiation at high average powers with high efficiency. Using laser diode arrays to end-pump the laser rod or slab in the wing of the Tm{sup 3+} absorption band near 785 nm results in 2-for-1 quantum efficiency in Tm{sup 3+} because high Tm{sup 3+} concentrations can be used. Wing pumping allows the thermal power generated in the rod or slab to be distributed over a large enough volume to make thermal management practical in the laser gain medium even at high average power operation. The approach is applicable to CW, Q-switched, and rep-pulsed free-laser operation. 7 figs.

  12. Use of Hydrogenophaga pseudoflava penetration to quantitatively assess the impact of filtration parameters for 0.2-micrometer-pore-size filters.

    PubMed

    Lee, A; McVey, J; Faustino, P; Lute, S; Sweeney, N; Pawar, V; Khan, M; Brorson, K; Hussong, D

    2010-02-01

    Filters rated as having a 0.2-microm pore size (0.2-microm-rated filters) are used in laboratory and manufacturing settings for diverse applications of bacterial and particle removal from process fluids, analytical test articles, and gasses. Using Hydrogenophaga pseudoflava, a diminutive bacterium with an unusual geometry (i.e., it is very thin), we evaluated passage through 0.2-microm-rated filters and the impact of filtration process parameters and bacterial challenge density. We show that consistent H. pseudoflava passage occurs through 0.2-microm-rated filters. This is in contrast to an absence of significant passage of nutritionally challenged bacteria that are of similar size (i.e., hydrodynamic diameter) but dissimilar geometry. PMID:19966023

  13. Optimization of A 2-Micron Laser Frequency Stabilization System for a Double-Pulse CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingsin; Koch, Grady; Petros, Mulugeta; Trieu, Bo; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for accurate CO2 concentration measurement requires a frequency locking system to achieve high frequency locking precision and stability. We describe the frequency locking system utilizing Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD), and Proportional Integration Derivative (PID) feedback servo loop, and report the optimization of the sensitivity of the system for the feed back loop based on the characteristics of a variable path-length CO2 gas cell. The CO2 gas cell is characterized with HITRAN database (2004). The method can be applied for any other frequency locking systems referring to gas absorption line.

  14. Atomic Processes in Emission Characteristics of a Lithium Plasma Plume Formed by Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Ajai, Kumar; K. Singh, R.; Prahlad, V.; C. Joshi, H.

    2013-03-01

    High resolution spectral analysis of lithium plasma formed by single and double laser ablation has been undertaken to understand the plume-laser interaction, especially at the early stages of the plasma plume. In order to identify different atomic processes in evolving plasma, time resolved spectral emission studies at different inter-pulse delays have been performed for ionic and neutral lithium lines emitting from different levels. Along with the enhancement in emission intensity, a large line broadening and spectral shift, especially in the case of excited state transition Li I 610.3 nm have been observed in the presence of the second pulse. This broadening and shift gradually decrease with increasing time delay. Another interesting feature is the appearance of a multi-component structure in the ionic line at 548.4 nm and these components change conversely into a single structure at the later stages of the plasma. The multi-component structures are correlated with the presence of different velocity (temperature) distributions in non-LTE conditions. Atomic analyses by computing photon emissivity coefficients with an ADAS code have been used to identify the above processes.

  15. Double-pulse machining as a technique for the enhancement of material removal rates in laser machining of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, A.C.; Banks, P.S.; Perry, M.D.; Campbell, E.M.; Dodell, A.L.; Armas, M.S.

    2005-08-01

    Several nanosecond 0.53-{mu}m laser pulses separated by several tens of nanoseconds have been shown to significantly enhance (three to ten times) material removal rates while minimizing redeposition and heat-affected zones. Economic, high-quality, high-aspect ratio holes (>10:1) in metals are produced as a result. A phenomenological model whereby the second laser pulse interacts with the ejecta produced by the first laser pulse and in close proximity to the material surface is consistent with the observations. Incident laser wavelengths of 1.05 and 0.35 {mu}m also benefit from this pulse format.

  16. Continuous Registration of Membrane Input Resistances of Small Plant Cells Using a Double-Pulse Current Clamp Technique for Single-Electrode Impalements 12

    PubMed Central

    Schefczik, Kurt; Simonis, Wilhelm; Schiebe, Michael

    1983-01-01

    To measure the cell input resistance in Elodea leaf cells, a new single-microelectrode method was explored by comparing the results with conventional two-microelectrode experiments. The new method takes advantage of the difference in the frequency response curves between electrode and cell impedances. By application of electrical stimuli, which contain specific frequency bands, the different impedances can be analyzed separately. To get a distinct separation in the frequency response of cell and electrode, respectively, the electrode capacitance has to be compensated during the impalement. Different time constants of the cell membrane can be accounted for by adjustment of the stimulus length. It is shown that both the single- and the double-electrode method yield the same results, even if the cell input resistances change considerably during the course of the experiment. This demonstrates the usefulness of the new single-electrode method for continuous measurements of cell membrane resistances, especially in cells so small that the double-electrode method is no longer applicable. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 2 PMID:16663008

  17. Fringe localization requirements for three-dimensional flow visualization of shock waves in diffuse-illumination double-pulse holographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A theory of fringe localization in rapid-double-exposure, diffuse-illumination holographic interferometry was developed. The theory was then applied to compare holographic measurements with laser anemometer measurements of shock locations in a transonic axial-flow compressor rotor. The computed fringe localization error was found to agree well with the measured localization error. It is shown how the view orientation and the curvature and positional variation of the strength of a shock wave are used to determine the localization error and to minimize it. In particular, it is suggested that the view direction not deviate from tangency at the shock surface by more than 30 degrees.

  18. Quantitative analysis of deuterium in zircaloy using double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) and helium gas plasma without a sample chamber.

    PubMed

    Suyanto, H; Lie, Z S; Niki, H; Kagawa, K; Fukumoto, K; Rinda, Hedwig; Abdulmadjid, S N; Marpaung, A M; Pardede, M; Suliyanti, M M; Hidayah, A N; Jobiliong, E; Lie, T J; Tjia, M O; Kurniawan, K H

    2012-03-01

    A crucial safety measure to be strictly observed in the operation of heavy-water nuclear power plants is the mandatory regular inspection of the concentration of deuterium penetrated into the zircaloy fuel vessels. The existing standard method requires a tedious, destructive, and costly sample preparation process involving the removal of the remaining fuel in the vessel and melting away part of the zircaloy pipe. An alternative method of orthogonal dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) is proposed by employing flowing atmospheric helium gas without the use of a sample chamber. The special setup of ps and ns laser systems, operated for the separate ablation of the sample target and the generation of helium gas plasma, respectively, with properly controlled relative timing, has succeeded in producing the desired sharp D I 656.10 nm emission line with effective suppression of the interfering H I 656.28 nm emission by operating the ps ablation laser at very low output energy of 26 mJ and 1 μs ahead of the helium plasma generation. Under this optimal experimental condition, a linear calibration line is attained with practically zero intercept and a 20 μg/g detection limit for D analysis of zircaloy sample while creating a crater only 10 μm in diameter. Therefore, this method promises its potential application for the practical, in situ, and virtually nondestructive quantitative microarea analysis of D, thereby supporting the more-efficient operation and maintenance of heavy-water nuclear power plants. Furthermore, it will also meet the anticipated needs of future nuclear fusion power plants, as well as other important fields of application in the foreseeable future. PMID:22283593

  19. Frequency doubled pulsed single longitudinal mode Nd:YAG laser at 1319 nm with pulse build-up negative feedback controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakanas, Ramunas; Pileckas, Julius

    2010-02-01

    We report on creation of frequency doubled E-O Q-switched Nd:YAG laser lasing Single Longitudinal and Transversal mode radiation at 1319 nm (4F3/2 to 4I11/2 transition) at repetition rate of 10 Hz. By means of linear resonator stable redlight pulses were obtained at 660 nm having Emax = 5mJ output energy and τ = 50 ns (FWHM) pulse duration by using NCPM LBO crystal as an extra-cavity frequency doubler. Laser design incorporates particularly made fast negative feedback loop controls for pulse buildup control. It allowed obtaining much more stable laser performance as well as much shorter Optical Jitter and fast pulse buildup time. To best our knowledge, these are the first time such pulse energy, rep rate Transversal and Longitudinal mode structure ever achieved in compact flashlamp pumped E-O Q-Switched laser operating at 1319 nm.

  20. Corticomotor control of lumbar multifidus muscles is impaired in chronic low back pain: concurrent evidence from ultrasound imaging and double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Massé-Alarie, Hugo; Beaulieu, Louis-David; Preuss, Richard; Schneider, Cyril

    2016-04-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is often associated with impaired control of deep trunk muscles and reorganization of the primary motor areas (M1). Precisely, functional changes of the lumbar multifidus muscles (MF) involved in spine stability may be of special interest in rehabilitation. Therefore, we tested MF corticomotor control using double transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigms for the first time in this muscle and examined its link with MF volitional activation. Eleven individuals with lateralized CLBP and 13 pain-free participants were recruited. Ultrasound imaging enabled measurement of MF volitional isometric contraction in prone lying. TMS of MF M1 area was used to test hemispheric excitability and mechanisms in relation to motor programming, i.e., active motor threshold (AMT), amplitude of motor-evoked potentials and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and facilitation (SICF). In CLBP, SICI level was lower in the left hemisphere and MF volitional contraction was not related to AMT (M1 excitability), conversely to what was observed in the pain-free group. No other between-group difference was detected. These original findings support a plasticity of cortical maps controlling paravertebral muscles and likely including a different motor strategy for the control of MF. Changes of M1 function may thus underlie impaired motor control of lumbopelvic spine and pain persistence in CLBP. PMID:26708518

  1. Spectral modification of the laser emission of a terahertz quantum cascade laser induced by broad-band double pulse injection seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Markmann, Sergej Nong, Hanond Hekmat, Negar; Jukam, Nathan; Pal, Shovon; Scholz, Sven; Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Dhillon, Sukhdeep; Tignon, Jérôme; Marcadet, Xavier; Bock, Claudia; Kunze, Ulrich

    2015-09-14

    We demonstrate by injection seeding that the spectral emission of a terahertz (THz) quantum cascade laser (QCL) can be modified with broad-band THz pulses whose bandwidths are greater than the QCL bandwidth. Two broad-band THz pulses delayed in time imprint a modulation on the single THz pulse spectrum. The resulting spectrum is used to injection seed the THz QCL. By varying the time delay between the THz pulses, the amplitude distribution of the QCL longitudinal modes is modified. By applying this approach, the QCL emission is reversibly switched from multi-mode to single mode emission.

  2. Characterization of Transducer Performance and Narrowband Transient Ultrasonic Fields in Metals by Rayleigh-Sommerfeld Backpropagation of Compression Acoustic Waves Measured with Double-Pulsed Tv Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trillo, Cristina; Doval, Ángel F.; Fernández, José L.; Rodríguez-Gómez, Pablo; López-Vázquez, J. Carlos

    2014-10-01

    This article presents a method aimed at the characterization of the narrowband transient acoustic field radiated by an ultrasonic plane transducer into a homogeneous, isotropic and optically opaque prismatic solid, and the assessment of the performance of the acoustic source. The method relies on a previous technique based on the full-field optical measurement of an acoustic wavepacket at the surface of a solid and its subsequent numerical backpropagation within the material. The experimental results show that quantitative transversal and axial profiles of the complex amplitude of the beam can be obtained at any plane between the measurement and excitation surfaces. The reconstruction of the acoustic field at the transducer face, carried out on a defective transducer model, shows that the method could also be suitable for the nondestructive testing of the performance of ultrasonic sources. In all cases, the measurements were performed with the transducer working under realistic loading conditions.

  3. Double nanosecond pulses generation in ytterbium fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Veiko, V P; Lednev, V N; Pershin, S M; Samokhvalov, A A; Yakovlev, E B; Zhitenev, I Yu; Kliushin, A N

    2016-06-01

    Double pulse generation mode for nanosecond ytterbium fiber laser was developed. Two sequential 60-200 ns laser pulses with variable delay between them were generated by acousto-optic modulator opening with continuous diode pumping. A custom radio frequency generator was developed to produce two sequential "opening" radio pulses with a delay of 0.2-1 μs. It was demonstrated that double pulse generation did not decrease the average laser power while providing the control over the laser pulse power profile. Surprisingly, a greater peak power in the double pulse mode was observed for the second laser pulse. Laser crater studies and plasma emission measurements revealed an improved efficiency of laser ablation in the double pulse mode. PMID:27370433

  4. Double nanosecond pulses generation in ytterbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.; Samokhvalov, A. A.; Yakovlev, E. B.; Zhitenev, I. Yu.; Kliushin, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Double pulse generation mode for nanosecond ytterbium fiber laser was developed. Two sequential 60-200 ns laser pulses with variable delay between them were generated by acousto-optic modulator opening with continuous diode pumping. A custom radio frequency generator was developed to produce two sequential "opening" radio pulses with a delay of 0.2-1 μs. It was demonstrated that double pulse generation did not decrease the average laser power while providing the control over the laser pulse power profile. Surprisingly, a greater peak power in the double pulse mode was observed for the second laser pulse. Laser crater studies and plasma emission measurements revealed an improved efficiency of laser ablation in the double pulse mode.

  5. Development of Mini-LIA and Primary Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Liao, Shu-Qing; Zheng, Shu-Xin; Lin, Yu-Zheng; Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Jing, Xiao-Bing; Mu, Fan; Pan, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Kai-Zhi; Shi, Jin-Shui; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2009-09-01

    Mini-LIA is a miniature of a linear induction accelerator developed by China Academy of Engineering Physics and Tsinghua University in 2007. It has been constructed with a thermionic cathode in an electron injector and a metglas core in the induction accelerator cavities. A double-pulsed electron beam was produced for the first time in China on the Mini-LIA with a thermionic cathode in the electron gun and a metglas core in the induction accelerator cavities. A double-pulsed beam current of more than 1.1 A was obtained on condition of 80 kV double-pulsed high voltage produced by pulsed power system supplying to the injector and accelerating modules. Some primary experiments for measuring the parameters of Mini-LIA has been performed, and some beam characterizations of Mini-LIA are presented. Further improvement is underway.

  6. Ultrastable reference pulser for high-resolution spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, R.; Lenkszus, F. R.; Sifter, L. L.; Strauss, M. G.

    1970-01-01

    Solid-state double-pulse generator for a high resolution semiconductor detector meets specific requirements for resolution /0.05 percent/, amplitude range /0.1-13 MeV/, and repetition rate /0.1-1000 pulses per second/. A tag pulse is generated in coincidence with each reference pulse.

  7. Vibrational Schroedinger Cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kis, Z.; Janszky, J.; Vinogradov, An. V.; Kobayashi, T.

    1996-01-01

    The optical Schroedinger cat states are simple realizations of quantum states having nonclassical features. It is shown that vibrational analogues of such states can be realized in an experiment of double pulse excitation of vibrionic transitions. To track the evolution of the vibrational wave packet we derive a non-unitary time evolution operator so that calculations are made in a quasi Heisenberg picture.

  8. Holographic cinematography and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smigielski, P.; Fagot, H.; Albe, F.

    1986-08-01

    Recording of single-exposure cineholograms of living bodies on 126-mm films, at a repetition rate of 25 holograms per second with the help of a frequency-doubled pulse YAG-laser; and recording of double-exposure cineholograms of reflecting moving objects for medical and industrial applications are reported. Limitations of 3D movies are described.

  9. Metabolizable energy and fiber digestibility of uncommon feedstuffs for geese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S J; Zhu, C H; Guo, J; Tang, Q P; Li, H F; Zou, J M

    2013-07-01

    This experiment was conducted to study the digestibility of uncommon feedstuffs for geese. Thirty Taihu ganders were selected and divided into 5 groups (n = 6), and one group was allocated as the control. Taihu ganders in the 4 treated groups were force-fed with a weight of different uncommon feedstuffs after 24 h of fasting, and the control group was kept in fasting with no force feeding. All excretion of each gander was collected on a plate for 24 h after force feeding. There was a 12-d recovery period between treatments. In this study, we measured the ME and analyzed neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, and hemicellulose of brewers grains, distillers grains, empty-grain rice, ryegrass powder, rice husk, corn stalk, rice straw, wheat straw, wheat husk, mushroom bran, and peanut vine. The TME values were 9.29, 8.67, 8.97, 5.89, 3.85, 3.10, 3.32, 3.02, 5.29, 2.48, and 3.15 MJ/kg, respectively. The digestibility of neutral detergent fiber for the feedstuffs ranged from 6.14 to 45.0%, the digestibility of acid detergent fiber ranged from 4.52 to 32.6%, and the digestibility of hemicellulose ranged from 18.5 to 61.6%. The best TME quadratic prediction equation was TME = 12.2 - 0.232CF, where CF is crude fiber. These results suggest that geese were able to use uncommon feedstuffs with high digestibility, and there was a significant negative correlation between energy digestibility and CF content. The ME values tested in this experiment can provide a foundation for preparation and adjustment of feed formulation for reasonable use of uncommon feedstuffs for geese. PMID:23776268

  10. Application of 2-um wavelength holmium lasers for treatment of skin diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Ivan A.; Klimov, Igor V.; Tsvetkov, Vladimir B.; Nerobeev, Alexander I.; Sadovnikova, Lija B.; Eliseenko, Vladimir I.

    1994-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental analysis of the efficiency of application of 2 micrometers pulsed holmium laser for cosmetic and plastic surgery and dermatology is carried out. Preliminary experiments were carried out on rats. Solid state 2 micrometers pulsed laser was allowed to operate in free running mode with pulse energy up to 1.5 J and pulse repetition rate up to 5 Hz. To deliver emission to the object a flexible quartz fiber without further focusing of 2.5 m in length and 400 micrometers of the core diameter was used. The effect of the different power density emission on the skin was studied. The second stage was the study of the influence of 2 micrometers emission on human skin. The results of the removal of hemangioma, papilloma, telangiectasia, nevus, nevus acantholytic, xanthelasma palpebral, verruca, chloasma, pigmental spots, tattoos, etc. are presented. Precision, simplicity, efficiency, and the high cosmetic effect of these operations is noted.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Two-Micron Sky Survey (TMSS) (Neugebauer+ 1969)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Leighton, R. B.

    1997-05-01

    The catalog, giving sources of emission in the 2.2-micrometer region for more than 5000 stars, represents a systematic survey of the Northern Hemisphere for stars brighter than third magnitude. The survey was carried out with a telescope at Mount Wilson, California, having a 62-inch diameter and an f/l aluminized epoxy mirror mounted equatorially. Radiation at an effective wavelength of 2.2 micrometers was detected by a lead sulfide photoconductive cell cooled by liquid nitrogen. In addition to the 2.2-micrometer detector array, radiation at an effective wavelength of 0.84 micrometers was detected by a simple silicon photovoltaic cell. The catalog includes right ascension and declination (B1950.0), K and I magnitudes, number of measurements, V magnitude, spectral types, cross identifications to the numbering systems of the General Catalogue, the Durchmusterung catalogs, the Bright Star Catalogue, and star names. (3 data files).

  12. SPECTRAL MEASUREMENTS OF GASEOUS SULFURIC ACID USING TUNABLE DIODE LASERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a spectral resolution of about 10 to the -4 power/cm, the important central portions of the two infrared absorption bands of H2SO4 at 8.2 micrometers (1222/cm) and 11.3 micrometers (880/cm) have been scanned at low pressure (approxima...

  13. AIRBORNE STUDIES OF THE EMISSIONS FROM THE VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS OF MOUNT ST. HELENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentrations of particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter in the ash emissions from Mount St. Helens have been more than 1000 times greater than those in the ambient air. Mass loadings of particles less than 2 micrometers in diameter were generally several hundred micr...

  14. Vapor-liquid phase separator permeability results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1981-01-01

    Continued studies are described in the area of vapor-liquid phase separator work with emphasis on permeabilities of porous sintered plugs (stainless steel, nominal pore size 2 micrometer). The temperature dependence of the permeability has been evaluated in classical fluid using He-4 gas at atmospheric pressure and in He-2 on the basis of a modified, thermosmotic permeability of the normal fluid.

  15. STUDY OF HORIZONTAL-SPRAY FLUX FORCE/CONDENSATION SCRUBBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a laboratory pilot-scale evaluation of a Flux Force/Condensation (FF/C) scrubber for collecting fine particles, those smaller than 2 micrometers in diameter. FF/C scrubbing includes the effects of diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, Stefan flow, and part...

  16. Comparison of Predicted and Measured 2 Micron Aerosol Backscatter from the 1998 ACLAIM Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.; Hannon, Stephen M.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    1999-01-01

    The 1998 Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced Inflight Measurements (ACLAIM) flight tests were conducted aboard a well-instrumented research aircraft. This paper presents comparisons of 2 micrometer aerosol backscatter coefficient predictions from aerosol sampling data and mie scattering codes with those produced by the ACLAIM instrument.

  17. ISO observations of Titan with SWS/grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coustenis, A.; Encrenaz, T.; Salama, A.; Lellouch, E.; Gautier, D.; Kessler, M. F.; deGraauw, T.; Samuelson, R. E.; Bjoraker, G.; Orton, G.

    1997-01-01

    The observations of Titan performed by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) short wavelength spectrometer (SWS), in the 2 micrometer to 45 micrometer region using the grating mode, are reported on. Special attention is given to data from Titan concerning 7 micrometer to 45 micrometer spectral resolution. Future work for improving Titan's spectra investigation is suggested.

  18. Piece of a Comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image shows a comet particle collected by the Stardust spacecraft. The particle is made up of the silicate mineral forsterite, also known as peridot in its gem form. It is surrounded by a thin rim of melted aerogel, the substance used to collect the comet dust samples. The particle is about 2 micrometers across.

  19. Performance assessment of the (Trans)Varestraint tests for determining solidification cracking susceptibility when using welding processes with filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal Mendes da Silva, Celina; Scotti, Américo

    2004-11-01

    This work is aimed at verifying if the Varestraint and Transvarestraint tests are adequate to assess solidification cracking susceptibility in welding of aluminium when a process with filler metal is employed. The main goal was to compare the performance of a reasonably new process (double pulsed GMAW) for welding aluminium alloys. Both tests and three cracking quantification criteria were analysed and compared to determine which was the most robust and reliable. The results showed that the most adequate ones were the Transvarestraint test and the maximum cracking length criterion. Some steps must be taken so as to guarantee reliability of the results if a small number of experiments are expected. The application of this methodology in comparison between a conventional pulsed GMAW and a double pulsed GMAW still showed that the latter reduces cracking susceptibility, appearing as an alternative solution for this critical phenomenon in aluminium welding.

  20. High intensity, plasma-induced electron emission from large area carbon nanotube array cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Qingliang; Yang Ya; Qi Junjie; Zhang Yue; Huang Yunhua; Xia Liansheng; Liu Liang

    2010-02-15

    The plasma-induced electron emission properties of large area carbon nanotube (CNT) array cathodes under different pulse electric fields were investigated. The formation and expansion of cathode plasmas were proved; in addition, the cathodes have higher emission current in the double-pulse mode than that in the single-pulse mode due to the expansion of plasma. Under the double-pulse electric field of 8.16 V/mum, the plasma's expansion velocity is about 12.33 cm/mus and the highest emission current density reached 107.72 A/cm{sup 2}. The Cerenkov radiation was used to diagnose the distribution of electron beams, and the electron beams' generating process was plasma-induced emission.

  1. Numerical Simulations of a 2.05 μm Q-switched Ho:YLF Laser for CO2 IPDA Space Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrientos Pellegrino, Jessica; Edouart, Dimitri; Gibert, Fabien; Cenac, Claire

    2016-06-01

    We report on numerical simulations of the performances of a 2.05 μm double pulse Q-switched Ho:YLF laser for the monitoring of CO2 from space. A Q-switched Holmium laser set-up based on a MOPA configuration is proposed to fulfill the requirements of a IPDA space-borne measurement. Double pulse operation is considered to obtain a 250 μs delay time between the ON and OFF pulse emissions. Numerical simulations results show that up to 40 mJ ON pulse can be extracted from the Ho:YLF laser at a repetition rate of 350 Hz with an optical efficiency of 17 %.

  2. Recovering degraded quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells by applying electrical pulses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Huang, Xuezhen

    2013-01-01

    We discovered a method of applying forward pulsed bias to recover the degradation of quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Up to 30.7% of the power conversion efficiency (η) of a degraded poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) based DSSC was recovered by a double-pulse. The recovered η remained higher than that before the double-pulse treatment for at least 28 days. It is deduced that the blocking of ion-transport channels in the quasi-solid-state electrolyte causes degradation of the DSSCs. This study will shed light on the efficiency enhancement and long-term stability of quasi-solid-state DSSCs. PMID:23545782

  3. Tuning near-field enhancements on an off-resonance nanorod dimer via temporally shaped femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guangqing; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Lu, Yu; Wu, Yanmin; Ou, Yan; Hou, Xun

    2015-11-01

    We theoretically investigated ultrafast thermal dynamics tuning of near-field enhancements on an off-resonance gold nanorod dimer via temporally shaped femtosecond (fs) laser double pulses. The nonequilibrium thermal excitation is self-consistently coupled into a near-field scattering model for exploring the ultrafast near-field enhancement effects. It is revealed that the near electric-field localized within the gold nanorod dimer can be largely promoted via optimizing the temporal separation and the pulse energy ratio of temporally shaped femtosecond laser double pulses. The results are explained as thermal dynamics manipulation of plasmon resonances in the nanorod dimer via tailoring temporally shaped femtosecond laser. This study provides basic understanding for tuning near-field properties on poorly fabricated metallic nano-structures via temporally shaped femtosecond laser, which can find potential applications in the fields such as fs super-resolution near-field imaging, near-field optical tweezers, and fs photothermal therapy.

  4. Comparative LIBS Analysis Of Calcified Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Salam, Z. A.; Harith, M. A.

    2008-09-23

    Signal enhancement, limits of detection, and relevance to environmental concentration for element in calcified tissues using LIBS with single and double laser pulses will be presented. These measurements were performed on three calcified tissues representing different matrices, namely enamel of human teeth, shells and eggshells. This method depends on the role of the laser induced shock wave on the ionization rate of the ablated target material atoms. The effect of the laser single and double pulse on the ionic to atomic ratio of calcium and magnesium spectral emission lines, CaII/CaI and MgII/MgI, will be presented and compared with the previous results and its relevance to the target material hardness. The results show that in case of single pulse the intensity ratios in calcium are higher than the double pulse while there is no appreciable difference between both in case of magnesium.

  5. Dynamics of optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, an optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses was studied. A high power Nd:YAG laser beam was used for producing optical breakdown plasma in the air. The dynamics of breakdown plasma were studied using an optical probe beam. A portion of the laser beam was used, as the probe beam and was aligned to propagate (perpendicular to the pump beam) through the breakdown region. The transmission of the probe beam (through the breakdown region) was temporally measured for both single and double pulse irradiations. The results were used to describe the evolution of the induced plasma in both conditions. These results show that the plasma formation time and its absorptivity are strongly dependent on the single or double pulse configurations.

  6. Electron temperature and density measurements of laser induced germanium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hira; Arshad, Saboohi; Haq, S. U.; Nadeem, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The germanium plasma produced by the fundamental harmonics (1064 nm) of Nd:YAG laser in single and double pulse configurations have been studied spectroscopically. The plasma is characterized by measuring the electron temperature using the Boltzmann plot method for neutral and ionized species and electron number density as a function of laser irradiance, ambient pressure, and distance from the target surface. It is observed that the plasma parameters have an increasing trend with laser irradiance (9-33 GW/cm2) and with ambient pressure (8-250 mbar). However, a decreasing trend is observed along the plume length up to 4.5 mm. The electron temperature and electron number density are also determined using a double pulse configuration, and their behavior at fixed energy ratio and different interpulse delays is discussed.

  7. Some laser measurement techniques used in aero engine research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. G.

    Holographic flow visualization and laser anemometry are described. Flow within a fan blade passage can be visualized in three dimensions by recording two superimposed holograms on the same film, using a double pulse laser. Interferometric fringes formed by the images represent a shearing of the density field with respect to itself, caused by rotor movement during the separation of the double pulse laser. Shocks, overtip vortices, wakes, shock interaction with the boundary layer, and separated boundary layers can be observed. The anemometer measures the time taken for particles to cross between two focused laser beams separated by a known amount. The backscattered light from each beam is recorded by two photomultipliers and the discriminated events from the two beams are cross correlated. Correlograms of events for selected angles of orientation of the two spots at gated positions in rotor passage provide a spatially localized, but time averaged, value of flow velocity.

  8. Holographic flow visualization at the Langley Expansion Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goad, W. K.; Burner, A. W.

    1981-01-01

    A holographic system used for flow visualization at the Langley Expansion Tube is described. A ruby laser which can be singly or doubly pulsed during the short run time of less than 300 microns is used as the light source. With holography, sensitivity adjustments can be optimized after a run instead of before a run as with conventional flow visualization techniques. This results in an increased reliability of the flow visualization available for the study of real-gas effects on flow about models. Holographic techniques such as single-plate schlieren and shadowgraph, two plate interferometry, double pulse interferometry for perfect infinite-fringe interferograms, and double-pulse interferometry used to examine changes in the flow over a short time period are described and examples presented.

  9. Dynamics of optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein; Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses was studied. A high power Nd:YAG laser beam was used for producing optical breakdown plasma in the air. The dynamics of breakdown plasma were studied using an optical probe beam. A portion of the laser beam was used, as the probe beam and was aligned to propagate (perpendicular to the pump beam) through the breakdown region. The transmission of the probe beam (through the breakdown region) was temporally measured for both single and double pulse irradiations. The results were used to describe the evolution of the induced plasma in both conditions. These results show that the plasma formation time and its absorptivity are strongly dependent on the single or double pulse configurations.

  10. Polarization sensitive anisotropic structuring of silicon by ultrashort light pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingyu; Drevinskas, Rokas Beresna, Martynas; Kazansky, Peter G.

    2015-07-27

    Imprinting of anisotropic structures on the silicon surface by double pulse femtosecond laser irradiation is demonstrated. The origin of the polarization-induced anisotropy is explained in terms of interaction of linearly polarized second pulse with the wavelength-sized symmetric crater-shaped structure generated by the linearly polarized first pulse. A wavefront sensor is fabricated by imprinting an array of micro-craters. Polarization controlled anisotropy of the structures can be also explored for data storage applications.

  11. Flexible control of femtosecond pulse duration and separation using an emittance-spoiling foil in x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Behrens, C.; Coffee, R.; Decker, F. -J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Helml, W.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J.

    2015-06-22

    We report experimental studies of generating and controlling femtosecond x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers (FELs) using an emittance spoiling foil. By selectivity spoiling the transverse emittance of the electron beam, the output pulse duration or double-pulse separation is adjusted with a variable size single or double slotted foil. Measurements were performed with an X-band transverse deflector located downstream of the FEL undulator, from which both the FEL lasing and emittance spoiling effects are observed directly.

  12. A compact high current pulsed electron gun with subnanosecond electron pulse widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khakoo, M. A.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetically-collimated, double-pulsed electron gun capable of generating electron pulses with a peak instantaneous current of approximately 70 microamps and a temporal width of 0.35 ns (FWHM) has been developed. Calibration is accomplished by measuring the lifetime of the well known 2(1P)-to-1(1S) transition in helium (58.4nm) at a near-threshold electron-impact energy by use of the delayed-coincidence technique.

  13. Structures in Te profiles: High resolution Thomson scattering in the Rijnhuizen tokamak project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Barth, C. J.; Lopes Cardozo, N. J.; van der Meiden, H. J.

    1999-01-01

    In the Rijnhuizen tokamak project, the double pulse multiposition Thomson scattering diagnostic is in full operation. Its high spatial resolution enables the measurement of small scale structures in Te, ne, and pe. Thomson scattering profiles during an ordinary sawtooth crash show the displacement of the hot core in great detail. Measurements on off-axis sawtoothing plasmas show that a small central part remains unaffected. Filaments are observed in plasmas which show a transient central temperature rise in response to fast edge cooling.

  14. Holographic Cinematography And Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smigielski, Paul

    1987-09-01

    We describe several applications of cineholography to objects scattering light by reflection: single-exposure cineholograms on 126-mm films at a repetition rate of 25 holograms per second for 3-D movies and for flight simulators applications, double-exposure cineholograms for medical and industrial applications (NDT). Limitations of cineholography are also described. The light source used for cineholograms recording is a frequency-doubled pulse YAG-laser.

  15. Holographic Cinematography And Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smigielski, P.; Fagot, H.; Albe, F.

    1988-01-01

    Important progresses were achieved for the first time: 1) recording of single-exposure cineholograms of living bodies on 126-mm films, at a repetition rate of 25 holograms per second with the help of a frequency-doubled pulse YAG-laser; 2) recording of double-exposure cineholograms of reflecting moving objects for medical and industrial applications. Limitations of 3-D movies are described.

  16. Inactivation of the cardiac Na+ channels in guinea-pig ventricular cells through the open state.

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuiye, T; Noma, A

    1995-01-01

    1. The inactivation kinetics of the Na+ current were investigated using the improved oil-gap voltage clamp method in single ventricular cells of guinea-pig hearts. 2. Activation of the Na+ current was observed on depolarization more positive than -50 mV from a holding potential of -100 mV, and inactivation was complete during these depolarizations. The time course of current decay was fitted by a double exponential at potentials between -40 and -15 mV, and virtually by a single exponential at more positive potentials. The decay time courses examined either by the double-pulse protocol or the single-pulse protocol were similar. 3. The double-pulse protocol clearly revealed a sigmoidal onset of inactivation on depolarization. The initial delay of inactivation decreased with more positive potentials. The time course of double-pulse inactivation was reconstructed by integrating the Na+ current recorded by a continuous depolarization. 4. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the cardiac Na+ channel inactivates exclusively through the open state. PMID:7562602

  17. Use of ns and fs pulse excitation in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to improve its analytical performances: A case study on quaternary bronze alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaviva, Salvatore; Fantoni, Roberta; Caneve, Luisa; Colao, Francesco; Fornarini, Lucilla; Santagata, Antonio; Teghil, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Analytical performances of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) resulted not fully satisfactory in some cases such as historical bronzes, therefore, efforts should be focussed on improving ablation efficiency and on better understanding the plasma parameter evolution. To this aim a set of double pulse experiments have been carried out in almost collinear geometry at about 530 nm laser excitation. The first emitting source was either a ns or a fs laser the second a ns one. Data were collected as a function of the interpulse delay, in order to determine the ablation efficiency increase, to study the kinetics of plasma parameters (temperature, electron density) and the decay of atomic and ionic intensities with respect to the optical background. In parallel a previously developed model for laser ablation, ionization and following plasma decay, was implemented, adding a second laser pulse, to analyse the double pulse excitation in the considered geometry, and the time evolution of the same variables was investigated. Model results are able to reproduce the observed experimental trends and support the possibility of improving analytical performances by using the double pulse technique with inter-pulse delays in the entire investigated range.

  18. A multiple work mode YAG laser in derma surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Yu; Zhang, Guizhong; Ye, Zhisheng; Yu, Lin

    2006-06-01

    It has been very common that a pulse laser is used in derma surgery based on the theory of "Selective Photothermolysis". This method has also been accepted as the best way to treat the pigments by the medical textbook. A kind of double-pulsed laser which gets the name by two pulse output at one pumping process is developed for derma surgery lately, and this kind of laser has been proved more effective and safe than single-pulse laser. We also develop a multiple work mode YAG laser including two double-pulsed modes at 1064nm and 532nm, two single-pulsed modes at 1064nm and 532nm, and one free-running mode at 1064nm. Considering availability, security and reliability of the laser as a surgery machine, some important subsystems of the laser are optimized carefully, such as Q-switch driver, wavelength-switching system, power supply, and control system etc. At last we get a prototype laser which can run for longer than 30 minutes continuously, and output Max10 pulse per second (pps) with Max800mJ energy at 1064nm double Q-Switch mode, or Max400mJ at 532nm. Using double pulse mode of the laser we do some removal experiments of tattoos and other pigments, and obtain good effect.

  19. Characteristics of excitation discharge of an excimer laser in gas density depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Go; Masuda, Wataru; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    1998-12-01

    The influences of gas density depletion on the highly- repetitive, high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge for excitation of excimer laser have been investigated eliminating the other instabilities, such as shock waves, residual ions, discharge products and electrode heating. The gas density depletion is simulated by utilizing a subsonic flow between the curved electrodes. The comparison has been made on the discharge occurred in the presence of the gas density depletion with the second discharge on the double-pulse experiment. We have found that the big gas density non uniformity, (Delta) (rho) /(rho) 0 approximately 3.6% corresponding to a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of approximately 20 Hz, tends to cause the arc discharge without the shocks, ions, discharge products and electrode heating. On the other hand, the second discharge on the double-pulse experiment becomes arc discharge in much smaller non uniformity ((Delta) (rho) /(rho) 0 approximately 1.2% corresponding to PRR approximately 3 Hz). The arc discharge in the double-pulse experiment might be driven by the residual ions and/or discharge products other than gas density depletion except for PRR greater than 20 Hz.

  20. Biomass waste gasification - can be the two stage process suitable for tar reduction and power generation?

    PubMed

    Sulc, Jindřich; Stojdl, Jiří; Richter, Miroslav; Popelka, Jan; Svoboda, Karel; Smetana, Jiří; Vacek, Jiří; Skoblja, Siarhei; Buryan, Petr

    2012-04-01

    A pilot scale gasification unit with novel co-current, updraft arrangement in the first stage and counter-current downdraft in the second stage was developed and exploited for studying effects of two stage gasification in comparison with one stage gasification of biomass (wood pellets) on fuel gas composition and attainable gas purity. Significant producer gas parameters (gas composition, heating value, content of tar compounds, content of inorganic gas impurities) were compared for the two stage and the one stage method of the gasification arrangement with only the upward moving bed (co-current updraft). The main novel features of the gasifier conception include grate-less reactor, upward moving bed of biomass particles (e.g. pellets) by means of a screw elevator with changeable rotational speed and gradual expanding diameter of the cylindrical reactor in the part above the upper end of the screw. The gasifier concept and arrangement are considered convenient for thermal power range 100-350 kW(th). The second stage of the gasifier served mainly for tar compounds destruction/reforming by increased temperature (around 950°C) and for gasification reaction of the fuel gas with char. The second stage used additional combustion of the fuel gas by preheated secondary air for attaining higher temperature and faster gasification of the remaining char from the first stage. The measurements of gas composition and tar compound contents confirmed superiority of the two stage gasification system, drastic decrease of aromatic compounds with two and higher number of benzene rings by 1-2 orders. On the other hand the two stage gasification (with overall ER=0.71) led to substantial reduction of gas heating value (LHV=3.15 MJ/Nm(3)), elevation of gas volume and increase of nitrogen content in fuel gas. The increased temperature (>950°C) at the entrance to the char bed caused also substantial decrease of ammonia content in fuel gas. The char with higher content of ash leaving the second stage presented only few mass% of the inlet biomass stream. PMID:21925858

  1. Biomass waste gasification - Can be the two stage process suitable for tar reduction and power generation?

    SciTech Connect

    Sulc, Jindrich; Stojdl, Jiri; Richter, Miroslav; Popelka, Jan; Svoboda, Karel; Smetana, Jiri; Vacek, Jiri; Skoblja, Siarhei; Buryan, Petr

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of one stage (co-current) and two stage gasification of wood pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Original arrangement with grate-less reactor and upward moving bed of the pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two stage gasification leads to drastic reduction of tar content in gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One stage gasification produces gas with higher LHV at lower overall ER. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Content of ammonia in gas is lower in two stage moving bed gasification. - Abstract: A pilot scale gasification unit with novel co-current, updraft arrangement in the first stage and counter-current downdraft in the second stage was developed and exploited for studying effects of two stage gasification in comparison with one stage gasification of biomass (wood pellets) on fuel gas composition and attainable gas purity. Significant producer gas parameters (gas composition, heating value, content of tar compounds, content of inorganic gas impurities) were compared for the two stage and the one stage method of the gasification arrangement with only the upward moving bed (co-current updraft). The main novel features of the gasifier conception include grate-less reactor, upward moving bed of biomass particles (e.g. pellets) by means of a screw elevator with changeable rotational speed and gradual expanding diameter of the cylindrical reactor in the part above the upper end of the screw. The gasifier concept and arrangement are considered convenient for thermal power range 100-350 kW{sub th}. The second stage of the gasifier served mainly for tar compounds destruction/reforming by increased temperature (around 950 Degree-Sign C) and for gasification reaction of the fuel gas with char. The second stage used additional combustion of the fuel gas by preheated secondary air for attaining higher temperature and faster gasification of the remaining char from the first stage. The measurements of gas composition and tar compound contents confirmed superiority of the two stage gasification system, drastic decrease of aromatic compounds with two and higher number of benzene rings by 1-2 orders. On the other hand the two stage gasification (with overall ER = 0.71) led to substantial reduction of gas heating value (LHV = 3.15 MJ/Nm{sup 3}), elevation of gas volume and increase of nitrogen content in fuel gas. The increased temperature (>950 Degree-Sign C) at the entrance to the char bed caused also substantial decrease of ammonia content in fuel gas. The char with higher content of ash leaving the second stage presented only few mass% of the inlet biomass stream.

  2. Progress in voltage and current mode on-chip analog-to-digital converters for CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panicacci, Roger; Pain, Bedabrata; Zhou, Zhimin; Nakamura, Junichi; Fossum, Eric R.

    1996-03-01

    Two 8 bit successive approximation analog-to-digital converter (ADC) designs and a 12 bit current mode incremental sigma delta ((Sigma) -(Delta) ) ADC have been designed, fabricated, and tested. The successive approximation test chip designs are compatible with active pixel sensor (APS) column parallel architectures with a 20.4 micrometers pitch in a 1.2 micrometers n-well CMOS process and a 40 micrometers pitch in a 2 micrometers n-well CMOS process. The successive approximation designs consume as little as 49 (mu) W at a 500 KHz conversion rate meeting the low power requirements inherent in column parallel architectures. The current mode incremental (Sigma) -(Delta) ADC test chip is designed to be multiplexed among 8 columns in a semi-column parallel current mode APS architecture. The higher accuracy ADC consumes 800 (mu) W at a 5 KHz conversion rate.

  3. On-chip noninterference angular momentum multiplexing of broadband light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haoran; Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Qiming; Gu, Min

    2016-05-01

    Angular momentum division has emerged as a physically orthogonal multiplexing method in high-capacity optical information technologies. However, the typical bulky elements used for information retrieval from the overall diffracted field, based on the interference method, impose a fundamental limit toward realizing on-chip multiplexing. We demonstrate noninterference angular momentum multiplexing by using a mode-sorting nanoring aperture with a chip-scale footprint as small as 4.2 micrometers by 4.2 micrometers, where nanoring slits exhibit a distinctive outcoupling efficiency on tightly confined plasmonic modes. The nonresonant mode-sorting sensitivity and scalability of our approach enable on-chip parallel multiplexing over a bandwidth of 150 nanometers in the visible wavelength range. The results offer the possibility of ultrahigh-capacity and miniaturized nanophotonic devices harnessing angular momentum division.

  4. On-chip noninterference angular momentum multiplexing of broadband light.

    PubMed

    Ren, Haoran; Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Qiming; Gu, Min

    2016-05-13

    Angular momentum division has emerged as a physically orthogonal multiplexing method in high-capacity optical information technologies. However, the typical bulky elements used for information retrieval from the overall diffracted field, based on the interference method, impose a fundamental limit toward realizing on-chip multiplexing. We demonstrate noninterference angular momentum multiplexing by using a mode-sorting nanoring aperture with a chip-scale footprint as small as 4.2 micrometers by 4.2 micrometers, where nanoring slits exhibit a distinctive outcoupling efficiency on tightly confined plasmonic modes. The nonresonant mode-sorting sensitivity and scalability of our approach enable on-chip parallel multiplexing over a bandwidth of 150 nanometers in the visible wavelength range. The results offer the possibility of ultrahigh-capacity and miniaturized nanophotonic devices harnessing angular momentum division. PMID:27056843

  5. Support for joint infrared and Copernicus X-Ray observations of Cygnus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous X-ray and infrared measurements were carried out of the flares from Cygnus X-3 from the Copernicus spacecraft observatory. The detectors, InSb, were arranged so that 1.65 and 2.2 micrometer broadbend photometry was performed through a common diaphragm. The measurements were used to determine the energy distribution during a flare and thus learn about the infrared spectrum and its changes during the flare.

  6. Stereological analysis of plasmolysis in logarithmic-phase Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed Central

    Schall, B F; Marathe, G V; Ghosh, B K

    1981-01-01

    The plasmolytic response of Bacillus licheniformis 749/C cells to the increasing osmolarity of the surrounding medium was quantitated with stereological techniques. Plasmolysis was defined as the area (in square micrometers) of the inside surface of the bacterial wall not in association with bacterial membrane per unit volume (in cubic micrometers) of bacteria. This plasmolyzed surface area was zero when the cells were suspended in a concentration of sucrose solution lower than 0.5 M, but increased linearly when the sucrose molarity rose above 0.5 M, reaching a plateau value of 3.61 micrometers2/micrometers3 in 2 M sucrose. In contrast, when the bacterial cells were treated with lysozyme plasmolysis increased abruptly from 0.06 micrometers2/micrometers3 in 0.75 M sucrose to 4.09 micrometers2/micrometers3 in 1 M sucrose. When the time of exposure was prolonged, the degree of plasmolysis increased gradually for the duration of the experiment (30 min) after exposure to 1 M sucrose without lysozyme, whereas with lysozyme plasmolysis reached a maximum (4.09 micrograms2/micrometers3) in 2 to 5 min. The examination of ultrastructure showed that the protoplast bodies of lysozyme-treated cells in 1 M sucrose and untreated cells in 2 M sucrose are maximally retracted from the intact wall of the bacteria; hardly any retraction of protoplasts could be seen for untreated cells in 1 M sucrose. The data suggest that the B. licheniformis cells are isoosmotic to 800 to 1,100 mosM solutions, but are able to withstand much greater osmotic pressure with no signs of plasmolysis because the cell wall and the plasma membrane are held in close association, perhaps by a covalent bond. It is likely that lysozyme weakens this bond by degradation of the peptidoglycan layer. Cellular autolysis also weakens this wall-membrane association. Images PMID:7217004

  7. Develop real-time dosimetry concepts and instrumentation for long term missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braby, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a rugged portable instrument to evaluate dose and dose equivalent is described. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter simulating a 2 micrometer spherical tissue volume was operated satisfactorily for over a year. The basic elements of the electronic system were designed and tested. And finally, the most suitable mathematical technique for evaluating dose equivalent with a portable instrument was selected. Design and fabrication of a portable prototype, based on the previously tested circuits, is underway.

  8. Nanobacteria are alive on Earth as well as Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folk, Robert L.; Lynch, F. Leo

    1997-07-01

    Nannobacteria are minute spherical to worm-shaped cells (diameter 0.03 to 0.2 micrometers ) that participate in the formation of carbonates, clays, and other minerals on Earth. The supposed nannobacterial objects found by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in the Martian meteorite can be exactly duplicated as to morphology and size by earthly examples. Grapelike colonies of 0.05-micrometers carbon balls in the Allende meteorite also resemble nannobacterial colonies in south Italian volcanic clays.

  9. Growing Gallium Arsenide On Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Gouri

    1989-01-01

    Epitaxial layers of high quality formed on <111> crystal plane. Present work reports successful growth of 1- and 2-micrometer thick layers of n-type, 7-ohms per cm, 2-inch diameter, Si<111> substrate. Growth conducted in Riber-2300(R) MBE system. Both doped and undoped layers of GaAs grown. Chamber equipped with electron gun and camera for in-situ reflection high-energy-electron diffraction measurements. RHEED patterns of surface monitored continuously during slow growth stage.

  10. What the Voyager infrared investigators hope to learn about the Saturn system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Voyager infrared investigation uses a Michelson interferometer (IRIS) covering the spectral range from 200 to 3000 cm/1 (3.3 to 50 micrometers) and a bore sighted radiometer covering the range from 5000 to 25000 cm/1 (0.4 to 2 micrometers). The spectral resolution of the interferometer is 4.3 cm/1 and the field of view is 0.25 deg. Scientific results anticipated from the investigation of the Saturnian system are discussed.

  11. Barrier layer for a MCrAlY basecoat superalloy combination

    DOEpatents

    Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.; Vance, Steven J.

    2001-01-01

    A turbine component contains a substrate (22) such as a superalloy, a basecoat (24) of the type MCrAlY, and a continuous barrier layer (28) between the substrate and basecoat, where the barrier layer (28) is made of an alloy of (Re, Ta, Ru, Os)X, where X can be Ni, Co or their mixture, where the barrier layer is at least 2 micrometers thick and substantially prevents materials from both the basecoat and substrate from migrating through it.

  12. Corrugated Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector Focal Plane Array Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, A.; Choi, K. K.; Das, N. C.; La, A.; Jhabvala, M.

    1999-01-01

    The corrugated quantum-well infrared photodetector (C-QWIP) uses total internal reflection to couple normal incident light into the optically active quantum wells. The coupling efficiency has been shown to be relatively independent of the pixel size and wavelength thus making the C-QWIP a candidate for detectors over the entire infrared spectrum. The broadband coupling efficiency of the C-QWIP makes it an ideal candidate for multiwavelength detectors. We fabricated and tested C-QWIP focal plane arrays (FPAs) with cutoff wavelengths of 11.2 and 16.2 micrometers. Each FPA has 256 x 256 pixels that are bump-bonded to a direct injection readout circuit. Both FPAs provided infrared imagery with good aesthetic attributes. For the 11.2-micrometers FPA, background-limited performance (BLIP) was observed at 60 K with f/3 optics. For the 16.2-micrometers FPA, BLIP was observed at 38 K. Besides the reduction of dark current in C-QWIP structures, the measured internal quantum efficiency (eta) remains to be high. The values for responsivity and quantum efficiency obtained from the FPA results agree well with those measured for single devices.

  13. Spectroscopy of luminous infrared galaxies at 2 microns: 1. The ultraluminous galaxies (L(sub IR) approximately greater than 10 (exp 12) solar luminosity)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.; Joseph, R. D.; Doyon, Rene; Sanders, D. B.

    1995-01-01

    We present high-quality spectra covering the K window at a resolving power of 340 for a sample of 13 ultraluminous (L(sub IR) approximately greater than 10(exp 12) solar luminosity) infrared-selected galaxies, and line fluxes for a comparison sample of 24 lower luminosity galaxies. The 2 micrometers spectra of 10 of the ultraluminous galaxies are characterized by emission and absorption features commonly associated with stars and star formation; two others have the red power-law spectra and Br gamma line widths of Seyfert 1 galaxies; the final galaxy has strong emission from hot dust. We have found no broad-line active nuclei not already known from optical observations, despite the fact that the extinction at 2 micrometers is 1/10 that at optical wavelengths; any putative Seyfert 1 nuclei must be deeply buried. Powerful continua and emission lines from H2 and Br gamma are detected in all the ultraluminous galaxies. Comparing the H2 1-0 S(1), Br gamma, and 2 micrometers and far-infrared luminosities to those of the lower luminosity galaxies yields several major results. First, the dereddened Br gamma emission, relative to the far-infrared luminosity is significantly depressed in the ultraluminous sample, when compared to the lower luminosity galaxies. Five of the ultraluminous galaxies have L(sub Br gamma)L(sub IR) ratios lower than for any of the comparison objects. Second, the H2 1-0 S(1) luminosity is also responsible, directly or indirectly, for producing the excited H2, and that the H2 apparently comes from optically thin regions in both classes of objects. Third, eight of the 13 ultraluminous systems have lower 2 micrometers/far-infrared luminosity ratios than any of the lower luminosity galaxies, and five of these are the galaxies also deficient in Br gamma. These three findings may be understood if the the H2, Br gamma, and 2 mircometers continua in the ultraluminous galaxies arise from spatially distinct regions, with the continuum and Br gamma largely

  14. New buoy observation system for tsunami and crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Narumi; Ishihara, Yasuhisa; Ochi, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Tatsuya; Tahara, Jun'ichiro; Maeda, Yosaku; Kido, Motoyuki; Ohta, Yusaku; Mutoh, Katsuhiko; Hashimoto, Gosei; Kogure, Satoshi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a new system for real-time observation of tsunamis and crustal deformation using a seafloor pressure sensor, an array of seafloor transponders and a Precise Point Positioning (PPP ) system on a buoy. The seafloor pressure sensor and the PPP system detect tsunamis, and the pressure sensor and the transponder array measure crustal deformation. The system is designed to be capable of detecting tsunami and vertical crustal deformation of ±8 m with a resolution of less than 5 mm. A noteworthy innovation in our system is its resistance to disturbance by strong ocean currents. Seismogenic zones near Japan lie in areas of strong currents like the Kuroshio, which reaches speeds of approximately 5.5 kt (2.8 m/s) around the Nankai Trough. Our techniques include slack mooring and new acoustic transmission methods using double pulses for sending tsunami data. The slack ratio can be specified for the environment of the deployment location. We can adjust slack ratios, rope lengths, anchor weights and buoy sizes to control the ability of the buoy system to maintain freeboard. The measured pressure data is converted to time difference of a double pulse and this simple method is effective to save battery to transmit data. The time difference of the double pulse has error due to move of the buoy and fluctuation of the seawater environment. We set a wire-end station 1,000 m beneath the buoy to minimize the error. The crustal deformation data is measured by acoustic ranging between the buoy and six transponders on the seafloor. All pressure and crustal deformation data are sent to land station in real-time using iridium communication.

  15. 2-micron Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Singh, U.; Petros, M.

    2012-12-01

    A 2-micron high energy, pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar is being developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. Development of this lidar heavily leverages the 2-micron laser technologies developed in LaRC over the last decade. The high pulse energy, direct detection lidar operating at CO2 2-micron absorption band provides an alternate approach to measure CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. It is expected to provide high-precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Our objective is to integrate an existing high energy double-pulsed 2-micron laser transmitter with a direct detection receiver and telescope to enable an airborne capability to perform a first proof of principle demonstration of airborne direct detection CO2 measurements. The 2-micron transmitter provides 100mJ at 10Hz with double pulse format specifically designed for DIAL/IPDA instrument. The compact, rugged, highly reliable transceiver is based on unique Ho:Tm:YLF high-energy 2-micron pulsed laser technology. All the optical mounts are custom designed and have space heritage. A 16-inch diameter telescope has been designed and being manufactured for the direct detection lidar. The detector is an InGaAs Positive-Intrinsic-Negative (PIN) photodiode manufactured by Hamamatsu Corporation. The performance of the detector is characterized at various operating temperatures and bias voltages for spectral response, NEP, response time, dynamic range, and linearity. A collinear lidar structure is designed to be integrated to NASA UC12 or B200 research aircrafts. This paper will describe the design of the airborne 2-micron pulsed IPDA lidar system; the lidar operation parameters; the wavelength pair selection; laser transmitter energy, pulse rate, beam divergence, double pulse generation and accurate frequency control; detector characterization; telescope design; lidar structure design

  16. Responsiveness of electrical nociceptive detection thresholds to capsaicin (8 %)-induced changes in nociceptive processing.

    PubMed

    Doll, Robert J; van Amerongen, Guido; Hay, Justin L; Groeneveld, Geert J; Veltink, Peter H; Buitenweg, Jan R

    2016-09-01

    Pain disorders can be initiated and maintained by malfunctioning of one or several mechanisms underlying the nociceptive function. Psychophysical procedures allow the estimation of nociceptive detection thresholds using intra-epidermal electrical stimuli. By varying the temporal properties of electrical stimuli, various contributions of nociceptive processes to stimulus processing can be observed. To observe the responsiveness of nociceptive thresholds to changes in nociceptive function, a model of capsaicin-induced nerve defunctionalization was used. Its effect on nociceptive detections thresholds was investigated over a period of 84 days. A cutaneous capsaicin (8 %) patch was applied for 60 min to the upper leg of eight healthy human participants. Single- and double-pulse electrical stimuli were presented in a pseudo-random order using an intra-epidermal electrode. Stimuli and corresponding responses were recorded on both treated and untreated skin areas prior to capsaicin application and on days 2, 7, 28, and 84. Increases in electrical detection thresholds at the capsaicin area were observed on days 2 and 7 for single-pulse stimuli. Detection thresholds corresponding to double-pulse stimuli were increased on days 7 and 28, suggesting a delayed and longer lasting effect on double-pulse stimuli. In the present study, it was demonstrated that the responsiveness of detection thresholds to capsaicin application depends on the temporal properties of electrical stimuli. The observation of capsaicin-induced changes by estimation of detection thresholds revealed different time patterns of contributions of peripheral and central mechanisms to stimulus processing. PMID:27142052

  17. Perception of synthesized voice quality in connected speech by Cantonese speakers.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Edwin M L; Murdoch, Bruce; Hird, Kathryn; Lau, Polly

    2002-09-01

    Perceptual voice analysis is a subjective process. However, despite reports of varying degrees of intrajudge and interjudge reliability, it is widely used in clinical voice evaluation. One of the ways to improve the reliability of this procedure is to provide judges with signals as external standards so that comparison can be made in relation to these "anchor" signals. The present study used a Klatt speech synthesizer to create a set of speech signals with varying degree of three different voice qualities based on a Cantonese sentence. The primary objective of the study was to determine whether different abnormal voice qualities could be synthesized using the "built-in" synthesis parameters using a perceptual study. The second objective was to determine the relationship between acoustic characteristics of the synthesized signals and perceptual judgment. Twenty Cantonese-speaking speech pathologists with at least three years of clinical experience in perceptual voice evaluation were asked to undertake two tasks. The first was to decide whether the voice quality of the synthesized signals was normal or not. The second was to decide whether the abnormal signals should be described as rough, breathy, or vocal fry. The results showed that signals generated with a small degree of aspiration noise were perceived as breathiness while signals with a small degree of flutter or double pulsing were perceived as roughness. When the flutter or double pulsing increased further, tremor and vocal fry, rather than roughness, were perceived. Furthermore, the amount of aspiration noise, flutter, or double pulsing required for male voice stimuli was different from that required for the female voice stimuli with a similar level of perceptual breathiness and roughness. These findings showed that changes in perceived vocal quality could be achieved by systematic modifications of synthesis parameters. This opens up the possibility of using synthesized voice signals as external standards or

  18. A High Energy 2-microns Laser for Multiple Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, James C.; Barnes, Norman P.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2000-01-01

    Solid-state 2-microns laser has been receiving considerable interest because of its eye-safe property and efficient diode pump operation, It has potential for multiple lidar applications to detect water vapor. carbon dioxide and winds. In this paper, we describe a 2-microns double pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF laser and end-pumped amplifier system. A comprehensive theoretical model has been developed to aid the design and optimization of the laser performance. In a single Q-switched pulse operation the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will be wasted. However, in a double pulses operation mode, the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will repopulate the Ho atoms that were depleted by the extraction of the first Q-switched pulse. Thus. the Tin sensitized Ho:YLF laser provides a unique advantage in applications that require double pulse operation, such as Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). A total output energy of 146 mJ per pulse pair under Q-switch operation is achieved with as high as 4.8% optical to optical efficiency. Compared to a single pulse laser, 70% higher laser efficiency is realized. To obtain high energy while maintaining the high beam quality, a master-oscillator-power-amplifier 2-microns system is designed. We developed an end-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF disk amplifier. This amplifier uses two diode arrays as pump source. A non-imaging lens duct is used to couple the radiation from the laser diode arrays to the laser disk. Preliminary result shows that the efficiency of this laser can be as high as 3%, a factor of three increases over side-pump configuration. This high energy, highly efficient and high beam quality laser is a promising candidate for use in an efficient, multiple lidar applications.

  19. One-Joule-per-Pulse Q-Switched 2-micron Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Modlin, Ed A.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Pual J.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2005-01-01

    Q-switched output of 1.1 J per pulse at 2-micron wavelength has been achieved in a diode pumped Ho:Tm:LuLF laser using a side-pumped rod configuration in a Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier (MOPA) architecture. This is the first time that a 2-micron laser has broken the Joule per pulse barrier for Q-switched operation. The total system efficiency reaches 5% and 6.2% for single and double pulse operation, respectively. The system produces excellent 1.4 times of transform limited beam quality.

  20. Trifluoromethylated (tetrahydropyrrolo) quinazolinones by a new three-component reaction and facile assignment of the regio- and stereoisomers formed by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dolenský, Bohumil; Kvícala, Jaroslav; Paleta, Oldrich; Lang, Jan; Dvoráková, Hana; Cejka, Jan

    2010-05-01

    A new three-component cyclisation reactions of methyl 3,3,3-trifluoropyruvate, 2-aminobenzylamine and oxo compounds afforded tetrahydropyrroloquinazolinones of the types 4 and 5 as mixtures of regio- and stereoisomers. Whereas standard 1D NMR spectroscopy was used for a facile assignment of the cyclization regioisomers, a combination of homo (proton-proton) and heteronuclear (proton-fluorine) NOE experiments allowed the determination of the relative configuration on stereogenic centres. The structure of some compounds was also confirmed by the X-ray diffraction. Adaptation of the 1D double-pulsed field-gradient spin-echo NOE for a heteronuclear case is presented. PMID:20301203

  1. Threshold for Trapping Positrons in the Wake Driven by a Ultra-relativistic Electron Bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Muggli, P.; Katsouleas, T.; Ischebeck, R.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.

    2009-01-22

    We have recently proposed a new concept for generating, injecting and accelerating positrons in a plasma using a double-pulse electron bunch. Monte Carlo simulations show that the number of the positrons produced in a foil target has an exponentially decay energy spectrum. The energy threshold for the trapping of these positrons in a ultra-relativistic electron wake is investigated numerically. For a typical 28.5 GeV electron drive bunch, the trapping threshold for the positrons is a few MeV, and therefore a majority of positrons generated in the foil target are focused and accelerated by the plasma wake.

  2. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milli­seconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. A description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented. PMID:25931061

  3. H/sub. cap alpha. / laser fluorescence diagnostic on the Tara Tandem Mirror experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, W.C.; Yao, X.Z.; Pocs, L.; Mahon, R.; Casey, J.; Post, R.S.

    1988-08-01

    A laser fluorescence diagnostic has been used for measuring the neutral hydrogen density in the central cell of the Tara thermal barrier tandem mirror. Experiments have been performed using laser-induced, resonance fluorescence detection of H/sub ..cap alpha../ (6563-A) radiation. Measurements were made at a number of radial positions with 1-cm resolution, from the magnetic axis to near the plasma limiter. Stray laser light contributions to the signal were eliminated with a double-pulse technique. For comparison, the chord-averaged plasma H/sub ..cap alpha../ radiation was analyzed under the identical conditions for which laser fluorescence data were taken.

  4. Study on neutron emission from 2.2 kJ plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Talukdar, N.; Neog, N. K.; Borthakur, T. K.

    2014-06-15

    The neutron emission from a low energy (2.2 kJ) plasma focus device operated in deuterium medium has been investigated by employing photo-multiplier tube (PMT) and bubble dosimeter. The neutron emission is found to be pressure dependent and anisotropic in nature. In most cases of plasma focus shots, the PMT signal shows double pulses of neutron emission with different intensities and widths. An interesting relation between intensity of hard X-ray and neutron emission is also observed.

  5. Laser ablation of powdered samples and analysis by means of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ctvrtnickova, T.; Cabalin, L.; Laserna, J.; Kanicky, V.; Nicolas, G.

    2009-03-01

    The presented work proves the capacities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a fast, universal, and versatile technique for analysis of complex materials as ceramics. This paper reports on the analysis of ceramic raw materials (brick clays and kaolin) submitted to laser ablation in the form of pressed pellets. Spectrographic study was provided by standard single-pulse LIBS technique and orthogonal reheating double-pulse LIBS. It was found that both methods are comparable in terms of analytical performance, if adequate experimental parameters and signal detection systems are used.

  6. Gaseous laser targets and optical diagnostics for studying compressible hydrodynamic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J M; Robey, H; Mackinnon, A

    2001-06-29

    Explore the combination of optical diagnostics and gaseous targets to obtain important information about compressible turbulent flows that cannot be derived from traditional laser experiments for the purposes of V and V of hydrodynamics models and understanding scaling. First year objectives: Develop and characterize blast wave-gas jet test bed; Perform single pulse shadowgraphy of blast wave interaction with turbulent gas jet as a function of blast wave Mach number; Explore double pulse shadowgraphy and image correlation for extracting velocity spectra in the shock-turbulent flow interaction; and Explore the use/adaptation of advanced diagnostics.

  7. Laser-Induced Underwater Plasma And Its Spectroscopic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lazic, Violeta

    2008-09-23

    Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for analysis of immersed solid and soft materials, and for liquid impurities are described. A method for improving the LIBS signal underwater and for obtaining quantitative analyses in presence of strong shot-to-shot variations of the plasma properties is proposed. Dynamic of the gas bubble formed by the laser pulse is also discussed, together with its importance in Double-Pulse (DP) laser excitation. Results of the studies relative to an application of multi-pulse sequence and its effects on the plasma and gas bubble formation are also presented.

  8. 1-kHz-repetition-rate femtosecond Raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, N. V.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Kostryukov, P. V.; Losev, L. L.; Pazyuk, V. S.; Tenyakov, S. Yu

    2016-07-01

    A femtosecond Raman laser utilising compressed hydrogen is experimentally investigated under pumping by radiation from a 1-kHz-repetition-rate Ti : sapphire laser. In the regime of double-pulse pumping, the conditions are determined, which correspond to the minimal energy dispersion of Stokes pulses. The optical scheme is realised, which is capable of ensuring the long-term stability of the average power of the first Stokes component with a variation of less than 2%. The Stokes pulses are produced with a pulse duration of 60 fs and energy of 0.26 mJ at a conversion efficiency of 14%.

  9. Single bubble generated by a pulsed discharge in liquids as a plasma microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemaru, M.; Sorimachi, S.; Ibuka, S.; Ishii, S.

    2011-06-01

    We discuss a single bubble, generated by a pulsed discharge in liquids, in which reactive plasmas interact with gases and liquids. Double-pulsed microdischarges with variable time intervals were used. The first microdischarge was used to generate the bubble and the second one was used to create plasmas in it, which worked as a microcavity for plasma processing. The bubble remained for a period of 400-600 µs, which was affected by discharge energy. The electrode erosion caused by the discharge in or without the bubble was characterized.

  10. The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric

    2015-03-03

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. In addition, a description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  11. Real-time multispectral 3-D photoacoustic imaging of blood phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosik, Ivan; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is exquisitely sensitive to blood and can infer blood oxygenation based on multispectral images. In this work we present multispectral real-time 3D photoacoustic imaging of blood phantoms. We used a custom-built 128-channel hemispherical transducer array coupled to two Nd:YAG pumped OPO laser systems synchronized to provide double pulse excitation at 680 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths, all during a triggered series of ultrasound pressure measurements lasting less than 300 μs. The results demonstrated that 3D PAI is capable of differentiating between oxygenated and deoxygenated blood at high speed at mm-level resolution.

  12. The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; et al

    2015-03-03

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. In addition, a description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  13. Gate frequency sweep: An effective method to evaluate the dynamic performance of AlGaN/GaN power heterojunction field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Santi, C. de; Meneghini, M. Meneghesso, G.; Zanoni, E.

    2014-08-18

    With this paper we propose a test method for evaluating the dynamic performance of GaN-based transistors, namely, gate-frequency sweep measurements: the effectiveness of the method is verified by characterizing the dynamic performance of Gate Injection Transistors. We demonstrate that this method can provide an effective description of the impact of traps on the transient performance of Heterojunction Field Effect Transistors, and information on the properties (activation energy and cross section) of the related defects. Moreover, we discuss the relation between the results obtained by gate-frequency sweep measurements and those collected by conventional drain current transients and double pulse characterization.

  14. Tomographic reconstruction of transient acoustic fields recorded by pulsed TV holography.

    PubMed

    Gren, P; Schedin, S; Li, X

    1998-02-10

    Pulsed TV holography combined with computerized tomography (CT) are used to evaluate the three-dimensional distribution of transient acoustic fields in air. Experiments are performed with an electrical discharge between two electrodes as the sound source. Holograms from several directions of the acoustic field are recorded directly onto a CCD detector by use of a double-pulsed ruby laser as the light source. Phase maps, representing projections of the acoustic field, are evaluated quantitatively from the recorded holograms. The projections are used for the CT reconstruction to evaluate the pressure-field distribution in any cross section of the measured volume of air. PMID:18268660

  15. Soliton bound states in semiconductor disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, Evgeny A.; Butkus, Mantas; Erneux, Thomas; Hamilton, Craig J.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2014-05-01

    We report what we believe is the first demonstration of a temporal soliton bound state in semiconductor disk laser. The laser was passively mode-locked using a quantum dot based semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (QD-SESAM). Two mode-locking regimes were observed where the laser would emit single or closely spaced double pulses (soliton bound state regime) per cavity round-trip. The pulses in soliton bound state regime were spaced by discrete, fixed time duration. We use a system of delay differential equations to model the dynamics of our device.

  16. Laser Launch-The Second Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kare, Jordin T.

    2003-05-01

    In the spring of 1986, a Workshop on Laser Propulsion was held to discuss the feasibility of using large free electron lasers to launch payloads into Earth orbit. This workshop kicked off a four-year program, supported by the U.S. Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO), to develop laser propulsion technology. This talk reviews the concepts addressed by the SDIO Laser Propulsion Program, and the results of both modeling and experiments on double-pulse planar ablative thrusters, which remain a promising approach to laser launch. Other program topics to be discussed include trajectory and system modeling, and air-breathing thruster and vehicle concepts.

  17. In-Situ Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; DeBoer, Gary; Scott, Darl D.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation involves emission and laser induced fluorescence (LIP) data obtained during carbon nanotube production by double pulse laser oven method. Recent LIP data of nickel indicate longer decay (of the order of few milliseconds) of nickel atomic vapor. This contrasts with less than a millisecond decays of C2 and C3 observed in the plume. The possible role of nickel in the kinetics of carbon nanotube formation will be discussed. Evolution of the laser ablated plume is recorded as plume images which are correlated with the transient emission and LIP data

  18. Standoff detection of hazardous materials using a novel dual-laser pulse technique: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Alan; Waterbury, Robert D.; Rose, Jeremy; Dottery, Edwin L.

    2009-05-01

    The present work focuses on a new variant of double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) called Townsend effect plasma spectroscopy (TEPS) for standoff applications. In the TEPS technique, the atomic and molecular emission lines are enhanced by a factor on the order of 25 to 300 times over LIBS, depending upon the emission lines observed. As a result, it is possible to extend the range of laser induced plasma techniques beyond LIBS and DP-LIBS for the detection of CBRNE materials at distances of several meters.

  19. Imaging with x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Cauble, B.; Frieders, G.; Koch, J.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Mrowka, S.; Ress, D.; Trebes, J.E.; Weiland, T.L.

    1993-11-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35--300 {Angstrom}. These sources have high peak brightness and are now being utilized for x-ray imaging and plasma interferometry. In this paper we will describe our efforts to probe long scalelength plasmas using Moire deflectrometry and soft x-ray imaging. The progress in the development of short pulse x-ray lasers using a double pulse irradiation technique which incorporates a travelling wave pump will also be presented.

  20. Development of short pulse soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; MacGowan, B.J.; Koch, J.A.; Mrowka, S.; Matthews, D.L.; Eder, D.; London, R.

    1993-02-01

    X-ray lasers with pulse duration shorter than 20 ps allow the possibility of imaging laser produced plasmas with {mu}m resolution. In addition, the high peak brightness of these new sources will allow us to study nonlinear optics in the xuv region. In this paper we will describe our efforts to produce collisionally pumped short pulse x-ray lasers. Initial results, which have produced {approximately} 45 ps (FWHM) x-ray lasers, using a double pulse irradiation technique are presented along with a discussion of the prospects for reducing the pulse width.

  1. Character State Reconstruction of Call Diversity in the Neoconocephalus Katydids Reveals High Levels of Convergence.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Katy; Schul, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The katydid genus Neoconocephalus is characterized by high diversity of the acoustic communication system. Both male signals and female preferences have been thoroughly studied in the past. This study used Bayesian character state reconstruction to elucidate the evolutionary history of diverse call traits, based on an existing, well supported phylogenetic hypothesis. The most common male call pattern consisted of continuous calls comprising one fast pulse rate; this pattern is the likely ancestral state in this genus. Three lines of call divergence existed among the species of the genus. First, four species had significantly slower pulse rates. Second, five species had alternating pulse periods, resulting in a double pulse rhythm. Third, several species had discontinuous calls, when pulses were grouped into rhythmically repeated verses. Bayesian character state reconstruction revealed that the double-pulse pattern likely evolved convergently five times; the slow pulse rate also evolved four times independently. Discontinuous calls have evolved twice and occur in two clades; each of which contains reversals to the ancestral continuous calls. Pairwise phylogenetically independent contrast analyses among the three call traits found no significant correlations among the character states of the different traits, supporting the independent evolution of the three call traits. PMID:27110432

  2. Seasonal patterns and individual differences in the calls of male haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus.

    PubMed

    Casaretto, L; Picciulin, M; Hawkins, A D

    2015-09-01

    Haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus males observed in captivity proved to be vocally active throughout the whole year, although the highest levels of vocal activity were reached in the spawning season between February and April. During this season, the most common type of sound consisted of sequences of regularly repeated, almost identical, double-pulsed knocks (KN). These sequences were mostly associated with a particular behaviour pattern, the patrolling display, which has previously been shown to play a key role in territoriality and spawning. Differences in the double-pulsed KNs produced by three individual males were demonstrated by two different statistical methods and it is suggested that these differences may allow individual males to be discriminated by other fish, perhaps conveying fitness-related information on the sender. Some aspects of the calls changed seasonally, perhaps reflecting observed variations in the mass of the drumming muscles. When using passive listening to locate M. aeglefinus spawning grounds, the physical characteristics of the sounds may indicate how close the individual males are to spawning. PMID:26333138

  3. KC-135 aero-optical turbulent boundary layer/shear layer experiment revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, J.; Allen, C.

    1987-01-01

    The aero-optical effects associated with propagating a laser beam through both an aircraft turbulent boundary layer and artificially generated shear layers are examined. The data present comparisons from observed optical performance with those inferred from aerodynamic measurements of unsteady density and correlation lengths within the same random flow fields. Using optical instrumentation with tens of microsecond temporal resolution through a finite aperture, optical performance degradation was determined and contrasted with the infinite aperture time averaged aerodynamic measurement. In addition, the optical data were artificially clipped to compare to theoretical scaling calculations. Optical instrumentation consisted of a custom Q switched Nd:Yag double pulsed laser, and a holographic camera which recorded the random flow field in a double pass, double pulse mode. Aerodynamic parameters were measured using hot film anemometer probes and a five hole pressure probe. Each technique is described with its associated theoretical basis for comparison. The effects of finite aperture and spatial and temporal frequencies of the random flow are considered.

  4. Sodium channel inactivation in the crayfish giant axon. Must channels open before inactivating

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, B.P.

    1981-09-01

    Experiments on sodium channel inactivation kinetics were performed on voltage-clamped crayfish giant axons. The primary goals was to investigate whether channels must open before activating. Voltage-clamp artifacts were minimized by the use of low-sodium solutions and full series resistance compensation, and the spatial uniformity of the currents was checked with a closely spaced pair of electrodes used to measure local current densities. For membrane potentials between -40 and +40 mV, sodium currents decay to zero with a single exponential time-course. The time constant for decay is a steep function of membrane potential. The time-course of inactivation measured with the double-pulse method is very similar to the decay of current at the same potential. Steady-state inactivation curves measured with different test pulses are identical. The time-course of doubling pulse inactivation shows a lag that roughly correlates with the opening of sodium channels, but it is not strictly necessary for channels to open before inactivating. Measurements of the potential dependence of the integral of sodium conductance are also inconsistent with the simplest cases of models in which channels must open before activating.

  5. Ejecta Particle-Size Measurements in Vacuum and Helium Gas using Ultraviolet In-Line Fraunhofer Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, Danny S.; Pazuchanics, Peter; Johnson, Randall P.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.; Tibbitts, A.; Tunnell, T.; Marks, D.; Capelle, G. A.; Grover, M.; Marshall, B.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; LaLone, B.

    2014-06-25

    An Ultraviolet (UV) in-line Fraunhofer holography diagnostic has been developed for making high-resolution spatial measurements of ejecta particles traveling at many mm/μsec. This report will discuss the development of the diagnostic including the high-powered laser system and high-resolution optical relay system. In addition, the system required to reconstruct the images from the hologram and the corresponding analysis of those images to extract particles will also be described. Finally, results from six high-explosive (HE), shock-driven Sn ejecta experiments will be presented. Particle size distributions will be shown that cover most of the ejecta velocities for experiments conducted in a vacuum, and helium gas environments. In addition, a modification has been made to the laser system that produces two laser pulses separated by 6.8 ns. This double-pulsed capability allows a superposition of two holograms to be acquired at two different times, thus allowing ejecta velocities to be measured directly. Results from this double pulsed experiment will be described.

  6. Evolution of Novel Signal Traits in the Absence of Female Preferences in Neoconocephalus Katydids (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Sarah L.; Schul, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Background Significance Communication signals that function to bring together the sexes are important for maintaining reproductive isolation in many taxa. Changes in male calls are often attributed to sexual selection, in which female preferences initiate signal divergence. Natural selection can also influence signal traits if calls attract predators or parasitoids, or if calling is energetically costly. Neutral evolution is often neglected in the context of acoustic communication. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe a signal trait that appears to have evolved in the absence of either sexual or natural selection. In the katydid genus Neoconocephalus, calls with a derived pattern in which pulses are grouped into pairs have evolved five times independently. We have previously shown that in three of these species, females require the double pulse pattern for call recognition, and hence the recognition system of the females is also in a derived state. Here we describe the remaining two species and find that although males produce the derived call pattern, females use the ancestral recognition mechanism in which no pulse pattern is required. Females respond equally well to the single and double pulse calls, indicating that the derived trait is selectively neutral in the context of mate recognition. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that 1) neutral changes in signal traits could be important in the diversification of communication systems, and 2) males rather than females may be responsible for initiating signal divergence. PMID:20805980

  7. Radio afterglow rebrightening: evidence for multiple active phases in gamma-ray burst central engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long-Biao; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Rice, Jared

    2015-09-01

    The rebrightening phenomenon is an interesting feature in some X-ray, optical, and radio afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here, we propose a possible energy-supply assumption to explain the rebrightenings of radio afterglows, in which the central engine with multiple active phases can supply at least two GRB pulses in a typical GRB duration time. Considering the case of double pulses supplied by the central engine, the double pulses have separate physical parameters, except for the number density of the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). Their independent radio afterglows are integrated by the ground detectors to form the rebrightening phenomenon. In this Letter, we firstly simulate diverse rebrightening light curves under consideration of different and independent physical parameters. Using this assumption, we also give our best fit to the radio afterglow of GRB 970508 at three frequencies of 1.43, 4.86, and 8.46 GHz. We suggest that the central engine may be active continuously at a timescale longer than that of a typical GRB duration time as many authors have suggested (e.g., Zhang et al., Astrophys. J. 787:66, 2014; Gao and Mészáros, Astrophys. J. 802:90, 2015), and that it may supply enough energy to cause the long-lasting rebrightenings observed in some GRB afterglows.

  8. Holographic flow visualization within a rotating compressor blade row

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benser, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    Rapid double-pulsed holographic techniques were used to visualize the shock configurations in the tip region of a lightly loaded, high tip speed fan stage. The holograms showed the passage shock emanating from the blade leading edge, a moderately strong conical shock originating at the intersection of the part span shroud leading edge and the blade suction surface, and a second conical shock originating at the intersection of the part span shroud and the blade pressure surface. Due to a limited viewing angle, the bow waves upstream of the rotor could not be observed, and only limited details of the trailing edge shocks were obtained. Reasonable details of the shock patterns were obtained from holograms which were made without extensive rig modifications. Results indicate that larger viewing windows and and holographic plates would permit a wider viewing angle and give much more coverage of the regions of interest. Also, shorter time delay for double-pulsed holograms is also desirable, and would minimize blade movement and give clearer holograms.

  9. A rapid change of the Hercules X-1 pulse profile and high-state duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soong, Yang; Gruber, Duane E.; Rothschild, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Her X-1 has been observed in the 13-180 keV energy range by the HEAO 1 A-4 Low-Energy Detectors during selected phases of the 35 d on-off cycle. During a pointing observation in September 1978, the pulse profile was observed to change continuously from its normal shape to an anomalous double-pulsed form. Moreover, at this time the main-on state, normally of the duration 10 d, was seen to terminate after only 7 d. Since such an anomalous pulse profile has also been reported by Truemper et al. in 1986 during a short-on state, three short-on states in the HEAO 1 data were also investigated. One short-on observation had the sensitivity to detect pulsing, and the observed profile also had an anomalous double-pulsed form. Current models for the 35 d cycle of Her X-1 have been examined, and a model with a neutron star undergoing free precession could not explain the sudden change of pulse profile within 20 hr at the end of a main-on state.

  10. Mid-IR enhanced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci; Ford, Alan; Akpovo, Codjo A.; Johnson, Lewis

    2016-08-01

    A double-pulsed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) technique utilizing wavelengths in the mid-infrared (MIR) for the second pulse, referred to as double-pulse LAMIS (DP-LAMIS), was examined for its effect on detection limits compared to single-pulse laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). A MIR carbon dioxide (CO2) laser pulse at 10.6 μm was employed to enhance spectral emissions from nanosecond-laser-induced plasma via mid-IR reheating and in turn, improve the determination of the relative abundance of isotopes in a sample. This technique was demonstrated on a collection of 10BO and 11BO molecular spectra created from enriched boric acid (H3BO3) isotopologues in varying concentrations. Effects on the overall ability of both LAMIS and DP-LAMIS to detect the relative abundance of boron isotopes in a starting sample were considered. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models was used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. Furthermore, some optimization for conditions of the enhanced emission was achieved, along with a comparison of the overall emission intensity, plasma density, and plasma temperature generated by the two techniques.

  11. Ejecta Particle-Size Measurements in Vacuum and Helium Gas using Ultraviolet In-Line Fraunhofer Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, D. S.; Pazuchanics, P.; Johnson, R.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.; Tibbitts, A.; Tunnell, T.; Marks, D.; Capelle, G. A.; Grover, M.; Marshall, B.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; LaLone, B.

    2014-06-30

    An ultraviolet (UV) in-line Fraunhofer holography diagnostic has been developed for making high-resolution spatial measurements of ejecta particles traveling at many mm/μsec. This report will discuss the development of the diagnostic, including the high-powered laser system and high-resolution optical relay system. In addition, we will also describe the system required to reconstruct the images from the hologram and the corresponding analysis of those images to extract particles. Finally, we will present results from six high-explosive (HE), shock-driven Sn-ejecta experiments. Particle-size distributions will be shown that cover most of the ejecta velocities for experiments conducted in a vacuum, and helium gas environments. In addition, a modification has been made to the laser system that produces two laser pulses separated by 6.8 ns. This double-pulsed capability allows a superposition of two holograms to be acquired at two different times, thus allowing ejecta velocities to be measured directly. Results from this double-pulsed experiment will be described.

  12. Optimization of liquid jet system for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skočovská, Katarína; Novotný, Jan; Prochazka, David; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    A complex optimization of geometrical and temporal parameters of a jet system (developed in Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) laboratory of Brno University of Technology) for direct elemental analysis of samples in a liquid state of matter using LIBS was carried out. First, the peristaltic pump was synchronized with the flashlamp of the ablation laser, which reduced variation of the ablated sample amount. Also, the fluctuation of the laser ray angle incident on the jet surface was diminished. Such synchronization reduced signal standard deviations and thus increased repeatability of the measurements. Then, laser energy and distance of the focusing lens from the sample were optimized. The gate delay time and the gate width were optimized for single pulse (SP) experiments; the gate delay time and the inter-pulse delay were optimized for the use of double pulse (DP) variant. Results were assessed according to the highest signal to noise ratios and the lowest relative standard deviations of the signal. The sensitivity of the single pulse and the double pulse LIBS for the detection of heavy metals traces, copper (Cu i at 324.754 nm) and lead (Pb i at 405.781 nm), in aqueous solution of copper (ii) sulfate and lead (ii) acetate, was estimated in terms of limits of detection (LODs). As a result, sensitivity improvement of DP LIBS system was observed, the LOD of Cu obtained with DP was calculated 40% lower than LOD gained from SP technique.

  13. Neutron detection in a high-gamma field using solution-grown stilbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M. M.; Clarke, S. D.; Adamowicz, N.; Pozzi, S. A.; Zaitseva, N.; Carman, L.

    2016-01-01

    A solution-based technique for growing large-volume stilbene scintillators was developed in 2013; crystals up to diameters of 10 cm, or larger, have been grown while preserving excellent pulse shape discrimination (PSD) properties. The goal of this study is to evaluate the PSD capabilities of 5.08 by 5.08-cm stilbene crystals grown by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Inrad Optics when exposed to a 1000 to 1 gamma ray-neutron ratio and operating at a 100-kHz count rate. Results were compared to an equivalent EJ-309 liquid scintillation detector. 252Cf neutron pulses were recorded in two experiments where 60Co and 137Cs sources created the high-gamma field. The high count rate created numerous double pulses that were cleaned using fractional and template approaches designed to remove double pulses while preserving neutron counts. PSD was performed at a threshold of 42 keVee (440-keV proton) for stilbene and 60 keVee (610-keV proton) for EJ-309 liquid. The lower threshold in stilbene resulted in a neutron intrinsic efficiency of approximately 14.5%, 10% higher than EJ-309 liquid, for bare 252Cf and 13% for 252Cf in the high-gamma field. Despite the lower threshold, the gamma misclassification rate in stilbene was approximately 3×10-6, nearly a factor-of-five lower than what we found with the EJ-309 liquid.

  14. Vibration Analysis Of Automotive Structures Using Holographic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, G. M.; Wales, R. R.

    1983-10-01

    Since 1979, Ford Motor Company has been developing holographic interferometry to supplement more conventional test methods to measure vehicle component vibrations. An Apollo PHK-1 Double Pulse Holographic Laser System was employed to visualize a variety of complex vibration modes, primarily on current production and prototype powertrain components. Design improvements to reduce powertrain response to problem excitations have been deter-mined through pulsed laser holography, and have, in several cases, been put into production in Ford vehicles. Whole-field definition of vibration related deflections provide continuity of information missed by accelerometer/modal analysis techniaues. Certain opera-tional problems, common among pulsed ruby holographic lasers, have reauired ongoing hardware and electronics improvements to minimize system downtime. Real-time, time-averaged and stroboscopic C. W. laser holographic techniques are being developed at Ford to complement the double pulse capabilities and provide rapid identification of modal frequencies and nodal lines for analysis of powertrain structures. Methods for mounting and exciting powertrains to minimize rigid body motions are discussed. Work at Ford will continue toward development of C. W. holographic techniques to provide refined test methodology dedicated to noise and vibration diagnostics with particular emphasis on semi-automated methods for quantifying displacement and relative phase using high resolution digitized video and computers. Continued use of refined pulsed and CW laser holographic interferometry for the analysis of complex structure vibrations seems assured.

  15. Holographic Flow Visualization at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Goad, W. K.

    2005-01-01

    Holographic flow visualization systems at two NASA Langley facilities, a hypersonic blow-down tunnel using CF4 gas and an expansion tube with very short test time, are described. A pulsed ruby laser is used at a CF4 tunnel for single pulse holography, double pulse with several minutes between exposures, and dual plate holographic interferometry. Shadow-graph, schlieren, and interferograms are reconstructed from the holograms in a separate reconstruction lab. At the expansion tube the short run time of 200 microseconds requires precise triggering of its double pulsed ruby laser. With pulse separation, one pulse can occur before and one after flow is established to obtain fringe free background interferograms (perfect infinite fringe) or both pulses can occur during flow in order to study flow instabilities. Holograms are reconstructed at the expansion tube with an in-place setup which makes use of a high power CW Argon laser and common optics for both recording and reconstructing the holograms. The holographic systems at the CF4 tunnel and expansion tube are operated routinely for flow visualization by tunnel technicians. Typical flow visualization photographs from both facilities are presented.

  16. The LLNL Flash X-Ray Induction Linear Accelerator (FXR)

    SciTech Connect

    Multhauf, L G

    2002-09-19

    The FXR is an induction linear accelerator used for high-speed radiography at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Experimental Test Site. It was designed specifically for the radiography of very thick explosive objects. Since its completion in 1982, it has been very actively used for a large variety of explosives tests, and has been periodically upgraded to achieve higher performance. Upgrades have addressed machine reliability, radiographic sensitivity and resolution, two-frame imaging by double pulsing improvements that are described in detail in the paper. At the same time, the facility in which it was installed has also been extensively upgraded, first by adding space for optical and interferometric diagnostics, and more recently by adding a containment chamber to prevent the environmental dispersal of hazardous and radioactive materials. The containment addition also further expands space for new non-radiographic diagnostics. The new Contained Firing Facility is still in the process of activation. At the same time, FXR is continuing to undergo modifications aimed primarily at further increasing radiographic resolution and sensitivity, and at improving double-pulsed performance.

  17. The LLNL flash x-ray induction linear accelerator (FXR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Multhauf, Lloyd G.; Back, Norman L.; Simmons, Larry F.; Zentler, Jan-Mark; Scarpetti, Raymond D.

    2003-07-01

    The FXR is an induction linear accelerator used for high-speed radiography at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Experimental Test Site. It was designed specifically for the radiography of very thick explosive objects. Since its completion in 1982, it has been very actively used for a large variety of explosives tests, and has been periodically upgraded to achieve higher performance. Upgrades have addressed machine reliability, radiographic sensitivity and resolution, two-frame imaging by double pulsing -- improvements that are described in detail in the paper. At the same time, the facility in which it was installed has also been extensively upgraded, first by adding space for optical and interferometric diagnostics, and more recently by adding a containment chamber to prevent the environmental dispersal of hazardous and radioactive materials. The containment addition also further expands space for new non-radiographic diagnostics. The new Contained Firing Facility is still in the process of activation. At the same time, FXR is continuing to undergo modifications aimed primarily at further increasing radiographic resolution and sensitivity, and at improving double-pulsed performance.

  18. Optimization of liquid jet system for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Skočovská, Katarína; Novotný, Jan; Prochazka, David; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    A complex optimization of geometrical and temporal parameters of a jet system (developed in Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) laboratory of Brno University of Technology) for direct elemental analysis of samples in a liquid state of matter using LIBS was carried out. First, the peristaltic pump was synchronized with the flashlamp of the ablation laser, which reduced variation of the ablated sample amount. Also, the fluctuation of the laser ray angle incident on the jet surface was diminished. Such synchronization reduced signal standard deviations and thus increased repeatability of the measurements. Then, laser energy and distance of the focusing lens from the sample were optimized. The gate delay time and the gate width were optimized for single pulse (SP) experiments; the gate delay time and the inter-pulse delay were optimized for the use of double pulse (DP) variant. Results were assessed according to the highest signal to noise ratios and the lowest relative standard deviations of the signal. The sensitivity of the single pulse and the double pulse LIBS for the detection of heavy metals traces, copper (Cu i at 324.754 nm) and lead (Pb i at 405.781 nm), in aqueous solution of copper (ii) sulfate and lead (ii) acetate, was estimated in terms of limits of detection (LODs). As a result, sensitivity improvement of DP LIBS system was observed, the LOD of Cu obtained with DP was calculated 40% lower than LOD gained from SP technique. PMID:27131663

  19. Growth of arc in high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge by gas density depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Go; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Wataru

    2000-10-01

    Effects of gas density depletion on arc formation of high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge have been investigated by eliminating the other factors which may affect the discharge stability, such as shock waves, residual ions, electrode heating, and discharge products. The gas density depletion has been simulated by utilizing a subsonic gas flow between the curved electrodes combined with a convergent nozzle and a divergent diffuser. A comparison has been made on the discharge in the aerodynamically created gas density depletion with the second discharge in the double-pulse discharge within a stable gas. We have found that the large gas density depletion, Δρ/ρ0˜-3.6% corresponding to a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of ˜50 Hz, tends to cause an arc-like filament or an arc without the shocks, ions, electrode heating, and products. However, the second discharge in the double-pulse discharge becomes an arc in much smaller gas density depletion (Δρ/ρ0˜-1.2% corresponding to PRR ˜3 Hz). Therefore, the collapse of high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge is most likely caused by some factor other than the gas density depletion.

  20. Enhancing the analytical performance of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, D.A.; Chinni, R.C.; Pichahchy, A.E.; Thornquist, H.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work is to enhance the analytical capabilities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS is a method of elemental analysis in which powerful laser pulses are focused on a sample to form a microplasma. LIBS is perhaps the most versatile elemental analysis method, applicable to a variety of different real-world analysis problems. Therefore, it is important to enhance the capabilities of the method as much as possible. Accomplishments include: (1) demonstration of signal enhancements of 5--30 times from soils and metals using a double pulse method; (2) development of a model of the observed enhancement obtained using double pulses; (3) demonstration that the analytical performance achievable using low laser-pulse energies (10 and 25 mJ) can match that achievable using an energy of 100 mJ; and (4) demonstration that time-gated detection is not necessary with LIBS.

  1. Optimizing a Laser Process for Making Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Holmes, William

    2010-01-01

    A systematic experimental study has been performed to determine the effects of each of the operating conditions in a double-pulse laser ablation process that is used to produce single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The comprehensive data compiled in this study have been analyzed to recommend conditions for optimizing the process and scaling up the process for mass production. The double-pulse laser ablation process for making SWCNTs was developed by Rice University researchers. Of all currently known nanotube-synthesizing processes (arc and chemical vapor deposition), this process yields the greatest proportion of SWCNTs in the product material. The aforementioned process conditions are important for optimizing the production of SWCNTs and scaling up production. Reports of previous research (mostly at Rice University) toward optimization of process conditions mention effects of oven temperature and briefly mention effects of flow conditions, but no systematic, comprehensive study of the effects of process conditions was done prior to the study described here. This was a parametric study, in which several production runs were carried out, changing one operating condition for each run. The study involved variation of a total of nine parameters: the sequence of the laser pulses, pulse-separation time, laser pulse energy density, buffer gas (helium or nitrogen instead of argon), oven temperature, pressure, flow speed, inner diameter of the flow tube, and flow-tube material.

  2. A real-time optical data processing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, A.; Grinberg, J.; Bleha, W.; Miller, L.; Fraas, L.; Myer, G.; Boswell, D.

    1975-01-01

    The design, operation, and structure of the hybrid field effect light valve, a real-time input device for application to coherent optical data processing (CODP), is described. The device consists of a sandwich of thin films that electrically control the optical birefringence of a thin (2 micrometer) liquid crystal layer. It has high resolution (greater than 100 1/mm), contrast ratio (greater than 100:1), speed (10 sec on, 15 sec off) and input sensitivity (about 0.3 ergs/sq cm) in addition to cost and size advantages. Performance data for a laboratory model are presented.

  3. Galileo infrared imaging spectroscopy measurements at venus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, R.W.; Baines, K.H.; Encrenaz, Th.; Taylor, F.W.; Drossart, P.; Kamp, L.W.; Pollack, James B.; Lellouch, E.; Collard, A.D.; Calcutt, S.B.; Grinspoon, D.; Weissman, P.R.; Smythe, W.D.; Ocampo, A.C.; Danielson, G.E.; Fanale, F.P.; Johnson, T.V.; Kieffer, H.H.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    During the 1990 Galileo Venus flyby, the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer investigated the night-side atmosphere of Venus in the spectral range 0.7 to 5.2 micrometers. Multispectral images at high spatial resolution indicate substantial cloud opacity variations in the lower cloud levels, centered at 50 kilometers altitude. Zonal and meridional winds were derived for this level and are consistent with motion of the upper branch of a Hadley cell. Northern and southern hemisphere clouds appear to be markedly different. Spectral profiles were used to derive lower atmosphere abundances of water vapor and other species.

  4. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  5. X-ray transmission microscope development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Rosenberger, Franz E.

    1995-01-01

    We are developing a hard x-ray microscope for direct observation of solidification dynamics in metal alloys and metal matrix composites. The Fein-Focus Inc. x-ray source was delivered in September and found to perform better than expected. Confirmed resolution of better than 2 micrometers was obtained and magnifications up to 800X were measured. Nickel beads of 30 micrometer diameter were easily detected through 6mm of aluminum. X-ray metallography was performed on several specimens showing high resolution and clear definition of 3-dimensional structures. Prototype furnace installed and tested.

  6. Solid C triple bond N bearing material on outer solar system bodies.

    PubMed

    Cruikshank, D P; Allamandola, L J; Hartmann, W K; Tholen, D J; Brown, R H; Matthews, C N; Bell, J F

    1991-01-01

    Using telescopic observations by ourselves and other observers, we have identified cyano-group containing molecules in the very dark solids on the surfaces of a few D-class asteroids, the dust of some comets, and low-albedo hemisphere of Iapetus, and the rings of Uranus, through spectroscopic detection of the 2.2-micrometers overtone of the C triple bond N stretching fundamental mode. The occurrence of this band on all four classes of small Solar System bodies may be diagnostic of the duration of exposure and degree of modification of surface materials, and may also establish a link between outer Solar System and interstellar materials. PMID:11538090

  7. Near Infrared Imaging of the Hubble Deep Field with Keck Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogg, David W.; Neugebauer, G.; Armus, Lee; Matthews, K.; Pahre, Michael A.; Soifer, B. T.; Weinberger, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    Two deep K-band (2.2 micrometer) images, with point-source detection limits of K=25.2 mag (one sigma), taken with the Keck Telescope in subfields of the Hubble Deep Field, are presented and analyzed. A sample of objects to K=24 mag is constructed and V(sub 606)- I(sub 814) and I(sub 814)-K colors are measured. By stacking visually selected objects, mean I(sub 814)-K colors can be measured to very faint levels, the mean I(sub 814)-K color is constant with apparent magnitude down to V(sub 606)=28 mag.

  8. Pulse height response of an optical particle counter to monodisperse aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, R. G.; Grice, S. S.; Cuda, V.

    1976-01-01

    The pulse height response of a right angle scattering optical particle counter has been investigated using monodisperse aerosols of polystyrene latex spheres, di-octyl phthalate and methylene blue. The results confirm previous measurements for the variation of mean pulse height as a function of particle diameter and show good agreement with the relative response predicted by Mie scattering theory. Measured cumulative pulse height distributions were found to fit reasonably well to a log normal distribution with a minimum geometric standard deviation of about 1.4 for particle diameters greater than about 2 micrometers. The geometric standard deviation was found to increase significantly with decreasing particle diameter.

  9. Eos, Koronis, and Maria Family Asteroids: Infrared (JHK) Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Owensby, Pamela D.; Gradie, Jonathan C.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Tedesco, Edward F.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared photometry at 1.2, 1.6, and 2.2 micrometer (JHK) is reported for 56 asteroids in the Eos, Koronis and, Maria dynamical families. These data are consistent with similar surface composition for all of the asteroids of each family. The infrared colors within each family cluster in the region observed for the S taxonomic class, but Eos asteroids may belong to a separable K class. Asteroid 243 Ida, which was observed by the Galileo spacecraft, is a typical member of the Koronis family. The average infrared colors of the Maria family are slightly redder than those of the Eos and Koronis families.

  10. Galileo infrared imaging spectroscopy measurements at venus.

    PubMed

    Carlson, R W; Baines, K H; Encrenaz, T; Taylor, F W; Drossart, P; Kamp, L W; Pollack, J B; Lellouch, E; Collard, A D; Calcutt, S B; Grinspoon, D; Weissman, P R; Smythe, W D; Ocampo, A C; Danielson, G E; Fanale, F P; Johnson, T V; Kieffer, H H; Matson, D L; McCord, T B; Soderblom, L A

    1991-09-27

    During the 1990 Galileo Venus flyby, the Near Infaied Mapping Spectrometer investigated the night-side atmosphere of Venus in the spectral range 0.7 to 5.2 micrometers. Multispectral images at high spatial resolution indicate substanmial cloud opacity variations in the lower cloud levels, centered at 50 kilometers altitude. Zonal and meridional winds were derived for this level and are consistent with motion of the upper branch of a Hadley cell. Northern and southern hemisphere clouds appear to be markedly different. Spectral profiles were used to derive lower atmosphere abundances of water vapor and other species. PMID:17784099

  11. Three-Dimensional Wind Profiling of Offshore Wind Energy Areas With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Cowen, Larry J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Grant, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    A technique has been developed for imaging the wind field over offshore areas being considered for wind farming. This is accomplished with an eye-safe 2-micrometer wavelength coherent Doppler lidar installed in an aircraft. By raster scanning the aircraft over the wind energy area (WEA), a three-dimensional map of the wind vector can be made. This technique was evaluated in 11 flights over the Virginia and Maryland offshore WEAs. Heights above the ocean surface planned for wind turbines are shown to be within the marine boundary layer, and the wind vector is seen to show variation across the geographical area of interest at turbine heights.

  12. Dark matter in the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.; Cruikshank, D.; De Bergh, C.; Geballe, T.

    1994-01-01

    There are now a large number of small bodies in the outer solar system that are known to be covered with dark material. Attempts to identify that material have been thwarted by the absence of discrete absorption features in the reflection spectra of these planetesimals. An absorption at 2.2 micrometers that appeared to be present in several objects has not been confirmed by new observations. Three absorptions in the spectrum of the unusually red planetesimal 5145 Pholus are well-established, but their identity remains a mystery.

  13. JWST Primary Mirror Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Mirror Technology was identified as a (if not the) critical capability necessary to achieve the Level 1 science goals. A never before demonstrated space telescope capability was required: 6 to 8 meter class pri mary mirror, diffraction limited at 2 micrometers and operates at temperatures below 50K. Launch vehicle constraints placed significant architectural constraints: deployed/segmented primary mirror (4.5 meter fairing diameter) 20 kg/m2 areal density (PM 1000 kg mass) Such mirror technology had never been demonstrated - and did not exist

  14. Growth defects in thick ion-plated coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1975-01-01

    Industrial ion plating conditions were selected to deposit metallic coatings such as copper, gold, and chromium 2 micrometer thick on metal and glass substrates. The surface finishes of 304 stainless steel, copper, and brass were utilized with mechanically and electrolytically polished surfaces. Nodular growth occurred in these coatings during ion plating as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. Surface irregularities such as scratches, steps, ledges, and so forth are responsible for outward growth, the typical cone type, whereas surface contaminants and loosely settled foreign particles are responsible for lateral growth; namely, the extreme localized surface outgrowths. These defect crystallographic features create porosity in the coatings when subjected to stresses and strains.

  15. A 128 x 128 CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensor for Highly Integrated Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A new CMOS-based image sensor that is intrinsically compatible with on-chip CMOS circuitry is reported. The new CMOS active pixel image sensor achieves low noise, high sensitivity, X-Y addressability, and has simple timing requirements. The image sensor was fabricated using a 2 micrometer p-well CMOS process, and consists of a 128 x 128 array of 40 micrometer x 40 micrometer pixels. The CMOS image sensor technology enables highly integrated smart image sensors, and makes the design, incorporation and fabrication of such sensors widely accessible to the integrated circuit community.

  16. Airborne studies of the emissions from the volcanic eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, P.V.; Radke, L.F.; Eltgroth, M.W.; Hegg, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The concentrations of particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter in the ash emissions from Mount St. Helens have been more than 1000 times greater than those in the ambient air. Mass loadings of particles less than 2 micrometers in diameter were generally several hundred micrograms per cubic meter. In the ash clouds, produced by the large eruption on 18 May 1980, the concentrations of several trace gases generally were low. In other emissions, significant, but variable, concentrations of sulfur gases were measured. The 18 May eruption produced nuees ardentes, lightning flashes, and volcanic hail.

  17. Develop real-time dosimetry concepts and instrumentation for long-term missions. Technical progress report, February 1981 to February 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Braby, L.A.

    1982-05-01

    Major objectives in the process of developing a rugged portable instrument to evaluate dose and dose equivalent have been achieved. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter simulating a 2 micrometer spherical tissue volume has operated satisfactorily for over a year. The basic elements of the electronic system have been designed and tested. And finally, the most suitable mathematical technique for evaluating dose equivalent with a portable instrument has been selected. Design and fabrication of a portable prototype, based on the previously tested circuits, is underway.

  18. Eye-Safe Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Laser infrared radar (lidar) undergoing development harmless to human eyes, consists almost entirely of solid-state components, and offers high range resolution. Operates at wavelength of about 2 micrometers. If radiation from such device strikes eye, almost completely absorbed by cornea without causing damage, even if aimed directly at eye. Continuous-wave light from laser oscillator amplified and modulated for transmission from telescope. Small portion of output of oscillator fed to single-mode fiber coupler, where mixed with return pulses. Intended for remote Doppler measurements of winds and differential-absorption measurements of concentrations of gases in atmosphere.

  19. Solid State Radiation Dosimeters for Space and Medical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the development of two radiation monitors (RADMON's) for use in detecting total radiation dose and high-energy particles. These radiation detectors are chip-size devices fabricated in 1.2 micrometer CMOS and have flown in space on both experimental and commercial spacecraft. They have been used to characterize protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, particles from the Sun, and protons used for medical therapy. Having proven useful in a variety of applications, the detector is now being readied for commercialization.

  20. Development of improved lithium tantalate pyroelectric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, N. E.; Vanderjagt, A.; Holton, W.

    1978-01-01

    A program was undertaken to increase the detectivity of LiTaO3 pyroelectric detectors to meet a performance requirement of D star (500 K, 15 Hz)=4x10 to the 9th power cm Hz1/2W-1. Emphasis was placed on reduction of the thermal conductance of the detector element to its surroundings, thinning the detector wafer to a thickness less than 3 micrometers, and increasing the absorptivity of the standard metallic film coatings. During the program, thermal conductance was reduced 41 percent through the use of reticulated (slotted) structures. Self-supported detector wafers less than 2 micrometers thick were fabricated. Multiple layer coatings, including an AR coating, with 16 percent more absorptance, were designed and fabricated. Later refinements in the multilayer design program have absorptivities of 75-80 percent, but detectors with these coatings had to be more than 2 micrometers thick because of a mismatch in the thermal expansion coefficients with LiTaO3.

  1. The First Diffraction-Limited Images from the W. M. Keck Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, K.; Ghez, A. M.; Weinberger, A. J.; Neugebauer, G.

    1996-01-01

    The first diffraction limited, 0.05s resolution, images on the W. M. Keck Telescope have been obtained at a wavelength of 2.2 micrometers. These images were part of an experiment to test the suitability of the Keck Telescope for speckle imaging. In order to conduct this test, it was necessary to modify the pixel scale of the Keck facility Near Infrared Camera (NIRC) to optimally sample the spatial frequencies made available by the Keck telescope. The design and implementation of the external reimaging optics, which convert the standard fl25 beam from the secondary mirror to fl182, are described here. Techniques for reducing speckle data with field rotation on an alt-az telescope are also described. Three binary stars were observed in this experiment with separations as small as 0.05s. With only 100 frames of data on each, a dynamic range of at least 3.5 mag was achieved in all cases. These observations imply that a companion as faint as 14.5 mag at 2.2 micrometers could be detected around an 11th magnitude point source.

  2. Adaptation of a Filter Assembly to Assess Microbial Bioburden of Pressurant Within a Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benardini, James N.; Koukol, Robert C.; Schubert, Wayne W.; Morales, Fabian; Klatte, Marlin F.

    2012-01-01

    A report describes an adaptation of a filter assembly to enable it to be used to filter out microorganisms from a propulsion system. The filter assembly has previously been used for particulates greater than 2 micrometers. Projects that utilize large volumes of nonmetallic materials of planetary protection concern pose a challenge to their bioburden budget, as a conservative specification value of 30 spores per cubic centimeter is typically used. Helium was collected utilizing an adapted filtration approach employing an existing Millipore filter assembly apparatus used by the propulsion team for particulate analysis. The filter holder on the assembly has a 47-mm diameter, and typically a 1.2-5 micrometer pore-size filter is used for particulate analysis making it compatible with commercially available sterilization filters (0.22 micrometers) that are necessary for biological sampling. This adaptation to an existing technology provides a proof-of-concept and a demonstration of successful use in a ground equipment system. This adaptation has demonstrated that the Millipore filter assembly can be utilized to filter out microorganisms from a propulsion system, whereas in previous uses the filter assembly was utilized for particulates greater than 2 micrometers.

  3. Pyrite forms in recent peats and carbonates from the Florida Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.E.; Cohen, A.D. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-03-01

    The modern sediments of the Everglades area of southern Florida demonstrate a variety of conditions for the syngenetic formation of pyrite. These conditions relate to the overall stratigraphy of the area, which is a transgressive sequence in which fresh water peats and carbonates are overlain by brackish and marine peats and marine carbonates. The pyrite observed in microtome thin sections of these sediments occurs in three general forms: framboidal aggregates, minute euhedral crystals (<2 micrometers) often in clusters, and solitary euhedral crystals (>2 micrometers, but not larger than 20 micrometers). The relative percentages and forms of pyrite vary in occurrence within any individual depth interval depending upon parameters such as the ratio of organic to inorganic constituents, the proximity to marine water, and the types of organic constituents present (i.e. roots, leaves, fungi, algae, etc.). The relationships between pyrite forms and the various organic and inorganic constituents demonstrate the importance of microenvironments to the formation of pyrite. Overall, the relative percentages of pyrite present do not show a direct correlation with depth, with the exception of the general scarcity of pyrite in the top 12 inches of the sediment, which likely represent a redox boundary in the sediment.

  4. High Efficiency End-Pumped Ho:Tm:YLF Disk Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Axenson, Theresa J.; Barnes, Norman P.

    1999-01-01

    Space based coherent lidar for global wind measurement requires an all solid state laser system with high energy, high efficiency and narrow linewidth that operates in the eye safe region. A Q-switched, diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF 2 micrometer laser with output energy of as much as 125 mJ at 6 Hz with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 3% has been reported. Single frequency operation of the laser was achieved by injection seeding. The design of this laser is being incorporated into NASA's SPARCLE (SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment) wind lidar mission. Laser output energy ranging from 500 mJ to 2 J is required for an operational space coherent lidar. We previously developed a high energy Ho:Tm:YLF master oscillator and side pumped power amplifier system and demonstrated a 600-mJ single frequency pulse at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. Although the output energy is high, the optical-to-optical efficiency is only about 2%. Designing a high energy, highly efficient, conductively cooled 2-micrometer laser remains a challenge. In this paper, the preliminary result of an end-pumped amplifier that has a potential to provide a factor 3 of improvement in the system efficiency is reported.

  5. Detection of alteration associated with a porphyry copper deposit in southern Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. J.; Siegal, B. S.

    1977-01-01

    Computer processing of Landsat MSS data was performed using contrast stretching and band-to-band ratioing. A false color ratio composite picture showed color anomalies which coincided with known areas of alteration on and about Red Mountain. A helicopter survey of the study area was undertaken using a portable field reflectance spectrometer. One hundred fifty-six spectra were obtained in the 0.4 to 2.5 micrometer wavelength region. The spectra were digitized, and contour maps for 24 wavelength intervals were produced; no spectral anomalies were evident for the known altered areas. A contour map produced from the 1.6 and 2.2 micrometer ratio generally delineated the alteration areas. The 1.3, 1.6, and 2.2 micrometer wavelength data were canonically transformed using a transformation empirically derived from discriminant function analysis of altered and unaltered materials for the Goldfield, Nevada region, and a contour map was produced for the first canonical variable. The known areas of alteration were clearly defined on the contour map.

  6. Impact of shorter wavelengths on optical quality for laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wissinger, Alan B.; Noll, Robert J.; Tsacoyeanes, James G.; Tausanovitch, Jeanette R.

    1993-01-01

    This study explores parametrically as a function of wavelength the degrading effects of several common optical aberrations (defocus, astigmatism, wavefronttilts, etc.), using the heterodyne mixing efficiency factor as the merit function. A 60 cm diameter aperture beam expander with an expansion ratio of 15:1 and a primary mirror focal ratio of f/2 was designed for the study. An HDOS copyrighted analysis program determined the value of merit function for various optical misalignments. With sensitivities provided by the analysis, preliminary error budget and tolerance allocations were made for potential optical wavefront errors and boresight errors during laser shot transit time. These were compared with the baseline 1.5 m CO2 laws and the optical fabrication state of the art (SOA) as characterized by the Hubble Space Telescope. Reducing wavelength and changing optical design resulted in optical quality tolerances within the SOA both at 2 and 1 micrometer. However, advanced sensing and control devices would be necessary to be tightened by a factory of 1.8 for a 2 micrometer system and by 3.6 for a 1 micrometer system relative to the baseline CO2 LAWS. Available SOA components could be used for operation at 2 micrometers but operation at 1 micrometer does not appear feasible.

  7. Impact of shorter wavelengths on optical quality for laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wissinger, Alan B.; Noll, Robert J.; Tsacoyeanes, James G.; Tausanovitch, Jeanette R.

    1993-01-01

    This study explores parametrically as a function of wavelength the degrading effects of several common optical aberrations (defocus, astigmatism, wavefront tilts, etc.), using the heterodyne mixing efficiency factor as the merit function. A 60 cm diameter aperture beam expander with an expansion ratio of 15:1 and a primary mirror focal ratio of f/2 was designed for the study. An HDOS copyrighted analysis program determined the value of merit function for various optical misalignments. With sensitivities provided by the analysis, preliminary error budget and tolerance allocations were made for potential optical wavefront errors and boresight errors during laser shot transit time. These were compared with the baseline l.5 m CO2 LAWS and the optical fabrication state of the art (SOA) as characterized by the Hubble Space Telescope. Reducing wavelength and changing optical design resulted in optical quality tolerances within the SOA both at 2 and 1 micrometers. However, advanced sensing and control devices would be necessary to maintain on-orbit alignment. Optical tolerance for maintaining boresight stability would have to be tightened by a factor of 1.8 for a 2 micrometers system and by 3.6 for a 1 micrometers system relative to the baseline CO2 LAWS. Available SOA components could be used for operation at 2 micrometers but operation at 1 micrometers does not appear feasible.

  8. Grain Properties of Comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) Deduced Through Computational Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harker, David E.; Wooden, Diane H.; Woodward, Charles E.; Lisse, Carey M.

    2001-01-01

    We present the computational analysis of the 7.6 - 13.2 micrometer infrared (IR) spectrophotometry (R approximately equal to 120) of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) in conjunction with concurrent observations which extend the spectral energy distribution from the near-infrared to far-infrared wavelengths. The observations include temporal epochs pre-perihelion, (1996 October UT and 1997 February UT), near perihelion (1997 April UT), and postperihelion (1997 June UT). Through the computational modeling of small amorphous carbon, and crystalline and amorphous silicate grains in Hale-Bopp's coma, we find that as the comet approached perihelion, the grain size distribution (the Hanner modified power law) steepened (N = 3.4 pre-perihelion, to N = 3.7 near and post-perihelion) along with an increase in the fractal porosity of larger (greater than 1 micrometer) grains. The peak of the grain size distribution remained constant (ap = 0.2 micrometer) at each epoch. We attribute the emergence of the 9.3 micrometer peak near perihelion to crystalline orthopyroxeno grains released from inside the nucleus. Crystalline silicates (olivine and orthopyroxene) make up about 30% (by mass) of the submicron sized (less than 1 micrometer) dust grains in Hale-Bopp's coma during each epoch.

  9. Effects of simultaneously fiber transmitted erbium and holmium radiation on the interaction with highly absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenz, Martin; Pratisto, Hans S.; Ith, Michael; Koenz, Flurin; Weber, Heinz P.

    1995-05-01

    Erbium and Holmium lasers have both been shown to be suitable for orthopedic surgery performed under water. Erbium lasers emitting in the 3 micrometers wavelength region corresponding to the maximum water absorption peak effectively ablated biological tissues with high precision and minimal thermal damage. Holmium laser radiation at 2 micrometers , due to a lower absorption coefficient, is characterized by a greater extent of thermal damage leading to hemostasis. To combine the special advantages of each system we simultaneously coupled their radiation into a zirconium fluoride fiber (ZrF4) which was protected with a quartz fiber tip. Pressure measurements performed in the liquid using a piezo electrical transducer, transmission measurements and video flash lamp schlieren imaging of the laser induced vapor bubble were used in order to determine optimum laser parameters. The cutting efficiency of the Erbium laser is drastically improved when a low energy Holmium laser pulse is additionally used which is just able to open a vapor channel through which the Erbium laser pulse can be transmitted. The dynamics of the channel formation, geometry and life time are measured as a function of the delay time between the two different laser pulses and the pulse energy applied. The combination of 2 micrometers and 3 micrometers radiation seems to be an ideal instrument for tissue treatment.

  10. Empirical water vapor continuum models for infrared propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Michael E.

    1995-06-01

    The characterization of the water vapor continuum remains an important problem concerning infrared propagation in the atmosphere. Radiometric imaging within the atmosphere in the 8 to 12 micrometers and 3 - 5 micrometers regions, and eye safe lidar in the 2 micrometers and 1.6 micrometers window regions require accurate knowledge of the water vapor continuum. Although the physical nature of the continuum is a complex problem, the observed frequency, pressure and temperature dependence can be represented reasonably well by simple mathematical functions consistent with far wing theories. This approach is the basis for current models used in LOWTRAN/MODTRAN and for the models listed in the SPIE/ERIM EO/IR Systems Handbook (Volume 2 Chapter 1). However, these models are based solely on a limited, but high quality, data set collected by a spectrometer and White cell. Additional information on oxygen broadening and temperature dependence is available from numerous laser measurements of the water vapor continuum. A survey of relevant experimental data is made to determine the best available measurements of the water vapor continuum in various atmospheric window regions. Then the data are fit to an empirical model over the entire window region. A good fit is obtained for typical atmospheric conditions covering the 8 to 12 micrometers and 3 to 5 micrometers regions. No experimental data, covering atmospheric conditions, exist in the 2 micrometers and 1.6 micrometers regions. However, models can be proposed based on far wing extrapolations of the bordering vibrational water vapor bands.

  11. Analysis of dynamic characteristics and ways of development of bipolar main memory with miniaturization of integrated circuit elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyev, A. G.; Savenkov, V. N.; Parmenov, Y. A.; Neklyudov, V. A.; Mindeyeva, A. A.

    1984-08-01

    A forecast estimate of the characteristics of a super large scale integrated circuit (super-BIS) memory as applied to bipolar main memory (OZU) circuits is presented. The limiting speed of bipolar OSU with d 2 micrometer will be determined by the characteristics of the interconnections and not by the parameters of bipolar devices. With d 2 micrometer, slowing down of the rate of growth of the response speed of OZU must be expected as the result of miniaturization as a consequence of the increase of the specific capacities of the p-n junctions and the metallization and constraint on the current density in the interconnections. The limitation and the specific properties of the energetics of bipolar OZU--localization of the current in separate lines, leads to a variance between speed of response and the decree of integration. For realization of the potentially high speed of response of bipolar OSU an improvement is necessary of the technology of the interconnections with the object of an increase of the current density to master a three layered system of interconnections.

  12. Physics and applications of III-Sb-based type-I QW diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermelstein, Carmen; Rattunde, M.; Schmitz, J.; Kiefer, Rudolf; Walther, Martin; Wagner, Joachim

    2002-05-01

    We present recent progress achieved in the development of type-I GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb quantum-well (QW) lasers covering the 1.74-2.34micrometers spectral range. Diode lasers based on the broadened waveguide design comprising 3 Qws have been studied in detail. Laser structures emitting at 2.23 micrometers exhibited a record high internal quantum efficiency of 89%, internal loss of 6.8cm-1, and threshold current density at infinite cavity length as low as 120 A/cm2, indicating the superior quality of these devices. For the 2micrometers lasers a high characteristic temperature of 179K for the threshold current was achieved for temperatures between 250 and 280 K. In order to investigate the heterobarrier leakage associated with thermally activated carriers, laser structures emitting at 2.23micrometers with different Al- concentrations in the barriers and separate confinement regions have been studied. While the structure with 40% Al revealed the highest To of 103K, the laser with 20% Al yielded the best power efficiency, with a maximum value of 30%. 1.7W in cw mode at room temperature has been achieved for broad area single emitters at (lambda) =2 micrometers , with high-reflection/antireflection coated mirror facets, mounted epi-side down. As an application, tunable diode lasers absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) sensing small concentrations of methane has been demonstrated using our 2.3micrometers diode laser.

  13. Unusual applications of holographic interferometry in a semi-industrial environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Pierre M.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents two rather specific applications of holographic interferometry. The first is related to the study of displacements and strains associated with the rapid (200 meter/second) crack propagation in pressurized polymer pipes. Denisyuk type holography using a double pulsed Ruby laser was found to yield practical results; due to the rather explosive nature, experiments were carried out at night, outside of the classical buildings. The other series of tests is concerned with the localization of most stressed zones in prototypes manufactured from steel castings. As the use of brittle lacquers is now prohibited, holographic interferometry was used to find the locations for putting the strain gauges. Relatively large (up to 1 X 1 m) and heavy (about 700 kgs) castings were tested, resting on an unisolated concrete slab, using a semi-professional ESPI system and a small argon laser.

  14. New half-voltage and double phase operation of the Hermes III linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelson, K.A.; Westfall, R.L.; Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.J. ); Neely, S.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The standard operating mode produces bremsstrahlung with an endpoint energy of about 18 MeV. This paper describes a new mode with a 8.5 MeV endpoint energy and the same standard mode pulse characteristics achieved by operating only half of the accelerator at full charge with the advantage of minimal setup time. An extension of the new half-voltage mode is to use the other half of the accelerator for delivering a second pulse at a later time with the same technique. The double pulse mode is ideal for beam generation which requires a long interpulse time in the millisecond regime. The beam characteristics of the two half-voltage pulses are nearly identical with the nominal radiation pulse full width at half maximum of 21 ns and 10--90 risetime of 11 ns recorded by the same Compton diode radiation monitors on instruments triggered 30 ms apart.

  15. Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to the analysis of algal biomass for industrial biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pořízka, P.; Prochazka, D.; Pilát, Z.; Krajcarová, L.; Kaiser, J.; Malina, R.; Novotný, J.; Zemánek, P.; Ježek, J.; Šerý, M.; Bernatová, S.; Krzyžánek, V.; Dobranská, K.; Novotný, K.; Trtílek, M.; Samek, O.

    2012-08-01

    We report on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the determination of elements distinctive in terms of their biological significance (such as potassium, magnesium, calcium, and sodium) and to the monitoring of accumulation of potentially toxic heavy metal ions in living microorganisms (algae), in order to trace e.g. the influence of environmental exposure and other cultivation and biological factors having an impact on them. Algae cells were suspended in liquid media or presented in a form of adherent cell mass on a surface (biofilm) and, consequently, characterized using their spectra. In our feasibility study we used three different experimental arrangements employing double-pulse LIBS technique in order to improve on analytical selectivity and sensitivity for potential industrial biotechnology applications, e.g. for monitoring of mass production of commercial biofuels, utilization in the food industry and control of the removal of heavy metal ions from industrial waste waters.

  16. A parametric study of single-wall carbon nanotube growth by laser ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William A.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Hadjiev, Victor G.; Scott, Carl D.

    2004-01-01

    Results of a parametric study of carbon nanotube production by the double-pulse laser oven process are presented. The effect of various operating parameters on the production of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is estimated by characterizing the nanotube material using analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermo gravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The study included changing the sequence of the laser pulses, laser energy, pulse separation, type of buffer gas used, operating pressure, flow rate, inner tube diameter, as well as its material, and oven temperature. It was found that the material quality and quantity improve with deviation from normal operation parameters such as laser energy density higher than 1.5 J/cm2, pressure lower than 67 kPa, and flow rates higher than 100 sccm. Use of helium produced mainly small diameter tubes and a lower yield. The diameter of SWCNTs decreases with decreasing oven temperature and lower flow rates.

  17. Mapping average axon diameters in porcine spinal cord white matter and rat corpus callosum using d-PFG MRI

    PubMed Central

    Komlosh, M.E.; Özarslan, E.; Lizak, M. J.; Horkayne-Szakaly, I.; Freidlin, R. Z.; Horkay, F.; Basser, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of microstructural features of nerve fascicles, such as axon diameter, is crucial for understanding normal function in the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as assessing changes due to pathologies. In this study double-pulsed field gradient (d-PFG) filtered MRI was used to map the average axon diameter (AAD) in porcine spinal cord, which was then compared to AADs measured with optical microscopy of the same specimen, as a way to further validate this MRI method. A novel 3D acquisition scheme was then used to obtain AADs in each voxel of a coronal slice of rat brain corpus callosum. AAD measurements were also acquired using optical microscopy performed on histological sections and validated using a novel MRI glass capillary array phantom. PMID:23583426

  18. Far-infrared-light shadowgraphy for high extraction efficiency of extreme ultraviolet light from a CO2-laser-generated tin plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukuma, Hiraku; Hosoda, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Yosuke; Yogo, Akifumi; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Kodama, Takeshi; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    The two-color, double-pulse method is an efficient scheme to generate extreme ultraviolet light for fabricating the next generation semiconductor microchips. In this method, a Nd:YAG laser pulse is used to expand a several-tens-of-micrometers-scale tin droplet, and a CO2 laser pulse is subsequently directed at the expanded tin vapor after an appropriate delay time. We propose the use of shadowgraphy with a CO2 laser probe-pulse scheme to optimize the CO2 main-drive laser. The distribution of absorption coefficients is derived from the experiment, and the results are converted to a practical absorption rate for the CO2 main-drive laser.

  19. Using shaped pulses to probe energy deposition during laser-induced damage of SiO2 surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Cross, D; Feit, M D; Bude, J D

    2008-10-24

    Laser-induced damage initiation in silica has been shown to follow a power-law behavior with respect to pulse-length. Models based on thermal diffusion physics can successfully predict this scaling and the effect of pulse shape for pulses between about 3ns and 10ns. In this work we use sophisticated new measurement techniques and novel pulse shape experiments to test the limits of this scaling. We show that simple pulse length scaling fails for pulses below about 3ns. Furthermore, double pulse initiation experiments suggest that energy absorbed by the first pulse is lost on time scales much shorter than would be predicted for thermal diffusion. This time scale for energy loss can be strongly modulated by maintaining a small but non-zero intensity between the pulses. By producing damage with various pulse shapes and pulse trains it is demonstrated that the properties of any hypothetical thermal absorber become highly constrained.

  20. The development, performance, and potential application of the copper halide laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, T. J.; Nerheim, N. M.

    1983-01-01

    The copper halide laser (CHL) is an efficient gas discharge laser that emits short pulses at two discrete wavelengths in the yellow and green spectral region. The laser pulse results from transitions in excited copper atoms. The CHL has produced pulses of up to 10 mJ in a double-pulsed mode at low repetition rates and has been operated at very high repetition rates (8 to over 35 kHz) in a continuously pulsed mode with a maximum average-power of 15 watts. In this paper, the development of the copper halide laser is reviewed along with a brief description of the copper laser operating principles. In the final section, a number of applications of the CHL are identified.

  1. Modeling of the influence of the driving laser wavelength on the beam quality of transiently pumped X-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, S.; Zeitoun, Ph.

    2003-04-01

    A three dimensional ray tracing code (SHADOX) has been developed, as a post-processor of any hydrodynamic/atomic code, to model X-ray laser beam propagation along the amplifying medium and any optical component. In this paper we show a study aimed to investigate the influence of the long driving pulse wavelength on the transiently pumped X-ray laser propagation and amplification. Different pumping configurations have been modeled and their respective influence on the beam quality has been investigated. This work shows that the beam homogeneity is highly sensitive to both the emissive zone dimension and electron density gradient and that pumping by a double pulse in a two-color configuration (2 ω/ ω; Δt=200 ps) is favorable in terms of beam quality.

  2. Solid-State 2-Micron Laser Transmitter Advancement for Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements From Ground, Airborne, and Space-Based Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Ismail, Syed

    2008-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing 2-micron lidar technologies over a decade for wind measurements, utilizing coherent Doppler wind lidar technique and carbon dioxide measurements, utilizing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique. Significant advancements have been made towards developing state-of-the-art technologies towards laser transmitters, detectors, and receiver systems. These efforts have led to the development of solid-state lasers with high pulse energy, tunablility, wavelength-stability, and double-pulsed operation. This paper will present a review of these technological developments along with examples of high resolution wind and high precision CO2 DIAL measurements in the atmosphere. Plans for the development of compact high power lasers for applications in airborne and future space platforms for wind and regional to global scale measurement of atmospheric CO2 will also be discussed.

  3. Practical applications of nondestructive materials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Robert E., Jr.

    1992-10-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are reviewed for applications to the industrial production of materials including microstructural, physical, and chemical analyses. NDE techniques addressed include: (1) double-pulse holographic interferometry for sealed-package leak testing; (2) process controls for noncontact metals fabrication; (3) ultrasonic detections of oxygen contamination in titanium welds; and (4) scanning acoustic microscopy for the evaluation of solder bonds. The use of embedded sensors and emerging NDE concepts provides the means for controlling the manufacturing and quality of quartz crystal resonators, nickel single-crystal turbine blades, and integrated circuits. Advances in sensor technology and artificial intelligence algorithms and the use of embedded sensors combine to make NDE technology highly effective in controlling industrial materials manufacturing and the quality of the products.

  4. X-ray lasers and methods utilizing two component driving illumination provided by optical laser means of relatively low energy and small physical size

    DOEpatents

    Rosen, Mordecai D.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10), and related methodology, are disclosed wherein an X-ray laser target (12) is illuminated with a first pulse of optical laser radiation (14) of relatively long duration having scarcely enough energy to produce a narrow and linear cool plasma of uniform composition (38). A second, relatively short pulse of optical laser radiation (18) is uniformly swept across the length, from end to end, of the plasma (38), at about the speed of light, to consecutively illuminate continuously succeeding portions of the plasma (38) with optical laser radiation having scarcely enough energy to heat, ionize, and invert them into the continuously succeeding portions of an X-ray gain medium. This inventive double pulse technique results in a saving of more than two orders of magnitude in driving optical laser energy, when compared to the conventional single pulse approach.

  5. Measurement of Sub-Picosecond Electron Bunches via Electro-Optic Sampling of Coherent Transition Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Timothy John

    2012-01-01

    Future collider applications as well as present high-gradient laser plasma wakefield accelerators and free-electron lasers operating with picosecond bunch durations place a higher demand on the time resolution of bunch distribution diagnostics. This demand has led to significant advancements in the field of electro-optic sampling over the past ten years. These methods allow the probing of diagnostic light such as coherent transition radiation or the bunch wakefields with sub-picosecond time resolution. We present results on the single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of coherent transition radiation from bunches generated at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector laboratory. A longitudinal double-pulse modulation of the electron beam is also realized by transverse beam masking followed by a transverse-to-longitudinal phase-space exchange beamline. Live profile tuning is demonstrated by upstream beam focusing in conjunction with downstream monitoring of single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of the coherent transition radiation.

  6. High energy conversion efficiency in laser-proton acceleration by controlling laser-energy deposition onto thin foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, C. M.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Markey, K.; Scott, R. H. H.; Lancaster, K. L.; Musgrave, I. O.; Spindloe, C.; Winstone, T.; Wyatt, D.; Neely, D.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J.; Deppert, O.; Batani, D.; Davies, J. R.; Hassan, S. M.; Tatarakis, M.; and others

    2014-02-24

    An all-optical approach to laser-proton acceleration enhancement is investigated using the simplest of target designs to demonstrate application-relevant levels of energy conversion efficiency between laser and protons. Controlled deposition of laser energy, in the form of a double-pulse temporal envelope, is investigated in combination with thin foil targets in which recirculation of laser-accelerated electrons can lead to optimal conditions for coupling laser drive energy into the proton beam. This approach is shown to deliver a substantial enhancement in the coupling of laser energy to 5–30 MeV protons, compared to single pulse irradiation, reaching a record high 15% conversion efficiency with a temporal separation of 1 ps between the two pulses and a 5 μm-thick Au foil. A 1D simulation code is used to support and explain the origin of the observation of an optimum pulse separation of ∼1 ps.

  7. Laser ablation process for single-walled carbon nanotube production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single-walled carbon nanotubes. The original method developed by researchers at Rice University used a "double-pulse laser oven" process. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to include one-laser pulse (green or infrared), different pulse widths (ns to micros as well as continuous wave), and different laser wavelengths (e.g., CO2, or free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). Some of these variations are tried with different combinations and concentrations of metal catalysts, buffer gases (e.g., helium), oven temperatures, flow conditions, and even different porosities of the graphite targets. This article is an attempt to cover all these variations and their relative merits. Possible growth mechanisms under these different conditions will also be discussed.

  8. Three-dimensional shock structure in a transonic flutter cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldman, D. R.; Buggele, A. E.; Decker, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Rapid double-pulse holography was employed to obtain detailed, two-dimensional images of the shock forming during simulated flutter in a transonic flowfield. The experiment comprised a linear cascade of airfoils externally oscillated in torsion and viewed tangentially at the shock surface. Three biconvex airfoils were subjected to harmonic pitching motion about the midchord axis at a frequency of 0.53 while immersed in a Mach 0.81 flow. Failure to produce observable shocks led to use of choked flow with a Mach number near one, of which 50 holograms were taken. The images revealed a narrow shock surface with a spanwise variation in the shock properties. The method is concluded to be useful for examining transonic flowfield shocks in the presence of airfoil flutter.

  9. One-shot phase stepping with a pulsed laser and modulation of polarization: application to speckle interferometry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Zurita, G; García-Arellano, A; Toto-Arellano, N I; Flores-Muñoz, V H; Pastrana-Sánchez, R; Robledo-Sánchez, C; Martínez-Bravo, O; Vásquez-Pasmiño, N; Costa-Vera, C

    2015-09-01

    For applications involving time varying optical phase distributions, fast cameras and/or pulsed lasers have to be used. To apply phase-shifting interferometry techniques (PSI) as well, single shot capture is required. Among others, modulation of polarization and phase grating interferometry is a possible technique to be considered. In this paper, a report about the use of this technique based on a double pulse laser system is presented. Single-pulse and twin-pulse operations are considered both in optical interferometers as well as in ESPI systems (mainly in subtraction mode). In ESPI a reduction of the degree of polarization appears due to scattering, so some measures have to be taken to prevent such deletereous effect. To show the feasibility of the proposed variants some experimental results are presented. PMID:26368442

  10. Measurements of copper ground-state and metastable level population densities in a copper-chloride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerheim, N. M.

    1977-01-01

    The population densities of both the ground and the 2D(5/2) metastable states of copper atoms in a double-pulsed copper-chloride laser are correlated with laser energy as a function of time after the dissociation current pulse. Time-resolved density variations of the ground and excited copper atoms were derived from measurements of optical absorption at 324.7 and 510.6 nm, respectively, over a wide range of operating conditions in laser tubes with diameters of 4 to 40 mm. The minimum delay between the two current pulses at which lasing was observed is shown to be a function of the initial density and subsequent decay of the metastable state. Similarly, the maximum delay is shown to be a function of the initial density and decay of the ground state.

  11. A Ground-Based 2-Micron DIAL System to Profile Tropospheric CO2 and Aerosol Distributions for Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady; Abedin, Nurul; Refaat, Tamer; Rubio, Manuel; Davis, Kenneth; Miller, Charles; Singh, Upendra

    2006-01-01

    System will operate at a temperature insensitive CO2 line (2050.967 nm) with side-line tuning and off-set locking. Demonstrated an order of magnitude improvement in laser line locking needed for high precision measurements, side-line operation, and simultaneously double pulsing and line locking. Detector testing of phototransistor has demonstrated sensitivity to aerosol features over long distances in the atmosphere and resolve features approx. 100m. Optical systems that collect light onto small area detectors work well. Receiver optical designs are being optimized and data acquisition systems developed. CO2 line parameter characterization in progress In situ sensor calibration in progress for validation of DIAL CO2 system.

  12. Strangeonium spectroscopy at 11 GeV/c and Cherenkov Ring Imaging at the SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Bienz, T.L.

    1990-07-01

    This thesis is divided into two sections, which describe portions of the data acquisition system and online software for the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD, and analyses of several low cross section strangeonium channels in data from the LASS spectrometer. The CRID section includes a description of the data acquisition system, determination of the preamplifier gain, and development of an online pulse finding algorithm based on deconvolution. Deconvolution uses knowledge of the preamplifier impulse response to aid in pulse finding. The algorithm is fast and shows good single pulse resolution and excellent double pulse resolution in preliminary tests. The strangeonium analyses are based on data from a 4.1 event/nanobarn exposure of the LASS spectrometer in K{sup {minus}}p interactions at 11 GeV/c, and include studies of {Lambda}{eta}{pi}{sup {plus}}{pi}{sup {minus}}, {Lambda}{Kappa}*{Kappa}*, and {Lambda}{phi}{phi}.

  13. Disinhibition of the contralateral motor cortex by low-frequency rTMS.

    PubMed

    Plewnia, Christian; Lotze, Martin; Gerloff, Christian

    2003-03-24

    Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the primary motor cortex (M1) results in a lasting decrease of motor evoked potentials (MEPs). Here we investigated the effects of supra-threshold rTMS (15 min, 1 Hz) to the left M1 on the excitability of the stimulated and homologous (unstimulated) M1 in healthy subjects by using single and double pulse TMS before and after rTMS. We found reduction of MEP amplitudes on the stimulated side and, most importantly, disinhibition of intracortical excitability of the homologous M1. This crossed effect of rTMS supports the concept of a physiological balance of reciprocal inhibitory projections and emphasizes that rTMS can induce remote effects that are relevant for the physiological interpretation of such interventions. PMID:12657896

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of gas mixtures of air, CO2, N2, and C3H8 for simultaneous C, H, O, and N measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Volker; Noll, Reinhard

    2003-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied for simultaneous measurement of the elements C, H, N, and O in CO2-air, C3H8-CO2, and C3H8-N2 gas mixtures at atmospheric pressure. A single 7-mm-diameter aperture at the sample chamber was used for 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser irradiation and plasma signal output to an echelle spectrometer. Double-pulse laser bursts of ~8-ns pulse width (FWHM) and 250-ns interpulse separation were applied to increase the plasma signal. Calibration curves of the LIBS signal versus the partial pressure or the atomic abundance ratios were taken by dilution series in intervals that are relevant in the combustion of heptane (C7H16) near an equivalence ratio of 1.

  15. Optimal control of the strong-field ionization of silver clusters in helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, N. X.; Goede, S.; Przystawik, A.; Fennel, Th.; Bornath, Th.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Hilse, P.; Schlanges, M.; Doeppner, T.; Gerber, G.

    2010-01-15

    Optimal control techniques combined with femtosecond laser pulse shaping are applied to steer and enhance the strong-field induced emission of highly charged atomic ions from silver clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets. With light fields shaped in amplitude and phase we observe a substantial increase of the Ag{sup q+} yield for q>10 when compared to bandwidth-limited and optimally stretched pulses. A remarkably simple double-pulse structure, containing a low-intensity prepulse and a stronger main pulse, turns out to produce the highest atomic charge states up to Ag{sup 20+}. A negative chirp during the main pulse hints at dynamic frequency locking to the cluster plasmon. A numerical optimal control study on pure silver clusters with a nanoplasma model converges to a similar pulse structure and corroborates that the optimal light field adapts to the resonant excitation of cluster surface plasmons for efficient ionization.

  16. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Novel interferometric measurement of size and velocity distributions of spherical particles in fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Masanobu; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Hishida, Koichi

    2000-12-01

    The present investigation describes a novel measurement technique used to determine both velocity and diameter of transparent spherical particles, mainly droplets and gas bubbles. We have developed a special receiving optical system that acquires the interferential image without any losses due to the overlapping of neighbouring fringes. The system enhances the spatial resolution by compressing the circular image with fringes into a linear image while maintaining the information of the fringe spacing, which is related to the particle diameter. The compression simplifies and ensures the detection of the interferograms in the digitized image. The image provides both the location and the size of particles simultaneously. The velocities of individual particles are obtained by capturing sequential images of interferograms with double-pulsed illumination. The technique was examined with the measurement of monodisperse droplets and estimated with a resultant error of less than 3% for arithmetic mean diameter.

  17. Development of a Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Refaat, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to the carbon cycle and global radiation budget on Earth. Active remote sensing of CO2 is important to address several limitations that contend with passive sensors. A 2-micron double-pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This active remote sensing instrument will provide an alternate approach of measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise ratio level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Commercial, on the shelf, components are implemented for the detection system. Instrument integration will be presented in this paper as well as a background for CO2 measurement at NASA Langley research Center

  18. ION BEAM HEATED TARGET SIMULATIONS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Armijo, J.; Bailey, D.S.; Friedman, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leung, P.T.; Logan, B.G.; Marinak, M.M.; More, R.M.; Ng, S.F.; Penn, G.E.; Perkins, L.J.; Veitzer, S.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.; Zylstra, A.B.

    2008-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  19. Ion Beam Heated Target Simulations for Warm Dense Matter Physics and Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Armijo, J; Bailey, D S; Friedman, A; Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Kaganovich, I; Leung, P T; Logan, B G; Marinak, M M; More, R M; Ng, S F; Penn, G E; Perkins, L J; Veitzer, S; Wurtele, J S; Yu, S S; Zylstra, A B

    2008-08-12

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  20. Relative Refractory Period in an Excitable Semiconductor Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmi, F.; Braive, R.; Beaudoin, G.; Sagnes, I.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Barbay, S.

    2014-05-01

    We report on experimental evidence of neuronlike excitable behavior in a micropillar laser with saturable absorber. We show that under a single pulsed perturbation the system exhibits subnanosecond response pulses and analyze the role of the laser bias pumping. Under a double pulsed excitation we study the absolute and relative refractory periods, similarly to what can be found in neural excitability, and interpret the results in terms of a dynamical inhibition mediated by the carrier dynamics. These measurements shed light on the analogy between optical and biological neurons and pave the way to fast spike-time coding based optical systems with a speed several orders of magnitude faster than their biological or electronic counterparts.

  1. Quantitative visualization of high-speed 3D turbulent flow structures using holographic interferometric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, B. H.; Watt, D. W.; Bryanston-Cross, P. J.

    1999-02-01

    Using holographic interferometry the three-dimensional structure of unsteady and large-scale motions within subsonic and transonic turbulent jet flows has been studied. The instantaneous 3D flow structure is obtained by tomographic reconstruction techniques from quantitative phase maps recorded using a rapid-switching, double reference beam, double pulse laser system. The reconstruction of the jets studied here reveal a three-dimensional nature of the flow. In particular an increasing complexity can be seen in the turbulence as the flow progresses from the jet nozzle. Furthermore, a coherent three-dimensional, possibly rotating, structure can be seen to exist within these jets. The type of flow features illustrated here are not just of fundamental importance for understanding the behavior of free jet flows, but are also common to a number of industrial applications, ranging from the combustion flow within an IC engine to the transonic flow through the stages of a gas turbine.

  2. Laser synthesis and modification of composite nanoparticles in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, N V; Butsen, A V

    2010-12-29

    The works devoted to the formation and modification of nanoparticles using laser ablation of solid targets in liquids are reviewed. Several approaches to implement laser ablation in liquids, aimed at synthesising nanoparticles of complex composition, are considered: direct laser ablation of a target of corresponding composition, laser ablation of a combined target composed of two different metals, laser irradiation of a mixture of two or more colloidal solutions, and laser ablation in reactive liquids. The properties of two-component bimetallic systems (Ag - Cu, Ag - Au), semiconductor nanocrystals (ZnO, CdSe), chalcopyrite nanoparticles, and doped oxide nanoparticles (ZnO:Ag, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}:Tb{sup 3+}) formed as a result of single- and double-pulse laser ablation in different liquids (water, ethanol, acetone, solutions of polysaccharides) are discussed. (photonics and nanotechnology)

  3. In situ industrial applications of optics; Proceedings of the Meeting, Brussels, Belgium, June 25-27, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebbeni, Jean

    Included in this volume are papers on real-time image enhancement by simple video systems, automatic identification and data collection via barcode laser scanning, the optimization of the cutting up of a strip of float glass, optical sensors for factory automation, and the use of a digital theodolite with infrared radiation. Attention is also given to ISIS (integrated shape imaging system), a new system for follow-up of scoliosis; optical diffraction extensometers; a cross-spectrum technique for high-sensitivity remote vibration analysis by optical interferometry; the compensation and measurement of any motion of three-dimensional objects in holographic interferometry; and stereoscreen. Additional papers are on holographic double pulse YAG lasers, miniature optic connectors, stress-field analysis in an adhesively bonded joint with laser photoelasticimetry, and the locking of the light pulse delay in externally triggered gas lasers.

  4. The use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the determination of fluorine concentration in glass ionomer cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratochvíl, T.; Pouzar, M.; Novotný, K.; Havránek, V.; Černohorský, T.; Zvolská, M.

    2013-10-01

    The influence of He atmosphere and gate width in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of fluorine concentration was investigated in detail. The measurements were realized on two double pulse LIBS devices featuring different parameters. Calibration curves, describing the relationship between the fluorine concentration and the corresponding intensity of the LIBS signal, were constructed for both LIBS devices, with and without He flow, respectively. Detection limits achieved were in the range 1.18-0.47 wt.%. The best LOD value was obtained in He atmosphere. The LIBS measurement of fluorine content is influenced by different gate widths and the atmosphere in the working chamber. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of fluorine concentration in glass ionomer cements.

  5. Application of holography to flow visualization within rotating compressor blade row. [to determine three dimensional shock patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuerker, R. F.; Kobayashi, R. J.; Heflinger, L. O.; Ware, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    Two holographic interblade row flow visualization systems were designed to determine the three-dimensional shock patterns and velocity distributions within the rotating blade row of a transonic fan rotor, utilizing the techniques of pulsed laser transmission holography. Both single- and double-exposure bright field holograms and dark field scattered-light holograms were successfully recorded. Two plastic windows were installed in the rotor tip casing and outer casing forward of the rotor to view the rotor blade passage. The viewing angle allowed detailed investigation of the leading edge shocks and shocks in the midspan damper area; limited details of the trailing edge shocks also were visible. A technique was devised for interpreting the reconstructed holograms by constructing three dimensional models that allowed identification of the major shock systems. The models compared favorably with theoretical predictions and results of the overall and blade element data. Most of the holograms were made using the rapid double-pulse technique.

  6. Generating femtosecond X-ray pulses using an emittance-spoiling foil in free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Behrens, C.; Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Helml, W.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J.

    2015-11-01

    Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond pulses is attracting much attention in X-ray free-electron laser user community. One method is to use a slotted, emittance-spoiling foil which was proposed before (P. Emma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 074801 (2004)) and has been widely used at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Direct experimental characterization of the slotted-foil performance was previously unfeasible due to a lack of appropriate diagnostics. With a recently installed X-band radio-frequency transverse deflector, we are able to characterize the electron bunch spoiling effect and X-ray pulse when using the slotted foil. We show that few-femtosecond X-ray pulses are generated with flexible control of the single-pulse duration or double-pulse separation with comparison to the theoretical model.

  7. Ion beam heated target simulations for warm dense matter physics and inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, J. J.; Armijo, J.; Bailey, D. S.; Friedman, A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leung, P. T.; Logan, B. G.; Marinak, M. M.; More, R. M.; Ng, S. F.; Penn, G. E.; Perkins, L. J.; Veitzer, S.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yu, S. S.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2009-07-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy-related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single-pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam-target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies.

  8. Generating femtosecond X-ray pulses using an emittance-spoiling foil in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y. Coffee, R.; Decker, F.-J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J.; Behrens, C.; Helml, W.

    2015-11-09

    Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond pulses is attracting much attention in X-ray free-electron laser user community. One method is to use a slotted, emittance-spoiling foil which was proposed before (P. Emma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 074801 (2004)) and has been widely used at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Direct experimental characterization of the slotted-foil performance was previously unfeasible due to a lack of appropriate diagnostics. With a recently installed X-band radio-frequency transverse deflector, we are able to characterize the electron bunch spoiling effect and X-ray pulse when using the slotted foil. We show that few-femtosecond X-ray pulses are generated with flexible control of the single-pulse duration or double-pulse separation with comparison to the theoretical model.

  9. Relative refractory period in an excitable semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Selmi, F; Braive, R; Beaudoin, G; Sagnes, I; Kuszelewicz, R; Barbay, S

    2014-05-01

    We report on experimental evidence of neuronlike excitable behavior in a micropillar laser with saturable absorber. We show that under a single pulsed perturbation the system exhibits subnanosecond response pulses and analyze the role of the laser bias pumping. Under a double pulsed excitation we study the absolute and relative refractory periods, similarly to what can be found in neural excitability, and interpret the results in terms of a dynamical inhibition mediated by the carrier dynamics. These measurements shed light on the analogy between optical and biological neurons and pave the way to fast spike-time coding based optical systems with a speed several orders of magnitude faster than their biological or electronic counterparts. PMID:24856697

  10. Overpressure wave interaction with droplets: time resolved measurements by laser shadowscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slangen, Pierre; Aprin, Laurent; Heymes, Frédéric; Munier, Laurent; Lapébie, Emmanuel; Dusserre, Gilles

    2012-10-01

    Risk sciences involve increasingly optics applications to perform accurate analysis of critical behavior such as failures, explosions, fires. In this particular context, different area sizes are investigated under high temporal sampling rate up to 10000fps. With the improvement of light sources and optical sensors, it is now possible to cope with high spatial resolution even for time resolved measurement. The paper deals with the study of the interaction between overpressure waves, occurring in case of explosion for example, with a liquid droplet present in the vicinity of the overpressure wave. This is a typical scenario encountered in case of industrial breakdown including liquid leakage and explosions. We designed an experimental setup for the evaluation of the interaction between the overpressure wave and falling liquid droplets. A gas chamber is filled with nitrogen until breakage of the outlet rupture disk at about 4 bar. The droplets fall is controlled by an automatic syringe injector placed in the overpressure wave. The imaging system is based on laser shadowscopy. The laser source is a double cavity 15mJ- 1000Hz Nd YLF laser emitting double pulses of about 10ns at 527nm. To record the double pulse after crossing the falling droplets, the transmitted light is captured by a lasersynchronized double frame camera. Since these measurements are time-synchronized, it is then possible to know accurately the different parameters of the phenomenon, such as overpressure wave velocity, droplets diameter, and Reynolds number. Different experiments have been carried out at about 4000 doubleframe/s. The paper presents the whole experiment, the enhancements of the setup and the results for different liquid products from water to acetone.

  11. A novel method designed for electrodeposition of nanocrystalline Ni coating and its corrosion behaviors in Hank's solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Shen, Yifu

    2015-01-01

    Unlike the traditional direct current deposition, a novel method of ultrasonic-assisted double pulse current deposition was developed to fabricate nanocrystalline Ni coatings on the surface of pure Titanium (TA2) substrate. In order to make surface modification of TA2 substrate for better electrodeposition of Ni coatings with strong interfacial adhesion, an effectively activating solution of a dilute HF-containing solution contained of DMF, TiCl3, and Ce(NO3)3 additives was applied. Attentively, different ultrasonic frequencies (i.e., 0, 45, and 80 kHz) produced by ultrasonic field were employed for comparing their effects on managing textural evolution of Ni growth. Besides an optimization of periodic variation for ultrasonic frequency (UF) was innovatively designed as a novel approach to prepare nanostructured Ni coatings with better densification. In addition, several electrochemical measurements of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization curves were devoted to making a comparative study of corrosion behaviors for electrodeposited Ni coatings under different ultrasonic frequencies. Survey results showed that a fully denser structure of nanocrystalline Ni coating was achieved by adding ultrasonic oscillations into the electroplating processes. So it exhibited superior corrosion resistance for Ni coatings prepared at 45 + 80 kHz (PV), followed by 45, 0, and 80 kHz in Hank's solution at 36.5 °C. Considering combined effects from both ultrasonic oscillations and double-pulsed current on structural evolution of electrodeposited Ni coating, an analytical modeling was illustrated for evaluating their mechanisms on modifications of concentration polarization and cathodic overpotential for more dynamic recrystallization and better structural densification of Ni grains.

  12. Pulsed laser propulsion for low cost, high volume launch to orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.

    1989-06-02

    Pulsed laser propulsion offers the prospect of delivering high thrust at high specific impulse (500-1000 seconds) from a very simple thruster, using the energy of a remote ground-based laser to heat an inert propellant. Current analyses indicate that payloads of approximately 1 kg per megawatt of average laser power can be launched at a rate of one payload every 15 minutes and a marginal cost of $20 to $200 per kg. A 20 MW entry-level launch system could be built using current technology at a cost of $500 million or less; it would be capable of placing 600 tons per year into LEO. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program has been developing the technology for such a launch system since 1987. The program has conducted theoretical and experimental research on a particular class of laser-driven thruster, the planar double-pulse LSD-wave thruster, which could be used for a near-term launcher. The double-pulse thruster offers several advantages, including extreme simplicity, design flexibility, and the ability to guide a vehicle remotely by precise control of the laser beam. Small-scale experiments have demonstrated the operation of this thruster at a specific impulse of 600 seconds and 10% efficiency; larger experiments now under way are expected to increase this to at least 20% efficiency. Systems-level issues, from guidance and tracking to possible unique applications, have also been considered and will be briefly discussed. There appear to be no fundamental obstacles to creating, in the next five to ten years, a new low-cost ''pipe-line to space.'' 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Influence of pressurization rate and pressure pulsing on the inactivation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores during pressure-assisted thermal processing.

    PubMed

    Ratphitagsanti, Wannasawat; Ahn, Juhee; Balasubramaniam, V M; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2009-04-01

    Pressure-assisted thermal processing (PATP) is an emerging sterilization technology in which a combination of pressure (500 to 700 MPa) and temperature (90 to 120 degrees C) are used to inactivate bacterial spores. The objective of this study was to examine the role of pressurization rate and pressure pulsing in enhancing PATP lethality to the bacterial spore. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TMW 2.479 spore suspensions were prepared in deionized water at three inoculum levels (1.1 x 10(9), 1.4 x 10(8), and 1.3 x 10(6) CFU/ml), treated at two pressurization rates (18.06 and 3.75 MPa/s), and held at 600 MPa and 105 degrees C for 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 5 min. Experiments were carried out using custom-fabricated, high-pressure microbial kinetic testing equipment. Single and double pulses with equivalent pressure-holding times (1 to 3 min) were investigated by using the spore suspension containing 1.4 x 10(8) CFU/ml. Spore survivors were enumerated by pour plating, using Trypticase soy agar after incubation at 32 degrees C for 2 days. During short pressure-holding times (< or = 2 min), PATP treatment with the slow pressurization rate provided enhanced spore reduction over that of the fast pressurization rate. However, these differences diminished with extended pressure-holding times. After a 5-min pressure-holding time, B. amyloliquefaciens population decreased about 6 log CFU/ml, regardless of pressurization rate and inoculum level. Double-pulse treatment enhanced PATP spore lethality by approximately 2.4 to 4 log CFU/ml, in comparison to single pulse for a given pressure-holding time. In conclusion, pressure pulsing considerably increases the efficacy of PATP treatment against bacterial spores. Contribution of pressurization rate to PATP spore lethality varies with duration of pressure holding. PMID:19435226

  14. Portable standoff Raman system for fast detection of homemade explosives through glass, plastic, and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Anupam K.; Sharma, Shiv K.; Acosta, Tayro E.; Porter, John N.; Lucey, Paul G.; Bates, David E.

    2012-06-01

    The University of Hawaii has been developing portable remote Raman systems capable of detecting chemicals in daylight from a safe standoff distance. We present data on standoff detection of chemicals used in the synthesis of homemade explosives (HME) using a portable standoff Raman system utilizing an 8-inch telescope. Data show that good-quality Raman spectra of various hazardous chemicals such as ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate, potassium perchlorate, sulfur, nitrobenzene, benzene, acetone, various organic and inorganic chemicals etc. could be easily obtained from remote distances, tested up to 120 meters, with a single-pulse laser excitation and with detection time less than 1 μs. The system uses a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG pulsed laser source (532 nm, 100 mJ/pulse, 15 Hz, pulse width 10 ns) capable of firing a single or double pulse. The double-pulse configuration also allows the system to perform standoff LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) at 50 m range. In the standoff Raman detection, the doublepulse sequence simply doubles the signal to noise ratio. Significant improvement in the quality of Raman spectra is observed when the standoff detection is made with 1s integration time. The system uses a 50-micron slit and has spectral resolution of 8 cm-1. The HME chemicals could be easily detected through clear and brown glass bottles, PP and HDPE plastic bottles, and also through fluorescent plastic water bottles. Standoff Raman detection of HME chemical from a 10 m distance through non-visible concealed bottles in plastic bubble wrap packaging is demonstrated with 1 s integration time. Possible applications of the standoff Raman system for homeland security and environmental monitoring are discussed.

  15. Identification of Gas Phase PAHs in Absorption Towards Protostellar Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse D.; Temi, Pasquale; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The infrared emission bands (also known as the UIR bands.) have recently been observed in absorption at 3.25 micrometers in the ices surrounding a few proto-stellar objects at 11.2 micrometers in MonR2, and at 6.2 micrometers towards two sources near the galactic center. The UIR bands have been observed in emission for many years, but identifying these bands has proven to be both difficult and contentious as no one has yet found a single material that provides a good match to the features. However, most investigators agree that some form of carbon-based material with aromatic bonds is the most likely candidate, and many arguments favor free molecules (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) as the carriers of at least the narrow emission bands. Since the emission arises not from a single molecule but from a family of molecules, identifying which PAHs are contributing to the infrared emission bands is difficult. The identification is further complicated by the fact that the emission at short wavelengths is dominated by small molecules while at long wavelengths it is dominated by large molecules. Thus, for example, the emission at 3.3 micrometers is from a different mix of molecules than those which produce the 11.2 micrometer band. To complicate matters further, the molecular mix includes both neutral and ionic species. In absorption, the same mixture of molecules contributes at all wavelengths and the molecules should be neutral, potentially simplifying comparisons with lab data. Also, absorption strengths measured in the lab are directly applicable to interstellar absorption bands without the need to model an emission spectrum of an unknown mixture of ionized and neutral PAHs. In this paper we show that a mixture of argon matrix isolated PAH molecules can reproduce the 3.25 micrometers absorption band seen in the ISO SWS spectra of four embedded Infrared sources, S140 IRS1, AFGL 2591, Elias 29, and AFGL 989. In section 2 we describe the ISO SWS data analysis and

  16. Stratified Volume Diffractive Optical Elements as Low-Mass Coherent Lidar Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.; Nordin, Gregory P.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Transmissive scanning elements for coherent laser radar systems are typically optical wedges, or prisms, which deflect the lidar beam at a specified angle and are then rotated about the instrument optical axis to produce a scan pattern. The wedge is placed in the lidar optical system subsequent to a beam-expanding telescope, implying that it has the largest diameter of any element in the system. The combination of the wedge diameter and asymmetric profile result in the element having very large mass and, consequently, relatively large power consumption required for scanning. These two parameters, mass and power consumption, are among the instrument requirements which need to be minimized when designing a lidar for a space-borne platform. Reducing the scanner contributions in these areas will have a significant effect on the overall instrument specifications, Replacing the optical wedge with a diffraction grating on the surface of a thin substrate is a straight forward approach with potential to reduce the mass of the scanning element significantly. For example, the optical wedge that will be used for the SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment (SPARCLE) is approximately 25 cm in diameter and is made from silicon with a wedge angle designed for 30 degree deflection of a beam operating at approx. 2 micrometer wavelength. The mass of this element could be reduced by a factor of four by instead using a fused silica substrate, 1 cm thick, with a grating fabricated on one of the surfaces. For a grating to deflect a beam with a 2 micrometer wavelength by 30 degrees, a period of approximately 4 micrometers is required. This is small enough that fabrication of appropriate high efficiency blazed or multi-phase level diffractive optical gratings is prohibitively difficult. Moreover, bulk or stratified volume holographic approaches appear impractical due to materials limitations at 2 micrometers and the need to maintain adequate wavefront quality. In order to avoid the

  17. Ultra-sensitive X-ray sensors give improved contrast sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupin, David M.

    Low-light-level cameras used with phosphors detect very small contrast differences and very small features in X-ray images. I used (1) a Silicon-Intensifier-Tube (SIT) television camera coupled by a fiber optic to a phosphor screen and (2) an integrating CCD camera focused on a phosphor to detect a 0.1 percent contrast difference and 2-micrometer-diameter wires in a digital image. Flannery, et al., and Kinney, et al., reported spatial resolution as small as 1 micrometer in computer X-ray tomography (CAT scans) using synchrotron X-ray sources and CCD cameras. I thought that these cameras could be used with industrial X-ray sources with microfocal spot sizes to produce X-ray images with spatial resolution as small as 1 micrometer and contrast sensitivity as small as 0.01 percent. Hence, near-real time X-ray inspection system could be made that have the resolution of X-ray film and 20 times better contrast sensitivity. As a proof of principle experiment, I used an X-ray camera composed of an X-ray phosphor deposited on a fiber optic that is coupled to a night vision camera (SIT). Using a digital subtraction technique and an 8-bit frame grabber, this camera detected wires as small as 2 micrometers in diameter and X-ray attenuations as small as 0.27 percent. Verhoeven reported 0.14 percent for a free-standing foil without a substrate. However, some CCD cameras have 64 times more levels of digitization than the frame grabber and can integrate images for as long as 30 minutes before the images are digitized. Hence, I predicted that the CCD camera would also detect wires 2 micrometers in diameter and contrast differences as small as 0.02 percent, ten times better than the SIT and 20 better than film. Unfortunately, my preliminary experiments with CCD camera duplicate, but do not improve upon, the performance of the SIT.

  18. Reflectance and Mossbauer spectroscopy of ferrihydrite-montmorillonite assemblages as Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Burns, R. G.; Chang, S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses show that Fe(3+)-doped smectites prepared in the laboratory exhibit important similarities to the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite has been identified as the interlayer ferric component in Fe(3+)-doped smectites by a low quadrupole splitting and magnetic field strength of approximately 48 tesla in Mossbauer spectra measured at 4.2 K, as well as a crystal field transition at 0.92 micrometer. Ferrihydrite in these smectites explains features in the visible-near infrared region that resemble the energies and band strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. Clay silicates have met resistance in the past as Mars soil analogs because terrestrial clay silicates exhibit prominent hydrous spectral features at 1.4, 1.9, and 2.2 micrometers; and these are observed weakly, if at all, in reflectance spectra of Mars. However, several mechanisms can weaken or compress these features, including desiccation under low-humidity conditions. The hydration properties of the interlayer cations also effect band strengths, such that a ferrihydrite-bearing smectite in the Martian environment would exhibit a 1.9 micrometers H2O absorption that is even weaker than the 2.2 micrometers structural OH absorption. Mixing experiments demonstrate that infrared spectral features of clays can be significantly suppressed and that the reflectance can be significantly darkened by mixing with only a few percent of a strongly absorbing opaque material. Therefore, the absolute reflectance of a soil on Mars may be disproportionately sensitive to a minor component. For this reason, the shape and position of spectral features and the chemical composition of potential analogs are of utmost importance in assessing the composition of the soil on Mars. Given the remarkable similarity between visible-infrared reflectance spectra of soils in bright regions on Mars and Fe(3+)-doped montmorillonites, coupled with recent observations of smectites in SNC

  19. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Gaspra V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 951 as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on October 29, 1991. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the target asteroid. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files gap015tn.qub, gap035tn.qub, gap036tn.qub, gap037tn.qub, and gap038tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3 TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the first Earth/Moon encounter of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  20. Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Analog-To-Digital Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Mendis, Sunetra K.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nixon, Robert H.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed single-chip integrated-circuit image sensor contains 128 x 128 array of active pixel sensors at 50-micrometer pitch. Output terminals of all pixels in each given column connected to analog-to-digital (A/D) converter located at bottom of column. Pixels scanned in semiparallel fashion, one row at time; during time allocated to scanning row, outputs of all active pixel sensors in row fed to respective A/D converters. Design of chip based on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, and individual circuit elements fabricated according to 2-micrometer CMOS design rules. Active pixel sensors designed to operate at video rate of 30 frames/second, even at low light levels. A/D scheme based on first-order Sigma-Delta modulation.

  1. Detection of shocked atomic gas in the Kleinmann-Low nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, M.; Crawford, M. K.; Genzel, R.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Townes, C. H.; Watson, F. M.

    1984-01-01

    The 63 micrometer (3)p(1)-(3)P(2) fine structure line emission of neutral atomic oxygen at the center of the Orion nebula with a resolution of 30" is presented. There are three main emission peaks. One is associated with the region of strongest thermal radio continuum radiation close to the Trapezium cluster, and probably arises at the interface between the HII region and the dense Orion molecular cloud. The other two line emission peaks, associated with the Kleinmann Low nebula, are similar in both distribution and velocity to those of the 2 micrometer S(1) line of molecular hydrogen and of the high velocity wings of rotational CO emission. The OI emission from the KL nebula can be produced in the shocked gas associated with the mass outflows in this region and is an important coolant of the shocked gas.

  2. Detection of shocked atomic gas in the Kleinmann-Low nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, M. W.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Crawford, M. K.; Genzel, R.; Townes, C. H.; Watson, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The 63 micrometer (3)P(1)-(3)P(2) fine structure line emission of neutral atomic oxygen at the center of the Orion nebula with a resolution of 30'' is presented. There are three main emission peaks. One is associated with the region of strongest thermal radio continuum radiation close to the Trapezium cluster, and probably arises at the interface between the H II region and the dense Orion molecular cloud. The other two line emission peaks, associated with the Kleinmann-Low nebula, are similar in both distribution and velocity to those of the 2 micrometer S(1) line of molecular hydrogen and of the high velocity wings of rotational CO emission. The OI emission from the KL nebula can be produced in the shocked gas associated with the mass outflows in this region and is an important coolant of the shocked gas.

  3. Juneau Airport Doppler Lidar Deployment: Extraction of Accurate Turbulent Wind Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannon, Stephen M.; Frehlich, Rod; Cornman, Larry; Goodrich, Robert; Norris, Douglas; Williams, John

    1999-01-01

    A 2 micrometer pulsed Doppler lidar was deployed to the Juneau Airport in 1998 to measure turbulence and wind shear in and around the departure and arrival corridors. The primary objective of the measurement program was to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of a pulsed coherent lidar to remotely and unambiguously measure wind turbulence. Lidar measurements were coordinated with flights of an instrumented research aircraft operated by representatives of the University of North Dakota (UND) under the direction of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The data collected is expected to aid both turbulence characterization as well as airborne turbulence detection algorithm development activities within NASA and the FAA. This paper presents a summary of the deployment and results of analysis and simulation which address important issues regarding the measurement requirements for accurate turbulent wind statistics extraction.

  4. Holographic evaluation of the marginal fit of complete crowns loaded at central fossa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Y.; Chang, Guan L.; Wu, Shih H.

    1993-07-01

    In dentistry, the defect of cementation on the margins of crowns accumulates bacterial plaque easily. This can result in recurrent caries and periodontal disease. In this paper holographic interferometry is applied to study the effect of masticatory force on various complete crowns. Four complete molar crowns made from different casting materials (Au, Pd-Ag, Ni-Cr, and PFM) were tested. The horizontal displacements of two points near the margin, measured by the method of multiple observations, could be as large as 15 micrometers under normal load (25 kgw). However, the marginal discrepancy of all four crowns estimated were quite small (< 0.2 micrometers ). This also indicates that the cementation between the crown and the tooth is quite good. Nevertheless, when the load was increased to 45 kgw, a defect of cementation was found on the Pd-Ag crown.

  5. Radial Distribution of Electron Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The average track model describes the response of physical and biological systems using radial dose distribution as the key physical descriptor. We report on an extension of this model to describe the average distribution of electron spectra as a function of radial distance from an ion. We present calculations of these spectra for ions of identical linear energy transfer (LET), but dissimilar charge and velocity to evaluate the differences in electron spectra from these ions. To illustrate the usefulness of the radial electron spectra for describing effects that are not described by electron dose, we consider the evaluation of the indirect events in microdosimetric distributions for ions. We show that folding our average electron spectra model with experimentally determined frequency distributions for photons or electrons provides a good representation of radial event spectra from high-energy ions in 0.5-2 micrometer sites.

  6. Radiobiological results from the Bacillus subtilis Biostack experiments within the Apollo and the ASTP space flights.

    PubMed

    Facius, R; Bucker, H; Hildebrand, D; Horneck, G; Holtz, G; Reitz, G; Schafer, M; Toth, B

    1978-01-01

    In order to check the results of earlier Biostack experiments, new experimental techniques were developed for the Biostack III experiment in the Apollo-Soyuz test project (ASTP). These techniques resulted in an increased accuracy of localization down to 0.2 micrometers for the determination of the impact parameter, accompanied by an increase in the sample size available for biological investigation. In addition, colony forming ability, metabolic mutations, and mutations affecting UV- and x-ray sensitivity were rendered observable by these methods. The biological and physical results obtained so far from the evaluation of the Bacillus subtilis experiment within Biostack III confirm and extend the findings of the previous Biostack experiments. They also add to the questions about the mechanisms of action of the radiation field under investigation, since the observed effects cannot be interpreted in terms of standard concepts. PMID:11965659

  7. Holographic microscopy studies of emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherow, W. K.

    1981-01-01

    A holographic microscopy system that records and observes the dynamic properties of separation of dispersed immiscible fluids is described. The holographic construction system and reconstruction system that were used to obtain particle size and distribution information from the holograms are discussed. The holographic microscopy system is used to observed the phase separating processes in immiscible fluids that were isothermally cooled into the two phase region. Nucleation, growth rates, coalescence, and particle motion are successfully demonstrated with this system. Thus a holographic particle sizing system with a resolution of 2 micrometers and a field of view of 100 cu cm was developed that provides the capability of testing the theories of separating immiscible fluids for particle number densities in the range of 10 to 10 to the 7th power particles.

  8. Ancient asteroids enriched in refractory inclusions.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, J M; Connolly, H C; McCoy, T J; Bus, S J; La Croix, L M

    2008-04-25

    Calcium- and aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) occur in all classes of chondritic meteorites and contain refractory minerals predicted to be the first condensates from the solar nebula. Near-infrared spectra of CAIs have strong 2-micrometer absorptions, attributed to iron oxide-bearing aluminous spinel. Similar absorptions are present in the telescopic spectra of several asteroids; modeling indicates that these contain approximately 30 +/- 10% CAIs (two to three times that of any meteorite). Survival of these undifferentiated, large (50- to 100-kilometer diameter) CAI-rich bodies suggests that they may have formed before the injection of radiogenic 26Al into the solar system. They have also experienced only modest post-accretionary alteration. Thus, these asteroids have higher concentrations of CAI material, appear less altered, and are more ancient than any known sample in our meteorite collection, making them prime candidates for sample return. PMID:18356491

  9. Preliminary characterization of hard dental tissue ablation with femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neev, Joseph; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    1998-05-01

    Because of low operating speed and excessive collateral damage, lasers have not succeeded in replacing conventional tools in many surgical and dental applications. Recent developments now allow the new generation of amplified ultrashort pulse lasers to operate at high repetition rates and high single pulse energies. A Titanium:sapphire Chirped Pulse Regenerative Amplifier system operating at 1 KHz and 50 fs pulse duration, was used to demonstrate ultrashort pulse ablation of hard and soft tissue. Maximum ablation rates for enamel and dentin were approximately 0.650 micrometers /pulse and 1.2 micrometers /pulse respectively. Temperature measurements at both front and rear surface of a 1 mm dentin and enamel slices showed minimal increases. Scanning electron micrographs clearly show that little thermal damage is generate by the laser system. If an effective delivery system is developed, ultrashort pulse system may offer a viable alternative as a safe, low noise dental tool.

  10. Preliminary results from the viking x-ray fluorescence experiment: The first sample from chryse planitia, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toulmin, P., III; Clark, B. C.; Baird, A.K.; Keil, Klaus; Rose, H.J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Iron, calcium, aluminum, silicon, and sulfur are major elements in the first surface sample of Mars that has been analyzed by the Viking x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Titanium is present in minor quantities. This is consistent with the sample being a mixture of fine silicate and oxide mineral grains, with a significant proportion of sulfates, possibly hydrated. Ferric oxide is regarded as the red pigmenting agent on the martian surface, but if it coats silicate grains, the coatings must be very thin (??? 2 micrometers) or discontinuous. A high abundance of Fe, relatively low abundances of Al, Rb, Sr, and Zr, and a high Ca/K ratio are distinctive features of the spectra. Preliminary determinations indicate the following abundances (as percentages by weight): Fe, 14 ?? 2; Ti < 1; S, 2 to 5; the Ca/K ratio by weight is greater than 5.

  11. Optical observation of ultrafine droplets and air flows from newly designed supersonic air assist spray nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashiro, Seiji S.; Mori, H.; Takechi, H.

    2001-04-01

    One of the authors developed a new spray drying nozzle (special quadruplet fluid spray nozzle) for drug manufacturing and it has succeeded in manufacturing fine particles of 2 micrometer diameter of 1/15 ratios to those currently in use. The flow visualization results show that the two air jets become under-expanded on both edge sides of the nozzle, generate shock and expansion waves alternately on each side and reach the edge tip, where they collide, unite, and spout out while shock and expansion waves are again formed in the mixed jet. When the edge surfaces are supplied with water, the water is extended into thin film by the air jet and intensely disturbed. At the nozzle tip it is torn into droplets, which are further atomized afterwards in shock waves. At the spray tip, the friction with ambient air shears the droplets furthermore, and they decrease further in size.

  12. Optical absorption of Bi/sub 12/SiO/sub 20/ single crystals doped with chromium or nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, V.M.; Kolosov, E.E.; Shilova, M.V.

    1986-08-01

    In the present work on Bi/sub 12/SiO/sub 20/ single crystals (BSO) undoped and doped with Cr or Ni, the authors studied the room-temperature optical absorption in the range 0.4-1.2 micrometers during emission of the photochromic effect and determined the impurity level energies due to Cr or Ni. The crystals studied were grown by the Czochralski method. In study of the photochromic effect, the authors used ultraviolet radiation from a mercury lamp and radiation from a He-Ne laser. The optical absorption spectral dependences are shown. It is confirmed that observation of photochromic effect in chromium-doped BSO crystals is encumbered by relaxation of their optical transmission. The extent of optical excitation in these sample depends substantially on the time elapsed after irradiation.

  13. Effect of Lunar Dust Simulant on Human Epithelial Cell Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Nicholas J.; Wallace, William T.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to assess the potential toxicity of lunar dust to cause the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by human lung cells. Some of this dust is on the scale of 1-2 micrometers and could enter the lungs when astronauts track dust into the habitat and inhale it. This could be a serious problem as NASA plans on going back to the moon for an extended period of time. Literature shows that quartz, which has a known cytoxicity, can cause acute cases of silicosis within 6 months, and in most cases cause silicosis after 3 years. The activation of lunar dust through impacts creates surface based radicals which, upon contact with water create hydroxl radicals and peroxyl radicals which are very reactive and potentially might even be as cytotoxic as quartz. These radicals could then react with lung cells to produce pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-6 and interleukin-8, and TNF-alpha.

  14. Evaluation of LANDSAT MSS vs TM simulated data for distinguishing hydrothermal alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. J.; Kahle, A. B.; Madura, D. P.; Soha, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The LANDSAT Follow-On (LFO) data was simulated to demonstrate the mineral exploration capability of this system for segregating different types of hydrothermal alteration and to compare this capability with that of the existing LANDSAT system. Multispectral data were acquired for several test sites with the Bendix 24-channel MSDS scanner. Contrast enhancements, band ratioing, and principal component transformations were used to process the simulated LFO data for analysis. For Red Mountain, Arizona, the LFO data allowed identification of silicified areas, not identifiable with LANDSAT 1 and 2 data. The improved LFO resolution allowed detection of small silicic outcrops and of a narrow silicified dike. For Cuprite - Ralston, Nevada, the LFO spectral bands allowed discrimination of argillic and opalized altered areas; these could not be spectrally discriminated using LANDSAT 1 and 2 data. Addition of data from the 1.3- and 2.2- micrometer regions allowed better discriminations of hydrothermal alteration types.

  15. Field Emission Study of Carbon Nanotubes: High Current Density from Nanotube Bundle Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronikowski, Micheal J.; Manohara, Harish M.; Siegel, Peter H.; Hunt, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the field emission behavior of lithographically patterned bundles of multiwalled carbon nanotubes arranged in a variety of array geometries. Such arrays of nanotube bundles are found to perform significantly better in field emission than arrays of isolated nanotubes or dense, continuous mats of nanotubes, with the field emission performance depending on the bundle diameter and inter-bundle spacing. Arrays of 2-micrometers diameter nanotube bundles spaced 5 micrometers apart (edge-to-edge spacing) produced the largest emission densities, routinely giving 1.5 to 1.8 A/cm(sup 2) at approximately 4 V/micrometer electric field, and greater than 6 A/cm(sup 2) at 20 V/micrometers.

  16. Organization of the topical meeting on tunable solid-state lasers. Held in North Falmouth, Massachusetts on May 1-3 1989. Final report, 30 August 1988-30 August 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-30

    Progress and interest in solid-state lasers generally, and in tunable solid state-lasers specifically, continues to expand. Applications of these lasers include spectroscopy, remote sensing, ranging and imaging, and medicine. New solid-state materials are providing lasers with higher output power, broader tunability, and more-efficient pumping schemes. The quantum electronics and crystal-chemistry properties of these new materials are leading to enhanced laser performance. At the meeting, sessions were held on sapphire, novel laser schemes, Cr lasers, forsterite and excited-state absorption, solid-state lasers for specialized applications, alexandrite lasers, Cr-related issues, diode pumped lasers, nonlinear frequency conversion, 1.3-micrometer Nd lasers, infrared lasers and energy transfer, 2-micrometer lasers, rare earth laser materials, and Er lasers.

  17. High Energy Directly Pumped Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Ji-Rong; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, Norman P.

    2000-01-01

    The most commonly used crystal architecture to produce 2 micrometer laser is co-doping Ho and Tm into a single host crystal. In this method, the stored energy transfer from the Tm (3)F4 to the Ho (5)I7 manifold is not fast enough to warrant high efficiency for short pulse applications. By separating the Ho and the Tm ions and doping the Tm in YALO3 and the Ho in YLF, we were able to directly pump the Ho (5)I7 manifold with 1.94 micrometers. The Ho:YLF laser has produced 33 mJ at 2.062 micrometers with a quantum efficiency of 0.88. The performance of each laser will be presented.

  18. A search for the 13175 A infrared diffuse band in dense environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, A. J.; Kerr, Tom H.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Duley, Walter W.

    1994-01-01

    Models of ionized interstellar C60 predict a strong transition in the 1.2 micrometer region, and two candidate bands have recently been detected in reddened stars. We have searched for the stronger of these bands (at 13175 A) in the Taurus dark cloud complex, to determine its response to the dark-cloud environment. None of the three lines of sight studied (two near the cloud surface, one reaching A(sub V) greater than 20(sup m)) give rise to a detectable band; in one case the equivalent width is a factor of order three below that predicted. Since such behaviour is also shown by the optical Diffuse Interstellar Bands, we suggest that the 13175 A band is a genuine DIB, but we caution against an automatic interpretation in terms of an ionic carrier.

  19. Design of a Low-Light-Level Image Sensor with On-Chip Sigma-Delta Analog-to- Digital Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nixon, Robert H.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    The design and projected performance of a low-light-level active-pixel-sensor (APS) chip with semi-parallel analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion is presented. The individual elements have been fabricated and tested using MOSIS* 2 micrometer CMOS technology, although the integrated system has not yet been fabricated. The imager consists of a 128 x 128 array of active pixels at a 50 micrometer pitch. Each column of pixels shares a 10-bit A/D converter based on first-order oversampled sigma-delta (Sigma-Delta) modulation. The 10-bit outputs of each converter are multiplexed and read out through a single set of outputs. A semi-parallel architecture is chosen to achieve 30 frames/second operation even at low light levels. The sensor is designed for less than 12 e^- rms noise performance.

  20. The clouds of Venus - A synthesis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knollenberg, R.; Travis, L.; Tomasko, M.; Smith, P.; Ragent, B.; Esposito, L.; Mccleese, D.; Martonchik, J.; Beer, R.

    1980-01-01

    The results presented represent a synthesis of data from those Pioneer Venus experiments directed toward studying cloud problems. These orbiter and multiprobe experiments show the cloud system to consist of three altitude regions populated by cloud particles and smaller haze particles which extend above and below as well as coexist with the cloud particles. The optical properties derived are only consistent with the largest particles, having platelike morphology. The smallest particles are shown to require changes in chemical composition to explain observed behavior. The medium-sized H2SO4 droplets of 2 micrometers diameter appear to be the least volatile and are the best understood. The role of the cloud particles in precipitation dynamical processes, lightning, and radiation are all discussed.

  1. Characterization of small noble metal electrodes by voltammetry and energy dispersive x ray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strein, Timothy G.; Ewing, Andrew G.

    1993-01-01

    Construction and characterization of platinum and gold electrodes with total structural diameters of 1-2 micrometers is described. These small voltammetric probes have been constructed by direct electroreduction of noble metals onto the tips of etched carbon fiber microdisk electrodes. Voltammetry, electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, and pulsed amperometric detection have been used to characterize these electrodes. Dopamine concentrations have been determined over a range of 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -3) M in the biological buffer system which contains 25 mM glucose, a compound known to adsorb strongly to electrodes. Amperometric monitoring at a constant potential with these small results in signal decay of 20% to 40% in a ten minute experiment. Pulsed amperometric detection minimizes electrode fouling, resulting in 5% or less signal decay over the same ten minute period.

  2. Detection of hydrothermal alteration at Virginia City, Nevada using Airborne Imaging Spectrometry (AIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutsinpiller, A.; Taranik, J. V.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data were collected over Virginia City, Nevada; an area of gold and silver mineralization with extensive surface exposures of altered volcanic rocks. The data were corrected for atmospheric effects by a flat-field method, and compared to library spectra of various alteration minerals using a spectral analysis program SPAM. Areas of strong clay alteration were identified on the AIS images that were mapped as kaolinitic, illitic, and sericitic alterations zones. Kaolinitic alteration is distinguishable in the 2.1 to 2.4 and 1.2 to 1.5 micrometer wavelength regions. Montmorillonite, illite, and sericite have absorption features similar to each other at 2.2 micrometer wavelength. Montnorillonite and illite also may be present in varying proportions within one Ground Instantaneous Field of View (GIFOV). In general AIS data is useful in identifying alteration zones that are associated with or lie above precious metal mineralization at Virginia City.

  3. Recording of spontaneous activity with photoetched microelectrode surfaces from mouse spinal neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Gross, G W; Williams, A N; Lucas, J H

    1982-01-01

    A matrix of photoetched gold conductors integrated into the floor of a tissue culture chamber has been used to record from mammalian spinal cord neurons grown on the insulation layer of the multielectrode plate. Spontaneous activity has been monitored from tissue microfragments less than 150 micrometers in diameter and from thin sheets of spinal cell aggregates. Maximum spike amplitudes of 360 microV with signal-to-noise ratios of 8:1 have so far been achieved and the spontaneous activity maintained for several days. Recording electrode impedances measured between 4 and 7 M omega at 1 kHz. Conductor tips were deinsulated with laser pulses that formed shallow craters 2 micrometers deep and 12 micrometers in diameter. Addition of colloidal gold or platimum black was not necessary to achieve satisfactory recordings. PMID:7057675

  4. Recent patents on electrophoretic displays and materials.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Marc; Phlips, Bernard F

    2010-11-01

    Electrophoretic displays (EPDs) have made their way into consumer products. EPDs enable displays that offer the look and form of a printed page, often called "electronic paper". We will review recent apparatus and method patents for EPD devices and their fabrication. A brief introduction into the basic display operation and history of EPDs is given, while pointing out the technological challenges and difficulties for inventors. Recently, the majority of scientific publications and patenting activity has been directed to micro-segmented EPDs. These devices exhibit high optical reflectance and contrast, wide viewing angle, and high image resolution. Micro-segmented EPDs can also be integrated with flexible transistors technologies into flexible displays. Typical particles size ranges from 200 nm to 2 micrometer. Currently one very active area of patenting is the development of full-color EPDs. We summarize the recent patenting activity for EPDs and provide comments on perceiving factors driving intellectual property protection for EPD technologies. PMID:20565384

  5. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) with Double Tunnel Junction Contact and Quantum Dot Barrier Infrared Detector (QD-BIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.-Y; Soibel, Alexander; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Keo, Sam A.; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John K.; Rafol, Sir B.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    The InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice based complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) has already demonstrated very good performance in long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) detection. In this work, we describe results on a modified CBIRD device that incorporates a double tunnel junction contact designed for robust device and focal plane array processing. The new device also exhibited reduced turn-on voltage. We also report results on the quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD). By incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the InAsSb absorber of the standard nBn detector structure, the QD-BIRD extend the detector cutoff wavelength from approximately 4.2 micrometers to 6 micrometers, allowing the coverage of the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The device has been observed to show infrared response at 225 K.

  6. Calculating Second-Order Effects in MOSFET's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benumof, Reuben; Zoutendyk, John A.; Coss, James R.

    1990-01-01

    Collection of mathematical models includes second-order effects in n-channel, enhancement-mode, metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's). When dimensions of circuit elements relatively large, effects neglected safely. However, as very-large-scale integration of microelectronic circuits leads to MOSFET's shorter or narrower than 2 micrometer, effects become significant in design and operation. Such computer programs as widely-used "Simulation Program With Integrated Circuit Emphasis, Version 2" (SPICE 2) include many of these effects. In second-order models of n-channel, enhancement-mode MOSFET, first-order gate-depletion region diminished by triangular-cross-section deletions on end and augmented by circular-wedge-cross-section bulges on sides.

  7. Amorphous microcellular polytetrafluoroethylene foam film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chongzheng

    1991-11-01

    We report herein the preparation of novel low-density ultramicrocellular fluorocarbon foams and their application. These fluorocarbon foams are of interest for the biochemistry arena in numerous applications including foodstuff, pharmacy, wine making, beer brewery, fermentation medical laboratory, and other processing factories. All of those require good quality processing programs in which, after eliminating bacterium and virus, compressed air is needed. Ordinarily, compressed air contains bacterium and virus, its size is 0.01 - 2 micrometers fluorocarbon foam films. Having average porous diameter 0.04 - 0.1 micrometers , these are stable to high temperature (280 degree(s)C) and chemical environments, and generally have good engineering and mechanical properties (e.g., low coefficient of thermal expansion, high modulus, and good dimensional stability). Our new process for preparing low density fluorocarbon foams provides materials with unique properties. As such, they offer the possibility for being superior to earlier materials for a number of the filter applications mentioned.

  8. Advancement of X-Ray Microscopy Technology and its Application to Metal Solidification Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1996-01-01

    The technique of x-ray projection microscopy is being used to view, in real time, the structures and dynamics of the solid-liquid interface during solidification. By employing a hard x-ray source with sub-micron dimensions, resolutions of 2 micrometers can be obtained with magnifications of over 800 X. Specimen growth conditions need to be optimized and the best imaging technologies applied to maintain x-ray image resolution, contrast and sensitivity. It turns out that no single imaging technology offers the best solution and traditional methods like radiographic film cannot be used due to specimen motion (solidification). In addition, a special furnace design is required to permit controlled growth conditions and still offer maximum resolution and image contrast.

  9. Investigation of Field Emitter Array Vacuum Microtriodes for Space Electronics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Mark A.; Kapoor, Vik J.

    1997-01-01

    Research into processing techniques for fabrication of vacuum microelectronic devices has been carried out, with special emphasis being given to the growth of silicon dioxide thin films. Oxide films ranging from 30 nm to approximately 2 micrometers have been grown on single crystal silicon wafers. Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor test structures have been made from some of these oxide films, and current-versus-voltage plots for these structures have been measured. It has been observed that the rate of applied voltage across the oxide films produces marked differences in measured leakage current. Breakdown fields across two of the thinnest oxide films have been measured and are comparable with highest values reported in literature. Several silicon wafers were processed to make field- emitter array diodes, and were delivered to collaborators at NASA-Lewis Research Center for final fabrication steps and testing.

  10. Effects of fine porosity on the fatigue behavior of a powder metallurgy superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy Astroloy was obtained which contained 1.4 percent fine porosity at the grain boundaries produced by argon entering the powder container during pressing. This material was tested at 650 C in fatigue, creep fatigue, tension, and stress-rupture and the results compared with previous data on sound Astroloy. The pores averaged about 2 micrometers diameter and 20 micrometers spacing. They did influence fatigue crack initiation and produced a more intergranular mode of propagation. However, fatigue life was not drastically reduced. A large 25 micrometers pore in one specimen resulting from a hollow particle did not reduce life by 60 percent. Fatigue behavior of the porous material showed typical correlation with tensile behavior. The plastic strain range life relation was reduced proportionately with the reduction in tensile ductility, but the elastic strain range-life relation was little changed reflecting the small reduction in sigma sub u/E for the porous material.

  11. Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer (GESE): Science Rationale, Optical Design, and Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Gong, Qian; Hull, Tony; Purves, Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    One of the key goals of NASA’s astrophysics program is to answer the question: How did galaxies evolve into the spiral, elliptical, and irregular galaxies that we see today? We describe a space mission concept called Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer (GESE) to help address this question by making a large ultraviolet spectroscopic survey of galaxies at a redshift, z approximately 1 (look-back time of approximately 8 billion years). GESE is a 1.5-m space telescope with an near-ultraviolet (NUV) multi-object slit spectrograph covering the spectral range, 0.2-0.4 micrometers (0.1-0.2 micrometers as emitted by galaxies at a redshift, z approximately 1) at a spectral resolution of delta lambda=6 A.

  12. Literature search on kickers and septa for the Amsterdam Pulse Stretcher (APS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijt, J.; Linden, A. V. D.

    A study of the literature was performed with a view to the design of kickers and septa for the injection and extraction line of the Amsterdam Pulse Stretcher Ring (APS) in the UPDATE project. The UPDATE kickers were given the following specifications: deflection angle 2 mrad, pulse width 2 micrometer, fall time 70 ans, available length 2 m. A comparison of the characteristic parameters (kick strength, pulse characteristics, required peak power) with the existing system shows correspondence with two ferrite kicker designs (CERN-CPS and ELSA), the Los Alamos TEM-kicker, and the Saskatoon electrostatic kicker. On account of the relative simplicity of construction and the pulse forming network, the Saskatoon kicker was chosen as the starting point for a design study. Septum magnets and electrostatic wire septa are overviewed.

  13. Low cost optical tweezers systems using double coil driving stepping motor to controlling sample stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laowattanatham, N.; Cheamanunkul, N.; Plaipichit, S.; Buranasiri, P.; Nuansri, R.

    2013-06-01

    In this research, the low cost optical tweezers systems using X-Y stage has been developed by using 5-phase stepping motor. By using sequential double coil driving, we can obtain the driving torque larger than using the single coil driving. The moving scale is fine resolution at 0.2 micrometer. The overall systems based on microcontroller PIC18F458 and joystick controller with LabView® graphical user interface (GUI). The mechanical damping has been included in the system for decreasing the vibrational noise. By using this method, our optical tweezers system is cheaper than the other commercial system that has been used the piezoelectric driving, and still has the same efficiency.

  14. Characterization and reliability of CMOS microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedder, Gary K.; Blanton, Ronald D. S.

    1999-08-01

    This paper provides an overview of high-aspect-ratio CMOS micromachining, focusing on materials characterization, reliability, and fault analysis. Composite microstrutural beam widths and gaps down to 1.2 micrometers are etched out of conventional CMOS dielectric, aluminum, and gate-polysilicon thin films using post-CMOS dry etching for both structural sidewall definition and for release from the substrate. Differences in stress between the multiple metal and dielectric layers cause vertical stress gradients and curl, while misalignment between layers causes lateral stress gradients and curl. Cracking is induced in a resonant fatigue structures at 620 MPa of repetitive stress after over 50 million cycles. Beams have withstood over 1.3 billion cycles at 124 MPa stress levels induced by electrostatic actuation. Failures due to process defects are classified according to the geometrical features of the defective structures. Relative probability of occurrence of each defect type is extracted from the process simulation results.

  15. Deposition of pressurised aerosols in the human respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S P; Pavia, D; Morén, F; Sheahan, N F; Clarke, S W

    1981-01-01

    Although the use of pressurised aerosol inhalers is widespread, little is known about the actual deposition of the aerosol in the respiratory tract, since this has previously been difficult to measure. We have incorporated Teflon particles (mean diameter 2 micrometer) with aerodynamic properties similar to those of bronchodilator drug crystals into pressurised aerosol canisters. Controlled inhalations by eight patients with obstructive airways disease showed that on average 8.8% of the dose was deposited in the lungs (3.0% in the alveoli and 5.8% on the conducting airways) and 80% in the mouth. These figures are in good agreement with previous indirect estimates of deposition based on metabolic studies. The remainder of the dose was either expired (1.0%) or deposited in the aerosol actuator (9.8%). This method should have wide application for measurement of deposition patterns under various conditions and for assessment of therapeutic effects. Images PMID:7292382

  16. LANDSAT-4 hightlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D.

    1983-01-01

    The LANDSAT 4 thematic mapper sensor possesses approximately twice the spectral resolution, three times the spatial resolution, and four times the spectral sensitivity of the MSS sensor on earlier LANDSAT satellites. Spectral bands on the TM, particularly those at wavelengths of 1.6 and 2.2 micrometers are useful for: (1) distinguishing crops such as rice and soybeans; (2) surveying areas that are cultivated in strip crop fashion; (3) determining clay variations and abundances and rock classifications; and (4) differentiating nutrients and sediments found in coastal waters. The sensor can identify surface features 30 meters on a side, which roughly corresponds to a standard city block. Highway construction, land excavation, urban growth, and the health and extent of vegetation can be detected.

  17. Characteristics of III-V Semiconductor Devices at High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Young, Paul G.; Taub, Susan R.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the development of III-V based pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (PHEMT's) designed to operate over the temperature range 77 to 473 K (-196 to 200 C). These devices have a pseudomorphic undoped InGaAs channel that is sandwiched between an AlGaAs spacer and a buffer layer; gate widths of 200, 400, 1600, and 3200 micrometers; and a gate length of 2 micrometers. Measurements were performed at both room temperature and 473 K (200 C) and show that the drain current decreases by 30 percent and the gate current increases to about 9 microns A (at a reverse bias of -1.5 V) at the higher temperature. These devices have a maximum DC power dissipation of about 4.5 W and a breakdown voltage of about 16 V.

  18. Mask-holding mechanism for an e-beam x-ray mask writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunioka, Tatsuya; Shimazu, Nobuo; Shimizu, Akira; Sakai, Tomoaki; Kuriyama, Youichi

    1995-07-01

    For high absolute pattern placement accuracy and high throughput in x- ray mask writing, it is very important to firmly hold the mask with little holding deformation and large thermal conduction. For these purposes we have developed a new 'triple-chuck' mask holding mechanism. This triple-chuck mechanism is a hybrid of three-point-contact and conventional electrostatic-chuck holding mechanism, and, as the name implies, it uses three small-area electrostatic chucks. To determine the suitable shape, area, and position of the electrostatic chucks, we performed deformation simulation using the finite element method, and also conducted thermal conduction simulations. The results suggested that the triple-chuck mechanism could attain targets set for an x-ray mask with a feature size of 0.2 micrometers . Accordingly, we installed the new holding mechanism in the EB-X1 writer and found that when holding 3-inch mask (2-mm thick, before bulk etching), there is no microslippage between the mask and holding mechanism when the XY-stage is moved with an acceleration of 0.3 G and the maximum holding deformation is 0.22 micrometers in a 25-mm-square patterning area. This corresponds to the absolute pattern placement accuracy degradation of less than 11 nm in the patterning area. About 30 minutes pass before the mask temperature is within 0.1 degree of the holding-mechanism temperature. This was determined by two different methods: a patterning method and marek detection. These experimental results confirmed the triple-chuck holding mechanism attained the targets set for an x-ray mask with a feature size of 0.2 micrometers .

  19. Determining size-specific emission factors for environmental tobacco smoke particles

    SciTech Connect

    Klepeis, Neil E.; Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Sextro, Richard G.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2002-07-07

    Because size is a major controlling factor for indoor airborne particle behavior, human particle exposure assessments will benefit from improved knowledge of size-specific particle emissions. We report a method of inferring size-specific mass emission factors for indoor sources that makes use of an indoor aerosol dynamics model, measured particle concentration time series data, and an optimization routine. This approach provides--in addition to estimates of the emissions size distribution and integrated emission factors--estimates of deposition rate, an enhanced understanding of particle dynamics, and information about model performance. We applied the method to size-specific environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) particle concentrations measured every minute with an 8-channel optical particle counter (PMS-LASAIR; 0.1-2+ micrometer diameters) and every 10 or 30 min with a 34-channel differential mobility particle sizer (TSI-DMPS; 0.01-1+ micrometer diameters) after a single cigarette or cigar was machine-smoked inside a low air-exchange-rate 20 m{sup 3} chamber. The aerosol dynamics model provided good fits to observed concentrations when using optimized values of mass emission rate and deposition rate for each particle size range as input. Small discrepancies observed in the first 1-2 hours after smoking are likely due to the effect of particle evaporation, a process neglected by the model. Size-specific ETS particle emission factors were fit with log-normal distributions, yielding an average mass median diameter of 0.2 micrometers and an average geometric standard deviation of 2.3 with no systematic differences between cigars and cigarettes. The equivalent total particle emission rate, obtained integrating each size distribution, was 0.2-0.7 mg/min for cigars and 0.7-0.9 mg/min for cigarettes.

  20. Phototransistors Development and their Applications to Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2007-01-01

    Custom-designed two-micron phototransistors have been developed using Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE), Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) techniques under Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP). The devices were characterized in the Detector Characterization Laboratory at NASA Langley Research Center. It appears that the performance of LPE- and MBE-grown phototransistors such as responsivity, noise-equivalent-power, and gain, are better than MOCVD-grown devices. Lidar tests have been conducted using LPE and MBE devices under the 2-micrometer CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, Colorado. The main focus of these tests was to examine the phototransistors performances as compared to commercial InGaAs avalanche photodiode by integrating them into the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) operating at 1.543 micrometers. A simultaneous measurement of the atmospheric backscatter signals using the LPE phototransistors and the commercial APD demonstrated good agreement between these two devices. On the other hand, simultaneous detection of lidar backscatter signals using MBE-grown phototransistor and InGaAs APD, showed a general agreement between these two devices with a lower performance than LPE devices. These custom-built phototransistors were optimized for detection around 2-micrometer wavelength while the lidar tests were performed at 1.543 micrometers. Phototransistor operation at 2-micron will improve the performance of a lidar system operating at that wavelength. Measurements include detecting hard targets (Rocky Mountains), atmospheric structure consisting of cirrus clouds and boundary layer. These phototransistors may have potential for high sensitivity differential absorption lidar measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor at 2.05-micrometers and 1.9-micrometers, respectively.

  1. High-aspect-ratio fine-line metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chienliu; Chang, Peizen; Yen, Kaihsiang; Lu, Sheyshi

    1998-08-01

    This study is aimed at making metallic fine lines characterized with high aspect ratio. There are two methods we have developed. One is the trilevel lift-off method with submicron lithography, and the other is the lift-off method by using the commercial negative photoresist SU-8 made by IBM. First, the trilevel lift-off method is described. A pre- imidized, soluble polyimide layer of OCG Probimide 293 A is spun on a wafer with thickness 4 micrometer. A 120 nm thick layer of silicon oxynitride was formed on the polyimide by PECVD. A layer photoresist layer was applied and patterned. This photoresist layer is used as the etching mask of silicon oxynitride by RIE with the gas CF4 plasma. Similarly, the silicon oxynitride is used as the etching mask of the thick polyimide layers by RIE with the gas O2 plasma. After metallization the pre-imidized polyimide is dissolved in methylene chloride lifting off the oxynitride and metal layers. Following this way, the submicron lithography, such as silylation technology, is suitable to make the aspect ratio up to 10 and the metal line will still have 3 micrometer height. The other is the lift-off method by using negative photoresist SU-8. This SU-8 is originally used as high aspect ratio molding. The linewidth of SU-8 is reduced to 2 micrometer linewidth with 12 micrometer height, and used as the remover to lift off after metallization. This SU-8 makes the fine-line metallization of 2 micrometer linewidth to achieve the aspect- ratio up to 5.

  2. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  3. Toxicity of two pulsed metal exposures to Daphnia magna: relative effects of pulsed duration-concentration and influence of interpulse period.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Gallagher, Jeffrey S; Tomasso, Joseph R; Klaine, Stephen J

    2007-11-01

    Aquatic organisms living in surface waters experience fluctuating contaminant exposures that vary in concentration, duration, and frequency. This study characterized the role of pulsed concentration, pulsed duration, and the interval between pulses on the toxicity of four metals (Cu, Zn, Se, and As) to Daphnia magna. During 21-d toxicity tests, neonatal D. magna were exposed to single or double pulses. Pulsed concentrations and durations ranged from 32 to 6000 microg/L and 8 to 96 h, respectively. Intervals between two pulses ranged from 24 to 288 h. Mortality, growth, and reproduction were characterized for exposures. For single-pulse exposures of Cu and As, metal concentration had a stronger effect on survival of D. magna than did pulsed duration: pulses with 2X concentration and 1Y duration resulted in more mortality than did pulses with 1X concentration and 2Y duration. In contrast, effects of pulsed duration were stronger than metal concentration for Zn. However, the effects of duration and concentration were similar for Se. The relative effects of pulsed concentration and duration found in the present study revealed that the common method using area under the curve (AUC = concentration x duration) may not always accurately estimate environmental risk from metals (e.g., for Cu, Zn, As). In addition, the occurrence of delayed mortality in the present study revealed that using continuous exposure bioassays might underestimate metal toxicity to aquatic biota. For double-pulse exposures, the toxicity of the second pulse was influenced by the first pulse for all four metals. This influence was dependent on the pulsed concentration and duration and the interval between pulses. Further, toxicity caused by the second pulse decreased as the time between the exposures increased. For all four metals, there existed an interval great enough that the toxicity of the two pulses was independent. This would result in less toxicity for multiple exposures than continuous

  4. Modeling-independent elucidation of inactivation pathways in recombinant and native A-type Kv channels.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D; Ritter, David M; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    A-type voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels self-regulate their activity by inactivating directly from the open state (open-state inactivation [OSI]) or by inactivating before they open (closed-state inactivation [CSI]). To determine the inactivation pathways, it is often necessary to apply several pulse protocols, pore blockers, single-channel recording, and kinetic modeling. However, intrinsic hurdles may preclude the standardized application of these methods. Here, we implemented a simple method inspired by earlier studies of Na(+) channels to analyze macroscopic inactivation and conclusively deduce the pathways of inactivation of recombinant and native A-type Kv channels. We investigated two distinct A-type Kv channels expressed heterologously (Kv3.4 and Kv4.2 with accessory subunits) and their native counterparts in dorsal root ganglion and cerebellar granule neurons. This approach applies two conventional pulse protocols to examine inactivation induced by (a) a simple step (single-pulse inactivation) and (b) a conditioning step (double-pulse inactivation). Consistent with OSI, the rate of Kv3.4 inactivation (i.e., the negative first derivative of double-pulse inactivation) precisely superimposes on the profile of the Kv3.4 current evoked by a single pulse because the channels must open to inactivate. In contrast, the rate of Kv4.2 inactivation is asynchronous, already changing at earlier times relative to the profile of the Kv4.2 current evoked by a single pulse. Thus, Kv4.2 inactivation occurs uncoupled from channel opening, indicating CSI. Furthermore, the inactivation time constant versus voltage relation of Kv3.4 decreases monotonically with depolarization and levels off, whereas that of Kv4.2 exhibits a J-shape profile. We also manipulated the inactivation phenotype by changing the subunit composition and show how CSI and CSI combined with OSI might affect spiking properties in a full computational model of the hippocampal CA1 neuron. This work unambiguously

  5. Planar velocity measurements in compressible mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, William David

    1999-10-01

    The efficiency of high-Mach number airbreathing propulsion devices is critically dependent upon the mixing of gases in turbulent shear flows. However, compressibility is known to suppress the growth rates of these mixing layers, posing a problem of both practical and scientific interest. In the present study, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to obtain planar, two- component velocity fields for Planar gaseous shear layers at convective Mach numbers Mc of 0.25, 0.63, and 0.76. The experiments are performed in a large-scale blowdown wind tunnel, with high-speed freestream Mach numbers up to 2.25 and shear-layer Reynolds numbers up to 106 . The instantaneous data are analyzed to produce maps of derived quantities such as vorticity, and ensemble averaged to provide turbulence statistics. Specific issues relating to the application of PIV to supersonic flows are addressed. In addition to the fluid- velocity measurements, we present double-pulsed scalar visualizations, permitting inference of the convective velocity of the large-scale structures, and examine the interaction of a weak wave with the mixing layer. The principal change associated with compressibility is seen to be the development of multiple high-gradient regions in the instantaneous velocity field, disrupting the spanwise-coherent `roller' structure usually associated with incompressible layers. As a result, the vorticity peaks reside in multiple thin sheets, segregated in the transverse direction. This suggests a decrease in cross-stream communication and a disconnection of the entrainment processes at the two interfaces. In the compressible case, steep-gradient regions in the instantaneous velocity field often correspond closely with the local sonic line, suggesting a sensitivity to lab-frame disturbances; this could in turn explain the effectiveness of sub-boundary layer mixing enhancement strategies in this flow. Large- ensemble statistics bear out the observation from previous single

  6. Modeling-independent elucidation of inactivation pathways in recombinant and native A-type Kv channels

    PubMed Central

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D.; Ritter, David M.

    2012-01-01

    A-type voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels self-regulate their activity by inactivating directly from the open state (open-state inactivation [OSI]) or by inactivating before they open (closed-state inactivation [CSI]). To determine the inactivation pathways, it is often necessary to apply several pulse protocols, pore blockers, single-channel recording, and kinetic modeling. However, intrinsic hurdles may preclude the standardized application of these methods. Here, we implemented a simple method inspired by earlier studies of Na+ channels to analyze macroscopic inactivation and conclusively deduce the pathways of inactivation of recombinant and native A-type Kv channels. We investigated two distinct A-type Kv channels expressed heterologously (Kv3.4 and Kv4.2 with accessory subunits) and their native counterparts in dorsal root ganglion and cerebellar granule neurons. This approach applies two conventional pulse protocols to examine inactivation induced by (a) a simple step (single-pulse inactivation) and (b) a conditioning step (double-pulse inactivation). Consistent with OSI, the rate of Kv3.4 inactivation (i.e., the negative first derivative of double-pulse inactivation) precisely superimposes on the profile of the Kv3.4 current evoked by a single pulse because the channels must open to inactivate. In contrast, the rate of Kv4.2 inactivation is asynchronous, already changing at earlier times relative to the profile of the Kv4.2 current evoked by a single pulse. Thus, Kv4.2 inactivation occurs uncoupled from channel opening, indicating CSI. Furthermore, the inactivation time constant versus voltage relation of Kv3.4 decreases monotonically with depolarization and levels off, whereas that of Kv4.2 exhibits a J-shape profile. We also manipulated the inactivation phenotype by changing the subunit composition and show how CSI and CSI combined with OSI might affect spiking properties in a full computational model of the hippocampal CA1 neuron. This work unambiguously

  7. Measurement of CO2 laser absorption by tin plasma emanating extreme ultraviolet light for photo-lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukuma, Hiraku; Yoshida, Kensuke; Hosoda, Tatsuya; Yogo, Akifumi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Sunahara, Atsushi; Somekawa, Toshihiro; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    2014-10-01

    Laser-driven tin plasma has been studied as a light source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) at 13.5 nm (+/- 1% in-band width) for the next-generation semiconductor manufacturing. By using CO2 laser as a driver, high conversion efficiency (CE) has been attained in previous works by optimizing optical thickness for EUV radiation. Radiation hydorodynamic simulation predicts, however, that absorption coefficient for CO2 laser is as high as 50% for a tin plasma generated with a single laser pulse mainly due to short plasma scale. The relatively low absorption is a crucial problem for efficient generation of EUV light. In order to solve this problem and to increase the energy absorption, a double pulse method has been proposed where plasma scale length is extended by pre-pulse irradiation. Therefore, it is important to measure CO2 laser absorption rate precisely in order to optimize plasma conditions. For this purpose we designed an integrating sphere for CO2 laser. Laser absorption was measured for tin plasmas generated under various conditions including target geometries. We will show experimental results and discuss on guidelines for getting higher CE. This study has been partly supported by Strategic Innovation Program for Energy Conservation Technologies in 2013 from New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) of Japan.

  8. Detection of chlorine with concentration of 0.18 kg/m{sup 3} in concrete by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, K.; Fujii, T.; Matsumura, T.; Shiogama, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Nemoto, K.

    2010-05-01

    The chlorine concentration in concrete samples was measured by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). One or two pulsed second harmonic Nd:YAG lasers ({lambda}=532 nm) were used for the generation of laser-induced breakdown, and an intensified CCD camera, spectrometer, and optical bundle fiber were used for spectral measurement. To maximize the spectral intensity of the chlorine fluorescence line at a wavelength of 837.59 nm, the time delay between laser irradiation and spectral measurement, the time delay between the two laser pulses in double-pulse measurement, and the gate width of the spectral measurement were optimized. The linear relationship between the spectral intensity of the chlorine fluorescence line and the chlorine concentration was verified for pressed samples with chlorine concentrations from 0.18 to 5.4 kg/m{sup 3}. The signal-to-noise ratio was higher than 2 for the sample with a chlorine concentration of 0.18 kg/m{sup 3} (0.008 wt. %). Thus, a chlorine concentration of 0.6 kg/m{sup 3}, at which the reinforcing bars in concrete structures start to corrode, can be detected. These results show that LIBS is effective for the quantitative measurement of chlorine concentration in concrete with high sensitivity.

  9. Digital PIV Measurements of Acoustic Particle Displacements in a Normal Incidence Impedance Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.

    1998-01-01

    Acoustic particle displacements and velocities inside a normal incidence impedance tube have been successfully measured for a variety of pure tone sound fields using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The DPIV system utilized two 600-mj Nd:YAG lasers to generate a double-pulsed light sheet synchronized with the sound field and used to illuminate a portion of the oscillatory flow inside the tube. A high resolution (1320 x 1035 pixel), 8-bit camera was used to capture double-exposed images of 2.7-micron hollow silicon dioxide tracer particles inside the tube. Classical spatial autocorrelation analysis techniques were used to ascertain the acoustic particle displacements and associated velocities for various sound field intensities and frequencies. The results show that particle displacements spanning a range of 1-60 microns can be measured for incident sound pressure levels of 100-130 dB and for frequencies spanning 500-1000 Hz. The ability to resolve 1 micron particle displacements at sound pressure levels in the 100 dB range allows the use of DPIV systems for measurement of sound fields at much lower sound pressure levels than had been previously possible. Representative impedance tube data as well as an uncertainty analysis for the measurements are presented.

  10. Grading of wooden plates for musical instrument making by means of holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urgela, Stanislav

    1998-07-01

    Wood selection for musical instrument making is usually based on visual estimation and on manual mechanical and vibrational subjective testing. The method proposed uses TV holography and holographic interferometry with a double- pulsed laser to visualize the standing acoustic waves and the impact generated by transient waves as inspection testing tools. The theory of bending waves in orthotropic plates is used to interpret the experimental results. This enables us to estimate Young's moduli parallel to and perpendicular to the grain and the in-plane shear modulus in wood. The testing is nondestructive, so the expensive wooden plates can be used in production. Properly modified, the test can be applied to the judgement of any wooden and wooden composite plates. The 3D charts for a set of the physioacoustical characteristics--density, modulus of elasticity, and acoustic constant on the axes--are confirmed as a useful procedure that can help to provide more objective results in wood grading for materials selection in the design of musical instruments, mainly bowed string instruments and pianos.

  11. Characterizing the toxicity of pulsed selenium exposure to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Klaine, Stephen J

    2008-03-01

    The acute toxicity of selenium (Se) to aquatic biota has been studied extensively for decades. However, most studies have used a constant concentration aqueous exposure of Se to an invertebrate species. Since constant concentration exposure of toxicants to invertebrates is unusual in the environment, episodic exposure or pulsed exposures may represent true risk to aquatic biota more accurately. This research was designed to characterize the toxicity effects of pulsed Se exposure to Daphnia magna. Selenium exposure was varied during a 21-d chronic toxicity test to examine the effects of exposure concentration, duration, and recovery on survival, growth, and reproduction of D. magna. While D. magna did not die during exposures, latent mortality was observed. Latent mortality increased with exposure concentration and duration. Hence, standard toxicity test using continuous exposures would underestimate Se toxicity. Risk assessment method using results of continuous exposure would underestimate risk of Se to biota. For double-pulse exposures, cumulative mortality on day 21 was higher when time interval between pulses was shorter. With the same total exposure time, continuous exposure caused higher toxicity than did pulsed exposures due to recovery and tolerance development in D. magna after earlier pulses. Growth and reproduction of surviving D. magna were not affected by pulsed Se exposure due to recovery of D. magna after removal of the pulses. Based on these results, risk assessment for Se should take latent effects and the effect of recovery in to account. PMID:18190947

  12. Comparison of line x-ray emission from solid and porous nano-layer coated targets irradiated by double laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Fazeli, R.; Mahdieh, M. H.

    2015-11-15

    Enhancement of line x-ray emission from both solid and porous iron targets induced by irradiation of single and double laser pulses is studied numerically. The line emission from laser produced plasma is calculated within the extreme ultra-violet lithography wavelength range of 13.5–13.7 nm. The effects of pre-pulse intensity and delay time between two pulses (pre-pulse and main pulse) are examined. The results show that using double pulses irradiation in the conditions of porous target can reduce the x-ray enhancement. According to the results, the use of both pre-pulse and porous target leads to efficient absorption of the laser energy. Calculations also show that such enhanced laser absorption can ionize atoms of the target material to very high degrees of ionization, leading to decrease of the density of appropriate ions that are responsible for line emission in the selected wavelength region. By increasing the target porosity, x-ray yield was more reduced.

  13. Anoxia/high temperature double whammy during the Permian-Triassic marine crisis and its aftermath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Haijun; Wignall, Paul B.; Chu, Daoliang; Tong, Jinnan; Sun, Yadong; Song, Huyue; He, Weihong; Tian, Li

    2014-02-01

    The Permian-Triassic mass extinction was the most severe biotic crisis in the past 500 million years. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the crisis, but few account for the spectrum of extinction selectivity and subsequent recovery. Here we show that selective losses are best accounted for by a combination of lethally warm, shallow waters and anoxic deep waters that acted to severely restrict the habitable area to a narrow mid-water refuge zone. The relative tolerance of groups to this double whammy provides the first clear explanation for the selective extinction losses during this double-pulsed crisis and also the fitful recovery. Thus, high temperature intolerant shallow-water dwellers, such as corals, large foraminifers and radiolarians were eliminated first whilst high temperature tolerant ostracods thrived except in anoxic deeper-waters. In contrast, hypoxia tolerant but temperature intolerant small foraminifers were driven from shallow-waters but thrived on dysoxic slopes margins. Only those mollusc groups, which are tolerant of both hypoxia and high temperatures, were able to thrive in the immediate aftermath of the extinction. Limited Early Triassic benthic recovery was restricted to mid-water depths and coincided with intervals of cooling and deepening of water column anoxia that expanded the habitable mid-water refuge zone.

  14. Electron Temperature Measurements and Energy Transport in SSPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, B. F.; Casper, T. A.; Hooper, E. B.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Lodestro, L. L.; McLean, H. S.; Moller, J. M.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Wood, R. D.

    2007-11-01

    Time-resolved measurements (<100 μs) have been made with a multi-pulse Thomson scattering diagnostic in the SSPX spheromak experiment, to obtain radial electron density and temperature profile during plasma formation and sustainment. In most discharges three regimes are observed with respect to Te and ne evolution. Initially there is a cold (<100 eV) formation phase, followed by a hollow Te profile with maximum temperatures 100-200 eV, and a final heat-up and cool-down phase where we obtain the highest plasma temperatures (350+ eV). The transition from hollow to peaked Te is quite sharp (˜50 μs) and the recent upgrade to double-pulse Thomson scattering (˜40 μs between pulses) facilitates capturing this transition. We also present simulations using the CORSICA code where the equilibrium is kept fixed and the discharge is evolved to observe the change in temperature profiles for different transport coefficients. In addition, electron transport and heating will be correlated with measured MHD mode activity. Temperature and density measurements during multi-pulse coaxial gun-current operation will also be presented. * Work performed under the auspices of the US DOE by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W--7405--ENG--48.

  15. Miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy system using frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Mills, Arthur K.; Zhao, Yuan; Jones, David J.; Tang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    We report on a miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system based on a frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser. The femtosecond pulses from the laser source are delivered to the miniature fiber-optic probe at 1.58 µm wavelength, where a standard single mode fiber is used for delivery without the need of free-space dispersion compensation components. The beam is frequency-doubled inside the probe by a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. Frequency-doubled pulses at 786 nm with a maximum power of 80 mW and a pulsewidth of 150 fs are obtained and applied to excite intrinsic signals from tissues. A MEMS scanner, a miniature objective, and a multimode collection fiber are further used to make the probe compact. The miniature fiber-optic MPM system is highly portable and robust. Ex vivo multiphoton imaging of mammalian skins demonstrates the capability of the system in imaging biological tissues. The results show that the miniature fiber-optic MPM system using frequency-doubled femtosecond fiber laser can potentially bring the MPM imaging for clinical applications. PMID:27231633

  16. Status of the Ablative Laser Propulsion Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Lin, Jun; Cohen, Tinothy; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Thompson, M. Shane

    2004-01-01

    We present a short review of our laser-propulsion research as well as some of the current results of the Ablative Laser Propulsion (ALP) studies currently underway at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. It has been shown that direct surface ablation of a solid material produces high specific impulse (Isp) at relatively high energy conversion efficiency (20 - 40%). We detail measurements of specific impulse, thrust and coupling coefficients for elemental target materials both with single and with double pulse laser shots. We also present measurements taken using three independent methods for determination of Isp. The three methods produce consistent values from ion time-of-flight technique, impulse measurements and imaging of the expansion front of plasma plume. We present a demonstration of our ALP lightcraft, a small free-flying micro-vehicle that is propelled by ablation. For ALP lightcraft we use a subscale thin shell of nickel replicated over a diamond turned mandrel that produces a highly polished self-focusing, truncated at the focus parabolic mirror. The mass of the lightcraft is 54 mg and it is driven by 100-ps wide, 35-mJ laser pulses at 532 nm wavelength. This is an ongoing research. We also present the latest work on laserdriven micro-thrusters and detail some the near term goals of our program.

  17. Evaluation of diffuse-illumination holographic cinematography in a flutter cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1979, the Lewis Research Center has examined holographic cinematography for three-dimensional flow visualization. The Nd:YAG lasers used were Q-switched, double-pulsed, and frequency-doubled, operating at 20 pulses per second. The primary subjects for flow visualization were the shock waves produced in two flutter cascades. Flow visualization was by diffuse-illumination, double-exposure, and holographic interferometry. The performances of the lasers, holography, and diffuse-illumination interferometry are evaluated in single-window wind tunnels. The fringe-contrast factor is used to evaluate the results. The effects of turbulence on shock-wave visualization in a transonic flow are discussed. The depth of field for visualization of a turbulent structure is demonstrated to be a measure of the relative density and scale of that structure. Other items discussed are the holographic emulsion, tests of coherence and polarization, effects of windows and diffusers, hologram bleaching, laser configurations, influence and handling of specular reflections, modes of fringe localization, noise sources, and coherence requirements as a function of the pulse energy. Holography and diffuse illumination interferometry are also reviewed.

  18. Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Birkan, Mitat

    2008-04-28

    One promising solution to the operationally responsive space is the application of remote electromagnetic energy to propel a launch vehicle into orbit. With beamed energy propulsion, one can leave the power source stationary on the ground or space, and direct heat propellant on the spacecraft with a beam from a fixed station. This permits the spacecraft to leave its power source at home, saving significant amounts of mass, greatly improving performance. This concept, which removes the mass penalty of carrying the propulsion energy source on board the vehicle, was first proposed by Arthur Kantrowitz in 1972; he invoked an extremely powerful ground based laser. The same year Michael Minovich suggested a conceptually similar 'in-space' laser rocket system utilizing a remote laser power station. In the late 1980's, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funded continuous, double pulse laser and microwave propulsion while Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) funded ablative laser rocket propulsion. Currently AFOSR has been funding the concept initiated by Leik Myrabo, repetitively pulsed laser propulsion, which has been universally perceived, arguably, to be the closest for mid-term applications. This 2-part paper examines the investment strategies in beamed energy propulsion and technical challenges to be covers Part 2 covers the present research status and needs.

  19. Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Birkan, Mitat

    2008-04-28

    One promising solution to the operationally responsive space is the application of remote electromagnetic energy to propel a launch vehicle into orbit. With beamed energy propulsion, one can leave the power source stationary on the ground or space, and direct heat propellant on the spacecraft with a beam from a fixed station. This permits the spacecraft to leave its power source at home, saving significant amounts of mass, greatly improving performance. This concept, which removes the mass penalty of carrying the propulsion energy source on board the vehicle, was first proposed by Arthur Kantrowitz in 1972; he invoked an extremely powerful ground based laser. The same year Michael Minovich suggested a conceptually similar 'in-space' laser rocket system utilizing a remote laser power station. In the late 1980's, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funded continuous, double pulse laser and microwave propulsion while Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) funded ablative laser rocket propulsion. Currently AFOSR has been funding the concept initiated by Leik Myrabo, repetitively pulsed laser propulsion, which has been universally perceived, arguably, to be the closest for mid-term applications. This 2-part paper examines the investment strategies in beamed energy propulsion and technical challenges to be overcome. Part 1 presents a world-wide review of beamed energy propulsion research, including both laser and microwave arenas.

  20. Charge Carrier Density and signal induced in a CVD diamond detector from NIF DT neutrons, x-rays, and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Dauffy, L S; Koch, J A

    2005-10-20

    This report investigates the use of x-rays and electrons to excite a CVD polycrystalline diamond detector during a double pulse experiment to levels corresponding to those expected during a successful (1D clean burn) and a typical failed ignition (2D fizzle) shot at the National Ignition Facility, NIF. The monitoring of a failed ignition shot is the main goal of the diagnostic, but nevertheless, the study of a successful ignition shot is also important. A first large neutron pulse is followed by a smaller pulse (a factor of 1000 smaller in intensity) after 50 to 300 ns. The charge carrier densities produced during a successful and failed ignition shot are about 10{sup 15} e-h+/cm{sup 3} and 2.6* 10{sup 12} e-h+/cm{sup 3} respectively, which is lower than the 10{sup 16} e-h+/cm{sup 3} needed to saturate the diamond wafer due to charge recombination. The charge carrier density and the signal induced in the diamond detector are calculated as a function of the incident x-ray and electron energy, flux, and detector dimensions. For available thicknesses of polycrystalline CVD diamond detectors (250 {micro}m to 1000 {micro}m), a flux of over 10{sup 11} x-rays/cm{sup 2} (with x-ray energies varying from 6 keV to about 10 keV) or 10{sup 9} {beta}/cm{sup 2} (corresponding to 400 pC per electron pulse, E{sub {beta}} > 800 keV) is necessary to excite the detector to sufficient levels to simulate a successful ignition's 14 MeV peak. Failed ignition levels would require lower fluxes, over 10{sup 8} x-rays/cm{sup 2} (6 to 10 keV) or 10{sup 6} {beta}/cm{sup 2} (1 pC per electron pulse, E{sub {beta}} > 800 keV). The incident pulse must be delivered on the detector surface in several nanoseconds. The second pulse requires fluxes down by a factor of 1000. Several possible x-ray beam facilities are investigated: (1) the LBNL Advanced Light Source, (2) the Stanford SLAC and SPEAR, (3) the BNL National Synchrotron Light Source, (4) the ANL Advanced Photon Source, (5) the LLNL Janus

  1. Laser produced plasma for efficient extreme ultraviolet light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Tony; Cummins, Thomas; O' Gorman, Colm; Li Bowen; Harte, Colm S.; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2012-05-25

    Extreme ultraviolet emission from laser produced plasma and their relevance to EUV source development is discussed. The current state of the field for Sn LPP sources operating at 13.5 nm is described and initial results are given for EUV emission from CO{sub 2} laser irradiation of a bulk Sn target. A maximum conversion efficiency of 1.7% has been measured and the influence of the CO{sub 2} laser temporal profile on the CE is discussed. A double pulse irradiation scheme is shown to increase CE up to a maximum value of 2.1% for an optimum prepulse - pulse delay of 150 ns. The emergence of a new EUVL source wavelength at 6.7 nm based on Gd and Tb LPPs has been outlined. An initial experiment investigating picosecond laser irradiation as a means to produce strong 6.7 nm emission from a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} target has been performed and verified.

  2. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Isakova, Yu. Pushkarev, A.; Khailov, I.; Zhong, H.

    2015-07-15

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm{sup 2}, and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm{sup 2}), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  3. Wavelength dependence on the forensic analysis of glass by nanosecond 266 nm and 1064 nm laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, Erica M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-05-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be used for the chemical characterization of glass to provide evidence of an association between a fragment found at a crime scene to a source of glass of known origin. Two different laser irradiances, 266 nm and 1064 nm, were used to conduct qualitative and quantitative analysis of glass standards. Single-pulse and double-pulse configurations and lens-to-sample-distance settings were optimized to yield the best laser-glass coupling. Laser energy and acquisition timing delays were also optimized to result in the highest signal-to-noise ratio corresponding to the highest precision and accuracy. The crater morphology was examined and the mass removed was calculated for both the 266 nm and 1064 nm irradiations. The analytical figures of merit suggest that the 266 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths are capable of good performance for the forensic chemical characterization of glass. The results presented here suggest that the 266 nm laser produces a better laser-glass matrix coupling, resulting in a better stoichiometric representation of the glass sample. The 266 nm irradiance is therefore recommended for the forensic analysis and comparison of glass samples.

  4. LPI Experiments at the Nike Laser*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J.; Oh, J.; Afeyan, B.; Phillips, L.; Seely, J.; Brown, C.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S.; Chan, L.-Y.; Kehne, D.; Brown, D.; Schmitt, A.; Velikovich, A.; Feldman, U.; Holland, G.; Aglitskiy, Y.

    2007-11-01

    Advanced implosion designs under development at NRL for direct drive inertial confinement fusion incorporate high intensity pulses from a krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser to achieve significant gain with lower total laser energy (Etot˜500 kJ). These designs will be affected by the thresholds and magnitudes of laser plasma instabilities (LPI). The Nike laser can create short, high intensity pulses (t <0.4 ns; I>10^15 W/cm^2) to explore how LPI will be influenced by the deep UV (248 nm), broad bandwidth (2-3 THz), and induced spatial incoherence beam smoothing of the NRL KrF laser systems. Previous results demonstrated no visible/VUV signatures of two-plasmon decay (2φp) for overlapped intensities ˜2x10^15 W/cm^2. We have increased the laser intensity and expanded the range of targets and diagnostics. Single and double pulse experiments are being planned with solid, foam, and cryogenic targets. In addition to spectrometers to study SRS, 2φp, SBS, and the parametric decay instability, hard x-ray spectrometers (hν>2 keV) and a scintillator/photomultiplier array (hν>10 keV) have been deployed to examine hot electron generation. *Work supported by U. S. DoE.

  5. Laser induced forward transfer of metals by temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Klini, A; Loukakos, P A; Gray, D; Manousaki, A; Fotakis, C

    2008-07-21

    Temporally shaped, femtosecond laser pulses have been used for controlling the size and the morphology of micron-sized metallic structures obtained by using the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique. We report the effect of pulse shaping on the size and morphology of the deposited structures of Au, Zn, Cr on a function of the pulse separation time ??t (from 0 to 10 ps) of double pulses of variable intensities generated by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). The observed differences in size and morphology are correlated with the outcome of pump-probe experiments for the study of electron-phonon scattering dynamics and subsequent energy transfer processes to the bulk in the different metals employed. We propose that in metals with weak electron-lattice coupling, the electron ballistic motion and the resulting fast electron scattering at the film surface, as well as the internal electron thermalization process are crucial to the morphology and size of the transferred material. Therefore, temporal shaping within the corresponding time scales of these processes may be used for tailoring the features of the metallic structures obtained by LIFT. PMID:18648449

  6. Deformation and secondary breakup of drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiang, L.-P.; Faeth, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    Drop properties during and after secondary breakup in the bag, multimode and shear breakup regimes were observed for shock wave initiated disturbances in air at normal temperature and pressure. Test liquids included water, n-heptane, ethyl alcohol and glycerol mixtures to yield Weber numbers of 15-600. Ohnesorge numbers of 0.0025-0.039, liquid/gas density ratios of 579-985 and Reynolds numbers of 1060-15080. Measurements included pulsed shadowgraphy and double-pulsed holography to find drop sizes and velocities after breakup. Drop size distributions after breakup satisfied Simmons' universal root normal distribution in all three breakup regimes, after removing the core (or drop-forming) drop from the drop population for shear breakup. The size and velocity of the core drop after shear breakup then was correlated successfully based on the observation that the end of drop stripping corresponded to a constant Eotvos number. The relative velocities of the drop liquid were significantly reduced during secondary breakup, due both to large drag coefficients during the drop deformation stage and reduced relaxation times of smaller drops. These effects were correlated successfully based on a simplified phenomenological theory.

  7. Emission dynamics of an expanding ultrafast-laser produced Zn plasma under different ambient pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Philip, Reji

    2013-09-07

    We report time and space resolved spectral measurements of neutral Zn emission from an ultrafast laser produced plasma, generated by the irradiation of a Zn target with laser pulses of 100 femtoseconds duration, carried out in a broad ambient pressure range of 0.05 to 100 Torr. The measurement is done for three different axial positions in the expanding plume. The spectra are rich in neutral Zn (Zn I) emissions at 334.5 nm, 468 nm, 472 nm, 481 nm, and 636 nm, respectively, depicting the characteristic triplet structure of Zn. Fast as well as slow peaks are observed in the time of flight data of 481 nm emission, which arise from recombination and atomic contributions, respectively, occurring at different time scales. Average speeds of the fast atomic species do not change appreciably with ambient pressure. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and number density) are evaluated from the measured optical emission spectra. The rates of ionization and recombination can be enhanced by a double-pulse excitation configuration in which optical energy is coupled to the ultrafast plasma through a delayed laser pulse.

  8. A low frequency study of PSRs B1133+16, B1112+50, and B0031-07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karuppusamy, R.; Stappers, B. W.; Serylak, M.

    2011-01-01

    We use the low frequency (110-180 MHz) capabilities of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) to characterise a large collection of single pulses from three low magnetic field pulsars. Using the Pulsar Machine II (PuMa-II) to acquire and coherently dedisperse the pulsar signals, we examine whether the bright pulses observed in these pulsars are related to the classical giant pulse emission. Giant pulses are reported from PSR B1112+50 and bright pulses from the PSRs B1133+16 and B0031-07. These pulsars also exhibit large intensity modulations observed as rapid changes in the single pulse intensity. Evidence of global magnetospheric effects is provided by our detection of bright double pulses in PSRs B0031-07 and B1133+16. Using the multi-frequency observations, we accurately determine the dispersion measures (4.844 ± 0.002 for B1133+16 and 9.1750 ± 0.0001 for B1112+50), derive the radio emission height in PSR B1133+16 and report on the properties of subpulse drift modes in these pulsars. We also find that these pulsars show a much larger intensity modulation at low sky frequencies resulting in narrow and bright emissions.

  9. Causal evidence of the involvement of the number form area in the visual detection of numbers and letters.

    PubMed

    Grotheer, Mareike; Ambrus, Géza Gergely; Kovács, Gyula

    2016-05-15

    Recent research suggests the existence of a visual area selectively processing numbers in the human inferior temporal cortex (number form area (NFA); Abboud et al., 2015; Grotheer et al., 2016; Shum et al., 2013). The NFA is thought to be involved in the preferential encoding of numbers over false characters, letters and non-number words (Grotheer et al., 2016; Shum et al., 2013), independently of the sensory modality (Abboud et al., 2015). However, it is not yet clear if this area is mandatory for normal number processing. The present study exploited the fact that high-resolution fMRI can be applied to identify the NFA individually (Grotheer et al., 2016) and tested if transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of this area interferes with stimulus processing in a selective manner. Double-pulse TMS targeted at the right NFA significantly impaired the detection of briefly presented and masked Arabic numbers in comparison to vertex stimulation. This suggests the NFA to be necessary for fluent number processing. Surprisingly, TMS of the NFA also impaired the detection of Roman letters. On the other hand, stimulation of the lateral occipital complex (LO) had neither an effect on the detection of numbers nor on letters. Our results show, for the first time, that the NFA is causally involved in the early visual processing of numbers as well as of letters. PMID:26940623

  10. Distinguishing Linear vs. Non-Linear Integration in CA1 Radial Oblique Dendrites: It’s about Time

    PubMed Central

    Gómez González, José Francisco; Mel, Bartlett W.; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2011-01-01

    It was recently shown that multiple excitatory inputs to CA1 pyramidal neuron dendrites must be activated nearly simultaneously to generate local dendritic spikes and supralinear responses at the soma; even slight input desynchronization prevented local spike initiation (Gasparini and Magee, 2006; Losonczy and Magee, 2006). This led to the conjecture that CA1 pyramidal neurons may only express their non-linear integrative capabilities during the highly synchronized sharp waves and ripples that occur during slow wave sleep and resting/consummatory behavior, whereas during active exploration and REM sleep (theta rhythm), inadequate synchronization of excitation would lead CA1 pyramidal cells to function as essentially linear devices. Using a detailed single neuron model, we replicated the experimentally observed synchronization effect for brief inputs mimicking single synaptic release events. When synapses were driven instead by double pulses, more representative of the bursty inputs that occur in vivo, we found that the tolerance for input desynchronization was increased by more than an order of magnitude. The effect depended mainly on paired-pulse facilitation of NMDA receptor-mediated responses at Schaffer collateral synapses. Our results suggest that CA1 pyramidal cells could function as non-linear integrative units in all major hippocampal states. PMID:22171217

  11. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS: Generation of an isolated sub-100 attosecond pulse in the water-window spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Pu; Li, Ru-Xin; Zeng, Zhi-Nan; Xiong, Hui; Liu, Peng; Leng, Yu-Xin; Fan, Pin-Zhong; Xu, Zhi-Zhan

    2010-01-01

    We propose a scheme to generate isolated attosecond pulses in the water-window spectral region. Based on the numerical solutions of the single active electron model, we investigate high-order harmonic generation in helium atoms driven by a multi-cycle two-colour optical field synthesized by an intense 2000 nm, 20 fs pulse and its frequency-doubled pulse. When the latter is slightly detuned and properly phase shifted with respect to the fundamental laser pulse, an ultra-broad extreme ultraviolet supercontinuum with a spectral width of 130 eV can be generated in the 270-400 eV spectral regions. A supercontinuum from 280-340 eV in the water window can be selected to yield an isolated 67 attosecond pulse without employing any phase compensation. This water window coherent x-ray pulse with less than 100 attosecond duration is a potential tool for studying the ultrafast electronic dynamics of biological samples in water.

  12. A matter of time: improvement of visual temporal processing during training-induced restoration of light detection performance

    PubMed Central

    Poggel, Dorothe A.; Treutwein, Bernhard; Sabel, Bernhard A.; Strasburger, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The issue of how basic sensory and temporal processing are related is still unresolved. We studied temporal processing, as assessed by simple visual reaction times (RT) and double-pulse resolution (DPR), in patients with partial vision loss after visual pathway lesions and investigated whether vision restoration training (VRT), a training program designed to improve light detection performance, would also affect temporal processing. Perimetric and campimetric visual field tests as well as maps of DPR thresholds and RT were acquired before and after a 3 months training period with VRT. Patient performance was compared to that of age-matched healthy subjects. Intact visual field size increased during training. Averaged across the entire visual field, DPR remained constant while RT improved slightly. However, in transition zones between the blind and intact areas (areas of residual vision) where patients had shown between 20 and 80% of stimulus detection probability in pre-training visual field tests, both DPR and RT improved markedly. The magnitude of improvement depended on the defect depth (or degree of intactness) of the respective region at baseline. Inter-individual training outcome variability was very high, with some patients showing little change and others showing performance approaching that of healthy controls. Training-induced improvement of light detection in patients with visual field loss thus generalized to dynamic visual functions. The findings suggest that similar neural mechanisms may underlie the impairment and subsequent training-induced functional recovery of both light detection and temporal processing. PMID:25717307

  13. Study of Pulsed vs. RF Plasma Properties for Surface Processing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ricky; Hopkins, Matthew; Barnat, Edward; Miller, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The ability to manipulate the plasma parameters (density, E/N) was previously demonstrated using a double-pulsed column discharge. Experiments extending this to large-surface plasmas of interest to the plasma processing community were conducted. Differences between an audio-frequency pulsed plasma and a radio-frequency (rf) discharge, both prevalent in plasma processing applications, were studied. Optical emission spectroscopy shows higher-intensity emission in the UV/visible range for the pulsed plasma comparing to the rf plasma at comparable powers. Data suggest that the electron energy is higher for the pulsed plasma leading to higher ionization, resulting in increased ion density and ion flux. Diode laser absorption measurements of the concentration of the 1S5 metastable and 1S4 resonance states of argon (correlated with the plasma E/N) provide comparisons between the excitation/ionization states of the two plasmas. Preliminary modeling efforts suggest that the low-frequency polarity switch causes a much more abrupt potential variation to support interesting transport phenomena, generating a ``wave'' of higher temperature electrons leading to more ionization, as well as ``sheath capture'' of a higher density bolus of ions that are then accelerated during polarity switch.

  14. Controlling the sense of molecular rotation: Classical versus quantum analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.; Kitano, Kenta; Hasegawa, Hirokazu; Ohshima, Yasuhiro

    2011-02-15

    Recently, it was predicted theoretically and verified experimentally that a pair of delayed and cross-polarized short laser pulses can create molecular ensembles with a well-defined sense of rotation (clockwise or counterclockwise). Here we provide a comparative study of the classical and quantum aspects of the underlying mechanism for linear molecules and for symmetric tops, like benzene molecules, that were used for the first experimental demonstration of the effect. Very good quantitative agreement is found between the classical description of the process and the rigorous quantum-mechanical analysis at the relevant experimental conditions. Both approaches predict the same optimal values for the delay between pulses and the angle between them, and deliver the same magnitude of the induced oriented angular momentum of the molecular ensemble. As expected, quantum and classical analyses substantially deviate when the delay between pulses is comparable with the period of quantum rotational revivals. However, time-averaged characteristics of the excited molecular ensemble are equally well described by these two approaches. This is illustrated by calculating the anisotropic time-averaged angular distribution of the double-pulse excited molecules, which reflects persistent confinement of the molecular axes to the rotation plane defined by two polarization vectors of the pulses.

  15. Modification of sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics by ether and halothane

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, B.P.; Shrager, P.; Goldstein, D.A.

    1981-03-01

    The effects of ether and halothane on the kinetics of sodium and potassium currents were investigated in the crayfish giant axon. Both general anesthetics produced a reversible, dose-dependent speeding up of sodium current inactivation at all membrane potentials, with no change in the rising phase of the currents. Double-pulse inactivation experiments with ether also showed faster inactivation, but the rate of recovery from inactivation at negative potentials was not affected. Ether shifted the midpoint of the steady-state fast inactivation curve in the hyperpolarizing direction and made the curve steeper. The activation of potassium currents was faster with ether present, with no change in the voltage dependence of steady-state potassium currents. Ether and halothane are known to perturb the structure of lipid bilayer membranes; the alterations in sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics are consistent with the hypothesis that the rats of the gating processes of the channels can be affected by the state of the lipids surrounding the channels, but a direct effect of ether and halothane on the protein part of the channels cannot be ruled out.

  16. Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy to the identification of emeralds from different synthetic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrosì, G.; Tempesta, G.; Scandale, E.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Pagnotta, S.; Palleschi, V.; Mangone, A.; Lezzerini, M.

    2014-12-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy can provide a useful contribution in mineralogical field in which the quantitative chemical analyses (including the evaluation of light elements) can play a key role in the studies on the origin of the emeralds. In particular, the chemical analyses permit to determine those trace elements, known as fingerprints, that can be useful to study their provenance. This technique, not requiring sample preparation results particularly suitable for gemstones, that obviously must be studied in a non-destructive way. In this paper, the LIBS technique was applied to distinguish synthetic emeralds grown by Biron hydrothermal method from those grown by Chatham flux method. The analyses performed by collinear double-pulse LIBS give a signal enhancement useful for the quantitative chemical analyses while guaranteeing a minimal sample damage. In this way it was obtained a considerable improvement on the detection limit of the trace elements, whose determination is essential for determining the origin of emerald gemstone. The trace elements V, Cr, and Fe and their relative amounts allowed the correct attribution of the manufacturer. Two different methods for quantitative analyses were used for this study: the standard Calibration-Free LIBS (CF-LIBS) method and its recent evolution, the One Point Calibration LIBS (OPC-LIBS). This is the first approach to the evaluation of the emerald origin by means of the LIBS technique.

  17. Investigation of charge balance in ion accelerator TEMP-4M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khailov, I. P.; Pak, V. G.

    2014-10-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on the balance of charge in accelerator TEMP-4M operating in double-pulse mode with resistance load and ion diode. Crucially, it was found, that during the switching there is no losses of accumulated charge. It means, that all accumulated charge transferred to the load. However when the charge is transferred from the Marx generator to Blumlein line the half of accumulated charge is lost. Calibration of diagnostic equipment showed a good agreement between the calculated and experimental values of voltage and current. It means, that our diagnostic system is correct for registration parameters of the ion accelerator. A distinctive feature of the ion accelerators with self-magnetically insulated diode is that there is no need to use additional energy source for the creation of an external magnetic field. That's why the efficiency of ion diodes with an external magnetic field is not more than 10-15%. The efficiency of energy conversion in self-magnetically insulated diodes will be determined by not only the efficiency of the diode, but the energy losses in the units of the accelerator. The aim of the researches is the analysis of the balance of charge in units of the ion beams pulsed generator and definition of the most significant channels of energy loss.

  18. Phase sensitive properties and coherent manipulation of a photonic crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Quiring, Wadim; Jonas, Björn; Förstner, Jens; Rai, Ashish K; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D; Zrenner, Artur

    2016-09-01

    We present phase sensitive cavity field measurements on photonic crystal microcavities. The experiments have been performed as autocorrelation measurements with ps double pulse laser excitation for resonant and detuned conditions. Measured E-field autocorrelation functions reveal a very strong detuning dependence of the phase shift between laser and cavity field and of the autocorrelation amplitude of the cavity field. The fully resolved phase information allows for a precise frequency discrimination and hence for a precise measurement of the detuning between laser and cavity. The behavior of the autocorrelation amplitude and phase and their detuning dependence can be fully described by an analytic model. Furthermore, coherent control of the cavity field is demonstrated by tailored laser excitation with phase and amplitude controlled pulses. The experimental proof and verification of the above described phenomena became possible by an electric detection scheme, which employs planar photonic crystal microcavity photo diodes with metallic Schottky contacts in the defect region of the resonator. The applied photo current detection was shown to work also efficiently at room temperature, which make electrically contacted microcavities attractive for real world applications. PMID:27607671

  19. Effects of overlap and pass number in CO2 laser skin resurfacing: preliminary results of residual thermal damage, cell death, and wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, E. V.; Glatter, Robert D.; Duke, Daniella; Grevelink, Joop M.

    1997-05-01

    Newer carbon-dioxide laser systems incorporating short pulse and scanning technology have been used effectively to resurface the skin. Although scarring is rare, as the number of resurfacing cases has increased, some hypertrophic scarring has been observed. Previous dermabrasion and continuous wave (cw) carbon-dioxide studies suggest that depth of injury and/or thermal damage are important predictors of scarring for a given anatomic region. To determine if overlapping laser pulses/scans significantly altered wound healing, we examined residual thermal damage, cell death, and histologic and clinical wound healing in a farm pig. The Ultrapulse and SilkTouch systems were used with various radiant exposures, degrees of overlap, and numbers of passes. Thermal damage was assessed by histology, and dermal cell viability was measured with nitrotetrazolium blue staining. Presence or absence of clinical scarring was determined by noting textural change and loss of skin markings. We observed that thermal damage and cell death depth did not increase significantly with pass number; however, by double-pulsing or double-scanning sites, residual thermal damage and cell death depth were increased as much as 100% over areas without immediate overlap of laser impacts. Also, scarring was increased focally in areas with overlap. We conclude that immediate overlapping of carbon- dioxide laser pulses/scans is a significant risk factor in increasing thermal damage, cell death, and scarring.

  20. Characterization of 900 four-anode Photomultiplier Tubes for use in 2013 Hadronic Forward calorimeter upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiras, Emrah

    The first 900 four-anode Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) have been evaluated for use in the 2013 Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter upgrade. HF is a part of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), which is one of the two large general-purpose particle detectors of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. HF requires 1728 PMTs. These small tubes are the sensitive light detectors that provide the output signals of HF. Before installing PMTs in HF, their quality control demands need to be satisfied. These tests, done at the University of Iowa, are designed in three categories to test seventeen different parameters for each PMT. The three most basic and most important groups of parameters are: dark current, gain (anode and cathode), and timing. There are secondary tests which are performed on a smaller percentage of the PMTs such as surface uniformity, double pulse and single photo-electron resolution. The PMTs that meet the specifications of HF will be sent to CERN where they are expected to be in use for at least a decade.

  1. Multianode Photomultiplier Testing for 2013 CMS Hadronic Forward (HF) Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, Garrett; Jia, Zhe; Onel, Yasar

    2012-03-01

    The Hadronic Forward (HF) section of the Compact Muon Solenoid, a detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, will undergo various upgrades in 2013. HF requires photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) to detect the energy signatures of hadronic collisions. The University of Iowa High Energy Physics group is responsible for testing new PMTs for the upgrade. These tests provide seven different operational parameters that will be used for calibration and quality control before installation. The dark current test checks the noise generated by the PMTs at different voltages when there is no light source. The after pulse test measures the degradation of the vacuum chamber of each PMT as it relates to pulse noise. The gain test measures the degree of amplification provided by the PMT. This is the most vital test, as it allows for the reconstruction of the energies observed by the PMT. The surface non-uniformity test checks the active face of the PMTs for signal uniformity and ``hot spot'' sensitivity to light. The timing test observes the PMT's reading and recovery speed. The linearity test measures the tube's output under varying levels of light. The double pulse test checks the linearity of the PMT with two signals occurring 25 nanoseconds apart.

  2. Comparison of ultrashort-pulse frequency-resolved-optical-gating traces for three common beam geometries

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R. ); Kane, D.J. )

    1994-09-01

    We recently introduced frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), a technique for measuring the intensity and phase of an individual, arbitrary, ultrashort laser pulse. FROG can use almost any instantaneous optical nonlinearity, with the most common geometries being polarization gate, self-diffraction, and second-harmonic generation. The experimentally generated FROG trace is intuitive, visually appealing, and can yield quantitative information about the pulse parameters (such as temporal and spectral width and chirp). However, the qualitative and the quantitative features of the FROG trace depend strongly on the geometry used. We compare the FROG traces for several common ultrashort pulses for these three common geometries and, where possible, develop scaling rules that allow one to obtain quantitative information about the pulse directly from the experimental FROG trace. We illuminate the important features of the various FROG traces for transform-limited, linearly chirped, self-phase modulated, and nonlinearly chirped pulses, pulses with simultaneous linear chirp and self-phase modulation, and pulses with simultaneous linear chirp and cubic phase distortion, as well as double pulses, pulses with phase jumps, and pulses with complex intensity and phase substructure.

  3. A methodology for laser diagnostics in large-bore marine two-stroke diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hult, J.; Mayer, S.

    2013-04-01

    Large two-stroke diesel engines for marine propulsion offer several challenges to successful implementation of the laser diagnostic techniques applied extensively in smaller automotive engines. For this purpose a fully operational large-bore engine has been modified to allow flexible optical access, through 24 optical ports with clear diameters of 40 mm. By mounting the entire optical set-up directly to the engine, effects of the vigorous vibrations and thermal drifts on alignment can be minimized. Wide-angle observation and illumination, as well as relatively large aperture detection, is made possible through mounting of optical modules and relays inside optical ports. This allows positioning of the last optical element within 10 mm from the cylinder wall. Finally, the implementation on a multi-cylinder engine allows for flexible and independent operation of the optically accessible cylinder for testing purposes. The performance of the integrated optical engine and imaging system developed is demonstrated through laser Mie scattering imaging of fuel jet structures, from which information on liquid penetration and spray angles can be deduced. Double pulse laser-sheet imaging of native in-cylinder structures is also demonstrated, for the purpose of velocimetry.

  4. Range-resolved optical detection of honeybees by use of wing-beat modulation of scattered light for locating land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, David S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Carlsten, John L.

    2007-05-01

    An imaging lidar instrument with the capability of measuring the frequency response of a backscattered return signal up to 3.6 kHz is demonstrated. The instrument uses a commercial microchip frequency-doubled pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a 7.2 kHz pulse repetition rate, a pulse duration of less than 1 ns, and a pulse energy of greater than 10 μJ. A 15.2 cm commercial telescope is used to collect the backscattered signal, and a photomultiplier tube is used to monitor the scattered light. This instrument is designed for range- and angle-resolved optical detection of honeybees for explosives and land-mine detection. The instrument is capable of distinguishing between the scattered light from honeybees and other sources through the frequency content of the return signal caused by the wing-beat modulation of the backscattered light. Detection of honeybees near a bee hive and spatial mapping of honeybee densities near feeders are demonstrated.

  5. A time digitizer CMOS gate-array with a 250 ps time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Yasuo

    1996-02-01

    Recent high-energy physics experiments are demanding a pipeline (deadtime-less) time-to-digital converter (TDC) with a time resolution of better than 500 ps and a double-pulse resolution of less than 30 ns. The TDC must keep all of the timing history until a trigger signal arrives about 3 {micro}s later. In large experiments, since the number of channels used is more than 100 k, the device must have a low power dissipation, a high circuit density and a low cost. A pipelined time digitizer CMOS gate-array has been developed using 0.5 {micro}m Sea-of-Gate technology. Precise timing signals which are used to sample input signals are generated from 32 taps of an asymmetric ring oscillator. The frequency of the oscillator is controlled by a phase-locked loop (PLL) circuit which runs in the 10--50 MHz frequency range. A test chip has been developed and tested; a time resolution of 250 ps rms at 40 MHz clock was measured. The chip has 4 channels and encoding circuits for both the rising and the falling edges of the input signals. The chip has 128-word dual-port memories, allowing the histories of the input signals to be stored and causing no deadtime for the conversion.

  6. Laser-produced plasma EUV source using a colloidal microjet target containing tin dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Dojyo, Naoto; Sasaki, Wataru; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2006-10-01

    We realized a low-debris laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source by use of a colloidal microjet target, which contained low-concentration (6 wt%) tin-dioxide nanoparticles. An Nd:YAG laser was used to produce a plasma at the intensity on the order of 10^11 W/cm^2. The use of low concentration nanoparticles in a microjet target with a diameter of 50 μm regulated the neutral debris emission from a target, which was monitored by a silicon witness plate placed 30 cm apart from the source in a vacuum chamber. No XPS signals of tin and/or oxygen atoms were observed on the plate after ten thousand laser exposures. The low concentration nature of the target was compensated and the conversion efficiency (CE) was improved by introducing double pulses of two Nd:YAG lasers operated at 532 and 1064 nm as a result of controlling the micro-plasma characteristics. The EUV CE reached its maximum of 1.2% at the delay time of approximately 100 ns with the main laser intensiy of 2 x10^11 W/cm^2. The CE value was comparable to that of a tin bulk target, which, however, produced a significant amount of neutral debris.

  7. Development and Evaluation of a High Sensitivity DIAL System for Profiling Atmospheric CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady J.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, M. N.; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-01-01

    A ground-based 2-micron Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) CO2 profiling system for atmospheric boundary layer studies and validation of space-based CO2 sensors is being developed and tested at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the NASA Instrument Incubator Program. To capture the variability of CO2 in the lower troposphere a precision of 1-2 ppm of CO2 (less than 0.5%) with 0.5 to 1 km vertical resolution from near surface to free troposphere (4-5 km) is one of the goals of this program. In addition, a 1% (3 ppm) absolute accuracy with a 1 km resolution over 0.5 km to free troposphere (4-5 km) is also a goal of the program. This DIAL system leverages 2-micron laser technology developed under NASA's Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and other NASA programs to develop new solid-state laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates new high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to achieve high precision DIAL measurements. This presentation describes the capabilities of this system for atmospheric CO2 and aerosol profiling. Examples of atmospheric measurements in the lidar and DIAL mode will be presented.

  8. Controlling the fast electron divergence in a solid target with multiple laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Volpe, L; Feugeas, J-L; Nicolai, Ph; Santos, J J; Touati, M; Breil, J; Batani, D; Tikhonchuk, V

    2014-12-01

    Controlling the divergence of laser-driven fast electrons is compulsory to meet the ignition requirements in the fast ignition inertial fusion scheme. It was shown recently that using two consecutive laser pulses one can improve the electron-beam collimation. In this paper we propose an extension of this method by using a sequence of several laser pulses with a gradually increasing intensity. Profiling the laser-pulse intensity opens a possibility to transfer to the electron beam a larger energy while keeping its divergence under control. We present numerical simulations performed with a radiation hydrodynamic code coupled to a reduced kinetic module. Simulation with a sequence of three laser pulses shows that the proposed method allows one to improve the efficiency of the double pulse scheme at least by a factor of 2. This promises to provide an efficient energy transport in a dense matter by a collimated beam of fast electrons, which is relevant for many applications such as ion-beam sources and could present also an interest for fast ignition inertial fusion. PMID:25615206

  9. Ultrafast electron dynamics in rare gas clusters under X-FEL light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Jan Michael; Gnodtke, Christian; Saalmann, Ulf

    2009-05-01

    Time resolved imaging with Angstrom resolution is one of the prime goals to use XFEL light for. Here we investigate in detail the dynamics of electrons and ions of a cluster exposed to a realistic X-FEL pulse. We focus on electron migration phenomena and investigate their role under the aspect of harm and benefit for imaging the cluster structure. Field ionization processes turn out to play an important role where the electric field is generated by quickly formed ions [1]. We also propose an experiment with double pulse of 1 fs duration each, separated by 10-100 fs which can be realized at LCLS in Stanford. With this pump-probe scenario, the dynamics of Auger processes in rare gas clusters (here Ne) can be studied which promises to be interesting since it differs from the isolated atom due to the neighboring ions/atoms [2]. [4pt] [1] Ch. Gnodtke, U. Saalmann, Jan M. Rost, submitted (2009).[0pt] [2] Ulf Saalmann and Jan M. Rost, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 143401 (2002).

  10. The application of holography to the visualization of shock patterns in a transonic compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hantman, R. G.; Burr, R. J.; Alwang, W. G.; Williams, M. C.

    1974-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment in the application of holographic interferometry to the visualization of flow in a transonic compressor. The principal objective of the study was to visualize the shock waves created by the rotor blades and to determine their relative orientation in three dimensions. The technique employed double-pulse, double-exposure holography to record the flow field through a plastic window built into the outer case over the rotor blades. Illumination was by diffuse reflection from the interior surfaces of the compressor. No other optical components in or on the compressor were used. The resulting holograms successfully showed the upstream bow shocks and, at high speed, the outer-most portion of the leading edge passage shock. Techniques were devised for locating these shocks in three dimensions and the results were compared with theoretical predictions. In all cases, the shock angles were somewhat larger than predicted by theory, and a distinct increase in angle near the outer wall was observed, which may be attributed to end wall boundary layer effects.

  11. Application of holography to the determination of flow conditions within the rotating blade row of a compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hantman, R. G.; Burr, R. J.; Alwang, W. G.; Williams, M. C.

    1973-01-01

    The double-pulse, double-exposure holography technique was applied to visualize the flow field within a transonic compressor rotor with a tip speed of 1800 ft/sec. The principal objective was to visualize the shock waves created in the flow field which was supersonic relative to the rotating blade row. The upstream rotor blade bow shocks and, at high speed, the outermost portion of the leading edge passage shock were successfully observed in the holograms. Techniques were devised for locating these shocks in three dimensions, and the results were compared with theoretical predictions. Density changes between the two pulses due to motion of the shocks were large and, therefore, it was not possible to resolve the fringe systems in detail for the 100% speed conditions. However, gross features of the shocks were easily observed, and the upstream shocks were well displayed. In all cases the shock angles were somewhat larger than predicted by theory, and a distinct increase in angle near the outer wall was observed, which may be attributed to endwall boundary layer effects. The location and orientation of the observed leading edge passage shocks were in good agreement with static pressure contours obtained from measurements in the outer casing over the rotor tip.

  12. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy application for ash characterisation for a coal fired power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ctvrtnickova, T.; Mateo, M. P.; Yañez, A.; Nicolas, G.

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this work was to apply the LIBS technique for the analysis of fly ash and bottom ash resulting from the coal combustion in a coal fired power plant. The steps of presented LIBS analysis were pelletizing of powdered samples, firing with laser and spectroscopic detection. The analysis "on tape" was presented as an alternative fast sampling approach. This procedure was compared with the usual steps of normalized chemical analysis methods for coal which are coal calcination, fluxing in high temperature plasma, dilution in strong acids and analyzing by means of ICP-OES and/or AAS. First, the single pulse LIBS approach was used for determination and quantification of elemental content in fly ash and bottom ash on the exit of the boiler. For pellet preparation, ash has to be mixed with proper binder to assure the sample resistance. Preparation of the samples (binder selection and pressing/pelletizing conditions) was determined and LIBS experimental conditions optimized. No preparation is necessary in "on tape" sampling. Moreover, double-pulse approach in orthogonal reheating configuration was applied to enhance the repeatability and precision of the LIBS results and to surpass the matrix effect influencing the calibration curves in case of some elements. Obtained results showed that LIBS responses are comparable to the normalized analytical methods. Once optimized the experimental conditions and features, application of LIBS may be a promising technique for combustion process control even in on-line mode.

  13. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakova, Yu.; Pushkarev, A.; Khailov, I.; Zhong, H.

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm2, and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm2), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  14. Novel electro-thermal latching micro-switch based on Ni/electrophoretic polymer micro-cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ping; Zhang, Ying; Mao, Shenping; Wang, Hong; Ding, Guifu; Zhang, Congchun; Dai, Xuhan; Zhao, Xiaolin

    2014-12-01

    A novel electro-thermal and mechanical latching micro-switch is proposed in this study. Theoretical calculations were carried out to determine the geometric parameters of the micro-switch. An electrophoretic polymer film was introduced as the actuation layer to sustain the nickel resistance heater of the electro-thermal actuator. Compared to SU-8, the electrophoretic polymer film had a large thermal expansion coefficient as well as a high adhesive force between the polymer film and Ni. By optimizing the processes, the micro-switch was finally fabricated using a MEMS process. In order to demonstrate the dynamic performance of the micro-switch, a sequential double-pulsed power was used to actuate the fabricated micro-switch, which was connected with an external circuit. The testing results indicated that the electro-thermal latching micro-switch could control the ON/OFF state of the external circuit.This demonstrated the bistable behaviour of the electro-thermal micro-switch.

  15. Dependence of Nociceptive Detection Thresholds on Physiological Parameters and Capsaicin-Induced Neuroplasticity: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Meijer, Hil G. E.; Doll, Robert J.; Buitenweg, Jan R.; van Gils, Stephan A.

    2016-01-01

    Physiological properties of peripheral and central nociceptive subsystems can be altered over time due to medical interventions. The effective change for the whole nociceptive system can be reflected in changes of psychophysical characteristics, e.g., detection thresholds. However, it is challenging to separate contributions of distinct altered mechanisms with measurements of thresholds only. Here, we aim to understand how these alterations affect Aδ-fiber-mediated nociceptive detection of electrocutaneous stimuli. First, with a neurophysiology-based model, we study the effects of single-model parameters on detection thresholds. Second, we derive an expression of model parameters determining the functional relationship between detection thresholds and the interpulse interval for double-pulse stimuli. Third, in a case study with topical capsaicin treatment, we translate neuroplasticity into plausible changes of model parameters. Model simulations qualitatively agree with changes in experimental detection thresholds. The simulations with individual forms of neuroplasticity confirm that nerve degeneration is the dominant mechanism for capsaicin-induced increases in detection thresholds. In addition, our study suggests that capsaicin-induced central plasticity may last at least 1 month. PMID:27252644

  16. Development of Double and Triple-Pulsed 2-micron IPDA Lidars for Column CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to the carbon cycle and globalradiation budget on Earth. CO2 role on Earth’s climate is complicated due to different interactions with various climatecomponents that include the atmosphere, the biosphere and the hydrosphere. Although extensive worldwide efforts formonitoring atmospheric CO2 through various techniques, including in-situ and passive sensors, are taking place highuncertainties exist in quantifying CO2 sources and sinks. These uncertainties are mainly due to insufficient spatial andtemporal mapping of the gas. Therefore it is required to have more rapid and accurate CO2 monitoring with higheruniform coverage and higher resolution. CO2 DIAL operating in the 2-µm band offer better near-surface CO2measurement sensitivity due to the intrinsically stronger absorption lines. For more than 15 years, NASA LangleyResearch Center (LaRC) contributed in developing several 2-?m CO2 DIAL systems and technologies. This paperfocuses on the current development of the airborne double-pulsed and triple-pulsed 2-?m CO2 integrated pathdifferential absorption (IPDA) lidar system at NASA LaRC. This includes the IPDA system development andintegration. Results from ground and airborne CO2 IPDA testing will be presented. The potential of scaling suchtechnology to a space mission will be addressed.

  17. Dependence of Nociceptive Detection Thresholds on Physiological Parameters and Capsaicin-Induced Neuroplasticity: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Meijer, Hil G E; Doll, Robert J; Buitenweg, Jan R; van Gils, Stephan A

    2016-01-01

    Physiological properties of peripheral and central nociceptive subsystems can be altered over time due to medical interventions. The effective change for the whole nociceptive system can be reflected in changes of psychophysical characteristics, e.g., detection thresholds. However, it is challenging to separate contributions of distinct altered mechanisms with measurements of thresholds only. Here, we aim to understand how these alterations affect Aδ-fiber-mediated nociceptive detection of electrocutaneous stimuli. First, with a neurophysiology-based model, we study the effects of single-model parameters on detection thresholds. Second, we derive an expression of model parameters determining the functional relationship between detection thresholds and the interpulse interval for double-pulse stimuli. Third, in a case study with topical capsaicin treatment, we translate neuroplasticity into plausible changes of model parameters. Model simulations qualitatively agree with changes in experimental detection thresholds. The simulations with individual forms of neuroplasticity confirm that nerve degeneration is the dominant mechanism for capsaicin-induced increases in detection thresholds. In addition, our study suggests that capsaicin-induced central plasticity may last at least 1 month. PMID:27252644

  18. Synchronous Use of IR and UV Laser Pulses in the Removal of Encrustation: Mechanistic Aspects, Discoloration Phenomena and Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafiropulos, V.; Pouli, P.; Kylikoglou, V.; Maravelaki-Kalaitzaki, P.; Luk'yanchuk, B. S.; Dogariu, A.

    The removal of encrustation from sculptures and monuments has been by far the most pronounced application of lasers in LACONA field. Considerable effort has been put in recognizing the operative ablation mechanisms when using different laser wavelengths and power levels, as well as in understanding the associated "yellowing" phenomenon. The deeper insight into the laser-matter interactions for different laser parameters as well as the understanding of side discoloration phenomena has led us in combining IR and UV laser pulses with excellent results. More specifically, the fundamental and the third harmonic of a Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser has been spatially and temporally combined to create a double pulse. The power levels must be fixed at a certain ratio for the two wavelengths in such a way, that the different operative removal mechanisms (mainly selective vaporization for IR- and spallation for UV-pulses) take action at the same depth from the surface of encrustation. The resulted surface after the final removal of encrustation lacks the yellowish hue, which is present when only IR pulses are used. A theoretical model has been applied to account for the different phenomena observed with the synchronous use of laser pulses as well as the absence of yellowing. This novel methodology has been applied to Parthenon West Frieze with success (see parallel case study contribution by Pouli et al.).

  19. The effect of ion current density amplification in a diode with passive anode in magnetic self-isolation mode

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, Alexander I.; Isakova, Yulia I.; Vakhrushev, Dmitry V.

    2010-12-15

    The results of a study on gigawatt power pulsed ion beam parameters are presented here. The pulsed ion beam is formed by a diode with an explosive-emission potential electrode, in magnetic self-isolation mode [A. I. Pushkarev, J. I. Isakova, M. S. Saltimakov et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 013104 (2010)]. The ion current density is 20-40 A/cm{sup 2}, the energy of the ions is 200-250 keV, and the beam composition is of protons and carbon ions. Experiments have been performed on the TEMP-4M accelerator, set in double-pulse formation mode. To measure the beam parameters, we used a time-of-flight diagnosis. It is shown that the carbon ion current density, formed in a planar diode with graphite potential electrode, is five to seven times higher than the values calculated from the Child-Langmuir ratio. A model of ion current density amplification in a diode with magnetic self-isolation is proposed. The motion of electrons in the anode-cathode gap is simulated using the program CST PARTICLE STUDIO.

  20. Quantitative estimation of carbonation and chloride penetration in reinforced concrete by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Shuzo; Matsuo, Toyofumi; Matsumura, Takuro; Fujii, Takashi; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2014-11-01

    The penetration profile of chlorine in a reinforced concrete (RC) specimen was determined by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The concrete core was prepared from RC beams with cracking damage induced by bending load and salt water spraying. LIBS was performed using a specimen that was obtained by splitting the concrete core, and the line scan of laser pulses gave the two-dimensional emission intensity profiles of 100 × 80 mm2 within one hour. The two-dimensional profile of the emission intensity suggests that the presence of the crack had less effect on the emission intensity when the measurement interval was larger than the crack width. The chlorine emission spectrum was measured without using the buffer gas, which is usually used for chlorine measurement, by collinear double-pulse LIBS. The apparent diffusion coefficient, which is one of the most important parameters for chloride penetration in concrete, was estimated using the depth profile of chlorine emission intensity and Fick's law. The carbonation depth was estimated on the basis of the relationship between carbon and calcium emission intensities. When the carbon emission intensity was statistically higher than the calcium emission intensity at the measurement point, we determined that the point was carbonated. The estimation results were consistent with the spraying test results using phenolphthalein solution. These results suggest that the quantitative estimation by LIBS of carbonation depth and chloride penetration can be performed simultaneously.

  1. Evoked-potential recovery during double click stimulation in a beluga whale: implications for biosonar gain control.

    PubMed

    Supin, Alexander Ya; Popov, Vladimir V

    2015-05-01

    Auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) were recorded in a beluga whale Delphinapterus leucas using a double-pulse stimulation paradigm, specifically measuring the recovery (release from masking) of the second (test) response as a function of delay after the first (conditioning) pulse at various levels of the conditioning and test stimuli. The conditioning/test stimulus level ratio influenced the recovery time (the higher the ratio, the longer the recovery). This interrelation was used to evaluate the intensity/time trade in release from forward masking. Trade was evaluated as 32.2 dB per time decade. Data were considered as simulating interactions between the transmitted pulse and echo during echolocation, assuming that a transmitted sonar pulse produces forward masking of the echo response. With increased target distance, the attenuation of the echo may be compensated by the release from masking. According to the model, the compensation results in substantial stabilization of the echo response even if the intensity/time trade of release from masking is not precisely equal to the rate of echo attenuation with distance. PMID:25994684

  2. Miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy system using frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Mills, Arthur K; Zhao, Yuan; Jones, David J; Tang, Shuo

    2016-05-01

    We report on a miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system based on a frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser. The femtosecond pulses from the laser source are delivered to the miniature fiber-optic probe at 1.58 µm wavelength, where a standard single mode fiber is used for delivery without the need of free-space dispersion compensation components. The beam is frequency-doubled inside the probe by a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. Frequency-doubled pulses at 786 nm with a maximum power of 80 mW and a pulsewidth of 150 fs are obtained and applied to excite intrinsic signals from tissues. A MEMS scanner, a miniature objective, and a multimode collection fiber are further used to make the probe compact. The miniature fiber-optic MPM system is highly portable and robust. Ex vivo multiphoton imaging of mammalian skins demonstrates the capability of the system in imaging biological tissues. The results show that the miniature fiber-optic MPM system using frequency-doubled femtosecond fiber laser can potentially bring the MPM imaging for clinical applications. PMID:27231633

  3. Dynamic holographic endoscopy--ex vivo investigations of malignant tumors in the human stomach.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Wolfgang; Kemper, Björn; Knoche, Sabine; Domagk, Dirk; Poremba, Christopher; von Bally, Gert; Domschke, Wolfram

    2005-01-01

    Laser holographic interferometry is based on the superimposition of the holograms of different motional states of an object on a single holographic storing medium. Using a combination of holographic interferometry and endoscopic imaging, we tried to detect areas of focally disturbed tissue elasticity in gastric cancer preparations. By connecting a mobile electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) camera system (light source: double frequency Nd:YAG laser, lambda = 532 nm) to different types of endoscopes, ex vivo experiments were performed on ten formalin fixed human stomachs, nine containing adenocarcinomas and one with a gastric lymphoma. Linking the endoscopic ESPI camera complex to a fast image processing system, the method of double pulse exposure image subtraction was applied at a video frame rate of 12.5 Hz. Speckle correlation patterns and corresponding phase difference distributions resulting from gastric wall deformation by gentle touch with a guide wire were analyzed. Tumor-free gastric areas showed high-contrast concentric fringes around the point of stimulation. In contrast, fringe patterns and filtered phase difference distributions corresponding to the areas of malignancy in all the cases were characterized by largely parallel lines, indicating that stimulation of rigid tumor tissue primarily led to tilting. Our ex vivo investigations of malignant gastric tumors show that the application of dynamic holographic endoscopy makes it possible to distinguish areas of malignancy from surrounding healthy tissue based on the differences in tissue elasticity. PMID:15726298

  4. Hydrogen Balmer α line behavior in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy depth scans of Au, Cu, Mn, Pb targets in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, G. S.; Benedetti, P. A.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.

    2010-07-01

    The behavior of hydrogen spectral emission of the plasmas obtained by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) measurement of four metal targets (Au, Cu, Mn, Pb) in air was investigated. The plasma was produced by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser emitting in the fundamental wavelength. A systematic study of the spatial-integrated plasma emission obtained by an in-depth scanning of the target was performed for each metal, both in single pulse and collinear double-pulse configurations. Further, a spatial-resolved analysis of the emission of plasma produced on the Al target by a single laser pulse was performed, in order to describe the spatial distribution of emitters deriving from the target and air elements. The line intensities of the main plasma components (target metal, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen) were measured in both experimental conditions. Results show that the hydrogen line intensity varies greatly as a function of the metal considered, and exhibits a marked decrease after the first laser shots. However, differently from emission lines due to surface impurities, the hydrogen line intensity reaches a constant level deep inside the target. The spatial-resolved measurements indicate that hydrogen atoms in the plasma mainly derive from the target surface and, only at a minor extent, from the dissociation of molecular hydrogen present in the surrounding air. These findings show that the calculation of plasma electron number density through the measurement of the Stark broadening of hydrogen Balmer α line is possible also in depth scanning measurements.

  5. Analysis of 100-lb(sub f) (445-N) LO2-LCH4 Reaction Control Engine Impulse Bit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William M.; Klenhenz, Julie E.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, liquid oxygen-liquid methane (LO2-LCH4) has been considered as a potential green propellant alternative for future exploration missions. The Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project was tasked by NASA to develop this propulsion combination to enable safe and cost-effective exploration missions. To date, limited experience with such combinations exist, and as a result a comprehensive test program is critical to demonstrating with the viability of implementing such a system. The NASA Glenn Research Center conducted a test program of a 100-lbf (445-N) reaction control engine (RCE) at the Center s Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS), focusing on altitude testing over a wide variety of operational conditions. The ACS facility includes unique propellant conditioning feed systems (PCFS), which allow precise control of propellant inlet conditions to the engine. Engine performance as a result of these inlet conditions was examined extensively during the test program. This paper is a companion to the previous specific impulse testing paper, and discusses the pulsed-mode operation portion of testing, with a focus on minimum impulse bit (MIB) and repeatable pulse performance. The engine successfully demonstrated target MIB performance at all conditions, as well as successful demonstration of repeatable pulse widths. Some anomalous conditions experienced during testing are also discussed, including a double pulse phenomenon, which was not noted in previous test programs for this engine.

  6. Summary of Altitude Pulse Testing of a 100-lbf L02/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William M.; Kleinhenz, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, liquid oxygen-liquid methane (LO2/LCH4) has been considered as a potential "green" propellant alternative for future exploration missions. The Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project has been tasked by NASA to develop this propulsion combination to enable safe and cost effective exploration missions. To date, limited experience with such combinations exist, and as a result a comprehensive test program is critical to demonstrating the viability of implementing such a system. The NASA Glenn Research Center has conducted a test program of a 100-lbf (445-N) reaction control engine (RCE) at the center s Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS), focusing on altitude testing over a wide variety of operational conditions. The ACS facility includes a unique propellant conditioning feed system (PCFS) which allows precise control of propellant inlet conditions to the engine. Engine performance as a result of these inlet conditions was examined extensively during the test program. This paper is a companion to the previous specific impulse testing paper, and discusses the pulsed mode operation portion of testing, with a focus on minimum impulse bit (I-bit) and repeatable pulse performance. The engine successfully demonstrated target minimum impulse bit performance at all conditions, as well as successful demonstration of repeatable pulse widths. Some anomalous conditions experienced during testing are also discussed, including a double pulse phenomenon which was not noted in previous test programs for this engine.

  7. An Experimental Study of Droplets Produced by Plunging Breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Dai, D.; Liu, X.; Duncan, J. H.

    2012-11-01

    The production of droplets by breaking water waves greatly affects the heat, mass and momentum transfer between the atmosphere and the sea surface. In this study, the production of droplets by mechanically generated breaking water waves was explored in a wave tank. The breakers were generated from dispersively focused wave packets (average frequency 1.15 Hz) using a programmable wave maker. Two overall wave maker amplitudes were used to create a strong spilling and a strong plunging breaker. The profile histories of the breaking wave crests along the center plane of the tank were measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique, while the droplet diameter distributions and motions were measured at different locations along a horizontal line, which is 1 cm above the maximum height of the wave crest, using a double-pulsed cinematic shadowgraph technique. It is found that droplets are primarily generated when the plunging jet of the wave generates strong turbulence during impact with the wave's front face and when large air bubbles, entrapped during the plunging process, rise to the free surface and pop. The differences between the generation mechanisms in spilling and plunging breakers is highlighted. This work is supported by the Ocean Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation.

  8. Orthogonal Double View Digital Holographic Diagnostics for Random Motion of Micro Polymer Jet by Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaiho; Sallam, Khaled

    2008-11-01

    An experimental investigation of three-dimensional random behavior of polymer micro jet generated by electrospinning is described. Two frequency doubled Nd:YAG lasers were used as the light source and a commercial grade CCD sensor (Nikon D-70) was used for holograms recording. The two lasers could be fired with a pulse separation as small as 100 ns, and the two laser beams were aligned with three polarized beam splitter cubes. Orthogonal double-view and double-pulses were recorded on the same camera frame. The camera frame was split into two, and both of the halves of the frame were used for each view. Two objective lenses (M 5x) and two spatial filters (Pinhole ˜ 5μm) were used to generate expanding laser beams in the digital microscopic holography (DMH) optical setup. As the electric field (˜20 kV) was intensified, the polymer solution formed a charged filament (or multiple filaments) from the tip of the Taylor cone. As the filament was accelerated toward the collector, its diameter was shrunk and axisymmetric disturbances grew further away from the exit. The polymer was randomly deposited on the collector as non woven microfiber.

  9. Phase discrimination and object fitting to measure fibers distribution and orientation in turbulent pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearing, Stella S.; Campolo, Marina; Capone, Alessandro; Soldati, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a methodology based on the analysis of single-camera, double-pulse PIV images is described and validated as a tool to characterize fiber-dispersed turbulent flows in large-scale facilities. The methodology consists of image pre-treatment (intensity adjustment, median filtering, threshold binarization and object identification by a recursive connection algorithm) and object-based phase discrimination used to generate two independent snapshots from one single image, one for the dispersed phase and one for the seeding. Snapshots are then processed to calculate the flow field using standard PIV techniques and to calculate fiber concentration and orientation statistics using an object-fitting procedure. The algorithm is tuned and validated by means of artificially generated images and proven to be robust against identified sources of error. The methodology is applied to experimental data collected from a fiber suspension in a turbulent pipe flow. Results show good qualitative agreement with experimental data from the literature and with in-house numerical data.

  10. Phase discrimination and object fitting to measure fibers distribution and orientation in turbulent pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearing, Stella S.; Campolo, Marina; Capone, Alessandro; Soldati, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    In this work, a methodology based on the analysis of single-camera, double-pulse PIV images is described and validated as a tool to characterize fiber-dispersed turbulent flows in large-scale facilities. The methodology consists of image pre-treatment (intensity adjustment, median filtering, threshold binarization and object identification by a recursive connection algorithm) and object-based phase discrimination used to generate two independent snapshots from one single image, one for the dispersed phase and one for the seeding. Snapshots are then processed to calculate the flow field using standard PIV techniques and to calculate fiber concentration and orientation statistics using an object-fitting procedure. The algorithm is tuned and validated by means of artificially generated images and proven to be robust against identified sources of error. The methodology is applied to experimental data collected from a fiber suspension in a turbulent pipe flow. Results show good qualitative agreement with experimental data from the literature and with in-house numerical data.

  11. Optimization of modified carbon paste electrode with multiwalled carbon nanotube/ionic liquid/cauliflower-like gold nanostructures for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Afraz, Ahmadreza; Rafati, Amir Abbas; Najafi, Mojgan

    2014-11-01

    We describe the modification of a carbon paste electrode (CPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an ionic liquid (IL). Electrochemical studies by using a D-optimal mixture design in Design-Expert software revealed an optimized composition of 60% graphite, 14.2% paraffin, 10.8% MWCNT and 15% IL. The optimal modified CPE shows good electrochemical properties that are well matched with model prediction parameters. In the next step, the optimized CPE was modified with gold nanostructures by applying a double-pulse electrochemical technique. The resulting electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It gives three sharp and well-separated oxidation peaks for ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The sensor enables simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA with linear responses from 0.3 to 285, 0.08 to 200, and 0.1 to 450 μM, respectively, and with 120, 30 and 30 nM detection limits (at an S/N of 3). The method was successfully applied to the determination of AA, DA, and UA in spiked samples of human serum and urine. PMID:25280680

  12. Ultra-Shallow P{sup +}/N Junction Formation in Si Using Low Temperature Solid Phase Epitaxy Assisted with Laser Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Shuhei; Tanaka, Yuki; Fukaya, Takumi; Matsumoto, Satoru; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Fuse, Genshu; Kudo, Toshio; Sakuragi, Susumu

    2008-11-03

    A combination of Ge pre-amorphization implantation (Ge-PAI), low-energy B implantation and laser annealing is a promising method to form highly-activated, abrupt and ultra-shallow junctions (USJ). In our previous report of IIT 2006, we succeeded in forming pn junctions less than 10 nm using non-melt double-pulsed green laser. However, a large leakage current under reverse bias was observed consequently due to residual defects in the implanted layer. In this study, a method to form USJ is proposed: a combination of low-temperature solid phase epitaxy and non-melt laser irradiation for B activation. Ge pre-amorphization implantation was performed at energy of 6 keV with a dose of 3x10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}. Then B implantation was performed at energy of 0.2 keV with a dose of 1.2x10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}. Samples were annealed at 400 deg. C for 10 h in nitrogen atmosphere. Subsequently, non-melt laser irradiation was performed at energy of 690 mJ/cm{sup 2} and pulse duration of 100 ns with intervals of 300 ns. As a result, USJ around 10 nm with better crystallinity was successfully formed. And the leakage current of pn diodes was reduced significantly. Moreover, it is proven from secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis that transient enhanced diffusion (TED) of B is specifically suppressed.

  13. Modification of polymer velvet cathode via metallic Mo coating for enhancement of high-current electron emission performances

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Ying; Wang, Bing; Yi, Yong; Xia, Liansheng; Zhang, Huang

    2013-09-15

    The effect of surface Mo coating on the high-current electron emission performances for polymer velvet cathode has been investigated in a diode with A-K gap of 11.5 cm by the combination of time-resolved electrical diagnostic and temporal pressure variation. Compared with uncoated polymer velvet cathode under the single-pulsed emission mode, the Mo-coated one shows lower outgassing levels (∼0.40 Pa L), slower cathode plasma expansion velocity (∼2.30 cm/μs), and higher emission stability as evidences by the change in cathode current, temporal pressure variation, and diode perveance. Moreover, after Mo coating, the emission consistency of the polymer velvet cathode between two adjacent pulses is significantly improved in double-pulsed emission mode with ∼500 ns interval between two pulses, which further confirms the effectiveness of Mo coating for enhancement of electron emission performance of polymer velvet cathodes. These results should be of interest to the high-repetitive high-power microwave systems with cold cathodes.

  14. Metallurgical and process variables affecting the resistance spot weldability of galvanized sheet steels

    SciTech Connect

    Geden, S.A.; Schrock, D.; LaPointe, J.; Eagar, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    Zinc coating integrity, composition, thickness, roughness, and the presence of Fe-Zn intermetallics are being investigated with regard to the mechanism of weld nugget formation. This information is being used in conjunction with the optimization of the weld process parameters; such as upsloping, downsloping, preheating, postheating, and double pulsing, to provide the widest range of acceptable welding conditions. Dynamic inspection monitoring of the welding current, voltage, force, and nugget displacement is being used to follow the progression of nugget formation and to assist in the evaluation of optimum process and material characteristics. It has been found that hot-dipped galvanized materials with coatings which have a very thin Fe-Zn alloy layer, have a wider range of acceptable welding conditions than the commercial galvannealed products, which have a fully alloyed Fe-Zn coating. Small variations in the thickness and roughness of the G90 hot-dipped coatings studied seem to have no significant effect on the welding current range. Upsloping and downsloping of the weld current increases the welding range of hot-dipped products when using truncated cone electrodes, whereas sloped current has no advantage for galvannealed or uncoated materials. Radiused electrodes can increase the lobe width of hot-dipped products but are not beneficial when using sloped current or when welding galvannealed or uncoated materials.

  15. Nucleation and growth in electrodeposition of thin copper films on pyrolytic graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Kinaci, F.S.; Muller, R.H.

    1992-05-01

    Electrodeposition of Cu on graphite electrodes was studied, with emphasis on nucleation. Various ex-situ and in-situ methods were investigated for determining the number density of nuclei. Two direct methods were studied (scanning electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy); indirect determinations included Raman spectroscopy and analysis of potentiostatic current transients. Though some of the techniques correctly predicted the nucleation densities under special conditions, SEM was the most reliable tool. The large scatter in the data necessitated steps to minimize this effect. To electrodeposit Cu on graphite, a nucleation overpotential of 250 mV was measured with cyclic voltammetry; such a large overpotential does not occur on a Pt or on a Cu-covered graphite electrode. The deposition potential is the dominant parameter governing nucleation density. There is a sharp increase in the nucleation density with applied potential. Cu can be deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite only between the nucleation overpotential and the hydrogen evolution potential. To increase the Cu nucleation density, while avoiding excessive H evolution, a double pulse potential technique was used; nucleation densities on the order of 10{sup 10} nuclei/cm{sup 2} were achieved. The use of inhibitors (PVA, benzotriazole) was also investigated. Deposition on conducting polymer electrodes was also studied; initial results with polyaniline show promise. 57 figs, 6 tabs, refs. (DLC)

  16. Preliminary clinical results of pulsed-dye laser therapy for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen; Shapshay, Stanley M.; McGilligan, J. A.; Wang, Zhi; Rebeiz, Elie E.

    1998-07-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a viral disease characterized by the growth of benign tumors on the vocal cords. Standard management of RRP currently consists of CO2 laser microsurgical ablation of the papillomas. Because of the recurrent nature of this disease, patients are often faced with significant cumulative risk of soft tissue complications such as vocal cord scarring. As a minimally traumatic alternative to management of RRP, we have investigated the use of the 585 nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) to cause regression of the papillomas by selective eradication of the tumor microvasculature. Three patients have been treated with the PDL at fluences of 6 J/cm2 (double pulses per irradiated site), 8 J/cm2 (single pulses), and 10 J/cm2 (single pulses), at noncritical areas within the larynx, using a specially designed micromanipulator. Lesions on the true cords were treated with the CO2 laser. Clinical examination showed that PDL treatment appeared to produce complete regression of papillomas. Unlike the sites of lesions treated by the CO2 laser, the epithelial surface at the PDL treatment sites was preserved intact. The presumed mechanism for papilloma regression following PDL treatment involves acute or chronic localized hypoxia caused by loss of tumor microvasculature.

  17. Motor simulation and the coordination of self and other in real-time joint action

    PubMed Central

    Ticini, Luca F.; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone; Keller, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    Joint actions require the integration of simultaneous self- and other-related behaviour. Here, we investigated whether this function is underpinned by motor simulation, that is the capacity to represent a perceived action in terms of the neural resources required to execute it. This was tested in a music performance experiment wherein on-line brain stimulation (double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation, dTMS) was employed to interfere with motor simulation. Pianists played the right-hand part of piano pieces in synchrony with a recording of the left-hand part, which had (Trained) or had not (Untrained) been practiced beforehand. Training was assumed to enhance motor simulation. The task required adaptation to tempo changes in the left-hand part that, in critical conditions, were preceded by dTMS delivered over the right primary motor cortex. Accuracy of tempo adaptation following dTMS or sham stimulations was compared across Trained and Untrained conditions. Results indicate that dTMS impaired tempo adaptation accuracy only during the perception of trained actions. The magnitude of this interference was greater in empathic individuals possessing a strong tendency to adopt others’ perspectives. These findings suggest that motor simulation provides a functional resource for the temporal coordination of one’s own behaviour with others in dynamic social contexts. PMID:23709353

  18. A Large Scale PIV Investigation of a Flap Edge Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Stephen M.; Alkislar, M. B.; Lourenco, L.; Krothapalli, A.

    1996-11-01

    A recent experiment at NASA/Ames Research Center demonstrated the application of a large scale 'on-line' Particle Image Velocimetry, (PIV), in a 7' x 10' wind tunnel. Data was collected for freestream velocities in the range from approximately 40 m/sec to 100 m/sec. The flow field of interest for this investigation was a vortex that was generated by a flap edge. The model was an unswept wing, having a span of 5 ft and a chord, (c), of 2.5 ft., fitted with a half-span Fowler flap. The flap had a chord of 9 inches. Cross plane flow field velocity measurements were made at 0.6 c, (18 inches), downstream of the trailing edge of the flap. The baseline model was also tested with a three quarter-span slat, and a flap edge fence. The fence is designed to reduce noise from high-lift devices. The area of the flow encompassed within this investigation was 40 cm by 40 cm. A high resolution CCD Camera, (2048 pixels x 2048 pixels), was used to capture the double exposure images. The light source used in this experiment was a Spectra Physics PIV-400 Nd:Yag double pulsed laser, and the particle seeding was generated from a Roscoe 4500 fog machine. The velocity data obtained from the experiment was used to determine both the vorticity and the circulation.

  19. 1KHz high average power single-frequency Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Ma, Xiuhua; Li, Shiguang; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    A laser-diode-pumped master oscillator and power amplifier was developed with high efficiency, high average power and high beam quality. The oscillator is an injection-seeding, fiber coupled diode-end-pumped E-O Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, producing single frequency pulse laser output with pulse energy of 8mJ and pulse width of 11ns at a pulse repetition rate of 1KHz,The 1KHz was divided into four chains with frequency of 250Hz, through E-O modulation technology, The power amplifier utilizes conductively-cooling Nd:YAG zigzag slab with two sides' pump architecture at bounce point. Pulse energy of more than 800mJ with pulse widths of 12.6ns was obtained at repetition rate of 250Hz in every amplifier chain, the frequency-doubled pulse energy of 360mJ when KTP crystal was used was obtained at a repetition of 250Hz.

  20. New Results from Frequency and Energy Reference Measurements during the first Test Flight with the Airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar System CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Amediek, A.; Quatrevalet, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) technique is regarded as a suitable means for the measurement of methane and carbon dioxide columns from satellite or aircraft platforms with unprecedented accuracy. Currently, the German-French methane mission MERLIN (Methan Remote Lidar Mission) is prepared. At the same time CHARM-F, an aircraft installed system has been developed at DLR as an airborne demonstrator for a spaceborne greenhouse gas mission. Both use e.g. optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) in a double-pulse mode as the transmitter. Of particular importance for both instruments are the sub-modules required for the frequency stabilization of the transmitter wavelength and, since the IPDA technique, in contrast to DIAL, requires the exact knowledge of the energy ratio of outgoing on-line. The coherence of the lidar transmitter gives rise to speckle effects which have to be considered for the monitoring of the energy ratio of outgoing on- and off-line pulses. For the frequency reference of CHARM-F, a very successful stabilization scheme has been developed which will also serve as the reference for MERLIN. In Spring 2015, CHARM-F was flown aboard the German HALO aircraft for the first time which enables a detailed view on the performance of both the energy calibration and frequency reference subsystems under real flight conditions. As an initial quality check we will compared the airborne results to previous lab measurements which have been performed under stable environmental conditions.

  1. Spectra and Autoionization Lifetimes of Long-Range Rydberg Molecular States of 85 Rb2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carollo, Ryan; Eyler, Edward; Gould, Phillip; Stwalley, William

    2016-05-01

    We present high-resolution autoionization data and modeling of the 7 p long-range Rydberg molecular states in 85 Rb2. Our process excites a photoassociation resonance in the 1 (0g-) state which decays to v'' = 35 and 36 long-range levels of the a3Σu+ state and to the continuum. These bound molecules are then excited via a single UV photon to target states below the 5 s + 7 p asymptote by a frequency-doubled pulse-amplified CW laser with narrow linewidth, ~ 150 MHz. The long-range portion of the bonding potential is formed by the scattering interaction of the Rydberg electron of a perturbed 7 p atom scattering from a nearby ground-state atom. We use time-of-flight to selectively measure molecular ions, which are formed via autoionization. Using a hyperfine model of the a3Σu+ and its coupling to the X1Σg+ state, we are able to place an upper limit on the autoionization linewidth of 450 MHz, corresponding to a lifetime >= 3 . 5 ×10-10 s. Excited-state hyperfine structure suggests a still-lower linewidth (and thus longer lifetime), but its contribution is not yet fully understood. This work is supported by NSF and AFOSR.

  2. Electric field modulation of ultra-high resonance frequency in obliquely deposited [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]0.68-[PbTiO3]0.32(011)/FeCoZr heterostructure for reconfigurable magnetoelectric microwave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuoc, Nguyen N.; Ong, C. K.

    2014-07-01

    The multiferroic heterostructure of FeCoZr/[Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]0.68-[PbTiO3]0.32(011) (PMN-PT) prepared by oblique sputtering deposition technique shows a large electrical tunability of ultra-high ferromagnetic resonance frequency from 7.4 GHz to 12.3 GHz. Moreover, we experimentally demonstrate the possibility of realizing electrically reconfigurable magnetoelectric microwave devices with ultra-low power consumption by employing the heterostructure under different resetting electric fields through a reconfiguration process. In particular, the tunability of the FeCoZr/PMN-PT heterostructure from 8.2 GHz to 11.6 GHz can retain in a remanent state after releasing the resetting electric field. This suggests that the tunable microwave devices based on such heterostructures are permanently reconfigurable by simply using a trigger electric field double-pulse which requires much less energy than that of the conventional ones wherein an electric field needs to be constantly applied during operation.

  3. Correlating single phase flow measurements with observations of trailing vortex cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, S. I.

    1991-03-01

    The single-phase and cavitating-tip vortex shed by an NACA 66-209 rectangular planform, rounded-tip hydrofoil has been studied. Single-phase measurements of instantaneous flow velocity were made by taking double-pulsed holograms of microbubbles moving in and around the vortex core. The tailored air bubble technique of Ooi and Acosta (1983) was employed to measure both the mean and the fluctuating single-phase vortex core static pressure. Cavitation inception was determined visually. The flow in the vortex core is highly unsteady; the rms axial velocity fluctuation can be as high as 0.2 U(infinity). Core pressure fluctuations greater than the freestream dynamic pressure have been observed. These fluctuations are commensurate with the axial velocity unsteadiness. Cavitation inception in saturated water occurs at mean core pressures above the vapor pressure. However, the pressure fluctuations are substantial enough to account for these elevated inception indices. The rapid establishment of a fully developed trailing vortex cavitation when the cavitation number is reduced below inception is attributable to the small variation in mean core pressure with downstream distance. The inception index increases substantially with dissolved air content.

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analyses of tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, D.; Hollmann, E. M.; Doerner, R. P.; Rudakov, D. L.

    2016-02-01

    Tungsten (W) surfaces are analyzed with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Interactions of W with nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) laser pulses are found to be quite different in terms of the ambient Ar gas pressure dependence of the average ablation rate and W I line intensity. Collinear double-pulse LIBS (115 + 115 mJ) using two ns lasers (with interpulse separation Δt 12 = 5.32 μs) improves the signal-to-noise ratio over the whole Ar pressure range P Ar = 6.7 × 10-1 - 6.7 × 104 Pa in contrast with single-pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS) with 230 mJ, where a signal enhancement by a factor of ˜2-3 is obtained only at P Ar > 103 Pa. SP-LIBS with a ns laser has succeeded in obtaining a sharp transition between thin W layer with a thickness of ˜100 nm and the graphite substrate. A He I (587.5 nm) line has been successfully detected with SP-LIBS with a ns laser from W containing He bubbles (˜20-30 nm layers) in the near-surface region.

  5. Closed electron drift in a self-magnetically insulated ion diode

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Isakova, Y. I.

    2013-05-15

    The paper investigates a spiral geometry self-magnetically insulated ion diode with an explosive-emission cathode made from graphite. The experiments have been carried out using the TEMP-4M accelerator, with the accelerator configured to operate in double-pulse mode: the first negative pulse (300–500 ns, 100–150 kV) and the second positive pulse (150 ns, 250–300 kV). The ion beam energy density was 0.4–0.8 J/cm{sup 2} and the beam was composed of carbon ions (80%–85%) and protons. In order to increase the efficiency of ion current generation, we have developed a new diode with a spiral-shaped grounded electrode. Using this geometry, it seems possible to realize closed electron drift in a diode with self-magnetic insulation. In the spiral diode, the efficiency of accelerated ions is increased from 5%–9% (conventional self-insulated diodes) up to 30%–40%. The realization of closed electron drift in the diode increases the efficiency of C{sup +} ion generation up to 40–50 times the Childe-Langmuir limit, which is more than 4 times higher than with other known constructions of self-magnetically insulated diodes.

  6. Motor simulation and the coordination of self and other in real-time joint action.

    PubMed

    Novembre, Giacomo; Ticini, Luca F; Schütz-Bosbach, Simone; Keller, Peter E

    2014-08-01

    Joint actions require the integration of simultaneous self- and other-related behaviour. Here, we investigated whether this function is underpinned by motor simulation, that is the capacity to represent a perceived action in terms of the neural resources required to execute it. This was tested in a music performance experiment wherein on-line brain stimulation (double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation, dTMS) was employed to interfere with motor simulation. Pianists played the right-hand part of piano pieces in synchrony with a recording of the left-hand part, which had (Trained) or had not (Untrained) been practiced beforehand. Training was assumed to enhance motor simulation. The task required adaptation to tempo changes in the left-hand part that, in critical conditions, were preceded by dTMS delivered over the right primary motor cortex. Accuracy of tempo adaptation following dTMS or sham stimulations was compared across Trained and Untrained conditions. Results indicate that dTMS impaired tempo adaptation accuracy only during the perception of trained actions. The magnitude of this interference was greater in empathic individuals possessing a strong tendency to adopt others' perspectives. These findings suggest that motor simulation provides a functional resource for the temporal coordination of one's own behaviour with others in dynamic social contexts. PMID:23709353

  7. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition if the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research questions still outstanding in this area. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J. )

    1990-07-30

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition of the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the Program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research question still outstanding in this area.

  9. Direct evidence of mismatching effect on H emission in laser-induced atmospheric helium gas plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zener Sukra Lie; Koo Hendrik Kurniawan; May On Tjia; Rinda, Hedwig; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Syahrun Nur Abdulmadjid; Nasrullah Idris; Alion Mangasi Marpaung; Marincan Pardede; Jobiliong, Eric; Muliadi Ramli; Heri Suyanto; Fukumoto, Kenichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2013-02-07

    A time-resolved orthogonal double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with helium surrounding gas is developed for the explicit demonstration of time mismatch between the passage of fast moving impurity hydrogen atoms and the formation of thermal shock wave plasma generated by the relatively slow moving major host atoms of much greater masses ablated from the same sample. Although this so-called 'mismatching effect' has been consistently shown to be responsible for the gas pressure induced intensity diminution of hydrogen emission in a number of LIBS measurements using different ambient gases, its explicit demonstration has yet to be reported. The previously reported helium assisted excitation process has made possible the use of surrounding helium gas in our experimental set-up for showing that the ablated hydrogen atoms indeed move faster than the simultaneously ablated much heavier major host atoms as signaled by the earlier H emission in the helium plasma generated by a separate laser prior to the laser ablation. This conclusion is further substantiated by the observed dominant distribution of H atoms in the forward cone-shaped target plasma.

  10. Diagnostics of Laser Produced Plume Under Carbon Nanotube Growth Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Holmes, William; Scott, Carl D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic data obtained from the plume of a graphite composite target during carbon nanotube production by the double-pulse laser oven method. The insitu emission spectrum (300 to 650 nm) is recorded at different locations upstream of the target and at different delay times from the lasers (IR and green). Spectral features are identified as emissions from C2 (Swan System: a (sup 3)pi(sub g) - delta (sup 3)pi(sub u) and C3 (Comet Head System: A (sup 1)pi(sub u) - chi (sup 1)sigma(sub u) (sup +). Experimental spectra are compared with computed spectra to estimate vibrational temperatures of excited state C2 in the range of 2500 to 4000 kappa The temporal evolution of the 510 nm band of C2 is monitored for two target positions in various locations which shows confinement of the plume in the inner tube and increase in plume velocity with temperature. The excitation spectra of C2 are obtained by using a dye laser to pump the (0,1) transition of the Swan System and collecting the Laser Induced Fluorescence signal from C2 These are used to obtain "ground-state" rotational and vibrational temperatures which are close to the oven temperature. Images of the plume are also collected and are compared with the spectral measurements.

  11. Double laser LIBS and micro-XRF spectroscopy applied to characterize materials coming from the Greek-Roman theater of Taormina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberghina, Maria Francesca; Barraco, Rosita; Brai, Maria; Schillaci, Tiziano; Tranchina, Luigi

    2009-07-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an applied physical technique that has shown, in recent years, its great potential for rapid qualitative analysis of materials. The possibility to implement a portable instrument that perform LIBS analysis makes this technique particularly useful for in situ analysis in the field of cultural heritages. The aim of this work is to compare the results, obtained by LIBS measurements with X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) ones, on calcareous and refractory materials coming from the Greek-Roman theater of Taormina. Calibration curves for LIBS and XRF were obtained by measuring certified reference materials and using them as standards. LIBS measurements were performed with a new mobile instrument Modı (Mobile Double pulse Instrument for LIBS Analysis) that use an innovative experimental set-up, based on the use of two suitably retarded laser pulses that greatly improves the potential of this technique for accurate quantitative analysis. XRF analyses were performed with a portable instrument ArtTAX that use a collimated X-Ray beam equipped with a fluxing system of helium gas on the detection path to the aim to detect the lighter elements with a good accuracy. LIBS results have shown that this technique is highly subjected to the sample chemical and physical characteristics.

  12. Chlorine detection in cement with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in the infrared and ultraviolet spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlen, Christoph Dominic; Wiens, Eugen; Noll, Reinhard; Wilsch, Gerd; Reichling, Kenji

    2009-10-01

    A significant parameter to monitor the status of concrete buildings like bridges or parking garages is the determination of the depth profile of the chlorine concentration below the exposed concrete surface. This information is required to define the needed volume of restoration for a construction. Conventional methods like wet chemical analysis are time- and cost-intensive so an alternative method is developed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The idea is to deploy LIBS to analyze drill cores by scanning the sample surface with laser pulses. Chlorine spectral lines in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV)-range were studied for chlorine detection in hydrated cement samples. The excitation energies of these spectral lines are above 9.2 eV. Hence high plasma temperatures and pulse energies in the range of some hundred millijoules are needed to induce sufficient line intensity levels at the required working distance. To further increase the line intensity and to lower the detection limit (LOD) of chlorine a measuring chamber is used where different ambient pressures and gases can be chosen for the measurements. The influences on the line intensity for pressures between 5 mbar and 400 mbar using helium as process gas and the influence of different laser burst modi like single and collinear double pulses are investigated. For the first time a LOD according to DIN 32 645 of 0.1 mass% was achieved for chlorine in hydrated cement using the UV line 134.72 nm.

  13. Optical alignment and diagnostics for the ATF microundulator FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fang, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The microundulator FEL oscillator has a wiggler period of 8.8 mm, and is designed for initial lasing at 0.5 microns with a 50 MeV electron beam. The design and performance of the optical diagnostics and alignment are discussed. A HeNe coalignment laser is mode-matched to the resonator cavity for transverse alignment. Interference fringes are observed in the cavity with a pellicle, allowing an alignment tolerance of +/- 10 micro-radians. The same pellicle is used to produce transition radiation by the electron beam. This enables precise transverse alignment of the electron beam to the resonator axis. The HeNe laser is also used to align the wiggler by backlighting its bore. This method aligns the wiggler to the optic axis to a tolerance of +/- 50 microns. A frequency-doubled,pulsed Nd:YAG laser that produces the electron bunch train is also mode-matched to the FEL cavity. The cavity length is adjusted to resonate with this pulse train. Light from the FEL is transported to the diagnostic room using two separate paths: one for the single pass spontaneous emission, and the second for the multipass cavity output. Several diagnostics (CCD camera, photodiode, photomultiplier tube, joulemeter, spectrometer, and streak camera) are used to characterize the light. These instruments measure light energy per micropulse ranging from 10 femto-Joules to 10 micro-Joules.

  14. Flux amplification and sustainment of ST plasmas by multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection on HIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, T.; Ishihara, M.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2010-11-01

    The Helicity Injected Spherical Torus (HIST) device has been developed towards high-current start up and sustainment by Multi-pulsed Coaxial Helicity Injection (M-CHI) method. Multiple pulses operation of the coaxial plasma gun can build the magnetic field of STs and spheromak plasmas in a stepwise manner. So far, successive gun pulses on SSPX at LLNL were demonstrated to maintain the magnetic field of spheromak in a quasi-steady state against resistive decay [1]. The resistive 3D-MHD numerical simulation [2] for STs reproduced the current amplification by the M-CHI method and confirmed that stochastic magnetic field was reduced during the decay phase. By double pulsed operation on HIST, the plasma current was effectively amplified against the resistive decay. The life time increases up to 10 ms which is longer than that in the single CHI case (4 ms). The edge poloidal fields last between 0.5 ms and 6 ms like a repetitive manner. During the second driven phase, the toroidal ion flow is driven in the same direction as the plasma current as well as in the initial driven phase. At the meeting, we will discuss a current amplification mechanism based on the merging process with the plasmoid injected secondly from the gun. [1] B. Hudson et al., Phys. Plasmas Vol.15, 056112 (2008). [2] Y. Kagei et al., J. Plasma Fusion Res. Vol.79, 217 (2003).

  15. Intense ion beam generation in a diode with explosive emission cathode in self-magnetically insulated mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, Alexander; Isakova, Yulia; Khailov, Iliya

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a review of experimental studies on pulsed intense ion beam generation in self-magnetically insulated diodes with an explosive emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (300-500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (150 ns, 250-300 kV). The ion beam energy density is 0.5-5 J/cm2 depending on the diode geometry. We have developed a new spiral geometry of the diode. In a spiral diode it is possible to increase the efficiency from 5-9% (previously studied diodes) up to 20-25%. We conducted a study on shot-to-shot variation in the ion beam parameters. It was found that the standard deviation of the energy density does not exceed 11%, whilst the same variation for ion current density was 20-30%. Focusing properties of an ion beam have been significantly improved by using a metal shield on the grounded electrode. Use of the shield on the grounded electrode provides decrease in the beam divergence from 11° to 7.5-8°.

  16. Tomography of homogenized laser-induced plasma by Radon transform technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S.; Demidov, A.; Gornushkin, I. B.; Schmid, T.; Rössler, R.; Huber, N.; Panne, U.; Pedarnig, J. D.

    2016-09-01

    Tomography of a laser-induced plasma in air is performed by inverse Radon transform of angle-resolved plasma images. Plasmas were induced by single laser pulses (SP), double pulses (DP) in collinear geometry, and by a combination of single laser pulses with pulsed arc discharges (SP-AD). Images of plasmas on metallurgical steel slags were taken at delay times suitable for calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (CF-LIBS). Delays ranged from few microseconds for SP and DP up to tens of microseconds for SP-AD excitation. The white-light and the spectrally resolved emissivity ε(x,y,z) was reconstructed for the three plasma excitation schemes. The electron number density Ne(x,y,z) and plasma temperature Te(x,y,z) were determined from Mg and Mn emission lines in reconstructed spectra employing the Saha-Boltzmann plot method. The SP plasma revealed strongly inhomogeneous emissivity and plasma temperature. Re-excitation of plasma by a second laser pulse (DP) and by an arc discharge (SP-AD) homogenized the plasma and reduced the spatial variation of ε and Te. The homogenization of a plasma is a promising approach to increase the accuracy of calibration-free LIBS analysis of complex materials.

  17. VUV-VIS imaging of high-pressure pulsed discharge in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treshchalov, Alexey B.; Lissovski, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial-time behavior of transversally excited pulsed volume discharge in argon is investigated by spontaneous emission spectroscopy and different imaging techniques. VUV Ar II* emission, UV-VIS continuum and Ar* red lines are used for direct monitoring of discharge homogeneity in the breakdown and recombination stages. Experimental data indicate that Ar* atoms and Ar II* excimers are created exclusively in the positive column of the discharge, not in near-cathode zones. These zones (cathode sheath and negative glow), however, are the main sources of UV-VIS continuum. The discharge is homogeneous during the first powerful breakdown pulse and fills the whole space between electrodes. Secondary excitation pulses initiate oscillations of plasma emission and longitudinal fragmentation of the discharge into separate zones. Fragmentation is connected with dynamical change of the electron emittance of heated and cold electrodes. Additional electrons, produced during secondary excitation pulses, convert effectively the reservoir of long-lived triplet Ar II* molecules to fast-emitted singlet Ar II* excimers - sharp spikes of VUV (126 nm) emission are observed. Double-pulse discharge pumping regime is suggested for easier achievement of the lasing threshold for rare gas excimer lasers.

  18. Nanosecond fluorescence microscopy. Emission kinetics of fura-2 in single cells.

    PubMed Central

    Keating, S M; Wensel, T G

    1991-01-01

    A microscope based time-correlated single photon counting instrument has been constructed to measure fluorescence intensity and emission anisotropy decays from fluorophores in single cells on a nanosecond time scale. The sample is excited and the emission collected using epi-illumination optics with frequency-doubled pulses from the cavity-dumped output of a synchronously pumped dye laser serving as an excitation source. Collection of decays from a single cell is possible due to the presence of an iris in the emission path that can be reduced to less than the diameter of a single cell. Using the instrument the decay of 60 nM 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene was measured, demonstrating that adequate data for lifetime analysis can be recorded from fewer 10(3) molecules of the fluorophore in an illuminated volume of 23 fl. In addition, the intensity and anisotropy decays of fura-2 in single adherent cells and in suspensions of fura-2 loaded cells in suspension, although the relative amplitudes and decay constants vary somewhat from cell to cell. The results indicate that a significant but variable fraction of fura-2 is bound to relatively immobile macromolecular components in these cells. PMID:2015383

  19. Batrachotoxin uncouples gating charge immobilization from fast Na inactivation in squid giant axons.

    PubMed Central

    Tanguy, J; Yeh, J Z

    1988-01-01

    The fast inactivation of sodium currents and the immobolization of sodium gating charge are thought to be closely coupled to each other. This notion was tested in the squid axon in which kinetics and steady-state properties of the gating charge movement were compared before and after removal of the Na inactivation by batrachotoxin (BTX), pronase, or chloramine-T. The immobilization of gating charge was determined by measuring the total charge movement (QON) obtained by integrating the ON gating current (Ig,ON) using a double pulse protocol. After removal of the fast inactivation with pronase or chloramine-T, the gating charge movement was no longer immobilized. In contrast, after BTX modification, the channels still exhibited an immobilization of the gating charge (QON) with an onset time course and voltage dependence similar to that for the activation process. These results show that BTX can uncouple the charge immobilization from the fast Na inactivation mechanism, suggesting that the Na gating charge movement can be immobilized independently of the inactivation of the channel. PMID:2852036

  20. Features of silicon-containing coatings deposition from ablation plasma formed by a powerful ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, R.; Kholodnaya, G.; Ponomarev, D.; Remnev, G.; Khailov, I.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the research of features of silicon-containing coatings deposition from ablation plasma, which is formed by a powerful ion beam at the influence on a microsized pressed powder of SiO2. Experimental research have been conducted with a laboratory setup based on a TEMP-4M pulsed ion accelerator in a double-pulse forming mode; the first is negative (300-500 ns, 100-150 kV), and the second is positive (150 ns, 250-300 kV). A beam composition: C+ ions (60-70 %) and protons, the ion current density on the target is 25±5 A/cm2. An electron self-magnetically insulated diode has been used to generate the ion beam in the TEMP-4M accelerator. The properties of obtained silicon-containing films have been analyzed with the help of IR spectroscopy. A surface structure has been studied by the method of scanning electron microscopy.

  1. Electrical defects in AlGaN and InAlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, D.; Leach, Jacob H.; Kovalskii, Vladimir A.; Fan, Qian; Xie, Jingqiao; Morkoç, Hadis

    2009-02-01

    Compound semiconductors based on GaN have multiple functional applications. Useful compositions include GaN, and ternary and quaternary compositions of (AlGaIn)N. Defects arising from lattice mismatch, point defects, or impurities may act as electrical trapping centers and degrade device efficiency. Current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, thermal admittance spectroscopy (TAS), and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements are applied to characterize the defects in Al0.40Ga0.80N and In0.18Al0.82N in this report. Broad peaks with a shoulder at high temperature dominate the DLTS spectra in each of the materials. An acceptor trap associated with a dislocation appears at 340 K in AlGaN. The defect has an energy of 0.2 eV and capture cross section of 10-21 cm2. A second trap at 0.35 eV, 10-14 cm2 appears in the TAS measurements in addition to the trap at 0.2 eV. Defects in InAlN are dominated by a peak near 150 K. Two traps appear in the TAS measurements. Both traps in the InAlN are acceptors, based on a lack of field dependent emission rates using double pulse DLTS (DDLTS). The two energy levels in InAlN appear to be coupled, with only one state occupied at a time.

  2. SOGGY: solvent-optimized double gradient spectroscopy for water suppression. A comparison with some existing techniques.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bao D; Meng, Xi; Donovan, Kevin J; Shaka, A J

    2007-02-01

    Excitation sculpting, a general method to suppress unwanted magnetization while controlling the phase of the retained signal [T.L. Hwang, A.J. Shaka, Water suppression that works. Excitation sculpting using arbitrary waveforms and pulsed field gradients, J. Magn. Reson. Ser. A 112 (1995) 275-279] is a highly effective method of water suppression for both biological and small molecule NMR spectroscopy. In excitation sculpting, a double pulsed field gradient spin echo forms the core of the sequence and pairing a low-power soft 180 degrees (-x) pulse with a high-power 180 degrees (x) all resonances except the water are flipped and retained, while the water peak is attenuated. By replacing the hard 180 degrees pulse in the double echo with a new phase-alternating composite pulse, broadband and adjustable excitation of large bandwidths with simultaneous high water suppression is obtained. This "Solvent-Optimized Gradient-Gradient Spectroscopy" (SOGGY) sequence is a reliable workhorse method for a wide range of practical situations in NMR spectroscopy, optimizing both solute sensitivity and water suppression. PMID:17126049

  3. Effective desynchronization with a resetting pulse train followed by a single pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tass, P. A.

    2001-07-01

    A combined pulse train, single-pulse stimulation technique is presented here which makes it possible to effectively desynchronize a cluster of globally coupled phase oscillators in the presence of noise. Such a composite stimulus consists of a resetting short periodic high-frequent pulse train followed by a desynchronizing single pulse. The pulse train entrains and, thus, restarts the collective oscillation independently of its initial dynamic state. With a fixed delay after the pulse train, a single pulse is delivered which desynchronizes the cluster by hitting it in a vulnerable state. After the desynchronization the cluster wants to become synchronized again since the incoherent state is unstable. Nevertheless, repeated administration of the same composite stimulus blocks the resynchronization. Compared to double-pulse phase resetting and with regard to neurological applications, this method is particularly mild and can be applied to effectively maintain incoherency in a population of oscillatory neurons that tend to synchronize their firing. The composite stimulation approach sheds new light on the mechanism of standard deep brain stimulation and suggests an improved, milder and demand-controlled deep brain stimulation technique for patients with Parkinson's disease or essential tremor.

  4. First Airborne Lidar Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Applying the MERLIN Demonstrator CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amediek, Axel; Büdenbender, Christian; Ehret, Gerhard; Fix, Andreas; Gerbig, Christoph; Kiemle, Chritstoph; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Wirth, Martin

    2016-04-01

    CHARM-F is the new airborne four-wavelengths lidar for simultaneous soundings of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Due to its high technological conformity it is also a demonstrator for MERLIN, the French-German satellite mission providing a methane lidar. MERLIN's Preliminary Design Review was successfully passed recently. The launch is planned for 2020. First CHARM-F measurements were performed in Spring 2015 onboard the German research aircraft HALO. The aircraft's maximum flight altitude of 15 km and special features of the lidar, such as a relatively large laser ground spot, result in data similar to those obtained by a spaceborne system. The CHARM-F and MERLIN lidars are designed in the IPDA (integrated path differential absorption) configuration using short double pulses, which gives column averaged gas mixing ratios between the system and ground. The successfully completed CHARM-F flight measurements provide a valuable dataset, which supports the retrieval algorithm development for MERLIN notably. Furthermore, the dataset allows detailed analyses of measurement sensitivities, general studies on the IPDA principle and on system design questions. These activities are supported by another instrument onboard the aircraft during the flight campaign: a cavity ring down spectrometer, providing in-situ data of carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor with high accuracy and precision, which is ideal for validation purposes of the aircraft lidar. For the near future, detailed characterizations of CHARM-F are planned, further support of the MERLIN design, as well as the scientific aircraft campaign CoMet.

  5. Airborne Lidar LEANDRE II for Water-Vapor Profiling in the Troposphere. I. System description.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, D; Quaglia, P; Flamant, C; Meissonnier, M; Pelon, J

    2001-07-20

    The airborne differential absorption lidar LEANDRE II, developed for profiling tropospheric water-vapor mixing ratios, is described. The emitter is a flash-lamp-pumped alexandrite laser, which operates in a double-pulse, dual-wavelength mode in the 727-736 nm spectral domain. Two 50-mJ successive on-line and off-line pulses with an output linewidth of 2.4 x 10(-2) cm(-1) and a spectral purity larger than 99.99% are emitted at a 50-mus time interval. The spectral positioning is controlled in real time by a wavemeter with an absolute accuracy of 5 x 10(-3) cm(-1). The receiver is a 30-cm aperture telescope with a 3.5-mrad field of view and a 1-nm filter bandwidth. These instrument characteristics are defined for measuring the water-vapor mixing ratio with an accuracy better than 0.5 g kg(-1) in the first 5 km of the atmosphere with a range resolution of 300 m, integration on 100 shots, and an instrumental systematic error of less than 2%. The sensitivity study and first results are presented in part II [Appl. Opt. 40, 3462-3475 (2001)]. PMID:18360370

  6. Applications Of Endoscopic Holography Through Fiber Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.; Friedman, M. D.; Epstein, Max

    1989-10-01

    Holographic endoscopy or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. It can be utilized in holographic imaging or interferometry inside natural cavities of the body. In imaging, the ability to record a three-dimensional, large focal depth, high resolution image of internal organs and tissue may greatly enhance the detection of disease and abnormality. With contact recording endoholography it is possible to obtain high resolution holographic recordings which can be examined microscopically. In this technique, a specially designed endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination where Denisyuk holograms are recorded on film at the endoscope's distal end. The holograms are viewed under a stereomicroscope with high magnification, allowing for the observation of individual cells. Specific dyes are used to enhance the contrast of the tissue prior to the recording of the holographic images. In endoholographic interferometry, the use of conventional multi-fiber imaging structures is sufficient to obtain an adequate recording of interference patterns. The use of conventional fiberoptic imaging structures for holographic investigations of displacement and vibration is demonstrated. Image-plane holograms are formed at the proximal output end of an imaging multifiber. Pairs of double-pulsed holograms of dynamic events are recorded, one through the multifiber, the other in a conventional manner as a standard of reference. The fringes of both holograms are practically identical. The ability to perform measurements in holographic interferometry through optical fibers should lead to further developments in medical as well as industrial applications.

  7. Statistical analysis of the ion beam production in a self magnetically insulated diode

    SciTech Connect

    Isakova, Y. I.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Khaylov, I. P.

    2013-09-15

    The paper presents the results of a study on shot to shot variation in energy density of an ion beam formed by a self-magnetically insulated diode with an explosive emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: plasma formation occurs during the first pulse (negative polarity, 300–500 ns, 100–150 kV), and ion extraction and acceleration during the second pulse (positive polarity, 150 ns, 250–300 kV). Crucially, it was found that the standard deviation of energy density does not exceed 11%, whilst the same variation for ion current density was 20%–30%, suggesting the presence of neutrals in the beam. This idea is further supported by the fact that ion current density is only weakly dependant on the accelerating voltage and other output parameters of the accelerator (coefficient of determination < 0.3), whilst the correlation between the energy density of the beam and the output parameters is strong (coefficient of determination > 0.9). We attribute the neutral component as being due to charge exchange between accelerated ions and neutral molecules from a neutral layer near the anode surface. Implementation using a self-magnetically insulated diode with an explosive-emission cathode, having an operational lifetime of up to 10{sup 7} shots, has promising prospects for various technological applications.

  8. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm².

    PubMed

    Isakova, Yu; Pushkarev, A; Khailov, I; Zhong, H

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm(2), and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm(2)), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied. PMID:26233370

  9. ,* Copper transport and accumulation in spruce stems (picea abies(L.) Karsten) revelaed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Krajcarova, Dr. Lucie; Novotny, Dr. Karel; Babula, Dr. Petr; Pravaznik, Dr Ivo; Kucerova, Dr. Petra; Vojtech, Dr. Adam; Martin, Madhavi Z; Kizek, Dr. Rene; Kaiser, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in double pulse configuration (DP LIBS) was used for scanning elemental spatial distribution in annual terminal stems of spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karsten). Cross sections of stems cultivated in Cu2+ solution of different concentrations were prepared and analyzed by DP LIBS. Raster scanning with 150 m spatial resolution was set and 2D (2-dimentional) maps of Cu and Ca distribution were created on the basis of the data obtained. Stem parts originating in the vicinity of the implementation of the cross sections were mineralized and subsequently Cu and Ca contents were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results provide quantitative information about overall concentration of the elements in places, where LIBS measurements were performed. The fluorescence pictures were created to compare LIBS distribution maps and the fluorescence intensity (or the increase in autofluorescence) was used for the comparison of ICP-MS quantitative results. Results from these three methods can be utilized for quantitative measurements of copper ions transport in different plant compartments in dependence on the concentration of cultivation medium and/or the time of cultivation.

  10. Parametric Study of Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Holmes, William; Hadjiev, Victor; Scott, Carl

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes form a new class of nanomaterials that are presumed to have extraordinary mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. The single wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are estimated to be 100 times stronger than steel with 1/6th the weight; electrical carrying capacity better than copper and thermal conductivity better than diamond. Applications of these SWNTs include possible weight reduction of aerospace structures, multifunctional materials, nanosensors and nanoelectronics. Double pulsed laser vaporization process produces SWNTs with the highest percentage of nanotubes in the output material. The normal operating conditions include a green laser pulse closely followed by an infrared laser pulse. Lasers ab late a metal-containing graphite target located in a flow tube maintained in an oven at 1473K with argon flow of 100 sccm at a 500 Torr pressure. In the present work a number of production runs were carried out, changing one operating condition at a time. We have studied the effects of nine parameters, including the sequencing of the laser pulses, pulse separation times, laser energy densities, the type of buffer gas used, oven temperature, operating pressure, flow rate and inner flow tube diameters. All runs were done using the same graphite target. The collected nanotube material was characterized by a variety of analytical techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Results indicate trends that could be used to optimize the process and increase the efficiency of the production process.

  11. Non/destructive testing (NDT) and vibration analysis of defects in components and structures using laser diode shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinchen, Wolfgang; Gan, Ymin; Kupfer, Gerhard; Mackel, Peter

    2004-09-01

    One of the most interesting and useful applications of shearographic interferometry is the detection, visualisation and measurement of the mechanical vibration of opaque objects. Until now the time-average shearography is a qualitative interferometric method for determining the oscillating loadings. The detected gradient of the deformation can be determined by changing the shearing distance. The fringes of the moving object are often faded and become clearer by filtering with FFT and against an uniform background intensity. The fringes formed in time-average shearography of sinusoidal motions have an irradiance described by the Bessel function Jo2. Quantitative interpretation of the shearogram requires a more precise analysis. Such a technique for extending or decreasing the sensitivity of vibration measurements and for determining the relative phase of vibration across the object surface is the stroboscopic illumination. Stroboscopic shearographic interferometry is a technique which compensates the deficiencies of time-average shearography at the expense of some increase in experimental complexity. However more complex is the recording of stroboscopic shearograms by using two pulses from a double-pulse laser.

  12. Development of the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE): An Advanced Airborne DIAL Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alvah S., Jr.; Brown, Kevin E.; Hall, William M.; Barnes, James C.; Edwards, William C.; Petway, Larry B.; Little, Alan D.; Luck, William S., Jr.; Jones, Irby W.; Antill, Charles W., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) Instrument is the first fully-engineered, autonomous Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) System for the measurement of water vapor in the troposphere (aerosol and cloud measurements are included). LASE uses a double-pulsed Ti:Sapphire laser for the transmitter with a 30 ns pulse length and 150 mJ/pulse. The laser beam is "seeded" to operate on a selected water vapor absorption line in the 815-nm region using a laser diode and an onboard absorption reference cell. A 40 cm diameter telescope collects the backscattered signals and directs them onto two detectors. LASE collects DIAL data at 5 Hz while onboard a NASA/Ames ER-2 aircraft flying at altitudes from 16-21 km. LASE was designed to operate autonomously within the environment and physical constraints of the ER-2 aircraft and to make water vapor profile measurements across the troposphere to better than 10% accuracy. LASE has flown 19 times during the development of the instrument and the validation of the science data. This paper describes the design, operation, and reliability of the LASE Instrument.

  13. Effect of temperature on acoustic communication: sound production in the croaking gourami (labyrinth fishes).

    PubMed

    Ladich, Friedrich; Schleinzer, Günter

    2015-04-01

    Sound communication comprising the production and detection of acoustic signals is affected by ambient temperature in ectothermic animals. In the present study we investigated the effects of temperature on sound production and characteristics in the croaking gourami Trichopsis vittata, a freshwater fish from Southeast Asia possessing a highly specialized sound-generating mechanism found only in a single genus. The croaking gourami produces pulsed sounds by stretching and plucking two enhanced pectoral fin tendons during rapid pectoral fin beating. Croaking sounds typically consist of a series of double-pulsed bursts with main energies between 1 and 1.5 kHz. Sounds were recorded during dyadic contests between two males at three different temperatures (25°, 30° and 35°C). The mean dominant frequency increased with rising temperature from 1.18 to 1.33 kHz, whereas temporal characteristics decreased. The sound interval dropped from 492 to 259 ms, the burst period from 51 to 35 ms and the pulse period from 5.8 to 5.1 ms. In contrast, the number of sounds and number of bursts within a sound were not affected by temperature. The current study shows that spectral and temporal characteristics of sounds are affected in different ways by temperature in the croaking gourami, whereas the numbers of sounds and bursts remain unaffected. We conclude that acoustic communication in gouramis is affected by changes in ambient temperature. PMID:25433336

  14. Compositional Heterogeneity in Orgueil SiC: Further Comparisons with Murchison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huss, G. R.; Deloule, E.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1993-07-01

    Interstellar SiC recovered from primitive chondrites is characterized by large enrichments in ^13C and ^14N, and by Si isotope compositions distinct from solar that define a linear array on a Si 3-isotope plot [1-3]. While most SiC >2 micrometers fit this description, the total population of presolar SiC is not homogeneous. A comparison [4] of C, N, Mg, and Si isotopic characteristic of 2-6 micrometer SiC crystals from Orgueil with Murchison SiC [2,3] found two significant differences: 1) Orgueil SiC do not exhibit the clustering on either an Si 3-isotope plot or on a plot of delta^29Si vs. delta^13C shown by large Murchison SiC, and 2) there were no Orgueil SiC with delta^15N between 0 and -350 per mil. The interpretation of these differences was tempered by the relatively small number of Orgueil SiC that had been measured. We report here new Si and C isotope data for an additional 70 Orgueil SiC grains, making a total of ~110 grains measured to date. We have extended our study to smaller grains, measuring 15 grains less than 2 micrometers. The great majonty (~90%) of Orgueil SiC have roughly similar isotopic compositions and define the main population (Fig. 1). Among the remaining SiC grains, one is extremely enriched in ^28Si (Fig. 1 inset) and extremely depleted in ^13C, like the Murchison 'X' grains [3]. Four grains have delta^13C<0 and Si compositions similar to Murchison 'Y' grains [5]. Two Orgueil SiC ('Z' grains) have delta^29Si ~-75 per mil and delta^30Si ~-34per mil and fall in a previously unoccupied region of Si isotope space. Unlike 'Y' grains, 'Z' grains have delta^13C > 0. Eight Orgueil SiC have extreme enrichments in ^13C (8000 per mil < delta^13C < 3000 per mil); six of the eight lie on the ^28Si-rich end of the Si isotope array (Fig. 1), five with delta^29Si <--4 per mil and the sixth with delta^29Si=13 per mil. The new data reveal a compositional variability among Orgueil SiC larger than ~2 micrometers at least as great as that found for

  15. The fate of the solid matter orbiting HR 4796A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; Ghez, A. M.; White, Russell J.; Mccarthy, D. W.; Smith, R. C.; Martin, P. G.

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained optical spectra, 2 micrometers speckle images, and an upper limit to the 800 micrometers flux for HR 4796A, and optical spectra for its physical companion separated by 7.7 arcsecs, HR 4796B. We detect H-beta, H-gamma, and the calcium H and K lines in emission from HR 4796B; these data are consistent with the hypothesis that it is later than spectral type M2 and lies substantially above the main-sequence. From the location of HR 4796B on the H-R diagram, the estimated age of this star is 3 x 10(exp 6) yr, and assuming this age for the entire system, we find from our 2 micrometers speckle data that there is no close stellar companion to HR 4796A (M greater than 0.125 solar mass) between 11 and 120 AU from the star. From the IRAS and ground-based photometry, it seems that there is a hole in the dust distribution around HR 4796A with an inner radius of between approximately 40 and approximately 200 AU. The observed circumstellar dust grains, which lie at D greater than 40 AU from the star, are likely to be at least 3 micrometers in radius in order to be gravitationally bound to HR 4796A, if the circumstellar dust cloud is optically thin. Since they are larger than almost all interstellar grains, the circumstellar dust grains probably grew by coalescence. Because the existing grains at D greater than 40 AU have undergone measurable coalescence, it is possible that particles that presumably once existed at D less than 40 AU, where the collision times were shorter than at D greater than 40 AU, grew into macroscopic objects. A likely explanation for the dust hole is that there is a companion located at about half the inner radius of the dust hole, or between 20 and 100 AU from the star. If such a companion exists, it must have a mass less than 0.125 solar mass. Since grain coalescence has occurred, this putative companion possibly could be a planet.

  16. JWST Mirror Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Since the initial Design Studies leading to JWST, Mirror Technology was identified as a (if not the) critical capability necessary to enable the next generation of large aperture space telescopes required to achieve the science goals of imaging the earliest galaxies and proto-galaxies after the big bang. Specific telescope architectures were explored via three independent design concept studies conducted during the summer of 1996. Achieving the desired science objectives required a never before demonstrated space telescope capability, one with an 8 meter class primary mirror that is diffraction limited at 2 micrometers and operating in deep space at temperatures well below 70K. Beryllium was identified in the NASA "Yardstick" design as the preferred material because of its ability to provide stable optical performance in the anticipated thermal environment as well as its excellent specific stiffness. Because of launch vehicle constraints, two very significant architectural constraints were placed upon the telescope: segmentation and areal density. Each of these directly resulted in specific technology capability requirements. First, because the maximum launch vehicle payload fairing diameter is approximately 4.5 meters, the only way to launch an 8 meter class mirror is to segment it, fold it and deploy it on orbit - resulting in actuation and control requirements. Second, because of launch vehicle mass limits, the primary mirror allocation was only 1000 kg - resulting in a maximum areal density specification of 20 kilograms per square meter.

  17. Measuring the Magnetic Center Behavior of an ILC Superconducting Quadrupole Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Cherrill M.; Adolphsen, Chris; Berndt, Martin; Jensen, David R.; Rogers, Ron; Sheppard, John C.; Lorant, Steve St; Weber, Thomas B.; Weisend, John, II; Brueck, Heinrich; Toral, Fernando; /Madrid, CIEMAT

    2011-02-07

    The main linacs of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) consist of superconducting cavities operated at 2K. The accelerating cavities are contained in a contiguous series of cryogenic modules that also house the main linac quadrupoles, thus the quadrupoles also need to be superconducting. In an early ILC design, these magnets are about 0.6 m long, have cos (2{theta}) coils, and operate at constant field gradients up to 60 T/m. In order to preserve the small beam emittances in the ILC linacs, the e+ and e- beams need to traverse the quadrupoles near their magnetic centers. A quadrupole shunting technique is used to measure the quadrupole alignment with the beams; this process requires the magnetic centers move by no more than about 5 micrometers when their strength is changed. To determine if such tight stability is achievable in a superconducting quadrupole, we at SLAC measured the magnetic center motions in a prototype ILC quadrupole built at CIEMAT in Spain. A rotating coil technique was used with a better than 0.1 micrometer precision in the relative field center position, and less than a 2 micrometer systematic error over 30 minutes. This paper describes the warm-bore cryomodule that houses the quadrupole in its Helium vessel, the magnetic center measurement system, the measured center data and strength and harmonics magnetic data.

  18. Flat-plate solar array project process development area process research of non-CZ silicon material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Three sets of samples were laser processed and then cell processed. The laser processing was carried out on P-type and N-type web at laser power levels from 0.5 joule/sq cm to 2.5 joule/sq cm. Six different liquid dopants were tested (3 phosphorus dopants, 2 boron dopants, 1 aluminum dopant). The laser processed web strips were fabricated into solar cells immediately after laser processing and after various annealing cycles. Spreading resistance measurements made on a number of these samples indicate that the N(+)P (phosphorus doped) junction is approx. 0.2 micrometers deep and suitable for solar cells. However, the P(+)N (or P(+)P) junction is very shallow ( 0.1 micrometers) with a low surface concentration and resulting high resistance. Due to this effect, the fabricated cells are of low efficiency. The maximum efficiency attained was 9.6% on P-type web after a 700 C anneal. The main reason for the low efficiency was a high series resistance in the cell due to a high resistance back contact.

  19. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Ida and Dactyl V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 243 Ida and a spectrum of the asteroid satellite Dactyl (Ida I) as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on August 28, 1993. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the 243 Ida system. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files idu002tn.qub, idu005tn.qub, idu006tn.qub, idu007tn.qub, idu019tn.qub, idu020tn.qub, idu022tn.qub, idu028tn.qub, idu032tn.qub, idu033tn.qub, and idu035tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3-TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the Jovian tour of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance and incidence/flux measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  20. In-situ x-ray microscopy of phase and composition distributions in metal alloys during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1999-07-01

    This research applies a state of the art x-ray transmission microscope, to image the solidification of metallic or semiconductor alloys in real-time. By employing a hard x-ray source with sub-micron dimensions, resolutions of up to 2 micrometers can be obtained with magnifications of over 800 X. Specimen growth conditions were optimized and the best imaging technologies applied to maintain x-ray image resolution, contrast and sensitivity. In addition, a special furnace design is required to permit controlled growth conditions and still offer maximum resolution and image contrast. We have successfully imaged in real-time: interfacial morphologies, phase growth, coalescence, incorporation of phases into the growing interface, and the solute boundary layer in the liquid at the solid-liquid interface. We have also measured true local growth rates and can evaluate segregation structures in the solid; a form of in situ metallography. Composition gradients within the specimen cause variations in absorption of the flux such that the final image represents a spatial integration of composition. During this study, the growth of secondary phase fibers and lamellae form eutectic and monotectic alloys have been imaged during solidification, in real-time, for the first time in bulk metal alloys.

  1. Green evolution and dynamic adaptations revealed by genomes of the marine picoeukaryotes Micromonas

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, Alexandra Z.; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Mock, Thomas; Rouze, Pierre; Simmons, Melinda P.; Aerts, Andrea L.; Allen, Andrew E.; Cuvelier, Marie L.; Derelle, Evelyne; Everett, Meredieht V.; Foulon, Elodie; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Henrissat, Bernard; Napoli, Carolyn; McDonald, Sarah M.; Parker, Micaela S.; Rombauts, Stephane; Salamov, Asaf; von Dassow, Peter; Badger, Jonathan G,; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Demir, Elif; Dubchak, Inna; Gentemann, Chelle; Eikrem, Wenche; Gready, Jill E.; John, Uwe; Lanier, William; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Mayer, Kluas F. X.; Moreau, Herve; Not, Fabrice; Otillar, Robert; Panaud, Olivier; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Paulsen, Ian; Piegu, Benoit; Poliakov, Aaron; Robbens, Steven; Schmutz, Jeremy; Roulza, Eve; Wyss, Tania; Zelensky, Alexander; Zhou, Kemin; Armbrust, E. Virginia; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Goodenough, Ursula W.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2009-10-14

    Picoeukaryotes are a taxonomically diverse group of organisms less than 2 micrometers in diameter. Photosynthetic marine picoeukaryotes in the genus Micromonas thrive in ecosystems ranging from tropical to polar and could serve as sentinel organisms for biogeochemical fluxes of modern oceans during climate change. These broadly distributed primary producers belong to an anciently diverged sister clade to land plants. Although Micromonas isolates have high 18S ribosomal RNA gene identity, we found that genomes from two isolates shared only 90percent of their predicted genes. Their independent evolutionary paths were emphasized by distinct riboswitch arrangements as well as the discovery of intronic repeat elements in one isolate, and in metagenomic data, but not in other genomes. Divergence appears to have been facilitated by selection and acquisition processes that actively shape the repertoire of genes that are mutually exclusive between the two isolates differently than the core genes. Analyses of the Micromonas genomes offer valuable insights into ecological differentiation and the dynamic nature of early plant evolution.

  2. Laboratory measurements of selected optical, physical, chemical, and remote-sensing properties of five water mixtures containing Calvert clay and a nonfluorescing dye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usry, J. W.; Whitlock, C. H.; Poole, L. R.; Witte, W. G., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Total suspended solids concentrations ranged from 6.1 ppm to 24.3 ppm and sizes ranged between 1.5 micrometers and 10 micrometers with the most frequently occurring size less than 2 micrometers. Iron concentration was less than 1 percent of the total suspended solids. Nonfluorescing dye concentrations of the two mixtures were 20 ppm and 40 ppm. Attenuation coefficient for the five mixtures ranged from 4.8/m to 21.3/m. Variations in volume scattering function with phase angle were typical. Variations in attenuation and absorption coefficient with wavelength were similar for the mixtures without the dye. Attenuation coefficient of the mixtures with the dye increased for wavelengths less than 600 nm due to the dye's strong absorption peak near 500 nm. Reflectance increased as the concentration of Calvert clay increased and peaked near 600 nm. The nonfluorescent dye decreased the magnitude of the peak, but had practically no effect on the variation for wavelengths greater than 640 nm. At wavelengths less than 600 nm, the spectral variations of the mixtures with the dye were significantly different from those mixtures without the dye.

  3. GESE: A Small UV Space Telescope to Conduct a Large Spectroscopic Survey of Z-1 Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Gong, Qian; Hull, Tony; Kruk, Jeffrey; Purves, Lloyd

    2013-01-01

    One of the key goals of NASA's astrophysics program is to answer the question: How did galaxies evolve into the spirals and elliptical galaxies that we see today? We describe a space mission concept called Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer (GESE) to address this question by making a large spectroscopic survey of galaxies at a redshift, z is approximately 1 (look-back time of approximately 8 billion years). GESE is a 1.5-meter space telescope with an ultraviolet (UV) multi-object slit spectrograph that can obtain spectra of hundreds of galaxies per exposure. The spectrograph covers the spectral range, 0.2-0.4 micrometers at a spectral resolving power, R approximately 500. This observed spectral range corresponds to 0.1-0.2 micrometers as emitted by a galaxy at a redshift, z=1. The mission concept takes advantage of two new technological advances: (1) light-weighted, wide-field telescope mirrors, and (2) the Next- Generation MicroShutter Array (NG-MSA) to be used as a slit generator in the multi-object slit spectrograph.

  4. New VLSI smart sensor for collision avoidance inspired by insect vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Derek; Moini, Alireza; Yakovleff, Andre; Nguyen, X. Thong; Blanksby, Andrew; Kim, Gyudong; Bouzerdoum, Abdesselam; Bogner, Robert E.; Eshraghian, Kamran

    1995-01-01

    An analog VLSI implementation of a smart microsensor that mimics the early visual processing stage in insects is described with an emphasis on the overall concept and the front- end detection. The system employs the `smart sensor' paradigm in that the detectors and processing circuitry are integrated on the one chip. The integrated circuit is composed of sixty channels of photodetectors and parallel processing elements. The photodetection circuitry includes p-well junction diodes on a 2 micrometers CMOS process and a logarithmic compression to increase the dynamic range of the system. The future possibility of gallium arsenide implementation is discussed. The processing elements behind each photodetector contain a low frequency differentiator where subthreshold design methods have been used. The completed IC is ideal for motion detection, particularly collision avoidance tasks, as it essentially detects distance, speed & bearing of an object. The Horridge Template Model for insect vision has been directly mapped into VLSI and therefore the IC truly exploits the beauty of nature in that the insect eye is so compact with parallel processing, enabling compact motion detection without the computational overhead of intensive imaging, full image extraction and interpretation. This world-first has exciting applications in the areas of automobile anti- collision, IVHS, autonomous robot guidance, aids for the blind, continuous process monitoring/web inspection and automated welding, for example.

  5. Cosmic Ray Energy Determination by the Reduced-Opening Angle Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1998-01-01

    The reduced opening angle technique offers a simple way with minimal model dependence to measure cosmic ray energies over a broad range with out any normalization uncertainties. The emulsion film and CR39 detectors proposed are well established techniques and should perform adequately. The analysis method depends on accurate automatic scanning of the CR39 plates. UAH have developed such a capability. With the proposed geometry energy measurements to approx. 5 TeV/a can be made. The expected iron event rate (E greater than or equal to 500 GeV/a) is 10/sq m day. The expected energy resolution, from accelerator calibrations at 200 GeV/a, is -50% to +80%. Since the absolute flux has some sensitivity to the assumed power law index it is essential that good energy resolution is obtained. The expected charge resolution is approx. 0.3 charge units for the CNO group falling to approx. 1 charge unit for the iron group. A suitable event trigger would be a measurable (greater than 2 micrometer) deflected heavy (Z greater than 2) fragment. One potential background is electromagnetic dissociation that predominantly couples to individual protons or alphas. Although the cross- sections can be appreciable such events will not pass the event trigger.

  6. Phosphorescent imaging of oxygen gradients in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Curtis J.; Kitakis, F.

    1995-08-01

    Until recently, the ability to measure the changing oxygen gradients in perfused tissues in response to metabolic demand, has been limited to point-measurements and/or averaged A-V oxygen differences during perfusion using oxygen electrodes. With the recent introduction of novel phosphorescent probes specifically quenched by oxygen, the ability to spacially map oxygen gradients in real-time may offer new insights into the dynamics of microvascular design and supply. Accordingly, this paper provides initial image data on Langendorff perfused rat hearts wherein the relative change in phosphorescent intensity of Pd-meso-tetra(4- carboxyphenyl)phorphine (2micrometers ) as the reporter probe, is quantitatively related to spacial oxygen gradients as seen on the left-ventricle during changing gassing conditions. Digital image analysis (frame advance), after proper calibration and alignment, provides images which can be usefully interpreted. Clinical applications of such emerging technologies could have wide-spread diagnostic applications not only as applied to the coronary bed, but other tissue surfaces displaying various degrees of aschemia and/or hypoxia.

  7. On-focal-plane ADC: recent progress at JPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhimin; Pain, Bedabrata; Panicacci, Roger; Mansoorian, Barmak; Nakamura, Junichi; Fossum, Eric R.

    1996-06-01

    Two 8 bit successive approximation analog-to-digital converters (ADC), an 8 bit single slope ADC and a 12 bit current mode incremental sigma delta ((Sigma) -(Delta) ) ADC have been designed, fabricated, and tested. The 20.4 micrometers and 40 micrometers pitch successive approximation test chip designs are compatible with active pixel sensors (APS) column parallel architectures. A 64 X 64 photogate APS with this ADC integrated on-chip was fabricated in a 1.2 micrometers N-well CMOS process and achieves 8 bit accuracy. A 1 K X 1 K APS with 11 micrometers pixels and a single slope ADC in each column was fabricated in a 0.55 micrometers N-well CMOS process and also achieves 8 bit accuracy. The successive approximation designs consume as little as 49 (mu) W at a 500 KHz conversion rate meeting the low power requirements inherent in column parallel architectures. The current mode (Sigma) -(Delta) ADC test chip is designed to be multiplexed among 8 columns in a semi-column parallel current mode APS architecture. It consumes 800 (mu) W at a 5 KHz conversion rate.

  8. NIFTE: The Near Infrared Faint-Object Telescope Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, James J.; Lange, Andrew E.; Matsumoto, T.; Eisenhardt, Peter B.; Hacking, Perry B.; Schember, Helene R.

    1994-01-01

    The high sensitivity of large format InSb arrays can be used to obtain deep images of the sky at 3-5 micrometers. In this spectral range cool or highly redshifted objects (e.g. brown dwarfs and protogalaxies) which are not visible at shorter wavelengths may be observed. Sensitivity at these wavelengths in ground-based observations is severly limited by the thermal flux from the telescope and from the earth's atmosphere. The Near Infrared Faint-Object Telescope Experiment (NIFTE), a 50 cm cooled rocket-borne telescope combined with large format, high performance InSb arrays, can reach a limiting flux less than 1 micro-Jy(1-sigma) over a large field-of-view in a single flight. In comparison, the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) will require days of observation to reach a sensitivity more than one order of magnitude worse over a similar area of the sky. The deep 3-5 micrometer images obtained by the rocket-borne telescope will assist in determining the nature of faint red objects detected by ground-based telescopes at 2 micrometers, and by ISO at wavelengths longer than 5 micrometers.

  9. Instrument Development for Single-Particle Albedo Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, T. J.; Murphy, D. M.; Fox, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    The ASTER (Aerosol Scattering To Extinction Ratio) instrument simultaneously measures scattering and extinction by single aerosol particles from which the albedo for each particle can be determined. ASTER employs a high-Q laser cavity to amplify loses in the cavity caused by individual particles to produce measurable extinction signals. The instrument collects light in three separate channels representing backward, forward, and wide-angle scattering. The ratio of forward to total scattering provides a proxy measurement for particle size that Mie scattering calculations show to be largely independent of particle refractive index for diameters below about 2 micrometers. Laboratory measurements on particles of known sizes and scattering properties have been used to assess the performance of the instrument and as a guide for ongoing modifications for eventual field deployment. Results from the current version of the instrument will be presented and compared to previous ASTER data to demonstrate improved performance. Data taken from ambient air have shown modes of highly absorbing particles that would not have been evident from bulk measurements. The single-particle nature of the measurements will provide additional information to complement existing methods for measuring aerosol albedos in the atmosphere.

  10. Quaternary laser devices: history and state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, Petr G.

    1993-05-01

    Quaternary alloys of semiconductor compounds are suitable materials for wide-spectrum optoelectronic applications. The most important property of these efficient luminescent materials is the opportunity to fit the lattice parameter in some range to a given value corresponding to another crystalline material. This leads to the method to construct defect-free and stress-free heterojunctions, which was used for the preparation of a number of laser and LED devices. Quaternaries of InGaAsP, InGaSbAs, InSbAsP, PbSnTeSe, and other alloys were introduced into practical usage particularly in diode laser devices. The alloy InGaAsP appears to be one of the most widely used in optoelectronic applications at present as it covers ranges near 1.3 and 1.55 micrometers wavelengths of fiber-optic communication. For the spectral range near 2 micrometers the alloy InGaSbAs seems to be most attractive, and cw-operating diode lasers at room temperature were demonstrated at 2.0 - 2.4 micrometers . The alloy PbSnTeSe was used to obtain a longest wave of diode laser emission 46 micrometers . Quaternaries played an important role in the development of the semiconductor optoelectronics during the last two decades.

  11. Interrelationships Between Aerosol Characteristics and Light Scattering During Late-winter in a Eastern Mediterranean Arid Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.; Schebeske, G.; Formenti, P.; Maenhaut, W.; Cafmeyer, J.; Ptasinski, J.; Karnieli, A.; Orlovsky, L.

    1999-01-01

    An intensive field campaign involving measurement of various aerosol physical, chemical, and radiative properties was conducted at Sde Boker in the Negev Desert of Israel, from 18 February to 15 March 1997. Nephelometer measurements gave average background scattering coefficient values of about 25 M/m at 550 nm wavelength, but strong dust events caused the value of this parameter to rise up to about 800 M/m Backscattering fractions did not depend on aerosol loading, and generally fell in the range of 0.1 to 0.25, comparable to values reported for marine and Arctic environments. Chemical analysis of the aerosol revealed that, in the coarse size range (2 - 10 micrometer equivalent aerodynamic diameter (EAD)), calcium (Ca) was by far the most abundant element followed by silicon (Si), both of which are indicators for mineral dust. In the fine size fraction (< 2 micrometers EAD), sulfur (S) generally was the dominant element, except during high dust episodes when Ca and Si were again the most abundant. Furthermore, fine black carbon (BC) correlates with S, suggesting that they may have originated from the same sources or source regions. An indication of the short-term effect of aerosol loading on radiative forcing was provided by measurements of global and diffuse solar radiation, which showed that during high turbidity periods (strong dust events) almost all of the solar radiation reaching the area is scattered or absorbed.

  12. BASD: SIRTF Telescope Instrument Changeout and Cryogen Replenishment (STICCR) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mord, A. J.; Urbach, A. R.; Poyer, M. E.; Andreozzi, L. C.; Hermanson, L. A.; Snyder, H. A.; Blalock, W. R.; Haight, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is a long-life cryogenically cooled space-based telescope for infrared astronomy from 2 micrometer to 700 miocrometers currently under study by NASA-ARC, and planned for launch in approximately the mid 90's. SIRTF will operate as a multi-user facility, initially carrying 3 instruments at the focal plane. It will be cooled to below 2 K by superfluid liquid helium to achieve radiometric sensitivity limited only by the statistical fluctuations in the natural infrared background radiation over most of its spectral range. The lifetime of the mission will be limited by the lifetime of the liquid helium supply, and is currently baselined to be 2 years. The telescope changes required to allow in-space replenishment of the 2,000 liter superfluid helium tank are investigated. A preliminary design for the space services equipment is also developed. The impacts of basing the equipment and servicing on the space station are investigated. Space replenishment and changeout of instruments requires changes to the telescope design and preliminary concepts are presented.

  13. AEOS radiometer system: a multichannel imaging radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchett, Donald G.; Hendrick, Roy W.; Moore, Douglas K.; Briscoe, David E.; Bishop, Joseph; Medrano, Robert S.; Vigil, Michael L.

    1999-07-01

    A four channel imaging radiometer is now operational as the first sensor on the U.S. Air Force 3.67-meter Advanced Electro Optical System (AEOS) telescope at the Maui Space Surveillance Site on Mt. Haleakala. The four AEOS Radiometer System (ARS) channels cover the visible/near infrared, MWIR (2.0 - 5.5 micrometers ), LWIR (7.9 - 13.2 micrometers ), and VLWIR (16.2 - 23 micrometers ). The bands are separated by dichroic mirrors that direct the visible channel into a cooled enclosure and the infrared channels into a common cryogenic Dewar. Interference filters separate each band into multiple subbands. A novel background suppression technique uses array data and a circular scan generated by the telescope secondary. The ARS design meets challenges in volume constraint on the trunnion, a low vibration cryogenic system, thermal dissipation control, internal calibration, remotely operating four integrated focal plane arrays, high frame rates with their attendant large data handling and processing requirements, and integration into an observatory wide control system. This paper describes the design, integration, and first light test results of the ARS at the AEOS facility.

  14. SiC and Si3N4 Recession Due to SiO2 Scale Volatility Under Combustor Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Robinson, Raymond C.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Fox, Dennis S.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) and Si3N4 materials were tested in various turbine engine combustion environments chosen to represent either conventional fuel-lean or fuel-rich mixtures proposed for high-speed aircraft. Representative chemical vapor-deposited (CVD), sintered, and composite materials were evaluated by furnace and high-pressure burner rig exposures. Although protective SiO2 scales formed in all cases, the evidence presented supports a model based on paralinear growth kinetics (i.e., parabolic growth moderated simultaneously by linear volatilization). The volatility rate is dependent on temperature, moisture content, system pressure, and gas velocity. The burner tests were thus used to map SiO2 volatility (and SiC recession) over a range of temperatures, pressures, and velocities. The functional dependency of material recession (volatility) that emerged followed the form A[exp(-Q / RT)](P(sup x)v(sup y). These empirical relations were compared with rates predicted from the thermodynamics of volatile SiO and SiOxHy reaction products and a kinetic model of diffusion through a moving boundary layer. For typical combustion conditions, recession of 0.2 to 2 micrometers/hr is predicted at 1200 to 1400 C, far in excess of acceptable long-term limits.

  15. The Vector Vortex Coronagraph: Sensitivity to Low-Order Aberrations, Central Obscuration, Chromaticism, and Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawet, Dimitri; Pueyo, Laurent; Moody, Dwight; Krist, John; Serabyn, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The Vector Vortex Coronagraph is a phase-based coronagraph, one of the most efficient in terms of inner working angle, throughput, discovery space, contrast, and simplicity. Using liquid-crystal polymer technology, this new coronagraph has recently been the subject of lab demonstrations in the near-infrared, visible and was also used on sky at the Palomar observatory in the H and K bands (1.65 and 2.2 micrometers, respectively) to image the brown dwarf companion to HR 7672, and the three extasolar planets around HR 8799. However, despite these recent successes, the Vector Vortex Coronagraph is, as are most coronagraphs, sensitive to the central obscuration and secondary support structures, low-order aberrations (tip-tilt, focus, etc), bandwidth (chromaticism), and polarization when image-plane wavefront sensing is performed. Here, we consider in detail these sensitivities as a function of the topological charge of the vortex and design properties inherent to the manufacturing technology, and show that in practice all of them can be mitigated to meet specific needs.

  16. Comparison of aerobically-treated and untreated crop residue as a source of recycled nutrients in a recirculating hydroponic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowiak, C. L.; Garland, J. L.; Strayer, R. F.; Finger, B. W.; Wheeler, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    This study compared the growth of potato plants on nutrients recycled from inedible potato biomass. Plants were grown for 105 days in recirculating, thin-film hydroponic systems containing four separate nutrient solution treatments: (1) modified half-strength Hoagland's (control), 2) liquid effluent from a bioreactor containing inedible potato biomass, 3) filtered (0.2 micrometer) effluent, and 4) the water soluble fraction of inedible potato biomass (leachate). Approximately 50% of the total nutrient requirement in treatments 2-4 were provided (recycled) from the potato biomass. Leachate had an inhibitory effect on leaf conductance, photosynthetic rate, and growth (50% reduction in plant height and 60% reduction in tuber yield). Plants grown on bioreactor effluent (filtered or unfiltered) were similar to the control plants. These results indicated that rapidly degraded, water soluble organic material contained in the inedible biomass, i.e., material in leachate, brought about phytotoxicity in the hydroponic culture of potato. Recalcitrant, water soluble organic material accumulated in all nutrient recycling treatments (650% increase after 105 days), but no increase in rhizosphere microbial numbers was observed.

  17. Electrical conductivity of the polycrystalline films of p-terphenyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkaczyk, S. W.

    1999-04-01

    Some results of p-terphenyl thin films investigations are presented. The mechanism of DC conductivity within unordered polycrystalline structures of p-terphenyl was investigated. The measurements were carried out for p-terphenyl films' thickness varying from 2 micrometers up to 15 micrometers . During the experiment the polarization voltage and temperature were changed from 0 to 200 V and 15 to 325 K, respectively. The p-terphenyl films were supplied with gold and aluminum electrodes. The obtained results and their analysis indicate that the injection of charge from the electrodes into the area of the investigated material proceeds by field- and thermoemission. The charge transport through the material's bulk is controlled by traps (hopping mechanism and Poole- Frenkel phenomenon). The determined values of the activation energy are in the range of kT (for the hopping area at low temperatures) through 0.06 eV in the range of 100 - 200 K to about 0.6 eV in the metallic conductivity area (220 - 320 K).

  18. Photocathodes based on semiconductor superlattices for streak tubes for IR region of 0.9-1.0 um

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolle, Eduard L.

    1995-05-01

    A possibility of temporal analysis of picosecond light pulses in the IR region with the help of photocathodes based on semiconductor superlattices (SL) of type I (InP/InGaAs) with Schottky barrier is discussed. A new principle of avalanche photoelectron emission from such an SL at interband absorption of light is suggested. The principle is based on the electrons free length path increasing in a SL with narrow quantum wells under high electric field applied to the SL. The idea makes it possible to develop a new device - avalanche photocathode with internal amplification for the IR region of 0.9-2 micrometers and temporal resolution better than 30 ps. It is proposed to use doped as well as undoped SL as basis for photocathodes sensitive to the IR radiation in the range of up to 10 micrometers . The photoemission from such structures is caused by the intersubband absorption of light in quantum wells. The use of undoped SL greatly reduced the thermoemission current of the photocathode but requires additional excitation of the SL by light pulses with energy approximately corresponding to the band gap of the narrow band gap material of the SL. The temporal resolution of such photocathodes is supposed to be less than 30 ps. The conditions for the avalanche photoelectron emission obtaining are determined, and the SL parameters which meet the requirement of maximum quantum efficiency of the photocathode are calculated.

  19. Selective evaporation of focusing fluid in two-fluid hydrodynamic print head.

    SciTech Connect

    Keicher, David M.; Cook, Adam W.

    2014-09-01

    The work performed in this project has demonstrated the feasibility to use hydrodynamic focusing of two fluid steams to create a novel micro printing technology for electronics and other high performance applications. Initial efforts focused solely on selective evaporation of the sheath fluid from print stream provided insight in developing a unique print head geometry allowing excess sheath fluid to be separated from the print flow stream for recycling/reuse. Fluid flow models suggest that more than 81 percent of the sheath fluid can be removed without affecting the print stream. Further development and optimization is required to demonstrate this capability in operation. Print results using two-fluid hydrodynamic focusing yielded a 30 micrometers wide by 0.5 micrometers tall line that suggests that the cross-section of the printed feature from the print head was approximately 2 micrometers in diameter. Printing results also demonstrated that complete removal of the sheath fluid is not necessary for all material systems. The two-fluid printing technology could enable printing of insulated conductors and clad optical interconnects. Further development of this concept should be pursued.

  20. Galileo infrared imaging spectrometry measurements at the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, T. B.; Soderblom, L. A.; Carlson, R. W.; Fanale, F. P.; Lopes-Gautier, R.; Ocampo, A. C.; Forsythe, J.; Campell, B.; Granahan, J. C.; Smythe, W. D.; Weissmann, P. R.; Becker, K. J.; Edwards, K.; Kamp, L.; Lo, J.; Mehlman, R.; Torson, J.; Danielson, G. E.; Matson, D. L.; Kieffer, H. H.; Johnson, T. V.

    1994-03-01

    Imaging spectrometer observations were made of the surface of the Moon during the December 1990 flyby of the Earth-Moon system by the Galileo spacecraft. This article documents this data set and presents analyses of some of the data. The near infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) investigation obtained 17 separate mosaics of the Moon in 408 spectral channels between about 0.7 and 5.2 micrometers. The instrument was originally designed to operate in orbit about Jupiter and therefore saturates at many spectral channels for most measurement situations at 1 AU. However, sufficient measurements were made of the Moon to verify the proper operation of the instrument and to demonstrate its capabilities. Analysis of these data show that the NIMS worked as expected and produced measurements consistent with previous ground-based telescopic studies. These are the first imaging spectrometer measurements of this type from space for the Moon, and they illustrate several major points concerning this type of observation and about the NIMS capabilities specifically. Of major importance are the difference between framing and scanning instruments and the effects of the spacecraft and the scan platform on the performance of such and experiment. The science return of subsequent NIMS and other investigation measurements will be significantly enhanced by the experience and results gained.

  1. Clay Bearing Units in the Region around Mawrth Vallis: Stratigraphy, Extent, and Possible Alteration Fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrea, E. Z. Noe; Bishop, J. L.; McKeown, N. K.; Swayze, G.; Michalski, J. R.; Poulet, F.; Bibring, J.-P.; Mustard, J. F.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Arvidson, R.; Morris, R. B.; Murchie, S.; McEwen, A. S.; Malaret, E.; Hash, C.

    2007-01-01

    The largest exposure of phyllosilicates on Mars occurs on the highland plains around Mawrth Vallis. This exposure extends for about 300 km southward from the edge of the dichotomy boundary, covering an area greater than 200 x 300 kilometers over an elevation range of approximately 2000 meters. At least two different types of hydrated phyllosilicates (Fe/Mg-rich and Al-rich phyllosilicates) have been identified in OMEGA data based on absorption bands near 2.3 and 2.2 micrometers, respectively. These clay-bearing units are associated with layered, indurated light-toned units with complex spatial and stratigraphic relationships, and are unconfomably overlain by a darker, indurated, more heavily cratered unit. Ongoing analysis of OMEGA (approximately 1 kilometer/pixel) and CRISM multi-spectral (MSP, 200 meters/pixel) data reveal hydrated minerals with absorptions at approximately 2.2 or 2.3 micrometers in locations up to 300 kilometers away from the borders of the previously identified extent of clay-bearing units. We seek to: 1) further constrain the mineralogy of the hydrated species identified in [5], and 2) understand spatial and stratigraphic relationships between the different hydrated minerals and the cratered plains units in which they are found. In this work we perform mineralogical and stratigraphic comparisons between units to test whether these extended units may be related, in order to establish a broad zone of alteration.

  2. The bacterial gliding machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Abhishek

    Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium, glide over surfaces with speeds reaching up to 2 micrometer's. Gliding is powered by a protonmotive force. The adhesin SprB forms filaments about 160 nm long that move on the cell-surface along a looped track. Interaction of SprB filaments with a surface produces gliding. We tethered F. johnsoniae cells to glass by adding anti-SprB antibody. Tethered cells spun about fixed points, rotating at speeds of about 1 Hz. The torques required to sustain such speeds were large, comparable to those generated by the flagellar rotary motor. Using a flow cell apparatus, we changed load on the gliding motor by adding the viscous agent Ficoll to tethered cells. We found that a gliding motor runs at constant speed rather than constant torque. We attached gold nanoparticles to the SprB filament and tracked its motion. We fluorescently tagged a bacterial Type IX secretion system (T9SS) protein and imaged its dynamics. Fluorescently tagged T9SS protein localized near the point of tether, indicating that T9SS localizes with the gliding motor. Based on our results, we propose a model to explain bacterial gliding.

  3. VLSI modified architecture for reduced symmetric fuzzy Singleton set and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-hafeez, Saleh M.; Starks, Scott A.

    1996-06-01

    A general-purpose fuzzy logic inference engine for real time control applications has been designed, the core of which is based on a modified reduced symmetric fuzzy singleton set (MRSFSS) structure combining the advantages of small fuzzy memory for a maximum storing capacity of 730 rule-base. The MRSFSS structure can provide up to three input variables, a maximum of nine membership functions for each input variable, and produces two output values. The innovation of FLC chip is the definition feature of the MRSFSS structure which alleviates the drawbacks of existing fuzzy inference engine and enables the entire FLC chip to be performed on a 1.2 micrometer CMOS VLSI single chip. Although the hardware of FLC engine is simplified, the structure itself can incorporate a wide class of applications since many systematic and heuristic approaches can be cast into the MRSFSS structure with an even more simplified approach and most equal performances. Moreover, a guide tour is provided through the aspects of generating the fuzzy IF-THEN rules, based on a proposed architecture for controlling a wide class of objects whose dynamics are approximated by first- order and second-order transfer functions.

  4. Depth of field and improved resolution of slit-scan flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Michael; Crone, Martin; Cremer, Christoph G.

    1996-12-01

    In a slit-scan flow cytometer particles specifically labelled by fluorochromes (e.g., cells, chromosomes) are aligned coaxially in a flow stream. One by another they pass a ribbon-like shaped laser beam with a diameter smaller than the particle length. Although several slit-scan flow systems have been developed during the last two decades, a complete description of the theory of optical resolution under the real experimental conditions used as well as a description how to overcome experimental limitations are missing. Often, resolution values are estimated under the assumption of ideal Gaussian beam propagation. These estimates suffer from a discrepancy to practical implementation, Here, some of these effects in slit-scan optics are discussed from a more theoretical point of view. In order to obtain an acceptable depth of field, a focal width around 2 micrometer appears to be an optimum under the regime of Gaussian beam propagation. However, in practice, effects due to thick lenses, finite apertures, chromatic aberrations, or the ellipticity of the laser beam overshadow this result and influence the laser beam shape. To further improve the resolution with a high depth of field, new concepts are required. Therefore, a combination of an interference fringe pattern of two coherent laser beams for excitation (fringe-scanning) with a slit-scan detection of the incoherent fluorescence light is introduced. Preliminary experiences of the first experimental realization are discussed.

  5. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    In several crystal growth processed based on capillarity, a melt comes into contact with a crucible wall at an angle defined as the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, this contact angle is dependent upon both the crucible and melt material and typical values fall in the range 80-170deg. However, on a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the melt and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously over a distance of up to several micrometers. Accurate modeling requires a more advanced treatment of this interaction. The interaction between the melt and solid surfaces can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir force. The Casimir force between the two bodies of complex geometry is calculated using a retarded temperature Green's function (Matsubara type) for the photon in the medium. The governing equations are cast in the form of a set of boundary integral equations which are then solved numerically for the case of molten Ge on SiO2. The shape of the molten surface approaching the flat solid body is determined, and the contact angle is defined as the angle between the two surfaces at the microscopically asymptotic distance of 1-2 micrometers. The formulation of this model and the results of the numerical calculations will be presented and discussed.

  6. Particulate retrieval of hydrolytically degraded poly(lactide-co-glycolide) polymers.

    PubMed

    Cordewener, F W; Dijkgraaf, L C; Ong, J L; Agrawal, C M; Zardeneta, G; Milam, S B; Schmitz, J P

    2000-04-01

    This article describes a technique for the retrieval of polymeric particulate debris following advanced hydrolytic in vitro degradation of a biodegradable polymer and presents the results of the subsequent particle analysis. Granular 80/20 poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) was degraded in distilled, deionized water in Pyrextrade mark test tubes at 80 degrees C for 6 weeks. Subsequently, a density gradient was created by layering isopropanol over the water, followed by a 48-h incubation. Two opaque layers formed in the PLG tubes, which were removed and filtered through 0.2-micrometer polycarbonate membrane filters. In addition, Fourier transform IR spectroscopy (FTIR) was performed to confirm the presence of polymer in the removed layers. The filters were gold sputter coated, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were made. FTIR analysis confirmed that the removed material was PLG. SEM images of the extracts from the upper (lowest density) opaque layer showed a fine, powderlike substance and globular structures of 500-750 nm. The SEM images of the lower (highest density) opaque layer showed particles with a crystalline-like morphology ranging in size from 4 to 30 micrometer. Particulate PLG debris generated with the described technique can be useful for further studies of its biological role in complications associated with poly(alpha-hydroxy)ester implants. This study shows the presence of very persistent nano- and microparticles in the degradation pathway of PLG. PMID:10644964

  7. Infrared Spectroscopy and Imaging Polarimetry of the Disk Around the T Tauri Star RNO 91

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weintraub, David A.; Tegler, Stephen C.; Rettig, Terrence

    1994-01-01

    We present 3-5 micrometer spectra and a 2.2 micrometer polarimetric image of the T Tauri star RNO 91. We report the detection of three absorption bands centered at 3250 per cm (3.08 micrometer), 2139 per cm (4.68 micrometer), and 2165 per cm (4.62 micrometer) in spectra of RNO 91. These features are due to frozen H2O, CO, and possibly XCN along the line of sight toward RNO 91. Our 2187-2107 per cm spectrum of RNO 90, the only other T Tauri star in the dark cloud L43, does not show the CO or XCN absorption bands. By comparing our observed polarimetric image with modeled images of scattered light from bipolar nebulae or circumstellar disks as well as with known morphology of the RNO 91 bipolar outflow, we demonstrate that the reflection nebulosity seen in the near-infrared is most likely a circumstellar disklike structure with a radius of approximately 1700 AU. The location of both RNO 90 and RNO 91 in front of or near the front of L43 suggests that the intracloud optical depths toward both stars are small and, therefore, that the frozen H2O, CO, and XCN molecules are located on grains in circumstellar material around RNO 91 at distances from the central star of perhaps 10-1700 AU. This frozen material may represent precometary grains orbiting RNO 91.

  8. Differential Absorption Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor with a Coherent Lidar at 2050.532 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Dharamsi, Amin; Davis, Richard E.; Petros, Mulugeta; McCarthy, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Wind and water vapor are two major factors driving the Earth's atmospheric circulation, and direct measurement of these factors is needed for better understanding of basic atmospheric science, weather forecasting, and climate studies. Coherent lidar has proved to be a valuable tool for Doppler profiling of wind fields, and differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has shown its effectiveness in profiling water vapor. These two lidar techniques are generally considered distinctly different, but this paper explores an experimental combination of the Doppler and DIAL techniques for measuring both wind and water vapor with an eye-safe wavelength based on a solid-state laser material. Researchers have analyzed and demonstrated coherent DIAL water vapor measurements at 10 micrometers wavelength based on CO2 lasers. The hope of the research presented here is that the 2 gm wavelength in a holmium or thulium-based laser may offer smaller packaging and more rugged operation that the CO2-based approach. Researchers have extensively modeled 2 um coherent lasers for water vapor profiling, but no published demonstration is known. Studies have also been made, and results published on the Doppler portion, of a Nd:YAG-based coherent DIAL operating at 1.12 micrometers. Eye-safety of the 1.12 micrometer wavelength may be a concern, whereas the longer 2 micrometer and 10 micrometer systems allow a high level of eyesafety.

  9. Fabrication of five-level ultraplanar micromirror arrays by flip-chip assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalicek, M. Adrian; Bright, Victor M.

    2001-10-01

    This paper reports a detailed study of the fabrication of various piston, torsion, and cantilever style micromirror arrays using a novel, simple, and inexpensive flip-chip assembly technique. Several rectangular and polar arrays were commercially prefabricated in the MUMPs process and then flip-chip bonded to form advanced micromirror arrays where adverse effects typically associated with surface micromachining were removed. These arrays were bonded by directly fusing the MUMPs gold layers with no complex preprocessing. The modules were assembled using a computer-controlled, custom-built flip-chip bonding machine. Topographically opposed bond pads were designed to correct for slight misalignment errors during bonding and typically result in less than 2 micrometers of lateral alignment error. Although flip-chip micromirror performance is briefly discussed, the means used to create these arrays is the focus of the paper. A detailed study of flip-chip process yield is presented which describes the primary failure mechanisms for flip-chip bonding. Studies of alignment tolerance, bonding force, stress concentration, module planarity, bonding machine calibration techniques, prefabrication errors, and release procedures are presented in relation to specific observations in process yield. Ultimately, the standard thermo-compression flip-chip assembly process remains a viable technique to develop highly complex prototypes of advanced micromirror arrays.

  10. Structural transformations in the a-tricalcium phosphate powders after mechanical activation and subsequent heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamray, V. F.; Karpihin, A. E.; Fedotov, A. Y.; Komlev, V. S.; Barinov, S. M.; Sirotinkin, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray diffraction analysis of the structural phase evolution in the a-TCP powder subjected to milling in the planetary mill in butanol, and followed by annealing at 1300 °C was performed. After milling, there was a systematic smoothing of the X-ray diffraction pattern of α-TCP. Significant changes in lattice constants and atomic parameters were not observed. The average particle size was reduced from 10 to 2 micrometers. The decrease of the size of coherently scattering domains CSD (250 to 80 nm) makes the main contribution to the X-ray lines broadening. The value of microstrain changes from 1 *10-6 to 2*10-4. After annealing at 1300 °C for 2 hours the phase with apatite structure was found. The content of the apatite phase increases with increasing of time of mechanical activation. Possible mechanisms of deformation of α-TCP particles and structural transformations α-TCP → HA are considered.

  11. Removing Atmospheric Effects From AVIRIS Data for Surface Reflectance Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Zamudio, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of high resolution imaging spectrometer data requires a thorough compensation for atmospheric absorption and scattering. A method for retrieving surface reflectances from spectral data collected by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) is being developed. In this method, the integrated water vapor amount on a pixel by pixel basis is derived from the 0.94- and 1.14-micrometer water vapor features. The water vapor, carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2) and methane (CH4) transmission spectrum in the 0.4-2.5 micrometer region is calculated. The derived water vapor value and the solar and observational geometry are used in the spectral calculation. The AVIRIS spectrum is ratioed against the transmission spectrum to obtain the surface reflectance spectrum. Major mineral absorption features near 2.2 micrometer in retrieved reflectance spectra can be identified. Different vegetation absorption characteristics are observed. At present, the method is most useful for deriving surface reflectances from AVIRIS data measured on clear days with high visibilities. Atmospheric scattering effects will be included in our spectral calculations in the near future.

  12. X-Ray tomography with micrometer spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raven, Carsten; Snigirev, Anatoly A.; Koch, Andreas; Snigireva, Irina; Kohn, Victor

    1997-10-01

    3D computed tomographic images with micrometer resolution were made in phase-contrast mode with high energy x-rays at a third generation synchrotron source. The phase-contrast technique enables one to obtain information not only about the amplitude of the wave field behind the object and thus about the absorption, but also about the refractive index distribution inside the sample. Increasing the x-ray energy from the soft x-ray region up to 10-60 keV simplifies the experimental setup and opens the possibility to study organic samples at room-temperature and under normal pressure conditions. The projection data is recorded with a fast, high-resolution x-ray camera consisting of a 5 micrometers thin YAG scintillator crystal, a visible light microscope optics and a slow scan 1k X 1k CCD camera. The spatial resolution of phase-contrast microtomography is currently limited by the resolution of the x-ray detector to about 1-2 micrometers . First applications in biology and geophysics are shown.

  13. Effect of Increased Cyclic AMP Concentration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Vaughn, J. R.; Bridge, K. Y.; Smith, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    Analogies of epinephrine are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle when fed to animals. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through interaction with the P-adrenergic receptor. Since the intracellular signal generated by the Beta-adrenergic receptor is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in cell culture to determine if artificial elevation of cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter muscle protein metabolism and P-adrenergic receptor expression. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were treated with 0.2-30 micrometers forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the treatment period, both the concentration of cAMP and the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) were measured. Concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, the quantity of MHC was increased approximately 50% above control cells at 0.2 micrometers forskolin, but exhibited a gradual decline at higher levels of forskolin so that the quantity of MHC in cells treated with 30 micrometers forskolin was not significantly different from controls. Curiously, the intracellular concentration of cAMP which elicited the maximum increase in the quantity of MHC was only 40% higher than cAMP concentration in control cells.

  14. 13CO2/12CO2 ratio analysis in exhaled air by lead-salt tunable diode lasers for noninvasive diagnostics in gastroenterology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Eugene V.; Zyrianov, Pavel V.; Miliaev, Valerii A.; Selivanov, Yurii G.; Chizhevskii, Eugene G.; Os'kina, Svetlana; Ivashkin, Vladimir T.; Nikitina, Elena I.

    1999-07-01

    An analyzer of 13CO2/12CO2 ratio in exhaled air based on lead-salt tunable diode lasers is presented. High accuracy of the carbon isotope ratio detection in exhaled carbon dioxide was achieved with help of very simple optical schematics. It was based on the use of MBE laser diodes operating in pulse mode and on recording the resonance CO2 absorption at 4.2 micrometers . Special fast acquisition electronics and software were applied for spectral data collection and processing. Developed laser system was tested in a clinical train aimed to assessment eradication efficiency in therapy of gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Data on the 13C-urea breath test used for P.pylori detection and obtained with tunable diode lasers in the course of the trail was compared with the results of Mass-Spectroscopy analysis and histology observations. The analyzer can be used also for 13CO2/12CO2 ratio detection in exhalation to perform gastroenterology breath test based on using other compounds labeled with stable isotopes.

  15. Ceramic bearing technology program, volume 1: Final report. Final report, 1 August 1992-1 July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Komanduri, R.; Lange, J.; Wicksted, J.; Krasinski, J.

    1995-07-01

    This project deals with the development of advanced manufacturing technologies for finishing silicon nitride balls and rollers for bearing applications and non-destructive inspection (NDI) methods for assessing surface damage of ceramic materials and to correlate the surface properties with tribological performance. Magnetic field assisted polishing was used for finishing the balls and magnetic abrasive finishing for finishing rollers. By applying low levels of controlled force (1 N/ball or less) the damage to the finished surface is expected to be minimal. Also chemomechanical polishing was used to minimize the brittle fracture. Using these techniques the polishing time was reduced from some 10 - 20 weeks to about 20 hours. The finish obtained was about 5-10 nm and the sphericity in the range of 0.5 - 1 micrometers. The non-destructive inspection (NDI) techniques used include Raman spectroscopy and radio frequency absorption (Lange), Brillouin scattering, and photoacoustic methods to detect surface damage. Inelastic Raman Light Scattering technique was found to be a rapid, non-contact method for characterizing the physical properties of the near-surface (approx. 2 micrometers) ceramic material in bearing balls. A number of features of the Raman spectra were demonstrated to be related to properties of the ceramic which are pertinent to the performance of the bearing balls.

  16. Spray-drying performance of a bench-top spray dryer for protein aerosol powder preparation.

    PubMed

    Maa, Y F; Nguyen, P A; Sit, K; Hsu, C C

    1998-11-01

    The objective of this work was to improve a bench-top spray dryer's efficiency in both production recovery and throughput for preparing protein aerosol powders. A Büchi mini-spray dryer was used to prepare the powders of recombinant humanized anti-IgE antibody. The resulting powder's physical properties such as particle size, residual moisture, and morphology, along with its recovery and production rate was the basis of this development work. Mass balance suggests that approximately 10-20% of powder was lost in the exhaust air, consisting primarily of particles less than 2 micrometer. Also, significant loss (20-30%) occurred in the cyclone. Attempts were made to improve product recovery in the receiving vessel using dual-cyclone configurations, different cyclone designs, cyclones with anti-static treatment, and different receiver designs. System modifications such as replacing the original bag-filter unit with a vacuum system effectively reduced drying air flow resistance, allowing the protein to be dried at a lower inlet air temperature and the production scale to be increased. We concluded that the modified spray-drying system is advantageous over the original bench-top spray dryer. This improvement will be beneficial to early-stage research and development involving high-valued protein powders. PMID:10099432

  17. Flow Visualization within the Evaporator of Planar Loop Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Junwoo; Cytrynowicz, Debra; Medis, Praveen; Gerner, Frank M.; Henderson, H. Thurman

    2005-02-01

    A planar micro loop heat pipe (LHP) with coherent porous silicon (CPS) wick in the evaporator is a two-phase heat transfer device that utilizes evaporation and condensation to transfer heat. This CPS wick has thousands of pores, which are 2 micrometer in diameter, contained over an area of one square centimeter. As heat is applied to the evaporator, liquid is vaporized and evaporator chamber's pressure is increased. A meniscus formed at the liquid/vapor interface inside the pore of the CPS wick is supported by capillary forces even though pressure force pushes it down. Vapor flows through the vapor line to the condenser and condenses. Liquid is transported back to the evaporator due to pressure difference. The internal thermodynamics and fluid dynamics are poorly understood due to the difficulty of taking internal measurements and the complexity of two-phase phenomena. To understand this thermal device, the clear evaporator machined from Pyrex glass was utilized to monitor the complex phenomena which occur in the evaporator. These phenomena include vapor formation, nucleate boiling, evaporation, depriming, and pressure oscillation. DI-water was utilized as the working fluid.

  18. Fate of products of degradation processes: consequences for climatic change.

    PubMed

    Slanina, J; ten Brink, H M; Khlystov, A

    1999-03-01

    The end products of atmospheric degradation are not only CO2 and H2O but also sulfate and nitrate depending on the chemical composition of the substances which are subject to degradation processes. Atmospheric degradation has thus a direct influence on the radiative balance of the earth not only due to formation of greenhouse gases but also of aerosols. Aerosols of a diameter of 0.1 to 2 micrometer, reflect short wave sunlight very efficiently leading to a radiative forcing which is estimated to be about -0.8 watt per m2 by IPCC. Aerosols also influence the radiative balance by way of cloud formation. If more aerosols are present, clouds are formed with more and smaller droplets and these clouds have a higher albedo and are more stable compared to clouds with larger droplets. Not only sulfate, but also nitrate and polar organic compounds, formed as intermediates in degradation processes, contribute to this direct and indirect aerosol effect. Estimates for the Netherlands indicate a direct effect of -4 watt m-2 and an indirect effect of as large as -5 watt m-2. About one third is caused by sulfates, one third by nitrates and last third by polar organic compounds. This large radiative forcing is obviously non-uniform and depends on local conditions. PMID:10070730

  19. PROPERTIES OF NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR SEDIMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    JONES, K.W.; FENG, H.; STERN, E.A.; NEUHAEUSLER, U.; OSAN, J.; MARINKOVIC, N.; SONG, Z.

    2005-05-20

    Sediments found in waterways around the world may contain toxic compounds of anthropogeilic origin that can harm the environment and human health. As a result, it is often necessary to remove them and find disposal methods that are environmentally and economically acceptable. Here, we report on results obtained in an experimental program to characterize the nature of the sediment contamination. The objective was to gain a better understanding of the properties of the sediments to develop better methods for understanding the fate and transport of the contaminants and for improving methods for their removal from the sediments. Our investigations made use of x-ray facilities at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) at Grenoble, France. The experiments included: measurements of the microstructure of the sediments using computed microtomography, x-ray absorption, and fluorescence microscopy with resolutions as low as 0.2 micrometers to obtain information on the relationships of organic and mineral components of the sediments and on the distribution of contaminants on the surfaces of the sediment grains, investigation of functional groups of chemical compounds using x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe measurements were made to ascertain the morphology of the sediment surfaces and the distribution of metals on individual sediment grains.

  20. Intensity Measurements of the 01(sup 1)21-00(sup 0)01 Perpendicular CO2 band at 5315 cm (sup -1) and 4 related hot bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; Spencer, Mark N.; Brown, Linda R.; Wattson, Richard B.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The near-infrared thermal emission windows in the spectrum of the night-side of Venus have stimulated new determinations of the intensities of weak CO2 bands which are prominent absorption features in Venus spectra. We have previously measured the 31(sup 1)04-00(sup 0)01 band at 4416 cm (sup -1), which dominates a portion of the 2.2 micrometer window, using the 25-meter White absorption cell at Ames. Parameters for many of the unmeasured bands have been recomputed for the HITRAN compilation using direct numerical diagonalization. This procedure has some uncertainties, particularly for higher overtone-combination perpendicular bands, and substantial differences were noted for these bands when comparing the 1986 HITRAN tabulation with the 1992 values. To clarify this situation, we decided to measure the intensities of several of these bands; L.R.B. obtained spectra using the McMath FTS and 6 meter White cell, covering the region 3800 to 7700 cm (sup -1). A table is provided in which we compare our measured intensities and Herman-Wallis al parameters for the 01(sup 1)21-00(sup 0)01 band and 4 associated hot bands with both Hitran tabulations. It is anticipated that these measured values will be useful in further DND calculations of many very weak unmeasurable bands.