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Sample records for 320-slice volume mdct

  1. Dynamic 320-slice CT larynx for detection and management of idiopathic bilateral vocal cord paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ruane, Laurence E; Lau, Kenneth K; Low, Kathy; Crossett, Marcus; Vallance, Neil; Bardin, Philip G

    2014-03-01

    Idiopathic bilateral vocal cord paralysis (VCP) is a rare and difficult condition often undiagnosed and frequently confused with asthma and other respiratory conditions. Accurate diagnosis is crucial since 80% of cases patients require surgical intervention, such as tracheostomy or laser surgery, to relieve symptoms. The "gold standard" for diagnosing VCP has been laryngoscopy. In this case study, we demonstrate for the first time that idiopathic bilateral VCP can be accurately diagnosed by means of a novel noninvasive methodology: dynamic volume 320-slice computed tomography larynx. Three-dimensional reconstruction of laryngeal motion during the breathing cycle permitted functional assessment of the larynx showing absence of vocal cord movements. The new methodology may be valuable for noninvasive diagnosis of vocal cord movement disorders before and for follow-up after surgery. PMID:25473555

  2. Assessing Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Depression Using 320-Slice Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Songlin; Liu, Xingde; O'Neil, Adrienne; Turner, Alyna; Chai, Fangxian; Chen, Fanying; Berk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    While there is evidence that the development and course of major depressive disorder (MDD) symptomatology is associated with vascular disease, and that there are changes in energy utilization in the disorder, the extent to which cerebral blood flow is changed in this condition is not clear. This study utilized a novel imaging technique previously used in coronary and stroke patients, 320-slice Computed-Tomography (CT), to assess regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in those with MDD and examine the pattern of regional cerebral perfusion. Thirty nine participants with depressive symptoms (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 24 (HAMD24) score >20, and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) score >53) and 41 healthy volunteers were studied. For all subjects, 3 ml of venous blood was collected to assess hematological parameters. Trancranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound was utilized to measure parameters of cerebral artery rCBFV and analyse the Pulsatility Index (PI). 16 subjects (8 =  MDD; 8 =  healthy) also had rCBF measured in different cerebral artery regions using 320-slice CT. Differences among groups were analyzed using ANOVA and Pearson's tests were employed in our statistical analyses. Compared with the control group, whole blood viscosity (including high\\middle\\low shear rate)and hematocrit (HCT) were significantly increased in the MDD group. PI values in different cerebral artery regions and parameters of rCBFV in the cerebral arteries were decreased in depressive participants, and there was a positive relationship between rCBFV and the corresponding vascular rCBF in both gray and white matter. rCBF of the left gray matter was lower than that of the right in MDD. Major depression is characterized by a wide range of CBF impairments and prominent changes in gray matter blood flow. 320-slice CT appears to be a valid and promising tool for measuring rCBF, and could thus be employed in psychiatric settings for biomarker and treatment response purposes. PMID:25251476

  3. Investigation of lung nodule detectability in low-dose 320-slice computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, J. D.; Paul, N. S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Low-dose imaging protocols in chest CT are important in the screening and surveillance of suspicious and indeterminate lung nodules. Techniques that maintain nodule detectability yet permit dose reduction, particularly for large body habitus, were investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which radiation dose can be minimized while maintaining diagnostic performance through knowledgeable selection of reconstruction techniques. A 320-slice volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion ONE™, Toshiba Medical Systems) was used to scan an anthropomorphic phantom at doses ranging from ∼0.1 mGy up to that typical of low-dose CT (LDCT, ∼5 mGy) and diagnostic CT (∼10 mGy). Radiation dose was measured via Farmer chamber and MOSFET dosimetry. The phantom presented simulated nodules of varying size and contrast within a heterogeneous background, and chest thickness was varied through addition of tissue-equivalent bolus about the chest. Detectability of a small solid lung nodule (3.2 mm diameter, −37 HU, typically the smallest nodule of clinical significance in screening and surveillance) was evaluated as a function of dose, patient size, reconstruction filter, and slice thickness by means of nine-alternative forced-choice (9AFC) observer tests to quantify nodule detectability. For a given reconstruction filter, nodule detectability decreased sharply below a threshold dose level due to increased image noise, especially for large body size. However, nodule detectability could be maintained at lower doses through knowledgeable selection of (smoother) reconstruction filters. For large body habitus, optimal filter selection reduced the dose required for nodule detection by up to a factor of ∼3 (from ∼3.3 mGy for sharp filters to ∼1.0 mGy for the optimal filter). The results indicate that radiation dose can be reduced below the current low-dose (5 mGy) and ultralow-dose (1 mGy) levels with knowledgeable selection of reconstruction parameters. Image

  4. Dynamic real-time 4D cardiac MDCT image display using GPU-accelerated volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Eagleson, Roy; Peters, Terry M

    2009-09-01

    Intraoperative cardiac monitoring, accurate preoperative diagnosis, and surgical planning are important components of minimally-invasive cardiac therapy. Retrospective, electrocardiographically (ECG) gated, multidetector computed tomographical (MDCT), four-dimensional (3D + time), real-time, cardiac image visualization is an important tool for the surgeon in such procedure, particularly if the dynamic volumetric image can be registered to, and fused with the actual patient anatomy. The addition of stereoscopic imaging provides a more intuitive environment by adding binocular vision and depth cues to structures within the beating heart. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a comprehensive stereoscopic 4D cardiac image visualization and manipulation platform, based on the opacity density radiation model, which exploits the power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) in the rendering pipeline. In addition, we present a new algorithm to synchronize the phases of the dynamic heart to clinical ECG signals, and to calculate and compensate for latencies in the visualization pipeline. A dynamic multiresolution display is implemented to enable the interactive selection and emphasis of volume of interest (VOI) within the entire contextual cardiac volume and to enhance performance, and a novel color and opacity adjustment algorithm is designed to increase the uniformity of the rendered multiresolution image of heart. Our system provides a visualization environment superior to noninteractive software-based implementations, but with a rendering speed that is comparable to traditional, but inferior quality, volume rendering approaches based on texture mapping. This retrospective ECG-gated dynamic cardiac display system can provide real-time feedback regarding the suspected pathology, function, and structural defects, as well as anatomical information such as chamber volume and morphology. PMID:19467840

  5. Systems for Lung Volume Standardization during Static and Dynamic MDCT-based Quantitative Assessment of Pulmonary Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuld, Matthew K.; Grout, Randall; Guo, Junfeng; Morgan, John H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Multidetector-row Computed Tomography (MDCT) has emerged as a tool for quantitative assessment of parenchymal destruction, air trapping (density metrics) and airway remodeling (metrics relating airway wall and lumen geometry) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Critical to the accuracy and interpretability of these MDCT-derived metrics is the assurance that the lungs are scanned during a breath-hold at a standardized volume. Materials and Methods A computer monitored turbine-based flow meter system was developed to control patient breath-holds and facilitate static imaging at fixed percentages of the vital capacity. Due to calibration challenges with gas density changes during multi-breath xenon-CT an alternative system was required. The design incorporated dual rolling seal pistons. Both systems were tested in a laboratory environment and human subject trials. Results The turbine-based system successfully controlled lung volumes in 32/37 subjects, having a linear relationship for CT measured air volume between repeated scans: for all scans, the mean and confidence interval of the differences (scan1-scan2) was −9 ml (−169, 151); for TLC alone 6 ml (−164, 177); for FRC alone, −23 ml (−172, 126). The dual-piston system successfully controlled lung volume in 31/41 subjects. Study failures related largely to subject non-compliance with verbal instruction and gas leaks around the mouthpiece. Conclusion We demonstrate the successful use of a turbine-based system for static lung volume control and demonstrate its inadequacies for dynamic xenon-CT studies. Implementation of a dual-rolling seal spirometer has been shown to adequately control lung volume for multi-breath wash-in xenon-CT studies. These systems coupled with proper patient coaching provide the tools for the use of CT to quantitate regional lung structure and function. The wash-in xenon-CT method for assessing regional lung function, while not

  6. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 3,2015 ... facts MDCT is a very fast type of computed tomography (CT) scan. MDCT creates pictures of the healthy ...

  7. MDCT of abdominopelvic oncologic emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Gunabushanam, Gowthaman; Chintapalli, Kedar N; Ryan, John G; Reinhold, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Acute complications arising in abdominopelvic malignancies represent a unique subset of patients presenting to the emergency room. The acute presentation can be due to complications occurring in the tumor itself or visceral or vascular structures harboring the tumor. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is the investigation of choice in the workup of these patients and enables appropriate and timely management. Management of the complication depends primarily on the extent of the underlying malignancy and the involvement of other viscera. The purpose of this article is to depict the imaging features of these complications on MDCT. PMID:23876309

  8. Perinephric abscess caused by ruptured retrocecal appendix: MDCT demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Nisar Ahmad; Farooq, Mir; Gojwari, Tariq; Kosar, Tasleem

    2010-01-01

    Acute appendicitis may occasionally become extraordinarily complicated and life threatening yet difficult to diagnose. One such presentation is described in a 60-year-old man who was brought to the hospital due to right lumbar pain and fever for the last 15 days. Ultrasonography showed a right perinephric gas and fluid collection. Abdominal computed tomography with multidetector-row CT (MDCT) revealed gas-containing abscess in the right retroperitoneal region involving the perinephric space, extending from the lower pole of the right kidney up to the bare area of the liver. Inflamed retrocecal appendix was seen on thick multiplanar reformat images with its tip at the lower extent of the abscess. Laparotomy and retroperitoneal exploration were performed immediately and a large volume of foul smelling pus was drained. A ruptured retrocecal appendix was confirmed as the cause of the abscess. PMID:20842255

  9. MDCT evaluation of acute aortic syndrome (AAS).

    PubMed

    Valente, Tullio; Rossi, Giovanni; Lassandro, Francesco; Rea, Gaetano; Marino, Maurizio; Muto, Maurizio; Molino, Antonio; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    Non-traumatic acute thoracic aortic syndromes (AAS) describe a spectrum of life-threatening aortic pathologies with significant implications on diagnosis, therapy and management. There is a common pathway for the various manifestations of AAS that eventually leads to a breakdown of the aortic intima and media. Improvements in biology and health policy and diffusion of technology into the community resulted in an associated decrease in mortality and morbidity related to aortic therapeutic interventions. Hybrid procedures, branched and fenestrated endografts, and percutaneous aortic valves have emerged as potent and viable alternatives to traditional surgeries. In this context, current state-of-the art multidetector CT (MDCT) is actually the gold standard in the emergency setting because of its intrinsic diagnostic value. Management of acute aortic disease has changed with the increasing realization that endovascular therapies may offer distinct advantages in these situations. This article provides a summary of AAS, focusing especially on the MDCT technique, typical and atypical findings and common pitfalls of AAS, as well as recent concepts regarding the subtypes of AAS, consisting of aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer and unstable aortic aneurysm or contained aortic rupture. MDCT findings will be related to pathophysiology, timing and management options to achieve a definite and timely diagnostic and therapeutic definition. In the present article, we review the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, outcomes and therapeutic approaches to acute aortic syndromes. PMID:27033344

  10. Postmortem imaging: MDCT features of postmortem change and decomposition.

    PubMed

    Levy, Angela D; Harcke, Howard Theodore; Mallak, Craig T

    2010-03-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has emerged as an effective imaging technique to augment forensic autopsy. Postmortem change and decomposition are always present at autopsy and on postmortem MDCT because they begin to occur immediately upon death. Consequently, postmortem change and decomposition on postmortem MDCT should be recognized and not mistaken for a pathologic process or injury. Livor mortis increases the attenuation of vasculature and dependent tissues on MDCT. It may also produce a hematocrit effect with fluid levels in the large caliber blood vessels and cardiac chambers from dependent layering erythrocytes. Rigor mortis and algor mortis have no specific MDCT features. In contrast, decomposition through autolysis, putrefaction, and insect and animal predation produce dramatic alterations in the appearance of the body on MDCT. Autolysis alters the attenuation of organs. The most dramatic autolytic changes on MDCT are seen in the brain where cerebral sulci and ventricles are effaced and gray-white matter differentiation is lost almost immediately after death. Putrefaction produces a pattern of gas that begins with intravascular gas and proceeds to gaseous distension of all anatomic spaces, organs, and soft tissues. Knowledge of the spectrum of postmortem change and decomposition is an important component of postmortem MDCT interpretation. PMID:20010292

  11. 3D Volumetric Evaluation of Lipiodol Retention in HCC after Chemoembolization: A Quantitative Comparison between CBCT and MDCT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijun; Lin, MingDe; Lesage, David; Chen, Rongxin; Chapiro, Julius; Gu, Tara; Tacher, Vania; Duran, Rafael; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To evaluate the capability of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquired immediately after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in determining Lipiodol retention quantitatively and volumetrically when compared to 1-day post-procedure unenhanced MDCT. Materials and methods From June to December, 2012, fifteen patients met the inclusion criteria of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that was treated with conventional TACE (cTACE), and had intra-procedural CBCT and 1-day post-TACE MDCT. Four patients were excluded because the Lipiodol was diffuse throughout the entire liver or Lipiodol deposition was not clear on both CBCT and MDCT. Eleven patients with a total of 31 target lesions were included in the analysis. A quantitative and 3D software was used to assess complete, localized and diffuse lipiodol deposition. Tumor volume, Lipiodol volume in the tumor, % Lipiodol retention, and Lipiodol enhancement in Hounsfield Unit (HU) were calculated and compared between CBCT and MDCT using two-tailed student’s t-test and Bland-Altman plots. Results The mean value of tumor volume, Lipiodol deposited regions, calculated average % Lipiodol retention, and HU value of CBCT were not significantly different from those of MDCT (tumor volume: 9.37±11.35cm3 vs. 9.34±11.44cm3, P=0.991; Lipiodol volume: 7.84±9.34cm3 vs. 7.84±9.60 cm3, P=0.998; % Lipiodol retention: 89.3%±14.7% vs. 90.2% ± 14.9%, P=0.811; HU value: 307.7±160.1 HU vs. 257.2±120.0 HU, P=0.139). Bland-Altman plots showed only minimal difference and high agreement when comparing CBCT to MDCT. Conclusion CBCT has a similar capability, intraprocedurally, to assess Lipiodol deposition in 3D for patients with HCC treated with cTACE when compared to MDCT. PMID:24507426

  12. Comparison of conventional radiography and MDCT in suspected scaphoid fractures

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Cyrus; Karul, Murat; Henes, Frank Oliver; Laqmani, Azien; Catala-Lehnen, Philipp; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Nagel, Hans-Dieter; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the diagnostic accuracy and radiation dose of conventional radiography and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in suspected scaphoid fractures. METHODS: One hundred twenty-four consecutive patients were enrolled in our study who had suffered from a wrist trauma and showed typical clinical symptoms suspicious of an acute scaphoid fracture. All patients had initially undergone conventional radiography. Subsequent MDCT was performed within 10 d because of persisting clinical symptoms. Using the MDCT data as the reference standard, a fourfold table was used to classify the test results. The effective dose and impaired energy were assessed in order to compare the radiation burden of the two techniques. The Wilcoxon test was performed to compare the two diagnostic modalities. RESULTS: Conventional radiography showed 34 acute fractures of the scaphoid in 124 patients (42.2%). Subsequent MDCT revealed a total of 42 scaphoid fractures. The sensitivity of conventional radiography for scaphoid fracture detection was 42.8% and its specificity was 80% resulting in an overall accuracy of 59.6%. Conventional radiography was significantly inferior to MDCT (P < 0.01) concerning scaphoid fracture detection. The mean effective dose of MDCT was 0.1 mSv compared to 0.002 mSv of conventional radiography. CONCLUSION: Conventional radiography is insufficient for accurate scaphoid fracture detection. Regarding the almost negligible effective dose, MDCT should serve as the first imaging modality in wrist trauma. PMID:25628802

  13. Reperfusion injury components and manifestations determined by cardiovascular MR and MDCT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Maythem; Hetts, Steve; Wilson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) imaging have improved visualization of acute and scar infarct. Over the past decade, there have been and continues to be many significant technical advancements in cardiac MR and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) technologies. The strength of MR imaging relies on a variety of pulse sequences and the ability to noninvasively provide information on myocardial structure, function and perfusion in a single imaging session. The recent technical developments may also allow CT technologies to rise to the forefront for evaluating clinical ischemic heart disease. Components of reperfusion injury including myocardial edema, hemorrhage, calcium deposition and microvascular obstruction (MO) have been demonstrated using MR and CT technologies. MR imaging can be used serially and noninvasively in assessing acute and chronic consequences of reperfusion injury because there is no radiation exposure or administration of radioactive materials. MDCT is better suited for assessing coronary artery stenosis and as an alternative technique for assessing viability in patients where MR imaging is contraindicated. Changes in left ventricular (LV) volumes and function measured on cine MR are directly related to infarct size measured on delayed contrast enhanced images. Recent MR studies found that transmural infarct, MO and peri-infarct zone are excellent predictors of poor post-infarct recovery and mortality. Recent MR studies provided ample evidence that growth factor genes and stem cells delivered locally have beneficial effects on myocardial viability, perfusion and function. The significance of deposited calcium in acute infarct detected on MDCT requires further studies. Cardiac MR and MDCT imaging have the potential for assessing reperfusion injury components and manifestations. PMID:21160735

  14. Effects of two different anesthetic protocols on 64-MDCT coronary angiography in dogs.

    PubMed

    Drees, Randi; Johnson, Rebecca A; Pinkerton, Marie; Del Rio, Alejandro Munoz; Saunders, Jimmy H; François, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate is a major factor influencing diagnostic image quality in computed tomographic coronary artery angiography (MDCT-CA), with an ideal heart rate of 60-65 beats/min in humans. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare effects of two different clinically applicable anesthetic protocols on cardiovascular parameters and 64-MDCT-CA quality in 10 healthy dogs. Scan protocols and bolus volumes were standardized. Image evaluations were performed in random order by a board-certified veterinary radiologist who was unaware of anesthetic protocols used. Heart rate during image acquisition did not differ between protocols (P = 1), with 80.6 ± 7.5 bpm for protocol A and 79.2 ± 14.2 bpm for protocol B. Mean blood pressure was significantly higher (P > 0.05) using protocol B (protocol A 62.9 ± 9.1 vs. protocol B 72.4 ± 15.9 mmHg). The R-R intervals allowing for best depiction of individual coronary artery segments were found in the end diastolic period and varied between the 70% and 95% interval. Diagnostic quality was rated excellent, good, and moderate in the majority of the segments evaluated, with higher scores given for more proximal segments and lower for more distal segments, respectively. Blur was the most commonly observed artifact and mainly affected the distal segments. No significant differences were identified between the two protocols for optimal reconstruction interval, diagnostic quality and measured length individual segments, or proximal diameter of the coronary arteries (P = 1). Findings indicated that, when used with a standardized bolus volume, both of these anesthetic protocols yielded diagnostic quality coronary 64-MDCT-CA exams in healthy dogs. PMID:25065815

  15. Imaging of acute thoracic injury: the advent of MDCT screening.

    PubMed

    Mirvis, Stuart E

    2005-10-01

    Chest radiography remains the primary screening study for the assessment of victims of chest trauma, but computed tomography (CT), particularly multidetector CT (MDCT), has progressively changed the imaging approach to these patients. MDCT acquires thinner sections with greater speed, allowing higher quality axial images and nonaxial reformations than conventional or single-detector helical CT. The speed of MDCT, both in acquiring data and in reconstructing images, makes the performance of total body surveys in the blunt polytrauma patient practicable. In general, CT has been well documented to offer major advantages over chest radiography in both screening for thoracic injuries and in characterizing such injuries. This capacity has been enhanced by the application of multichannel data acquisition. The greater sensitivity of MDCT has been well demonstrated in diagnosing vascular and diaphragmatic injuries. This article reviews current concepts of diagnostic imaging in acute chest trauma from blunt force and penetrating mechanisms emphasizing the spectrum of diagnostic imaging findings for various injuries, based primarily on radiographic and CT appearances. The advantages of MDCT for selected injuries are emphasized. PMID:16274001

  16. Fusion of MDCT-based endoluminal renderings and endoscopic video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Lav; Higgins, William E.

    2009-02-01

    Early lung cancer can cause structural and color changes to the airway mucosa. A three-dimensional (3D) multidetector CT (MDCT) chest scan provides 3D structural data for airway walls, but no detailed mucosal information. Conversely, bronchoscopy gives color mucosal information, due to airway-wall inflammation and early cancer formation. Unfortunately, each bronchoscopic video image provides only a limited local view of the airway mucosal surface and no 3D structural/location information. The physician has to mentally correlate the video images with each other and the airway surface data to analyze the airway mucosal structure and color. A fusion of the topographical information from the 3D MDCT data and the color information from the bronchoscopic video enables 3D visualization, navigation, localization, and combined color-topographic analysis of the airways. This paper presents a fast method for topographic airway-mucosal surface fusion of bronchoscopic video with 3D MDCT endoluminal views. Tests were performed on phantom sequences, real bronchoscopy patient video, and associated 3D MDCT scans. Results show that we can effectively accomplish mapping over a continuous sequence of airway images spanning several generations of airways in a few seconds. Real-time navigation and visualization of the combined data was performed. The average surface-point mapping error for a phantom case was estimated to be only on the order of 2 mm for 20 mm diameter airway.

  17. Improvement of image quality in MDCT by high-frequency sampling of x-, y- and z-direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Naruomi; Ishikawa, Yoko; Kodera, Yoshie

    2006-03-01

    The multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) has dramatically increased speed of scanning, and allows high-resolution imaging compared with the conventional single-detector row CT (SDCT). However, use of the MDCT was making use of three-dimensional (3D) volume scanning and four-dimensional (4D) dynamic scanning increase, and made radiation dose to patients increase simultaneously. In addition, in recent years, lung-cancer screening CT (LSCT) is introduced, and low-dose scanning is strongly required to increase the benefit/risk ratio. In this study, high-frequency volume data sampling (over-sampling) method of x-, y- and z-direction was proposed as technique for reduction of image noise in the MDCT and discussed about reduction of radiation dose and improvement of image quality. In this proposed method, volume data are obtained by over-sampling of x-, y- and z-direction and image is obtained by averaging these data. In x- and y-direction, over-sampling is equivalent to obtaining projection data using large matrix size for same scan-field of view (scan-FOV), and in z-direction, equivalent to using thin slice. Normally, when signal with which noise distribution differs are averaged n-times, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) will increases by factor of [square root of] n. In this method, each pixel value of the image is obtained from n2 x,yn z pixels by n x,y-times sampling for x- and y-direction, and n z-times sampling for z-direction. In other words, SNR of the image increases [square root of] n2 x,yn z-times. In this high-frequency data sampling method, it is possible to obtain high-quality image as compared with conventional image. Moreover, by applying to noisy image obtained with low-dose scanning, reduction of radiation dose to patients is possible.

  18. 3-D segmentation of human sternum in lung MDCT images.

    PubMed

    Pazokifard, Banafsheh; Sowmya, Arcot

    2013-01-01

    A fully automatic novel algorithm is presented for accurate 3-D segmentation of the human sternum in lung multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) images. The segmentation result is refined by employing active contours to remove calcified costal cartilage that is attached to the sternum. For each dataset, costal notches (sternocostal joints) are localized in 3-D by using a sternum mask and positions of the costal notches on it as reference. The proposed algorithm for sternum segmentation was tested on 16 complete lung MDCT datasets and comparison of the segmentation results to the reference delineation provided by a radiologist, shows high sensitivity (92.49%) and specificity (99.51%) and small mean distance (dmean=1.07 mm). Total average of the Euclidean distance error for costal notches positioning in 3-D is 4.2 mm. PMID:24110446

  19. CT Hounsfield Numbers of Soft Tissues on Unenhanced Abdominal CT Scans: Variability Between Two Different Manufacturers’ MDCT Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Ramit; McGahan, John P.; Corwin, Michael T.; Li, Chin-Shang; Tran, Tien; Seibert, J. Anthony; Boone, John M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hounsfield numbers of soft tissues on unenhanced abdominal CT of the same patient vary on repeat scans done on two different manufacturers’ MDCT scanners. MATERIALS AND METHODS A database search was performed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent unenhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed both on a Volume CT (GE Healthcare) and a Definition AS Plus (Siemens Healthcare) 64-MDCT scanner within 12 months of each other. After excluding those patients for whom Hounsfield unit measurements would be affected by mitigating factors, 48 patients (mean age, 58.8 years) were identified. Hounsfield unit measurements were obtained in nine different soft-tissue anatomic locations on each scan, and the location of these sites was kept identical on each scan pair. Data were analyzed to evaluate Hounsfield unit differences between these scanners. RESULTS In general, there was a low consistency in the Hounsfield unit measurements for each of these sites on scans obtained by the two scanners, with the subcutaneous fat in the left posterolateral flank showing the lowest correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.198). There were differences in the Hounsfield unit measurements obtained in all anatomic sites on scans obtained by both scanners. Mean Hounsfield unit measurements obtained on the Definition AS Plus scanner were lower than those obtained on the Volume CT scanner, with the intriguing exception of the anterior midline subcutaneous fat Hounsfield unit measurements, which were higher on the Definition AS Plus scanner. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION Hounsfield unit measurements for unenhanced abdominal soft tissues of the same patient vary between scanners of two common MDCT manufacturers. PMID:25341139

  20. Autopsy radiography: digital radiographs (DR) vs multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in high-velocity gunshot-wound victims.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H Theodore; Levy, Angela D; Abbott, Robert M; Mallak, Craig T; Getz, John M; Champion, Howard R; Pearse, Lisa

    2007-03-01

    This study compared full-body digital radiography (DR) with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the postmortem evaluation of gunshot wound (GSW) victims. Thirteen consecutive male GSW victims (mean age, 27 years) had full-body DR and MDCT prior to routine autopsy. DR successfully identified all metallic fragments, but MDCT was superior in its ability to precisely determine location because it provided 3-dimensional anatomic localization. In all cases, MDCT more accurately assessed organ injuries and wound tracks. Both DR and MDCT are limited in classifying multiple wounds and major vessel injury, but MDCT is generally superior to DR. MDCT shows significant advantages over DR in the forensic evaluation of GSW victims. This is particularly advantageous for the pathologist retrieving metallic fragments and for describing fracture detail accurately. Use of MDCT instead of radiographs will require medical examiners to become familiar with reading cross-sectional images. PMID:17325457

  1. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Youbing; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A; Tawhai, Merryn H; Lin, Ching-Long

    2013-07-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C 1 continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung. PMID:23794749

  2. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Youbing; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2013-07-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C{sub 1} continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung.

  3. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Youbing; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2012-01-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C1 continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung. PMID:23794749

  4. Coronary lesion complexity assessed by SYNTAX score in 256-slice dual-source MDCT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Yüceler, Zeyneb; Kantarcı, Mecit; Tanboğa, İbrahim Halil; Sade, Recep; Kızrak, Yeşim; Pirimoğlu, Berhan; Bayraktutan, Ümmügülsüm; Oğul, Hayri; Aksakal, Enbiya

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The SYNTAX Score (SS) has an important role in grading the complexity of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients undergoing revascularization. Noninvasive determination of SS prior to invasive coronary angiography (ICA) might optimize patient management. We aimed to evaluate the agreement between ICA and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) while testing the diagnostic effectiveness of SS-MDCT. METHODS Our study included 108 consecutive patients who underwent both MDCT angiography with a 256-slice dual-source MDCT system and ICA within 14±3 days. SS was calculated for both ICA and MDCT coronary angiography. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the association of SS-MDCT with SS-ICA, and Bland-Altman analysis was performed. RESULTS The degree of agreement between SS-ICA and SS-MDCT was moderate. The mean SS-MDCT was 14.5, whereas the mean SS-ICA was 15.9. After dividing SS into three groups (high [≥33], intermediate [23–32], and low [≤22] subgroups), agreement analysis was repeated. There was a significant correlation between SS-MDCT and SS-ICA in the low SS group (r=0.63, P = 0.043) but no significant correlation in the high SS group (r=0.036, P = 0.677). The inter-test agreement analysis showed at least moderate agreement, whereas thrombotic lesions and the type of bifurcation lesion showed fair agreement. CONCLUSION The calculation of SS-MDCT by adapting SS-ICA parameters achieved nearly the same degree of precision as SS-ICA and was better than SS-ICA, especially in the low SS group. PMID:27328718

  5. Simulating solid lung nodules in MDCT images for CAD evaluation: modeling, validation, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangwei; Olcott, E.; Raffy, Philippe; Yu, Naichang; Chui, Haili

    2007-03-01

    A new lung nodule simulation model was designed to create and insert synthetic solid lung nodules, with shapes and density similar to real nodules, into normal MDCT chest exams. Nodule shapes were modeled using linearly deformed superquadrics with added randomly generated high dimensional deformations. Nodule density statistics and attenuation profiles were extracted from a group of real nodule samples, by dissecting each real nodule digitally layer by layer from the border to the core. A nodule created with modeled shape and density was inserted into real CT images by creating volume average layers using weighted averaging between nodule density and background density for each voxel. The nodule simulation model was validated both subjectively by human experts and quantitatively by comparing density attenuation profiles of simulated nodules with real nodules. These validation studies demonstrated a high level of similarity between the synthetic nodules and real nodules. This nodule simulation model was used to create objective test databases for use in evaluating a CAD system. The evaluation study showed that the CAD system was accurate in detection and volume measurement for isolated nodules, and also performed relatively well for juxta-vascular nodules. The CAD system also demonstrated stable performances for different dosages.

  6. Polyarteritis nodosa: MDCT as a 'One-Stop Shop' Modality for Whole-Body Arterial Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, W.-L.; Tsai, I-C.; Lee Tain; Hsieh, C.-W.

    2008-07-15

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare disease, which is characterized by aneurysm formation and occlusion in the arteries of multiple systems. Due to its extensive involvement, whole-body evaluation is necessary for diagnosis and treatment monitoring. We report a case of polyarteritis nodosa using multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as a 'one-stop shop' modality for whole-body arterial evaluation. With precise protocol design, MDCT can be used as a reliable noninvasive modality providing comprehensive whole-body arterial evaluation.

  7. Diagnostic imaging strategy for MDCT- or MRI-detected breast lesions: use of targeted sonography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Leading-edge technology such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) often reveals mammographically and ultrasonographically occult lesions. MRI is a well-documented, effective tool to evaluate these lesions; however, the detection rate of targeted sonography varies for MRI detected lesions, and its significance is not well established in diagnostic strategy of MRI detected lesions. We assessed the utility of targeted sonography for multidetector-row CT (MDCT)- or MRI-detected lesions in practice. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 695 patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer who were candidates for breast conserving surgery and underwent MDCT or MRI in our hospital between January 2004 and March 2011. Targeted sonography was performed in all MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions followed by imaging-guided biopsy. Patient background, histopathology features and the sizes of the lesions were compared among benign, malignant and follow-up groups. Results Of the 695 patients, 61 lesions in 56 patients were detected by MDCT or MRI. The MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions were identified by targeted sonography in 58 out of 61 lesions (95.1%). Patients with pathological diagnoses were significantly older and more likely to be postmenopausal than the follow-up patients. Pathological diagnosis proved to be benign in 20 cases and malignant in 25. The remaining 16 lesions have been followed up. Lesion size and shape were not significantly different among the benign, malignant and follow-up groups. Conclusions Approximately 95% of MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions were identified by targeted sonography, and nearly half of these lesions were pathologically proven malignancies in this study. Targeted sonography is a useful modality for MDCT- or MRI-detected breast lesions. PMID:22691539

  8. Accurate 3D quantification of the bronchial parameters in MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saragaglia, A.; Fetita, C.; Preteux, F.; Brillet, P. Y.; Grenier, P. A.

    2005-08-01

    The assessment of bronchial reactivity and wall remodeling in asthma plays a crucial role in better understanding such a disease and evaluating therapeutic responses. Today, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) makes it possible to perform an accurate estimation of bronchial parameters (lumen and wall areas) by allowing a quantitative analysis in a cross-section plane orthogonal to the bronchus axis. This paper provides the tools for such an analysis by developing a 3D investigation method which relies on 3D reconstruction of bronchial lumen and central axis computation. Cross-section images at bronchial locations interactively selected along the central axis are generated at appropriate spatial resolution. An automated approach is then developed for accurately segmenting the inner and outer bronchi contours on the cross-section images. It combines mathematical morphology operators, such as "connection cost", and energy-controlled propagation in order to overcome the difficulties raised by vessel adjacencies and wall irregularities. The segmentation accuracy was validated with respect to a 3D mathematically-modeled phantom of a pair bronchus-vessel which mimics the characteristics of real data in terms of gray-level distribution, caliber and orientation. When applying the developed quantification approach to such a model with calibers ranging from 3 to 10 mm diameter, the lumen area relative errors varied from 3.7% to 0.15%, while the bronchus area was estimated with a relative error less than 5.1%.

  9. Three-dimensional reconstruction of upper airways from MDCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perchet, Diane; Fetita, Catalin; Preteux, Francoise

    2005-03-01

    Under the framework of clinical respiratory investigation, providing accurate modalities for morpho-functional analysis is essential for diagnosis improvement, surgical planning and follow-up. This paper focuses on the upper airways investigation and develops an automated approach for 3D mesh reconstruction from MDCT acquisitions. In order to overcome the difficulties related to the complex morphology of the upper airways and to the image gray level heterogeneity of the airway lumens and thin bony septa, the proposed 3D reconstruction methodology combines 2D segmentation and 3D surface regularization approaches. The segmentation algorithm relies on mathematical morphology theory and provides airway lumen robust discrimination from the surrounding tissues, while preserving the connectivity relationship between the different anatomical structures. The 3D regularization step uses an energy-based modeling in order to achieve a smooth and well-fitted 3D surface of the upper airways. An accurate 3D mesh representation of the reconstructed airways makes it possible to develop specific clinical applications such as virtual endoscopy, surgical planning and computer assisted intervention. In addition, building up patient-specific 3D models of upper airways is highly valuable for the study and design of inhaled medication delivery via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations.

  10. CT angiography of neonates and infants: comparison of radiation dose and image quality of target mode prospectively ECG-gated 320-MDCT and ungated helical 64-MDCT.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Siddharth P; Golriz, Farahnaz; Atweh, Lamya A; Zhang, Wei; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose and image quality of target mode prospectively ECG-gated volumetric CT angiography (CTA) performed with a 320-MDCT scanner compared with the radiation dose and image quality of ungated helical CTA performed with a 64-MDCT scanner. MATERIALS AND METHODS. An experience with CTA for cardiovascular indications in neonates and infants 0-6 months old was retrospectively assessed. Radiation doses and quantitative and qualitative image quality scores of 28 CTA examinations performed with a 320-MDCT scanner and volumetric target mode prospective ECG gating plus iterative reconstruction (target mode) were compared with the doses and scores of 28 CTA examinations performed with a 64-MDCT scanner and ungated helical scanning plus filtered back projection reconstruction (ungated mode). All target mode studies were performed during free breathing. Seven ungated CTA examinations (25%) were performed with general endotracheal anesthesia. The findings of 17 preoperative CTA examinations performed in target mode were also compared with surgical reports for evaluation of diagnostic accuracy. RESULTS. All studies performed with target mode technique were diagnostic for the main clinical indication. Effective doses were significantly lower in the target mode group (0.51 ± 0.19 mSv) compared with the ungated mode group (4.8 ± 1.4 mSv) (p < 0.0001). Quantitative analysis revealed no statistically significant difference between the two groups with respect to signal-to-noise ratio (of pulmonary artery and aorta) and contrast-to-noise ratio. Subjective image quality was significantly better with target mode than with ungated mode (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION. Target mode prospectively ECG-gated volumetric scanning with iterative reconstruction performed with a 320-MDCT scanner has several benefits in cardiovascular imaging of neonates and infants, including low radiation dose, improved image quality, high diagnostic

  11. Quantitative analysis of the central-chest lymph nodes based on 3D MDCT image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kongkuo; Bascom, Rebecca; Mahraj, Rickhesvar P. M.; Higgins, William E.

    2009-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In lung-cancer staging, central-chest lymph nodes and associated nodal stations, as observed in three-dimensional (3D) multidetector CT (MDCT) scans, play a vital role. However, little work has been done in relation to lymph nodes, based on MDCT data, due to the complicated phenomena that give rise to them. Using our custom computer-based system for 3D MDCT-based pulmonary lymph-node analysis, we conduct a detailed study of lymph nodes as depicted in 3D MDCT scans. In this work, the Mountain lymph-node stations are automatically defined by the system. These defined stations, in conjunction with our system's image processing and visualization tools, facilitate lymph-node detection, classification, and segmentation. An expert pulmonologist, chest radiologist, and trained technician verified the accuracy of the automatically defined stations and indicated observable lymph nodes. Next, using semi-automatic tools in our system, we defined all indicated nodes. Finally, we performed a global quantitative analysis of the characteristics of the observed nodes and stations. This study drew upon a database of 32 human MDCT chest scans. 320 Mountain-based stations (10 per scan) and 852 pulmonary lymph nodes were defined overall from this database. Based on the numerical results, over 90% of the automatically defined stations were deemed accurate. This paper also presents a detailed summary of central-chest lymph-node characteristics for the first time.

  12. A rare congenital anomaly, bridge-like appendiceal fistula to the terminal ileum, demonstrated by MDCT.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kayo; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Kinoshita, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Toyohiko; Sawai, Katsuji; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Kimura, Hirohiko

    2013-08-01

    Although appendiceal anatomical anomalies are very rare, understanding of the anatomical details of these anomalies is important for surgery. In this case report, we present images from multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) and histological findings of a rare anatomical appendiceal anomaly originating from the cecum and opening into the terminal ileum like a bridge. These anatomical details were clearly depicted on MDCT with multi-planar reconstruction. MDCT demonstrated a communication between the appendix and terminal ileum. Histological analysis revealed that a normal mucosal layer was maintained from the appendix to the connected ileum, without any evidence of inflammatory or neoplastic changes, and only thickening of the muscular layer of the appendix was identified. Based on these histological findings, the appendix was considered to represent an anatomical anomaly rather than secondary fistula caused by inflammation or neoplasm, which has not yet been reported. PMID:23247734

  13. Robust extraction of the aorta and pulmonary artery from 3D MDCT image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeprasartsit, Pinyo; Higgins, William E.

    2010-03-01

    Accurate definition of the aorta and pulmonary artery from three-dimensional (3D) multi-detector CT (MDCT) images is important for pulmonary applications. This work presents robust methods for defining the aorta and pulmonary artery in the central chest. The methods work on both contrast enhanced and no-contrast 3D MDCT image data. The automatic methods use a common approach employing model fitting and selection and adaptive refinement. During the occasional event that more precise vascular extraction is desired or the method fails, we also have an alternate semi-automatic fail-safe method. The semi-automatic method extracts the vasculature by extending the medial axes into a user-guided direction. A ground-truth study over a series of 40 human 3D MDCT images demonstrates the efficacy, accuracy, robustness, and efficiency of the methods.

  14. Feasibility of Free-breathing CCTA using 256-MDCT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Sun, Ye; Zhang, Zhuolu; Chen, Lei; Hong, Nan

    2016-07-01

    Usually, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is performed during breath-holding to reduce artifact caused by respiration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of free-breathing CCTA compared to breath-holding using CT scanner with wide detector. To evaluate the feasibility of CCTA during free-breathing using a 256-MDCT. In 80 patients who underwent CCTA, 40 were performed during breath-holding (group A), and the remaining 40 during free-breathing (group B). The quality scores for coronary arteries were analyzed and defined as: 3 (excellent), 2 (good), and 1 (poor). The image noise, signal-to-noise ratio and effective radiation dose as well as the heart rate variation were compared. The noise, signal-to-noise ratio, and effective radiation dose were not significantly different between the 2 groups. The mean heart rate variation between planning and scanning for group A was 7 ± 7.6 bpm, and larger than 3 ± 2.6 bpm for group B (P = 0.012). Quality scores of the free-breathing group were better than those of the breath-holding group (group A: 2.55 ± 0.64, group B: 2.85 ± 0.36, P = 0.018). Free-breathing CCTA is feasible on wide detector CT scanner to provide acceptable image quality with reduced heart rate variation and better images for certain patients. PMID:27399104

  15. Automated diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases and emphysema in MDCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Chang Chien, Kuang-Che; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Prêteux, Françoise

    2007-09-01

    Diffuse lung diseases (DLD) include a heterogeneous group of non-neoplasic disease resulting from damage to the lung parenchyma by varying patterns of inflammation. Characterization and quantification of DLD severity using MDCT, mainly in interstitial lung diseases and emphysema, is an important issue in clinical research for the evaluation of new therapies. This paper develops a 3D automated approach for detection and diagnosis of diffuse lung diseases such as fibrosis/honeycombing, ground glass and emphysema. The proposed methodology combines multi-resolution 3D morphological filtering (exploiting the sup-constrained connection cost operator) and graph-based classification for a full characterization of the parenchymal tissue. The morphological filtering performs a multi-level segmentation of the low- and medium-attenuated lung regions as well as their classification with respect to a granularity criterion (multi-resolution analysis). The original intensity range of the CT data volume is thus reduced in the segmented data to a number of levels equal to the resolution depth used (generally ten levels). The specificity of such morphological filtering is to extract tissue patterns locally contrasting with their neighborhood and of size inferior to the resolution depth, while preserving their original shape. A multi-valued hierarchical graph describing the segmentation result is built-up according to the resolution level and the adjacency of the different segmented components. The graph nodes are then enriched with the textural information carried out by their associated components. A graph analysis-reorganization based on the nodes attributes delivers the final classification of the lung parenchyma in normal and ILD/emphysematous regions. It also makes possible to discriminate between different types, or development stages, among the same class of diseases.

  16. US and MDCT findings in a caudal blind ending bifid ureter with calculi

    PubMed Central

    Ustuner, Evren; Atman, Ebru Dusunceli; Yagci, Cemil; Tokatli, Zafer Nida; Uzun, Caglar

    2011-01-01

    Herein we present a rare ureteric duplication anomaly; blind ending bifid ureter with calculi which is asymptomatic unless complicated by infection, reflux, calculi or malignancy. The diagnosis is often missed at intravenous urography (IVU) and US because the ipsilateral ureter and kidney are grossly normal. In this case the diagnosis was established with ultrasound (US) and mainly with multidetector computerized tomography (MDCT) imaging using multiplanar reformats and 3-D reconstructions which were unique to this case. MDCT scans not only revealed the exact diagnosis and anatomic relationships but also ruled out other pathologies included in the differential diagnosis as well, such as ureter and bladder diverticula. PMID:24765338

  17. Semi-automatic central-chest lymph-node definition from 3D MDCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kongkuo; Higgins, William E.

    2010-03-01

    Central-chest lymph nodes play a vital role in lung-cancer staging. The three-dimensional (3D) definition of lymph nodes from multidetector computed-tomography (MDCT) images, however, remains an open problem. This is because of the limitations in the MDCT imaging of soft-tissue structures and the complicated phenomena that influence the appearance of a lymph node in an MDCT image. In the past, we have made significant efforts toward developing (1) live-wire-based segmentation methods for defining 2D and 3D chest structures and (2) a computer-based system for automatic definition and interactive visualization of the Mountain central-chest lymph-node stations. Based on these works, we propose new single-click and single-section live-wire methods for segmenting central-chest lymph nodes. The single-click live wire only requires the user to select an object pixel on one 2D MDCT section and is designed for typical lymph nodes. The single-section live wire requires the user to process one selected 2D section using standard 2D live wire, but it is more robust. We applied these methods to the segmentation of 20 lymph nodes from two human MDCT chest scans (10 per scan) drawn from our ground-truth database. The single-click live wire segmented 75% of the selected nodes successfully and reproducibly, while the success rate for the single-section live wire was 85%. We are able to segment the remaining nodes, using our previously derived (but more interaction intense) 2D live-wire method incorporated in our lymph-node analysis system. Both proposed methods are reliable and applicable to a wide range of pulmonary lymph nodes.

  18. Intussusception in Adults: The Role of MDCT in the Identification of the Site and Cause of Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Viola; Buquicchio, Grazia Loretta; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Di Grezia, Graziella; Ambrosio, Rosa; Trinci, Margherita; Miele, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Unlike pediatric intussusception, intestinal intussusception is infrequent in adults and it is often secondary to a pathological condition. The growing use of Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) in abdominal imaging has increased the number of radiological diagnoses of intussusception, even in transient and nonobstructing cases. MDCT is well suited to delineate the presence of the disease and provides valuable information about several features, such as the site of intussusception, the intestinal segments involved, and the extent of the intussuscepted bowel. Moreover, MDCT can demonstrate the complications of intussusceptions, represented by bowel wall ischemia and perforation, which are mandatory to promptly refer for surgery. However, not all intussusceptions need an operative treatment. In this paper, we review the current role of MDCT in the diagnosis and management of intussusception in adults, focusing on features, as the presence of a leading point, that may guide an accurate selection of patients for surgery. PMID:26819606

  19. MDCT and MRI for the diagnosis of complex fractures of the tibial plateau: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    XU, YUNQIN; LI, QIANG; SU, PEIHUA; SHEN, TUGANG; ZHU, YAZHONG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis and treatment of complex fractures of the tibial plateau. A total of 71 patients with complex fractures of the tibial plateau (estimated Schatzker classifications III, V and VI) were included in this study. The X-ray, MDCT and MRI data obtained from the patients were analyzed. MDCT was the most sensitive method in the diagnosis of tibial articular surface collapse, cruciate ligament tibial avulsion fracture, degree of fracture comminution and degree of fracture displacement (P<0.01). MRI was the most sensitive method in the diagnosis of injuries of the cruciate and collateral ligaments, menisci and cartilage peeling of the articular surfaces (P<0.01). MDCT and MRI were demonstrated to be more sensitive than X-rays for the diagnosis of insidious damage around the knee. PMID:24348790

  20. MDCT Versus MRI Assessment of Tumor Response After Transarterial Chemoembolization for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kloeckner, Roman; Otto, Gerd; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Oberholzer, Katja; Dueber, Christoph; Pitton, Michael B.

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the ability of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate treatment results after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), with a special focus on the influence of Lipiodol on calculation of tumor necrosis according to EASL criteria. A total of 115 nodules in 20 patients (17 males, 3 females; 69.5 {+-} 9.35 years) with biopsy-proven hepatocellular carcinoma were treated with TACE. Embolization was performed using a doxorubicin-Lipiodol emulsion (group I) or DC Beads loaded with doxorubicin (group II). Follow-up included triphasic contrast-enhanced 64-row MDCT (collimation, 0.625 mm; slice, 3 mm; contrast bolus, 120 ml iomeprol; delay by bolus trigger) and contrast-enhanced MRI (T1 native, T2 native; five dynamic contrast-enhanced phases; 0.1 mmol/kg body weight gadolinium-DTPA; slice thickness, 4 mm). Residual tumor and the extent of tumor necrosis were evaluated according to EASL. Contrast enhancement within tumor lesions was suspected to represent vital tumor. In the Lipiodol-based TACE protocol, MDCT underestimated residual viable tumor compared to MRI, due to Lipiodol artifacts (23.2% vs 47.7% after first, 11.9% vs 31.2% after second, and 11.4% vs 23.7% after third TACE; p = 0.0014, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). In contrast to MDCT, MRI was completely free of any artifacts caused by Lipiodol. In the DC Bead-based Lipiodol-free TACE protocol, MRI and CT showed similar residual tumor and rating of treatment results (46.4% vs 41.2%, 31.9 vs 26.8%, and 26.0% vs 25.6%; n.s.). In conclusion, MRI is superior to MDCT for detection of viable tumor residuals after Lipiodol-based TACE. Since viable tumor tissue is superimposed by Lipiodol artifacts in MDCT, MRI is mandatory for reliable decision-making during follow-up after Lipiodol-based TACE protocols.

  1. Comparison between MDCT and Grayscale IVUS in a Quantitative Analysis of Coronary Lumen in Segments with or without Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Falcão, João L. A. A.; Falcão, Breno A. A.; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V.; Campos, Carlos M.; Silva, Expedito R.; Kalil-Filho, Roberto; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Shiozaki, Afonso A.; Coelho-Filho, Otavio R.; Lemos, Pedro A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnostic accuracy of 64-slice MDCT in comparison with IVUS has been poorly described and is mainly restricted to reports analyzing segments with documented atherosclerotic plaques. Objectives We compared 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with gray scale intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for the evaluation of coronary lumen dimensions in the context of a comprehensive analysis, including segments with absent or mild disease. Methods The 64-slice MDCT was performed within 72 h before the IVUS imaging, which was obtained for at least one coronary, regardless of the presence of luminal stenosis at angiography. A total of 21 patients were included, with 70 imaged vessels (total length 114.6 ± 38.3 mm per patient). A coronary plaque was diagnosed in segments with plaque burden > 40%. Results At patient, vessel, and segment levels, average lumen area, minimal lumen area, and minimal lumen diameter were highly correlated between IVUS and 64-slice MDCT (p < 0.01). However, 64-slice MDCT tended to underestimate the lumen size with a relatively wide dispersion of the differences. The comparison between 64-slice MDCT and IVUS lumen measurements was not substantially affected by the presence or absence of an underlying plaque. In addition, 64-slice MDCT showed good global accuracy for the detection of IVUS parameters associated with flow-limiting lesions. Conclusions In a comprehensive, multi-territory, and whole-artery analysis, the assessment of coronary lumen by 64-slice MDCT compared with coronary IVUS showed a good overall diagnostic ability, regardless of the presence or absence of underlying atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:25993595

  2. Coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection: the role of 64-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Das, K M; Abdou, Sayed M; El-Menyar, Ayman; Ayman, El Menyar; Khulaifi, A A; Nabti, A L

    2008-01-01

    A rare case of bilateral coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection is described. 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) was able to demonstrate both this findings along with involvement of other neck vessels. TEE demonstrated the severity and mechanisms of aortic valve damage and assisted the surgeon in valve repair. MDCT has played an invaluable role in the diagnosis of the abnormal details of such life-threatening vascular complications. PMID:18384568

  3. Congenital coronary arteries anomalies: review of the literature and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT)-appearance.

    PubMed

    Montaudon, M; Latrabe, V; Iriart, X; Caix, P; Laurent, F

    2007-07-01

    The prevalence of coronary arteries congenital anomalies is 1 to 2% in the general population. Although the spectrum of their clinical manifestations is very broad from total inocuity to lethal, anomalies of coronary arteries need to be recognized by clinicians in certain circumstances: they are the first cause of death in young adults under physical exercise and an abnormal course of a coronary artery can complicate a cardiac surgery. Therefore, a non-invasive test is highly suitable for detecting anomalies of coronary arteries and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is likely to be the best one. To understand how anomalies of coronary arteries may occur, we have reviewed the recent literature about their development. Then, the main types of anomalies are presented with their clinical context, and representative MDCT images from our personal database are used for illustration. PMID:17563833

  4. Evolution of imaging in rectal cancer: multimodality imaging with MDCT, MRI, and PET.

    PubMed

    Raman, Siva P; Chen, Yifei; Fishman, Elliot K

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), and positron emission tomography (PET) are complementary imaging modalities in the preoperative staging of patients with rectal cancer, and each offers their own individual strengths and weaknesses. MRI is the best available radiologic modality for the local staging of rectal cancers, and can play an important role in accurately distinguishing which patients should receive preoperative chemoradiation prior to total mesorectal excision. Alternatively, both MDCT and PET are considered primary modalities when performing preoperative distant staging, but are limited in their ability to locally stage rectal malignancies. This review details the role of each of these three modalities in rectal cancer staging, and how the three imaging modalities can be used in conjunction. PMID:25830037

  5. MDCT-Guided Transthoracic Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Lung Using the Transscapular Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Ferro, Carlo

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to report our preliminary experience using MDCT-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy using the transscapular approach in the upper posterolateral lung nodules, an area that it is difficult or hazardous to reach with the conventional approach. Five patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy of the lung via the transscapular approach. A coaxial needle technique was used in all patients. Biopsy was successful in all patients. No major complications were encountered. One patient developed a minimal pneumothorax next to the lesion immediately after biopsy, which resolved spontaneously. MDCT-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy of the lung via the transscapular approach is an effective and safe procedure that reduces the risk of pneumothorax in selected patients.

  6. Robust method for extracting the pulmonary vascular trees from 3D MDCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeprasartsit, Pinyo; Higgins, William E.

    2011-03-01

    Segmentation of pulmonary blood vessels from three-dimensional (3D) multi-detector CT (MDCT) images is important for pulmonary applications. This work presents a method for extracting the vascular trees of the pulmonary arteries and veins, applicable to both contrast-enhanced and unenhanced 3D MDCT image data. The method finds 2D elliptical cross-sections and evaluates agreement of these cross-sections in consecutive slices to find likely cross-sections. It next employs morphological multiscale analysis to separate vessels from adjoining airway walls. The method then tracks the center of the likely cross-sections to connect them to the pulmonary vessels in the mediastinum and forms connected vascular trees spanning both lungs. A ground-truth study indicates that the method was able to detect on the order of 98% of the vessel branches having diameter >= 3.0 mm. The extracted vascular trees can be utilized for the guidance of safe bronchoscopic biopsy.

  7. Evolution of imaging in rectal cancer: multimodality imaging with MDCT, MRI, and PET

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yifei; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), and positron emission tomography (PET) are complementary imaging modalities in the preoperative staging of patients with rectal cancer, and each offers their own individual strengths and weaknesses. MRI is the best available radiologic modality for the local staging of rectal cancers, and can play an important role in accurately distinguishing which patients should receive preoperative chemoradiation prior to total mesorectal excision. Alternatively, both MDCT and PET are considered primary modalities when performing preoperative distant staging, but are limited in their ability to locally stage rectal malignancies. This review details the role of each of these three modalities in rectal cancer staging, and how the three imaging modalities can be used in conjunction. PMID:25830037

  8. Significant reduction of left atrial volume concomitant with clinical improvement after percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation for drug-refractory hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, and its precise detection with multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Yuichiro; Akita, Keitaro; Tsuruta, Hikaru; Yamada, Yoshitake; Hayashida, Kentaro; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Murata, Mitsushige; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Objective In patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM), left atrial (LA) volume measurement is very important to provide prognostic information. Recent studies demonstrated that multidetector CT (MDCT) is useful to assess the changes in LA volume. Our aim was to examine the utility of a follow-up cardiac MDCT for long-term evaluation of the effect of percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) on LA volume. Methods We studied a consecutive cohort of 20 patients with drug-refractory symptomatic HOCM after PTSMA. We evaluated LA volume analyses with cardiac MDCT on patients who underwent PTSMA as compared to echocardiography. Results Before PTSMA, 75% of all patients had heart failure-associated symptoms in the New York Heart Association functional class III/IV. All patients experienced relief from heart failure-associated symptoms after PTSMA. Cardiac MDCT showed significant reduction in the index of maximum LA volume during follow-up compared to before PTSMA in the same way as in echocardiography (93.6±34.1 mL/m2 vs 82.6±35.3 mL/m2, p=0.035). A Bland-Altman plot showed small mean differences and limits of agreement in the measurements of the index of maximum LA volume before and after PTSMA between echocardiography and MDCT. Conclusions The follow-up cardiac MDCT was a useful tool to evaluate the effectiveness of PTSMA on reduction of LA volume. Cardiac MDCT might provide comparable measurements of the LA volume in patients with drug-refractory symptomatic HOCM before and after PTSMA compared to echocardiography. PMID:27307994

  9. Radiation dose from MDCT using Monte Carlo simulations: estimating fetal dose due to pulmonary embolism scans accounting for overscan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, E.; Wellnitz, C.; Goodsitt, M.; DeMarco, J.; Cagnon, C.; Ghatali, M.; Cody, D.; Stevens, D.; McCollough, C.; Primak, A.; McNitt-Gray, M.

    2007-03-01

    Pregnant women with shortness of breath are increasingly referred for CT Angiography to rule out Pulmonary Embolism (PE). While this exam is typically focused on the lungs, extending scan boundaries and overscan can add to the irradiated volume and have implications on fetal dose. The purpose of this work was to estimate radiation dose to the fetus when various levels of overscan were encountered. Two voxelized models of pregnant patients derived from actual patient anatomy were created based on image data. The models represent an early (< 7 weeks) and late term pregnancy (36 weeks). A previously validated Monte Carlo model of an MDCT scanner was used that takes into account physical details of the scanner. Simulated helical scans used 120 kVp, 4x5 mm beam collimation, pitch 1, and varying beam-off locations (edge of the irradiated volume) were used to represent different protocols plus overscan. Normalized dose (mGy/100mAs) was calculated for each fetus. For the early term and the late term pregnancy models, fetal dose estimates for a standard thoracic PE exam were estimated to be 0.05 and 0.3 mGy/100mAs, respectively, increasing to 9 mGy/100mAs when the beam-off location was extended to encompass the fetus. When performing PE exams to rule out PE in pregnant patients, the beam-off location may have a large effect on fetal dose, especially for late term pregnancies. Careful consideration of ending location of the x-ray beam - and not the end of image data - could result in significant reduction in radiation dose to the fetus.

  10. Differences of Upper Airway Morphology According to Obesity: Study with Cephalometry and Dynamic MD-CT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Chun, Bum Soo; Lee, Ho Won

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We investigated difference of parameters of polysomnography, cephalometry and dynamic multi-detector computerized tomography (MD-CT) in wake and sleep states according to obesity. Methods We evaluated 93 patients who underwent polysomnography and cephalometry. MD-CT was performed in 68 of these 93 patients. Fifty-nine and 34 patients were classified as obese and non-obese, with obesity defined as BMI ≥25. Cephalometry results were analyzed for 12 variables. Using the MD-CT, we evaluated dynamic upper airway morphology in wake and sleep states and divided the upper airway into four parts named as high retropalatal (HRP), low retropalatal (LRP), high retroglossal (HRG), and low retroglossal (LRG). A minimal cross sectional area (mCSA) and collapsibility index (CI) were calculated for each airway level. Results Diastolic blood pressure (P=0.0005), neck circumference (P<0.0001), and apnea-hypopnea index (P<0.0001) were statistically significantly different between the obese and non-obese group. Among 12 cephalometric variables, there was a significant difference in only the distance from mandibular plane to hyoid bone (P=0.003). There was statistical difference in CI of HRG and LRG in sleep state (P=0.0449, 0.0281) but no difference in mCSA in wake and sleep states. Conclusion The obese group had more severe sleep apnea than the non-obese group. We believe that the increased severity of apnea in the obese group may be have been due to increased collapsibility of the upper airway rather than decreased size of the upper airway. PMID:20978543

  11. Coronary Abnormalities in Hyper-IgE Recurrent Infection Syndrome: Depiction at Coronary MDCT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Ahmed M.; Pettigrew, Roderic I.; Elagha, Abdalla; Hsu, Amy; Welch, Pam; Holland, Steven M.; Freeman, Alexandra F.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hyper-IgE recurrent infection syndrome (HIES or Job’s syndrome) is a rare disorder affecting the immune system and connective tissues. The purpose of this study is to describe the coronary abnormalities in genetically confirmed HIES patients as depicted by coronary MDCT angiography (MDCTA). CONCLUSION Coronary MDCTA has provided an opportunity for noninvasive evaluation of the coronary arteries in patients with HIES. These coronary abnormalities vary from tortuosity to ectatic dilation and focal aneurysms of the coronary arteries. Such an evaluation has potential value in identifying new aspects of this disease and thereby providing better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disorder. PMID:19933621

  12. Coronary Abnormalities in Hyper-IgE Recurrent Infection Syndrome: Depiction at Coronary MDCT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Ahmed M.; Pettigrew, Roderic I.; Elagha, Abdalla; Hsu, Amy; Welch, Pam; Holland, Steven M.; Freeman, Alexandra F.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hyper-IgE recurrent infection syndrome (HIES or Job’s syndrome) is a rare disorder affecting the immune system and connective tissues. The purpose of this study is to describe the coronary abnormalities in genetically confirmed HIES patients as depicted by coronary MDCT angiography (MDCTA). CONCLUSION Coronary MDCTA has provided an opportunity for noninvasive evaluation of the coronary arteries in patients with HIES. These coronary abnormalities vary from tortuosity to ectatic dilation and focal aneurysms of the coronary arteries. Such an evaluation has potential value in identifying new aspects of this disease and thereby providing better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disorder. PMID:21494893

  13. Numerical Study of Turbulent Laryngeal Jet in the MDCT-based Human Lung Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Long; Tawhai, Merryn H.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2006-11-01

    The geometry of the human upper respiratory tract is constructed from x-ray-based multidetector computed tomography (MDCT: Sensation 64) images using in house developed segmentation software. The geometry consists of a mouth piece, the mouth, the oropharynx, the larynx, and up to 6 generations of the intra-thoracic airway tree. We applied a custom-developed Characteristic-Galerkin finite element method, which solves the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, to study the effect of turbulence on air flow structures in the MDCT-based lung model. In order to gather sufficient data for analysis of turbulence statistics, a constant flow rate of about 320 ml/s at the peak inspiratory phase is imposed at the terminal branches to draw air into the upper respiratory tract. The flow rate yields an average speed of about 2 m/s and a Reynolds number of 1,700 in the trachea. The characteristics of mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy are analyzed. A curved sheet-like high-speed laryngeal jet with high turbulence intensity is formed in the trachea. Some peak frequencies associated with the jet flow are detected. Their association with turbulent coherent structures is examined. The work is sponsored by NIH Grants R01-EB-005823 and R01-HL-064368.

  14. Aortic ostia of the bronchial arteries and tracheal bifurcation: MDCT analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ziyawudong, Julaiti; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio; Ikoma, Akira; Sanda, Hiroki; Takeuchi, Taizo; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Nakai, Motoki; Tanaka, Takami; Sonomura, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To explore the anatomical relationships between bronchial artery and tracheal bifurcation using computed tomography angiography (CTA). METHODS: One hundred consecutive patients (84 men, 16 women; aged 46-85 years) who underwent CTA using multi-detector row CT (MDCT) were investigated retrospectively. The distance between sites of bronchial artery ostia and tracheal bifurcation, and dividing directions were explored. The directions of division from the descending aorta were described as on a clock face. RESULTS: We identified ostia of 198 bronchial arteries: 95 right bronchial arteries, 67 left bronchial arteries, 36 common trunk arteries. Of these, 172 (87%) divided from the descending aorta, 25 (13%) from the aortic arch, and 1 (0.5%) from the left subclavian artery. The right, left, and common trunk bronchial arteries divided at -1 to 2 cm from tracheal bifurcation with frequencies of 77% (73/95), 82% (54/66), and 70% (25/36), respectively. The dividing direction of right bronchial arteries from the descending aorta was 9 to 10 o’clock with a frequency of 81% (64/79); that of left and common tract bronchial arteries was 11 to 1 o’clock with frequencies of 70% (43/62) and 77% (24/31), respectively. CONCLUSION: CTA using MDCT provides details of the relation between bronchial artery ostia and tracheal bifurcation. PMID:22328969

  15. Effect of Low-Dose MDCT and Iterative Reconstruction on Trabecular Bone Microstructure Assessment.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Felix K; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Baum, Thomas; Nasirudin, Radin A; Mei, Kai; Garcia, Eduardo G; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J; Kirschke, Jan S; Noël, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low-dose multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) in combination with statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms on trabecular bone microstructure parameters. Twelve donated vertebrae were scanned with the routine radiation exposure used in our department (standard-dose) and a low-dose protocol. Reconstructions were performed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and maximum-likelihood based statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR). Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were assessed and statistically compared for each reconstruction. Moreover, fracture loads of the vertebrae were biomechanically determined and correlated to the assessed microstructure parameters. Trabecular bone microstructure parameters based on low-dose MDCT and SIR significantly correlated with vertebral bone strength. There was no significant difference between microstructure parameters calculated on low-dose SIR and standard-dose FBP images. However, the results revealed a strong dependency on the regularization strength applied during SIR. It was observed that stronger regularization might corrupt the microstructure analysis, because the trabecular structure is a very small detail that might get lost during the regularization process. As a consequence, the introduction of SIR for trabecular bone microstructure analysis requires a specific optimization of the regularization parameters. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches, superior noise-resolution trade-offs can be found with the proposed methods. PMID:27447827

  16. Accuracy of Monte Carlo simulations compared to in-vivo MDCT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bostani, Maryam McMillan, Kyle; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Mueller, Jonathon W.; Cody, Dianna D.; DeMarco, John J.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of a Monte Carlo simulation-based method for estimating radiation dose from multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) by comparing simulated doses in ten patients to in-vivo dose measurements. Methods: MD Anderson Cancer Center Institutional Review Board approved the acquisition of in-vivo rectal dose measurements in a pilot study of ten patients undergoing virtual colonoscopy. The dose measurements were obtained by affixing TLD capsules to the inner lumen of rectal catheters. Voxelized patient models were generated from the MDCT images of the ten patients, and the dose to the TLD for all exposures was estimated using Monte Carlo based simulations. The Monte Carlo simulation results were compared to the in-vivo dose measurements to determine accuracy. Results: The calculated mean percent difference between TLD measurements and Monte Carlo simulations was −4.9% with standard deviation of 8.7% and a range of −22.7% to 5.7%. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrate very good agreement between simulated and measured doses in-vivo. Taken together with previous validation efforts, this work demonstrates that the Monte Carlo simulation methods can provide accurate estimates of radiation dose in patients undergoing CT examinations.

  17. Effect of Low-Dose MDCT and Iterative Reconstruction on Trabecular Bone Microstructure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Thomas; Nasirudin, Radin A.; Mei, Kai; Garcia, Eduardo G.; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Kirschke, Jan S.; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low-dose multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) in combination with statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms on trabecular bone microstructure parameters. Twelve donated vertebrae were scanned with the routine radiation exposure used in our department (standard-dose) and a low-dose protocol. Reconstructions were performed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and maximum-likelihood based statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR). Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were assessed and statistically compared for each reconstruction. Moreover, fracture loads of the vertebrae were biomechanically determined and correlated to the assessed microstructure parameters. Trabecular bone microstructure parameters based on low-dose MDCT and SIR significantly correlated with vertebral bone strength. There was no significant difference between microstructure parameters calculated on low-dose SIR and standard-dose FBP images. However, the results revealed a strong dependency on the regularization strength applied during SIR. It was observed that stronger regularization might corrupt the microstructure analysis, because the trabecular structure is a very small detail that might get lost during the regularization process. As a consequence, the introduction of SIR for trabecular bone microstructure analysis requires a specific optimization of the regularization parameters. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches, superior noise-resolution trade-offs can be found with the proposed methods. PMID:27447827

  18. 3D MDCT-Based System for Planning Peripheral Bronchoscopic Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Jason D.; Graham, Michael W.; Higgins, William E.

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis and staging of lung cancer often begins with the assessment of a suspect peripheral chest site. Such suspicious peripheral sites may be solitary pulmonary nodules or other abnormally appearing regions of interest (ROIs). The state-of-the-art process for assessing such peripheral ROIs involves off-line procedure planning using a three-dimensional (3D) multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) chest scan followed by bronchoscopy with an ultrathin bronchoscope. We present an integrated computer-based system for planning peripheral bronchoscopic procedures. The system takes a 3D MDCT chest image as input and performs nearly all operations automatically. The only interaction required by the physician is the selection of ROI locations. The system is computationally efficient and fits smoothly within the clinical work flow. Integrated into the system and described in detail in the paper is a new surface-definition method, which is vital for effective analysis and planning to peripheral sites. Results demonstrate the efficacy of the system and its usage for the live guidance of ultrathin bronchoscopy to the periphery. PMID:19217089

  19. Impact of Aortic Valve Calcification, as Measured by MDCT, on Survival in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Pibarot, Philippe; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Capoulade, Romain; Malouf, Joseph; Aggarval, Shivani; Araoz, Phillip A.; Michelena, Hector I.; Cueff, Caroline; Larose, Eric; Miller, Jordan D.; Vahanian, Alec; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Aortic valve calcification (AVC) load measures lesion severity in aortic stenosis (AS) and is useful for diagnostic purposes. Whether AVC predicts survival after diagnosis, independent of clinical and Doppler echocardiographic AS characteristics, has not been studied. OBJECTIVES This study evaluated the impact of AVC load, absolute and relative to aortic annulus size (AVCdensity), on overall mortality in patients with AS under conservative treatment and without regard to treatment. METHODS In 3 academic centers, we enrolled 794 patients (mean age, 73 ± 12 years; 274 women) diagnosed with AS by Doppler echocardiography who underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) within the same episode of care. Absolute AVC load and AVCdensity (ratio of absolute AVC to cross-sectional area of aortic annulus) were measured, and severe AVC was separately defined in men and women. RESULTS During follow-up, there were 440 aortic valve implantations (AVIs) and 194 deaths (115 under medical treatment). Univariate analysis showed strong association of absolute AVC and AVCdensity with survival (both, p < 0.0001) with a spline curve analysis pattern of threshold and plateau of risk. After adjustment for age, sex, coronary artery disease, diabetes, symptoms, AS severity on hemodynamic assessment, and LV ejection fraction, severe absolute AVC (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04 to 2.92; p = 0.03) or severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.44; 95% CI: 1.37 to 4.37; p = 0.002) independently predicted mortality under medical treatment, with additive model predictive value (all, p ≤ 0.04) and a net reclassification index of 12.5% (p = 0.04). Severe absolute AVC (adjusted HR: 1.71; 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.62; p = 0.01) and severe AVCdensity (adjusted HR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.40 to 3.52; p = 0.001) also independently predicted overall mortality, even with adjustment for time-dependent AVI. CONCLUSIONS This large-scale, multicenter outcomes study of

  20. Acute colonic diverticulitis: an update on clinical classification and management with MDCT correlation.

    PubMed

    Barat, Maxime; Dohan, Anthony; Pautrat, Karine; Boudiaf, Mourad; Dautry, Raphael; Guerrache, Youcef; Pocard, Marc; Hoeffel, Christine; Eveno, Clarisse; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the most commonly used classification of acute colonic diverticulitis (ACD) is the modified Hinchey classification, which corresponds to a slightly more complex classification by comparison with the original description. This modified classification allows to categorize patients with ACD into four major categories (I, II, III, IV) and two additional subcategories (Ia and Ib), depending on the severity of the disease. Several studies have clearly demonstrated the impact of this classification for determining the best therapeutic approach and predicting perioperative complications for patients who need surgery. This review provides an update on the classification of ACD along with a special emphasis on the corresponding MDCT features of the different categories and subcategories. This modified Hinchey classification should be known by emergency physicians, radiologists, and surgeons in order to improve patient care and management because each category has a specific therapeutic approach. PMID:27138434

  1. Data compression in wireless sensors network using MDCT and embedded harmonic coding.

    PubMed

    Alsalaet, Jaafar K; Ali, Abduladhem A

    2015-05-01

    One of the major applications of wireless sensors networks (WSNs) is vibration measurement for the purpose of structural health monitoring and machinery fault diagnosis. WSNs have many advantages over the wired networks such as low cost and reduced setup time. However, the useful bandwidth is limited, as compared to wired networks, resulting in relatively low sampling. One solution to this problem is data compression which, in addition to enhancing sampling rate, saves valuable power of the wireless nodes. In this work, a data compression scheme, based on Modified Discrete Cosine Transform (MDCT) followed by Embedded Harmonic Components Coding (EHCC) is proposed to compress vibration signals. The EHCC is applied to exploit harmonic redundancy present is most vibration signals resulting in improved compression ratio. This scheme is made suitable for the tiny hardware of wireless nodes and it is proved to be fast and effective. The efficiency of the proposed scheme is investigated by conducting several experimental tests. PMID:25541332

  2. Multidetector CT with 3-dimensional volume rendering in the evaluation of the spine in patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1: a retrospective review in 73 patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) may involve the spine as various abnormalities including bony dysplasia, scoliosis, and nerve sheath tumors. Surgery may be performed for stabilization of the spine. We have seen an increase in requests for multidetector CT (MDCT) imaging with the (three-dimensional) 3D-volume rendered (VR) images in patients evaluated at our institution. We, therefore, investigated how MDCT could be best utilized in this patient population. Methods Seventy-three patients with NF-1 were identified in whom MDCT imaging was performed for diagnostic, pre-operative, or post-operative evaluation of spinal abnormalities. True axial source images and two dimensional (2D) orthogonal reconstructed MDCT images, as well as the VR images, were compared with plain radiographs and MRI. In addition, the MDCT study was compared to the VR images. These studies were reviewed to compare assessment of A) bony abnormalities such as remodeling from dural ectasia, dysplasia, and fusion, B) abnormal spinal curvature, C) nerve sheath tumors, and D) surgical instrumentation. Results When compared to plain radiographs, the MDCT and VR images were rated as helpful for evaluating the abnormalities of the spine in 19 of 24 patients for a total of 30 findings. This included the following categories A) (n = 6), B) (n = 5), C) (n = 7), and D) (n = 12). Compared to MR, the MDCT and VR study was helpful in evaluating the findings of NF-1 in 24 of 36 patients for a total of 40 findings. This included the following categories A) (n = 12), B) (n = 10), C) (n = 3), and D) (n = 15). When the VR images were compared to the orthogonal MDCT, the VR images was rated as helpful in 41 of 73 patients for a total of 60 findings, including the following categories: A) (n = 11), B) (n = 24), C) (n = 0), and D) (n = 25). Conclusion MDCT has distinct advantages over plain radiographs and MR imaging, and the VR images over MDCT in the

  3. The feasibility of a 64-slice MDCT for detection of the Adamkiewicz artery: comparison of the detection rate of intravenous injection CT angiography using a 64-slice MDCT versus intra-arterial and intravenous injection CT angiography using a 16-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Tatsuya; Kono, Atsushi K; Negi, Noriyuki; Hashimura, Hiromi; Uotani, Kensuke; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-12-01

    Identification of the Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) using CT angiography (CTA) is crucial in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) or aortic dissection (AD). The purpose of this study was to compare the AKA detection rate of intravenous injection with a 64-slice MDCT (IV64) versus a 16-slice MDCT (IV16) as well as by CTA using intra-arterial injection with a 16-slice MDCT (IA16). A retrospective review of 160 consecutive patients who underwent CTA was performed. There were 108 TAA and 52 AD cases, 105 of whom were examined with IV64, 15 with IV16, and 40 with IA16. The AKA detectability for each imaging method was assessed, and the factors influencing the detectability were analyzed by multivariate analysis. The detection rates for IV64, IV16, and IA16 were 85.7, 60.0, and 80.0 %, respectively, with IV64 being more sensitive than IV16 (P = 0.025). The detection rate for AD patients was 66.7 % with IV64, which was similar to IV16 (57.1 %) and IA16 (66.8 %). On the other hand, the detection rate for TAA patients was 93.3 % with IV64, which was higher than IV16 (62.5 %, P = 0.021) and similar to IA16 (88.0 %). Multivariate analysis demonstrated the independent factors for AKA detectability were TAA versus AD (P = 0.005, Odds ratio = 3.98) and IV64 versus IV16 (P = 0.037, Odds ratio = 4.03). The detection rate was higher for IV64 than for IV16, especially for TAA patients, while the rate was similar between IV64 and invasive IA16. A 64-slice MDCT thus provides a less invasive visualization of the AKA. PMID:24081485

  4. [Measurement of scatter radiation on MDCT equipment using an OSL dosimeter].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hironobu; Morozumi, Kunihiko

    2004-11-01

    The recent introduction of multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) has made it possible to scan the entire abdomen within approximately 10 sec in procedures such as interventional radiology computed tomography (IVRCT), which are associated with operator exposure. Therefore, anxious patients and patients who are not able to remain still can be examined with an assistant. In the present study, radiation exposure to the assistant was estimated, and the distribution of scattered radiation near the gantry was measured using an optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter. Simultaneous measurements were obtained using a direction storage (DIS) dosimeter for reference. The maximum value of 1.47 mSv per examination was obtained at the point closest to the gantry's center (50 cm from the center at a height of 150 cm above the floor) . In addition, scattered radiation decreased as the measurement point was moved further from the gantry's center, falling below the limit of detection (0.1 mSv or less) at 200 cm and at the sides of the gantry. OSL dosimeters are also employed as personal dosimeters, permitting reliable values to be obtained easily. They were found to be an effective tool for the measurement of scattered radiation, as in the present study, helping to provide better understanding of the distribution of scattered radiation within the CT room. PMID:15568007

  5. A Numerical Study of Heat and Water Vapor Transfer in MDCT-Based Human Airway Models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) thermo-fluid model is developed to study regional distributions of temperature and water vapor in three multi-detector row computed-tomography (MDCT)-basedhuman airwayswith minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min. A one-dimensional (1D) model is also solved to provide necessary initial and boundary conditionsforthe 3D model. Both 3D and 1D predicted temperature distributions agree well with available in vivo measurement data. On inspiration, the 3D cold high-speed air stream is split at the bifurcation to form secondary flows, with its cold regions biased toward the inner wall. The cold air flowing along the wall is warmed up more rapidly than the air in the lumen center. The repeated splitting pattern of air streams caused by bifurcations acts as an effective mechanism for rapid heat and mass transfer in 3D. This provides a key difference from the 1D model, where heating relies largely on diffusion in the radial direction, thus significantly affecting gradient-dependent variables, such as energy flux and water loss rate. We then propose the correlations for respective heat and mass transfer in the airways of up to 6 generations: Nu=3.504(ReDaDt)0.277, R = 0.841 and Sh=3.652(ReDaDt)0.268, R = 0.825, where Nu is the Nusselt number, Sh is the Sherwood number, Re is the branch Reynolds number, Da is the airway equivalent diameter, and Dt is the tracheal equivalentdiameter. PMID:25081386

  6. Visual vs Fully Automatic Histogram-Based Assessment of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) Progression Using Sequential Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT)

    PubMed Central

    Colombi, Davide; Dinkel, Julien; Weinheimer, Oliver; Obermayer, Berenike; Buzan, Teodora; Nabers, Diana; Bauer, Claudia; Oltmanns, Ute; Palmowski, Karin; Herth, Felix; Kauczor, Hans Ulrich; Sverzellati, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe changes over time in extent of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) at multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) assessed by semi-quantitative visual scores (VSs) and fully automatic histogram-based quantitative evaluation and to test the relationship between these two methods of quantification. Methods Forty IPF patients (median age: 70 y, interquartile: 62-75 years; M:F, 33:7) that underwent 2 MDCT at different time points with a median interval of 13 months (interquartile: 10-17 months) were retrospectively evaluated. In-house software YACTA quantified automatically lung density histogram (10th-90th percentile in 5th percentile steps). Longitudinal changes in VSs and in the percentiles of attenuation histogram were obtained in 20 untreated patients and 20 patients treated with pirfenidone. Pearson correlation analysis was used to test the relationship between VSs and selected percentiles. Results In follow-up MDCT, visual overall extent of parenchymal abnormalities (OE) increased in median by 5 %/year (interquartile: 0 %/y; +11 %/y). Substantial difference was found between treated and untreated patients in HU changes of the 40th and of the 80th percentiles of density histogram. Correlation analysis between VSs and selected percentiles showed higher correlation between the changes (Δ) in OE and Δ 40th percentile (r=0.69; p<0.001) as compared to Δ 80th percentile (r=0.58; p<0.001); closer correlation was found between Δ ground-glass extent and Δ 40th percentile (r=0.66, p<0.001) as compared to Δ 80th percentile (r=0.47, p=0.002), while the Δ reticulations correlated better with the Δ 80th percentile (r=0.56, p<0.001) in comparison to Δ 40th percentile (r=0.43, p=0.003). Conclusions There is a relevant and fully automatically measurable difference at MDCT in VSs and in histogram analysis at one year follow-up of IPF patients, whether treated or untreated: Δ 40th percentile might reflect the change in overall extent of lung

  7. The most characteristic lesions and radiologic signs of Crohn disease of the small bowel: air enteroclysis, MDCT, endoscopy, and pathology.

    PubMed

    Carbo, Alberto I; Reddy, Threta; Gates, Thomas; Vesa, Telciane; Thomas, Jaiyeola; Gonzalez, Enrique

    2014-02-01

    This pictorial essay describes the most characteristic lesions and radiologic signs of Crohn disease of the small bowel: nodular lymphoid hyperplasia, abnormal mucosal folds, villous pattern, aphthous ulcerations, linear ulcerations, cobblestone pattern, string sign, target sign, comb sign, creeping fat, sinus tracts, fistulas, and abscesses. Each description includes the definition, a correlation with the pathologic findings, an explanation of the possible physiopathologic mechanism, sample radiologic images with air enteroclysis or MDCT, the correspondence with the endoscopic findings when possible, and a list of differential diagnoses. PMID:24173609

  8. MDCT Anatomic Assessment of Right Inferior Phrenic Artery Origin Related to Potential Supply to Hepatocellular Carcinoma and its Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, Antonio Tsetis, Dimitrios; Montineri, Arturo; Puleo, Stefano; Massa Saluzzo, Cesare; Runza, Giuseppe; Coppolino, Francesco; Ettorre, Giovanni Carlo; Patti, Maria Teresa

    2008-03-15

    Purpose. To prospectively assess the anatomic variation of the right inferior phrenic artery (RIPA) origin with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scans in relation to the technical and angiographic findings during transcatheter arterial embolization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods. Two hundred patients with hepatocellular carcinomas were examined with 16-section CT during the arterial phase. The anatomy of the inferior phrenic arteries was recorded, with particular reference to their origin. All patients with subcapsular HCC located at segments VII and VIII underwent arteriography of the RIPA with subsequent embolization if neoplastic supply was detected. Results. The RIPA origin was detected in all cases (sensitivity 100%), while the left inferior phrenic artery origin was detected in 187 cases (sensitivity 93.5%). RIPAs originated from the aorta (49%), celiac trunk (41%), right renal artery (5.5%), left gastric artery (4%), and proper hepatic artery (0.5%), with 13 types of combinations with the left IPA. Twenty-nine patients showed subcapsular HCCs in segments VII and VIII and all but one underwent RIPA selective angiography, followed by embolization in 7 cases. Conclusion. MDCT assesses well the anatomy of RIPAs, which is fundamental for planning subsequent cannulation and embolization of extrahepatic RIPA supply to HCC.

  9. Influence of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm in MDCT assessment of airway wall thickness: A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Nagle, Scott K.; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong; Robinson, Terry E.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Wall thickness (WT) is an airway feature of great interest for the assessment of morphological changes in the lung parenchyma. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has recently been used to evaluate airway WT, but the potential risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis—particularly in younger patients—might limit a wider use of this imaging method in clinical practice. The recent commercial implementation of the statistical model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm, instead of the conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm, has enabled considerable radiation dose reduction in many other clinical applications of MDCT. The purpose of this work was to study the impact of radiation dose and MBIR in the MDCT assessment of airway WT. Methods: An airway phantom was scanned using a clinical MDCT system (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare) at 4 kV levels and 5 mAs levels. Both FBP and a commercial implementation of MBIR (Veo{sup TM}, GE Healthcare) were used to reconstruct CT images of the airways. For each kV–mAs combination and each reconstruction algorithm, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the airways was measured, and the WT of each airway was measured and compared with the nominal value; the relative bias and the angular standard deviation in the measured WT were calculated. For each airway and reconstruction algorithm, the overall performance of WT quantification across all of the 20 kV–mAs combinations was quantified by the sum of squares (SSQs) of the difference between the measured and nominal WT values. Finally, the particular kV–mAs combination and reconstruction algorithm that minimized radiation dose while still achieving a reference WT quantification accuracy level was chosen as the optimal acquisition and reconstruction settings. Results: The wall thicknesses of seven airways of different sizes were analyzed in the study. Compared with FBP, MBIR improved the CNR of the airways, particularly at low radiation dose

  10. Coronary calcium mass scores measured by identical 64-slice MDCT scanners are comparable: a cardiac phantom study.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Greuter, Marcel J W; Groen, Jaap M; Vliegenthart-Proença, Rozemarijn; Renema, Klaasjan W K; de Lange, Frank; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2010-01-01

    To assess whether absolute mass scores are comparable or differ between identical 64-slice MDCT scanners of the same manufacturer and to compare absolute mass scores to the physical mass and between scan modes using a calcified phantom. A non-moving anthropomorphic phantom with nine calcifications of three sizes and three densities was scanned 30 times on three 64-slice MDCT scanners of manufacturer A and on three 64-slice MDCT scanners of manufacturer B in both sequential and spiral scan mode. The mean mass scores and mass score variabilities of seven calcifications were determined for all scanners; two non-detectable calcifications were omitted. It was analyzed whether identical scanners yielded similar or significantly different mass scores. Furthermore mass scores were compared to the physical mass and mass scores were compared between scan modes. The mass score calibration factor was determined for all scanners. Mass scores obtained on identical scanners were similar for almost all calcifications. Overall, mass score differences between the scanners were small ranging from 1.5 to 3.4% for the total mass scores, and most differences between scanners were observed for high density calcifications. Mass scores were significantly different from the physical mass for almost all calcifications and all scanners. In sequential mode the total physical mass (167.8 mg) was significantly overestimated (+2.3%) for 4 out of 6 scanners. In spiral mode a significant overestimation (+2.5%) was found for system B and a significant underestimation (-1.8%) for two scanners of system A. Mass scores were dependent on the scan mode, for manufacturer A scores were higher in sequential mode and for manufacturer B in spiral mode. For system A using spiral scan mode no differences were found between identical scanners, whereas a few differences were found using sequential mode. For system B the scan mode did not affect the number of different mass scores between identical scanners. Mass

  11. Pelvic ultrasound immediately following MDCT in female patients with abdominal/pelvic pain: is it always necessary?

    PubMed

    Yitta, Silaja; Mausner, Elizabeth V; Kim, Alice; Kim, Danny; Babb, James S; Hecht, Elizabeth M; Bennett, Genevieve L

    2011-10-01

    To determine the added value of reimaging the female pelvis with ultrasound (US) immediately following multidetector CT (MDCT) in the emergent setting. CT and US exams of 70 patients who underwent MDCT for evaluation of abdominal/pelvic pain followed by pelvic ultrasound within 48 h were retrospectively reviewed by three readers. Initially, only the CT images were reviewed followed by evaluation of CT images in conjunction with US images. Diagnostic confidence was recorded for each reading and an exact Wilcoxon signed rank test was performed to compare the two. Changes in diagnosis based on combined CT and US readings versus CT readings alone were identified. Confidence intervals (95%) were derived for the percentage of times US reimaging can be expected to lead to a change in diagnosis relative to the diagnosis based on CT interpretation alone. Ultrasound changed the diagnosis for the ovaries/adnexa 8.1% of the time (three reader average); the majority being cases of a suspected CT abnormality found to be normal on US. Ultrasound changed the diagnosis for the uterus 11.9% of the time (three reader average); the majority related to the endometrial canal. The 95% confidence intervals for the ovaries/adnexa and uterus were 5-12.5% and 8-17%, respectively. Ten cases of a normal CT were followed by a normal US with 100% agreement across all three readers. Experienced readers correctly diagnosed ruptured ovarian cysts and tubo-ovarian abscesses (TOA) based on CT alone with 100% agreement. US reimaging after MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis is not helpful: (1) following a normal CT of the pelvic organs or (2) when CT findings are diagnostic and/or characteristic of certain entities such as ruptured cysts and TOA. Reimaging with ultrasound is warranted for (1) less-experienced readers to improve diagnostic confidence or when CT findings are not definitive, (2) further evaluation of suspected endometrial abnormalities. A distinction should be made between the need for

  12. Correlating MDCT Liver Injury Grade and Clinical Outcome in Patients Without Significant Extra-hepatic Injury.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravi; Kumar, Atin; Baliyan, Vinit; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Subodh; Misra, M C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to correlate multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) grading with clinical severity and outcome in liver trauma patients without significant extrahepatic injury. Over a period of 2 years (2011-2013), all patients showing evidence of liver injury on contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) abdomen and without significant extrahepatic trauma were prospectively included in the study. Correlation between the CT injury grade and outcome in terms of mortality, duration of ICU/hospital stay, fluid and blood requirements, need for intervention and complications were assessed. The significance of the difference in mortality, duration of ICU/hospital stay, fluid requirement and blood requirements among the patients with various injury grades was assessed by Kruskal-Wallis test. The significance of the difference in need for intervention and complications among the patients with various injury grades was assessed by Fisher's exact test. A total of 198 patients were found to have evidence of hepatic injury on CECT. Out of 198 patients, 117 had insignificant extrahepatic trauma. The overall mean age for these 117 patients was 25.74 ± 15.53 (age range 2-84 years). Death rates according to AAST grades were 0 % in grades II and III, 6.89 % in grade IV and 9.09 % in grade V (p = 0.053). The mean ICU and total hospital stay for grade II was 1.32 and 5.91 days, for grade III was 1.76 and 8.48, for grade IV was 2.86 and 10.31 days and for grade V was 6.54 and 12 days, respectively (p = 0.0001 for ICU, p = 0.0003 for total stay). Mean input and fluid deficit according to various grades were 8634/2607 ml for grade II, 9535/2555 ml for grade III, 15,549/6242 ml for grade IV and 19,958/8280 ml for grade V (p value input-0.0016, output-input (fluid deficit)-0.0001). Average unit of RBC and sum of the blood products transfused were 1.73 and 2.26 for grade II, 2.18 and 2.72 for grade III, 3.03 and 6.27 for grade IV, 6.85 and 38.12 for grade V

  13. Uncinate Process Variations and Their Relationship with Ostiomeatal Complex: A Pictorial Essay of Multidedector Computed Tomography (MDCT) Findings.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Gülay; Okur, Nazan; Okur, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    The ostiomeatal complex (OMC) is a key area for the drainage and ventilation of the paranasal sinuses. Stenosis created by inflammation and anatomic variations in this region causes an ideal ground for parasanal sinus infections, by preventing the drainage and ventilation of the sinuses. In today's diagnostics of paranasal sinus infections, the role of evaluation of OMC anatomical variations and soft tissue pathology has increased.. Knowing the anatomical details is important in terms of directing both medical and surgical treatment. The uncinate process (UP) constitutes the most important structure of the ostiomeatal complex, playing a role in mucociliary activity. UP variations can cause mucociliary drainage and ventilation problems, causing complications during surgery. Therefore, knowing and identifying their appearances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), the most frequently used radiological imaging method for these variations, becomes a very important consideration. PMID:27158282

  14. Uncinate Process Variations and Their Relationship with Ostiomeatal Complex: A Pictorial Essay of Multidedector Computed Tomography (MDCT) Findings

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, Gülay; Okur, Nazan; Okur, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ostiomeatal complex (OMC) is a key area for the drainage and ventilation of the paranasal sinuses. Stenosis created by inflammation and anatomic variations in this region causes an ideal ground for parasanal sinus infections, by preventing the drainage and ventilation of the sinuses. In today’s diagnostics of paranasal sinus infections, the role of evaluation of OMC anatomical variations and soft tissue pathology has increased.. Knowing the anatomical details is important in terms of directing both medical and surgical treatment. The uncinate process (UP) constitutes the most important structure of the ostiomeatal complex, playing a role in mucociliary activity. UP variations can cause mucociliary drainage and ventilation problems, causing complications during surgery. Therefore, knowing and identifying their appearances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), the most frequently used radiological imaging method for these variations, becomes a very important consideration. PMID:27158282

  15. Radiological surveillance of formerly asbestos-exposed power industry workers: rates and risk factors of benign changes on chest X-ray and MDCT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence of asbestos-related changes on chest X-ray (CXR) and low-dose multidetector-row CT (MDCT) of the thorax in a cohort of formerly asbestos-exposed power industry workers and to assess the importance of common risk factors associated with specific radiological changes. Methods To assess the influence of selected risk factors (age, time since first exposure, exposure duration, cumulative exposure and pack years) on typical asbestos-related radiographic changes, we employed multiple logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results On CXR, pleural changes and asbestosis were strongly associated with age, years since first exposure and exposure duration. The MDCT results showed an association between asbestosis and age and between plaques and exposure duration, years since first exposure and cumulative exposure. Parenchymal changes on CXR and MDCT, and diffuse pleural thickening on CXR were both associated with smoking. Using a cut-off of 55 years for age, 17 years for exposure duration and 28 years for latency, benign radiological changes in the cohort with CXR could be predicted with a sensitivity of 82.0% for all of the three variables and a specificity of 47.4%, 39.0% and 40.6%, respectively. Conclusions Participants aged 55 years and older and those with an asbestos exposure of at least 17 years or 28 years since first exposure should be seen as having an increased risk of abnormal radiological findings. For implementing a more focused approach the routine use of low-dose MDCT rather than CXR at least for initial examinations would be justified. PMID:24808921

  16. Pulmonary 64-MDCT angiography with 50 mL of iodinated contrast material in an unselected patient population: a feasible protocol*

    PubMed Central

    Trad, Henrique Simão; Boasquevisque, Gustavo Santos; Giacometti, Tiago Rangon; Trad, Catherine Yang; Zoghbi Neto, Orlando Salomão; Trad, Clovis Simão

    2016-01-01

    Objective To propose a protocol for pulmonary angiography using 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (64-MDCT) with 50 mL of iodinated contrast material, in an unselected patient population, as well as to evaluate vascular enhancement and image quality. Materials and Methods We evaluated 29 patients (22-86 years of age). The body mass index ranged from 19.0 kg/m2 to 41.8 kg/m2. Patients underwent pulmonary CT angiography in a 64-MDCT scanner, receiving 50 mL of iodinated contrast material via venous access at a rate of 4.5 mL/s. Bolus tracking was applied in the superior vena cava. Two experienced radiologists assessed image quality and vascular enhancement. Results The mean density was 382 Hounsfield units (HU) for the pulmonary trunk; 379 and 377 HU for the right and left main pulmonary arteries, respectively; and 346 and 364 HU for the right and left inferior pulmonary arteries, respectively. In all patients, subsegmental arteries were analyzed. There were streak artifacts from contrast material in the superior vena cava in all patients. However, those artifacts did not impair the image analysis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that pulmonary angiography using 64-MDCT with 50 mL of iodinated contrast can produce high quality images in unselected patient populations. PMID:27141128

  17. Congenital solitary kidney with multiple renal arteries: case report using MDCT angiography.

    PubMed

    Matusz, Petru; Miclăuş, Graţian Dragoslav; Banciu, Christian Dragoş; Sas, Ioan; Joseph, Shamfa C; Pirtea, Laurenţiu Cornel; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    A congenital solitary kidney with multiple renal arteries is a rare congenital abnormality that can occur in the presence of multiple other anomalies. We describe an atypical case of a right congenital solitary kidney with three renal arteries (RA) one main RA and two additional renal arteries in a 75-year-old woman with uterine didelphys. The main RA had an intraluminal diameter larger than the diameter of the additional renal arteries (AdRAs) at the origin (0.53 cm for the main RA; 0.49 cm and 0.32 cm for the two AdRAs). Both the AdRAs had a greater length than the main RA (3.51 cm for the main RA; 3.70 cm and 4.77 cm for the two AdRAs). The calculated volume of the kidney was 283 cm³, while the volume of the renal parenchyma was 258 cm³. Knowledge of this variant is extremely important in clinical practice as it has been found to be associated with proteinuria, hypertension and renal insufficiency. PMID:26429179

  18. [Application possibilities and initial experience with digital volume tomography in hand and wrist imaging].

    PubMed

    Goerke, Sebastian M; Neubauer, J; Zajonc, H; Thiele, J R; Kotter, E; Langer, M; Stark, G B; Lampert, F M

    2015-02-01

    During the last decade, DVT (digital volume tomography) imaging has become a widely used standard technique in head and neck imaging. Lower radiation exposure compared to conventional computed tomography (MDCT) has been described. Recently, DVT has been developed as an extremity scanner and as such represents a new imaging technique for hand surgery. We here describe the first 24 months experience with this new imaging modality in hand and wrist imaging by presenting representative cases and by describing the technical background. Furthermore, the method's advantages and disadvantages are discussed with reference to the given literature. PMID:25706176

  19. Arterial double-contrast dual-energy MDCT: in-vivo rabbit atherosclerosis with iodinated nanoparticles and gadolinium agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Raz; Kafri, Galit; Altman, Ami; Goshen, Liran; Planer, David; Sosna, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    An in-vivo feasibility study of potentially improved atherosclerosis CT imaging is presented. By administration of two different contrast agents to rabbits with induced atherosclerotic plaques we aim at identifying both soft plaque and vessel lumen simultaneously. Initial injection of iodinated nanoparticle (INP) contrast agent (N1177 - Nanoscan Imaging), two to four hours before scan, leads to its later accumulation in macrophage-rich soft plaque, while a second gadolinium contrast agent (Magnevist) injected immediately prior to the scan blends with the aortic blood. The distinction between the two agents in a single scan is achieved with a double-layer dual-energy MDCT (Philips Healthcare) following material separation analysis using the reconstructed images of the different x-ray spectra. A single contrast agent injection scan, where only INP was injected two hours prior to the scan, was compared to a double-contrast scan taken four hours after INP injection and immediately after gadolinium injection. On the single contrast agent scan we observed along the aorta walls, localized iodine accumulation which can point on INP uptake by atherosclerotic plaque. In the double-contrast scan the gadolinium contributes a clearer depiction of the vessel lumen in addition to the lasting INP presence. The material separation shows a good correlation to the pathologies inferred from the conventional CT images of the two different scans while performing only a single scan prevents miss-registration problems and reduces radiation dose. These results suggest that a double-contrast dual-energy CT may be used for advanced clinical diagnostic applications.

  20. Unenhanced MDCT in Suspected Urolithiasis: Improved Stone Detection and Density Measurements Using Coronal Maximum-Intensity-Projection Images

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, Michael T.; Hsu, Margaret; McGahan, John P.; Wilson, Machelle; Lamba, Ramit

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine whether coronal maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) reformations improve urinary tract stone detection and density measurements compared with routine axial and coronal images. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty-five consecutive patients who underwent MDCT for suspected urolithiasis were included. Two radiologists independently determined the number of stones on 5-, 3-, and 1.25-mm axial, 5- and 3-mm coronal, and 5-mm coronal MIP images. The reference standard was obtained by consensus review using all six datasets. Stone density was determined for all calculi 4 mm or larger on all datasets. RESULTS There were a total of 115 stones. Reader 1 identified 111 (96.5%), 112 (97.4%), 97 (84.3%), 102 (88.7%), 99 (86.1%), and 85 (73.9%) stones and reader 2 identified 105 (91.3%), 102 (88.7%), 85 (73.9%), 89 (77.4%), 89 (77.4%), and 76 (66.1%) stones on the MIP, 1.25-mm axial, 3-mm axial, 3-mm coronal, 5-mm coronal, and 5-mm axial images, respectively. Both readers identified more stones on the MIP images than on the 3- or 5-mm axial or coronal images (p < 0.0001). The mean difference in stone attenuation compared with the thin axial images was significantly less for the MIP images (44.6 HU) compared with 3-mm axial (235 HU), 3-mm coronal (309 HU), and 5-mm coronal (329.6 HU) or axial images (347.8 HU) (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION Coronal MIP reformations allow more accurate identification and density measurements of urinary tract stones compared with routine axial and coronal reformations. PMID:24147474

  1. In-Vivo Assessment of Femoral Bone Strength Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) Based on Routine MDCT Imaging: A Preliminary Study on Patients with Vertebral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Hans; Garcia, Eduardo Grande; Holzner, Fabian; Noel, Peter B.; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Baum, Thomas; Bauer, Jan S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To experimentally validate a non-linear finite element analysis (FEA) modeling approach assessing in-vitro fracture risk at the proximal femur and to transfer the method to standard in-vivo multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) data of the hip aiming to predict additional hip fracture risk in subjects with and without osteoporosis associated vertebral fractures using bone mineral density (BMD) measurements as gold standard. Methods One fresh-frozen human femur specimen was mechanically tested and fractured simulating stance and clinically relevant fall loading configurations to the hip. After experimental in-vitro validation, the FEA simulation protocol was transferred to standard contrast-enhanced in-vivo MDCT images to calculate individual hip fracture risk each for 4 subjects with and without a history of osteoporotic vertebral fractures matched by age and gender. In addition, FEA based risk factor calculations were compared to manual femoral BMD measurements of all subjects. Results In-vitro simulations showed good correlation with the experimentally measured strains both in stance (R2 = 0.963) and fall configuration (R2 = 0.976). The simulated maximum stress overestimated the experimental failure load (4743 N) by 14.7% (5440 N) while the simulated maximum strain overestimated by 4.7% (4968 N). The simulated failed elements coincided precisely with the experimentally determined fracture locations. BMD measurements in subjects with a history of osteoporotic vertebral fractures did not differ significantly from subjects without fragility fractures (femoral head: p = 0.989; femoral neck: p = 0.366), but showed higher FEA based risk factors for additional incident hip fractures (p = 0.028). Conclusion FEA simulations were successfully validated by elastic and destructive in-vitro experiments. In the subsequent in-vivo analyses, MDCT based FEA based risk factor differences for additional hip fractures were not mirrored by according BMD measurements. Our

  2. The feasibility of a scanner-independent technique to estimate organ dose from MDCT scans: Using CTDIvol to account for differences between scanners

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Adam C.; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; Zhang, Di; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna D.; Stevens, Donna M.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques have made it possible to accurately estimate the radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in patient models from scans performed with modern multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. However, there is considerable variation in organ doses across scanners, even when similar acquisition conditions are used. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a technique to estimate organ doses that would be scanner independent. This was accomplished by assessing the ability of CTDIvol measurements to account for differences in MDCT scanners that lead to organ dose differences. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of 64-slice MDCT scanners from each of the four major manufacturers were performed. An adult female patient model from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms was used in which all ICRP Publication 103 radiosensitive organs were identified. A 120 kVp, full-body helical scan with a pitch of 1 was simulated for each scanner using similar scan protocols across scanners. From each simulated scan, the radiation dose to each organ was obtained on a per mA s basis (mGy∕mA s). In addition, CTDIvol values were obtained from each scanner for the selected scan parameters. Then, to demonstrate the feasibility of generating organ dose estimates from scanner-independent coefficients, the simulated organ dose values resulting from each scanner were normalized by the CTDIvol value for those acquisition conditions. Results: CTDIvol values across scanners showed considerable variation as the coefficient of variation (CoV) across scanners was 34.1%. The simulated patient scans also demonstrated considerable differences in organ dose values, which varied by up to a factor of approximately 2 between some of the scanners. The CoV across scanners for the simulated organ doses ranged from 26.7% (for the adrenals) to 37.7% (for the thyroid), with a mean CoV of 31.5% across all organs. However, when organ

  3. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinato, W.; Santos, W. S.; Paschoal, C. M. M.; Souza, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current-time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  4. Celiac Axis, Common Hepatic and Hepatic Artery Variants as Evidenced on MDCT Angiography in South Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the increase in the hepatobiliary, pancreatic surgeries and liver transplantation, being aware of the anatomic variations of the celiac axis and the hepatic arteries is of paramount importance. Aim To illustrate the normal anatomy and variants of the celiac axis and the hepatic arteries with multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography in South Indian population and determine the potential variations in the celiac axis anatomy and the hepatic arteries, thus assisting the hepatobiliary surgeon and the interventional radiologist in avoiding iatrogenic injury to the arteries. Materials and Methods Two hundred patients undergoing abdominal CT angiography from July 2014 till July 2015 were retrospectively studied for hepatic arterial and celiac axis anatomical variation. The anatomic variations in our study were correlated with other studies. Results The celiac axis (CA) and the hepatic artery (HA) variations were analysed as per criteria laid by Song et al., and Michel. Out of 15 possible CA variations, 5 types of celiac artery variations were seen in 14 patients. A normal CA was seen in 179(89.5%) patients of the 200 patients. In the remaining 7 patients, the CA anatomy was classified as ambiguous since there was separate origin of the right and left hepatic arteries from the CA with absent common hepatic artery (CHA). The CHA originated normally from the celiac axis in 94% of the cases. Variation of CHA origin was seen in 5 patients. Normal HA anatomy was seen in 114 (57%) patients. Variation in HA anatomy was seen in 86 (43%) patients. Origin of the right hepatic artery (RHA) from the hepatic artery proper was seen in 182 (91%) patients and replaced origin of RHA from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was seen in 18 (9%) of the cases. Accessory RHA was seen in 7(3.5%) patients. The left hepatic artery (LHA) originated from the hepatic artery proper in 186 (93%) patients and replaced origin of LHA from the left gastric artery (LGA) was

  5. Detection of small (≤ 2 cm) pancreatic adenocarcinoma and surrounding parenchyma: correlations between enhancement patterns at triphasic MDCT and histologic features

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim is to assess the time-density curves (TDCs) and correlate the histologic results for small (≤ 2 cm) PDA and surrounding parenchyma at triphasic Multidetector-row CT (MDCT). Methods Triphasic MDCT scans of 38 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for a small PDA were retrospectively reviewed. The TDCs were analyzed and compared with histologic examination of the PDA and pancreas upstream/downstream in all cases. Three enhancement patterns were identified: 1) enhancement peak during pancreatic parenchymal phase (PPP) followed by a rapid decline on portal venous phase (PVP) and delayed phase (DP) at 5 minutes (type 1 pattern: normal pancreas); 2) maximum enhancement in PVP that gradually decreases in DP (type 2 pattern: mild chronic pancreatitis or PDA with mild fibrous stroma); 3) progressive enhancement with maximum peak in DP (type 3 pattern: severe chronic pancreatitis or PDA with severe fibrous stroma). A p value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Sensitivity was calculated for PDA detection and an attenuation difference with the surrounding tissue of at least 10 HU was considered. Results PDA showed type 2 pattern in 5/38 cases (13.2%) and type 3 pattern in 33/38 cases (86,8%). Pancreas upstream to the tumor had type 2 pattern in 20/38 cases (52,6%) and type 3 pattern in 18/38 cases (47,4%). Pancreas downstream to the tumor had type 1 pattern in 19/25 cases (76%) and type 2 pattern in 6/25 cases (24%). Attenuation difference between tumor and parenchyma upstream was higher of 10 UH on PPP in 31/38 patients (sensitivity = 81.6%), on PVP in 29/38 (sensitivity = 76.3%) and on DP in 17/38 (sensitivity = 44.7%). Attenuation difference between tumor and parenchyma downstream was higher of 10 UH on PPP in 25/25 patients (sensitivity = 100%), on PVP in 22/25 (sensitivity = 88%) and on DP in 20/25 (sensitivity = 80%). Small PDAs were isodense to the pancreas upstream to the tumor, and therefore

  6. Hepatic Arterial Configuration in Relation to the Segmental Anatomy of the Liver; Observations on MDCT and DSA Relevant to Radioembolization Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hoven, Andor F. van den Leeuwen, Maarten S. van Lam, Marnix G. E. H. Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2015-02-15

    PurposeCurrent anatomical classifications do not include all variants relevant for radioembolization (RE). The purpose of this study was to assess the individual hepatic arterial configuration and segmental vascularization pattern and to develop an individualized RE treatment strategy based on an extended classification.MethodsThe hepatic vascular anatomy was assessed on MDCT and DSA in patients who received a workup for RE between February 2009 and November 2012. Reconstructed MDCT studies were assessed to determine the hepatic arterial configuration (origin of every hepatic arterial branch, branching pattern and anatomical course) and the hepatic segmental vascularization territory of all branches. Aberrant hepatic arteries were defined as hepatic arterial branches that did not originate from the celiac axis/CHA/PHA. Early branching patterns were defined as hepatic arterial branches originating from the celiac axis/CHA.ResultsThe hepatic arterial configuration and segmental vascularization pattern could be assessed in 110 of 133 patients. In 59 patients (54 %), no aberrant hepatic arteries or early branching was observed. Fourteen patients without aberrant hepatic arteries (13 %) had an early branching pattern. In the 37 patients (34 %) with aberrant hepatic arteries, five also had an early branching pattern. Sixteen different hepatic arterial segmental vascularization patterns were identified and described, differing by the presence of aberrant hepatic arteries, their respective vascular territory, and origin of the artery vascularizing segment four.ConclusionsThe hepatic arterial configuration and segmental vascularization pattern show marked individual variability beyond well-known classifications of anatomical variants. We developed an individualized RE treatment strategy based on an extended anatomical classification.

  7. MDCT findings of renal cell carcinoma associated with Xp11.2 translocation and TFE3 gene fusion and papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sungmin; Kim, Sang Youn; Lee, Myoung Seok; Moon, Kyung Chul; Kim, See Hyung; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to compare the MDCT features of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with Xp11.2 translocation and TFE3 gene fusion (Xp11 RCC) and papillary RCC. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The study included 19 and 39 patients with histologically proven Xp11 RCC and papillary RCC, respectively, who underwent multiphase renal MDCT before nephrectomy. CT findings were compared between Xp11 RCC and papillary RCC using the Student t test and chi-square test. Subgroup analyses of small (< 4 cm) renal masses for these features were performed. RESULTS. Patients with Xp11 RCC were younger (p < 0.001), and it was more prevalent in women (p = 0.007). Tumor size was greater in Xp11 RCC (p = 0.004) and more common in cystic change (p < 0.001). Calcification and unenhanced high-attenuating areas were more frequent in Xp11 RCC (p = 0.001 and 0.026, respectively). Xp11 RCCs were more prevalent in lymph node and distant metastasis (p < 0.001 and p = 0.031, respectively). Xp11 RCC and papillary RCC showed no significant difference in epicenter, margin, and venous and collecting duct invasion (p = 0.403-1.000). Although Xp11 RCC and papillary RCC had lower attenuation than the renal cortex on corticomedullary and early excretory phases (p < 0.001), only Xp11 RCCs were hyperattenuating to the cortex on the unenhanced phase (p < 0.001). Xp11 RCCs had significantly higher attenuation compared with papillary RCCs on all phases (p ≤ 0.02). Regarding small masses, cystic change, calcification, and lymph node metastasis were still more frequent in Xp11 RCCs (p ≤ 0.016). CONCLUSION. Greater size, more cystic change, calcification, high-attenuating areas on unenhanced imaging, and lymph node and distant metastasis were helpful for differentiating Xp11 RCC from papillary RCC. PMID:25714283

  8. Dynamic volume vs respiratory correlated 4DCT for motion assessment in radiation therapy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, Catherine; Bracken, John; Driscoll, Brandon; Hope, Andrew; Jaffray, David

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Conventional (i.e., respiratory-correlated) 4DCT exploits the repetitive nature of breathing to provide an estimate of motion; however, it has limitations due to binning artifacts and irregular breathing in actual patient breathing patterns. The aim of this work was to evaluate the accuracy and image quality of a dynamic volume, CT approach (4D{sub vol}) using a 320-slice CT scanner to minimize these limitations, wherein entire image volumes are acquired dynamically without couch movement. This will be compared to the conventional respiratory-correlated 4DCT approach (RCCT). Methods: 4D{sub vol} CT was performed and characterized on an in-house, programmable respiratory motion phantom containing multiple geometric and morphological ''tumor'' objects over a range of regular and irregular patient breathing traces obtained from 3D fluoroscopy and compared to RCCT. The accuracy of volumetric capture and breathing displacement were evaluated and compared with the ground truth values and with the results reported using RCCT. A motion model was investigated to validate the number of motion samples needed to obtain accurate motion probability density functions (PDF). The impact of 4D image quality on this accuracy was then investigated. Dose measurements using volumetric and conventional scan techniques were also performed and compared. Results: Both conventional and dynamic volume 4DCT methods were capable of estimating the programmed displacement of sinusoidal motion, but patient breathing is known to not be regular, and obvious differences were seen for realistic, irregular motion. The mean RCCT amplitude error averaged at 4 mm (max. 7.8 mm) whereas the 4D{sub vol} CT error stayed below 0.5 mm. Similarly, the average absolute volume error was lower with 4D{sub vol} CT. Under irregular breathing, the 4D{sub vol} CT method provides a close description of the motion PDF (cross-correlation 0.99) and is able to track each object, whereas the RCCT method results in a

  9. Reducing radiation dose to selected organs by selecting the tube start angle in MDCT helical scans: A Monte Carlo based study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Di; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; Angel, Erin; Turner, Adam C.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Previous work has demonstrated that there are significant dose variations with a sinusoidal pattern on the peripheral of a CTDI 32 cm phantom or on the surface of an anthropomorphic phantom when helical CT scanning is performed, resulting in the creation of ''hot'' spots or ''cold'' spots. The purpose of this work was to perform preliminary investigations into the feasibility of exploiting these variations to reduce dose to selected radiosensitive organs solely by varying the tube start angle in CT scans. Methods: Radiation dose to several radiosensitive organs (including breasts, thyroid, uterus, gonads, and eye lenses) resulting from MDCT scans were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models, including GSF's Baby, Child, and Irene. Dose to fetus was also estimated using four pregnant female models based on CT images of the pregnant patients. Whole-body scans were simulated using 120 kVp, 300 mAs, both 28.8 and 40 mm nominal collimations, and pitch values of 1.5, 1.0, and 0.75 under a wide range of start angles (0 deg. - 340 deg. in 20 deg. increments). The relationship between tube start angle and organ dose was examined for each organ, and the potential dose reduction was calculated. Results: Some organs exhibit a strong dose variation, depending on the tube start angle. For small peripheral organs (e.g., the eye lenses of the Baby phantom at pitch 1.5 with 40 mm collimation), the minimum dose can be 41% lower than the maximum dose, depending on the tube start angle. In general, larger dose reductions occur for smaller peripheral organs in smaller patients when wider collimation is used. Pitch 1.5 and pitch 0.75 have different mechanisms of dose reduction. For pitch 1.5 scans, the dose is usually lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x-ray tube is posterior to the patient when it passes the longitudinal location of the organ. For pitch 0.75 scans, the dose is lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x

  10. Absorbed Radiation Dose in Radiosensitive Organs During Coronary CT Angiography Using 320-MDCT: Effect of Maximum Tube Voltage and Heart Rate Variations

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Boris; Khosa, Faisal; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Khan, Atif N.; Sarwar, Sheryar; Yam, Chun-Shan; Court, Laurence E.; Raptopoulos, Vassilios; Clouse, Melvin E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to estimate the absorbed radiation dose in radiosensitive organs during coronary MDCT angiography using 320-MDCT and to determine the effects of tube voltage variation and heart rate (HR) control on absorbed radiation dose. MATERIALS AND METHODS Semiconductor field effect transistor detectors were used to measure absorbed radiation doses for the thyroid, midbreast, breast, and midlung in an anthropomorphic phantom at 100, 120, and 135 kVp at two different HRs of 60 and 75 beats per minute (bpm) with a scan field of view of 320 mm, 400 mA, 320 × 0.5 mm detectors, and 160 mm collimator width (160 mm range). The paired Student’s t test was used for data evaluation. RESULTS At 60 bpm, absorbed radiation doses for 100, 120, and 135 kVp were 13.41 ± 3.59, 21.7 ± 4.12, and 29.28 ± 5.17 mGy, respectively, for midbreast; 11.76 ± 0.58, 18.86 ± 1.06, and 24.82 ± 1.45 mGy, respectively, for breast; 12.19 ± 2.59, 19.09 ± 3.12, and 26.48 ± 5.0 mGy, respectively, for lung; and 0.37 ± 0.14, 0.69 ± 0.14, and 0.92 ± 0.2 mGy, respectively, for thyroid. Corresponding absorbed radiation doses for 75 bpm were 38.34 ± 2.02, 59.72 ± 3.13, and 77.8 ± 3.67 mGy for midbreast; 26.2 ± 1.74, 44 ± 1.11, and 52.84 ± 4.07 mGy for breast; 38.02 ± 1.58, 58.89 ± 1.68, and 78 ± 2.93 mGy for lung; and 0.79 ± 0.233, 1.04 ± 0.18, and 2.24 ± 0.52 mGy for thyroid. Absorbed radiation dose changes were significant for all organs for both tube voltage reductions as well as for HR control from 75 to 60 bpm at all tube voltage settings (p < 0.05). The absorbed radiation doses for the calcium score protocol were 11.2 ± 1.4 mGy for midbreast, 9.12 ± 0.48 mGy for breast, 10.36 ± 1.3 mGy for lung, and 0.4 ± 0.05 mGy for thyroid. CONCLUSION CT angiography with 320-MDCT scanners results in absorbed radiation doses in radiosensitive organs that compare favorably to those previously reported. Significant dose reductions can be achieved by tube

  11. Reducing radiation dose to selected organs by selecting the tube start angle in MDCT helical scans: A Monte Carlo based study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Di; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; Angel, Erin; Turner, Adam C.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Previous work has demonstrated that there are significant dose variations with a sinusoidal pattern on the peripheral of a CTDI 32 cm phantom or on the surface of an anthropomorphic phantom when helical CT scanning is performed, resulting in the creation of “hot” spots or “cold” spots. The purpose of this work was to perform preliminary investigations into the feasibility of exploiting these variations to reduce dose to selected radiosensitive organs solely by varying the tube start angle in CT scans. Methods: Radiation dose to several radiosensitive organs (including breasts, thyroid, uterus, gonads, and eye lenses) resulting from MDCT scans were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models, including GSF’s Baby, Child, and Irene. Dose to fetus was also estimated using four pregnant female models based on CT images of the pregnant patients. Whole-body scans were simulated using 120 kVp, 300 mAs, both 28.8 and 40 mm nominal collimations, and pitch values of 1.5, 1.0, and 0.75 under a wide range of start angles (0°–340° in 20° increments). The relationship between tube start angle and organ dose was examined for each organ, and the potential dose reduction was calculated. Results: Some organs exhibit a strong dose variation, depending on the tube start angle. For small peripheral organs (e.g., the eye lenses of the Baby phantom at pitch 1.5 with 40 mm collimation), the minimum dose can be 41% lower than the maximum dose, depending on the tube start angle. In general, larger dose reductions occur for smaller peripheral organs in smaller patients when wider collimation is used. Pitch 1.5 and pitch 0.75 have different mechanisms of dose reduction. For pitch 1.5 scans, the dose is usually lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x-ray tube is posterior to the patient when it passes the longitudinal location of the organ. For pitch 0.75 scans, the dose is lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x

  12. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  13. Quantum volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum systems in a mechanical embedding, the breathing mode of a small particles, optomechanical system, etc. are far not the full list of examples in which the volume exhibits quantum behavior. Traditional consideration suggests strain in small systems as a result of a collective movement of particles, rather than the dynamics of the volume as an independent variable. The aim of this work is to show that some problem here might be essentially simplified by introducing periodic boundary conditions. At this case, the volume is considered as the independent dynamical variable driven by the internal pressure. For this purpose, the concept of quantum volume based on Schrödinger’s equation in 𝕋3 manifold is proposed. It is used to explore several 1D model systems: An ensemble of free particles under external pressure, quantum manometer and a quantum breathing mode. In particular, the influence of the pressure of free particle on quantum oscillator is determined. It is shown also that correction to the spectrum of the breathing mode due to internal degrees of freedom is determined by the off-diagonal matrix elements of the quantum stress. The new treatment not using the “force” theorem is proposed for the quantum stress tensor. In the general case of flexible quantum 3D dynamics, quantum deformations of different type might be introduced similarly to monopole mode.

  14. Change in the Growth Rate of Localized Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma in Response to Gemcitabine, Bevacizumab, and Radiation Therapy on MDCT

    SciTech Connect

    Rezai, Pedram; Yaghmai, Vahid; Tochetto, Sandra M.; Galizia, Mauricio S.; Miller, Frank H.; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Small, William

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To depict treatment response to chemoradiotherapy by comparing tumor growth rate between treated and untreated patients and to compare depicted response with objective response according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 guideline. Methods and Materials: This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. Volume doubling time (DT) of histologically confirmed locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma was calculated in 16 patients treated with chemoradiotherapy and 10 untreated patients by incorporating interscan interval ({Delta}t) and tumor volume at baseline (V0) and follow-up (V1) obtained by semiautomated segmentation into the following equation: DT = {Delta}t . log 2/log (V1/V0). Reciprocal of doubling time (RDT), which is the linear representation of tumor growth rate, was calculated by use of the following equation: RDT = 365/DT. The lowest RDT value of 2.42 in untreated patients was considered as the cutoff value for depiction of treatment response. Depicted response rate was defined as the proportion of patients with an RDT value of less than 2.42. Depicted response was compared with objective response according to the RECIST 1.1 guideline. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. Results: There was a significant difference in mean RDT between treated (range, -7.12 to 3.27; mean, -1.27; median, -1.30) and untreated (range, 2.42 to 10.74; mean, 5.33; median, 4.26) patients (p < 0.05). Reciprocal of doubling time was less than 2.42 in 14 treated patients, which corresponded to a depicted response rate of 87.50% as opposed to the objective response rate of 18.75% according to the RECIST 1.1 guideline (p < 0.05) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response rate of 62.50% (p > 0.05). Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was concordant with RDT and RECIST response in 12 patients (75.00%) ({kappa}, 0.38) and 9 patients (56.25%) ({kappa}, 0

  15. Computed tomographic quantification of canine adrenal gland volume and attenuation.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Giovanna; Furlanello, Tommaso; De Lorenzi, Davide; Caldin, Marco

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study in presumed normal dogs to determine the adrenal gland attenuation and volume values. Multidetector computer tomography (MDCT 16) analysis of the gland was carried out in 48 adult dogs without evidence of adrenal gland disease that underwent CT examination for acute spinal injuries. The mean nonenhanced attenuation value +/- SD of the left adrenal gland was 36.0 +/- 5.3 HU (range: 22.0-42.0 HU). The mean nonenhanced attenuation value +/- SD of the right gland was 34.3 +/- 7.0 HU (range: 20.4-48.6HU). The mean enhanced attenuation value +/- SD were: left gland 101.5 +/- 10.6HU (range: 86.8-128.0 HU), and right gland 97.4 +/- 12.4 HU (range: 58.9-123.6 HU). The mean CT volume +/- SD were: left gland was 0.60 cm3 (range: 0.20-0.95; SD 0.17), and right gland (0.55cm3, range: 0.22-1.01; SD 0.19). Attenuation values and volume data were related to age, weight, and gender, using ANOVA. There was no statistically significant difference between the left and right side or in adrenal measurements, because of body weight class effects. The animal effect was the most important source of variation for all adrenal measurements. Based on our study, CT is an effective method for assessing adrenal characteristics in the dog. Normative CT data are provided to allow estimation of normal adrenal gland size and volume. PMID:17009504

  16. Direct Volume Rendering of Curvilinear Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi; Wilhelms, J.; Challinger, J.; Alper, N.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Direct volume rendering can visualize sampled 3D scalar data as a continuous medium, or extract features. However, it is generally slow. Furthermore, most algorithms for direct volume rendering have assumed rectilinear gridded data. This paper discusses methods for using direct volume rendering when the original volume is curvilinear, i.e. is divided into six-sided cells which are not necessarily equilateral hexahedra. One approach is to ray-cast such volumes directly. An alternative approach is to interpolate the sample volumes to a rectilinear grid, and use this regular volume for rendering. Advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches in terms of speed and image quality are explored.

  17. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage: evaluation with MDCT.

    PubMed

    Soto, Jorge A; Park, Seong Ho; Fletcher, Joel G; Fidler, Jeff L

    2015-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common medical problem, with high associated morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation of gastrointestinal hemorrhage varies with the location of the bleeding source, the intensity of the bleed, and the presence of comorbidities that affect the ability to tolerate blood loss. Conventional endoscopic examinations are usually the initial diagnostic tests in patients presenting with overt gastrointestinal hemorrhage. However, implementation of upper tract endoscopy and colonoscopy in the emergency setting can be challenging due to inconsistent availability of the service and difficulties in achieving adequate colonic cleansing in emergent situations. Thus, imaging tests are often relied upon to establish the location and the cause of bleeding, either for initial diagnosis or after non-revealing upper and lower tract endoscopies ("obscure" bleeding). This article discusses the imaging evaluation of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and reviews the imaging appearance of the most common causes, taking into account the two most relevant clinical presentations: overt bleeding and obscure bleeding. PMID:25637128

  18. Antialiasing backprojection for helical MDCT.

    PubMed

    Mori, I

    2008-03-01

    Helical CTs are well known to suffer from aliasing artifacts because of their finite longitudinal sampling pitch. The artifact pattern is typically strong streaks from bone edges in clinical images. Especially in the case of multidetector row CT, the artifact resulting from longitudinal aliasing is often called a windmill artifact because the visible streaks form a windmill pattern when the object is of a particular shape. The scan must be performed using a very thin slice thickness, i.e., fine sampling in the longitudinal direction, with a longer scan time to mitigate this aliasing artifact. Some elaborate longitudinal interpolation methods to remediate longitudinal aliasing have been proposed, but they have not been successful in practice despite their theoretical importance. A periodic swing of the focal spot in the longitudinal direction, a so-called z-flying focal spot, was introduced recently to achieve finer sampling. Although it is a useful technique, some important deficiencies exist: It is sufficiently effective only near the isocenter and is difficult to apply to a scan using a thick slice thickness, even though longitudinal aliasing is more serious at the thicker scan. In this paper, the author addresses the nature of interlaced (or unequally spaced) sampling and derives a new principle of data treatment that can suppress the aliased spectra selectively. According to this principle, the common practice of image reconstruction, which backprojects data along the original sampling ray path, is never the best choice. The author proposes a new scheme of backprojection, which involves the longitudinal shift of projection data. A proper choice of longitudinal shift for backprojection provides effective and selective suppression of aliased spectra, with retention of the original frequency spectrum depending on the level of focus swing. With this shifted backprojection, the swing of focus can be made much smaller than for a conventional z-flying focal spot. The required amount of shift for backprojection is position dependent. Nevertheless, its implementation in the reconstruction process can be achieved simply by relocating the x-ray source and detector assembly from positions of actual scanning. Through simulation, the combination of shifted backprojection and the small swing of focus is evaluated. Results confirm that the artifact attributable to longitudinal aliasing is well suppressed in the entire field of view, whereas the penalty on the slice sensitivity profile (or longitudinal resolution) can be kept minimal. Moreover, this method solves other deficiencies of z-flying focus, such as inapplicability to scans with a thicker slice thickness. PMID:18404941

  19. Three-Dimensional Endo-Cardiovascular Volume-Rendered Cine Computed Tomography of Isolated Left Ventricular Apical Hypoplasia: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sun Hwa; Kim, Yang Min; Lee, Hyun Jong

    2016-01-01

    We report multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) findings of a 34-year-old female with isolated left ventricular apical hypoplasia. The MDCT and CMR scans displayed a spherical left ventricle (LV) with extensive fatty infiltration within the myocardium at the apex, interventricular septum and inferior wall, anteroapical origin of the papillary muscle, right ventricle wrapping around the deficient LV apex, and impaired systolic function. MDCT visualized morphologic and also functional findings of this unique cardiomyopathy. PMID:26798219

  20. Multivariate volume rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Crawfis, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a new technique for representing multivalued data sets defined on an integer lattice. It extends the state-of-the-art in volume rendering to include nonhomogeneous volume representations. That is, volume rendering of materials with very fine detail (e.g. translucent granite) within a voxel. Multivariate volume rendering is achieved by introducing controlled amounts of noise within the volume representation. Varying the local amount of noise within the volume is used to represent a separate scalar variable. The technique can also be used in image synthesis to create more realistic clouds and fog.

  1. Dynamic Evolutionary Changes in Blood Flow Measured by MDCT in a Hepatic VX2 Tumor Implant over an Extended 28-day Growth Period: Time-Density Curve Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hanping; Exner, Agata A.; Shi, Hong; Bear, Joshua; Haaga, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives The enhancement pattern of malignant tumors has been studied in short-term animal models (7–14 days), but the reported results have been variable and inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changing blood flow characteristics of VX2 tumors implanted in rabbit livers with contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to establish a predictable pattern of vascular evolution over an extended 28-day growth period. Materials and Methods VX2 carcinoma was implanted in livers of 10 male New Zealand White rabbits. Dynamic CT (2/seconds × 60 seconds) was conducted on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after tumor implantation. Enhancement parameters of time-density curve (TDC), time to start (T0), time to peak (TP), maximum enhancement (ΔH), slope of enhancement (SLe), and washout (SLw) in tumor center, tumor rim, and normal liver were analyzed. Tumor samples corresponding to CT images of one tumor on days 14 and 21 and seven tumors on day 28 were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and anti-CD31 monoclonal antibody. The relationship between enhancement parameters and histology parameters (thickness of tumor border, extent of blood stasis, and luminar vessel density) was analyzed. Results Consistent growth, appearance, and vascular changes occurred in 7 of 10 animals over the 4-week observation period. Peripheral rim-like enhancement was noted in CT images. TDC analysis showed that tumor rim enhancement was pronounced and more rapid than normal liver initially but this difference diminished with tumor progression. The SLe, SLw, and ΔH decreased from 10.03 ± 3.25 Hu/second, 0.42 ± 0.25 Hu/sec, and 58.00 ± 25.27 Hu on day 7 to 5.86 ± 2.73 Hu/second, 0.10 ± 0.13 Hu/second, and 37.78 ± 8.89 Hu/second on day 28, respectively. TP increased from 12.71 ± 4.85 seconds on day 7 to 25.57 ± 7.75 seconds on day 28. No significant changes were noted on the TDC parameters in normal liver. The maximum density difference between

  2. QUANTITATIVE PLANAR AND VOLUMETRIC CARDIAC MEASUREMENTS USING 64 MDCT AND 3T MRI VS. STANDARD 2D AND M-MODE ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY: DOES ANESTHETIC PROTOCOL MATTER?

    PubMed

    Drees, Randi; Johnson, Rebecca A; Stepien, Rebecca L; Munoz Del Rio, Alejandro; Saunders, Jimmy H; François, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sectional imaging of the heart utilizing computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be superior for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and systolic function in humans compared to echocardiography. The purpose of this prospective study was to test the effects of two different anesthetic protocols on cardiac measurements in 10 healthy beagle dogs using 64-multidetector row computed tomographic angiography (64-MDCTA), 3T magnetic resonance (MRI) and standard awake echocardiography. Both anesthetic protocols used propofol for induction and isoflourane for anesthetic maintenance. In addition, protocol A used midazolam/fentanyl and protocol B used dexmedetomedine as premedication and constant rate infusion during the procedure. Significant elevations in systolic and mean blood pressure were present when using protocol B. There was overall good agreement between the variables of cardiac size and systolic function generated from the MDCTA and MRI exams and no significant difference was found when comparing the variables acquired using either anesthetic protocol within each modality. Systolic function variables generated using 64-MDCTA and 3T MRI were only able to predict the left ventricular end diastolic volume as measured during awake echocardiogram when using protocol B and 64-MDCTA. For all other systolic function variables, prediction of awake echocardiographic results was not possible (P = 1). Planar variables acquired using MDCTA or MRI did not allow prediction of the corresponding measurements generated using echocardiography in the awake patients (P = 1). Future studies are needed to validate this approach in a more varied population and clinically affected dogs. PMID:26082285

  3. Quantitative planar and volumetric cardiac measurements using 64 MDCT and 3T MRI versus standard 2D and M-mode echocardiography: Does anesthetic protocol matter?

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Randi; Johnson, Rebecca A; Stepien, Rebecca L; Rio, Alejandro Munoz Del; Saunders, Jimmy H; François, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional imaging of the heart utilizing computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be superior for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and systolic function in humans compared to echocardiography. The purpose of this prospective study was to test the effects of two different anesthetic protocols on cardiac measurements in 10 healthy beagle dogs using 64-multidetector row computed tomographic angiography (64-MDCTA), 3T magnetic resonance (MRI) and standard awake echocardiography. Both anesthetic protocols used propofol for induction and isoflourane for anesthetic maintenance. In addition, protocol A used midazolam/fentanyl and protocol B used dexmedetomedine as premedication and constant rate infusion during the procedure. Significant elevations in systolic and mean blood pressure were present when using protocol B. There was overall good agreement between the variables of cardiac size and systolic function generated from the MDCTA and MRI exams and no significant difference was found when comparing the variables acquired using either anesthetic protocol within each modality. Systolic function variables generated using 64-MDCTA and 3T MRI were only able to predict the left ventricular end diastolic volume as measured during awake echocardiogram when using protocol B and 64-MDCTA. For all other systolic function variables, prediction of awake echocardiographic results was not possible (P = 1). Planar variables acquired using MDCTA or MRI did not allow prediction of the corresponding measurements generated using echocardiography in the awake patients (P=1). Future studies are needed to validate this approach in a more varied population and clinically affected dogs. PMID:26082285

  4. Unsteady flow volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.G.; Lane, D.A.; Max, N.L.

    1995-03-01

    Flow volumes are extended for use in unsteady (time-dependent) flows. The resulting unsteady flow volumes are the 3 dimensional analog of streamlines. There are few examples where methods other than particle tracing have been used to visualize time varying flows. Since particle paths can become convoluted in time there are additional considerations to be made when extending any visualization technique to unsteady flows. We will present some solutions to the problems which occur in subdivision, rendering, and system design. We will apply the unsteady flow volumes to a variety of field types including moving multi-zoned curvilinear grids.

  5. Anthropometric Assessment of Neck Adipose Tissue and Airway Volume Using Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Maresky, Hillel S.; Sharfman, Zachary; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Gomori, J.M.; Copel, Laurian; Tal, Sigal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neck adiposity tissue volume (NATV) accumulation is an indicator for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Neck circumference is a poor measure of NATV, and a quantifier for this entity has not yet been established. To evaluate volumetric quantification by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as a reproducible anthropometric tool to measure NATV and airway volume (AWV). A total of 519 patients, including a subset of 70 random patients who underwent head and neck CT scanning in our hospital within 1 year (2013), were studied. Included patients were all those undergoing nonenhanced CT (NECT) or CT angiography (CTA). Neck cross-sectional areas (NCSA) were measured at 2 separate levels of the neck, and 3D postprocessing tissue reconstruction was performed, and NATV and AWVs were quantified volumetrically for all patients within the year. The average NCSA at the level of the soft palate and thyroid cartilage was 22,579 and 14,500 mm2, respectively. NATV when compared to the upper and lower levels of NCSA showed correlations of 0.64 and 0.79, respectively (P < 0.001). Interobserver analysis showed mean deviations of 0.46% and 0.32% for NATV and AWV, respectively. A strong correlation between NATV and body mass index (BMI) was found (r = 0.658, P < 0.001), and the top quartile of NATV:AWV patients (out of 519 patients) displayed a statistically significant mortality rate during 670 days of follow-up (d = 7.5%, P = 0.032). After adjustment for age and gender, the association between NATV:AWV and mortality was close to significant (P = 0.072). Volumetric quantification of NATV and AWV is a reproducible and prognostic anthropometric tool, as a high NATV:AWV demonstrated a significant risk factor for mortality; future research may further advance our understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:26559286

  6. Variable-Volume Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colling, A. K.; Nallette, T. A.; Sansevero, F.

    1989-01-01

    Container holds bed of beads securely while accommodating sizable changes in volume and allowing gases to flow through bed. Developed for air-purifying system in which carbon dioxide is removed by solid amine beads.

  7. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  8. Stereometric body volume measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The following studies are reported: (1) effects of extended space flight on body form of Skylab astronauts using biostereometrics; (2) comparison of body volume determinations using hydrostatic weighing and biostereometrics; and (3) training of technicians in biostereometric principles and procedures.

  9. Free volume under shear.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H A; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-14

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems - particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior. PMID:26472384

  10. Geomagnetism. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The latest attempt to summarise the wealth of knowledge now available on geomagnetic phenomena has resulted in this multi-volume treatise, with contributions and reviews from many scientists. The first volume in the series contains a thorough review of all existing information on measuring the Earth's magnetic field, both on land and at sea, and includes a comparative analysis of the techniques available for this purpose.

  11. Direct volume editing.

    PubMed

    Bürger, Kai; Krüger, Jens; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present basic methodology for interactive volume editing on GPUs, and we demonstrate the use of these methods to achieve a number of different effects. We present fast techniques to modify the appearance and structure of volumetric scalar fields given on Cartesian grids. Similar to 2D circular brushes as used in surface painting we present 3D spherical brushes for intuitive coloring of particular structures in such fields. This paint metaphor is extended to allow the user to change the data itself, and the use of this functionality for interactive structure isolation, hole filling, and artefact removal is demonstrated. Building on previous work in the field we introduce high-resolution selection volumes, which can be seen as a resolution-based focus+context metaphor. By utilizing such volumes we present a novel approach to interactive volume editing at sub-voxel accuracy. Finally, we introduce a fast technique to paste textures onto iso-surfaces in a 3D scalar field. Since the texture resolution is independent of the volume resolution, this technique allows structure-aligned textures containing appearance properties or textual information to be used for volume augmentation and annotation. PMID:18988988

  12. TREATABILITY MANUAL. VOLUME V: SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Treatability Manual presents in five volumes an extensive survey of the effectiveness of various water pollution treatment processes when applied to particular industrial effluents. This volume summarizes volumes one through four and outlines their potential utility to Nation...

  13. Volume MLS ray casting.

    PubMed

    Ledergerber, Christian; Guennebaud, Gaël; Meyer, Miriah; Bächer, Moritz; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2008-01-01

    The method of Moving Least Squares (MLS) is a popular framework for reconstructing continuous functions from scattered data due to its rich mathematical properties and well-understood theoretical foundations. This paper applies MLS to volume rendering, providing a unified mathematical framework for ray casting of scalar data stored over regular as well as irregular grids. We use the MLS reconstruction to render smooth isosurfaces and to compute accurate derivatives for high-quality shading effects. We also present a novel, adaptive preintegration scheme to improve the efficiency of the ray casting algorithm by reducing the overall number of function evaluations, and an efficient implementation of our framework exploiting modern graphics hardware. The resulting system enables high-quality volume integration and shaded isosurface rendering for regular and irregular volume data. PMID:18988986

  14. Assessing volume status.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael C; Mallemat, Haney

    2014-11-01

    Shock is a physiologic state associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The clinician has several tools available to evaluate volume status. Each modality has its benefits and limitations but, to date, no one test can indicate with 100% accuracy which patients will be truly volume responsive. Although the search for the Holy Grail of a perfect intravascular monitor continues, we must remember the importance of early, aggressive, and goal-directed interventions for patients in shock. Finally, there is no substitute for the most important intervention-the frequent presence of the physician at the patient's bedside. PMID:25441036

  15. Aperiodic Volume Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Tim D.

    Presented in this thesis is an investigation into aperiodic volume optical devices. The three main topics of research and discussion are the aperiodic volume optical devices that we call computer-generated volume holograms (CGVH), defects within periodic 3D photonic crystals, and non-periodic, but ordered 3D quasicrystals. The first of these devices, CGVHs, are designed and investigated numerically and experimentally. We study the performance of multi-layered amplitude computer-generated volume holograms in terms of efficiency and angular/frequency selectivity. Simulation results show that such aperiodic devices can increase diffraction efficiency relative to periodic amplitude volume holograms while maintaining angular and wavelength selectivity. CGVHs are also designed as voxelated volumes using a new projection optimization algorithm. They are investigated using a volumetric diffraction simulation and a standard 3D beam propagation technique as well as experimentally. Both simulation and experiment verify that the structures function according to their design. These represent the first diffractive structures that have the capacity for generating arbitrary transmission and reflection wave fronts and that provide the ability for multiplexing arbitrary functionality given different illumination conditions. Also investigated and discussed in this thesis are 3D photonic crystals and quasicrystals. We demonstrate that these devices can be fabricated using a femtosecond laser direct writing system that is particularly appropriate for fabrication of such arbitrary 3D structures. We also show that these devices can provide 3D partial bandgaps which could become complete bandgaps if fabricated using high index materials or by coating lower index materials with high index metals. Our fabrication method is particularly suited to the fabrication of engineered defects within the periodic or quasi-periodic systems. We demonstrate the potential for fabricating defects within

  16. GREEK BASIC COURSE, VOLUME I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OBOLENSKY, SERGE; AND OTHERS

    THE GREEK LANGUAGE DESCRIBED IN VOLUME I OF THIS INTRODUCTORY COURSE FOR ADULTS IS THE "KATHOMILUMENI" VARIETY, THAT OF THE STANDARD SPEECH OF EDUCATED GREEKS. (VOLUME III OF THE COURSE INTRODUCES THE MORE FORMAL KATHAREVUSA VARIETY.) EACH VOLUME OF THE COURSE CONTAINS 25 UNITS PLUS FIVE REVIEW SECTIONS. A TYPICAL UNIT IN VOLUME I CONSISTS OF--(1)…

  17. Leadership Abstracts, Volume 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliron, Mark D., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The abstracts in this series provide brief discussions of issues related to leadership, administration, professional development, technology, and education in community colleges. Volume 10 for 1997 contains the following 12 abstracts: (1) "On Community College Renewal" (Nathan L. Hodges and Mark D. Milliron); (2) "The Community College Niche in a…

  18. Liter - Metric Volume.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisk, Diane

    This autoinstructional program, developed as part of a general science course, is offered for students in the middle schools. Mathematics of fractions and decimals is considered to be prerequisite knowledge. The behavioral objectives are directed toward mastery of determining volumes of solid objects using the water displacement method as well as…

  19. Overview of the Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Emslie, A. G.; Hudson, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    In this introductory chapter, we provide a brief summary of the successes and remaining challenges in understanding the solar flare phenomenon and its attendant implications for particle acceleration mechanisms in astrophysical plasmas. We also provide a brief overview of the contents of the other chapters in this volume, with particular reference to the well-observed flare of 2002 July 23.

  20. Volume measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oele, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Chamber is designed to be airtight; it includes face mask for person to breathe outside air so that he does not disturb chamber environment. Chamber includes piston to vary air volume inside. Also included are two microphone transducers which record pressure information inside chamber.

  1. Navajo Biographies. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Virginia

    The life stories of eight Navajo ("Dine", their term for themselves) leaders are presented in volume one of this collection of biographies. Interspersed with portraits, drawings, and maps, the narrative chronologically covers the time period from 1766 when the Navajos lived on land under the rule of Spain into the twentieth century and dealings…

  2. Strategic Plan. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the strategic plan and associated organizational structure that the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) will utilize to achieve the defined mission and objectives provided by NASA. Much of the information regarding the background and establishment of the NSBRI by NASA has been provided in other documentation and will not be repeated in this Strategic Plan. This Strategic Plan is presented in two volumes. Volume I (this volume) begins with an Introduction (Section 2) that provides the Institute's NASA-defined mission and objectives, and the organizational structure adopted to implement these through three Strategic Programs: Countermeasure Research; Education, Training and Outreach; and Cooperative Research and Development. These programs are described in Sections 3 to 5. Each program is presented in a similar way, using four subsections: Goals and Objectives; Current Strategies; Gaps and Modifications; and Resource Requirements. Section 6 provides the administrative infrastructure and total budget required to implement the Strategic Programs and assures that they form a single cohesive plan. This plan will ensure continued success of the Institute for the next five years. Volume II of the Strategic Plan provides an in-depth analysis of the current and future strategic programs of the 12 current NSBRI teams, including their goals, objectives, mutual interactions and schedules.

  3. VOLUME AND SURFACE AREA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOLEY, JACK L.

    THIS BOOKLET, ONE OF A SERIES, HAS BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THE PROJECT, A PROGRAM FOR MATHEMATICALLY UNDERDEVELOPED PUPILS. A PROJECT TEAM, INCLUDING INSERVICE TEACHERS, IS BEING USED TO WRITE AND DEVELOP THE MATERIALS FOR THIS PROGRAM. THE MATERIALS DEVELOPED IN THIS BOOKLET INCLUDE (1) MEASURING VOLUMES OF RECTANGULAR SOLIDS, RIGHT RECTANGULAR…

  4. Negotiating Salaries, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Service Bureau, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This volume discusses specific strategy and tactics that can be employed in the effort to reach an agreement on salaries at the bargaining table. Although strategies and situations may vary from case to case, this report focuses on those principles and approaches that are essential to any good bargaining procedure. The discussion covers public vs.…

  5. Negotiating Salaries, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Service Bureau, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This volume deals with concepts important to the effective negotiation of salaries in public schools. The discussion covers the compensation patterns in education, the goals and pressures affecting reacher negotiators, salaries in relation to other benefits and proposals, extra pay for extra duties and merit pay, and the stance of the negotiators…

  6. Global bioconversions. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    These volumes present the most active bioconversion-based research and development projects worldwide, with an emphasis on the important practical aspects of this work. A major focus of the text is the bioconversion of organic residues to useful products, which also encompasses the field of anaerobic methane fermentation. Chapters from an international perspective are also included, which further address the global importance of bioconversion.

  7. Global bioconversions. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    These volumes present the most active bioconversion-based research and development projects worldwide, with an emphasis on the important practical aspects of this work. A major focus of the text is the bioconversion of organic residues to useful products, which also encompasses the field of anaerobic methane fermentation. Chapters from an international perspective are also included, which further address the global importance of bioconversion.

  8. MDCT evaluation of sternal variations: Pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Duraikannu, Chary; Noronha, Olma V; Sundarrajan, Pushparajan

    2016-01-01

    Sternal variations and anomalies have been identified in the past during autopsy or cadaveric studies. Recently, an increasing number of minor sternal variations have been reported with the advent of multidetector computed tomography (CT). Although there are many sternal variations that occur with varying appearance and prevalence, most of them are not recognized or are underreported during routine imaging of thorax. Identification of sternal variations is important to differentiate from pathological conditions and to prevent fatal complications prior to sternal interventions like marrow aspiration or acupuncture. This article aims to describe the minor and asymptomatic sternal variations by multidetector CT and their clinical significance. PMID:27413263

  9. Variable volume calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, R.L. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for determining the volume of a closed chamber. The apparatus includes a body having a cylindrical cavity therein including a threaded rear portion and a closed front end, and a piston having a threaded portion which mates with threaded rear portion of the cavity and which reciprocates in the cavity. A gas-impermeable seal, which is carried by the piston in one embodiment, forms a closed chamber in the front end of the cavity. A linear-movement indicator, attached to the rear end of the piston, measures the reciprocating movement of the piston in the cavity, while a pressure sensing device, connected to the front end of the cavity, determines the pressure in the closed system. In use, a vessel, having a volume enclosing experimental materials, is also connected to the front end of the cavity, and pressure and piston movement measurements are made which enable calculation of a volume change in the vessels. The design and operation of this instrument are presented. 7 figs.

  10. Anisotropic Ambient Volume Shading.

    PubMed

    Ament, Marco; Dachsbacher, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel method to compute anisotropic shading for direct volume rendering to improve the perception of the orientation and shape of surface-like structures. We determine the scale-aware anisotropy of a shading point by analyzing its ambient region. We sample adjacent points with similar scalar values to perform a principal component analysis by computing the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the covariance matrix. In particular, we estimate the tangent directions, which serve as the tangent frame for anisotropic bidirectional reflectance distribution functions. Moreover, we exploit the ratio of the eigenvalues to measure the magnitude of the anisotropy at each shading point. Altogether, this allows us to model a data-driven, smooth transition from isotropic to strongly anisotropic volume shading. In this way, the shape of volumetric features can be enhanced significantly by aligning specular highlights along the principal direction of anisotropy. Our algorithm is independent of the transfer function, which allows us to compute all shading parameters once and store them with the data set. We integrated our method in a GPU-based volume renderer, which offers interactive control of the transfer function, light source positions, and viewpoint. Our results demonstrate the benefit of anisotropic shading for visualization to achieve data-driven local illumination for improved perception compared to isotropic shading. PMID:26529745

  11. Research Summary No. 36-6, Volume II. Volume II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    The Research Summary is a bimonthly report of supporting research and development conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This periodical is issued in three volumes. Volume I contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Space Sciences, Systems, Guidance and Control, and Telecommunications Divisions of the Laboratory. Volume II contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Physical Sciences, Engineering Mechanics, Engineering Facilities, and Propulsion Divisions. All work of a classified nature is contained in Volume Ill.

  12. Research Summary No. 36-5, Volume II. Volume II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    The Research Summary is a bimonthly report of supporting research and development conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This periodical is issued in three volumes. Volume I contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Space Sciences, Systems, Guidance and Control, and Telecommunications Divisions of the Laboratory. Volume II contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Physical Sciences, Engineering Mechanics, Engineering Facilities, and Propulsion Divisions. All work of a classified nature is contained in Volume Ill.

  13. Environmental Report 1996, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1996, prepared for the US Department of Energy. Volume 2 supports Volume 1 summary data and is essentially a detailed data report that provides individual data points, where applicable. Volume 2 includes information on monitoring of air, air effluents, sewerable water, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, environmental radiation, and quality assurance.

  14. BULGARIAN, BASIC COURSE, VOLUME 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HODGE, CARLETON T.; AND OTHERS

    A BASIC COURSE IN BULGARIAN HAS BEEN PREPARED IN TWO VOLUMES. THIS VOLUME, VOLUME 1, IS DIVIDED INTO THREE PARTS--BASIC SENTENCES, NOTES, AND DRILLS. AN ADDITIONAL PART INCLUDES READING PASSAGES. THE BASIC SENTENCES ARE NORMAL DIALOG MATERIAL, MEANT TO BE MEMORIZED. THE NOTES EXPLAIN THE GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURE OF THE LANGUAGE AND ARE DIVIDED INTO…

  15. Calculus Students' Understanding of Volume

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorko, Allison; Speer, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have documented difficulties that elementary school students have in understanding volume. Despite its importance in higher mathematics, we know little about college students' understanding of volume. This study investigated calculus students' understanding of volume. Clinical interview transcripts and written responses to volume…

  16. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  17. New volume and inverse volume operators for loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinsong; Ma, Yongge

    2016-08-01

    A new alternative volume operator is constructed for loop quantum gravity by using the so-called cotriad operators as building blocks. It is shown that the new volume operator shares the same qualitative properties with the standard volume operator. Moreover, a new alternative inverse volume operator is also constructed in the light of the construction of the alternative volume operator, which is possessed of the same qualitative properties as those of the alternative volume operator. The new inverse volume operator can be employed to construct the Hamiltonian operator of matter fields, which may lead to an anomaly-free on-shell quantum constraint algebra without any special restriction on the regularization procedure for gravity coupled to matter fields.

  18. Strong volume, stable prices

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    This article is the September-October 1993 market report, providing trading volume and prices in the Uranium market. Activity was brisk, with 15 deals concluded. Six were in the spot concentrates market, with four of the six deals involving U.S. utilities and approximately 1.8M pounds of U3O8 equivalent. There were five conversion deals announced, with four of the five deals involving U.S. utilities. Four deals were concluded in the enrichment market, and the deals involving U.S. utilities were approximately 327k SWUs. On the horizon, there are deals for approximately 4.1M SWU.

  19. Mining volume measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph Saul (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In a shaft with a curved or straight primary segment and smaller off-shooting segments, at least one standing wave is generated in the primary segment. The shaft has either an open end or a closed end and approximates a cylindrical waveguide. A frequency of a standing wave that represents the fundamental mode characteristic of the primary segment can be measured. Alternatively, a frequency differential between two successive harmonic modes that are characteristic of the primary segment can be measured. In either event, the measured frequency or frequency differential is characteristic of the length and thus the volume of the shaft based on length times the bore area.

  20. Transparent volume imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wixson, Steve E.

    1990-07-01

    Transparent Volume Imaging began with the stereo xray in 1895 and ended for most investigators when radiation safety concerns eliminated the second view. Today, similiar images can be generated by the computer without safety hazards providing improved perception and new means of image quantification. A volumetric workstation is under development based on an operational prototype. The workstation consists of multiple symbolic and numeric processors, binocular stereo color display generator with large image memory and liquid crystal shutter, voice input and output, a 3D pointer that uses projection lenses so that structures in 3 space can be touched directly, 3D hard copy using vectograph and lenticular printing, and presentation facilities using stereo 35mm slide and stereo video tape projection. Volumetric software includes a volume window manager, Mayo Clinic's Analyze program and our Digital Stereo Microscope (DSM) algorithms. The DSM uses stereo xray-like projections, rapidly oscillating motion and focal depth cues such that detail can be studied in the spatial context of the entire set of data. Focal depth cues are generated with a lens and apeture algorithm that generates a plane of sharp focus, and multiple stereo pairs each with a different plane of sharp focus are generated and stored in the large memory for interactive selection using a physical or symbolic depth selector. More recent work is studying non-linear focussing. Psychophysical studies are underway to understand how people perce ive images on a volumetric display and how accurately 3 dimensional structures can be quantitated from these displays.

  1. Environmental report 1995. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1996-09-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1995. This volume is intended to support summary data from Volume 1 and is essentially a detailed data report that provides additional data points, where applicable. Some summary data are also included in Volume 2, and more detailed accounts are given of sample collection and analytical methods. Volume 2 includes information in eight chapters on monitoring of air, air effluent, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation, as well as three chapters on ground water protection, compliance self-monitoring and quality assurance.

  2. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  3. Prehospital tidal volume influences hospital tidal volume: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stoltze, Andrew J.; Wong, Terrence S.; Harland, Karisa K.; Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Fuller, Brian M.; Mohr, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe current practice of ventilation in a modern air medical system, and to measure the association of ventilation strategy with subsequent ventilator care and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Materials and Methods Retrospective observational cohort study of intubated adult patients (n=235) transported by a university-affiliated air medical transport service to a 711-bed tertiary academic center between July 2011 and May 2013. Low tidal volume ventilation was defined as tidal volumes ≤ 8 mL/kg predicted body weight (PBW). Multivariable regression was used to measure the association between prehospital tidal volume, hospital ventilation strategy, and ARDS. Results Most patients (57%) were ventilated solely with bag-valve ventilation during transport. Mean tidal volume of mechanically ventilated patients was 8.6 mL/kg PBW (SD 0.2 mL/kg). Low tidal volume ventilation was used in 13% of patients. Patients receiving low tidal volume ventilation during air medical transport were more likely to receive low tidal volume ventilation in the emergency department (p < 0.001) and intensive care unit (p = 0.015). ARDS was not associated with pre-hospital tidal volume (p = 0.840). Conclusions Low tidal volume ventilation was rare during air medical transport. Air transport ventilation strategy influenced subsequent ventilation, but was not associated with ARDS. PMID:25813548

  4. Volume Rendering of Heliospheric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hick, P. P.; Jackson, B. V.; Bailey, M. J.; Buffington, A.

    2001-12-01

    We demonstrate some of the techniques we currently use for the visualization of heliospheric volume data. Our 3D volume data usually are derived from tomographic reconstructions of the solar wind density and velocity from remote sensing observations (e.g., Thomson scattering and interplanetary scintillation observations). We show examples of hardware-based volume rendering using the Volume Pro PCI board (from TeraRecon, Inc.). This board updates the display at a rate of up to 30 frames per second using a parallel projection algorithm, allowing the manipulation of volume data in real-time. In addition, the manipulation of 4D volume data (the 4th dimension usually representing time) enables the visualization in real-time of an evolving (time-dependent) data set. We also show examples of perspective projections using IDL. This work was supported through NASA grant NAG5-9423.

  5. Retained gas sampler interface volume

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.

    1997-10-01

    The maximum Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) interface volume was determined; this volume can trap contamination gases during the sampling process. A new technique (helium backfill) for eliminating contamination gases from the RGS sampler interface volume is described, and verification testing reported. Also demonstrated was that RGS data obtained prior to the introduction of the new helium backfill technique can be compensated for air contamination using the measured oxygen concentration and normal air composition.

  6. Electromagnetic Theory 3 Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaviside, Oliver

    2011-09-01

    Volume 1: Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Outline of the electromagnetic connections; 3. The elements of vectorial algebra and analysis; 4. Theory of plane electromagnetic waves; Appendix. Volume 2: Preface; 5. Mathematics and the age of the earth; 6. Pure diffusion of electric displacement; 7. Electromagnetic waves and generalised differentiation; 8. Generalised differentiation and divergent series; Appendix. Volume 3: 9. Waves from moving sources; 10. Waves in the ether.

  7. Twisted mass finite volume effects

    SciTech Connect

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2010-08-01

    We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

  8. The physics of volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Radiation transfer is an important topic in several physical disciplines, probably most prominently in astrophysics. Computer scientists use radiation transfer, among other things, for the visualization of complex data sets with direct volume rendering. In this article, I point out the connection between physical radiation transfer and volume rendering, and I describe an implementation of direct volume rendering in the astrophysical radiation transfer code RADMC-3D. I show examples for the use of this module on analytical models and simulation data.

  9. Heliophysics 3 Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Siscoe, George L.

    2010-11-01

    Volume 1: Preface; 1. Prologue Carolus J. Schrijver and George L. Siscoe; 2. Introduction to heliophysics Thomas J. Bogdan; 3. Creation and destruction of magnetic field Matthias Rempel; 4. Magnetic field topology Dana W. Longcope; 5. Magnetic reconnection Terry G. Forbes; 6. Structures of the magnetic field Mark B. Moldwin, George L. Siscoe and Carolus J. Schrijver; 7. Turbulence in space plasmas Charles W. Smith; 8. The solar atmosphere Viggo H. Hansteen; 9. Stellar winds and magnetic fields Viggo H. Hansteen; 10. Fundamentals of planetary magnetospheres Vytenis M. Vasyliūnas; 11. Solar-wind magnetosphere coupling: an MHD perspective Frank R. Toffoletto and George L. Siscoe; 12. On the ionosphere and chromosphere Tim Fuller-Rowell and Carolus J. Schrijver; 13. Comparative planetary environments Frances Bagenal; Bibliography; Index. Volume 2: Preface; 1. Perspective on heliophysics George L. Siscoe and Carolus J. Schrijver; 2. Introduction to space storms and radiation Sten Odenwald; 3. In-situ detection of energetic particles George Gloeckler; 4. Radiative signatures of energetic particles Tim Bastian; 5. Observations of solar and stellar eruptions, flares, and jets Hugh Hudson; 6. Models of coronal mass ejections and flares Terry Forbes; 7. Shocks in heliophysics Merav Opher; 8. Particle acceleration in shocks Dietmar Krauss-Varban; 9. Energetic particle transport Joe Giacalone; 10. Energy conversion in planetary magnetospheres Vytenis Vasyliūnas; 11. Energization of trapped particles Janet Green; 12. Flares, CMEs, and atmospheric responses Tim Fuller-Rowell and Stanley C. Solomon; 13. Energetic particles and manned spaceflight 358 Stephen Guetersloh and Neal Zapp; 14. Energetic particles and technology Alan Tribble; Appendix I. Authors and editors; List of illustrations; List of tables; Bibliography; Index. Volume 3: Preface; 1. Interconnectedness in heliophysics Carolus J. Schrijver and George L. Siscoe; 2. Long-term evolution of magnetic activity of Sun

  10. Direct volume estimation without segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, X.; Wang, Z.; Islam, A.; Bhaduri, M.; Chan, I.; Li, S.

    2015-03-01

    Volume estimation plays an important role in clinical diagnosis. For example, cardiac ventricular volumes including left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) are important clinical indicators of cardiac functions. Accurate and automatic estimation of the ventricular volumes is essential to the assessment of cardiac functions and diagnosis of heart diseases. Conventional methods are dependent on an intermediate segmentation step which is obtained either manually or automatically. However, manual segmentation is extremely time-consuming, subjective and highly non-reproducible; automatic segmentation is still challenging, computationally expensive, and completely unsolved for the RV. Towards accurate and efficient direct volume estimation, our group has been researching on learning based methods without segmentation by leveraging state-of-the-art machine learning techniques. Our direct estimation methods remove the accessional step of segmentation and can naturally deal with various volume estimation tasks. Moreover, they are extremely flexible to be used for volume estimation of either joint bi-ventricles (LV and RV) or individual LV/RV. We comparatively study the performance of direct methods on cardiac ventricular volume estimation by comparing with segmentation based methods. Experimental results show that direct estimation methods provide more accurate estimation of cardiac ventricular volumes than segmentation based methods. This indicates that direct estimation methods not only provide a convenient and mature clinical tool for cardiac volume estimation but also enables diagnosis of cardiac diseases to be conducted in a more efficient and reliable way.

  11. Healthy People 2010: Conference Edition, Volume I [and] Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC.

    This document contains the two volumes of the Conference Edition of Healthy People 2010, a comprehensive, nationwide health promotion and disease prevention agenda. The first section of Volume I, "Healthy People 2010: Understanding and Improving Health," includes "Introduction,""Leading Health Indicators," and "Bibliography. The second section,…

  12. The Occupational Thesaurus: Volume 1 and Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teal, Everett A.

    Presented in two volumes, the job guide handbook can be used by high school and college counselors, students, recruiters for business and industry, and parents in determining areas of employment which are compatible with a student's or potential employee's interests, abilities, and preparation. Volume 1 lists job areas for students majoring in…

  13. Multilayer volume microwave filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdev, V. I.; Smirnov, S. V.; Chernushenko, A. M.

    1985-09-01

    Multilayer volume microwave filters are particularly suitable for miniaturization of radioelectronic devices by way of circuit integration, the principal advantage over planar filters being the much higher Q-factor; Q sub 0 or = 10 to the 3rd power as compared with Q sub 0 or = 10 to the 2nd power. Their metal-dielectric structure forms an array of coupled half-wavelength resonators electrically symmetric with respect to the center layer, coupling being effected by a magnetic field normal to the plane of resonators. The structure consists of an asymmetric strip line with conductor at the input end, followed by a metal layer with cut out symmetric slot line, a dielectric layer, a symmetric strip line with conductor, a metal layer with cut out symmetric slot line, a dielectric layer, and an asymmetric strip line with conductor at the output end. The size of such a filter depends directly on the number of resonator stages and, without the case, is comparable with the size of conventional filters on symmetric strip lines only but is much smaller than that of conventional filters on asymmetric strip lines only.

  14. Cordoba Durchmusterung, volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The 'Cordoba Durchmusterung' (CD) is a visual survey of southern stars in the declination zones -22 to -89 deg, carried out as an extension to the 'Bonner Durchmusterung' (BD) catalogs of Argelander and Schoenfeld. This volume covers the declination range -40 deg through -49 deg. The survey was performed using techniques similar to those used for the BD; i.e., the stars were cataloged by allowing the telescope to drift along the mean declination of each zone and recording the positions and magnitudes of stars crossing the transit line of the field. The goal of the survey was to obtain a position and estimated visual magnitude for every star down to 10.0 magnitude inclusive, but the faint limit was confirmed from comparisons with other catalogs, to be somewhat below 10. The positions are given to 0.1 s in right ascension and 0.1 min in declination for the equinox 1875. The positional uncertainties quoted in the original publications are plus or minus 0.42 sec and plus or minus 0.23 min for zones -22 deg to -32 deg. A list of all corrections made to the original data as a result of published corrigenda is presented. No other corrections or changes were incorporated into the original data, e.g., from more modern positions and magnitudes or comparison with the 'Cape Photographic Durchmusterung'.

  15. Cordoba Durchmusterung, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The 'Cordoba Durchmusterung' (CD) is a visual survey of southern stars in the declination zones -22 to -89 deg, carried out as an extension to the 'Bonner Durchmusterung' (BD) catalogs of Argelander and Schoenfeld. This volume covers the declination range -22 deg through -30 deg. The survey was performed using techniques similar to those used for the BD; i.e., the stars were cataloged by allowing the telescope to drift along the mean declination of each zone and recording the positions and magnitudes of stars crossing the transit line of the field. The goal of the survey was to obtain a position and estimated visual magnitude for every star down to 10.0 magnitude inclusive, but the faint limit was confirmed from comparisons with other catalogs, to be somewhat below 10. The positions are given to 0.1 s in right ascension and 0.1 min in declination for the equinox 1875. The positional uncertainties quoted in the original publications are plus or minus 0.42 s and plus or minus 0.23 min for zones -22 deg to -32 deg. A list of all corrections made to the original data as a result of published corrigenda is presented. No other corrections or changes were incorporated into the original data, e.g., from more modern positions and magnitudes or comparison with the 'Cape Photographic Durchmusterung'.

  16. Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    DeCamp, Malcolm M.; McKenna, Robert J.; Deschamps, Claude C.; Krasna, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) is the safe, effective, and durable palliation of dyspnea in appropriately selected patients with moderate to severe emphysema. Appropriate patient selection and preoperative preparation are prerequisites for successful LVRS. An effective LVRS program requires participation by and communication between experts from pulmonary medicine, thoracic surgery, thoracic anesthesiology, critical care medicine, rehabilitation medicine, respiratory therapy, chest radiology, and nursing. The critical analysis of perioperative outcomes has influenced details of the conduct of the procedure and has established a bilateral, stapled approach as the standard of care for LVRS. The National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) remains the world's largest multi-center, randomized trial comparing LVRS to maximal medical therapy. NETT purposely enrolled a broad spectrum of anatomic patterns of emphysema. This, along with the prospective, audited collection of extensive demographic, physiologic, radiographic, surgical and quality-of-life data, has positioned NETT as the most robust repository of evidence to guide the refinement of patient selection criteria for LVRS, to assist surgeons in providing optimal intraoperative and postoperative care, and to establish benchmarks for survival, complication rates, return to independent living, and durability of response. This article reviews the evolution of current LVRS practice with a particular emphasis on technical aspects of the operation, including the predictors and consequences of its most common complications. PMID:18453353

  17. Multidetector CT of the female pelvis.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Kristina A; Rubens, Deborah J

    2005-11-01

    In the emergency room setting, multidetector detector CT (MDCT) offers rapid, noninvasive, multiplanar evaluation of female patients who have acute pelvic pain. MDCT has been integrated into several of the major trauma centers, and its use may surpass the use of ultrasound in the trauma evaluation of the pregnant patient. In the nonemergent setting, MDCT can be used to stage gynecologic malignancy and to evaluate tumor recurrence. Multiplanar MDCT has received some acceptance for evaluation of small primary tumor volume and small metastatic implants. MDCT also has a role in the evaluation of pelvic varices and suspected pelvic congestion syndrome. PMID:16253664

  18. Modern Written Arabic, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naja, A. Nashat; Snow, James A.

    This second volume of Modern Written Arabic builds on the previous volume and is the second step designed to teach members of the Foreign Service to read the modern Arabic press. The student will gain recognitional mastery of an extensive set of vocabulary items and will be more intensively exposed to wider and more complex morphological and…

  19. Portuguese Programmatic Course. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulsh, Jack Lee; And Others

    This volume, containing units 26-48, completes the Portuguese Programmatic Course. The odd-numbered units present the grammatical features not covered in Volume One in a programmed format. The even numbered units contain dialogs, substitution drills, practice with irregular verb forms, and exercises geared to vocabulary expansion. The…

  20. PDLE: Sustaining Professionalism. Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Patricia, Ed.; Nelson, Gayle, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This third volume looks at ways that seasoned professionals continue to develop throughout their careers. The text includes descriptive accounts of professionals seeking to enhance their careers while remaining inspired to continue to develop professionally. This volume reveals how personal and professional lives are entwined. It proves that TESOL…

  1. Lao Basic Course, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Warren G.; And Others

    This second volume on Lao is designed as the continuation of the introductory material presented in volume one. The objectives are to produce greater proficiency in the use of Lao and, at the same time, to provide a general introduction to Laotian culture. The course is divided into six modules concerning various aspects of culture: physical…

  2. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Sicat, Ronell; Krüger, Jens; Möller, Torsten; Hadwiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs. PMID:26146475

  3. Volume Segmentation and Ghost Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, Isaac; Adrian, Ronald

    2011-11-01

    Volume Segmentation Tomographic PIV (VS-TPIV) is a type of tomographic PIV in which images of particles in a relatively thick volume are segmented into images on a set of much thinner volumes that may be approximated as planes, as in 2D planar PIV. The planes of images can be analysed by standard mono-PIV, and the volume of flow vectors can be recreated by assembling the planes of vectors. The interrogation process is similar to a Holographic PIV analysis, except that the planes of image data are extracted from two-dimensional camera images of the volume of particles instead of three-dimensional holographic images. Like the tomographic PIV method using the MART algorithm, Volume Segmentation requires at least two cameras and works best with three or four. Unlike the MART method, Volume Segmentation does not require reconstruction of individual particle images one pixel at a time and it does not require an iterative process, so it operates much faster. As in all tomographic reconstruction strategies, ambiguities known as ghost particles are produced in the segmentation process. The effect of these ghost particles on the PIV measurement is discussed. This research was supported by Contract 79419-001-09, Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  4. Sonographic measurement of gallbladder volume.

    PubMed

    Dodds, W J; Groh, W J; Darweesh, R M; Lawson, T L; Kishk, S M; Kern, M K

    1985-11-01

    Sonographic images of the gallbladder enable satisfactory approximation of gallbladder volume using the sum-of-cylinders method. The sum-of-cylinder measurements, however, are moderately cumbersome and time consuming to perform. In this investigation, in vitro and in vivo testing was done to determine that a simple ellipsoid method applied to sonographic gallbladder images yields reasonable volume approximations that are comparable to the volumes calculated by the sum-of-cylinders method. Findings from a water-bath experiment showed that measurement of gallbladder volume by the ellipsoid method closely approximated the true volume with a mean difference of about 1.0 ml. The results of in vivo studies in five volunteers demonstrated that the gallbladder contracted substantially after a fatty meal and that volumes calculated by the ellipsoid and sum-of-cylinders methods were nearly identical. Thus, a simple ellipsoid method, requiring negligible time, may be used to approximate satisfactory gallbladder volume for clinical or investigative studies. PMID:3901703

  5. FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast volume summary - Volume 1 and Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, O.J.

    1996-02-22

    Solid waste forecast volumes to be generated or received ;at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste program over the life cycle of the site are described in this report. Previous forecast summary reports have covered only a 30-year period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted for this FY 1996 report to ensure consistency with waste volumes reported in the 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans (MYPP). The volume data were collected on a life-cycle basis from onsite and offsite waste generators who currently ship or plan to ship solid waste to the Solid Waste program. The volumes described in detail are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic-mixed (TRU(M)) waste. The volumes reported in this document represent the external volume of the containers selected to ship the waste. Summary level information pertaining to low-level waste (LLW) is described in Appendix B. Hazardous waste volumes are also provided in Appendices E and F but are not described in detail since they will be managed by a commercial facility. Emphasis is placed on LLMW and TRU(M) waste because it will require processing and storage at Hanford Solid Waste`s Central Waste Complex (CORK) prior to final disposal. The LLW will generally be sent directly to disposal. The total baselines volume of LLMW and TRU(M) waste forecast to be received by the Solid Waste program (until 2070) is approximately 100,900 cubic meters. This total waste volume is composed of the following waste categories: 077,080 cubic meters of LLMW; 23,180 cubic meters of TRU(M); 640 cubic meters of greater-than-class III LLMW. This total is about 40% of the total volume reported last year (FY 1995).

  6. Particles in small volume injections.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S A; Spence, J

    1983-12-01

    The level of particulate contamination in small volume injections has been examined using the light blockage (HIAC) and electrical sensing zone (Coulter counter) techniques, the HIAC system being found to be the more suitable. Particle counts on the same batch of injection showed a large and variable difference between the HIAC and the Coulter counter results, especially below 5 micron. None of the injections examined complied with the British Pharmacopoeia limits for particulates in large volume parenterals, suggesting the unsuitability of the limits for small volume parenterals. PMID:6141237

  7. Image space adaptive volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Andrew; Dingliana, John

    2012-01-01

    We present a technique for interactive direct volume rendering which provides adaptive sampling at a reduced memory requirement compared to traditional methods. Our technique exploits frame to frame coherence to quickly generate a two-dimensional importance map of the volume which guides sampling rate optimisation and allows us to provide interactive frame rates for user navigation and transfer function changes. In addition our ray casting shader detects any inconsistencies in our two-dimensional map and corrects them on the fly to ensure correct classification of important areas of the volume.

  8. Anthropometric Assessment of Neck Adipose Tissue and Airway Volume Using Multidetector Computed Tomography: An Imaging Approach and Association With Overall Mortality.

    PubMed

    Maresky, Hillel S; Sharfman, Zachary; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Gomori, J M; Copel, Laurian; Tal, Sigal

    2015-11-01

    Neck adiposity tissue volume (NATV) accumulation is an indicator for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Neck circumference is a poor measure of NATV, and a quantifier for this entity has not yet been established. To evaluate volumetric quantification by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as a reproducible anthropometric tool to measure NATV and airway volume (AWV). A total of 519 patients, including a subset of 70 random patients who underwent head and neck CT scanning in our hospital within 1 year (2013), were studied. Included patients were all those undergoing nonenhanced CT (NECT) or CT angiography (CTA). Neck cross-sectional areas (NCSA) were measured at 2 separate levels of the neck, and 3D postprocessing tissue reconstruction was performed, and NATV and AWVs were quantified volumetrically for all patients within the year. The average NCSA at the level of the soft palate and thyroid cartilage was 22,579 and 14,500 mm, respectively. NATV when compared to the upper and lower levels of NCSA showed correlations of 0.64 and 0.79, respectively (P < 0.001). Interobserver analysis showed mean deviations of 0.46% and 0.32% for NATV and AWV, respectively. A strong correlation between NATV and body mass index (BMI) was found (r = 0.658, P < 0.001), and the top quartile of NATV:AWV patients (out of 519 patients) displayed a statistically significant mortality rate during 670 days of follow-up (d = 7.5%, P = 0.032). After adjustment for age and gender, the association between NATV:AWV and mortality was close to significant (P = 0.072). Volumetric quantification of NATV and AWV is a reproducible and prognostic anthropometric tool, as a high NATV:AWV demonstrated a significant risk factor for mortality; future research may further advance our understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:26559286

  9. VOLUMNECT: measuring volumes with Kinect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintino Ferreira, Beatriz; Griné, Miguel; Gameiro, Duarte; Costeira, João. Paulo; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a solution to volume measurement object packing using 3D cameras (such as the Microsoft KinectTM). We target application scenarios, such as warehouses or distribution and logistics companies, where it is important to promptly compute package volumes, yet high accuracy is not pivotal. Our application auto- matically detects cuboid objects using the depth camera data and computes their volume and sorting it allowing space optimization. The proposed methodology applies to a point cloud simple computer vision and image processing methods, as connected components, morphological operations and Harris corner detector, producing encouraging results, namely an accuracy in volume measurement of 8mm. Aspects that can be further improved are identified; nevertheless, the current solution is already promising turning out to be cost effective for the envisaged scenarios.

  10. Volumetric measurement of tank volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Richard T. (Inventor); Vanbuskirk, Paul D. (Inventor); Weber, William F. (Inventor); Froebel, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining the volume of compressible gas in a system including incompressible substances in a zero-gravity environment consisting of measuring the change in pressure (delta P) for a known volume change rate (delta V/delta t) in the polytrophic region between isothermal and adiabatic conditions. The measurements are utilized in an idealized formula for determining the change in isothermal pressure (delta P sub iso) for the gas. From the isothermal pressure change (delta iso) the gas volume is obtained. The method is also applicable to determination of gas volume by utilizing work (W) in the compression process. In a passive system, the relationship of specific densities can be obtained.

  11. A urine volume measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppendiek, H. F.; Mouritzen, G.; Sabin, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    An improved urine volume measurement system for use in the unusual environment of manned space flight is reported. The system utilizes a low time-constant thermal flowmeter. The time integral of the transient response of the flowmeter gives the urine volume during a void as it occurs. In addition, the two phase flows through the flowmeter present no problem. Developments of the thermal flowmeter and a verification of the predicted performance characteristics are summarized.

  12. Midface volumization with injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Tan, Marietta; Kontis, Theda C

    2015-05-01

    The aging midface has long been overlooked in cosmetic surgery. Our understanding of facial aging in terms of 3 dimensions has placed increased importance on volume restoration. Although an "off-label" indication for most fillers in this facial region, volumization of the midface with injectable fillers is usually a safe and straightforward procedure technically. Injectors, nevertheless, need to have an excellent understanding of facial anatomy and the characteristics of the injected products should problems arise. PMID:25921573

  13. Projection-Based Volume Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lingbo; Snapp, Robert R.; Ruiz, Teresa; Radermacher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    When heterogeneous samples of macromolecular assemblies are being examined by 3D electron microscopy (3DEM), often multiple reconstructions are obtained. For example, subtomograms of individual particles can be acquired from tomography, or volumes of multiple 2D classes can be obtained by random conical tilt reconstruction. Of these, similar volumes can be averaged to achieve higher resolution. Volume alignment is an essential step before 3D classification and averaging. Here we present a projection-based volume alignment (PBVA) algorithm. We select a set of projections to represent the reference volume and align them to a second volume. Projection alignment is achieved by maximizing the cross-correlation function with respect to rotation and translation parameters. If data are missing, the cross-correlation functions are normalized accordingly. Accurate alignments are obtained by averaging and quadratic interpolation of the cross-correlation maximum. Comparisons of the computation time between PBVA and traditional 3D cross-correlation methods demonstrate that PBVA outperforms the traditional methods. Performance tests were carried out with different signal-to-noise ratios using modeled noise and with different percentages of missing data using a cryo-EM dataset. All tests show that the algorithm is robust and highly accurate. PBVA was applied to align the reconstructions of a subcomplex of the NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) from the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, followed by classification and averaging. PMID:23410725

  14. NASA Reactor Facility Hazards Summary. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Supplements to volume 1 are presented herein. Included in these papers are information unavailable when volume 1 was written, an evaluation of the proposed nuclear facility, and answers to questions raised by the AEC concerning volume 1.

  15. Image plane sweep volume illumination.

    PubMed

    Sundén, Erik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ropinski, Timo

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, many volumetric illumination models have been proposed, which have the potential to simulate advanced lighting effects and thus support improved image comprehension. Although volume ray-casting is widely accepted as the volume rendering technique which achieves the highest image quality, so far no volumetric illumination algorithm has been designed to be directly incorporated into the ray-casting process. In this paper we propose image plane sweep volume illumination (IPSVI), which allows the integration of advanced illumination effects into a GPU-based volume ray-caster by exploiting the plane sweep paradigm. Thus, we are able to reduce the problem complexity and achieve interactive frame rates, while supporting scattering as well as shadowing. Since all illumination computations are performed directly within a single rendering pass, IPSVI does not require any preprocessing nor does it need to store intermediate results within an illumination volume. It therefore has a significantly lower memory footprint than other techniques. This makes IPSVI directly applicable to large data sets. Furthermore, the integration into a GPU-based ray-caster allows for high image quality as well as improved rendering performance by exploiting early ray termination. This paper discusses the theory behind IPSVI, describes its implementation, demonstrates its visual results and provides performance measurements. PMID:22034331

  16. Age estimation from canine volumes.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Danilo; Gaudio, Daniel; Guercini, Nicola; Cipriani, Filippo; Gibelli, Daniele; Caputi, Sergio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Techniques for estimation of biological age are constantly evolving and are finding daily application in the forensic radiology field in cases concerning the estimation of the chronological age of a corpse in order to reconstruct the biological profile, or of a living subject, for example in cases of immigration of people without identity papers from a civil registry. The deposition of teeth secondary dentine and consequent decrease of pulp chamber in size are well known as aging phenomena, and they have been applied to the forensic context by the development of age estimation procedures, such as Kvaal-Solheim and Cameriere methods. The present study takes into consideration canines pulp chamber volume related to the entire teeth volume, with the aim of proposing new regression formulae for age estimation using 91 cone beam computerized scans and a freeware open-source software, in order to permit affordable reproducibility of volumes calculation. PMID:25698302

  17. Flex bearing UUEC, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapper, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    This volume, Volume 2, of this Flex Bearing UUEC Final Report documents findings and data pertaining to Team B's tasks. Team B was organized as one of two sub-teams of the Unplanned/Unintended Event or Condition (UUEC) board established per InterOffice Memorandum (IOM) A100-FY93-072. Team A determined the cause of the unacceptable unbonds (referred to as 'heat-affect' unbonds), including the initial, light rust film, in the FSM #3 flex bearing was overheating of the Forward End Ring (FER) during cure, specifically in zone 8 of the mold. Team A's findings are documented in Volume 1 of this report. Team B developed flight rationale for existing bearings, based on absence or presence of an unpropitious unbond condition like that in FSM #3's flex bearing.

  18. Rockets and People. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertok, Boris E; Siddiqi, Asif A. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    Much has been written in the West on the history of the Soviet space program but few Westerners have read direct first-hand accounts of the men and women who were behind the many Russian accomplishments in exploring space.The memoirs of Academician Boris Chertok, translated from the original Russian, fills that gap.Chertok began his career as an electrician in 1930 at an aviation factory near Moscow.Twenty-seven years later, he became deputy to the founding figure of the Soviet space program, the mysterious Chief Designer Sergey Korolev. Chertok s sixty-year-long career and the many successes and failures of the Soviet space program constitute the core of his memoirs, Rockets and People. These writings are spread over four volumes. This is volume I. Academician Chertok not only describes and remembers, but also elicits and extracts profound insights from an epic story about a society s quest to explore the cosmos. In Volume 1, Chertok describes his early years as an engineer and ends with the mission to Germany after the end of World War II when the Soviets captured Nazi missile technology and expertise. Volume 2 takes up the story with the development of the world s first intercontinental ballistic missile ICBM) and ends with the launch of Sputnik and the early Moon probes. In Volume 3, Chertok recollects the great successes of the Soviet space program in the 1960s including the launch of the world s first space voyager Yuriy Gagarin as well as many events connected with the Cold War. Finally, in Volume 4, Chertok meditates at length on the massive Soviet lunar project designed to beat the Americans to the Moon in the 1960s, ending with his remembrances of the Energiya-Buran project.

  19. Gas volume contents within a container, smart volume instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Van Buskirk, Paul D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for determining the volume of an incompressible gas in a system including incompressible substances in a zero-gravity environment. The method includes inducing a volumetric displacement within a container and measuring the resulting pressure change. From this data, the liquid level can be determined.

  20. Thai Basic Course. Volume 1 and Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Warren G.; Tryon, Absorn

    The 40 lessons in these two volumes and the accompanying tape recordings are designed to teach standard spoken Thai to Foreign Service Officers and other American Government personnel. After completing the "Programed Introduction to Thai Phonology," the student should be able to read the phonemic transcription in which all Thai material is…

  1. High air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector

    DOEpatents

    Masquelier, Donald A.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Willeke, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    A high air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector. A high volume flow of aerosol particles is drawn into an annular, centripetal slot in a collector which directs the aerosol flow into a small volume of liquid pool contained is a lower center section of the collector. The annular jet of air impinges into the liquid, imbedding initially airborne particles in the liquid. The liquid in the pool continuously circulates in the lower section of the collector by moving to the center line, then upwardly, and through assistance by a rotating deflector plate passes back into the liquid at the outer area adjacent the impinging air jet which passes upwardly through the liquid pool and through a hollow center of the collector, and is discharged via a side outlet opening. Any liquid droplets escaping with the effluent air are captured by a rotating mist eliminator and moved back toward the liquid pool. The collector includes a sensor assembly for determining, controlling, and maintaining the level of the liquid pool, and includes a lower centrally located valve assembly connected to a liquid reservoir and to an analyzer for analyzing the particles which are impinged into the liquid pool.

  2. Be the Volume: A Classroom Activity to Visualize Volume Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikhaylov, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    A hands-on activity can help multivariable calculus students visualize surfaces and understand volume estimation. This activity can be extended to include the concepts of Fubini's Theorem and the visualization of the curves resulting from cross-sections of the surface. This activity uses students as pillars and a sheet or tablecloth for the…

  3. Disorders of Erythrocyte Volume Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Glogowska, Edyta; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited disorders of erythrocyte volume homeostasis are a heterogeneous group of rare disorders with phenotypes ranging from dehydrated to overhydrated erythrocytes. Clinical, laboratory, physiologic, and genetic heterogeneity characterize this group of disorders. A series of recent reports have provided novel insights into our understanding of the genetic bases underlying some of these disorders of red cell volume regulation. This report reviews this progress in understanding determinants that influence erythrocyte hydration and how they have yielded a better understanding of the pathways that influence cellular water and solute homeostasis. PMID:25976965

  4. Vector quantization for volume rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1992-01-01

    Volume rendering techniques typically process volumetric data in raw, uncompressed form. As algorithmic and architectural advances improve rendering speeds, however, larger data sets will be evaluated requiring consideration of data storage and transmission issues. In this paper, we analyze the data compression requirements for volume rendering applications and present a solution based on vector quantization. The proposed system compresses volumetric data and then renders images directly from the new data format. Tests on a fluid flow data set demonstrate that good image quality may be achieved at a compression ratio of 17:1 with only a 5 percent cost in additional rendering time.

  5. Time-Critical Volume Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Arie

    1998-01-01

    For the past twelve months, we have conducted and completed a joint research entitled "Time- Critical Volume Rendering" with NASA Ames. As expected, High performance volume rendering algorithms have been developed by exploring some new faster rendering techniques, including object presence acceleration, parallel processing, and hierarchical level-of-detail representation. Using our new techniques, initial experiments have achieved real-time rendering rates of more than 10 frames per second of various 3D data sets with highest resolution. A couple of joint papers and technique reports as well as an interactive real-time demo have been compiled as the result of this project.

  6. Foaming volume and foam stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Sydney

    1947-01-01

    A method of measuring foaming volume is described and investigated to establish the critical factors in its operation. Data on foaming volumes and foam stabilities are given for a series of hydrocarbons and for a range of concentrations of aqueous ethylene-glycol solutions. It is shown that the amount of foam formed depends on the machinery of its production as well as on properties of the liquid, whereas the stability of the foam produced, within specified mechanical limitations, is primarily a function of the liquid.

  7. 40 CFR 791.48 - Production volume.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Production volume. 791.48 Section 791... (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.48 Production volume. (a) Production volume.... (b) For the purpose of determining fair reimbursement shares, production volume shall include...

  8. 40 CFR 791.48 - Production volume.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Production volume. 791.48 Section 791... (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.48 Production volume. (a) Production volume.... (b) For the purpose of determining fair reimbursement shares, production volume shall include...

  9. 40 CFR 791.48 - Production volume.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Production volume. 791.48 Section 791... (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.48 Production volume. (a) Production volume.... (b) For the purpose of determining fair reimbursement shares, production volume shall include...

  10. Carnegie Observatories Astrophysics 4 Volume Hardback Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Luis

    2004-11-01

    Volume 1: Coevolution of Black Holes and Galaxies Luis C. Ho. Volume 2: Measuring and Modelling the Universe Wendy L. Freedman. Volume 3: Clusters of Galaxies John S. Mulchaey, Alan Dressler and Augustus Oemler. Volume 4: Origin and Evolution of the Elements Andrew McWilliam and Michael Rauch.

  11. Carnegie Observatories Astrophysics 4 Volume Paperback Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Luis

    2011-11-01

    Volume 1: Coevolution of Black Holes and Galaxies Luis C. Ho. Volume 2: Measuring and Modelling the Universe Wendy L. Freedman. Volume 3: Clusters of Galaxies John S. Mulchaey, Alan Dressler and Augustus Oemler. Volume 4: Origin and Evolution of the Elements Andrew McWilliam and Michael Rauch.

  12. 40 CFR 791.48 - Production volume.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Production volume. 791.48 Section 791... (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.48 Production volume. (a) Production volume.... (b) For the purpose of determining fair reimbursement shares, production volume shall include...

  13. 40 CFR 791.48 - Production volume.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Production volume. 791.48 Section 791... (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.48 Production volume. (a) Production volume.... (b) For the purpose of determining fair reimbursement shares, production volume shall include...

  14. HANDBOOK: GROUND WATER VOLUME II: METHODOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This handbook is an extensively revised version of the Ground Water Handbook, originally published in 1987 as EPA/625/6-87/016. It has been published in two volumes: Volume I: Ground Water and Contamination, EPA/625/6-90/016a, and Volume II: Methodology, EPA/625/6-90/016b. Volume...

  15. Wilderness Medicine Newsletter, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilderness Medicine Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This volume of newsletters addresses issues related to the treatment and prevention of medical emergencies in the wilderness. Each issue includes feature articles, book reviews, product reviews, letters to the editor, notices of upcoming wilderness conferences and training courses, additional resources, and general information relevant to medical…

  16. Korean Basic Course. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, B. Nam

    Volume I of the Korean Basic Course provides introductory materials for the student who wishes to achieve a working command of the language currently spoken by an estimated 40 to 43 million people on the Korean Peninsula and in Japan, Manchuria, and the Soviet Union. The linguistic content is based on the speech of educated Koreans in Seoul, the…

  17. Korean Basic Course. Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, B. Nam

    Volume Two of the Korean Basic Course contains Units 29 through 47. Most units consist of (1) a basic dialog, (2) notes on the basic dialog, (3) additional vocabulary and phrases, (4) grammar notes, (5) drills, (6) a supplementary dialog for comprehension, (7) a narrative for comprehension and reading, and (8) exercises. Two of the last units…

  18. Organ volume estimation using SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Zaidi, H.

    1996-06-01

    Knowledge of in vivo thyroid volume has both diagnostic and therapeutic importance and could lead to a more precise quantification of absolute activity contained in the thyroid gland. In order to improve single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantitation, attenuation correction was performed according to Chang`s algorithm. The dual window method was used for scatter subtraction. The author used a Monte Carlo simulation of the SPECT system to accurately determine the scatter multiplier factor k. Volume estimation using SPECT was performed by summing up the volume elements (voxels) lying within the contour of the object, determined by a fixed threshold and the gray level histogram (GLH) method. Thyroid phantom and patient studies were performed and the influence of (1) fixed thresholding, (2) automatic thresholding, (3) attenuation, (4) scatter, and (5) reconstruction filter were investigated. This study shows that accurate volume estimation of the thyroid gland is feasible when accurate corrections are performed. The relative error is within 7% for the GLH method combined with attenuation and scatter corrections.

  19. Chemical measurement of urine volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Chemical method of measuring volume of urine samples using lithium chloride dilution technique, does not interfere with analysis, is faster, and more accurate than standard volumetric of specific gravity/weight techniques. Adaptation of procedure to urinalysis could prove generally practical for hospital mineral balance and catechoamine determinations.

  20. Summation of IMS Volume Frequencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordillo, Frank

    A computer program designed to produce summary information on the data processing volume of the Southwest Regional Laboratory's (SWRL) Instructional Management System (IMS) is described. Written in FORTRAN IV for use on an IBM 360 Model 91, the program sorts IMS input data on the basis of run identifier and on the basis of classroom identification…

  1. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L.; Chapman, Kenneth

    This volume is one of the series for the Chemical Technician Curriculum Project (ChemTeC) of the American Chemical Society funded by the National Science Foundation. It consists of discussions, exercises, and experiments on the following topics: the nature of reversible processes, equilibrium constants, variable reaction tendencies, practical…

  2. Thinkers on Education. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morsy, Zaghloul, Ed.

    This collection of essays targets universities, social science research institutes, teacher training colleges, and those who lecture and carry out research on the history of ideas and of education. It is the third volume in a series that presents, in English, French, and Spanish, a comprehensive view of great educators of every age and culture.…

  3. Leadership Abstracts; Volume 4, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doucette, Don, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    "Leadership Abstracts" is published bimonthly and distributed to the chief executive officer of every two-year college in the United States and Canada. This document consists of the 15 one-page abstracts published in 1991. Addressing a variety of topics of interest to the community college administrators, this volume includes: (1) "Delivering the…

  4. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L., Ed.; Chapman, Kenneth, Ed.

    This volume contains chapters 26-31 for the American Chemical Society (ACS) "Modern Chemical Technology" (ChemTeC) instructional material intended to prepare chemical technologists. Chapter 26 reviews oxidation and reduction, including applications in titrations with potassium permanganate and iodometry. Coordination compounds are described in the…

  5. The African Experience. Volume I: Syllabus Lectures; Volume II: Bibliographic References; Volume IIIA: Introductory Essays; Volume IIIB: Introductory Essays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paden, John N.; Soja, Edward W.

    In response to demands for more and better teaching about Africa in American higher education, the US Office of Education requested that the Program of African Studies at Northwestern University generate a set of teaching materials which could be used in introductory undergraduate courses. Included in these volumes, these materials provide…

  6. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L.; Chapman, Kenneth

    This volume contains chapters 19 to 25 of the ACS "Modern Chemical Technology" (CHemTeC) curriculum material which is intended to prepare chemical technologists. Laboratory techniques and procedures are emphasized. The chapters cover the areas of the techniques of sampling, the techniques of weighing, sample preparation, the measurement of pH,…

  7. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L.; Chapman, Kenneth

    This volume contains chapters 14-18 for the ACS "Modern Chemical Technology" (ChemTeC) instructional material which is intended to prepare chemical technologists. The content concentrates on the background needed to understand the periodic table; names of inorganic compounds; structures, names and classes of common organic material; chemistry and…

  8. Thinkers on Education. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morsy, Zaghloul, Ed.

    This collection of essays targets universities, social science research institutes, teacher training colleges, and those who lecture and carry out research on the history of ideas and of education. It is the first volume in a series that presents, in English, French, and Spanish, a comprehensive view of great educators of every age and culture.…

  9. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  10. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L.; Chapman, Kenneth

    This volume is the first in a series of the ACS "Modern Chemical Technology" (ChemTeC) curriculum which is to prepare chemical technicians. The chapters concentrate on gas chromatography, tests for purity, properties of gases, and gas measurements. Included is the appropriate content, exercises, laboratory activities, and all needed mathematics.…

  11. Simple estimate of critical volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedors, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Method for estimating critical molar volume of materials is faster and simpler than previous procedures. Formula sums no more than 18 different contributions from components of chemical structure of material, and is as accurate (within 3 percent) as older more complicated models. Method should expedite many thermodynamic design calculations.

  12. Intermediate Nepali Structure. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, M. K.; Sharma, T. N.

    This volume is made up of 20 lessons and is part of a comprehensive course in intermediate Nepali. It explains and illustrates the basic structures of Nepali grammar through lessons which include different tense forms, postpositions, conditionals, comparatives, and other structural elements. The first lesson is devoted specifically to guiding…

  13. Innovation Abstracts, Volume XV, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This volume of 30 one- to two-page abstracts from 1993 highlights a variety of innovative approaches to teaching and learning in the community college. Topics covered in the abstracts include: (1) role-playing to encourage critical thinking; (2) team learning techniques to cultivate business skills; (3) librarian-instructor partnerships to create…

  14. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  15. Safety Education Handbook. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Education, Topeka.

    This is the second of three volumes of a safety guide developed to assist Kansas administrators and teachers in organizing, evaluating, and maintaining safety programs. It provides information to help them identify, assess, and correct unsafe conditions relating to equipment and facilities and ensure a safe and healthy environment for themselves…

  16. Advances in Librarianship. Volume 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Melvin J., Ed.; Harris, Michael H., Ed.

    A major theme of this volume is the issue of library accountability and evaluation of productivity. Four review papers deal directly with the topic. The first reviews the literature relating to evaluation of libraries generally with an emphasis on school libraries. The second focuses on the measurement of productivity in the academic library. It…

  17. Advances In Librarianship. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Melvin J., Ed.

    The authors of this second volume provide a composite contribution to a broader understanding of some of the major topics affecting libraries and their operation today. These contributions are in keeping with the aim of the series of providing scholarly reviews of specific topics related to the rapidly changing and advancing field of…

  18. Partial specific volume of xanthan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfarth, Ch.

    This document is part of Subvolume D2 'Polymer Solutions - Physical Properties and their Relations I (Thermodynamic Properties: PVT -Data and miscellaneous Properties of polymer Solutions) of Volume 6 `Polymers' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII `Advanced Materials and Technologies'.

  19. Thinkers on Education. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morsy, Zaghloul, Ed.

    This collection of essays targets universities, social science research institutes, teacher training colleges, and those who lecture and carry out research on the history of ideas and of education. It is the second volume in a series that presents, in English, French, and Spanish, a comprehensive view of great educators of every age and culture.…

  20. Thinkers on Education. Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morsy, Zaghloul, Ed.

    This collection of essays targets universities, social science research institutes, teacher training colleges, and those who lecture and carry out research on the history of ideas and of education. It is the fourth volume in a series that presents, in English, French, and Spanish, a comprehensive view of great educators of every age and culture.…

  1. The volume change during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rittich, M.

    1985-01-01

    The liquid-solid phase transformation of solidifying metallic melts is accompanied by a volume change Delta-Vm. This volume change produces a gravity-independent microscopic flow near the solidification front. In a ground-based laboratory, solidification processes are also affected by convection due to temperature and concentration gradients. A quantitative evaluation of the effects of these flows on the formation of structure requires reproducible values of Delta-Vm. Alloys with Delta-Vm = 0 would be best suited for such an evaluation, while alloys with a constant value for Delta-Vm are still usable. Another requirement is related to a solidus-liquidus interval which is as small as possible. One-phase alloys, which would be particularly well suited, could not be found. For these reasons, alloys which solidify in two phases, as for example eutectics, have been considered, taking into account the Al-Ge system. Attention is given to the volume change at the melting point, the measurement of this change, the volume change at solidification, and applications to terrestrial technology.

  2. Rural Libraries, Volume XIV, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Mary Lou, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    The 2 issues in this volume contain 10 articles on rural libraries and information access in rural America. Topics include telecommunications and distance education in Nebraska, the future of small rural public libraries, federal programs to improve rural access to information, outreach issues for public libraries, and the role of information in…

  3. Skylab Experiments, Volume 6, Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    Volume 6, one of a series of booklets designed to acquaint teachers with the Skylab Program, is focused on mechanics. Introductory material provides background information on Skylab and its related education program. Section 1 of the booklet presents relevant physics content concerning the concept of mechanics. Section 2 contains a discussion of…

  4. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L.; Chapman, Kenneth

    This volume contains chapters 8 to 13 of the ACS "Modern Chemical Technology" (ChemTeC) curriculum material which is intended to prepare chemical technologists. The content is centered around the background needed to understand the structure of the atom, covalence, electrovalence, elements and compounds, liquids and solutions, and chemical…

  5. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L.; Chapman, Kenneth

    This volume is one of a series for the Chemical Technician Curriculum Project (ChemTeC) of the American Chemical Society funded by the National Science Foundation. It consists of discussions, exercises, and experiments on the following topics: amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, synthetic polymers, other natural products, chemical separations…

  6. Pragmatics & Language Learning. Volume 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasper, Gabriele, Ed.; Nguyen, Hanh thi, Ed.; Yoshimi, Dina Rudolph, Ed.; Yoshioka, Jim K., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This volume examines the organization of second language and multilingual speakers' talk and pragmatic knowledge across a range of naturalistic and experimental activities. Based on data collected on Danish, English, Hawai'i Creole, Indonesian, and Japanese as target languages, the contributions explore the nexus of pragmatic knowledge,…

  7. Physics in Perspective, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Physics Survey Committee.

    As the second report on physics disciplines, a balanced picture of recent progress in relation to other scientific fields and human civilization is presented in this first volume prepared by the Physics Survey Committee. Fourteen chapters are included with the first one dealing with the origin, objectives, and organization of the Committee. The…

  8. Cost, volume and profitability analysis.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, David P

    2002-01-01

    If you want to increase your income by seeing more patients, it's important to figure out the financial impact such a move could have on your practice. Learn how to run a cost, volume, and profitability analysis to determine how business decisions can change your financial picture. PMID:11806235

  9. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L., Ed.; Chapman, Kenneth, Ed.

    This volume contains chapters 32-39 for the American Chemical Society (ACS) "Modern Chemical Technology" (ChemTeC) instructional materials intended to prepare chemical technologists. The study of organic chemistry is continued as these major topics are considered: alcohols and phenols, alkyl and aryl halides, ethers, aldehydes and ketones,…

  10. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L.; Chapman, Kenneth

    This volume is one of the series for the Chemical Technician Curriculum Project (ChemTeC) of the American Chemical Society funded by the National Science Foundation. It consists of discussions, exercises, and experiments on the following topics: ion exchange, electrphoresis, dialysis, electrochemistry, corrosion, electrolytic cells, coulometry,…

  11. Construction Cluster Volume III [Plumbing].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Justice, Harrisburg. Bureau of Correction.

    The document is the third of a series, to be integrated with a G.E.D. program, containing instructional materials at the basic skills level for the construction cluster. The volume focuses on plumbing and consists of 20 instructional units which require a month of study. The units include: (1) importance of plumbing; (2) pipe and tubing…

  12. Healing Magazine, Volume 8, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    This volume of "Healing Magazine" features practical, clinical information aimed at sharing current work in children's mental health. The first issue contains articles on intervention for self-injurious behavior, providing school-based grief groups, effectively using time-out as a parenting tool, and KidsPeace's suicide prevention program. The…

  13. NASA Thesaurus. Volume 1: Hierarchical listing. Volume 2: Access vocabulary. Volume 3: Definitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    There are over 17,500 postable terms and some 4,000 nonpostable terms approved for use in the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Database in the Hierarchical Listing of the NASA Thesaurus. The generic structure is presented for many terms. The broader term and narrower term relationships are shown in an indented fashion that illustrates the generic structure better than the more widely used BT and NT listings. Related terms are generously applied, thus enhancing the usefulness of the Hierarchical Listing. Greater access to the Hierarchical Listing may be achieved with the collateral use of Volume 2 - Access Vocabulary and Volume 3 - Definitions.

  14. High-Volume Hospitals with High-Volume and Low-Volume Surgeons: Is There a "Field Effect" for Pancreaticoduodenectomy?

    PubMed

    Wood, Thomas W; Ross, Sharona B; Bowman, Ty A; Smart, Amanda; Ryan, Carrie E; Sadowitz, Benjamin; Downs, Darrell; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2016-05-01

    Since the Leapfrog Group established hospital volume criteria for pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), the importance of surgeon volume versus hospital volume in obtaining superior outcomes has been debated. This study was undertaken to determine whether low-volume surgeons attain the same outcomes after PD as high-volume surgeons at high-volume hospitals. PDs undertaken from 2010 to 2012 were obtained from the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration. High-volume hospitals were identified. Surgeon volumes within were determined; postoperative length of stay (LOS), in-hospital mortality, discharge status, and hospital charges were examined relative to surgeon volume. Six high-volume hospitals were identified. Each hospital had at least one surgeon undertaking ≥ 12 PDs per year and at least one surgeon undertaking < 12 PDs per year. Within these six hospitals, there were 10 "high-volume" surgeons undertaking 714 PDs over the three-year period (average of 24 PDs per surgeon per year), and 33 "low-volume" surgeons undertaking 225 PDs over the three-year period (average of two PDs per surgeon per year). For all surgeons, the frequency with which surgeons undertook PD did not predict LOS, in-hospital mortality, discharge status, or hospital charges. At the six high-volume hospitals examined from 2010 to 2012, low-volume surgeons undertaking PD did not have different patient outcomes from their high-volume counterparts with respect to patient LOS, in-hospital mortality, patient discharge status, or hospital charges. Although the discussion of volume for complex operations has shifted toward surgeon volume, hospital volume must remain part of the discussion as there seems to be a hospital "field effect." PMID:27215720

  15. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. Two tables are provided at the end of the Glossary to help readers: the first defines the prefixes

  16. Japanese 12-Week Course. Volume IV, Lessons 42-55. Volume V, Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Educational Systems Development Center.

    These two volumes comprise Lesson Units 42-55 (Volume IV), and a comprehensive Glossary (Volume V) which accompanies this 12-week Defense Language Institute course in beginning Japanese. (See AL 002 223 for Volume I--Introduction and Lesson Units 1-15, and AL 002 224 for Volumes II and III--Lesson Units 16-27 and 28-41.) (AMM)

  17. O*NET Final Technical Report. Volume I [and] Volume II [and] Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Norman G.; Mumford, Michael D.; Borman, Walter C.; Jeanneret, P. Richard; Fleishman, Edwin A.; Levin, Kerry Y.

    This document contains the three volumes of the technical report for development of the prototype of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET), which is intended to replace the "Dictionary of Occupational Titles.""General Introduction" (Norman G. Peterson) presents an overview of O*NET's purpose, content, and structure. "Research Method:…

  18. Diffuse volume transport in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Howard

    2010-10-01

    The diffuse flux of volume j in a single-component liquid or gas, the subject of this paper, is a purely molecular quantity defined as the difference between the flux of volume n and the convective flux of volume nvˆ carried by the flowing mass, with n the mass flux, vˆ=1/ρ the specific volume, and ρ the mass density. Elementary statistical-mechanical arguments are used to derive the linear constitutive equation j=DS∇lnρ, valid in near-equilibrium fluids from which body forces are absent. Here, DS is the fluid’s self-diffusion coefficient. The present derivation is based on Einstein’s mesoscopic Brownian motion arguments, albeit applied here to volume- rather than particle-transport phenomena. In contrast to these mesoscale arguments, all prior derivations were based upon macroscale linear irreversible thermodynamic (LIT) arguments. DS replaces the thermometric diffusivity α as the phenomenological coefficient appearing in earlier, ad hoc, derivations. The prior scheme based on α, which had been shown to accord with Burnett’s well-known gas-kinetic constitutive data for the heat flux and viscous stress, carries over intact to now show comparable accord of DS with these same data, since for gases the dimensionless Lewis number Le=α/DS is essentially unity. On the other hand for most liquids, where Le≫1, use of DS in place of α is shown to agree much better with existing experimental data for liquids. For the case of binary mixtures it is shown for the special case of isothermal, isobaric, force-free, Fick’s law-type molecular diffusion processes that j=D∇lnρ, where D is the binary diffusion coefficient. In contrast with the preceding use in the single-component case of both mesoscopic and LIT models to obtain a constitutive equation for j, the corresponding mixture result is derived here without use of any physical model whatsoever. Rather, the derivation effectively requires little more than the respective definitions of the diffuse volume

  19. Computer simulations to estimate organ doses from clinically validated cardiac, neuro, and pediatric protocols for multiple detector computed tomography scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghita, Monica

    Recent advances in Computed Tomography (CT) technology, particularly that of multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanning, have provided increased utilization and more diverse clinical applications including more advanced vascular and cardiac exams, perfusion imaging, and screening exams. Notwithstanding the benefits to the patient undergoing a CT study, the fundamental concern in radiation protection is the minimization of the radiation exposure delivered as well as the implementation of structures to prevent inappropriate ordering and clinical use of these advanced studies. This research work developed a computational methodology for routine clinical use to assess patient organ doses from MDCT scanners. To support the methodology, a computer code (DXS-Diagnostic X-ray Spectra) was developed to accurately and conveniently generate x-ray spectra in the diagnostic energy range (45-140 keV). The two accepted standard radiation transport calculation methods namely, deterministic and Monte Carlo, have been preliminarily investigated for their capability and readiness to support the proposed goal of the work. Thorough tests demonstrated that the lack of appropriate discrete photon interaction coefficients in the aforementioned diagnostic energy range impedes the applicability of the deterministic approach to routine clinical use; improvements in the multigroup treatment may make it more viable. Thus, the open source Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, was adapted to appropriately model an MDCT scan. For this, a new method, entirely based on routine clinical CT measurements, was developed and validated to generate an "equivalent source and filtration" model that obviates the need of proprietary information for a given CT scanner. Computer simulations employing the Monte Carlo methodology and UF's tomographic human phantoms were performed to assess, compare, and optimize pediatric, cardiac and neuro-imaging protocols for the new 320-slice scanner at Shands/UF based on dose considerations

  20. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  1. Cape Photographic Durchmusterung, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Cape Photographic Durchmusterung (CPD, Gill and Kapleyn 1895-1900) is a photographic survey of southern stars in the declination range -18 to -90 degrees. This volume covers the declination range -53 through -89 degrees. Positions are given for the 1875 equinox. The summary of the positional uncertainties quoted in the third volume of the published catalog gives +/- 0.28 sec (R.A.), + 0.044 arcmin (Dec.) for zones -18 to -57 degrees, + 0.157 sec + 0.0764/cos(delta) sec (R.A.), +/- 0.056 arcmin (Dec.) for zones -58 to -85 degrees, +0.157 sec + 0.0353/cos(delta) sec (R.A.), +/- 0.0127 arcmin (Dec.) for the polar plate where, as explained in the introduction to the third volume, many positions were derived from rectangular coordinates (these are positions reported to 0.1 sec (R.A.) and 0.001 arcmin (Dec.) in the -86 to -89 degree zones in the catalog). The probable error of a photographic magnitude, as determined by combining results for different magnitudes and weighting proportionately according to the numbers of stars in each class of magnitude, is given as +0.055 mag. From an analysis of the faint magnitude limits on the plates discussed in the third volume introduction, the catalog as a whole can be considered complete to photographic magnitude 9.2, but it is stated that it will be found practically complete, in or near the Milky Way, to magnitude 9.5.

  2. On Infinite-Volume Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenci, Marco

    2010-09-01

    In the context of the long-standing issue of mixing in infinite ergodic theory, we introduce the idea of mixing for observables possessing an infinite-volume average. The idea is borrowed from statistical mechanics and appears to be relevant, at least for extended systems with a direct physical interpretation. We discuss the pros and cons of a few mathematical definitions that can be devised, testing them on a prototypical class of infinite measure-preserving dynamical systems, namely, the random walks.

  3. Appropriate technology sourcebook. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, K.; Keller, K.; Pam, R

    1981-01-01

    The second in a 2 volume set of guides to practical books and plans for village and small community technology, with over 500 annotated references in print in 1980/1. The forestry section includes material on deforestation, conservation, reforestation, firewood crops, agroforestry, timber drying and the safe use of chain saws. Improved cooking stoves and charcoal kilns are covered in another section, and there is also a section on aquaculture. A glossary and a general index are included.

  4. Cape Photographic Durchmusterung, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Cape Photographic Durchmusterung (CPD, Gill and Kapteyn 1895-1900) is a Photographic survey of southern stars in the declination range -18 to -90 degrees. This volume covers the declination range -53 through -89 degrees. Positions are given for 1875 equinox. The summary of the positional uncertainties quoted in the third volume of the published catalog gives +/- 0.28 sec (R.A.), +/- 0.044 arcmin (Dec.) for zones - 18 to -57 degrees, + 0.157 sec + 0.0764/cos(delta) sec (R.A.), +/- 0.056 arcmin (Dec.) for zones -58 to -85 degrees, +0.157 sec + 0.0353/cos (delta) sec (R.A.), + 0.0127 arcmin (Dec.) for the polar plate where, as explained in the introduction to the third volume, many positions were derived from rectangular coordinates (these are positions reported to 0.1 SCC (R.A.) and 0.001 arcmin (Dec.) in the -86 to -89 degree zones in the catalog). The probable error of a photographic magnitude, as determined by combining results for different magnitudes and weighting proportionately according to the numbers of stars in each class of magnitude, is given as +0.055 mag. From an analysis of the faint magnitude limits on the plates discussed in the third volume introduction, the catalog as a whole can be considered complete to photographic magnitude 9.2, but it is stated that it will be found practically complete, in or near the Milky Way, to magnitude 9.5.

  5. Astronautic Structures Manual, Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This document (Volumes I, II, and III) presents a compilation of industry-wide methods in aerospace strength analysis that can be carried out by hand, that are general enough in scope to cover most structures encountered, and that are sophisticated enough to give accurate estimates of the actual strength expected. It provides analysis techniques for the elastic and inelastic stress ranges. It serves not only as a catalog of methods not usually available, but also as a reference source for the background of the methods themselves. An overview of the manual is as follows: Section A is a general introduction of methods used and includes sections on loads, combined stresses, and interaction curves; Section B is devoted to methods of strength analysis; Section C is devoted to the topic of structural stability; Section D is on thermal stresses; Section E is on fatigue and fracture mechanics; Section F is on composites; Section G is on rotating machinery; and Section H is on statistics. These three volumes supersede Volumes I and II, NASA TM X-60041 and NASA TM X-60042, respectively.

  6. Cape Photographic Durchmusterung, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Cape Photographic Durchmusterung (CPD Gill and Kapteyn 1895-1900) is a photographic survey of southern stars in the declination range -18 to -90 degrees. This volume covers the declination range -18 through -37 degrees. Positions are given for the 1875 equinox. The summary of the positional uncertainties quoted in the third volume of the published catalog gives +/- 0.28 sec (R.A.) +/- 0.044 arcmin (Dec.) for zones -18 to -57 degrees. The probable error of a photographic magnitude as determined by combining results for different magnitudes and weighting proportionately according to the numbers of stars in each class of magnitude is given as +/- 0.055 mag. From an analysis of the taint magnitude limits on the plates discussed in the third volume introduction, the catalog as a whole can be considered complete to photographic magnitude 9.2 but it is stated that it will be found practically complete in or near the Milky Way, to magnitude 9.5.

  7. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison M.

    2013-03-27

    The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

  8. Volume rendering in the presence of partial volume effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Andre D. A.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Saha, Punam K.

    2002-05-01

    In tomographic images, partial volume effects (PVE) cause several artifacts in volume renditions. In x-ray CT, for example, soft-tissue-like pseudo structures appear in bone-to-air and bone-to-fat interfaces. Further, skin, which is identical to soft tissue in terms of CT number, obscures the rendition of the latter. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate these phenomena and to provide effective solutions that yield significantly improved renditions. Here, we introduce two methods that detect and classify voxels with PVE in x-ray CT. A method is described to automatically peel skin so that PVE-resolved renditions of bone and soft tissue reveal considerably more details. In the first method, the fraction of each tissue material in each voxel v is estimated by taking into account the intensities of the voxels neighboring v. The second method is based on the following postulate (IEEE PAMI, vol. 23 pp. 689- 706, 2001): In any acquired image, voxels with the highest uncertainty occur in the vicinity of object boundaries. The removal of skin is achieved by means of mathematical morphology. Volume renditions have been created before and after applying the methods for several patient CT datasets. A mathematical phantom experiment involving different levels of PVE has been conducted by adding different degrees of noise and blurring. A quantitative evaluation is done utilizing the mathematical phantom and clinical CT data wherein an operator carefully masked out voxels with PVE in the segmented images. All results have demonstrated the enhanced quality of display of bone and soft tissue after applying the proposed methods. The quantitative evaluations indicate that more than 98% of the voxels with PVE are removed by the two methods and the second method performs slightly better than the first. Further, skin peeling vividly reveals fine details in the soft tissue structures.

  9. Cochlear labyrinth volume in Krapina Neandertals.

    PubMed

    Beals, Michaela E; Frayer, David W; Radovčić, Jakov; Hill, Cheryl A

    2016-01-01

    Research with extant primate taxa suggests that cochlear labyrinth volume is functionally related to the range of audible frequencies. Specifically, cochlear volume is negatively correlated with both the high and low frequency limits of hearing so that the smaller the cochlea, the higher the normal range of audible frequencies. The close anatomical relationship between the membranous cochlea and the bony cochlear labyrinth allows for the determination of cochlear size from fossil specimens. This study compares Krapina Neandertal cochlear volumes to extant taxa cochlear volumes. Cochlear volumes were acquired from high-resolution computed tomography scans of temporal bones of Krapina Neandertals, chimpanzees, gorillas, and modern humans. We find that Krapina Neandertals' cochlear volumes are similar to modern Homo sapiens and are significantly larger than chimpanzee and gorilla cochlear volumes. The measured cochlear volume in Krapina Neandertals suggests they had a range of audible frequencies similar to the modern human range. PMID:26603101

  10. Measurement Corner: Volume, Temperature and Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teates, Thomas G.

    1977-01-01

    Boyle's Law and basic relationships between volume and pressure of a gas at constant temperature are presented. Suggests two laboratory activities for demonstrating the effect of temperature on the volume of a gas or liquid. (CS)

  11. RADTRAN 4: User guide. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, K S; Kanipe, F L

    1992-01-01

    RADTRAN 4 is used to evaluate radiological consequences of incident-free transportation, as well as the radiological risks from vehicular accidents occurring during transportation. This User Guide is Volume 3 in a series of four volume of the documentation of the RADTRAN 4 computer code for transportation risk analysis. The other three volumes are Volume 1, the Executive Summary; Volume 2, the Technical Manual; and Volume 4, the Programmer`s Manual. The theoretical and calculational basis for the operations performed by RADTRAN 4 are discussed in Volume 2. Throughout this User Guide the reader will be referred to Volume 2 for detailed discussions of certain RADTRAN features. This User Guide supersedes the document ``RADTRAN III`` by Madsen et al. (1983). This RADTRAN 4 User Guide specifies and describes the required data, control inputs, input sequences, user options, program limitations, and other activities necessary for execution of the RADTRAN 4 computer code.

  12. Oncoplastic breast conserving surgery: Volume replacement vs. volume displacement.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, M; Yokoi-Noguchi, M; Ohno, Y; Morioka, E; Nakano, Y; Kosaka, T; Kurita, T

    2016-07-01

    Oncoplastic breast conserving surgery (BCS) has emerged as a third option between conventional BCS and mastectomy. Oncoplastic BCS includes two fundamentally different approaches: volume replacement and volume displacement. The former involves partial mastectomy and immediate reconstruction of the breast with the transposition of autologous tissue from elsewhere, while the latter involves partial mastectomy and using the remaining breast tissue to fill the defect resulting from extirpation of the tumor. There are several benefits associated with oncoplastic BCS. First, it allows partial mastectomy without cosmetic penalties, and can achieve better cosmetic outcomes than total mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction. Second, it avoids the need for total mastectomy in an increasing number of patients without compromising local control. Third, partial breast reconstruction is less extensive and has fewer complications than conventional procedures. Partial mastectomy and partial breast reconstruction can be carried out either simultaneously as a one-stage procedure, or using a two-stage approach. Although patients prefer a one-stage procedure, it requires intraoperative confirmation of complete tumor excision using frozen-section analysis. Moreover, oncoplastic BCS requires combined skills, knowledge, and understanding of both oncological and plastic surgeries, which may be optimally achieved by an oncoplastic surgeon. PMID:26988623

  13. Comparing Volumes of Prisms and Pyramids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinogradova, Natalya

    2012-01-01

    Students' experience in using formulas for volumes is often limited to substituting numbers into given formulas. An activity presented in this article may help students make connections between the formulas for volumes of prisms and volumes of pyramids. In addition, some interesting facts from number theory arise, demonstrating strong connections…

  14. Tetroon evaluation program. [volume accuracies under superpressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beemer, J. D.; Markhardt, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    The actual volume of a constant volume superpressured tetrahedron shaped balloon changes as the amount of superpressure is changed. The experimental methods used to measure these changes in volume are described and results are presented. The basic equations used to determine the amount of inflation gas required for a tetroon to float at a predetermined flight level are presented and inflation techniques discussed.

  15. Renewable Electricity Futures Study - Volume One

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hand, Maureen; Mai, Treui; Baldwin, Sam; Brinkman, Greg; Sandor, Debbie; Denholm, Paul; Heath, Garvin; Wiser, Ryan

    2016-06-01

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study - Volume One. This is part of a series of four volumes describing exploring a high-penetration renewable electricity future for the United States of America. This data set is provides data for the entire volume one document and includes all data for the charts and graphs included in the document.

  16. 36 CFR 223.36 - Volume determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Volume determination. 223.36... Sale Contracts Contract Conditions and Provisions § 223.36 Volume determination. (a) Timber sale contracts may provide for volume determination by scaling, measuring, weighing, or counting the logs...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1760 - Volume plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Volume plethysmograph. 868.1760 Section 868.1760...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1760 Volume plethysmograph. (a) Identification. A volume plethysmograph is an airtight box, in which a patient sits, that is used to...

  18. 7 CFR 984.49 - Volume regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Volume regulation. 984.49 Section 984.49 Agriculture... Regulating Handling Marketing Policy § 984.49 Volume regulation. (a) Free, reserve, and export percentages... volume of reserve walnuts available for export and additional demand exists, which would not...

  19. 7 CFR 984.49 - Volume regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Volume regulation. 984.49 Section 984.49 Agriculture... Regulating Handling Marketing Policy § 984.49 Volume regulation. (a) Free, reserve, and export percentages... volume of reserve walnuts available for export and additional demand exists, which would not...

  20. 21 CFR 868.1760 - Volume plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Volume plethysmograph. 868.1760 Section 868.1760...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1760 Volume plethysmograph. (a) Identification. A volume plethysmograph is an airtight box, in which a patient sits, that is used to...

  1. 7 CFR 984.49 - Volume regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Volume regulation. 984.49 Section 984.49 Agriculture... Regulating Handling Marketing Policy § 984.49 Volume regulation. (a) Free, reserve, and export percentages... volume of reserve walnuts available for export and additional demand exists, which would not...

  2. 36 CFR 223.36 - Volume determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Volume determination. 223.36... Sale Contracts Contract Conditions and Provisions § 223.36 Volume determination. (a) Timber sale contracts may provide for volume determination by scaling, measuring, weighing, or counting the logs...

  3. 21 CFR 868.1760 - Volume plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Volume plethysmograph. 868.1760 Section 868.1760...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1760 Volume plethysmograph. (a) Identification. A volume plethysmograph is an airtight box, in which a patient sits, that is used to...

  4. 36 CFR 223.36 - Volume determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Volume determination. 223.36... Sale Contracts Contract Conditions and Provisions § 223.36 Volume determination. (a) Timber sale contracts may provide for volume determination by scaling, measuring, weighing, or counting the logs...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1760 - Volume plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Volume plethysmograph. 868.1760 Section 868.1760...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1760 Volume plethysmograph. (a) Identification. A volume plethysmograph is an airtight box, in which a patient sits, that is used to...

  6. 36 CFR 223.36 - Volume determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Volume determination. 223.36... Sale Contracts Contract Conditions and Provisions § 223.36 Volume determination. (a) Timber sale contracts may provide for volume determination by scaling, measuring, weighing, or counting the logs...

  7. 7 CFR 984.49 - Volume regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Volume regulation. 984.49 Section 984.49 Agriculture... Regulating Handling Marketing Policy § 984.49 Volume regulation. (a) Free, reserve, and export percentages... volume of reserve walnuts available for export and additional demand exists, which would not...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1760 - Volume plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Volume plethysmograph. 868.1760 Section 868.1760...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1760 Volume plethysmograph. (a) Identification. A volume plethysmograph is an airtight box, in which a patient sits, that is used to...

  9. 7 CFR 984.49 - Volume regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Volume regulation. 984.49 Section 984.49 Agriculture... Regulating Handling Marketing Policy § 984.49 Volume regulation. (a) Free, reserve, and export percentages... volume of reserve walnuts available for export and additional demand exists, which would not...

  10. Olympic Training Film Profiles. Volume Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    Providing a convenient reference source to training and educational films, this fourth volume of the "Training Film Profiles" lists films and filmstrips from all sources for 1971 through 1972. The volume first presents an index, listing film titles and categories from the first four volumes, and then provides entries arranged according to subject…

  11. Multilayer Volume Holographic Optical Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markov, Vladimir; Millerd, James; Trolinger, James; Norrie, Mark; Downie, John; Timucin, Dogan; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate a scheme for volume holographic storage based on the features of shift selectivity of a speckle reference wave hologram. The proposed recording method allows more efficient use of the recording medium and increases the storage density in comparison with spherical or plane-wave reference beams. Experimental results of multiple hologram storage and replay in a photorefractive crystal of iron-doped lithium niobate are presented. The mechanism of lateral and longitudinal shift selectivity are described theoretically and shown to agree with experimental measurements.

  12. Advances in drying: Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Mujumdar, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Topics covered in this volume include recent thoughts in modeling of drying phenomena, use of computers in rational design of drying particulates, recent advances in drying of wood, and heat/mass transfer phenomena in drying of solids. As the readers will no doubt notice, special effort is made to ensure the truly international nature of the contents of this serial publication. As existing knowledge on drying and dryers becomes more widely and readily accessible, it is expected that more and more dryers will be designed rationally rather than built solely with the benefit of empiricism.

  13. Environmental Report 1995. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) environmental monitoring and compliance effort and an assessment of the impact of LLNL operations on the environment and the public. This first volume describes LLNL`s environmental impact and compliance activities and features descriptive and explanatory text, summary data tables, and plots showing data trends. The summary data include measures of the center of data, their spread or variability, and their extreme values. Chapters on monitoring air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation are present.

  14. Modeling of landslide volume estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirahmadi, Abolghasem; Pourhashemi, Sima; Karami, Mokhtar; Akbari, Elahe

    2016-06-01

    Mass displacement of materials such as landslide is considered among problematic phenomena in Baqi Basin located at southern slopes of Binaloud, Iran; since, it destroys agricultural lands and pastures and also increases deposits at the basin exit. Therefore, it is necessary to identify areas which are sensitive to landslide and estimate the significant volume. In the present study, in order to estimate the volume of landslide, information about depth and area of slides was collected; then, considering regression assumptions, a power regression model was given which was compared with 17 suggested models in various regions in different countries. The results showed that values of estimated mass obtained from the suggested model were consistent with observed data (P value= 0.000 and R = 0.692) and some of the existing relations which implies on efficiency of the suggested model. Also, relations that were created in small-area landslides were more suitable rather than the ones created in large-area landslides for using in Baqi Basin. According to the suggested relation, average depth value of landslides was estimated 3.314 meters in Baqi Basin which was close to the observed value, 4.609 m.

  15. The GPS Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F. H.; Moreau, M. C.; Dahle-Melsaether, M. E.; Petrofski, W. P.; Stanton, B. J.; Thomason, S.; Harris, G. A.; Sena, R. P.; Temple, L. Parker, III

    2006-01-01

    Prior to the advent of artificial satellites, the concept of navigating in space and the desire to understand and validate the laws of planetary and satellite motion dates back centuries. At the initiation of orbital flight in 1957, space navigation was dominated by inertial and groundbased tracking methods, underpinned by the laws of planetary motion. It was early in the 1980s that GPS was first explored as a system useful for refining the position, velocity, and timing (PVT) of other spacecraft equipped with GPS receivers. As a result, an entirely new GPS utility was developed beyond its original purpose of providing PVT services for land, maritime, and air applications. Spacecraft both above and below the GPS constellation now receive the GPS signals, including the signals that spill over the limb of the Earth. The use of radionavigation satellite services for space navigation in High Earth Orbits is in fact a capability unique to GPS. Support to GPS space applications is being studied and planned as an important improvement to GPS. This paper discusses the formalization of PVT services in space as part of an overall GPS improvement effort. It describes the GPS Space Service Volume (SSV) and compares it to the Terrestrial Service Volume (TSV). It also discusses SSV coverage with the current GPS constellation, coverage characteristics as a function of altitude, expected power levels, and coverage figures of merit.

  16. Volume efficient sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1980-01-01

    In accordance with the teachings of this specification, a sodium sulfur battery is formed as follows. A plurality of box shaped sulfur electrodes are provided, the outer surfaces of which are defined by an electrolyte material. Each of the electrodes have length and width dimensions substantially greater than the thicknesses thereof as well as upwardly facing surface and a downwardly facing surface. An electrode structure is contained in each of the sulfur electrodes. A holding structure is provided for holding the plurality of sulfur electrodes in a stacked condition with the upwardly facing surface of one sulfur electrode in facing relationship to the downwardly facing surface of another sulfur electrode thereabove. A small thickness dimension separates each of the stacked electrodes thereby defining between each pair of sulfur electrodes a volume which receives the sodium reactant. A reservoir is provided for containing sodium. A manifold structure interconnects the volumes between the sulfur electrodes and the reservoir. A metering structure controls the flow of sodium between the reservoir and the manifold structure.

  17. Exploded views for volume data.

    PubMed

    Bruckner, Stefan; Gröiller, M Eduard

    2006-01-01

    Exploded views are an illustration technique where an object is partitioned into several segments. These segments are displaced to reveal otherwise hidden detail. In this paper we apply the concept of exploded views to volumetric data in order to solve the general problem of occlusion. In many cases an object of interest is occluded by other structures. While transparency or cutaways can be used to reveal a focus object, these techniques remove parts of the context information. Exploded views, on the other hand, do not suffer from this drawback. Our approach employs a force-based model: the volume is divided into a part configuration controlled by a number of forces and constraints. The focus object exerts an explosion force causing the parts to arrange according to the given constraints. We show that this novel and flexible approach allows for a wide variety of explosion-based visualizations including view-dependent explosions. Furthermore, we present a high-quality GPU-based volume ray casting algorithm for exploded views which allows rendering and interaction at several frames per second. PMID:17080837

  18. Large volume manufacture of dymalloy

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-22

    The purpose of this research was to test the commercial viability and feasibility of Dymalloy, a composite material to measure thermal conductivity. Dymalloy was developed as part of a CRADA with Sun Microsystems. Sun Microsystems was a potential end user of Dymalloy as a substrate for MCMS. Sun had no desire to be involved in the manufacture of this material. The goal of this small business CRADA with Spectra Mat was to establish the high volume commercial manufacturing industry source for Dymalloy required by an end-user such as Sun Microsystems. The difference between the fabrication technique developed during the CRADA and this proposed work related to the mechanical technique of coating the diamond powder. Mechanical parts for the high-volume diamond powder coating process existed; however, they needed to be installed in an existing coating system for evaluation. Sputtering systems similar to the one required for this project were available at LLNL. Once the diamond powder was coated, both LLNL and Spectra Mat could make and test the Dymalloy composites. Spectra Mat manufactured Dymalloy composites in order to evaluate and establish a reasonable cost estimate on their existing processing capabilities. This information was used by Spectra Mat to define the market and cost-competitive products that could be commercialized from this new substrate material.

  19. Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  20. Petroleum supply annual 1994. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-22

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  1. Japanese 12-Week Course. Volume II, Lessons 16-27. Volume III, Lessons 28-41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Educational Systems Development Center.

    These two volumes contain Lesson Units 16-41 in the Defense Language Institute's 12-week course in Japanese. (See AL 002 223 for Volume I, Lessons Units 1-15 and AL 002 225 for Volume IV, Lesson Units 42-55 and Volume V, Glossary.) (AMM)

  2. Wavelet-assisted volume ray casting.

    PubMed

    He, T

    1998-01-01

    Volume rendering is an important technique for computational biology. In this paper we propose a new wavelet-assisted volume ray casting algorithm. The main idea is to use the wavelet coefficients for detecting the local frequency, and decide the appropriate sampling rate along the ray according to the maximum frequency. Our algorithm is to first apply the 3D discrete wavelet transform on the volume, then create an index volume to indicate the necessary sampling distance at each voxel. During ray casting, the original volume is traversed in the spatial domain, while the index volume is used to decide the appropriate sampling distance. We demonstrate that our algorithm provides a framework for approximating the volume rendering at different levels of quality in a rapid and controlled way. PMID:9697179

  3. Drug dosage in isolated limb perfusion: evaluation of a limb volume model for extremity volume calculation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exact drug dosing in isolated limb perfusion (ILP) and infusion (ILI) is essential. We developed and evaluated a model for calculating the volume of extremities and compared this model with body weight- and height-dependent parameters. Methods The extremity was modeled by a row of coupled truncated cones. The sizes of the truncated cone bases were derived from the circumference measurements of the extremity at predefined levels (5 cm). The resulting volumes were added. This extremity volume model was correlated to the computed tomography (CT) volume data of the extremity (total limb volume). The extremity volume was also correlated with the patient’s body weight, body mass index (BMI) and ideal body weight (IBW). The no-fat CT limb volume was correlated with the circumference-measured limb volume corrected by the ideal-body-weight to actual-body-weight ratio (IBW corrected-limb-volume). Results The correlation between the CT volume and the volume measured by the circumference was high and significant. There was no correlation between the limb volume and the bare body weight, BMI or IBW. The correlation between the no-fat CT volume and IBW-corrected limb volume was high and significant. Conclusions An appropriate drug dosing in ILP can be achieved by combining the limb volume with the simple circumference measurements and the IBW to body-weight ratio. PMID:24684972

  4. Space resources. Volume 3: Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Mary Fae (Editor); Mckay, David S. (Editor); Duke, Michael B. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Space Resources addresses the issues of using space resources to support life on the Moon and for exploration of Mars. This volume - Materials - covers a number of technical and policy issues regarding the materials in space (mainly lunar and asteroidal) which can be used to support space operations. In part 1, nature and location of these materials, exploration strategy, evaluation criteria, and the technical means to collect or mine these materials is discussed. A baseline lunar mine and the basics of asteroid mining are presented and critiqued. In part 2, the beneficiation of ores and the extraction of such materials as oxygen, metals, and the makings of concrete are discussed. In part 3, the manufacturing and fabrication of nonterrestrial products are discussed. The economic tradeoffs between bringing needed products from Earth and making these products on location in space is considered.

  5. Space resources. Volume 3: Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mckay, M.F.; Mckay, D.S.; Duke, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    Space Resources addresses the issues of using space resources to support life on the Moon and for exploration of Mars. This volume - Materials - covers a number of technical and policy issues regarding the materials in space (mainly lunar and asteroidal) which can be used to support space operations. In part 1, nature and location of these materials, exploration strategy, evaluation criteria, and the technical means to collect or mine these materials is discussed. A baseline lunar mine and the basics of asteroid mining are presented and critiqued. In part 2, the beneficiation of ores and the extraction of such materials as oxygen, metals, and the makings of concrete are discussed. In part 3, the manufacturing and fabrication of nonterrestrial products are discussed. The economic tradeoffs between bringing needed products from Earth and making these products on location in space is considered. Separate abstracts have been prepared for papers in this report.

  6. Information architecture. Volume 3: Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this document, as presented in Volume 1, The Foundations, is to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing and promulgating information architecture guidance. This guidance is aimed at increasing the development of information architecture as a Departmentwide management best practice. This document describes departmental information architecture principles and minimum design characteristics for systems and infrastructures within the DOE Information Architecture Conceptual Model, and establishes a Departmentwide standards-based architecture program. The publication of this document fulfills the commitment to address guiding principles, promote standard architectural practices, and provide technical guidance. This document guides the transition from the baseline or defacto Departmental architecture through approved information management program plans and budgets to the future vision architecture. This document also represents another major step toward establishing a well-organized, logical foundation for the DOE information architecture.

  7. Optics survivability support, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, N.; Simpson, T.; Busdeker, A.; Doft, F.

    1993-01-01

    This volume of the Optics Survivability Support Final Report contains plots of all the data contained in the computerized Optical Glasses Database. All of these plots are accessible through the Database, but are included here as a convenient reference. The first three pages summarize the types of glass included with a description of the radiation source, test date, and the original data reference. This information is included in the database as a macro button labeled 'LLNL DATABASE'. Following this summary is an Abbe chart showing which glasses are included and where they lie as a function of nu(sub d) and n(sub d). This chart is also callable through the database as a macro button labeled 'ABBEC'.

  8. Volume Rendering of AMR Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labadens, M.; Pomarède, D.; Chapon, D.; Teyssier, R.; Bournaud, F.; Renaud, F.; Grandjouan, N.

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution simulations often rely on the Adaptive Mesh Resolution (AMR) technique to optimize memory consumption versus attainable precision. While this technique allows for dramatic improvements in terms of computing performance, the analysis and visualization of its data outputs remain challenging. The lack of effective volume renderers for the octree-based AMR used by the RAMSES simulation program has led to the development of the solutions presented in this paper. Two custom algorithms are discussed, based on the splatting and the ray-casting techniques. Their usage is illustrated in the context of the visualization of a high-resolution, 6000-processor simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy. Performance obtained in terms of memory management and parallelism speedup are presented.

  9. ATF2 Proposal Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Grishanov, B.I.; Logachev, P.; Podgorny, F.; Telnov, V.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.; Kalinin, A.; Napoly, O.; Payet, J.; Braun, H.H.; Schulte, D.; Zimmermann, F.; Appleby, R.; Barlow, R.; Bailey, I.; Jenner, L.; Jones, R.; Kourevlev, G.; Elsen, E.; Vogel, V.; Walker, N.; /DESY /Fermilab /Hiroshima U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Oxford U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Orsay, LAL /Valencia U. /Annecy, LAPP /LBL, Berkeley /LLNL, Livermore /University Coll. London /Chiba, Natl. Inst. Rad. Sci. /North Carolina A-T State U. /Oregon U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Queen Mary, U. of London /SLAC /Tokyo U.

    2006-02-27

    For achieving the high luminosity required at the International Linear Collider (ILC), it is critical to focus the beams to nanometer size with the ILC Beam Delivery System (BDS), and to maintain the beam collision with a nanometer-scale stability. To establish the technologies associated with this ultra-high precision beam handling, it has been proposed to implement an ILC-like final focus optics in an extension of the existing extraction beamline of ATF at KEK. The ATF is considered to be the best platform for this exercise, since it provides an adequate ultra-low emittance electron beam in a manner dedicated to the development of ILC. The two major goals for this facility, called ATF2, are: (A) Achievement of a 37 nm beam size, and (B) control of beam position down to 2 nm level. The scientific justification for the ATF2 project and its technical design have been described in Volume 1 of the ATF2 Proposal [1]. We present here Volume 2 of the ATF2 Proposal, in which we present specifics of the construction plans and the group organization to execute the research programs at ATF2. The sections in this report have been authored by relevant ATF2 subgroups within the International ATF Collaboration. The time line of the project is described in Section 2. Section 3 discuss the structure of the international collaboration. Sections 4 and 5 discuss budget considerations, which are presented as well as the design and construction tasks to be shared by the international collaboration at ATF2. Concluding remarks have been contributed by Dr. Ewan Paterson, Chair of the International Collaboration Board of the ATF collaboration.

  10. [Plasma osmolarity and cerebral volume].

    PubMed

    Boulard, G

    2001-02-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, the osmolarity of extracellular fluids (ECFs) and natremia are controlled by two regulatory mechanisms modulating the water balance and sodium outflow from information collected by the osmoreceptors and baroreceptors, respectively. As well, under normal physiological conditions, water and electrolytes of brain ECFs are secreted by the endothelial cells of brain capillaries. Furthermore, isotonicity is present on both sides of the blood-brain barrier. In the event of systemic osmolarity disorders, water transport subject to osmosis laws occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier. In the case of plasmatic hyperosmolarity cerebral dehydration is observed, while cerebral edema occurs in the contrary case. However, plasmatic osmolarity disorders have less effect on the cerebral volume when their introduction is slow. Experimentation in acute conditions shows that measured variations of the cerebral water content are lower than calculated variations, thus suggesting the existence of an adaptive mechanism, that is, the cerebral osmoregulation which limits the variation of the volume of brain cells by modulating their osmoactive molecule content. These osmoactive molecules are, on the one hand, the electrolytes, which are early and rapidly mobilized, and, on the other hand, the organic osmoles (amino acids, etc.), whose secretion is slower and delayed. This phenomenon should be taken into account in the treatment of osmolarity disorders. Thus, the related-risk of treatment for natremia disorders is therapeutic reversal of the osmotic gradient at the level of the blood-brain barrier. This reversal, which corresponds to a second osmotic stress, requires the implementation of a new procedure of cerebral osmoregulation in the opposite direction of the preceding one. As successive osmotic stresses decrease the effectiveness of brain osmoregulation, the risk for cerebral dehydration and pontine myelinolysis increases when the treatment

  11. Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties.

    SciTech Connect

    DURHAM, L.A.; JOHNSON, R.L.; RIEMAN, C.R.; SPECTOR, H.L.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUFFALO DISTRICT

    2007-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the preremedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in predesign data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in predesign characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland1, Ashland2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate predesign contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District.

  12. Site Environmental Report for 2009, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Suying

    2010-08-19

    Volume II of the Site Environmental Report for 2009 is provided by Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a supplemental appendix to Volume I, which contains the body of the report. Volume II contains the environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate summary results of routine and nonroutine sampling at the Laboratory, except for groundwater sampling data, which may be found in the reports referred to in Chapter 4 of Volume I. The results from sample collections are more comprehensive in Volume II than in Volume I: for completeness, all results from sample collections that began or ended in calendar year (CY) 2009 are included in this volume. However, the samples representing CY 2008 data have not been used in the summary results that are reported in Volume I. (For example, although ambient air samples collected on January 6, 2009, are presented in Volume II, they represent December 2008 data and are not included in Table 4-2 in Volume I.) When appropriate, sampling results are reported in both conventional and International System (SI) units. For some results, the rounding procedure used in data reporting may result in apparent differences between the numbers reported in SI and conventional units. (For example, stack air tritium results reported as < 1.5 Bq/m3 are shown variously as < 39 and < 41 pCi/m3. Both of these results are rounded correctly to two significant digits.)

  13. Waterpower`95. Volume 1-3

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    Waterpower `95 is organized around 70 sessions with four papers being presented in each session and a poster paper forum, There are 26 topic area, with Volume I containing 5 topics and the poster session papers; Volume II containing 11 topics, and Volume III containing 10 topics and the student paper submittals. The topics are: Volume I (1) environmental, (2) case studies, (3) legal and licensing, (4) performance testing, (5) performance measurement, (6) posters, (7) construction; Volume II (8) rehabilitation and modernization, (9) operation and maintenance, (10) turbines and pump turbines, (11) electrical systems and controls, (12) generators, (13) recreation, (14) EPRI, (15) planning, (16) economics and finance, (17) integrated resource management, (18) technology transfer; Volume III (19) research and development, (20) safety, (21) risk analysis, (22) reservoir system operations, (23) hydraulic analysis, (24) hydrologic analysis, (25) geotechnical, (26) mechanical systems, (27) civil works, and (28) scholarship contest.

  14. NASA Safety Manual. Volume 3: System Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This Volume 3 of the NASA Safety Manual sets forth the basic elements and techniques for managing a system safety program and the technical methods recommended for use in developing a risk evaluation program that is oriented to the identification of hazards in aerospace hardware systems and the development of residual risk management information for the program manager that is based on the hazards identified. The methods and techniques described in this volume are in consonance with the requirements set forth in NHB 1700.1 (VI), Chapter 3. This volume and future volumes of the NASA Safety Manual shall not be rewritten, reprinted, or reproduced in any manner. Installation implementing procedures, if necessary, shall be inserted as page supplements in accordance with the provisions of Appendix A. No portion of this volume or future volumes of the NASA Safety Manual shall be invoked in contracts.

  15. Karl Schwarzschild. Collected works. Volume 3.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, H.-H.

    This volume is the third part of a three-volume collection of research papers by Karl Schwarzschild. The complete collection will comprise a total of 119 papers, organized into ten categories. (For volumes 1, 2 see 55.003.011, 55.003.086, respectively). Contents: 8. Optics. Commentary by G. Schmahl. 9. Physical papers. Commentary by F. Hund. 10. Miscellaneous. Commentary by H.-H. Voigt.

  16. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The {ital Petroleum Supply Annual} contains information on supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. It reflects data collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys, and it is divided into 2 volumes. This volume contains three sections: summary statistics, detailed statistics, and selected refinery statistics, each with final annual data. (The other volume contains final statistics for each month and replaces data previously published in the {ital Petroleum Supply Monthly}).

  17. Heliophysics 3 Volume Paperback Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Siscoe, George L.

    2013-03-01

    Volume 1: Preface; 1. Prologue Carolus J. Schrijver and George L. Siscoe; 2. Introduction to heliophysics Thomas J. Bogdan; 3. Creation and destruction of magnetic field Matthias Rempel; 4. Magnetic field topology Dana W. Longcope; 5. Magnetic reconnection Terry G. Forbes; 6. Structures of the magnetic field Mark B. Moldwin, George L. Siscoe and Carolus J. Schrijver; 7. Turbulence in space plasmas Charles W. Smith; 8. The solar atmosphere Viggo H. Hansteen; 9. Stellar winds and magnetic fields Viggo H. Hansteen; 10. Fundamentals of planetary magnetospheres Vytenis M. Vasyliunas; 11. Solar-wind magnetosphere coupling: an MHD perspective Frank R. Toffoletto and George L. Siscoe; 12. On the ionosphere and chromosphere Tim Fuller-Rowell and Carolus J. Schrijver; 13. Comparative planetary environments Frances Bagenal; Bibliography; Index. Volume 2: Preface; 1. Perspective on heliophysics George L. Siscoe and Carolus J. Schrijver; 2. Introduction to space storms and radiation Sten Odenwald; 3. In-situ detection of energetic particles George Gloeckler; 4. Radiative signatures of energetic particles Tim Bastian; 5. Observations of solar and stellar eruptions, flares, and jets Hugh Hudson; 6. Models of coronal mass ejections and flares Terry Forbes; 7. Shocks in heliophysics Merav Opher; 8. Particle acceleration in shocks Dietmar Krauss-Varban; 9. Energetic particle transport Joe Giacalone; 10. Energy conversion in planetary magnetospheres Vytenis Vasyliunas; 11. Energization of trapped particles Janet Green; 12. Flares, CMEs, and atmospheric responses Tim Fuller-Rowell and Stanley C. Solomon; 13. Energetic particles and manned spaceflight Stephen Guetersloh and Neal Zapp; 14. Energetic particles and technology Alan Tribble; Appendix I. Authors and editors; List of illustrations; List of tables; Bibliography; Index. Volume 3: Preface; 1. Interconnectedness in heliophysics Carolus J. Schrijver and George L. Siscoe; 2. Long-term evolution of magnetic activity of Sun

  18. Rapid Decimation for Direct Volume Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Jonathan; VanGelder, Allen; Verma, Vivek; Wilhelms, Jane

    1997-01-01

    An approach for eliminating unnecessary portions of a volume when producing a direct volume rendering is described. This reduction in volume size sacrifices some image quality in the interest of rendering speed. Since volume visualization is often used as an exploratory visualization technique, it is important to reduce rendering times, so the user can effectively explore the volume. The methods presented can speed up rendering by factors of 2 to 3 with minor image degradation. A family of decimation algorithms to reduce the number of primitives in the volume without altering the volume's grid in any way is introduced. This allows the decimation to be computed rapidly, making it easier to change decimation levels on the fly. Further, because very little extra space is required, this method is suitable for the very large volumes that are becoming common. The method is also grid-independent, so it is suitable for multiple overlapping curvilinear and unstructured, as well as regular, grids. The decimation process can proceed automatically, or can be guided by the user so that important regions of the volume are decimated less than unimportant regions. A formal error measure is described based on a three-dimensional analog of the Radon transform. Decimation methods are evaluated based on this metric and on direct comparison with reference images.

  19. High volume data storage architecture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A High Volume Data Storage Architecture Analysis was conducted. The results, presented in this report, will be applied to problems of high volume data requirements such as those anticipated for the Space Station Control Center. High volume data storage systems at several different sites were analyzed for archive capacity, storage hierarchy and migration philosophy, and retrieval capabilities. Proposed architectures were solicited from the sites selected for in-depth analysis. Model architectures for a hypothetical data archiving system, for a high speed file server, and for high volume data storage are attached.

  20. Chem-nuclear's midwest volume reduction facility

    SciTech Connect

    Loiselle, V.

    1987-01-01

    The 1985 amendments to the Low-Level Waste Policy Act mandated volume allocation limits for nuclear utilities over a 7-yr period ending December 31, 1992. Under the provisions of the act, nonsited regions of the US, such as the Midwest, have received more stringent volume limitations than the sited regions. Restrictions, however severe, are causing all nuclear utilities to carefully examine the source and volume generation of low-level wastes at their respective plants. Nuclear utilities dry active wastes (DAW), as compared to wet wastes, amount to 50 to 75% of wastes generated. The progress in reducing DAW can now be achieved with volume reduction by supercompaction. Chem-Nuclear established and licensed its Midwest Volume Reduction Facility (MWVRF) to provide an integrated volume reduction service. Although compaction of DAW is not new, supercompaction is. Through millions of pounds-force (as compared to tens of thousands pounds-force currently available from conventional equipment) much greater volume reduction can be achieved. The results of supercompaction is a product that approaches the theoretical density of its solid constituents - a logical and ultimate end point for compaction capability and volume reduction overall. The reduction service, equipment, and the facility interfacing with other services of transportation and disposal and the generator are discussed in detail. As a result of the integrated service, significant savings in waste management and volume allocation can be achieved.

  1. A Scaling Law of Vascular Volume

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yunlong; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Vascular volume is of fundamental significance to the function of the cardiovascular system. An accurate prediction of blood volume in patients is physiologically and clinically significant. This study proposes what we believe is a novel volume scaling relation of the form: Vc=KvDs2/3Lc, where Vc and Lc are cumulative vessel volume and length, respectively, in the tree, and Ds is the diameter of the vessel segment. The scaling relation is validated in vascular trees of various organs including the heart, lung, mesentery, muscle, and eye of different species. Based on the minimum energy hypothesis and volume scaling relation, four structure-function scaling relations are predicted, including the diameter-length, volume-length, flow-diameter, and volume-diameter relations, with exponent values of 3/7, 127, 2⅓, and 3, respectively. These four relations are validated in the various vascular trees, which further confirm the volume scaling relation. This scaling relation may serve as a control reference to estimate the blood volume in various organs and species. The deviation from the scaling relation may indicate hypovolemia or hypervolemia and aid diagnosis. PMID:19167288

  2. Volume holographic gratings: fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, G.; Ferrara, M. A.; Borbone, F.; Roviello, A.; Pagliarulo, V.; Grilli, S.; Ferraro, P.; Striano, V.; Coppola, G.

    2015-05-01

    Volume Holographic Gratings is designed and fabricated to obtain a simple, lightweight and cheap light deflector. The entire process, starting from the chemical preparation of the photosensitive material, to the recording of Volume Holographic Gratings and their appropriate characterization, is reported. The recording material was a new photopolymer sensitive to light at 532nm. Results showed that the recorded Volume Holographic Grating presents a very high value of the diffraction efficiency, up to 94%. In addition, a flexible material is used to write Volume Holographic Gratings.

  3. Tumor Volumes and Prognosis in Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Mohamad R.; Samuels, Stuart E.; Bellile, Emily; Shalabi, Firas L.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Wolf, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Tumor staging systems for laryngeal cancer (LC) have been developed to assist in estimating prognosis after treatment and comparing treatment results across institutions. While the laryngeal TNM system has been shown to have prognostic information, varying cure rates in the literature have suggested concern about the accuracy and effectiveness of the T-classification in particular. To test the hypothesis that tumor volumes are more useful than T classification, we conducted a retrospective review of 78 patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy at our institution. Using multivariable analysis, we demonstrate the significant prognostic value of anatomic volumes in patients with previously untreated laryngeal cancer. In this cohort, primary tumor volume (GTVP), composite nodal volumes (GTVN) and composite total volume (GTVP + GTVN = GTVC) had prognostic value in both univariate and multivariate cox model analysis. Interestingly, when anatomic volumes were measured from CT scans after a single cycle of induction chemotherapy, all significant prognosticating value for measured anatomic volumes was lost. Given the literature findings and the results of this study, the authors advocate the use of tumor anatomic volumes calculated from pretreatment scans to supplement the TNM staging system in subjects with untreated laryngeal cancer. The study found that tumor volume assessment after induction chemotherapy is not of prognostic significance. PMID:26569309

  4. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    The ``Petroleum Supply Annual`` (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the PSA. The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

  5. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 48 tabs.

  6. Surgeon volume and outcomes in benign hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Doll, Kemi M; Milad, Magdy P; Gossett, Dana R

    2013-01-01

    Annual surgeon case volume has been linked to patient outcome in a variety of surgical fields, although limited data focus on gynecologic surgery performed by general gynecologists. Herein we review the literature addressing the associations between intraoperative injury, postoperative morbidity, and resource use among surgeons performing a low vs high volume of hysterectomies. Although study design and populations differ, individual and composite morbidity outcomes consistently favored high-volume surgeons. Given the growing emphasis on competency-based evaluation in surgery, gynecology departments may soon consider volume requirements a component of privileging. PMID:23622760

  7. High Performance Schools Best Practices Manual. Volume I: Planning [and] Volume II: Design [and] Volume III: Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eley, Charles, Ed.

    This three-volume manual, focusing on California's K-12 public schools, presents guidelines for establishing schools that are healthy, comfortable, energy efficient, resource efficient, water efficient, secure, adaptable, and easy to operate and maintain. The first volume describes why high performance schools are important, what components are…

  8. Information architecture. Volume 4: Vision

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Vision document marks the transition from definition to implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture Program. A description of the possibilities for the future, supported by actual experience with a process model and tool set, points toward implementation options. The directions for future information technology investments are discussed. Practical examples of how technology answers the business and information needs of the organization through coordinated and meshed data, applications, and technology architectures are related. This document is the fourth and final volume in the planned series for defining and exhibiting the DOE information architecture. The targeted scope of this document includes DOE Program Offices, field sites, contractor-operated facilities, and laboratories. This document paints a picture of how, over the next 7 years, technology may be implemented, dramatically improving the ways business is conducted at DOE. While technology is mentioned throughout this document, the vision is not about technology. The vision concerns the transition afforded by technology and the process steps to be completed to ensure alignment with business needs. This goal can be met if those directing the changing business and mission-support processes understand the capabilities afforded by architectural processes.

  9. High volume medical web sites.

    PubMed

    Elliott, B; Elliott, G

    2000-01-01

    In 1998, 22 million individuals reported surfing the web for medical information, and this number will increase to over 30 million by 2000. Fifteen of the highest volume medical web sites are described in this paper. Sponsorship and/or ownership of the fifteen sites varied. The government sponsors one, and some are the products of well-known educational institutions. One site is supported by a consumer health organization, and the American Medical Association was in the top 15. However, the most common owners are commercial, for-profit businesses. Attributes of the ideal site were categorized, and include a robust privacy and disclosure statement with an emphasis on education and an appropriate role for advertising. The covering of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) should be in a balanced and unbiased manner. There has to be an emphasis on knowledge based evidence as opposed to testimonials, and sources should be timely and reviewed. Bibliographies of authors need to be available. Hyperlinking to other web resources is valuable, as even the largest of sites cannot come close to covering all of medicine. PMID:10687272

  10. Blood volume changes. [weightlessness effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.; Driscoll, T. B.; Leblance, A. D.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of radionuclide volume determinations made for the crewmembers of selected Gemini and Apollo missions showed that orbital spaceflight has an effect on red cell mass. Because the methods and the protocol developed for earlier flights were used for the crews of the three Skylab missions, direct comparisons are possible. After each Skylab mission, decreases were found in crewmembers' red cell masses. The mean red cell mass decrease of 11 percent or 232 milliliters was approximately equal to the 10 percent mean red cell mass decrease of the Apollo 14 to 17 crewmembers. The red cell mass drop was greatest and the postrecovery reticulocyte response least for crewmembers of the 28-day Skylab 2 mission. Analyses of data from the red cell mass determinations indicate that the red cell mass drops occurred in the first 30 days of flight and that a gradual recovery of the red cell mass deficits began approximately 60 days after launch. The beginning of red cell mass regeneration during the Skylab 4 flight may explain the higher postmission reticulocyte counts.

  11. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  12. Research Summary No. 36-3, Volume I, Part I. Volume I, Part One

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    The Research Summary is a bimonthly report of supporting research and development conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This periodical is issued in three volumes. Volume I contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Space Sciences, Systems, Guidance and Control, and Telecommunications Divisions of the Laboratory. Volume II contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Physical Sciences, Engineering Mechanics, Engineering Facilities, and Propulsion Divisions. All work of a classified nature is contained in Volume Ill.

  13. Research Summary No. 36-3, Volume I, Part II. Volume I, Part Two

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    The Research Summary is a bimonthly report of supporting research and development conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This periodical is issued in three volumes. Volume I contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Space Sciences, Systems, Guidance and Control, and Telecommunications Divisions of the Laboratory. Volume II contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Physical Sciences, Engineering Mechanics, Engineering Facilities, and Propulsion Divisions. All work of a classified nature is contained in Volume Ill.

  14. Comparing the Volumes of Rectangular Prisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assuah, Charles K.; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2010-01-01

    Can middle-grades students determine which of two rectangular prisms has a larger volume? Can they do so without using a formula? Geometry, and particularly the concept of volume, is important in many subjects, such as physics and chemistry. Students greatly enhance their mathematics knowledge when they make generalizations and construct arguments…

  15. Wave energy devices with compressible volumes

    PubMed Central

    Kurniawan, Adi; Greaves, Deborah; Chaplin, John

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of wave energy devices with air-filled compressible submerged volumes, where variability of volume is achieved by means of a horizontal surface free to move up and down relative to the body. An analysis of bodies without power take-off (PTO) systems is first presented to demonstrate the positive effects a compressible volume could have on the body response. Subsequently, two compressible device variations are analysed. In the first variation, the compressible volume is connected to a fixed volume via an air turbine for PTO. In the second variation, a water column separates the compressible volume from another volume, which is fitted with an air turbine open to the atmosphere. Both floating and bottom-fixed, axisymmetric, configurations are considered, and linear analysis is employed throughout. Advantages and disadvantages of each device are examined in detail. Some configurations with displaced volumes less than 2000 m3 and with constant turbine coefficients are shown to be capable of achieving 80% of the theoretical maximum absorbed power over a wave period range of about 4 s. PMID:25484609

  16. Developmental Physical Education Accountability; Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarnieri, Barbara; Sandeen, Cecile

    Presented in the first of a two volume series is a developmental physical education checklist which provides teachers of trainable mentally retarded students with a permanent and accountable record of pupil progress and needs. The checklist is intended to be used with the accompanying volume of curricular activities in a nongraded enviroment for…

  17. Reflections on America. Volumes 1 and 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Robert, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    A series of articles celebrating the Bicentennial of the Constitution is presented in two volumes. The first article in Volume 1 is an interview by Bernard Murchland with Barbara Jordan discussing the effectiveness of the original Constitution. The second article, "If I Were President," is an interview by Bernard Murchland with Studs Terkel on the…

  18. INTRODUCTION AND STATIC ELECTRICITY, VOLUME 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME, PART OF A TWO-VOLUME SET, PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE MATERIAL COVERS UNITS ON (1) STATIC ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRICAL CHARGES, (2) COULOMB'S LAW, (3) DISTRIBUTION OF CHARGE AND FLOW OF CURRENT, (4) DIFFERENCE OF POTENTIAL, (5) BATTERIES AND CIRCUITS, (6) RESISTANCE AND RESISTORS, (7) POTENTIAL DIVIDER AND WHEATSTONE…

  19. Instrumentation for Environmental Monitoring: Water, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley. Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

    This volume is one of a series discussing instrumentation for environmental monitoring. Each volume contains an overview of the basic problems, comparisons among the basic methods of sensing and detection, and notes that summarize the characteristics of presently available instruments and techniques. The text of this survey discusses the…

  20. Update on Gifted Education. Volume 1, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Gifted Education, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This document is the first volume of a projected quarterly publication designed to assure that the most current information, both on the latest research and on successful practices in the field of gifted education is made available to schools as quickly and efficiently as possible. The four issues of this volume contain the following articles:…

  1. Ways to Environmental Education, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Joel, Ed.; And Others

    This resource guide is the first of three volumes of environmental education ideas and activities compiled by participants at the Tallahassee Junior Museum for the benefit of other environmental educators. This volume contains ten booklets produced by various community groups to educate their membership or target groups about the environment. The…

  2. Extracting excited mesons from the finite volume

    SciTech Connect

    Doring, Michael

    2014-12-01

    As quark masses come closer to their physical values in lattice simulations, finite volume effects dominate the level spectrum. Methods to extract excited mesons from the finite volume are discussed, like moving frames in the presence of coupled channels. Effective field theory can be used to stabilize the determination of the resonance spectrum.

  3. Agriculture Supplies & Services. Volume 2 of 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Univ., Manhattan.

    The second of three volumes included in a secondary agricultural supplies and services curriculum guide, this volume contains units of instruction in three major areas: (1) Animal Science, (2) Supervised Training Programs--Farm Business Management, and (3) Career Selection/Public Relations. Typical of the sixteen units included in the first…

  4. Discovering a Geometric Volume Relationship in Calculus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morriss, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the discovery of an advanced calculus class based on the generalization of the relationship between the volume of a right circular cone and the volume of a right cylinder with same height and base radius while studying solids of revolution. Relates the course of discovery and concludes with plans to use it to try to generate the same…

  5. Gender and Education. An Encyclopedia. Volume II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank, Barbara J., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This book represents the second of two volumes in a two-volume set where educators explore the intersection of gender and education. Their entries deal with educational theories, research, curricula, practices, personnel, and policies, but also with variations in the gendering of education across historical and cultural contexts. The various…

  6. EVALUATION OF GROUNDWATER EXTRACTION REMEDIES - VOLUME III

    EPA Science Inventory

    This volume is the third of a three-volume report documenting the results of an evaluation of ground-water extraction remedies at hazardous waste sites. It consists of a collection of 112 data base reports presenting general information on sites where ground-water extraction sys...

  7. Agriculture Supplies & Services. Volume 3 of 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Univ., Manhattan.

    The third of three volumes included in a secondary agricultural supplies and services curriculum guide, this volume contains twenty-five units of instruction in the area of agricultural mechanics. Among the unit topics included are (1) Farm Safety, (2) Ignition Systems; (3) Servicing Wheel Bearings, (4) Oxyacetylene Cutting, (5) Servicing the…

  8. Areas and Volumes in Pre-Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Joscelyn A.

    2008-01-01

    This article suggests the introduction of the concepts of areas bounded by plane curves and the volumes of solids of revolution in Pre-calculus. It builds on the basic knowledge that students bring to a pre-calculus class, derives a few more formulas, and gives examples of some problems on plane areas and the volumes of solids of revolution that…

  9. Chesapeake Bay Hypoxic Volume Forecasts and Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, Mary Anne; Scavia, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Given the average Jan-May 2013 total nitrogen load of 162,028 kg/day, this summer's hypoxia volume forecast is 6.1 km3, slightly smaller than average size for the period of record and almost the same as 2012. The late July 2013 measured volume was 6.92 km3.

  10. VOLUME COMPENSATING MEANS FOR PULSATING PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, D.L.W.; MacCormack, R.S. Jr.

    1959-12-01

    A double diaphragm, two-liquid pulsating pump for remote control use, having as an improvement an apparatus for maintaining constant the volume of the liquid such as kerosene between the two diaphragms is described. Phase difficulties encountered in the operation of such pumps when the volume of the liquid is altered by changes in temperature are avoided.

  11. Chesapeake Bay hypoxic volume forecasts and results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 Forecast - Given the average Jan-May 2013 total nitrogen load of 162,028 kg/day, this summer’s hypoxia volume forecast is 6.1 km3, slightly smaller than average size for the period of record and almost the same as 2012. The late July 2013 measured volume was 6.92 km3.

  12. Control of cell volume in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Usher-Smith, Juliet A; Huang, Christopher L-H; Fraser, James A

    2009-02-01

    Regulation of cell volume is a fundamental property of all animal cells and is of particular importance in skeletal muscle where exercise is associated with a wide range of cellular changes that would be expected to influence cell volume. These complex electrical, metabolic and osmotic changes, however, make rigorous study of the consequences of individual factors on muscle volume difficult despite their likely importance during exercise. Recent charge-difference modelling of cell volume distinguishes three major aspects to processes underlying cell volume control: (i) determination by intracellular impermeant solute; (ii) maintenance by metabolically dependent processes directly balancing passive solute and water fluxes that would otherwise cause cell swelling under the influence of intracellular membrane-impermeant solutes; and (iii) volume regulation often involving reversible short-term transmembrane solute transport processes correcting cell volumes towards their normal baselines in response to imposed discrete perturbations. This review covers, in turn, the main predictions from such quantitative analysis and the experimental consequences of comparable alterations in extracellular pH, lactate concentration, membrane potential and extracellular tonicity. The effects of such alterations in the extracellular environment in resting amphibian muscles are then used to reproduce the intracellular changes that occur in each case in exercising muscle. The relative contributions of these various factors to the control of cell volume in resting and exercising skeletal muscle are thus described. PMID:19133959

  13. Iodine retention during evaporative volume reduction

    DOEpatents

    Godbee, H.W.; Cathers, G.I.; Blanco, R.E.

    1975-11-18

    An improved method for retaining radioactive iodine in aqueous waste solutions during volume reduction is disclosed. The method applies to evaporative volume reduction processes whereby the decontaminated (evaporated) water can be returned safely to the environment. The method generally comprises isotopically diluting the waste solution with a nonradioactive iodide and maintaining the solution at a high pH during evaporation.

  14. Computer Literature Bibliography; Volume 2, 1964 - 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youden, W.W.

    In this second volume of a two-volume bibliography of computer literature approximately 5,200 references from 1964 to 1967 are listed. The full title and the names of all the authors of articles published in 17 journals, 20 books, and 43 conference proceedings are given. In addition, references to all items that were reviewed in the Institute of…

  15. [Volume replacement in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Nohé, B; Ploppa, A; Schmidt, V; Unertl, K

    2011-05-01

    Volume substitution represents an essential component of intensive care medicine. The amount of fluid administered, the composition and the timing of volume replacement seem to affect the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. Although restrictive volume strategies bear the risk of tissue hypoperfusion and tissue hypoxia in hemodynamically unstable patients liberal strategies favour the development of avoidable hypervolemia with edema and resultant organ dysfunction. However, neither strategy has shown a consistent benefit. In order to account for the heavily varying oxygen demand of critically ill patients, a goal-directed, demand-adapted volume strategy is proposed. Using this strategy, volume replacement should be aligned to the need to restore tissue perfusion and the evidence of volume responsiveness. As the efficiency of volume resuscitation for correction of tissue hypoxia is time-dependent, preload optimization should be completed in the very first hours. Whether colloids or crystalloids are more suitable for this purpose is still controversially discussed. Nevertheless, a temporally limited use of colloids during the initial stage of tissue hypoperfusion appears to represent a strategy which uses the greater volume effect during hypovolemia while minimizing the risks for adverse reactions. PMID:21350879

  16. A COURSE IN URDU, VOLUME TWO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARKER, MUHAMMAD ABD AL RAHMAN; AND OTHERS

    VOLUME TWO, UNITS 16 THROUGH 25, CONTINUE THIS INTRODUCTORY COURSE IN URDU. THE GENERAL FORMAT IN THE FIRST FIVE UNITS IS CONSISTENT WITH VOLUME ONE (IN WHICH THE SOUNDS, BASIC STRUCTURES, AND WRITING SYSTEM WERE INTRODUCED). THE LAST FIVE UNITS BEGIN WITH AN ESSAY WRITTEN IN URDU SCRIPT FOLLOWED BY A VOCABULARY SECTION, WHICH TOGETHER REPLACE THE…

  17. Agriculture Supplies & Services. Volume 1 of 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Univ., Manhattan.

    The first of three volumes included in a secondary agricultural supplies and services curriculum guide, this volume contains units of instruction in two major areas: (1) plant and soil science and (2) leadership (Future Farmers of America). Typical of the nineteen units included in the first section are the following: Plant Insect Control, Plant…

  18. Stories That Must Not Die. Volume One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauvageau, Juan

    Ranch hands gathered around a campfire and old folks rocking on the porch were some of the sources for the 10 folkloric tales presented in this volume. Written in both Spanish and English, this book of traditional tales from the Mexican American people of South Texas is the first of a series of three volumes. Five of the stories deal with the…

  19. News Research for Better Newspapers. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Chilton R., Ed.

    This volume is a compilation of the summaries of news-editorial research reported in the American Newspaper Publishers Association News Research Bulletins during 1967. Of the 44 studies reported in this volume, twenty were done by universities, ten by individuals, nine by research agencies, and five by other organizations. The studies are arranged…

  20. Sandia software guidelines, Volume 4: Configuration management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. This volume is based on the IEEE standard and guide for software configuration management. The basic concepts and detailed guidance on implementation of these concepts are discussed for several software project types. Example planning documents for both projects and organizations are included.

  1. New Trends in Mathematics Teaching, Volume IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, H. G., Ed.; Christiansen, Bent, Ed.

    This volume is largely based upon the preparation for and proceedings of the Third International Congress on Mathematical Education (ICME) held in Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany, in August 1976. The volume deals with 13 broad themes of general educational interest for mathematics teachers and educators. Six of these themes divided the…

  2. 50th JANNAF Propulsion Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, Debra S. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This volume, the first of two volumes, is a collection of 29 unclassified/unlimited-distribution papers which were presented at the 50th Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Propulsion Meeting, held 11-13 July 2001 at the Salt Lake City Marriott Hotel in Salt Lake City, Utah.

  3. Matter, Motion, and Man, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montag, Betty Jo

    Volume Three of the three-volume experimental program in general science attempts to provide preparation for the new approaches in biology, chemistry, and physics and to give those who will not continue in science a realistic way of understanding themselves, the world, and the role of science in society. Chapters on embryology, the body systems,…

  4. Liposome technology. Volume I: Preparation of liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoriadis, G.

    1984-01-01

    These three volumes cover liposome technology in pharmacology and medicine. Contributors emphasize methodology used in their own laboratories, and include a brief introduction, coverage of relevant literature, applications and critical evaluations for the methods they describe. Volume I examine methods for the preparation of liposomes and auxiliary techniques.

  5. SURFACE VOLUME ESTIMATES FOR INFILTRATION PARAMETER ESTIMATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volume balance calculations used in surface irrigation engineering analysis require estimates of surface storage. These calculations are often performed by estimating upstream depth with a normal depth formula. That assumption can result in significant volume estimation errors when upstream flow d...

  6. Matter, Motion, and Man, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montag, Betty Jo

    Volume Two of the three-volume experimental program in general science attempts to provide preparation for the new approaches in biology, chemistry, and physics and to give those who will not continue in science a realistic way of understanding themselves, the world, and the role of science in society. Chapters on classification, heredity, light,…

  7. BEGINNING POLISH, VOLUME ONE. YALE LINGUISTIC SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCHENKER, ALEXANDER M.

    BASED ON A MODERN LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS OF THE POLISH LANGUAGE, THIS TWO-VOLUME TEXT IS APPROPRIATE FOR A ONE-YEAR INTENSIVE COURSE. VOLUME I INCLUDES 25 LESSONS, EACH DIVIDED INTO--SENTENCES (DIALOGS), GRAMMAR, EXERCISES, AND VOCABULARY LISTS. THE INTRODUCTION PRESENTS A BRIEF CONTRASTIVE ANALYSIS OF POLISH AND RUSSIAN, AND THERE IS INCLUDED A…

  8. Distributed shared memory for roaming large volumes.

    PubMed

    Castanié, Laurent; Mion, Christophe; Cavin, Xavier; Lévy, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    We present a cluster-based volume rendering system for roaming very large volumes. This system allows to move a gigabyte-sized probe inside a total volume of several tens or hundreds of gigabytes in real-time. While the size of the probe is limited by the total amount of texture memory on the cluster, the size of the total data set has no theoretical limit. The cluster is used as a distributed graphics processing unit that both aggregates graphics power and graphics memory. A hardware-accelerated volume renderer runs in parallel on the cluster nodes and the final image compositing is implemented using a pipelined sort-last rendering algorithm. Meanwhile, volume bricking and volume paging allow efficient data caching. On each rendering node, a distributed hierarchical cache system implements a global software-based distributed shared memory on the cluster. In case of a cache miss, this system first checks page residency on the other cluster nodes instead of directly accessing local disks. Using two Gigabit Ethernet network interfaces per node, we accelerate data fetching by a factor of 4 compared to directly accessing local disks. The system also implements asynchronous disk access and texture loading, which makes it possible to overlap data loading, volume slicing and rendering for optimal volume roaming. PMID:17080865

  9. Molar volumes and densities of minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, Richard A.; Bethke, Philip M.

    1962-01-01

    These tables present critically chosen "best values" for the density and molar volume of selected mineral compounds. No attempt was made to be all-inclusive; rather we have tried to present data for chemically and physically well-defined phases for which the molar volume and/or density was knovvn to the order of 0. 2 percent.

  10. Site Environmental Report for 2003, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Pauer, Ron

    2004-06-22

    Volume II of the ''Site Environmental Report for 2003'' is provided by Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a supplemental appendix to Volume I, which contains the body of the report. Volume II contains the environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate summary results of routine and nonroutine activities at the Laboratory (except for groundwater sampling data, which may be found in the reports referred to in Chapter 6). Volume I summarizes the results from analyses of the data. For completeness, results from sample collections beginning or ending in calendar year (CY) 2003 are included in this volume but samples representing CY 2002 data are not used in summary results reported in Volume I. (For example, although Ambient Air samples collected on January 6, 2003, are presented in Volume II, they represent December 2002 data and are not included in Tables 4-6 and 4-7 in Volume I.) When appropriate, sampling results are reported in both conventional and International System of Units (SI). For some results, the rounding procedure used in data reporting may result in apparent differences between the numbers reported in SI and conventional units. For example, stack air results reported as < 1.1 Bq/m{sup 3} are shown variously as < 29, < 30 and < 31 pCi/m{sup 3}. Each of these results is rounded correctly to two significant digits.

  11. Intracranial volume in craniosynostotic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mooney, M P; Burrows, A M; Wigginton, W; Singhal, V K; Losken, H W; Smith, T D; Dechant, J; Towbin, A; Cooper, G M; Towbin, R; Siegel, M I

    1998-05-01

    Although craniosynostosis alters brain growth direction resulting in compensatory changes in the neurocranium, it has been suggested that such compensations occur with little reduction in intracranial volume (ICV). This hypothesis was tested in a rabbit model with nonsyndromic, familial coronal suture synostosis. Cross-sectional three-dimensional computed tomographic head scans were obtained from 79 rabbits (25 normal, 28 with delayed-onset synostosis, and 26 with early-onset synostosis) at 25, 42, and 126 days of age. Intracranial contents were reconstructed and indirect ICV was calculated. Results revealed that by 25 days of age the intracranial contents from early-onset synostosed rabbit skulls showed rostral (anterior) constrictions and a "beaten copper" morphology in the parietal and temporal regions compared with the other two groups. These deformities increased in severity with age. Quantitatively, ICV was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) by 7% in rabbits with early-onset synostosis compared with both control rabbits and rabbits with delayed-onset synostosis at 25 days of age. By 126 days of age, ICV in rabbits with synostosis was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by 11% in early-onset synostosis and by 8% in delayed-onset synostosis compared with normal rabbits. Results suggest that in rabbits with uncorrected craniosynostosis, compensatory changes in the neurocranium were not adequate to allow normal expansion of the neurocapsular matrix. Further research is needed to determine if ICV reduction is correlated with cerebral atrophy or cerebral spinal fluid (i.e., ventricular or subarachnoid) space compression in this model. PMID:9693554

  12. Lake volume monitoring from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crétaux, Jean-Francois; Abarca Del Rio, Rodrigo; Berge-Nguyen, Muriel; Arsen, Adalbert; Drolon, Vanessa; Maisongrande, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Lakes are integrator of environmental changes occurring at regional to global scale and present a high variety of behaviors on a variety of time scales (cyclic and secular) depending on the climate conditions and their morphology. In addition their crucial importance as water stocks and retaining, given the significant environment changes occurring worldwide at many anthropocentric levels, has increased the necessity of monitoring all its morphodynamics characteristics, say water level, surface (water contour) and volume. The satellite altimetry and satellite imagery together are now widely used for the calculation of lakes and reservoirs water storage changes worldwide. However strategies and algorithms to calculate these characteristics are not straightforward and need development of specific approaches. We intend to present a review of some of these methodologies by using the lakes over the Tibetan Plateau to illustrate some critical aspects and issues (technical and scientific) linked with the survey of climate changes impacts on surface waters from remote sensing data. Many authors have measured water variations using the short period of remote sensing measurements available, although time series are probably too short to lead to definitive conclusions to link these results directly with the framework of climate changes. Indeed, many processes beyond the observations are still uncertain, for example the influence of morphology of the lakes. The time response for a lake to reach new state of equilibrium is one of the key aspects often neglected in the current literature. Observations over long period of time, therein maintaining a constellation of comprehensive and complementary satellite missions with a continuity of services over decades, especially when ground gauges network is too limited is therefore a necessity. In addition, the design of future satellite missions with new instrumental concepts (e.g. SAR, SARin, Ka band altimetry, Ka interferometry) is

  13. Lake Volume Monitoring from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crétaux, J.-F.; Abarca-del-Río, R.; Bergé-Nguyen, M.; Arsen, A.; Drolon, V.; Clos, G.; Maisongrande, P.

    2016-03-01

    Lakes are integrators of environmental change occurring at both the regional and global scale. They present a wide range of behavior on a variety of timescales (cyclic and secular) depending on their morphology and climate conditions. Lakes play a crucial role in retaining and stocking water, and because of the significant global environmental changes occurring at several anthropocentric levels, the necessity to monitor all morphodynamic characteristics [e.g., water level, surface (water contour) and volume] has increased substantially. Satellite altimetry and imagery are now widely used together to calculate lake and reservoir water storage changes worldwide. However, strategies and algorithms to calculate these characteristics are not straightforward, and specific approaches need to be developed. We present a review of some of these methodologies by using lakes over the Tibetan Plateau to illustrate some critical aspects and issues (technical and scientific) linked to the observation of climate change impact on surface waters from remote sensing data. Many authors have measured water variation using the limited remote sensing measurements available over short time periods, even though the time series are probably too short to directly link these results with climate change. Indeed, there are many processes and factors, like the influence of lake morphology, that are beyond observation and are still uncertain. The time response for lakes to reach a new state of equilibrium is a key aspect that is often neglected in current literature. Observations over a long period of time, including maintaining a constellation of comprehensive and complementary satellite missions with service continuity over decades, are therefore necessary especially when the ground gauge network is too limited. In addition, the design of future satellite missions with new instrumental concepts (e.g., SAR, SARin, Ka band altimetry, Ka interferometry) will also be suitable for complete

  14. Development of a prototype fluid volume measurement system. [for urine volume measurement on space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppendiek, H. F.; Sabin, C. M.; Meckel, P. T.

    1974-01-01

    The research is reported in applying the axial fluid temperature differential flowmeter to a urine volume measurement system for space missions. The fluid volume measurement system is described along with the prototype equipment package. Flowmeter calibration, electronic signal processing, and typical void volume measurements are also described.

  15. Molecular representation of molar domain (volume), evolution equations, and linear constitutive relations for volume transport.

    PubMed

    Eu, Byung Chan

    2008-09-01

    In the traditional theories of irreversible thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, the specific volume and molar volume have been interchangeably used for pure fluids, but in this work we show that they should be distinguished from each other and given distinctive statistical mechanical representations. In this paper, we present a general formula for the statistical mechanical representation of molecular domain (volume or space) by using the Voronoi volume and its mean value that may be regarded as molar domain (volume) and also the statistical mechanical representation of volume flux. By using their statistical mechanical formulas, the evolution equations of volume transport are derived from the generalized Boltzmann equation of fluids. Approximate solutions of the evolution equations of volume transport provides kinetic theory formulas for the molecular domain, the constitutive equations for molar domain (volume) and volume flux, and the dissipation of energy associated with volume transport. Together with the constitutive equation for the mean velocity of the fluid obtained in a previous paper, the evolution equations for volume transport not only shed a fresh light on, and insight into, irreversible phenomena in fluids but also can be applied to study fluid flow problems in a manner hitherto unavailable in fluid dynamics and irreversible thermodynamics. Their roles in the generalized hydrodynamics will be considered in the sequel. PMID:19044872

  16. Mobile Volume Rendering: Past, Present and Future.

    PubMed

    Noguera, José M; Jiménez, J Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Volume rendering has been a relevant topic in scientific visualization for the last decades. However, the exploration of reasonably big volume datasets requires considerable computing power, which has limited this field to the desktop scenario. But the recent advances in mobile graphics hardware have motivated the research community to overcome these restrictions and to bring volume graphics to these ubiquitous handheld platforms. This survey presents the past and present work on mobile volume rendering, and is meant to serve as an overview and introduction to the field. It proposes a classification of the current efforts and covers aspects such as advantages and issues of the mobile platforms, rendering strategies, performance and user interfaces. The paper ends by highlighting promising research directions to motivate the development of new and interesting mobile volume solutions. PMID:26731459

  17. Photogrammetric Technique for Timber Stack Volume Contol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyaz, V. A.; Maksimov, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    The problem of accurate log volume measurement is a very important, especially in case of seaport volume control where logs are put in a huge stack of hundred meters length and a time for volume control is strongly restricted. Current technology of volume control use manual means such as measuring tape, so the process of measurement is rather inaccurate and time consuming. To estimate the volume of timber stack its frontal area is measured and some control parts of a stack are used for stacking coefficient (wood density in a stack) determination. Non-contact vision based technique is proposed for manual measurements substituting. The developed methods are implemented in portable photogrammetric system for stack parameters measuring and documenting.

  18. Development of limb volume measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhagat, P. K.; Kadaba, P. K.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the reductions in orthostatic tolerance associated with weightlessness are not well established. Contradictory results from measurements of leg volume changes suggest that altered venomotor tone and reduced blood flow may not be the only contributors to orthostatic intolerance. It is felt that a more accurate limb volume system which is insensitive to environmental factors will aid in better quantification of the hemodynamics of the leg. Of the varous limb volume techniques presently available, the ultrasonic limb volume system has proven to be the best choice. The system as described herein is free from environmental effects, safe, simple to operate and causes negligible radio frequency interference problems. The segmental ultrasonic ultrasonic plethysmograph is expected to provide a better measurement of limb volume change since it is based on cross-sectional area measurements.

  19. Volume of Distribution in Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dennis A; Beaumont, Kevin; Maurer, Tristan S; Di, Li

    2015-08-13

    Volume of distribution is one of the most important pharmacokinetic properties of a drug candidate. It is a major determinant of half-life and dosing frequency of a drug. For a similar log P, a basic molecule will tend to exhibit higher volume of distribution than a neutral molecule. Acids often exhibit low volumes of distribution. Although a design strategy against volume of distribution can be advantageous in achieving desirable dosing regimen, it must be well-directed in order to avoid detrimental effects to other important properties. Strategies to increase volume of distribution include adding lipophilicity and introducing basic functional groups in a way that does not increase metabolic clearance. PMID:25799158

  20. Stroke volume optimization: the new hemodynamic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alexander; Ahrens, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Critical care practices have evolved to rely more on physical assessments for monitoring cardiac output and evaluating fluid volume status because these assessments are less invasive and more convenient to use than is a pulmonary artery catheter. Despite this trend, level of consciousness, central venous pressure, urine output, heart rate, and blood pressure remain assessments that are slow to be changed, potentially misleading, and often manifested as late indications of decreased cardiac output. The hemodynamic optimization strategy called stroke volume optimization might provide a proactive guide for clinicians to optimize a patient's status before late indications of a worsening condition occur. The evidence supporting use of the stroke volume optimization algorithm to treat hypovolemia is increasing. Many of the cardiac output monitor technologies today measure stroke volume, as well as the parameters that comprise stroke volume: preload, afterload, and contractility. PMID:25639574

  1. Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Rieman, C.R.; Spector, H.L.; Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L.

    2007-07-01

    Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the pre-remedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in pre-design data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in pre-design characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland 1, Ashland 2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate pre-design contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District. (authors)

  2. Small bowel wall thickening: MDCT evaluation in the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Akcalar, Seray; Turkbey, Baris; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay; Akpinar, Erhan; Akhan, Okan

    2011-10-01

    Small bowel wall thickening detected on computed tomography is a frequent finding in patients referring to emergency room with acute abdominal pain. In this pictorial review, we aim to discuss patterns of small bowel wall thickening and to explain hints for differential diagnosis with imaging findings. PMID:21681404

  3. Finite volume hydromechanical simulation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-05-01

    Cell-centered finite volume methods are prevailing in numerical simulation of flow in porous media. However, due to the lack of cell-centered finite volume methods for mechanics, coupled flow and deformation is usually treated either by coupled finite-volume-finite element discretizations, or within a finite element setting. The former approach is unfavorable as it introduces two separate grid structures, while the latter approach loses the advantages of finite volume methods for the flow equation. Recently, we proposed a cell-centered finite volume method for elasticity. Herein, we explore the applicability of this novel method to provide a compatible finite volume discretization for coupled hydromechanic flows in porous media. We detail in particular the issue of coupling terms, and show how this is naturally handled. Furthermore, we observe how the cell-centered finite volume framework naturally allows for modeling fractured and fracturing porous media through internal boundary conditions. We support the discussion with a set of numerical examples: the convergence properties of the coupled scheme are first investigated; second, we illustrate the practical applicability of the method both for fractured and heterogeneous media.

  4. Regulation of mammalian brain cell volume.

    PubMed

    Law, R O

    1994-02-01

    Maintenance of brain cell volume is of crucial importance for normal central nervous system (CNS) function. This review considers volume regulation primarily in response to disturbances of body fluid osmolality. Brain cells counter the tendency to swell or shrink by appropriate adjustment of their internal osmotic potential. This is achieved by loss or uptake of inorganic ions and low molecular weight organic solutes (osmolytes). The latter comprise mainly amino acids, myoinositol, choline, and methylamines. Taurine may be of particular importance in volume control, especially in young animals. Brain cell volume regulation, however, is only one contributory factor to maintenance of constant brain volume (water content), and operates in parallel with important alterations in bulk fluid and electrolyte movement across the blood-brain barrier and between the interstitium and cerebrospinal fluid, which themselves moderate the requirement for transient alteration in cell volume during acute osmotic imbalance. Although altered cerebral content of inorganic ions and osmolytes are usually regarded as responses, respectively, to acute and chronic osmotic disturbances, osmolytes (especially taurine) may also participate in short-term cell volume regulation. PMID:8301256

  5. Prediction of calf volume during muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Faghri, Pouran D; Du, Qing Yuan

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between calf volume changes and different intensities of maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs) of a lower limb performing plantar flexions. An electronic plethysmography instrument (EPI) was developed, and after testing for its reliability, it was used to measure calf volume changes. For EPI, the reliability correlation coefficients (r) to measure calf volume consistently were .98, .91, and .98 at 100% MVC, 80% MVC, and 60% MVC, respectively. There were also significant correlations between calf volume changes and the different intensities of MVC (MVC: r = .42, p < .011; 80% MVC: r = .41, p < .013; 60% MVC: r = .5, p < .002). The calf volume changes at different levels of muscle contractions also correlate significantly (upper calf: r = .55, p < .0002; middle calf: r = .58, p < .0007; and lower calf: r = .55, p < .002). The results indicated that EPI might be used as a reliable tool to predict the intensity of muscle contraction based on calf volume changes. Clinicians who use functional electrical stimulation to induce muscle contraction in people with muscle paralysis may use EPI to predict the volume changes during functional electrical stimulation-induced contractions and to deliver the proper amount of electrical stimulation, producing the desired level of contraction without undue stimulation or fatigue. PMID:16796241

  6. Finite volume hydromechanical simulation in porous media

    PubMed Central

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-01-01

    Cell-centered finite volume methods are prevailing in numerical simulation of flow in porous media. However, due to the lack of cell-centered finite volume methods for mechanics, coupled flow and deformation is usually treated either by coupled finite-volume-finite element discretizations, or within a finite element setting. The former approach is unfavorable as it introduces two separate grid structures, while the latter approach loses the advantages of finite volume methods for the flow equation. Recently, we proposed a cell-centered finite volume method for elasticity. Herein, we explore the applicability of this novel method to provide a compatible finite volume discretization for coupled hydromechanic flows in porous media. We detail in particular the issue of coupling terms, and show how this is naturally handled. Furthermore, we observe how the cell-centered finite volume framework naturally allows for modeling fractured and fracturing porous media through internal boundary conditions. We support the discussion with a set of numerical examples: the convergence properties of the coupled scheme are first investigated; second, we illustrate the practical applicability of the method both for fractured and heterogeneous media. PMID:25574061

  7. Fundamental Kinetics Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements (Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, and Volume 6)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K

    The data from shock tube experiments generally takes three forms: ignition delay times, species concentration time-histories and reaction rate measurements. Volume 1 focuses on ignition delay time data measured and published by the Shock Tube Group in the Mechanical Engineering Department of Stanford University. The cut-off date for inclusion into this volume was January 2005. Volume 2 focuses on species concentration time-histories and was cut off December 2005. The two volumes are in PDF format and are accompanied by a zipped file of supporting data. Volume 3 was issued in 2009. Volume 4, Ignition delay times measurements came out in May, 2014, along with Reaction Rates Measurements, Vol 6. Volume 5 is not available at this time.

  8. Sonographic pleural fluid volume estimation in cats.

    PubMed

    Shimali, Jerry; Cripps, Peter J; Newitt, Anna L M

    2010-02-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether a recently published study used to objectively monitor pleural fluid volumes in dogs could be successfully employed in cats and secondly to assess its accuracy. Eleven feline cadavers were selected. Using the trans-sternal view employed in dogs, linear measurements from the pleural surface of the midline of the sternebra at the centre of the heart to the furthest ventro-lateral point of both right and left lung edges were recorded. Isotonic saline was injected using ultrasound guidance into both right and left pleural spaces and the measurements were repeated using standard increments until 400 ml total volume was reached. The mean measurement increased in a linear relationship with the cube root of fluid volume for all cats individually. An equation was produced to predict the volume of fluid from the mean linear measurement for all cats combined: Volume=[-3.75+2.41(mean)](3)(P<0.001) but variability in the slope of the curve for individual cats limited the accuracy of the combined equation. Equations were derived to predict the constant and slope of the curve for individual cats using the thoracic measurements made, but the residual diagnostic graphs demonstrated considerable variability. As in dogs, good correlation was found between the ultrasonographic measurement and fluid volume within individual cats. An accurate equation to predict absolute pleural fluid volume was not identified. Further analysis with reference to thoracic measurements did not increase accuracy. In conclusion, this study does provide a method of estimating absolute pleural fluid volume in cats, which may be clinical useful for pleural fluid volume monitoring but this is yet to be validated in live cats. PMID:19744872

  9. Computer-assisted venous thrombosis volume quantification.

    PubMed

    Puentes, John; Dhibi, Mounir; Bressollette, Luc; Guias, Bruno; Solaiman, Basel

    2009-03-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT) volume assessment, by verifying its risk of progression when anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapies are prescribed, is often necessary to screen life-threatening complications. Commonly, VT volume estimation is done by manual delineation of few contours in the ultrasound (US) image sequence, assuming that the VT has a regular shape and constant radius, thus producing significant errors. This paper presents and evaluates a comprehensive functional approach based on the combination of robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contours to calculate VT volume in a more accurate manner when applied to freehand 2-D US image sequences. Robust anisotropic filtering reduces image speckle noise without generating incoherent edge discontinuities. Prior knowledge of the VT shape allows initializing the deformable contour, which is then guided by the noise-filtering outcome. Segmented contours are subsequently used to calculate VT volume. The proposed approach is integrated into a system prototype compatible with existing clinical US machines that additionally tracks the acquired images 3-D position and provides a dense Delaunay triangulation required for volume calculation. A predefined robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contour parameter set enhances the system usability. Experimental results pertinence is assessed by comparison with manual and tetrahedron-based volume computations, using images acquired by two medical experts of eight plastic phantoms and eight in vitro VTs, whose independently measured volume is the reference ground truth. Results show a mean difference between 16 and 35 mm(3) for volumes that vary from 655 to 2826 mm(3). Two in vivo VT volumes are also calculated to illustrate how this approach could be applied in clinical conditions when the real value is unknown. Comparative results for the two experts differ from 1.2% to 10.08% of the smallest estimated value when the image acquisition cadences are similar. PMID

  10. Measuring Intracranial Pressure And Volume Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic technique eliminates need to drill into brain cavity. Intracranial dynamics instrument probes cranium ultrasonically to obtain data for determination of intracranial pressure (ICP) and pressure-volume index (PVI). Instrument determines sensitivity of skull to changes in pressure and by use of mechanical device to exert external calibrated pressure on skull. By monitoring volume of blood flowing into jugular vein, one determines change of volume of blood in cranial system. By measuring response of skull to increasing pressure (where pressure increased by tilting patient known amount) and by using cranial blood pressure, one determines intial pressure in cerebrospinal fluid. Once PVI determined, ICP determined.

  11. JANNAF Combustion Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This volume, the first of four volumes, is a collection of 33 unclassified/unlimited papers which were presented at the 33rd Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Combustion Subcommittee Meeting in conjunction with the Propulsion Systems Hazards at the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. The JANNAF papers contained in this volume review airbreathing combustion measurement, performance and control; electrothermal-chemical gun experiment and modeling; liquid propellant gun experiment and modeling; solid propellant gun interior ballistics; formulation modeling and diagnostics, ignition, and gun barrel wear modeling, blast and flash; and ram, fastcore and gas generator gun propulsion concepts.

  12. Free Volume in Membranes: Viscosity or Tension?

    PubMed Central

    Markin, V. S.; Sachs, F.

    2016-01-01

    Many papers have used fluorescent probe diffusion to infer membrane viscosity but the measurement is actually an assay of the free volume of the membrane. The free volume is also related to the membrane tension. Thus, changes in probe mobility refer equally well to changes in membrane tension. In complicated structures like cell membranes, it appears more intuitive to consider variations in free volume as referring to the effect of domains structures and interactions with the cytoskeleton than changes in viscosity since tension is a state variable and viscosity is not.

  13. Site Environmental Report for 1998 Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggieri, Michael

    1999-09-30

    Volume II of the Site Environment Report for 1998 is provided by Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a supplemental appendix to the report printed in volume I. Volume II contains the environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate summary results in the main report for routine and non routine activities at the Laboratory (except for groundwater sampling data, which may be found in the reports referred to in chapter 6). Data presented in the tables are given in International System of Units (SI) units of measure.

  14. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, Bram; Koren, Barry; de Blank, Hugo J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  15. Weapon container catalog. Volumes 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.A.; Higuera, M.C.

    1998-02-01

    The Weapon Container Catalog describes H-gear (shipping and storage containers, bomb hand trucks and the ancillary equipment required for loading) used for weapon programs and for special use containers. When completed, the catalog will contain five volumes. Volume 1 for enduring stockpile programs (B53, B61, B83, W62, W76, W78, W80, W84, W87, and W88) and Volume 2, Special Use Containers, are being released. The catalog is intended as a source of information for weapon program engineers and also provides historical information. The catalog also will be published on the SNL Internal Web and will undergo periodic updates.

  16. Sandia Software Guidelines, Volume 2. Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standards for software documentation, this volume provides guidance in the selection of an adequate document set for a software project and example formats for many types of software documentation. A tutorial on life cycle documentation is also provided. Extended document thematic outlines and working examples of software documents are available on electronic media as an extension of this volume.

  17. Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report. Volume Four

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehmann, H. W.; Barry, J. L.; Deal, D. W.; Hallock, J. N.; Hess, K. W.

    2003-01-01

    This is Volume Four of a set of six reports produced by NASA and other organizations which were provided to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) in support of its inquiry into the February 1, 2003 destruction of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The Technical Documents included in this volume are: Appendix F.1 Water Absorption by Foam; Appendix F.2 Follow the TPS; Appendix F.3 MADS Sensor Data; Appendix F.4 ET Cryoinsulation; Appendix F.5 Space Shuttle STS-107 Columbia Accident Investigation, and External Tank Working Group Final Report - Volume 1.

  18. SU-E-I-28: Introduction and Investigation of Effective Diameter Ratios as a New Patient Size Metric for Use in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoureux, R; Sinclair, L; Mench, A; Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Bidari, S; Cormack, B; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce and investigate effective diameter ratios as a new patient metric for use in computed tomography protocol selection as a supplement to patient-specific size parameter data. Methods: The metrics of outer effective diameter and inner effective diameter were measured for 7 post-mortem subjects scanned with a standardized chest/abdomen/pelvis (CAP) protocol on a 320-slice MDCT scanner. The outer effective diameter was calculated by obtaining the anterior/posterior and lateral dimensions of the imaged anatomy at the middle of the scan range using Effective Diameter= SQRT(AP height*Lat Width). The inner effective diameter was calculated with the same equation using the AP and Lat dimensions of the anatomy excluding the adipose tissue. The ratio of outer to inner effective diameter was calculated for each subject. A relationship to BMI, weight, and CTDI conversion coefficients was investigated. Results: For the largest subject with BMI of 43.85 kg/m2 and weight of 255 lbs the diameter ratio was calculated as 1.33. For the second largest subject with BMI of 33.5 kg/m2 and weight of 192.4 lbs the diameter ratio was measured as 1.43, indicating a larger percentage of adipose tissue in the second largest subject’s anatomical composition. For the smallest subject at BMI of 17.4 kg/m2 and weight of 86 lbs a similar tissue composition was indicated as a subject with BMI of 24.2 kg/m2 and weight of 136 lbs as they had the same diameter ratios of 1.11. Conclusion: The diameter ratio proves to contain information about anatomical composition that the BMI and weight alone do not. The utility of this metric is still being examined but could prove useful for determining MDCT techniques and for giving a more in depth detail of the composition of a patient’s body habitus.

  19. Gravimetric gas determinations for volume calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    Gravimetric measurement of gases is one of the methods available for calibrating gas volumes. By inputting a known quantity of gas and measuring the resulting pressure and temperature, the system volume can be calculated using gas law principles. Historically, this method has been less accurate due to the difficulty in the mass determination. This difficulty comes from several sources. Two examples are the large tare weight of the gas container relative to the weight of gas and the external volume of the gas container relative to the standards. The application of a gravimetric gas determination to tank volume calibrations at the Savannah River Site is discussed. Mass determinations on a 25,000 gram gas container were such that a 1500 gram quantity of gas was routinely determined to within {plus minus}0.2 gram at the 99% confidence level. The weighing design and the methods used to address the difficulties of the mass determination are detailed.

  20. Gravimetric gas determinations for volume calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, P.W.

    1991-12-31

    Gravimetric measurement of gases is one of the methods available for calibrating gas volumes. By inputting a known quantity of gas and measuring the resulting pressure and temperature, the system volume can be calculated using gas law principles. Historically, this method has been less accurate due to the difficulty in the mass determination. This difficulty comes from several sources. Two examples are the large tare weight of the gas container relative to the weight of gas and the external volume of the gas container relative to the standards. The application of a gravimetric gas determination to tank volume calibrations at the Savannah River Site is discussed. Mass determinations on a 25,000 gram gas container were such that a 1500 gram quantity of gas was routinely determined to within {plus_minus}0.2 gram at the 99% confidence level. The weighing design and the methods used to address the difficulties of the mass determination are detailed.

  1. Solar cell array design handbook, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    Twelve chapters discuss the following: historical developments, the environment and its effects, solar cells, solar cell filters and covers, solar cell and other electrical interconnections, blocking and shunt diodes, substrates and deployment mechanisms, material properties, design synthesis and optimization, design analysis, procurement, production and cost aspects, evaluation and test, orbital performance, and illustrative design examples. A comprehensive index permits rapid locating of desired topics. The handbook consists of two volumes: Volume 1 is of an expository nature while Volume 2 contains detailed design data in an appendix-like fashion. Volume 2 includes solar cell performance data, applicable unit conversion factors and physical constants, and mechanical, electrical, thermal optical, magnetic, and outgassing material properties. Extensive references are provided.

  2. Theoretical atomic volumes of the light actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M. D.; Boettger, J. C.; Albers, R. C.; Singh, D. J.

    2000-02-15

    The zero-pressure zero-temperature equilibrium volumes and bulk moduli are calculated for the light actinides Th through Pu using two independent all-electron, full-potential, electronic-structure methods: the full-potential linear augmented-plane-wave method and the linear combinations of Gaussian-type orbitals-fitting function method. The results produced by these two distinctly different electronic-structure techniques are in good agreement with each other, but differ significantly from previously published calculations using the full-potential linear muffin-tin-orbital (FP-LMTO) method. The theoretically calculated equilibrium volumes are in some cases nearly 10% larger than the previous FP-LMTO calculations, bringing them much closer to the experimentally observed volumes. We also discuss the anomalous upturn in equilibrium volume seen experimentally for {alpha}-Pu. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  3. Pacific Basin Communication Study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, E. L.; Hurd, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    Users' meeting summary report, chronology of visits, economic data for forum countries, techniques used in the study, communication choices, existing resources in the Pacific Basin, and warc 79 region 3 rules and regulations were presented in volume 2.

  4. Site Environmental Report for 1999 - Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggieri, M

    2000-08-01

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1999 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1999. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summary results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Each chapter in Volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow, including any tables or figures found in the chapter. Readers should use section numbers (e.g., {section}1.5) as navigational tools to find topics of interest in either the printed or the electronic version of the report. Volume II contains the individual data results from monitoring programs.

  5. Site Environmental Report for 1999 - Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggieri, M

    2000-08-12

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1999 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1999. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summary results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Each chapter in Volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow, including any tables or figures found in the chapter. Readers should use section numbers (e.g., {section}1.5) as navigational tools to find topics of interest in either the printed or the electronic version of the report. Volume II contains the individual data results from monitoring programs.

  6. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  7. Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1996, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  8. Petroleum supply annual 1994, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  9. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and selected Refinery Statistics each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1995, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  10. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  11. Influence of Type 2 Diabetes on Brain Volumes and Changes in Brain Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Espeland, Mark A.; Bryan, R. Nick; Goveas, Joseph S.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Siddiqui, Mustafa S.; Liu, Simin; Hogan, Patricia E.; Casanova, Ramon; Coker, Laura H.; Yaffe, Kristine; Masaki, Kamal; Rossom, Rebecca; Resnick, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study how type 2 diabetes adversely affects brain volumes, changes in volume, and cognitive function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Regional brain volumes and ischemic lesion volumes in 1,366 women, aged 72–89 years, were measured with structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Repeat scans were collected an average of 4.7 years later in 698 women. Cross-sectional differences and changes with time between women with and without diabetes were compared. Relationships that cognitive function test scores had with these measures and diabetes were examined. RESULTS The 145 women with diabetes (10.6%) at the first MRI had smaller total brain volumes (0.6% less; P = 0.05) and smaller gray matter volumes (1.5% less; P = 0.01) but not white matter volumes, both overall and within major lobes. They also had larger ischemic lesion volumes (21.8% greater; P = 0.02), both overall and in gray matter (27.5% greater; P = 0.06), in white matter (18.8% greater; P = 0.02), and across major lobes. Overall, women with diabetes had slightly (nonsignificant) greater loss of total brain volumes (3.02 cc; P = 0.11) and significant increases in total ischemic lesion volumes (9.7% more; P = 0.05) with time relative to those without diabetes. Diabetes was associated with lower scores in global cognitive function and its subdomains. These relative deficits were only partially accounted for by brain volumes and risk factors for cognitive deficits. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes is associated with smaller brain volumes in gray but not white matter and increasing ischemic lesion volumes throughout the brain. These markers are associated with but do not fully account for diabetes-related deficits in cognitive function. PMID:22933440

  12. Karl Schwarzschild. Collected works. Volume 2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, H.-H.

    This volume is the second part of a three-volume collection of research papers by Karl Schwarzschild. The complete collection will comprise a total of 119 papers, organized into ten categories. (For Vol. 1 see 003.011). Contents: 5. Astronomical positioning. Commentary by G. Seeber. 6. Photographic photometry. Commentary by U. Haug. 7. Measuring techniques, binary stars, variable stars and spectroscopy. Commentary by E. H. Geyer.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid volume measurements in hydrocephalic rats.

    PubMed

    Basati, Sukhraaj; Desai, Bhargav; Alaraj, Ali; Charbel, Fady; Linninger, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Object Experimental data about the evolution of intracranial volume and pressure in cases of hydrocephalus are limited due to the lack of available monitoring techniques. In this study, the authors validate intracranial CSF volume measurements within the lateral ventricle, while simultaneously using impedance sensors and pressure transducers in hydrocephalic animals. Methods A volume sensor was fabricated and connected to a catheter that was used as a shunt to withdraw CSF. In vitro bench-top calibration experiments were created to provide data for the animal experiments and to validate the sensors. To validate the measurement technique in a physiological system, hydrocephalus was induced in weanling rats by kaolin injection into the cisterna magna. At 28 days after induction, the sensor was implanted into the lateral ventricles. After sealing the skull using dental cement, an acute CSF drainage/infusion protocol consisting of 4 sequential phases was performed with a pump. Implant location was confirmed via radiography using intraventricular iohexol contrast administration. Results Controlled CSF shunting in vivo with hydrocephalic rats resulted in precise and accurate sensor measurements (r = 0.98). Shunting resulted in a 17.3% maximum measurement error between measured volume and actual volume as assessed by a Bland-Altman plot. A secondary outcome confirmed that both ventricular volume and intracranial pressure decreased during CSF shunting and increased during infusion. Ventricular enlargement consistent with successful hydrocephalus induction was confirmed using imaging, as well as postmortem. These results indicate that volume monitoring is feasible for clinical cases of hydrocephalus. Conclusions This work marks a departure from traditional shunting systems currently used to treat hydrocephalus. The overall clinical application is to provide alternative monitoring and treatment options for patients. Future work includes development and testing of a chronic

  14. 49th JANNAF Propulsion Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, Debra S. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume, the first of three volumes, is a collection of 15 unclassified/unlimited-distribution papers which were presented at the 49,h Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Propulsion Meeting, held 14-16 December 1999 at the Sheraton El Conquistador Resort in Tucson, Arizona. Specific subjects discussed include solid propellants; solid propellant ingredients, hazards, and demilitarization/disposal; composite materials used in propulsion applications; and sensors.

  15. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    For structural studies with neutron diffraction more intense neutron sources, improved sensitivity detector and larger volume crystals are all means by which the science is being advanced to enable studies on a wider range of samples. We have chosen a simplistic approach using a well understood crystallization method, with minimal amounts of sample and using design of experiment techniques to maximize the crystal volume all for minimum effort. Examples of the application are given.

  16. Instrument for Measuring Engine Clearance Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, S W

    1920-01-01

    With the advent of the V type engine, a new method to measure the clearance volume in cylinders was needed. It was suggested that this measurement could be made by a process which consisted essentially of simultaneously changing both a known and unknown volume of gas by a known amount and then calculating the magnitude of the unknown from the resulting difference in pressure between the two. An instrument based on this design is described.

  17. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Gabe V.; Carlson, Nancy M.; Donaldson, Alan D.

    1991-01-01

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid.

  18. [ENDOSCOPIC LUNG VOLUME REDUCTION IN PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA].

    PubMed

    Duysinx, B; Heinen, V; Louis, R; Corhay, J-L

    2015-12-01

    Emphysema is characterized by an irreversible alveolar destruction, a progressive lung hyperinflation and a dysfunction of respiratory muscles. It induces a respiratory functional limitation and a decrease of quality of life. Endoscopic lung volume reduction represents a potential alternative to surgical treatments for advanced heterogeneous emphysema without concomitant surgical morbidity. The different bronchoscopic systems for lung volume reduction currently under evaluation are presented. PMID:26867305

  19. Chemical Method of Urine Volume Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrack, P.

    1967-01-01

    A system has been developed and qualified as flight hardware for the measurement of micturition volumes voided by crewmen during Gemini missions. This Chemical Urine Volume Measurement System (CUVMS) is used for obtaining samples of each micturition for post-flight volume determination and laboratory analysis for chemical constituents of physiological interest. The system is versatile with respect to volumes measured, with a capacity beyond the largest micturition expected to be encountered, and with respect to mission duration of inherently indefinite length. The urine sample is used for the measurement of total micturition volume by a tracer dilution technique, in which a fixed, predetermined amount of tritiated water is introduced and mixed into the voided urine, and the resulting concentration of the tracer in the sample is determined with a liquid scintillation spectrometer. The tracer employed does not interfere with the analysis for the chemical constituents of the urine. The CUVMS hardware consists of a four-way selector valve in which an automatically operated tracer metering pump is incorporated, a collection/mixing bag, and tracer storage accumulators. The assembled system interfaces with a urine receiver at the selector valve inlet, sample bags which connect to the side of the selector valve, and a flexible hose which carries the excess urine to the overboard drain connection. Results of testing have demonstrated system volume measurement accuracy within the specification limits of +/-5%, and operating reliability suitable for system use aboard the GT-7 mission, in which it was first used.

  20. Blood Volume: Its Adaptation to Endurance Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Expansion of blood volume (hypervolemia) has been well documented in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies as a consequence of endurance exercise training. Plasma volume expansion can account for nearly all of the exercise-induced hypervolemia up to 2-4 wk; after this time expansion may be distributed equally between plasma and red cell volumes. The exercise stimulus for hypervolemia has both thermal and nonthermal components that increase total circulating plasma levels of electrolytes and proteins. Although protein and fluid shifts from the extravascular to intravascular space may provide a mechanism for rapid hypervolemia immediately after exercise, evidence supports the notion that chronic hypervolemia associated with exercise training represents a net expansion of total body water and solutes. This net increase of body fluids with exercise training is associated with increased water intake and decreased urine volume output. The mechanism of reduced urine output appears to be increased renal tubular reabsorption of sodium through a more sensitive aldosterone action in man. Exercise training-induced hypervolemia appears to be universal among most animal species, although the mechanisms may be quite different. The hypervolemia may provide advantages of greater body fluid for heat dissipation and thermoregulatory stability as well as larger vascular volume and filling pressure for greater cardiac stroke volume and lower heart rates during exercise.

  1. Volume strain within The Geysers geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossop, Antony; Segall, Paul

    1999-12-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, The Geysers geothermal region was rapidly developed as a site of geothermal power production. The likelihood that this could cause significant strain within the reservoir, with corresponding surface displacements, led to a series of deformation monitoring surveys. In 1973, 1975, 1977, and 1980, The Geysers region was surveyed using first-order, class I, spirit leveling. In 1994, 1995, and 1996, many of the leveling control monuments were resurveyed using high-precision Global Positioning System receivers. The two survey methods are reconciled using the GEOID96 geoid model. The displacements are inverted to determine volume strain within the reservoir. For the period 1980-1994, peak volume strains in excess of 5×10-4 are imaged. There is an excellent correlation between the observed changes in reservoir steam pressures and the imaged volume strain. If reservoir pressure changes are inducing volume strain, then the reservoir quasi-static bulk modulus K must be <4.6×109 Pa. However, seismic velocities indicate a much suffer reservoir with K = 3.4 × 1010 Pa. This apparent discrepancy is shown to be consistent with predicted frequency dependence in K for fractured and water-saturated rock. Inversion of surface deformation data therefore appears to be a powerful method for imaging pressure change within the body of the reservoir. Correlation between induced seismicity at The Geysers and volume strain is observed. However, earthquake distribution does not appear to have a simple relationship with volume strain rate.

  2. Live ultrasound volume reconstruction using scout scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Amelie; Lasso, Andras; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided interventions often necessitate scanning of deep-seated anatomical structures that may be hard to visualize. Visualization can be improved using reconstructed 3D ultrasound volumes. High-resolution 3D reconstruction of a large area during clinical interventions is challenging if the region of interest is unknown. We propose a two-stage scanning method allowing the user to perform quick low-resolution scouting followed by high-resolution live volume reconstruction. Scout scanning is accomplished by stacking 2D tracked ultrasound images into a low-resolution volume. Then, within a region of interest defined in the scout scan, live volume reconstruction can be performed by continuous scanning until sufficient image density is achieved. We implemented the workflow as a module of the open-source 3D Slicer application, within the SlicerIGT extension and building on the PLUS toolkit. Scout scanning is performed in a few seconds using 3 mm spacing to allow region of interest definition. Live reconstruction parameters are set to provide good image quality (0.5 mm spacing, hole filling enabled) and feedback is given during live scanning by regularly updated display of the reconstructed volume. Use of scout scanning may allow the physician to identify anatomical structures. Subsequent live volume reconstruction in a region of interest may assist in procedures such as targeting needle interventions or estimating brain shift during surgery.

  3. Physical activity, fitness, and gray matter volume.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Leckie, Regina L; Weinstein, Andrea M

    2014-09-01

    In this review, we explore the association among physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and exercise on gray matter volume in older adults. We conclude that higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels are routinely associated with greater gray matter volume in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus and less consistently in other regions. We also conclude that physical activity is associated with greater gray matter volume in the same regions that are associated with cardiorespiratory fitness including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Some heterogeneity in the literature may be explained by effect moderation by age, stress, or other factors. Finally, we report promising results from randomized exercise interventions that suggest that the volume of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex remain pliable and responsive to moderate intensity exercise for 6 months-1 year. Physical activity appears to be a propitious method for influencing gray matter volume in late adulthood, but additional well-controlled studies are necessary to inform public policies about the potential protective or therapeutic effects of exercise on brain volume. PMID:24952993

  4. Physical activity, fitness, and gray matter volume

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Leckie, Regina L.; Weinstein, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review we explore the association between physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and exercise on gray matter volume in older adults. We conclude that higher cardiorespiratory fitness levels are routinely associated with greater gray matter volume in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and less consistently in other regions. We also conclude that physical activity is associated with greater gray matter volume in the same regions that are associated with cardiorespiratory fitness including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Some heterogeneity in the literature may be explained by effect moderation by age, stress, or other factors. Finally, we report promising results from randomized exercise interventions that suggest that the volume of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex remain pliable and responsive to moderate intensity exercise for 6-months to 1-year. Physical activity appears to be a propitious method for influencing gray matter volume in late adulthood, but additional well-controlled studies are necessary to inform public policies about the potential protective or therapeutic effects of exercise on brain volume. PMID:24952993

  5. Estimating the volume of Alpine glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. J.; Quincey, D. J.

    2015-09-01

    Supraglacial, moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes represent a potential glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) threat to downstream communities in many mountain regions. This has motivated the development of empirical relationships to predict lake volume given a measurement of lake surface area obtained from satellite imagery. Such relationships are based on the notion that lake depth, area and volume scale predictably. We critically evaluate the performance of these existing empirical relationships by examining a global database of measured glacial lake depths, areas and volumes. Results show that lake area and depth are not always well correlated (r2 = 0.38), and that although lake volume and area are well correlated (r2 = 0.91), there are distinct outliers in the dataset. These outliers represent situations where it may not be appropriate to apply existing empirical relationships to predict lake volume, and include growing supraglacial lakes, glaciers that recede into basins with complex overdeepened morphologies or that have been deepened by intense erosion, and lakes formed where glaciers advance across and block a main trunk valley. We use the compiled dataset to develop a conceptual model of how the volumes of supraglacial ponds and lakes, moraine-dammed lakes and ice-dammed lakes should be expected to evolve with increasing area. Although a large amount of bathymetric data exist for moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes, we suggest that further measurements of growing supraglacial ponds and lakes are needed to better understand their development.

  6. Chemistry of coal utilization. Second supplementary volume

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    The first two volumes of this work, published in 1945, and the first supplemental volume, published in 1963, all under the editorship of H.H. Lowry, are recognized classics. Their comprehensive coverage and critical review of the literature on coal science and technology have been invaluable to workers at all levels of experience. Between 1963 and 1976, however, funding of coal research and development by government and industry in the United States increased from about $22 million to about $322 million per year. Throughout this period the expansion in the literature on coal science and technology and in the number of newcomers to the field made evident the need for a second supplementary volume to Chemistry of Coal Utilization. This second supplementary volume has the following four topics which are not covered in the earlier volumes: Coal Industry and Coal Research and Development in Perspective; Coal Resources; Control of Pollution from Combustion Processes; and Environmental, Health and Safety Implications of Increased Coal Utilization. In addition, the broad areas of pyrolysis, combustion, gasification, and liquefaction, are subdivided for treatment in three separate chapters on fundamentals, processes, and treatment of products. The 31 chapters in this volume have been abstracted and indexed for the data base.

  7. Effect of Colonoscopy Volume on Quality Indicators.

    PubMed

    Pace, David; Borgaonkar, Mark; Lougheed, Muna; Marcoux, Curtis; Evans, Brad; Hickey, Nikita; O'Leary, Meghan; Boone, Darrell; McGrath, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study is to determine if colonoscopy quality is associated with the annual case volume of endoscopists. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was performed on 3235 patients who underwent colonoscopy in the city of St. John's, NL, between January and June 2012. Data collected included completion of colonoscopy (CCR) and adenoma detection rates (ADR). Endoscopists were divided into quintiles based on annual case volume. To account for potential confounding variables, univariate analyses followed by multivariable logistic regression were used to identify variables independently associated with CCR and ADR. Results. A total of 13 surgeons and 8 gastroenterologists were studied. There was a significant difference in CCR (p < 0.001) and ADR (p < 0.001) based on annual volume. Following multivariable regression, predictors of successful colonoscopy completion included annual colonoscopy volume, lower age, male sex, an indication of screening or surveillance, and a low ASA score. Predictors of adenoma detection included older age, male sex, an indication of screening or surveillance, and gastroenterology specialty. Conclusion. Higher annual case volume is associated with better quality of colonoscopy in terms of completion. However, gastroenterology specialty appears to be a better predictor of ADR than annual case volume. PMID:27446831

  8. Effect of Colonoscopy Volume on Quality Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Brad; Hickey, Nikita; Boone, Darrell; McGrath, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study is to determine if colonoscopy quality is associated with the annual case volume of endoscopists. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was performed on 3235 patients who underwent colonoscopy in the city of St. John's, NL, between January and June 2012. Data collected included completion of colonoscopy (CCR) and adenoma detection rates (ADR). Endoscopists were divided into quintiles based on annual case volume. To account for potential confounding variables, univariate analyses followed by multivariable logistic regression were used to identify variables independently associated with CCR and ADR. Results. A total of 13 surgeons and 8 gastroenterologists were studied. There was a significant difference in CCR (p < 0.001) and ADR (p < 0.001) based on annual volume. Following multivariable regression, predictors of successful colonoscopy completion included annual colonoscopy volume, lower age, male sex, an indication of screening or surveillance, and a low ASA score. Predictors of adenoma detection included older age, male sex, an indication of screening or surveillance, and gastroenterology specialty. Conclusion. Higher annual case volume is associated with better quality of colonoscopy in terms of completion. However, gastroenterology specialty appears to be a better predictor of ADR than annual case volume. PMID:27446831

  9. CONTAMINATED SOIL VOLUME ESTIMATE TRACKING METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L.; Rieman, C.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

    2003-02-27

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting a cleanup of radiologically contaminated properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The largest cost element for most of the FUSRAP sites is the transportation and disposal of contaminated soil. Project managers and engineers need an estimate of the volume of contaminated soil to determine project costs and schedule. Once excavation activities begin and additional remedial action data are collected, the actual quantity of contaminated soil often deviates from the original estimate, resulting in cost and schedule impacts to the project. The project costs and schedule need to be frequently updated by tracking the actual quantities of excavated soil and contaminated soil remaining during the life of a remedial action project. A soil volume estimate tracking methodology was developed to provide a mechanism for project managers and engineers to create better project controls of costs and schedule. For the FUSRAP Linde site, an estimate of the initial volume of in situ soil above the specified cleanup guidelines was calculated on the basis of discrete soil sample data and other relevant data using indicator geostatistical techniques combined with Bayesian analysis. During the remedial action, updated volume estimates of remaining in situ soils requiring excavation were calculated on a periodic basis. In addition to taking into account the volume of soil that had been excavated, the updated volume estimates incorporated both new gamma walkover surveys and discrete sample data collected as part of the remedial action. A civil survey company provided periodic estimates of actual in situ excavated soil volumes. By using the results from the civil survey of actual in situ volumes excavated and the updated estimate of the remaining volume of contaminated soil requiring excavation, the USACE Buffalo District was able to forecast and update project costs and schedule. The soil volume

  10. Data collection system. Volume 1, Overview and operators manual; Volume 2, Maintenance manual; Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, R.B.; Bauder, M.E.; Boyer, W.B.; French, R.E.; Isidoro, R.J.; Kaestner, P.C.; Perkins, W.G.

    1993-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Instrumentation Development Department was tasked by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) to record data on Tektronix RTD720 Digitizers on the HUNTERS TROPHY field test conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on September 18, 1992. This report contains a overview and description of the computer hardware and software that was used to acquire, reduce, and display the data. The document is divided into two volumes: an overview and operators manual (Volume 1) and a maintenance manual (Volume 2).

  11. Networking of three dimensional sonography volume data.

    PubMed

    Kratochwil, A; Lee, A; Schoisswohl, A

    2000-09-01

    Three-dimensioned (3D) sonography enables the examiner to store, instead of copies from single B-scan planes, a volume consisting of 300 scan planes. The volume is displayed on a monitor in form of three orthogonal planes--longitudinal, axial and coronal. Translation and rotation facilitates anatomical orientation and provides any arbitrary plane within the volume to generate organ optimized scan planes. Different algorithms allow the extraction of different information such as surface, or bone structures by maximum mode, or fluid filled structures, such as vessels by the minimum mode. The volume may contain as well color information of vessels. The digitized information is stored on a magnetic optical disc. This allows virtual scanning in absence of the patient under the same conditions as the volume was primarily stored. The volume size is dependent on different, examiner-controlled settings. A volume may need a storage capacity between 2 and 16 MB of 8-bit gray level information. As such huge data sets are unsuitable for network transfer, data compression is of paramount interest. 100 stored volumes were submitted to JPEG, MPEG, and biorthogonal wavelet compression. The original and compressed volumes were randomly shown on two monitors. In case of noticeable image degradation, information on the location of the original and compressed volume and the ratio of compression was read. Numerical values for proving compression fidelity as pixel error calculation and computation of square root error have been unsuitable for evaluating image degradation. The best results in recognizing image degradation were achieved by image experts. The experts disagreed on the ratio where image degradation became visible in only 4% of the volumes. Wavelet compression ratios of 20:1 or 30:1 could be performed without discernible information reduction. The effect of volume compression is reflected both in the reduction of transfer time and in storage capacity. Transmission time for a

  12. Lung Volume Recruitment in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Srour, Nadim; LeBlanc, Carole; King, Judy; McKim, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary function abnormalities have been described in multiple sclerosis including reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC) and cough but the time course of this impairment is unknown. Peak cough flow (PCF) is an important parameter for patients with respiratory muscle weakness and a reduced PCF has a direct impact on airway clearance and may therefore increase the risk of respiratory tract infections. Lung volume recruitment is a technique that improves PCF by inflating the lungs to their maximal insufflation capacity. Objectives Our goals were to describe the rate of decline of pulmonary function and PCF in patients with multiple sclerosis and describe the use of lung volume recruitment in this population. Methods We reviewed all patients with multiple sclerosis referred to a respiratory neuromuscular rehabilitation clinic from February 1999 until December 2010. Lung volume recruitment was attempted in patients with FVC <80% predicted. Regular twice daily lung volume recruitment was prescribed if it resulted in a significant improvement in the laboratory. Results There were 79 patients included, 35 of whom were seen more than once. A baseline FVC <80% predicted was present in 82% of patients and 80% of patients had a PCF insufficient for airway clearance. There was a significant decline in FVC (122.6 mL/y, 95% CI 54.9–190.3) and PCF (192 mL/s/y, 95% 72–311) over a median follow-up time of 13.4 months. Lung volume recruitment was associated with a slower decline in FVC (p<0.0001) and PCF (p = 0.042). Conclusion Pulmonary function and cough decline significantly over time in selected patients with multiple sclerosis and lung volume recruitment is associated with a slower rate of decline in lung function and peak cough flow. Given design limitations, additional studies are needed to assess the role of lung volume recruitment in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:23383293

  13. Volume Matters: Returning Home After Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gozalo, Pedro; Leland, Natalie E.; Christian, Thomas J.; Mor, Vincent; Teno, Joan M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine the effect of the relationship between volume (number of hip fracture admissions during the 12 months before participant’s fracture) and other facility characteristics on outcomes. DESIGN Prospective observational study. SETTING U.S. skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) admitting individuals discharged from the hospital after treatment for hip fracture between 2000 and 2007 (N = 15,439). PARTICIPANTS Community-dwelling fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries aged 75 and older admitted to U.S. hospitals for their first hip fracture and discharged to a SNF for postacute care from 2000 to 2007 (N = 512,967). MEASUREMENTS Successful discharge from SNF to community, defined as returning to the community within 30 days of hospital discharge to the SNF and remaining in the community without being institutionalized for at least 30 days, was examined using Medicare administrative data, propensity score matching, and instrumental variables. RESULTS The overall rate of successful discharge to the community was 31%. Of the 15,439 facilities, the facility interquartile range varied from 0% (25th percentile) to 42% (75th percentile). An important determinant of variation in discharge rate was SNF volume of hip fracture admissions. Unadjusted successful discharge from SNF to community was 43.7% in high-volume facilities (>24 admissions/year), versus 18.8% in low-volume facilities (1–6 admissions/year). This facility volume effect persisted after adjusting for participant and facility characteristics associated with outcomes (e.g., adjusted odds ratio = 2.06, 95% confidence interval = 1.91–2.21 for volume of 25 vs 3 admissions per year). CONCLUSION In community-dwelling persons with their first hip fracture, successful return to the community varies substantially according to SNF provider volume and staffing characteristics. PMID:26424223

  14. Volume effects in Rhesus monkey spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, T.E. ); Stephens, L.C.; Price, R.E.; Ang, K.K.; Peters, L.J. )

    1994-04-30

    An experiment was conducted to test for the existence of a volume effect in radiation myelopathy using Rhesus monkeys treated with clinically relevant field sizes and fractionation schedules. Five groups of Rhesus monkeys were irradiated using 2.2 Gy per fraction to their spinal cords. Three groups were irradiated with 8 cm fields to total doses of 70.4, 77, and 83.6 Gy. Two additional groups were irradiated to 70.4 Gy using 4 and 16 cm fields. The incidence of paresis expressed within 2 years following the completion of treatment was determined for each group. Maximum likelihood estimation was used to determine parameters of a logistic dose response function. The volume effect was modeled using the probability model in which the probability of producing a lesion in an irradiated volume is governed by the probability of the occurrence of independent events. This is a two parameter model requiring only the estimates of the parameters of the dose-response function for the reference volume, but not needing any additional parameters for describing the volume effect. The probability model using a logistic dose-response function fits the data well with the D[sub 50] = 75.8 Gy for the 8-cm field. No evidence was seen for a difference in sensitivities for different anatomical levels of the spinal cord. Most lesions were type 3, combined white matter parenchymal and vascular lesions. Latent periods did not differ significantly from those of type 3 lesions in humans. The spinal cord exhibits a volume effect that is well described by the probability model. Because the dose response function for radiation myelopathy is steep, the volume effect is modest. The Rhesus monkey remains the animal model most similar to humans in dose response, histopathology, and latency for radiation myelopathy. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Spent Fuel Working Group Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    O`Toole, T.

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy is storing large amounts of spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials (herein referred to as RINM). In the past, the Department reprocessed RINM to recover plutonium, tritium, and other isotopes. However, the Department has ceased or is phasing out reprocessing operations. As a consequence, Department facilities designed, constructed, and operated to store RINM for relatively short periods of time now store RINM, pending decisions on the disposition of these materials. The extended use of the facilities, combined with their known degradation and that of their stored materials, has led to uncertainties about safety. To ensure that extended storage is safe (i.e., that protection exists for workers, the public, and the environment), the conditions of these storage facilities had to be assessed. The compelling need for such an assessment led to the Secretary`s initiative on spent fuel, which is the subject of this report. This report comprises three volumes: Volume I; Summary Results of the Spent Fuel Working Group Evaluation; Volume II, Working Group Assessment Team Reports and Protocol; Volume III; Operating Contractor Site Team Reports. This volume presents the overall results of the Working Group`s Evaluation. The group assessed 66 facilities spread across 11 sites. It identified: (1) facilities that should be considered for priority attention. (2) programmatic issues to be considered in decision making about interim storage plans and (3) specific vulnerabilities for some of these facilities.

  16. Partial Volume Correction in Quantitative Amyloid Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Ances, Beau M.; Bateman, Randall J.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Aldea, Patricia; Cash, Lisa; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Farrar, Angela M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam M.; Klunk, William; Price, Julie C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Schofield, Peter R.; Buckles, Virginia; Morris, John C.; Benzinger, Tammie. LS.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid imaging is a valuable tool for research and diagnosis in dementing disorders. As positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have limited spatial resolution, measured signals are distorted by partial volume effects. Various techniques have been proposed for correcting partial volume effects, but there is no consensus as to whether these techniques are necessary in amyloid imaging, and, if so, how they should be implemented. We evaluated a two-component partial volume correction technique and a regional spread function technique using both simulated and human Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging data. Both correction techniques compensated for partial volume effects and yielded improved detection of subtle changes in PiB retention. However, the regional spread function technique was more accurate in application to simulated data. Because PiB retention estimates depend on the correction technique, standardization is necessary to compare results across groups. Partial volume correction has sometimes been avoided because it increases the sensitivity to inaccuracy in image registration and segmentation. However, our results indicate that appropriate PVC may enhance our ability to detect changes in amyloid deposition. PMID:25485714

  17. Partial volume correction in quantitative amyloid imaging.

    PubMed

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M; Snyder, Abraham Z; Raichle, Marcus E; Marcus, Daniel S; Ances, Beau M; Bateman, Randall J; Cairns, Nigel J; Aldea, Patricia; Cash, Lisa; Christensen, Jon J; Friedrichsen, Karl; Hornbeck, Russ C; Farrar, Angela M; Owen, Christopher J; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam M; Klunk, William; Price, Julie C; Thompson, Paul M; Ghetti, Bernadino; Saykin, Andrew J; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Schofield, Peter R; Buckles, Virginia; Morris, John C; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2015-02-15

    Amyloid imaging is a valuable tool for research and diagnosis in dementing disorders. As positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have limited spatial resolution, measured signals are distorted by partial volume effects. Various techniques have been proposed for correcting partial volume effects, but there is no consensus as to whether these techniques are necessary in amyloid imaging, and, if so, how they should be implemented. We evaluated a two-component partial volume correction technique and a regional spread function technique using both simulated and human Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging data. Both correction techniques compensated for partial volume effects and yielded improved detection of subtle changes in PiB retention. However, the regional spread function technique was more accurate in application to simulated data. Because PiB retention estimates depend on the correction technique, standardization is necessary to compare results across groups. Partial volume correction has sometimes been avoided because it increases the sensitivity to inaccuracy in image registration and segmentation. However, our results indicate that appropriate PVC may enhance our ability to detect changes in amyloid deposition. PMID:25485714

  18. Local volume fraction fluctuations in random media

    SciTech Connect

    Quintanilla, J.; Torquato, S.

    1997-02-01

    Although the volume fraction is a constant for a statistically homogeneous random medium, on a spatially local level it fluctuates. We study the full distribution of volume fraction within an observation window of finite size for models of random media. A formula due to Lu and Torquato for the standard deviation or {open_quotes}coarseness{close_quotes} associated with the {ital local} volume fraction {xi} is extended for the nth moment of {xi} for any n. The distribution function F{sub L} of the local volume fraction of five different model microstructures is evaluated using analytical and computer-simulation methods for a wide range of window sizes and overall volume fractions. On the line, we examine a system of fully penetrable rods and a system of totally impenetrable rods formed by random sequential addition (RSA). In the plane, we study RSA totally impenetrable disks and fully penetrable aligned squares. In three dimensions, we study fully penetrable aligned cubes. In the case of fully penetrable rods, we will also simplify and numerically invert a prior analytical result for the Laplace transform of F{sub L}. In all of these models, we show that, for sufficiently large window sizes, F{sub L} can be reasonably approximated by the normal distribution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Foundations for Measuring Volume Rendering Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Peter L.; Uselton, Samuel P.; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide a foundation for objectively comparing volume rendered images. The key elements of the foundation are: (1) a rigorous specification of all the parameters that need to be specified to define the conditions under which a volume rendered image is generated; (2) a methodology for difference classification, including a suite of functions or metrics to quantify and classify the difference between two volume rendered images that will support an analysis of the relative importance of particular differences. The results of this method can be used to study the changes caused by modifying particular parameter values, to compare and quantify changes between images of similar data sets rendered in the same way, and even to detect errors in the design, implementation or modification of a volume rendering system. If one has a benchmark image, for example one created by a high accuracy volume rendering system, the method can be used to evaluate the accuracy of a given image.

  20. Volume of a laser-induced microjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Sennosuke; Hayasaka, Keisuke; Noguchi, Yuto; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Needle-free injection systems are of great importance for medical treatments. In spite of their great potential, these systems are not commonly used. One of the common problems is strong pain caused by diffusion shape of the jet. To solve this problem, the usage of a high-speed highly-focused microjet as needle-free injection system is expected. It is thus crucial to control important indicators such as ejected volume of the jet for its safe application. We conduct experiments to reveal which parameter influences mostly the ejected volume. In the experiments, we use a glass tube of an inner diameter of 500 micro-meter, which is filled with the liquid. One end is connected to a syringe and the other end is opened. Radiating the pulse laser instantaneously vapors the liquid, followed by the generation of a shockwave. We find that the maximum volume of a laser-induced bubble is approximately proportional to the ejected volume. It is also found that the occurrence of cavitation does not affect the ejected volume while it changes the jet velocity.

  1. Site Environmental Report for 2002, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pauer, Ron

    2003-07-01

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2002'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterizes environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlights significant programs and efforts for calendar year 2002. Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab,'' ''the Laboratory,'' ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,'' and ''LBNL.'' The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Volume II contains individual data results from the monitoring programs. This year, the ''Site Environmental Report'' was distributed on a CD in PDF format that includes Volume I, Volume II, and related documents. The report is also available on the Web at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are additionally reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements because this system is referenced by some current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. The tables included at the end of the Glossary are intended to help readers understand the various prefixes used with SI units of measurement and convert these units from one system to the other.

  2. EOS Data Products Handbook. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L. (Editor); Greenstone, Reynold (Editor); Closs, James (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The EOS Data Products Handbook provides brief descriptions of the data products that will be produced from a range of missions of the Earth Observing System (EOS) and associated projects. Volume 1, originally published in 1997, covers the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the Terra mission (formerly named EOS AM-1), and the Data Assimilation System, while this volume, Volume 2, covers the Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor Satellite (ACRIMSAT), Aqua, Jason-1, Landsat 7, Meteor 3M/Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III). the Quick Scatterometer (QuikScat), the Quick Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (Quik-TOMS), and the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) missions. Volume 2 follows closely the format of Volume 1, providing a list of products and an introduction and overview descriptions of the instruments and data processing, all introductory to the core of the book, which presents the individual data product descriptions, organized into 11 topical chapters. The product descriptions are followed by five appendices, which provide contact information for the EOS data centers that will be archiving and distributing the data sets, contact information for the science points of contact for the data products, references, acronyms and abbreviations, and a data products index.

  3. Partial molecular volumes of lipids and cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Alexander I.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Volumetric measurements are reported for fully hydrated lipid/cholesterol bilayer mixtures using the neutral flotation method. Apparent specific volume data were obtained with the lipids DOPC, POPC and DMPC at T = 30 °C, DPPC at 50 °C, and brain sphingomyelin (BSM) at 45 and 24 °C for mole fractions of cholesterol x from 0 to 0.5. Unlike previous cholesterol mixture studies, we converted our raw data to partial molecular volume VL of the lipid and VC of the cholesterol. The partial molecular volumes were constant for POPC and DOPC as x was varied, but had sharp breaks for the other lipids at values of xC near 0.25 ± 0.05. Results for x < xC clearly exhibit the condensation effect of cholesterol on DPPC, DMPC and BSM when measured at temperatures above their main transition temperatures TM. The break points at xC are compared to phase diagrams in the literature. For x > xC the values of the partial molecular volumes of cholesterol clustered near 630 ± 10 Å3 in all the lipids when measured for T > TM; we suggest that this is the most appropriate measure of the bare volume of cholesterol in lipid bilayers. PMID:16737691

  4. Cell volume regulation in goldfish intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Groot, J A

    1981-11-01

    1. Ion and water content of goldfish intestinal mucosa, stripped free from muscular layers were measured under various incubation conditions. 2. Ouabain induces an increase in cation content that is electrically compensated for by chloride. The increase in solute content is accompanied by an increase in water content. 3. When extracellular chloride is partially replaced by sulphate, ouabain does induce cell shrinkage. 4. Anoxia induces a rapid increase in cell volume that is restored by oxygenation of the incubation solution. Ouabain prevents the restoration of volume. 5. It is concluded that the classical ouabain-sensitive Na/K pump participates in the maintenance of cellular volume. We suggest that the constancy in volume after ouabain poisoning as is reported for many tissues might be due to a low chloride conductance of its membranes. 6. Anisotonic media (range: 0.6-1.2 isotonicity), made by variation on mannitol concentration, induce changes in cell water content that deviates from the simplified van't Hoff equation by about 10%. No change in water content after the initial increase was found. 7. We conclude that goldfish enterocytes do not possess a mechanism for rapid volume readjustment. PMID:7322833

  5. Self-Digitization of Sample Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Dawn E.; Schneider, Thomas; Wang, Michelle; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a very simple and robust microfluidic device for digitizing samples into an array of discrete volumes. The device is based on an inherent fluidic phenomenon, where an incoming aqueous sample divides itself into an array of chambers that have been primed with an immiscible phase. Self-digitization of sample volumes results from the interplay between fluidic forces, interfacial tension, channel geometry, and the final stability of the digitized samples in the chambers. Here we describe experiments and simulations that were used to characterize these parameters and the conditions under which the self-digitization process occurred. Unlike existing methods used to partition samples into array, our method is able to digitize 100% of a sample into a localized array without any loss of sample volume. The final volume of the discretized sample at each location is defined by the geometry and size of each chamber. Thus, we can form an array of samples with varying but predefined volumes. We exploited this feature to separate the crystal growth of otherwise concomitant polymorphs from a single solution. Additionally, we demonstrated the removal of the digitized samples from the chambers for downstream analysis, as well as the addition of reagents to the digitized samples. We believe this simple method will be useful in a broad range of applications where a large array of discretized samples is required, including digital PCR, single-cell analysis, and cell-based drug screening. PMID:20550137

  6. Site Environmental Report for 2002, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Pauer, Ron

    2003-07-01

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2002'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterizes environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlights significant programs and efforts for calendar year 2002. Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab,'' ''the Laboratory,'' ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,'' and ''LBNL.'' The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Volume II contains individual data results from the monitoring programs. This year, the ''Site Environmental Report'' was distributed on a CD in PDF format that includes Volume I, Volume II, and related documents. The report is also available on the Web at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are additionally reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements because this system is referenced by some current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. The tables included at the end of the Glossary are intended to help readers understand the various prefixes used with SI units of measurement and convert these units from one system to the other.

  7. Karl Schwarzschild. Collected works. Volume 1.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, H.-H.

    This volume is the first part of a three-volume collection of research papers by Karl Schwarzschild. The complete collection will comprise a total of 119 papers, organized into ten categories. Karl Schwarzschild was one of the most important German astronomers and was, in addition, one of the founders of modern astrophysics. His personal papers are held at the Niedersächsische Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek in Göttingen, and an extensive collection of reprints can be found in the Observatory in Göttingen. The material presented in these volumes is restricted intentionally to Schwarzschild's published works. Contents: Biography of Karl Schwarzschild (1873 - 1916). 1. Celestial mechanics. Commentary by R. Dvorak. 2. Sun and stellar atmospheres. Commentary by W. Mattig. 3. Cometary tails. Commentary by K. Jockers. 4. Structure, kinematics and dynamics of stellar systems. Commentary by R. Wielen.

  8. Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report. Volume Three

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchhoff, C. M.; Reingold, L. A.; Reid, J. A.; Goodman, P. A.; White, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Columbia Accident Investigation Board's (CAIB) independent investigation into the February 1, 2003 destruction of the Space Shuttle Columbia produced a six volume report. This is Volume III of the report. Volume III contains other technical documents produced by NASA and other organizations, which were provided to the CAIB in support of its inquiry into the tragedy. Technical documents included in the report are: Appendix E.1 CoFR Endorsements; Appendix E.2 STS-107 Image Analysis Team Final Report; Appendix E.3 An Assessment of Potential Material Candidates for the 'Flight Day 2', Radar Object Observed during the NASA Mission STS-107; Appendix E.4 Columbia Early Sighting Assessment Team Final Report.

  9. Annual petroleum review. Volume 1. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    Each year the California Energy Commission prepares the Annual Petroleum Review for the Governor and the Legislature for the purpose of conveying information about the current status of the supply and demand of petroleum products in California. The document is submitted under the provisions of the Petroleum Industry Information Reporting Act of 1980 (PIIRA), which directs the Commission to collect relevant information from petroleum companies operating in California and from other sources. This year the report has been divided into three separate documents: (1) the Executive Summary, (2) Volume 1, the Annual Petroleum Review report, and (3) Volume 2, the 1982 Annual Petroleum Review data section. Volume 1 contains background papers on: Outer Continental Shelf development, crude oil and gasoline pricing and industry supply and demand projections for 1983, natural gas policy and fuel switching, thermally enhanced oil recovery, and crude oil severance tax. 20 figures, 39 tables.

  10. Ab initio molar volumes and Gaussian radii.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Drew F; Ninham, Barry W

    2009-02-12

    Ab initio molar volumes are calculated and used to derive radii for ions and neutral molecules using a spatially diffuse model of the electron distribution with Gaussian spread. The Gaussian radii obtained can be used for computation of nonelectrostatic ion-ion dispersion forces that underlie Hofmeister specific ion effects. Equivalent hard-sphere radii are also derived, and these are in reasonable agreement with crystalline ionic radii. The Born electrostatic self-energy is derived for a Gaussian model of the electronic charge distribution. It is shown that the ionic volumes used in electrostatic calculations of strongly hydrated cosmotropic ions ought best to include the first hydration shell. Ionic volumes for weakly hydrated chaotropic metal cations should exclude electron overlap (in electrostatic calculations). Spherical radii are calculated as well as nonisotropic ellipsoidal radii for nonspherical ions, via their nonisotropic static polarizability tensors. PMID:19140766

  11. Atomic polarizability, volume and ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politzer, Peter; Jin, Ping; Murray, Jane S.

    2002-11-01

    Our primary focus in this work has been upon the relationship between atomic polarizability and volume, although we also looked at the role of ionization energy. For approximating volumes in this context, we tried ten different measures of atomic radii, based upon both empirical and theoretical criteria. Our results confirm that the polarizability can be expressed, to good accuracy, as directly proportional to the volume alone, provided that an appropriate set of radii is used. Most effective for the present purpose are (a) the distances to the outermost maxima of the orbital radial densities and (b) outermost orbital values. Our data also support an earlier prediction that the correlation would be enhanced by the inclusion of a slowly varying periodic function of the nuclear charge.

  12. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward H.; vanderWoerd, Mark; Damon, Michael; Judge, Russell, A.; Myles, Dean; Meilleur, F.

    2006-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is uniquely sensitive to hydrogen positions and protonation state. In that context structural information from neutron data is complementary to that provided through X-ray diffraction. However, there are practical obstacles to overcome in fully exploiting the potential of neutron diffraction, Le. low flux and weak scattering. Several approaches are available to overcome these obstacles and we have investigated the simplest: increasing the diffracting volume of the crystals. Volume is a quantifiable metric that is well suited for experiment design and optimization techniques. By using response surface methods we have optimized xylose isomerase crystal volume, enabling neutron diffraction while we determined the crystallization parameters with the minimum of experiments. Our results suggest a systematic means of enabling neutron diffraction studies for a larger number of samples that require information on hydrogen position and/or protonation state.

  13. The Comprehensive Health Challenge: Promoting Health through Education. Volume One; Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortese, Peter, Ed.; Middleton, Kathleen, Ed.

    The 32 chapters in this book (presented in two volumes) cover a continuum of issues in comprehensive school health education, including a review of the past and a vision of the future. Volume 1 opens with a foreword by Dr. M. Jocelyn Elders (Surgeon General of the United States) and provides the following chapters: (1) "School Health Education:…

  14. EIN History and Findings. Final Report, Volume I of II Volumes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeGates, John C.; Zafft, Wayne

    Volume one of the two-volume report on the operation of the Educational Information Network (EIN) gives the background, development, and results of the EIN project from its inception in July 1968 to December 1971. EIN attempted to promote the sharing of computing resources at colleges, universities, and educational service institutions across the…

  15. Making the Grade? Globalisation and the Training Market in Australia. Volume 1 [and] Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Richard; Buchanan, John; Bretherton, Tanya; van Barneveld, Kristin; Pickersgill, Richard

    This two-volume document reports on a study of globalization and Australia's training market. Volume 1 begins by examining debate on globalization and industry training in Australia. Discussed next is the study methodology, which involved field studies of the metals and engineering industry in South West Sydney and the Hunter and the information…

  16. Energy Conservation Education Leadership Institute. Final Report, Volume I [And] Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee.

    The document presents the final report of a summer institute to help high school classroom teachers develop and implement energy education programs. The document is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains workshop objectives, the program schedule, a list of participants, and evaluation results. Major objectives were to familiarize participants…

  17. Indian Education Confronts the Seventies. Five Volumes, Volume No. IV: Technical Problems in Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deloria, Vine, Jr., Ed.

    As the fourth volume in a five-volume series of position papers on Indian education, this publication presents seven papers relative to the technicalities of the financial, political, and legislative problems of Indian education. Papers are titled as follows: (1) "State Responsibilities for American Indians--Minnesota" (the question of Federal…

  18. Primary Teachers' Conceptions about the Concept of Volume: The Case of Volume-Measurable Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiz, Mariana

    2003-01-01

    In this paper part of the results obtained by a research project called "Primary Teachers' Thinking about the Concept of Volume and its Teaching", performed from 1997 to 2001, are reported. This paper focuses in one of the two main objectives of the aforementioned research: To describe the mental object volume of the participant teachers. The…

  19. Independent Living Training. A Guide to Programming. Volume I [and] Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmins, Tippy; And Others

    Information on curriculum offerings and program planning and administration of a community-based work and living program for deaf-blind and other severely disabled adolescents and young adults is presented in two volumes. Volume I, an administrative manual independently titled "Community Based Training. Work and Independent Living Training for…

  20. Volume strain within the Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Mossop, Antony; Segall, Paul

    1999-12-10

    During the 1970s and 1980s. The Geysers geothermal region was rapidly developed as a site of geothermal power production. The likelihood that this could cause significant strain within the reservoir, with corresponding surface displacements, led to a series of deformation monitoring surveys. In 1973, 1975, 1977, and 1980, The Geysers region was surveyed using first-order, class I, spirit leveling. In 1994, 1995, and 1996, many of the leveling control monuments were resurveyed using high-precision Global Positioning System receivers. The two survey methods are reconciled using the GEOID96 geoid model. The displacements are inverted to determine volume strain within the reservoir. For the period 1980-1994, peak volume strains in excess of 5x10{sup -4} are imaged. There is an excellent correlation between the observed changes in reservoir steam pressures and the imaged volume strain. If reservoir pressure changes are inducing volume strain, then the reservoir quasi-static bulk modulus K must be <4.6x10{sup 9} Pa. However, seismic velocities indicate a much stiffer reservoir with K=3.4x10{sup 10} Pa. This apparent discrepancy is shown to be consistent with predicted frequency dependence in K for fractured and water-saturated rock. Inversion of surface deformation data therefore appears to be a powerful method for imaging pressure change within the body of the reservoir. Correlation between induced seismicity at The Geysers and volume strain is observed. However, earthquake distribution does not appear to have a simple relationship with volume strain rate. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  1. Time varying, multivariate volume data reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, James P; Fout, Nathaniel; Ma, Kwan - Liu

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale supercomputing is revolutionizing the way science is conducted. A growing challenge, however, is understanding the massive quantities of data produced by large-scale simulations. The data, typically time-varying, multivariate, and volumetric, can occupy from hundreds of gigabytes to several terabytes of storage space. Transferring and processing volume data of such sizes is prohibitively expensive and resource intensive. Although it may not be possible to entirely alleviate these problems, data compression should be considered as part of a viable solution, especially when the primary means of data analysis is volume rendering. In this paper we present our study of multivariate compression, which exploits correlations among related variables, for volume rendering. Two configurations for multidimensional compression based on vector quantization are examined. We emphasize quality reconstruction and interactive rendering, which leads us to a solution using graphics hardware to perform on-the-fly decompression during rendering. In this paper we present a solution which addresses the need for data reduction in large supercomputing environments where data resulting from simulations occupies tremendous amounts of storage. Our solution employs a lossy encoding scheme to acrueve data reduction with several options in terms of rate-distortion behavior. We focus on encoding of multiple variables together, with optional compression in space and time. The compressed volumes can be rendered directly with commodity graphics cards at interactive frame rates and rendering quality similar to that of static volume renderers. Compression results using a multivariate time-varying data set indicate that encoding multiple variables results in acceptable performance in the case of spatial and temporal encoding as compared to independent compression of variables. The relative performance of spatial vs. temporal compression is data dependent, although temporal compression has the

  2. Estimating the volume of Alpine glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. J.; Quincey, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Supraglacial, moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes represent a potential glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) threat to downstream communities in many mountain regions. This has motivated the development of empirical relationships to predict lake volume given a measurement of lake surface area obtained from satellite imagery. Such relationships are based on the notion that lake depth, area and volume scale predictably. We critically evaluate the performance of these existing empirical relationships by examining a global database of glacial lake depths, areas and volumes. Results show that lake area and depth are not always well correlated (r2 = 0.38) and that although lake volume and area are well correlated (r2 = 0.91), and indeed are auto-correlated, there are distinct outliers in the data set. These outliers represent situations where it may not be appropriate to apply existing empirical relationships to predict lake volume and include growing supraglacial lakes, glaciers that recede into basins with complex overdeepened morphologies or that have been deepened by intense erosion and lakes formed where glaciers advance across and block a main trunk valley. We use the compiled data set to develop a conceptual model of how the volumes of supraglacial ponds and lakes, moraine-dammed lakes and ice-dammed lakes should be expected to evolve with increasing area. Although a large amount of bathymetric data exist for moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes, we suggest that further measurements of growing supraglacial ponds and lakes are needed to better understand their development.

  3. Comparison of Coulter volumes with radiometrically determined intracellular water volumes for cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Burres, N.S.; Cass, C.E.

    1989-05-01

    During methotrexate-induced differentiation of cultured human choriocarcinoma (BeWo) cells, proliferation is inhibited, morphologic and biochemical changes occur, and giant, often multinucleated, cells form. We have used the increase in cell volume as a marker of the mature syncytiotrophoblastlike phenotype. Uninduced and differentiated BeWo cells are not spherical, and theoretical considerations suggested that deviations in shape could result in significant errors in Coulter volume. To determine if the values obtained by electrical pulse sizing reflected the actual mass of BeWo cells, we have evaluated the relationship between Coulter volumes and intracellular water volumes obtained using a shape-independent estimate for eight cell types. A close correlation (r2 = 0.97) was found, indicating that cell volume changes in populations of irregularly shaped cells can be accurately measured using a Coulter instrument.

  4. 1998 JANNAF Propulsion Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, Debra S. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This volume, the first of four volumes, is a collection of 40 unclassified/unlimited-distribution papers which were presented at the 1998 Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Propulsion Meeting (JPM), held 15-17 July 1998 at the Cleveland Marriott Downtown at Key Center and the Celebreeze Federal Building in Cleveland, Ohio. The 1998 JPM was co-located with the 1998 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Joint Propulsion Conference. Specific subjects discussed include reusable liquid boosters, controllable solid propulsion, advanced propellants for the 2.75' rocket system, air-turbo-rocket propulsion, issues in gun propulsion, electric propulsion, liquid engine turbomachinery, and new liquid propulsion technology.

  5. Volume accumulator design analysis computer codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, W. D.; Shimazaki, T. T.

    1973-01-01

    The computer codes, VANEP and VANES, were written and used to aid in the design and performance calculation of the volume accumulator units (VAU) for the 5-kwe reactor thermoelectric system. VANEP computes the VAU design which meets the primary coolant loop VAU volume and pressure performance requirements. VANES computes the performance of the VAU design, determined from the VANEP code, at the conditions of the secondary coolant loop. The codes can also compute the performance characteristics of the VAU's under conditions of possible modes of failure which still permit continued system operation.

  6. Solute partial molal volumes in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.; Ziger, D.H.; Johnston, K.P.; Kim, S.

    1986-06-05

    A novel technique is described for the measurement of the partial molal volume at infinite dilution of solutes in supercritical fluids. Results are reported for five systems from 2/sup 0/C above the solvent critical temperature up to 15/sup 0/C above, at pressures from just above the critical pressure to 350 bars. The solute partial molal volumes are small and positive at high pressures, but very large and negative in the highly compressible near-critical region. The results are interpreted in terms of solvent structure and intermolecular forces.

  7. NASA thesaurus. Volume 1: Hierarchical Listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    There are over 17,000 postable terms and nearly 4,000 nonpostable terms approved for use in the NASA scientific and technical information system in the Hierarchical Listing of the NASA Thesaurus. The generic structure is presented for many terms. The broader term and narrower term relationships are shown in an indented fashion that illustrates the generic structure better than the more widely used BT and NT listings. Related terms are generously applied, thus enhancing the usefulness of the Hierarchical Listing. Greater access to the Hierarchical Listing may be achieved with the collateral use of Volume 2 - Access Vocabulary and Volume 3 - Definitions.

  8. Satellite voice broadcast. Volume 2: System study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachtell, E. E.; Bettadapur, S. S.; Coyner, J. V.; Farrell, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Technical Volume of the Satellite Broadcast System Study is presented. Designs are synthesized for direct sound broadcast satellite systems for HF-, VHF-, L-, and Ku-bands. Methods are developed and used to predict satellite weight, volume, and RF performance for the various concepts considered. Cost and schedule risk assessments are performed to predict time and cost required to implement selected concepts. Technology assessments and tradeoffs are made to identify critical enabling technologies that require development to bring technical risk to acceptable levels for full scale development.

  9. On dissipative effects in volume plasmon response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Krotscheck, E.; Suraud, E.

    2016-03-01

    We study the imortance of dissipation on the volume plasmon response in moderate size Sodium clusters. Volume plasmon response has been tentatively identified experimentally in Sodium clusters. An open question is whether the standard mean-field approach, based on Density Functional Theory (DFT), is sufficient to provide a proper description of such modes in a possibly non-linear regime of excitations. A conceptually simple approximation, based on a recently proposed quantum Relaxation Time Ansatz (RTA), is used to evaluate these effects. It turns out that the response is, in the explored cases, clearly dominated by the mean field, which allows the use of simplified theories that give access to larger systems.

  10. Quantum of volume in de Sitter space

    SciTech Connect

    Mielczarek, Jakub; Piechocki, Wlodzimierz

    2011-05-15

    We apply the nonstandard loop quantum cosmology method to quantize a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model with a free scalar field and the cosmological constant {Lambda}>0. Modification of the Hamiltonian in terms of loop geometry parametrized by a length {lambda} introduces a scale dependence of the model. The spectrum of the volume operator is discrete and depends on {Lambda}. Relating quantum of the volume with an elementary lattice cell leads to an explicit dependence of {Lambda} on {lambda}. Based on this assumption, we investigate the possibility of interpreting {Lambda} as a running constant.

  11. Multiple volume compressor for hot gas engine

    DOEpatents

    Stotts, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    A multiple volume compressor for use in a hot gas (Stirling) engine having a plurality of different volume chambers arranged to pump down the engine when decreased power is called for and return the working gas to a storage tank or reservoir. A valve actuated bypass loop is placed over each chamber which can be opened to return gas discharged from the chamber back to the inlet thereto. By selectively actuating the bypass valves, a number of different compressor capacities can be attained without changing compressor speed whereby the capacity of the compressor can be matched to the power available from the engine which is used to drive the compressor.

  12. The 1993 JANNAF Propulsion Meeting, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, Debra S.

    1993-11-01

    This volume, the second of six volumes, is a collection of 30 unclassified/unlimited distribution papers which were presented at the 1993 Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Propulsion Meeting, held 15-19 November 1993 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel and Conference Center and the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. Specific subjects discussed include grain integrity, hybrid motors, liquid engines, turbopumps, reaction control systems, composite motor cases, continuous propellant mixing, nondestructive testing, solar propulsion, combustion chambers, and foreign propulsion technology.

  13. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M.; Donaldson, A.D.

    1991-03-19

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools is disclosed, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figures.

  14. Measurement of Human Blood and Plasma Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Szalkay, H. G. H.

    1987-01-01

    Report reviews techniques for measuring blood-plasma volume in humans. Common technique of using radioactive iodine isotope to label plasma albumin involves unwarranted risks from low-level radiation. Report emphasizes techniques using Evans-blue-dye (T-1824) labeling of albumin, hematocrit or hemoglobin/hematocrit measurements, or blood densitometry. In Evans-blue-dye technique, plasma volume determined from decrease in dye concentration occurring after small amount of dye solution injected into circulatory system. Subjection of Evans blue dye to test for carcinogenicity gave negative results.

  15. Methodology for generating waste volume estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.Q.; Hale, T.; Miller, D.

    1991-09-01

    This document describes the methodology that will be used to calculate waste volume estimates for site characterization and remedial design/remedial action activities at each of the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge (DOE-OR) facilities. This standardized methodology is designed to ensure consistency in waste estimating across the various sites and organizations that are involved in environmental restoration activities. The criteria and assumptions that are provided for generating these waste estimates will be implemented across all DOE-OR facilities and are subject to change based on comments received and actual waste volumes measured during future sampling and remediation activities. 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Students' Reasoning about Invariance of Volume as a Quantity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kara, Melike

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate how upper-elementary-grade students compare the volume of rectangular prisms of equal volume (specifically, students' noticing and reasoning for invariance of volume and coordination of the three linear dimensions of rectangular prisms) and how students' levels of sophistication in volume measurement…

  17. Effect of Lung Volume on Voice Onset Time (VOT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoit, Jeannette D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Five men repeated a phrase, beginning at total lung capacity and ending at residual volume. Analysis indicated that voice onset time (VOT) was longer at high lung volumes and shorter at low lung volumes. Lung volume should, therefore, be considered when using VOT as an index of laryngeal behavior in healthy and speech-disordered individuals.…

  18. STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES DESIGN GUIDE VOLUME 1 - GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is Volume 1 of a three volume series that provides guidance on the selection and design of stormwater management Best Management Practices (BMPs). This first volume provides general considerations associated with the selection and design of BMPs.
    Volume I provi...

  19. 21 CFR 864.5950 - Blood volume measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood volume measuring device. 864.5950 Section... § 864.5950 Blood volume measuring device. (a) Identification. A blood volume measuring device is a..., and total blood volume. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  20. 17 CFR 15.04 - Reportable trading volume level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reportable trading volume... REPORTS-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 15.04 Reportable trading volume level. The volume quantity for the purpose of reports filed under parts 17 and 18 of this chapter is trading volume of 50 or more contracts, during...

  1. 46 CFR 69.65 - Calculation of volumes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calculation of volumes. 69.65 Section 69.65 Shipping... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS Convention Measurement System § 69.65 Calculation of volumes. (a) Volumes V and Vc used... accepted naval architectural practices for the spaces concerned. (b) The volume of the hull below the...

  2. 46 CFR 69.65 - Calculation of volumes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calculation of volumes. 69.65 Section 69.65 Shipping... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS Convention Measurement System § 69.65 Calculation of volumes. (a) Volumes V and Vc used... accepted naval architectural practices for the spaces concerned. (b) The volume of the hull below the...

  3. Surface and Volume Grid Generation in Parametric Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Tzuyi; Soni, Bharat K.; Benjamin, Ted; Williams, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The algorithm for surface modeling and volume grid generation using parametric Non-Uniform Rational B-splines (NURBS) geometric representation are presented. The enhanced re-parameterization algorithm which can yield a desired physical distribution on the curve, surface, and volume is also presented. This approach bridges the gap between computer aided design surface/volume definition and surface/volume grid generation.

  4. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  5. 46 CFR 69.65 - Calculation of volumes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation of volumes. 69.65 Section 69.65 Shipping... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS Convention Measurement System § 69.65 Calculation of volumes. (a) Volumes V and Vc used... other calculations which relate to the form of the vessel (such as displacement volumes and center...

  6. HANDBOOK: GROUND WATER VOLUME I: GROUND WATER AND CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This handbook is an extensively revised version of the Ground Water Handbook, originally published in 1987 as EPA/625/6-87/016. It has been published in two volumes: Volume I: Ground Water and Contamination, EPA/625/6-90/016a, and Volume II: Methodology, EPA/625/6-90/016b. Volume...

  7. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is the second volume in the 1994 annual report for the NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center's Sixth Annual Symposium. This conference covered: (1) Combustors and Nozzles; (2) Turbomachinery Aero- and Hydro-dynamics; (3) On-board Propulsion systems; (4) Advanced Propulsion Applications; (5) Vaporization and Combustion; (6) Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics; and (7) Atomization and Sprays.

  8. 2013 BNL Site Environmental Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ratel, K.; Remien, J.; Pohlot, P.; Williams, J.; Green, T.; Paquette, P.; Dorsch, W.; Welty, T.; Burke, J.

    2014-10-01

    A summary of Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL) Site Environmental Report, meant to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory’s environmental performance in the lab’s surrounding area during the calendar year. The review is comprised of multiple volumes relevant to environmental data/environmental management performance and groundwater status report.

  9. Advances in planetary geology, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a continuation of volume 1; it is a compilation of reports focusing on research into the origin and evolution of the solar system with emphasis on planetary geology. Specific reports include a multispectral and geomorphic investigation of the surface of Europa and a geologic interpretation of remote sensing data for the Martian volcano Ascreaus Mons.

  10. 10 CFR 63.332 - Representative volume.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... accessible environment; (2) Its position and dimensions in the aquifer are determined using average... dimensions of the representative volume. The DOE must propose its chosen method, and any underlying assumptions, to NRC for approval. (1) DOE may calculate the dimensions as a well-capture zone. If DOE...

  11. Federal Register Document Image Database, Volume 1

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Federal Register Document Image Database, Volume 1 (PC database for purchase)   NIST has produced a new document image database for evaluating document analysis and recognition technologies and information retrieval systems. NIST Special Database 25 contains page images from the 1994 Federal Register and much more.

  12. MRI Amygdala Volume in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capitao, Liliana; Sampaio, Adriana; Sampaio, Cassandra; Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Fernandez, Montse; Garayzabal, Elena; Shenton, Martha E.; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most intriguing characteristics of Williams Syndrome individuals is their hypersociability. The amygdala has been consistently implicated in the etiology of this social profile, particularly given its role in emotional and social behavior. This study examined amygdala volume and symmetry in WS individuals and in age and sex matched…

  13. Changes in leg volume during microgravity simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.; Hedge, Vickie; Coleman, Eugene; Uri, John J.; Moore, Thomas P.

    1992-01-01

    Little published information exists regarding the magnitude and time course of cephalad fluid shift resulting from microgravity simulations. Six subjects were exposed to 150 min each at horizontal bed rest, 6-deg head-down tilt, and horizontal water immersion. Fluid shift was estimated by calculating leg volumes from eight serial girth measurements from groin to ankle before, during, and after exposure. Results were compared with data from the first 3 h of spacecraft. By the end of exposure, total leg volume for the six subjects decreased by 2.6 +/- 0.8 percent, 1.7 +/- 1.2 percent, and 4.0 +/- 1.6 percent for horizontal, head-down, and immersion, respectively. Changes had plateaued for horizontal and head-down and had slowed for immersion. Relatively more fluid was lost from the lower leg than the thigh for all three conditions, particularly head-down. During the first 3 h of spaceflight, total leg volume decreased by 8.6 percent, and relatively more fluid was lost from the thigh than the lower leg. The difference in volume changes in microgravity and simulated microgravity may be caused by the small transverse pressures still present in ground-based simulations and the extremely nonlinear compliance of tissue.

  14. Finite volume renormalization scheme for fermionic operators

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostas

    2013-11-01

    We propose a new finite volume renormalization scheme. Our scheme is based on the Gradient Flow applied to both fermion and gauge fields and, much like the Schr\\"odinger functional method, allows for a nonperturbative determination of the scale dependence of operators using a step-scaling approach. We give some preliminary results for the pseudo-scalar density in the quenched approximation.

  15. Construction Cluster Volume II [Masonry Work].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Justice, Harrisburg. Bureau of Correction.

    The document is the second of a series, to be integrated with a G.E.D. program, containing instructional materials at the basic skills level for the construction cluster. The volume focuses on masonry and consists of 20 instructional units which require a month of study. The units include: (1) historical aspects of masonry work and occupational…

  16. Basic Communication Course Annual. Volume 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburger, Craig, Ed.

    This volume of an annual collection presents 13 essays relating to instruction in the basic communication course. Six of the essays are on the theme of cultural diversity in the basic course. The essays are: "The Differential Impact of a Basic Public Speaking Course on Perceived Communication Competencies in Class, Work, and Social Contexts"…

  17. Annual Review of Psychology, Volume 33, 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenzweig, Mark R., Ed.; Porter, Lyman W., Ed.

    This volume contains 20 essays on current research in representative areas of psychology. The authors are professors and researchers at universities in the United States, England, Colombia, Poland, Australia, the Netherlands, France, and Canada. A wide range of topics is discussed. Included among these are social psychology of intergroup…

  18. Natural gas annual 1994: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, Volume 2, presents historical data fro the Nation from 1930 to 1994, and by State from 1967 to 1994.

  19. Basic Communication Course Annual. Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugenberg, Lawrence W., Ed.

    This volume of an annual collection of essays relating to instruction in the basic communication course presents 1992 Speech Communication Association Basic Course Committee award winning papers, articles on teaching assistants in the basic course, approaches to teaching in the basic course, research on the basic course, and a commentary. Essays…

  20. Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, Regina E; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Wyrick, Steve

    2008-09-15

    The Site Environmental Report for 2007 is an integrated report on the environmental programs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and satisfies the requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

  1. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, Regina; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Xu, Suying

    2009-09-21

    The Site Environmental Report for 2008 is an integrated report on environmental programs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and satisfies the requirements of DOE Order 231.1 A., Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities

  2. Directions in Rehabilitation Counseling. Volume 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Directions in Rehabilitation Counseling, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Rehabilitation counselors must stay apprised of numerous issues in their field. To help them remain current, this volume features 12 lessons which can count as continuing education credits. Lesson 1 explores issues surrounding Latino clients, focusing on cultural considerations, ethnic identity, and the counselor-client relationship. Sexuality…

  3. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Doelling, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  4. FLES NEWS, Volume 5, 1991-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FLES NEWS, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Articles in the three Volume 5 issues of the National Network for Early Language Learning newsletter include: "Young Authors--A Double Success" (Carolyn Andrade); "Teacher Preparation for Elementary School Foreign Language Programs" (Carol Ann Pesola); "Strategies in a Small School Setting: The Filley FLES Program" (Zoe E. Louton, Robert E.…

  5. First CLIPS Conference Proceedings, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The topics of volume 2 of First CLIPS Conference are associated with following applications: quality control; intelligent data bases and networks; Space Station Freedom; Space Shuttle and satellite; user interface; artificial neural systems and fuzzy logic; parallel and distributed processing; enchancements to CLIPS; aerospace; simulation and defense; advisory systems and tutors; and intelligent control.

  6. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Doelling, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  7. Construction Cluster Volume IV: [Concrete Work].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Justice, Harrisburg. Bureau of Correction.

    The document is the fourth of a series, to be integrated with a G.E.D. program, containing instructional materials for the construction cluster. The volume focuses on concrete work and consists of 20 instructional units which require a month of study. The units include: (1) uses of concrete and occupational information; (2) soils, drainage, and…

  8. Occupational Information 1990/91. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Nebraska Career Information System.

    The Nebraska Occupational Information books (volumes I and II) contain information about 386 different occupations in the state and answer questions about specific occupations in detail. The descriptions are arranged according to a U.S. Department of Labor classification system, with occupational titles clustered in general groups of selected…

  9. Gender and Education. An Encyclopedia. Volume I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank, Barbara J., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    In this two volume set, educators explore the intersection of gender and education. Their entries deal with educational theories, research, curricula, practices, personnel, and policies, but also with variations in the gendering of education across historical and cultural contexts. The various contributors discuss gender as a social construction.…

  10. Basic Communication Course Annual. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugenberg, Lawrence W., Ed.

    This volume of an annual collection of essays relating to instruction in the basic communication course is presented in five sections: (1) Six Approaches to the Introductory Course: A Forum; (2) 1990 Basic Course Committee Award Winning Papers; (3) Instruction in the Introductory Communication Course; (4) Research on the Introductory Communication…

  11. REACH. Teacher's Guide, Volume III. Task Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, James Lee; And Others

    Designed for use with individualized instructional units (CE 026 345-347, CE 026 349-351) in the electromechanical cluster, this third volume of the postsecondary teacher's guide presents the task analysis which was used in the development of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air Conditioning, Heating) curriculum. The major blocks of…

  12. Golden Hill, Volume Five. Work and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Lee, Ed.; And Others

    The 12 articles and stories in this issue focus on the integration of work and learning and on adult learning. "An Introduction to 'Work and Learning'" (Lee Herman) outlines the scope of the volume. "Child's Work" (Nancy Wallace) shows children's independent play to be important intellectual work. "Learning to Write" (Laura Robert) is a Kafkaesque…

  13. A Course in Baluchi. Volume Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Muhammad Abd-al-Rahman; Mengal, Aqil Khan

    Volume Two contains Units XXI through XXX of the Baluchi course. Unit XXI introduces the Arabic script as adapted for Baluchi. Special conventions, abbreviations, numerals, and punctuation symbols are discussed next, and several sections are devoted to the orthography of certain substantive and verbal affies. A series of reading drills which…

  14. Introducing Literary Arabic, Volume II: Grammatical Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Sami A.; Greis, Naguib

    This volume, designed as a companion to "Introducing Literary Arabic" provides basic grammatical explanations essential in first-year courses. Each of the 15 units, with the exception of the first, contains related grammatical notes, paradigms, and illustrations. The grammatical rules are intended to make explicit general underlying structures.…

  15. CONSTANT VOLUME SAMPLING SYSTEM WATER CONDENSATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion of organic motor vehicle fuels produces carbon dioxide and water (H2O) vapor (and also products of incomplete combustion, e.g. hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide, at lower concentrations). he Constant Volume Sampling (CVS) system, commonly used to condition auto exhaust ...

  16. New Trends in Mathematics Teaching, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This volume consists of 29 papers and articles from leading mathematics-teaching journals in many countries. Discussed is new content and curricula and unusual approaches and techniques in the teaching of mathematics at the elementary and secondary levels. Some topics discussed are theories of mathematics instruction, new mathematical experiences…

  17. EVALUATION OF GROUNDWATER EXTRACTION REMEDIES - VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    This volume was prepared as part of an evaluation of groundwater extraction remedies completed under EPA Contract No. 68-W8-0098. It presents 19 case studies of individual sites where ground-water extraction systems have been implemented. These case studies present site characte...

  18. American Industries. Performance Objectives. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsbury, Paul; And Others

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of the three categories (Manufacturing, Graphic Communication, and Power) included in this second of a two-volume course guide on American industries. The materials were developed for a 9- to 12-week course for seventh grade students to acquaint…

  19. Basic Communication Course Annual. Volume 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburger, Craig, Ed.

    This volume of an annual collection of essays presents seven essays relating to instruction in the basic communication course. The essays are: "Gerald M. Phillips' Devotion to Basic Communication Skills" (Julia T. Wood); "The Basic Course in Organizational Communication: A National Survey" (Donald Treadwell and Ronald L. Applbaum); "Improving Oral…

  20. Gastric Residual Volume: Rethinking the Threshold.

    PubMed

    Emami Zeydi, Amir; Sharafkhani, Mohammad; Armat, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    There are many challenges related to enteral feedings of the mechanically ventilated patient. Among the most often debated issues is the threshold for gastric residual volume before further feeding. This brief article considers the factors to be considered and reviews current thinking on the topic. PMID:27575801