Science.gov

Sample records for 320x240 pixel lec

  1. X-ray imaging using a 320 x 240 hybrid GaAs pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Irsigler, R.; Andersson, J.; Alverbro, J.

    1999-06-01

    The authors present room temperature measurements on 200 {micro}m thick GaAs pixel detectors, which were hybridized to silicon readout circuits. The whole detector array contains 320 x 240 square shaped pixel with a pitch of 38 {micro}m and is based on semi-insulating liquid-encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) GaAs material. After fabricating and dicing, the detector chips were indium bump flip chip bonded to CMOS readout circuits based on charge integration and finally evaluated. This readout chip was originally designed for the readout of flip chip bonded infrared detectors, but appears to be suitable for X-ray applications as well. A bias voltage between 50 V and 100 V was sufficient to operate the detector at room temperature. The detector array did respond to x-ray radiation by an increase in current due to production of electron hole pairs by the ionization processes. Images of various objects and slit patterns were acquired by using a standard X-ray source for dental imaging. The new X-ray hybrid detector was analyzed with respect to its imaging properties. Due to the high absorption coefficient for X-rays in GaAs and the small pixel size, the sensor shows a high modulation transfer function up to the Nyquist frequency.

  2. 320 x 240 uncooled IRFPA with pixel wise thin film vacuum packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yon, J.-J.; Dumont, G.; Rabaud, W.; Becker, S.; Carle, L.; Goudon, V.; Vialle, C.; Hamelin, A.; Arnaud, A.

    2012-10-01

    Silicon based vacuum packaging is a key enabling technology for achieving affordable uncooled Infrared Focal Plane Arrays (IRFPA) as required by the promising mass market for very low cost IR applications, such as automotive driving assistance, energy loss monitoring in buildings, motion sensors… Among the various approaches studied worldwide, the CEA, LETI is developing a unique technology where each bolometer pixel is sealed under vacuum at the wafer level, using an IR transparent thin film deposition. This technology referred to as PLP (Pixel Level Packaging), leads to an array of hermetic micro-caps each containing a single microbolometer. Since the successful demonstration that the PLP technology, when applied on a single microbolometer pixel, can provide the required vacuum < 10-3 mbar, the authors have pushed forward the development of the technology on fully operational QVGA readout circuits CMOS base wafers (320 x 240 pixels). In this outlook, the article reports on the electro optical performance obtained from this preliminary PLP based QVGA demonstrator. Apart from the response, noise and NETD distributions, the paper also puts emphasis on additional key features such as thermal time constant, image quality, and ageing properties.

  3. 320x240 and 640x480 UFPAs for TWS and DVE applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C. J.; Rawlings, Richard; Sweeney, Mike; Whicker, Steve; Peysha, Doug; Clarke, J. Elwood; Sullivan, Bill; Li, Chuan; Howard, Phillip

    2005-05-01

    DRS Technologies has designed and delivered Thermal Weapon Site (TWS) and Driver's Viewer Enhancer (DVE) system using its U3500 (320x240) and U6000 (640x480) 1-mil detector arrays. The detectors are modified to enhance its manufacturability, thermal time constant, package life time, and its reliability under shock and vibration to meet TWS and DVE requirements. The U6000 array operates at 30 Hz frame rate with NETD less than 50 mK normalized to F/1.0 optics. At a saving to the system weight and power, these arrays operate from -40°C to +65°C without the aid of a TE cooler. This is accomplished through a combination of sensor calibration and smart ROIC architecture.

  4. Enhanced amorphous silicon technology for 320 x 240 microbolometer arrays with a pitch of 35 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottin, Eric; Martin, Jean-Luc; Ouvrier-Buffet, Jean-Louis; Vilain, Michel; Bain, Astrid; Yon, Jean-Jacques; Tissot, Jean-Luc; Chatard, Jean-Pierre

    2001-10-01

    LETI LIR has been involved in Amorphous Silicon uncooled microbolometer development for years. This technology is now in production at Sofradir and first delivery have already been done to customers. From our background in modeling and material mastering LETI/LIR concentrate now on performance enhancement. This is a key point for cost reduction due to the fact that signal to noise ratio enhancement will allow us to decrease the pitch. A new approach of packaging is also described in this paper and first results are displayed. A new technological stack of amorphous silicon fully compatible with industrial process is presented. Electro-optical results obtained from an IRCMOS 320 X 240 with 35 μm pitch are presented. NETD close to 35 mK has been obtained with our new embodiment of amorphous silicon microbolometer technology.

  5. Advanced high-performance 320x240 VOx microbolometer uncooled IR focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Philip E.; Clarke, John E.; Parrish, William J.; Woolaway, James T., II

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes Boeing's next-generation 320 X 320 uncooled IR focal plane product. The basic objectives have ben to at least double focal plane performance, improve focal pane operating stability, and significantly enhance the control interface between the focal pane and the camera. All of these basic objectives have been achieved. Focal plane temporal NETD equals 0.028 degrees C has been demonstrated at a frame rate of 60 Hz on the first lot of UFPAs produced, as well as a worst-case spatial NETD < 0.016 degrees C measured over 10 degrees C temperature calibration range. Operating stability improvement has been successfully demonstrated. The design has validated a 'smart sensor' UFPA/camera control interface that provides externally programmability of on-chip signal gain, on-chip pixel offset compensation, on-chip detector bias regulation, precision on-chip temperature measurement, and a 16 test- point Built In Test function. Based on Lot-1 test results, the next lot, which is now in wafer processing, is expected to achieve NETD < 0.02 degrees C at a 60 Hz frame rate. With an improved microbolometer Thermal Isolation Structure, currently in development at Boeing, NETD < 0.010 degrees C can be demonstrated before the end of this year.

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans galectins LEC-6 and LEC-10 interact with similar glycoconjugates in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Maduzia, Lisa L; Yu, Evan; Zhang, Yinhua

    2011-02-11

    Galectins are a family of metazoan proteins that show binding to various β-galactoside-containing glycans. Because of a lack of proper tools, the interaction of galectins with their specific glycan ligands in the cells and tissues are largely unknown. We have investigated the localization of galectin ligands in Caenorhabditis elegans using a novel technology that relies on the high binding specificity between galectins and their endogenous ligands. Fluorescently labeled recombinant galectin fusions are found to bind to ligands located in diverse tissues including the intestine, pharynx, and the rectal valve. Consistent with their role as galactoside-binding proteins, the interaction with their ligands is inhibited by galactose or lactose. Two of the galectins, LEC-6 and LEC-10, recognize ligands that co-localize along the intestinal lumen. The ligands for LEC-6 and LEC-10 are absent in three glycosylation mutants bre-1, fut-8, and galt-1, which have been shown to be required to synthesize the Gal-β1,4-Fuc modifications of the core N-glycans unique to C. elegans and several other invertebrates. Both galectins pull down the same set of glycoproteins in a manner dependent on the presence of these carbohydrate modifications. Endogenous LEC-6 and LEC-10 are expressed in the intestinal cells, but they are localized to different subcellular compartments that do not appear to overlap with each other or with the location of their glycan targets. An altered subcellular distribution of these ligands is found in mutants lacking both galectins. These results suggest a model where LEC-6 and LEC-10 interact with glycoproteins through specific glycans to regulate their cellular fate. PMID:21115491

  7. Design of ADC in 25 μm pixels pitch dedicated for IRFPA image processing at LETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchagaspanian, M.; Villard, P.; Dupont, B.; Chammings, G.; Martin, J. L.; Pistre, C.; Lattard, D.; Chantre, C.; Arnaud, A.; Yon, J. J.; Simoens, F.; Tissot, J. L.

    2007-04-01

    LETI has been involved in IRFPA development since 1978, the design department (LETI/DCIS) has focused its work on new ROIC architecture since many years. The trend is to integrate advanced functions into the CMOS design in the aim of making cost efficient sensors. The purpose of this paper is to present the latest developments of an Analog to Digital Converter embedded in a 25μm pixel. The design is driven by several goals. It targets both long integration time and snapshot exposure, 100% of image frame time being available for integration. All pixels are integrating the IR signal at the same time. The IR signal is converted into digital by using a charge packet counter. High density 130nm CMOS allows to use many digital functions such as counting, memory and addressing. This new structure has been applied to 25μm pitch bolometer sensors with a dedicated 320 x 240 IRCMOS circuit. Due to smart image processing in the CMOS, the bolometer architecture requirements may become very simple and low cost. The room temperature sensitivity and the DC offset are solved directly in the pixel. This FPA targets low NETD (<50mK), a variation of 80 Kelvin for the FPA temperature, 14 bits output at 50/60Hz video rate.

  8. High-performance uncooled amorphous silicon VGA and XGA IRFPA with 17μm pixel-pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.; Tinnes, S.; Durand, A.; Minassian, C.; Robert, P.; Vilain, M.

    2010-10-01

    The high level of accumulated expertise by ULIS and CEA/LETI on uncooled microbolometers made from amorphous silicon with 45μm, 35μm and 25μm, enables ULIS to develop VGA and XGA IRFPA formats with 17μm pixel-pitch to fulfill every applications. These detector keeps all the recent innovations developed on the 25μm pixel-pitch ROIC (detector configuration by serial link, low power consumption and wide electrical dynamic range). The specific appeal of these units lies in the high spatial resolution it provides while keeping the small thermal time constant. The reduction of the pixel-pitch turns the TEC-less VGA array into a product well adapted for high resolution and compact systems and the XGA a product well adapted for high resolution imaging systems. High electro-optical performances have been demonstrated with NETD < 50mK. We insist on NETD and wide thermal dynamic range trade-off, and on the high characteristics uniformity, achieved thanks to the mastering of the amorphous silicon technology as well as the ROIC design. This technology node paves the way to high end products as well as low end compact smaller formats like 320 x 240 and 160 x 120 or smaller.

  9. Genomic Rearrangements and Functional Diversification of lecA and lecB Lectin-Coding Regions Impacting the Efficacy of Glycomimetics Directed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Boukerb, Amine M; Decor, Aude; Ribun, Sébastien; Tabaroni, Rachel; Rousset, Audric; Commin, Loris; Buff, Samuel; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne; Vidal, Sébastien; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    LecA and LecB tetrameric lectins take part in oligosaccharide-mediated adhesion-processes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Glycomimetics have been designed to block these interactions. The great versatility of P. aeruginosa suggests that the range of application of these glycomimetics could be restricted to genotypes with particular lectin types. The likelihood of having genomic and genetic changes impacting LecA and LecB interactions with glycomimetics such as galactosylated and fucosylated calix[4]arene was investigated over a collection of strains from the main clades of P. aeruginosa. Lectin types were defined, and their ligand specificities were inferred. These analyses showed a loss of lecA among the PA7 clade. Genomic changes impacting lec loci were thus assessed using strains of this clade, and by making comparisons with the PAO1 genome. The lecA regions were found challenged by phage attacks and PAGI-2 (genomic island) integrations. A prophage was linked to the loss of lecA. The lecB regions were found less impacted by such rearrangements but greater lecB than lecA genetic divergences were recorded. Sixteen combinations of LecA and LecB types were observed. Amino acid variations were mapped on PAO1 crystal structures. Most significant changes were observed on LecBPA7, and found close to the fucose binding site. Glycan array analyses were performed with purified LecBPA7. LecBPA7 was found less specific for fucosylated oligosaccharides than LecBPAO1, with a preference for H type 2 rather than type 1, and Lewis(a) rather than Lewis(x). Comparison of the crystal structures of LecBPA7 and LecBPAO1 in complex with Lewis(a) showed these changes in specificity to have resulted from a modification of the water network between the lectin, galactose and GlcNAc residues. Incidence of these modifications on the interactions with calix[4]arene glycomimetics at the cell level was investigated. An aggregation test was used to establish the efficacy of these ligands. Great

  10. Genomic Rearrangements and Functional Diversification of lecA and lecB Lectin-Coding Regions Impacting the Efficacy of Glycomimetics Directed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Boukerb, Amine M.; Decor, Aude; Ribun, Sébastien; Tabaroni, Rachel; Rousset, Audric; Commin, Loris; Buff, Samuel; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne; Vidal, Sébastien; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    LecA and LecB tetrameric lectins take part in oligosaccharide-mediated adhesion-processes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Glycomimetics have been designed to block these interactions. The great versatility of P. aeruginosa suggests that the range of application of these glycomimetics could be restricted to genotypes with particular lectin types. The likelihood of having genomic and genetic changes impacting LecA and LecB interactions with glycomimetics such as galactosylated and fucosylated calix[4]arene was investigated over a collection of strains from the main clades of P. aeruginosa. Lectin types were defined, and their ligand specificities were inferred. These analyses showed a loss of lecA among the PA7 clade. Genomic changes impacting lec loci were thus assessed using strains of this clade, and by making comparisons with the PAO1 genome. The lecA regions were found challenged by phage attacks and PAGI-2 (genomic island) integrations. A prophage was linked to the loss of lecA. The lecB regions were found less impacted by such rearrangements but greater lecB than lecA genetic divergences were recorded. Sixteen combinations of LecA and LecB types were observed. Amino acid variations were mapped on PAO1 crystal structures. Most significant changes were observed on LecBPA7, and found close to the fucose binding site. Glycan array analyses were performed with purified LecBPA7. LecBPA7 was found less specific for fucosylated oligosaccharides than LecBPAO1, with a preference for H type 2 rather than type 1, and Lewisa rather than Lewisx. Comparison of the crystal structures of LecBPA7 and LecBPAO1 in complex with Lewisa showed these changes in specificity to have resulted from a modification of the water network between the lectin, galactose and GlcNAc residues. Incidence of these modifications on the interactions with calix[4]arene glycomimetics at the cell level was investigated. An aggregation test was used to establish the efficacy of these ligands. Great variations

  11. T-LECS: The Control Software System for MOIRCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, T.; Omata, K.; Konishi, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Suzuki, R.; Tokoku, C.; Katsuno, Y.; Nishimura, T.

    2006-07-01

    MOIRCS (Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph) is a new instrument for the Subaru Telescope. We present the system design of the control software system for MOIRCS, named T-LECS (Tohoku University - Layered Electronic Control System). T-LECS is a PC-Linux based network distributed system. Two PCs equipped with the focal plane array system operate two HAWAII2 detectors, respectively, and another PC is used for user interfaces and a database server. Moreover, these PCs control various devices for observations distributed on a TCP/IP network. T-LECS has three interfaces; interfaces to the devices and two user interfaces. One of the user interfaces is to the integrated observation control system (Subaru Observation Software System) for observers, and another one provides the system developers the direct access to the devices of MOIRCS. In order to help the communication between these interfaces, we employ an SQL database system.

  12. 47 CFR 51.705 - Incumbent LECs' rates for transport and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Incumbent LECs' rates for transport and... CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Reciprocal Compensation for Transport and Termination of Telecommunications Traffic § 51.705 Incumbent LECs' rates for transport and termination. (a) An incumbent LEC's...

  13. 47 CFR 51.705 - Incumbent LECs' rates for transport and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Incumbent LECs' rates for transport and... CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Reciprocal Compensation for Transport and Termination of Telecommunications Traffic § 51.705 Incumbent LECs' rates for transport and termination. (a) An incumbent LEC's...

  14. 47 CFR 51.911 - Access reciprocal compensation rates for competitive LECs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... competitive LECs. 51.911 Section 51.911 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Transitional Access Service Pricing § 51.911 Access... Competitive LECs operating in an area served by a Price Cap Carrier, no such Competitive LEC may increase...

  15. 47 CFR 51.705 - LECs' rates for transport and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false LECs' rates for transport and termination. 51... SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Reciprocal Compensation for Transport and Termination of Telecommunications Traffic § 51.705 LECs' rates for transport and termination. (a) Notwithstanding any...

  16. 47 CFR 51.705 - LECs' rates for transport and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false LECs' rates for transport and termination. 51... SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Reciprocal Compensation for Transport and Termination of Telecommunications Traffic § 51.705 LECs' rates for transport and termination. (a) Notwithstanding any...

  17. 47 CFR 51.705 - LECs' rates for transport and termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false LECs' rates for transport and termination. 51... SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Reciprocal Compensation for Transport and Termination of Telecommunications Traffic § 51.705 LECs' rates for transport and termination. (a) Notwithstanding any...

  18. 47 CFR 51.707 - Default proxies for incumbent LECs' transport and termination rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Default proxies for incumbent LECs' transport... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Reciprocal Compensation for Transport and Termination of Telecommunications Traffic § 51.707 Default proxies for incumbent LECs' transport...

  19. 47 CFR 69.711 - Channel terminations between LEC end offices and customer premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and customer premises. 69.711 Section 69.711 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... terminations between LEC end offices and customer premises. (a) Scope. This paragraph governs requests for pricing flexibility with respect to channel terminations between LEC end offices and customer premises....

  20. 47 CFR 51.707 - Default proxies for incumbent LECs' transport and termination rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Default proxies for incumbent LECs' transport... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Reciprocal Compensation for Transport and Termination of Telecommunications Traffic § 51.707 Default proxies for incumbent LECs' transport...

  1. PIXEL PUSHER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanfill, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    Pixel Pusher is a Macintosh application used for viewing and performing minor enhancements on imagery. It will read image files in JPL's two primary image formats- VICAR and PDS - as well as the Macintosh PICT format. VICAR (NPO-18076) handles an array of image processing capabilities which may be used for a variety of applications including biomedical image processing, cartography, earth resources, and geological exploration. Pixel Pusher can also import VICAR format color lookup tables for viewing images in pseudocolor (256 colors). This program currently supports only eight bit images but will work on monitors with any number of colors. Arbitrarily large image files may be viewed in a normal Macintosh window. Color and contrast enhancement can be performed with a graphical "stretch" editor (as in contrast stretch). In addition, VICAR images may be saved as Macintosh PICT files for exporting into other Macintosh programs, and individual pixels can be queried to determine their locations and actual data values. Pixel Pusher is written in Symantec's Think C and was developed for use on a Macintosh SE30, LC, or II series computer running System Software 6.0.3 or later and 32 bit QuickDraw. Pixel Pusher will only run on a Macintosh which supports color (whether a color monitor is being used or not). The standard distribution medium for this program is a set of three 3.5 inch Macintosh format diskettes. The program price includes documentation. Pixel Pusher was developed in 1991 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. Think C is a trademark of Symantec Corporation. Macintosh is a registered trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.

  2. 47 CFR 69.709 - Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... other than channel terminations between LEC end offices and customer premises. 69.709 Section 69.709... terminations between LEC end offices and customer premises. (a) Scope. This paragraph governs requests for... transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end offices and...

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin LecB inhibits tissue repair processes by triggering β-catenin degradation

    PubMed Central

    Cott, Catherine; Thuenauer, Roland; Landi, Alessia; Kühn, Katja; Juillot, Samuel; Imberty, Anne; Madl, Josef; Eierhoff, Thorsten; Römer, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that induces severe lung infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and acute lung injury. Under these conditions, the bacterium diminishes epithelial integrity and inhibits tissue repair mechanisms, leading to persistent infections. Understanding the involved bacterial virulence factors and their mode of action is essential for the development of new therapeutic approaches. In our study we discovered a so far unknown effect of the P. aeruginosa lectin LecB on host cell physiology. LecB alone was sufficient to attenuate migration and proliferation of human lung epithelial cells and to induce transcriptional activity of NF-κB. These effects are characteristic of impaired tissue repair. Moreover, we found a strong degradation of β-catenin, which was partially recovered by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. In addition, LecB induced loss of cell–cell contacts and reduced expression of the β-catenin targets c-myc and cyclin D1. Blocking of LecB binding to host cell plasma membrane receptors by soluble l-fucose prevented these changes in host cell behavior and signaling, and thereby provides a powerful strategy to suppress LecB function. Our findings suggest that P. aeruginosa employs LecB as a virulence factor to induce β-catenin degradation, which then represses processes that are directly linked to tissue recovery. PMID:26862060

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin LecB inhibits tissue repair processes by triggering β-catenin degradation.

    PubMed

    Cott, Catherine; Thuenauer, Roland; Landi, Alessia; Kühn, Katja; Juillot, Samuel; Imberty, Anne; Madl, Josef; Eierhoff, Thorsten; Römer, Winfried

    2016-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that induces severe lung infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and acute lung injury. Under these conditions, the bacterium diminishes epithelial integrity and inhibits tissue repair mechanisms, leading to persistent infections. Understanding the involved bacterial virulence factors and their mode of action is essential for the development of new therapeutic approaches. In our study we discovered a so far unknown effect of the P. aeruginosa lectin LecB on host cell physiology. LecB alone was sufficient to attenuate migration and proliferation of human lung epithelial cells and to induce transcriptional activity of NF-κB. These effects are characteristic of impaired tissue repair. Moreover, we found a strong degradation of β-catenin, which was partially recovered by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. In addition, LecB induced loss of cell-cell contacts and reduced expression of the β-catenin targets c-myc and cyclin D1. Blocking of LecB binding to host cell plasma membrane receptors by soluble l-fucose prevented these changes in host cell behavior and signaling, and thereby provides a powerful strategy to suppress LecB function. Our findings suggest that P. aeruginosa employs LecB as a virulence factor to induce β-catenin degradation, which then represses processes that are directly linked to tissue recovery. PMID:26862060

  5. Decreased tumorigenicity correlates with expression of altered cell surface carbohydrates in Lec9 CHO cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ripka, J; Shin, S; Stanley, P

    1986-01-01

    To investigate a role for surface carbohydrates in cellular malignancy, 15 different glycosylation-defective CHO cell mutants were examined for their tumorigenic and metastatic capacities after subcutaneous injection into nude mice. Most of the glycosylation mutants displayed similar or slightly decreased tumorigenicity compared with parental CHO cells. Neither parental CHO cells nor any of the mutants were observed to metastasize. However, independent isolates of one mutant type, Lec9, showed a dramatic reduction in tumor formation. The altered carbohydrates expressed at the surface of Lec9 cells appeared to be responsible for their loss of tumorigenicity, because revertants for lectin resistance were able to form tumors, and a double mutant (Lec9.Lec1) that expressed a Lec1 glycosylation phenotype also formed tumors. Finally, Lec9 cells were able to form tumors in gamma-irradiated nude mice, suggesting that recognition by an irradiation-sensitive host cell(s) was responsible for their reduced tumorigenicity in untreated nude mice. PMID:3785164

  6. Pixel Perfect

    SciTech Connect

    Perrine, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2005-09-01

    cubic warp. During image acquisitions, the cubic warp is evaluated by way of forward differencing. Unwanted pixelation artifacts are minimized by bilinear sampling. The resulting system is state-of-the-art for biological imaging. Precisely registered images enable the reliable use of FRET techniques. In addition, real-time image processing performance allows computed images to be fed back and displayed to scientists immediately, and the pipelined nature of the FPGA allows additional image processing algorithms to be incorporated into the system without slowing throughput.

  7. Single CRD containing lectin from Macrobrachium rosenbergii (MrLec) participates in innate immunity against pathogen infections.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Li, Wen; Jin, Min; Ma, Fu-Tong; Huang, Ying; Shi, Yan-Ru; Zhao, Ling-Ling; Feng, Jin-Ling; Ren, Qian; Wang, Wen

    2016-04-01

    As a type of pattern-recognition proteins, lectins perform important functions in the innate immunity of crustaceans, including prawns. Although several reports showed that C-type lectin domain family (CLEC) importantly functions in host-pathogen interactions, limited research has focused on CLEC in Macrobrachium rosenbergii. In the present study, a new single CRD containing CLEC (designated as MrLec) was reported in freshwater prawns, M. rosenbergii. The full-length cDNA of MrLec consisted of 1027 bp with an open reading frame of 801 bp, which encoded a peptide of 266 amino acid residues. Genomic sequence for MrLec was also obtained from the M. rosenbergii, which contain 4 exons and 3 introns. MrLec was found to contain a single carbohydrate-recognition domain with an EPN motif. MrLec was ubiquitously distributed in various tissues of a normal prawn, particularly in the hepatopancreas and gills. MrLec expression in the gills was significantly upregulated after a challenge with Vibrio parahaemolyticus and downregulated at 24 h after MrLec RNA interference (MrLec-RNAi). The expression levels of some AMPs, including antilipopolysaccharide factor 1 (Alf1) and lysozyme 2 (Lyso2), also markedly decreased after MrLec-RNAi. Recombinant MrLec can agglutinate (Ca(2+)-dependent) and bind both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Results suggested that MrLec participates in the recognition of invading pathogens and functions in the immune response of prawn against pathogen infections. PMID:26923244

  8. Functionalization of a Rigid Divalent Ligand for LecA, a Bacterial Adhesion Lectin**

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ou; Pukin, Aliaksei V; Quarles van Ufford, H C; Kemmink, Johan; de Mol, Nico J; Pieters, Roland J

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial adhesion lectin LecA is an attractive target for interference with the infectivity of its producer P. aeruginosa. Divalent ligands with two terminal galactoside moieties connected by an alternating glucose-triazole spacer were previously shown to be very potent inhibitors. In this study, we chose to prepare a series of derivatives with various new substituents in the spacer in hopes of further enhancing the LecA inhibitory potency of the molecules. Based on the binding mode, modifications were made to the spacer to enable additional spacer–protein interactions. The introduction of positively charged, negatively charged, and also lipophilic functional groups was successful. The compounds were good LecA ligands, but no improved binding was seen, even though altered thermodynamic parameters were observed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). PMID:26478841

  9. Structural Insight into Multivalent Galactoside Binding to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lectin LecA.

    PubMed

    Visini, Ricardo; Jin, Xian; Bergmann, Myriam; Michaud, Gaelle; Pertici, Francesca; Fu, Ou; Pukin, Aliaksei; Branson, Thomas R; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M E; Kemmink, Johan; Gillon, Emilie; Imberty, Anne; Stocker, Achim; Darbre, Tamis; Pieters, Roland J; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2015-11-20

    Multivalent galactosides inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms may help control this problematic pathogen. To understand the binding mode of tetravalent glycopeptide dendrimer GalAG2 [(Gal-β-OC6H4CO-Lys-Pro-Leu)4(Lys-Phe-Lys-Ile)2Lys-His-Ile-NH2] to its target lectin LecA, crystal structures of LecA complexes with divalent analog GalAG1 [(Gal-β-OC6H4CO-Lys-Pro-Leu)2Lys-Phe-Lys-Ile-NH2] and related glucose-triazole linked bis-galactosides 3u3 [Gal-β-O(CH2)n-(C2HN3)-4-Glc-β-(C2HN3)-[β-Glc-4-(N3HC2)]2-(CH2)n-O-β-Gal (n = 1)] and 5u3 (n = 3) were obtained, revealing a chelate bound 3u3, cross-linked 5u3, and monovalently bound GalAG1. Nevertheless, a chelate bound model better explaining their strong LecA binding and the absence of lectin aggregation was obtained by modeling for all three ligands. A model of the chelate bound GalAG2·LecA complex was also obtained rationalizing its unusually tight LecA binding (KD = 2.5 nM) and aggregation by lectin cross-linking. The very weak biofilm inhibition with divalent LecA inhibitors suggests that lectin aggregation is necessary for biofilm inhibition by GalAG2, pointing to multivalent glycoclusters as a unique opportunity to control P. aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:26295304

  10. 47 CFR 52.23 - Deployment of long-term database methods for number portability by LECs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Deployment of long-term database methods for... database methods for number portability by LECs. (a) Subject to paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, all... LECs must provide a long-term database method for number portability in the 100 largest...

  11. 47 CFR 52.23 - Deployment of long-term database methods for number portability by LECs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Deployment of long-term database methods for... database methods for number portability by LECs. (a) Subject to paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, all... LECs must provide a long-term database method for number portability in the 100 largest...

  12. 47 CFR 52.23 - Deployment of long-term database methods for number portability by LECs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Deployment of long-term database methods for... database methods for number portability by LECs. (a) Subject to paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, all... LECs must provide a long-term database method for number portability in the 100 largest...

  13. 47 CFR 52.23 - Deployment of long-term database methods for number portability by LECs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deployment of long-term database methods for... database methods for number portability by LECs. (a) Subject to paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, all... LECs must provide a long-term database method for number portability in the 100 largest...

  14. 47 CFR 52.23 - Deployment of long-term database methods for number portability by LECs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Deployment of long-term database methods for... database methods for number portability by LECs. (a) Subject to paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, all... LECs must provide a long-term database method for number portability in the 100 largest...

  15. Low susceptibility to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced transplacental carcinogenesis in Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuchigauchi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Ohnishi, Takamasa; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Bando, Yoshimi; Uehara, Hisanori; Takizawa, Tamotsu; Kaneda, Shinya; Nakai, Tokiko; Shiota, Hiroshi; Izumi, Keisuke

    2009-08-01

    The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat, an animal model of Wilson's disease, is resistant to a variety of chemical carcinogenesis except liver and colon. In the present study, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced transplacental carcinogenesis was examined in male and female LEC, Long-Evans Agouti (LEA), a sibling line of the LEC rat, and F344 rats (n=21). ENU was administered to pregnant rats as a single s.c. injection at a dose of 60 mg/kg body weight on the 17th day after conception. Cerebral/spinal gliomas and trigeminal/spinal nerve schwannomas developed in both LEA and F344 rats at 30 weeks of age, but no nervous system tumors developed in LEC rats, the difference being statistically significant. Lung adenomas also developed in LEA and F344 rats, but not in LEC rats. Semiquantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that metallothionein (MT)1a, MT2 and O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) mRNA levels in the liver of LEC rats were higher than those in F344 and LEA rats. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that MT (MT1 plus MT2) in the liver of LEC rats was also higher than that in other strains. Present results suggest that high levels of MT and/or MGMT contribute to the resistance to nitrosamine-induced carcinogenesis in LEC rats. PMID:19763020

  16. LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2) promotes embryogenic induction in somatic tissues of Arabidopsis, via YUCCA-mediated auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wójcikowska, Barbara; Jaskóła, Karolina; Gąsiorek, Przemysław; Meus, Magdalena; Nowak, Katarzyna; Gaj, Małgorzata D

    2013-09-01

    The LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2) transcription factor with a plant-specific B3 domain plays a central role in zygotic and somatic embryogenesis (SE). LEC2 overexpression induced in planta leads to spontaneous somatic embryo formation, but impairs the embryogenic response of explants cultured in vitro under auxin treatment. The auxin-related functions of LEC2 appear during SE induction, and the aim of the present study was to gain further insights into this phenomenon. To this end, the effect of LEC2 overexpression on the morphogenic responses of Arabidopsis explants cultured in vitro under different auxin treatments was evaluated. The expression profiles of the auxin biosynthesis genes were analysed in embryogenic cultures with respect to LEC2 activity. The results showed that LEC2 overexpression severely modifies the requirement of cultured explants for an exogenous auxin concentration at a level that is effective in SE induction and suggested an increase in the auxin content in 35S::LEC2-GR transgenic explants. The assumption of an LEC2 promoted increase in endogenous auxin in cultured explants was further supported by the expression profiling of the genes involved in auxin biosynthesis. The analysis indicated that YUCCAs and TAA1, working in the IPA-YUC auxin biosynthesis pathway, are associated with SE induction, and that the expression of three YUCCA genes (YUC1, YUC4 and YUC10) is associated with LEC2 activity. The results also suggest that the IAOx-mediated auxin biosynthesis pathway involving ATR1/MYB34 and CYP79B2 does not seem to be involved in SE induction. We conclude that de novo auxin production via the tryptophan-dependent IPA-YUC auxin biosynthesis pathway is implicated in SE induction, and that LEC2 plays a key role in this mechanism. PMID:23722561

  17. Recent improvements and developments in uncooled systems at BAE SYSTEMS North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backer, Brian S.; Butler, Neal R.; Kohin, Margaret; Gurnee, Mark N.; Whitwam, Jason T.; Breen, Tom

    2002-08-01

    BAE SYSTEMS has designed and developed MicroIR microbolometer focal plane arrays (FPAs) in three formats (160x120, 320x240, and 640x480) and with two different pixel sizes (46micrometers and 28micrometers ). In addition to successfully demonstrating these FPA technologies, BAE SYSTEMS has produced and delivered thousands of 320x240 (46micrometers pixel) imaging modules and camera cores for military, thermography, firefighting, security and numerous other applications throughout the world. Recently, BAE SYSTEMS has started production deliveries of 160x120 (46micrometers ) systems, demonstrated 320x240 and 640x480 second-generation (28micrometers ) imaging, and demonstrated second-generation thermoelectric cooler-less operation. This paper discusses these recent accomplishments and, when possible, provides quantitative NETD and performance data for our newly developed FPAs and systems. Video will be shown to demonstrate sensor performance capabilities.

  18. The Theobroma cacao B3 domain transcription factor TcLEC2 plays a duel role in control of embryo development and maturation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Arabidopsis thaliana LEC2 gene encodes a B3 domain transcription factor, which plays critical roles during both zygotic and somatic embryogenesis. LEC2 exerts significant impacts on determining embryogenic potential and various metabolic processes through a complicated genetic regulatory network. Results An ortholog of the Arabidopsis Leafy Cotyledon 2 gene (AtLEC2) was characterized in Theobroma cacao (TcLEC2). TcLEC2 encodes a B3 domain transcription factor preferentially expressed during early and late zygotic embryo development. The expression of TcLEC2 was higher in dedifferentiated cells competent for somatic embryogenesis (embryogenic calli), compared to non-embryogenic calli. Transient overexpression of TcLEC2 in immature zygotic embryos resulted in changes in gene expression profiles and fatty acid composition. Ectopic expression of TcLEC2 in cacao leaves changed the expression levels of several seed related genes. The overexpression of TcLEC2 in cacao explants greatly increased the frequency of regeneration of stably transformed somatic embryos. TcLEC2 overexpressing cotyledon explants exhibited a very high level of embryogenic competency and when cultured on hormone free medium, exhibited an iterative embryogenic chain-reaction. Conclusions Our study revealed essential roles of TcLEC2 during both zygotic and somatic embryo development. Collectively, our evidence supports the conclusion that TcLEC2 is a functional ortholog of AtLEC2 and that it is involved in similar genetic regulatory networks during cacao somatic embryogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed report of the functional analysis of a LEC2 ortholog in a species other then Arabidopsis. TcLEC2 could potentially be used as a biomarker for the improvement of the SE process and screen for elite varieties in cacao germplasm. PMID:24758406

  19. Multivalent ligand mimetics of LecA from P. aeruginosa: synthesis and NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Bini, Davide; Marchetti, Roberta; Russo, Laura; Molinaro, Antonio; Silipo, Alba; Cipolla, Laura

    2016-06-24

    Molecular recognition of glycans plays an important role in glycomic and glycobiology studies. For example, pathogens have a number of different types of lectin for targeting host sugars. In bacteria, lectins exist sometimes as domains of bacterial toxins and exploit adhesion to glycoconjugates as a means of entering host cells. Herein, we describe the synthesis of three glycodendrons with the aim to dissect the fine structural details involved in the multivalent carbohydrate-protein interactions. LecA, from the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has been used to characterize galactose dendrons interaction using one of the most widespread NMR technique for the elucidation of receptor-ligand binding in solution, the saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR. Furthermore, the effective hydrodynamic radius of each dendrimer recognized by LecA was estimated from the diffusion coefficients determined by pulsed-field-gradient stimulated echo (PFG-STE) NMR experiments. PMID:27185108

  20. Isolation and characterization of BanLec-I, a mannoside-binding lectin from Musa paradisiac (banana).

    PubMed Central

    Koshte, V L; van Dijk, W; van der Stelt, M E; Aalberse, R C

    1990-01-01

    A lectin (BanLec-I) from banana (Musa paradisiac) with a binding specificity for oligomannosidic glycans of size classes higher than (Man)6GlcNAc was isolated and purified by affinity chromatography on a Sephadex G-75 column. It did not agglutinate untreated human or sheep erythrocytes, but it did agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes. BanLec-I stimulated T-cell proliferation. On size-exclusion chromatography, BanLec-I has a molecular mass of approx. 27 kDa, and on SDS/PAGE the molecular mass is approx. 13 kDa. The isoelectric point is 7.2-7.5. BanLec-I was found to be very effective as a probe in detecting glycoproteins, e.g. on nitrocellulose blots. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2268297

  1. SOI monolithic pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, T.; Ahmed, M. I.; Arai, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Ikemoto, Y.; Takeda, A.; Tauchi, K.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing monolithic pixel detector using fully-depleted (FD) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) pixel process technology. The SOI substrate is high resistivity silicon with p-n junctions and another layer is a low resistivity silicon for SOI-CMOS circuitry. Tungsten vias are used for the connection between two silicons. Since flip-chip bump bonding process is not used, high sensor gain in a small pixel area can be obtained. In 2010 and 2011, high-resolution integration-type SOI pixel sensors, DIPIX and INTPIX5, have been developed. The characterizations by evaluating pixel-to-pixel crosstalk, quantum efficiency (QE), dark noise, and energy resolution were done. A phase-contrast imaging was demonstrated using the INTPIX5 pixel sensor for an X-ray application. The current issues and future prospect are also discussed.

  2. Partial gene deletion in LEC rat: An animal model for Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Forbes, J.R.; Cox, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease is an inherited disorder of copper transport in which incorporation of copper into ceruloplasmin and excretion of copper into bile are greatly reduced. Copper accumulates to a toxic level in the liver and also in the brain and kidney, causing a spectrum of hepatic and neurological abnormalities. We have recently cloned the gene for Wilson disease (designated ATP7B), which encodes a putative copper-transporting P-type ATPase. The inbred mutant Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat strain shows similarity to Wilson disease in many clinical and biochemical features. We have cloned cDNAs for the rat homologue (Atp7b) of the human Wilson disease gene (ATP7B) and have shown that the two genes have {approximately}82% identity at the amino acid sequence level. Rat cDNA sequences were used to identify a partial deletion in the Atp7b gene in the LEC rat. The deletion removes at least 750 bp of the coding region at the 3{prime} end, which includes the crucial ATP binding domain and extends downstream of the gene. The proximal breakpoint has been precisely localized at the cDNA level. Our results provide convincing evidence that the LEC rat is an animal model for Wilson disease. This model will be important for studying liver pathophysiology, for developing therapy for Wilson disease, and for studying the pathway of copper transport and its possible interaction with other heavy metals.

  3. CfLec-3 from scallop: an entrance to non-self recognition mechanism of invertebrate C-type lectin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jialong; Huang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Hao; Wang, Leilei; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2015-01-01

    A C-type lectin (CfLec-3) from Chlamys farreri with three carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) was selected to dissect the possible mechanisms of PAMP binding and functional differentiation of invertebrate lectins. CfLec-3 distributed broadly, and its mRNA expression in hemocytes increased significantly after stimulations with LPS, PGN or β-glucan, but not poly(I:C). The recombinant CfLec-3 (rCfLec-3) could bind PAMPs and several microbes. rCfLec-3 mediated hemocytes phagocytosis against Escherichia coli and encapsulation towards agarose beads. Obvious functional differentiation occurred among the three CRDs, as CRD1 exhibited higher activity to bind PAMPs, while CRD2/3 were expert in promoting hemocyte mediated opsonisation. The tertiary structural differences were suspected to be associated with such functional differentiation. PAMP binding abilities of CfLec-3 were determined by Ca2+-binding site 2 motif. When Pro in this motif of each CRD was mutated into Ser, their PAMP binding abilities were deprived absolutely. rCRD2 acquired mannan binding capability when its EPD was replaced by EPN, but lost when EPN in rCRD3 was changed into EPD. The Pro in Ca2+-binding site 2 was indispensable for PAMPs binding, while Asn was determinant for specific binding to mannan. It shed new insight into PAMPs binding mechanism of invertebrate C-type lectins and their functional differentiation. PMID:25975813

  4. Development and optimization of a competitive binding assay for the galactophilic low affinity lectin LecA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Ines; Rikker, Sebastian; Hauck, Dirk; Ponader, Daniela; Boden, Sophia; Sommer, Roman; Hartmann, Laura; Titz, Alexander

    2016-08-16

    Infections with the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa result in a high mortality among immunocompromised patients and those with cystic fibrosis. The pathogen can switch from planktonic life to biofilms, and thereby shields itself against antibiotic treatment and host immune defense to establish chronic infections. The bacterial protein LecA, a C-type lectin, is a virulence factor and an integral component for biofilm formation. Inhibition of LecA with its carbohydrate ligands results in reduced biofilm mass, a potential Achilles heel for treatment. Here, we report the development and optimization of a fluorescence polarization-based competitive binding assay with LecA for application in screening of potential inhibitors. As a consequence of the low affinity of d-galactose for LecA, the fluorescent ligand was optimized to reduce protein consumption in the assay. The assay was validated using a set of known inhibitors of LecA and IC50 values in good agreement with the known Kd values were obtained. Finally, we employed the optimized assay to screen sets of synthetic thio-galactosides and natural blood group antigens and report their structure-activity relationship. In addition, we evaluated a multivalent fluorescent assay probe for LecA and report its applicability in an inhibition assay. PMID:27488655

  5. Antimicrobial functions of EsLecH, a C-type lectin, via JNK pathway in the Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, You-Ting; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Shi-Chuang; Li, Wei-Wei; Wang, Qun

    2016-08-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are pattern recognition proteins that play significant roles in the innate immune system by identifying and eliminating pathogens. Here, we have reported a CTL (EsLecH) from the Chinese mitten crab that can bind to microorganisms and regulate antimicrobial peptide (AMP) expression via the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. EsLecH was found to have an N-terminal signal peptide and a single carbohydrate recognition domain. The EsLecH transcript was detected abundantly in various tissues, and it was significantly upregulated in hemocytes after challenging with lipopolysaccharides and bacteria. Recombinant (r)EsLecH could bind to microorganisms, but at different levels. Ca(2+) significantly increased rEsLecH binding affinity to microorganisms. Furthermore, growth inhibition by rEsLecH increased with increasing rEsLecH levels. Knockdown of EsLecH was accompanied by a significant reduction in AMP expression and JNK phosphorylation; AMP expression was reduced with JNK silencing and can not rescued by rEsLecH when absence of JNK. These results indicate that EsLecH could regulate AMPs via JNK signaling. PMID:27068761

  6. PixelLearn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzoni, Dominic; Wagstaff, Kiri; Bornstein, Benjamin; Tang, Nghia; Roden, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    PixelLearn is an integrated user-interface computer program for classifying pixels in scientific images. Heretofore, training a machine-learning algorithm to classify pixels in images has been tedious and difficult. PixelLearn provides a graphical user interface that makes it faster and more intuitive, leading to more interactive exploration of image data sets. PixelLearn also provides image-enhancement controls to make it easier to see subtle details in images. PixelLearn opens images or sets of images in a variety of common scientific file formats and enables the user to interact with several supervised or unsupervised machine-learning pixel-classifying algorithms while the user continues to browse through the images. The machinelearning algorithms in PixelLearn use advanced clustering and classification methods that enable accuracy much higher than is achievable by most other software previously available for this purpose. PixelLearn is written in portable C++ and runs natively on computers running Linux, Windows, or Mac OS X.

  7. The Effects of Digital Video Quality on Learner Comprehension in an American Sign Language Assessment Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Simon; Miller, Charles; Rose, Susan; Veletsianos, George

    2007-01-01

    The effects of digital video frame rate and size on American Sign Language (ASL) learner comprehension were investigated. Fifty-one students were randomly assigned to one of three video-size treatment groups: 480x360, 320x240, and 240x180 pixels. Within each treatment, three 30-second videos of signed narratives at frame rates of 6, 12, and 18…

  8. Excretion of copper complexed with thiomolybdate into the bile and blood in LEC rats.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Y; Sadakata, I; Ogra, Y; Suzuki, K T

    2000-02-01

    Copper (Cu) accumulating in a form bound to metallothionein (MT) in the liver of Long-Evans rats with a cinnamon-like coat color (LEC rats), an animal model of Wilson disease, was removed with ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (TTM), and the fate of the Cu complexed with TTM and mobilized from the liver was determined. TTM was injected intravenously as a single dose of 2, 10 or 50 mg TTM/kg body weight into LEC and Wistar (normal Cu metabolism) rats, and then the concentrations of Cu and molybdenum (Mo) in the bile and plasma were monitored with time after the injection. In Wistar rats, most of the Mo was excreted into the urine, only a small quantity being excreted into the bile, while Cu excreted into the urine decreased. However, in LEC rats, Cu and Mo were excreted into the bile and blood, and the bile is recognized for the first time as the major route of excretion. The Cu excreted into both the bile and plasma was accompanied by an equimolar amount of Mo. The relative ratio of the amounts of Cu excreted into the bile and plasma was 40/60 for the low and high dose groups, and 70/30 for the medium dose group. The systemic dispositions of the Cu mobilized from the liver and the Mo complexed with the Cu were also determined for the kidneys, spleen and brain together with their urinal excretion. Although Mo in the three organs and Cu in the kidneys and spleen were increased or showed a tendency to increase, Cu in the brain was not increased at all doses of TTM. PMID:10728780

  9. Cloning and Characterization of 5′ Flanking Regulatory Sequences of AhLEC1B Gene from Arachis Hypogaea L.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Guiying; Xu, Pingli; Liu, Wei; Liu, Zhanji; Shan, Lei

    2015-01-01

    LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) is a B subunit of Nuclear Factor Y (NF-YB) transcription factor that mainly accumulates during embryo development. We cloned the 5′ flanking regulatory sequence of AhLEC1B gene, a homolog of Arabidopsis LEC1, and analyzed its regulatory elements using online software. To identify the crucial regulatory region, we generated a series of GUS expression frameworks driven by different length promoters with 5′ terminal and/or 3′ terminal deletion. We further characterized the GUS expression patterns in the transgenic Arabidopsis lines. Our results show that both the 65bp proximal promoter region and the 52bp 5′ UTR of AhLEC1B contain the key motifs required for the essential promoting activity. Moreover, AhLEC1B is preferentially expressed in the embryo and is co-regulated by binding of its upstream genes with both positive and negative corresponding cis-regulatory elements. PMID:26426444

  10. High density pixel array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener-Avnear, Eliezer (Inventor); McFall, James Earl (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pixel array device is fabricated by a laser micro-milling method under strict process control conditions. The device has an array of pixels bonded together with an adhesive filling the grooves between adjacent pixels. The array is fabricated by moving a substrate relative to a laser beam of predetermined intensity at a controlled, constant velocity along a predetermined path defining a set of grooves between adjacent pixels so that a predetermined laser flux per unit area is applied to the material, and repeating the movement for a plurality of passes of the laser beam until the grooves are ablated to a desired depth. The substrate is of an ultrasonic transducer material in one example for fabrication of a 2D ultrasonic phase array transducer. A substrate of phosphor material is used to fabricate an X-ray focal plane array detector.

  11. Pixel-One

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedichini, F.; Di Paola, A.; Testa, V.

    2010-07-01

    The early future of astronomy will be dominated by Extremely Large Telescopes where the focal lengths will be of the order of several hundred meters. This yields focal plane sizes of roughly one square meter to obtain a field of view of about 5 x 5 arcmin. When operated in seeing limited mode this field is correctly sampled with 1x1mm pixels. Such a sampling can be achieved using a peculiar array of tiny CMOS active photodiodes illuminated through microlenses or lightpipes. If the photodiode is small enough and utilizes the actual pixel technology, its dark current can be kept well below the sky background photocurrent, thus avoiding the use of cumbersome cryogenics systems. An active smart electronics will manage each pixel up to the A/D conversion and data transfer. This modular block is the Pixel-One. A 30x30 mm tile filled with 1000 Pixel-Ones could be the basic unit to mosaic very large focal planes. By inserting dispersion elements inside the optical path of the lenslet array one could also produce a low dispersed spectrum of each focal plane sub-aperture and, by using an array of few smart photodiodes, also get multi-wavelength information in the optical band for each equivalent focal plane pixel. An application to the E-ELT is proposed.

  12. Selecting Pixels for Kepler Downlink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Stephen T.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Klaus, Todd C.; Cote, Miles T.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Hall, Jennifer R.; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey E.; Haas, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler mission monitors > 100,000 stellar targets using 42 2200 1024 pixel CCDs. Bandwidth constraints prevent the downlink of all 96 million pixels per 30-minute cadence, so the Kepler spacecraft downlinks a specified collection of pixels for each target. These pixels are selected by considering the object brightness, background and the signal-to-noise of each pixel, and are optimized to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of the target. This paper describes pixel selection, creation of spacecraft apertures that efficiently capture selected pixels, and aperture assignment to a target. Diagnostic apertures, short-cadence targets and custom specified shapes are discussed.

  13. Inhibition and dispersion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by glycopeptide dendrimers targeting the fucose-specific lectin LecB.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Emma M V; Crusz, Shanika A; Kolomiets, Elena; Buts, Lieven; Kadam, Rameshwar U; Cacciarini, Martina; Bartels, Kai-Malte; Diggle, Stephen P; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Loris, Remy; Nativi, Cristina; Rosenau, Frank; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Darbre, Tamis; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2008-12-22

    The human pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a fucose-specific lectin, LecB, implicated in tissue attachment and the formation of biofilms. To investigate if LecB inhibition disrupts these processes, high-affinity ligands were obtained by screening two 15,536-member combinatorial libraries of multivalent fucosyl-peptide dendrimers. The most potent LecB-ligands identified were dendrimers FD2 (C-Fuc-LysProLeu)(4)(LysPheLysIle)(2)LysHisIleNH(2) (IC(50) = 0.14 microM by ELLA) and PA8 (OFuc-LysAlaAsp)(4)(LysSerGlyAla)(2)LysHisIleNH(2) (IC(50) = 0.11 microM by ELLA). Dendrimer FD2 led to complete inhibition of P. aeruginosa biofilm formation (IC(50) approximately 10 microM) and induced complete dispersion of established biofilms in the wild-type strain and in several clinical P. aeruginosa isolates. These experiments suggest that LecB inhibition by high-affinity multivalent ligands could represent a therapeutic approach against P. aeruginosa infections by inhibition of biofilm formation and dispersion of established biofilms. PMID:19101469

  14. MytiLec, a Mussel R-Type Lectin, Interacts with Surface Glycan Gb3 on Burkitt's Lymphoma Cells to Trigger Apoptosis through Multiple Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Sugawara, Shigeki; Fujii, Yuki; Koide, Yasuhiro; Terada, Daiki; Iimura, Naoya; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Keisuke G; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Rajia, Sultana; Kawsar, Sarkar M A; Kanaly, Robert A; Uchiyama, Hideho; Hosono, Masahiro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Fujita, Hideaki; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2015-12-01

    MytiLec; a novel lectin isolated from the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis); shows strong binding affinity to globotriose (Gb3: Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc). MytiLec revealed β-trefoil folding as also found in the ricin B-subunit type (R-type) lectin family, although the amino acid sequences were quite different. Classification of R-type lectin family members therefore needs to be based on conformation as well as on primary structure. MytiLec specifically killed Burkitt's lymphoma Ramos cells, which express Gb3. Fluorescein-labeling assay revealed that MytiLec was incorporated inside the cells. MytiLec treatment of Ramos cells resulted in activation of both classical MAPK/ extracellular signal-regulated kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-ERK) and stress-activated (p38 kinase and JNK) Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways. In the cells, MytiLec treatment triggered expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (a ligand of death receptor-dependent apoptosis) and activation of mitochondria-controlling caspase-9 (initiator caspase) and caspase-3 (activator caspase). Experiments using the specific MEK inhibitor U0126 showed that MytiLec-induced phosphorylation of the MEK-ERK pathway up-regulated expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, leading to cell cycle arrest and TNF-α production. Activation of caspase-3 by MytiLec appeared to be regulated by multiple different pathways. Our findings, taken together, indicate that the novel R-type lectin MytiLec initiates programmed cell death of Burkitt's lymphoma cells through multiple pathways (MAPK cascade, death receptor signaling; caspase activation) based on interaction of the lectin with Gb3-containing glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains on the cell surface. PMID:26694420

  15. MytiLec, a Mussel R-Type Lectin, Interacts with Surface Glycan Gb3 on Burkitt’s Lymphoma Cells to Trigger Apoptosis through Multiple Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Sugawara, Shigeki; Fujii, Yuki; Koide, Yasuhiro; Terada, Daiki; Iimura, Naoya; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Keisuke G.; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Rajia, Sultana; Kawsar, Sarkar M. A.; Kanaly, Robert A.; Uchiyama, Hideho; Hosono, Masahiro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Fujita, Hideaki; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    MytiLec; a novel lectin isolated from the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis); shows strong binding affinity to globotriose (Gb3: Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc). MytiLec revealed β-trefoil folding as also found in the ricin B-subunit type (R-type) lectin family, although the amino acid sequences were quite different. Classification of R-type lectin family members therefore needs to be based on conformation as well as on primary structure. MytiLec specifically killed Burkitt's lymphoma Ramos cells, which express Gb3. Fluorescein-labeling assay revealed that MytiLec was incorporated inside the cells. MytiLec treatment of Ramos cells resulted in activation of both classical MAPK/ extracellular signal-regulated kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-ERK) and stress-activated (p38 kinase and JNK) Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways. In the cells, MytiLec treatment triggered expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (a ligand of death receptor-dependent apoptosis) and activation of mitochondria-controlling caspase-9 (initiator caspase) and caspase-3 (activator caspase). Experiments using the specific MEK inhibitor U0126 showed that MytiLec-induced phosphorylation of the MEK-ERK pathway up-regulated expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, leading to cell cycle arrest and TNF-α production. Activation of caspase-3 by MytiLec appeared to be regulated by multiple different pathways. Our findings, taken together, indicate that the novel R-type lectin MytiLec initiates programmed cell death of Burkitt’s lymphoma cells through multiple pathways (MAPK cascade, death receptor signaling; caspase activation) based on interaction of the lectin with Gb3-containing glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains on the cell surface. PMID:26694420

  16. Spectrally tunable pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfelder, G.; Buffa, C.; Longoni, A. F.; Zaraga, F.

    2013-01-01

    They are here reported the developments and experimental results of fully operating matrices of spectrally tunable pixels based on the Transverse Field Detector (TFD). Unlike several digital imaging sensors based on color filter arrays or layered junctions, the TFD has the peculiar feature of having electrically tunable spectral sensitivities. In this way the sensor color space is not fixed a priori but can be real-time adjusted, e.g. for a better adaptation to the scene content or for multispectral capture. These advantages come at the cost of an increased complexity both for the photosensitive elements and for the readout electronics. The challenges in the realization of a matrix of TFD pixels are analyzed in this work. First experimental results on an 8x8 (x 3 colors) and on a 64x64 (x 3 colors) matrix will be presented and analyzed in terms of colorimetric and noise performance, and compared to simulation predictions.

  17. Pilot-scale Limestone Emission Control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1, Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Prudich, M.E.; Appell, K.W.; McKenna, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. A total of over 90 experimental trials have been performed using the pilot-scale moving-bed LEC dry scrubber as a part of this research project with run times ranging up to a high of 125 hours. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies as high as 99.9% were achievable for all experimental conditions studied during which sufficient humidification was added to the LEC bed. The LEC process and conventional limestone scrubbing have been compared on an equatable basis using flue gas conditions that would be expected at the outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) of a 500 MW coal-fired power plant. The LEC was found to have a definite economic advantage in both direct capital costs and operating costs. Based on the success and findings of the present project, the next step in LEC process development will be a full-scale commercial demonstration unit.

  18. Cinnamide Derivatives of d‐Mannose as Inhibitors of the Bacterial Virulence Factor LecB from Pseudomonas aeruginosa †

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Roman; Hauck, Dirk; Varrot, Annabelle; Wagner, Stefanie; Audfray, Aymeric; Prestel, Andreas; Möller, Heiko M.; Imberty, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram‐negative pathogen with high antibiotic resistance. Its lectin LecB was identified as a virulence factor and is relevant in bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Inhibition of LecB with carbohydrate‐based ligands results in a decrease in toxicity and biofilm formation. We recently discovered two classes of potent drug‐like glycomimetic inhibitors, that is, sulfonamides and cinnamides of d‐mannose. Here, we describe the chemical synthesis and biochemical evaluation of more than 20 derivatives with increased potency compared to the unsubstituted cinnamide. The structure–activity relationship (SAR) obtained and the extended biophysical characterization allowed the experimental determination of the binding mode of these cinnamides with LecB. The established surface binding mode now allows future rational structure‐based drug design. Importantly, all glycomimetics tested showed extended receptor residence times with half‐lives in the 5–20 min range, a prerequisite for therapeutic application. Thus, the glycomimetics described here provide an excellent basis for future development of anti‐infectives against this multidrug‐resistant pathogen. PMID:27308201

  19. Cinnamide Derivatives of d-Mannose as Inhibitors of the Bacterial Virulence Factor LecB from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Roman; Hauck, Dirk; Varrot, Annabelle; Wagner, Stefanie; Audfray, Aymeric; Prestel, Andreas; Möller, Heiko M; Imberty, Anne; Titz, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen with high antibiotic resistance. Its lectin LecB was identified as a virulence factor and is relevant in bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Inhibition of LecB with carbohydrate-based ligands results in a decrease in toxicity and biofilm formation. We recently discovered two classes of potent drug-like glycomimetic inhibitors, that is, sulfonamides and cinnamides of d-mannose. Here, we describe the chemical synthesis and biochemical evaluation of more than 20 derivatives with increased potency compared to the unsubstituted cinnamide. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) obtained and the extended biophysical characterization allowed the experimental determination of the binding mode of these cinnamides with LecB. The established surface binding mode now allows future rational structure-based drug design. Importantly, all glycomimetics tested showed extended receptor residence times with half-lives in the 5-20 min range, a prerequisite for therapeutic application. Thus, the glycomimetics described here provide an excellent basis for future development of anti-infectives against this multidrug-resistant pathogen. PMID:27308201

  20. The CMS pixel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortoletto, Daniela; CMS Collaboration

    2007-09-01

    The CMS hybrid pixel detector is located at the core of the CMS tracker and will contribute significantly to track and vertex reconstruction. The detector is subdivided into a three-layer barrel, and two end-cap disks on either side of the interaction region. The system operating in the 25-ns beam crossing time of the LHC must be radiation hard, low mass, and robust. The construction of the barrel modules and the forward disks has started after extensive R&D. The status of the project is reported.

  1. The ALICE Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado-Perez, Jorge

    2002-07-01

    The present document is a brief summary of the performed activities during the 2001 Summer Student Programme at CERN under the Scientific Summer at Foreign Laboratories Program organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society (Sociedad Mexicana de Fisica). In this case, the activities were related with the ALICE Pixel Group of the EP-AIT Division, under the supervision of Jeroen van Hunen, research fellow in this group. First, I give an introduction and overview to the ALICE experiment; followed by a description of wafer probing. A brief summary of the test beam that we had from July 13th to July 25th is given as well.

  2. A single CRD C-type lectin from Eriocheir sinensis (EsLecB) with microbial-binding, antibacterial prophenoloxidase activation and hem-encapsulation activities.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zi-Yan; Li, Dan; Li, Xue-Jie; Zhang, Xing; Zhu, You-Ting; Li, Wei-Wei; Wang, Qun

    2016-03-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) exist widely in crustaceans. To date, thirteen CTLs have been reported in crustaceans, and play significant roles in pathogen recognition, encapsulation of hemocytes and antimicrobial activity in the innate immune response. Based on the initial expressed sequence tags (EST) of a hepatopancreatic cDNA library, a novel CTL, designated as EsLecB, with a 470 bp open reading frame encodes a polypeptide of 156 amino acids, including a signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues and one carbohydrate-recognition domain of 131 aa residues, was cloned from the crustacean Eriocheir sinensis. By qRT-PCR analysis, EsLecB was detected in all tested tissues, and showed highest expression in hemocytes, hepatopancreas and heart. The expression of EsLecB was up-regulated following injections of PAMPs or bacteria. The recombinant protein (rEsLecB) expressed in Escherichia coli had a calcium-independent but carbohydrate-dependent microbial-binding and microbial-agglutinating, microorganism growth inhibitory and hem-encapsulation activities. Moreover, the rEsLecB could stimulate the activation of prophenoloxidase in vitro. These results indicated that EsLecB, as an antibacterial pattern recognition receptor is involved in innate immunity, and may act as an upstream detector of the prophenoloxidase activating system, which can detect pathogen invasion in E. sinensis. PMID:26826423

  3. Imaging properties of pixellated scintillators with deep pixels

    PubMed Central

    Barber, H. Bradford; Fastje, David; Lemieux, Daniel; Grim, Gary P.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Miller, Brian W.; Parkhurst, Philip; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the light-transport properties of scintillator arrays with long, thin pixels (deep pixels) for use in high-energy gamma-ray imaging. We compared 10×10 pixel arrays of YSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce and BGO (1mm × 1mm × 20 mm pixels) made by Proteus, Inc. with similar 10×10 arrays of LSO:Ce and BGO (1mm × 1mm × 15mm pixels) loaned to us by Saint-Gobain. The imaging and spectroscopic behaviors of these scintillator arrays are strongly affected by the choice of a reflector used as an inter-pixel spacer (3M ESR in the case of the Proteus arrays and white, diffuse-reflector for the Saint-Gobain arrays). We have constructed a 3700-pixel LYSO:Ce Prototype NIF Gamma-Ray Imager for use in diagnosing target compression in inertial confinement fusion. This system was tested at the OMEGA Laser and exhibited significant optical, inter-pixel cross-talk that was traced to the use of a single-layer of ESR film as an inter-pixel spacer. We show how the optical cross-talk can be mapped, and discuss correction procedures. We demonstrate a 10×10 YSO:Ce array as part of an iQID (formerly BazookaSPECT) imager and discuss issues related to the internal activity of 176Lu in LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce detectors. PMID:26236070

  4. Imaging properties of pixellated scintillators with deep pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, H. Bradford; Fastje, David; Lemieux, Daniel; Grim, Gary P.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Miller, Brian W.; Parkhurst, Philip; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated the light-transport properties of scintillator arrays with long, thin pixels (deep pixels) for use in high-energy gamma-ray imaging. We compared 10x10 pixel arrays of YSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce and BGO (1mm x 1mm x 20 mm pixels) made by Proteus, Inc. with similar 10x10 arrays of LSO:Ce and BGO (1mm x 1mm x 15mm pixels) loaned to us by Saint-Gobain. The imaging and spectroscopic behaviors of these scintillator arrays are strongly affected by the choice of a reflector used as an inter-pixel spacer (3M ESR in the case of the Proteus arrays and white, diffuse-reflector for the Saint-Gobain arrays). We have constructed a 3700-pixel LYSO:Ce Prototype NIF Gamma-Ray Imager for use in diagnosing target compression in inertial confinement fusion. This system was tested at the OMEGA Laser and exhibited significant optical, inter-pixel cross-talk that was traced to the use of a single-layer of ESR film as an inter-pixel spacer. We show how the optical cross-talk can be mapped, and discuss correction procedures. We demonstrate a 10x10 YSO:Ce array as part of an iQID (formerly BazookaSPECT) imager and discuss issues related to the internal activity of 176Lu in LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce detectors.

  5. A BeppoSAX/LECS X-ray observation of alpha Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewe, R.; Guedel, M.; Favata, F.; Kaastra, J. S.

    1998-12-01

    We present the X-ray spectrum of the nearby binary alpha Cen AB (G2V + K1V) that has been obtained from observations with the low-energy concentrator (LECS) onboard the BeppoSAX X-ray astronomy satellite. SAX combines, in contrast to previous satellites, simultaneous coverage of the 0.1-10 keV energy range with sufficient spectral resolution to determine emission measure distributions and elemental abundances of soft coronal sources. The analysis of the spectrum using the SPEX plasma emission code shows a two-temperature structure of the corona which is confirmed by a differential emission measure analysis. It reveals a soft ( ~ 0.1 keV) component as detected previously by \\hboxEUVE and ROSAT and a hard ( ~ 0.5 keV) component comparable to that seen by EINSTEIN, \\hboxEUVE, and ASCA. The derived coronal Fe abundance of 0.7 +/- 0.3 (relative to solar photospheric) is consistent with the solar photospheric abundance but marginally (3hbox {\\sigma^2 CrB}ma) different from the value of the metal-rich photosphere of alpha Cen. The abundance ratios Mg/Fe and Si/Fe are consistent (within 1hbox {\\sigma^2 CrB}ma) with solar photospheric and coronal values, whereas the O/Fe ratio (3+/- 2) appears too high but the uncertainty is large. The X-ray flux in the 0.1-2.4 keV band is comparable to the average of previous observations with other instruments and to that derived from the ASCA observations if the different passbands of the instruments are taken into account. The two-temperature structure is reminiscent of recently determined emission measure distributions of the solar corona; the hotter component may be evidence for flare heating.

  6. Pixelation Effects in Weak Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High, F. William; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Ellis, Richard

    2007-11-01

    Weak gravitational lensing can be used to investigate both dark matter and dark energy but requires accurate measurements of the shapes of faint, distant galaxies. Such measurements are hindered by the finite resolution and pixel scale of digital cameras. We investigate the optimum choice of pixel scale for a space-based mission, using the engineering model and survey strategy of the proposed Supernova Acceleration Probe as a baseline. We do this by simulating realistic astronomical images containing a known input shear signal and then attempting to recover the signal using the Rhodes, Refregier, & Groth algorithm. We find that the quality of shear measurement is always improved by smaller pixels. However, in practice, telescopes are usually limited to a finite number of pixels and operational life span, so the total area of a survey increases with pixel size. We therefore fix the survey lifetime and the number of pixels in the focal plane while varying the pixel scale, thereby effectively varying the survey size. In a pure trade-off for image resolution versus survey area, we find that measurements of the matter power spectrum would have minimum statistical error with a pixel scale of 0.09" for a 0.14" FWHM point-spread function (PSF). The pixel scale could be increased to ~0.16" if images dithered by exactly half-pixel offsets were always available. Some of our results do depend on our adopted shape measurement method and should be regarded as an upper limit: future pipelines may require smaller pixels to overcome systematic floors not yet accessible, and, in certain circumstances, measuring the shape of the PSF might be more difficult than those of galaxies. However, the relative trends in our analysis are robust, especially those of the surface density of resolved galaxies. Our approach thus provides a snapshot of potential in available technology, and a practical counterpart to analytic studies of pixelation, which necessarily assume an idealized shape

  7. Pixelation Effects in Weak Lensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    High, F. William; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Ellis, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing can be used to investigate both dark matter and dark energy but requires accurate measurements of the shapes of faint, distant galaxies. Such measurements are hindered by the finite resolution and pixel scale of digital cameras. We investigate the optimum choice of pixel scale for a space-based mission, using the engineering model and survey strategy of the proposed Supernova Acceleration Probe as a baseline. We do this by simulating realistic astronomical images containing a known input shear signal and then attempting to recover the signal using the Rhodes, Refregier, and Groth algorithm. We find that the quality of shear measurement is always improved by smaller pixels. However, in practice, telescopes are usually limited to a finite number of pixels and operational life span, so the total area of a survey increases with pixel size. We therefore fix the survey lifetime and the number of pixels in the focal plane while varying the pixel scale, thereby effectively varying the survey size. In a pure trade-off for image resolution versus survey area, we find that measurements of the matter power spectrum would have minimum statistical error with a pixel scale of 0.09' for a 0.14' FWHM point-spread function (PSF). The pixel scale could be increased to 0.16' if images dithered by exactly half-pixel offsets were always available. Some of our results do depend on our adopted shape measurement method and should be regarded as an upper limit: future pipelines may require smaller pixels to overcome systematic floors not yet accessible, and, in certain circumstances, measuring the shape of the PSF might be more difficult than those of galaxies. However, the relative trends in our analysis are robust, especially those of the surface density of resolved galaxies. Our approach thus provides a snapshot of potential in available technology, and a practical counterpart to analytic studies of pixelation, which necessarily assume an idealized shape

  8. Uncooled microbolometer detector: recent developments at ULIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.; Legras, O.; Trouilleau, C.; Crastes, A.; Fièque, B.

    2005-10-01

    Uncooled infrared focal plane arrays are being developed for a wide range of thermal imaging applications. Firefighting, predictive maintenance, process control and thermography are a few of the industrial applications which could take benefit from uncooled infrared detector. Therefore, to answer these markets, a 35 μm pixel-pitch uncooled IR detector technology has been developed enabling high performance 160 x 120 and 384 x 288 arrays production. Besides a wide-band version from uncooled 320 x 240 / 45 μm array has been also developed in order to address process control and more precisely industrial furnaces control. The ULIS amorphous silicon technology is well adapted to manufacture low cost detector in mass production. After some brief microbolometer technological background, we present the characterization of 35 μm pixel-pitch detector as well as the wide-band 320 x 240 infrared focal plane arrays with a pixel pitch of 45 μm.

  9. Uncooled microbolometer detector: recent developments at ULIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouilleau, C.; Crastes, A.; Fièque, B.; Legras, O.; Tissot, J. L.

    2005-10-01

    Uncooled infrared focal plane arrays are being developed for a wide range of thermal imaging applications. Fire-fighting, predictive maintenance. process control and thermography are a few of the industrial applications which could take benefit from uncooled infrared detector. Therefore, to answer these markets, a 35 μm pixel-pitch uncooled IR detector technology has been developed enabling high performance 160 x 120 and 384 x 288 arrays production. Besides a wide-band version from uncooled 320 x 240 / 45 μm array has been also developed in order to address process control and more precisely industrial furnaces control. The ULIS amorphous silicon technology is well adapted to manufacture low cost detector in mass production. After some brief microbolometer technological background, we present the characterization of 35 μm pixel-pitch detector as well as the wide-band 320 x 240 infrared focal plane arrays with a pixel pitch of 45 μm.

  10. Uncooled microbolometer detector: recent development at Ulis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.; Trouilleau, C.; Crastes, A.; Fièque, B.; Legras, O.

    2005-10-01

    Uncooled infrared focal plane arrays are being developed for a wide range of thermal imaging applications. Firefighting, predictive maintenance, process control and thermography are a few of the industrial applications which could take benefit from uncooled infrared detector. Therefore, to answer these markets, a 35 μm pixel-pitch uncooled IR detector technology has been developed enabling high performance 160 x 120 and 384 x 288 arrays production. Besides a wide-band version from uncooled 320 x 240 / 45 μm array has been also developed in order to address process control and more precisely industrial furnaces control. The ULIS amorphous silicon technology is well adapted to manufacture low cost detector in mass production. After some brief microbolometer technological background, we present the characterization of 35 μm pixel-pitch detector as well as the wide-band 320 x 240 infrared focal plane arrays with a pixel pitch of 45 μm.

  11. Uncooled microbolometer detector: recent developments at Ulis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.; Trouilleau, C.; Fieque, B.; Crastes, A.; Legras, O.

    2005-09-01

    Uncooled infrared focal plane arrays are being developed for a wide range of thermal imaging applications. Fire-fighting, predictive maintenance, process control and thermography are a few of the industrial applications which could take benefit from uncooled infrared detector. Therefore, to answer these markets, a 35 μm pixel-pitch uncooled IR detector technology has been developed enabling high performance 160 x 120 and 384 x 288 arrays production. Besides a wide-band version from uncooled 320 x 240 / 45 μm array has been also developed in order to address process control and more precisely industrial furnaces control. The ULIS amorphous silicon technology is well adapted to manufacture low cost detector in mass production. After some brief microbolometer technological background, we present the characterization of 35 μm pixel-pitch detector as well as the wide-band 320 x 240 infrared focal plane arrays with a pixel pitch of 45 μm.

  12. Characterization of Multisugar-Binding C-Type Lectin (SpliLec) from a Bacterial-Challenged Cotton Leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis

    PubMed Central

    Seufi, AlaaEddeen M.; Galal, Fatma H.; Hafez, Elsayed E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Various proteins that display carbohydrate-binding activity in a Ca2+-dependent manner are classified into the C-type lectin family. They have one or two C-type carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) composed of 110–130 amino acid residues in common. C-type lectins mediate cell adhesion, non-self recognition, and immuno-protection processes in immune responses and thus play significant roles in clearance of invaders, either as cell surface receptors for microbial carbohydrates or as soluble proteins existing in tissue fluids. The lectin of Spodoptera littoralis is still uncharacterized. Methodology A single orf encoding a deduced polypeptide consisting of an 18-residue signal peptide and a 291-residue mature peptide, termed SpliLec, was isolated from the haemolymph of the cotton leafworm, S. littoralis, after bacterial challenge using RACE-PCR. Sequence analyses of the data revealed that SpliLec consists of two CRDs. Short-form CRD1 and long-form CRD2 are stabilized by two and three highly conserved disulfide bonds, respectively. SpliLec shares homology with some dipteran lectins suggesting possible common ancestor. The purified SpliLec exhibited a 140-kDa molecular mass with a subunit molecular mass of 35 kDa. The hemagglutination assays of the SpliLec confirmed a thermally stable, multisugar-binding C-type lectin that binds different erythrocytes. The purified SpliLec agglutinated microorganisms and exhibited comparable antimicrobial activity against gram (+) and gram (−) bacteria too. Conclusions Our results suggested an important role of the SpliLec gene in cell adhesion and non-self recognition. It may cooperate with other AMPs in clearance of invaders of Spodoptera littoralis. PMID:22916161

  13. cDNA and Gene Structure of MytiLec-1, A Bacteriostatic R-Type Lectin from the Mediterranean Mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis)

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Gerdol, Marco; Fujii, Yuki; Rajia, Sultana; Koide, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Daiki; Kawsar, Sarkar M. A.; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    MytiLec is an α-d-galactose-binding lectin with a unique primary structure isolated from the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis). The lectin adopts a β-trefoil fold that is also found in the B-sub-unit of ricin and other ricin-type (R-type) lectins. We are introducing MytiLec(-1) and its two variants (MytiLec-2 and -3), which both possess an additional pore-forming aerolysin-like domain, as members of a novel multi-genic “mytilectin family” in bivalve mollusks. Based on the full length mRNA sequence (911 bps), it was possible to elucidate the coding sequence of MytiLec-1, which displays an extended open reading frame (ORF) at the 5′ end of the sequence, confirmed both at the mRNA and at the genomic DNA sequence level. While this extension could potentially produce a polypeptide significantly longer than previously reported, this has not been confirmed yet at the protein level. MytiLec-1 was revealed to be encoded by a gene consisting of two exons and a single intron. The first exon comprised the 5′UTR and the initial ATG codon and it was possible to detect a putative promoter region immediately ahead of the transcription start site in the MytiLec-1 genomic locus. The remaining part of the MytiLec-1 coding sequence (including the three sub-domains, the 3′UTR and the poly-A signal) was included in the second exon. The bacteriostatic activity of MytiLec-1 was determined by the agglutination of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, which was reversed by the co-presence of α-galactoside. Altogether, these data support the classification of MytiLec-1 as a member of the novel mytilectin family and suggest that this lectin may play an important role as a pattern recognition receptor in the innate immunity of mussels. PMID:27187419

  14. cDNA and Gene Structure of MytiLec-1, A Bacteriostatic R-Type Lectin from the Mediterranean Mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis).

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Gerdol, Marco; Fujii, Yuki; Rajia, Sultana; Koide, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Daiki; Kawsar, Sarkar M A; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    MytiLec is an α-d-galactose-binding lectin with a unique primary structure isolated from the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis). The lectin adopts a β-trefoil fold that is also found in the B-sub-unit of ricin and other ricin-type (R-type) lectins. We are introducing MytiLec(-1) and its two variants (MytiLec-2 and -3), which both possess an additional pore-forming aerolysin-like domain, as members of a novel multi-genic "mytilectin family" in bivalve mollusks. Based on the full length mRNA sequence (911 bps), it was possible to elucidate the coding sequence of MytiLec-1, which displays an extended open reading frame (ORF) at the 5' end of the sequence, confirmed both at the mRNA and at the genomic DNA sequence level. While this extension could potentially produce a polypeptide significantly longer than previously reported, this has not been confirmed yet at the protein level. MytiLec-1 was revealed to be encoded by a gene consisting of two exons and a single intron. The first exon comprised the 5'UTR and the initial ATG codon and it was possible to detect a putative promoter region immediately ahead of the transcription start site in the MytiLec-1 genomic locus. The remaining part of the MytiLec-1 coding sequence (including the three sub-domains, the 3'UTR and the poly-A signal) was included in the second exon. The bacteriostatic activity of MytiLec-1 was determined by the agglutination of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, which was reversed by the co-presence of α-galactoside. Altogether, these data support the classification of MytiLec-1 as a member of the novel mytilectin family and suggest that this lectin may play an important role as a pattern recognition receptor in the innate immunity of mussels. PMID:27187419

  15. THE KEPLER PIXEL RESPONSE FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bryson, Stephen T.; Haas, Michael R.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Koch, David G.; Borucki, William J.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Klaus, Todd; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    2010-04-20

    Kepler seeks to detect sequences of transits of Earth-size exoplanets orbiting solar-like stars. Such transit signals are on the order of 100 ppm. The high photometric precision demanded by Kepler requires detailed knowledge of how the Kepler pixels respond to starlight during a nominal observation. This information is provided by the Kepler pixel response function (PRF), defined as the composite of Kepler's optical point-spread function, integrated spacecraft pointing jitter during a nominal cadence and other systematic effects. To provide sub-pixel resolution, the PRF is represented as a piecewise-continuous polynomial on a sub-pixel mesh. This continuous representation allows the prediction of a star's flux value on any pixel given the star's pixel position. The advantages and difficulties of this polynomial representation are discussed, including characterization of spatial variation in the PRF and the smoothing of discontinuities between sub-pixel polynomial patches. On-orbit super-resolution measurements of the PRF across the Kepler field of view are described. Two uses of the PRF are presented: the selection of pixels for each star that maximizes the photometric signal-to-noise ratio for that star, and PRF-fitted centroids which provide robust and accurate stellar positions on the CCD, primarily used for attitude and plate scale tracking. Good knowledge of the PRF has been a critical component for the successful collection of high-precision photometry by Kepler.

  16. Applications of pixellated GaAs X-ray detectors in a synchrotron radiation beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, J.; Bates, R.; Campbell, M.; Mathieson, K.; Mikulec, B.; O'Shea, V.; Passmore, M.-S.; Schwarz, C.; Smith, K. M.; Whitehill, C.; XIMAGE Project

    2001-03-01

    Hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors are being investigated as imaging devices for radiography and synchrotron radiation beam applications. Based on previous work in the CERN RD19 and the UK IMPACT collaborations, a photon counting GaAs pixel detector (PCD) has been used in an X-ray powder diffraction experiment. The device consists of a 200 μm thick SI-LEC GaAs detector patterned in a 64×64 array of 170 μm pitch square pixels, bump-bonded to readout electronics operating in single photon counting mode. Intensity peaks in the powder diffraction pattern of KNbO 3 have been resolved and compared with results using the standard scintillator, and a PCD predecessor (the Ω3). The PCD shows improved speed, dynamic range, 2-D information and comparable spatial resolution to the standard scintillator based systems. It also overcomes the severe dead time limitations of the Ω3 by using a shutter based acquisition mode. A brief demonstration of the possibilities of the system for dental radiography and image processing are given, showing a marked reduction in patient dose and dead time compared with film.

  17. From Pixels to Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownston, Lee; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was launched in 2009 as NASAs first mission capable of finding Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. Its telescope consists of a 1.5-m primary mirror and a 0.95-m aperture. The 42 charge-coupled devices in its focal plane are read out every half hour, compressed, and then downlinked monthly. After four years, the second of four reaction wheels failed, ending the original mission. Back on earth, the Science Operations Center developed the Science Pipeline to analyze about 200,000 target stars in Keplers field of view, looking for evidence of periodic dimming suggesting that one or more planets had crossed the face of its host star. The Pipeline comprises several steps, from pixel-level calibration, through noise and artifact removal, to detection of transit-like signals and the construction of a suite of diagnostic tests to guard against false positives. The Kepler Science Pipeline consists of a pipeline infrastructure written in the Java programming language, which marshals data input to and output from MATLAB applications that are executed as external processes. The pipeline modules, which underwent continuous development and refinement even after data started arriving, employ several analytic techniques, many developed for the Kepler Project. Because of the large number of targets, the large amount of data per target and the complexity of the pipeline algorithms, the processing demands are daunting. Some pipeline modules require days to weeks to process all of their targets, even when run on NASA's 128-node Pleiades supercomputer. The software developers are still seeking ways to increase the throughput. To date, the Kepler project has discovered more than 4000 planetary candidates, of which more than 1000 have been independently confirmed or validated to be exoplanets. Funding for this mission is provided by NASAs Science Mission Directorate.

  18. Expression, purification, and characterization of avian Thy-1 from Lec1 mammalian and Tn5 insect cells.

    PubMed

    Mehndiratta, Promod; Walton, Wendy J; Hare, Joan T; Pulido, Silvia; Parthasarathy, Gopalakrishnan; Emmett, Mark R; Marshall, Alan G; Logan, Timothy M

    2004-02-01

    Structural studies of asparagine-linked glycoproteins are complicated by the oligosaccharide heterogeneity inherent to individual glycosylation sites. Herein, we report the cloning of a novel isoform of avian Thy-1 and the subsequent expression, purification, and characterization of a soluble form of Thy-1 from Lec1 mammalian and Tn5 insect cells. The novel isoform of Thy-1 differs from the previously reported chicken isoform by eight amino acid residues, but these changes do not alter the secondary structure content, the disulfide bond pattern, or the sites of glycosylation. The disulfide linkage pattern and glycoform distribution on each N-glycosylation site of recombinant chicken Thy-1 from both cell lines were determined by a combination of amino-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. The mass spectral data showed that the amino-terminal glutamine was modified to pyroglutamate. Recombinant Thy-1 from Lec1 cells contained (GlcNAc)(2)(Man)(5) on asparagine 60, whereas the oligosaccharides on asparagine 23 and 100 contained approximately 80% (GlcNAc)(2)(Man)(4) and approximately 20% (GlcNAc)(2)(Man)(5). The glycoforms on Thy-1 expressed in Tn5 cells were more heterogeneous, with the oligosaccharides ranging over (GlcNAc)(2)(Fuc)(0-2)(Man)(2-3) on each site. The ability to generate recombinant glycoproteins with restricted carbohydrate heterogeneity is the first step toward the systematic study of structure-function relationships in intact glycoproteins. PMID:14711516

  19. Local Pixel Bundles: Bringing the Pixels to the People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jay

    2014-12-01

    The automated galaxy-based alignment software package developed for the Frontier Fields program (hst2galign, see Anderson & Ogaz 2014 and http://www.stsci.edu/hst/campaigns/frontier-fields/) produces a direct mapping from the pixels of the flt frame of each science exposure into a common master frame. We can use these mappings to extract the flt-pixels in the vicinity of a source of interest and package them into a convenient "bundle". In addition to the pixels, this data bundle can also contain "meta" information that will allow users to transform positions from the flt pixels to the reference frame and vice-versa. Since the un-resampled pixels in the flt frames are the only true constraints we have on the astronomical scene, the ability to inter-relate these pixels will enable many high-precision studies, such as: point-source-fitting and deconvolution with accurate PSFs, easy exploration of different image-combining algorithms, and accurate faint-source finding and photometry. The data products introduced in this ISR are a very early attempt to provide the flt-level pixel constraints in a package that is accessible to more than the handful of experts in HST astrometry. The hope is that users in the community might begin using them and will provide feedback as to what information they might want to see in the bundles and what general analysis packages they might find useful. For that reason, this document is somewhat informally written, since I know that it will be modified and updated as the products and tools are optimized.

  20. Numerical simulation of the LEC-growth of GaAs crystals with account of high-pressure gas convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainberg, J.; Leister, H.-J.; Müller, G.

    1997-10-01

    The influence of the inert gas pressure on the growth of 4 GaAs crystals by the liquid encapsulated Czochralski method (LEC) process is studied for a range of the Ar gas pressure up to 10 bar by using our finite-volume computer code STHAMAS. Up to the pressure of 0.6 bar we are considering laminar convection. For the pressure range from 5 to 10 bar we are using the buoyancy extended standard k-ε turbulence model with wall functions to simulate the gas flow. The numerical results show that the Argon gas pressure has a strong influence on the consumption of heater power in qualitative agreement with our experimental results. The convex curvature of the growth interface and the maximum thermal stress (von Mises criterion) are found to increase with increasing gas pressure both in the laminar and turbulent evaluations.

  1. The CMS pixel luminosity telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornmayer, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) is a new complement to the CMS detector for the LHC Run II data taking period. It consists of eight 3-layer telescopes based on silicon pixel detectors that are placed around the beam pipe on each end of CMS viewing the interaction point at small angle. A fast 3-fold coincidence of the pixel planes in each telescope will provide a bunch-by-bunch measurement of the luminosity. Particle tracking allows collision products to be distinguished from beam background, provides a self-alignment of the detectors, and a continuous in-time monitoring of the efficiency of each telescope plane. The PLT is an independent luminometer, essential to enhance the robustness on the measurement of the delivered luminosity and to reduce its systematic uncertainties. This will allow to determine production cross-sections, and hence couplings, with high precision and to set more stringent limits on new particle production.

  2. Microradiography with Semiconductor Pixel Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubek, Jan; Cejnarova, Andrea; Dammer, Jiří; Holý, Tomáš; Platkevič, Michal; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Vavřík, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdeněk

    2007-11-01

    High resolution radiography (with X-rays, neutrons, heavy charged particles, …) often exploited also in tomographic mode to provide 3D images stands as a powerful imaging technique for instant and nondestructive visualization of fine internal structure of objects. Novel types of semiconductor single particle counting pixel detectors offer many advantages for radiation imaging: high detection efficiency, energy discrimination or direct energy measurement, noiseless digital integration (counting), high frame rate and virtually unlimited dynamic range. This article shows the application and potential of pixel detectors (such as Medipix2 or TimePix) in different fields of radiation imaging.

  3. Advances in uncooled technology at BAE SYSTEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backer, Brian S.; Kohin, Margaret; Leary, Arthur R.; Blackwell, Richard J.; Rumbaugh, Roy N.

    2003-09-01

    BAE SYSTEMS has made tremendous progress in uncooled technology and systems in the last year. In this paper we present performance results and imagery from our latest 640x480 and 320x240 small pixel focal plane arrays. Both were produced using submicron lithography and have achieved our lowest NETDs to date. Testing of the 320x240 devices has shown TNETDs of 30mK at F/1. Video imagery from our 640 x 480 uncooled camera installed in a POINTER Unattended Aerial Vehicle is also shown. In addition, we introduce our newest commercial imaging camera core, the SCC500 and show its vastly improved characteristics. Lastly, plans for future advancements are outlined.

  4. Developments in uncooled IR technology at BAE SYSTEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnee, Mark N.; Kohin, Margaret; Blackwell, Richard J.; Butler, Neal R.; Whitwam, Jason T.; Backer, Brian S.; Leary, Arthur R.; Nielson, Thomas

    2001-10-01

    Uncooled microbolometer thermal imaging sensor technology has begun to successfully address military, government and commercial applications in the real world. BAE SYSTEMS, located in Lexington MA, has been involved in the design and development of uncooled IR technology since the early 1980s. Our current MicroIRTM products are based on vanadium oxide (VOx) microbolometers. Thousands of uncooled microbolometer thermal imaging sensors are now being produced and sold annually. A the same time, applied research and development on the technology continues to improve the basic products and make them suitable for new applications. In this paper we report on the status and improvements achieved in the MicroIRTM product line, based on 320 X 240 element and 160 X 120 element FPA's with 46 μm pixel pitch. Other near term MicroIRTM products include 320 X 240 and 640 X 480 FPA's with 28 micrometers pixel pitch and measured sensitivities below 50 mK. In the systems area we discuss development and testing of a Light Thermal Weapon Sight (LTWS) for the U.S. Army, being developed by BAE SYSTEMS in partnership with Thales, based upon our uncooled MicroIRTM focal plane arrays (FPA) and systems. The LTWS prototypes were based upon our Standard Imaging Module SIM200, which employs our LAM2C, 320 X 240 element, microbolometer FPA. Finally we discuss the 480 X 640 element FPA and its application to the Heavy Thermal Weapon Sight application.

  5. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  6. Representing SAR complex image pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, A. W.

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images are often complex-valued to facilitate specific exploitation modes. Furthermore, these pixel values are typically represented with either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values, with constituent components comprised of integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  7. CMOS digital pixel sensors: technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorka, Orit; Joseph, Dileepan

    2014-04-01

    CMOS active pixel sensor technology, which is widely used these days for digital imaging, is based on analog pixels. Transition to digital pixel sensors can boost signal-to-noise ratios and enhance image quality, but can increase pixel area to dimensions that are impractical for the high-volume market of consumer electronic devices. There are two main approaches to digital pixel design. The first uses digitization methods that largely rely on photodetector properties and so are unique to imaging. The second is based on adaptation of a classical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for in-pixel data conversion. Imaging systems for medical, industrial, and security applications are emerging lower-volume markets that can benefit from these in-pixel ADCs. With these applications, larger pixels are typically acceptable, and imaging may be done in invisible spectral bands.

  8. Low complexity pixel-based halftone detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, Jiheon; Han, Seong Wook; Jarno, Mielikainen; Lee, Chulhee

    2011-10-01

    With the rapid advances of the internet and other multimedia technologies, the digital document market has been growing steadily. Since most digital images use halftone technologies, quality degradation occurs when one tries to scan and reprint them. Therefore, it is necessary to extract the halftone areas to produce high quality printing. In this paper, we propose a low complexity pixel-based halftone detection algorithm. For each pixel, we considered a surrounding block. If the block contained any flat background regions, text, thin lines, or continuous or non-homogeneous regions, the pixel was classified as a non-halftone pixel. After excluding those non-halftone pixels, the remaining pixels were considered to be halftone pixels. Finally, documents were classified as pictures or photo documents by calculating the halftone pixel ratio. The proposed algorithm proved to be memory-efficient and required low computation costs. The proposed algorithm was easily implemented using GPU.

  9. The FPGA Pixel Array Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hromalik, Marianne S.; Green, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2013-02-01

    A proposed design for a reconfigurable x-ray Pixel Array Detector (PAD) is described. It operates by integrating a high-end commercial field programmable gate array (FPGA) into a 3-layer device along with a high-resistivity diode detection layer and a custom, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) layer. The ASIC layer contains an energy-discriminating photon-counting front end with photon hits streamed directly to the FPGA via a massively parallel, high-speed data connection. FPGA resources can be allocated to perform user defined tasks on the pixel data streams, including the implementation of a direct time autocorrelation function (ACF) with time resolution down to 100 ns. Using the FPGA at the front end to calculate the ACF reduces the required data transfer rate by several orders of magnitude when compared to a fast framing detector. The FPGA-ASIC high-speed interface, as well as the in-FPGA implementation of a real-time ACF for x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy experiments has been designed and simulated. A 16×16 pixel prototype of the ASIC has been fabricated and is being tested.

  10. Investigation of asymmetry effects in a heater-magnet module for TMF VGF and LEC growth by three-dimensional numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasjanow, H.; Nacke, B.; Eichler, St.; Jockel, D.; Frank-Rotsch, Ch.; Lange, P.; Kießling, F.-M.; Rudolph, P.

    2008-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic computer modeling is used to analyze the effects of asymmetry at the crystal growth by the vertical gradient freeze (VGF) and liquid encapsulation Czochralski (LEC) methods under traveling magnetic fields (TMF). Based on the results a heater-magnet module (HMM), combining the generation of heat and induction of magnetic field, was developed and optimized. It will be shown that asymmetry effects are caused by the designs of the heater-magnet coils and bus bars. They are enforced when a TMF of higher frequencies is used. It can be concluded that for VGF arrangements without container rotation the module design must be modified. Compared to that in case of LEC the effect of asymmetry can be effectively graduated by crucible and crystal rotations.

  11. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  12. Pilot-scale limestone emission control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1: Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. The primary goal of the current study is the demonstration of the techno/economic capability of the LEC system as a post-combustion FGD process capable of use in both existing and future coal-fired boiler facilities burning high-sulfur coal. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. The pilot plant was normally operated on the slipstream of the Ohio Univ. boiler plant flue gas, but also had the capability of operating at higher inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations (typically equivalent to 3-1/2% sulfur coal) than those normally available from the flue gas slipstream. This was accomplished by injecting SO{sub 2} gas into the slipstream inlet. The pilot plant was instrumented to provide around-the-clock operation and was fully outfitted with temperature, SO{sub 2}, gas flow and pressure drop monitors.

  13. Optimizing the Multivalent Binding of the Bacterial Lectin LecA by Glycopeptide Dendrimers for Therapeutic Purposes.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Benjamin

    2016-06-27

    Bacterial lectins are nonenzymatic sugar-binding proteins involved in the formation of biofilms and the onset of virulence. The weakness of individual sugar-lectin interactions is compensated by the potentially large number of simultaneous copies of such contacts, resulting in high overall sugar-lectin affinities and marked specificities. Therapeutic compounds functionalized with sugar residues can compete with the host glycans for binding to lectins only if they are able to take advantage of this multivalent binding mechanism. Glycopeptide dendrimers, featuring treelike topologies with sugar moieties at their leaves, have already shown great promise in this regard. However, optimizing the dendrimers' amino acid sequence is necessary to match the dynamics of the lectin active sites with that of the multivalent ligands. This work combines long-time-scale coarse-grained simulations of dendrimers and lectins with a reasoned exploration of the dendrimer sequence space in an attempt to suggest sequences that could maximize multivalent binding to the galactose-specific bacterial lectin LecA. These candidates are validated by simulations of mixed dendrimer/lectin solutions, and the effects of the dendrimers on lectin dynamics are discussed. This approach is an attractive first step in the conception of therapeutic compounds based on the dendrimer scaffold and contributes to the understanding of the various classes of multivalency that underpin the ubiquitous "sugar code". PMID:27223679

  14. Making a trillion pixels dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vivek; Hu, Bin; Toh, Kenny; Bollepalli, Srinivas; Wagner, Stephan; Borodovsky, Yan

    2008-03-01

    In June 2007, Intel announced a new pixelated mask technology. This technology was created to address the problem caused by the growing gap between the lithography wavelength and the feature sizes patterned with it. As this gap has increased, the quality of the image has deteriorated. About a decade ago, Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) was introduced to bridge this gap, but as this gap continued to increase, one could not rely on the same basic set of techniques to maintain image quality. The computational lithography group at Intel sought to alleviate this problem by experimenting with additional degrees of freedom within the mask. This paper describes the resulting pixelated mask technology, and some of the computational methods used to create it. The first key element of this technology is a thick mask model. We realized very early in the development that, unlike traditional OPC methods, the pixelated mask would require a very accurate thick mask model. Whereas in the traditional methods, one can use the relatively coarse approximations such as the boundary layer method, use of such techniques resulted not just in incorrect sizing of parts of the pattern, but in whole features missing. We built on top of previously published domain decomposition methods, and incorporated limitations of the mask manufacturing process, to create an accurate thick mask model. Several additional computational techniques were invoked to substantially increase the speed of this method to a point that it was feasible for full chip tapeout. A second key element of the computational scheme was the comprehension of mask manufacturability, including the vital issue of the number of colors in the mask. While it is obvious that use of three or more colors will give the best image, one has to be practical about projecting mask manufacturing capabilities for such a complex mask. To circumvent this serious issue, we eventually settled on a two color mask - comprising plain glass and etched

  15. Pixelated filters for spatial imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Karine; Lequime, Michel; Lumeau, Julien; Abel-Tiberini, Laetitia; Savin De Larclause, Isabelle; Berthon, Jacques

    2015-10-01

    Small satellites are often used by spatial agencies to meet scientific spatial mission requirements. Their payloads are composed of various instruments collecting an increasing amount of data, as well as respecting the growing constraints relative to volume and mass; So small-sized integrated camera have taken a favored place among these instruments. To ensure scene specific color information sensing, pixelated filters seem to be more attractive than filter wheels. The work presented here, in collaboration with Institut Fresnel, deals with the manufacturing of this kind of component, based on thin film technologies and photolithography processes. CCD detectors with a pixel pitch about 30 μm were considered. In the configuration where the matrix filters are positioned the closest to the detector, the matrix filters are composed of 2x2 macro pixels (e.g. 4 filters). These 4 filters have a bandwidth about 40 nm and are respectively centered at 550, 700, 770 and 840 nm with a specific rejection rate defined on the visible spectral range [500 - 900 nm]. After an intense design step, 4 thin-film structures have been elaborated with a maximum thickness of 5 μm. A run of tests has allowed us to choose the optimal micro-structuration parameters. The 100x100 matrix filters prototypes have been successfully manufactured with lift-off and ion assisted deposition processes. High spatial and spectral characterization, with a dedicated metrology bench, showed that initial specifications and simulations were globally met. These excellent performances knock down the technological barriers for high-end integrated specific multi spectral imaging.

  16. PIXEL 2010 - A Résumé

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wermes, N.

    2011-09-01

    The Pixel 2010 conference focused on semiconductor pixel detectors for particle tracking/vertexing as well as for imaging, in particular for synchrotron light sources and XFELs. The big LHC hybrid pixel detectors have impressively started showing their capabilities. X-ray imaging detectors, also using the hybrid pixel technology, have greatly advanced the experimental possibilities for diffraction experiments. Monolithic or semi-monolithic devices like CMOS active pixels and DEPFET pixels have now reached a state such that complete vertex detectors for RHIC and superKEKB are being built with these technologies. Finally, new advances towards fully monolithic active pixel detectors, featuring full CMOS electronics merged with efficient signal charge collection, exploiting standard CMOS technologies, SOI and/or 3D integration, show the path for the future. This résumé attempts to extract the main statements of the results and developments presented at this conference.

  17. Predicting human gaze beyond pixels.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Jiang, Ming; Wang, Shuo; Kankanhalli, Mohan S; Zhao, Qi

    2014-01-01

    A large body of previous models to predict where people look in natural scenes focused on pixel-level image attributes. To bridge the semantic gap between the predictive power of computational saliency models and human behavior, we propose a new saliency architecture that incorporates information at three layers: pixel-level image attributes, object-level attributes, and semantic-level attributes. Object- and semantic-level information is frequently ignored, or only a few sample object categories are discussed where scaling to a large number of object categories is not feasible nor neurally plausible. To address this problem, this work constructs a principled vocabulary of basic attributes to describe object- and semantic-level information thus not restricting to a limited number of object categories. We build a new dataset of 700 images with eye-tracking data of 15 viewers and annotation data of 5,551 segmented objects with fine contours and 12 semantic attributes (publicly available with the paper). Experimental results demonstrate the importance of the object- and semantic-level information in the prediction of visual attention. PMID:24474825

  18. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  19. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  20. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  1. Proceedings of PIXEL98 -- International pixel detector workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.

    1998-08-01

    Experiments around the globe face new challenges of more precision in the face of higher interaction rates, greater track densities, and higher radiation doses, as they look for rarer and rarer processes, leading many to incorporate pixelated solid-state detectors into their plans. The highest-readout rate devices require new technologies for implementation. This workshop reviewed recent, significant progress in meeting these technical challenges. Participants presented many new results; many of them from the weeks--even days--just before the workshop. Brand new at this workshop were results on cryogenic operation of radiation-damaged silicon detectors (dubbed the Lazarus effect). Other new work included a diamond sensor with 280-micron collection distance; new results on breakdown in p-type silicon detectors; testing of the latest versions of read-out chip and interconnection designs; and the radiation hardness of deep-submicron processes.

  2. Serial Pixel Analog-to-Digital Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E D

    2010-02-01

    This method reduces the data path from the counter to the pixel register of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) from as many as 10 bits to a single bit. The reduction in data path width is accomplished by using a coded serial data stream similar to a pseudo random number (PRN) generator. The resulting encoded pixel data is then decoded into a standard hexadecimal format before storage. The high-speed serial pixel ADC concept is based on the single-slope integrating pixel ADC architecture. Previous work has described a massively parallel pixel readout of a similar architecture. The serial ADC connection is similar to the state-of-the art method with the exception that the pixel ADC register is a shift register and the data path is a single bit. A state-of-the-art individual-pixel ADC uses a single-slope charge integration converter architecture with integral registers and “one-hot” counters. This implies that parallel data bits are routed among the counter and the individual on-chip pixel ADC registers. The data path bit-width to the pixel is therefore equivalent to the pixel ADC bit resolution.

  3. Dead pixel replacement in LWIR microgrid polarimeters.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Bradley M; Tyo, J Scott; Boger, James K; Black, Wiley T; Bowers, David L; Fetrow, Matthew P

    2007-06-11

    LWIR imaging arrays are often affected by nonresponsive pixels, or "dead pixels." These dead pixels can severely degrade the quality of imagery and often have to be replaced before subsequent image processing and display of the imagery data. For LWIR arrays that are integrated with arrays of micropolarizers, the problem of dead pixels is amplified. Conventional dead pixel replacement (DPR) strategies cannot be employed since neighboring pixels are of different polarizations. In this paper we present two DPR schemes. The first is a modified nearest-neighbor replacement method. The second is a method based on redundancy in the polarization measurements.We find that the redundancy-based DPR scheme provides an order-of-magnitude better performance for typical LWIR polarimetric data. PMID:19547086

  4. Dead pixel replacement in LWIR microgrid polarimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Bradley M.; Tyo, J. Scott; Boger, James K.; Black, Wiley T.; Bowers, David L.; Fetrow, Matthew P.

    2007-06-01

    LWIR imaging arrays are often affected by nonresponsive pixels, or “dead pixels.” These dead pixels can severely degrade the quality of imagery and often have to be replaced before subsequent image processing and display of the imagery data. For LWIR arrays that are integrated with arrays of micropolarizers, the problem of dead pixels is amplified. Conventional dead pixel replacement (DPR) strategies cannot be employed since neighboring pixels are of different polarizations. In this paper we present two DPR schemes. The first is a modified nearest-neighbor replacement method. The second is a method based on redundancy in the polarization measurements.We find that the redundancy-based DPR scheme provides an order-of-magnitude better performance for typical LWIR polarimetric data.

  5. Equivalence of a Bit Pixel Image to a Quantum Pixel Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Laurel Carlos; Dong, Shi-Hai; Cruz-Irisson, M.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new method to transform a pixel image to the corresponding quantum-pixel using a qubit per pixel to represent each pixels classical weight in a quantum image matrix weight. All qubits are linear superposition, changing the coefficients level by level to the entire longitude of the gray scale with respect to the base states of the qubit. Classically, these states are just bytes represented in a binary matrix, having code combinations of 1 or 0 at all pixel locations. This method introduces a qubit-pixel image representation of images captured by classical optoelectronic methods. Supported partially by the project 20150964-SIP-IPN, Mexico

  6. Infrared astronomy - Pixels to spare

    SciTech Connect

    Mccaughrean, M. )

    1991-07-01

    An infrared CCD camera containing an array with 311,040 pixels arranged in 486 rows of 640 each is tested. The array is a chip of platinum silicide (PtSi), sensitive to photons with wavelengths between 1 and 6 microns. Observations of the Hubble Space Telescope, Mars, Pluto and moon are reported. It is noted that the satellite's twin solar-cell arrays, at an apparent separation of about 1 1/4 arc second, are well resolved. Some two dozen video frames were stacked to make each presented image of Mars at 1.6 microns; at this wavelength Mars appears much as it does in visible light. A stack of 11 images at a wavelength of 1.6 microns is used for an image of Jupiter with its Great Red Spot and moons Io and Europa.

  7. [Hadamard transform spectrometer mixed pixels' unmixing method].

    PubMed

    Yan, Peng; Hu, Bing-Liang; Liu, Xue-Bin; Sun, Wei; Li, Li-Bo; Feng, Yu-Tao; Liu, Yong-Zheng

    2011-10-01

    Hadamard transform imaging spectrometer is a multi-channel digital transform spectrometer detection technology, this paper based on digital micromirror array device (DMD) of the Hadamard transform spectrometer working principle and instrument structure, obtained by the imaging sensor mixed pixel were analyzed, theory derived the solution of pixel aliasing hybrid method, simulation results show that the method is simple and effective to improve the accuracy of mixed pixel spectrum more than 10% recovery. PMID:22250574

  8. Method for fabricating pixelated silicon device cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nelson, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Benjamin John

    2015-08-18

    A method, apparatus and system for flexible, ultra-thin, and high efficiency pixelated silicon or other semiconductor photovoltaic solar cell array fabrication is disclosed. A structure and method of creation for a pixelated silicon or other semiconductor photovoltaic solar cell array with interconnects is described using a manufacturing method that is simplified compared to previous versions of pixelated silicon photovoltaic cells that require more microfabrication steps.

  9. Commissioning of the CMS Forward Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashish; /SUNY, Buffalo

    2008-12-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is scheduled for physics data taking in summer 2009 after the commissioning of high energy proton-proton collisions at Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the core of the CMS all-silicon tracker is the silicon pixel detector, comprising three barrel layers and two pixel disks in the forward and backward regions, accounting for a total of 66 million channels. The pixel detector will provide high-resolution, 3D tracking points, essential for pattern recognition and precise vertexing, while being embedded in a hostile radiation environment. The end disks of the pixel detector, known as the Forward Pixel detector, has been assembled and tested at Fermilab, USA. It has 18 million pixel cells with dimension 100 x 150 {micro}m{sup 2}. The complete forward pixel detector was shipped to CERN in December 2007, where it underwent extensive system tests for commissioning prior to the installation. The pixel system was put in its final place inside the CMS following the installation and bake out of the LHC beam pipe in July 2008. It has been integrated with other sub-detectors in the readout since September 2008 and participated in the cosmic data taking. This report covers the strategy and results from commissioning of CMS forward pixel detector at CERN.

  10. Implementation of TDI based digital pixel ROIC with 15μm pixel pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan, Omer; Shafique, Atia; Burak, A.; Caliskan, Can; Abbasi, Shahbaz; Yazici, Melik; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2016-05-01

    A 15um pixel pitch digital pixel for LWIR time delay integration (TDI) applications is implemented which occupies one fourth of pixel area compared to previous digital TDI implementation. TDI is implemented on 8 pixels with oversampling rate of 2. ROIC provides 16 bits output with 8 bits of MSB and 8 bits of LSB. Pixel can store 75 M electrons with a quantization noise of 500 electrons. Digital pixel TDI implementation is advantageous over analog counterparts considering power consumption, chip area and signal-to-noise ratio. Digital pixel TDI ROIC is fabricated with 0.18um CMOS process. In digital pixel TDI implementation photocurrent is integrated on a capacitor in pixel and converted to digital data in pixel. This digital data triggers the summation counters which implements TDI addition. After all pixels in a row contribute, the summed data is divided to the number of TDI pixels(N) to have the actual output which is square root of N improved version of a single pixel output in terms of signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR).

  11. Diagnosis of abnormal biliary copper excretion by positron emission tomography with targeting of 64Copper-asialofetuin complex in LEC rat model of Wilson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Bahde, Ralf; Kapoor, Sorabh; Bhargava, Kuldeep K; Palestro, Christopher J; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    Identification by molecular imaging of key processes in handling of transition state metals, such as copper (Cu), will be of considerable clinical value. For instance, the ability to diagnose Wilson’s disease with molecular imaging by identifying copper excretion in an ATP7B-dependent manner will be very significant. To develop highly effective diagnostic approaches, we hypothesized that targeting of radiocopper via the asialoglycoprotein receptor will be appropriate for positron emission tomography, and examined this approach in a rat model of Wilson’s disease. After complexing 64Cu to asialofetuin we studied handling of this complex compared with 64Cu in healthy LEA rats and diseased homozygous LEC rats lacking ATP7B and exhibiting hepatic copper toxicosis. We analyzed radiotracer clearance from blood, organ uptake, and biliary excretion, including sixty minute dynamic positron emission tomography recordings. In LEA rats, 64Cu-asialofetuin was better cleared from blood followed by liver uptake and greater biliary excretion than 64Cu. In LEC rats, 64Cu-asialofetuin activity cleared even more rapidly from blood followed by greater uptake in liver, but neither 64Cu-asialofetuin nor 64Cu appeared in bile. Image analysis demonstrated rapid visualization of liver after 64Cu-asialofetuin administration followed by decreased liver activity in LEA rats while liver activity progressively increased in LEC rats. Image analysis resolved this difference in hepatic activity within one hour. We concluded that 64Cu-asialofetuin complex was successfully targeted to the liver and radiocopper was then excreted into bile in an ATP7B-dependent manner. Therefore, hepatic targeting of radiocopper will be appropriate for improving molecular diagnosis and for developing drug/cell/gene therapies in Wilson’s disease. PMID:25250203

  12. Hot pixel generation in active pixel sensors: dosimetric and micro-dosimetric response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheick, Leif; Novak, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The dosimetric response of an active pixel sensor is analyzed. heavy ions are seen to damage the pixel in much the same way as gamma radiation. The probability of a hot pixel is seen to exhibit behavior that is not typical with other microdose effects.

  13. Soil moisture variability within remote sensing pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, Michael A.; Groffman, Peter M.

    1992-11-01

    The effects of topography and the level of soil moisture on the variability of soil moisture within remote sensing pixels were assessed during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) during 1987 and 1989. Soil moisture data from flat, sloped, and valley-shaped pixels were obtained over a wide range of moisture conditions. Relative elevation data were obtained for each study area to create digital elevation models with which to quantify topographic variability. Within-pixel soil moisture variability was shown to increase with increased topographic heterogeneity. The flat pixel had significantly lower standard deviations and fewer outlier points than the slope and valley pixels. Most pixel means had a positive skewness, indicating that most pixels will have areas of markedly higher than average soil moisture. Soil moisture variability (as indicated by the coefficient of variation) decreased as soil moisture levels increased. However, the absolute value of the standard deviation of soil moisture was independent of wetness. The data suggest that remote sensing will reflect soil moisture conditions less accurately on pixels with increased topographic variability and less precisely when the soil is dry. These differences in the inherent accuracy and precision of remote sensing soil moisture data should be considered when evaluating error sources in analyses of energy balance or biogeochemical processes that utilize soil moisture data produced by remote sensing.

  14. High stroke pixel for a deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.

    2005-09-20

    A mirror pixel that can be fabricated using standard MEMS methods for a deformable mirror. The pixel is electrostatically actuated and is capable of the high deflections needed for spaced-based mirror applications. In one embodiment, the mirror comprises three layers, a top or mirror layer, a middle layer which consists of flexures, and a comb drive layer, with the flexures of the middle layer attached to the mirror layer and to the comb drive layer. The comb drives are attached to a frame via spring flexures. A number of these mirror pixels can be used to construct a large mirror assembly. The actuator for the mirror pixel may be configured as a crenellated beam with one end fixedly secured, or configured as a scissor jack. The mirror pixels may be used in various applications requiring high stroke adaptive optics.

  15. Performance improvements for VOx microbolometer FPAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Daniel F.; Ray, Michael; Wyles, Jessica; Asbrock, James F.; Hewitt, C.; Wyles, Richard; Gordon, Eli; Sessler, T.; Kennedy, Adam; Baur, Stefan T.; Van Lue, David; Anderson, Steven; Chin, Richard; Gonzales, H.; Le Pere, C.; Ton, S.; Kostrzewa, Thomas

    2004-08-01

    Raytheon is producing high-quality 320 x 240 microbolometer FPAs with 25 μm pitch pixels. The 320 x 240 FPAs have a sensitivity that is comparable to microbolometer FPAs with 50 μm pixels. Typical NETD values for these FPAs are <50mK with an f/1 aperture and operating at 30 Hz frame rates. Pixel operability is greater than 99.9% on most FPAs, and uncorrected responsivity nonuniformity is less than 4% (sigma/mean). These 25 μm microbolometer detectors also have a relatively fast thermal time constant of approximately 10 msec. These arrays have produced excellent image quality, and are currently fielded in a variety of demonstration systems. The pixel size reduction facilitates a significant FPA cost reduction since the number of die printed on a wafer can be increased, and also has enabled the development of a large-format 640 x 480 FPA array. Raytheon is producing these arrays with excellent sensitivity and typical NETD values of <50mK with an f/1 aperture and operating at 30 Hz frame rates. These arrays have excellent operability and image quality. Several dual FOV prototype 640 x 480 systems have been delivered under the LCMS and UAV programs. RVS has developed a flexible uncooled front end (UFE) electronics that will serve as the basis for the camera engine systems using 320 x 240 arrays. RVS has developed a 640 x 480 Common Uncooled Engine (CUE) which is intended for small pixel, high performance applications. The CUE is the ideal cornerstone for ground and airborne systems, multi-mode sensor, weapon sight or seeker architectures, and commercial surveillance.

  16. Crystal structure of MytiLec, a galactose-binding lectin from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis with cytotoxicity against certain cancer cell types

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Daiki; Kawai, Fumihiro; Noguchi, Hiroki; Unzai, Satoru; Hasan, Imtiaj; Fujii, Yuki; Park, Sam-Yong; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Tame, Jeremy R. H.

    2016-01-01

    MytiLec is a lectin, isolated from bivalves, with cytotoxic activity against cancer cell lines that express globotriaosyl ceramide, Galα(1,4)Galβ(1,4)Glcα1-Cer, on the cell surface. Functional analysis shows that the protein binds to the disaccharide melibiose, Galα(1,6)Glc, and the trisaccharide globotriose, Galα(1,4)Galβ(1,4)Glc. Recombinant MytiLec expressed in bacteria showed the same haemagglutinating and cytotoxic activity against Burkitt’s lymphoma (Raji) cells as the native form. The crystal structure has been determined to atomic resolution, in the presence and absence of ligands, showing the protein to be a member of the β-trefoil family, but with a mode of ligand binding unique to a small group of related trefoil lectins. Each of the three pseudo-equivalent binding sites within the monomer shows ligand binding, and the protein forms a tight dimer in solution. An engineered monomer mutant lost all cytotoxic activity against Raji cells, but retained some haemagglutination activity, showing that the quaternary structure of the protein is important for its cellular effects. PMID:27321048

  17. Crystal structure of MytiLec, a galactose-binding lectin from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis with cytotoxicity against certain cancer cell types.

    PubMed

    Terada, Daiki; Kawai, Fumihiro; Noguchi, Hiroki; Unzai, Satoru; Hasan, Imtiaj; Fujii, Yuki; Park, Sam-Yong; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2016-01-01

    MytiLec is a lectin, isolated from bivalves, with cytotoxic activity against cancer cell lines that express globotriaosyl ceramide, Galα(1,4)Galβ(1,4)Glcα1-Cer, on the cell surface. Functional analysis shows that the protein binds to the disaccharide melibiose, Galα(1,6)Glc, and the trisaccharide globotriose, Galα(1,4)Galβ(1,4)Glc. Recombinant MytiLec expressed in bacteria showed the same haemagglutinating and cytotoxic activity against Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) cells as the native form. The crystal structure has been determined to atomic resolution, in the presence and absence of ligands, showing the protein to be a member of the β-trefoil family, but with a mode of ligand binding unique to a small group of related trefoil lectins. Each of the three pseudo-equivalent binding sites within the monomer shows ligand binding, and the protein forms a tight dimer in solution. An engineered monomer mutant lost all cytotoxic activity against Raji cells, but retained some haemagglutination activity, showing that the quaternary structure of the protein is important for its cellular effects. PMID:27321048

  18. X-Ray induced cataract is preceded by LEC loss, and coincident with accumulation of cortical DNA, and ROS; similarities with age-related cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Zitnik, Galynn; Tsai, Ryan; Wolf, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare age-related cataractous (ARC) changes in unirradiated mice lenses to those induced by head-only X-irradiation of 3 month-old mice. Methods lens epithelial cells (LECs) as well as partially degraded cortical DNA were visualized in fixed sections using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, and in fresh lenses using the vital stain Hoechst 33342. reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity was also visualized directly in fresh lenses using the vital dye Dihydrorhodamine (DHR). In fixed lenses an antibody specific for 8-OH Guanosine (8-OH-G) lesions was used to visualize DNA oxidative adducts from ROS damage. Alpha smooth muscle actin was visualized using specific antibodies to determine if myofibroblasts were present. Fluorescence was quantified using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM). The degree of lens opacity and cataract formation was determined by slit lamp, or from digitalized images of light reflections taken with a low magnification light microscope. Results Using DNA- and ROS-specific vital fluorescent dyes, and laser scanning confocal microscopy we have previously described 4 changes in the aging rodent lenses: 1) a significantly decreased density of surface LECs in lenses from old compared to younger mice and rats; 2) a very large increase in retained cortical nuclei and DNA fragments in the secondary lens fibers of old rodent lenses; 3) increased cortical ROS in old rodent lenses; 4) increased cataract concomitantly with the cortical DNA and ROS increases. In the current study we report that these same 4 changes also occur in an accelerated fashion in mice given head-only X-irradiation at 3 months of age. In addition to vital staining of fresh lenses, we also examined sections from fixed eyes stained with DAPI or hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and found the same loss of surface LECs and accumulation of undigested nuclei and debris in secondary lens fibers occur with age or following X-irradiation. In addition sections from fixed

  19. Sub-pixel mapping of water boundaries using pixel swapping algorithm (case study: Tagliamento River, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niroumand-Jadidi, Milad; Vitti, Alfonso

    2015-10-01

    Taking the advantages of remotely sensed data for mapping and monitoring of water boundaries is of particular importance in many different management and conservation activities. Imagery data are classified using automatic techniques to produce maps entering the water bodies' analysis chain in several and different points. Very commonly, medium or coarse spatial resolution imagery is used in studies of large water bodies. Data of this kind is affected by the presence of mixed pixels leading to very outstanding problems, in particular when dealing with boundary pixels. A considerable amount of uncertainty inescapably occurs when conventional hard classifiers (e.g., maximum likelihood) are applied on mixed pixels. In this study, Linear Spectral Mixture Model (LSMM) is used to estimate the proportion of water in boundary pixels. Firstly by applying an unsupervised clustering, the water body is identified approximately and a buffer area considered ensuring the selection of entire boundary pixels. Then LSMM is applied on this buffer region to estimate the fractional maps. However, resultant output of LSMM does not provide a sub-pixel map corresponding to water abundances. To tackle with this problem, Pixel Swapping (PS) algorithm is used to allocate sub-pixels within mixed pixels in such a way to maximize the spatial proximity of sub-pixels and pixels in the neighborhood. The water area of two segments of Tagliamento River (Italy) are mapped in sub-pixel resolution (10m) using a 30m Landsat image. To evaluate the proficiency of the proposed approach for sub-pixel boundary mapping, the image is also classified using a conventional hard classifier. A high resolution image of the same area is also classified and used as a reference for accuracy assessment. According to the results, sub-pixel map shows in average about 8 percent higher overall accuracy than hard classification and fits very well in the boundaries with the reference map.

  20. Pixel multichip module development at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Turqueti, M A; Cardoso, G; Andresen, J; Appel, J A; Christian, D C; Kwan, S W; Prosser, A; Uplegger, L

    2005-10-01

    At Fermilab, there is an ongoing pixel detector R&D effort for High Energy Physics with the objective of developing high performance vertex detectors suitable for the next generation of HEP experiments. The pixel module presented here is a direct result of work undertaken for the canceled BTeV experiment. It is a very mature piece of hardware, having many characteristics of high performance, low mass and radiation hardness driven by the requirements of the BTeV experiment. The detector presented in this paper consists of three basic devices; the readout integrated circuit (IC) FPIX2A [2][5], the pixel sensor (TESLA p-spray) [6] and the high density interconnect (HDI) flex circuit [1][3] that is capable of supporting eight readout ICs. The characterization of the pixel multichip module prototype as well as the baseline design of the eight chip pixel module and its capabilities are presented. These prototypes were characterized for threshold and noise dispersion. The bump-bonds of the pixel module were examined using an X-ray inspection system. Furthermore, the connectivity of the bump-bonds was tested using a radioactive source ({sup 90}Sr), while the absolute calibration of the modules was achieved using an X-ray source. This paper provides a view of the integration of the three components that together comprise the pixel multichip module.

  1. It's not the pixel count, you fool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The first thing a "marketing guy" asks the digital camera engineer is "how many pixels does it have, for we need as many mega pixels as possible since the other guys are killing us with their "umpteen" mega pixel pocket sized digital cameras. And so it goes until the pixels get smaller and smaller in order to inflate the pixel count in the never-ending pixel-wars. These small pixels just are not very good. The truth of the matter is that the most important feature of digital cameras in the last five years is the automatic motion control to stabilize the image on the sensor along with some very sophisticated image processing. All the rest has been hype and some "cool" design. What is the future for digital imaging and what will drive growth of camera sales (not counting the cell phone cameras which totally dominate the market in terms of camera sales) and more importantly after sales profits? Well sit in on the Dark Side of Color and find out what is being done to increase the after sales profits and don't be surprised if has been done long ago in some basement lab of a photographic company and of course, before its time.

  2. Performances of THz cameras with enhanced sensitivity in sub-terahertz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Naoki; Ishi, Tsutomu; Kurashina, Seiji; Sudou, Takayuki; Morimoto, Takao; Miyoshi, Masaru; Doi, Kohei; Goto, Hideki; Sasaki, Tokuhito; Isoyama, Goro; Kato, Ryukou; Irizawa, Akinori; Kawase, Keigo

    2015-05-01

    Uncooled microbolometer-type 640x480 and 320x240 Terahertz (THz) focal plane arrays (FPAs) with enhanced sensitivity in sub-THz region are developed, and incorporated into 640x480 and 320x240 cameras, respectively. The pixel in the THz-FPA has such a structure that an area sensitive to electromagnetic wave is suspended above read-out integrated circuit (ROIC). A thin metallic layer is formed on the top of the sensitive area, while a thick metallic layer is formed on the surface of ROIC. The structure composed of the thin metallic layer and the thick metallic layer behaves as an optical cavity. The THz-FPAs reported in this paper have a modified pixel structure which has several times longer optical-cavity length than NEC's previous pixel does, by forming a thick SiN layer on the ROIC. The extended optical-cavity structure is favorable for detecting electromagnetic wave with lower frequency. Consequently, the Minimum Detectable Power per pixel (MDP) is improved ten times in sub-THz region, especially 0.5-0.6 THz. This paper presents spectral frequency dependences of MDP values for THz-FPA with the modified pixel structure and THz-FPA with the previous pixel structure, using THz free electron laser (FEL) developed by Osaka University. The modification of pixel structure extends high sensitivity region to lower frequency region, such as sub-THz region, and the wider spectral coverage of THz camera surely expands its applicability

  3. Per-Pixel Lighting Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Inanici, Mehlika

    2005-08-01

    This report presents a framework for per-pixel analysis of the qualitative and quantitative aspects of luminous environments. Recognizing the need for better lighting analysis capabilities and appreciating the new measurement abilities developed within the LBNL Lighting Measurement and Simulation Toolbox, ''Per-pixel Lighting Data Analysis'' project demonstrates several techniques for analyzing luminance distribution patterns, luminance ratios, adaptation luminance and glare assessment. The techniques are the syntheses of the current practices in lighting design and the unique practices that can be done with per-pixel data availability. Demonstrated analysis techniques are applicable to both computer-generated and digitally captured images (physically-based renderings and High Dynamic Range photographs).

  4. Pixels, Imagers and Related Fabrication Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Pixels, imagers and related fabrication methods are described. The described methods result in cross-talk reduction in imagers and related devices by generating depletion regions. The devices can also be used with electronic circuits for imaging applications.

  5. Monolithic Active-Pixel Infrared Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Krabach, Timothy N.; Staller, Craig O.

    1995-01-01

    Monolithic arrays of active-pixel junction field-effect (JFET) devices made from InGaAs proposed for use as imaging sensors sensitive to light in visible and short-wavelength infrared parts of electromagnetic spectrum. Each pixel of such array comprises photodetector monolithically integrated with JFET output-amplifier circuit of source-follower type - structure similar to charge-coupled device (CCD). Sizes of instruments reduced because large cooling systems not needed.

  6. Design of the small pixel pitch ROIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qinghua; Jiang, Dazhao; Chen, Honglei; Zhai, Yongcheng; Gao, Lei; Ding, Ruijun

    2014-11-01

    Since the technology trend of the third generation IRFPA towards resolution enhancing has steadily progressed,the pixel pitch of IRFPA has been greatly reduced.A 640×512 readout integrated circuit(ROIC) of IRFPA with 15μm pixel pitch is presented in this paper.The 15μm pixel pitch ROIC design will face many challenges.As we all known,the integrating capacitor is a key performance parameter when considering pixel area,charge capacity and dynamic range,so we adopt the effective method of 2 by 2 pixels sharing an integrating capacitor to solve this problem.The input unit cell architecture will contain two paralleled sample and hold parts,which not only allow the FPA to be operated in full frame snapshot mode but also save relatively unit circuit area.Different applications need more matching input unit circuits. Because the dimension of 2×2 pixels is 30μm×30μm, an input stage based on direct injection (DI) which has medium injection ratio and small layout area is proved to be suitable for middle wave (MW) while BDI with three-transistor cascode amplifier for long wave(LW). By adopting the 0.35μm 2P4M mixed signal process, the circuit architecture can make the effective charge capacity of 7.8Me- per pixel with 2.2V output range for MW and 7.3 Me- per pixel with 2.6V output range for LW. According to the simulation results, this circuit works well under 5V power supply and achieves less than 0.1% nonlinearity.

  7. Steganography based on pixel intensity value decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulla, Alan Anwar; Sellahewa, Harin; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2014-05-01

    This paper focuses on steganography based on pixel intensity value decomposition. A number of existing schemes such as binary, Fibonacci, Prime, Natural, Lucas, and Catalan-Fibonacci (CF) are evaluated in terms of payload capacity and stego quality. A new technique based on a specific representation is proposed to decompose pixel intensity values into 16 (virtual) bit-planes suitable for embedding purposes. The proposed decomposition has a desirable property whereby the sum of all bit-planes does not exceed the maximum pixel intensity value, i.e. 255. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed technique offers an effective compromise between payload capacity and stego quality of existing embedding techniques based on pixel intensity value decomposition. Its capacity is equal to that of binary and Lucas, while it offers a higher capacity than Fibonacci, Prime, Natural, and CF when the secret bits are embedded in 1st Least Significant Bit (LSB). When the secret bits are embedded in higher bit-planes, i.e., 2nd LSB to 8th Most Significant Bit (MSB), the proposed scheme has more capacity than Natural numbers based embedding. However, from the 6th bit-plane onwards, the proposed scheme offers better stego quality. In general, the proposed decomposition scheme has less effect in terms of quality on pixel value when compared to most existing pixel intensity value decomposition techniques when embedding messages in higher bit-planes.

  8. Small pixel oversampled IR focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, John; Curzan, Jon; Lewis, Jay; Dhar, Nibir

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new high definition high charge capacity 2.1 Mpixel MWIR Infrared Focal Plane Array. This high definition (HD) FPA utilizes a small 5 um pitch pixel size which is below the Nyquist limit imposed by the optical systems Point Spread Function (PSF). These smaller sub diffraction limited pixels allow spatial oversampling of the image. We show that oversampling IRFPAs enables improved fidelity in imaging including resolution improvements, advanced pixel correlation processing to reduce false alarm rates, improved detection ranges, and an improved ability to track closely spaced objects. Small pixel HD arrays are viewed as the key component enabling lower size, power and weight of the IR Sensor System. Small pixels enables a reduction in the size of the systems components from the smaller detector and ROIC array, the reduced optics focal length and overall lens size, resulting in an overall compactness in the sensor package, cooling and associated electronics. The highly sensitive MWIR small pixel HD FPA has the capability to detect dimmer signals at longer ranges than previously demonstrated.

  9. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  10. Spatial clustering of pixels of a multispectral image

    DOEpatents

    Conger, James Lynn

    2014-08-19

    A method and system for clustering the pixels of a multispectral image is provided. A clustering system computes a maximum spectral similarity score for each pixel that indicates the similarity between that pixel and the most similar neighboring. To determine the maximum similarity score for a pixel, the clustering system generates a similarity score between that pixel and each of its neighboring pixels and then selects the similarity score that represents the highest similarity as the maximum similarity score. The clustering system may apply a filtering criterion based on the maximum similarity score so that pixels with similarity scores below a minimum threshold are not clustered. The clustering system changes the current pixel values of the pixels in a cluster based on an averaging of the original pixel values of the pixels in the cluster.

  11. Raffinose, a plant galactoside, inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation via binding to LecA and decreasing cellular cyclic diguanylate levels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Shin; Cha, Eunji; Kim, YunHye; Jeon, Young Ho; Olson, Betty H; Byun, Youngjoo; Park, Hee-Deung

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation on biotic or abiotic surfaces has unwanted consequences in medical, clinical, and industrial settings. Treatments with antibiotics or biocides are often ineffective in eradicating biofilms. Promising alternatives to conventional agents are biofilm-inhibiting compounds regulating biofilm development without toxicity to growth. Here, we screened a biofilm inhibitor, raffinose, derived from ginger. Raffinose, a galactotrisaccharide, showed efficient biofilm inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa without impairing its growth. Raffinose also affected various phenotypes such as colony morphology, matrix formation, and swarming motility. Binding of raffinose to a carbohydrate-binding protein called LecA was the cause of biofilm inhibition and altered phenotypes. Furthermore, raffinose reduced the concentration of the second messenger, cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP), by increased activity of a c-di-GMP specific phosphodiesterase. The ability of raffinose to inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and its molecular mechanism opens new possibilities for pharmacological and industrial applications. PMID:27141909

  12. Raffinose, a plant galactoside, inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation via binding to LecA and decreasing cellular cyclic diguanylate levels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Shin; Cha, Eunji; Kim, YunHye; Jeon, Young Ho; Olson, Betty H.; Byun, Youngjoo; Park, Hee-Deung

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation on biotic or abiotic surfaces has unwanted consequences in medical, clinical, and industrial settings. Treatments with antibiotics or biocides are often ineffective in eradicating biofilms. Promising alternatives to conventional agents are biofilm-inhibiting compounds regulating biofilm development without toxicity to growth. Here, we screened a biofilm inhibitor, raffinose, derived from ginger. Raffinose, a galactotrisaccharide, showed efficient biofilm inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa without impairing its growth. Raffinose also affected various phenotypes such as colony morphology, matrix formation, and swarming motility. Binding of raffinose to a carbohydrate-binding protein called LecA was the cause of biofilm inhibition and altered phenotypes. Furthermore, raffinose reduced the concentration of the second messenger, cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP), by increased activity of a c-di-GMP specific phosphodiesterase. The ability of raffinose to inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and its molecular mechanism opens new possibilities for pharmacological and industrial applications. PMID:27141909

  13. Regioisomerism in cationic sulfonyl-substituted [Ir(C^N)2(N^N)](+) complexes: its influence on photophysical properties and LEC performance.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Cathrin D; Gil-Escrig, Lidón; Cerdá, Jesús; Pertegás, Antonio; Bolink, Henk J; Junquera-Hernández, José M; Prescimone, Alessandro; Neuburger, Markus; Constable, Edwin C; Ortí, Enrique; Housecroft, Catherine E

    2016-08-01

    A series of regioisomeric cationic iridium complexes of the type [Ir(C^N)2(bpy)][PF6] (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) is reported. The complexes contain 2-phenylpyridine-based cyclometallating ligands with a methylsulfonyl group in either the 3-, 4- or 5-position of the phenyl ring. All the complexes have been fully characterized, including their crystal structures. In acetonitrile solution, all the compounds are green emitters with emission maxima between 493 and 517 nm. Whereas substitution meta to the Ir-C bond leads to vibrationally structured emission profiles and photoluminescence quantum yields of 74 and 77%, placing a sulfone substituent in a para position results in a broad, featureless emission band, an enhanced quantum yield of 92% and a shorter excited-state lifetime. These results suggest a larger ligand-centred ((3)LC) character of the emissive triplet state in the case of meta substitution and a more pronounced charge transfer (CT) character in the case of para substitution. Going from solution to the solid state (powder samples and thin films), the emission maxima are red-shifted for all the complexes, resulting in green-yellow emission. Data obtained from electrochemical measurements and density functional theory calculations parallel the photophysical trends. Light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) based on the complexes were fabricated and evaluated. A maximum efficiency of 4.5 lm W(-1) at a maximum luminance of 940 cd m(-2) was observed for the LEC with the complex incorporating the sulfone substituent in the 4-position when operated under pulsed current driving conditions. PMID:27171612

  14. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, S.; Cole, D. M.; Hancock, B. R.; Smith, R. M.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic coupling effects such as Inter-Pixel Capacitance (IPC) affect the quantitative interpretation of image data from CMOS, hybrid visible and infrared imagers alike. Existing methods of characterizing IPC do not provide a map of the spatial variation of IPC over all pixels. We demonstrate a deterministic method that provides a direct quantitative map of the crosstalk across an imager. The approach requires only the ability to reset single pixels to an arbitrary voltage, different from the rest of the imager. No illumination source is required. Mapping IPC independently for each pixel is also made practical by the greater S/N ratio achievable for an electrical stimulus than for an optical stimulus, which is subject to both Poisson statistics and diffusion effects of photo-generated charge. The data we present illustrates a more complex picture of IPC in Teledyne HgCdTe and HyViSi focal plane arrays than is presently understood, including the presence of a newly discovered, long range IPC in the HyViSi FPA that extends tens of pixels in distance, likely stemming from extended field effects in the fully depleted substrate. The sensitivity of the measurement approach has been shown to be good enough to distinguish spatial structure in IPC of the order of 0.1%.

  15. Pixels, Blocks of Pixels, and Polygons: Choosing a Spatial Unit for Thematic Accuracy Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pixels, polygons, and blocks of pixels are all potentially viable spatial assessment units for conducting an accuracy assessment. We develop a statistical population-based framework to examine how the spatial unit chosen affects the outcome of an accuracy assessment. The populati...

  16. Uncooled infrared detectors toward smaller pixel pitch with newly proposed pixel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohyama, Shigeru; Sasaki, Tokuhito; Endoh, Tsutomu; Sano, Masahiko; Katoh, Kouji; Kurashina, Seiji; Miyoshi, Masaru; Yamazaki, Takao; Ueno, Munetaka; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Imai, Tadashi

    2011-06-01

    Since authors have successfully demonstrated uncooled infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) with 23.5 um pixel pitch, it has been widely utilized for commercial applications such as thermography, security camera and so on. One of the key issues for uncooled IR detector technology is to shrink the pixel size. The smaller the pixel pitch, the more the IR camera products become compact and the less cost. This paper proposes a new pixel structure with a diaphragm and beams which are placed in different level, to realize an uncooled IRFPA with smaller pixel pitch )<=17 μm). The upper level consists of diaphragm with VOx bolometer and IR absorber layers, while the lower level consists of the two beams, which are designed to place on the adjacent pixels. The test devices of this pixel design with 12 um, 15 um and 17 um pitch have been fabricated on the Si ROIC of QVGA (320 × 240) with 23.5 um pitch. Their performances reveal nearly equal to the IRFPA with 23.5 um pitch. For example, noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 12 μm pixel is 63.1 mK with thermal time constant of 14.5 msec. In addition, this new structure is expected to be more effective for the existing IRFPA with 23.5 um pitch in order to improve the IR responsivity.

  17. Development of CMOS Pixel Sensors with digital pixel dedicated to future particle physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Wang, T.; Pham, H.; Hu-Guo, C.; Dorokhov, A.; Hu, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Two prototypes of CMOS pixel sensor with in-pixel analog to digital conversion have been developed in a 0.18 μm CIS process. The first design integrates a discriminator into each pixel within an area of 22 × 33 μm2 in order to meet the requirements of the ALICE inner tracking system (ALICE-ITS) upgrade. The second design features 3-bit charge encoding inside a 35 × 35 μm2 pixel which is motivated by the specifications of the outer layers of the ILD vertex detector (ILD-VXD). This work aims to validate the concept of in-pixel digitization which offers higher readout speed, lower power consumption and less dead zone compared with the column-level charge encoding.

  18. Modulation transfer function of a trapezoidal pixel array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Guo, Rongli; Ni, Jinping; Dong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is the tool most commonly used for quantifying the performance of an electro-optical imaging system. Recently, trapezoid-shaped pixels were designed and used in a retina-like sensor in place of rectangular-shaped pixels. The MTF of a detector with a trapezoidal pixel array is determined according to its definition. Additionally, the MTFs of detectors with differently shaped pixels, but the same pixel areas, are compared. The results show that the MTF values of the trapezoidal pixel array detector are obviously larger than those of rectangular and triangular pixel array detectors at the same frequencies.

  19. Vivid, full-color aluminum plasmonic pixels

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Jana; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Liu, Lifei; Chang, Wei-Shun; Foerster, Benjamin; King, Nicholas S.; Knight, Mark W.; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.; Link, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum is abundant, low in cost, compatible with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor manufacturing methods, and capable of supporting tunable plasmon resonance structures that span the entire visible spectrum. However, the use of Al for color displays has been limited by its intrinsically broad spectral features. Here we show that vivid, highly polarized, and broadly tunable color pixels can be produced from periodic patterns of oriented Al nanorods. Whereas the nanorod longitudinal plasmon resonance is largely responsible for pixel color, far-field diffractive coupling is used to narrow the plasmon linewidth, enabling monochromatic coloration and significantly enhancing the far-field scattering intensity of the individual nanorod elements. The bright coloration can be observed with p-polarized white light excitation, consistent with the use of this approach in display devices. The resulting color pixels are constructed with a simple design, are compatible with scalable fabrication methods, and provide contrast ratios exceeding 100:1. PMID:25225385

  20. Likelihood Analysis for Mega Pixel Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan J.

    1999-01-01

    The derivation of cosmological parameters from astrophysical data sets routinely involves operations counts which scale as O(N(exp 3) where N is the number of data points. Currently planned missions, including MAP and Planck, will generate sky maps with N(sub d) = 10(exp 6) or more pixels. Simple "brute force" analysis, applied to such mega-pixel data, would require years of computing even on the fastest computers. We describe an algorithm which allows estimation of the likelihood function in the direct pixel basis. The algorithm uses a conjugate gradient approach to evaluate X2 and a geometric approximation to evaluate the determinant. Monte Carlo simulations provide a correction to the determinant, yielding an unbiased estimate of the likelihood surface in an arbitrary region surrounding the likelihood peak. The algorithm requires O(N(sub d)(exp 3/2) operations and O(Nd) storage for each likelihood evaluation, and allows for significant parallel computation.

  1. Active Pixel Sensors: Are CCD's Dinosaurs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD's) are presently the technology of choice for most imaging applications. In the 23 years since their invention in 1970, they have evolved to a sophisticated level of performance. However, as with all technologies, we can be certain that they will be supplanted someday. In this paper, the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology is explored as a possible successor to the CCD. An active pixel is defined as a detector array technology that has at least one active transistor within the pixel unit cell. The APS eliminates the need for nearly perfect charge transfer -- the Achilles' heel of CCDs. This perfect charge transfer makes CCD's radiation 'soft,' difficult to use under low light conditions, difficult to manufacture in large array sizes, difficult to integrate with on-chip electronics, difficult to use at low temperatures, difficult to use at high frame rates, and difficult to manufacture in non-silicon materials that extend wavelength response.

  2. Optical links for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucci, Stefania

    2016-07-01

    With the expected increase in the instantaneous luminosity of the LHC in the next few years, the off-detector optical read-out system of the outer two layers of the Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment will reach its bandwidth limits. The bandwidth will be increased with new optical receivers, which had to be redesigned since commercial solutions could not be used. The new design allows for a wider operational range in terms of data frequency and input optical power to match the on-detector transmitters of the present Pixel Detector. We report on the design and testing of prototypes of these components and the plans for the installation in the Pixel Detector read-out chain in 2015.

  3. SVGA AMOLED with world's highest pixel pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prache, Olivier; Wacyk, Ihor

    2006-05-01

    We present the design and early evaluation results of the world's highest pixel pitch full-color 800x3x600- pixel, active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) color microdisplay for consumer and environmentally demanding applications. The design premises were aimed at improving small area uniformity as well as reducing the pixel size while expanding the functionality found in existing eMagin Corporations' microdisplay products without incurring any power consumption degradation when compared to existing OLED microdisplays produced by eMagin. The initial results of the first silicon prototype presented here demonstrate compliance with all major objectives as well as the validation of a new adaptive gamma correction technique that can operate automatically over temperature.

  4. Power Studies for the CMS Pixel Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Todri, A.; Turqueti, M.; Rivera, R.; Kwan, S.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The Electronic Systems Engineering Department of the Computing Division at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is carrying out R&D investigations for the upgrade of the power distribution system of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Pixel Tracker at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Among the goals of this effort is that of analyzing the feasibility of alternative powering schemes for the forward tracker, including DC to DC voltage conversion techniques using commercially available and custom switching regulator circuits. Tests of these approaches are performed using the PSI46 pixel readout chip currently in use at the CMS Tracker. Performance measures of the detector electronics will include pixel noise and threshold dispersion results. Issues related to susceptibility to switching noise will be studied and presented. In this paper, we describe the current power distribution network of the CMS Tracker, study the implications of the proposed upgrade with DC-DC converters powering scheme and perform noise susceptibility analysis.

  5. K2flix: Kepler pixel data visualizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barentsen, Geert

    2015-03-01

    K2flix makes it easy to inspect the CCD pixel data obtained by NASA's Kepler space telescope. The two-wheeled extended Kepler mission, K2, is affected by new sources of systematics, including pointing jitter and foreground asteroids, that are easier to spot by eye than by algorithm. The code takes Kepler's Target Pixel Files (TPF) as input and turns them into contrast-stretched animated gifs or MPEG-4 movies. K2flix can be used both as a command-line tool or using its Python API.

  6. Development of a CMOS SOI Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Y.; Hazumi, M.; Ikegami, Y.; Kohriki, T.; Tajima, O.; Terada, S.; Tsuboyama, T.; Unno, Y.; Ushiroda, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Hara, K.; Ishino, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Miyake, H.; Martin, E.; Varner, G.; Tajima, H.; Ohno, M.; Fukuda, K.; Komatsubara, H.; Ida, J.; /NONE - OKI ELECTR INDUST TOKYO

    2008-08-19

    We have developed a monolithic radiation pixel detector using silicon on insulator (SOI) with a commercial 0.15 {micro}m fully-depleted-SOI technology and a Czochralski high resistivity silicon substrate in place of a handle wafer. The SOI TEG (Test Element Group) chips with a size of 2.5 x 2.5 mm{sup 2} consisting of 20 x 20 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels have been designed and manufactured. Performance tests with a laser light illumination and a {beta} ray radioactive source indicate successful operation of the detector. We also briefly discuss the back gate effect as well as the simulation study.

  7. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    ATLAS Collaboration; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008, and is ready for the imminent LHC turn-on. The highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system are presented.

  8. From hybrid to CMOS pixels ... a possibility for LHC's pixel future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wermes, N.

    2015-12-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors have been invented for the LHC to make tracking and vertexing possible at all in LHC's radiation intense environment. The LHC pixel detectors have meanwhile very successfully fulfilled their promises and R&D for the planned HL-LHC upgrade is in full swing, targeting even higher ionising doses and non-ionising fluences. In terms of rate and radiation tolerance hybrid pixels are unrivaled. But they have disadvantages as well, most notably material thickness, production complexity, and cost. Meanwhile also active pixel sensors (DEPFET, MAPS) have become real pixel detectors but they would by far not stand the rates and radiation faced from HL-LHC. New MAPS developments, so-called DMAPS (depleted MAPS) which are full CMOS-pixel structures with charge collection in a depleted region have come in the R&D focus for pixels at high rate/radiation levels. This goal can perhaps be realised exploiting HV technologies, high ohmic substrates and/or SOI based technologies. The paper covers the main ideas and some encouraging results from prototyping R&D, not hiding the difficulties.

  9. Uncooled infrared detectors toward smaller pixel pitch with newly proposed pixel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohyama, Shigeru; Sasaki, Tokuhito; Endoh, Tsutomu; Sano, Masahiko; Kato, Koji; Kurashina, Seiji; Miyoshi, Masaru; Yamazaki, Takao; Ueno, Munetaka; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Imai, Tadashi

    2013-12-01

    An uncooled infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) with 23.5 μm pixel pitch has been successfully demonstrated and has found wide commercial applications in the areas of thermography, security cameras, and other applications. One of the key issues for uncooled IRFPA technology is to shrink the pixel pitch because the size of the pixel pitch determines the overall size of the FPA, which, in turn, determines the cost of the IR camera products. This paper proposes an innovative pixel structure with a diaphragm and beams placed in different levels to realize an uncooled IRFPA with smaller pixel pitch (≦17 μm). The upper level consists of a diaphragm with VOx bolometer and IR absorber layers, while the lower level consists of the two beams, which are designed to be placed on the adjacent pixels. The test devices of this pixel design with 12, 15, and 17 μm pitch have been fabricated on the Si read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) of quarter video graphics array (QVGA) (320×240) with 23.5 μm pitch. Their performances are nearly equal to those of the IRFPA with 23.5 μm pitch. For example, a noise equivalent temperature difference of 12 μm pixel is 63.1 mK for F/1 optics with the thermal time constant of 14.5 ms. Then, the proposed structure is shown to be effective for the existing IRFPA with 23.5 μm pitch because of the improvements in IR sensitivity. Furthermore, the advanced pixel structure that has the beams composed of two levels are demonstrated to be realizable.

  10. Pixel telescope test in STAR at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiangming; Szelezniak, Michal; Greiner, Leo; Matis, Howard; Vu, Chinh; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Wieman, Howard

    2007-10-01

    The STAR experiment at RHIC is designing a new inner vertex detector called the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT). The HFT's innermost two layers is called the PIXEL detector which uses Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor technology (MAPS). To test the MAPS technology, we just constructed and tested a telescope. The telescope uses a stack of three MIMOSTAR2 chips, Each MIMOSTAR2 sensor, which was designed by IPHC, is an array of 132x128 pixels with a square pixel size of 30 μ. The readout of the telescope makes use of the ALICE DDL/SIU cards, which is compatible with the future STAR data acquisition system called DAQ1000. The telescope was first studied in a 1.2 GeV/c electron beam at LBNL's Advanced Light Source. Afterwards, the telescope was outside the STAR magnet, and then later inside it, 145 cm away from STAR's center. We will describe this first test of MAPS technology in a collider environment, and report on the occupancy, particle flux, and performance of the telescope.

  11. Digital-pixel focal plane array development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Matthew G.; Baker, Justin; Colonero, Curtis; Costa, Joe; Gardner, Tom; Kelly, Mike; Schultz, Ken; Tyrrell, Brian; Wey, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006, MIT Lincoln Laboratory has been developing Digital-pixel Focal Plane Array (DFPA) readout integrated circuits (ROICs). To date, four 256 × 256 30 μm pitch DFPA designs with in-pixel analog to digital conversion have been fabricated using IBM 90 nm CMOS processes. The DFPA ROICs are compatible with a wide range of detector materials and cutoff wavelengths; HgCdTe, QWIP, and InGaAs photo-detectors with cutoff wavelengths ranging from 1.6 to 14.5 μm have been hybridized to the same digital-pixel readout. The digital-pixel readout architecture offers high dynamic range, A/C or D/C coupled integration, and on-chip image processing with low power orthogonal transfer operations. The newest ROIC designs support two-color operation with a single Indium bump connection. Development and characterization of the two-color DFPA designs is presented along with applications for this new digital readout technology.

  12. Design Methodology: ASICs with complex in-pixel processing for Pixel Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fahim, Farah

    2014-10-31

    The development of Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) for pixel detectors with complex in-pixel processing using Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools that are, themselves, mainly developed for the design of conventional digital circuits requires a specialized approach. Mixed signal pixels often require parasitically aware detailed analog front-ends and extremely compact digital back-ends with more than 1000 transistors in small areas below 100μm x 100μm. These pixels are tiled to create large arrays, which have the same clock distribution and data readout speed constraints as in, for example, micro-processors. The methodology uses a modified mixed-mode on-top digital implementation flow to not only harness the tool efficiency for timing and floor-planning but also to maintain designer control over compact parasitically aware layout.

  13. Design methodology: edgeless 3D ASICs with complex in-pixel processing for pixel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fahim Farah, Fahim Farah; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Hoff, James R.; Mohseni, Hooman

    2015-08-28

    The design methodology for the development of 3D integrated edgeless pixel detectors with in-pixel processing using Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools is presented. A large area 3 tier 3D detector with one sensor layer and two ASIC layers containing one analog and one digital tier, is built for x-ray photon time of arrival measurement and imaging. A full custom analog pixel is 65μm x 65μm. It is connected to a sensor pixel of the same size on one side, and on the other side it has approximately 40 connections to the digital pixel. A 32 x 32 edgeless array without any peripheral functional blocks constitutes a sub-chip. The sub-chip is an indivisible unit, which is further arranged in a 6 x 6 array to create the entire 1.248cm x 1.248cm ASIC. Each chip has 720 bump-bond I/O connections, on the back of the digital tier to the ceramic PCB. All the analog tier power and biasing is conveyed through the digital tier from the PCB. The assembly has no peripheral functional blocks, and hence the active area extends to the edge of the detector. This was achieved by using a few flavors of almost identical analog pixels (minimal variation in layout) to allow for peripheral biasing blocks to be placed within pixels. The 1024 pixels within a digital sub-chip array have a variety of full custom, semi-custom and automated timing driven functional blocks placed together. The methodology uses a modified mixed-mode on-top digital implementation flow to not only harness the tool efficiency for timing and floor-planning but also to maintain designer control over compact parasitically aware layout. The methodology uses the Cadence design platform, however it is not limited to this tool.

  14. Design methodology: edgeless 3D ASICs with complex in-pixel processing for pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahim, Farah; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Hoff, James R.; Mohseni, Hooman

    2015-08-01

    The design methodology for the development of 3D integrated edgeless pixel detectors with in-pixel processing using Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools is presented. A large area 3 tier 3D detector with one sensor layer and two ASIC layers containing one analog and one digital tier, is built for x-ray photon time of arrival measurement and imaging. A full custom analog pixel is 65μm x 65μm. It is connected to a sensor pixel of the same size on one side, and on the other side it has approximately 40 connections to the digital pixel. A 32 x 32 edgeless array without any peripheral functional blocks constitutes a sub-chip. The sub-chip is an indivisible unit, which is further arranged in a 6 x 6 array to create the entire 1.248cm x 1.248cm ASIC. Each chip has 720 bump-bond I/O connections, on the back of the digital tier to the ceramic PCB. All the analog tier power and biasing is conveyed through the digital tier from the PCB. The assembly has no peripheral functional blocks, and hence the active area extends to the edge of the detector. This was achieved by using a few flavors of almost identical analog pixels (minimal variation in layout) to allow for peripheral biasing blocks to be placed within pixels. The 1024 pixels within a digital sub-chip array have a variety of full custom, semi-custom and automated timing driven functional blocks placed together. The methodology uses a modified mixed-mode on-top digital implementation flow to not only harness the tool efficiency for timing and floor-planning but also to maintain designer control over compact parasitically aware layout. The methodology uses the Cadence design platform, however it is not limited to this tool.

  15. Impact of CT detector pixel-to-pixel crosstalk on image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Klaus J.; Spies, Lothar; Vogtmeier, Gereon; Luhta, Randy

    2006-03-01

    In Computed Tomography (CT), the image quality sensitively depends on the accuracy of the X-ray projection signal, which is acquired by a two-dimensional array of pixel cells in the detector. If the signal of X-ray photons is spread out to neighboring pixels (crosstalk), a decrease of spatial resolution may result. Moreover, streak and ring artifacts may emerge. Deploying system simulations for state-of-the-art CT detector configurations, we characterize origin and appearance of these artifacts in the reconstructed CT images for different scenarios. A uniform pixel-to-pixel crosstalk results in a loss of spatial resolution only. The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) is attenuated, without affecting the limiting resolution, which is defined as the first zero of the MTF. Additional streak and ring artifacts appear, if the pixel-to-pixel crosstalk is non-uniform. Parallel to the system simulations we developed an analytical model. The model explains resolution loss and artifact level using the first and second derivative of the X-ray profile acquired by the detector. Simulations and analytical model are in agreement to each other. We discuss the perceptibility of ring and streak artifacts within noisy images if no crosstalk correction is applied.

  16. ACS/WFC Pixel Stability – Bringing the Pixels Back to the Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borncamp, David; Grogin, Norman A.; Bourque, Matthew; Ogaz, Sara

    2016-06-01

    Electrical current that has been trapped within the lattice structure of a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) can be present through multiple exposures, which will have an adverse effect on its science performance. The traditional way to correct for this extra charge is to take an image with the camera shutter closed periodically throughout the lifetime of the instrument. These images, generally referred to as dark images, allow for the characterization of the extra charge that is trapped within the CCD at the time of observation. This extra current can then be subtracted out of science images to correct for the extra charge that was there at this time. Pixels that have a charge above a certain threshold of current are marked as “hot” and flagged in the data quality array. However, these pixels may not be "bad" in the traditional sense that they cannot be reliably dark-subtracted. If these pixels are shown to be stable over an anneal period, the charge can be properly subtracted and the extra noise from this dark current can be taken into account. We present the results of a pixel history study that analyzes every pixel of ACS/WFC individually and allows pixels that were marked as bad to be brought back into the science image.

  17. The influence of the aromatic aglycon of galactoclusters on the binding of LecA: a case study with O-phenyl, S-phenyl, O-benzyl, S-benzyl, O-biphenyl and O-naphthyl aglycons.

    PubMed

    Casoni, Francesca; Dupin, Lucie; Vergoten, Gérard; Meyer, Albert; Ligeour, Caroline; Géhin, Thomas; Vidal, Olivier; Souteyrand, Eliane; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Chevolot, Yann; Morvan, François

    2014-12-01

    A library of 24 new mannose-centered tetragalactoclusters with four different linkers (di- and triethyleneglycol with phosphodiester or phosphorothioate linkages) and six different aromatic aglycons (O-phenyl, S-phenyl, O-benzyl, S-benzyl, O-biphenyl and O-naphthyl) was synthesized. Their interactions with LecA were evaluated on a DNA Directed Immobilization (DDI) based glycocluster array allowing the determination of their IC50 against lactose and the evaluation of their dissociation constant (Kd). Finally, the docking simulations confirm the experimental results and demonstrated that the better affinity of O-biphenyl- and O-naphthyl-galactoside is due to a double interaction between the aromatic ring and the histidine 50 and proline 51 of LecA. PMID:25295668

  18. Advanced monolithic pixel sensors using SOI technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Arai, Yasuo; Asano, Mari; Fujita, Yowichi; Hamasaki, Ryutaro; Hara, Kazuhiko; Honda, Shunsuke; Ikegami, Yoichi; Kurachi, Ikuo; Mitsui, Shingo; Nishimura, Ryutaro; Tauchi, Kazuya; Tobita, Naoshi; Tsuboyama, Toru; Yamada, Miho

    2016-07-01

    We are developing advanced pixel sensors using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology. A SOI wafer is used; top silicon is used for electric circuit and bottom silicon is used as a sensor. Target applications are high-energy physics, X-ray astronomy, material science, non-destructive inspection, medical application and so on. We have developed two integration-type pixel sensors, FPIXb and INTPIX7. These sensors were processed on single SOI wafers with various substrates in n- or p-type and double SOI wafers. The development status of double SOI sensors and some up-to-date test results of n-type and p-type SOI sensors are shown.

  19. Radiation experience with the CMS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veszpremi, V.

    2015-04-01

    The CMS pixel detector is the innermost component of the CMS tracker occupying the region around the centre of CMS, where the LHC beams are crossed, between 4.3 cm and 30 cm in radius and 46.5 cm along the beam axis. It operates in a high-occupancy and high-radiation environment created by particle collisions. Studies of radiation damage effects to the sensors were performed throughout the first running period of the LHC . Leakage current, depletion voltage, pixel readout thresholds, and hit finding efficiencies were monitored as functions of the increasing particle fluence. The methods and results of these measurements will be described together with their implications to detector operation as well as to performance parameters in offline hit reconstruction.

  20. Noise in a CMOS digital pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zhang; Suying, Yao; Jiangtao, Xu

    2011-11-01

    Based on the study of noise performance in CMOS digital pixel sensor (DPS), a mathematical model of noise is established with the pulse-width-modulation (PWM) principle. Compared with traditional CMOS image sensors, the integration time is different and A/D conversion is implemented in each PWM DPS pixel. Then, the quantitative calculating formula of system noise is derived. It is found that dark current shot noise is the dominant noise source in low light region while photodiode shot noise becomes significantly important in the bright region. In this model, photodiode shot noise does not vary with luminance, but dark current shot noise does. According to increasing photodiode capacitance and the comparator's reference voltage or optimizing the mismatch in the comparator, the total noise can be reduced. These results serve as a guideline for the design of PWM DPS.

  1. The Silicon Pixel Detector for ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fabris, D.; Bombonati, C.; Dima, R.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pepato, A.; Bohus, L. Sajo; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.; Shen, D.; Turrisi, R.; Viesti, G.; Anelli, G.; Boccardi, A.; Burns, M.; Campbell, M.; Ceresa, S.; Conrad, J.; Kluge, A.; Kral, M.

    2007-10-26

    The Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment is made of position sensitive detectors which have to operate in a region where the track density may be as high as 50 tracks/cm{sup 2}. To handle such densities detectors with high precision and granularity are mandatory. The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD), the innermost part of the ITS, has been designed to provide tracking information close to primary interaction point. The assembly of the entire SPD has been completed.

  2. Effect of mixed (boundary) pixels on crop proportion estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chhikara, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    In estimating acreage proportions of crop types in a segment using Landsat data, considerable problem is caused by the presence of mixed pixels. Due to lack of understanding of their spectral characteristics, mixed pixels have been treated in the past as pure while clustering and classifying the segment data. This paper examines this approach of treating mixed pixels as pure pixels and the effect of mixed pixels on the bias and variance of a crop type proportion estimate. First, the spectral response of a boundary pixel is modeled and an analytical expression for the bias and variance of a proportion estimate is obtained. This is followed by a numerical illustration of the effect of mixed pixels on bias and variance. It is shown that as the size of the mixed pixel class increases in a segment, the variance increases, however, such increase does not always affect the bias of the proportion estimate.

  3. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology and Reliability Characterization Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yuan; Guertin, Steven M.; Pain, Bedabrata; Kayaii, Sammy

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the technology, design features and reliability characterization methodology of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. Both overall chip reliability and pixel reliability are projected for the imagers.

  4. Pixelated diffraction signatures for explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flynn, Daniel; Reid, Caroline; Christodoulou, Christiana; Wilson, Matt; Veale, Matthew C.; Seller, Paul; Speller, Robert

    2012-06-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) is a technique which can be used to improve the detection and characterisation of explosive materials. This study has performed EDXRD measurements of various explosive compounds using a novel, X-ray sensitive, pixelated, energy resolving detector developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK (RAL). EDXRD measurements are normally performed at a fixed scattering angle, but the 80×80 pixel detector makes it possible to collect both spatially resolved and energy resolved data simultaneously. The detector material used is Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), which can be utilised at room temperature and gives excellent spectral resolution. The setup uses characteristics from both energy dispersive and angular dispersive scattering techniques to optimise specificity and speed. The purpose of the study is to develop X-ray pattern "footprints" of explosive materials based on spatial and energy resolved diffraction data, which can then be used for the identification of such materials hidden inside packages or baggage. The RAL detector is the first energy resolving pixelated detector capable of providing an energy resolution of 1.0-1.5% at energies up to 150 keV. The benefit of using this device in a baggage scanner would be the provision of highly specific signatures to a range of explosive materials. We have measured diffraction profiles of five explosives and other compounds used to make explosive materials. High resolution spectra have been obtained. Results are presented to show the specificity of the technique in finding explosives within baggage.

  5. Soil moisture variability within remote sensing pixels

    SciTech Connect

    Charpentier, M.A.; Groffman, P.M. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. This paper addresses the question of soil moisture variation within the field of view of a remote sensing pixel. Remote sensing is the only practical way to sense soil moisture over large areas, but it is known that there can be large variations of soil moisture within the field of view of a pixel. The difficulty with this is that many processes, such as gas exchange between surface and atmosphere can vary dramatically with moisture content, and a small wet spot, for example, can have a dramatic impact on such processes, and thereby bias remote sensing data results. Here the authors looked at the impact of surface topography on the level of soil moisture, and the interaction of both on the variability of soil moisture sensed by a push broom microwave radiometer (PBMR). In addition the authors looked at the question of whether variations of soil moisture within pixel size areas could be used to assign errors to PBMR generated soil moisture data.

  6. Status of the CMS pixel project

    SciTech Connect

    Uplegger, Lorenzo; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment (CMS) will start taking data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2008. The closest detector to the interaction point is the silicon pixel detector which is the heart of the tracking system. It consists of three barrel layers and two pixel disks on each side of the interaction point for a total of 66 million channels. Its proximity to the interaction point means there will be very large particle fluences and therefore a radiation-tolerant design is necessary. The pixel detector will be crucial to achieve a good vertex resolution and will play a key role in pattern recognition and track reconstruction. The results from test beam runs prove that the expected performances can be achieved. The detector is currently being assembled and will be ready for insertion into CMS in early 2008. During the assembly phase, a thorough electronic test is being done to check the functionality of each channel to guarantee the performance required to achieve the physics goals. This report will present the final detector design, the status of the production as well as results from test beam runs to validate the expected performance.

  7. Uncooled infrared sensor development trends and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Skidmore, George D.; Han, C. J.

    2011-10-01

    Uncooled infrared sensor markets have grown dramatically over the past decade due to significant improvements in sensor performance, producibility and cost reductions. Current uncooled sensors are dominated by VOx and amorphous silicon based microbolometers with spectral responses in the 7-14 μm wavelength region (LWIR). The majority of uncooled microbolometer focal plane array (UFPA) formats currently in production are 160x120, 320x240, 640x480 with 20 to 38 um pixel pitch. Most suppliers have reported good UFPA performance with less than 50 mK NETD(f/1 optics, 30 -60 Hz frame rates). Recently, 17 μm pixel pitch UFPAs have been introduced to the market. The smaller detector pixel pitch allows manufacturing of larger format such as 1024x768 UFPAs without photolithographic stitching. In the past, uncooled IR sensor developments were primarily driven by military needs; however, as low cost uncooled sensors began to proliferate in the commercial market, uncooled sensors with FPA formats of 320x240 and smaller are rapidly becoming commodity items. Reduction of sensor system size, weight, and power (SWaP) as well as cost is the key driver for the next generation of uncooled sensors. This paper presents a brief overview of the uncooled sensors status, developmental trends and challenges facing the industry.

  8. PIXELS: Using field-based learning to investigate students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, A.; Tinigin, L.; Petcovic, H. L.; Ormand, C. J.; LaDue, N.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical work over the past decade supports the notion that a high level of spatial thinking skill is critical to success in the geosciences. Spatial thinking incorporates a host of sub-skills such as mentally rotating an object, imagining the inside of a 3D object based on outside patterns, unfolding a landscape, and disembedding critical patterns from background noise. In this study, we focus on sense of scale, which refers to how an individual quantified space, and is thought to develop through kinesthetic experiences. Remote sensing data are increasingly being used for wide-reaching and high impact research. A sense of scale is critical to many areas of the geosciences, including understanding and interpreting remotely sensed imagery. In this exploratory study, students (N=17) attending the Juneau Icefield Research Program participated in a 3-hour exercise designed to study how a field-based activity might impact their sense of scale and their conceptions of pixels in remotely sensed imagery. Prior to the activity, students had an introductory remote sensing lecture and completed the Sense of Scale inventory. Students walked and/or skied the perimeter of several pixel types, including a 1 m square (representing a WorldView sensor's pixel), a 30 m square (a Landsat pixel) and a 500 m square (a MODIS pixel). The group took reflectance measurements using a field radiometer as they physically traced out the pixel. The exercise was repeated in two different areas, one with homogenous reflectance, and another with heterogeneous reflectance. After the exercise, students again completed the Sense of Scale instrument and a demographic survey. This presentation will share the effects and efficacy of the field-based intervention to teach remote sensing concepts and to investigate potential relationships between students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale.

  9. Detection and evaluation of mixed pixels in Landsat agricultural scenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merickel, M. B.; Lundgren, J. C.; Lennington, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    A major problem area encountered in the identification and estimation of agricultural crop proportions in Landsat imagery involves the large proportion of the pixels which are mixed pixels, whose spectral response is influenced by more than one ground cover type. The development of methods for the detection and estimation of crop proportions in mixed pixels is presently reported. The procedure designated CASCADE, based on the estimation of the gradient image for the detection of mixed pixels, considers the consequences of a linear mixing model and is found to provide a method for the allocation of mixed pixels to the surrounding homogeneous region.

  10. Active pixel sensor pixel having a photodetector whose output is coupled to an output transistor gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nakamura, Junichi (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node. There is also a readout circuit, part of which can be disposed at the bottom of each column of cells and be common to all the cells in the column. A Simple Floating Gate (SFG) pixel structure could also be employed in the imager to provide a non-destructive readout and smaller pixel sizes.

  11. Planar pixel detector module development for the HL-LHC ATLAS pixel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Richard L.; Buttar, C.; Stewart, A.; Blue, A.; Doonan, K.; Ashby, J.; Casse, G.; Dervan, P.; Forshaw, D.; Tsurin, I.; Brown, S.; Pater, J.

    2013-12-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector for the HL-LHC requires the development of large area pixel modules that can withstand doses up to 1016 1 MeV neq cm-2. The area of the pixel detector system will be over 5 m2 and as such low cost, large area modules are required. The development of a quad module based on 4 FE-I4 readout integrated chips (ROIC) will be discussed. The FE-I4 ROIC is a large area chip and the yield of the flip-chip process to form an assembly is discussed for single chip assemblies. The readout of the quad module for laboratory tests will be reported.

  12. How many pixels does it take to make a good 4"×6" print? Pixel count wars revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    In the early 1980's the future of conventional silver-halide photographic systems was of great concern due to the potential introduction of electronic imaging systems then typified by the Sony Mavica analog electronic camera. The focus was on the quality of film-based systems as expressed in the number of equivalent number pixels and bits-per-pixel, and how many pixels would be required to create an equivalent quality image from a digital camera. It was found that 35-mm frames, for ISO 100 color negative film, contained equivalent pixels of 12 microns for a total of 18 million pixels per frame (6 million pixels per layer) with about 6 bits of information per pixel; the introduction of new emulsion technology, tabular AgX grains, increased the value to 8 bit per pixel. Higher ISO speed films had larger equivalent pixels, fewer pixels per frame, but retained the 8 bits per pixel. Further work found that a high quality 3.5" x 5.25" print could be obtained from a three layer system containing 1300 x 1950 pixels per layer or about 7.6 million pixels in all. In short, it became clear that when a digital camera contained about 6 million pixels (in a single layer using a color filter array and appropriate image processing) that digital systems would challenge and replace conventional film-based system for the consumer market. By 2005 this became the reality. Since 2005 there has been a "pixel war" raging amongst digital camera makers. The question arises about just how many pixels are required and are all pixels equal? This paper will provide a practical look at how many pixels are needed for a good print based on the form factor of the sensor (sensor size) and the effective optical modulation transfer function (optical spread function) of the camera lens. Is it better to have 16 million, 5.7-micron pixels or 6 million 7.8-micron pixels? How does intrinsic (no electronic boost) ISO speed and exposure latitude vary with pixel size? A systematic review of these issues will

  13. Content-dependent block noise reduction for mobile displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ga-Hee; Lee, Yoon-Gyoo; Kim, Han-Eol; Kim, Choon-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Number of pixels on mobile displays is rapidly increasing. Recently, mobile displays with more than one million pixels have been introduced into markets. However, most of multimedia contents to be displayed on mobile displays have much smaller pixel counts. For example, number of pixels for a T-DMB(terrestrial digital multimedia broadcasting) sequence is 320x240. When enlargement is applied to input sequence, perceived image quality would be degraded. Increase in visibility of block noise is one of the major reasons for image quality degradation on mobile displays. This paper presents a simple and computationally efficient method to reduce visibility of block noise on enlarged multimedia sequences. In proposed method, a simple low pass filtering is selectively applied to the pixels of block noises for reduction of block noise visibility as well as faithful reproduction of image details.

  14. A new 9T global shutter pixel with CDS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Ma, Cheng; Zhou, Quan; Wang, Xinyang

    2015-04-01

    Benefiting from motion blur free, Global shutter pixel is very widely used in the design of CMOS image sensors for high speed applications such as motion vision, scientifically inspection, etc. In global shutter sensors, all pixel signal information needs to be stored in the pixel first and then waiting for readout. For higher frame rate, we need very fast operation of the pixel array. There are basically two ways for the in pixel signal storage, one is in charge domain, such as the one shown in [1], this needs complicated process during the pixel fabrication. The other one is in voltage domain, one example is the one in [2], this pixel is based on the 4T PPD technology and normally the driving of the high capacitive transfer gate limits the speed of the array operation. In this paper we report a new 9T global shutter pixel based on 3-T partially pinned photodiode (PPPD) technology. It incorporates three in-pixel storage capacitors allowing for correlated double sampling (CDS) and pipeline operation of the array (pixel exposure during the readout of the array). Only two control pulses are needed for all the pixels at the end of exposure which allows high speed exposure control.

  15. Single-pixel complementary compressive sampling spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ruo-Ming; Liu, Xue-Feng; Yao, Xu-Ri; Yu, Wen-Kai; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2016-05-01

    A new type of compressive spectroscopy technique employing a complementary sampling strategy is reported. In a single sequence of spectral compressive sampling, positive and negative measurements are performed, in which sensing matrices with a complementary relationship are used. The restricted isometry property condition necessary for accurate recovery of compressive sampling theory is satisfied mathematically. Compared with the conventional single-pixel spectroscopy technique, the complementary compressive sampling strategy can achieve spectral recovery of considerably higher quality within a shorter sampling time. We also investigate the influence of the sampling ratio and integration time on the recovery quality.

  16. Active pixel sensor array with electronic shuttering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An active pixel cell includes electronic shuttering capability. The cell can be shuttered to prevent additional charge accumulation. One mode transfers the current charge to a storage node that is blocked against accumulation of optical radiation. The charge is sampled from a floating node. Since the charge is stored, the node can be sampled at the beginning and the end of every cycle. Another aspect allows charge to spill out of the well whenever the charge amount gets higher than some amount, thereby providing anti blooming.

  17. Small pixel uncooled imaging FPAs and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Richard; Franks, Glen; Lacroix, Daniel; Hyland, Sandra; Murphy, Robert

    2010-04-01

    BAE Systems continues to make dramatic progress in uncooled microbolometer sensors and applications. This paper will review the latest advancements in microbolometer technology at BAE Systems, including the development status of 17 micrometer pixel pitch detectors and imaging modules which are entering production and will be finding their way into BAE Systems products and applications. Benefits include increased die per wafer and potential benefits to SWAP for many applications. Applications include thermal weapons sights, thermal imaging modules for remote weapon stations, vehicle situational awareness sensors and mast/pole mounted sensors.

  18. A new method to improve multiplication factor in micro-pixel avalanche photodiodes with high pixel density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadygov, Z.; Ahmadov, F.; Khorev, S.; Sadigov, A.; Suleymanov, S.; Madatov, R.; Mehdiyeva, R.; Zerrouk, F.

    2016-07-01

    Presented is a new model describing development of the avalanche process in time, taking into account the dynamics of electric field within the depleted region of the diode and the effect of parasitic capacitance shunting individual quenching micro-resistors on device parameters. Simulations show that the effective capacitance of a single pixel, which defines the multiplication factor, is the sum of the pixel capacitance and a parasitic capacitance shunting its quenching micro-resistor. Conclusions obtained as a result of modeling open possibilities of improving the pixel gain in micropixel avalanche photodiodes with high pixel density (or low pixel capacitance).

  19. Further applications for mosaic pixel FPA technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddiard, Kevin C.

    2011-06-01

    In previous papers to this SPIE forum the development of novel technology for next generation PIR security sensors has been described. This technology combines the mosaic pixel FPA concept with low cost optics and purpose-designed readout electronics to provide a higher performance and affordable alternative to current PIR sensor technology, including an imaging capability. Progressive development has resulted in increased performance and transition from conventional microbolometer fabrication to manufacture on 8 or 12 inch CMOS/MEMS fabrication lines. A number of spin-off applications have been identified. In this paper two specific applications are highlighted: high performance imaging IRFPA design and forest fire detection. The former involves optional design for small pixel high performance imaging. The latter involves cheap expendable sensors which can detect approaching fire fronts and send alarms with positional data via mobile phone or satellite link. We also introduce to this SPIE forum the application of microbolometer IR sensor technology to IoT, the Internet of Things.

  20. Efficient single pixel imaging in Fourier space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Hu, Xuemei; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-08-01

    Single pixel imaging (SPI) is a novel technique capturing 2D images using a bucket detector with a high signal-to-noise ratio, wide spectrum range and low cost. Conventional SPI projects random illumination patterns to randomly and uniformly sample the entire scene’s information. Determined by Nyquist sampling theory, SPI needs either numerous projections or high computation cost to reconstruct the target scene, especially for high-resolution cases. To address this issue, we propose an efficient single pixel imaging technique (eSPI), which instead projects sinusoidal patterns for importance sampling of the target scene’s spatial spectrum in Fourier space. Specifically, utilizing the centrosymmetric conjugation and sparsity priors of natural images’ spatial spectra, eSPI sequentially projects two \\tfrac{π }{2}-phase-shifted sinusoidal patterns to obtain each Fourier coefficient in the most informative spatial frequency bands. eSPI can reduce requisite patterns by two orders of magnitude compared to conventional SPI, which helps a lot for fast and high-resolution SPI.

  1. The LAMBDA photon-counting pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennicard, D.; Lange, S.; Smoljanin, S.; Hirsemann, H.; Graafsma, H.; Epple, M.; Zuvic, M.; Lampert, M.-O.; Fritzsch, T.; Rothermund, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Medipix3 photon-counting detector chip has a number of novel features that are attractive for synchrotron experiments, such as a high frame rate with zero dead time and high spatial resolution. DESY are developing a large-area Medipix3-based detector array (LAMBDA). A single LAMBDA module consists of 2 by 6 Medipix3 chips on a ceramic carrier board, bonded to either a single large silicon sensor or two smaller high-Z sensors. The readout system fits behind the carrier board to allow module tiling, and uses a large on-board RAM and multiple 10 Gigabit Ethernet links to permit high-speed readout. Currently, the first large silicon modules have been constructed and read out at low speed, and the firmware for highspeed readout is being developed. In addition to these silicon sensors, we are developing a germanium hybrid pixel detector in collaboration with Canberra for higher-energy beamlines. Canberra have produced a set of 256-by-256-pixel planar germanium sensors with 55μm pitch, and these are currently being bonded to Medipix3 readout chips by Fraunhofer IZM (Berlin).

  2. Active pixel sensor array with multiresolution readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node. There is also a readout circuit, part of which can be disposed at the bottom of each column of cells and be common to all the cells in the column. The imaging device can also include an electronic shutter formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate, and/or a storage section to allow for simultaneous integration. In addition, the imaging device can include a multiresolution imaging circuit to provide images of varying resolution. The multiresolution circuit could also be employed in an array where the photosensitive portion of each pixel cell is a photodiode. This latter embodiment could further be modified to facilitate low light imaging.

  3. Multi-scale feature learning on pixels and super-pixels for seminal vesicles MRI segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qinquan; Asthana, Akshay; Tong, Tong; Rueckert, Daniel; Edwards, Philip "Eddie"

    2014-03-01

    We propose a learning-based approach to segment the seminal vesicles (SV) via random forest classifiers. The proposed discriminative approach relies on the decision forest using high-dimensional multi-scale context-aware spatial, textual and descriptor-based features at both pixel and super-pixel level. After affine transformation to a template space, the relevant high-dimensional multi-scale features are extracted and random forest classifiers are learned based on the masked region of the seminal vesicles from the most similar atlases. Using these classifiers, an intermediate probabilistic segmentation is obtained for the test images. Then, a graph-cut based refinement is applied to this intermediate probabilistic representation of each voxel to get the final segmentation. We apply this approach to segment the seminal vesicles from 30 MRI T2 training images of the prostate, which presents a particularly challenging segmentation task. The results show that the multi-scale approach and the augmentation of the pixel based features with the super-pixel based features enhances the discriminative power of the learnt classifier which leads to a better quality segmentation in some very difficult cases. The results are compared to the radiologist labeled ground truth using leave-one-out cross-validation. Overall, the Dice metric of 0:7249 and Hausdorff surface distance of 7:0803 mm are achieved for this difficult task.

  4. Analysis of pixel circuits in CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zou; Chen, Nan; Yao, Li-bin

    2015-04-01

    CMOS image sensors (CIS) have lower power consumption, lower cost and smaller size than CCD image sensors. However, generally CCDs have higher performance than CIS mainly due to lower noise. The pixel circuit used in CIS is the first part of the signal processing circuit and connected to photodiode directly, so its performance will greatly affect the CIS or even the whole imaging system. To achieve high performance, CMOS image sensors need advanced pixel circuits. There are many pixel circuits used in CIS, such as passive pixel sensor (PPS), 3T and 4T active pixel sensor (APS), capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA), and passive pixel sensor (PPS). At first, the main performance parameters of each pixel structure including the noise, injection efficiency, sensitivity, power consumption, and stability of bias voltage are analyzed. Through the theoretical analysis of those pixel circuits, it is concluded that CTIA pixel circuit has good noise performance, high injection efficiency, stable photodiode bias, and high sensitivity with small integrator capacitor. Furthermore, the APS and CTIA pixel circuits are simulated in a standard 0.18-μm CMOS process and using a n-well/p-sub photodiode by SPICE and the simulation result confirms the theoretical analysis result. It shows the possibility that CMOS image sensors can be extended to a wide range of applications requiring high performance.

  5. Edge pixel response studies of edgeless silicon sensor technology for pixellated imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneuski, D.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Doonan, K.; Eklund, L.; Gimenez, E. N.; Hynds, D.; Kachkanov, S.; Kalliopuska, J.; McMullen, T.; O'Shea, V.; Tartoni, N.; Plackett, R.; Vahanen, S.; Wraight, K.

    2015-03-01

    Silicon sensor technologies with reduced dead area at the sensor's perimeter are under development at a number of institutes. Several fabrication methods for sensors which are sensitive close to the physical edge of the device are under investigation utilising techniques such as active-edges, passivated edges and current-terminating rings. Such technologies offer the goal of a seamlessly tiled detection surface with minimum dead space between the individual modules. In order to quantify the performance of different geometries and different bulk and implant types, characterisation of several sensors fabricated using active-edge technology were performed at the B16 beam line of the Diamond Light Source. The sensors were fabricated by VTT and bump-bonded to Timepix ROICs. They were 100 and 200 μ m thick sensors, with the last pixel-to-edge distance of either 50 or 100 μ m. The sensors were fabricated as either n-on-n or n-on-p type devices. Using 15 keV monochromatic X-rays with a beam spot of 2.5 μ m, the performance at the outer edge and corners pixels of the sensors was evaluated at three bias voltages. The results indicate a significant change in the charge collection properties between the edge and 5th (up to 275 μ m) from edge pixel for the 200 μ m thick n-on-n sensor. The edge pixel performance of the 100 μ m thick n-on-p sensors is affected only for the last two pixels (up to 110 μ m) subject to biasing conditions. Imaging characteristics of all sensor types investigated are stable over time and the non-uniformities can be minimised by flat-field corrections. The results from the synchrotron tests combined with lab measurements are presented along with an explanation of the observed effects.

  6. Pixel-level robust digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Cofaru, Corneliu; Philips, Wilfried; Van Paepegem, Wim

    2013-12-01

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a well-established non-contact optical metrology method. It employs digital image analysis to extract the full-field displacements and strains that occur in objects subjected to external stresses. Despite recent DIC progress, many problematic areas which greatly affect accuracy and that can seldomly be avoided, received very little attention. Problems posed by the presence of sharp displacement discontinuities, reflections, object borders or edges can be linked to the analysed object's properties and deformation. Other problematic areas, such as image noise, localized reflections or shadows are related more to the image acquisition process. This paper proposes a new subset-based pixel-level robust DIC method for in-plane displacement measurement which addresses all of these problems in a straightforward and unified approach, significantly improving DIC measurement accuracy compared to classic approaches. The proposed approach minimizes a robust energy functional which adaptively weighs pixel differences in the motion estimation process. The aim is to limit the negative influence of pixels that present erroneous or inconsistent motions by enforcing local motion consistency. The proposed method is compared to the classic Newton-Raphson DIC method in terms of displacement accuracy in three experiments. The first experiment is numerical and presents three combined problems: sharp displacement discontinuities, missing image information and image noise. The second experiment is a real experiment in which a plastic specimen is developing a lateral crack due to the application of uniaxial stress. The region around the crack presents both reflections that saturate the image intensity levels leading to missing image information, as well as sharp motion discontinuities due to the plastic film rupturing. The third experiment compares the proposed and classic DIC approaches with generic computer vision optical flow methods using images from

  7. How big is an OMI pixel?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Martin; Sihler, Holger; Tilstra, Lieuwe G.; Stammes, Piet

    2016-08-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is a push-broom imaging spectrometer, observing solar radiation backscattered by the Earth's atmosphere and surface. The incoming radiation is detected using a static imaging CCD (charge-coupled device) detector array with no moving parts, as opposed to most of the previous satellite spectrometers, which used a moving mirror to scan the Earth in the across-track direction. The field of view (FoV) of detector pixels is the solid angle from which radiation is observed, averaged over the integration time of a measurement. The OMI FoV is not quadrangular, which is common for scanning instruments, but rather super-Gaussian shaped and overlapping with the FoV of neighbouring pixels. This has consequences for pixel-area-dependent applications, like cloud fraction products, and visualisation.The shapes and sizes of OMI FoVs were determined pre-flight by theoretical and experimental tests but never verified after launch. In this paper the OMI FoV is characterised using collocated MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance measurements. MODIS measurements have a much higher spatial resolution than OMI measurements and spectrally overlap at 469 nm. The OMI FoV was verified by finding the highest correlation between MODIS and OMI reflectances in cloud-free scenes, assuming a 2-D super-Gaussian function with varying size and shape to represent the OMI FoV. Our results show that the OMPIXCOR product 75FoV corner coordinates are accurate as the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a super-Gaussian FoV model when this function is assumed. The softness of the function edges, modelled by the super-Gaussian exponents, is different in both directions and is view angle dependent.The optimal overlap function between OMI and MODIS reflectances is scene dependent and highly dependent on time differences between overpasses, especially with clouds in the scene. For partially clouded scenes, the optimal overlap function was

  8. Research of IRFPAs' reliability evaluation by bad pixel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lichao; Huang, Aibo; Lai, Canxiong; Chen, Xing; Hao, Mingming; Chen, Honglei; Lu, Guoguang; Huang, Yun; En, Yunfei

    2015-10-01

    Reliability is an important index to ensure the application of infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs) in complex environment, and it becomes a major bottleneck problem of IRFPAs' development. Because of the characteristics such as type, nature, quantity, location and distribution et al, bad pixel which contains initial bad pixel and used bad pixel has outstanding advantage for failure analysis and reliability evaluation of IRFPAs. In this paper, the structure of IRPFAs has been introduced in detail, and the damage mechanisms of used bad pixel also have been analyzed deeply. At the same time, the feasibility to study IRPFAs' damage stress, failure position, damage mechanism has been discussed all around. The research of bad pixel can be used to optimize the structure and process, meanwhile it also can improve the accuracy of bad pixel identification and replacements.

  9. Development of pixel detectors for SSC vertex tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G. . Electro-Optical and Data Systems Group); Atlas, E.L.; Augustine, F.; Barken, O.; Collins, T.; Marking, W.L.; Worley, S.; Yacoub, G.Y. ) Shapiro, S.L. ); Arens, J.F.; Jernigan, J.G. . Space Sciences Lab.); Nygren,

    1991-04-01

    A description of hybrid PIN diode arrays and a readout architecture for their use as a vertex detector in the SSC environment is presented. Test results obtained with arrays having 256 {times} 256 pixels, each 30 {mu}m square, are also presented. The development of a custom readout for the SSC will be discussed, which supports a mechanism for time stamping hit pixels, storing their xy coordinates, and storing the analog information within the pixel. The peripheral logic located on the array, permits the selection of those pixels containing interesting data and their coordinates to be selectively read out. This same logic also resolves ambiguous pixel ghost locations and controls the pixel neighbor read out necessary to achieve high spatial resolution. The thermal design of the vertex tracker and the proposed signal processing architecture will also be discussed. 5 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. CMB component separation in the pixel domain

    SciTech Connect

    Doroshkevich, A.; Verkhodanov, O.

    2011-02-15

    We show that the popular internal linear combination approach is unstable with respect to division of the observed map pixels to a set of 'homogeneous' subsamples. For various choices of such subsamples we can obtain a restored CMB signal with amplitudes ranging from zero to the amplitude of the observed signal. We propose an approach which allows us to obtain corrected estimates of the CMB power spectrum C{sub l} at l{<=}30 and provides results similar to WMAP for larger l. Using this approach, we eliminate some anomalies of the WMAP results. In particular, our estimate of the quadrupole is consistent with the theoretically expected one. The effect of the 'axis of evil' is suppressed, and the symmetry of the north and south galactic hemispheres increases. These results can change estimates of quadrupole polarization and the redshift of reionization of the Universe. We also propose a new simple approach which can improve the WMAP estimates of the high l power spectrum.

  11. Pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector.

    PubMed

    Jing, You Liang; Li, Zhi Feng; Li, Qian; Chen, Xiao Shuang; Chen, Ping Ping; Wang, Han; Li, Meng Yao; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, plasmonics has been central to the manipulation of photons on the subwavelength scale, and superior infrared imagers have opened novel applications in many fields. Here, we demonstrate the first pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector with a single quantum well integrated between metal patches and a reflection layer. Greater than one order of magnitude enhancement of the peak responsivity has been observed. The significant improvement originates from the highly confined optical mode in the cavity, leading to a strong coupling between photons and the quantum well, resulting in the enhanced photo-electric conversion process. Such strong coupling from the localized surface plasmon mode inside the cavity is independent of incident angles, offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array devices. This demonstration paves the way for important infrared optoelectronic devices for sensing and imaging. PMID:27181111

  12. Pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Jing, You Liang; Li, Zhi Feng; Li, Qian; Chen, Xiao Shuang; Chen, Ping Ping; Wang, Han; Li, Meng Yao; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, plasmonics has been central to the manipulation of photons on the subwavelength scale, and superior infrared imagers have opened novel applications in many fields. Here, we demonstrate the first pixel-level plasmonic microcavity infrared photodetector with a single quantum well integrated between metal patches and a reflection layer. Greater than one order of magnitude enhancement of the peak responsivity has been observed. The significant improvement originates from the highly confined optical mode in the cavity, leading to a strong coupling between photons and the quantum well, resulting in the enhanced photo-electric conversion process. Such strong coupling from the localized surface plasmon mode inside the cavity is independent of incident angles, offering a unique solution to high-performance focal plane array devices. This demonstration paves the way for important infrared optoelectronic devices for sensing and imaging. PMID:27181111

  13. 196 Million Pixels: An Immersive Visualization Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, P. J.; Vandenberg, A.; Wang, G.

    2011-12-01

    Georgia State University (GSU) has recently implemented one of the world's largest high-resolution, tiled visualization walls specifically designed for researcher accessibility and display of data in an interactive, immersive, exploratory and collaborative experience. The Visualization Wall, comprised of 48 individual high-resolution monitors, is able to analyze, evaluate, and present data using the latest earth science research software packages. Multi-core processing and 24 graphical processing units (GPU's) allow the system to process and view data using research software applications at high resolution (+196 million pixels), while maintaining an interactive experience for the user. A Windows platform solves many application compatibility obstacles but also presents a new host of problems when scaling applications across multiple monitors. Continuous data set visualization, frame rate slowing, and graphic performance have been a challenge with the Visualization Wall. To overcome these obstacles, GSU has implemented several innovative solutions including Google Code projects, hardware accelerated browsers, and open-source software such as SAGE.

  14. The status of the CMS forward pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Ping; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    The silicon pixel detector is the innermost component of the CMS tracking system. It provides precise measurements of space points to allow effective pattern recognition in multiple track environments near the LHC interaction point. The end disks of the pixel detector, known as the Forward Pixel detector, are constructed mainly by the US-CMS collaborators. The design techniques, readout electronics, test beam activities, and construction status are reviewed.

  15. Data encoding efficiency in pixel detector readout with charge information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Wang, Xinkang

    2016-04-01

    The average minimum number of bits needed for lossless readout of a pixel detector is calculated, in the regime of interest for particle physics where only a small fraction of pixels have a non-zero value per frame. This permits a systematic comparison of the readout efficiency of different encoding implementations. The calculation is compared to the number of bits used by the FE-I4 pixel readout chip of the ATLAS experiment.

  16. Fast Pixel Buffer For Processing With Lookup Tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Timothy E.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed scheme for buffering data on intensities of picture elements (pixels) of image increases rate or processing beyond that attainable when data read, one pixel at time, from main image memory. Scheme applied in design of specialized image-processing circuitry. Intended to optimize performance of processor in which electronic equivalent of address-lookup table used to address those pixels in main image memory required for processing.

  17. Mapping Capacitive Coupling Among Pixels in a Sensor Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, Suresh; Cole, David M.; Smith, Roger M.

    2010-01-01

    An improved method of mapping the capacitive contribution to cross-talk among pixels in an imaging array of sensors (typically, an imaging photodetector array) has been devised for use in calibrating and/or characterizing such an array. The method involves a sequence of resets of subarrays of pixels to specified voltages and measurement of the voltage responses of neighboring non-reset pixels.

  18. CMOS monolithic pixel sensors research and development at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contarato, D.; Bussat, J.-M.; Denes, P.; Greiner, L.; Kim, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Wieman, H.; Battaglia, M.; Hooberman, B.; Tompkins, L.

    2007-12-01

    This paper summarizes the recent progress in the design and characterization of CMOS pixel sensors at LBNL. Results of lab tests, beam tests and radiation hardness tests carried out at LBNL on a test structure with pixels of various sizes are reported. The first results of the characterization of back-thinned CMOS pixel sensors are also reported, and future plans and activities are discussed.

  19. Impact of aperturing and pixel size on XPCS using AGIPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J.; Graafsma, H.

    2012-02-01

    A case study for the Adaptive Gain Integrating Pixel Detector (AGIPD) at the European XFEL employing the intensity autocorrelation technique was performed using the detector simulation tool HORUS. The study compares the AGIPD (pixel size of (200 μm)2) to a possible apertured version of the detector and to a hypothetical system with 100 μm pixel size and investigates the influence of intensity fluctuations and incoherent noise on the quality of the acquired data.

  20. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Star Tracker with Regional Electronic Shutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Pain, Bedabrata; Staller, Craig; Clark, Christopher; Fossum, Eric

    1996-01-01

    The guidance system in a spacecraft determines spacecraft attitude by matching an observed star field to a star catalog....An APS(active pixel sensor)-based system can reduce mass and power consumption and radiation effects compared to a CCD(charge-coupled device)-based system...This paper reports an APS (active pixel sensor) with locally variable times, achieved through individual pixel reset (IPR).

  1. High-MTF hybrid ferroelectric IRFPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Scott B.; Hayden, Terrence

    1998-07-01

    Low cost, uncooled hybrid infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA's) are in full-scale production at Raytheon Systems Company (RSC), formerly Texas Instruments Defense Systems and Electronics Group. Detectors consist of reticulated ceramic barium strontium titanate (BST) arrays of 320 X 240 pixels on 48.5 micrometer pitch. The principal performance shortcoming of the hybrid arrays has been low MTF due to thermal crosstalk between pixels. In the past two years, significant improvements have been made to increase MTF making hybrids more competitive in performance with monolithic arrays. The improvements are (1) the reduction of the thickness of the IR absorbing layer electrode that maintains electrical continuity and increases thermal isolation between pixels, (2) reduction of the electrical crosstalk from the ROIC, and (3) development of a process to increase the thermal path-length between pixels called 'elevated optical coat.' This paper describes all three activities and their efficacy. Also discussed is the uncooled IRFPA production capability at RSC.

  2. Dead pixel correction techniques for dual-band infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chuong T.; Mould, Nick; Regens, James L.

    2015-07-01

    We present two new dead pixel correction algorithms for dual-band infrared imagery. Specifically, we address the problem of repairing unresponsive elements in the sensor array using signal processing techniques to overcome deficiencies in image quality that are present following the nonuniformity correction process. Traditionally, dead pixel correction has been performed almost exclusively using variations of the nearest neighbor technique, where the value of the dead pixel is estimated based on pixel values associated with the neighboring image structure. Our approach differs from existing techniques, for the first time we estimate the values of dead pixels using information from both thermal bands collaboratively. The proposed dual-band statistical lookup (DSL) and dual-band inpainting (DIP) algorithms use intensity and local gradient information to estimate the values of dead pixels based on the values of unaffected pixels in the supplementary infrared band. The DSL algorithm is a regression technique that uses the image intensities from the reference band to estimate the dead pixel values in the band undergoing correction. The DIP algorithm is an energy minimization technique that uses the local image gradient from the reference band and the boundary values from the affected band to estimate the dead pixel values. We evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms with 50 dual-band videos. Simulation results indicate that the proposed techniques achieve perceptually and quantitatively superior results compared to existing methods.

  3. Hit efficiency study of CMS prototype forward pixel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongwook; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the author describes the measurement of the hit efficiency of a prototype pixel device for the CMS forward pixel detector. These pixel detectors were FM type sensors with PSI46V1 chip readout. The data were taken with the 120 GeV proton beam at Fermilab during the period of December 2004 to February 2005. The detectors proved to be highly efficient (99.27 {+-} 0.02%). The inefficiency was primarily located near the corners of the individual pixels.

  4. Evaluation of a single-pixel one-transistor active pixel sensor for fingerprint imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Man; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun; Wang, Kai

    2015-08-01

    Since it first appeared in iPhone 5S in 2013, fingerprint identification (ID) has rapidly gained popularity among consumers. Current fingerprint-enabled smartphones unanimously consists of a discrete sensor to perform fingerprint ID. This architecture not only incurs higher material and manufacturing cost, but also provides only static identification and limited authentication. Hence as the demand for a thinner, lighter, and more secure handset grows, we propose a novel pixel architecture that is a photosensitive device embedded in a display pixel and detects the reflected light from the finger touch for high resolution, high fidelity and dynamic biometrics. To this purpose, an amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) dual-gate photo TFT working in both fingerprint-imaging mode and display-driving mode will be developed.

  5. Pixel-by-pixel deconvolution of bolus-tracking data: optimization and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourbron, S.; Dujardin, M.; Makkat, S.; Luypaert, R.

    2007-01-01

    Quantification of haemodynamic parameters with a deconvolution analysis of bolus-tracking data is an ill-posed problem which requires regularization. In a previous study, simulated data without structural errors were used to validate two methods for a pixel-by-pixel analysis: standard-form Tikhonov regularization with either the L-curve criterion (LCC) or generalized cross validation (GCV) for selecting the regularization parameter. However, problems of image artefacts were reported when the methods were applied to patient data. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of these problems in more detail and evaluate strategies of optimization for routine application in the clinic. In addition we investigated to which extent the calculation time of the algorithm can be minimized. In order to ensure that the conclusions are relevant for a larger range of clinical applications, we relied on patient data for evaluation of the algorithms. Simulated data were used to validate the conclusions in a more quantitative manner. We conclude that the reported problems with image quality can be removed by appropriate optimization of either LCC or GCV. In all examples this could be achieved with LCC without significant perturbation of the values in pixels where the regularization parameter was originally selected accurately. GCV could not be optimized for the renal data, and in the CT data only at the cost of image resolution. Using the implementations given, calculation times were sufficiently short for routine application in the clinic.

  6. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  7. Synchrotron beam test with a photon-counting pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Brönnimann, C; Florin, S; Lindner, M; Schmitt, B; Schulze-Briese, C

    2000-09-01

    Synchrotron beam measurements were performed with a single-photon-counting pixel detector to investigate the influence of threshold settings on charge sharing. Improvement of image homogeneity by adjusting the threshold of each pixel individually was demonstrated. With a flat-field correction, the homogeneity could be improved. A measurement of the point spread function is reported. PMID:16609212

  8. Novel integrated CMOS pixel structures for vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Matis, Howard S.; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans Georg; Wieman, Howard H.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2003-10-29

    Novel CMOS active pixel structures for vertex detector applications have been designed and tested. The overriding goal of this work is to increase the signal to noise ratio of the sensors and readout circuits. A large-area native epitaxial silicon photogate was designed with the aim of increasing the charge collected per struck pixel and to reduce charge diffusion to neighboring pixels. The photogate then transfers the charge to a low capacitance readout node to maintain a high charge to voltage conversion gain. Two techniques for noise reduction are also presented. The first is a per-pixel kT/C noise reduction circuit that produces results similar to traditional correlated double sampling (CDS). It has the advantage of requiring only one read, as compared to two for CDS, and no external storage or subtraction is needed. The technique reduced input-referred temporal noise by a factor of 2.5, to 12.8 e{sup -}. Finally, a column-level active reset technique is explored that suppresses kT/C noise during pixel reset. In tests, noise was reduced by a factor of 7.6 times, to an estimated 5.1 e{sup -} input-referred noise. The technique also dramatically reduces fixed pattern (pedestal) noise, by up to a factor of 21 in our tests. The latter feature may possibly reduce pixel-by-pixel pedestal differences to levels low enough to permit sparse data scan without per-pixel offset corrections.

  9. Estimation of proportions in mixed pixels through their region characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A region of mixed pixels can be characterized through the probability density function of proportions of classes in the pixels. Using information from the spectral vectors of a given set of pixels from the mixed pixel region, expressions are developed for obtaining the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters of probability density functions of proportions. The proportions of classes in the mixed pixels can then be estimated. If the mixed pixels contain objects of two classes, the computation can be reduced by transforming the spectral vectors using a transformation matrix that simultaneously diagonalizes the covariance matrices of the two classes. If the proportions of the classes of a set of mixed pixels from the region are given, then expressions are developed for obtaining the estmates of the parameters of the probability density function of the proportions of mixed pixels. Development of these expressions is based on the criterion of the minimum sum of squares of errors. Experimental results from the processing of remotely sensed agricultural multispectral imagery data are presented.

  10. CMOS Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Simple Floating Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Nakamura, Junichi; Kemeny, Sabrina E.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental complementary metal-oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) active-pixel image sensor integrated circuit features simple floating-gate structure, with metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) as active circuit element in each pixel. Provides flexibility of readout modes, no kTC noise, and relatively simple structure suitable for high-density arrays. Features desirable for "smart sensor" applications.

  11. Method for hyperspectral imagery exploitation and pixel spectral unmixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An efficiently hybrid approach to exploit hyperspectral imagery and unmix spectral pixels. This hybrid approach uses a genetic algorithm to solve the abundance vector for the first pixel of a hyperspectral image cube. This abundance vector is used as initial state in a robust filter to derive the abundance estimate for the next pixel. By using Kalman filter, the abundance estimate for a pixel can be obtained in one iteration procedure which is much fast than genetic algorithm. The output of the robust filter is fed to genetic algorithm again to derive accurate abundance estimate for the current pixel. The using of robust filter solution as starting point of the genetic algorithm speeds up the evolution of the genetic algorithm. After obtaining the accurate abundance estimate, the procedure goes to next pixel, and uses the output of genetic algorithm as the previous state estimate to derive abundance estimate for this pixel using robust filter. And again use the genetic algorithm to derive accurate abundance estimate efficiently based on the robust filter solution. This iteration continues until pixels in a hyperspectral image cube end.

  12. Singlet mega-pixel resolution lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chen-Hung; Lin, Hoang Yan; Chang, Horng

    2008-03-01

    There always exist some new challenges for lens designers to keep their old-line technology update. To minimize lens volume is one of the most notified examples. In this paper we designed a single thick lens, constructed by using one oblique (reflective) surface, apart from two conventional refractive surfaces, to bend the optical path of the optical system to achieve this goal. Detail design procedure, including system layout and lens performance diagrams, will be presented. Following the first order layout, we applied aspherical form to the two refractive surfaces in order to correct the spherical aberration up to an acceptable condition. Then, the reduced aberrations such as coma, astigmatism, field curvature and distortion can easily be corrected with some calculations related to spherical aberration as shown in the publication of H. H. Hopkins (1950). Plastic material is used in the design, because the aspherical surfaces can then be manufactured in a more cost effective way. The final specification of the design is: EFL is 4.6 mm, the F number is 2.8, the over all thickness of lens is 3.6 mm, its MTF is 0.3 at 227 lp/mm in center field and chief ray angle is less than 15 degrees. Lens data as well as optical performance curves are also presented in the paper. In conclusion we have successfully finished a mega-pixel resolution lens design and its overall thickness is compatible with the state of the art.

  13. Rectangular pixels for efficient color image sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Tripurari; Singh, Mritunjay

    2011-01-01

    We present CFA designs that faithfully capture images with specified luminance and chrominance bandwidths. Previous academic research has mostly been concerned with maximizing PSNR of reconstructed images without regard to chrominance bandwidth and cross-talk. Commercial systems, on the other hand, pay close attention to both these parameters as well as to the visual quality of reconstructed images. They commonly sacrifice resolution by using a sufficiently aggressive OLPF to achieve low cross-talk and artifact free images. In this paper, we present the so called Chrominance Bandwidth Ratio, r, model in an attempt to capture both the chrominance bandwidth and the cross-talk between the various signals. Next, we examine the effect of tuning photosite aspect ratio, a hitherto neglected design parameter, and show the benefit of setting it at a different value than the pixel aspect ratio of the display. We derive panchromatic CFA patterns that provably minimize the photo-site count for all values of r. An interesting outcome is a CFA design that captures full chrominance bandwidth, yet uses fewer photosites than the venerable color-stripe design. Another interesting outcome is a low cost practical CFA design that captures chrominance at half the resolution of luminance using only 4 unique filter colors, that lends itself to efficient linear demosaicking, and yet vastly outperforms the Bayer CFA with identical number of photosites demosaicked with state of the art compute-intensive nonlinear algorithms.

  14. CMB component separation in the pixel domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, A.; Verkhodanov, O.

    2011-02-01

    We show that the popular internal linear combination approach is unstable with respect to division of the observed map pixels to a set of “homogeneous” subsamples. For various choices of such subsamples we can obtain a restored CMB signal with amplitudes ranging from zero to the amplitude of the observed signal. We propose an approach which allows us to obtain corrected estimates of the CMB power spectrum Cℓ at ℓ≤30 and provides results similar to WMAP for larger ℓ. Using this approach, we eliminate some anomalies of the WMAP results. In particular, our estimate of the quadrupole is consistent with the theoretically expected one. The effect of the “axis of evil” is suppressed, and the symmetry of the north and south galactic hemispheres increases. These results can change estimates of quadrupole polarization and the redshift of reionization of the Universe. We also propose a new simple approach which can improve the WMAP estimates of the high ℓ power spectrum.

  15. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapoire, C.; Atlas Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as B-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.2% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy is sufficiently low and hit efficiency exceed the design specification.

  16. Detector apparatus having a hybrid pixel-waveform readout system

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Ling-Jian

    2014-10-21

    A gamma ray detector apparatus comprises a solid state detector that includes a plurality of anode pixels and at least one cathode. The solid state detector is configured for receiving gamma rays during an interaction and inducing a signal in an anode pixel and in a cathode. An anode pixel readout circuit is coupled to the plurality of anode pixels and is configured to read out and process the induced signal in the anode pixel and provide triggering and addressing information. A waveform sampling circuit is coupled to the at least one cathode and configured to read out and process the induced signal in the cathode and determine energy of the interaction, timing of the interaction, and depth of interaction.

  17. Readout of TPC Tracking Chambers with GEMs and Pixel Chip

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyk, John; Kim, T.; Freytsis, M.; Button-Shafer, J.; Kadyk, J.; Vahsen, S.E.; Wenzel, W.A.

    2007-12-21

    Two layers of GEMs and the ATLAS Pixel Chip, FEI3, have been combined and tested as a prototype for Time Projection Chamber (TPC) readout at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The double-layer GEM system amplifies charge with gain sufficient to detect all track ionization. The suitability of three gas mixtures for this application was investigated, and gain measurements are presented. A large sample of cosmic ray tracks was reconstructed in 3D by using the simultaneous timing and 2D spatial information from the pixel chip. The chip provides pixel charge measurement as well as timing. These results demonstrate that a double GEM and pixel combination, with a suitably modified pixel ASIC, could meet the stringent readout requirements of the ILC.

  18. Research on ionospheric tomography based on variable pixel height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dunyong; Li, Peiqing; He, Jie; Hu, Wusheng; Li, Chaokui

    2016-05-01

    A novel ionospheric tomography technique based on variable pixel height was developed for the tomographic reconstruction of the ionospheric electron density distribution. The method considers the height of each pixel as an unknown variable, which is retrieved during the inversion process together with the electron density values. In contrast to conventional computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT), which parameterizes the model with a fixed pixel height, the variable-pixel-height computerized ionospheric tomography (VHCIT) model applies a disturbance to the height of each pixel. In comparison with conventional CIT models, the VHCIT technique achieved superior results in a numerical simulation. A careful validation of the reliability and superiority of VHCIT was performed. According to the results of the statistical analysis of the average root mean square errors, the proposed model offers an improvement by 15% compared with conventional CIT models.

  19. Attenuating Stereo Pixel-Locking via Affine Window Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Andrew N.; Huertas, Andres; Matthies, Larry H.

    2006-01-01

    For real-time stereo vision systems, the standard method for estimating sub-pixel stereo disparity given an initial integer disparity map involves fitting parabolas to a matching cost function aggregated over rectangular windows. This results in a phenomenon known as 'pixel-locking,' which produces artificially-peaked histograms of sub-pixel disparity. These peaks correspond to the introduction of erroneous ripples or waves in the 3D reconstruction of truly Rat surfaces. Since stereo vision is a common input modality for autonomous vehicles, these inaccuracies can pose a problem for safe, reliable navigation. This paper proposes a new method for sub-pixel stereo disparity estimation, based on ideas from Lucas-Kanade tracking and optical flow, which substantially reduces the pixel-locking effect. In addition, it has the ability to correct much larger initial disparity errors than previous approaches and is more general as it applies not only to the ground plane.

  20. Using an Active Pixel Sensor In A Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, HansGeorg; Wieman, Howard H.; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2004-04-22

    Research has shown that Active Pixel CMOS sensors can detect charged particles. We have been studying whether this process can be used in a collider environment. In particular, we studied the effect of radiation with 55 MeV protons. These results show that a fluence of about 2 x 10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2} reduces the signal by a factor of two while the noise increases by 25%. A measurement 6 months after exposure shows that the silicon lattice naturally repairs itself. Heating the silicon to 100 C reduced the shot noise and increased the collected charge. CMOS sensors have a reduced signal to noise ratio per pixel because charge diffuses to neighboring pixels. We have constructed a photogate to see if this structure can collect more charge per pixel. Results show that a photogate does collect charge in fewer pixels, but it takes about 15 ms to collect all of the electrons produced by a pulse of light.

  1. DC-DC powering for the CMS pixel upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feld, Lutz; Fleck, Martin; Friedrichs, Marcel; Hensch, Richard; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Rittich, David; Sammet, Jan; Wlochal, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The CMS experiment plans to replace its silicon pixel detector with a new one with improved rate capability and an additional detection layer at the end of 2016. In order to cope with the increased number of detector modules the new pixel detector will be powered via DC-DC converters close to the sensitive detector volume. This paper reviews the DC-DC powering scheme and reports on the ongoing R&D program to develop converters for the pixel upgrade. Design choices are discussed and results from the electrical and thermal characterisation of converter prototypes are shown. An emphasis is put on system tests with up to 24 converters. The performance of pixel modules powered by DC-DC converters is compared to conventional powering. The integration of the DC-DC powering scheme into the pixel detector is described and system design issues are reviewed.

  2. Single photon counting pixel detectors for synchrotron radiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, H.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Henrich, B.; Kawase, M.; Kobas, M.; Kraft, P.; Sato, M.; Schmitt, B.; Suzuki, M.; Tanida, H.; Uruga, T.

    2010-11-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI an X-ray single photon counting pixel detector (PILATUS) based on the hybrid-pixel detector technology was developed in collaboration with SPring-8. The detection element is a 320 or 450 μm thick silicon sensor forming pixelated pn-diodes with a pitch of 172 μm×172 μm. An array of 2×8 custom CMOS readout chips are indium bump-bonded to the sensor, which leads to 33.5 mm×83.8 mm detective area. Each pixel contains a charge-sensitive amplifier, a single level discriminator and a 20 bit counter. This design realizes a high dynamic range, short readout time of less than 3 ms, a high framing rate of over 200 images per second and an excellent point-spread function. The maximum counting rate achieves more than 2×10 6 X-rays/s/pixel.

  3. The pixel tracking telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Simon; Lei, CM; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Prosser, Alan; Rivera, Ryan; Terzo, Stefano; Turqueti, Marcos; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vigani, Luigi; Dinardo, Mauro E.

    2016-03-01

    An all silicon pixel telescope has been assembled and used at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) since 2009 to provide precise tracking information for different test beam experiments with a wide range of Detectors Under Test (DUTs) requiring high resolution measurement of the track impact point. The telescope is based on CMS pixel modules left over from the CMS forward pixel production. Eight planes are arranged to achieve a resolution of less than 8 μm on the 120 GeV proton beam transverse coordinate at the DUT position. In order to achieve such resolution with 100×150 μm2 pixel cells, the planes were tilted to 25 degrees to maximize charge sharing between pixels. Crucial for obtaining this performance is the alignment software, called Monicelli, specifically designed and optimized for this system. This paper will describe the telescope hardware, the data acquisition system and the alignment software constituting this particle tracking system for test beam users.

  4. Resolution and sensitivity improvements for VOx microbolometer FPAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Daniel F.; Kennedy, Adam; Ray, Michael; Wyles, Richard; Wyles, Jessica; Asbrock, James F.; Hewitt, C.; Van Lue, David; Sessler, T.; Anderson, John S.; Bradley, Daryl; Chin, Richard; Gonzales, H.; Le Pere, C.; Kostrzewa, Thomas

    2003-09-01

    Raytheon Vision Systems (RVS) has achieved a significant technical breakthrough in uncooled FPAs by reducing the pixel size by a factor of two while maintaining state-of-the-art sensitivity. Raytheon is producing high-quality 320 x 240 microbolometer FPAs with 25 μm pitch pixels. The 320 x 240 FPAs have a sensitivity that is comparable to microbolometer FPAs with 50 μm pixels. The array average NETD value for these FPAs is about 30 mK with an f/1 aperture and operating at 30 Hz frame rates. Pixel operability is greater than 99% on most FPAs, and uncorrected responsivity nonuniformity is less than 4% (sigma/mean). These 25 μm microbolometer detectors also have a relatively fast thermal time constant of approximately 10 msec. This state-of-the-art performance has been achieved as a result of an advanced micro machining fabrication process, which allows maximization of both the thermal isolation and the optical fill-factor. These arrays have produced excellent image quality, and are currently fielded in demonstration systems. The reduction in pixel size offers several potential benefits for IR systems. For a given system resolution (IFOV) requirement, the 25 μm pxiels allow a factor of two reduction in both the focal length and aperture size of the sensor optics. These FPAs are applicable to wide-field-of-view, long-range surveillance and targeting missions. The pixel size reduction facilitates a significant FPA cost reduction since the number of die printed on a wafer can be increased, and also has enabled the development of a large-format 640 x 480 FPA array. Raytheon is producing these arrays with very good sensitivity. These arrays have excellent operability and image quality. Several dual FOV prototype systems have been delivered under the LCMS and UAV programs, and are under evaluation at NVESD. Raytheon Vision Systems (RVS) has developed a flexible uncooled front end (UFE) electronics that will serve as the basis for camera engine systems using 320 x 240

  5. Analysis of Multipath Pixels in SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. W.; Wu, J. C.; Ding, X. L.; Zhang, L.; Hu, F. M.

    2016-06-01

    As the received radar signal is the sum of signal contributions overlaid in one single pixel regardless of the travel path, the multipath effect should be seriously tackled as the multiple bounce returns are added to direct scatter echoes which leads to ghost scatters. Most of the existing solution towards the multipath is to recover the signal propagation path. To facilitate the signal propagation simulation process, plenty of aspects such as sensor parameters, the geometry of the objects (shape, location, orientation, mutual position between adjacent buildings) and the physical parameters of the surface (roughness, correlation length, permittivity)which determine the strength of radar signal backscattered to the SAR sensor should be given in previous. However, it's not practical to obtain the highly detailed object model in unfamiliar area by field survey as it's a laborious work and time-consuming. In this paper, SAR imaging simulation based on RaySAR is conducted at first aiming at basic understanding of multipath effects and for further comparison. Besides of the pre-imaging simulation, the product of the after-imaging, which refers to radar images is also taken into consideration. Both Cosmo-SkyMed ascending and descending SAR images of Lupu Bridge in Shanghai are used for the experiment. As a result, the reflectivity map and signal distribution map of different bounce level are simulated and validated by 3D real model. The statistic indexes such as the phase stability, mean amplitude, amplitude dispersion, coherence and mean-sigma ratio in case of layover are analyzed with combination of the RaySAR output.

  6. Consequences of Mixed Pixels on Temperature Emissivity Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, Patrick G.; Foley, Michael G.; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2007-02-01

    This report investigates the effect that a mixed pixel can have on temperature/emissivity seperation (i.e. temperature/emissivity estimation using long-wave infra-red data). Almost all temperature/emissivity estimation methods are based on a model that assumes both temperature and emissivity within the imaged pixel is homogeneous. A mixed pixel has heterogeneous temperature/emissivity and therefore does not satisfy the assumption. Needless to say, this heterogeneity causes biases in the estimates and this report quantifies the magnitude of the biases.

  7. Pixel detectors in 3D technologies for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, G.; Demarteau, M.; Hoff, J.; Lipton, R.; Shenai, A.; Yarema, R.; Zimmerman, T.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports on the current status of the development of International Linear Collider vertex detector pixel readout chips based on multi-tier vertically integrated electronics. Initial testing results of the VIP2a prototype are presented. The chip is the second embodiment of the prototype data-pushed readout concept developed at Fermilab. The device was fabricated in the MIT-LL 0.15 {micro}m fully depleted SOI process. The prototype is a three-tier design, featuring 30 x 30 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 48 x 48 pixels.

  8. Characterization of a Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (DMAPS) prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, T.; Havranek, M.; Hemperek, T.; Hügging, F.; Kishishita, T.; Krüger, H.; Marinas, C.; Wermes, N.

    2015-03-01

    New monolithic pixel detectors integrating CMOS electronics and sensor on the same silicon substrate are currently explored for particle tracking in future HEP experiments, most notably at the LHC . The innovative concept of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) is based on high resistive silicon bulk material enabling full substrate depletion and the application of an electrical drift field for fast charge collection, while retaining full CMOS capability for the electronics. The technology (150 nm) used offers quadruple wells and allows to implement the pixel electronics with independently isolated N- and PMOS transistors. Results of initial studies on the charge collection and sensor performance are presented.

  9. Dual collection mode optical microscope with single-pixel detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, A. D.; Clemente, P.; Fernández-Alonso, Mercedes; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we have developed a single-pixel optical microscope that provides both re ection and transmission images of the sample under test by attaching a diamond pixel layout DMD to a commercial inverted microscope. Our system performs simultaneous measurements of re ection and transmission modes. Besides, in contrast with a conventional system, in our single-element detection system both images belong, unequivocally, to the same plane of the sample. Furthermore, we have designed an algorithm to modify the shape of the projected patterns that improves the resolution and prevents the artifacts produced by the diamond pixel architecture.

  10. Modulation transfer function measurement technique for small-pixel detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchywka, Mike; Socker, Dennis G.

    1992-01-01

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) measurement technique suitable for large-format, small-pixel detector characterization has been investigated. A volume interference grating is used as a test image instead of the bar or sine wave target images normally used. This technique permits a high-contrast, large-area, sinusoidal intensity distribution to illuminate the device being tested, avoiding the need to deconvolve raw data with imaging system characteristics. A high-confidence MTF result at spatial frequencies near 200 cycles/mm is obtained. We present results at several visible light wavelengths with a 6.8-micron-pixel CCD. Pixel response functions are derived from the MTF results.

  11. Monolithic pixel detectors in silicon on insulator technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisello, Dario

    2013-05-01

    Silicon On Insulator (SOI) is becoming an attractive technology to fabricate monolithic pixel detectors. The possibility of using the depleted resistive substrate as a drift collection volume and to connect it by means of vias through the buried oxide to the pixel electronic makes this kind of approach interesting both for particle and photon detection. In this paper I report the results obtained in the development of monolithic pixel detectors in an SOI technology by a collaboration between groups from the University and INFN of Padova (Italy) and the LBNL and the SCIPP at UCSC (USA).

  12. Active-Pixel Image Sensors With Programmable Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nakamura, Junichi; Matthies, Larry H.

    1996-01-01

    Active-pixel image sensors with programmable resolution proposed for use in applications in which speed and efficiency of processing of image data enhanced by providing those data at varying resolutions. Such applications include modeling of biological vision, stereoscopic range-finding, recognition of patterns, tracking targets, and progressive transmission of compressed images. In target-tracking application, sensor initially forms low-resolution image from which area of interest identified, then sensor set at high resolution for examination of identified area. Outputs of contiguous pixels combined. Sensor of this type made to act as though it comprised fewer and larger pixels.

  13. Vertically integrated pixel readout chip for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Khalid, Farah; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of the vertex detector pixel readout chips based on multi-tier vertically integrated electronics for the International Linear Collider. Some testing results of the VIP2a prototype are presented. The chip is the second iteration of the silicon implementation of the prototype, data-pushed concept of the readout developed at Fermilab. The device was fabricated in the 3D MIT-LL 0.15 {micro}m fully depleted SOI process. The prototype is a three-tier design, featuring 30 x 30 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 48 x 48 pixels.

  14. DRS uncooled VOx infrared detector development and production status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Han, C. J.; Skidmore, George D.; Hess, Cory

    2010-04-01

    Significant progress has been made over the past decade on uncooled focal plane array (UFPA) technology development and production capacity at DRS as well as other domestic and overseas suppliers. This resulted in the proliferation of uncooled IR detectors in commercial and military markets. The uncooled detectors are widely used in firefighting, surveillance, industrial process monitoring, machine vision, and medical applications. In the military arena, uncooled detectors are fielded among diverse systems such as weapon sights, driver enhancement viewers, helmet-mounted sights, airborne and ground surveillance sensors including UAVs and robot vehicles. Pixel dimensions have continually decreased with an increase in pixel performance. This paper presents an overview of the DRS 25- and 17-micron pixel pitch uncooled VOx detector technology development and production status. The DRS uncooled FPA products include 320x240 and 640x480 arrays while the larger 1024x768 17-micron pitch array is at engineering prototype quantities. Current production of the 25-micron pitch 320x240 and 640x480 arrays exceeds 5,000 units per month, supporting U.S. military systems such as Army thermal weapon sights (TWS) and driver vision enhancers (DVE). Next generation systems are moving towards the 17-micron pixel pitch detectors. Advancement in small pixel technology has enabled the 17-micron pitch detectors performance to surpass their 25-micron pitch counterparts. To meet future production demand of the 17-micron pitch UFPAs, DRS has made significant investment in production infrastructure to upgrade its tools. These investments include a new DUV stepper, coater, and plasma etcher plus improvements in its manufacturing techniques to enhance yield. These advanced tools reduce the minimum line width in production below 0.35μm and are now being used to manufacture the 17-micron 320x240 and 640x480 arrays. To further technology development, DRS continues to engage in R&D activities

  15. Sub-pixel radiometry: a three-part study in generating synthetic imagery that incorporates sub-pixel variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Sarah; Goodenough, Adam A.; Brown, Scott D.; Salvaggio, Carl

    2010-04-01

    A pixel represents the limit of spatial knowledge that can be represented in an image. It is represented as a single (perhaps spectral) digital count value that represents the energy propagating from a spatial portion of a scene. In any captured image, that single value is the result of many factors including the composition of scene optical properties within the projected pixel, the characteristic point spread function (or, equivalently, modulation transfer function) of the system, and the sensitivity of the detector element itself. This presentation examines the importance of sub-pixel variability in the context of generating synthetic imagery for remote sensing applications. The study was performed using the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tool, an established ray-tracing based synthetic modeling system whose approach to sub-pixel computations was updated during this study. The paper examines three aspects of sub-pixel variability of interest to the remote sensing community. The first study simply looks at sampling frequency relative to structural frequency in a scene and the effects of aliasing on an image. The second considers the task of modeling a sub-pixel target whose signature would be mixed with background clutter, such as a small, hot target in a thermal image. The final study looks at capturing the inherent spectral variation in a single class of material, such as grass in hyperspectral imagery. Through each study we demonstrate in a quantitative fashion, the improved capabilities of DIRSIG's sub-pixel rendering algorithms.

  16. A germanium hybrid pixel detector with 55μm pixel size and 65,000 channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennicard, D.; Struth, B.; Hirsemann, H.; Sarajlic, M.; Smoljanin, S.; Zuvic, M.; Lampert, M. O.; Fritzsch, T.; Rothermund, M.; Graafsma, H.

    2014-12-01

    Hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors provide high performance through a combination of direct detection, a relatively small pixel size, fast readout and sophisticated signal processing circuitry in each pixel. For X-ray detection above 20 keV, high-Z sensor layers rather than silicon are needed to achieve high quantum efficiency, but many high-Z materials such as GaAs and CdTe often suffer from poor material properties or nonuniformities. Germanium is available in large wafers of extremely high quality, making it an appealing option for high-performance hybrid pixel X-ray detectors, but suitable technologies for finely pixelating and bump-bonding germanium have not previously been available. A finely-pixelated germanium photodiode sensor with a 256 by 256 array of 55μm pixels has been produced. The sensor has an n-on-p structure, with 700μm thickness. Using a low-temperature indium bump process, this sensor has been bonded to the Medipix3RX photoncounting readout chip. Tests with the LAMBDA readout system have shown that the detector works successfully, with a high bond yield and higher image uniformity than comparable high-Z systems. During cooling, the system is functional around -80°C (with warmer temperatures resulting in excessive leakage current), with -100°C sufficient for good performance.

  17. Characterization of a three side abuttable CMOS pixel sensor with digital pixel and data compression for charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilloux, F.; Değerli, Y.; Flouzat, C.; Lachkar, M.; Monmarthe, E.; Orsini, F.; Venault, P.

    2016-02-01

    CMOS monolithic pixel sensor technology has been chosen to equip the new ALICE trackers for HL-LHC . PIXAM is the final prototype from an R&D program specific to the Muon Forward Tracker which intends to push significantly forward the performances of the mature rolling shutter architecture. By implementing a digital pixel allowing to readout of a group of rows in parallel, the PIXAM sensor increases the rolling shutter readout speed while keeping the same power consumption as that of analogue pixel sensors. This paper will describe shortly the ASIC architecture and will focus on the analogue and digital performances of the sensor, obtained from laboratory measurements.

  18. Active pixel sensors with substantially planarized color filtering elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor imaging system preferably having an active pixel sensor array compatible with a CMOS fabrication process. Color-filtering elements such as polymer filters and wavelength-converting phosphors can be integrated with the image sensor.

  19. Coherence experiments in single-pixel digital holography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jung-Ping; Guo, Chia-Hao; Hsiao, Wei-Jen; Poon, Ting-Chung; Tsang, Peter

    2015-05-15

    In optical scanning holography (OSH), the coherence properties of the acquired holograms depend on the single-pixel size, i.e., the active area of the photodetector. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we have demonstrated coherent, partial coherent, and incoherent three-dimensional (3D) imaging by experiment in such a single-pixel digital holographic recording system. We have found, for the incoherent mode of OSH, in which the detector of the largest active area is applied, the 3D location of a diffusely reflecting object can be successfully retrieved without speckle noise. For the partial coherent mode employing a smaller pixel size of the detector, significant speckles and randomly distributed bright spots appear among the reconstructed images. For the coherent mode of OSH when the size of the pixel is vanishingly small, the bright spots disappear. However, the speckle remains and the signal-to-noise ratio is low. PMID:26393741

  20. DAQ hardware and software development for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramaglia, Maria Elena

    2016-07-01

    In 2014, the Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has been extended by about 12 million pixels thanks to the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). Data-taking and tuning procedures have been implemented along with newly designed readout hardware to support high bandwidth for data readout and calibration. The hardware is supported by an embedded software stack running on the readout boards. The same boards will be used to upgrade the readout bandwidth for the two outermost barrel layers of the ATLAS Pixel Detector. We present the IBL readout hardware and the supporting software architecture used to calibrate and operate the 4-layer ATLAS Pixel Detector. We discuss the technical implementations and status for data taking, validation of the DAQ system in recent cosmic ray data taking, in-situ calibrations, and results from additional tests in preparation for Run 2 at the LHC.

  1. ARCONS: a 1024 pixel superconducting integral field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Kieran; Mazin, Ben; McHugh, Sean; Meeker, Seth; Marsden, Danica; Bumble, Bruce

    2012-09-01

    ARCONS, the Array Camera for Optical to Near-infrared Spectrophotometry, was recently commissioned at the Coude focus of the 200-inch Hale Telescope at the Palomar Observatory. At the heart of this unique instrument is a 1024-pixel Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector (MKID), exploiting the Kinetic Inductance effect to measure the energy of the incoming photon to better than several percent. The ground-breaking instrument is lens coupled with a pixel scale of 0.23"/pixel, with each pixel recording the arrival time (< 2 _μsec) and energy of a photon (~10%) in the optical to near-IR (0.4-1.1 microns) range. The scientific objectives of the instrument include the rapid follow-up and classi_cation of the transient phenomena

  2. Two-dimensional pixel array image sensor for protein crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Beuville, E.; Beche, J.-F.; Cork, C.

    1996-07-01

    A 2D pixel array image sensor module has been designed for time resolved Protein Crystallography. This smart pixels detector significantly enhances time resolved Laue Protein crystallography by two to three orders of magnitude compared to existing sensors like films or phosphor screens coupled to CCDs. The resolution in time and dynamic range of this type of detector will allow one to study the evolution of structural changes that occur within the protein as a function of time. This detector will also considerably accelerate data collection in static Laue or monochromatic crystallography and make better use of the intense beam delivered by synchrotron light sources. The event driven pixel array detectors, based on the column Architecture, can provide multiparameter information (energy discrimination, time), with sparse and frameless readout without significant dead time. The prototype module consists of a 16x16 pixel diode array bump-bonded to the integrated circuit. The detection area is 150x150 square microns.

  3. A Chip and Pixel Qualification Methodology on Imaging Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yuan; Guertin, Steven M.; Petkov, Mihail; Nguyen, Duc N.; Novak, Frank

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a qualification methodology on imaging sensors. In addition to overall chip reliability characterization based on sensor s overall figure of merit, such as Dark Rate, Linearity, Dark Current Non-Uniformity, Fixed Pattern Noise and Photon Response Non-Uniformity, a simulation technique is proposed and used to project pixel reliability. The projected pixel reliability is directly related to imaging quality and provides additional sensor reliability information and performance control.

  4. MTF study of planar small pixel pitch quantum IR detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravrand, O.; Baier, N.; Ferron, A.; Rochette, F.; Berthoz, J.; Rubaldo, L.; Cluzel, R.

    2014-06-01

    The actual trend in quantum IR detector development is the design of very small pixel pitch large arrays. From previously 30μm pitch, the standard pixel pitch is today 15μm and is expected to decrease to 12μm in the next few years. Furthermore, focal plane arrays (FPA) with pixel pitch as small as small as 10μm has been demonstrated. Such ultra-small pixel pitches are very small compared to the typical length ruling the electrical characteristics of the absorbing materials, namely the minority carrier diffusion length. As an example for low doped N type HgCdTe or InSb material, this diffusion length is of the order of 30 to 50μm, i.e. 3 to 5 times the targeted pixel pitches. This has strong consequences on the modulation transfer function (MTF) for planar structures, where the lateral extension of the photodiode is limited by diffusion. For such aspect ratios, the self-confinement of neighboring diodes may not be efficient enough to maintain optimal MTF. Therefore, this issue has to be addressed in order to take full benefits of the pixel pitch reduction in terms of image resolution. This paper aims at investigating the MTF evolution of HgCdTe and InSb FPAs decreasing the pixel pitch below 15μm. Both experimental measurements and finite element simulations are used to discuss this issue. Different scenarii will be compared, namely deep mesa etch between pixels, internal drift, surface recombination, thin absorbing layers.

  5. Small pixel CZT detector for hard X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew David; Cernik, Robert; Chen, Henry; Hansson, Conny; Iniewski, Kris; Jones, Lawrence L.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C.

    2011-10-01

    A new small pixel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been developed for hard X-ray spectroscopy. The X-ray performance of four detectors is presented and the detectors are analysed in terms of the energy resolution of each pixel. The detectors were made from CZT crystals grown by the travelling heater method (THM) bonded to a 20×20 application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and data acquisition (DAQ) system. The detectors had an array of 20×20 pixels on a 250 μm pitch, with each pixel gold-stud bonded to an energy resolving circuit in the ASIC. The DAQ system digitised the ASIC output with 14 bit resolution, performing offset corrections and data storage to disc in real time at up to 40,000 frames per second. The detector geometry and ASIC design was optimised for X-ray spectroscopy up to 150 keV and made use of the small pixel effect to preferentially measure the electron signal. A 241Am source was used to measure the spectroscopic performance and uniformity of the detectors. The average energy resolution (FWHM at 59.54 keV) of each pixel ranged from 1.09±0.46 to 1.50±0.57 keV across the four detectors. The detectors showed good spectral performance and uniform response over almost all pixels in the 20×20 array. A large area 80×80 pixel detector will be built that will utilise the scalable design of the ASIC and the large areas of monolithic spectroscopic grade THM grown CZT that are now available. The large area detector will have the same performance as that demonstrated here.

  6. Pixel readout electronics for LHC and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanquart, L.; Bonzom, V.; Comes, G.; Delpierre, P.; Fischer, P.; Hausmann, J.; Keil, M.; Lindner, M.; Meuser, S.; Wermes, N.

    2000-01-01

    The demanding requirements for pixel readout electronics for high-energy physics experiments and biomedical applications are reviewed. Some examples of the measured analog performance of prototype chips are given. The readout architectures of the PIxel Readout for the ATlas Experiment (PIRATE) chip suited for LHC experiments and of the Multi Picture Element Counter (MPEC) counting chip targeted for biomedical applications are presented. First results with complete chip-sensor assemblies are also shown.

  7. FPIX2, the BTeV pixel readout chip

    SciTech Connect

    David C. Christian et al.

    2003-12-10

    A radiation tolerant pixel readout chip, FPIX2, has been developed at Fermilab for use by BTeV. Some of the requirements of the BTeV pixel readout chip are reviewed and contrasted with requirements for similar devices in LHC experiments. A description of the FPIX2 is given, and results of initial tests of its performance are presented, as is a summary of measurements planned for the coming year.

  8. Preliminary investigations of active pixel sensors in Nuclear Medicine imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Robert; Evans, Noel; Evans, Phil; Osmond, J.; Clark, A.; Turchetta, R.

    2009-06-01

    Three CMOS active pixel sensors have been investigated for their application to Nuclear Medicine imaging. Startracker with 525×525 25 μm square pixels has been coupled via a fibre optic stud to a 2 mm thick segmented CsI(Tl) crystal. Imaging tests were performed using 99mTc sources, which emit 140 keV gamma rays. The system was interfaced to a PC via FPGA-based DAQ and optical link enabling imaging rates of 10 f/s. System noise was measured to be >100e and it was shown that the majority of this noise was fixed pattern in nature. The intrinsic spatial resolution was measured to be ˜80 μm and the system spatial resolution measured with a slit was ˜450 μm. The second sensor, On Pixel Intelligent CMOS (OPIC), had 64×72 40 μm pixels and was used to evaluate noise characteristics and to develop a method of differentiation between fixed pattern and statistical noise. The third sensor, Vanilla, had 520×520 25 μm pixels and a measured system noise of ˜25e. This sensor was coupled directly to the segmented phosphor. Imaging results show that even at this lower level of noise the signal from 140 keV gamma rays is small as the light from the phosphor is spread over a large number of pixels. Suggestions for the 'ideal' sensor are made.

  9. High Chromaticity Aluminum Plasmonic Pixels for Active Liquid Crystal Displays.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jana; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Basu, Tiyash; Huang, Da; Schlather, Andrea E; Zheng, Bob; Halas, Naomi J; Nordlander, Peter; Link, Stephan

    2016-01-26

    Chromatic devices such as flat panel displays could, in principle, be substantially improved by incorporating aluminum plasmonic nanostructures instead of conventional chromophores that are susceptible to photobleaching. In nanostructure form, aluminum is capable of producing colors that span the visible region of the spectrum while contributing exceptional robustness, low cost, and streamlined manufacturability compatible with semiconductor manufacturing technology. However, individual aluminum nanostructures alone lack the vivid chromaticity of currently available chromophores because of the strong damping of the aluminum plasmon resonance in the visible region of the spectrum. In recent work, we showed that pixels formed by periodic arrays of Al nanostructures yield far more vivid coloration than the individual nanostructures. This progress was achieved by exploiting far-field diffractive coupling, which significantly suppresses the scattering response on the long-wavelength side of plasmonic pixel resonances. In the present work, we show that by utilizing another collective coupling effect, Fano interference, it is possible to substantially narrow the short-wavelength side of the pixel spectral response. Together, these two complementary effects provide unprecedented control of plasmonic pixel spectral line shape, resulting in aluminum pixels with far more vivid, monochromatic coloration across the entire RGB color gamut than previously attainable. We further demonstrate that pixels designed in this manner can be used directly as switchable elements in liquid crystal displays and determine the minimum and optimal numbers of nanorods required in an array to achieve good color quality and intensity. PMID:26639191

  10. Active Pixel Sensor Characterization for the STAR Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jake

    2004-10-01

    The STAR collaboration is studying matter at high temperatures and densities. If a significant improvement to the measurement of particle trajectories can be made, charmed mesons that decay away from the primary collision point could be identified. To achieve this goal, STAR is building a vertex detector consisting of a new technology Â- active pixel sensors. (APS) An APS is an implementation of standard CMOS technology in which each pixel has a photodiode directly above the epitaxial layer. Incident particles produce electron-hole pairs in the epitaxial layer, and these electrons accumulate on the photodiode. Charge from the photodiode is digitized to identify the position of the incident particle. It is important to characterize the signal to noise, readout time, and resolution on several different pixel sizes so that the vertex detector can be optimized for cost and speed. Larger pixels result in a faster data acquisition, while smaller pixels have better resolution. We will present studies of 5, 10, 20 and 30μm square pixel geometries that measure charge distribution and collection. We will also display the results of using a field emission scanning electron microscope with energies from 1 to 30 keV. This tool has the potential to probe regions of the APS integrated circuit and contribute to understanding its properties.