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Sample records for 35cl nqr frequency

  1. 35Cl NQR frequency and spin lattice relaxation time in 3,4-dichlorophenol as a function of pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Ramu, L; Ramesh, K P; Chandramani, R

    2013-01-01

    The pressure dependences of (35)Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency, temperature and pressure variation of spin lattice relaxation time (T(1)) were investigated in 3,4-dichlorophenol. T(1) was measured in the temperature range 77-300?K. Furthermore, the NQR frequency and T(1) for these compounds were measured as a function of pressure up to 5?kbar at 300?K. The temperature dependence of the average torsional lifetimes of the molecules and the transition probabilities W(1) and W(2) for the ?m?=?1 and ?m?=?2 transitions were also obtained. A nonlinear variation of NQR frequency with pressure has been observed and the pressure coefficients were observed to be positive. A thermodynamic analysis of the data was carried out to determine the constant volume temperature coefficients of the NQR frequency. An attempt is made to compare the torsional frequencies evaluated from NQR data with those obtained by IR spectra. On selecting the appropriate mode from IR spectra, a good agreement with torsional frequency obtained from NQR data is observed. The previously mentioned approach is a good illustration of the supplementary nature of the data from IR studies, in relation to NQR studies of compounds in solid state. PMID:23161529

  2. Temperature variation of ultralow frequency modes and mean square displacements in solid lasamide (diuretic drug) studied by 35Cl-NQR, X-ray and DFT/QTAIM.

    PubMed

    Latosi?ska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosi?ska, Magdalena; Kasprzak, Jerzy; Tomczak, Magdalena; Maurin, Jan Krzysztof

    2012-10-25

    The application of combined (35)Cl-NQR/X-ray/DFT/QTAIM methods to study the temperature variation of anisotropic displacement parameters and ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic torsional vibrations in the solid state is illustrated on the example of 2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamolybenzoic acid (lasamide, DSBA) which is a diuretic and an intermediate in the synthesis of furosemide and thus its common impurity. The crystallographic structure of lasamide is solved by X-ray diffraction and refined to a final R-factor of 3.06% at room temperature. Lasamide is found to crystallize in the triclinic space group P-1, with two equivalent molecules in the unit cell a = 7.5984(3) , b = 8.3158(3) , c = 8.6892(3) ; ? = 81.212(3), ? = 73.799(3), ? = 67.599(3). Its molecules form symmetric dimers linked by two short and linear intermolecular hydrogen bonds O-HO (O-HO = 2.648 and ?OHO = 171.5), which are further linked by weaker and longer intermolecular hydrogen bonds N-HO (N-HO = 2.965 and ?NHO = 166.4). Two (35)Cl-NQR resonance frequencies, 36.899 and 37.129 MHz, revealed at room temperature are assigned to chlorine sites at the ortho and para positions, relative to the carboxyl functional group, respectively. The difference in C-Cl(1) and C-Cl(2) bond lengths only slightly affects the value of (35)Cl-NQR frequencies, which results mainly from chemical inequivalence of chlorine atoms but also involvement in different intermolecular interactions pattern. The smooth decrease in both (35)Cl-NQR frequencies with increasing temperature in the range of 77-300 K testifies to the averaging of EFG tensor at each chlorine site due to anharmonic torsional vibrations. Lasamide is thermally stable; no temperature-induced release of chlorine or decomposition of this compound is detected. The temperature dependence of ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic small-angle internal torsional vibrations averaging EFG tensor and mean square angle displacements at both chlorine sites is derived from the (35)Cl-NQR temperature dependence. The frequencies of torsional vibrations higher for the para site than the ortho site are in good agreement with those obtained from thermal parameters obtained from X-ray studies. The mean square angle displacements are in good agreement with those estimated from X-ray data with the use of the TLS model. The detailed DFT/QTAIM analysis suggests that the interplay between different hydrogen bonds in adjacent molecules forming dimers is responsible for the differences in flexibility of the carboxyl and sulphonamide substituents as well as both C-Cl(1) and C-Cl(2) bonds. Three ultralow wavenumber modes of internal vibrations in Raman and IR spectra obtained at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level close to those obtained within the TLS model suggest that internal and external modes of vibrations are not well separated. PMID:23020838

  3. Isotope effect on the temperature dependence of the 35Cl NQR frequency in (NH4)2RuCl6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Yoshio; Amino, Daiki; Asaji, Tetsuo

    2013-07-01

    The 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies and spin-lattice relaxation times for (NH4)2RuCl6, (ND4)2RuCl6, (NH4)2SnCl6, and (ND4)2SnCl6 were measured in the temperature range 4.2-300 K. In these four compounds, it was confirmed that no phase transition occurs in the observed temperature range. At 4.2 K, discrepancies of the NQR frequency between non-deuterated and deuterated compounds, which are attributed to the difference in the spatial distributions of hydrogen (deuterium) atoms in the ground states of the rotational motion of ammonium ion, reached to 24 kHz and 23 kHz for the ruthenate compounds and the stannate compounds, respectively. The separation between the ground and the first excited states of the rotational motion of the ammonium ion was estimated to be 466 J mol-1 and 840 J mol-1 for (ND4)2RuCl6 and (NH4)2RuCl6, respectively, by least-square fitting calculations of temperature dependence of the NQR frequency. For (ND4)2SnCl6 and (NH4)2SnCl6, these quantities were estimated to be 501 J mol-1 and 1544 J mol-1, respectively. It was clarified that the T1 minimum, which has been observed for the stannate compounds at around 60 K as a feature of the temperature dependence, was dependent on a method of sample preparation. It is concluded that the minimum is not an essential character of the ammonium hexachlorostannate(IV) since the crystals prepared in strong acid condition to prevent a partial substitution of chlorine atoms by hydroxyl groups, did not show such T1 minimum.

  4. Two-dimensional exchange 35Cl NQR spectroscopy of hexachloroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maćkowiak, Mariusz; Sinyavsky, Nicolay; Bluemich, Bernhard

    2005-05-01

    Two-dimensional exchange 35Cl NQR spectroscopy for studies of the CCl 3-group reorientation processes in hexachloroethane has been applied. It has been demonstrated that 2D NQR exchange spectroscopy is appropriate for quantitative studies of exchange processes in molecular crystals containing quadrupole nuclei. The method is of particular value for the detection of exchange networks in systems with many sites. Thus, detailed information on the exchange pathways within a network of structural isomers in hexachloroethane can be deduced and a proper assignment of the NQR lines can be made. Temperature dependence of the exchange rate was studied. The mixing dynamics by exchange and the expected cross-peak intensities have been derived. The very good agreement of the experimental results with theoretical predictions confirms the validity of the motion model.

  5. 35Cl NQR Study of Thermoactivated Motions of Nitro Groups in Picryl Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyuntsel, Igor A.

    1996-06-01

    The temperature dependences of the 35Cl NQR frequency (ν), spin-lattice relaxation time (T1), and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) have been studied in 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (picryl chloride) from 77 K up to the melting point (354 K). The T1(T) curve exhibits a pronounced composite mimimum near 300 K which gives evidence for the reorientations of the two ortho-NO2 groups around their two-fold symmetry axes with the activation energies of 27.4 kJ mol - 1 and 31.2 kJ mol - 1. These values can be related to the ortho-NO2 groups having the twist angles of 33° and 81°, respectively (the crystal structure of picryl chloride is known). The T2(T) dependence exhibits interesting features, too: a deep minimum about 140 K and a new rapid decrease above 270 K.

  6. Single crystal zeeman effect studies on 35Cl NQR lines of 2,6-dichlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, N. V. L. N.; Venkatacharyulu, P.; Premaswarup, D.

    1987-10-01

    Zeeman effect studies on the two 35Cl NQR lines in cylindrical single crystals of 2,6-dichlorophenol were carried out using a self-quenched super-regenerative NQR spectrometer to obtain information on the nature of the crystalline unit cell and the effect of hydrogen bonding on the electric field gradient tensor. Analysis of the experimental data reveals: (1) the results are in good agreement with those reported from X-ray studies; (2) the crystal is unequivocally identified as belonging to the orthorhombic system; (3) there are two crystallographically equivalent and four physically nonequivalent directions for the principal field gradients for both the low and high frequency resonance lines; (4) the directions of the crystalline a, b, c axes are uniquely identified as (90°, 0°), (0°, -), and (90°, 90°); (5) the b-axis is identified as the growth axis; (6) there are a minimum of four molecules per unit cell, the four molecules lie in different planes, which are, however, connected by symmetry operations; (7)_there exists a weak intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the crystal; (8) the asymmetry parameters for the loci corresponding to the low frequency resonance line, which is affected by hydrogen bonding, are less than the asymmetry parameters of the loci corresponding to the high frequency resonance line, which is not affected by hydrogen bonding; (9) the single bond and ionic bond characters for the hish frequency line are less than that of the low frequency line, while the double bond character for the low frequency line is less than that of the high frequency line and (10) the small deviation between the single bond and double bond characters of the two resonance lines is attributed to the existence of weak hydrogen bonding in the crystal.

  7. 35Cl NQR study of incommensurate state in thiourea-hexachloroethane inclusion compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panich, A. M.; Semenov, A. R.; Chekhova, G. N.; Krieger, Ju. H.; Goren, S. D.

    1999-04-01

    A study of the incommensurate phase of the channel thiourea-hexachloroethane inclusion compound by means of 35Cl NQR, in the temperature range from 68 to 88 K, is presented. Hahn echo measurements indicate the slow diffusion-like motion of the modulation wave. This motion is obtained close to the transition temperature Ti˜90 K. At higher temperatures, the NQR spectrum is not observed. We attribute this fact to the reorientational mobility of C 2Cl 6 molecules in the host sublattice, probably accompanied by an order-disorder phase transition.

  8. A study of transition-metal organometallic complexes combining 35Cl solid-state NMR spectroscopy and 35Cl?NQR spectroscopy and first-principles DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Karen E; O'Keefe, Christopher A; Gauvin, Rgis M; Trbosc, Julien; Delevoye, Laurent; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Popoff, Nicolas; Taoufik, Mostafa; Oudatchin, Konstantin; Schurko, Robert W

    2013-09-01

    A series of transition-metal organometallic complexes with commonly occurring metal-chlorine bonding motifs were characterized using (35)Cl solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy, (35)Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy, and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations of NMR interaction tensors. Static (35)Cl ultra-wideline NMR spectra were acquired in a piecewise manner at standard (9.4?T) and high (21.1?T) magnetic field strengths using the WURST-QCPMG pulse sequence. The (35)Cl electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shielding (CS) tensor parameters were readily extracted from analytical simulations of the spectra; in particular, the quadrupolar parameters are shown to be very sensitive to structural differences, and can easily differentiate between chlorine atoms in bridging and terminal bonding environments. (35)Cl?NQR spectra were acquired for many of the complexes, which aided in resolving structurally similar, yet crystallographically distinct and magnetically inequivalent chlorine sites, and with the interpretation and assignment of (35)Cl?SSNMR spectra. (35)Cl?EFG tensors obtained from first-principles DFT calculations are consistently in good agreement with experiment, highlighting the importance of using a combined approach of theoretical and experimental methods for structural characterization. Finally, a preliminary example of a (35)Cl?SSNMR spectrum of a transition-metal species (TiCl4) diluted and supported on non-porous silica is presented. The combination of (35)Cl?SSNMR and (35)Cl?NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations is shown to be a promising and simple methodology for the characterization of all manner of chlorine-containing transition-metal complexes, in pure, impure bulk and supported forms. PMID:23907813

  9. Sodium and potassium salts of dichloroisocyanuric acid and their hydrates as antimicrobials agents studied by 35Cl-NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, A.; Brycki, B.; Kaczmarek, M.; Poleshchuk, O. Kh.; Ostafin, M.; Nogaj, B.

    2006-06-01

    The electronic structure of dichloroisocyanuric acid derivatives was analysed by 35Cl-NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Here we concentrate our attention on three different factors: type of metallic substituent (sodium and potassium), temperature of the sample (liquid nitrogen and room) and degree of hydration (an amount of water molecules attached to analysed compounds). In particular, all the variations in 35Cl-NQR frequencies upon hydration of salts containing sodium and potassium ions are explained as a consequence of H-bonds formation and accompanied effects of charge redistribution. Our studies can be useful in searching for the derivatives of dichloroisocyanuric acid revealing higher antimicrobial activity.

  10. Studies of the electronic structure and biological activity of chosen 1,4-benzodiazepines by 35Cl NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronisz, K.; Ostafin, M.; Poleshchuk, O. Kh.; Mielcarek, J.; Nogaj, B.

    2006-11-01

    Selected derivatives of 1,4-benzodiazepine: lorazepam, lormetazepam, oxazepam and temazepam, used as active substances in anxiolytic drugs, have been studied by 35Cl NQR method in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and biological activity. The 35Cl NQR resonance frequencies ( νQ) measured at 77 K have been correlated with the following parameters characterising their biological activity: biological half-life period ( t0.5), affinity to benzodiazepine receptor (IC 50) and mean dose equivalent. The results of experimental study of some benzodiazepine derivatives by nuclear quadrupole resonance of 35Cl nuclei are compared with theoretical results based on DFT calculations which were carried out by means of Gaussian'98 W software.

  11. Temperature dependence of 35Cl NQR in 3,4-Dichlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramani, R.; Devaraj, N.; Indumathy, A.; Ramakrishna, J.

    NQR frequencies in 3,4-dichlorophenol are investigated in the temperature range 77 K to room temperature. Two resonances have been observed throughout the temperature range, corresponding to the two chemically inequivalent chlorine sites. Using Bayer's theory and Brown's method torsional frequencies and their temperature dependence in this range are estimated.

  12. Stereoelectronic structure and 35Cl NQR parameters of 4-(trichlorgermyl)butan-2-one using ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feshin, V. P.; Feshina, E. V.

    2012-03-01

    The results of ab initio calculations at the RHF/6-31G(d) and MP2/6-31G(d) levels of two stable structures of the 4-(trichlorgermyl)butan-2-one molecule with total optimization of their geometry have been represented. The structure with pentacoordinated Ge atom is energetically more advantageous as compared with that with tetracoordinated one. Using these results, the 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequencies and asymmetry parameters of the electric field gradient (EFG) at the 35Cl nuclei in molecule with pentacoordinated Ge atom have been assessed, the frequencies satisfactorily agreeing with experimental data. Calculations at the RHF/6-31G(d) level have been performed also at various Ge⋯O distances. It has been demonstrated that convergence of the Ge and O coordination centers leads to the increase of positive charge at the Ge coordination center and of negative charge at the O coordination center, at that, electron density from the Ge atom shifts mainly to the axial Cl atom and from the C atom of carbonyl group - to its O atom. The electron density transfer from the O to Ge atom does not occur.

  13. 35Cl NQR Spectra of several 2,2-bis- p-chlorophenyl chloroethane derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogaj, B.; Pietrzak, J.; Wielopolska, E.; Schroeder, G.; Jarczewski, A.

    Measurement of NQR line frequency at 77 K have been performed for the following compounds: 1-chloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (DDMU), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (DDE), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl) ethane (ODD), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT). An attempt to assign spectrum lines to particular Cl nuclei in a molecule has been made. Molecular and crystallographic inequivalences occurring in these compounds have been considered. Comparison of the NQR and crystallographic data revealed the influence of phenyl rings conformation on electric charge distribution in the studied molecules.

  14. Detection of {sup 14}N and {sup 35}Cl in cocaine base and hydrochloride using NQR, NMR, and SQUID techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yesinowski, J.P.; Buess, M.L.; Garroway, A.N.; Ziegeweid, M.; Pines, A. |

    1995-07-01

    Results from {sup 14}N pure NQR of cocaine in the free base form (cocaine base) yield a nuclear quadrupole coupling constant (NQCC) e{sup 2}Qq/h of 5.0229 ({+-}0.0001) MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.0395 ({+-}0.0001) at 295 K, with corresponding values of 5.0460 ({+-}0.0013) MHz and 0.0353 ({+-}0.0008) at 77 K. Both pure NQR (at 295-77 K) and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector (at 4.2 K) were used to measure the very low (<1 MHz) {sup 14}N transition frequencies in cocaine hydrochloride; at 295 K the NQCC is 1.1780 ({+-}0.0014) MHz and the asymmetry parameter is 0.2632 ({+-}0.0034). Stepping the carrier frequency enables one to obtain a powder pattern without the severe intensity distortions that otherwise arise from finite pulse power. A powder pattern simulation using an NQCC value of 5.027 MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.2 agrees reasonably well with the experimental stepped-frequency spectrum. The use of pure NQR for providing nondestructive, quantitative, and highly specific detection of crystalline compounds is discussed, as are experimental strategies. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Frequency selective detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, Samuel D.; Jakobsson, Andreas; Smith, John A. S.; Althoefer, Kaspar A.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) technique that can be used to detect the presence of quadrupolar nuclei, such as the 14N nucleus prevalent in many explosives and narcotics. The technique has been hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and is further aggravated by the presence of RF interference (RFI). To ensure accurate detection, proposed detectors should exploit the rich form of the NQR signal. Furthermore, the detectors should also be robust to any remaining residual interference, left after suitable RFI mitigation has been employed. In this paper, we propose a new NQR data model, particularly for the realistic case where multiple pulse sequences are used to generate trains of spin echoes. Furthermore, we refine two recently proposed approximative maximum likelihood (AML) detectors, enabling the algorithm to optimally exploit the data model of the entire echo train and also incorporate knowledge of the temperature dependent spin-echo decay time. The AML-based detectors ensure accurate detection and robustness against residual RFI, even when the temperature of the sample is not precisely known, by exploiting the dependencies of the NQR resonant lines on temperature. Further robustness against residual interference is gained as the proposed detector is frequency selective; exploiting only those regions of the spectrum where the NQR signal is expected. Extensive numerical evaluations based on both simulated and measured NQR data indicate that the proposed Frequency selective Echo Train AML (FETAML) detector offers a significant improvement as compared to other existing detectors.

  16. Low-Frequency NMR and Nqr with a DC SQUID Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Nong-Qiang

    A sensitive Fourier-transform spectrometer based on a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in zero applied magnetic field and pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at low frequencies. The motivation to detect zero field NMR and NQR is to provide a new high resolution spectroscopy technique at frequencies below 200 kHz to study ultra-weak interactions in chemicals and materials. By comparing the sensitivity of a SQUID amplifier with that of a conventional semiconductor amplifier, it is shown that a SQUID amplifier is essential for the direct detection of low frequency resonant signals. The spectrometer has a frequency response extending from about 10 to 200 kHz, and a recovery time (after the magnetic pulse is removed) of about 50 mus. The spectrometer is used to detect NMR spectra from Pt and Cu metal powders in a magnetic field of 6 mtesla, and NQR spectra from ^2D in a tunneling methyl group and ^{14}N in rm NH_4ClO_4. Finally, the zero field NMR spectrum from a quantum tunneling methyl group is calculated.

  17. NQR studies on 2,5-dichlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasturi, Alapati; Venkatacharyulu, P.; Premaswarup, D.

    1990-11-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) Zeeman effect studies were carried out on cylindrical single crystals of 2,5-dichlorophenol, using the two 35Cl-NQR frequencies. A self-quenched superregenerative NQR spectrometer was used, and the spectra were analysed ot obtain information on the nature of the crystalline unit cell. An analysis of the experimental data reveals that: (1) the results are in good agreement with the structural reports of Bavoux and Perrin; (2) the crystal unequivocally belongs to the monoclinic system; (3) there are two crystallographically equivalent but physically inequivalent directions for the principal field gradient axes for both the low- and high-frequency resonance lines; (4) as the number of physically inequivalent directions for each of the two resonance lines is two, the minimum number of molecules per unit cell is two; (5) the b axis (90°,90°) is identified as the symmetry axis; (6) the growth axis is slightly inclined to the c axis; (7) the asymmetry parameters obtained for the loci corresponding to the low-frequency line, which is hydrogen bonded, are greater than those for the high-frequency line, which is nonhydrogen bonded; (8) the double-bond character is greater for the hydrogen-bonded chlorine than for the non-hydrogen-bonded chlorine; (9) the ratios of the various bond characters estimated for both the low- and high-frequency resonance lines are 69:24:7 and 74:24:2.

  18. Electron density distribution in cladribine (2-chloro-2?-deoxyadenosine) - A drug against leukemia and multiple sclerosis - Studied by multinuclear NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latosi?ska, J. N.; Latosi?ska, M.; Seliger, J.; agar, V.; Kazimierczuk, Z.

    2009-07-01

    2-Chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (Cladribine) chemotherapeutic drug has been studied experimentally in solid state by 35Cl NQR and NMR-NQR double resonance and theoretically by the Density Functional Theory. Fifteen resonance frequencies on 14N have been detected and assigned to particular nitrogen sites in the 2-CdA molecule. The effects of tautomerism, regioisomerism, conformations and molecular aggregations, related to intermolecular hydrogen bond formation, on the NQR parameters have been analysed within the DFT and AIM ( Atoms in Molecules) formalism. The properties of the whole molecule, the so-called global reactivity descriptors, have been calculated for a comparison of both syn and anti conformations of 2-CdA molecule to check the effect of crystal packing on molecular conformation.

  19. Measurement of temperature and temperature gradient in millimeter samples by chlorine NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2009-09-01

    A mini-thermometer based on the 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency temperature dependence in the chlorates KClO3 and NaClO3 was built and successfully tested by measuring temperature and temperature gradient at 77 K and higher in about 100 mm3 active volume of a mini Joule-Thomson refrigerator. In the design of the tank-circuit coil, an array of small coils connected in series enabled us (a) to achieve a suitable ratio of inductance to capacity in the NQR spectrometer input tank circuit, (b) to use a single crystal of KClO3 or NaClO3 (of 1-2 mm3 size) in one coil as a mini-thermometer with a resolution of 0.03 K and (c) to construct a system for measuring temperature gradients when the spatial coordinates of each chlorate single crystal within an individual coil are known.

  20. Explosives detection by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1994-10-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). This paper presents abbreviated results from a demonstration of the laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center in May 1994 on RDX-based explosives.

  1. PEANUT experiment in NQR spectroscopy for I=3/2.

    PubMed

    Sinyavsky, Nikolay; Dolinenkov, Philip; Ma?kowiak, Mariusz

    2012-01-01

    The experiment with phase inversion and phase-inverted echo-amplitude detected nutation (PEANUT) was introduced in the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Formulas were obtained describing the NQR (I=3/2) experiment. Exemplary experiments are provided confirming the predicted particularities of the PEANUT spectra in NQR Cl-35. It is proposed to apply the method for the purpose of determination the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) tensor in powders with the help of the analysis of PEANUT interferograms. Application of two-dimensional PEANUT experiments, in which the nutation frequencies correlate with the resonance NQR frequencies, can substantially simplify the interpretation of complex spectra. PMID:22365993

  2. A miniaturized NQR spectrometer for a multi-channel NQR-based detection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguš, Samo; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2014-10-01

    A low frequency (0.5-5 MHz) battery operated sensitive pulsed NQR spectrometer with a transmitter power up to 5 W and a total mass of about 3 kg aimed at detecting 14N NQR signals, predominantly of illicit materials, was designed and assembled. This spectrometer uses a standard software defined radio (SDR) platform for the data acquisition unit. Signal processing is done with the LabView Virtual instrument on a personal computer. We successfully tested the spectrometer by measuring 14N NQR signals from aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH), potassium nitrate (PN), paracetamol (PCM) and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Such a spectrometer is a feasible component of a portable single or multichannel 14N NQR based detection device.

  3. A miniaturized NQR spectrometer for a multi-channel NQR-based detection device.

    PubMed

    Begu, Samo; Jazbinek, Vojko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2014-10-01

    A low frequency (0.5-5 MHz) battery operated sensitive pulsed NQR spectrometer with a transmitter power up to 5 W and a total mass of about 3 kg aimed at detecting (14)N NQR signals, predominantly of illicit materials, was designed and assembled. This spectrometer uses a standard software defined radio (SDR) platform for the data acquisition unit. Signal processing is done with the LabView Virtual instrument on a personal computer. We successfully tested the spectrometer by measuring (14)N NQR signals from aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH), potassium nitrate (PN), paracetamol (PCM) and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Such a spectrometer is a feasible component of a portable single or multichannel (14)N NQR based detection device. PMID:25233110

  4. FPGA based pulsed NQR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemnani, Preeti; Rajarajan, A. K.; Joshi, Gopal; Motiwala, Paresh D.; Ravindranath, S. V. G.

    2014-04-01

    An NQR spectrometer for the frequency range of 1 MHz to 5 MHZ has been designed constructed and tested using an FPGA module. Consisting of four modules viz. Transmitter, Probe, Receiver and computer controlled (FPGA & Software) module containing frequency synthesizer, pulse programmer, mixer, detection and display, the instrument is capable of exciting nuclei with a power of 200W and can detect signal of a few microvolts in strength. 14N signal from NaNO2 has been observed with the expected signal strength.

  5. I: Low Frequency NMR and NQR Using a dc SQUID. II: Variable-temperature 13C CP/MAS of Organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegeweid, M.A.

    1995-11-29

    NMR and NQR at low frequencies are difficult prospects due to small nuclear spin polarization. Furthermore, the sensitivity'of the inductive pickup circuitry of standard spectrometers is reduced as the frequency is lowered. I have used a cw-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) spectrometer, which has no such frequency dependence, to study the local atomic environment of {sup 14}N via the quadrupolar interaction. Because {sup 14}N has spin I = 1 and a 0-6 MHz frequency range, it is not possible to obtain well-resolved spectra in high magnetic fields. I have used a technique to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances via their effect on neighboring protons mediated by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to study peptides and narcotics. The sensitivity of the SQUID is not enough to measure low-frequency surface (or other low spin density) systems. The application of spin-polarized xenon has been previously used to enhance polarization in conventional NMR experiments. Because xenon only polarizes spins with which it is in contact, it is surface selective. While differences in chemical shifts between surface and bulk spins are not large, it is expected that the differences in quadrupole coupling constant should be very large due to the drastic change of the electric field gradient surrounding spins at the surface. With this in mind, I have taken preliminary steps to measure SQUID detected polarization transfer from Xe to another spin species at 4.2 K and in small magnetic fields (<50 G). In this regime, the spin-lattice relaxation of xenon is dependent on the applied magnetic field. The results of our efforts to characterize the relaxation of xenon are presented. The final section describes the solid-state variable-temperature (VT) one- and two-dimensional {sup 13}C cross polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of Hf({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, Zr({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}) and Sn({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 4}. This work was undertaken in the hope of gaining insight into the intramolecuhrr dynamics, specifically which fluxional processes exist in the solid state, by what mechanism rearrangements are occurring, and the activation energies by which these processes are governed.

  6. Pressure Dependence of the Chlorine NQR in Chloro Pyridines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, K. P.; Ramakrishna, J.; Suresh, K. S.; Rao, C. Raghavendra

    2000-02-01

    The 35CI NQR frequency (?Q) and spin lattice relaxation time (T1 ) in 2,6-dichloropyridine, 2 amino 3,5-dichloropyridine and 6 chloro 2-pyridinol have been measured as a function of pressure up to 5.1 kbar at 300 K, and the data have been analysed to estimate the temperature coefficients of the NQR frequency at constant volume. All the three compounds show a non linear variation of the NQR frequency with pressure which can be described by a 2nd order polynomial in pressure. The rate of change of the NQR frequency with pressure is positive and decreases with increasing pressure. The spin lattice relaxation time T1, in all the three compounds shows a small increase with pressure, indicating that the relaxation is mainly due to the torsional motions.

  7. Intensity of NQR lines for integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anferov, V. P.; Beloglazov, G. S.; Grechishkin, V. S.

    1986-12-01

    Because of the publication of contradictory information demonstrating an incorrect approach to the modeling of NQR-NMR frequency-intensity spectra of integral-spin isotopes (for example, boron-10), we study the NQR-NMR double resonance with level crossing (DRLC) in10B-1H,11B-1H,59K-1H and23Na-1H in crystal hydrates of sodium tetraborate (Na2B4O710H2O) and potassium tetraborate (K2B4O74H2O) and the results of the measurements are compared with theoretical calculations. The fact that for a system including three elements-quadrupole (NQR), Zeeman (NMR), and dipole-dipole, which establishes the interaction of the first two- the intensities of the lines in double resonance spectra are determined both by the equations of balance of the populations of the levels of the quadrupole and Zeeman reservoirs and by the probabilities of transitions within each reservoir is taken into account in the calculations. The distortion of the energy levels of the NQR subsystem by the magnetic field in the process of level crossing with the NMR subsystem is taken into account.

  8. Two-dimensional NQR using ultra-broadband electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, S.; Song, Y.-Q.

    2014-03-01

    We have recently developed an ultra-broadband instrument that can effectively excite and detect NMR and NQR signals over a wide frequency range. Our current system operates between 100 kHz and 3.2 MHz using an un-tuned sample coil. The major benefits of this instrument compared to conventional NQR/NMR systems include increased robustness, ease of use (in particular for multi-frequency experiments), and elimination of the need for tuning adjustments in the hardware. Here we describe its use for performing two-dimensional (2D) scans, which allow improved interpretation of complex NQR spectra by detecting the connected resonances. Our method relies on population transfers between the three energy levels of spin-1 nuclei (such as 14N) by using multi-frequency excitation and a single RF coil. Experimental results on pure samples and mixtures are also presented.

  9. Monoanion inhibition and 35Cl nuclear magnetic resonance studies of renal dipeptidase.

    PubMed

    Ferren, L G; Ward, R L; Campbell, B J

    1975-12-01

    Kinetic analyses of monoanion inhibition and 15Cl nuclear magnetic resonance at 5.88 MHz were employed to study monoanion interactions with the zinc metalloenzyme, renal dipeptidase. The enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of glycyldehydrophenylalanine exhibited competitive inhibition when the reaction rate was determined in the presence of the monovalent anions fluoride, chloride, bromide, iodide, azide, nitrate, or thiocyanate or upon the addition of the divalent anion, sulfate. Competitive inhibition was produced by these anions. One anion was bound per enzyme molecule, and except in the case of fluoride all of the anions appeared to bind at the same site. Cyanide ion produced a much more effective inhibition of renal dipeptidase than the other monoanions, and it was shown that two cyanide ions were bound per enzyme molecule. An investigation of the effect of pH upon monoanion inhibition suggested that the anion inhibitors bind to the group with a pK of approximately 7.8. Complete dissociation of this group (approximately pH 8.4) eliminates the inhibitory effect of anions. The 35Cl line broadening produced by renal dipeptidase in 0.5 M NaCl solutions was 100 times more effective than that produced by equivalent concentrations of aquozinc(II). The line broadening was dependent upon the concentration of the metalloenzyme and independent of the frequency of the exciting radiation. When zinc ion was removed from the metalloenzyme by dialysis or when chloride was titrated from the metalloenzyme by cyanide, line broadening was decreased. Treatment of renal dipeptidase with saturating concentrations of the competitive inhibitor, guanosine triphosphate, in the presence of 0.5 M NaCl also produced a significant decrease in the 35Cl line width. The 35Cl line broadening produced by renal dipeptidase was shown to decrease with increasing pH through the range pH 5.8-10.8. This line-width variation with pH appeared to result from the titration of a site on the metalloprotein with an approximate pK of 7.4. Temperature studies of 35Cl line broadening by the metalloenzyme in the presence of chloride and cyanide inhibitors suggest that the fast exchange process pertains and that the dominant relaxation mechanism is quadrupolar in nature. PMID:48

  10. NQR study of neutral-ionic phase transition and quantum paraelectric state in organic charge-transfer complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Fumitatsu; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Kanoda, Kazushi; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2008-12-01

    NQR measurements were performed for the charge-transfer complexes DMTTF-QBr nCl n-4 under ambient and hydrostatic pressures in order to understand the neutral-ionic phase transition and the quantum critical behavior. The 35Cl NQR spectrum of DMTTF-QCl 4 showed a splitting and a shift below Tc, indicating the occurrence of dimerization and charge transfer. The spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/ T1 showed a peak anomaly around Tc, reflecting the critical slowing down. The quantum paraelectric states in DMTTF-2,6-QBr 2Cl 2 and pressured DMTTF-QBr 4 were studied by the 79Br NQR. We found the microscopic evidence for the evolution of the critical fluctuations at low temperatures in the temperature dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate.

  11. Zeeman shift--a tool for assignment of 14N NQR lines of nonequivalent 14N atoms in powder samples.

    PubMed

    Luznik, J; Jazbinsek, V; Pirnat, J; Seliger, J; Trontelj, Z

    2011-09-01

    The use of Zeeman perturbed 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) to determine the ?+ and ?-14N lines in polycrystalline samples with several nonequivalent nitrogen atoms was investigated. The 14N NQR line shift due to a weak external Zeeman magnetic field was calculated, assuming isotropic distribution of EFG tensor directions. We calculated the broad line distribution of the ?+ and ?- line shifts and experimentally confirmed the calculated Zeeman field dependence of singularities (NQR peaks) in cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH). The calculated and measured frequency shifts agreed well. The proposed measurement method enabled determination of which 14N NQR lines in ATMH belong to ?+ and which to ?- transitions. PMID:21783395

  12. New perspectives in the PAW/GIPAW approach: J(P-O-Si) coupling constants, antisymmetric parts of shift tensors and NQR predictions.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Christian; Gervais, Christel; Coelho, Cristina; Pourpoint, Frédérique; Azaïs, Thierry; Bonhomme-Coury, Laure; Babonneau, Florence; Jacob, Guy; Ferrari, Maude; Canet, Daniel; Yates, Jonathan R; Pickard, Chris J; Joyce, Siân A; Mauri, Francesco; Massiot, Dominique

    2010-12-01

    In 2001, Pickard and Mauri implemented the gauge including projected augmented wave (GIPAW) protocol for first-principles calculations of NMR parameters using periodic boundary conditions (chemical shift anisotropy and electric field gradient tensors). In this paper, three potentially interesting perspectives in connection with PAW/GIPAW in solid-state NMR and pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) are presented: (i) the calculation of J coupling tensors in inorganic solids; (ii) the calculation of the antisymmetric part of chemical shift tensors and (iii) the prediction of (14)N and (35)Cl pure NQR resonances including dynamics. We believe that these topics should open new insights in the combination of GIPAW, NMR/NQR crystallography, temperature effects and dynamics. Points (i), (ii) and (iii) will be illustrated by selected examples: (i) chemical shift tensors and heteronuclear (2)J(P-O-Si) coupling constants in the case of silicophosphates and calcium phosphates [Si(5)O(PO(4))(6), SiP(2)O(7) polymorphs and α-Ca(PO(3))(2)]; (ii) antisymmetric chemical shift tensors in cyclopropene derivatives, C(3)X(4) (X = H, Cl, F) and (iii) (14)N and (35)Cl NQR predictions in the case of RDX (C(3)H(6)N(6)O(6)), β-HMX (C(4)H(8)N(8)O(8)), α-NTO (C(2)H(2)N(4)O(3)) and AlOPCl(6). RDX, β-HMX and α-NTO are explosive compounds. PMID:20589728

  13. Mutual effect of ligands in nitrido and nitroso complexes of osmium and ruthenium from NQR data

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko. E.A.; Burtsev, M.Yu.; Sinitsyn, M.N.; Svetlov, A.A.; Kokunov, Ya.V.; Buslaev, A.

    1987-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study by NQR the spectral results of the mutual ligand effect in complex compounds having various types of short bonds. The authors obtained the /sup 35/Cl, /sup 81/Br, and /sup 127/I NQR spectra of a large number of halogen complexes of osmium and ruthenium having short Os=N and M in equilibrium NO bonds of the following types: R(OsNHal/sub 4/) (R = (Ph/sub 4/P)/sup +/, (Bu/sub 4/N)/sup +/; Hal = Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/), K/sub 2/(OsNCl/sub 5/), Rb/sub 2/(OsNBr/sub 5/), (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/(OsNBr/sub 5/), K(OsNHal/sub 4/L) (Hal = Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/; L = H/sub 2/O, CH/sub 3/CN), K/sub 2/(MNOHal/sub 5/) (M = Os, Ru; Hal = Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/). The experimental NQR values measured are connected by the Townes and Dailey theory with the chemical bond characteristics i, sigma, ..pi.., the degree of the ionic, the sigma-covalent, and the ..pi..-covalent natures respectively ( i + sigma + ..pi.. = 1).

  14. Local electric state of noncentrosymmetric superconductor Mo3Al2C revealed by Mo NQR and NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Y.; Kimura, Y.; Kumagai, K.; Bauer, E.; Rogl, G.; Rogl, P.

    2012-12-01

    Mo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements were performed on a noncentrosymmetric superconductor Mo3Al2C to investigate the local electronic state at Mo nuclei, which carries the electrons responsible for superconductivity. The NQR frequency, which is linked to the electric field gradient at Mo site, was determined from 95Mo NMR spectrum and the result was verified by the independent 97Mo NQR measurement. The experimentally obtained value is compared to the result of a point charge calculation to extract the EFG induced by conduction electrons and reveal the local electronic state.

  15. Dissociation dynamics of higher-order He2I35Cl(B,v? = 3) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darr, Joshua P.; Loomis, Richard A.

    2013-10-01

    The dissociation dynamics of He2I35Cl complexes prepared with varying amounts of intermolecular vibrational excitation within the 2He + I35Cl(B,v? = 3) potential energy surface are reported. For the intermolecular level associated with one He atom in an energetically excited, delocalized state and the other localized in the lowest-energy, T-shaped potential minimum, the higher-energy He atom dissociates preferentially. The binding energy of the ground-state He2I35Cl(X,v? = 0) conformer with a police nightstick geometry (one He atom in the T-shaped minimum and the second in the linear well) is measured to be 38.6(9) cm-1.

  16. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    PubMed

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K. PMID:9650797

  17. Pulsed Spin Locking in Spin-1 NQR: Broadening Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Michael W.

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a branch of magnetic resonance physics that allows for the detection of spin I > 1/2 nuclei in crystalline and semi-crystalline materials. Through the application of a resonant radio frequency (rf) pulse, the nuclei's response is to create an oscillating magnetic moment at a frequency unique to the target substance. This creates the NQR signal, which is typically weak and rapidly decaying. The decay is due to the various line broadening mechanisms, the relative strengths of which are functions of the specific material, in addition to thermal relaxation processes. Through the application of a series of rf pulses the broadening mechanisms can be refocused, narrowing the linewidth and extending the signal in time. Three line broadening mechanisms are investigated to explain the NQR signal's linewidth and behavior. The first, electric field gradient (EFG) inhomogeneity, is due to variations in the local electric environment among the target nuclei, for instance from crystal imperfections. While EFG inhomogeneity can vary between samples of the same chemical composition and structure, the other broadening mechanisms of homonuclear and heteronuclear dipolar coupling are specific to this composition and structure. Simple analytical models are developed that explain the NQR signal response to pulse sequences by accounting for the behavior of each broadening mechanism. After a general theoretical introduction, a model of pairs of spin-1 nuclei is investigated, and the refocusing behaviors of EFG and homonuclear dipolar coupling are analyzed. This reveals the conditions where EFG is refocused but homonuclear dipolar coupling is not. In this case the resulting signal shows a rapid decay, the rate of which becomes a measure of interatomic distances. This occurs even in the more complex case of a powder sample with its many randomly oriented crystallites, under particular pulsing conditions. Many target NQR compounds are rich in hydrogen, and therefore might have a significant heteronuclear dipolar coupling component. To incorporate this, a second model is developed composed of two different nuclear species, one spin 1 the other spin 1/2, although the work can be extended to additional spin species. This model reveals that heteronuclear dipolar coupling for this system behaves just like EFG broadening under spin locking, and that the strong homonuclear response is still observable. The experimental results closely match theoretical predictions, and the conclusions greatly expand the number of target substances that are suitable for this measurement technique of homonuclear dipolar coupling. The combined results explain why certain pulse sequences perform better than others for substance detection: it is because of the relative strengths of the line broadening mechanisms. Therefore the ability to measure homonuclear dipolar coupling's contribution to the linewidth is useful not only for material characterization, but also for substance detection. By explaining the conditions that reveal homonuclear coupling, we make it possible to measure the relative broadening strengths, increasing the efficiency of NQR in these roles.

  18. Isotope ratio of Cl NQR spin-lattice relaxation times in 1D hydrogen-bonding system of tetramethylpyrazine-chloranilic acid at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaji, Tetsuo

    2013-05-01

    The temperature dependences of spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 of 35Cl and 37Cl NQR were studied for the co-crystal of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) with chloranilic acid (H2ca), TMP-H2ca, in which one-dimensional hydrogen bonding is formed by alternate arrangement of TMP and H2ca. The isotope ratio 37Cl T 1 / 35Cl T 1 was determined to be 1.0 0.1 above ca. 290 K where a steep decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 with increasing temperature was observed. In this temperature range it is suggested that the relaxation is originated from the slow fluctuation of electric field gradient (EFG). Beside EFG fluctuation due to the external-charge-density fluctuation, the small angle reorientation of the quantization axis triggered by a proton transfer motion between N...H-O and N-H...O hydrogen bonding states is proposed.

  19. Solid-state NMR/NQR and first-principles study of two niobium halide cluster compounds.

    PubMed

    Perić, Berislav; Gautier, Régis; Pickard, Chris J; Bosiočić, Marko; Grbić, Mihael S; Požek, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Two hexanuclear niobium halide cluster compounds with a [Nb6X12](2+) (X=Cl, Br) diamagnetic cluster core, have been studied by a combination of experimental solid-state NMR/NQR techniques and PAW/GIPAW calculations. For niobium sites the NMR parameters were determined by using variable Bo field static broadband NMR measurements and additional NQR measurements. It was found that they possess large positive chemical shifts, contrary to majority of niobium compounds studied so far by solid-state NMR, but in accordance with chemical shifts of (95)Mo nuclei in structurally related compounds containing [Mo6Br8](4+) cluster cores. Experimentally determined δiso((93)Nb) values are in the range from 2,400 to 3,000 ppm. A detailed analysis of geometrical relations between computed electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors with respect to structural features of cluster units was carried out. These tensors on niobium sites are almost axially symmetric with parallel orientation of the largest EFG and the smallest CS principal axes (Vzz and δ33) coinciding with the molecular four-fold axis of the [Nb6X12](2+) unit. Bridging halogen sites are characterized by large asymmetry of EFG and CS tensors, the largest EFG principal axis (Vzz) is perpendicular to the X-Nb bonds, while intermediate EFG principal axis (Vyy) and the largest CS principal axis (δ11) are oriented in the radial direction with respect to the center of the cluster unit. For more symmetrical bromide compound the PAW predictions for EFG parameters are in better correspondence with the NMR/NQR measurements than in the less symmetrical chlorine compound. Theoretically predicted NMR parameters of bridging halogen sites were checked by (79/81)Br NQR and (35)Cl solid-state NMR measurements. PMID:24581866

  20. A Pulsed Spectrometer Designed for Feedback NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiano, J. L.; Ginsberg, M. D.

    2000-02-01

    A pulsed NQR spectrometer specifically designed to facilitate real-time tuning of pulse sequence parameters is described. A modular approach based on the interconnection of several rack-mounted blocks provides easy access to all spectrometer signals and simplifies the task of modifying the spectrometer design. We also present experimental data that demonstrates the ability of the spectrometer to increase the signal to noise ratio of NQR measurements by automatically adjusting the pulse width in the strong off-resonant comb pulse sequence.

  1. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  2. 14 N NQR spectrum of sildenafil citrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, David; Singh, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    The 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectrum of sildenafil citrate tablets has been recorded allowing the quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters of all six unique nitrogen atoms in its structure to be determined. A density function calculation gives results that are largely in agreement with the experimental values.

  3. Application of a dc SQUID to rf amplification: NQR

    SciTech Connect

    Hilbert, C.; Clarke, J.; Sleator, T.; Hahn, E.L.

    1985-05-01

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have been used for more than a decade for the detection of magnetic resonance. Until recently, these devices had mostly been confined to operation in the audiofrequency range, so that experiments have been restricted to measurements of resonance at low frequencies, or of changes in the static susceptibility of a sample induced by rf irradiation at the resonant frequency. However, the recent extension of the operating range of low noise dc SQUIDs to radiofrequencies (rf) allows one to detect magnetic resonance directly at frequencies up to several hundred megahertz. In this paper, we begin by summarizing the properties of dc SQUIDs as tuned rf amplifers. We then describe first, the development of a SQUID system for the detection of pulsed nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at about 30 MHz and second, a novel technique for observing magnetic resonances in the absence of any externally applied rf fields.

  4. A Computer-controlled, Fully Automatic NMR/NQR Double Resonance Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenye, Feng; Lcken, Edwin A. C.; Diolot, Jacques

    1992-02-01

    A completely automatic computer-controlled NMR/NQR double resonance spectrometer is described. It features automatic tuning of the low, variable frequency power amplifier, thus permitting untended use over long periods, with high sensitivity and signal reproducibility. The sample is transferred between the low-frequency, zero-field region and the high-field region using compressed air and the possibility of switching on a field of several tens of gauss during the transfer of the sample is also included

  5. Hydrogen chloride 37Cl/35Cl isotopic ratio field analyzer for the investigation of volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amato, Francesco; Burton, Mike; Chiarugi, Antonio; Viciani, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    We present a new analyzer for the in-field measurement of the isotopic ratio 37Cl/35Cl in the hydrogen chloride emitted by volcanoes, developed within the frame of the ERC Project CO2Volc (Grant 279802). The Project aims to the measurement of several molecular species in the volcanic plumes. The analyzer is based on molecular spectroscopy. The volcanic plume interacts in a multipass cell with two laser beams at suitable wavelengths. From the absorptions of the two beams by the two isotopologues the isotopic ratio is retrieved. We report here the results of the laboratory checks of the instrument, and the results of a measurement campaign carried out on Etna and Vulcano. The campaign aimed to verify not only the in-field performances of the analyzer but also to assess its robustness in such a hostile environment.

  6. Fission fragment mass distributions in 35Cl+Sm,154144 reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R.; Sodaye, S.; Sudarshan, K.; Nayak, B. K.; Jhingan, A.; Pujari, P. K.; Mahata, K.; Santra, S.; Saxena, A.; Mirgule, E. T.; Thomas, R. G.

    2015-08-01

    Background: A new type of asymmetric fission was observed in β -delayed fission of 180Tl [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 252502 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.252502] as symmetric mass distribution would be expected based on conventional shell effects leading to the formation of N =50 fragments. Following this observation, theoretical calculations were carried out which predict asymmetric mass distribution for several mercury isotopes around mass region of ˜180 at low and moderate excitation energies [Moller, Randrup, and Sierk, Phys. Rev. C 85, 024306 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.024306; Andreev, Adamian, and Antonenko, Phys. Rev. C 86, 044315 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.044315]. Studies on fission fragment mass distribution are required in this mass region to investigate this newly observed phenomenon. Purpose: The fission fragment mass distributions have been measured in 35Cl+Sm,154144 reactions at Elab=152.5 ,156.1 ,and 163.7 MeV populating compound nuclei in the mass region of ˜180 with variable excitation energy and neutron number to investigate the nature of mass distribution. Method: The fission fragment mass distribution has been obtained by measuring the "time of flight (TOF)" of fragments with respect to the beam pulse using two multiwire proportional counters placed at θlab=±65 .5∘ with respect to the beam direction. From the TOF of fragments, their velocities were determined, which were used to obtain mass distribution taking the compound nucleus as the fissioning system. Results: For both systems, mass distributions, although, appear to be symmetric, could not be fitted well by a single Gaussian. The deviation from a single Gaussian fit is more pronounced for the 35Cl+144Sm reaction. A clear flat top mass distribution has been observed for the 35Cl+144Sm reaction at the lowest beam energy. The mass distribution is very similar to that observed in the 40Ca+142Nd reaction, which populated a similar compound nucleus, but for the pronounced dip in the symmetric region [Phys. Rev. C 91, 064605 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevC.91.064605]. Conclusions: The present study shows that the mass distribution deviates from that expected on the basis of a pure liquid drop model in the mass region of ˜180, indicating a contribution from asymmetric fission. The contribution from asymmetric fission is more pronounced for the 35Cl+144Sm reaction as evident from the large deviation of the fission fragment mass distribution from the single Gaussian fit. This is consistent with the observation of an asymmetric component in the 40Ca+142Nd reaction in a recent study [Phys. Rev. C 91, 064605 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevC.91.064605]. The contribution from asymmetric component is also consistent with the theoretical predictions by Moller et al. [Phys. Rev. C 85, 024306 (2012)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.024306, although the magnitude of the effect appears to be smaller.

  7. Chlorine-35 NQR and 1H NMR study of guest structure and dynamics in the thiourea-hexachloroethane inclusion compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panich, A. M.; Krieger, Ju H.; Semenov, A. R.; Goren, S. D.; Chekhova, G. N.

    2000-07-01

    Atom-atomic potential calculation of the channel non-stoichiometric thiourea-hexachloroethane inclusion compound shows that the structure of the guest sublattice comprises two types of finite molecular chain, having different structure and separated by domain walls. In the present paper we present results of 35Cl NQR and 1H NMR measurements of thiourea-hexachloroethane, [2.95(NH2)2CS]C2Cl6, in the temperature range from 7.5 to 90 K, which confirm this model and show the existence of such a state at least below 60 K. Two resonances in the NQR spectra were assigned to the two nearly commensurate regions, while the third resonance, showing an anomalous behaviour, was attributed to the guest molecules in the domain wall. The observed structure results from the different periodicity of the guest and host substructures and shows a difference from conventional continuum models of the incommensurate state. Propagation motion of the domain wall over the channel is discussed.

  8. 93Nb- and 27Al-NMR/NQR studies of the praseodymium based PrNb2Al20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Tetsuro; Kotegawa, Hisashi; Tou, Hideki; Higashinaka, Ryuji; Nakama, Akihiro; Aoki, Yuji; Sato, Hideyuki

    2015-03-01

    We report a study of 93Nb- and 27Al-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) in a praseodymium based compound PrNb2Al20. The observed NMR line at around 3 T and 30 K shows a superposition of typical powder patterns of one Nb signal and at least two Al signals. 93Nb-NMR line could be reproduced by using the previously reported NQR frequency ?Q ? 1.8MHz and asymmetry parameter ? ? 0 [Kubo T et al 2014 JPS Conf. Proc. 3 012031]. From 27Al-NMR/NQR, NQR parameters are obtained to be ?Q,A ? 1.53 MHz, and ?A ? 0.20 for the site A, and ?Q,B ? 2.28 MHz, and ?B ? 0.17 for the site B. By comparing this result with the previous 27Al-NMR study of PrT2Al20 (T = Ti, V) [Tokunaga Y et al 2013 Phys. Rev. B 88 085124], these two Al site are assigned to the two of three crystallographycally inequivalent Al sites.

  9. Two-dimensional proton-detected (35)Cl/(1)H correlation solid-state NMR experiment under fast magic angle sample spinning: application to pharmaceutical compounds.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Kato, Hiroshi; Ishii, Yuji; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-02-17

    The determination of structure of hydrochloride salts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (HCl APIs) utilizing (35)Cl solid-state NMR studies has been of considerable interest in the recent past. Until now these studies relied on the (35)Cl direct observation method which has its own limitations in terms of the sensitivity and resolution due to the quadrupolar nature and the low gyromagnetic ratio of (35)Cl. In this contribution we demonstrate the two-dimensional (2D) (35)Cl/(1)H correlation measurement by using the proton detection-based (indirect observation of (35)Cl via(1)H) approach under fast magic angle sample spinning (MAS: 70 kHz). The main advantages of this approach over the direct observation method are highlighted in the present study. We have employed heteronuclear magnetization transfer through the recoupling of (35)Cl-(1)H heteronuclear dipolar interactions. The applicability of (35)Cl indirect detection method is first demonstrated on hydrochloride salts of amino acids, l-tyrosineHCl and l-histidineHClH2O following which the 2D (35)Cl/(1)H correlations are obtained for HCl APIs, procainamide HCl (Proc) and aminoguanidine HCl (Amin). On the basis of separation between the central transition (CT) and satellite transition (ST) peaks, and the shape/width of CT powder patterns, it is also shown that the quadrupolar parameters which are useful for the elucidation of the molecular structure can be determined. Moreover, the (35)Cl/(1)H correlations provide the precise determination of (1)H chemical shifts of nearby (35)Cl nuclei. PMID:26852884

  10. Numerical simulation of NQR/NMR: Applications in quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Possa, Denimar; Gaudio, Anderson C; Freitas, Jair C C

    2011-04-01

    A numerical simulation program able to simulate nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments is presented, written using the Mathematica package, aiming especially applications in quantum computing. The program makes use of the interaction picture to compute the effect of the relevant nuclear spin interactions, without any assumption about the relative size of each interaction. This makes the program flexible and versatile, being useful in a wide range of experimental situations, going from NQR (at zero or under small applied magnetic field) to high-field NMR experiments. Some conditions specifically required for quantum computing applications are implemented in the program, such as the possibility of use of elliptically polarized radiofrequency and the inclusion of first- and second-order terms in the average Hamiltonian expansion. A number of examples dealing with simple NQR and quadrupole-perturbed NMR experiments are presented, along with the proposal of experiments to create quantum pseudopure states and logic gates using NQR. The program and the various application examples are freely available through the link http://www.profanderson.net/files/nmr_nqr.php. PMID:21324720

  11. New Accurate Wavenumbers of H35Cl^+ and H37Cl^+ Rovibrational Transitions in the v=0-1 Band of the ^2? State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domenech, Jose Luis; Cueto, Maite; Herrero, Victor Jose; Tanarro, Isabel; Cernicharo, Jose; Drouin, Brian

    2015-06-01

    HCl^+ is a key intermediate in the interstellar chemistry of chlorine. It has been recently identified in space from Herschel's spectra and it has also been detected in the laboratory through its optical emission, infrared and mm-wave spectra. Now that Hershchel is decomissioned, further astrophysical studies on this radical ion will likely rely on ground-based observations in the mid-infrared. We have used a difference frequency laser spectrometer coupled to a hollow cathode discharge to measure the absorption spectrum of H35Cl^+ and H37Cl^+ in the v=0-1 band of the ^2? state with Dopppler limited resolution. The accuracy of the individual measurements ( 10 MHz (3?)) relies on a solid state wavemeter referenced to an iodine-stabilized Ar^+ laser. The new data are being fit using the CALPGM software from JPL, and the current status will be presented. M. De Luca et al., Astrophys. J. Lett. 751, L37 (2012) W. D. Sheasley and C. W. Mathews, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 47, 420 (1973) P. B. Davies, P. A. Hamilton, B. A. Johnson, Mol. Phys. 57, 217 (1986) H. Gupta, B. J. Drouin, and J. C. Pearson, Astrophys. J. Lett. 751, L37 (2012)

  12. Prediction of P-branch emission spectral lines of NaF and 63Cu35Cl molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yonghong; Sun, Weiguo; Zhang, Yi; Fu, Jia; Fan, Qunchao; Li, Huidong; Feng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The analytical formula derived by Sun et al. in 2011 and used to predict the rotational lines for rovibrational diatomic systems is improved in this study. The new formula is obtained by adding a higher order spectral term Hυ that is neglected in our previous expression. A physical requirement is also added to the converging process to minimize the possible error of the predicted rotational line. All these are applied to study some rovibrational transition systems of 63Cu35Cl and NaF molecules. The results indicate that the accuracy of the P-branch rotational lines predicted by this new formula is about one order of magnitude better than the results obtained using the previous formula, and that both the small Hυ contribution and the improved converging requirement may play a vital role in predicting the high-lying rovibrational energies and the rotational lines. Comparisons between physical predictions and mathematical extrapolations on the rotational lines are also given.

  13. NQR study of local structures and cooling rate dependent superconductivity in La sub 2 CuO sub 4+. delta

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, A.P.; Ahrens, E.T.; Hammel, P.C.; Heffner, R.H.; Thompson, J.D.; Canfield, P.C.; Fisk, Z. ); Schirber, J.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Structural properties of oxygen-annealed polycrystals of La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4 + {delta}} ({delta}{approximately}0.03) have been studied using {sup 139}La NQR spectroscopy. Superconducting critical temperatures were found to depend on the rate of cooling through a narrow temperature range at about 195K. Preliminary analysis of the {sup 139}La NQR spectra suggest that the oxygen-rich phase-separated region is composed of two structurally distinct phases, both of which are metallic and super-conducting. One phase has a structure closely related to the stoichiometric oxygen-poor compound. The second shows a considerable amount of apical oxygen disorder, a large shift in NQR frequency {nu}{sub Q}, and a volume fraction which increases with cooling rate. The formation of the second phase below {minus}200K is indicative of the freezing Of CuO{sub 6} octahedral tilting. Abrupt shifts in {nu}{sub Q} above {Tc} were also observed for both phases, suggestive of a local structural anomaly or charge transfer to the Cu-O plane.

  14. NQR experiments on Sc-Y alloys at very low temperatures. [Absolute thermometry below 500[mu]K

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, L.; Smith, E.N.; Richardson, R.C. )

    1992-10-01

    The authors performed Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments on an alloy of scandium and yttrium. They find that the characteristic resonance frequencies in zero external field are 50% larger than in pure scandium. This increase in frequency makes the Sc-Y alloy a better candidate for absolute thermometry below 500 [mu]K. However, the spin-lattice relaxation time of this alloy is more than an order of magnitude longer than in the pure scandium. In addition, an abrupt increase in the Korringa constant was observed for temperatures below 5mK.

  15. sup 35 Cl and sup 1 H NMR study of anion binding to reduced bovine copper-zinc superoxide dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Mota de Freitas, D.; Ramasamy, R. ); Ming, Lijune; Valentine, J.S. )

    1990-09-05

    Binding of chloride to reduced bovine copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 2}SOD) and chemically modified derivatives was monitored by the line width at half-height of the Cl{sup {minus}} resonance as measured by {sup 35}Cl nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Reduced arginine-modified and reduced lysine-modified Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 2}SOD (at concentrations of 2.14 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M) caused less broadening of the Cl{sup {minus}} resonance line width of 0.1 M NaCl solutions than did reduced native protein when measured under the same conditions; Cl{sup {minus}} broadening with all protein derivatives decreased drastically in the presence of 0.05 M phosphate. The C-H and N-H proton resonances of histidyl imidazoles of reduced native and reduced lysine-modified Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 2}SOD were shifted by addition of Cl{sup {minus}} (with apparent affinity constants of 12 and {approximately} 2 M{sup {minus}1}, respectively) whereas this anion had less effect in the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of reduced arginine-modified Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 2}SOD (affinity constant <2 M{sup {minus}1}) under the same conditions. phosphate caused relatively smaller changes on the {sup 1}H NMR resonances of all reduced protein derivatives. The competition measured by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy between chloride and phosphate for anion binding sites in the neighborhood of the Cu{sup 1} ion was much less than that for nonspecific Cl{sup {minus}} binding monitored by {sup 35}Cl NMR spectroscopy. It is concluded from these experiments that, in addition to the weak anion binding at or near the Cu{sup I} ion, Arg-141, Lys-120, and Lys-134 serve as major anion binding sites in the reduced native protein. 57 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Fragmentation Cross Sections of Medium-Energy 35Cl, 40Ar, and 48TiBeams on Elemental Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, C.; Guetersloh, S.; Heilbronn, L.; Miller, J.; Fukumura,A.; Iwata, Y.; Murakami, T.; Sihver, L.; Mancusi, D.

    2007-12-08

    Charge-changing and fragment production cross sections at 0degrees have been obtained for interactions of 290, 400, and 650MeV/nucleon 40Ar beams, 650 and 1000 MeV/nucleon 35Cl beams, and a 1000MeV/nucleon 48Ti beam. Targets of C, CH2, Al, Cu, Sn, and Pb were used.Using standard analysis methods, we obtain fragment cross sections forcharges as low as 8 for Cl and Ar beams, and as low as 10 for the Tibeam. Using data obtained with small-acceptance detectors, we reportfragment production cross sections for charges as low as 5, corrected foracceptance using a simple model of fragment angular distributions. Withthe lower-charged fragment cross sections, we cancompare the data topredictions from several models (including NUCFRG2, EPAX2, and PHITS) ina region largely unexplored in earlier work. As found in earlier workwith other beams, NUCFRG2 and PHITS predictions agree reasonably wellwith the data for charge-changing cross sections, but do not accuratelypredict the fragment production cross sections. The cross sections forthe lightest fragments demonstrate the inadequacy of several models inwhich the cross sections fall monotonically with the charge of thefragment. PHITS, despite not agreeing particularly well with the fragmentproduction cross sections on average, nonetheless qualitativelyreproduces somesignificant features of the data that are missing from theother models.

  17. Prediction of P-branch emission spectral lines of NaF and (63)Cu(35)Cl molecules.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yonghong; Sun, Weiguo; Zhang, Yi; Fu, Jia; Fan, Qunchao; Li, Huidong; Feng, Hao

    2016-01-15

    The analytical formula derived by Sun et al. in 2011 and used to predict the rotational lines for rovibrational diatomic systems is improved in this study. The new formula is obtained by adding a higher order spectral term H? that is neglected in our previous expression. A physical requirement is also added to the converging process to minimize the possible error of the predicted rotational line. All these are applied to study some rovibrational transition systems of (63)Cu(35)Cl and NaF molecules. The results indicate that the accuracy of the P-branch rotational lines predicted by this new formula is about one order of magnitude better than the results obtained using the previous formula, and that both the small H? contribution and the improved converging requirement may play a vital role in predicting the high-lying rovibrational energies and the rotational lines. Comparisons between physical predictions and mathematical extrapolations on the rotational lines are also given. PMID:26296252

  18. 14N NQR and relaxation in ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, David

    2015-04-01

    The complete 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectrum of ammonium nitrate is presented recorded using two double resonance techniques - double contact cross relaxation and zero field NQR. The spectra gave the quadrupole coupling constant (Qcc) and asymmetry parameter ( ?) values for the nitro of 611 kHz, 0.229 and that for the ammonium nitrogen of 242 kHz, 0.835. The three relaxation transition probabilities have been determined for both the nitro and ammonium nitrogen atoms. The bi-exponential relaxation times (T 1) were measured at 295 K. The values for nitro are 16.9 s and 10.5 s and that of the ammonium are 23.0 s and 16.4 s.

  19. NMR and NQR study of the thermodynamically stable quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastri, A.

    1995-02-10

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 61,65}Cu NMR measurements are reported for powder samples of stable AlCuFe and AlCuRu icosahedral quasicrystals and their crystalline approximants, and for a AlPdMn single grain quasicrystal. Furthermore, {sup 27}Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K have been observed in the AlCuFe and AlCuRu samples. From the quadrupole perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from the zero field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal axis system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 AlCuFe approximant was successful in explaining the observed NQR spectra. It is concluded that the average local gradient is largely determined by the p-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to the lattice contribution to the EFG. Comparison of {sup 63}Cu NMR with {sup 27}Al NMR shows that the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but that the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more s-type wave function of the conduction electrons.

  20. A new dedicated ?-NMR/?-NQR setup for LISE-GANIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rydt, M.; Lozeva, R.; Vermeulen, N.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Grvy, S.; Himpe, P.; Stdel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Vingerhoets, P.; Neyens, G.

    2009-12-01

    A new ?-NMR/?-NQR setup is developed to study nuclear magnetic dipole moments and electric quadrupole moments at the LISE fragment separator at GANIL. Two key elements make the new design very powerful: the homogeneous magnet and the strong radio-frequency amplifier. The combination of both makes it possible to examine a broad spectrum of magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments. Several factors have an influence on the detection efficiency and on the sensitivity of the setup to observe a resonant change in the ?-asymmetry: the thickness and the tilting angle of the implantation crystal, the material in the vacuum chamber, the applied magnetic field and the Q?-value of the decaying nuclei. A detailed study of these effects is made using a dedicated GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code.

  1. Beta-detected NQR in zero field with a low energy beam of 8Li+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Z.; Kiefl, R. F.; Chow, K. H.; MacFarlane, W. A.; Kreitzman, S. R.; Arseneau, D. J.; Daviel, S.; Levy, C. D. P.; Maeno, Y.; Poutissou, R.

    2006-03-01

    Beta-detected nuclear quadrupole resonances ( ?-NQR) in zero field are observed using a beam of low energy highly polarized radioactive Li+8. The resonances were detected in SrTiO 3, Al 2O 3 and Sr 2RuO 4 single crystals by monitoring the beta-decay anisotropy as a function of a small audio frequency magnetic field. The resonances show clearly that Li+8 occupies one site with non-cubic symmetry in SrTiO 3, two in Al 2O 3 and three sites in Sr 2RuO 4. The resonance amplitude and width are surprisingly large compared to the values expected from transitions between the |2>?|1> spin states, indicating a significant mixing between the |m> quadrupolar split levels.

  2. 35C NQR studies in 2,4,6-,2,3,6-, and 2,3,4-trichloro anisoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukmani, K.; Ramakrishna, J.

    1985-02-01

    The chlorine-35 NQR frequencies and their temperature variation in 2,4,6-, 2,3,6- and 2,3,4-trichloro anisoles have been studied and compared with the corresponding chlorophenols with a view to studying the effect of hydrogen bonding. The observed frequencies have been assigned to the various chlorines with the help of the additive model of the substituent effect. The temperature dependence has been analysed in terms of the BayerKushidaBrown models. The torsional frequencies and their temperature dependence have been calculated numerically under a two mode approximation. A comparison of the trichloro anisoles with the corresponding trichloro phenols has shown that the resonance frequency decreases due to hydrogen bonding while the torsional frequencies are not affected.

  3. Part I. Analyzing the distribution of gas law questions in chemistry textbooks. Part II. Chlorine-35 NQR spectra of group 1 and silver dichloromethanesulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, Gabriel

    Part I. Two studies involving the gas law questions in eight high school and Advanced Placement/college chemistry textbooks were performed using loglinear analysis to look for associations among six variables. These variables included Bloom's Taxonomy (higher-order, lower-order), Book Type (high school, college), Question Format (multiple-choice, problem, short answer), Question Placement (in-chapter, end-of-chapter, test bank), Representation (macroscopic, microscopic, symbolic), and Arkansas Science Standard (conceptual, mathematical; gas laws, pressure conversion, stoichiometry). The first study, involving the conceptual gas law questions, found the Book Type and Question Placement variables had the biggest impact, each appearing in 5 of the 11 significant associations. The second study, involving the mathematical gas law questions, found the Question Placement had the biggest impact, appearing in 7 of the 11 significant associations, followed by Book Type and the Arkansas Science Standard variables, which appeared in 5 of the 11 significant associations. These studies showed that compared to the high school books, college books have fewer multiple-choice questions (compared to short-answer and problem questions), fewer in-chapter questions (compared to end-of-chapter and test bank questions), fewer questions in the chapters and more questions at the end of the chapters and fewer multiple-choice questions in and at the end of the books and more multiple-choice questions in the test banks. Part II. The dichloromethanesulfonate salts of several +1 charged cations, M+Cl2CHSO3 - (M = Li, Na, K, Rb Ag, Cs Tl) were synthesized and studied by 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Dichloromethanesulfonic acid was prepared by the methanolysis of dichloromethanesulfonyl chloride, which was neutralized with the metal carbonates to produce the corresponding metal dichloromethanesulfonate salts. This study completed the NQR investigation of the family of chloroacetates and chloromethanesulfonates of silver. The study suggests that the ability of organochlorine atoms to coordinate to silver ions decreases as the number of electron-withdrawing groups attached to carbon atom bound to the coordinating chlorine atom increases. The unusually large NQR spectral width found among M+Cl2CHCO2 - salts are not present among M+Cl2CHSO 3- salts and does not appear to be generally characteristic of the dichloromethyl family of salts.

  4. Formation of a necklike structure in {sup 35}Cl+{sup 12}C and {sup 197}Au reactions at 43 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Larochelle, Y.; Gingras, L.; Beaulieu, L.; Qian, X.; Saddiki, Z.; Djerroud, B.; Dore, D.; Laforest, R.; Roy, R.; Samri, M.; St-Pierre, C.; Ball, G.C.; Bowman, D.R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Hagberg, E.; Horn, D.; Lopez, J.A.; Robinson, T.

    1997-04-01

    The experimental signature of the formation of a necklike structure, with a velocity between that of the projectilelike emitter and that of the targetlike emitter, is investigated with the same beam and experimental setup for targets lighter and heavier than the projectile. The reactions are {sup 35}Cl on {sup 12}C and on {sup 197}Au at 43 MeV/nucleon. Particle velocity distributions are compared with two-source statistical simulations and the presence of a necklike structure is inferred from the data. In the second part of the paper, dynamical model simulations with the formation of a necklike structure are presented for the {sup 35}Cl+{sup 12}C system at 43 MeV/nucleon. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Polymorphism and disorder in natural active ingredients. Low and high-temperature phases of anhydrous caffeine: Spectroscopic ((1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR/(14)N NQR) and solid-state computational modelling (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) study.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Apih, Tomaž; Gregorovič, Alan; Latosińska, Magdalena; Olejniczak, Grzegorz Andrzej; Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia

    2016-03-31

    The polymorphism of anhydrous caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine; 1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-(3H,7H)-dione) has been studied by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) double resonance and pure (14)N NQR (Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) followed by computational modelling (Density Functional Theory, supplemented Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules with Reduced Density Gradient) in solid state. For two stable (phase II, form β) and metastable (phase I, form α) polymorphs the complete NQR spectra consisting of 12 lines were recorded. The assignment of signals detected in experiment to particular nitrogen sites was verified with the help of DFT. The shifts of the NQR frequencies, quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters at each nitrogen site due to polymorphic transition were evaluated. The strongest shifts were observed at N(3) site, while the smallest at N(9) site. The commercial pharmaceutical sample was found to contain approximately 20-25% of phase I and 75-80% of phase II. The orientational disorder in phase II with a local molecular arrangement mimics that in phase I. Substantial differences in the intermolecular interaction phases I and II of caffeine were analysed using computational (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) approach. The analysis of local environment of each nitrogen nucleus permitted drawing some conclusions on the topology of interactions in both polymorphs. For the most stable orientations in phase I and phase II the maps of the principal component qz of EFG tensor and its asymmetry parameter at each point of the molecular system were calculated and visualized. The relevant maps calculated for both phases I and II indicates small variation in electrostatic potential upon phase change. Small differences between packings in phases slightly disturb the neighbourhood of the N(1) and N(7) nitrogens, thus are meaningless from the biological point of view. The composition of two phases in pharmaceutical material should not be any obstacle, which is relevant from the pharmaceutical industry point of view. PMID:26826282

  6. Chemical structure and intra-molecular effects on NMR-NQR tensors of harmine and harmaline alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadinejad, Neda; Tahan, Arezoo; Talebi Tari, Mostafa

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to analyze the effects of molecular structure and ring currents on the NMR chemical shielding tensors and NQR frequencies of harmine and harmaline alkaloids in the gas phase. The results demonstrated that NMR tensors and NQR frequencies of 15N nuclei in these compounds depend on chemical environment and resonance interactions. Hence, their values are obviously different in the mentioned structures. The interpretation of natural bond orbital (NBO) data suggests that in harmine structure, the lone pair participation of N9 in π-system electron clouds causes to development of aromaticity nature in pyrrole ring. However, the chemical shielding around N9 atom in harmine structure is higher than in harmaline, while in harmaline structure, lone pair participation of N2 in π-system electron clouds causes to development of aromaticity nature in pyridine ring. Hence, chemical shielding around N2 atom in harmaline structure is higher than in harmine. It can be deduced that by increasing lone pair electrons contribution of nitrogen atoms in ring resonance interactions and aromaticity development, the values of NMR chemical shielding around them increase, while χ and q zz values of these nuclei decrease.

  7. Optimization of NQR Pulse Parameters using Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiano, J. L.; Blauch, A. J.; Ginsberg, M. D.

    2000-02-01

    A new method for increasing the probability of detecting nuclear resonance signals is demon-strated experimentally. It is well known that the detection of signals with a low signal to noise ratio (SNR) results in missed detections of false alarms. In situations where the noise is correlated or where limited data is averaging, it may not be possible to achieve a desired SNR through averaging alone. We present an alternative approach in which a feedback algorithm automatically adjusts pulse parameters so that the SNR and probability of correct detection are increased. Experimental results are presented for the detection of 14N NQR signals.

  8. Absence of Magnetic Dipolar Phase Transition and Evolution of Low-Energy Excitations in PrNb2Al20 with Crystal Electric Field ?3 Ground State: Evidence from 93Nb-NQR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Tetsuro; Kotegawa, Hisashi; Tou, Hideki; Higashinaka, Ryuji; Nakama, Akihiro; Aoki, Yuji; Sato, Hideyuki

    2015-07-01

    We report measurements of bulk magnetic susceptibility and 93Nb nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) in the Pr-based caged compound PrNb2Al20. By analyzing the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization, the crystal electric field (CEF) level scheme of PrNb2Al20 is determined to be ?3(0 K)-?4(21.32 K)-?5(43.98 K)-?1(51.16 K) within the framework of the localized 4f electron picture. The 93Nb-NQR spectra exhibit neither spectral broadening nor spectral shift upon cooling down to 75 mK. The 93Nb-NQR spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 at 5 K depends on the frequency and remains almost constant below 5 K. The frequency dependence of 1/T1 is attributed to the magnetic fluctuation due to the hyperfine-enhanced 141Pr nuclear moment inherent in the nonmagnetic ?3 CEF ground state. The present NQR results provide evidence that no symmetry-breaking magnetic dipole order occurs down to 75 mK. Also, considering an invariant form of the quadrupole and octupole couplings between a 93Nb nucleus and Pr 4f electrons, Pr 4f quadrupoles and an octupole can couple with a 93Nb nuclear quadrupole moment and nuclear spin, respectively. Together with the results of bulk measurements, the present NQR results suggest that the possibility of a static quadrupole or octupole ordering can be excluded down to 100 mK. At low temperatures below 500 mK, however, the nuclear spin-echo decay rate gradually increases and the decay curve changes from Gaussian decay to Lorentzian decay, suggesting the evolution of a low-energy excitation.

  9. NMR shielding and spin-rotation constants of 175LuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I) molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation demonstrates the relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants and shielding spans of 175LuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I) molecules. The results are obtained from calculations performed using density functional theory (non-relativistic and four-component relativistic) and coupled-cluster calculations. The spin-rotation constants are compared with available experimental values. In most of the molecules studied, relativistic effects make an order of magnitude difference on the NMR absolute shielding constants.

  10. A computational NQR study on the hydrogen-bonded lattice of cytosine-5-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Hadipour, Nasser L

    2008-04-15

    A computational study at the level of density functional theory (DFT) employing 6-311++G** standard basis set was carried out to evaluate nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy parameters in cytosine-5-acetic acid (C5AA). Since the electric field gradient (EFG) tensors are very sensitive to the electrostatic environment at the sites of quadruple nuclei, the most possible interacting molecules with the target one were considered in a five-molecule model system of C5AA using X-ray coordinates transforming. The hydrogen atoms positions were optimized and two model systems of original and H-optimized C5AA were considered in NQR calculations. The calculated EFG tensors at the sites of (17)O, (14)N, and (2)H nuclei were converted to their experimentally measurable parameters, quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters. The evaluated NQR parameters reveal that the nuclei in original and H-optimized systems contribute to different hydrogen bonding (HB) interaction. The comparison of calculated parameters between optimized isolated gas-phase and crystalline monomer also shows the relationship between the structural deformation and NQR parameters in C5AA. The basis set superposition error (BSSE) calculations yielded no significant errors for employed basis set in the evaluation of NQR parameters. All the calculations were performed by Gaussian 98 package of program. PMID:17926341

  11. Experimental study of the structure of chalcogenide glassy semiconductors in three-component systems of Ge-As-Se and As-Sb-Se by means of NQR and EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolebrukh, Olga; Sinyavsky, Nikolay; Korneva, Irina; Dobosz, Bernadeta; Ostafin, Michal; Nogaj, Boleslaw; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard

    2013-12-01

    The structure of chalcogenide glassy semiconductors in three-component systems of Ge-As-Se and As-Sb-Se has been studied by means of both NQR (nuclear quadrupole resonance) and EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) spectroscopy. It is investigated that in the glasses of both systems the value of the electric field gradient at the resonating nuclei grows with increasing concentration of the clusters As2Se3 and Sb2Se3, thereby increasing the NQR resonance frequencies. It appears that for the Ge-As-Se system the structural transition from a two-dimensional to three-dimensional structure occurs at average coordination number bar r = 2.45. The EPR spectral parameters of glasses depend on the composition, the average coordination number and the temperature, and these are discussed. The effect of "ageing" for CGS (chalcogenide glassy semiconductors) of As-Sb-Se system due to partial crystallization of the sample is observed from the EPR spectra.

  12. Jun2006 Years of Nmr/nqr Experiments in Solid Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Detlef

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments in solid electrolytes started around 1975 when a new interest arose in solids with high ionic conductivity. The emphasis of this revue is on experiments rather than theoretical issues. We will present typical NMR/NQR studies which demonstrate the power of these techniques to elucidate dynamic and static behavior of these solids at a microscopic level. Because of the overwhelming wealth of results accumulated in the last 30 years, we will be limited to some characteristic examples.

  13. 127I NQR, 1H NMR and crystal structure of a novel compound, guanidinium heptaiodomercurate(II) [C(NH 2) 3] 3Hg 2I 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, Hiromitsu; Kai, Yoshihiko; Gesing, Thorsten M.; Ishihara, Hideta; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Gowda, B. Thimme

    2009-08-01

    The crystal structure of [C(NH 2) 3] 3Hg 2I 7 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/ c with a = 10.301(2), b = 11.919(2), c = 22.143(4) , ? = 100.50(3), and Z = 4. The asymmetric unit of the structure consists of an Hg 2I 73- anion and three guanidinium cations [C(NH 2) 3] +. The Hg 2I 73- anion is composed of two distorted HgI 4 tetrahedra which share an apex of I(4) atom and are related to each other by the C 2 axis. The lengths of the four Hg-I bonds of the tetrahedron are different, the longest being the bridging Hg-I(4) bond. In accordance with the crystal structure, four 127I NQR resonance lines have been observed and are assigned to m = 1/2 ? 3/2 transitions. With decreasing temperature one line assigned to the bridging I(4) atom faded out around 250 K. The temperature dependence of 1H NMR T1 has been analyzed by postulating the C 3 reorientations of two crystallographically independent cations with the BPP and the Arrhenius type relations. The hydrogen bond interactions N-H⋯I are important in the architecture of the crystal structure, which manifest themselves on the differences in the Hg-I bond lengths, in the NQR frequencies, and in the activation energies of the cation reorientations.

  14. Determination of molecular stopping cross section of 12C, 16O, 28Si, 35Cl, 58Ni, 79Br, and 127I in silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barradas, N. P.; Bergmaier, A.; Mizohata, K.; Msimanga, M.; Risnen, J.; Sajavaara, T.; Simon, A.

    2015-10-01

    Silicon nitride is a technologically important material in a range of applications due to a combination of important properties. Ion beam analysis techniques, and in particular, heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis can be used to determine the stoichiometry of silicon nitride films, which often deviates from the ideal Si3N4, as well as the content of impurities such as hydrogen, even in the presence of other materials or in a matrix containing heavier elements. Accurate quantification of IBA results depends on the basic data used in the data analysis. Quantitative depth profiling relies on the knowledge of the stopping power cross sections of the materials studied for the ions involved, which in the case of HI-ERDA is both the primary beam, and the recoiled species. We measured the stopping cross section of 12C, 16O, 28Si, 35Cl, 58Ni, 79Br, and 127I in a well-characterised silicon nitride membrane. The measurements were made by independent groups utilising different experimental setups and methods. In some cases there is extensive overlap of the energy range in different experiments, allowing a comparison of the different results. The four independent data sets reported in this work are in excellent agreement with each other, in the cases where similar energy ranges were measured. On the other hand, the data are in most cases higher than calculations made with the interpolative schemes SRIM and MSTAR together with the Bragg rule. Better agreement is found with MSTAR in some of the cases studied. This work is a significant extension of the heavy ion stopping power data base for silicon nitride.

  15. The Conformational Changes Induced by Ubiquinone Binding in the Na+-pumping NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) Are Kinetically Controlled by Conserved Glycines 140 and 141 of the NqrB Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Madeleine; Juárez, Oscar; Neehaul, Yashvin; Cook, Darcie A.; Barquera, Blanca; Hellwig, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Na+-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is responsible for maintaining a sodium gradient across the inner bacterial membrane. This respiratory enzyme, which couples sodium pumping to the electron transfer between NADH and ubiquinone, is not present in eukaryotes and as such could be a target for antibiotics. In this paper it is shown that the site of ubiquinone reduction is conformationally coupled to the NqrB subunit, which also hosts the final cofactor in the electron transport chain, riboflavin. Previous work showed that mutations in conserved NqrB glycine residues 140 and 141 affect ubiquinone reduction and the proper functioning of the sodium pump. Surprisingly, these mutants did not affect the dissociation constant of ubiquinone or its analog HQNO (2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide) from Na+-NQR, which indicates that these residues do not participate directly in the ubiquinone binding site but probably control its accessibility. Indeed, redox-induced difference spectroscopy showed that these mutations prevented the conformational change involved in ubiquinone binding but did not modify the signals corresponding to bound ubiquinone. Moreover, data are presented that demonstrate the NqrA subunit is able to bind ubiquinone but with a low non-catalytically relevant affinity. It is also suggested that Na+-NQR contains a single catalytic ubiquinone binding site and a second site that can bind ubiquinone but is not active. PMID:25006248

  16. Nuclear quadrupole relaxation in chlorates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzak, J.; Pietrzak, J.

    Sodium, barium and silver chlorates have been subjected to NQR investigations, Measurements of the 35Cl pure quadrupole resonance frequency and relaxation times were carried out in the temperature range from 290 K to temperatures where the NQR signal vanishes. It was found, that temperature dependence of the T 1 indicates some activation processes. The hindered rotation of ClO 3 groups and the water diffusion are playing an essential role in the description of phenomena occuring in these crystals.

  17. 75As-NQR study of the hybridization gap semiconductor CeOs4As12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogi, M.; Higa, N.; Niki, H.; Kawata, T.; Sekine, C.

    2016-02-01

    We performed an 75As nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurement on CeOs4As12. The 75As-NQR spectrum shape demonstrates that the Ce-site filling fraction of our high-pressure synthesized sample is close to unity. A presence of the c — f hybridization gap is confirmed from the temperature dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1. An increase of 1/T1 below ∼3 K indicates a development of the spin fluctuations. The 1/T1 for CeOs4As12 shows similar behavior as that for CeOs4Sb12 with different magnitude of the c — f hybridization gap. An absence of phase transition in CeOs4As12 may be caused by the increase of the c — f hybridization, which increases the gap magnitude and reduces the residual density of state inside the gap.

  18. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Ru-NQR studies on filled skutterudite compounds RRu4P12 (R=La,Nd,Sm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, S.; Mito, T.; Takemura, M.; Wada, S.; Harima, H.; Kikuchi, D.; Sato, H.; Sugawara, H.; Takeda, N.; Zheng, G.-q.

    2008-04-01

    We report nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies on Ru-sites of filled skutterudite compounds RRu4P12 (R=La,Nd,Sm) in zero magnetic field. For NdRu4P12, the Ru101-NQR signal disappears below TC=1.6 K, which is indicative of the transformation into the ferromagnetically ordered ground state. For SmRu4P12, a single Ru101-NQR line splits into two lines below the metal-insulator transition temperature TMI=16.5 K with the intensity ratio of 3:1. This result gives evidence that there are two inequivalent Ru-sites with different electric field gradient. The intensity ratio leads to a conclusion that the symmetry is lowered below TMI from a cubic Im3bar space group to a trigonal R3bar one.

  20. Cu NQR study of charge localization in HgBa2CuO4+? with different oxygen content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gippius, A. A.; Antipov, E. V.; Hoffmann, W.; Lders, K.

    1996-02-01

    Variation of the oxygen content ? in HgBa2CuO4+?(1201) provides a good opportunity to study the influence of oxygen doping on nuclear quadrupole interactions (NQI) and charge localization in different regions of (Tc-?) phase diagram. We performed63,65Cu NQR of series HgBa2CuO4+? samples with different oxygen content ?.

  1. Measurement of in-situ stress in salt and rock using NQR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Schempp, E.; Hirschfeld, T.; Klainer, S.

    1980-12-01

    A discussion of how stress and strain affect the quantities which can be measured in an NQR experiment shows that, for stresses of the magnitude to be expected at depths up to about 10,000 feet, quadrupole coupling constants will fall in the range of 1 to 10 kHz for both the sodium and chloride ions in NaCl. The most promising system involves pulsed nuclear double resonance detection; and alterative is to observe the quadrupolar splitting of the NMR signal. Choices to be made in the measurement and mapping techniques are discussed. The well-known perturbation of the homogenous stress field in the neighborhood of a borehole is shown to be advantageous from the point of view of obtaining directional information on the stress. Construction and operation of a borehole stress sensor are considered. The NQR technique seems feasible for measuring the magnitude and direction of underground stress with a resolution of about 25 psi, or 2.5% at 1000 psi. Downhole instrumentation suitable for in-situ determinations of stress appears within the state of the art. Additional tasks required on the project are identified.

  2. 105Pd NMR/NQR studies in UPd 2Al 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, K.; Kohori, Y.; Kohara, T.

    1999-01-01

    105Pd NMR and NQR measurements have been performed both in the normal and in the superconducting states for UPd 2Al 3. In the antiferromagnetically (AF) ordered state, the small internal field of about 3 kOe (at 4.2 K), which is perpendicular to the c-axis, appears below 14.5 K and does not decrease in the superconducting state. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/ T1, in UPd 2Al 3 is nearly temperature, T, independent in the paramagnetic state up to 60 K, successively diverges at Nel temperature associated with the critical slowing down of U magnetic moments, and then decreases markedly in the AF ordered state. In the superconducting state, 1/ T1 decreases in proportion to T3 down to 0.4 K with no coherence peak just below TC, which indicates the occurrence of anisotropic superconductivity having line nodes in the superconducting energy gap.

  3. Ab initio DFT study of bisphosphonate derivatives as a drug for inhibition of cancer: NMR and NQR parameters.

    PubMed

    Aghabozorg, Hussein; Sohrabi, Beheshteh; Mashkouri, Sara; Aghabozorg, Hamid Reza

    2012-03-01

    DFT computations were carried out to characterize the (17)Oand (2)H electric field gradient, EFG, in various bisphosphonate derivatives. The computations were performed at the B3LYP level with 6-311++G (d,P) standard basis set. Calculated EFG tensors were used to determine the (17)O and (2)H nuclear quadrupole coupling constant, ? and asymmetry parameter, ?. For better understanding of the bonding and electronic structure of bisphosphonates, isotropic and anisotropic NMR chemical shieldings were calculated for the (13)C, (17)O and (31)P nuclei using GIAO method for the optimized structure of intermediate bisphosphonates at B3LYP level of theory using 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. The results showed that various substituents have a strong effect on the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) parameters (?, ?) of (17)O in contrast with (2)H NQR parameters. The NMR and NQR parameters were studied in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and the activity of the desired bisphosphonates. In addition, the effect of substitutions on the bisphosphonates polarity was investigated. Molecular polarity was determined via the DFT calculated dipole moment vectors and the results showed that substitution of bromine atom on the ring would increase the activity of bisphosphonates. PMID:21633790

  4. Structural and Functional Investigation of Flavin Binding Center of the NqrC Subunit of Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  5. Herschel* Observations of Interstellar Chloronium. II. Detections toward G29.96-0.02, W49N, W51, and W3(OH), and Determinations of the Ortho-to-Para and 35Cl/37Cl Isotopic Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Black, John H.; Gerin, Maryvonne; Goicoechea, Javier R.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Gry, Cecile; Gupta, Harshal; Herbst, Eric; Indriolo, Nick; Lis, Dariusz; Menten, Karl M.; Monje, Raquel; Mookerjea, Bhaswati; Persson, Carina; Schilke, Peter; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Wolfire, Mark G.

    2015-07-01

    We report additional detections of the chloronium molecular ion, H2Cl+, toward four bright submillimeter continuum sources: G29.96-0.02, W49N, W51, and W3(OH). With the use of the HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory, we observed the {2}12-{1}01 transition of ortho-H{}235Cl+ at 781.627 GHz in absorption toward all four sources. Much of the detected absorption arises in diffuse foreground clouds that are unassociated with the background continuum sources and in which our best estimates of the N({{{H}}}2{{Cl}}+)/N({{H}}) ratio lie in the range (0.9-4.8) × {10}-9. These chloronium abundances relative to atomic hydrogen can exceed the predictions of current astrochemical models by up to a factor of 5. Toward W49N, we have also detected the {2}12-{1}01 transition of ortho-H{}237Cl+ at 780.053 GHz and the {1}11-{0}00 transition of para-H{}235Cl+ at 485.418 GHz. These observations imply {{{H}}}235Cl+/H{}237Cl+ column density ratios that are consistent with the solar system 35Cl/37Cl isotopic ratio of 3.1, and chloronium ortho-to-para ratios consistent with 3, the ratio of spin statistical weights. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  6. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br and (127)I).

    PubMed

    Demissie, Taye B; Jaszuński, Michał; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-28

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in (175)LuX and (197)AuX (X = (19)F, (35)Cl, (79)Br, (127)I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides. PMID:26520517

  7. Absolute NMR shielding scales and nuclear spin-rotation constants in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br and 127I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszu?ski, Micha?; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-10-01

    We present nuclear spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, and shielding spans of all the nuclei in 175LuX and 197AuX (X = 19F, 35Cl, 79Br, 127I), calculated using coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles with a perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) correction theory, four-component relativistic density functional theory (relativistic DFT), and non-relativistic DFT. The total nuclear spin-rotation constants determined by adding the relativistic corrections obtained from DFT calculations to the CCSD(T) values are in general in agreement with available experimental data, indicating that the computational approach followed in this study allows us to predict reliable results for the unknown spin-rotation constants in these molecules. The total NMR absolute shielding constants are determined for all the nuclei following the same approach as that applied for the nuclear spin-rotation constants. In most of the molecules, relativistic effects significantly change the computed shielding constants, demonstrating that straightforward application of the non-relativistic formula relating the electronic contribution to the nuclear spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic contribution to the shielding constants does not yield correct results. We also analyze the origin of the unusually large absolute shielding constant and its relativistic correction of gold in AuF compared to the other gold monohalides.

  8. The high-resolution infrared spectrum of nitryl chloride: Rotational analysis of the [sup 35]ClNO[sub 2] [nu][sub 4] band around 6 [mu]m

    SciTech Connect

    Orphal, J.; Morillon-Chapey, M.; Guelachvili, G. . Lab. de Physique Moleculaire et Applications Univ. Paris 6 et 11, Orsay )

    1994-06-01

    Nitryl chloride (ClNO[sub 2]) is involved in heterogeneous stratospheric chemistry by the reaction of HCl with N[sub 2]O[sub 5] on polar stratospheric cloud particles. The present work reports the first high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of nitryl chloride. The authors have recorded two infrared absorption spectra of ClNO[sub 2] at room temperature between 450 and 2,450 cm[sup [minus]1] with a stepping-mode Fourier transform spectrometer at 0.0028 cm[sup [minus]1] nonapodized resolution. The spectrum shows rich, well-resolved rotational structure in the [nu][sub 6] (652 cm[sup [minus]1]), [nu][sub 2] (792 cm[sup [minus]1]), [nu][sub 1] (1,268 cm[sup [minus]1]), 2[nu][sub 6] (1,318 cm[sup [minus]1]), and [nu][sub 4] (1,684 cm[sup [minus]1]) bands. They have carried out a rotational analysis of the [nu][sub 4] band of [sup 35]ClNO[sub 2] around 1,684 cm[sup [minus]1], leading to the assignment of 1,691 b-type transitions. The authors have determined new rotational constants for the ground state, and the rotational constants for the [nu][sub 4] = 1 vibrational state.

  9. Studies of Ga NMR and NQR in SrGa4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, H.; Higa, N.; Nakamura, S.; Kuroshima, H.; Toji, T.; Yogi, M.; Nakamura, A.; Hedo, M.; Nakama, T.; ?nuki, Y.; Harima, H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to microscopically investigate the properties in SrGa4, the Ga NMR measurements of a powder sample were carried out. The Ga NMR spectra corresponding to Ga(I) and Ga(II) sites are obtained. The NMR spectra of 69&71Ga (a nuclear spin I = 3/2) in the powder sample of SrGa4 do not take a typical powder pattern caused by the NQR interaction, but take the spectra consisting of three well resolved resonance-lines, which indicates that the nonuniform distribution of crystal orientation in the powder sample occurs because of the magnetic anisotropy. From the analysis of the Ga NMR spectrum, it is found that the ab-plane of the crystal is parallel to the external magnetic field, which would be attributed to the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility with the easy axis parallel to the ab-plane. This result is also confirmed by the 69Ga NQR in SrGa4. The Knight shifts of the 69Ga(I) and 69Ga(II) shift slightly to the negative side with decreasing temperature due to the core polarization of the d-electrons. The values of the Knight shift of the 69Ga(I) and 69Ga(II) are 0.01 and -0.11 % at 4.2 K, and 0.09 and -0.08 % at 300 K, respectively. The values of the 1/ T 1 T of the NMR of both 69Ga(I) and 69Ga(II) are almost constant between 4.2 and 100 K, whose values are 1.5 s -1 K -1 at 69Ga(I) and 0.12 s -1 K -1 at 69Ga(II), while the 1/ T 1 T slightly increase above 100K with increasing temperature. The value of T 1 of 69Ga(I) is one order of magnitude less than that of 69Ga(II).

  10. Mass and charge distributions in chlorine-induced nuclear reactions. [[sup 35]Cl at E/A = 15 MeV, [sup 37]Cl at E/A = 7. 3 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Projectile-like fragments were detected and characterized in terms of A, Z, and energy for the reactions [sup 37]Cl on [sup 40]Ca and [sup 209]Bi at E/A = 7.3 MeV, and [sup 35]Cl, on [sup 209]Bi at E/A = 15 MeV, at angles close to the grazing angle. Mass and charge distributions were generated in the N-Z plane as a function of energy loss, and have been parameterized in terms of their centroids, variances, and coefficients of correlation. Due to experimental problems, the mass resolution corresponding to the [sup 31]Cl on [sup 209]Bi reaction was very poor. This prompted the study and application of a deconvolution technique for peak enhancement. The drifts of the charge and mass centroids for the system [sup 37]Cl on [sup 40]Ca are consistent with a process of mass and charge equilibration mediated by nucleon exchange between the two partners, followed by evaporation. The asymmetric systems show a strong drift towards larger asymmetry, with the production of neutron-rich nuclei. It was concluded that this is indicative of a net transfer of protons from the light to the heavy partner, and a net flow of neutrons in the opposite direction. The variances for all systems increase with energy loss, as it would be expected from a nucleon exchange mechanism; however, the variances for the reaction [sup 37]Cl on [sup 40]Ca are higher than those expected from that mechanism. The coefficients of correlation indicate that the transfer of nucleons between projectile and target is correlated. The results were compared to the predictions of two current models based on a stochastic nucleon exchange mechanism. In general, the comparisons between experimental and predicted variances support this mechanism; however, the need for more realistic driving forces in the model calculations is indicated by the disagreement between predicted and experimental centroids.

  11. 139La NQR and NMR studies of the structural phase transitions in La 1.8- xEu 0.2Sr xCuO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, B. J.; Hammel, P. C.

    139La NQR and NMR relaxation measurements in the title compound have been used to investigate the dynamical properties of the structural phase transitions (SPT): HTT ? LTO and LTO ? LTT of lathanum cuprate. We present the data for thermodynamic fluctuations of critical modes in the vicinity of the SPT's which clearly reveal the character of each SPT and its dependence on doped hole concentration.

  12. (121,123)Sb and (75)As NMR and NQR investigation of the tetrahedrite (Cu12Sb4S13) - Tennantite (Cu12As4S13) system and other metal arsenides.

    PubMed

    Bastow, T J; Lehmann-Horn, J A; Miljak, D G

    2015-10-01

    This work is motivated by the recent developments in online minerals analysis in the mining and minerals processing industry via nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Here we describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and NQR study of the minerals tennantite (Cu12As4S13) and tetrahedrite (Cu12 Sb4S13). In the first part NQR lines associated with (75)As in tennantite and (121,123)Sb isotopes in tetrahedrite are reported. The spectroscopy has been restricted to an ambient temperature studies in accord with typical industrial conditions. The second part of this contribution reports nuclear quadrupole-perturbed NMR findings on further, only partially characterised, metal arsenides. The findings enhance the detection capabilities of NQR based analysers for online measurement applications and may aid to control arsenic and antimony concentrations in metal processing stages. PMID:26453410

  13. Ferromagnetic Spin Fluctuation and Unconventional Superconductivity in Rb2Cr3As3 Revealed by 75As NMR and NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Tang, Z. T.; Cao, G. H.; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2015-10-01

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies on the superconductor Rb2Cr3As3 with a quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure. Below T 100 K , the spin-lattice relaxation rate (1 /T1 ) divided by temperature, 1 /T1T , increases upon cooling down to Tc=4.8 K , showing a Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence. The Knight shift also increases with decreasing temperature. These results suggest ferromagnetic spin fluctuation. In the superconducting state, 1 /T1 decreases rapidly below Tc without a Hebel-Slichter peak, and follows a T5 variation below T 3 K , which points to unconventional superconductivity with point nodes in the gap function.

  14. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1991-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for x ranging from 0 up to 0.3, with particular emphasis on the effect of doping on the Cu(2+) magnetic correlations and dynamics, are reviewed. In the low doping limit, x less than or equal to 0.05, the results can be interpreted consistently in terms of a simple phenomenological 'two-fluids' model whereby the effect of thermally-activated mobile O(2p) holes is the one of disrupting locally the Cu(2+) spin correlations. For x greater than or equal to 0.1, the results indicate the onset, as T approaches T(sub c)(+), of a strong coupling between Cu(2+) spins and the Fermi liquid of O(2p) holes leading to the apparent disappearance of localized Cu(2+) moment in connection with the opening of a superconducting gap.

  15. Ferromagnetic Spin Fluctuation and Unconventional Superconductivity in Rb2Cr3As3 Revealed by 75As NMR and NQR.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Tang, Z T; Cao, G H; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2015-10-01

    We report (75)As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies on the superconductor Rb(2)Cr(3)As(3) with a quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure. Below T∼100  K, the spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T(1)) divided by temperature, 1/T(1)T, increases upon cooling down to T(c)=4.8  K, showing a Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence. The Knight shift also increases with decreasing temperature. These results suggest ferromagnetic spin fluctuation. In the superconducting state, 1/T(1) decreases rapidly below T(c) without a Hebel-Slichter peak, and follows a T(5) variation below T∼3  K, which points to unconventional superconductivity with point nodes in the gap function. PMID:26551818

  16. Electronic properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors as seen by Cu and O NMR/NQR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkmann, D.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) allow the investigation of electronic properties at the atomic level. We will report on such studies of typical members of the the Y-Ba-Cu-O family such as YBa2Cu30(6 + x) (1-2-3-(6 + x)), YBa2Cu4O8 (1-2-4) and Y2Ba4Cu7015 (2-4-7) with many examples of recent work performed in our laboratory. In particular, we will deal with Knight shift and relaxation studies of copper and oxygen. We will discuss important issues of current studies such as: (1) Existence of a common electronic spin-susceptibility in the planes (and perhaps in the chains) of 1-2-4; (2) Strong evidence for the existence of a pseudo spin-gap of the antiferromagnetic fluctuations in 1-2-4 and 2-4-7; (3) Evidence for d-wave pairing in 1-2-4; (4) Strong coupling of inequivalent Cu-O planes in 2-4-7 and possible origin for the high Tc value of this compound; and (5) The possibility to describe NMR data in the framework of a charge-excitation picture.

  17. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1990-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for O = to or less than 0.3 and in the temperature range 1.6 + 450 K are analyzed in terms of Cu(++) magnetic correlations and dynamics. It is described how the magnetic correlations that would result from Cu-Cu exchange are reduced by mobile charge defects related to x-doping. A comprehensive picture is given which explains satisfactorily the x and T dependence of the correlation time, of the correlation length and of the Neel temperature T(sub n)(x) as well as being consistent with known electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. It is discussed how, in the superconducting samples, the mobile defects also cause the decrease, for T yields T(sub c)(+) of the hyperfine Cu electron-nucleus effective interaction, leading to the coexistence of quasi-localized, reduced magnetic moments from 3d Cu electrons and mobile oxygen p-hole carriers. The temperature dependence of the effective hyperfine field around the superconducting transition yields an activation energy which could be related to the pairing energy. New specific heat measurements are also presented and discussed in terms of the above picture.

  18. NMR and NQR study of the electronic and structural properties of Al-Cu-Fe and Al-Cu-Ru quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastri, A.; Borsa, F.; Torgeson, D.R.; Shield, J.E.; Goldman, A.I. )

    1994-12-01

    [sup 27]Al and [sup 63,65]Cu NMR is reported for powdered stable Al-Cu-Fe and Al-Cu-Ru icosahedral quasicrystals and crystalline approximants, and for an Al-Pd-Mn single-grain quasicrystal. [sup 27]Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K were observed in Al-Cu-Fe and Al-Cu-Ru samples. From quadrupole-perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from zero-field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric-field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal-axis-system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 Al-Cu-Fe approximant successfully explained the observed NQR spectra. The average local gradient is largely determined by the [ital p]-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to EFG lattice contribution. Comparison of [sup 63]Cu and [sup 27]Al NMR shows the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more [ital s]-type wave function of the conduction electrons. Overall spread of EFG values is well reproduced by calculation based on the approximant. However, the experimental spectra indicate a much larger number of nonequivalent sites when compared with the simulated NQR spectra based on the 1/1 approximant. The short-range, local chemical order is well represented by the approximant, but differences in coordination must be included at intermediate range in the quasicrystal. Measured [sup 27]Al Knight shift, magnetic susceptibility, and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time as a function of temperature indicate reduced density of states at the Fermi level by a factor of 7 or 8 from the value in Al metal, consistent with the notion of a pseudogap for these quasicrystals. No differences in measured parameters were detected as a function of composition of the quasicrystalline alloys.

  19. Coexistence of multiple charge-density waves and superconductivity in SrPt2As2 revealed by 75As-NMR /NQR and 195Pt-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Shinji; Tani, Yoshihiko; Mabuchi, Tomosuke; Kudo, Kazutaka; Nishikubo, Yoshihiro; Mitsuoka, Daisuke; Nohara, Minoru; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between charge-density wave (CDW) orders and superconductivity in arsenide superconductor SrPt2As2 with Tc=5.2 K which crystallizes in the CaBe2Ge2 -type structure was studied by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements up to 520 K, and 75As nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and 195Pt-NMR measurements down to 1.5 K. At high temperature, 75As-NMR spectrum and nuclear-spin-relaxation rate (1 /T1) have revealed two distinct CDW orders, one realized in the As-Pt-As layer below TCDWAs (1 )=410 K and the other in the Pt-As-Pt layer below TCDWAs (2 )=255 K . The 1 /T1 measured by 75As-NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially well below Tc. Concomitantly, 195Pt Knight shift decreases below Tc. Our results indicate that superconductivity in SrPt2As2 is in the spin-singlet state with an s -wave gap and is robust under the two distinct CDW orders in different layers.

  20. Ferromagnetic Quantum Critical Fluctuations and Anomalous Coexistence of Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity in UCoGe Revealed by Co-NMR and NQR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Tetsuya; Nakai, Yusuke; Ihara, Yoshihiko; Ishida, Kenji; Deguchi, Kazuhiko; Sato, Noriaki K.; Satoh, Isamu

    2008-02-01

    Co nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies were carried out for the recently discovered UCoGe, in which the ferromagnetic and superconducting (SC) transitions are reported to occur at TCurie 3 K and TS 0.8 K [Huy et al.: Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 (2007) 067006], in order to investigate the coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity as well as the normal-state and SC properties from a microscopic point of view. From the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 and Knight-shift measurements, we confirm that ferromagnetic fluctuations that possess a quantum critical character are present above TCurie and also the occurrence of a ferromagnetic transition at 2.5 K in our polycrystalline sample. The magnetic fluctuations in the normal state show that UCoGe is an itinerant ferromagnet similar to ZrZn2 and YCo2. The onset SC transition is identified at TS 0.7 K, below which 1/T1 arising from 30% of the volume fraction starts to decrease due to the opening of the SC gap. This component of 1/T1, which follows a T3 dependence in the temperature range 0.3-0.1 K, coexists with the magnetic components of 1/T1 showing a \\sqrt{T} dependence below TS. From the NQR measurements in the SC state, we suggest that the self-induced vortex state is realized in UCoGe.

  1. Measurement of the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies by the solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-07-01

    1H- 14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance using magnetic field cycling between high and low magnetic field and solid effect in the low magnetic field is analyzed in details. The transition probabilities per unit time for the solid-effect transitions are calculated. The double resonance spectra are calculated in the limiting cases of fast and slow nitrogen spin-lattice relaxation. The double resonance spectra are measured in histamine and quinolinic acid. The experimental spectra are analyzed and the 14N NQR frequencies are determined.

  2. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Y.; Roy, B.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility ? and the T dependence of 1/T1T?, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  3. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Yuji; Roy, Beas; Ran, Sheng; Budko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2014-03-20

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility ? and the T dependence of 1/T1T?, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  4. Feasibility of nuclear quadrupole resonance as a novel dosimetry tool

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.; Hintenlang, D.E.; Epperson, S.J.; Higgins, G.A.; Jamil, K.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (N.Q.R) frequencies are influenced by the symmetry of the charge distribution of a compound around the site of interest. Damage by ionizing radiation causes changes in this charge symmetry which can be detected by standard pulsed N.Q.R. methods. Previous work done on various chlorates of [sup 35]Cl at room temperature (Vargas et al., 1978) shows a linear effect between absorbed gammadose and the N.Q.R. frequency shift and line broadening. This paper reviews the theory of N.Q.R. and details our experimental apparatus. The accumulated data on [sup 14]N-containing compounds, both irradiated and nonirradiated, is discussed. The long term goal of this research is to choose an appropriate organic compound to duplicate the effects of radiation on human tissue. Under such conditions, we may be able to extend this work to provide a mixed radiation field (gamma and neutron) dosimeter which does not require knowing quality factors or energy fluences.

  5. Feasibility of nuclear quadrupole resonance as a novel dosimetry tool

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.; Hintenlang, D.E.; Epperson, S.J.; Higgins, G.A.; Jamil, K.

    1990-12-31

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (N.Q.R) frequencies are influenced by the symmetry of the charge distribution of a compound around the site of interest. Damage by ionizing radiation causes changes in this charge symmetry which can be detected by standard pulsed N.Q.R. methods. Previous work done on various chlorates of {sup 35}Cl at room temperature (Vargas et al., 1978) shows a linear effect between absorbed gammadose and the N.Q.R. frequency shift and line broadening. This paper reviews the theory of N.Q.R. and details our experimental apparatus. The accumulated data on {sup 14}N-containing compounds, both irradiated and nonirradiated, is discussed. The long term goal of this research is to choose an appropriate organic compound to duplicate the effects of radiation on human tissue. Under such conditions, we may be able to extend this work to provide a mixed radiation field (gamma and neutron) dosimeter which does not require knowing quality factors or energy fluences.

  6. Specific Heat and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Study of Thiourea-Hexachloroethane Inclusion Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekhova, G. N.; Goren, S. D.; Krieger, Ju. H.; Linsky, D.; Lusternik, V.; Panich, A. M.; Semenov, A. R.; Voronel, A.

    2000-02-01

    Specific heat and 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements of the channel thio-urea-hexachloroethane inclusion compound are presented. Experimental NQR data confirm the results of atom-atom potential calculations that the guest sublattice comprises two types of nearly commensurate finite molecular chains, having different structure and separated by domain walls. Specific heat measurements show phase transition near 96 K.

  7. Towards ferromagnetic quantum criticality in FeGa3 -xGex :71Ga NQR as a zero-field microscopic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, M.; Wagner-Reetz, M.; Cardoso-Gil, R.; Gille, P.; Steglich, F.; Grin, Y.; Baenitz, M.

    2016-02-01

    71Ga NQR, magnetization, and specific-heat measurements have been performed on polycrystalline Ge-doped FeGa3 samples. A crossover from an insulator to a correlated local moment metal in the low-doping regime and the evolution of itinerant ferromagnet upon further doping is found. For the nearly critical concentration at the threshold of ferromagnetic order, xC=0.15, 71(1 /T1T ) exhibits a pronounced T-4 /3 power law over two orders of magnitude in temperature, which indicates three-dimensional quantum critical ferromagnetic fluctuations. Furthermore, for the ordered x =0.2 sample (TC≈6 K), 71(1 /T1T ) could be fitted well in the frame of Moriya's self-consistent renormalization theory for weakly ferromagnetic systems with 1 /T1T ˜χ . In contrast to this, the low-doping regime nicely displays local moment behavior where 1 /T1T ˜χ2 is valid. For T →0 , the Sommerfeld ratio γ =(C /T ) is enhanced (70 mJ /mole K2 for x =0.1 ) , which indicates the formation of heavy 3 d electrons.

  8. An innovative method for the non-destructive identification of photodegradation products in solid state: 1H-14N NMR-NQR and DFT/QTAIM study of photodegradation of nifedipine (anti-hypertensive) to nitrosonifedipine (potential anti-oxidative).

    PubMed

    Latosi?ska, J N; Latosi?ska, M; Seliger, J; Zagar, V

    2012-08-30

    Stability of the antihypertensive drug nifedipine (NIF) has been studied experimentally in solid state by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR double resonance (NQDR) and theoretically by the Density Functional Theory (DFT). Photodegradation of NIF to its metabolite in vivo nitrosonifedipine, NO-NIF (antioxidative agent) upon long term daylight exposure was detected and the changes in the molecular structure of NIF were analysed. The photoconversion of NIF to NO-NIF in solid was found to be accompanied with the electron density redistribution at nitrogen sites (NH to N and NO(2) to NO) and proved to be successfully detected with identification of photoproducts by (1)H-(14)N NQDR and DFT methods. The increase in the e(2)qQ/h and ? describing EFG tendency towards non-spherical symmetry was significantly greater upon the reduction of NO(2) site than upon hydrogen abstraction from NH site. The level of sensitivity of detection of the photodegradation product was about 1% of the original sample. The Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) analysis has been found useful in predicting photoreactive sites in the molecules and finding the explanation of differences in reactivity between parent NIF and its photoproduct NO-NIF. Using NIF as a model, this study demonstrates the suitability of NQDR supported by DFT for non-destructive determination of the photodegradation products in solid state. PMID:22609436

  9. Electronic Characteristics of Sn-Hal Bonds in Hexa-and Pentacoordinate Tin(IV) Adducts of Type RnSnHal4-nLx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, E. A.; Burtzev, M. Yu.

    1996-06-01

    The σ-and π-electron effects of alkyl/phenyl substituents on the Sn-Hal bonds in penta- and hexacoordinate tin(IV) chloro and iodo adducts are discussed based on their 35Cl and 127I NQR spectra. Unexpectedly high 127I EFG asymmetry parameters were found in most dialkyl(phenyl)-substituted adducts of thin(VI) iodides.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance with dc SQUID (Super-conducting QUantum Interference Device) preamplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, N.Q.; Heaney, M.B.; Clark, J.; Newitt, D.; Wald, L.; Hahn, E.L.; Bierlecki, A.; Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    Sensitive radio-frequency (rf) amplifiers based on dc Superconducting QUantum Interface Devices (SQUIDS) are available for frequencies up to 200 MHz. At 4.2 K, the gain and noise temperature of a typical tuned amplifier are 18.6 +- 0.5 dB and 1.7 +- 0.5 K at 93 MHz. These amplifiers are being applied to a series of novel experiments on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). The high sensitivity of these amplifiers was demonstrated in the observation of ''nuclear spin noise'', the emission of photons by /sup 35/Cl nuclei in a state of zero polarization. In the more conventional experiments in which one applies a large rf pulse to the spins, a Q-spoiler, consisting of a series array of Josephson junctions, is used to reduce the Q of the input circuit to a very low value during the pulse. The Q-spoiler enables the circuit to recover quickly after the pulse, and has been used in an NQR experiment to achieve a sensitivity of about 2 /times/ 10/sup 16/ nuclear Bohr magnetons in a single free precession signal with a bandwidth of 10 kHz. In a third experiment, a sample containing /sup 35/Cl nuclei was placed in a capacitor and the signal detected electrically using a tuned SQUID amplifier and Q-spoiler. In this way, the electrical polarization induced by the precessing Cl nuclear quadrupole moments was detected: this is the inverse of the Stark effect in NQR. Two experiments involving NMR have been carried out. In the first, the 30 MHz resonance in /sup 119/Sn nuclei is detected with a tuned amplifier and Q-spoiler, and a single pulse resolution of 10/sup 18/ nuclear Bohr magnetons in a bandwidth of 25 kHz has been achieved. For the second, a low frequency NMR system has been developed that uses an untuned input circuit coupled to the SQUID. The resonance in /sup 195/Pt nuclei has been observed at 55 kHz in a field of 60 gauss. 23 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance with dc SQUID preamplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, N.Q.; Heaney, M.B.; Clarke, J.; Newitt, D.; Wald, L.L.; Hahn, E.L.; Bielecki, A.; Pines, A.

    1989-03-01

    Sensitive radio-frequency (rf) amplifiers based on dc Superconducting QUantum Intererference Devices (SQUIDSs) are available for frequencies up to 200 MHz. At 4.2 K, the gain and noise temperature of a typical tuned amplifier are 18.6+-0.5 dB and 1.7+0.5 K at 93 MHz. These amplifiers are being applied to a series of novel experiments on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). The high sensitivity of these amplifiers was demonstrated in the observation of nuclear spin noise, the emission of photons by /sup 35/Cl nuclei in a state of zero polarization. In the more conventional experiments in which one applies a large rf pulse to the spins, a Q-spoiler, consisting of a series array of Josephson junctions, is used to reduce the Q of the input circuit to a very low value during the pulse. The Q-spoiler enables the circuit to recover quickly after the pulse, and has been used in an NQR experiment to achieve a sensitivity of about 2 x 10/sup 16/ nuclear Bohr magnetons in a single free precession signal with a bandwidth of 10 kHz. In a third experiment, a sample containing /sup 35/Cl nuclei was placed in a capacitor and the signal detected electrically using a tuned SQUID amplifier and Q-spoiler. In this way, the electrical polarization induced by the precessing Cl nuclear quadrupole moments was detected: this is the inverse of the Stark effect in NQR. Two experiments involving NMR have been carried out. In the first, the 30 MHz resonance in /sup 119/Sn nuclei is detected with a tuned amplifier and Q-spoiler, and a single pulse resolution of 10/sup 18/ nuclear Bohr magnetons in a bandwidth of 25 kHz has been achieved. For the second, a low frequency NMR system has been developed that uses an untuned input circuit coupled to the SQUID. The resonance in /sup 195/Pt nuclei has been observed at 55 kHz in a field of 60 gauss.

  12. 35CI NQR and Structural Studies of N-(2,6-Dichlorophenyl)-Amides, 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NHCO-R (R = H or CH3-y Xy and X = CH3 or CI; y = 0,1, 2 or 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, B. Thimme; Paulus, Helmut; Fuess, Hartmut

    2000-10-01

    The effect of side chain substitution on the 35CI NQR and crystal structure of amides of the type N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-amides, 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NHCO-R (R = H or CH3_yXy where X = CH3 or CI and y = 0, 1, 2 or 3), has been studied by measuring the 35C1 NQR spectra and determining the crystal structures of the compounds N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-formamide, 2,6-Cl2C6H3- NHCO-H (DCPFA); N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2-methylacetamide(propionamide), 2,6-Cl2C6H3- NHCO-CH2CH3 (DCPMA); N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2,2-dimethylacetamide(isobutyramide), 2,6- Cl2C6H3-NHCO-CH(CH3 ) 2 (DCPDMA) and N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trimethylacetamide (neopentylamide), 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NHCO-C(CH3)3 (DCPTMA), and by analysing the present data along with the 35CI NQR spectra and / or crystal structures of the compounds, 2,6-dichloroaniline, 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NH2 (DCA), N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-acetamide, 2,6-Cl2C6H3--NHCO-CH3 (DCPA), N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2-chloroacetamide, 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NHCO-CH2Cl (DCPCA), N- (2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroacetamide, 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NHCO-CHCl2 (DCPDCA) and N- (2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroacetamide, 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NHCO-CCl3 (DCPTCA). The crystal type, space group, formula units and lattice constants in A of the new structures are;DCPFA: orthorhombic, Pbca, Z = 8, a = 8.593(3), b = 12.728(4), c = 14.376(4); DCPMA: orthorhombic, P212121, Z = 4, a = 4.774(2), b = 10.961(5), c = 19.562(8); DCPDMA: monoclinic, P21/c, Z = 4, a = 9.901(4), b = 13.785(5), c = 9.060(3), = 103.58(2) and DCPTMA: monoclinic, P21/n, Z = 8, a = 16.047(5), b = 9.882(3), c = 16.270(5) = 102.12(1). The compound, DCPTMA shows two molecules in its asymmetric unit. This is in agreement with the multiple lines observed in the 35CI NQR spectra of the compound. The conversion of DCA (monoclinic) into it's various acid amides DCPFA, DCPA, DCPMA, DCPDMA, DCPTMA, DCPCA and DCPTCA affects it's crystal symmetry. The replacement of the side chain CH3 in DCPA by the H atom or substitution of either a CH3 group or a CI atom for one of the H atoms in the side chain CH3 or replacement of the two ring CI atoms by the H atoms changes it's crystal symmetry from monoclinic to orthorhombic, while the substitution of 2 or all the 3 H atoms in the CH3 group of DCPA by 2 or 3 CH3 groups or CI atoms restores it's crystal symmetry back to the monoclinic type. The bond lengths and bond angles are normal except for some deviations.

  13. Light and variable 37Cl/35Cl ratios in rocks from Gale Crater, Mars: Possible signature of perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Martin, P.; Archer, P. D.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Fairén, A. G.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malespin, C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Sutter, B.

    2016-03-01

    Cl isotope ratios measured on HCl thermally evolved from as-yet-unknown phases in sedimentary rocks and sand in Gale Crater provide unexpected insights to the Martian surficial Cl cycle. The seven samples yield δ37Cl values ranging from - 1 ± 25 ‰ to - 51 ± 5 ‰. Five analyses from two samples of the Sheepbed mudstone (Yellowknife Bay study area) are analytically indistinguishable with a mean δ37Cl of - 11 ± 7 ‰ (1 σ). In contrast, four mudstones/sandstones from the Kimberley and Pahrump study areas also yielded indistinguishable ratios, but with a mean δ37Cl of - 43 ± 6 ‰. The Rocknest sand deposit gave a highly uncertain δ37Cl value of - 7 ± 44 ‰. These light and highly variable δ37Cl values are unique among known solar system materials. Two endmember models are offered to account for these observations, and in both, perchlorate, with its extreme ability to fractionate Cl isotopes, is critical. In the first model, SAM is detecting HCl from an oxychlorine compound (e.g., perchlorate) produced from volcanic gas emissions by atmospheric chemical reactions. Similar reactions in Earth's atmosphere may be responsible for the isotopically lightest known Cl outside of this study, in perchlorate from the Atacama Desert. Some of the Gale Crater δ37Cl values are more negative than those in Atacama perchlorate, but because reaction mechanisms and associated fractionation factors are unknown, it is impossible to assess whether this difference is prohibitive. If the negative δ37Cl signal is produced in this fashion, the isotopic variability among samples could arise either from variations in the relative size of the reactant chloride and product perchlorate reservoirs, or from variations in the fraction of perchlorate reduced back to chloride after deposition. Such reduction strongly enriches 37Cl in the residual perchlorate. Perchlorate reduction alone offers an alternative endmember model that can explain the observed data if SAM measured HCl derived from chloride. In this model isotopically normal perchlorate produced by an unspecified mechanism is reduced to chloride. Depending on the relative size of the reduced reservoir, the integrated product chloride can vary in isotopic composition from - 70 ‰ in the first increment all the way to the starting composition if the perchlorate is fully reduced. Thus, variable degrees of perchlorate reduction can produce chloride with the appropriate δ37Cl range. Combination of the two endmember models, in which the perchlorate subject to post-deposition reduction is isotopically negative from atmospheric reactions, is also possible. Determination of the phase hosting the Cl measured by SAM, an oxychlorine compound or chloride, is critical for selecting between these models, and for developing implications of the results for the Mars surficial Cl cycle. At present it is not possible to conclusively establish which phase is responsible (possibly both), but limited evidence favors the conclusion that the measured Cl derives mostly from an oxychlorine compound.

  14. The registration of signals from the nuclei other than protons at 0.5 T MRI scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, N.; Volkov, D.; Gulyaev, M.; Pavlova, O.; Pirogov, Yu

    2016-02-01

    The practical aspects of the adaptation of the medical MRI scanner for multinuclear applications are considered. Examples of high resolution NMR spectra for nuclei 19F, 31P, 23Na, 11B, 13C, 2H, and also NQR spectrum for 35Cl are given. Possibilities of MRI for nuclei 19F, 31P, 23Na, 11B are shown. Experiments on registration of signals 19F from the fluorocarbons injected in laboratory animals are described.

  15. Frequency stability review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    Certain aspects of the description and measurement of oscillator stability are treated. Topics covered are time and frequency deviations, Allan variance, the zero-crossing counter measurement technique, frequency drift removal, and the three-cornered hat.

  16. Frequency Response Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-03-13

    According to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) definition: “Frequency response is a measure of an Interconnection’s ability to stabilize frequency immediately following the sudden loss of generation or load, and is a critical component of the reliable operation of the Bulk-Power System, particularly during disturbances and recoveries. Failure to maintain frequency can disrupt the operation of equipment and initiate disconnection of power plant equipment to prevent it from being damaged, which could leadmore » to wide-spread blackouts.” Frequency Response Tool automates the power system frequency response analysis process. The tool performs initial estimation of the system frequency parameters (initial frequency, minimum frequency, settling point). User can visually inspect and adjust these parameters. The tool also calculates the frequency response performance metrics of the system, archives the historic events and baselines the system performance. Frequency response performance characteristics of the system are calculated using phasor measurement unit (PMU) information. Methodology of the frequency response performance assessment implemented in the tool complies with the NERC Frequency response standard.« less

  17. INCREASING MILKING FREQUENCY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milk Yield increases by a fixed amount due to increased milking frequency and not by some percentage of previous milk yields. Six times-a-day milking frequency from calving through six weeks post-partum results in not only increased production during the period of high frequency milking by also in ...

  18. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  19. Frequency Response Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-13

    According to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) definition: ?Frequency response is a measure of an Interconnection?s ability to stabilize frequency immediately following the sudden loss of generation or load, and is a critical component of the reliable operation of the Bulk-Power System, particularly during disturbances and recoveries. Failure to maintain frequency can disrupt the operation of equipment and initiate disconnection of power plant equipment to prevent it from being damaged, which could lead to wide-spread blackouts.? Frequency Response Tool automates the power system frequency response analysis process. The tool performs initial estimation of the system frequency parameters (initial frequency, minimum frequency, settling point). User can visually inspect and adjust these parameters. The tool also calculates the frequency response performance metrics of the system, archives the historic events and baselines the system performance. Frequency response performance characteristics of the system are calculated using phasor measurement unit (PMU) information. Methodology of the frequency response performance assessment implemented in the tool complies with the NERC Frequency response standard.

  20. Harmonic Frequency Lowering

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A novel algorithm for frequency lowering in music was developed and experimentally tested in hearing-impaired listeners. Harmonic frequency lowering (HFL) combines frequency transposition and frequency compression to preserve the harmonic content of music stimuli. Listeners were asked to make judgments regarding detail and sound quality in music stimuli. Stimuli were presented under different signal processing conditions: original, low-pass filtered, HFL, and nonlinear frequency compressed. Results showed that participants reported perceiving the most detail in the HFL condition. In addition, there was no difference in sound quality across conditions. PMID:26834122

  1. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2014-11-25

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  2. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2013-05-28

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  3. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  4. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency conversion system comprises first and second gain sources providing first and second frequency radiation outputs where the second gain source receives as input the output of the first gain source and, further, the second gain source comprises a Raman or Brillouin gain fiber for wave shifting a portion of the radiation of the first frequency output into second frequency radiation output to provided a combined output of first and second frequencies. Powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  5. Frequency modulated microrheology.

    PubMed

    Shindel, Matthew M; Furst, Eric M

    2015-06-01

    Coupling analog frequency modulation (FM) to the driving stimulus in active microrheology measurements conducted with optical tweezers effectively parallelizes numerous single-frequency experiments. Consequently, frequency modulated microrheology (FMMR) can efficiently characterize the dynamic stress response of complex fluids over several frequency decades in a single experiment. The time required to complete an FMMR measurement scales with the lowest frequency probed, improving throughput over the serial frequency sweep approach. The ease of implementation, straight-forward data analysis and rapidity of FMMR offer particular utility toward applications such as characterization of non-equilibrium materials, automated microrheology instrumentation, high-throughput screening of biomaterials and (bio) pharmaceutical formulations, and in situ monitoring of chemical and biochemical reaction processes. PMID:25925730

  6. Probability and Relative Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drieschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The concept of probability seems to have been inexplicable since its invention in the seventeenth century. In its use in science, probability is closely related with relative frequency. So the task seems to be interpreting that relation. In this paper, we start with predicted relative frequency and show that its structure is the same as that of probability. I propose to call that the `prediction interpretation' of probability. The consequences of that definition are discussed. The "ladder"-structure of the probability calculus is analyzed. The expectation of the relative frequency is shown to be equal to the predicted relative frequency. Probability is shown to be the most general empirically testable prediction.

  7. Frequency selective terahertz retroreflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard James

    The use of novel optical structures operating at terahertz frequencies in industrial and military applications continues to grow. Some of these novel structures include gratings, frequency selective surfaces, metamaterials and metasurfaces, and retroreflectors. A retroreflector is a device that exhibits enhanced backscatter by concentrating the reflected wave in the direction of the source. Retroreflectors have applications in a variety of diverse fields such as aviation, radar systems, antenna technology, communications, navigation, passive identification, and metrology due to their large acceptance angles and frequency bandwidth. This thesis describes the design, fabrication, and characterization of a retroreflector designed for terahertz frequencies and the incorporation of a frequency selective surface in order to endow the retroreflector with narrow-band frequency performance. The radar cross section of several spherical lens reflectors operating at terahertz frequencies was investigated. Spherical lens reflectors with diameters ranging from 2 mm to 8 mm were fabricated from fused silica ball lenses and their radar cross section was measured at 100 GHz, 160 GHz, and 350 GHz. Crossed-dipole frequency selective surfaces exhibiting band-pass characteristics at 350 GHz fabricated from 12 um-thick Nickel screens were applied to the apertures of the spherical lens reflectors. The radar cross section of the frequency selective retroreflectors was measured at 160 GHz and 350 GHz to demonstrate proof-of-concept of narrow-band terahertz performance.

  8. Probability and Relative Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drieschner, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The concept of probability seems to have been inexplicable since its invention in the seventeenth century. In its use in science, probability is closely related with relative frequency. So the task seems to be interpreting that relation. In this paper, we start with predicted relative frequency and show that its structure is the same as that of probability. I propose to call that the `prediction interpretation' of probability. The consequences of that definition are discussed. The "ladder"-structure of the probability calculus is analyzed. The expectation of the relative frequency is shown to be equal to the predicted relative frequency. Probability is shown to be the most general empirically testable prediction.

  9. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

    2014-12-31

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  10. Nonlinear Frequency Compression

    PubMed Central

    Scollie, Susan; Glista, Danielle; Seelisch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Frequency lowering technologies offer an alternative amplification solution for severe to profound high frequency hearing losses. While frequency lowering technologies may improve audibility of high frequency sounds, the very nature of this processing can affect the perceived sound quality. This article reports the results from two studies that investigated the impact of a nonlinear frequency compression (NFC) algorithm on perceived sound quality. In the first study, the cutoff frequency and compression ratio parameters of the NFC algorithm were varied, and their effect on the speech quality was measured subjectively with 12 normal hearing adults, 12 normal hearing children, 13 hearing impaired adults, and 9 hearing impaired children. In the second study, 12 normal hearing and 8 hearing impaired adult listeners rated the quality of speech in quiet, speech in noise, and music after processing with a different set of NFC parameters. Results showed that the cutoff frequency parameter had more impact on sound quality ratings than the compression ratio, and that the hearing impaired adults were more tolerant to increased frequency compression than normal hearing adults. No statistically significant differences were found in the sound quality ratings of speech-in-noise and music stimuli processed through various NFC settings by hearing impaired listeners. These findings suggest that there may be an acceptable range of NFC settings for hearing impaired individuals where sound quality is not adversely affected. These results may assist an Audiologist in clinical NFC hearing aid fittings for achieving a balance between high frequency audibility and sound quality. PMID:23539261

  11. Ultrastable automatic frequency control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabourin, D. J.; Furiga, A.

    1981-01-01

    Center frequency of wideband AFC circuit drifts only hundredths of percent per day. Since circuit responds only to slow frequency drifts and modulation signal has high-pass characteristics, AFC does not interfere with normal FM operation. Stable oscillator, reset circuit, and pulse generator constitute time-averaging discriminator; digital counter in pulse generator replaces usual monostable multivibrator.

  12. Frequency modulated oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A. (inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A frequency modulated push-pull oscillator in which the non-linear characteristic of varactors producing frequency modulation is compensated for by an opposite non-linear characteristic of a field effect transistor providing modulating bias to the varactors is described.

  13. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  14. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  15. Laser Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donelan, Darsa; Mueller, Guido; Thorpe, James; Livas, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Laser ranging and interferometry are essential technologies allowing for many astounding new spacebased missions such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) to measure gravitational radiation emitted from distant super massive black hole mergers or distributed aperture telescopes with unprecedented angular resolution in the NIR or visible regime. The requirements on laser frequency noise depend on the residual motion and the distances between the spacecraft forming the interferometer. The intrinsic frequency stability of commercial lasers is several orders of magnitude above these requirements. Therefore, it is necessary for lasers to be stabilized to an ultrastable frequency reference so that they can be used to sense and control distances between spacecraft. Various optical frequency references and frequency stabilization schemes are considered and investigated for the applicability and usefulness for space-based interferometry missions.

  16. High Frequency Ultrasonic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shung, K Kirk

    2010-01-01

    High frequency ultrasonic imaging is considered by many to be the next frontier in ultrasound. It has many clinical applications ranging from imaging the eye and skin to small animal imaging. Small animal imaging has recently generated intense interest for the purpose of evaluating the efficacy of drugs and gene therapy. Commercial high frequency scanners often termed ultrasonic biomicroscope, or UBM, all use mechanically scanned single element transducers at frequencies between 30 to 60 MHz with a frame rate of 30 frames/second or lower. To alleviate problems with UBMs which include mechanical motion and fixed focusing, high frequency linear arrays and imaging systems in the 2050 MHz range have been developed. In this paper, current efforts in the development of high frequency ultrasonic imaging will be reviewed and potential biomedical applications discussed. PMID:20445825

  17. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  18. Frequency comb swept lasers

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a ~?1.2dB sensitivity roll off over ~3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have ?10dB and ?5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 03mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed. PMID:19997365

  19. DC SQUID detection of new magnetic resonance phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Sleator, T.

    1986-01-01

    A dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) was used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier at liquid helium temperatures to detect very-low-signal magnetic resonance phenomena. Three experiments were performed. In the first experiment, a dc SQUID was used to detect pulsed nuclear quadrupole resonance at about 30 MHz. At a bath temperature of 4.2K, a total system noise temperature of 6 +/- 1K was achieved, with a quality factor Q of 2500. A novel Q-spoiler, consisting of a series array of Josephson tunnel junction, reduced the ring-down time of the tuned circuit after each pulse. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free-precession signal after a single pulse was about 2 x 10/sup 16/ in a bandwidth of 10 kHz. In the second experiment, a sample of nuclear spins was placed in the inductor of a tuned LCR circuit and the spectral density of current fluctuations in the circuit was measured using a dc SQUID as an rf amplifier. The measurements were made in liquid helium at 1.5K on samples of NaClO/sub 3/ and KClO/sub 3/, each of which exhibit a /sup 35/Cl NQR transition at about 30 MHz. In the third experiment, precessing nuclear quadrupole moments were observed to induce oscillating electric dipole moments in neighboring atoms. The /sup 35/Cl nuclei of a single crystal of NaClO/sub 3/ placed between the plates of a capacitor were excited into precession by a rf pulse.

  20. Image restoration using fast Fourier and wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrod, William J.; Nagy, James G.; Plemmons, Robert J.

    1994-02-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a proof-of-concept NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). With minimal modification to the existing explosives detector, we can detect operationally relevant quantities of (free base) cocaine within the 300-liter inspection volume in 6 seconds. We are presently extending this approach to the detection of heroin base and also examining 14N and 35,37Cl pure NQR for detection of the hydrochloride forms of both materials. An adaptation of this NQR approach may be suitable for scanning personnel for externally carried contraband and explosives. We first outline the basics of the NQR approach, highlighting strengths and weaknesses, and then present representative results for RDX and cocaine detection. We also present a partial compendium of relevant NQR parameters measured for some materials of interest.

  1. Narcotics and explosives detection by 14N pure nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.

    1994-03-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a proof-of-concept NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). With minimal modification to the existing explosives detector, we can detect operationally relevant quantities of (free base) cocaine within the 300-liter inspection volume in 6 seconds. We are presently extending this approach to the detection of heroin base and also examining 14N and 35,37Cl pure NQR for detection of the hydrochloride forms of both materials. An adaptation of this NQR approach may be suitable for scanning personnel for externally carried contraband and explosives. We first outline the basics of the NQR approach, highlighting strengths and weaknesses, and then present representative results for RDX and cocaine detection. We also present a partial compendium of relevant NQR parameters measured for some materials of interest.

  2. Supernova frequency estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvetkov, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of the frequency of type I and II supernovae occurring in galaxies of different types are derived from observational material acquired by the supernova patrol of the Shternberg Astronomical Institute.

  3. Histograms and Frequency Density.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micromath, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Introduces exercises on histograms and frequency density. Guides pupils to Discovering Important Statistical Concepts Using Spreadsheets (DISCUSS), created at the University of Coventry. Includes curriculum points, teaching tips, activities, and internet address (http://www.coventry.ac.uk/discuss/). (KHR)

  4. Electromechanical Frequency Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wersing, W.; Lubitz, K.

    Frequency filters select signals with a frequency inside a definite frequency range or band from signals outside this band, traditionally afforded by a combination of L-C-resonators. The fundamental principle of all modern frequency filters is the constructive interference of travelling waves. If a filter is set up of coupled resonators, this interference occurs as a result of the successive wave reflection at the resonators' ends. In this case, the center frequency f c of a filter, e.g., set up of symmetrical ?/2-resonators of length 1, is given by f_c = f_r = v_{ph}/? = v_{ph}/2l , where v ph is the phase velocity of the wave. This clearly shows the big advantage of acoustic waves for filter applications in comparison to electro-magnetic waves. Because v ph of acoustic waves in solids is about 104-105 smaller than that of electro-magnetic waves, much smaller filters can be realised. Today, piezoelectric materials and processing technologies exist that electromechanical resonators and filters can be produced in the frequency range from 1 kHz up to 10 GHz. Further requirements for frequency filters such as low losses (high resonator Q) and low temperature coefficients of frequency constants can also be fulfilled with these filters. Important examples are quartz-crystal resonators and filters (1 kHz-200 MHz) as discussed in Chap. 2, electromechanical channel filters (50 kHz and 130 kHz) for long-haul communication systems as discussed in this section, surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters (20 MHz-5 GHz), as discussed in Chap. 14, and thin film bulk acoustic resonators (FBAR) and filters (500 MHz-10 GHz), as discussed in Chap. 15.

  5. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  6. ALMA High Frequency Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J. D.; Mason, B.; Impellizzeri, V.; Kameno, S.; Fomalont, E.; Chibueze, J.; Takahashi, S.; Remijan, A.; Wilson, C.; ALMA Science Team

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the ALMA High Frequency Campaign is to improve the quality and efficiency of science observing in Bands 8, 9, and 10 (385-950 GHz), the highest frequencies available to the ALMA project. To this end, we outline observing modes which we have demonstrated to improve high frequency calibration for the 12m array and the ACA, and we present the calibration of the total power antennas at these frequencies. Band-to-band (B2B) transfer and bandwidth switching (BWSW), techniques which improve the speed and accuracy of calibration at the highest frequencies, are most necessary in Bands 8, 9, and 10 due to the rarity of strong calibrators. These techniques successfully enable increased signal-to-noise on the calibrator sources (and better calibration solutions) by measuring the calibrators at lower frequencies (B2B) or in wider bandwidths (BWSW) compared to the science target. We have also demonstrated the stability of the bandpass shape to better than 2.4% for 1 hour, hidden behind random noise, in Band 9. Finally, total power observing using the dual sideband receivers in Bands 9 and 10 requires the separation of the two sidebands; this procedure has been demonstrated in Band 9 and is undergoing further testing in Band 10.

  7. Monolithic THz Frequency Multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, N. R.; Narayanan, G.; Grosslein, R. M.; Martin, S.; Mehdi, I.; Smith, P.; Coulomb, M.; DeMartinez, G.

    2001-01-01

    Frequency multipliers are required as local oscillator sources for frequencies up to 2.7 THz for FIRST and airborne applications. Multipliers at these frequencies have not previously been demonstrated, and the object of this work was to show whether such circuits are really practical. A practical circuit is one which not only performs as well as is required, but also can be replicated in a time that is feasible. As the frequency of circuits is increased, the difficulties in fabrication and assembly increase rapidly. Building all of the circuit on GaAs as a monolithic circuit is highly desirable to minimize the complexity of assembly, but at the highest frequencies, even a complete monolithic circuit is extremely small, and presents serious handling difficulty. This is compounded by the requirement for a very thin substrate. Assembly can become very difficult because of handling problems and critical placement. It is very desirable to make the chip big enough to that it can be seen without magnification, and strong enough that it may be picked up with tweezers. Machined blocks to house the chips present an additional challenge. Blocks with complex features are very expensive, and these also imply very critical assembly of the parts. It would be much better if the features in the block were as simple as possible and non-critical to the function of the chip. In particular, grounding and other electrical interfaces should be done in a manner that is highly reproducible.

  8. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and imaging an event horizon (Invited) / S. Doeleman. Optically-pumped space cesium clock for Galileo: results of the breadboard / R. Ruffieux ... [et al.] -- pt. IV. Optical clocks I: lattice clocks. Optical lattice clock: seven years of progress and next steps (Invited) / H. Katori, M. Takamoto and T. Akatsuka. The Yb optical lattice clock (Invited) / N. D. Demke ... [et al.]. Optical Lattice clock with Sr atoms (Invited) / P. G. Westergaard ... [et al.]. Development of an optical clock based on neutral strontium atoms held in a lattice trap / E. A. Curtis ... [et al.]. Decoherence and losses by collisions in a [symbol]Sr lattice clock / J. S. R. Vellore Winfred ... [et al.]. Lattice Yb optical clock and cryogenic Cs fountain at INRIM / F. Levi ... [et al.] -- pt. V. Optical clocks II: ion clocks. [Symbol]Yb+ single-ion optical frequency standards (Invited) / Chr. Tamm ... [et al.]. An optical clock based on a single trapped [symbol]Sr+ ion (Invited) / H. S. Margolis ... [et al.]. A trapped [symbol]Yb+ ion optical frequency standard based on the [symbol] transition (Invited) / P. Gill ... [et al.]. Overview of highly accurate RF and optical frequency standards at the National Research Council of Canada (Invited) / A. A. Madej ... [et al.] -- pt. VI. Optical frequency combs. Extreme ultraviolet frequency combs for spectroscopy (Invited) / A. Ozawa ... [et al.]. Development of an optical clockwork for the single trapped strontium ion standard at 445 THz / J. E. Bernard ... [et al.]. A phase-coherent link between the visible and infrared spectral ranges using a combination of CW OPO and femtosecond laser frequency comb / E. V. Kovalchuk and A. Peters. Improvements to the robustness of a TI: sapphire-based femtosecond comb at NPL / V. Tsatourian ... [et al.] -- pt. VII. Atomic microwave standards. NIST FI and F2 (Invited) / T. P. Heavner ... [et al.]. Atomic fountains for the USNO master clock (Invited) / C. Ekstrom ... [et al.]. The transportable cesium fountain clock NIM5: its construction and performance (Invited) / T. Li ... [et al.].Compensated multi-pole mercury trapped ion frequency standard and stability evaluation of systematic effects (Invited) / E. A. Burt ... [et al.]. Research of frequency standards in SIOM - atomic frequency standards based on coherent storage (Invited) / B. Yan ... [et al.]. The PTB fountain clock ensemble preliminary characterization of the new fountain CSF2 / N. Nemitz ... [et al.]. The pulsed optically pumped clock: microwave and optical detection / S. Micalizio ... [et al.]. Research on characteristics of pulsed optically pumped rubidium frequency standard / J. Deng ... [et al.]. Status of the continuous cold fountain clocks at METAS-LTF / A. Joyet ... [et al.]. Experiments with a new [symbol]Hg+ ion clock / E. A. Burt ... [et al.]. Optimising a high-stability CW laser-pumped rubidium gas-cell frequency standard / C. Affolderbach ... [et al.]. Raman-Ramsey Cs cell atomic clock / R. Boudot ... [et al.] -- pt. VIII. Microwave resonators & oscillators. Solutions and ultimate limits in temperature compensation of metallic cylindrical microwave resonators (Invited) / A. De Marchi. Cryogenic sapphire oscillators (Invited) / J. G. Hartnett, E. N. Ivanov and M. E. Tobar. Ultra-stable optical cavity: design and experiments / J. Millo ... [et al.]. New results for whispering gallery mode cryogenic sapphire maser oscillators / K. Benmessai ... [et al.] -- pt. IX. Advanced techniques. Fundamental noise-limited optical phase locking at Femtowatt light levels (Invited) / J. Dick ... [et al.]. Microwave and optical frequency transfer via optical fibre / G. Marra ... [et al.]. Ultra-stable laser source for the [symbol]Sr+ single-ion optical frequency standard at NRC / P. Dubé, A. A. Madej and J. E. Bernard. Clock laser system for a strontium lattice clock / T. Legero ... [et al.]. Measurement noise floor for a long-distance optical carrier transmission via fiber / G. Grosche ... [et al.]. Optical frequency transfer over 172 KM of installed fiber / S. Crane -- pt. X. Miniature systems. Chip-scale atomic devices: precision atomic instruments based on MEMS (Invited) / J. Kitching ... [et al.]. CSAC - the chip-scale atomic clock (Invited) / R. Lutwak ... [et al.]. Reaching a few 10[symbol] stability level with a compact cold atom clock / F. X. Esnault ... [et al.]. Evaluation of Lin||Lin CPT for compact and high performance frequency standard / E. Breschi ... [et al.] -- pt. XI. Time scales. Atomic time scales TAI and TI(BIPM): present status and prospects (Invited) / G. Petit. Weight functions for biases in atomic frequency standards / J. H. Shirley -- pt. XII. Interferometers. Definition and construction of noise budget in atom interferometry (Invited) / E. D'Ambriosio. Characterization of a cold atom gyroscope (Invited) / A. Landragin ... [et al.]. A mobile atom interferometer for high precision measurements of local gravity / M. Schmidt ... [et al.]. Demonstration of atom interferometer comprised of geometric beam splitters / Hiromitsu Imai and Atsuo Morinaga -- pt. XIII. New directions. Active optical clocks (Invited) / J. Chen. Prospects for a nuclear optical frequency standard based on Thorium-229 (Invited) / E. Peik ... [et al.]. Whispering gallery mode oscillators and optical comb generators (Invited) / A. B. Matsko ... [et al.]. Frequency comparison using energy-time entangled photons / A. Stefanov -- List of participants.

  9. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength sources include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  10. Single frequency multitransmitter telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreno, Victor A.

    1986-12-01

    The invention relates to a single frequency multitransmitter telemetry system that will deliver a substantial amount of data at low cost. The invention consists essentially of a plurality of sensor transmitter units at different locations, with individual signal conditioning and logic, which send sampled data signals to a single receiver. The transmitters operate independently on the same frequency in a frequency shift keying modulation system and are not synchronized to the receiver. The problem of reception of data from more than one transmitter simultaneously is solved by discarding the data - when there is overlap of data from two or more transmitters, the data is discarded and when there is no overlap the data is retained. The invention utilizes a unique overlap detection technique to determine if data should be retained or discarded. When data is received from a transmitter, it goes into a shift register.

  11. Hg(+) Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we review the development of Hg(+) microwave frequency standards for use in high reliability and continuous operation applications. In recent work we have demonstrated short-term frequency stability of 3 x 10(exp -14)/nu(sub tau) when a cryogenic oscillator of stability 2-3 x 10(exp 15) was used a the local oscillator. The trapped ion frequency standard employs a Hg-202 discharge lamp to optically pump the trapped Hg(+)-199 clock ions and a helium buffer gas to cool the ions to near room temperature. We describe a small Hg(+) ion trap based frequency standard with an extended linear ion trap (LITE) architecture which separates the optical state selection region from the clock resonance region. This separation allows the use of novel trap configurations in the resonance region since no optical pumping is carried out there. A method for measuring the size of an ion cloud inside a linear trap with a 12-rod trap is currently being investigated. At approx. 10(exp -12), the 2nd order Doppler shift for trapped mercury ion frequency standards is one of the largest frequency offsets and its measurement to the 1% level would represent an advance in insuring the very long-term stability of these standards to the 10(exp -14) or better level. Finally, we describe atomic clock comparison experiments that can probe for a time variation of the fine structure constant, alpha = e(exp 2)/2(pi)hc, at the level of 10(exp -20)/year as predicted in some Grand Unified String Theories.

  12. Frequency Tunable Wire Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides frequency tunable solid-state radiation-generating devices, such as lasers and amplifiers, whose active medium has a size in at least one transverse dimension (e.g., its width) that is much smaller than the wavelength of radiation generated and/or amplified within the active medium. In such devices, a fraction of radiation travels as an evanescent propagating mode outside the active medium. It has been discovered that in such devices the radiation frequency can be tuned by the interaction of a tuning mechanism with the propagating evanescent mode.

  13. All-frequency reflectionlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philbin, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    We derive planar permittivity profiles that do not reflect perpendicularly exiting radiation of any frequency. The materials obey the KramersKronig relations and have no regions of gain. Reduction of the Casimir force by means of such materials is also discussed.

  14. improving maser frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen maser frequency standard is more stable by addition of parallel pyrex capillary tube array collimator. With collimator, maser line width has been made as narrow as 0.24 hertz representing fivefold improvement over maser without collimator. Fluorocarbon coating in tubes virtually eliminates energy loss in collimator.

  15. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA); Schipper, John F. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  16. Theoretical Study on Isotope-Selective Dissociation of the Lithium Chloride Molecule Using a Designed Terahertz-Wave Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Akira; Matsuoka, Leo; Kurosaki, Yuzuru; Yokoyama, Keiichi

    Isotope-selective dissociation of the lithium chloride (LiCl) molecules is investigated by the quantum mechanical calculations. In the mixture of 7Li35Cl and 7Li37Cl, the 7Li35Cl molecule in the lowest rovibrational state is excited into a high rotational state by the frequency comb whose spectral frequencies are tuned to the rotational transition frequencies of 7Li35Cl. The excited 7Li35Cl molecule is dissociated into the atomic species by the second terahertz field. Our simulations suggest a potential of the isotope separation with terahertz fields.

  17. Endless frequency shifting of optical frequency comb lines.

    PubMed

    Benkler, Erik; Rohde, Felix; Telle, Harald R

    2013-03-11

    The functional principle of a novel technique for frequency shifting lines of an optical frequency comb is demonstrated. The underlying principle is to shift the carrier frequency by changing the carrier phase within the time span between subsequent pulses of a mode-locked laser used as comb generator. This universal frequency shifter does not require intrusion into the comb generator and provides high agility for arbitrary temporal frequency evolutions. PMID:23482149

  18. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers. PMID:26072834

  19. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  20. Extended frequency turbofan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. R.; Park, J. W.; Jaekel, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    The fan model was developed using two dimensional modeling techniques to add dynamic radial coupling between the core stream and the bypass stream of the fan. When incorporated into a complete TF-30 engine simulation, the fan model greatly improved compression system frequency response to planar inlet pressure disturbances up to 100 Hz. The improved simulation also matched engine stability limits at 15 Hz, whereas the one dimensional fan model required twice the inlet pressure amplitude to stall the simulation. With verification of the two dimensional fan model, this program formulated a high frequency F-100(3) engine simulation using row by row compression system characteristics. In addition to the F-100(3) remote splitter fan, the program modified the model fan characteristics to simulate a proximate splitter version of the F-100(3) engine.

  1. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  2. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  3. Multiwire thermocouples: Frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements are made with a novel two wire thermocouple. Signals from two wires of unequal diameters are recorded from the thermocouple suspended in constant flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the two wire thermocouple requires no compensation for omega less than or equal to 2 omega(sub 1) where omega is the natural frequency of the smaller wire. A compensation factor is recommended for larger frequencies omega greater than 2 omega(sub 1). Theory and experimental measurements are compared with a novel three wire thermocouple. Signals from three wires of unequal diameters are recorded from the thermocouple suspended in constant flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the three wire thermocouple requires no compensation for omega less than or equal to 5 omega(sub 1) where omega (sub 1) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire. The latter result represents a significant improvement compared to previous work with two wire thermocouples. A correction factor has also been derived to account for wires of arbitrary diameter. Measurements are recorded for multiwire thermocouples consisting of either two or three wires of unequal diameters. Signals from the multiwire probe are recorded for a reversing gas flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the multiwire thermocouple requires no compensation provided omega/omega(sub 1) is less than 2.3 for two wires or omega/omega(sub 1) is less than 3.6 for three wires where omega(sub 1) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire based on the maximum gas velocity. The latter results were possible provided Fourier transformed data were used and knowledge of the gas velocity is available.

  4. Frequency steerable acoustic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, Matteo

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an active research area devoted to the assessment of the structural integrity of critical components of aerospace, civil and mechanical systems. Guided wave methods have been proposed for SHM of plate-like structures using permanently attached piezoelectric transducers, which generate and sense waves to evaluate the presence of damage. Effective interrogation of structural health is often facilitated by sensors and actuators with the ability to perform electronic, i.e. phased array, scanning. The objective of this research is to design an innovative directional piezoelectric transducer to be employed for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health. The proposed Frequency Steerable Acoustic Transducers (FSATs) are characterized by a spatial arrangement of active material which leads to directional characteristics varying with frequency. Thus FSATs can be employed both for directional sensing and generation of guided waves without relying on phasing and control of a large number of channels. The analytical expression of the shape of the FSATs is obtained through a theoretical formulation for continuously distributed active material as part of a shaped piezoelectric device. The FSAT configurations analyzed in this work are a quadrilateral array and a geometry which corresponds to a spiral in the wavenumber domain. The quadrilateral array is experimentally validated, confirming the concept of frequency-dependent directionality. Its limited directivity is improved by the Wavenumber Spiral FSAT (WS-FSAT), which, instead, is characterized by a continuous frequency dependent directionality. Preliminary validations of the WS-FSAT, using a laser doppler vibrometer, are followed by the implementation of the WS-FSAT as a properly shaped piezo transducer. The prototype is first used for localization of acoustic broadband sources. Signal processing algorithms and related imaging techniques for damage location are also presented. Finally, the WS-FSAT has also been experimentally validated in generation.

  5. Rapid Frequency Scan EPR

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x,y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5 T2 after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5 T2. However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5 T2, even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B1, periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  6. High frequency electromagnetic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Ueng, T.; Latorre, R.

    1989-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate high frequency electromagnetic tomography as a candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for several planes between boreholes. Data were taken before the heater was turned on, during heating and during cooldown of the rockmass. This data is interpreted to yield maps of changes in water content of the rockmass as a function of time. This interpretation is based on laboratory measurement of electromagnetic permittivity as a function of water content for densely welded tuff. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Frequency Domain Identification Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Chen, Chung-Wen

    1996-01-01

    This report documents software written in MATLAB programming language for performing identification of systems from frequency response functions. MATLAB is a commercial software environment which allows easy manipulation of data matrices and provides other intrinsic matrix functions capabilities. Algorithms programmed in this collection of subroutines have been documented elsewhere but all references are provided in this document. A main feature of this software is the use of matrix fraction descriptions and system realization theory to identify state space models directly from test data. All subroutines have templates for the user to use as guidelines.

  8. Frequency doubling crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.; Velsko, S.P.

    1989-10-24

    A systematic approach to the production of frequency conversion crystals is described in which a chiral molecule has attached to it a harmonic generating unit which contributes to the noncentrosymmetry of the molecule. Certain preferred embodiments of such harmonic generating units include carboxylate, guanadyly and imidazolyl units. Certain preferred crystals include L- arginine fluoride, deuterated L-arginine fluoride, L-arginine chloride monohydrate, L-arginine acetate, dithallium tartrate, ammonium N-acetyl valine, N-acetyl tyrosine and N-acetyl hydroxyproline. Chemical modifications of the chiral molecule, such as deuteration, halogenation and controlled counterion substitution are available to adapt the dispersive properties of a crystal in a particular wavelength region.

  9. High frequency pulsed electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, David Wayne

    Electromigration life tests were performed on copper-alloyed aluminum test structures that were representative of modern CMOS metallization schemes, complete with Ti/TiN cladding layers and a tungsten-plug contact at the cathode. A total of 18 electrical stress treatments were applied. One was a DC current of 15 mA. The other 17 were pulsed currents, varied according to duty cycle and frequency. The pulse amplitude was 15 mA (2.7 10sp6 A/cmsp2) for all treatments. Duty cycles ranged from 33.3% to 80%, and frequencies fell into three rough ranges-100 KHz, 1 MHz, and 100 MHz. The ambient test temperature was 200spC in all experiments. Six to 9 samples were subjected to each treatment. Experimental data were gathered in the form of test stripe resistance versus time, R(t). For purposes of lifetime analysis, "failure" was defined by the criterion R(t)/R(0) = 1.10, and the median time to failure, tsb{50}, was used as the primary basis of comparison between test groups. It was found that the dependence of tsb{50} on pulse duty cycle conformed rather well to the so-called "average current density model" for duty cycles of 50% and higher. Lifetimes were less enhanced for a duty cycle of 33.3%, but they were still considerably longer than an "on-time" model would predict. No specific dependence of tsb{50} on pulse frequency was revealed by the data, that is, reasonably good predictions of tsb{50} could be made by recognizing the dominant influence of duty cycle. These findings confirm that IC miniaturization can be more aggressively pursued than an on-time prediction would allow. It is significant that this was found to be true for frequencies on the order of 100 MHz, where many present day digital applications operate. Post-test optical micrographs were obtained for each test subject in order to determine the location of electromigration damage. The pulse duty cycle was found to influence the location. Most damage occurred at the cathode contact, regardless of treatment conditions, but there was an increased incidence of damage farther downwind with decreasing duty cycle. This tendency and the deviation from the average current density model for small duty cycles were explained in terms of the Blech length, its dependence on microstructure and duty cycle, and its impact on the relative rates of damage and recovery.

  10. Radio frequency pulse compression

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1988-12-01

    High gradients require peak powers. One possible way to generate high peak powers is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a shorter pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before dc to rf conversion as is done for the relativistic klystron or after dc to rf conversion as is done with SLED. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered. Three methods of RFPC will be discussed: SLED, BEC, and REC. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Microwave Frequency Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Vien The; Mirel, Paul; Kogut, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and analysis of microwave frequency polarizing grids. The grids are designed to measure polarization from the cosmic microwave background. It is effective in the range of 500 to 1500 micron wavelength. It is cryogenic compatible and highly robust to high load impacts. Each grid is fabricated using an array of different assembly processes which vary in the types of tension mechanisms to the shape and size of the grids. We provide a comprehensive study on the analysis of the grids' wire heights, diameters, and spacing.

  12. RADIO FREQUENCY ATTENUATOR

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1963-11-12

    A high peak power level r-f attenuator that is readily and easily insertable along a coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer annular conductor without breaking the ends thereof is presented. Spaced first and second flares in the outer conductor face each other with a slidable cylindrical outer conductor portion therebetween. Dielectric means, such as water, contact the cable between the flares to attenuate the radio-frequency energy received thereby. The cylindrical outer conductor portion is slidable to adjust the voltage standing wave ratio to a low level, and one of the flares is slidable to adjust the attenuation level. An integral dielectric container is also provided. (AFC)

  13. Frequency stabilisation of femtosecond frequency combs with a reference laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bagayev, S N; Pivtsov, V S; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2002-04-30

    A solution to the key problem of femtosecond metrology - elimination of the frequency offset related to the intracavity dispersion of a femtosecond laser - is proposed. The proposed method involves stabilisation of the intermode interval between equidistant spectral components in a frequency comb produced by a mode-locked femtosecond laser by phase-locking the frequency difference between a pair of discrete spectral components in this comb to the frequency of a reference laser. An introduction of a nonlinear-optical crystal for frequency doubling into the scheme for frequency-comb stabilisation allows the frequency offset related to the intracavity dispersion of the femtosecond laser to be eliminated, thus suggesting the way for absolute stabilisation of frequency combs generated by femtosecond mode-locked lasers. Radiation of a reference laser with such an approach plays the role of an anchor in the femtosecond clockwork. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  14. Impacts of frequency increment errors on frequency diverse array beampattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kuandong; Chen, Hui; Shao, Huaizong; Cai, Jingye; Wang, Wen-Qin

    2015-12-01

    Different from conventional phased array, which provides only angle-dependent beampattern, frequency diverse array (FDA) employs a small frequency increment across the antenna elements and thus results in a range angle-dependent beampattern. However, due to imperfect electronic devices, it is difficult to ensure accurate frequency increments, and consequently, the array performance will be degraded by unavoidable frequency increment errors. In this paper, we investigate the impacts of frequency increment errors on FDA beampattern. We derive the beampattern errors caused by deterministic frequency increment errors. For stochastic frequency increment errors, the corresponding upper and lower bounds of FDA beampattern error are derived. They are verified by numerical results. Furthermore, the statistical characteristics of FDA beampattern with random frequency increment errors, which obey Gaussian distribution and uniform distribution, are also investigated.

  15. Frequency selective bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowitt, M. S.; Fixsen, D. J.; Goldin, A.; Meyer, S. S.

    1996-10-01

    We propose a concept for radiometry in the millimeter, the submillimeter, and the far-IR spectral regions, the frequency selective bolometer (FSB). This system uses a bolometer as a coupled element of a tuned quasi-optical interference filter in which the absorption, the transmission, and the reflection characteristics of the filter depend on the frequency in a controlled manner. Several FSB's can be cascaded within a straight light pipe to produce a high-efficiency, compact, multiband radiometer. A prototype design is presented together with its anticipated performance based on a one-dimensional transmission-line model. Instruments based on FSB technology should have several advantages over current multiband bolometric radiometers including smaller and more compact cryogenic optics, reduced demands on cryostat size and weight, high coupling efficiency, minimum constraints on the geometry in the focal plane. An FSB system can be configured as a multiband, close-packed focal-plane array, permitting efficient use of the throughput of a telescope.

  16. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire ventricular surface and were signal-averaged and filtered in the 30-250 Hz frequency range. The results showed that the decrease noted in the HF-QRS correlated linearly with the local conduction delay. The results suggest that HF-QRS is a potent indicator of disturbed local conduction. An alternative theory is that HF-QRS reflect the shape of the original electrocardiographic signal. Bennhagen et al showed that root mean square (RMS) voltage values of the depolarization signal correlate poorly with the signal amplitude but highly with the first and second derivatives, i.e. the velocity and the acceleration of the signal. It has also been suggested that the autonomic nervous system affects HF-QRS. For example, sitting up causes significant changes in HF-QRS in some leads compared to the supine position [Douglas et al., 2006]. Unpublished results indicate that familial dysautonomic patients (both vagal and sympathetic degeneration) have very little Reduced Amplitude Zones (RAZ) formation . Athletic individuals, especially elite athletes, who have vagally-mediated changes on the conventional ECG (i.e. early repolarization, bradycardia) have increased RAZ formation. Further electrophysiological studies are needed, however, to better understand the underlying mechanisms of HF-QRS. Several investigators have studied HF-QRS in different cardiac conditions, including acute myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction (MI). However, in order for clinicians to confidently use HF-QRS as an adjunct to standard ECG, more knowledge about the characteristics of HF-QRS is needed.

  17. Frequency effects in compound production

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Heidrun; Levelt, Willem J. M.; Baayen, R. Harald

    2005-01-01

    Four experiments investigated the role of frequency information in compound production by independently varying the frequencies of the first and second constituent as well as the frequency of the compound itself. Pairs of Dutch noun-noun compounds were selected such that there was a maximal contrast for one frequency while matching the other two frequencies. In a position-response association task, participants first learned to associate a compound with a visually marked position on a computer screen. In the test phase, participants had to produce the associated compound in response to the appearance of the position mark, and we measured speech onset latencies. The compound production latencies varied significantly according to factorial contrasts in the frequencies of both constituting morphemes but not according to a factorial contrast in compound frequency, providing further evidence for decompositional models of speech production. In a stepwise regression analysis of the joint data of Experiments 1-4, however, compound frequency was a significant nonlinear predictor, with facilitation in the low-frequency range and a trend toward inhibition in the high-frequency range. Furthermore, a combination of structural measures of constituent frequencies and entropies explained significantly more variance than a strict decompositional model, including cumulative root frequency as the only measure of constituent frequency, suggesting a role for paradigmatic relations in the mental lexicon. PMID:16301521

  18. Time, Frequency and Physical Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellwig, Helmut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes several developments in atomic clocks and frequency standards pointing out the feasibility and practicality in adopting a unified standard of time and frequency to replace other base standards of length, mass, and temperature. (GA)

  19. Open loop digital frequency multiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. C. (inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An open loop digital frequency multiplier is described which has a multiplied output synchronized to low frequency clock pulse. The system includes a multistage digital counter which provides a pulse output as a function of an integer divisor. The integer divisor and the timing or counting cycle of the counter are interrelated to the frequency of a clock input. The counting cycle is controlled by a one shot multivibrator which, in turn, is driven by a reference frequency input.

  20. Frequency mixing crystal

    DOEpatents

    Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Laura E. (Manteca, CA); Webb, Mark (Salida, CA)

    1992-01-01

    In a laser system for converting infrared laser light waves to visible light comprising a source of infrared laser light waves and means of harmoic generation associated therewith for production of light waves at integral multiples of the frequency of the original wave, the improvement of said means of harmonic generation comprising a crystal having the chemical formula X.sub.2 Y(NO.sub.3).sub.5 .multidot.2 nZ.sub.2 o wherein X is selected from the group consisting of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Tl; Y is selected from the group consisting of Sc, Y, La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Al, Ga, and In; Z is selected from the group consisting of H and D; and n ranges from 0 to 4.

  1. Frequency doubling crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.; Velsko, S.P.

    1988-08-15

    A systematic approach to the production of frequency conversion crystals is described in which a chiral molecule has attached to it a harmonic generating unit'' which contributes to the noncentrosymmetry of the molecule. Certain preferred embodiments of such harmonic generating units include carboxylate, guanadyly and imidazolyl units. Certain preferred crystals include L-arginine fluoride, deuterated L-arginine fluoride, L-arginine chloride monohydrate, L-arginine acetate, dithallium tartrate, ammonium N-acetyl valine, N-acetyl tyrosine and N-acetyle hydroxyyproline. Chemical modifications of the chiral molecule, such as deuteration, halogenation and controlled counterion substitution are available to adapt the dispersive properties of a crystal in a particular wavelength region.

  2. Frequency doubling crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Francis; Velsko, Stephan P.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic approach to the production of frequency conversion crystals is described in which a chiral molecule has attached to it a "harmonic generating unit" which contributes to the noncentrosymmetry of the molecule. Certain preferred embodiments of such harmonic generating units include carboxylate, guanadyly and imidazolyl units. Certain preferred crystals include L-arginine fluoride, deuterated L-arginine fluoride, L-arginine chloride monohydrate, L-arginine acetate, dithallium tartrate, ammonium N-acetyl valine, N-acetyl tyrosine and N-acetyl hydroxyproline. Chemical modifications of the chiral molecule, such as deuteration, halogenation and controlled counterion substitution are available to adapt the dispersive properties of a crystal in a particular wavelength region.

  3. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  4. Radio frequency picosecond phototube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaryan, A.; Carlini, R.; Ent, R.; Grigoryan, N.; Gyunashyan, K.; Hashimoto, O.; Hovater, K.; Ispiryan, M.; Knyazyan, S.; Kross, B.; Majewski, S.; Marikyan, G.; Mkrtchyan, M.; Parlakyan, L.; Popov, V.; Tang, L.; Vardanyan, H.; Yan, C.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Zorn, C.

    2006-10-01

    We propose a photon detector for recording low-level and ultra-fast optical signals, based on radio frequency (RF) analysis of low-energy photoelectrons (PEs). By using currently developed 500 MHz RF deflector, it is possible to scan circularly and detect single PEs, amplified in multi-channel plates (MCPs). The operation of the tube is investigated by means of thermionic electron source. It is demonstrated that the signals generated in the MCP can be processed event by event; by using available nanosecond electronics and that time resolution better than 20 ps can be achieved. Timing characteristics of the Cherenkov detector with RF phototube in a 'head-on' geometry is investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulation.

  5. Instantaneous Frequency Attribute Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlin, M. J.; Margrave, G. F.; Ben Horin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The instantaneous seismic data attribute provides a different means of seismic interpretation, for all types of seismic data. It first came to the fore in exploration seismology in the classic paper of Taner et al (1979), entitled " Complex seismic trace analysis". Subsequently a vast literature has been accumulated on the subject, which has been given an excellent review by Barnes (1992). In this research we will compare two different methods of computation of the instantaneous frequency. The first method is based on the original idea of Taner et al (1979) and utilizes the derivative of the instantaneous phase of the analytic signal. The second method is based on the computation of the power centroid of the time-frequency spectrum, obtained using either the Gabor Transform as computed by Margrave et al (2011) or the Stockwell Transform as described by Stockwell et al (1996). We will apply both methods to exploration seismic data and the DPRK events recorded in 2006 and 2013. In applying the classical analytic signal technique, which is known to be unstable, due to the division of the square of the envelope, we will incorporate the stabilization and smoothing method proposed in the two paper of Fomel (2007). This method employs linear inverse theory regularization coupled with the application of an appropriate data smoother. The centroid method application is straightforward and is based on the very complete theoretical analysis provided in elegant fashion by Cohen (1995). While the results of the two methods are very similar, noticeable differences are seen at the data edges. This is most likely due to the edge effects of the smoothing operator in the Fomel method, which is more computationally intensive, when an optimal search of the regularization parameter is done. An advantage of the centroid method is the intrinsic smoothing of the data, which is inherent in the sliding window application used in all Short-Time Fourier Transform methods. The Fomel technique has a larger CPU run-time, resulting from the necessary matrix inversion. Barnes, Arthur E. "The calculation of instantaneous frequency and instantaneous bandwidth.", Geophysics, 57.11 (1992): 1520-1524. Fomel, Sergey. "Local seismic attributes.", Geophysics, 72.3 (2007): A29-A33. Fomel, Sergey. "Shaping regularization in geophysical-estimation problems." , Geophysics, 72.2 (2007): R29-R36. Stockwell, Robert Glenn, Lalu Mansinha, and R. P. Lowe. "Localization of the complex spectrum: the S transform."Signal Processing, IEEE Transactions on, 44.4 (1996): 998-1001. Taner, M. Turhan, Fulton Koehler, and R. E. Sheriff. "Complex seismic trace analysis." Geophysics, 44.6 (1979): 1041-1063. Cohen, Leon. "Time frequency analysis theory and applications."USA: Prentice Hall, (1995). Margrave, Gary F., Michael P. Lamoureux, and David C. Henley. "Gabor deconvolution: Estimating reflectivity by nonstationary deconvolution of seismic data." Geophysics, 76.3 (2011): W15-W30.

  6. Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1989-01-17

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feed-through provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflections from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  7. Frequency tripling mirror.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Cristina; Günster, Stefan; Ristau, Detlev; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2015-11-30

    A frequency tripling mirror (FTM) is designed, fabricated and demonstrated. The mirror consists of an aperiodic sequence of metal oxide layers on a fused silica substrate tailored to produce the third harmonic in reflection. An optimized 25-layer structure is predicted to increase the reflected TH by more than five orders of magnitude compared to a single hafnia layer, which is a result of global compensation of the phase mismatch of TH and fundamental, field enhancement and design favoring reflection. Single pulse conversion efficiencies approaching one percent have been observed with the 25-layer stack for fundamental wavelengths in the near infrared and 55 fs pulse duration. The FTM is scalable to higher conversion, larger bandwidths and other wavelength regions making it an attractive novel nonlinear optical component based on optical interference coatings. PMID:26698782

  8. Frequency-bin entangled photons

    SciTech Connect

    Olislager, L.; Emplit, P.; Nguyen, A. T.; Massar, S.; Merolla, J.-M.; Huy, K. Phan

    2010-07-15

    A monochromatic laser pumping a parametric down-conversion crystal generates frequency-entangled photon pairs. We study this experimentally by addressing such frequency-entangled photons at telecommunication wavelengths (around 1550 nm) with fiber-optics components such as electro-optic phase modulators and narrow-band frequency filters. The theory underlying our approach uses the notion of frequency-bin entanglement. Our results show that the phase modulators address coherently up to eleven frequency bins, leading to an interference pattern which can violate by more than five standard deviations a Bell inequality adapted to our setup.

  9. Flood frequency in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childers, J.M.

    1970-01-01

    Records of peak discharge at 183 sites were used to study flood frequency in Alaska. The vast size of Alaska, its great ranges of physiography, and the lack of data for much of the State precluded a comprehensive analysis of all flood determinants. Peak stream discharges, where gaging-station records were available, were analyzed for 2-year, 5-year, 10-year, 25-year, and 50-year average-recurrence intervals. A regional analysis of the flood characteristics by multiple-regression methods gave a set of equations that can be used to estimate floods of selected recurrence intervals up to 50 years for any site on any stream in Alaska. The equations relate floods to drainage-basin characteristics. The study indicates that in Alaska the 50-year flood can be estimated from 10-year gaging- station records with a standard error of 22 percent whereas the 50-year flood can be estimated from the regression equation with a standard error of 53 percent. Also, maximum known floods at more than 500 gaging stations and miscellaneous sites in Alaska were related to drainage-area size. An envelope curve of 500 cubic feet per second per square mile covered all but 2 floods in the State.

  10. Multifractal Flood Frequency Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D.; Lovejoy, S.

    2007-12-01

    Hydrology and more generally sciences involved in water resources management, researches and technological or operational development face a fundamental difficulty: the extreme variability of hydrological fields. It clearly appears today that this variability is a function of the observation scale and yield natural hazards such as floods or droughts. The estimation of return periods for extreme precipitation and flooding events requires a model of the natural (unperturbed) statistical behaviour of the probability tails and the possible clustering (including possible long-range dependencies) of the extremes. Appropriate approaches for handling such non classical variability over wide ranges of time and space scale do exist. They are based on a fundamental property of the non-linear equations: scale invariance. Its specific framework is that of multifractals. In this framework hydrological variability builds up scale by scale leading to non-classical statistics; this provides the key element needed to better understand and predict floods. Scaling is a verifiable physical principle which can be exploited to model hydrological processes and estimate their statistics over wide ranges of space-time scales. We first present the Multifractal Flood Frequency Analysis (MFFA) tool and illustrate some results of its application to a large database (for more than 16000 selected stations over USA and Canada). We then discuss its efficiency by showing how the mean flow information - coupled with universal multifractal parametrizations with power law tails - can be used to estimate return times for extreme flood events.

  11. A Biochemical Magic Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1993-01-01

    Life is composed principally of four classes of biomolecules - protein, nucleic acid, polysaccharide and lipid. Using 1) estimates of the reducing equivalents (electron pairs) needed to synthesize these biomolecules from carbon dioxide, and 2) measurements of the molecular composition of different organisms, we calculated the average number of electron pairs required for the reduction of carbon dioxide to biological carbon (electron pairs/carbon atom). These calculations showed that the carbon of the Earths biosphere is at the reduction level of formaldehyde that requires 2 electron pairs/carbon atom to be synthesized from carbon dioxide. This was also the reduction level of carbon of individual organisms, except for those that stored large amounts of fuel as lipid. Since this chemical property of life is easily discovered and probably universal, it's most likely known by other intelligent life in the universe. It could be the one thing we know about other carbon-based life in the universe, and the one thing that other intelligent life knows about us. We believe this common knowledge that formaldehyde represents the reduction level of life's carbon could lead to the selection of the 72.83814 GHz line of the 0,0,0,1,0,1 ground-state rotational transition of formaldehyde as a frequency for interstellar communication.

  12. Ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces, infrared spectra, and vibrational predissociation dynamics of the 35Cl-⋯H2/D2 complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. A.; Grinev, T. A.; Kłos, J.; Bieske, E. J.; Szczȩśniak, M. M.; Chałasiński, G.

    2003-12-01

    Three-dimensional potential energy and dipole moment surfaces of the Cl--H2 system are calculated ab initio by means of a coupled cluster method with single and double excitations and noniterative correction to triple excitations with augmented correlation consistent quadruple-zeta basis set supplemented with bond functions, and represented in analytical forms. Variational calculations of the energy levels up to the total angular momentum J=25 provide accurate estimations of the measured rotational spectroscopic constants of the ground van der Waals levels n=0 of the Cl-⋯H2/D2 complexes although they underestimate the red shifts of the mid-infrared spectra with v=0→v=1 vibrational excitation of the monomer. They also attest to the accuracy of effective radial interaction potentials extracted previously from experimental data using the rotational RKR procedure. Vibrational predissociation of the Cl-⋯H2/D2(v=1) complexes is shown to follow near-resonant vibrational-to-rotational energy transfer mechanism so that more than 97% of the product monomers are formed in the highest accessible rotational level. This mechanism explains the strong variation of the predissociation rate with isotopic content and nuclear spin form of the complex. Strong deviation of the observed relative abundances of ortho and para forms of the complexes from those of the monomers is qualitatively explained by the secondary ligand exchange reactions in the ionic beam, within the simple thermal equilibrium model. Positions and intensities of the hot v=0, n=1→v=1, n=1 and combination v=0, n=0→v=1, n=1 bands are predicted, and implications to the photoelectron spectroscopy of the complex are briefly discussed.

  13. Understanding of nuclear quadrupole interactions of 35Cl, 79Br and 129I and binding energies of solid halogens at first-principles level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, M. M.; Mishra, D. R.; Paudyal, D.; Byahut, S.; Maharjan, N. B.; Adhikari, N. P.; Scheieher, R. H.; Jeong, Junho; Badu, S. R.; Pink, R. H.; Chow, Lee; Das, T. P.

    This paper deals with the understanding at a first-principles level of the nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) parameters of solid chlorine, bromine and iodine as well as the intermolecular binding of these molecules in the solid. The electronic structure investigations that we have carried out to study these properties of the solid halogens are based on the Hartree-Fock Cluster approach using the Roothaan variational procedure with electron correlation effects included using many-body perturbation theory with the empty orbitals used in the perturbation theory investigations for the excited states. The results of our investigations provide good agreement with the measured NQI parameters primarily from the Hartree-Fock one electron wave-functions with many-body effects making minor contributions. The binding (dissociation) energies for the molecules with the solid state environment on the other hand arises from intermolecular many body effects identified as the Van der Waals attraction with one-electron Hartree-Fock contribution being repulsive in nature.

  14. Understanding of nuclear quadrupole interactions of 35 Cl, 79 Br and 129 I and binding energies of solid halogens at first-principles level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, M. M.; Mishra, D. R.; Paudyal, D. D.; Byahut, S.; Maharjan, N. B.; Adhikari, N. P.; Scheicher, R. H.; Jeong, Junho; Badu, S. R.; Pink, R. H.; Chow, Lee; Das, T. P.

    2007-04-01

    This paper deals with the understanding at a first-principles level of the nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) parameters of solid chlorine, bromine and iodine as well as the intermolecular binding of these molecules in the solid. The electronic structure investigations that we have carried out to study these properties of the solid halogens are based on the Hartree-Fock Cluster approach using the Roothaan variational procedure with electron correlation effects included using many-body perturbation theory with the empty orbitals used in the perturbation theory investigations for the excited states. The results of our investigations provide good agreement with the measured NQI parameters primarily from the Hartree-Fock one electron wave-functions with many-body effects making minor contributions. The binding (dissociation) energies for the molecules with the solid state environment on the other hand arises from intermolecular many body effects identified as the Van der Waals attraction with one-electron Hartree-Fock contribution being repulsive in nature.

  15. High spectral purity Kerr frequency comb radio frequency photonic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Liang, W; Eliyahu, D; Ilchenko, V S; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-based generation of radio frequency signals has produced astonishing improvements in achievable spectral purity, one of the basic features characterizing the performance of an radio frequency oscillator. Kerr frequency combs hold promise for transforming these lab-scale oscillators to chip-scale level. In this work we demonstrate a miniature 10?GHz radio frequency photonic oscillator characterized with phase noise better than -60?dBc?Hz(-1) at 10?Hz, -90?dBc?Hz(-1) at 100?Hz and -170?dBc?Hz(-1) at 10?MHz. The frequency stability of this device, as represented by Allan deviation measurements, is at the level of 10(-10) at 1-100?s integration time-orders of magnitude better than existing radio frequency photonic devices of similar size, weight and power consumption. PMID:26260955

  16. Operational frequency stability of rubidium and cesium frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The frequency stabilities under operational conditions of several commercially available rubidium and cesium frequency standards were determined from experimental data for frequency averaging times from 10 to the 7th power s and are presented in table and graph form. For frequency averaging times between 10 to the 5th power and 10 to the 7th power s, the rubidium standards tested have a stability of between 10 to the minus 12th power and 5 x 10 to the minus 12th power, while the cesium standards have a stability of between 2 x 10 to the minus 13th power and 5 x 10 to the minus 13th power.

  17. Frequency measurement of visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Riehle, Fritz; Schnatz, Harald; Lipphardt, Burghardt; Zinner, Goetz; Trebst, Tilmann; Helmcke, Juergen

    1999-01-15

    Frequency measurements of the Ca optical frequency standard based on an ensemble of cold atoms are described. They represent the first phase-coherent frequency measurement of visible radiation directly related to the primary standard of time and frequency. The optical frequency was provided by the Ca intercombination line ({sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 1}). Sub-kHz resolution close to the natural linewidth of the optical clock transition was observed by time-separated pulsed excitation. The measured frequency is {nu}{sub Ca}=455 986 240 494.13 kHz with a total relative uncertainty of 2.5{center_dot}10{sup -13}.

  18. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, G.J.; Kaskey, J.A.

    1992-11-24

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics. 2 figs.

  19. Light beam frequency comb generator

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, Gordon J.; Kaskey, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A light beam frequency comb generator uses an acousto-optic modulator to generate a plurality of light beams with frequencies which are uniformly separated and possess common noise and drift characteristics. A well collimated monochromatic input light beam is passed through this modulator to produce a set of both frequency shifted and unshifted optical beams. An optical system directs one or more frequency shifted beams along a path which is parallel to the path of the input light beam such that the frequency shifted beams are made incident on the modulator proximate to but separated from the point of incidence of the input light beam. After the beam is thus returned to and passed through the modulator repeatedly, a plurality of mutually parallel beams are generated which are frequency-shifted different numbers of times and possess common noise and drift characteristics.

  20. Effective switching frequency multiplier inverter

    DOEpatents

    Su, Gui-Jia (Oak Ridge, TN); Peng, Fang Z. (Okemos, MI)

    2007-08-07

    A switching frequency multiplier inverter for low inductance machines that uses parallel connection of switches and each switch is independently controlled according to a pulse width modulation scheme. The effective switching frequency is multiplied by the number of switches connected in parallel while each individual switch operates within its limit of switching frequency. This technique can also be used for other power converters such as DC/DC, AC/DC converters.

  1. Frequency-Shift Hearing Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed hearing aid maps spectrum of speech into band of lower frequencies at which ear remains sensitive. By redirecting normal speech frequencies into frequency band from 100 to 1,500 Hz, hearing aid allows people to understand normal conversation, including telephone calls. Principle operation of hearing aid adapted to other uses such as, clearing up noisy telephone or radio communication. In addition, loud-speakers more easily understood in presence of high background noise.

  2. Instantaneous VEP signal frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Shelton, D; Longbotham, H

    1993-01-01

    Various methods have been used in the analysis of visually evoked potential signals. Due to the high noise content of the ssVEP signal, the signal is usually filtered using averaging or an order statistic filter, and then analyzed for frequency content. A frequency analysis technique often employed is the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) which yields information about both the frequency content and the spatial localization simultaneously. In 1946, D. Gabor modified the STFT by using a Gaussian window instead of a Hanning, Hamming, etc. for optimal simultaneous location in time and frequency. The common problem with the windowed DFT/FFT is the ambiguity of the estimate of frequency at a point (frequency localization). This paper will introduce a frequency analysis technique utilizing the WMMR (weighted majority with minimum range) filter, which, while in the time domain, will determine the frequency and spatial properties of a ssVEP signal within one period. This technique has been shown to be robust to impulsive noise of up to 40% and also robust to independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) noise and DC shifts, for frequency content and spatial localization analysis for sinusoidal signals. The WMMR technique will be compared to the Gabor STFT by application to steady state visual evoked potential data. PMID:8329589

  3. Automatic oscillator frequency control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A frequency control system makes an initial correction of the frequency of its own timing circuit after comparison against a frequency of known accuracy and then sequentially checks and corrects the frequencies of several voltage controlled local oscillator circuits. The timing circuit initiates the machine cycles of a central processing unit which applies a frequency index to an input register in a modulo-sum frequency divider stage and enables a multiplexer to clock an accumulator register in the divider stage with a cyclical signal derived from the oscillator circuit being checked. Upon expiration of the interval, the processing unit compares the remainder held as the contents of the accumulator against a stored zero error constant and applies an appropriate correction word to a correction stage to shift the frequency of the oscillator being checked. A signal from the accumulator register may be used to drive a phase plane ROM and, with periodic shifts in the applied frequency index, to provide frequency shift keying of the resultant output signal. Interposition of a phase adder between the accumulator register and phase plane ROM permits phase shift keying of the output signal by periodic variation in the value of a phase index applied to one input of the phase adder.

  4. Atomic frequency standards for ultra-high-frequency stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the Hg-199(+) trapped-ion frequency standard are outlined and compared to other atomic frequency standards, especially the hydrogen maser. The points discussed are those which make the trapped Hg-199(+) standard attractive: high line Q, reduced sensitivity to external magnetic fields, and simplicity of state selection, among others.

  5. Gaming Frequency and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Barry; Jacobs, Gabriel; Watkins, Alan

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous claims that playing computer and video games may be educationally beneficial, but there has been little formal investigation into whether or not the frequency of exposure to such games actually affects academic performance. This paper explores the issue by analysing the relationships between gaming frequency--measured as the

  6. Frequency shaped sliding mode synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.D. ); Oezguener, U. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-03-01

    A sliding mode design method based on frequency shaped quadratic optimal control formulation is proposed in this paper. This method is applied to the design of a VSC controller for a flexible link robot arm. Simulation results show that the excitation of the link deformations can be minimized by introducing frequency-shaping in the synthesis of sliding mode. 7 refs., 19 figs.

  7. Lexical Frequency in Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Measures of lexical frequency presuppose the existence of corpora, but true machine-readable corpora of sign languages (SLs) are only now being created. Lexical frequency ratings for SLs are needed because there has been a heavy reliance on the interpretation of results of psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic experiments in the SL research

  8. Lexical Frequency in Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Measures of lexical frequency presuppose the existence of corpora, but true machine-readable corpora of sign languages (SLs) are only now being created. Lexical frequency ratings for SLs are needed because there has been a heavy reliance on the interpretation of results of psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic experiments in the SL research…

  9. Hydrogen-maser frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V.; Cervenka, P.

    1979-01-01

    Wall shift in frequency of proposed variable-shift maser that is caused by collisions between hydrogen atoms and container walls, could easily be determined, thereby allowing building of frequency standard with accuracy of 1 part in 10 to 14th power.

  10. Dual-frequency ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Y.; Bailey, W. E.

    2006-05-01

    We describe a new experimental technique to investigate coupling effects between different layers or modes in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Dual FMR frequencies are excited (2-8GHz) simultaneously and detected selectively in a broadband rf circuit using lock-in amplifier detection at separate modulation frequencies.

  11. Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1982-09-29

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  12. Contour Integration across Spatial Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persike, Malte; Olzak, Lynn A.; Meinhardt, Gunter

    2009-01-01

    Association field models of contour integration suggest that local band-pass elements are spatially grouped to global contours within limited bands of spatial frequency (Field, Hayes, & Hess, 1993). While results for local orientation and spacing variation render support for AF models, effects of spatial frequency (SF) have rarely been addressed.

  13. Signal Frequency Spectra with Audacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gailey, Alycia

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of the activity presented here is to allow students to explore the frequency components of various simple signals, with the ultimate goal of teaching them how to remove unwanted noise from a voice signal. Analysis of the frequency components of a signal allows students to design filters that remove unwanted components of a

  14. Frequency conversion of structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinlechner, Fabian; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Pruneri, Valerio; Torres, Juan P.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent frequency conversion of structured light, i.e. the ability to manipulate the carrier frequency of a wave front without distorting its spatial phase and intensity profile, provides the opportunity for numerous novel applications in photonic technology and fundamental science. In particular, frequency conversion of spatial modes carrying orbital angular momentum can be exploited in sub-wavelength resolution nano-optics and coherent imaging at a wavelength different from that used to illuminate an object. Moreover, coherent frequency conversion will be crucial for interfacing information stored in the high-dimensional spatial structure of single and entangled photons with various constituents of quantum networks. In this work, we demonstrate frequency conversion of structured light from the near infrared (803 nm) to the visible (527 nm). The conversion scheme is based on sum-frequency generation in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal pumped with a 1540-nm Gaussian beam. We observe frequency-converted fields that exhibit a high degree of similarity with the input field and verify the coherence of the frequency-conversion process via mode projection measurements with a phase mask and a single-mode fiber. Our results demonstrate the suitability of exploiting the technique for applications in quantum information processing and coherent imaging.

  15. Frequency conversion of structured light

    PubMed Central

    Steinlechner, Fabian; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Pruneri, Valerio; Torres, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Coherent frequency conversion of structured light, i.e. the ability to manipulate the carrier frequency of a wave front without distorting its spatial phase and intensity profile, provides the opportunity for numerous novel applications in photonic technology and fundamental science. In particular, frequency conversion of spatial modes carrying orbital angular momentum can be exploited in sub-wavelength resolution nano-optics and coherent imaging at a wavelength different from that used to illuminate an object. Moreover, coherent frequency conversion will be crucial for interfacing information stored in the high-dimensional spatial structure of single and entangled photons with various constituents of quantum networks. In this work, we demonstrate frequency conversion of structured light from the near infrared (803 nm) to the visible (527 nm). The conversion scheme is based on sum-frequency generation in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal pumped with a 1540-nm Gaussian beam. We observe frequency-converted fields that exhibit a high degree of similarity with the input field and verify the coherence of the frequency-conversion process via mode projection measurements with a phase mask and a single-mode fiber. Our results demonstrate the suitability of exploiting the technique for applications in quantum information processing and coherent imaging. PMID:26875448

  16. Frequency conversion of structured light.

    PubMed

    Steinlechner, Fabian; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Pruneri, Valerio; Torres, Juan P

    2016-01-01

    Coherent frequency conversion of structured light, i.e. the ability to manipulate the carrier frequency of a wave front without distorting its spatial phase and intensity profile, provides the opportunity for numerous novel applications in photonic technology and fundamental science. In particular, frequency conversion of spatial modes carrying orbital angular momentum can be exploited in sub-wavelength resolution nano-optics and coherent imaging at a wavelength different from that used to illuminate an object. Moreover, coherent frequency conversion will be crucial for interfacing information stored in the high-dimensional spatial structure of single and entangled photons with various constituents of quantum networks. In this work, we demonstrate frequency conversion of structured light from the near infrared (803 nm) to the visible (527 nm). The conversion scheme is based on sum-frequency generation in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal pumped with a 1540-nm Gaussian beam. We observe frequency-converted fields that exhibit a high degree of similarity with the input field and verify the coherence of the frequency-conversion process via mode projection measurements with a phase mask and a single-mode fiber. Our results demonstrate the suitability of exploiting the technique for applications in quantum information processing and coherent imaging. PMID:26875448

  17. Pitch perception: dissociating frequency from fundamental-frequency discrimination.

    PubMed

    Oxenham, Andrew J; Micheyl, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    High-frequency pure tones (>6 kHz), which alone do not produce salient melodic pitch information, provide melodic pitch information when they form part of a harmonic complex tone with a lower fundamental frequency (F0). We explored this phenomenon in normal-hearing listeners by measuring F0 difference limens (F0DLs) for harmonic complex tones and pure-tone frequency difference limens (FDLs) for each of the tones within the harmonic complexes. Two spectral regions were tested. The low- and high-frequency band-pass regions comprised harmonics 6-11 of a 280- or 1,400-Hz F0, respectively; thus, for the high-frequency region, audible frequencies present were all above 7 kHz. Frequency discrimination of inharmonic log-spaced tone complexes was also tested in control conditions. All tones were presented in a background of noise to limit the detection of distortion products. As found in previous studies, F0DLs in the low region were typically no better than the FDL for each of the constituent pure tones. In contrast, F0DLs for the high-region complex were considerably better than the FDLs found for most of the constituent (high-frequency) pure tones. The data were compared with models of optimal spectral integration of information, to assess the relative influence of peripheral and more central noise in limiting performance. The results demonstrate a dissociation in the way pitch information is integrated at low and high frequencies and provide new challenges and constraints in the search for the underlying neural mechanisms of pitch. PMID:23716218

  18. Single-frequency tunable laser for pumping cesium frequency standards

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, O V; Ivanov, Andrei V; Leonovich, A I; Kurnosov, V D; Kurnosov, K V; Chernov, Roman V; Shishkov, V V; Pleshanov, S A

    2006-08-31

    A single-frequency tunable laser for pumping the cesium frequency standard is studied. It is shown experimentally that the laser emits at a single frequency despite the fact that a few longitudinal modes of the external cavity fall within the reflection band of a fibre Bragg grating (FBG) written in the optical fibre. The laser wavelength can be tuned by varying the pump current of the laser, its temperature, and the FBG temperature. The laser linewidth does not exceed 2 MHz for 10 mW of output power. (lasers)

  19. Acoustic resonance frequency locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-09-09

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell, the acoustic source having a source frequency; repeatedly and continuously sweeping the source frequency across the resonance frequency at a sweep rate; and employing an odd-harmonic of the source frequency sweep rate to maintain the source frequency sweep centered on the resonance frequency.

  20. Medium-Frequency Pseudonoise Georadar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, G. Dickey; Carl, J. R.; Byerly, Kent A.; Amini, B. Jon

    2005-01-01

    Ground-probing radar systems featuring medium-frequency carrier signals phase-modulated by binary pseudonoise codes have been proposed. These systems would be used to locate and detect movements of subterranean surfaces; the primary intended application is in warning of the movement of underground water toward oil-well intake ports in time to shut down those ports to avoid pumping of water. Other potential applications include oil-well logging and monitoring of underground reservoirs. A typical prior georadar system operates at a carrier frequency of at least 50 MHz in order to provide useable range resolution. This frequency is too high for adequate penetration of many underground layers of interest. On the other hand, if the carrier frequency were to be reduced greatly to increase penetration, then bandwidth and thus range resolution would also have to be reduced, thereby rendering the system less useful. The proposed medium-frequency pseudonoise georadar systems would offer the advantage of greater penetration at lower carrier frequencies, but without the loss of resolution that would be incurred by operating typical prior georadar systems at lower frequencies.

  1. Laser frequency stabilization for LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Guido; McNamara, Paul; Thorpe, Ira; Camp, Jordan

    2005-01-01

    The requirement on laser frequency noise in the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) depends on the velocity and our knowledge of the position of each spacecraft of the interferometer. Currently it is assumed that the lasers must have a pre-stabilized frequency stability of 30Hz/square root of Hz over LISA'S most sensitive frequency band (3 mHz - 30 mHz). The intrinsic frequency stability of even the most stable com- mercial lasers is several orders of magnitude above this level. Therefore it is necessary to stabilize the laser frequency to an ultra-stable frequency reference which meets the LISA requirements. The baseline frequency reference for the LISA lasers are high finesse optical cavities based on ULE spacers. We measured the stability of two ULE spacer cavities with respect to each other. Our current best results show a noise floor at, or below, 30 Hz/square root of Hz above 3 mHz. In this report we describe the experimental layout of the entire experiment and discuss the limiting noise sources.

  2. Detecting body cavity bombs with nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michael London

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a technology with great potential for detecting hidden explosives. Past NQR research has studied the detection of land mines and bombs concealed within luggage and packages. This thesis focuses on an NQR application that has received less attention and little or no publicly available research: detecting body cavity bombs (BCBs). BCBs include explosives that have been ingested, inserted into orifices, or surgically implanted. BCBs present a threat to aviation and secure facilities. They are extremely difficult to detect with the technology currently employed at security checkpoints. To evaluate whether or not NQR can be used to detect BCBs, a computational model is developed to assess how the dielectric properties of biological tissue affect the radio frequency magnetic field employed in NQR (0.5-5MHz). The relative permittivity of some biological tissue is very high (over 1,000 at 1MHz), making it conceivable that there is a significant effect on the electromagnetic field. To study this effect, the low-frequency approximation known as the Darwin model is employed. First, the electromagnetic field of a coil is calculated in free space. Second, a dielectric object or set of objects is introduced, and the free-space electric field is modified to accommodate the dielectric object ensuring that the relevant boundary conditions are obeyed. Finally, the magnetic field associated with the corrected electric field is calculated. This corrected magnetic field is evaluated with an NQR simulation to estimate the impact of dielectric tissue on NQR measurements. The effect of dielectric tissue is shown to be small, thus obviating a potential barrier to BCB detection. The NQR model presented may assist those designing excitation and detection coils for NQR. Some general coil design considerations and strategies are discussed.

  3. Microcontroller interrupts in frequency controlling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panoiu, C.; Rob, R.; Panoiu, M.

    2015-06-01

    Present paper represents an educational software application that permits to measure the signals frequency. The application is accomplished in MicroC compiler that also permit to user to program a microcontroller PIC18F45K22 using a developing board EasyPICv7. An important issue of present application is to measure the frequency of an external signal that is acquired by an input pin of the microcontroller. The frequency value is displayed on the seven segment display provided by the developing board.

  4. Pulsed optically pumped frequency standard

    SciTech Connect

    Godone, Aldo; Micalizio, Salvatore; Levi, Filippo

    2004-08-01

    We reconsider the idea of a pulsed optically pumped frequency standard conceived in the early 1960s to eliminate the light-shift effect. The development of semiconductor lasers and of pulsed electronic techniques for atomic fountains and new theoretical findings allow an implementation of this idea which may lead to a frequency standard whose frequency stability is limited only by the thermal noise in the short term and by the temperature drift in the long term. We shall also show both theoretically and experimentally the possibility of doubling the atomic quality factor with respect to the classical Ramsey technique approach.

  5. Spectrally resolved frequency comb interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, S.

    2014-04-01

    In this contribution a novel method for interferometric distance measurement is presented, that is based on unraveling the spectrum of a femtosecond frequency comb. The light of a frequency comb is sent into a Michelson interferometer. The output of the interferometer is analyzed by a high-resolution spectrometer, resolving the individual comb modes. The path-length difference between the two arms is determined on the level of tens of nm, by utilizing the wealth of information present in the unraveled spectrum, showing homodyne interference for each individual frequency comb mode. The measurement method allows for high-accuracy measurements in combination with a large range of non-ambiguity.

  6. Secondary electrons in dual-frequency capacitive radio frequency discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Julian; Schuengel, Edmund; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Donko, Zoltan

    2011-10-01

    Two fundamentally different types of dual-frequency capacitive RF discharges can be used to realize separate control of the ion mean energy, , and the ion flux, ?i, at the electrodes: (i) Classical discharges operated at substantially different frequencies, where the low and high frequency voltage amplitudes, ?lfand ?hf, are used to control and ?i, respectively. (ii) Electrically asymmetric (EA) discharges operated at a fundamental frequency and its second harmonic with adjustable phase shift, ?, between the driving frequencies, which is used to control . We study the effect of secondary electrons on the quality of this separate control in both discharge types in argon at different gas pressures by PIC/MCC simulations with focus on the effect of the control parameter for on ?i for different secondary yields, ?. A dramatic effect of tuning ?lf in classical discharges and a significantly less pronounced effect of tuning ? in EA discharges is observed. This is caused by a transition from ?- to ?-mode induced by changing ?lf and not induced by changing ?. Two fundamentally different types of dual-frequency capacitive RF discharges can be used to realize separate control of the ion mean energy, , and the ion flux, ?i, at the electrodes: (i) Classical discharges operated at substantially different frequencies, where the low and high frequency voltage amplitudes, ?lfand ?hf, are used to control and ?i, respectively. (ii) Electrically asymmetric (EA) discharges operated at a fundamental frequency and its second harmonic with adjustable phase shift, ?, between the driving frequencies, which is used to control . We study the effect of secondary electrons on the quality of this separate control in both discharge types in argon at different gas pressures by PIC/MCC simulations with focus on the effect of the control parameter for on ?i for different secondary yields, ?. A dramatic effect of tuning ?lf in classical discharges and a significantly less pronounced effect of tuning ? in EA discharges is observed. This is caused by a transition from ?- to ?-mode induced by changing ?lf and not induced by changing ?. Alexander von Humboldt foundation, Ruhr-University Research Department Plasma, Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA-K-77653 + IN-85261).

  7. Critical frequencies at ocean boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Allan J.; Shi, Chuan

    1991-06-01

    Past theoretical work has shown that for low-frequency flow at a given ocean boundary location, a critical frequency ωc exists such that for ω > ωc unforced motion is trapped to the coast while for ω; < ωc energy leaves the coast. Alternatively, for motion of a given frequency ω on the boundary, there exists a critical latitude such that the motion is trapped to the coast poleward of that latitude but equatorward it is not. This theory is discussed physically for both meridional and nonmeridional boundaries. The simple formula for critical frequency along a nonmeridional boundary is used to document critical periods for the eastern and western Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean boundaries. The theory occasionally breaks down when boundary curvature is too large.

  8. Solving reed frequency vibration problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, F.D.

    1989-01-01

    Reed frequency vibration problems in vertical pump installations can be diagnosed and corrected in the field or avoided in initial design with these guidelines. Some vertical pump installations experience excessive vibration caused by a close match between the operating speed and the reed frequency. In these cases the driver and its support system vibrate as a cantilever beam similar to the reed in a musical instrument, hence the term ''reed frequency''. The driver may be any suitable prime mover, it makes little difference. However, for convenience we are assuming the driver is a large electric motor. Basic spring/mass system properties can be used to define and solve this structure resonance problem commonly called reed frequency vibration. Better yet, the problem can be avoided by properly using information available from motor and pump manufacturers. This article is intended to provide an overall perspective of the problem and suggest means to deal with it.

  9. Low-frequency vibration isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. C.; Otth, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Viscoelastic shear dampers help eliminate microinch deflections resulting from low frequency vibrations. Dampers are applicable to control of tones and resonances in record players and turntables and other audio engineering equipment where vibration isolation is critical.

  10. High Frequency Electronic Packaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M.; Lowry, L.; Lee, K.; Kolawa, E.; Tulintseff, A.; Shalkhauser, K.; Whitaker, J.; Piket-May, M.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial and government communication, radar, and information systems face the challenge of cost and mass reduction via the application of advanced packaging technology. A majority of both government and industry support has been focused on low frequency digital electronics.

  11. Frequency coded sensors incorporating tapers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor); Solie, Leland P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave device includes a piezoelectric substrate on which is formed a transducer that generates acoustic waves on the surface of the substrate from electrical waves received by the transducer. The waves are carried along an acoustic track to either a second transducer or a reflector. The transducers or transducer and reflector are formed of subsections that are constructed to operate at mutually different frequencies. The subsections of at least one of the transducers or transducer and reflector are out of alignment with respect to one another relative to the transverse of the propagation direction. The out of aligned subsections provide not only a frequency component but also a time to the signal output signal. Frequency response characteristics are improved. An alternative embodiment provides that the transducers and/or reflectors are continuously tapered instead of having discrete frequency subsections.

  12. Frequency regulator for synchronous generators

    DOEpatents

    Karlicek, R.F.

    1982-08-10

    The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices. 11 figs.

  13. Frequency regulator for synchronous generators

    DOEpatents

    Karlicek, Robert F.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices.

  14. The classical microwave frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busca, Giovanni; Thomann, Pierre; Laurent-Guy, Bernier; Willemin, Philippe; Schweda, Hartmut S.

    1990-01-01

    Some key problems are presented encountered in the classical microwave frequency standards which are still not solved today. The point of view expressed benefits from the experience gained both in the industry and in the research lab, on the following classical microwave frequency standards: active and passive H, conventional and laser pumped Cs beam tube, small conventional and laser pumped Rubidium. The accent is put on the Rubidium standard.

  15. Stepped frequency ground penetrating radar

    DOEpatents

    Vadnais, Kenneth G.; Bashforth, Michael B.; Lewallen, Tricia S.; Nammath, Sharyn R.

    1994-01-01

    A stepped frequency ground penetrating radar system is described comprising an RF signal generating section capable of producing stepped frequency signals in spaced and equal increments of time and frequency over a preselected bandwidth which serves as a common RF signal source for both a transmit portion and a receive portion of the system. In the transmit portion of the system the signal is processed into in-phase and quadrature signals which are then amplified and then transmitted toward a target. The reflected signals from the target are then received by a receive antenna and mixed with a reference signal from the common RF signal source in a mixer whose output is then fed through a low pass filter. The DC output, after amplification and demodulation, is digitized and converted into a frequency domain signal by a Fast Fourier Transform. A plot of the frequency domain signals from all of the stepped frequencies broadcast toward and received from the target yields information concerning the range (distance) and cross section (size) of the target.

  16. Optimal filtering in multipulse sequences for nuclear quadrupole resonance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osokin, D. Ya.; Khusnutdinov, R. R.; Mozzhukhin, G. V.; Rameev, B. Z.

    2014-05-01

    The application of the multipulse sequences in nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) detection of explosive and narcotic substances has been studied. Various approaches to increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of signal detection are considered. We discussed two modifications of the phase-alternated multiple-pulse sequence (PAMS): the 180 pulse sequence with a preparatory pulse and the 90 pulse sequence. The advantages of optimal filtering to detect NQR in the case of the coherent steady-state precession have been analyzed. It has been shown that this technique is effective in filtering high-frequency and low-frequency noise and increasing the reliability of NQR detection. Our analysis also shows the PAMS with 180 pulses is more effective than PSL sequence from point of view of the application of optimal filtering procedure to the steady-state NQR signal.

  17. Radio frequency nanowire resonators and in situ frequency tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Wayne Y.; Dattoli, Eric N.; Lu, Wei

    2009-05-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of radio frequency nanoelectromechanical resonators based on semiconductor nanowires with a dual-gate configuration. Suspended nanowire resonators were fabricated with little residual tension using a dry transfer method and lithographically defined metal electrodes. Fundamental flexural modes of the nanowire resonators were actuated and detected electrically at room temperature using the on-chip gates and a mixing circuit. The dual-gate setup in turn enabled us to tune the nanowire resonant frequency up or down in situ through elastic hardening and capacitive softening effects, respectively. Selective actuation of the out-of-plane or the in-plane vibrational mode was also reported.

  18. Parametric Effects of Word Frequency in Memory for Mixed Frequency Lists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohnas, Lynn J.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The "word frequency paradox" refers to the finding that low frequency words are better recognized than high frequency words yet high frequency words are better recalled than low frequency words. Rather than comparing separate groups of low and high frequency words, we sought to quantify the functional relation between word frequency and…

  19. Parametric Effects of Word Frequency in Memory for Mixed Frequency Lists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohnas, Lynn J.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The "word frequency paradox" refers to the finding that low frequency words are better recognized than high frequency words yet high frequency words are better recalled than low frequency words. Rather than comparing separate groups of low and high frequency words, we sought to quantify the functional relation between word frequency and

  20. Dual-frequency multifunction lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Rosemary; Chan, Sze-Chun; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2007-02-01

    The design and performance of a multifunction continuous wave dual-frequency lidar system is presented. The system is based on the use of the nonlinear dynamics of an optically injected semiconductor laser. Under proper operating conditions, the laser emits a dual-frequency beam with a broadly tunable microwave separation. The two optical lines are coherently locked to each other using an external microwave synthesizer, resulting in a stable microwave beat frequency. The lidar system is capable of simultaneous velocity and range measurement of remote targets. The velocity is measured from the Doppler shift of the microwave beat frequency. The stability of the microwave beat frequency enables accurate measurement of low velocities. In addition, the stable locking enables long-range measurements because of the long microwave coherence length. Ranging is accomplished by extracting the time-of-flight information carried on the residual microwave phase noise. We demonstrate preliminary measurements of velocities as low as 26 ?m/s and range measurements of 7.95 km with 2 % accuracy.

  1. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.910(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 ?W. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks. PMID:25361349

  2. Variable frequency drive applications guide

    SciTech Connect

    Laloudakis, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Traditionally, fans and pumps have been designed to be capable of handling the maximum demand of the system in which they are installed. However, quite often the actual demand can vary and it can be much lower than the original design capacity. These situations have been corrected in the past through additions of outlet dampers to fans or throttling valves to pumps. While these can be effective and simple controls they severely affect the efficiency of the system. Variable frequency (speed) is the most efficient means of capacity control. The most cost effective method of achieving variable speed capacity control is using AC adjustable frequency drives. AC adjustable frequency controls convert any fixed speed AC motor into an adjustable speed device. Adjusting the speed of a motor, by controlling the frequency of the AC power to that motor, reduces its horsepower requirements. According to pump and fan laws, capacity is proportional to speed while horsepower is proportional to the cube of the speed. Therefore, by reducing the speed of an AC motor by 20 percent the horsepower requirement is reduced by nearly 50 percent. Reduced speed through variable frequency control allows for flexibility of meeting changing weather and comfort requirements without operating costly equipment at full capacity.

  3. 47 CFR 87.375 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.375 Section 87.375... Aeronautical Search and Rescue Stations 87.375 Frequencies. (a) The frequency 123.100 MHz is available for... rescue station must be equipped to operate on this frequency. (b) The frequency 122.900 MHz is...

  4. 47 CFR 5.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 5.303 Section 5.303... Licenses 5.303 Frequencies. Licensees may operate in any frequency band, except for frequency bands... licensees are permitted to operate in frequency bands above 38.6 GHz, unless these bands are listed...

  5. 47 CFR 87.375 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.375 Section 87.375... Aeronautical Search and Rescue Stations 87.375 Frequencies. (a) The frequency 123.100 MHz is available for... rescue station must be equipped to operate on this frequency. (b) The frequency 122.900 MHz is...

  6. 47 CFR 87.375 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.375 Section 87.375... Aeronautical Search and Rescue Stations 87.375 Frequencies. (a) The frequency 123.100 MHz is available for... rescue station must be equipped to operate on this frequency. (b) The frequency 122.900 MHz is...

  7. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of 90.213 of...

  8. 47 CFR 87.375 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.375 Section 87.375... Aeronautical Search and Rescue Stations 87.375 Frequencies. (a) The frequency 123.100 MHz is available for... rescue station must be equipped to operate on this frequency. (b) The frequency 122.900 MHz is...

  9. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of 90.213 of...

  10. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of 90.213 of...

  11. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of 90.213 of...

  12. 47 CFR 74.464 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.464 Section 74.464....464 Frequency tolerance. For operations on frequencies above 25 MHz using authorized bandwidths up to... frequency of each station in compliance with the frequency tolerance requirements of 90.213 of...

  13. 47 CFR 87.375 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.375 Section 87.375... Aeronautical Search and Rescue Stations 87.375 Frequencies. (a) The frequency 123.100 MHz is available for... rescue station must be equipped to operate on this frequency. (b) The frequency 122.900 MHz is...

  14. Ultra stable frequency distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, R. L.; Macconnell, J. W. (inventors)

    1977-01-01

    A system is presented for synchronizing a signal at a remotely located slave station with the phase and frequency of a signal generated at a master station. The signal transmitted at the master station and received by the slave station provides compensation for the phase shift caused by the transmission path delays between the master and slave station. The slave station transmits a signal to the master station at a frequency that is different from the frequency of the signal being transmitted by the master station. The signal transmitted by the slave station is received by the master station while the master station transmitter is off. The signal transmitted by the master station is received by the slave station while the slave station transmitter is off.

  15. Variable frequency microprocessor clock generator

    SciTech Connect

    Branson, C.N.

    1989-04-04

    A microprocessor-based system is described comprising: a digital central microprocessor provided with a clock input and having a rate of operation determined by the frequency of a clock signal input thereto; memory means operably coupled to the central microprocessor for storing programs respectively including a plurality of instructions and addressable by the central microprocessor; peripheral device operably connected to the central microprocessor, the first peripheral device being addressable by the central microprocessor for control thereby; a system clock generator for generating a digital reference clock signal having a reference frequency rate; and frequency rate reduction circuit means connected between the clock generator and the clock input of the central microprocessor for selectively dividing the reference clock signal to generate a microprocessor clock signal as an input to the central microprocessor for clocking the central microprocessor.

  16. Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Johnson, Arvid C. (Lake in the Hills, IL); Thigpen, Larry T. (Angier, NC)

    1999-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  17. Gabor: frequency, time, and memory.

    PubMed

    Korpel, A

    1982-10-15

    Dennis Gabor is well-known as the inventor of holography. Less well-known, perhaps, are his contributions to other areas. Yet they are important and, like holography, characteristic of his foresight. In the field of communications, Gabor investigated the classic dichotomy of time and frequency. Guided by analogies to quantum mechanics, he postulated a set of elementary signals and made brilliant use of time-frequency diagrams to analyze communication systems. Applying his theories to acoustics, he researched the mechanism of hearing, defining acoustical quanta in the process and inventing early prototype frequency compressors and expanders. In a completely different field, Gabor, inspired by some early work of Longuet-Higgins on models for holographic temporal recall in the brain, suggested novel approaches which contributed significantly to the understanding of associative memories. In this paper we describe Gabor's pioneering work in these areas and trace the subsequent development by himself and others. PMID:20396288

  18. Low-frequency electrical properties.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olhoeft, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the interpretation of induced polarization data, it is commonly assumed that metallic mineral polarization dominantly or solely causes the observed response. However, at low frequencies, there is a variety of active chemical processes which involve the movement or transfer of electrical charge. Measurements of electrical properties at low frequencies (such as induced polarization) observe such movement of charge and thus monitor many geochemical processes at a distance. Examples in which this has been done include oxidation-reduction of metallic minerals such as sulfides, cation exchange on clays, and a variety of clay-organic reactions relevant to problems in toxic waste disposal and petroleum exploration. By using both the frequency dependence and nonlinear character of the complex resistivity spectrum, these reactions may be distinguished from each other and from barren or reactionless materials.-Author

  19. Frequency Synthesizer For Tracking Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    Digital frequency-synthesizing subsystem generates trains of pulses, free of jitter, for use as frequency-control signals in tracking filters. Part of assembly of electronic equipment used to measure vibrations in bearings in rotating machinery. Designed to meet requirements for tracking narrow-band cage-rotation and ball-pass components of vibrations, as discussed in "Frequency-Tracking Error Detector" (MFS-29538) and "Ball-Pass Cage-Modulation Detector" (MFS-29539). Synthesizer includes preset counter, output of which controls signal for ball-pass filter. Input to this preset counter updated every 2 microseconds: responds almost immediately, effectively eliminating relatively long response time (lock-in time) and phase jitter.

  20. Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.; Johnson, A.C.; Thigpen, L.T.

    1999-10-05

    A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  1. Electron collision frequency in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Rogers, F.J.; DeWitt, H.E.

    1982-03-01

    In strongly coupled, degenerate plasmas, the electron collision frequency has been described by the Ziman formula with the ion-ion correlations modeled by the classical one-component plasma (OCP). However, this model fails to reproduce the correct quantum Lenard-Balescu result in the weak-coupling limit. It is demonstrated here that a recently obtained, correlation-function expression for the collision frequency reduces to the Ziman and Lenard-Balescu results in the appropriate limits. In addition, it is shown that an extension of the Lenard-Balescu result to include strong coupling can be interpreted as the Ziman collision frequency with the OCP structure factor replaced by the ion-ion structure factor for a two-component system. Numerical estimates of this structure factor are used to calculate the electrical conductivity in moderately coupled (GAMMA< or =2) hydrogen plasmas.

  2. The instantaneous frequency rate spectrogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    An accelerogram of the instantaneous phase of signal components referred to as an instantaneous frequency rate spectrogram (IFRS) is presented as a joint time-frequency distribution. The distribution is directly obtained by processing the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) locally. A novel approach to amplitude demodulation based upon the reassignment method is introduced as a useful by-product. Additionally, an estimator of energy density versus the instantaneous frequency rate (IFR) is proposed and referred to as the IFR profile. The energy density is estimated based upon both the classical energy spectrogram and the IFRS smoothened by the median filter. Moreover, the impact of an analyzing window width, additive white Gaussian noise and observation time is tested. Finally, the introduced method is used for the analysis of the acoustic emission of an automotive engine. The recording of the engine of a Lamborghini Gallardo is analyzed as an example.

  3. Swept Frequency Laser Metrology System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Feng (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A swept frequency laser ranging system having sub-micron accuracy that employs multiple common-path heterodyne interferometers, one coupled to a calibrated delay-line for use as an absolute reference for the ranging system. An exemplary embodiment uses two laser heterodyne interferometers to create two laser beams at two different frequencies to measure distance and motions of target(s). Heterodyne fringes generated from reflections off a reference fiducial X(sub R) and measurement (or target) fiducial X(sub M) are reflected back and are then detected by photodiodes. The measured phase changes Delta phi(sub R) and Delta phi (sub m) resulting from the laser frequency swept gives target position. The reference delay-line is the only absolute reference needed in the metrology system and this provides an ultra-stable reference and simple/economical system.

  4. Hg{sup +} frequency standards

    SciTech Connect

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    1999-01-15

    In this paper we review the development of Hg{sup +} microwave frequency standards for use in high reliability and continuous operation applications. In recent work we have demonstrated short-term frequency stability of 3x10{sup -14}/{radical}{tau} when a cryogenic oscillator of stability 2-3x10{sup -15} was used as the local oscillator. The trapped ion frequency standard employs a {sup 202}Hg discharge lamp to optically pump the trapped {sup 199}Hg{sup +} clock ions and a helium buffer gas to cool the ions to near room temperature. We describe a small Hg{sup +} ion trap based frequency standard with an extended linear ion trap (LITE) architecture which separates the optical state selection region from the clock resonance region. This separation allows the use of novel trap configurations in the resonance region since no optical pumping is carried out there. A method for measuring the size of an ion cloud inside a linear trap with a 12-rod trap is currently being investigated. At {approx}10{sup -12}, the 2{sup nd} order Doppler shift for trapped mercury ion frequency standards is one of the largest frequency offsets and its measurement to the 1% level would represent an advance in insuring the very long-term stability of these standards to the 10{sup -14} or better level. Finally, we describe atomic clock comparison experiments that can probe for a time variation of the fine structure constant, {alpha}=e{sup 2}/2{pi}hc, at the level of 10{sup -20}/year as predicted in some Grand Unified String Theories.

  5. Molecular Spectroscopy with Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, Ian

    2010-03-01

    Pulsed femtosecond frequency combs are rapidly developing as a powerful spectroscopic tool. As a spectroscopic source stabilized frequency combs potentially offer broad spectral coverage, near perfect frequency accuracy, low timing jitter and broadband compatibility with resonant cavities. This talk will focus on the first three advantages in a dual comb spectroscopic technique that is highly analogous to traditional Fourier transform spectroscopy. In the dual comb approach, (pioneered in the THz by Keilmann, Van der Weide and coworkers under the name multi-heterodyne spectroscopy), one comb is used to sample a gas and a second frequency comb serves as a local oscillator (LO) that samples the first comb. The LO is held at a slightly different repetition rate than the first comb. When viewed in the time domain, the comb sources each emit a train of pulses. With the difference in repetition rates, for each successive pair of pulses, the timing between the sample and LO laser pulses shifts slightly. Through successive measurements, the LO pulses read out the entire time domain structure of the transmitted sample pulse. Through a Fourier transform, we recover the broadband, complex, absorption profile of the sample gas. In analogy to a Fourier transform spectrometer the LO serves as a scanning interferometer arm. The removal of moving parts from the system along with the addition of high brightness collimated sources brings new flexibility to FTIR spectroscopy. This talk will focus on strengths and limitations of the dual comb technique. Specifically we focus on comb stabilization techniques that allow for long averaging periods, firmware based averaging techniques that keep data sizes manageable and allow for realtime data processing, time domain multiplexing of signal and reference data for continuous removal of system drift, and difference frequency generation techniques to extend this system into the mid IR. We will also discuss methods to improve the sensitivity of this technique as well as tradeoffs between sensitivity and resolution, while maintaining the inherent frequency accuracy of this system.

  6. DSS 13 frequency stability tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Franco, M. M.

    1987-01-01

    In a previous article, the results of frequency stability tests at DSS 13 were presented in table form for tau = 1000 s for the test period May 1985 through March 1986. This article is a continuation of that initial report and presents specially selected Allan sigma (square root of variance) plots of each of the subsystem test previously reported. An additional result obtained from tests performed during July 1986 was included for completeness. The Allan sigma plots are useful in that frequency stability information is not only given for tau = 1000 s, but for tau values in the regions of 1, 100, 500, and 2000 s as well.

  7. Bichromatically pumped microresonator frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, T.; Wabnitz, S.

    2014-07-01

    A study is made of the nonlinear dynamics of bichromatically pumped microresonator Kerr frequency combs described by a driven and damped nonlinear Schrdinger equation, with an additional degree of freedom in the form of the modulation frequency. A truncated four-wave model is derived for the pump modes and the dominant sideband pair, which is found to be able to describe much of the essential dynamical behavior of the full equation. The stability of stationary states within the four-wave model is investigated, and numerical simulations are made to demonstrate that a large range of solutions, including cavity solitons, are possible beyond previously considered low-intensity patterns.

  8. Power enhanced frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency conversion system includes at least one source providing a first near-IR wavelength output including a gain medium for providing high power amplification, such as double clad fiber amplifier, a double clad fiber laser or a semiconductor tapered amplifier to enhance the power output level of the near-IR wavelength output. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Ra-man/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device.

  9. DOA estimation exploiting coprime frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Si; Zhang, Yimin D.; Amin, Moeness G.

    2014-05-01

    Coprime array, which utilizes a coprime pair of uniform linear subarrays, is an attractive structure to achieve sparse array configurations. Alternatively, effective coprime array configurations can be implemented using a uniform linear array with two coprime sensing frequencies. This enables the integration of the coprime array and filter concepts to achieve high capabilities in meeting system performance and complexity constraints. This paper examines its performance for direction-of-arrival estimations. In particular, we analyze the number of detectable signals and the estimation accuracy as related to the array configurations and sensing frequencies.

  10. Central Control of Local Oscillator Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Central unit automatically controls frequencies of group of independent crystal-controlled low-power oscillators. Unit checks its own frequency against accurate frequency reference, such as station WWV and corrects its own timing circuit as necessary.

  11. Accumulator and Debuncher Revolution Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.

    1985-09-09

    The purpose of this note is to identify what parameters determine the proper setting of the Accumulator and Debuncher dipole buses, and what the {bar p} revolution frequencies should be under these circumstances. As will be seen, certain parameters of the Main Ring lead to very tight tolerances in these bus setting.

  12. Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Velsko, S.P.

    1998-11-24

    The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy. 14 figs.

  13. Frequency Allocation; The Radio Spectrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) assigns segments of the radio spectrum to categories of users, and specific frequencies within each segment to individual users. Since demand for channel space exceeds supply, the process is complex. The radio spectrum can be compared to a long ruler: the portion from 10-540 kiloHertz has been set aside…

  14. Judged Frequency of Lethal Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenstein, Sarah; And Others

    1978-01-01

    College student and adult subjects were studied in five experimental formats to gauge how well people can estimate the frequency of death from specific causes. Subjects tended to overestimate the rate of rare causes, underestimate likely causes, and be influenced by drama or vividness. (Author/SJL)

  15. OPTIMUM FREQUENCY OF CALIBRATION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper develops an algorithm by which to compute the optimal frequency of calibration monitoring to minimize the total cost of analyzing a set of samples and the required calibration standards. Optimum calibration monitoring is needed because of the high cost and calibration d...

  16. Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Velsko, Stephan P.

    1998-01-01

    The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy.

  17. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a... for the operation of medical telemetry devices. (b) The frequency coordinator shall (1) Review...

  18. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a... for the operation of medical telemetry devices. (b) The frequency coordinator shall (1) Review...

  19. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a... for the operation of medical telemetry devices. (b) The frequency coordinator shall (1) Review...

  20. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a... for the operation of medical telemetry devices. (b) The frequency coordinator shall (1) Review...

  1. 47 CFR 95.1113 - Frequency coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions 95.1113 Frequency coordinator. (a... for the operation of medical telemetry devices. (b) The frequency coordinator shall (1) Review...

  2. Ionospheric very low frequency transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-02-15

    The theme of this paper is to establish a reliable ionospheric very low frequency (VLF) transmitter, which is also broad band. Two approaches are studied that generate VLF waves in the ionosphere. The first, classic approach employs a ground-based HF heater to directly modulate the high latitude ionospheric, or auroral electrojet. In the classic approach, the intensity-modulated HF heater induces an alternating current in the electrojet, which serves as a virtual antenna to transmit VLF waves. The spatial and temporal variations of the electrojet impact the reliability of the classic approach. The second, beat-wave approach also employs a ground-based HF heater; however, in this approach, the heater operates in a continuous wave mode at two HF frequencies separated by the desired VLF frequency. Theories for both approaches are formulated, calculations performed with numerical model simulations, and the calculations are compared to experimental results. Theory for the classic approach shows that an HF heater wave, intensity-modulated at VLF, modulates the electron temperature dependent electrical conductivity of the ionospheric electrojet, which, in turn, induces an ac electrojet current. Thus, the electrojet becomes a virtual VLF antenna. The numerical results show that the radiation intensity of the modulated electrojet decreases with an increase in VLF radiation frequency. Theory for the beat wave approach shows that the VLF radiation intensity depends upon the HF heater intensity rather than the electrojet strength, and yet this approach can also modulate the electrojet when present. HF heater experiments were conducted for both the intensity modulated and beat wave approaches. VLF radiations were generated and the experimental results confirm the numerical simulations. Theory and experimental results both show that in the absence of the electrojet, VLF radiation from the F-region is generated via the beat wave approach. Additionally, the beat wave approach generates VLF radiations over a larger frequency band than by the modulated electrojet.

  3. Ionospheric very low frequency transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-02-01

    The theme of this paper is to establish a reliable ionospheric very low frequency (VLF) transmitter, which is also broad band. Two approaches are studied that generate VLF waves in the ionosphere. The first, classic approach employs a ground-based HF heater to directly modulate the high latitude ionospheric, or auroral electrojet. In the classic approach, the intensity-modulated HF heater induces an alternating current in the electrojet, which serves as a virtual antenna to transmit VLF waves. The spatial and temporal variations of the electrojet impact the reliability of the classic approach. The second, beat-wave approach also employs a ground-based HF heater; however, in this approach, the heater operates in a continuous wave mode at two HF frequencies separated by the desired VLF frequency. Theories for both approaches are formulated, calculations performed with numerical model simulations, and the calculations are compared to experimental results. Theory for the classic approach shows that an HF heater wave, intensity-modulated at VLF, modulates the electron temperature dependent electrical conductivity of the ionospheric electrojet, which, in turn, induces an ac electrojet current. Thus, the electrojet becomes a virtual VLF antenna. The numerical results show that the radiation intensity of the modulated electrojet decreases with an increase in VLF radiation frequency. Theory for the beat wave approach shows that the VLF radiation intensity depends upon the HF heater intensity rather than the electrojet strength, and yet this approach can also modulate the electrojet when present. HF heater experiments were conducted for both the intensity modulated and beat wave approaches. VLF radiations were generated and the experimental results confirm the numerical simulations. Theory and experimental results both show that in the absence of the electrojet, VLF radiation from the F-region is generated via the beat wave approach. Additionally, the beat wave approach generates VLF radiations over a larger frequency band than by the modulated electrojet.

  4. Detection of RDX and TNT mine-like targets by nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deas, Robert M.; Burch, Ian A.; Port, Daniel M.

    2002-08-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is being researched in order to confirm the presence of explosives as part of landmine sensor suites for the UK MOD hand held and vehicle mounted detection applied research programs. A low power NQR system has been developed as a non-contacting, but short range, detection method for explosives typically found in landmines. The results of stand-off detection of buried anti-personnel and anti-tank quantities of RDX and TNT by this system are presented and the differences in the detection of these explosives by NQR are discussed. Signal processing and radio frequency interference rejection methods to improve the performance of NQR explosive detection have been investigated.

  5. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  6. Frequency response of electrochemical cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    Impedance concepts can be applied to the analysis of battery electrodes, yielding information about the structure of the electrode and the processes occurring in the electrode. Structural parameters such as the specific area (surface area per gram of electrode) can be estimated. Electrode variables such as surface overpotential, ohmic losses, and diffusion limitations may be studied. Nickel and cadmium electrodes were studied by measuring the ac impedance as a function of frequency, and the specific areas that were determined were well within the range of specific areas determined from BET measurements. Impedance spectra were measured for the nickel and cadmium electrodes, and for a 20 A-hr NiCd battery as functions of the state of charge. More work is needed to determine the feasibility of using frequency response as a nondestructive testing technique for batteries.

  7. Frequency response of electrochemical cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Daniel L.

    1990-01-01

    The main objective was to examine the feasibility of using frequency response techniques (1) as a tool in destructive physical analysis of batteries, particularly for estimating electrode structural parameters such as specific area, porosity, and tortuosity and (2) as a non-destructive testing technique for obtaining information such as state of charge and acceptability for space flight. The phenomena that contribute to the frequency response of an electrode include: (1) double layer capacitance; (2) Faradaic reaction resistance; (3) mass transfer of Warburg impedance; and (4) ohmic solution resistance. Nickel cadmium cells were investigated in solutions of KOH. A significant amount of data was acquired. Quantitative data analysis, using the developed software, is planned for the future.

  8. Lossless equalization of frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Torres-Company, Vctor; Lancis, Jess; Andrs, Pedro

    2008-08-15

    Frequency combs obtained by sinusoidal phase modulation of narrowband cw lasers are widely used in the field of optical communications. However, the resulting spectral envelope of the comb is not flat. We propose a general and efficient approach to achieve flat frequency combs with tunable bandwidth. The idea is based on a two-step process. First, efficient generation of a train with a temporal flat-top-pulse profile is required. Second, we use large parabolic phase modulation in every train period to map the temporal intensity shape into the spectral domain. In this way the resulting spectral envelope is flat, and the size is tunable with the chirping rate. Two different schemes are proposed and verified through numerical simulations. PMID:18709099

  9. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, Salvatore

    1985-01-01

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  10. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1984-02-09

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  11. 47 CFR 87.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Flight Test Stations § 87.303 Frequencies. (a) These frequencies are available for assignment to flight....375 3 123.450 3 (b) These additional frequencies are available for assignment only to flight test... flight test land station. (c) These frequencies are available for equipment test, emergency and...

  12. 47 CFR 87.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Flight Test Stations § 87.303 Frequencies. (a) These frequencies are available for assignment to flight....375 3 123.450 3 (b) These additional frequencies are available for assignment only to flight test... flight test land station. (c) These frequencies are available for equipment test, emergency and...

  13. 47 CFR 87.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Flight Test Stations § 87.303 Frequencies. (a) These frequencies are available for assignment to flight....375 3 123.450 3 (b) These additional frequencies are available for assignment only to flight test... flight test land station. (c) These frequencies are available for equipment test, emergency and...

  14. 47 CFR 87.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Flight Test Stations § 87.303 Frequencies. (a) These frequencies are available for assignment to flight....375 3 123.450 3 (b) These additional frequencies are available for assignment only to flight test... flight test land station. (c) These frequencies are available for equipment test, emergency and...

  15. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block. ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section...

  16. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block. ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section...

  17. 47 CFR 87.475 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.475 Section 87.475 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Stations in the Radiodetermination Service § 87.475 Frequencies. (a) Frequency coordination. The Commission will assign frequencies...

  18. 47 CFR 74.402 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.402 Section 74.402....402 Frequency assignment. Operation on all channels listed in this section (except: frequencies 26.07... assigned by its center frequency, channel bandwidth, and emission designator. In general, the...

  19. 47 CFR 74.402 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.402 Section 74.402....402 Frequency assignment. Operation on all channels listed in this section (except: frequencies 26.07... assigned by its center frequency, channel bandwidth, and emission designator. In general, the...

  20. 47 CFR 87.351 - Frequency changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... control of unicom frequency) the licensee must submit an application for modification to specify the new... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency changes. 87.351 Section 87.351... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.351 Frequency changes. When the aeronautical utility frequency...

  1. 47 CFR 90.715 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., with base station frequencies taken from the 220-221 MHz band with corresponding mobile and control... frequency pair(s) is listed in the table. Use of these frequencies in the Mexican and Canadian border areas.... Base frequency (MHz) 1 220.0025 2 .0075 3 .0125 4 .0175 5 .0225 6 .0275 7 .0325 8 .0375 9 .0425...

  2. 47 CFR 90.715 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., with base station frequencies taken from the 220-221 MHz band with corresponding mobile and control... frequency pair(s) is listed in the table. Use of these frequencies in the Mexican and Canadian border areas.... Base frequency (MHz) 1 220.0025 2 .0075 3 .0125 4 .0175 5 .0225 6 .0275 7 .0325 8 .0375 9 .0425...

  3. 47 CFR 87.421 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... frequency 123.100 MHz is available for use by control towers and RCOs at special aeronautical events on the... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.421 Frequencies. The Commission will assign VHF frequencies after coordination with the FAA. Frequencies in the following bands are available to control towers and RCOs....

  4. 47 CFR 90.715 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., with base station frequencies taken from the 220-221 MHz band with corresponding mobile and control... frequency pair(s) is listed in the table. Use of these frequencies in the Mexican and Canadian border areas.... Base frequency (MHz) 1 220.0025 2 .0075 3 .0125 4 .0175 5 .0225 6 .0275 7 .0325 8 .0375 9 .0425...

  5. 47 CFR 87.421 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... frequency 123.100 MHz is available for use by control towers and RCOs at special aeronautical events on the... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.421 Frequencies. The Commission will assign VHF frequencies after coordination with the FAA. Frequencies in the following bands are available to control towers and RCOs....

  6. 47 CFR 87.351 - Frequency changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... control of unicom frequency) the licensee must submit an application for modification to specify the new... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency changes. 87.351 Section 87.351... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.351 Frequency changes. When the aeronautical utility frequency...

  7. 47 CFR 87.421 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... frequency 123.100 MHz is available for use by control towers and RCOs at special aeronautical events on the... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.421 Frequencies. The Commission will assign VHF frequencies after coordination with the FAA. Frequencies in the following bands are available to control towers and RCOs....

  8. 47 CFR 73.754 - Frequency monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... International Broadcast Stations § 73.754 Frequency monitors. (a) The licensee of each international broadcast station shall operate a frequency monitor at the transmitter independent of the frequency control of the... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency monitors. 73.754 Section...

  9. 47 CFR 87.351 - Frequency changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... control of unicom frequency) the licensee must submit an application for modification to specify the new... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency changes. 87.351 Section 87.351... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.351 Frequency changes. When the aeronautical utility frequency...

  10. 47 CFR 73.754 - Frequency monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... International Broadcast Stations § 73.754 Frequency monitors. (a) The licensee of each international broadcast station shall operate a frequency monitor at the transmitter independent of the frequency control of the... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency monitors. 73.754 Section...

  11. 47 CFR 74.402 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.402 Section 74.402....402 Frequency assignment. Operation on all channels listed in this section (except: frequencies 26.07... assigned by its center frequency, channel bandwidth, and emission designator. In general, the...

  12. 47 CFR 87.421 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... frequency 123.100 MHz is available for use by control towers and RCOs at special aeronautical events on the... Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.421 Frequencies. The Commission will assign VHF frequencies after coordination with the FAA. Frequencies in the following bands are available to control towers and RCOs....

  13. 47 CFR 87.421 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.421 Section 87.421 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Airport Control Tower Stations § 87.421 Frequencies. The Commission will assign VHF frequencies after coordination with the FAA. Frequencies...

  14. 47 CFR 74.402 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.402 Section 74.402....402 Frequency assignment. Operation on all channels listed in this section (except: frequencies 26.07... assigned by its center frequency, channel bandwidth, and emission designator. In general, the...

  15. 47 CFR 90.715 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., with base station frequencies taken from the 220-221 MHz band with corresponding mobile and control... frequency pair(s) is listed in the table. Use of these frequencies in the Mexican and Canadian border areas.... Base frequency (MHz) 1 220.0025 2 .0075 3 .0125 4 .0175 5 .0225 6 .0275 7 .0325 8 .0375 9 .0425...

  16. 47 CFR 87.351 - Frequency changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... control of unicom frequency) the licensee must submit an application for modification to specify the new... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency changes. 87.351 Section 87.351... Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.351 Frequency changes. When the aeronautical utility frequency...

  17. 47 CFR 87.195 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.195 Section 87.195... Aircraft Stations Emergency Locator Transmitters 87.195 Frequencies. (a) ELTs transmit on the frequency 121.500 MHz, using A3E, A3X or NON emission. ELTs that transmit on the frequency 406.0-406.1 MHz...

  18. 47 CFR 24.229 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.229 Section 24.229... SERVICES Broadband PCS 24.229 Frequencies. The frequencies available in the Broadband PCS service are listed in this section in accordance with the frequency allocations table of 2.106 of this chapter....

  19. 47 CFR 24.129 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.129 Section 24.129... SERVICES Narrowband PCS 24.129 Frequencies. The following frequencies are available for narrowband PCS: (a) Eighteen frequencies are available for assignment on a nationwide basis as follows: (1) Seven...

  20. 47 CFR 74.802 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.802 Section 74.802... Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies within the following bands may be assigned for use by low power... MHz. All zones 113 km (70 miles) (c) Specific frequency operation is required when operating...

  1. 47 CFR 87.287 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.287 Section 87.287... Data Link Land Test Stations 87.287 Frequencies. (a) The frequencies assignable to aircraft data link..., 136.925 MHz, 136.950 MHz, and 136.975 MHz. Interstitial frequencies separated by 8.33 kilohertz...

  2. 47 CFR 95.853 - Frequency segments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency segments. 95.853 Section 95.853... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards 95.853 Frequency segments. There are two frequency segments available for assignment to the 218-219 MHz Service in each service area. Frequency segment A...

  3. 47 CFR 74.161 - Frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerances. 74.161 Section 74.161... Technical Operation and Operators 74.161 Frequency tolerances. The departure of the carrier frequency or frequencies of an experimental broadcast station must not exceed the tolerance specified in the instrument...

  4. 47 CFR 87.449 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.449 Section 87.449... Operational Fixed Stations 87.449 Frequencies. The following frequencies in the 72-76 MHz band are... TV reception on Channels 4 and 5. These frequencies are shared with the Land Mobile and the...

  5. 47 CFR 87.195 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.195 Section 87.195... Aircraft Stations Emergency Locator Transmitters 87.195 Frequencies. (a) ELTs transmit on the frequency 121.500 MHz, using A3E, A3X or NON emission. ELTs that transmit on the frequency 406.0-406.1 MHz...

  6. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301... Standards 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz except as indicated in 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with 2.106 of the rules,...

  7. 47 CFR 95.1401 - Frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency. 95.1401 Section 95.1401... SERVICES Personal Locator Beacons (PLB). 95.1401 Frequency. The frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz is an emergency and distress frequency band available for use by Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs). Personal...

  8. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block....

  9. 47 CFR 80.45 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 80.45 Section 80.45... MARITIME SERVICES Applications and Licenses 80.45 Frequencies. For applications other than ship stations, the applicant must propose frequencies and ensure that those requested frequencies are consistent...

  10. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within 0.0001 percent (1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  11. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301... Standards 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz except as indicated in 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with 2.106 of the rules,...

  12. 47 CFR 87.449 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.449 Section 87.449... Operational Fixed Stations 87.449 Frequencies. The following frequencies in the 72-76 MHz band are... TV reception on Channels 4 and 5. These frequencies are shared with the Land Mobile and the...

  13. 47 CFR 74.802 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.802 Section 74.802... Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies within the following bands may be assigned for use by low power... MHz. All zones 113 km (70 miles) (c) Specific frequency operation is required when operating...

  14. 47 CFR 74.661 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.661 Section 74.661... Stations 74.661 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of each authorized transmitter to within the following percentage of the assigned frequency....

  15. 47 CFR 80.45 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 80.45 Section 80.45... MARITIME SERVICES Applications and Licenses 80.45 Frequencies. For applications other than ship stations, the applicant must propose frequencies and ensure that those requested frequencies are consistent...

  16. 47 CFR 87.449 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.449 Section 87.449... Operational Fixed Stations 87.449 Frequencies. The following frequencies in the 72-76 MHz band are... TV reception on Channels 4 and 5. These frequencies are shared with the Land Mobile and the...

  17. 47 CFR 95.853 - Frequency segments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency segments. 95.853 Section 95.853... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards 95.853 Frequency segments. There are two frequency segments available for assignment to the 218-219 MHz Service in each service area. Frequency segment A...

  18. 47 CFR 74.1261 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.1261 Section 74.1261... FM Broadcast Booster Stations 74.1261 Frequency tolerance. (a) The licensee of an FM translator or... frequency at the output of the translator within 0.01 percent of its assigned frequency. (b) The licensee...

  19. 47 CFR 74.802 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.802 Section 74.802... Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies within the following bands may be assigned for use by low power... MHz. All zones 113 km (70 miles) (c) Specific frequency operation is required when operating...

  20. 47 CFR 74.1261 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.1261 Section 74.1261... FM Broadcast Booster Stations 74.1261 Frequency tolerance. (a) The licensee of an FM translator or... frequency at the output of the translator within 0.01 percent of its assigned frequency. (b) The licensee...

  1. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  2. 47 CFR 80.45 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 80.45 Section 80.45... MARITIME SERVICES Applications and Licenses 80.45 Frequencies. For applications other than ship stations, the applicant must propose frequencies and ensure that those requested frequencies are consistent...

  3. 47 CFR 24.129 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.129 Section 24.129... SERVICES Narrowband PCS 24.129 Frequencies. The following frequencies are available for narrowband PCS: (a) Eighteen frequencies are available for assignment on a nationwide basis as follows: (1) Seven...

  4. 47 CFR 95.1401 - Frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency. 95.1401 Section 95.1401... SERVICES Personal Locator Beacons (PLB). 95.1401 Frequency. The frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz is an emergency and distress frequency band available for use by Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs). Personal...

  5. 47 CFR 74.1261 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.1261 Section 74.1261... FM Broadcast Booster Stations 74.1261 Frequency tolerance. (a) The licensee of an FM translator or... frequency at the output of the translator within 0.01 percent of its assigned frequency. (b) The licensee...

  6. 47 CFR 95.853 - Frequency segments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency segments. 95.853 Section 95.853... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards 95.853 Frequency segments. There are two frequency segments available for assignment to the 218-219 MHz Service in each service area. Frequency segment A...

  7. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  8. 47 CFR 87.195 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.195 Section 87.195... Aircraft Stations Emergency Locator Transmitters 87.195 Frequencies. (a) ELTs transmit on the frequency 121.500 MHz, using A3E, A3X or NON emission. ELTs that transmit on the frequency 406.0-406.1 MHz...

  9. 47 CFR 95.853 - Frequency segments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency segments. 95.853 Section 95.853... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards 95.853 Frequency segments. There are two frequency segments available for assignment to the 218-219 MHz Service in each service area. Frequency segment A...

  10. 47 CFR 74.661 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.661 Section 74.661... Stations 74.661 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of each authorized transmitter to within the following percentage of the assigned frequency....

  11. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within 0.0001 percent (1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  12. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301... Standards 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz except as indicated in 18.303. The following frequency bands, in accordance with 2.106 of the rules,...

  13. 47 CFR 87.449 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.449 Section 87.449... Operational Fixed Stations 87.449 Frequencies. The following frequencies in the 72-76 MHz band are... TV reception on Channels 4 and 5. These frequencies are shared with the Land Mobile and the...

  14. 47 CFR 74.1261 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.1261 Section 74.1261... FM Broadcast Booster Stations 74.1261 Frequency tolerance. (a) The licensee of an FM translator or... frequency at the output of the translator within 0.01 percent of its assigned frequency. (b) The licensee...

  15. 47 CFR 95.1401 - Frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency. 95.1401 Section 95.1401... SERVICES Personal Locator Beacons (PLB) 95.1401 Frequency. The frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz is an emergency and distress frequency band available for use by Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs). Personal...

  16. 47 CFR 80.45 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 80.45 Section 80.45... MARITIME SERVICES Applications and Licenses 80.45 Frequencies. For applications other than ship stations, the applicant must propose frequencies and ensure that those requested frequencies are consistent...

  17. 47 CFR 74.161 - Frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerances. 74.161 Section 74.161... Technical Operation and Operators 74.161 Frequency tolerances. The departure of the carrier frequency or frequencies of an experimental broadcast station must not exceed the tolerance specified in the instrument...

  18. 47 CFR 74.503 - Frequency selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency selection. 74.503 Section 74.503... 74.503 Frequency selection. (a) Each application for a new station or change in an existing station shall be specific with regard to frequency. In general, the lowest suitable frequency will be...

  19. 47 CFR 74.103 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.103 Section 74.103....103 Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies allocated to broadcasting and the various categories of auxiliary stations, in the FCC's Table of Frequency Allocations (Part 2 of this chapter), may be...

  20. 47 CFR 95.1401 - Frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency. 95.1401 Section 95.1401... SERVICES Personal Locator Beacons (PLB) 95.1401 Frequency. The frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz is an emergency and distress frequency band available for use by Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs). Personal...

  1. 47 CFR 74.161 - Frequency tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerances. 74.161 Section 74.161... Technical Operation and Operators 74.161 Frequency tolerances. The departure of the carrier frequency or frequencies of an experimental broadcast station must not exceed the tolerance specified in the instrument...

  2. 47 CFR 74.802 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.802 Section 74.802... Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies within the following bands may be assigned for use by low power... MHz. All zones 113 km (70 miles) (c) Specific frequency operation is required when operating...

  3. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as...

  4. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block....

  5. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  6. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  7. 47 CFR 95.1401 - Frequency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency. 95.1401 Section 95.1401... SERVICES Personal Locator Beacons (PLB) 95.1401 Frequency. The frequency band 406.0-406.1 MHz is an emergency and distress frequency band available for use by Personal Locator Beacons (PLBs). Personal...

  8. 47 CFR 24.129 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.129 Section 24.129... SERVICES Narrowband PCS 24.129 Frequencies. The following frequencies are available for narrowband PCS: (a) Eighteen frequencies are available for assignment on a nationwide basis as follows: (1) Seven...

  9. 47 CFR 24.229 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.229 Section 24.229... SERVICES Broadband PCS 24.229 Frequencies. The frequencies available in the Broadband PCS service are listed in this section in accordance with the frequency allocations table of 2.106 of this chapter....

  10. 47 CFR 87.449 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.449 Section 87.449... Operational Fixed Stations 87.449 Frequencies. The following frequencies in the 72-76 MHz band are... TV reception on Channels 4 and 5. These frequencies are shared with the Land Mobile and the...

  11. 47 CFR 74.661 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.661 Section 74.661... Stations 74.661 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of each authorized transmitter to within the following percentage of the assigned frequency....

  12. 47 CFR 74.503 - Frequency selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency selection. 74.503 Section 74.503... 74.503 Frequency selection. (a) Each application for a new station or change in an existing station shall be specific with regard to frequency. In general, the lowest suitable frequency will be...

  13. 47 CFR 24.129 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.129 Section 24.129... SERVICES Narrowband PCS 24.129 Frequencies. The following frequencies are available for narrowband PCS: (a) Eighteen frequencies are available for assignment on a nationwide basis as follows: (1) Seven...

  14. 47 CFR 74.103 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.103 Section 74.103....103 Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies allocated to broadcasting and the various categories of auxiliary stations, in the FCC's Table of Frequency Allocations (Part 2 of this chapter), may be...

  15. 47 CFR 24.129 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.129 Section 24.129... SERVICES Narrowband PCS 24.129 Frequencies. The following frequencies are available for narrowband PCS: (a) Eighteen frequencies are available for assignment on a nationwide basis as follows: (1) Seven...

  16. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as...

  17. 47 CFR 5.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 5.303 Section 5.303... Licenses 5.303 Frequencies. Licensees may operate in any frequency band, except for the following: (a) Frequency bands at or below 38.6 GHz that are designated as restricted in 15.205(a) of this chapter;...

  18. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as...

  19. 47 CFR 87.195 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.195 Section 87.195... Aircraft Stations Emergency Locator Transmitters 87.195 Frequencies. (a) ELTs transmit on the frequency 121.500 MHz, using A3E, A3X or NON emission. ELTs that transmit on the frequency 406.0-406.1 MHz...

  20. 47 CFR 74.103 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.103 Section 74.103....103 Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies allocated to broadcasting and the various categories of auxiliary stations, in the FCC's Table of Frequency Allocations (Part 2 of this chapter), may be...

  1. 47 CFR 95.853 - Frequency segments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency segments. 95.853 Section 95.853... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards 95.853 Frequency segments. There are two frequency segments available for assignment to the 218-219 MHz Service in each service area. Frequency segment A...

  2. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within 0.0001 percent (1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  3. 47 CFR 74.1261 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.1261 Section 74.1261... FM Broadcast Booster Stations 74.1261 Frequency tolerance. (a) The licensee of an FM translator or... frequency at the output of the translator within 0.01 percent of its assigned frequency. (b) The licensee...

  4. 47 CFR 74.802 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.802 Section 74.802... Frequency assignment. (a) Frequencies within the following bands may be assigned for use by low power... MHz. All zones 113 km (70 miles) (c) Specific frequency operation is required when operating...

  5. 47 CFR 80.45 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 80.45 Section 80.45... MARITIME SERVICES Applications and Licenses 80.45 Frequencies. For applications other than ship stations, the applicant must propose frequencies and ensure that those requested frequencies are consistent...

  6. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within 0.0001 percent (1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  7. 47 CFR 74.661 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.661 Section 74.661... Stations 74.661 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of each authorized transmitter to within the following percentage of the assigned frequency....

  8. 47 CFR 24.235 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.235 Section 24.235... SERVICES Broadband PCS 24.235 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emission stays within the authorized frequency block....

  9. 47 CFR 24.135 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 24.135 Section 24.135... SERVICES Narrowband PCS 24.135 Frequency stability. (a) The frequency stability of the transmitter shall be maintained within 0.0001 percent (1 ppm) of the center frequency over a temperature variation...

  10. 47 CFR 87.195 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.195 Section 87.195... Aircraft Stations Emergency Locator Transmitters 87.195 Frequencies. (a) ELTs transmit on the frequency 121.500 MHz, using A3E, A3X or NON emission. ELTs that transmit on the frequency 406.0-406.1 MHz...

  11. 47 CFR 24.229 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.229 Section 24.229... SERVICES Broadband PCS 24.229 Frequencies. The frequencies available in the Broadband PCS service are listed in this section in accordance with the frequency allocations table of 2.106 of this chapter....

  12. 47 CFR 74.503 - Frequency selection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency selection. 74.503 Section 74.503... 74.503 Frequency selection. (a) Each application for a new station or change in an existing station shall be specific with regard to frequency. In general, the lowest suitable frequency will be...

  13. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as...

  14. 47 CFR 101.507 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 101.507 Section 101.507... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service 101.507 Frequency stability. The frequency...% for each DEMS User Station transmitter. The frequency stability in the 24,250-25,250 MHz bands must...

  15. 47 CFR 74.561 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.561 Section 74.561... 74.561 Frequency tolerance. In the bands above 944 MHz, the operating frequency of the transmitter shall be maintained in accordance with the following table: Frequency band (MHz) Tolerance as...

  16. 47 CFR 24.229 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 24.229 Section 24.229... SERVICES Broadband PCS 24.229 Frequencies. The frequencies available in the Broadband PCS service are listed in this section in accordance with the frequency allocations table of 2.106 of this chapter....

  17. 47 CFR 5.403 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 5.403 Section 5.403 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE Medical Testing Experimental Radio Licenses 5.403 Frequencies. (a) Licensees may operate in any frequency band, including those above 38.6 GHz, except for frequency...

  18. 47 CFR 5.403 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 5.403 Section 5.403 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE Medical Testing Experimental Radio Licenses 5.403 Frequencies. (a) Licensees may operate in any frequency band, including those above 38.6 GHz, except for frequency...

  19. Dynamic optical frequency domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Arbel, Dror; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-04-21

    We describe a dynamic Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) system which enables real time, long range, acoustic sensing at high sampling rate. The system is based on a fast scanning laser and coherent detection scheme. Distributed sensing is obtained by probing the Rayleigh backscattered light. The system was tested by interrogation of a 10 km communication type single mode fiber and successfully detected localized impulse and sinusoidal excitations. PMID:24787772

  20. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A.; Eide, S.A.

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to determine generic and plant-specific firewater inadvertent actuation frequencies for wetpipe and preaction firewater systems at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Firewater systems of both kinds are installed throughout the ATR facility. When installed for the protection of reactor equipment, firewater systems may also adversely affect the equipment they are meant to protect. This occurs when inadvertent actuation of a firewater system causes wetting and subsequent damage to equipment.

  1. HELIOS dual swept frequency radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The HELIOS dual swept frequency radiometer, used in conjunction with a dipole antenna, was designed to measure electromagnetic radiation in space. An engineering prototype was fabricated and tested on the HELIOS spacecraft. Two prototypes and two flight units were fabricated and three of the four units were integrated into the HELIOS spacecraft. Two sets of ground support equipment were provided for checkout of the radiometer.

  2. Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough device

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.; Baity, Frederick W.; Hoffman, Daniel J.; Whealton, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A radio frequency coaxial vacuum feedthrough is provided which utilizes a cylindrical ceramic vacuum break formed of an alumina ceramic. The cylinder is coaxially disposed and brazed between tapered coaxial conductors to form a vacuum sealed connection between a pressurized upstream coaxial transmission line and a utilization device located within a vacuum container. The feedthrough provides 50 ohm matched impedance RF feedthrough up to about 500 MHz at power levels in the multimegawatt range.

  3. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.

    1994-06-14

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system includes a microwave signal generator or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator. A second amplifier is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier. The second amplifier outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity. In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply is provided for operation of the second amplifier. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load. 5 figs.

  4. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14) for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier (18) may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator (12) or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14). A second amplifier (20) is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier (18). The second amplifier (20) outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity (34). In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier (20) is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the second amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  5. Automatic frequency control for FM transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automatic frequency control circuit for an FM television transmitter is described. The frequency of the transmitter is sampled during what is termed the back porch portion of the horizontal synchronizing pulse which occurs during the retrace interval, the frequency sample compared with the frequency of a reference oscillator, and a correction applied to the frequency of the transmitter during this portion of the retrace interval.

  6. A tunable dual frequency dye laser - dual frequency oscillator design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abury, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The pulsed dye laser offers a tunable oscillator, followed by three amplifiers. It is pumped by a dual frequency Nd:YAG laser. Tuning and spectral width are controlled by a holographic network connected to a high power telescope. The modified two wavelength dye laser allows for absorption lidar techniques for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Line switching is achieved by electrooptical commutation. A feasibility experiment was performed with the original oscillator. A model was then built, and tested with different dyes. After a few modifications were made to improve the conversion efficiency, this oscillator was inserted in the laser to check whether the amplifier stages were correctly adjusted.

  7. Pulsed Bromine-81 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy of Brominated Flame Retardants and Associated Polymer Blends.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrse, Anthony A.; Lee, Youngil; Bryant, Pamela L.; Fronczek, Frank R.; Butler, Leslie G.; Simeral, Larry S.

    1998-03-01

    The dispersion of brominated flame retardants in polymers is monitored with bromine-81 NQR using a pulse NQR spectrometer. The NQR spectrometer consists of a homemade 10-300 MHz single-channel NMR console coupled to a broadly tunable probe. The probe is a loop-gap resonator usable from 220 to 300 MHz, and automatically tuned over any 5 MHz region with a stepping motor and an RF bidirectional coupler. Bromine-81 NQR spectra of several brominated aromatic flame retardants, as pure materials and in polymers, were recorded in the range of 227 to 256 MHz in zero applied magnetic field. Two factors affect the bromine-79/81 NQR transition frequencies in brominated aromatics: electron withdrawing substituents on the ring and intermolecular contacts with other bromine atoms in the crystal structure. An existing model for substituents is updated and a point charge model for the intermolecular contacts is developed. In this study, we exploit the bromine-81 NQR transition frequency dependence on intermolecular contacts to learn how a flame retardant is dispersed in a polymer matrix.

  8. Low Radio Frequency Picosatellite Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dayton L.

    2014-06-01

    The dramatic advances in cubesat and other picosatellite capabilities are opening the door for scientifically important observations at low radio frequencies. Because simple antennas are effective at low frequencies, and receiver technology allows low mass and low power instruments, these observations are an ideal match for very small spacecraft. A workshop on cubesat missions for low frequency radio astronomy was held at the Kiss Institute for Space Sciences, Caltech, to explore mission concepts involving one up to hundreds of picosatellites. One result from this workshop was that there are opportunities for viable missions throughout this large range. For example, the sky-integrated spectral signature of highly redshifted neutral hydrogen from the dark ages and cosmic dawn epochs can be measured by a single antenna on a single spacecraft. There are challenging issues of calibration, foreground removal, and RF interference that need to be solved, but the basic concept is appealingly simple. At the other extreme, imaging of angular structure in the high-redshift hydrogen signal will require an interferometer array with a very large number of antennas. In this case the primary requirement is a sufficiently low individual spacecraft mass that hundreds can be launched affordably. The technical challenges for large arrays are long-term relative station keeping and high downlink data rates. Missions using several to a few tens of picosatellites can image and track bright sources such as solar and planetary radio bursts, and will provide essential validation of technologies needed for much larger arrays.This work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. Planet frequency from microlensing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassan, A.; Ranc, C.

    2014-12-01

    Galactic gravitational microlensing is a very efficient technique to detect brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets at large orbital distances from their stars, and down to Earth-mass planets. More than 50 planets have been discovered so far, with 31 already published. Recent statistical results on the frequency of exoplanets based on several years of microlensing observations find that planets should be the rule rather than the exception, and confirm that super-Earth are much more frequent that giant planets in the Galaxy.

  10. Formulae for Insect Wingbeat Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, Michael A B

    2010-01-01

    A formula is developed connecting the wingbeat frequency of insects with their masses and wing areas. It is derived first theoretically, using dimensional analysis, and then it is compared with published measurements. The formula discovered involves two parameters which dimensional analysis alone cannot determine. One of these is evaluated using one among many proposed semi-empirical relationships (the only one that stands scrutiny); the other by fitting a published dataset. It is found that the resulting equation, applying to insects in general, accords well with observation, and indeed is very close to being optimal (in a sense to be defined). PMID:20673120

  11. Multi-frequency communication system and method

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-06-01

    A multi-frequency RFID remote communication system is provided that includes a plurality of RFID tags configured to receive a first signal and to return a second signal, the second signal having a first frequency component and a second frequency component, the second frequency component including data unique to each remote RFID tag. The system further includes a reader configured to transmit an interrogation signal and to receive remote signals from the tags. A first signal processor, preferably a mixer, removes an intermediate frequency component from the received signal, and a second processor, preferably a second mixer, analyzes the IF frequency component to output data that is unique to each remote tag.

  12. Low frequency AC waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Bilharz, Oscar W. (Scotia, NY)

    1986-01-01

    Low frequency sine, cosine, triangle and square waves are synthesized in circuitry which allows variation in the waveform amplitude and frequency while exhibiting good stability and without requiring significant stabilization time. A triangle waveform is formed by a ramped integration process controlled by a saturation amplifier circuit which produces the necessary hysteresis for the triangle waveform. The output of the saturation circuit is tapped to produce the square waveform. The sine waveform is synthesized by taking the absolute value of the triangular waveform, raising this absolute value to a predetermined power, multiplying the raised absolute value of the triangle wave with the triangle wave itself and properly scaling the resultant waveform and subtracting it from the triangular waveform itself. The cosine is synthesized by squaring the triangular waveform, raising the triangular waveform to a predetermined power and adding the squared waveform raised to the predetermined power with a DC reference and subtracting the squared waveform therefrom, with all waveforms properly scaled. The resultant waveform is then multiplied with a square wave in order to correct the polarity and produce the resultant cosine waveform.

  13. Radio frequency sustained ion energy

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Hooke, William M.

    1977-01-01

    Electromagnetic (E.M.) energy injection method and apparatus for producing and sustaining suprathermal ordered ions in a neutral, two-ion-species, toroidal, bulk equilibrium plasma. More particularly, the ions are produced and sustained in an ordered suprathermal state of existence above the average energy and velocity of the bulk equilibrium plasma by resonant rf energy injection in resonance with the natural frequency of one of the ion species. In one embodiment, the electromagnetic energy is injected to clamp the energy and velocity of one of the ion species so that the ion energy is increased, sustained, prolonged and continued in a suprathermal ordered state of existence containing appreciable stored energy that counteracts the slowing down effects of the bulk equilibrium plasma drag. Thus, selective deuteron absorption may be used for ion-tail creation by radio-frequency excitation alone. Also, the rf can be used to increase the fusion output of a two-component neutral injected plasma by selective heating of the injected deuterons.

  14. Low frequency ac waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Bilharz, O.W.

    1983-11-22

    Low frequency sine, cosine, triangle and square waves are synthesized in circuitry which allows variation in the waveform amplitude and frequency while exhibiting good stability and without requiring significant stablization time. A triangle waveform is formed by a ramped integration process controlled by a saturation amplifier circuit which produces the necessary hysteresis for the triangle waveform. The output of the saturation circuit is tapped to produce the square waveform. The sine waveform is synthesized by taking the absolute value of the triangular waveform, raising this absolute value to a predetermined power, multiplying the raised absolute value of the triangle wave with the triangle wave itself and properly scaling the resultant waveform and subtracting it from the triangular waveform to a predetermined power and adding the squared waveform raised to the predetermined power with a DC reference and subtracting the squared waveform therefrom, with all waveforms properly scaled. The resultant waveform is then multiplied with a square wave in order to correct the polarity and produce the resultant cosine waveform.

  15. [Low-Frequency Flow Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.

    1997-01-01

    The results of the research conducted under this grant are presented in detail in three Master theses, by Heinrich, Balow, and Broeren. Additional analysis of the experimental data can be found in two AIAA Journal articles and two conference papers. Citations for all of the studies' publications can be found in the bibliography which is attached. The objective of Heinrich's study was to document the low-frequency flow oscillation on the LRN-1007 airfoil, which had been previously observed at low Reynolds number, to determine its origin, and explore the phenomenon at higher Reynolds number. Heinrich performed detailed flow visualization on the airfoil using surface fluorescent oil and laser-sheet off-body visualization. A large leading-edge separation bubble and trailing-edge separation was identified on the airfoil just prior to the onset of the unsteady stall flow oscillation. From the laser-sheet data, the unsteady flow appeared as a massive boundary-layer separation followed by flow reattachment. Hot-wire data were taken in the wake to identify the presence of the flow oscillation and the dominant frequency. The oscillation was found in the flow from a Reynolds number of 0.3 to 1.3 x 10 exp 6. The Strouhal number based on airfoil projected height was nominally 0.02 and increased slightly with increasing Reynolds number and significantly with increasing airfoil angle of attack. Balow focused his research on the leading-edge separation bubble which was hypothesized to be the origin of the low-frequency oscillation. Initially, experimental measurements in the bubble at the onset of the low-frequency oscillation were attempted to study the characteristics of the bubble and explain possible relationships to the shear-layer-flapping phenomena. Unfortunately, the bubble proved to be extremely sensitive to the probe interference and it drastically reduced the size of the bubble. These detailed measurements were then abandoned by Balow. However, this led to a series of tests where the leading-edge bubble and trailing-edge separation were altered and the affect on the flow-oscillation studied. Balow found that by tripping the airfoil boundary-layer with "zigzag" tape ahead of bubble separation, the bubble was effectively eliminated mid the oscillation suppressed. Wake survey drag measurements showed a drastic reduction in airfoil drag when the bubble and oscillation were eliminated. Using the "zigzag" tape, the trailing-edge separation was moved downstream approximately 5 percent chord. This was found to reduce the amplitude of the oscillation, particularly in the onset stage at low angle of attack (around 14 degrees). Through detailed analysis of the wake behind the airfoil during the unsteady flow oscillation, Balow provided a better understanding of the wake flowfield. Broeren studied the oscillating flowfield in detail at Reynolds number equal 3 x 10 exp 5 and an angle of attack of 15 degrees using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Two-dimensional LDV data were acquired at 687 grid points above the model upper surface while hot-wire data were taken simultaneously in the wake. Using the hot-wire signal, the LDV data were phase averaged into 24 bins to represent a single ensemble average of one oscillation cycle. The velocity data showed a flowfield oscillation that could be divided into three flow regimes. In the first regime, the flow over the airfoil was completely separated initially, the flowfield reattached from the leading edge and the reattachment point moved downstream with increasing time or phase. Broeren referred to this as the reattachment regime. The bubble development regime followed, where a leading-edge separation bubble formed at the leading edge and grew with increasing time. During the initial part of this regime the trailing-edge separation continued to move downstream. However, during the last 30 degrees of phase the trailing-edge separation moved rapidly forward and appeared to merge with the leading-edge bubble. During the third regime, the separation regime, the flow was segmented from the airfoil leading edge and did not reattach to the airfoil surface. The reverse flow was seen to grow in vertical extent up from the model surface as the phase increased. Next reattachment began again at the leading edge signaling the start of the reattachment regime, and so the cycle continued. From Broeren's work, the details of the unsteady flowfield over the airfoil were seen for the first time. From this research a great deal has been learned about the low-frequency flow oscillation which naturally occurs on the LRN-1007 airfoil near stall. The oscillation was seen to persist at higher Reynolds number, the dependence of the Strouhal number on angle of attack and Reynolds number were discovered, the critical role played by the laminar bubble was shown and the entire upper surface flowfield during a flow oscillation cycle was measured and analyzed. What still eludes understanding is the scaling of the flow oscillation and why certain airfoils, such as the LRN, have a very strong low-frequency mode and other airfoils exhibit no organized low-frequency oscillation at all.

  16. Frequency Comb Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossel, Kevin C.; Sinclair, Laura C.; Coffey, Tyler; Cornell, Eric; Ye, Jun

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel technique for rapid ion-sensitive spectroscopy over a broad spectral bandwidth by combining the high sensitivity of velocity modulation spectroscopy (VMS) with the parallel nature and high frequency accuracy of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy. Prior to this research, no techniques have been capable of high sensitivity velocity modulation spectroscopy on every parallel detection channel over such a broad spectral range. We have demonstrated the power of this technique by measuring the A^2?_u - X^2?_g^+ (4,2) band of N_2^+ at 830 nm with an absorption sensitivity of 110-6 for each of 1500 simultaneous measurement channels spanning 150 Cm-1. A densely sampled spectrum consisting of interleaved measurements to achieve 75 MHz spacing is acquired in under an hour. This technique is ideally suited for high resolution survey spectroscopy of molecular ions with applications including chemical physics, astrochemistry, and precision measurement. Currently, this system is being used to map the electronic transitions of HfF^+ for the JILA electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) experiment. The JILA eEDM experiment uses trapped molecular ions to significantly increase the coherence time of the measurement in addition to utilizing the strong electric field enhancement available from molecules. Previous theoretical work has shown that the metastable ^3?_1 state in HfF^+ and ThF^+ provides high sensitivity to the eEDM and good cancellation of systematic effects; however, the electronic level structure of these species have not previously been measured, and the theoretical uncertainties are hundreds to thousands of wavenumbers. This necessitates broad-bandwidth, high-resolution survey spectroscopy provided by frequency comb VMS in the 700-900 nm spectral window. F. Adler, M. J. Thorpe, K. C. Cossel, and J. Ye. Annu. Rev. Anal. Chem. 3, 175-205 (2010) A. E. Leanhardt, et. al. arXiv:1008.2997v2 E. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, and M. P. Deskevich. Phys. Rev. A 73, 062108 (2006) A. N. Petrov, N. S. Mosyagin, T. A. Isaev, and A. V. Titov Phys. Rev. A 76, 030501 (2007)

  17. High Frequency Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V.; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K.; Swager, Timothy M.; Temkin, Richard J.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus During the three decades 19802010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-? nuclei such as the I = species 13C or 15N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, like 17O or 27Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime roughly 150660 GHz and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low temperature MAS probes were developed that permit in-situ microwave irradiation of the samples. And, finally, biradical polarizing agents were developed that increased the efficiency of DNP experiments by factors of ~4 at considerably lower paramagnet concentrations. Collectively these developments have made it possible to apply DNP on a routine basis to a number of different scientific endeavors, most prominently in the biological and material sciences. This Account reviews these developments, including the primary mechanisms used to transfer polarization in high frequency DNP, and the current choice of microwave sources and biradical polarizing agents. In addition, we illustrate the utility of the technique with a description of applications to membrane and amyloid proteins that emphasizes the unique structural information that is available in these two cases. PMID:23597038

  18. Substructure coupling in the frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Frequency domain analysis was found to be a suitable method for determining the transient response of systems subjected to a wide variety of loads. However, since a large number of calculations are performed within the discrete frequency loop, the method loses it computational efficiency if the loads must be represented by a large number of discrete frequencies. It was also discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain work particularly well for analyzing structural system with a small number of interface and loaded degrees of freedom. It was discovered that substructure coupling in the frequency domain can lead to an efficient method of obtaining natural frequencies of undamped structures. It was also found that the damped natural frequencies of a system may be determined using frequency domain techniques.

  19. Pneumatic analog-to-pulse frequency converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.

    1969-01-01

    Pneumatic analog-to-pulse frequency converter circuit has output pulse frequency proportional to the pressure level of the input signal. Converter circuit drives a pneumatic stepping motor and is part of a pneumatic control system for nuclear powered spacecraft.

  20. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz. PMID:12071247

  1. Frequency Responses Of Hot-Wire Anemometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes theoretical study of frequency response of constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer, with view toward increasing frequency response while maintaining stable operation in supersonic flow. Effects of various circuit parameters discussed.

  2. Radio frequency power load and associated method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A radio frequency power load and associated method. A radio frequency power load apparatus includes a container and a fluid having an ion source therein, the fluid being contained in the container. Two conductors are immersed in the fluid. A radio frequency transmission system includes a radio frequency transmitter, a radio frequency amplifier connected to the transmitter and a radio frequency power load apparatus connected to the amplifier. The apparatus includes a fluid having an ion source therein, and two conductors immersed in the fluid. A method of dissipating power generated by a radio frequency transmission system includes the steps of: immersing two conductors of a radio frequency power load apparatus in a fluid having an ion source therein; and connecting the apparatus to an amplifier of the transmission system.

  3. ELM frequency feedback control on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennholm, M.; Beaumont, P. S.; Carvalho, I. S.; Chapman, I. T.; Felton, R.; Frigione, D.; Garzotti, L.; Goodyear, A.; Graves, J.; Grist, D.; Jachmich, S.; Lang, P.; Lerche, E.; de la Luna, E.; Mooney, R.; Morris, J.; Nave, M. F. F.; Rimini, F.; Sips, G.; Solano, E.; Tsalas, M.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the first development and implementation of a closed loop edge localized mode (ELM) frequency controller using gas injection as the actuator. The controller has been extensively used in recent experiments on JET and it has proved to work well at ELM frequencies in the 15-40 Hz range. The controller responds effectively to a variety of disturbances, generally recovering the requested ELM frequency within approximately 500 ms. Controlling the ELM frequency has become of prime importance in the new JET configuration with all metal walls, where insufficient ELM frequency is associated with excessive tungsten influx. The controller has allowed successful operation near the minimum acceptable ELM frequency where the best plasma confinement can be achieved. Use of the ELM frequency controller in conjunction with pellet injection has enabled investigations of ELM triggering by pellets while maintaining the desired ELM frequency even when pellets fail to trigger ELMs.

  4. Stabilization of a Kerr frequency comb oscillator.

    PubMed

    Savchenkov, A A; Eliyahu, D; Liang, W; Ilchenko, V S; Byrd, J; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2013-08-01

    We study stability and spectral purity of a microresonator-based Kerr frequency comb oscillator experimentally and observe a correlation between the frequency of the continuous wave laser pumping the nonlinear resonator and the repetition frequency of the comb. This correlation is used in a proof-of-principle demonstration of a Kerr frequency comb stabilized with an optical transition of 87Rb. PMID:23903097

  5. 47 CFR 74.661 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 74.661 Section 74.661... Stations 74.661 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of... band(MHz) Frequency tolerance (%) 2,025 to 2,110 1 0.005 2,450 to 2,483.5 2 0.001 6,425 to 6,525...

  6. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The Community College Division is pleased to report progress of NASA funded research at West Virginia State College. During this reporting period, the project research group has continued with activities to develop instrumentation capability designed to monitor resonant cavity frequencies in the atmospheric region between the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. In addition, the project's principal investigator, Dr. Craig Spaniol, and NASA technical officer, Dr. John Sutton, have written and published technical papers intended to expand the scientific and technical framework needed for project research. This research continues to provide an excellent example of government and education working together to provide significant research in the college environment. This cooperative effort has provided many students with technical project work which compliments their education.

  7. Lightweight, high-frequency transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    The 25-kVA space transformer was developed under contract by Thermal Technology Laboratory, Buffalo, N. Y. The NASA Lewis transformer technology program attempted to develop the baseline technology. For the 25-kVA transformer the input voltage was chosen as 200 V, the output voltage as 1500 V, the input voltage waveform as square wave, the duty cycle as continuous, the frequency range (within certain constraints) as 10 to 40 kHz, the operating temperatures as 85 deg. and 130 C, the baseplate temperature as 50 C, the equivalent leakage inductance as less than 10 micro-h, the operating environment as space, and the life expectancy as 10 years. Such a transformer can also be used for aircraft, ship and terrestrial applications.

  8. Annular symmetry nonlinear frequency converters.

    PubMed

    Kasimov, Dror; Arie, Ady; Winebrand, Emil; Rosenman, Gil; Bruner, Ariel; Shaier, Pnina; Eger, David

    2006-10-01

    We present a new type of two-dimensional nonlinear structure for quasi-phase matching. This structure has continuous rotational symmetry, and in contrary to the commonly used periodic structures, is not lattice shaped and has no translation symmetry. It is shown that this annular symmetry structure possesses interesting phase matching attributes that are significantly different than those of periodic structures. In particular, it enables simultaneous phase-matched frequency doubling of the same pump into several different directions. Moreover, it has extremely wide phase-mismatch tolerance, since a change in the phase matching conditions does not change the second harmonic power, but only changes its propagation direction. Several structures were fabricated using either the indirect e-beam method in LiNbO(3) or the electric field poling method in stoichiometric LiTaO(3), and their conversion efficiencies, as well as angular and thermal dependencies, were characterized by second harmonic generation. PMID:19529321

  9. Frequency stabilization of algaas lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, M.; Tsuchida, H.; Tako, T.

    1982-01-01

    Performances of semiconductor lasers have been remarkably improved by the demand of the optical communications industry. Recently, a single longitudinal mode, CW oscillation at room temperature has been realized. The price of each laser has been reduced as low as $250. These lasers are mostly oscillated in the near-infrared, and the coherent lights of 0.83 micrometers and 1.3-1.6 micrometers in wavelengths are obtained by AlGaAs lasers and InGaAsP lasers, respectively. Since few number of other kind of lasers oscillates in these wavelength regions, these semiconductor lasers could be conveniently used not only in optical communications but in many fields of application, e.g., laser spectroscopy, optical pumping, frequency and length standards, laser radar, air-borne gyroscope, etc.

  10. A radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Owens, T.L.

    1987-12-07

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feedthrough is provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflection from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits the voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  11. Estimating diversity via frequency ratios.

    PubMed

    Willis, Amy; Bunge, John

    2015-12-01

    We wish to estimate the total number of classes in a population based on sample counts, especially in the presence of high latent diversity. Drawing on probability theory that characterizes distributions on the integers by ratios of consecutive probabilities, we construct a nonlinear regression model for the ratios of consecutive frequency counts. This allows us to predict the unobserved count and hence estimate the total diversity. We believe that this is the first approach to depart from the classical mixed Poisson model in this problem. Our method is geometrically intuitive and yields good fits to data with reasonable standard errors. It is especially well-suited to analyzing high diversity datasets derived from next-generation sequencing in microbial ecology. We demonstrate the method's performance in this context and via simulation, and we present a dataset for which our method outperforms all competitors. PMID:26038228

  12. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength. PMID:24805968

  13. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-05-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength.

  14. LOFAR- The Low Frequency Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcke, H. D. E.

    2006-08-01

    LOFAR is an innovative radio telescope in the frequency range of 10-240 MHz, realized as a phased array. It will become the largest radio telescope in the world in the time frame 2006-2010, located in Northern Europe. LOFAR is being implemented as a Wide Area Sensor Network which connects thousands of cheap sensors spread throughout the country to a central super computer using an ultra-broadband, synchronized data network. As the central processor IBM has provided its Blue Gene/L supercomputer. It will process streaming data with about 0.5 Terabit per second. Many simple radio antennas connected to the network turn it into a huge radio telescope for cosmological studies. In addition, geophones will turn LOFAR into an earthquake monitoring system and infrasound and meteorology sensors will turn LOFAR into a real-time weather monitoring array for agricultural applications. LOFAR is the first radio telescopes that can listen to radio signals from the entire sky overhead, on all time scales, at a large range of frequencies, and even look back in time for a couple of seconds. The main strength of LOFAR are surveys. One goal is to detect the first generation of black holes and galaxies in the universe during the epoch of reionization and study hydrogen formed after the big bang. LOFAR is also an ideal system to discover transient and sporadic radio signals. Likely transient sources to be discovered with LOFAR are bursting stars and Jupiter-like planets, gamma-ray bursts, radio outbursts from black holes, but also lightning on Earth and even radio flashes from ultra-high energy cosmic particles hitting the Earth atmosphere. Some LOFAR prototypes have recently been built. They have produced the first instantaneous all-sky maps and discovered the radio emission from cosmic particle air showers.

  15. Coping with Radio Frequency Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. M.

    2009-01-01

    The radio spectrum is a finite resource, on which humanity makes many demands. And pressure on it is ever increasing with the development of new technology and ideas for radio services. After all, we all benefit from wifi and cell phones. Radio astronomers have a small percentage of the spectrum allocated to them at octave intervals in the metre-centimetre bands, and at important frequencies, such as that of the 21cm line of HI. Signals from other services, as well as from our own poorly-engineered equipment, sometimes contaminate our bands: these signals constitute RFI. These may totally obliterate the astronomical signal, or, in the case of CLOUDSAT, may be capable of completely destroying a receiver, which introduces us to the new possibility of 'destructive interference'. A geo-stationary satellite can block access to a piece of sky from one site. Good equipment design eliminates self-inflicted interference, while physical separation often provides adequate practical mitigation at many frequencies. However, new observatories end up being located in the West Australian desert or Antarctica. In future they may be on the back side of the Moon. But there is no Earth-bound protection via physical separation against satellite signals. Some mitigation can be achieved by frequent data dumps and the excision of RFI, or by real-time detection and blanking of the receiver, or by more sophisticated algoriths. Astronomers of necessity aim to achieve mitigation via coordination, at the local level, and by participating in spectrum management at the national and international levels. This involves them spending a lot of time in Geneva at the International Telegraphic Union protecting their access to spectrum, and access to clean spectrum from the L3 point and the far side of the Moon.

  16. 47 CFR 78.36 - Frequency coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency coordination. 78.36 Section 78.36 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 78.36 Frequency coordination. (a) Coordination of all frequency assignments for fixed stations in...

  17. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz...

  18. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  19. Heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W. (Livermore, CA); Johnson, Michael A. (Pleasanton, CA); Globig, Michael A. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system is disclosed. The system utilizes heterodyning of a pulsed laser beam with a continuous wave laser beam to form a beat signal. The beat signal is processed by a controller or computer which determines both the average frequency of the laser pulse and any changes or chirp of the frequency during the pulse.

  20. Heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W. (Livermore, CA); Johnson, Michael A. (Pleasanton, CA); Globig, Michael A. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser instantaneous frequency measurement system is disclosed. The system utilizes heterodyning of a pulsed laser beam with a continuous wave laser beam to form a beat signal. The beat signal is processed by a controller or computer which determines both the average frequency of the laser pulse and any changes or chirp of th frequency during the pulse.

  1. 47 CFR 22.863 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... accounting for Doppler frequency shifts, the occupied bandwidth of the fundamental emissions remains within... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 22.863 Section 22.863...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.863 Frequency stability....

  2. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54... COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emissions stay within the authorized bands of operation....

  3. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54... COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall be sufficient to ensure that the fundamental emissions stay within the authorized bands of operation....

  4. 47 CFR 87.303 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.303 Section 87.303 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Flight Test Stations § 87.303 Frequencies. (a) These frequencies are available for assignment to flight test land and aircraft stations: kHz...

  5. 47 CFR 87.263 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Alaska. No airborne operations are permitted. Peak envelope power of stations operating on this frequency... flight operations. Frequency assignments are based on either 8.33 kHz or 25 kHz channel spacing. Proposed... frequencies (carrier) available to enroute stations serving international flight operations on the Major...

  6. 47 CFR 87.187 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.187 Section 87.187 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aircraft Stations § 87.187 Frequencies. (a) Frequencies used for air-ground Communications are listed in subpart E. Aircraft stations may...

  7. 47 CFR 87.217 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.217 Frequencies. (a) Only one unicom frequency will be assigned at any one airport. Applicants must request a particular frequency, which will be taken into... airports which have a full-time control tower or full-time FAA flight service station. (2) 122.700,...

  8. 47 CFR 87.351 - Frequency changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency changes. 87.351 Section 87.351 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.351 Frequency changes. When the aeronautical utility frequency is required to be changed...

  9. 47 CFR 90.613 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., with mobile and control station transmitting frequencies taken from the 806-824 MHz band with... and control station frequencies taken from the 896-901 MHz band with corresponding base station... frequency of each pair is listed in the following tables. Table of 806-824/851-869 MHz Channel...

  10. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... transponders are not subject to frequency tolerance restrictions. 14 Control stations may operate with the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless...

  11. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., portable and control transmitters must normally use automatic frequency control (AFC) to lock on to the... segment must be 1 part per million or better. (e) The frequency stability of mobile, portable and control... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section...

  12. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  13. 47 CFR 87.323 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.323 Section 87.323 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aviation Support Stations § 87.323 Frequencies. (a) 121.500 MHz: Emergency and distress only. (b) The frequencies 121.950, 123.300 and 123.500...

  14. 47 CFR 90.613 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., with mobile and control station transmitting frequencies taken from the 806-824 MHz band with... and control station frequencies taken from the 896-901 MHz band with corresponding base station... frequency of each pair is listed in the following tables. Table of 806-824/851-869 MHz Channel...

  15. 47 CFR 87.349 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... frequency used by the control tower for ground traffic control or by the flight service station for communications with vehicles. In addition to the ground control frequency, an aeronautical utility station at an airport served by a control tower or RCO may be assigned the tower or RCO frequency if the assignment...

  16. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... transponders are not subject to frequency tolerance restrictions. 14 Control stations may operate with the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless...

  17. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  18. 47 CFR 87.323 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the date notified. Applicants for aviation support land stations may request frequency(ies) based upon their eligibility although the Commission reserves the right to specify the frequency of assignment... support land stations. (c) The frequency 122.775 MHz and, secondary to aeronautical multicom stations,...

  19. 47 CFR 87.217 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.217 Frequencies. (a) Only one unicom frequency will be assigned at any one airport. Applicants must request a particular frequency, which will be taken into... airports which have a full-time control tower or full-time FAA flight service station. (2) 122.700,...

  20. 47 CFR 87.217 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.217 Frequencies. (a) Only one unicom frequency will be assigned at any one airport. Applicants must request a particular frequency, which will be taken into... airports which have a full-time control tower or full-time FAA flight service station. (2) 122.700,...

  1. 47 CFR 87.349 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... frequency used by the control tower for ground traffic control or by the flight service station for communications with vehicles. In addition to the ground control frequency, an aeronautical utility station at an airport served by a control tower or RCO may be assigned the tower or RCO frequency if the assignment...

  2. 47 CFR 90.715 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies available. 90.715 Section 90.715 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 220-222 MHz Band § 90.715 Frequencies available. (a)...

  3. 47 CFR 87.217 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.217 Section 87.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.217 Frequencies. (a) Only one unicom frequency will be assigned at any one airport. Applicants...

  4. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  5. 47 CFR 90.613 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., with mobile and control station transmitting frequencies taken from the 806-824 MHz band with... and control station frequencies taken from the 896-901 MHz band with corresponding base station... frequency of each pair is listed in the following tables. Table of 806-824/851-869 MHz Channel...

  6. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., portable and control transmitters must normally use automatic frequency control (AFC) to lock on to the... segment must be 1 part per million or better. (e) The frequency stability of mobile, portable and control... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section...

  7. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  8. 47 CFR 87.217 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Aeronautical Advisory Stations (Unicoms) § 87.217 Frequencies. (a) Only one unicom frequency will be assigned at any one airport. Applicants must request a particular frequency, which will be taken into... airports which have a full-time control tower or full-time FAA flight service station. (2) 122.700,...

  9. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... transponders are not subject to frequency tolerance restrictions. 14 Control stations may operate with the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless...

  10. 47 CFR 87.323 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the date notified. Applicants for aviation support land stations may request frequency(ies) based upon their eligibility although the Commission reserves the right to specify the frequency of assignment... support land stations. (c) The frequency 122.775 MHz and, secondary to aeronautical multicom stations,...

  11. 47 CFR 90.613 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., with mobile and control station transmitting frequencies taken from the 806-824 MHz band with... and control station frequencies taken from the 896-901 MHz band with corresponding base station... frequency of each pair is listed in the following tables. Table of 806-824/851-869 MHz Channel...

  12. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... transponders are not subject to frequency tolerance restrictions. 14 Control stations may operate with the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless...

  13. 47 CFR 90.539 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., portable and control transmitters must normally use automatic frequency control (AFC) to lock on to the... segment must be 1 part per million or better. (e) The frequency stability of mobile, portable and control... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.539 Section...

  14. 47 CFR 87.349 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... frequency used by the control tower for ground traffic control or by the flight service station for communications with vehicles. In addition to the ground control frequency, an aeronautical utility station at an airport served by a control tower or RCO may be assigned the tower or RCO frequency if the assignment...

  15. 47 CFR 87.349 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... frequency used by the control tower for ground traffic control or by the flight service station for communications with vehicles. In addition to the ground control frequency, an aeronautical utility station at an airport served by a control tower or RCO may be assigned the tower or RCO frequency if the assignment...

  16. 47 CFR 87.349 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.349 Section 87.349 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AVIATION SERVICES Aeronautical Utility Mobile Stations § 87.349 Frequencies. (a) The frequency assigned to an aeronautical utility station at an airport served by...

  17. 47 CFR 90.213 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... transponders are not subject to frequency tolerance restrictions. 14 Control stations may operate with the... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 90.213 Section 90.213... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.213 Frequency stability. (a) Unless...

  18. Judging the Frequency of English Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderson, J. Charles

    2007-01-01

    Given the lack of empirical corpus-based frequency counts in many languages, it would be useful and of theoretical interest if judgements of relative frequency of words in a language by proficient speakers of that language could substitute objective frequency counts for the purposes of devising language teaching materials, tests, and research

  19. 47 CFR 18.301 - Operating frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operating frequencies. 18.301 Section 18.301 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.301 Operating frequencies. ISM equipment may be operated on any frequency above 9 kHz...

  20. 47 CFR 5.101 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency stability. 5.101 Section 5.101...) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements 5.101 Frequency stability. An applicant must propose to use a frequency tolerance that would confine emissions within the band of operation, unless...

  1. 47 CFR 87.133 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency stability. 87.133 Section 87.133... Technical Requirements 87.133 Frequency stability. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d), (f), and (g) of this section, the carrier frequency of each station must be maintained within these...

  2. 47 CFR 22.863 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 22.863 Section 22.863...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems 22.863 Frequency stability. The frequency stability of equipment used under this subpart shall be sufficient to ensure that,...

  3. 47 CFR 101.505 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies. 101.505 Section 101.505 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service 101.505 Frequencies. Frequencies, and...

  4. 47 CFR 22.355 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 22.355 Section 22.355... Operational and Technical Requirements Technical Requirements 22.355 Frequency tolerance. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the carrier frequency of each transmitter in the Public Mobile...

  5. 47 CFR 87.279 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.279 Section 87.279... Aeronautical Enroute and Aeronautical Fixed Stations Aeronautical Fixed Stations 87.279 Frequencies. (a) United States (except Alaska). The applicant must request specific frequencies in accordance with ...

  6. 47 CFR 22.355 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 22.355 Section 22.355... Operational and Technical Requirements Technical Requirements 22.355 Frequency tolerance. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the carrier frequency of each transmitter in the Public Mobile...

  7. 47 CFR 5.101 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency stability. 5.101 Section 5.101... Operating Requirements 5.101 Frequency stability. Experimental Radio Service licensees shall ensure that transmitted emissions remain within the authorized frequency band under normal operating conditions:...

  8. 47 CFR 87.279 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.279 Section 87.279... Aeronautical Fixed Stations 87.279 Frequencies. (a) United States (except Alaska). The applicant must request specific frequencies in accordance with 2.106 of this chapter. The Commission will determine...

  9. 47 CFR 87.133 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 87.133 Section 87.133... Technical Requirements 87.133 Frequency stability. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c), (d), (f), and (g) of this section, the carrier frequency of each station must be maintained within these...

  10. 47 CFR 87.41 - Frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies. 87.41 Section 87.41... Applications and Licenses 87.41 Frequencies. (a) Applicant responsibilities. The applicant must propose frequencies to be used by the station consistent with the applicant's eligibility, the proposed operation...

  11. 47 CFR 27.54 - Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency stability. 27.54 Section 27.54 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards 27.54 Frequency stability. The frequency stability shall...

  12. 47 CFR 80.509 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 80.509 Section 80.509... MARITIME SERVICES Private Coast Stations and Marine Utility Stations 80.509 Frequency assignment. Frequencies assignable to private coast stations and marine utility stations are listed in subpart H....

  13. 47 CFR 80.709 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies available. 80.709 Section 80.709 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Alaska Fixed Stations 80.709 Frequencies available. Frequencies assignable to...

  14. 33 CFR 401.61 - Assigned frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Assigned frequencies. 401.61 Section 401.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... frequencies. The Seaway stations operate on the following assigned VHF frequencies: 156.8 MHz(channel...

  15. 47 CFR 78.111 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 78.111 Section 78.111... SERVICE Technical Regulations 78.111 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of each authorized transmitter to within the following percentage of the...

  16. 47 CFR 74.502 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.502 Section 74.502... 74.502 Frequency assignment. (a) Except as provided in NG30, broadcast auxiliary stations licensed as... Frequency Allocations. These stations will be protected from possible interference caused by new users...

  17. 47 CFR 74.502 - Frequency assignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency assignment. 74.502 Section 74.502... 74.502 Frequency assignment. (a) Except as provided in NG30, broadcast auxiliary stations licensed as... Frequency Allocations. These stations will be protected from possible interference caused by new users...

  18. 33 CFR 401.61 - Assigned frequencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Assigned frequencies. 401.61 Section 401.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... frequencies. The Seaway stations operate on the following assigned VHF frequencies: 156.8 MHz(channel...

  19. 47 CFR 78.111 - Frequency tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency tolerance. 78.111 Section 78.111... SERVICE Technical Regulations 78.111 Frequency tolerance. Stations in this service shall maintain the carrier frequency of each authorized transmitter to within the following percentage of the...

  20. 47 CFR 80.709 - Frequencies available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies available. 80.709 Section 80.709 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Alaska Fixed Stations 80.709 Frequencies available. Frequencies assignable to...