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Sample records for 36cl ams measurements

  1. Methodological study on exposure date of Tiankeng by AMS measurement of in situ produced cosmogenic 36Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kejun, Dong; Shizhuo, Li; Ming, He; Sasa, Kimikazu; Matsushi, Yuki; Baojian, Huang; Xiangdong, Ruan; Yongjing, Guan; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Sueki, Keisuke; Chaoli, Li; Shaoyong, Wu; Xianggao, Wang; Hongtao, Shen; Nagashima, Yasuo; Shan, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Tiankeng is a typical Karst relief of the late Quaternary Period. Studies on the exposure ages of Tiankeng are very important in geographical research to elucidate the formation condition, the developing process, and the features of biological species. 36Cl on the surface layer of the rupture cross-section of Tiankeng is largely produced by cosmogenic high-energy neutron induced reactions 40Ca(n, αp) and 39K(n, α), and has accumulated since the formation of the Tiankeng. Low-energy neutron reaction 35Cl(n, γ) contributes a small portion of 36Cl. In this work, the concentration of the cosmogenic 36Cl in rock samples taken from Dashiwei Tiankeng, Leye County, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China, was measured jointly by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) laboratories of CIAE and University of Tsukuba in an effort to estimate the formation time (or exposure age) of the Tiankeng. The results show that the exposure time of Da Shiwei Tiankeng is about 26 ± 9.6 ka (without erosion correction). The sampling strategy and procedures, experimental set-up, and preliminary results will be presented in detail.

  2. Intercomparison study on (152)Eu gamma ray and (36)Cl AMS measurements for development of the new Hiroshima-Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02).

    PubMed

    Hoshi, M; Endo, S; Tanaka, K; Ishikawa, M; Straume, T; Komura, K; Rühm, W; Nolte, E; Huber, T; Nagashima, Y; Seki, R; Sasa, K; Sueki, K; Fukushima, H; Egbert, S D; Imanaka, T

    2008-07-01

    In the process of developing a new dosimetry system for atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (DS02), an intercomparison study between (152)Eu and (36)Cl measurements was proposed, to reconcile the discrepancy previously observed in the Hiroshima data between measurements and calculations of thermal neutron activation products. Nine granite samples, exposed to the atomic-bomb radiation in Hiroshima within 1,200 m of the hypocenter, as well as mixed standard solutions containing known amounts of europium and chlorine that were neutron-activated by a (252)Cf source, were used for the intercomparison. Gamma-ray spectrometry for (152)Eu was carried out with ultra low-background Ge detectors at the Ogoya Underground Laboratory, Kanazawa University, while three laboratories participated in the (36)Cl measurement using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS): The Technical University of Munich, Germany, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA and the University of Tsukuba, Japan. Measured values for the mixed standard solutions showed good agreement among the participant laboratories. They also agreed well with activation calculations, using the neutron fluences monitored during the (252)Cf irradiation, and the corresponding activation cross-sections taken from the JENDL-3.3 library. The measured-to-calculated ratios obtained were 1.02 for (152)Eu and 0.91-1.02 for (36)Cl, respectively. Similarly, the results of the granite intercomparison indicated good agreement with the DS02 calculation for these samples. An average measured-to-calculated ratio of 0.98 was obtained for all granite intercomparison measurements. The so-called neutron discrepancy that was previously observed and that which included increasing measured-to-calculated ratios for thermal neutron activation products for increasing distances beyond 1,000 m from the hypocenter was not seen in the results of the intercomparison study. The previously claimed discrepancy could be explained by

  3. Study of nuclear reactions producing 36Cl by micro-AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luís, H.; Jesus, A. P.; Fonseca, M.; Cruz, J.; Galaviz, D.; Franco, N.; Alves, E.

    2016-01-01

    36Cl is one of several short to medium lived isotopes (as compared to the earth age) whose abundances at the earlier solar system may help to clarify its formation process. There are two generally accepted possible models for the production of this radionuclide: it originated from the ejecta of a nearby supernova (where 36Cl was most probably produced in the s-process by neutron irradiation of 35Cl) and/or it was produced by in-situ irradiation of nebular dust by energetic particles (mostly, p, a, 3He -X-wind irradiation model). The objective of the present work is to measure the cross section of the 37Cl(p,d)36Cl and 35Cl(d,p)36Cl nuclear reactions, by measuring the 36Cl content of AgCl samples (previously bombarded with high energy protons and deuterons) with AMS, taking advantage of the very low detection limits of this technique for chlorine measurements. For that, the micro-AMS system of the LF1/ITN laboratory had to be optimized for chlorine measurements, as to our knowledge this type of measurements had never been performed in such a system (AMS with micro-beam). Here are presented the first results of these developments, namely the tests in terms of precision and reproducibility that were done by comparing AgCl blanks irradiated at the Portuguese National Reactor with standards produced by the dilution of the NIST SRM 4943 standard material.

  4. The Hiroshima thermal-neutron discrepancy for (36)Cl at large distances. Part I: New (36)Cl measurements in granite samples exposed to A-bomb neutrons.

    PubMed

    Huber, Thomas; Rühm, Werner; Kato, Kazuo; Egbert, Stephen D; Kubo, Florian; Lazarev, Vitali; Nolte, Eckehart

    2005-10-01

    The long-lived radioisotope (36)Cl (half-life: 301,000 years) was measured in granite samples exposed to A-bomb neutrons at distances from 94 to 1,591 m from the hypocenter in Hiroshima, by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Measured (36)Cl/Cl ratios decrease from 1.6 x 10(-10) close to the hypocenter to about 1-2 x 10(-13), at a distance of 1,300 m from the hypocenter. At this distance and beyond the measured (36)Cl/Cl ratios do not change significantly and scatter around values of 1-2 x 10(-13). These findings suggest that the (36)Cl had been predominantly produced by thermalized neutrons from the A-bomb via neutron capture on stable (35)Cl, at distances from the hypocenter smaller than about 1,200 m. At larger distances, however, confounding processes induced by cosmic rays or neutrons from the decay of uranium and thorium become important. This hypothesis is theoretically and experimentally supported in a consecutive paper. The results are compared to calculations that are based on the most recent dosimetry system DS02. Close to the hypocenter, measured (36)Cl/Cl ratios are lower than those calculated, while they are significantly higher at large distances from the hypocenter. If the contribution of the cosmic rays and of the neutrons from the decay of uranium and thorium in the sample was subtracted, however, no significant deviation from the DS02 calculations was observed, at those distances. Thus, the Hiroshima neutron discrepancy reported in the literature for (36)Cl for samples from large distances from the hypocenter, i.e., higher measured (36)Cl/Cl ratios than predicted by the previous dosimetry system DS86, was not confirmed. PMID:16177928

  5. Measurement of cosmogenic /sup 36/Cl/Cl in young volcanic rocks: An application of accelerator mass spectrometry in geochronology

    SciTech Connect

    Leavy, B.D.; Phillips, F.M.; Elmore, D.; Kubik, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    We have measured /sup 36/Cl/Cl ratios in a number of young volcanic rocks in order to test the feasibility of using /sup 36/Cl buildup as a geochronometer for materials less than about 700,000 years old. All of the analyzed rocks have been dated independently using K-Ar or other radiometric dating methods and have exposure histories that are known or can be reasonably assumed. Measured /sup 36/Cl/Cl ratios in these rocks are in good agreement with the calculated in-situ /sup 36/Cl buildup curve. These analyses indicate that AMS measurement of /sup 36/Cl buildup in young rocks is a potentially powerful new method for dating materials that had previously been undatable, and as such will have broad applications in volcanology, tectonics, geophysics, and Quaternary research.

  6. Cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl accumulation in unstable landforms 2. Simulations and measurements on eroding moraines

    SciTech Connect

    Zreda, M.G.; Phillips, F.M.; Elmore, D.

    1994-11-01

    Cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl ages of boulders from late Pleistocene moraines in Bishop Creek, Sierra Nevada, California, provided valuable details about {sup 36}Cl surface exposure dating and the nature of post depositional processes that modify glacial landforms. The natural variability of the apparent {sup 36}Cl ages among morainal boulders is due to soil erosion and gradual exposure of boulders at the surface. Two mechanisms are responsible for the resulting distributions of the apparent {sup 36}Cl ages. Variability of the initial burial depth among boulders and variability in the chemical composition of boulders from the same depth both result in different {sup 36}Cl ages due to the dependence of the depth production profile on the boulder chemistry. The authors measured cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in boulders from a late Pleistocene moraine. The distribution of the calculated apparent ages allowed them to calculate the true age of 85 kyr and the erosion rate of 570 g cm{sup -2}. These results are in excellent agreement with independently estimated values of 87 kyr and 600 g cm{sup -2} for the age and erosion depth, respectively. These results indicate that the model satisfactorily simulates effects of erosion processes and can thus aid in surface exposure dating of eroding landforms.

  7. Activation Measurements for Thermal Neutrons, U.S. Measurements of 36Cl in Mineral Samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and Measurement of 63 Ni in Copper Samples From Hiroshima by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tore Straume; Alfredo A. Marchetti; Stephen D. Egbert; James A. Roberts; Ping Men; Shoichiro Fujita; Kiyoshi Shizuma; Masaharu Hoshi; G. Rugel; W. Ruhm; G. Korschinek; J. E. McAninch; K. L. Carroll; T. Faestermann; K. Knie; R. E. Martinelli; A. Wallner; C. Wallner

    2005-01-14

    The present paper presents the {sup 36}Cl measurement effort in the US. A large number of {sup 36}Cl measurements have been made in both granite and concrete samples obtained from various locations and distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These measurements employed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the number of atoms of {sup 36}Cl per atom of total Cl in the sample. Results from these measurements are presented here and discussed in the context of the DS02 dosimetry reevaluation effort for Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bomb survivors. The production of {sup 36}Cl by bomb neutrons in mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki was primarily via the reaction {sup 35}Cl(n,{gamma}){sup 36}Cl. This reaction has a substantial thermal neutron cross-section (43.6 b at 0.025 eV) and the product has a long half-life (301,000 y). hence, it is well suited for neutron-activation detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using AMS more than 50 years after the bombings. A less important reaction for bomb neutrons, {sup 39}K(n,{alpha}){sup 36}Cl, typically produces less than 10% of the {sup 36}Cl in mineral samples such as granite and concrete, which contain {approx} 2% potassium. In 1988, only a year after the publication of the DS86 final report (Roesch 1987), it was demonstrated experimentally that {sup 36}Cl measured using AMS should be able to detect the thermal neutron fluences at the large distances most relevant to the A-bomb survivor dosimetry. Subsequent measurements in mineral samples from both Hiroshima and Nagasaki validated the experimental findings. The potential utility of {sup 36}Cl as a thermal neutron detector in Hiroshima was first presented by Haberstock et al. who employed the Munich AMS facility to measure {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in a gravestone from near the hypocenter. That work subsequently resulted in an expanded {sup 36}Cl effort in Germany that paralleled the US work. More recently, there have also been {sup 36}Cl measurements made by a Japanese

  8. 36Cl/Cl ratios in geothermal systems: preliminary measurements from the Coso Field

    SciTech Connect

    Nimz, G.J.; Moore, J.N.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1997-07-01

    The {sub 36}Cl/Cl isotopic composition of chlorine in geothermal systems can be a useful diagnostic tool in characterizing hydrologic structure, in determining the origins and age of waters within the systems, and in differentiating the sources of chlorine (and other solutes) in the thermal waters. The {sub 36}Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples from the Coso, California geothermal field have been measured for these purposes. The results indicate that most of the chlorine is not derived from the dominant granitoid that host the geothermal system. If the chlorine was originally input into the Coso subsurface through meteoric recharge, that input occurred at least 1-1.25 million years ago. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic sources. In either case, the results indicate that most of the chlorine in the thermal waters has existed within the granitoid host rocks for no more than about 100,00-200,00 years. this residence time for the chlorine is similar to residence times suggested by other researchers for chlorine in deep groundwaters of the Mono Basin north of the Coso field.

  9. 36Cl measurements in Hiroshima granite samples as part of an international intercomparison study. Results from the Munich group.

    PubMed

    Huber, T; Rühm, W; Hoshi, M; Egbert, S D; Nolte, E

    2003-04-01

    Within the effort to resolve the so-called Hiroshima neutron discrepancy, an international intercomparison study has been carried out on granite samples from Hiroshima, with participating institutions from Japan, the US, and Germany. (36)Cl and (152)Eu produced in these samples by thermal neutrons from the A-bomb explosion were assessed independently by means of different techniques. At the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory near Munich, Germany, (36)Cl concentrations were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry. Measured (36)Cl/Cl ratios ranged from 1,670 x 10(-13) (at a distance of 146 m from the hypocenter) to 2.2 x 10(-13) (at a distance of 1,163 m from the hypocenter). One granite sample not exposed to A-bomb neutrons was measured as a control, and a (36)Cl/Cl ratio of 2.6 x 10(-13) was obtained. On average, our experimental results are 20-30% lower than those provided by model calculations based on the dosimetry system DS86. The results presented here do not support previous assessments of (36)Cl, (60)Co, and (152)Eu which had suggested much larger thermal neutron fluences than those calculated on the basis of DS86 for distances from the hypocenter of more than 1,000 m. PMID:12684827

  10. 36Cl accelerator mass spectrometry with a bespoke instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcken, K. M.; Freeman, S. P. H. T.; Schnabel, C.; Binnie, S. A.; Xu, S.; Phillips, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Cosmogenic 36Cl analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a valuable environmental and geological sciences research tool. Overcoming the stable nuclide 36S isobar interfering with measurement is challenging, however. Traditionally this has required large accelerators, but following recent technical advances it is now possible with ∼30 MeV ion energies. Consequently 5 MV or even smaller modern bespoke spectrometers are now 36Cl-capable, increasing accessibility and promoting wider and more varied 36Cl use. However, the technical ability to identify 36Cl ions is quite distinct from demonstrated high-performance AMS. Such is the theme of this paper. We present a systematic analysis of the accurate measurement of sample radioisotope relative to the stable chlorine, the normalisation of the measured ratio and correction for remaining 36S interference, all combined with the use of stable-isotope dilution to determine sample Cl concentration to begin with. We conclude by showing that repeated analyses support our claims for routine 3% 36Cl-AMS data. Accordingly, the modest SUERC spectrometer well competes with the performance of larger longer-established instruments, and the results may be quite generic for modern bespoke instruments.

  11. Perchlorate isotope forensics with naturally produced 36Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, D.; Parker, D.; Singleton, M.; Buchholz, B.; Esser, B.; Moran, J.; Rood, D.; Finkel, R.

    2008-12-01

    The source of perchlorate (ClO4-) in many surface and groundwaters is not known. Recent studies (Parker et al., 2008) suggest that natural production is widespread and common, and may involve atmospheric processes. The isotopic composition of perchlorate chlorine and oxygen has proven useful for identifying anthropogenic/natural perchlorate sources (Bohlke et al, 2005) and for exploring biodegradation in environmental samples (Sturchio et al, 2007). The stable isotope approach, however, requires processing very large volumes of water to obtain milligrams of rigorously separated perchlorate for analysis, limiting its widespread application. Chlorine-36 (36Cl) is a long-lived and rare radionuclide produced cosmogenically in the upper atmosphere. The measurement of 36Cl/Cl by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) only requires micrograms of sample chlorine enabling lower volume extractions (less than 1/10th that required for stable isotope techniques), and potentially less rigorous perchlorate chemistry. The primary technical goal of our work is to determine the utility of 36Cl in distinguishing perchlorate source and in constraining mechanisms of natural perchlorate formation. We expect that synthetic perchlorate compounds produced using chloride brines from ancient sources and concentrated modern deposits will have low 36Cl/Cl ratios that will be distinct from natural perchlorate produced in the atmosphere. High levels of 36Cl in groundwater or rainwater perchlorate would then be an unambiguous indication of a natural atmospheric production, and the distribution of 36Cl/Cl in precipitation and groundwater (in conjunction with stable isotope compositions) would constrain the mechanism for natural perchlorate production in the atmosphere. Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), we have measured 36Cl/Cl in a number of synthetic perchlorate salts (including potassium, sodium, magnesium, and ammonium salts). Synthetic salt 36Cl/Cl atom ratios range from 1 to 35 e-15

  12. Temporal evolution of (36)Cl abundances in the Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Armen; Sturchio, Neil C

    2015-06-01

    The observed (36)Cl isotopic abundance in Great Lakes water decreases from west to east, with the highest (36)Cl/Cl ratio of 1332 × 10(-15) in Lake Superior and the lowest (36)Cl/Cl ratio of 151 × 10(-15) in Lake Erie, whereas the (36)Cl concentration ((36)Cl atoms/L) is lowest in Lake Superior and higher in the other Great Lakes. The (36)Cl concentration in Lake Superior is much higher than expected from normal atmospheric deposition over the basin, consistent with deposition of nuclear bomb-produced (36)Cl during 1952-1964. A conservative mass-balance model constrained by hydrological parameters and available (36)Cl fluence measurements predicts the (36)Cl abundances in the Great Lakes from 1945 to 2015, in excellent agreement with available data for Lakes Superior, Michigan, and Huron, but the model underestimates (36)Cl abundances for Lakes Erie and Ontario. However, assuming that (36)Cl demonstrates non-conservative behavior and is significantly retained in the drainage basins, a model incorporating a delayed input parameter successfully predicts observed (36)Cl concentrations in all of the Great Lakes. PMID:25817926

  13. Comparison of 36Cl and 3He measurements in glacial surfaces on the tropical Altiplano (Cerro Tunupa volcano, 20°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Lavé, Jérôme; Benedetti, Lucilla; Aster Team

    2016-04-01

    The combination of two or more cosmogenic nuclides measured in the same rock samples allow complex landscape exposure histories to be quantified, due to the nuclide-specific production and decay rates. In supposedly simple exposure scenarios, such as moraine chronologies, the use of more than one nuclide can also help identify outliers caused by geomorphological bias (e.g. "inheritance") or analytical problems (e.g. nuclide loss or contamination during chemical extraction). The two cosmogenic in situ nuclides 3He and 36Cl are potentially very useful to be simultaneously measured in quartz-lacking lithologies, but their application is more challenging than that of combined 10Be and 26Al measurements, which are routinely employed in quartz-bearing rocks. This is, amongst other things, because the production of 3He and 36Cl depend on various compositional factors. Therefore, 3He and 36Cl have rarely been measured in the same samples so far. Here, we present 36Cl measurements in plagioclases extracted from four moraine boulders and one roche moutonnée on the southern flank of Cerro Tunupa volcano, located in the tropical Bolivian Andes (3800-4500 m, 20°S). In pyroxenes of these samples, 3He has previously been measured to gain insights into the local deglaciation history and climate conditions about 15 kyr ago during the Lake Tauca highstand (Blard et al., 2009, 2013). The ages calculated from the measured 3He and 36Cl concentrations of the 5 samples range from 12 kyr to 180 kyr and are generally in good agreement. The good age agreement of a boulder surface (TU-1C) that is significantly older than the other boulder ages from this moraine confirm the suspicion, that it was exposed to cosmic radiation previous to its last deposition (Blard et al., 2009, 2013). In contrast, the 36Cl age of the roche moutonnée surface (TU2) is significantly younger than the corresponding 3He age, but fits well with the adjacent moraine mean age. It thus arises the question if the 3He

  14. Correcting for nucleogenic ^{36}Cl in cosmogenic ^{36}Cl dating of volcanic rocks from the Erciyes volcano, Central Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikaya, M. A.; Zreda, M.; Desilets, D.; Ciner, A.; Sen, E.

    2006-12-01

    Many radiometric methods are suitable for dating lava flows, but none is reliable for routine dating of lava flows younger than 10 ky. The cosmogenic ^{36}Cl method seems promising because it can be applied to any type of rock and laboratory and analytical work is easy and fast. But low cosmogenic ^{36}Cl inventory (after short exposure duration), combined with possible large non-cosmogenic component, makes this technique difficult to apply in a routine fashion. We applied the ^{36}Cl method to date a lava flow and the 14C technique to date the associated ash flow from the Erciyes (Argaeus) volcano, central Turkey. The average of three cosmogenic ^{36}Cl ages is 7.3 \\mp 0.5 ky and the average of two radiocarbon ages is 9.5 \\mp 0.3 ky (calibrated using Calib 5.0). The difference could be due to the overestimation of the calculated nucleogenic ^{36}Cl, which makes up almost one-third of the measured ^{36}Cl. If the nucleogenic component were set to zero, the average ^{36}Cl age would be 10.3 \\mp 0.2 ky. Thus, the ^{36}Cl age should be in the range between 7.3 ky and 10.2 ky, which includes the 14C age near the upper end of the interval. Under the assumption that the 14C age is correct and that the nucleogenic ^{36}Cl has reached a secular equilibrium with the magma, the nucleogenic ^{36}Cl needed to reconcile the ^{36}Cl and 14C ages is only about one-fifth of that previously calculated. In order to investigate this disparity of ages and possible calculating errors of nucleogenic ^{36}Cl, we are analyzing rock samples from where we can directly measure nucleogenic component of ^{36}Cl. This work is important for developing better ways to estimate the nucleogenic ^{36}Cl, which will improve the accuracy of ^{36}Cl dating of young volcanic rocks.

  15. Infiltration at yucca mountain, nevada, traced by 36Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, A. E.; Wolfsberg, K.; Gifford, S. K.; Bentley, H. W.; Elmore, D.

    1987-11-01

    Measurements of chloride and 36Cl in soils from two locations near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have been used to trace the infiltration of precipitation in this arid region. The results show that the 36Cl fallout from nuclear-weapons testing formed a well-defined peak at one location, with a maximum 36Cl/Cl ratio 0.5 m below the surface. The structure of the 36Cl bomb pulse at the other location was much more complex, and the quantity of 36Cl in the bomb pulse was < 1% of the 6 × 10 12 atoms {36Cl }/{m 2} in the bomb pulse at the first location. The data indicate hydrologic activity subsequent to the 36Cl bomb-pulse fallout at one location, but none at the other location.

  16. APMP comparison of measurement of surface emission rate of 36Cl large area source (APMP.RI(II)-K2.Cl-36).

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Akira; Hino, Yoshio

    2012-09-01

    An international comparison of measurement of beta particle surface emission rate from a (36)Cl large area source (APMP.RI(II)-S1.Cl-36) was carried out within the framework of the Asia-Pacific Metrology Program (APMP). Participants from APMP were NMIJ (Japan), KRISS (Korea) and INER (Chinese Taipei). Participants from the other RMOs were NIST (United States), PTB (Germany), NMISA (South Africa) and VNIIM (Russia). All the results of the participants agreed within ±1%. This was the first international comparison of measurement of surface emission rate of beta particle from a large area source. PMID:22424747

  17. Cosmogenic 36Cl in karst waters from Bunker Cave North Western Germany - A tool to derive local evapotranspiration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münsterer, C.; Fohlmeister, J.; Christl, M.; Schröder-Ritzrau, A.; Alfimov, V.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Wackerbarth, A.; Mangini, A.

    2012-06-01

    Monthly rain and drip waters were collected over a period of 10 months at Bunker Cave, Germany. The concentration of 36Cl and the 36Cl/Cl-ratios were determined by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), while stable (35+37)Cl concentrations were measured with both, ion chromatography (IC) and AMS. The measured 36Cl-fluxes of (0.97 ± 0.57) × 104 atoms cm-2 month-1 (0.97 atoms m-2 month-1) in precipitation were on average twice as high as the global mean atmospheric production rate. This observation is consistent with the local fallout pattern, which is characterized by a maximum at mid-latitudes. The stable chloride concentration in drip waters (ranging from 13.2 to 20.9 mg/l) and the 36Cl-concentrations (ranging from 16.9 × 106 to 35.3 × 106 atoms/l) are a factor of 7 and 10 above the values expected from empirical evapotranspiration formulas and the rain water concentrations, respectively. Most likely the additional stable Cl is due to human impact from a nearby urban conglomeration. The large 36Cl-enrichment is attributed to the local evapotranspiration effect, which appears to be higher than the calculated values and to additional bomb-derived 36Cl from nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s and 60s stored in the soil above the cave. In the densely vegetated soil above Bunker Cave, 36Cl seems not to behave as a completely conservative tracer. The bomb derived 36Cl might be retained in the soil due to uptake by minerals and organic material and is still being released now. Based on our data, the residence time of 36Cl in the soil is estimated to be about 75-85 years.

  18. Infiltration at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, traced by {sup 36}Cl

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, A.E.; Wolfsberg, K.; Gifford, S.K.; Bentley, H.W.; Elmore, D.

    1987-04-01

    Measurements of chloride and {sup 36}Cl in soils from two locations near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have been used to trace the infiltration of precipitation in this arid region. The results show that the {sup 36}Cl fallout from nuclear weapons testing formed a well-defined peak at one location, with a maximum 0.5m below the surface. The structure of the {sup 36}Cl bomb pulse at the other location was much more complex, and quantity of {sup 36}Cl in the bomb pulse was <1% of the 6 x 10{sup 12} atoms {sup 36}Cl/m{sup 2} in the bomb pulse at the first location. The data indicate hydrologic activity subsequent to the {sup 36}Cl bomb pulse fallout at one location, but none at the other location. 11 refs.

  19. High (36)Cl/Cl ratios in Chernobyl groundwater.

    PubMed

    Roux, Céline; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Simonucci, Caroline; Van Meir, Nathalie; Fifield, L Keith; Diez, Olivier; Bassot, Sylvain; Simler, Roland; Bugai, Dmitri; Kashparov, Valery; Lancelot, Joël

    2014-12-01

    After the explosion of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in April 1986, contaminated material was buried in shallow trenches within the exclusion zone. A (90)Sr plume was evidenced downgradient of one of these trenches, trench T22. Due to its conservative properties, (36)Cl is investigated here as a potential tracer to determine the maximal extent of the contamination plume from the trench in groundwater. (36)Cl/Cl ratios measured in groundwater, trench soil water and leaf leachates are 1-5 orders of magnitude higher than the theoretical natural (36)Cl/Cl ratio. This contamination occurred after the Chernobyl explosion and currently persists. Trench T22 acts as an obvious modern point source of (36)Cl, however other sources have to be involved to explain such contamination. (36)Cl contamination of groundwater can be explained by dilution of trench soil water by uncontaminated water (rainwater or deep groundwater). With a plume extending further than that of (90)Sr, radionuclide which is impacted by retention and decay processes, (36)Cl can be considered as a suitable tracer of contamination from the trench in groundwater provided that modern release processes of (36)Cl from trench soil are better characterized. PMID:25128774

  20. Distribution and Origin of 36Cl In Allende CAIs

    SciTech Connect

    Matzel, J P; Jacobsen, B; Hutcheon, I D; Krot, A N; Nagashima, K; Yin, Q; Ramon, E C; Weber, P; Wasserburg, G J

    2009-12-11

    greater than values for sodalite in some CAIs and chondrules. We report here new {sup 36}Cl-{sup 36}S isotope measurements of wadalite in two Type B CAIs (TS34 and Egg-6) and sodalite in a fine-grained CAI (Pink Angel) from Allende.

  1. Determination of 36Cl in biological shield concrete using pyrohydrolysis and liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Kazuo; Hatakeyama, Mutsuo; Tachibana, Mitsuo

    2002-07-01

    A method for the determination of 36Cl in biological shield concrete of nuclear reactors was developed. Cl in the concrete sample was extracted quantitatively by pyrohydrolysis at 900 degrees C and recovered in Na2CO3 solution for subsequent measurement of 36Cl by liquid scintillation counting. WO3 was used as an accelerator in the pyrohydrolysis. The Cl extraction procedure was optimized by investigating experimental conditions with the use of ion chromatography and its recovery was evaluated by the analysis of the geochemical reference samples. The detection limit of 36Cl was 0.02 Bq g(-1) for a sample weight of 2 g. The relative standard deviation was 3-7% for the samples containing 0.5 Bq g(-1) levels of 36Cl. The method was applied to determine 36Cl in biological shield concrete of the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor. PMID:12173658

  2. 36Cl-36Ar Exposure Ages of Chondritic Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Th.; Caffee, M. W.; Finkel, R. C.; Marti, K.; Nishiizumi, K.; Ponganis, K. V.

    1995-09-01

    Metal separates were prepared to determine ^36Cl-^36Ar exposure ages for six H4 p.m. falls (with reported bulk exposure ages of 4 to 10Ma), for ten H5 a.m. falls (T(sub)e = 4-10 Ma) and for the Acapulco meteorite (T(^36Cl-^36Ar)= 5.7 Ma). This dating method uses production rate ratios P(^36Cl)/P(^36Ar) and is independent of the shielding-sensitive absolute production rates. It is also known that for protons the production rate ratio is rather insensitive to changes in the energy spectrum; the dependence of this ratio for secondary neutrons is at present less understood. First results were already reported [1]. The cosmic-ray-produced ^3He/^38Ar ratios show a bimodal distribution with two clusters at about 15 and about 9 (Fig. 1). About half of the ^3He is produced via ^3H which is known to diffuse in metal at relatively low temperatures. Therefore, Fig. 1 provides evidence for a quasi-continuous loss of ^3H from such metals. If this loss mechanism is due to solar heating, perihelia <1 AU are indicated for these meteorites. Losses are prominent for H5 a.m. falls, but not for H4 p.m. falls. The orbital implications are consistent with those already known from the time-of-fall parameter (p.m. falls / total falls) which was used in the selection of the H4,H5 sample sets [2]. The exposure age histograms of both H groups show the well known clusters at about 7 Ma. The width of the exposure age peaks differ, however, and the collisional break-up event can be further constrained. Except for Nassirah, all members of the H4 p.m. group fall into the range 7.0 +/- 0.3 Ma. Bulk rock ages (8.2-9.3 Ma) [3] as well as the ^36Cl-^36Ar age (8.3 Ma) of Nassirah are higher and may indicate that this meteorite does not belong to the collisional event. We observe a small but systematic difference in calculated exposure ages by the ^36Cl-^36Ar method, when compared with ages obtained by conventional noble gas production rates. This shift (about 10%) does not appear to be dependent on

  3. Determination of paleoseismic activity over a large time-scale: Fault scarp dating with 36Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozafari Amiri, Nasim; Tikhomirov, Dmitry; Sümer, Ökmen; Özkaymak, Çaǧlar; Uzel, Bora; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Vockenhuber, Christof; Sözbilir, Hasan; Akçar, Naki

    2016-04-01

    Bedrock fault scarps are the most direct evidence of past earthquakes to reconstruct seismic activity in a large time-scale using cosmogenic 36Cl dating if built in carbonates. For this method, a surface along the fault scarp with a minimum amount of erosion is required to be chosen as an ideal target point. The section of the fault selected for sampling should cover at least two meters of the fault surface from the lower part of the scarp, where intersects with colluvium wedge. Ideally, sampling should be performed on a continuous strip along the direction of the fault slip direction. First, samples of 10 cm high and 15 cm wide are marked on the fault surface. Then, they are collected using cutters, hammer and chisel in a thickness of 3 cm. The main geometrical factors of scarp dip, scarp height, top surface dip and colluvium dip are also measured. Topographic shielding in the sampling spot is important to be estimated as well. Moreover, density of the fault scarp and colluvium are calculated. The physical and chemical preparations are carried in laboratory for AMS and chemical analysis of the samples. A Matlab® code is used for modelling of seismically active periods based on increasing production rate of 36Cl following each rupture, when a buried section of a fault is exposed. Therefore, by measuring the amount of cosmogenic 36Cl versus height, the timing of major ruptures and their offsets are determined. In our study, Manastır, Mugırtepe and Rahmiye faults in Gediz graben, Priene-Sazlı, Kalafat and Yavansu faults in Büyük Menderes graben and Ören fault in Gökava half-graben have been examined in the seismically active region of Western Turkey. Our results reconstruct at least five periods of high seismic activity during the Holocene time, three of which reveal seismic ruptures beyond the historical pre-existing data.

  4. Progress in AMS measurements at the LLNL spectrometer. [Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Southon, J.R.; Vogel, J.S.; Trumbore, S.E.; Davis, J.C.; Roberts, M.L.; Caffee, M.; Finkel, R.; Proctor, I.D.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Berno, A.J.; Hornady, R.S.

    1991-06-01

    The AMS measurement program at LLNL began in earnest in late 1989, and has initially concentrated on {sup 14}C measurements for biomedical and geoscience applications. We have now begun measurements on {sup 10}Be and {sup 36}Cl, are presently testing the spectrometer performance for {sup 26}Al and {sup 3}H, and will begin tests on {sup 7}Be, {sup 41}Ca and {sup 129}I within the next few months. Our laboratory has a strong biomedical AMS program of {sup 14}C tracer measurements involving large numbers of samples (sometimes hundreds in a single experiment) at {sup 14}C concentrations which are typically .5--5 times Modern, but are occasionally highly enriched. The sample preparation techniques required for high throughput and low cross-contamination for this work are discussed elsewhere. Similar demands are placed on the AMS measurement system, and in particular on the ion source. Modifications to our GIC 846 ion source, described below, allow us to run biomedical and geoscience or archaeological samples in the same source wheel with no adverse effects. The source has a capacity for 60 samples (about 45 unknown) in a single wheel and provides currents of 30--60{mu}A of C{sup {minus}} from hydrogen-reduced graphite. These currents and sample capacity provide high throughput for both biomedical and other measurements: the AMS system can be started up, tuned, and a wheel of carbon samples measured to 1--1.5% in under a day; and 2 biomedical wheels can be measured per day without difficulty. We report on the present status of the Lawrence Livermore AMS spectrometer, including sample throughput and progress towards routine 1% measurement capability for {sup 14}C, first results on other isotopes, and experience with a multi-sample high intensity ion source. 5 refs.

  5. The distribution of meteoric 36Cl/Cl in the United States: A comparison of models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moysey, S.; Davis, S.N.; Zreda, M.; Cecil, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    The natural distribution of 36Cl/Cl in groundwater across the continental United States has recently been reported by Davis et al. (2003). In this paper, the large-scale processes and atmospheric sources of 36Cl and chloride responsible for controlling the observed 36Cl/Cl distribution are discussed. The dominant process that affects 36Cl/Cl in meteoric groundwater at the continental scale is the fallout of stable chloride from the atmosphere, which is mainly derived from oceanic sources. Atmospheric circulation transports marine chloride to the continental interior, where distance from the coast, topography, and wind patterns define the chloride distribution. The only major deviation from this pattern is observed in northern Utah and southern Idaho where it is inferred that a continental source of chloride exists in the Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah. In contrast to previous studies, the atmospheric flux of 36Cl to the land surface was found to be approximately constant over the United States, without a strong correlation between local 36Cl fallout and annual precipitation. However, the correlation between these variables was significantly improved (R 2=0.15 to R 2=0.55) when data from the southeastern USA, which presumably have lower than average atmospheric 36Cl concentrations, were excluded. The total mean flux of 36Cl over the continental United States and total global mean flux of 36Cl are calculated to be 30.5??7.0 and 19.6??4.5 atoms m-2 s-1, respectively. The 36Cl/Cl distribution calculated by Bentley et al. (1996) underestimates the magnitude and variability observed for the measured 36Cl/Cl distribution across the continental United States. The model proposed by Hainsworth (1994) provides the best overall fit to the observed 36Cl/Cl distribution in this study. A process-oriented model by Phillips (2000) generally overestimates 36Cl/Cl in most parts of the country and has several significant local departures from the empirical data.

  6. Variation in background concentrations and specific activities of 36Cl, 129I and U/Th-series radionuclides in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, S C; Herod, M

    2012-04-01

    Assessment of the potential environmental impacts of nuclear fuel waste involves multiple lines of argument, one of which is an evaluation of the possible increments to background concentrations of certain radionuclides. This is especially relevant for radionuclides such as (3)H, (36)Cl and (129)I where there is continuous cosmogenic or geogenic production. However, for (36)Cl and (129)I and certain U/Th-series radionuclides, data are scarce because the analysis methods are complex and costly. The present study used accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) to measure(36)Cl and (129)I in river waters throughout Canada. Radiochemical methods were used for (3)H and the selected U/Th-series radionuclides, and stable element concentrations were also determined. There were distinct differences in concentrations among the sites. Stable Cl and I tended to be at higher concentrations near the ocean or population centres. The (3)H was high in regions with power reactors. The (226)Ra, (235)U and (238)U concentrations were high in areas with known U mineralizations, as expected. The (36)Cl and (129)I concentrations were generally homogenous in mid-latitudes, but the (129)I concentration was lower in the one arctic site sampled. Because the stable and radioactive isotopes of Cl and I varied in response to different factors, the resulting specific activities were especially variable. Both Cl and I are homeostatically controlled in animals, thus it follows that dose from (36)Cl and (129)I will depend more closely on specific activity than concentration, and therefore the environmental increments of interest are in the specific activities rather than simply concentrations. PMID:22304997

  7. An Alluvial Surface Chronology Based on Cosmogenic 36Cl Dating, Ajo Mountains (Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument), Southern Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Beiling; Phillips, Fred M.; Pohl, Molly M.; Sharma, Pankaj

    1996-01-01

    A chronology of alluvial surfaces on piedmont slopes below the western Ajo Mountains, southern Arizona, has been obtained using cosmogenic 36Cl accumulation and AMS radiocarbon dating. The apparent 36Cl ages of individual boulders range from 520,000 to 13,000 yr, and the 14C ages of organic material in the two young terraces are 2750-2350 and 17,800 cal yr B.P. The sequence of 36Cl ages is consistent with the apparent stratigraphic order, but groupings of similar ages for different surfaces appear to result from repeated reworking of older surfaces associated with the deposition of younger ones. The youngest surface gave a distribution of 36Cl ages about 30,000 yr older than the 14C and soil ages; however, this distribution had 36Cl ages that overlapped with 36Cl ages from active channels and hillslopes. We attribute the older-than-expected exposure ages of sampled boulders to inheritance of 36Cl while residing near the surface during very slow erosion on the mountain front. Our results show that although cosmogenic nuclide accumulation can help establish chronologies for surfaces in piedmont settings, care must be used in evaluating the effects of complex exposure histories.

  8. "Groundwater ages" of the Lake Chad multi-layer aquifers system inferred from 14C and 36Cl data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchez, Camille; Deschamps, Pierre; Goncalves, Julio; Hamelin, Bruno; Seidel, Jean-Luc; Doumnang, Jean-Claude

    2014-05-01

    Assessment of recharge, paleo-recharge and groundwater residence time of aquifer systems of the Sahel is pivotal for a sustainable management of this vulnerable resource. Due to its stratified aquifer system, the Lake Chad Basin (LCB) offers the opportunity to assess recharge processes over time and to link climate and hydrology in the Sahel. Located in north-central Africa at the fringe between the Sahel and the Sahara, the lake Chad basin (LCB) is an endorheic basin of 2,5.106 km2. With a monsoon climate, the majority of the rainfall occurs in the southern one third of the basin, the Chari/Logone River system transporting about 90% of the runoff generated within the drainage basin. A complex multi-layer aquifer system is located in the central part of the LCB. The Quaternary unconfined aquifer, covering 500 000 km2, is characterized by the occurrence of poorly understood piezometric depressions. Artesian groundwaters are found in the Plio-Pleistocene lacustrine and deltaic sedimentary aquifers (early Pliocene and Continental Terminal). The present-day lake is in hydraulic contact with the Quaternary Aquifer, but during past megalake phases, most of the Quaternary aquifer was submerged and may experience major recharge events. To identify active recharge area and assess groundwater dynamics, one hundred surface and groundwater samples of all layers have been collected over the southern part of the LCB. Major and trace elements have been analyzed. Measurements of 36Cl have been carried out at CEREGE, on the French 5 MV AMS National Facility ASTER and 14C activities have been analyzed for 17 samples on the French AMS ARTEMIS. Additionally, the stable isotopic composition was measured on the artesian aquifer samples. In the Quaternary aquifer, results show a large scatter with waters having very different isotopic and geochemical signature. In its southern part and in the vicinity of the surface waters, groundwaters are predominantly Ca-Mg-HCO3 type waters with very

  9. Attempt to determine the environmental 36Cl concentration in water by liquid scintillation counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowski, T.; Schuszler, Ch.

    1986-11-01

    A low-background liquid scintillation spectrometer (ALOKA SL-1) located in the IAEA Isotope Hydrology Laboratory in Vienna was used for 36Cl activity measurement in water samples. The procedure of sample preparation consists of synthesizing of silicon tetrachloride or sodium chloride followed by purification. In both cases the limiting factor in the analysis appeared to be the pure reproducibility of the sample preparation procedure. The conclusion from these experiments is that the liquid scintillation method could be feasible only for the identification of the "bomb chlorine" but is far from being suitable for the accurate determination of 36Cl in groundwater for dating purposes.

  10. Seismic slip history of the Pizzalto fault (Central Apennines, Italy) using in situ 36Cl cosmogenic dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delli Rocioli, Mattia; Pace, Bruno; Benedetti, Lucilla; Visini, Francesco; Guillou, Valery; Bourlès, Didier; Arnorld, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Keddadouche, Karim

    2013-04-01

    A prerequisite to constrain fault-based and time-dependent earthquake rupture forecast models is to acquire data on the past large earthquake frequency on an individual seismogenic source. Here we present a paleoseismological study on the Pizzalto fault using the in situ produced cosmogenic nuclide 36Cl (Schlagenhauf et al., 2011). The Pizzalto fault, located in central Italy about 50 km southeast of the epicenter of L'Aquila 2009 earthquake, is about 12 km long, SW dipping and belongs to the 30 km long Rotella-Aremogna active normal fault system. Recent activity along the Pizzalto fault is suggested by the presence of a continuous and linear 2 to 5 m high limestone fault scarp that was sampled every 10 cm at a site located in its particularly well-preserved central portion. 49 samples have been chemically processed and measured, and their 36Cl and Cl concentrations have been determined using isotope dilution mass spectrometry at the French AMS national facility ASTER located at CEREGE. Modeling the in situ 36Cl concentration with the scarp height allow deciphering the age and slip of the last major earthquake events on the fault. To derive those earthquake parameters, we used the published Matlab code from Schlagenhauf et al. (2011) that we implemented with a Monte Carlo approach to explore a large number of earthquake recurrence scenarios varying both the number of events, their slip and their ages. The "a priori" constraints input in the Monte Carlo code were: 1-the number of events, which is given by the stacking of individual probability density functions (assumed to be Gaussian) of each sample concentration; and, 2-the cumulative slip that should be equal to the height of the fault scarp. The first results show that 36Cl concentrations are reproduced better considering five events occurring over the last 5 ka and a previous one at about 13 ka. This suggests that most earthquake events clustered during a period of intense seismic activity preceded by a longer

  11. The sup 36 Cl ages of the brines in the Magadi-Natron basin, east Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A.; Margaritz, M.A.; Hollos, G. ); Paul, M.; Boaretto, E. ); Hillaire-Marcel, C. ); Taieb, M. )

    1990-10-01

    The depression in the East African Rift which includes both Lake Magadi and Lake Natron forms a closed basin within which almost all the dissolved chloride originates in precipitation, since there is no important source of very ancient sedimentary chloride. This provides an ideal setting for the evaluation of the {sup 36}Cl methodology as a geochemical and hydrological tracer. The main source of recent water, as represented by the most dilute samples measured, is characterized by a {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratio of 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}14}, in agreement with the calculated value expected in precipitation. Surface evaporation increases the chlorinity of the local freshwater inflow by about a factor of 110 without changing the isotopic ratio, indicating that little chloride enters the system in the form of sediment leachate. A second type of brine found in the basin occurs in a hot deep groundwater reservoir and is characterized by lower {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios (<1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}14}). By comparing this value with the 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} in recent recharge, one obtains an approximate salt accumulation age of 760 Ka which is consistent with thee time of the first appearance of the lake. These older brines also have lower {sup 18}O and {sup 2}H values which indicate that they were recharged during a climatically different era. The {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in the inflowing waters and in the accumulated brine, together with the known age of the Lake Magadi basin, may be used to estimate the importance of the hypogene and epigene, as opposed to the meteoric, mode of {sup 36}Cl production. Such a calculation shows that the hypogene and epigene processes together contribute less than 6% of the total {sup 36}Cl present in the lake.

  12. The cosmogenic radionuclides {sup 7}Be, {sup 10}Be, and {sup 36}Cl in precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Knies, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Two-thirds of atmospheric {sup 7}Be (t{sub 1/2}=53 d), {sup 10}Be(t{sub 1/2}= 1.5 My), and {sup 36}Cl(t{sub 1/2}=0.3 My) is produced in the stratosphere and one-third in the troposphere. The residence time of these radionuclides in the stratosphere is a few years and in the troposphere is a few weeks. Since {sup 7}Be`s half-life is short compared to its residence time in the stratosphere and similar to its residence time in the troposphere, the {sup 7}Be/{sup 10}Be and {sup 7}Be/{sup 36}Cl ratios should have distinct tropospheric and stratospheric values. Consequently, these isotopes can be used to study processes that involve mixing of air from the troposphere and stratosphere. Relationships between the radionuclide concentrations and air mass history, event type, season, and the major cation and anion concentrations will be presented. Evidence and mechanisms for the fractionation of the {sup 36}Cl and {sup 10}Be concentrations as a function of event type will be presented. Evidence and mechanisms for the fractionation of the {sup 36}Cl and {sup 10}Be concentrations as a function of event type will be presented. A departure from the theoretical {sup 10}Be/{sup 36}Cl production rate ratio of {approx}40 is seen only in one direction with an apparent limit right at the calculated ratio. For this reason, a new theoretical calculation of the {sup 10}Be/{sup 36}Cl production rate ratio was undertaken. The new calculated value is {approx}9.3. This value is in good agreement with the measured mean values in both the Greenland ice sheet and West Lafayette, IN wet precipitation of 8.1 and 9.1 respectively.

  13. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornett, R. J.; Kazi, Z. H.; Zhao, X.-L.; Chartrand, M. G.; Charles, R. J.; Kieser, W. E.

    2015-10-01

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF3. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF3 precipitates were diluted about 6-8 fold with PbF2. The measured concentrations of 239,240Pu and 241Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of 239,240Pu and 241Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  14. 36Cl: A tracer in groundwater in the aquia formation of Southern Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purdy, C.B.; Mignerey, A.C.; Helz, G.R.; Drummond, D.D.; Kubik, P.W.; Elmore, D.; Hemmick, T.

    1987-01-01

    The Aquia Formation (Paleocene) of Southern Maryland, a marine unit consisting predominantly of quartz sands, but containing 20-40% glauconite, represents one of the many productive, heavily pumped aquifers of the Southeastern Coastal Plain. An unusually high 36Cl activity ( ~ 15 ?? modem water) measured in an outcrop sample is interpreted as a result of the bomb pulse input. About 25 km downdip from the recharge area, a minimum in total chloride concentration occurs. This minimum is thought to correlate with the latest low-stand of sea-level, and thus to provide time information which is in general agreement with ages calculated from hydrodynamic data. However, significant increases in the 36Cl concentrations are observed along the flow path which may be due to ion filtration or to leakage of modem, bomb-contaminated water into the Aquia aquifer. ?? 1987.

  15. Formation of the Short-lived Radionuclide 36Cl in the Protoplanetary Disk During Late-stage Irradiation of a Volatile-rich Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Benjamin; Matzel, Jennifer; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Krot, Alexander N.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Ramon, Erick C.; Weber, Peter K.; Ishii, Hope A.; Ciesla, Fred J.

    2011-04-01

    Short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) in the early solar system provide fundamental insight into protoplanetary disk evolution. We measured the 36Cl-36S-isotope abundance in wadalite (<15 μm), a secondary chlorine-bearing mineral found in calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in the Allende CV chondrite, to decipher the origin of the SLR 36Cl (τ 1/2 ~ 3 × 105 yr) in the early solar system. Its presence, initial abundance, and the noticeable decoupling from 26Al raise serious questions about the origin of SLRs. The inferred initial 36Cl abundance for wadalite, corresponding to a 36Cl/35Cl ratio of (1.81 ± 0.13) × 10-5, is the highest 36Cl abundance ever reported in any early solar system material. The high level of 36Cl in wadalite and the absence of 26Al (26Al/27Al <= 3.9 × 10-6) in co-existing grossular (1) unequivocally support the production of 36Cl by late-stage solar energetic particle irradiation in the protoplanetary disk and (2) indicates that the production of 36Cl, recorded by wadalite, is unrelated to the origin of 26Al and other SLRs (10Be, 53Mn) recorded by primary minerals of CAIs and chondrules. We infer that 36Cl was largely produced by irradiation of a volatile-rich reservoir in an optically thin protoplanetary disk adjacent to the region in which the CV chondrite parent asteroid accreted while the Sun was a weak T Tauri star. Subsequently, 36Cl accreted into the Allende CV chondrite together with condensed water ices.

  16. FORMATION OF THE SHORT-LIVED RADIONUCLIDE {sup 36}Cl IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK DURING LATE-STAGE IRRADIATION OF A VOLATILE-RICH RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, Benjamin; Yin Qingzhu; Matzel, Jennifer; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Ramon, Erick C.; Weber, Peter K.; Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Ishii, Hope A.; Ciesla, Fred J.

    2011-04-20

    Short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) in the early solar system provide fundamental insight into protoplanetary disk evolution. We measured the {sup 36}Cl-{sup 36}S-isotope abundance in wadalite (<15 {mu}m), a secondary chlorine-bearing mineral found in calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in the Allende CV chondrite, to decipher the origin of the SLR {sup 36}Cl ({tau}{sub 1/2} {approx} 3 x 10{sup 5} yr) in the early solar system. Its presence, initial abundance, and the noticeable decoupling from {sup 26}Al raise serious questions about the origin of SLRs. The inferred initial {sup 36}Cl abundance for wadalite, corresponding to a {sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl ratio of (1.81 {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -5}, is the highest {sup 36}Cl abundance ever reported in any early solar system material. The high level of {sup 36}Cl in wadalite and the absence of {sup 26}Al ({sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al {<=} 3.9 x 10{sup -6}) in co-existing grossular (1) unequivocally support the production of {sup 36}Cl by late-stage solar energetic particle irradiation in the protoplanetary disk and (2) indicates that the production of {sup 36}Cl, recorded by wadalite, is unrelated to the origin of {sup 26}Al and other SLRs ({sup 10}Be, {sup 53}Mn) recorded by primary minerals of CAIs and chondrules. We infer that {sup 36}Cl was largely produced by irradiation of a volatile-rich reservoir in an optically thin protoplanetary disk adjacent to the region in which the CV chondrite parent asteroid accreted while the Sun was a weak T Tauri star. Subsequently, {sup 36}Cl accreted into the Allende CV chondrite together with condensed water ices.

  17. Estimating groundwater recharge in fractured rock from environmental 3H and 36Cl, Clare Valley, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, P. G.; Robinson, N. I.

    2002-08-01

    Vertical profiles of 3H and 36Cl concentrations are obtained from piezometer nests installed in fractured metasedimentary aquifers in the Clare Valley, South Australia. Because 3H is lost during evapotranspiration with negligible fractionation, while 36Cl is retained within the soil, comparison of 3H and 36Cl concentrations allows estimation of the aquifer recharge rate. An analytical solution for the transport of 3H and 36Cl through planar, parallel fractures is used to investigate the effect of variations in matrix porosity, tortuosity, fracture aperture, fracture spacing and aquifer recharge rate on tracer profiles and then to reproduce observed profiles within piezometer nests. While the measured distributions of these tracers are not able to constrain most model parameters, they are able to tightly constrain the aquifer recharge rate. The broad nature of the 36Cl and 3H peaks measured at our sites is simulated using a constant fracture spacing, lognormal distributions of fracture apertures, and mean recharge rates of 60-75 mm yr-1.

  18. Cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl accumulation in unstable landforms 1. Effects of the thermal neutron distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Phillips, F.M.; Stone, W.D.; Fabryka-Martin, J.T.; Fowler, M.M.

    1994-11-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides produced in situ within minerals at the surface of the Earth are proving to be an effective means of assessing geomorphic histories. The use of multiple cosmogenic nuclides permits both exposure times and erosion rates to be determined. However, if two nuclides are produced only by spallation reactions, the systematic differences in their accumulation rates depend only on the differences in their production rates and half-lives. The relatively small differences that result require a high degree of analytical precision to yield useful results. In contrast to other spallogenic nuclides, {sup 36}Cl is also produced by low-energy neutron, absorption, which creates a different pattern of production as a function of depth. We have measured the thermal flux with depth in a concrete block using {sup 3}He-filled neutron detectors. The measured thermal neutron profile agrees well with predictions from a simple diffusion-based thermal neutron distribution model. Calculations of {sup 36}Cl production using the model suggest that the use of {sup 36}Cl along with a purely spallogenic nuclide to determine erosion rates and exposure times should be less sensitive to analytical error than are determinations from two purely spallogenic nuclides. 31 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Multi-nuclide AMS system at the University of Tsukuba

    SciTech Connect

    Sasa, Kimikazu; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2010-05-12

    A multi-nuclide AMS system on the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator at the University of Tsukuba (Tsukuba AMS system) can measure environmental levels of long-lived radioisotopes of {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 129}I by employing a molecular pilot beam. AMS is an ultrasensitive technique for the study of long-lived radioisotopes, and stable isotopes at very low abundances. The high terminal voltage has an advantage in the detection of heavy radioisotopes. Much progress has been made in the development of new AMS techniques. For example, a standard deviation of the fluctuation for the {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratio is +- 2%, and the effective detection limit is better than 1x10{sup -15}. In recent years, the main research field of the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator has shifted to accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) research from nuclear physics. This report presents an overview of the Tsukuba AMS system.

  20. Age and geomorphic history of Meteor Crater, Arizona, from cosmogenic 36Cl and 14C in rock varnish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, F.M.; Zreda, M.G.; Smith, S.S.; Elmore, D.; Kubik, P.W.; Dorn, R.I.; Roddy, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Using cosmogenic 36Cl buildup and rock varnish radiocarbon, we have measured the exposure age of rock surfaces at Meteor Crater, Arizona. Our 36Cl measurements on four dolomite boulders ejected from the crater by the impact yield a mean age of 49.7 ?? 0.85 ka, which is in excellent agreement with an average age of 49 ?? 3 ka obtained from thermoluminescence studies on shock-metamorphosed dolomite and quartz. These ages are supported by undetectably low 14C in the oldest rock varnish sample. ?? 1991.

  1. Aluminum 26, {sup 10}Be, and {sup 36}Cl depth profiles in the Canyon Diablo iron meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Michlovich, E.S.; Elmore, D.; Vogt, S.; Lipschutz, M.E.; Masarik, J.; Reedy, R.C.

    1994-11-25

    The authors have measured activities of the long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides {sup 26}Al, {sup 10}Be, and {sup 36}Cl in 12 fragments of the iron meteorite Canyon Diablo and have constructed production rate-versus-depth profiles of those radionuclides. Profiles determined using differential particle fluxes calculated with the LAHET code system are in good agreement with {sup 26}Al, {sup 10}Be, and {sup 36}Cl experimental data, but the agreement for {sup 36}Cl was obtained only after neutron-induced cross sections were modified. Profiles calculated with lunar particle fluxes are much lower than experimental Canyon Diablo profiles. The cosmic ray exposure ages of most samples are near 540 m.y. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Estimation of thermal neutron fluences in the concrete of proton accelerator facilities from 36Cl production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.; Wang, Q.; Masumoto, K.; Hagura, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Sasa, K.; Sueki, K.; Matsuhiro, T.; Tosaki, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The thermal neutron fluence that poured into the shielding concrete of proton accelerator facilities was estimated from the in situ production of 36Cl. The thermal neutron fluences at concrete surfaces during 10-30 years of operation were in the range of 1012-1014 n/cm2. The maxima in thermal neutron fluences were observed at ≈5-15 cm in the depths analyzed for 36Cl/35Cl by AMS. These characteristics imply that thermalization of neutrons occurred inside the concrete. Compared to the several tens of MeV cyclotrons, secondary neutrons penetrate deeper into the concrete at the high-energy accelerators possessing acceleration energies of 400 MeV and 12 GeV. The attenuation length of neutrons reflects the energy spectra of secondary neutrons emitted by the nuclear reaction at the beam-loss points. Increasing the energy of secondary neutrons shifts the maximum in the thermal neutron fluences to deeper positions. The data obtained in this study will be useful for the radioactive waste management at accelerator facilities.

  3. In-Situ Cosmogenic 36Cl Production Rate Calibration from Basaltic Flows of Mount Etna (Sicily, 38° N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmelpfennig, I.; Benedetti, L.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Blard, P. H.; Bourles, D.

    2007-12-01

    One of the CRONUS-EU goals is to provide high quality calibration sites from independently dated surfaces. Several previous studies have been conducted on 36Cl production rate calibration (e.g. Stone et al. 1996, Phillips et al. 2001), which, however, used different protocols and yielded 36Cl production rates with up to 40% discrepancies. The objectives of this study are 1- to understand the source of these discrepancies and 2- to calibrate 36Cl production rates from its target elements Ca and K. As a first step we focused on testing the chemical protocol by performing a sequential 36Cl extraction experiment on whole rock grains and Ca-rich plagioclase from the same sample. The sample was collected at Mt. Etna on a pahoehoe flow, which has a K-Ar fossil exposure time of (10±3) kyr. Cosmogenic 3He was also precisely measured within cogenetic olivine phenocrysts of this sample (Blard et al. 2005) and yields an exposure time of (10.4±1.5) kyr. Both, total Cl and 36Cl concentrations from the first dissolution steps are high, 5800 ppm (whole rock) and 450 ppm (plagioclase) Cl, and 107 - 106 atoms 36Cl/g of rock dissolved. After about 20% dissolution of the plagioclase sample, Cl is almost completely removed (1-3ppm) and 36Cl concentrations reach a plateau value of 2*105 atoms/g of rock. Using the Stone et al. (1996) and Evans et al. (1997) 36Cl production rates for the target elements Ca and K, respectively, this plateau concentration yields an exposure age which is in excellent agreement with K-Ar dating and cosmogenic 3He ages. On the contrary, in the whole rock sample total Cl concentrations remain high (>330ppm) resulting in a considerable 36Cl production from capture of low-energy neutrons by 35Cl, an additional and still not well-constrained 36Cl production mechanism. The resulting exposure ages from the whole rock are 35-45% higher than the independent 3He ages. For 36Cl production rate calibration from Ca, we will use separated Ca-rich plagioclase from various

  4. A comparison of groundwater dating with 81Kr, 36Cl and 4He in four wells of the Great Artesian Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, B. E.; Love, A.; Purtschert, R.; Collon, P.; Loosli, H. H.; Kutschera, W.; Beyerle, U.; Aeschbach-Hertig, W.; Kipfer, R.; Frape, S. K.; Herczeg, A.; Moran, J.; Tolstikhin, I. N.; Gröning, M.

    2003-06-01

    The isotopic ratios 81Kr/Kr and 36Cl/Cl and the 4He concentrations measured in groundwater from four artesian wells in the western part of the Great Artesian Basin (GAB) in Australia are discussed. Based on radioactive decay along a water flow path the 81Kr/Kr ratios are directly converted to groundwater residence times. Results are in a range of 225-400 kyr with error bars in the order of 15% primarily due to counting statistics in the cyclotron accelerator mass spectrometer measurement. Additional uncertainties from subsurface production and/or exchange with stagnant porewaters in the confining shales appear to be of the same order of magnitude. These 81Kr ages are then used to calibrate the 36Cl and the 4He dating methods. Based on elemental analyses of rock samples from the sandstone aquifer as well as from the confining Bulldog shale the in situ flux of thermal neutrons and the corresponding 3He/ 4He and 36Cl/Cl ratios are calculated. From a comparison of: (i) the 3He/ 4He ratios measured in the groundwater samples with the calculated in situ ratios in rocks and (ii) the measured δ 37Cl ratios with the 4He concentrations measured in groundwater it is concluded that both helium and chloride are most likely added to the aquifer from sources in the stagnant porewaters of the confining shale by diffusion and/or mixing. Based on this 'working hypothesis' the 36Cl transport equation in groundwater is solved taking into account: (i) radioactive decay, (ii) subsurface production in the sandstone aquifer (with an in situ 36Cl/Cl ratio of 6×10 -15) and (iii) addition of chloride from a source in the confining shale (with a 36Cl/Cl ratio of 13×10 -15). Lacking better information it is assumed that the chloride concentration increased linearly with time from an (unknown) initial value Ci to its measured present value C= Ci+ Ca, where Ca represents the (unknown) amount of chloride added from subsurface sources. Using the 81Kr ages of the four groundwater samples and a

  5. Using 36Cl data to quantify the paleorecharge in arid region. Example of the North Western Saharan Aquifer System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriane Petersen, Jade; Deschamps, Pierre; Gonçalvès, Julio; Hamelin, Bruno; Michelot, Jean-Luc; Guendouz, Abdelhamid; Zouari, Kamel

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive understanding of large-scale systems such as multi-layer aquifers in sedimentary basins (e.g. North Western Saharan Aquifer System -NWSAS- or the Great Artesian Basin) requires to investigate the recharge history to Quaternary timescale. In fact, for such systems, the residence time of groundwater is often in the order of 100 000 years to 1 million years, the recharge occurring during past, intermittent humid periods paced by the quaternary climatic cycles. In this study, we propose to reconstruct the history of the recharge over the Continental Intercalaire (CI) aquifer, one of the two main aquifers of the NWSAS. It extends over 1 million km2, shared between Algeria, Tunisia and Libya. We focus on the main recharge area of the CI aquifer located in the Algerian Atlas Mountains. Existing chlorine-36 data (36Cl half-life: 301 ka) indicate that groundwater residence time in this system is around 1 million years. A set of modeling approaches is combined to model the theoretical 36Cl/Cl distribution within the aquifer as a function of different recharge scenarios. Seventeen 36Cl/Cl data from two distinct flowpaths provide temporal constraints on groundwater ages. A simple piston model is used to simulate the distribution of theoretical 36Cl along these flowlines as a function of the distance from the outcrop with respect to a recharge scenario. Simplified climatic scenarios are constructed considering humid periods only during interglacial cycles. This allows to define 9 recharge rates (Rh(i)) associated to last interglacials (from marine isotope stages MIS1 to MIS19). In addition, a constant recharge Rg was considered during glacial periods. For each recharge scenario, the recharge values are constrained by using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion, which yields the best agreement between measured and modeled 36Cl/Cl. This MCMC probabilistic inversion approach allows identifying plausible sets of the 10 parameters (9 Rh(i) and Rg) involved in

  6. A new Holocene eruptive history of Erebus volcano, Antarctica using cosmogenic 3He and 36Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmelee, D. E.; Kyle, P. R.; Kurz, M. D.; Marrero, S.

    2013-12-01

    Unraveling the timing of a volcano's most recent eruptions is crucial to understanding its present and future behavior. In this study, we use cosmogenic 3He and 36Cl in mineral separates (clinopyroxene and anorthoclase, respectively) to date the 10 most recent lava flows on Erebus volcano. Erebus is a 2,170-km3 active stratovolcano on Ross Island, Antarctica that is known for its persistent anorthoclase phonolite lava lake and frequent Strombolian eruptions. Previous anorthoclase 40Ar/39Ar ages from the 10 flows [1, 2] suggest they were erupted at roughly regular intervals between 17 and 0 ka. However, the uncertainties on the Ar ages are large (up to 39 %), and the likelihood of excess 40Ar in melt inclusions may skew the Ar ages older than eruption ages. The new cosmogenic ages provide new insights into Erebus eruption chronology. We used two different models to scale production rates: the Lal/Stone model [3] and the new Sato/Lifton model [4]. We find ~20-25 % younger ages with the Sato/Lifton model, attributable to different treatment of atmospheric pressure effects, solar modulation effects, and muogenic production rates in each model. 3He and 36Cl exposure ages of the same 10 flows range from 4.5 × 0.1 to 9.7 × 0.2 ka (Lal/Stone) or 3.5 × 0.1 to 7.5 × 0.2 ka (Sato/Lifton), significantly different than the Ar ages, with a much shorter eruption period. Surprisingly, three of the flows have exposure ages older than their Ar ages, despite the exposure ages being considered minimum ages of eruption and the Ar ages maxima. Concordance of the 3He and 36Cl ages measured in the same samples strengthens the validity of our results and implies that the 3He and 36Cl production rates [5] are well-calibrated for high latitude, high altitude sites and that the methodologies are robust. Regardless of which scaling model is used, the results yield a new understanding of the current eruptive phase of Erebus, particularly in documenting the short timespan over which the

  7. The LLNL AMS facility

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.L.; Bench, G.S.; Brown, T.A.

    1996-05-01

    The AMS facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) routinely measures the isotopes {sup 3}H, {sup 7}Be, {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 59,63}Ni, and {sup 129}I. During the past two years, over 30,000 research samples have been measured. Of these samples, approximately 30% were for {sup 14}C bioscience tracer studies, 45% were {sup 14}C samples for archaeology and the geosciences, and the other isotopes constitute the remaining 25%. During the past two years at LLNL, a significant amount of work has gone into the development of the Projectile X-ray AMS (PXAMS) technique. PXAMS uses induced characteristic x-rays to discriminate against competing atomic isobars. PXAMS has been most fully developed for {sup 63}Ni but shows promise for the measurement of several other long lived isotopes. During the past year LLNL has also conducted an {sup 129}I interlaboratory comparison exercise. Recent hardware changes at the LLNL AMS facility include the installation and testing of a new thermal emission ion source, a new multianode gas ionization detector for general AMS use, re-alignment of the vacuum tank of the first of the two magnets that make up the high energy spectrometer, and a new cryo-vacuum system for the AMS ion source. In addition, they have begun design studies and carried out tests for a new high-resolution injector and a new beamline for heavy element AMS.

  8. AMS applied to Hiroshima and Chernobyl dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.; Marchetti, A.A.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1995-12-01

    Two projects employing AMS are summarized and updated. One project employs AMS to measure {sup 36}Cl in concrete and other mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki to help reconstruct neutron fluences received by the atom-bomb survivors. In this project, we have demonstrated a large discrepancy between the neutron activation measured in Hiroshima and predictions based on the current dosimetry system. This discrepancy has practical implications for radiation risk assessment and radiation protection standards. The other project employs AMS to measure {sup 129}I in soil and other environmental samples from Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia. This is a proof-of-principle study to determine if the long lived {sup 129}I isotope (half life, 16 x 10{sup 6} y) measured by AMS can be used to reconstruct deposition of the short lived {sup 131}I isotope from the 1986 Chernobyl reactor accident. This is required because {sup 131}I disappeared before adequate measurements could be made.

  9. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 36Cl produced by neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Habara, M; Yoshizawa, Y; Biebel, U; Haberstock, G; Heinzl, J; Korschinek, G; Morinaga, H; Nolte, E

    1990-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry was performed at the Munich tandem laboratory to determine 36Cl/Cl ratios of samples from a tombstone exposed to neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. The ratios were determined from the surface to deeper positions. The depth profile of 36Cl/Cl can be used for estimating the neutron energy distribution and intensity near the hypocentre in Hiroshima. PMID:1976726

  10. PRIME Lab Radiocarbon Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, D. J.; Mueller, K. A.; Ma, X.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1996-03-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is one of three NSF national facilities for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), and is the only one capable of determining six cosmogenic radionuclides: 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, and 129I. This abstract describes the current status of the radiocarbon analysis program at PRIME Lab.

  11. The Hiroshima thermal-neutron discrepancy for (36)Cl at large distances. Part II: Natural in situ production as a source.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Eckehart; Huber, Thomas; Rühm, Werner; Kato, Kazuo; Lazarev, Vitali; Schultz, Ludolf

    2005-10-01

    For Hiroshima, a large discrepancy between calculated and measured thermal-neutron fluences had been reported in the past, for distances to the epicenter larger than about 1,000 m. To be more specific, measured (36)Cl concentrations in environmental samples from Hiroshima were too large at these distances, and the ratio of measured to calculated values reached about 70, at a distance of 1,800 m. In an attempt to identify other sources that might also produce (36)Cl in Hiroshima samples, the role of cosmic rays and of neutrons from natural terrestrial sources was investigated. Four reaction mechanisms were taken into account: spallation reactions of the nucleonic (hadronic) component of the cosmic rays on potassium (K) and calcium (Ca) in the sample material, particle emission after nuclear capture of negative muons by K and Ca, reactions of fast-muon induced electromagnetic, and hadronic showers with K and Ca, and neutron capture reactions with (35)Cl in the sample where the neutrons originate from the above three reaction mechanisms and from uranium and thorium decay. These mechanisms are physically described and mathematically quantified. It is shown that among those parameters important for the production of (36)Cl in granite, the chemical composition of the sample, the depth in the quarry where the sample had initially been taken, and the erosion rate at the site of the quarry are most important. Based on these physical, chemical, and geological parameters, (36)Cl concentrations were calculated for different types of granite that are typical for the Hiroshima area. In samples that were of these granite types and that had not been exposed to atomic bomb(A-bomb) neutrons, the (36)Cl concentration was also determined experimentally by means of accelerator mass spectrometry, and good agreement was found with the calculated values. The (36)Cl signal due to natural in situ production was also calculated in granite samples that had been exposed to A-bomb neutrons at

  12. Search for extinct 36Cl: Vigarano CAIs, the Pink Angel from Allende, and a Ningqiang chondrule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Daisuke; Ott, Ulrich; Hoppe, Peter; El Goresy, Ahmed

    2008-12-01

    We have searched for excesses of 36S derived from the decay of extinct 36Cl in sodalite, a secondary Cl-rich mineral, in Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) from the Vigarano and Allende CV3 chondrites and in a chondrule from the Ningqiang carbonaceous chondrite. The presence of sodalite in two CAIs from Vigarano and its absence from surrounding CAI fragments suggests sodalite formation after CAI fragmentation. As for sodalite in the Allende Pink Angel CAI, oxygen isotopic compositions have been interpreted as indicative of high temperature interactions, thus suggesting formation prior to accretion to the parent body, probably in a nebular setting. Sodalite in the Ningqiang chondrule is considered to have formed via alkali-Ca exchange, which is believed to have occurred before accretion to the parent body. Sodalites in the Vigarano CAIs and in the Ningqiang chondrule show no clear evidence for the presence of radiogenic 36S. The inferred 2 σ upper limits for 36Cl/ 35Cl at the time of sodalite formation are 1.6 × 10 -6 (Vigarano CAIs) and 3.3 × 10 -6 (Ningqiang chondrule), respectively. In the Pink Angel CAI sodalite exhibits small 36S excesses which weakly correlate with 35Cl/ 34S ratios. The inferred 36Cl/ 35Cl ratio of (1.8 ± 2.2) × 10 -6 (2 σ error) is lower than that found by Hsu et al. [Hsu, W., Guan, Y., Leshin, L. A., Ushikubo, T. and Wasserburg, G. J. (2006) A late episode of irradiation in the early solar system: Evidence from extinct 36Cl and 26Al in meteorites. Astrophys. J. 640, 525-529], thus indicative of heterogeneous distribution of 36Cl in this CAI. Spallation reactions induced by energetic particles from the young Sun are suggested for the origin of 36Cl, similar to the case of 10Be. While 10Be appears to be present in roughly equal abundance in all studied CAIs, our study indicates the level of 36Cl abundances to be variable so that there seems to be no simple relationship between 10Be and 36Cl. This would be expected if trapped cosmic rays rather

  13. Excess 36Ar in the Efremovka Meteorite: Evidence for Live 36Cl in the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, S. V. S.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.; Goswami, J. N.

    1995-09-01

    The recent discovery of the presence of ^41Ca (t = 0.15 Ma) in the early solar system at the time of formation of the Efremovka CAIs [1] has prompted us to look for the possible presence of ^36Cl (t = 0.43 Ma) in this meteorite. Since ^36Cl decays to ^36Ar, an excess ^36Ar will in principle be a signature of the presence of extinct ^36Cl. However in situ (n,g) reaction on ^35Cl can also produce ^36Cl and generate excess ^36Ar. A study of all noble gases is helpful in decoupling the various ^36Ar components. Here we report the noble gas results on a bulk sample of Efremovka (a single chip adjacent to CAI E60). Work on two CAIs E40 (coarse-grained) and E42 (fine-grained) is currently in progress. All the noble gases have been analysed on VG 1200 mass spectrometer by standard procedure. After 400 degrees C combustion in 2 torr O2, mainly intended to get rid of surfical contaminants, the subsequent extractions at 900, 1200 and 1500 degrees C are carried out by pyrolysis. The Ne and Ar data for the total sample given in Table-1 have been corrected for blanks, mass discrimination and interferences as detailed in [2]. From the Ne data, we derive ^21Ne(sub)c = 4.1x10^-8ccSTP/g and (^22Ne/^21Ne)(sub)c = 1.043 +/-0.011. Using the ^21Ne production rate of Eugster [3] an exposure age of 9.0 Ma is obtained. The maximum ^36Ar release (about 86%) occurs at 1200 degrees C wherein the minimum ^38Ar/^36Ar (0.1795) is also observed. Even the ^38Ar/^36Ar value of 0.1801 for the total sample is less than the value of 0.1880 for the planetary component[4], indicating the presence of additional Ar-components in Efremovka and in particular, Ar produced by neutron capture on chlorine. If we assume that the measured ^38Ar/^36Ar value in Efremovka is a mixture of three components (trapped = 0.1880; spallogenic = 1.45-1.60 and neutron produced from Cl = 3x10^-3 [5,6]), the abundance of each of these components can be obtained, with the aid of Ne data, to be (in units of 10^-8ccSTP/g) ^36Ar

  14. 241Am (n,gamma) isomer ratio measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Evelyn M; Vieira, David J; Moody, Walter A; Slemmons, Alice K

    2011-01-05

    The objective of this project is to improve the accuracy of the {sup 242}Cm/{sup 241}Am radiochemistry ratio. We have performed an activation experiment to measure the {sup 241}Am(n,{gamma}) cross section leading to either the ground state of {sup 242g}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 16 hr) which decays to {sup 242}Cm (t{sub 1/2} = 163 d) or the long-lived isomer {sup 242m}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 141 yr). This experiment will develop a new set of americium cross section evaluations that can be used with a measured {sup 242}Cm/{sup 241}Am radiochemical measurement for nuclear forensic purposes. This measurement is necessary to interpret the {sup 242}Cm/{sup 241}Am ratio because a good measurement of this neutron capture isomer ratio for {sup 241}Am does not exist. The targets were prepared in 2007 from {sup 241}Am purified from LANL stocks. Gold was added to the purified {sup 241}Am as an internal neutron fluence monitor. These targets were placed into a holder, packaged, and shipped to Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, where they were irradiated at their Van de Graff facility in February 2008. One target was irradiated with {approx}25 keV quasimonoenergetic neutrons produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction for 3 days and a second target was also irradiated for 3 days with {approx}500 keV neutrons. Because it will be necessary to separate the {sup 242}Cm from the {sup 241}Am in order to measure the amount of {sup 242}Cm by alpha spectrometry, research into methods for americium/curium separations were conducted concurrently. We found that anion exchange chromatography in methanol/nitric acid solutions produced good separations that could be completed in one day resulting in a sample with no residue. The samples were returned from Germany in July 2009 and were counted by gamma spectrometry. Chemical separations have commenced on the blank sample. Each sample will be spiked with {sup 244}Cm, dissolved and digested in nitric acid solutions. One third of each sample will be processed at a time

  15. Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Baseline Surveys for Emergency Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, C

    2012-06-04

    Originally established in the 1960s to support the Nuclear Test Program, the AMS mission is to provide a rapid and comprehensive worldwide aerial measurement, analysis, and interpretation capability in response to a nuclear/radiological emergency. AMS provides a responsive team of individuals whose processes allow for a mission to be conducted and completed with results available within hours. This presentation slide-show reviews some of the history of the AMS, summarizes present capabilities and methods, and addresses the value of the surveys.

  16. Tritium and 36Cl as constraints on fast fracture flow and percolation flux in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerin, Marianne

    2001-10-01

    An analysis of tritium and 36Cl data collected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada suggests that fracture flow may occur at high velocities through the thick unsaturated zone. The mechanisms and extent of this "fast flow" in fractures at Yucca Mountain are investigated with data analysis, mixing models and several one-dimensional modeling scenarios. The model results and data analysis provide evidence substantiating the weeps model [Gauthier, J.H., Wilson, M.L., Lauffer, F.C., 1992. Proceedings of the Third Annual International High-level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, vol. 1, Las Vegas, NV. American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL, pp. 891-989] and suggest that fast flow in fractures with minimal fracture-matrix interaction may comprise a substantial proportion of the total infiltration through Yucca Mountain. Mixing calculations suggest that bomb-pulse tritium measurements, in general, represent the tail end of travel times for thermonuclear-test-era (bomb-pulse) infiltration. The data analysis shows that bomb-pulse tritium and 36Cl measurements are correlated with discrete features such as horizontal fractures and areas where lateral flow may occur. The results presented here imply that fast flow in fractures may be ubiquitous at Yucca Mountain, occurring when transient infiltration (storms) generates flow in the connected fracture network.

  17. Tritium and 36Cl as constraints on fast fracture flow and percolation flux in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain.

    PubMed

    Guerin, M

    2001-10-01

    An analysis of tritium and 36Cl data collected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada suggests that fracture flow may occur at high velocities through the thick unsaturated zone. The mechanisms and extent of this "fast flow" in fractures at Yucca Mountain are investigated with data analysis, mixing models and several one-dimensional modeling scenarios. The model results and data analysis provide evidence substantiating the weeps model [Gauthier, J.H., Wilson, M.L., Lauffer, F.C., 1992. Proceedings of the Third Annual International High-level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, vol. 1, Las Vegas, NV. American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL, pp. 891-989] and suggest that fast flow in fractures with minimal fracture-matrix interaction may comprise a substantial proportion of the total infiltration through Yucca Mountain. Mixing calculations suggest that bomb-pulse tritium measurements, in general, represent the tail end of travel times for thermonuclear-test-era (bomb-pulse) infiltration. The data analysis shows that bomb-pulse tritium and 36Cl measurements are correlated with discrete features such as horizontal fractures and areas where lateral flow may occur. The results presented here imply that fast flow in fractures may be ubiquitous at Yucca Mountain, occurring when transient infiltration (storms) generates flow in the connected fracture network. PMID:11588829

  18. Radiocarbon dating and the 36Cl/Cl evolution of three Great Artesian Basin wells at Dalhousie, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Risha, Usama A.

    2016-06-01

    The use of 14C (half-life = 5,730 years) in modeling the evolution of the 36Cl/Cl ratios in groundwater is reported for the first time. The complexity of the Cl-36Cl system due to the occurrence of different Cl and 36Cl sources and the difficulty of the determination of the initial groundwater 36Cl/Cl ratios have raised concerns about the reliability of using 36Cl (half-life = 301 thousand years, a) as a groundwater-dating tool. This work uses groundwater 14C age as a calibrating parameter of the Cl-36Cl/Cl decay-mixing models of three wells from the southwestern Great Artesian Basin (GAB), Australia. It aims to allow for the different sources of Cl and 36Cl in the southwestern GAB aquifer. The results show that the initial Cl concentrations range from 245 to 320 mg/l and stable Cl is added to groundwater along flowpaths at rates ranging from 1.4 to 3.5 mg/l/ka. The 36Cl content of the groundwater is assumed to be completely of atmospheric origin. The samples have different Cl-36Cl/Cl mixing-decay models reflecting recharge under different conditions as well as the heterogeneity of the aquifer.

  19. Radiocarbon dating and the 36Cl/Cl evolution of three Great Artesian Basin wells at Dalhousie, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Risha, Usama A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of 14C (half-life = 5,730 years) in modeling the evolution of the 36Cl/Cl ratios in groundwater is reported for the first time. The complexity of the Cl-36Cl system due to the occurrence of different Cl and 36Cl sources and the difficulty of the determination of the initial groundwater 36Cl/Cl ratios have raised concerns about the reliability of using 36Cl (half-life = 301 thousand years, a) as a groundwater-dating tool. This work uses groundwater 14C age as a calibrating parameter of the Cl-36Cl/Cl decay-mixing models of three wells from the southwestern Great Artesian Basin (GAB), Australia. It aims to allow for the different sources of Cl and 36Cl in the southwestern GAB aquifer. The results show that the initial Cl concentrations range from 245 to 320 mg/l and stable Cl is added to groundwater along flowpaths at rates ranging from 1.4 to 3.5 mg/l/ka. The 36Cl content of the groundwater is assumed to be completely of atmospheric origin. The samples have different Cl-36Cl/Cl mixing-decay models reflecting recharge under different conditions as well as the heterogeneity of the aquifer.

  20. 50 CFR 648.233 - Spiny dogfish Accountability Measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spiny dogfish Accountability Measures... Management Measures for the Spiny Dogfish Fishery § 648.233 Spiny dogfish Accountability Measures (AMs). (a... dogfish on that date for the remainder of that semi-annual period by publishing notification in...

  1. 50 CFR 648.233 - Spiny dogfish Accountability Measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spiny dogfish Accountability Measures... Management Measures for the Spiny Dogfish Fishery § 648.233 Spiny dogfish Accountability Measures (AMs). (a... quota described in § 648.232 will be harvested and shall close the EEZ to fishing for spiny dogfish...

  2. 50 CFR 648.233 - Spiny dogfish Accountability Measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spiny dogfish Accountability Measures... Management Measures for the Spiny Dogfish Fishery § 648.233 Spiny dogfish Accountability Measures (AMs). (a... dogfish on that date for the remainder of that semi-annual period by publishing notification in...

  3. 50 CFR 648.163 - Bluefish Accountability Measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bluefish Accountability Measures (AMs). 648.163 Section 648.163 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic...

  4. Further study on highly sensitive AMS measurement of 53Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kejun, Dong; Hao, Hu; Xianggao, Wang; Chaoli, Li; Ming, He; Zhenyu, Li; Shaoyong, Wu; Jiancheng, Liu; Guowen, Zheng; Heng, Li; Zhigang, Chen; Guangshan, Liu; Jian, Yuan; Shan, Jiang

    2012-08-01

    The AMS facility at China Institute of Atomic Energy has been equipped with a ΔE-Q3D detection system for the measurements of 53Mn. While the sample material of MnO2 and the extraction ions of MnO- were used previously in AMS measurement of 53Mn with fairly good results, a method has recently been developed with the extraction of MnF- from ion source using MnF2 and MnO2 + PbF2 as sample materials. As a result, a sensitivity of 10-14 (53Mn/Mn) has been achieved. Compared with the original MnO-/MnO2 approach, the method of MnF- extraction, combined with ΔE-Q3D detection technique, demonstrated an improved sensitivity for AMS measurement of 53Mn.

  5. Distribution and chemical fate of 36Cl-chlorine dioxide gas during the fumigation of tomatoes and cantaloupe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distribution and chemical fate of 36Cl-ClO2 gas subsequent to fumigation of tomatoes or cantaloupe was investigated as was major factors that affect the formation of chloroxyanion byproducts. Approximately 22% of the generated 36Cl-ClO2 was present on fumigated tomatoes after a 2-hour exposure t...

  6. Calibration of cosmogenic noble gas production in ordinary chondrites based on 36Cl-36Ar ages. Part 1: Refined produced rates for cosmogenic 21Ne and 38Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalcher, N.; Caffee, M. W.; Nishiizumi, K.; Welten, K. C.; Vogel, N.; Wieler, R.; Leya, I.

    2013-10-01

    We measured the concentrations and isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar in bulk samples and metal separates of 14 ordinary chondrite falls with long exposure ages and high metamorphic grades. In addition, we measured concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclides 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl in metal separates and in the nonmagnetic fractions of the selected meteorites. Using cosmogenic 36Cl and 36Ar measured in the metal separates, we determined 36Cl-36Ar cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) ages, which are shielding-independent and therefore particularly reliable. Using the cosmogenic noble gases and radionuclides, we are able to decipher the CRE history for the studied objects. Based on the correlation 3He/21Ne versus 22Ne/21Ne, we demonstrate that, among the meteorites studied, only one suffered significant diffusive losses (about 35%). The data confirm that the linear correlation 3He/21Ne versus 22Ne/21Ne breaks down at high shielding. Using 36Cl-36Ar exposure ages and measured noble gas concentrations, we determine 21Ne and 38Ar production rates as a function of 22Ne/21Ne. The new data agree with recent model calculations for the relationship between 21Ne and 38Ar production rates and the 22Ne/21Ne ratio, which does not always provide unique shielding information. Based on the model calculations, we determine a new correlation line for 21Ne and 38Ar production rates as a function of the shielding indicator 22Ne/21Ne for H, L, and LL chondrites with preatmospheric radii less than about 65 cm. We also calculated the 10Be/21Ne and 26Al/21Ne production rate ratios for the investigated samples, which show good agreement with recent model calculations.

  7. Evaluation of Am-Li neutron spectra data for active well type neutron multiplicity measurements of uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Croft, Stephen; Lousteau, Angela; Peerani, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Safeguarding nuclear material is an important and challenging task for the international community. One particular safeguards technique commonly used for uranium assay is active neutron correlation counting. This technique involves irradiating unused uranium with (α, n) neutrons from an Am-Li source and recording the resultant neutron pulse signal which includes induced fission neutrons. Although this non-destructive technique is widely employed in safeguards applications, the neutron energy spectra from an Am-Li sources is not well known. Several measurements over the past few decades have been made to characterize this spectrum; however, little work has been done comparing the measured and theoretical spectra of various Am-Li sources to each other. This paper examines fourteen different Am-Li spectra, focusing on how these spectra affect simulated neutron multiplicity results using the code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). Two measurement and simulation campaigns were completed using Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) detectors and uranium standards of varying enrichment. The results of this work indicate that for standard AWCC measurements, the fourteen Am-Li spectra produce similar doubles and triples count rates. The singles count rates varied by as much as 20% between the different spectra, although they are usually not used in quantitative analysis, being dominated by scattering which is highly dependent on item placement.

  8. Preliminary AMS measurements of 10Be at the CENTA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ješkovský, Miroslav; Steier, Peter; Priller, Alfred; Breier, Robert; Povinec, Pavel P.; Golser, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Very sensitive methods, presently mainly accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are necessary for analysis of cosmogenic 10Be in the environment. AMS is mainly limited by the stable isobar 10B, while the requirements for mass separation are the least stringent of all standard isotopes analyzed by AMS. We tested a possibility to measure 10Be using a small switching magnet as an analyzer of accelerated ions, and an ionization chamber with a silicon nitride foil stack used as a passive absorber. A detection limit of 10-12 for the 10Be/9Be isotopic ratio was obtained using this technique, which was mainly determined by scattering of 9Be+2 ions on residual gas inside the switching magnet.

  9. Depth dependence of soil carbonate accumulation based on cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Beiling; Phillips, Fred M.; Elmore, David; Sharma, Pankaj

    1994-12-01

    Indurated pedogenic carbonate layers (calcretes) are common in soils on stable surfaces in arid to semiarid climates. The morphology and composition of calcretes provide important information on the geomorphic and climatic histories of the regions where they are formed, but they have proved difficult to date with conventional radiometric methods. We report cosmogenic 36Cl-buildup ages from three fractions (leachable Cl, carbonate, silicate) of a calcrete from the surface of an alluvial slope below the Ajo Mountains in southern Arizona. All three fractions give reasonably concordant ages, ranging from 700 ka at the base of the calcrete horizon to 200 ka at its top. These ages are in good agreement both with estimates of age based on correlation with similar, independently dated, soils in the region and with 36Cl-buildup ages on surficial boulders. These results support the ideas that calcretes accumulate upward with time and that water movement through the carbonate matrix is very limited after induration.

  10. Millennial strain partitioning and fault interaction revealed by 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide datasets from Abruzzo, Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, L. C.; Phillips, R. J.; Roberts, G.; Cowie, P. A.; Shanks, R. P.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.; Wedmore, L. N. J.; Zijerveld, L.

    2015-12-01

    In zones of distributed continental faulting, it is critical to understand how slip is partitioned onto brittle structures over both long-term millennial time scales and shorter-term individual earthquake cycles. The comparison of slip distributions on different timescales is challenging due to earthquake repeat-times being longer or similar to historical earthquake records, and a paucity of data on fault activity covering millennial to Quaternary scales in detail. Cosmogenic isotope analyses from bedrock fault scarps have the potential to bridge the gap, as these datasets track the exposure of fault planes due to earthquakes with better-than-millennial resolution. In this presentation, we will use an extensive 36Cl dataset to characterise late Holocene activity across a complicated network of normal faults in Abruzzo, Italy, comparing the most recent fault behaviour with the historical earthquake record in the region. Extensional faulting in Abruzzo has produced scarps of exposed bedrock limestone fault planes that have been preserved since the last glacial maximum (LGM). 36Cl accumulates in bedrock fault scarps as the plane is progressively exhumed by earthquakes and thus the concentration of 36Cl measured up the fault plane reflects the rate and patterns of slip. In this presentation, we will focus on the most recent record, revealed at the base of the fault. Utilising new Bayesian modelling techniques on new and previously collected data, we compare evidence for this most recent period of slip (over the last several thousands of years) across 5-6 fault zones located across strike from each other. Each sampling site is carefully characterised using LiDAR and GPR. We demonstrate that the rate of slip on individual fault strands varies significantly, between having periods of accelerated slip to relative quiescence. Where data is compared between across-strike fault zones and with the historical catalogue, it appears that slip is partitioned such that one fault

  11. Cosmogenic 36Cl ages of Quaternary basalt flows in the Mojave Desert, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Fred M.

    2003-07-01

    Basalt flows provide excellent opportunities for calibration and intercomparison of Quaternary dating methods, remote sensing methods, and rates of geomorphic processes. The immediate motivation for this study was to provide chronology for a blind test of the utility of rock varnish microstratigraphy as an indicator of the age of flow emplacement. Five basaltic eruptive centers in the Mojave Desert of California were sampled for cosmogenic 36Cl analysis. Multiple samples were taken from most centers and, with one exception, produced good agreement. Assuming a surficial erosion rate of 1 mm/kyr -1, the flows yielded the following ages: Amboy Crater, 79±5 ka; Pisgah Crater, 22.5±1.3 ka; Cima field, I-Cone, 27±1.3 ka; Cima field, A-Cone, 21±1.6 ka and 11.5±1.5 ka; Cima field, flow of unidentified origin, 46±2 ka. The ages from the Cima I and A cones are in good agreement with previous cosmogenic 3He dating. Ages from the three previously undated flows are significantly older than previous estimates based on flow appearance. Tanzhou Liu performed varnish microstratigraphic analysis on samples collected from the same sites. His results were submitted for publication without knowledge of the 36Cl ages. His age estimates agree well with the 36Cl ages for the three previously undated flows, strongly supporting the validity of varnish microstratigraphy as a chronological correlation tool.

  12. Development of AMS procedure for measurement of 93Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenting; Collon, Philippe; Kashiv, Yoav; Bowers, Matthew; Robertson, Daniel; Schmitt, Christopher

    2011-10-01

    The procedure for measuring 93Zr (t1/2 = 1.5 Ma) by AMS is currently being developed at the Nuclear Science Lab at the University of Notre Dame and we report on first experiments performed in this direction. AMS detection of 93Zr can potentially be applied to address astrophysical and environmental issues: (1) the measurement of the 92Zr(n,γ)93Zr reaction cross-section at nucleosynthesis s-process relevant temperatures, (2) the search for potential live 93Zr from a supernova in deep sea sediments, (3) hydrological and radioactive waste tracing. The measurement of 93Zr requires adequate separation from its stable isobar 93Nb. We are currently working on optimizing this separation by using the GasFilled Magnet technique with additional multiple dE measurements in a focal plane ionization chamber.

  13. Positron fraction, electron and positron spectra measured by AMS-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzolotto, Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    A precise measurement by AMS-02 of the electron spectrum up to 700 GeV and of the positron spectrum and positron fraction in primary cosmic rays up 500 GeV are presented. The combined measurement of the cosmic-ray electron and positron energy spectra and fraction provide a unique tool to improve our understanding of the production, acceleration and propagation mechanism of cosmic rays.

  14. Calculation of the compounded uncertainty of 14C AMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Marie-Josée; Grootes, Pieter M.

    2013-01-01

    The correct method to calculate conventional 14C ages from the carbon isotopic ratios was summarised 35 years ago by Stuiver and Polach (1977) and is now accepted as the only method to calculate 14C ages. There is, however, no consensus regarding the treatment of AMS data, mainly of the uncertainty of the final result. The estimation and treatment of machine background, process blank, and/or in situ contamination is not uniform between laboratories, leading to differences in 14C results, mainly for older ages. As Donahue (1987) and Currie (1994), among others, mentioned, some laboratories find it important to use the scatter of several measurements as uncertainty while others prefer to use Poisson statistics. The contribution of the scatter of the standards, machine background, process blank, and in situ contamination to the uncertainty of the final 14C result is also treated in different ways. In the early years of AMS, several laboratories found it important to describe their calculation process in details. In recent years, this practise has declined. We present an overview of the calculation process for 14C AMS measurements looking at calculation practises published from the beginning of AMS until present.

  15. Dating chert using in-situ produced 10Be: Possible complications revealed on landslide scarps through a comparison with 36Cl applied to coexisting limestone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerathe, Swann; Braucher, Régis; Lebourg, Thomas; Leani, Leatitia; Manetti, Michel; Bourles, Didier

    2013-04-01

    This abstract and presentation highlights potential complications that may arise while using in situ produced 10Be to date diagenetic silica (chert)exposure or burial event. The initiation and evolution of large gravitational collapses in sedimentary rocks were constrained using cosmic ray exposure dating. Because these collapses occurred in a stratigraphic level composed of chert (diagenetic silica) concretions interbedded in limestone layers, their development was studied by performing in situ-produced 36Cl and 10Be concentration measurements in both the limestone and coexisting diagenetic silica (chert), respectively. Following the routinely used decontamination and preparation protocols for 10Be produced in diagenetic silica, large discrepancies were observed with exposure ages determined by 36Cl within carbonate for samples originating from the same scarp. While 36Cl exposure ages were clustered as expected for a unique single gravitational event, 10Be exposure ages were scattered along the same studied scarps. To determine the origin of such a bias, petrological investigations were carried out for chert (diagenetic silica). Thin sections highlighted a complex mineralogical texture characterized by remnant silicified ooids showing calcitic cores, calcite inclusions and a dominant amorphous hydrated silica (grain > 20 μm). To decipher and characterize the potential origins of the excess measured 10Be within diagenetic silica, all samples were first reprocessed following the routine decontamination protocol (HCL-H2SiF6 leachings and three partial HF dissolutions) but starting from three different grain size fractions (GS1: 1000-500, GS2: 500-250 and GS3: 250-50 μm). The resulting concentrations clearly showed a decreasing 10Be content as a function of the grain size, but still yielded 10Be exposure ages significantly higher than 36Cl counterparts. Because potential adsorption of 10Be at the surface of amorphous silica grains was suspected, partial dissolution

  16. Measurement of the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n){sup 240}Am reaction in the giant dipole resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Tonchev, A. P.; Howell, C. R.; Hutcheson, A.; Kwan, E.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Tornow, W.; Hammond, S. L.; Huibregtse, C.; Kelley, J. H.; Kawano, T.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-11-15

    The photodisintegration cross section of the radioactive nucleus {sup 241}Am has been obtained using activation techniques and monoenergetic {gamma}-ray beams from the HI{gamma}S facility. The induced activity of {sup 240}Am produced via the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n) reaction was measured in the energy interval from 9 to 16 MeV utilizing high-resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The experimental data for the {sup 241}Am({gamma},n) reaction in the giant dipole resonance energy region are compared with statistical nuclear-model calculations.

  17. Impact of AMS-02 Measurements on Reducing GCR Model Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, T. C.; O'Neill, P. M.; Golge, S.; Norbury, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    For vehicle design, shield optimization, mission planning, and astronaut risk assessment, the exposure from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) poses a significant and complex problem both in low Earth orbit and in deep space. To address this problem, various computational tools have been developed to quantify the exposure and risk in a wide range of scenarios. Generally, the tool used to describe the ambient GCR environment provides the input into subsequent computational tools and is therefore a critical component of end-to-end procedures. Over the past few years, several researchers have independently and very carefully compared some of the widely used GCR models to more rigorously characterize model differences and quantify uncertainties. All of the GCR models studied rely heavily on calibrating to available near-Earth measurements of GCR particle energy spectra, typically over restricted energy regions and short time periods. In this work, we first review recent sensitivity studies quantifying the ions and energies in the ambient GCR environment of greatest importance to exposure quantities behind shielding. Currently available measurements used to calibrate and validate GCR models are also summarized within this context. It is shown that the AMS-II measurements will fill a critically important gap in the measurement database. The emergence of AMS-II measurements also provides a unique opportunity to validate existing models against measurements that were not used to calibrate free parameters in the empirical descriptions. Discussion is given regarding rigorous approaches to implement the independent validation efforts, followed by recalibration of empirical parameters.

  18. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  19. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  20. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  1. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  2. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  3. Neutron capture and (n,2n) measurements on 241Am

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, D; Jandel, M; Bredeweg, T; Bond, E; Clement, R; Couture, A; Haight, R; O'Donnell, J; Reifarth, R; Ullmann, J; Wilhelmy, J; Wouters, J; Tonchev, A; Hutcheson, A; Angell, C; Crowell, A; Fallin, B; Hammond, S; Howell, C; Karowowski, H; Kelley, J; Pedroni, R; Tornow, W; Macri, R; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J; Dashdorj, D; Stoyer, M; Wu, C

    2007-07-18

    We report on a set of neutron-induced reaction measurements on {sup 241}Am which are important for nuclear forensics and advanced nuclear reactor design. Neutron capture measurements have been performed on the DANCE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering CEnter (LANSCE). In general, good agreement is found with the most recent data evaluations up to an incident neutron energy of {approx} 300 keV where background limits the measurement. Using mono-energetic neutrons produced in the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction at Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), we have measured the {sup 241}Am(n,2n) excitation function from threshold (6.7 MeV) to 14.5 MeV using the activation method. Good agreement is found with previous measurements, with the exception of the three data points reported by Perdikakis et al. around 11 MeV, where we obtain a much lower cross section that is more consistent with theoretical estimates.

  4. Radiocarbon measurement with 1 MV AMS at charge state 1+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, K. H.; Hong, W.; Park, G.; Lee, J. G.

    2015-10-01

    A 1 MV AMS was installed at KIGAM (Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources) in 2007. We usually measure 14C at charge state 2+ because beam transmission yield reaches maximum value at a terminal voltage of 950 kV. However, this condition always has the possibility of interference by Li22+ molecules. To avoid the interference, samples with high Li contents need to be measured with charge states 1+ or 3+ because lithium ions only form the even charge states. Therefore, it was necessary to investigate the operating conditions of our AMS machine with charge state 1+ or 3+. The optimized condition for 1+ measurement was found to be 500 kV for terminal voltage and 2.5 × 10-2 mbar for stripper gas pressure. After setting up operating conditions for measurement with C1+, standard (IAEA C1, C7 and C8), blank, unknown wood and charcoal samples were measured and the results were compared with those obtained with a C2+ beam. The background level was determined to be as low as 2-5 × 10-15 for 14C1+.

  5. Depth dependence of soil carbonate accumulation based on cosmogenic [sup 36]Cl dating

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Phillips, F.M. ); Elmore, D.; Sharma, P. )

    1994-12-01

    Indurated pedogenic carbonate layers (calcretes) are common in soils on stable surfaces in arid to semiarid climates. The morphology and composition of calcretes provide important information on the geomorphic and climatic histories of the regions where they are formed, but they have proved difficult to date with conventional radiometric methods. We report cosmogenic [sup 36]Cl-buildup ages from three fractions (leachable Cl, carbonate, silicate) of a calcrete from the surface of an alluvial slope below the Ajo Mountains in southern Arizona. All three fractions give reasonably concordant ages, ranging from 700 ka at the base of the calcrete horizon to 200 ka at its top. These ages are in good agreement both with estimates of age based on correlation with similar, independently dated, soils in the region and with [sup 36]Cl-buildup ages on surficial boulders. These results support the ideas that calcretes accumulate upward with time and that water movement through the carbonate matrix is very limited after induration. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Pulsar interpretation of lepton spectra measured by AMS-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jie; Zhang, Hong-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) recently published its lepton spectra measurement. The results show that the positron fraction no longer increases above ˜ 200 GeV. The aim of this work is to investigate the possibility that the excess of positron fraction is due to pulsars. Nearby known pulsars from the ATNF catalog are considered to be a possible primary positron source of the high energy positrons. We find that the pulsars with age T˜eq (0.45{-}4.5)× 105 year and distance d<0.5 kpc can explain the behavior of positron fraction of AMS-02 in the range of high energy. We show that each of the four pulsars—Geminga, J1741-2054, Monogem, and J0942-5552—is able to be a single source satisfying all considered physical requirements. We also discuss the possibility that these high energy e{}^{± } are from multiple pulsars. The multiple pulsar contribution predicts a positron fraction with some structures at higher energies.

  7. Determination of 36Cl Production Rates Derived from the Well-Dated Deglaciation Surfaces of Whidbey and Fidalgo Islands, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Terry W.; Caffee, Marc L.

    2001-11-01

    The 36Cl dating method is increasingly being used to determine the surface-exposure history of Quaternary landforms. Production rates for the 36Cl isotopic system, a critical component of the dating method, have now been refined using the well-constrained radiocarbon-based deglaciation history of Whidbey and Fidalgo Islands, Washington. The calculated total production rates due to calcium and potassium are 91±5 atoms 36Cl (g Ca) -1 yr -1 and are 228±18 atoms 36Cl (g K) -1 yr -1, respectively. The calculated ground-level secondary neutron production rate in air, P f(0), inferred from thermal neutron absorption by 35Cl is 762±28 neutrons (g air) -1 yr -1 for samples with low water content (1-2 wt.%). Neutron absorption by serpentinized harzburgite samples of the same exposure age, having higher water content (8-12 wt.%), is ˜40% greater relative to that for dry samples. These data suggest that existing models do not adequately describe thermalization and capture of neutrons for hydrous rock samples. Calculated 36Cl ages of samples collected from the surfaces of a well-dated dacite flow (10,600-12,800 cal yr B.P.) and three disparate deglaciated localities are consistent with close limiting calibrated 14C ages, thereby supporting the validity of our 36Cl production rates integrated over the last ˜15,500 cal yr between latitudes of 46.5° and 51°N. Although our production rates are internally consistent and yield reasonable exposure ages for other localities, there nevertheless are significant differences between these production rates and those of other investigators.

  8. 47 CFR 73.154 - AM directional antenna partial proof of performance measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... measurements are to be made within 3 to 15 kilometers from the center of the antenna array. When a monitoring... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AM directional antenna partial proof of...) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.154 AM directional...

  9. 47 CFR 73.154 - AM directional antenna partial proof of performance measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AM directional antenna partial proof of...) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.154 AM directional antenna... measurements are to be made within 3 to 15 kilometers from the center of the antenna array. When a...

  10. 47 CFR 73.154 - AM directional antenna partial proof of performance measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AM directional antenna partial proof of...) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.154 AM directional antenna... measurements are to be made within 3 to 15 kilometers from the center of the antenna array. When a...

  11. 47 CFR 73.154 - AM directional antenna partial proof of performance measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false AM directional antenna partial proof of...) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.154 AM directional antenna... measurements are to be made within 3 to 15 kilometers from the center of the antenna array. When a...

  12. 47 CFR 73.154 - AM directional antenna partial proof of performance measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false AM directional antenna partial proof of...) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.154 AM directional antenna... measurements are to be made within 3 to 15 kilometers from the center of the antenna array. When a...

  13. International-Aerial Measuring System (I-AMS) Training Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wasiolek, Piotre T.; Malchor, Russell L.; Maurer, Richard J.; Adams, Henry L.

    2015-10-01

    Since the Fukushima reactor accident in 2011, there has been an increased interest worldwide in developing national capabilities to rapidly map and assess ground contamination resulting from nuclear reactor accidents. The capability to rapidly measure the size of the contaminated area, determine the activity level, and identify the radionuclides can aid emergency managers and decision makers in providing timely protective action recommendations to the public and first responders. The development of an aerial detection capability requires interagency coordination to assemble the radiation experts, detection system operators, and aviation aircrews to conduct the aerial measurements, analyze and interpret the data, and provide technical assessments. The Office of International Emergency Management and Cooperation (IEMC) at the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) sponsors an International - Aerial Measuring System (I-AMS) training program for partner nations to develop and enhance their response to radiological emergencies. An initial series of courses can be conducted in the host country to assist in developing an aerial detection capability. As the capability develops and expands, additional experience can be gained through advanced courses with the opportunity to conduct aerial missions over a broad range of radiation environments.

  14. AM noise impact on low level phase noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Cibiel, Gilles; Régis, Myrianne; Tournier, Eric; Llopis, Oliver

    2002-06-01

    The influence of the source AM noise in microwave residual phase noise experiments is investigated. The noise floor degradation problem, caused by the parasitic detection of this type of noise by an unperfectly balanced mixer, is solved thanks to a refinement of the quadrature condition. The parasitic noise contribution attributable to the AM to PM (phase modulation) conversion occurring in the device under test is minimized through the development of a dedicated microwave source featuring an AM noise level as low as -170 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset from a 3.5 GHz carrier. PMID:12075970

  15. 50 CFR 640.28 - Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY OF THE GULF... accountability measures (AMs). For recreational and commercial spiny lobster landings combined, the ACL is...

  16. AMS beyond 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.

    1993-12-28

    The occasion of this conference, the Sixth International Conference on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, falls sixteen years after the remarkable triple simultaneous discovery of this powerful isotopic measurement. In the interval since the Fifth Conference in Paris in 1991, new facilities of both large and small size have become fully operational, achieving impressive gains in both measurement throughput and precision. The purpose of this short review is to extrapolate from recent gains and experience and to project the status of the field beyond the coming millennial date. AMS achieved instant application in archaeology and the geosciences and its early growth was stimulated by the excitement caused by the early results. The ability to obtain an accurate radiocarbon date with a sample one thousand times smaller than possible with scintillation or gas counting, the ability to trace {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in sea water with a similar thousand fold shrinkage in sample size, and the wide utility of {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, and {sup 129}I as tracers and chronometers of erosion, hydrology and paleoclimate were sufficient to drive the partial conversion of existing accelerators and the construction of new dedicated ones. These applications remain the core of the present field and continue to justify its growth. The past few years, however, have seen developments in new fields. Biomedicine, chemical kinetics, materials science, forensic dosimetry, and arms control/counter proliferation have been explored. These applications have varying promise and will influence development of AMS programs in new ways in the future.

  17. Using the nuclear activation AMS method for determining chlorine in solids at ppb-levels and below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stephan R.; Eigl, Rosmarie; Forstner, Oliver; Martschini, Martin; Steier, Peter; Sterba, Johannes H.; Golser, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Neutron activation analysis using decay counting of the activated element is a well-established method in elemental analysis. However, for chlorine there is a better alternative to measuring decay of the short-lived activation product chlorine-38 (t1/2 = 37.24 min) - accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) of 36Cl: the relatively high neutron capture cross section of chlorine-35 for thermal neutrons (43.7 b) and combined the AMS technique for chlorine-36 (t1/2 = 301 ka) allow for determination of chlorine down to ppb-levels using practical sample sizes and common exposure durations. The combination of neutron activation and AMS can be employed for a few other elements (nitrogen, thorium, and uranium) as well. For bulk solid samples an advantage of the method is that lab contamination can be rendered irrelevant. The chlorine-35 in the sample is activated to chlorine-36, and surface chlorine can be removed after the irradiation. Subsequent laboratory contamination, however, will not carry a prominent chlorine-36 signature. After sample dissolution and addition of sufficient amounts of stable chlorine carrier the produced chlorine-36 and thus the original chlorine-35 of the sample can be determined using AMS. We have developed and applied the method for analysis of chlorine in steel samples. The chlorine content of steel is of interest to nuclear industry, precisely because of above mentioned high neutron capture cross section for chlorine-35, which leads to accumulation of chlorine-36 as long-term nuclear waste. The samples were irradiated at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atominstitut in Vienna and the 36Cl-AMS setup at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA) was used for 36Cl/Cl analysis.

  18. Experimental determination of the {sup 36}Cl(n,p){sup 36}S and {sup 36}Cl(n,{alpha}){sup 33}P reaction cross sections and the consequences on the origin of {sup 36}S

    SciTech Connect

    Smet, L. de; Wagemans, C.; Goeminne, G.; Heyse, J.; Gils, J. van

    2007-03-15

    The {sup 36}Cl(n,p){sup 36}S and {sup 36}Cl(n,{alpha}){sup 33}P reaction cross sections have been studied with resonance neutrons at the linear accelerator GELINA of the IRMM in Geel (Belgium) and have been determined up to approximately 250 keV using the time-of-flight technique. In this energy region, 17 resonances were observed, whereas eight were identified before. For some resonances the resonance strength, the spin, and the total width could be determined. From the obtained cross section data, the MACS has been calculated by numerical integration. These updated MACS values were used in stellar models to trace the origin of the rare isotope {sup 36}S.

  19. Interlaboratory study of the ion source memory effect in 36Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavetich, Stefan; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier; Buchriegler, Josef; Golser, Robin; Keddadouche, Karim; Martschini, Martin; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg; Steier, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Understanding and minimization of contaminations in the ion source due to cross-contamination and long-term memory effect is one of the key issues for accurate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of volatile elements. The focus of this work is on the investigation of the long-term memory effect for the volatile element chlorine, and the minimization of this effect in the ion source of the Dresden accelerator mass spectrometry facility (DREAMS). For this purpose, one of the two original HVE ion sources at the DREAMS facility was modified, allowing the use of larger sample holders having individual target apertures. Additionally, a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, an interlaboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect of the four Cs sputter ion sources at DREAMS (two sources: original and modified), ASTER (Accélérateur pour les Sciences de la Terre, Environnement, Risques) and VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) had been investigated by measuring samples of natural 35Cl/37Cl-ratio and samples highly-enriched in 35Cl (35Cl/37Cl ∼ 999). Besides investigating and comparing the individual levels of long-term memory, recovery time constants could be calculated. The tests show that all four sources suffer from long-term memory, but the modified DREAMS ion source showed the lowest level of contamination. The recovery times of the four ion sources were widely spread between 61 and 1390 s, where the modified DREAMS ion source with values between 156 and 262 s showed the fastest recovery in 80% of the measurements.

  20. Evidence from cosmic-ray exposure dating based on 36Cl for the pre-Minoan caldera on Santorini, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassas, Constantin; Bourlès, Didier; Braucher, Regis; Druitt, Tim; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Léanni, Laetitia

    2016-04-01

    The physiography of Santorini prior to the Minoan (Late Bronze Age) eruption (17th century BCE) is of great archaeological interest, given the importance of Santorini as a commercial centre and port in the Minoan empire. However, the paleogeography of the pre-Minoan caldera has been a point of controversy: Heiken and McCoy (1984) advocated the existence, in the southern part of the present-day caldera, of a pre-existing caldera formed during the 172 ka Lower Pumice eruption, whereas Druitt and Francaviglia (1992), based on the presence of in situ plinian pumice from the Minoan eruption adhering to the modern cliff, conceived the pre-Minoan (22 ka) caldera as having occupied much of the northern basin of the present-day caldera. With the goal of settling the debate we performed cosmic ray exposure dating employing in situ-produced cosmogenic 36Cl to date different generations of caldera cliffs at Santorini, and hence to identify those cliffs predating the Minoan eruption. Our methodology involved the determination of the in situ-produced cosmogenic 36Cl in basaltic and andesitic rocks cropping out in the cliffs. The samples returned 36Cl CRE ages consistent with previously published field mapping of cliff populations based on geomorphological and stratigraphic arguments (Druitt and Francaviglia 1992), suggesting that much of the present cliff line of northern Santorini predated the Minoan eruption, or was superficially modified by landslips and rockfalls during that eruption. The 36Cl CRE ages enable us to better define the paleogeography of the pre-Minoan caldera. References [1] Druitt, T. H. and Francaviglia, V.1992. Caldera formation on Santorini and the physiography of the islands in the Late Bronze Age. Bulletin of Volcanology 54, 484-493. [2] Heiken G and McCoy F (1984) Caldera development during the Minoan eruption, Thira, Cyclades, Greece. Journal of Geophysical Research: 89 (B10), 8841-8862.

  1. Toward a measurement of α -decay lifetime change at high pressure: The case of 241Am

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissim, Noaz; Belloni, Fabio; Eliezer, Shalom; Delle Side, Domenico; Martinez Val, José Maria

    2016-07-01

    This paper suggests that a change in the lifetime of the α -decay process in 241Am may be detected at high pressures achievable in the laboratory, essentially, due to the extraordinary high compressibility of Am at the megabar range. The Thomas-Fermi model was used to calculate the effect of high pressure on the atomic electron density and the variation of the atomic potential of 241Am . It was found that at pressures of about 0.5 Mbar the relative change in the lifetime of 241Am is about -2 ×10-4 . Detailed experimental procedures to measure this effect by compressing the 241Am metal in a diamond-anvil cell are presented where diagnostics is based on counting of the 60-keV γ rays accompanying the α decay and/or mass spectrometry on the 237Np/241Am isotope ratio.

  2. Total radioactive residues and residues of [36Cl]chlorate in market size broilers.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Byrd, James A; Anderson, Robin C

    2007-07-11

    The oral administration of chlorate salts reduces the numbers of Gram-negative pathogens in gastrointestinal tracts of live food animals. Although the efficacy of chlorate salts has been demonstrated repeatedly, the technology cannot be introduced into commercial settings without first demonstrating that chlorate residues, and metabolites of chlorate remaining in edible tissues, represent a negligible risk to consumers. Typically, a first step in this risk assessment is to quantify the parent compound and to identify metabolites remaining in edible tissues of animals treated with the experimental compound. The objectives of this study were to determine the pathway(s) of chlorate metabolism in market broilers and to determine the magnitude of chlorate residues remaining in edible tissues. To this end, 12 broilers (6 weeks; 2.70+/-0.34 kg) were randomly assigned to three treatments of 7.4, 15.0, and 22.5 mM sodium [36Cl]chlorate dissolved in drinking water (n=4 broilers per treatment). Exposure to chlorate, dissolved in drinking water, occurred at 0 and 24 h (250 mL per exposure), feed was withdrawn at hour 38, water was removed at hour 48, and birds were slaughtered at hour 54 (16 h after feed removal and 8 h after water removal). The radioactivity was rapidly eliminated in excreta with 69-78% of the total administered radioactivity being excreted by slaughter. Total radioactive residues were proportional to dose in all edible tissues with chloride ion comprising greater than 98.5% of the radioactive residue for the tissue (9.4-97.8 ppm chlorate equivalents). Chlorate residues were typically greatest in the skin (0.33-0.82 ppm), gizzard (0.1-0.137 ppm), and dark muscle (0.05-0.14 ppm). Adipose, liver, and white muscle tissue contained chlorate concentrations from 0.03 to 0.13 ppm. In contrast, chlorate concentrations in excreta eliminated during the 6 h period prior to slaughter ranged from 53 to 71 ppm. Collectively, these data indicate that broilers rapidly

  3. In vivo measurement of /sup 241/Am in an accidentally exposed subject

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, H.E.; Rieksts, G.A.; Icayan, E.E.

    1981-10-01

    Detailed external measurements were made of internally deposited /sup 241/Am in a nuclear chemical operator involved in an americium exposure accident at the Hanford plant. Despite some interference from high-level external contamination, quantitative measurements of the /sup 241/Am content in the lung, liver, and bones were made starting on the third day after the accident. The rate of excretion of /sup 241/Am from these organs was determined. The /sup 241/Am embedded in the skin of the face and head was carefully mapped. The distribution over the total length of the body was also determined. Linear and rectilinear scanners, gamma cameras, large and small scintillation detectors, proportional counters, and Si(Li) and intrinsic germanium detectors were used to evaluate the internal deposition. Methods of calibration for quantitative measurement included simulation of the /sup 241/Am activity in both phantom and cadaver parts.

  4. Report on 241,242Am(n,x) surrogate cross section measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J T; Ressler, J J; Gostic, J; Henderson, R A; Bernstein, L A; Escher, J E; Bleuel, D; Kritcher, A; Matoon, C; Scielzo, N D; Stoyer, M A

    2011-02-16

    The main goal of this measurement is to determine the {sup 242}Am(n,f) and {sup 241}Am(n,f) cross sections via the surrogate {sup 243}Am. Gamma-ray data was also collected for the purpose of measuring the (n,2n) cross-sections. The experiment was conducted using the STARS/LIBERACE experimental facility located at the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory the first week of February 2011. A description of the experiment and status of the data analysis follow.

  5. Timing of maximum glacial extent and deglaciation from HualcaHualca volcano (southern Peru), obtained with cosmogenic 36Cl.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, Jesus; Palacios, David; Vazquez, Lorenzo; Juan Zamorano, Jose

    2015-04-01

    Andean glacial deposits are key records of climate fluctuations in the southern hemisphere. During the last decades, in situ cosmogenic nuclides have provided fresh and significant dates to determine past glacier behavior in this region. But still there are many important discrepancies such as the impact of Last Glacial Maximum or the influence of Late Glacial climatic events on glacial mass balances. Furthermore, glacial chronologies from many sites are still missing, such as HualcaHualca (15° 43' S; 71° 52' W; 6,025 masl), a high volcano of the Peruvian Andes located 70 km northwest of Arequipa. The goal of this study is to establish the age of the Maximum Glacier Extent (MGE) and deglaciation at HualcaHualca volcano. To achieve this objetive, we focused in four valleys (Huayuray, Pujro Huayjo, Mollebaya and Mucurca) characterized by a well-preserved sequence of moraines and roches moutonnées. The method is based on geomorphological analysis supported by cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating. 36Cl ages have been estimated with the CHLOE calculator and were compared with other central Andean glacial chronologies as well as paleoclimatological proxies. In Huayuray valley, exposure ages indicates that MGE occurred ~ 18 - 16 ka. Later, the ice mass gradually retreated but this process was interrupted by at least two readvances; the last one has been dated at ~ 12 ka. In the other hand, 36Cl result reflects a MGE age of ~ 13 ka in Mollebaya valley. Also, two samples obtained in Pujro-Huayjo and Mucurca valleys associated with MGE have an exposure age of 10-9 ka, but likely are moraine boulders affected by exhumation or erosion processes. Deglaciation in HualcaHualca volcano began abruptly ~ 11.5 ka ago according to a 36Cl age from a polished and striated bedrock in Pujro Huayjo valley, presumably as a result of reduced precipitation as well as a global increase of temperatures. The glacier evolution at HualcaHualca volcano presents a high correlation with

  6. 45 CFR 2522.580 - What performance measures am I required to submit to the Corporation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What performance measures am I required to submit... Evaluation Requirements Performance Measures: Requirements and Procedures § 2522.580 What performance... minimum, the following performance measures: (1) One set of aligned performance measures (one output,...

  7. The use of AMS to the biomedical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.

    1991-04-01

    The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) began making AMS measurements in 1989. Biomedical experiments were originally limited by sample preparation techniques, but we expect the number of biomedical samples to increase five-fold. While many of the detailed techniques for making biomedical measurements resemble those used in other fields, biological tracer experiments differ substantially from the observational approaches of earth science investigators. The role of xenobiotius in initiating mutations in cells is of particular interest. One measure of the damage caused to the genetic material is obtained by counting the number of adducts formed by a chemical agent at a given dose. AMS allows direct measurement of the number of adducts through stoichiometric quantification of the {sup 14}C label attached to the DNA after exposure to a labelled carcinogen. Other isotopes of interest include tritium, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 79}SE, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 26}Al and {sup 129}I. Our experiments with low dose environmental carcinogens reflect the protocols which will become a common part of biomedical AMS. In biomedical experiments, the researcher defines the carbon to be analyzed through dissection and/or chemical purification; thus the sample is merely'' combusted and graphitized at the AMS facility. However, since biomedical samples can have a {sup 14}C range of five orders of magnitude, preparation of graphite required construction of a special manifold to prevent cross-contamination. Additionally, a strain of {sup 14}C-depleted C57BL/6 mice is being developed to further reduce background in biomedical experiments. AMS has a bright and diverse future in radioisotope tracing. Such work requires a dedicated amalgamation of AMS scientists and biomedical researchers who will redesign experimental protocols to maximize the AMS technique and minimize the danger of catastrophic contamination. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. AMS-02 Capabilities in Solar Energetic Particle Measurements for Space Weather Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolandi, Cristina; Bindi, Veronica; Corti, Claudio; Hoffman, Julia; Whitman, Kathryn

    2016-04-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02), thanks to its large acceptance of about 0.45 m2 sr, is the biggest Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) detector ever flown in space. AMS-02 was installed on the International Space Station (ISS) on May 19, 2011, where it will measure cosmic rays from 1 GV up to a few TV, for the duration of the ISS, currently extended till 2024. During these years of operation, AMS-02 measured several increases of the protons flux over the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) background associated to the strongest solar events. AMS-02 has observed the related SEP accelerated during M- and X-class flares and fast coronal mass ejections measuring an increase of the proton flux near 1 GV and above. Some of these solar events were also followed by the typical GCR suppression i.e. Forbush decrease, which makes even more evident the measurement of the SEP flux over the GCR background. Thanks to its large acceptance and particle detection capabilities, AMS-02 is able to perform precise measurements in a short period of time which is typical of these transient phenomena and to collect enough statistics to measure fine structures and time evolution of particle spectra. The events observed by AMS-02 since the beginning of its mission will be presented and some of the more interesting events will be shown. AMS-02 observations with their unprecedented resolution and high statistics, will improve the understanding of SEP behavior at high energies to constrain models of SEP production used in space weather physics.

  9. The AMS Measurements and Its Applications in Nuclear Physics at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE)

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Shan; Shen Hongtao; He Ming; Dong Kejun; He Guozhu; Wang Xianggao; Yuan Jian; Wang Wei; Wu Shaoyong; Ruan Xiangdong; Wu Weimin

    2010-05-12

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), initiated in late 1970s at McMaster university based on the accelerator and detector technique, has long been applied in the studies on archaeology, geology, and cosmology, as a powerful tool for isotope dating. The advantages of AMS in the analysis of rare nuclides by direct counting of the atoms, small sample size and relatively free from the interferences of molecular ions have been well documented. This paper emphasizes that AMS can not only be used for archaeology, geology, environment, biology and so on, but also served as a unique tool for nuclear physics research. In this paper, the determination of the half-lives of {sup 79}Se, the measurements of the cross-sections of {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92g}Nb and {sup 238}U(n,3n){sup 236}U reactions, the detection and determination of ultratrace impurities in neutrino detector materials, and the measurement of the fission product nuclide {sup 126}Sn, are to be introduced, as some of examples of AMS applications in nuclear research conducted in AMS lab of China Institute of Atomic Energy. Searching for superheavy nuclides by using AMS is being planned.

  10. In vivo measurement of 241Am in the lungs confounded by activity deposited in other organs.

    PubMed

    Lobaugh, Megan L; Spitz, Henry B; Glover, Samuel E

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive material deposited in multiple organs of the body is likely to confound a result of an in vivo measurement performed over the lungs, the most frequently monitored organ for occupational exposure. The significance of this interference was evaluated by measuring anthropometric torso phantoms containing lungs, liver, skeleton, and axillary lymph nodes, each with a precisely known quantity of 241Am uniformly distributed in the organs. Arrays of multiple high-resolution germanium detectors were positioned over organs within the torso phantom containing 241Am or over proximal organs without activity to determine the degree of measurement confounding due to photons emitted from other source organs. A set of four mathematical response functions describes the measured count rate with detectors positioned over each of the relevant organs and 241Am contained in the measured organ or one of the other organs selected as a confounder. Simultaneous solution of these equations by matrix algebra, where the diagonal terms of the matrix are calibration factors for a direct measurement of activity in an organ and the off-diagonal terms reflect the contribution (i.e., interference or cross-talk) produced by 241Am in a confounding organ, yields the activity deposited in each of the relevant organs. The matrix solution described in this paper represents a method for adjusting a result of 241Am measured directly in one organ for interferences that may arise from 241Am deposited elsewhere and represents a technically valid procedure to aid in evaluating internal dose based upon in vivo measurements for those radioactive materials known to deposit in multiple organs. PMID:25437522

  11. 50 CFR 622.49 - Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs). 622.49 Section 622.49 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Management Measures...

  12. Calibration of cosmogenic noble gas production based on 36Cl-36Ar ages. Part 2. The 81Kr-Kr dating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, I.; Dalcher, N.; Vogel, N.; Wieler, R.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2015-11-01

    We calibrated the 81Kr-Kr dating system for ordinary chondrites of different sizes using independent shielding-corrected 36Cl-36Ar ages. Krypton concentrations and isotopic compositions were measured in bulk samples from 14 ordinary chondrites of high petrologic type and the cosmogenic Kr component was obtained by subtracting trapped Kr from phase Q. The thus-determined average cosmogenic 78Kr/83Kr, 80Kr/83Kr, 82Kr/83Kr, and 84Kr/83Kr ratiC(Lavielle and Marti 1988; Wieler 2002). The cosmogenic 78Kr/83Kr ratio is correlated with the cosmogenic 22Ne/21Ne ratio, confirming that 78Kr/83Kr is a reliable shielding indicator. Previously, 81Kr-Kr ages have been determined by assuming the cosmogenic production rate of 81Kr, P(81Kr)c, to be 0.95 times the average of the cosmogenic production rates of 80Kr and 82Kr; the factor Y = 0.95 therefore accounts for the unequal production of the various Kr isotopes (Marti 1967a). However, Y should be regarded as an empirical adjustment. For samples whose 80Kr and 82Kr concentrations may be affected by neutron-capture reactions, the shielding-dependent cosmogenic (78Kr/83Kr)c ratio has been used instead to calculate P(81Kr)/P(83Kr), as for some lunar samples, this ratio has been shown to linearly increase with (78Kr/83Kr)c (Marti and Lugmair 1971). However, the 81Kr-Kr ages of our samples calculated with these methods are on average ~30% higher than their 36Cl-36Ar ages, indicating that most if not all the 81Kr-Kr ages determined so far are significantly too high. We therefore re-evaluated both methods to determine P(81Kr)c/P(83Kr)c. Our new Y value of 0.70 ± 0.04 is more than 25% lower than the value of 0.95 used so far. Furthermore, together with literature data, our data indicate that for chondrites, P(81Kr)c/P(83Kr)c is rather constant at 0.43 ± 0.02, at least for the shielding range covered by our samples ([78Kr/83Kr]c = 0.119-0.185; [22Ne/21Ne]c = 1.083-1.144), in contrast to the observations on lunar samples. As expected

  13. A new HVE 6 MV AMS system at the University of Cologne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M. G.; Dewald, A.; Gottdang, A.; Heinze, S.; Mous, D. J. W.

    2011-12-01

    CologneAMS is the new Centre for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the University of Cologne. It will operate a dedicated AMS system designed to measure all standard cosmogenic nuclides ( 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 129I) and which uses a 6 MV Tandetron™ accelerator equipped with an all solid-state power supply, foil and gas stripper. The system also enables a sensitive detection of heavy ions up to 239U and 244Pu. The high-energy mass-spectrometer consists of a 90 degree magnet with a radius of 2 m and a mass-energy product of 351 AMU MeV to allow the detection of 244Pu 5+ up to the maximum terminal voltage of 6 MV. This magnet is followed by an electrostatic energy analyzer and a switching magnet that can transport the rare isotope beam into various beamlines. The switching magnet forms a third analyzing element which is needed especially for the sensitive detection of heavy elements. So far two beamlines are equipped with their own detection system. One of these lines is used for suppression of isobaric background in the case of the analysis of e.g. 36Cl. This is accomplished by an absorber foil which generates a Z-dependent energy loss in combination with a momentum/charge-state selection via a 120 degree magnet that features up to 30 mrad acceptance for efficient beam transport. In this contribution we will introduce the new Centre, the layout and specific characteristics of the AMS system as well as the main topics of the future scientific work to be performed at CologneAMS.

  14. Report on 240Am(n,x) surrogate cross section test measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ressler, J J; Burke, J T; Gostic, J; Bleuel, D; Escher, J E; Henderson, R A; Koglin, J; Reed, T; Scielzo, N D; Stoyer, M A

    2012-02-01

    The main goal of the test measurement was to determine the feasibility of the {sup 243}Am(p,t) reaction as a surrogate for {sup 240}Am(n,f). No data cross section data exists for neutron induced reactions on {sup 240}Am; the half-life of this isotope is only 2.1 days making direct measurements difficult, if not impossible. The 48-hour experiment was conducted using the STARS/LIBERACE experimental facility located at the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in August 2011. A description of the experiment and results is given. The beam energy was initially chosen to be 39 MeV in order to measure an equivalent neutron energy range from 0 to 20 MeV. However, the proton beam was not stopped in the farady cup and the beam was deposited in the surrounding shielding material. The shielding material was not conductive, and a beam current, needed for proper tuning of the beam as well as experimental monitoring, could not be read. If the {sup 240}Am(n,f) surrogate experiment is to be run at LBNL, simple modifications to the beam collection site will need to be made. The beam energy was reduced to 29 MeV, which was within an energy regime of prior experiments and tuning conditions at STARS/LIBERACE. At this energy, the beam current was successfully tuned and measured. At 29 MeV, data was collected with both the {sup 243}Am and {sup 238}U targets. An example particle identification plot is shown in Fig. 1. The triton-fission coincidence rate for the {sup 243}Am target and {sup 238}U target were measured. Coincidence rates of 0.0233(1) cps and 0.150(6) cps were observed for the {sup 243}Am and {sup 238}U targets, respectively. The difference in count rate is largely attributed to the available target material - the {sup 238}U target contains approximately 7 times more atoms than the {sup 243}Am. A proton beam current of {approx}0.7 nA was used for measurements on both targets. Assuming a full experimental run under similar conditions, an estimate for the

  15. CologneAMS, a dedicated center for accelerator mass spectrometry in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, A.; Heinze, S.; Jolie, J.; Zilges, A.; Dunai, T.; Rethemeyer, J.; Melles, M.; Staubwasser, M.; Kuczewski, B.; Richter, J.; Radtke, U.; von Blanckenburg, F.; Klein, M.

    2013-01-01

    CologneAMS is a new centre for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at the University of Cologne. It has been funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) to improve the experimental conditions especially for those German scientists that apply the AMS technique for their geologic, environmental, nuclear chemical, and nuclear astrophysical research. The new AMS-device has been built by High Voltage Engineering Europe (HVEE) and has been installed in the existing accelerator area of the Institute of Nuclear Physics. The AMS-facility is designed for the spectrometry of 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, 129I in and heavy ions up to 236U and 244Pu. The central part of the AMS-facility is a 6 MV Tandetron™ accelerator. Downstream of the high energy mass spectrometer an additional switching magnet is used as a further filter element which supplies also additional ports for future extensions of the detector systems. The current status of CologneAMS and the results of the first test measurements will be presented.

  16. Cosmogenic 10Be and 36Cl geochronology of offset alluvial fans along the northern Death Valley fault zone: Implications for transient strain in the eastern California shear zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, K.L.; Brantley, K.S.; Dolan, J.F.; Finkel, R.C.; Klinger, R.E.; Knott, J.R.; Machette, M.N.; Owen, L.A.; Phillips, F.M.; Slate, J.L.; Wernicke, B.P.

    2007-01-01

    The northern Death Valley fault zone (NDVFZ) has long been recognized as a major right-lateral strike-slip fault in the eastern California shear zone (ECSZ). However, its geologic slip rate has been difficult to determine. Using high-resolution digital topographic imagery and terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating, we present the first geochronologically determined slip rate for the NDVFZ. Our study focuses on the Red Wall Canyon alluvial fan, which exposes clean dextral offsets of seven channels. Analysis of airborne laser swath mapping data indicates ???297 ?? 9 m of right-lateral displacement on the fault system since the late Pleistocene. In situ terrestrial cosmogenic 10Be and 36C1 geochronology was used to date the Red Wall Canyon fan and a second, correlative fan also cut by the fault. Beryllium 10 dates from large cobbles and boulders provide a maximum age of 70 +22/-20 ka for the offset landforms. The minimum age of the alluvial fan deposits based on 36Cl depth profiles is 63 ?? 8 ka. Combining the offset measurement with the cosmogenic 10Be date yields a geologic fault slip rate of 4.2 +1.9/-1.1 mm yr-1, whereas the 36Cl data indicate 4.7 +0.9/-0.6 mm yr-1 of slip. Summing these slip rates with known rates on the Owens Valley, Hunter Mountain, and Stateline faults at similar latitudes suggests a total geologic slip rate across the northern ECSZ of ???8.5 to 10 mm yr-1. This rate is commensurate with the overall geodetic rate and implies that the apparent discrepancy between geologic and geodetic data observed in the Mojave section of the ECSZ does not extend north of the Garlock fault. Although the overall geodetic rates are similar, the best estimates based on geology predict higher strain rates in the eastern part of the ECSZ than to the west, whereas the observed geodetic strain is relatively constant. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Precision measurements of e+, e_, e++e_ fluxes with AMS-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzolotto, Cecilia

    2016-05-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a large acceptance particle physics detector installed on board the International Space Station (ISS) since May 19th 2011 to search for primordial anti-matter, for indirect signals of dark matter and to perform a high statistic and long duration measurement of the spectra of primary charged cosmic rays. Precise measurements of the electron and positron fluxes and of the total e++e_ flux are presented. These AMS results provide a deeper understanding of the nature of high energy cosmic rays and can shed more light on the nature of dark matter.

  18. AMS Ground Truth Measurements: Calibration and Test Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Wasiolek, P.

    2013-11-01

    Airborne gamma spectrometry is one of the primary techniques used to define the extent of ground contamination after a radiological incident. Its usefulness was demonstrated extensively during the response to the Fukushima nuclear power plant (NPP) accident in March-May 2011. To map ground contamination a set of scintillation detectors is mounted on an airborne platform (airplane or helicopter) and flown over contaminated areas. The acquisition system collects spectral information together with the aircraft position and altitude every second. To provide useful information to decision makers, the count rate data expressed in counts per second (cps) needs to be converted to the terrestrial component of the exposure rate 1 m above ground, or surface activity of isotopes of concern. This is done using conversion coefficients derived from calibration flights. During a large scale radiological event, multiple flights may be necessary and may require use of assets from different agencies. However, as the production of a single, consistent map product depicting the ground contamination is the primary goal, it is critical to establish very early into the event a common calibration line. Such a line should be flown periodically in order to normalize data collected from different aerial acquisition systems and potentially flown at different flight altitudes and speeds. In order to verify and validate individual aerial systems, the calibration line needs to be characterized in terms of ground truth measurements. This is especially important if the contamination is due to short-lived radionuclides. The process of establishing such a line, as well as necessary ground truth measurements, is described in this document.

  19. High resolution measurements of the Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, C.; Semkova, V.; Bouland, O.; Dessagne, P.; Fernandez, A.; Gunsing, F.; Nästren, C.; Noguère, G.; Ottmar, H.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Romain, P.; Rudolf, G.; Somers, J.; Wastin, F.

    2010-06-01

    Measurements of the Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section have been performed at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) Geel in the frame of a collaboration between the European Commission (EC) JRC and French laboratories from CNRS and the Commissariat à L’Energie Atomique (CEA) Cadarache. Raw material coming from the Atalante facility of CEA Marcoule has been transformed by JRC Karlsruhe into suitable Am241O2 samples embedded in Al2O3 matrices specifically designed for these measurements. The irradiations were carried out at the 7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator. The Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section was determined relative to the Al27(n,α)Na24 standard cross section. The measurements were performed in four sessions, using quasi-mono-energetic neutrons with energies ranging from 8 to 21 MeV produced via the H2(d,n)He3 and the H3(d,n)He4 reactions. The induced activity was measured by standard γ-ray spectrometry using a high-purity germanium detector. Below 15 MeV, the present results are in agreement with data obtained earlier. Above 15 MeV, these measurements allowed the experimental investigation of the Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section for the first time. The present data are in good agreement with predictions obtained with the talys code that uses an optical and fission model developed at CEA.

  20. Production of cosmogenic isotopes 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na, and 36Cl in the atmosphere: Altitudinal profiles of yield functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poluianov, S. V.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Mishev, A. L.; Usoskin, I. G.

    2016-07-01

    New consistent and precise computations of the production of five cosmogenic radioisotopes, 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na, and 36Cl, in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic rays are presented in the form of tabulated yield functions. For the first time, a detailed set of the altitude profiles of the production functions is provided which makes it possible to apply the results directly as input for atmospheric transport models. Good agreement with most of the earlier published works for columnar and global isotopic production rates is shown. Altitude profiles of the production are important, in particular for such tasks as studies of strong solar particle events in the past, precise reconstructions of solar activity on long-term scale, tracing air mass dynamics using cosmogenic radioisotopes, etc. As an example, computations of the 10Be deposition flux in the polar region are shown for the last decades and also for a period around 780 A.D. and confronted with the actual measurements in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores.

  1. 50 CFR 622.280 - Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.280 Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs). (a) Atlantic dolphin—(1) Commercial sector. (i) If commercial landings for Atlantic dolphin, as estimated by the SRD, reach or are projected to reach...

  2. 50 CFR 622.280 - Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.280 Annual catch limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs). (a) Atlantic dolphin—(1) Commercial sector. If commercial landings for Atlantic dolphin, as estimated by the SRD, reach or are projected to reach...

  3. Progress in AMS measurement of U isotope ratios in nanogram U samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kejun; He, Ming; Wang, Chen; Zhao, Xinhong; Li, Lili; Zhao, Yonggang; Wang, Xianggao; Shen, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaoming; Pang, Fangfang; Xu, Yongning; Zhao, Qingzhang; Dou, Liang; Yang, Xuran; Wu, Shaoyong; Lin, Deyu; Li, Kangning; You, Qubo; Bao, Yiwen; Hu, Yueming; Xia, Qingliang; Yin, Xinyi; Jiang, Shan

    2015-10-01

    The determination of uranium isotopic composition in ultra-trace U samples is very important in different fields, especially for the nuclear forensics. A new Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique has been developed for the measurement of uranium isotopic ratios in ng level uranium samples at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). Recently, the method was further optimized and developed by using a series of blank and standard samples. The results show that the 236U at the femtogram level can be determined in nanogram U samples by the newly developed AMS technique at CIAE. The experimental setup, performances and results will be detailed in this contribution.

  4. Biological sample preparation and {sup 41}Ca AMS measurement at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.P.H.T.; Southon, J.R.; Bench, G.S.; McAninch, J.E.; Serfass, R.E.; Fang, Y.; King, J.C.; Woodhouse, L.R.

    1994-10-10

    Calcium metabolism in biology may be better understood by the use of {sup 41}Ca labels, although detection by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is required. Methodologies for preparation of urine samples and subsequent AMS measurement were investigated. Novel attempts at preparing CaH{sub 2} were unsuccessful, but CaF{sub 2} of sufficient purity could be produced by precipitation of calcium from urine as oxalate, followed by separation of calcium by cation exchange chromatography and washing the CaF{sub 2} precipitate. The presence of some remaining impurities could be compensated for by selecting the appropriate accelerated ion charge state for AMS. The use of projectile x rays for isobar discrimination was explored as an alternative to the conventional dE/dx device.

  5. Quantitative measurement of AMS and orange mixtures by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Ma, Yehao; Wang, Xiaowei

    2012-06-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is a new kind of nondestructive detection method, frequency of terahertz wave spans from a few tens of GHz to several THz, which is used to detect material because of its strong identification, it can supply rich vibration information caused by intermolecular and large intra-molecular. Ammonium sulfamate (AMS) is a kind of herbicide, it has special value for many woody plants, which can prevent annual weeds. The excess use of pesticide is a huge threaten for human health in recent years, thus the research on detection of pesticide has absolutely important meaning, in this paper, pure AMS and mixture samples of AMS and orange are measured using THz-TDS, and their absorption coefficient are calculated by the model, which is put forward based on Fresnel equation. We qualitatively analyze the absorption coefficient spectra of pure AMS, which is useful for us to identify the pesticide in agriculture products. Meanwhile, we measured 14 mixture samples of AMS and orange, the weight ratio of mixtures are from 0% to 59.9%. Nine samples are considered as calibration set and the other five samples are regarded as prediction set, to quantitatively analyze the concentration of AMS by the partial least squares (PLS), the result shows that the prediction error is less then 4.5%, in addition, the relationship of the average absorption and weight ratio are absolutely linear. The experiment demonstrates that THz-TDS is promising and efficient to quantitatively detect the component of mixtures, and it has important reference value for the detection of pesticide in agriculture food.

  6. Precise measurement of cosmic ray fluxes with the AMS-02 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchi, Manuela

    2015-12-01

    The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer operating onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The main goals of the detector are the search for antimatter and dark matter in space, as well as the measurement of cosmic ray composition and flux. In this document we present precise measurements of cosmic ray positrons, electrons and protons, collected during the first 30 months of operations.

  7. 14C AMS measurements of the bomb pulse in N- and S-hemisphere tropical trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. O.; Lawson, E. M.; Fink, D.; Hotchkis, M. A. C.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Smith, A. M.; Tuniz, C.

    1997-03-01

    The 14C bomb-pulse signature has been measured by AMS on cross-dateable teak samples from N- and S-hemisphere locations in the tropics. Excellent agreement is found with the atmospheric 14C content in the period 1955 to 1980 for the respective hemispheres. These results demonstrate that 14C measurements can be used to facilitate growth rate determinations in tropical trees.

  8. Precise measurement of cosmic ray fluxes with the AMS-02 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchi, Manuela

    2015-12-17

    The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer operating onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The main goals of the detector are the search for antimatter and dark matter in space, as well as the measurement of cosmic ray composition and flux. In this document we present precise measurements of cosmic ray positrons, electrons and protons, collected during the first 30 months of operations.

  9. Precision measurements of nuclear CR energy spectra and composition with the AMS-02 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiandrini, E.

    2016-05-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 02 (AMS-02) is a large acceptance high-energy physics experiment operating since May 2011 on board the International Space Station. More than 60 billion events have been collected by the instrument in the first four years of operation. AMS-02 offers a unique opportunity to study the Cosmic Rays (CRs) since it measures the spectra of all the species simultaneously. We report on the precision measurements of primary and secondary nuclear spectra, in the GeV-TeV energy interval. These measurements allow for the first time a detailed study of the spectral index variation with rigidity providing a new insight on the origin and propagation of CR.

  10. Ultra-separation of nickel from copper metal for the measurement of 63Ni by AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, A. A.; Hainsworth, L. J.; McAninch, J. E.; Leivers, M. R.; Jones, P. R.; Proctor, I. D.; Straume, T.

    1997-03-01

    Measurements of 63Ni (t{1}/{2} = 100 yr) produced by the reaction 63Cu(n,p)63Ni could be used in the assessment of fast-neutron fluence from the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Such measurements would add new information to help resolve the current discrepancy between measured thermal neutron activation values and those calculated with the DS86 dosimetry system. It has been estimated that the 63Ni production at 5 m from the hypocenter was (1.4 ± 0.1) × 107 atoms/g Cu. Because of its sensitivity, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is ideal for measurements at this low level. However, 63Ni has to be separated from large amounts of stable atomic isobar 63Cu (69% of pure Cu). In this study, a procedure is presented for the electrochemical separation of ultra-low amounts of Ni from Cu. The method was developed using samples of electrical Cu wire that were irradiated with fission neutrons from a 252Cf source. The wire samples were electrochemically dissolved in a solution containing 1 mg of Ni carrier. The Cu was selectively deposited on a cathode at controlled potential. Measurements of total Ni after electroseparation indicate ˜ 100% carrier recovery. To prevent Cu contamination, AMS targets were prepared by nickel carbonyl generation. The AMS results show a successful quantitative separation of ˜ 107 atoms of 63Ni from 2-20 g samples of Cu.

  11. Direct high-precision mass measurements on Am241,243, Pu244, and Cf249

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibach, M.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Grund, J.; Nagy, Sz.; Nitsche, H.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Renisch, D.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Schneider, F.; Smorra, C.; Vieten, J.; Wang, M.; Wendt, K.

    2014-06-01

    The absolute masses of four long-lived transuranium nuclides, Am241,243, Pu244, Pu244, and Cf249, in the vicinity of the deformed N =152 neutron shell closure have been measured directly with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP. Our measurements confirm the AME2012 mass values of Am241,243 and Pu244 within one standard deviation, which were indirectly determined, by decay spectroscopy studies. In the case of the Cf249 mass, a discrepancy of more than three standard deviations has been observed, affecting absolute masses even in the superheavy element region. The implementation of the mass values into the AME2012 network yields a reduced mass uncertainty for 84 nuclides, particularly for Pu244 and its strongly correlated α decay chains.

  12. FM-to-AM conversion measurement for high power nanosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PENNINCKX, Denis

    2016-03-01

    Through numerical simulations we show that the spectral content of amplitude modulations induced by a transfer function converting frequency modulations required for high-power lasers may be very broad. Hence, measurement of FM-to-AM conversion should be first done in the spectral domain to remove unwanted transfer functions at low frequency scale and then in the time domain to obtain an accurate value.

  13. A calibration phantom for direct, in vivo measurement of 241Am in the axillary lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Rachel; Lobaugh, Megan; Spitz, Henry; Glover, Samuel; Hickman, David

    2009-09-01

    A calibration phantom was developed at the University of Cincinnati (UC) to determine detection efficiency and estimate the quantity of activity deposited in the axillary lymph nodes of a worker who had unknowingly sustained a wound contaminated with 241Am at some distant time in the past. This paper describes how the Livermore Torso Phantom was modified for calibrating direct, in vivo measurements of 241Am deposited in the axillary lymph nodes. Modifications involved milling a pair of parallel, flat bottom, cylindrical holes into the left and right shoulders (below the humeral head) of the Livermore Torso Phantom in which solid, 1.40-cm-diameter cylindrical rods were inserted. Each rod was fabricated using a muscle tissue substitute. One end of each rod contained a precisely known quantity of Am sealed in a 1-cm-diameter, 2.54-cm-deep well to simulate the axillary lymph nodes when inserted into the modified Livermore Torso Phantom. The fixed locations for the axillary lymph nodes in the phantom were determined according to the position of the Level I and the combined Level II + III axillary lymph nodes reported in the literature. Discrete calibration measurements for 241Am in the simulated axillary lymph nodes located in the right and left sides of the thorax were performed using pairs of high-resolution germanium detectors at UC and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The percent efficiency for measuring the 59.5 keV photon from Am deposited in the right and left axillary lymph nodes using a pair of 3,000 mm2 detectors is 2.60 +/- 0.03 counts gamma-1 and 5.45 +/- 0.07 counts gamma-1, respectively. Activity deposited in the right and left axillary lymph nodes was found to contribute 12.5% and 19.7%, respectively, to a lung measurement and 1.2% and 0.2%, respectively, to a liver measurement. Thus, radioactive material mobilized from a wound in a finger or hand and deposited in the axillary lymph nodes has been shown to confound results of a direct, in vivo

  14. Multiple dating approach (14C, U/Th and 36Cl) of tsunami-transported reef-top megaclasts on Bonaire (Leeward Antilles) - potential and current limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixhon, Gilles; May, Simon Matthias; Engel, Max; Mechernich, Silke; Keulertz, Rebecca; Schroeder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Fohlmeister, Jens; Frank, Norbert; Dunai, Tibor; Brueckner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Coastal hazard assessment depends on reliable information on the magnitude and frequency of past high-energy wave events (EWE: tsunamis, storms). For this purpose onshore sedimentary records represent promising geo-archives for the mid- and late-Holocene EWE history. In comparison to fine-grained sediments which have been extensively studied in the recent past, supralittoral megaclasts are less investigated, essentially due to the difficulties related to the dating of corresponding depositional events, and thus their limited value for inferring the timing of major events. On Bonaire (Leeward Antilles, Caribbean), supratidal coarse-clast deposits form prominent landforms all around the island. Fields of large boulders (up to 150 t) are among the best-studied reef-top megaclasts worldwide. Transport by Holocene tsunamis is assumed at least for the largest boulders (Engel and May, 2012). Although a large dataset of 14C and electron spin resonance (ESR) ages is available for major coral rubble ridges and ramparts, showing some age clusters during the Late Holocene, it is still debated whether these data reflect the timing of major depositional/transport event(s), and how these data sets are biased by reworking of coral fragments. In addition, different processes may be responsible for the deposition of the coral rubble ridges and ramparts (storm) and the solitary megaclasts (tsunami). As an attempt to overcome the current challenges for dating the dislocation of the megaclasts, three distinct dating methods were implemented: (i) 14C dating of boring bivalves (Lithophaga) attached to the boulders; (ii) uranium-series (U/Th) dating of post-depositional, secondary calcitic flowstone at the underside of the boulders; and (iii) surface exposure dating of overturned boulders via 36Cl concentration measurements in corals. The three 14C datings yield age estimates >37 ka, i.e. most probably beyond the applicability of the method, which sheds doubt on the usefulness of this

  15. Estimating Am-241 activity in the body: comparison of direct measurements and radiochemical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Timothy P.; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; James, Anthony C.

    2009-06-01

    The assessment of dose and ultimately the health risk from intakes of radioactive materials begins with estimating the amount actually taken into the body. An accurate estimate provides the basis to best assess the distribution in the body, the resulting dose, and ultimately the health risk. This study continues the time-honored practice of evaluating the accuracy of results obtained using in vivo measurement methods and techniques. Results from the radiochemical analyses of the 241Am activity content of tissues and organs from four donors to the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries were compared to the results from direct measurements of radioactive material in the body performed in vivo and post mortem. Two were whole body donations and two were partial body donations The skeleton was the organ with the highest deposition of 241Am activity in all four cases. The activities ranged from 30 Bq to 300 Bq. The skeletal estimates obtained from measurements over the forehead were within 20% of the radiochemistry results in three cases and differed by 78% in one case. The 241Am lung activity estimates ranged from 1 Bq to 30 Bq in the four cases. The results from the direct measurements were within 40% of the radiochemistry results in 3 cases and within a factor of 3 for the other case. The direct measurement estimates of liver activity ranged from 2 Bq to 60 Bq and were generally lower than the radiochemistry results. The results from this study suggest that the measurement methods and calibration techniques used at the In Vivo Radiobioassay and Research Facility to quantify the activity in the lungs, skeleton and liver are reasonable under the most challenging conditions where there is 241Am activity in multiple organs. These methods and techniques are comparable to those used at other Department of Energy sites. This suggests that the current in vivo methods and calibration techniques provide reasonable estimates of radioactive material in the body. Not

  16. Preliminary measurements on the new TOF system installed at the AMS beamline of INFN-LABEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, L.; Castelli, L.; Czelusniak, C.; Fedi, M. E.; Giuntini, L.; Liccioli, L.; Mandò, P. A.; Martini, M.; Mazzinghi, A.; Ruberto, C.; Schiavulli, L.; Sibilia, E.; Taccetti, F.

    2015-10-01

    A high resolution time of flight (TOF) system has been developed at LABEC, the 3 MV Tandem accelerator laboratory in Florence, in order to improve the sensitivity of AMS measurements on carbon samples with ultra-low concentration and also to measure other isotopes, such as 129I. The system can be employed to detect and identify residual interfering particles originated from the break-up of molecular isobars. The set-up has been specifically designed for low energy heavy ions: it consists of two identical time pick-off stations, each made up of a thin conductive foil and a Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) multiplier. The beamline is also equipped with a silicon detector, installed downstream the stop TOF station. In this paper the design of the new system and the implemented readout electronics are presented. The tests performed on the single time pick-off station are reported: they show that the maximum contribution to the timing resolution given by both the intrinsic MCP resolution and the electronics is ⩽500 ps (FWHM). For these tests, single particle pulsed beams of 2-5 MeV protons and 10 MeV 12C3+ ions, to simulate typical AMS conditions, were used. The preliminary TOF and TOF-E (TOF-energy) measurements performed with carbon beams after the installation of the new system on the AMS beam line are also discussed. These measurements were performed using the foil-MCP as the start stage and a silicon detector as the stop stage. The spectra acquired with carbon ions suggest the presence of a small residual background from neighboring masses reaching the end of the beamline with the same energy as the rare isotope.

  17. 50 CFR 622.411 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and... measures (AMs). For recreational and commercial spiny lobster landings combined, the ACL is 7.32 million...

  18. 50 CFR 622.411 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and... measures (AMs). For recreational and commercial spiny lobster landings combined, the ACL is 7.32 million...

  19. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Woolford, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ˜1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ˜17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ˜17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ˜35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  20. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Woolford, Jeff M

    2015-01-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ∼1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ∼17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ∼17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ∼35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  1. The rock avalanche of the Mt. Peron (Eastern Alps, Italy): new insights from 36Cl exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Silvana; Ivy-ochs, Susan; Alfimov, Vasili; Vockenhuber, %Christof; Surian, Nicola; Campedel, Paolo; Rigo, Manuel; Viganò, Alfio; De Zorzi, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    In the Late Pleistocene, in the southern side of the Eastern Alps (Veneto region, Italy), when the glacier tongues retreated from the end moraine system areas towards the Dolomitic region, large rock avalanches took place. In the Belluno Valley, occupied by the Piave river, the left side is represented by the Belluno Prealps range, corresponding to the northern flank of a km-scale WSW-ENE oriented alpine syncline formed by rocks from Late Triassic to Late Tertiary in age. The Mt. Peron, belonging to this mountain range, shows its southern lower slope covered by debris cones with scattered boulders and its higher slope, corresponding to the scarp, made of vertical rock strata. At the foot of Mt. Peron, at a distance varying from 500 to 4500 m, there is a 4.5 km2 fan like area delimited by a perimeter of about 15 km. This is a hilly area of poortly sorted, chaotic deposits composed of heterogeneous debris, sandy and silty gravels, angular blocks and very large boulders of carbonatic rocks up to 20 m in diameter. The average thickness of the deposit was estimated to be 80 m, with maximum of 120 m. According to previous works, the main event occurred during the first phases of deglaciation, between 17,000 and 15,000 years BP. Popular stories narrate about two legendary villages destroyed by a mass of stones rolling down in the valley. This is confirmed by archeological findings in the Piave valley which indicate the presence of almost one pre-historic settlement dating 40000-20000 years a B.P., (i.e. before the Last Glacial Maximum).. Recent 36Cl exposure dating have yielded historical ages for both the boulders at the foot of the Mt Peron and those located a few km far from the main scarp. According to these exposure ages we can not exclude the hypothesis that earthquakes related to the Venetian faults could have played a key role for triggering of the rock avalanche and that the main gravitational event took place in historical times rather than during the

  2. The U.S. Department of Energy's Aerial Measuring System (AMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Marianno

    2008-03-01

    For nearly 40 years, aerial radiological search and survey missions have been performed by the United States Department of Energy's (USDOE) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL). Originally created in 1967 as Aerial Measurement Operations (AMO), the AMS mission has expanded to include acquiring baseline measurements, performing periodic area monitoring, and responding to radiological emergencies. In an accident scenario, AMS fixed-wing and/or rotary-wing systems can be deployed to map radiological deposition. A fixed-wing system is on standby twenty-fours per day, seven days per week and can be deployed within four hours of notification. It can quickly evaluate high levels of radiation which may constitute immediate health risks. To accomplish its mission the fixed-wing aircraft utilizes the Spectral Aerial Radiological Computer System (SPARCS) which records gross count and spectral information. Data from SPARCS is telemetered to ground stations and secure websites where it can be viewed and evaluated in near-real time. The rotary-wing system deploys following the critical phase of an accident and supports the DOE's Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) in determining long term consequences of the accident. The rotary wing aircraft utilizes the Radiation and Environmental Data Acquisition and Recording System (REDAR). A 25-liter sodium iodide (NaI) spectral system and precise positioning allow distributed man-made activity of less than 1 {micro}R/hr at ground level to be precisely mapped. This talk will discuss history of the USDOE's AMS program and its current efforts to conduct baseline aerial surveys of some US cities.

  3. Fully automated measurement of field-dependent AMS using MFK1-FA Kappabridge equipped with 3D rotator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadima, Martin; Studynka, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Low-field magnetic susceptibility of paramagnetic and diamagnetic minerals is field-independent by definition being also field-independent in pure magnetite. On the other hand, in pyrrhotite, hematite and high-Ti titanomagnetite it may be clearly field-dependent. Consequently, the field-dependent AMS enables the magnetic fabric of the latter group of minerals to be separated from the whole-rock AMS. The methods for the determination of the field-dependent AMS consist of separate measurements of each specimen in several fields within the Rayleigh Law range and subsequent processing in which the field-independent and field-dependent AMS components are calculated. The disadvantage of this technique is that each specimen must be measured several times, which is relatively laborious and time consuming. Recently, a new 3D rotator was developed for the MFK1-FA Kappabridge, which rotates the specimen simultaneously about two axes with different velocities. The measurement is fully automated in such a way that, once the specimen is inserted into the rotator, it requires no additional manipulation to measure the full AMS tensor. Consequently, the 3D rotator enables to measure the AMS tensors in the pre-set field intensities without any operator interference. Whole procedure is controlled by newly developed Safyr5 software; once the measurements are finished, the acquired data are immediately processed and can be visualized in a standard way.

  4. Implications of the first AMS-02 measurement for dark matter annihilation and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hong-Bo; Wu, Yue-Liang; Zhou, Yu-Feng E-mail: ylwu@itp.ac.cn

    2013-11-01

    In light of the first measurement of the positron fraction by the AMS-02 experiment, we perform a detailed global analysis on the interpretation of the latest data of PAMELA, Fermi-LAT, and AMS-02 in terms of dark matter (DM) annihilation and decay in various propagation models. The allowed regions for the DM particle mass and annihilation cross section or decay life-time are obtained for channels with leptonic final states: 2e, 2μ, 2τ, 4e, 4μ and 4τ. We show that for the conventional astrophysical background the AMS-02 positron fraction data alone favour a DM particle mass ∼ 500(800) GeV if DM particles annihilate dominantly into 2μ(4μ) final states, which is significantly lower than that favoured by the Fermi-LAT data of the total flux of electrons and positrons. The allowed regions by the two experiments do not overlap at a high confidence level (99.99999%C.L.). We consider a number of propagation models with different halo height Z{sub h}, diffusion parameters D{sub 0} and δ{sub 1/2}, and power indices of primary nucleon sources γ{sub p1/p2}. The normalization and the slope of the electron background are also allowed to vary. We find that the tension between the two experiments can be only slightly reduced in the propagation model with large Z{sub h} and D{sub 0}. The consistency of fit is improved for annihilation channels with 2τ and 4τ final states which favour TeV scale DM particle with large cross sections above ∼ 10{sup −23} cm{sup 3}s{sup −1}. In all the considered leptonic channels, the current data favour the scenario of DM annihilation over DM decay. In the decay scenario, the charge asymmetric DM decay is slightly favoured.

  5. Spectroscopic Measurement of L X-Rays Emitted by 241Am Source by TES Microcalorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, M.; Yamaguchi, K.; Maehata, K.; Iyomoto, N.; Ishibashi, K.; Takasaki, K.; Nakamura, K.; Tanaka, K.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Nondestructive plutonium monitoring during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and in mixed-oxide-fuel fabrication facilities is expected to require spectroscopic measurements of L X-rays ranging from 10 to 20 keV. To this end, L X-ray emission intensities of transuranium elements will be important parameters in estimating the plutonium isotopic composition from L X-ray spectra. However, owing to fine structure within the L X-ray spectra, significant discrepancies exist among theoretical values, reference and experimental data concerning these emission intensities. To obtain better spectroscopic measurements, we used a TES microcalorimeter to get the energy spectrum of L X-rays emitted by 237Np resulting from α-decay of a 241Am source. Values for the L X-ray emission intensities were estimated by analyzing the spectral data and compared with previous data. We advocate for improvements in evaluation of emission intensities given the enhanced precision afforded by TES microcalorimetry.

  6. Late Pleistocene piedmont glaciations in the Eastern Mediterranean; insights from cosmogenic 36Cl dating of hummocky moraines in southern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çiner, Attila; Sarıkaya, Mehmet Akif; Yıldırım, Cengiz

    2015-05-01

    We report the presence of Late Pleistocene piedmont glaciers represented by the largest hummocky moraine field observed in the Eastern Mediterranean. The piedmont glaciers originated from the Geyikdağ ice cap (∼40 km2), situated between 2350 and 2650 m above sea level (a.s.l.) (Central Tauride Mountains of Turkey), and deeply carved the north-facing hillslopes before reaching the Namaras Valley (2000-2050 m a.s.l). The hummocky moraines resulted from in-situ deposition of stagnant glacier ice where debris cover was heterogeneously distributed on the glacier surface. Thirty-four boulders from hummocky, disintegration, lateral and terminal moraines from the Namaras Valley and the tributary Susam Valley (2100-2200 m a.s.l.) were dated by cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating. The moraine ages indicate three phases of deglaciation during the Late Pleistocene. The oldest deglaciation occurred in the Namaras Valley at 18.0 ± 1.1 ka (ka: thousand years ago) towards the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and is recorded entirely by hummocky moraines. We speculate that hummocky moraine forming processes with cycles of relief inversion gave rise to boulder apparent ages up to a few thousand years younger in our study area. Therefore, 18.0 ± 1.1 ka should be regarded as a minimum age with a probable true age much closer to the local-LGM values (∼20 ka) as observed in the surrounding mountains. Paleo-piedmont glaciers also deposited several lateral moraines that are ∼50 m higher than the hummocky moraines. Although the lateral moraines probably represent the build-up and the hummocky moraines the final phase of the same local-LGM-pulse, both lateral moraines started to retreat from the Late-glacial (14.0 ± 2.7 ka) and gradually disappeared by mid-Holocene (5.2 ± 1.0 ka), encompassing the Younger Dryas (YD) stadial. In the Susam Valley, the Late-glacial is represented by a terminal moraine (13.4 ± 1.5 ka). The glacier retreat was very fast as indicated by an

  7. Methods for high precision 14C AMS measurement of atmospheric CO2 at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Graven, H D; Guilderson, T P; Keeling, R F

    2006-10-18

    Development of {sup 14}C analysis with precision better than 2{per_thousand} has the potential to expand the utility of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} measurements for carbon cycle investigations as atmospheric gradients currently approach traditional measurement precision of 2-5{per_thousand}. The AMS facility at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, produces high and stable beam currents that enable efficient acquisition times for large numbers of {sup 14}C counts. One million {sup 14}C atoms can be detected in approximately 25 minutes, suggesting that near 1{per_thousand} counting precision is economically feasible at LLNL. The overall uncertainty in measured values is ultimately determined by the variation between measured ratios in several sputtering periods of the same sample and by the reproducibility of replicate samples. Experiments on the collection of one million counts on replicate samples of CO{sub 2} extracted from a whole air cylinder show a standard deviation of 1.7{per_thousand} in 36 samples measured over several wheels. This precision may be limited by the reproducibility of Oxalic Acid I standard samples, which is considerably poorer. We outline the procedures for high-precision sample handling and analysis that have enabled reproducibility in the cylinder extraction samples at the <2{per_thousand} level and describe future directions to continue increasing measurement precision at LLNL.

  8. Preliminary studies of Pu measurement by AMS using PuF4-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.-L.; Kieser, W. E.; Dai, X.; Priest, N. D.; Kramer-Tremblay, S.; Eliades, J.; Litherland, A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Using targets made with PbF2 matrices, Cs+ sputter sources have been found to yield element-specific patterns of molecular fluoride anions that may be used to enhance the mass spectrometry of certain elements. While the patterns are found similar for all lanthanides and the heavier actinides, substantial differences are found for the lighter actinides. In the case of Pu and U, of all their fluoride anions, PuF4- and UF5- are produced with the highest yield. Mass spectrometry of Pu using PuF4- can provide a partial chemical separation in the ion source, as the yield of UF4- is two orders of magnitude lower than that of the UF5-. This, in turn, reduces scattering of U ions when measuring Pu in the high-energy components of the AMS system. This instrumental reduction of U is advantageous in cases that require rapid Pu analyses as it simplifies the chemistry of Pu/U separation and other steps in the sample processing. In this procedure, Pu can be co-precipitated with another element as a fluoride, which is then mixed with a sufficient amount of PbF2 powder to form a sputter target. A series of tests were carried out and NdF3 was identified as one such suitable carrier. Measurements of Pu+3 at ∼0.85 MV terminal voltage showed that the 239,240,241,242Pu isotopes can be detected with a manageably low background, high efficiency and a 1 fg detection limit. Preliminary tests were carried out using the existing IsoTrace AMS system, modified only by the addition of electronic controls to automatically adjust the terminal voltage and all high-energy electric analyzers, along with the injection magnet bouncer. However, both the injection and detection systems were not designed for this task, so considerable room is available for reducing the detection limit into the ag range with modern AMS systems - such as the one being commissioned at University of Ottawa.

  9. Vibrations and reorientations of NH3 molecules in [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2 studied by infrared spectroscopy and theoretical (DFT) calculations.

    PubMed

    Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Hetmańczyk, Łukasz; Migdał-Mikuli, Anna; Mikuli, Edward

    2015-02-01

    The vibrational and reorientational motions of NH3 ligands and ClO4(-) anions were investigated by Fourier transform middle-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) in the high- and low-temperature phases of [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2. The temperature dependencies of full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the infrared bands at: 591 and 3385cm(-1), associated with: ρr(NH3) and νas(N-H) modes, respectively, indicate that there exist fast (correlation times τR≈10(-12)-10(-13)s) reorientational motions of NH3 ligands, with a mean values of activation energies: 7.8 and 4.5kJmol(-1), in the phase I and II, respectively. These reorientational motions of NH3 ligands are only slightly disturbed in the phase transition region and do not significantly contribute to the phase transition mechanism. Fourier transform far-infrared and middle-infrared spectra with decreasing of temperature indicated characteristic changes at the vicinity of PT at TC(c)=137.6K (on cooling), which suggested lowering of the crystal structure symmetry. Infrared spectra of [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2 were recorded and interpreted by comparison with respective theoretical spectra calculated using DFT method (B3LYP functional, LANL2DZ ECP basis set (on Mn atom) and 6-311+G(d,p) basis set (on H, N, Cl, O atoms) for the isolated equilibrium two models (Model 1 - separate isolated [Mn(NH3)6](2+) cation and ClO4(-) anion and Model 2 - [Mn(NH3)6(ClO4)2] complex system). Calculated optical spectra show a good agreement with the experimental infrared spectra (FT-FIR and FT-MIR) for the both models. PMID:25459713

  10. Vibrations and reorientations of NH3 molecules in [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2 studied by infrared spectroscopy and theoretical (DFT) calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Hetmańczyk, Łukasz; Migdał-Mikuli, Anna; Mikuli, Edward

    2015-02-01

    The vibrational and reorientational motions of NH3 ligands and ClO4- anions were investigated by Fourier transform middle-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) in the high- and low-temperature phases of [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2. The temperature dependencies of full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the infrared bands at: 591 and 3385 cm-1, associated with: ρr(NH3) and νas(N-H) modes, respectively, indicate that there exist fast (correlation times τR ≈ 10-12-10-13 s) reorientational motions of NH3 ligands, with a mean values of activation energies: 7.8 and 4.5 kJ mol-1, in the phase I and II, respectively. These reorientational motions of NH3 ligands are only slightly disturbed in the phase transition region and do not significantly contribute to the phase transition mechanism. Fourier transform far-infrared and middle-infrared spectra with decreasing of temperature indicated characteristic changes at the vicinity of PT at TCc = 137.6 K (on cooling), which suggested lowering of the crystal structure symmetry. Infrared spectra of [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2 were recorded and interpreted by comparison with respective theoretical spectra calculated using DFT method (B3LYP functional, LANL2DZ ECP basis set (on Mn atom) and 6-311 + G(d,p) basis set (on H, N, Cl, O atoms) for the isolated equilibrium two models (Model 1 - separate isolated [Mn(NH3)6]2+ cation and ClO4- anion and Model 2 - [Mn(NH3)6(ClO4)2] complex system). Calculated optical spectra show a good agreement with the experimental infrared spectra (FT-FIR and FT-MIR) for the both models.

  11. Ion irradiation of 37Cl implanted nuclear graphite: Effect of the energy deposition on the chlorine behavior and consequences for the mobility of 36Cl in irradiated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Bérerd, N.; Pipon, Y.; Blondel, A.; Galy, N.; Sainsot, P.; Rouzaud, J.-N.; Deldicque, D.

    2015-09-01

    Graphite is used in many types of nuclear reactors due to its ability to slow down fast neutrons without capturing them. Whatever the reactor design, the irradiated graphite waste management has to be faced sooner or later regarding the production of long lived or dose determining radioactive species such as 14C, 3H or 36Cl. The first carbon dioxide cooled, graphite moderated nuclear reactors resulted in a huge quantity of irradiated graphite waste for which the management needs a previous assessment of the radioactive inventory and the radionuclide's location and speciation. As the detection limits of usual spectroscopic methods are generally not adequate to detect the low concentration levels (<1 ppm) of the radionuclides, we used an indirect approach based on the implantation of 37Cl, to simulate the presence of 36Cl. Our previous studies show that temperature is one of the main factors to be considered regarding the structural evolution of nuclear graphite and chlorine mobility during reactor operation. However, thermal release of chlorine cannot be solely responsible for the depletion of the 36Cl inventory. We propose in this paper to study the impact of irradiation and its synergetic effects with temperature on chlorine release. Indeed, the collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic collisions. However, a small part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the lattice through electronic excitation. This paper aims at elucidating the effects of the different irradiation regimes (ballistic and electronic) using ion irradiation, on the mobility of implanted 37Cl, taking into account the initial disorder level of the nuclear graphite.

  12. Aerial Measuring System (AMS)/Israel Atomic Energy Commission (IAEC) Joint Comparison Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wasiolek, P.; Halevy, I.

    2013-12-23

    Under the 13th Bilateral Meeting to Combat Nuclear Terrorism conducted on January 8–9, 2013, the committee approved the development of a cost-effective proposal to conduct a Comparison Study of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Israel Atomic Energy Commission (IAEC). The study was to be held at the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), Nellis Air Force Base, Las Vegas, Nevada, with measurements at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The goal of the AMS and the IAEC joint survey was to compare the responses of the two agencies’ aerial radiation detection systems to varied radioactive surface contamination levels and isotopic composition experienced at the NNSS, and the differing data processing techniques utilized by the respective teams. Considering that for the comparison both teams were using custom designed and built systems, the main focus of the short campaign was to investigate the impact of the detector size and data analysis techniques used by both teams. The AMS system, SPectral Advanced Radiological Computer System, Model A (SPARCS-A), designed and built by RSL, incorporates four different size sodium iodide (NaI) crystals: 1" × 1", 2" × 4" × 4", 2" × 4" ×16", and an “up-looking” 2" × 4" × 4". The Israel AMS System, Air RAM 2000, was designed by the IAEC Nuclear Research Center – Negev (NRCN) and built commercially by ROTEM Industries (Israel) and incorporates two 2" diameter × 2" long NaI crystals. The operational comparison was conducted at RSL-Nellis in Las Vegas, Nevada, during week of June 24–27, 2013. The Israeli system, Air RAM 2000, was shipped to RSL-Nellis and mounted together with the DOE SPARCS on a DOE Bell-412 helicopter for a series of aerial comparison measurements at local test ranges, including the Desert Rock Airport and Area 3 at the NNSS. A 4-person Israeli team from the IAEC NRCN supported the activity together with 11

  13. Seismic slip history of the Pizzalto fault (central Apennines, Italy) using in situ-produced 36Cl cosmic ray exposure dating and rare earth element concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesson, J.; Pace, B.; Benedetti, L.; Visini, F.; Delli Rocioli, M.; Arnold, M.; Aumaître, G.; Bourlès, D. L.; Keddadouche, K.

    2016-03-01

    Morphological and geological observations reveal that most Apenninic faults are highly segmented and that the majority of the fault segments are less than 10 km long. Although these faults have undergone numerous paleoseismological investigations, quantitative data remain crucially lacking for a large number of fault segments. Because such data are essential to understanding how these faults have ruptured and interacted in the past and how they might behave in the future, we investigated the Holocene seismic history of the Pizzalto normal fault, a 13 km long fault segment belonging to the Pizzalto-Rotella-Aremogna fault system in the Apennines. We collected 44 samples from the Pizzalto fault plane exhumed during the Holocene and analyzed the 36Cl and rare earth element (REE) contents. Together, the 36Cl and REE concentrations show that at least six events have exhumed 4.4 m of the fault scarp between 3 and 1 ka, with slip per event values ranging from 0.3 to 1.2 m. No major events have been detected over the last 1 kyr. The Rotella-Aremogna-Pizzalto fault system has a clustered earthquake behavior with a mean recurrence time of 1.2 kyr and a low to moderate probability (ranging from 4% to 26%) of earthquake occurrence over the next 50 years.

  14. Preparing and measuring ultra-small radiocarbon samples with the ARTEMIS AMS facility in Saclay, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delqué-Količ, E.; Comby-Zerbino, C.; Ferkane, S.; Moreau, C.; Dumoulin, J. P.; Caffy, I.; Souprayen, C.; Quilès, A.; Bavay, D.; Hain, S.; Setti, V.

    2013-01-01

    The ARTEMIS facility in Saclay France measures, on average, 4500 samples a year for French organizations working in an array of fields, including environmental sciences, archeology and hydrology. In response to an increasing demand for the isolation of specific soil compounds and organic water fractions, we were motivated to evaluate our ability to reduce microgram samples using our standard graphitization lines and to measure the graphite thus obtained with our 3MV NEC Pelletron AMS. Our reduction facility consists of two fully automated graphitization lines. Each line has 12 reduction reactors with a reduction volume of 18 ml for the first line and 12 ml for the second. Under routine conditions, we determined that we could reduce the samples down to 10 μg of carbon, even if the graphitization yield is consequently affected by the lower sample mass. Our results when testing different Fe/C ratios suggest that an amount of 1.5 mg of Fe powder was ideal (instead of lower amounts of catalyst) to prevent the sample from deteriorating too quickly under the Cs+ beam, and to facilitate pressing procedures. Several sets of microsamples produced from HOxI standard, international references and backgrounds were measured. When measuring 14C-free wood charcoal and HOxI samples we determined that our modern and dead blanks, due to the various preparation steps, were of 1.1 ± 0.8 and 0.2 ± 0.1 μg, respectively. The results presented here were obtained for IAEA-C1, 14C-free wood, IAEA-C6, IAEA-C2 and FIRI C.

  15. 50 CFR 622.496 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.496 Section 622.496 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  16. 50 CFR 622.439 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.439 Section 622.439 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  17. 50 CFR 622.457 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs). 622.457 Section 622.457 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  18. Separation of field-independent and field-dependent susceptibility tensors using a sequence of fully automated AMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studynka, J.; Chadima, M.; Hrouda, F.; Suza, P.

    2013-12-01

    Low-field magnetic susceptibility of diamagnetic and paramagnetic minerals as well as that of pure magnetite and all single-domain ferromagnetic (s.l.) minerals is field-independent. In contrast, magnetic susceptibility of multi-domain pyrrhotite, hematite and titanomagnetite may significantly depend on the field intensity. Hence, the AMS data acquired in various fields have a great potential to separate the magnetic fabric carried by the latter group of minerals from the whole-rock fabric. The determination of the field variation of AMS consist of separate measurements of each sample in several fields within the Rayleigh Law range and subsequent processing in which the field-independent and field-dependent susceptibility tensors are calculated. The disadvantage of this technique is that each sample must be measured several times in various positions, which is relatively laborious and time consuming. Recently, a new 3D rotator was developed for the MFK1 Kappabridges which rotates the sample simultaneously about two axes with different velocities. The measurement is fully automated in such a way that, once the sample is mounted into the rotator, it requires no additional positioning to measure the full AMS tensor. The important advantage of the 3D rotator is that it enables to measure AMS in a sequence of pre-set field intensities without any operator manipulation. Whole procedure is computer-controlled and, once a sequence of measurements is finished, the acquired data are immediately processed and visualized. Examples of natural rocks demonstrating various types of field dependence of AMS are given.

  19. Further improvement for 10Be measurement on an upgraded compact AMS radiocarbon facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dongpo; Ding, Xingfang; Liu, Kexin; Müller, Arnold Milenko; Suter, Martin; Christl, Marcus; Zhou, Liping; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    The Peking University 500 kV NEC compact AMS radiocarbon facility (PKU-CAMS) has been modified in order to have additionally the possibility to measure 10Be. In the preliminary experiment a silicon nitride foil was mounted in front of the electrostatic deflector as passive boron degrader, and the original Si detector for radiocarbon detection was replaced by an ETHZ-designed high-resolution ΔE - Eres gas ionization chamber (GIC) for 10Be identification. This simple arrangement has yielded an overall 10Be transmission of 2.2% and a 10Be/9Be background level of 3.5 × 10-14. To further reduce the background and increase the transmission by re-focusing the 10Be ions, an additional 90° bending magnet with 350 mm radius was installed after the electrostatic deflector. The silicon detector was shifted slightly relative to its position of original NEC system setup in opposite direction of beam and can be lifted up manually without breaking vacuum when 10Be measurements are carried out. In this way the system can be easily and fast set up for 10Be without affecting any parameters for radiocarbon measurement. The gas detector for 10Be was mounted at the end of the beam line after the additional magnet. The lay-out of the upgraded spectrometer is very compact and does not require more space than the original instrument. Using this compact setup, the overall transmission for 10Be was doubled to 5-6% and the 10Be/9Be background level was reduced to radios as low as 2.4 × 10-15.

  20. Deriving earthquake history of the Knidos Fault Zone, SW Turkey, using cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating of the fault scarp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Cengiz; Ersen Aksoy, Murat; Akif Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tuysuz, Okan; Genc, S. Can; Ertekin Doksanalti, Mustafa; Sahin, Sefa; Benedetti, Lucilla; Tesson, Jim; Aster Team

    2016-04-01

    Formation of bedrock fault scarps in extensional provinces is a result of large and successive earthquakes that ruptured the surface several times. Extraction of seismic history of such faults is critical to understand the recurrence intervals and the magnitude of paleo-earthquakes and to better constrain the regional seismic hazard. Knidos on the Datca Peninsula (SW Turkey) is one of the largest cities of the antique times and sits on a terraced hill slope formed by en-echelon W-SW oriented normal faults. The Datça Peninsula constitutes the southern boundary of the Gulf of Gökova, one of the largest grabens developed on the southernmost part of the Western Anatolian Extensional Province. Our investigation relies on cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating of limestone faults scarps. This method is a powerful tool to reconstruct the seismic history of normal faults (e.g. Schlagenhauf et al 2010, Benedetti et al. 2013). We focus on one of the most prominent fault scarp (hereinafter Mezarlık Fault) of the Knidos fault zone cutting through the antique Knidos city. We collected 128 pieces of tablet size (10x20cm) 3-cm thick samples along the fault dip and opened 4 conventional paleoseismic trenches at the base of the fault scarp. Our 36Cl concentration profile indicates that 3 to 4 seismic events ruptured the Mezarlık Fault since Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The results from the paleoseismic trenching are also compatible with 36Cl results, indicating 3 or 4 seismic events that disturbed the colluvium deposited at the base of the scarp. Here we will present implications for the seismic history and the derived slip-rate of the Mezarlık Fault based on those results. This project is supported by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK, Grant number: 113Y436) and it was conducted with the Decision of the Council of Ministers with No. 2013/5387 on the date 30.09.2013 and was done with the permission of Knidos Presidency of excavation in

  1. Erosion rate study at the Allchar deposit (Macedonia) based on radioactive and stable cosmogenic nuclides (26 Al, 36 Cl, 3 He, and 21 Ne)

    PubMed Central

    Cvetković, V.; Niedermann, S.; Pejović, V.; Amthauer, G.; Boev, B.; Bosch, F.; Aničin, I.; Henning, W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper focuses on constraining the erosion rate in the area of the Allchar Sb‐As‐Tl‐Au deposit (Macedonia). It contains the largest known reserves of lorandite (TlAsS2), which is essential for the LORanditeEXperiment (LOREX), aimed at determining the long‐term solar neutrino flux. Because the erosion history of the Allchar area is crucial for the success of LOREX, we applied terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides including both radioactive (26Al and 36Cl) and stable (3He and 21Ne) nuclides in quartz, dolomite/calcite, sanidine, and diopside. The obtained results suggest that there is accordance in the values obtained by applying 26Al, 36Cl, and 21Ne for around 85% of the entire sample collection, with resulting erosion rates varying from several tens of m/Ma to ∼165 m/Ma. The samples from four locations (L‐8 CD, L1b/R, L1c/R, and L‐4/ADR) give erosion rates between 300 and 400 m/Ma. Although these localities reveal remarkably higher values, which may be explained by burial events that occurred in part of Allchar, the erosion rate estimates mostly in the range between 50 and 100 m/Ma. This range further enables us to estimate the vertical erosion rate values for the two main ore bodies Crven Dol and Centralni Deo. We also estimate that the lower and upper limits of average paleo‐depths for the ore body Centralni Deo from 4.3 Ma to the present are 250–290 and 750–790 m, respectively, whereas the upper limit of paleo‐depth for the ore body Crven Dol over the same geological age is 860 m. The estimated paleo‐depth values allow estimating the relative contributions of 205Pb derived from pp‐neutrino and fast cosmic‐ray muons, respectively, which is an important prerequisite for the LOREX experiment. PMID:27587984

  2. Erosion rate study at the Allchar deposit (Macedonia) based on radioactive and stable cosmogenic nuclides (26Al, 36Cl, 3He, and 21Ne)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavićević, M. K.; Cvetković, V.; Niedermann, S.; Pejović, V.; Amthauer, G.; Boev, B.; Bosch, F.; Aničin, I.; Henning, W. F.

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on constraining the erosion rate in the area of the Allchar Sb-As-Tl-Au deposit (Macedonia). It contains the largest known reserves of lorandite (TlAsS2), which is essential for the LORanditeEXperiment (LOREX), aimed at determining the long-term solar neutrino flux. Because the erosion history of the Allchar area is crucial for the success of LOREX, we applied terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides including both radioactive (26Al and 36Cl) and stable (3He and 21Ne) nuclides in quartz, dolomite/calcite, sanidine, and diopside. The obtained results suggest that there is accordance in the values obtained by applying 26Al, 36Cl, and 21Ne for around 85% of the entire sample collection, with resulting erosion rates varying from several tens of m/Ma to ˜165 m/Ma. The samples from four locations (L-8 CD, L1b/R, L1c/R, and L-4/ADR) give erosion rates between 300 and 400 m/Ma. Although these localities reveal remarkably higher values, which may be explained by burial events that occurred in part of Allchar, the erosion rate estimates mostly in the range between 50 and 100 m/Ma. This range further enables us to estimate the vertical erosion rate values for the two main ore bodies Crven Dol and Centralni Deo. We also estimate that the lower and upper limits of average paleo-depths for the ore body Centralni Deo from 4.3 Ma to the present are 250-290 and 750-790 m, respectively, whereas the upper limit of paleo-depth for the ore body Crven Dol over the same geological age is 860 m. The estimated paleo-depth values allow estimating the relative contributions of 205Pb derived from pp-neutrino and fast cosmic-ray muons, respectively, which is an important prerequisite for the LOREX experiment.

  3. Collection and measurement of atmospheric contaminants during Skylab AM/MDA unmanned altitude chamber test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The analytical data obtained from both cryogenic and grab sampling of the atmosphere of the Skylab AM/MDA during an 84 hour unmanned chamber run are reported. The level of contaminants found at different points of the test chamber are tabulated. The results indicate that there was no clear trend of increasing or decreasing contaminant levels during the test run.

  4. 36Cl and41Ca depth profiles in a Hiroshima granite stone and the Dosimetry System 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühm, W.; Kato, K.; Korschinek, G.; Morinaga, H.; Nolte, E.

    1992-06-01

    For the first time a depth profile of the radioisotope41Ca produced by neutrons from the atomic bomb explosion of Hiroshima was measured. The measurements were performed at the Munich Tandem Laboratory via accelerator mass spectrometry. The41Ca depth profile is part of the evaluation to determine the neutron spectrum of the A-bomb which is basis of the Dosimetry System 1986.

  5. Angle Measurement System (AMS) for Establishing Model Pitch and Roll Zero, and Performing Single Axis Angle Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Bradley L.

    2007-01-01

    The angle measurement system (AMS) developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is a system for many uses. It was originally developed to check taper fits in the wind tunnel model support system. The system was further developed to measure simultaneous pitch and roll angles using 3 orthogonally mounted accelerometers (3-axis). This 3-axis arrangement is used as a transfer standard from the calibration standard to the wind tunnel facility. It is generally used to establish model pitch and roll zero and performs the in-situ calibration on model attitude devices. The AMS originally used a laptop computer running DOS based software but has recently been upgraded to operate in a windows environment. Other improvements have also been made to the software to enhance its accuracy and add features. This paper will discuss the accuracy and calibration methodologies used in this system and some of the features that have contributed to its popularity.

  6. Confronting recent AMS-02 positron fraction and Fermi-LAT extragalactic γ-ray background measurements with gravitino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carquín, Edson; Díaz, Marco A.; Gómez-Vargas, Germán A.; Panes, Boris; Viaux, Nicolás

    2016-03-01

    Recent positron flux fraction measurements in cosmic-rays (CR) made by the AMS-02 detector confirm and extend the evidence on the existence of a new (yet unknown) source of high energy electrons and positrons. We test the gravitino dark matter of bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetric models as this electrons/positrons source. Being a long lived weak-interacting and spin 3/2 particle, it offers several particularities which makes it an attractive dark matter candidate. We compute the electron, positron and γ-ray fluxes produced by each gravitino decay channel as it would be detected at the Earth's position. Combining the flux from the different decay modes we are able to reproduce AMS-02 measurements of the positron fraction, as well as the electron and positron fluxes, with a gravitino dark matter mass in the range 1-3 TeV and lifetime of ˜1.0-0.7×1026 s. The high statistics measurement of electron and positron fluxes, and the flattening in the behaviour of the positron fraction recently found by AMS-02 allow us to determine that the preferred gravitino decaying mode by the fit is W±τ∓, unlike previous analyses. Then we study the viability of these scenarios through their implication in γ-ray observations. For this we use the Extragalactic γ-ray Background recently reported by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration and a state-of-the-art model of its known contributors. Based on the γ-ray analysis we exclude the gravitino parameter space which provides an acceptable explanation of the AMS-02 data. Therefore, we conclude that the gravitino of bilinear R-parity violating models is ruled out as the unique primary source of electrons and positrons needed to explain the rise in the positron fraction.

  7. Evaluation of (241)Am deposited in different parts of the leg bones and skeleton to justify in vivo measurements of the knee for estimating total skeletal activity.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Majid; Brey, Richard R; Derryberry, DeWayne

    2013-01-01

    The percentage of Am deposited in different parts of leg bones relative to the total leg activity was calculated from radiochemical analysis results from six whole body donors participating in the U.S. Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR). In five of these six USTUR cases, the percentage of Am deposited in the knee region as well as in the entire leg was separately calculated relative to total skeletal activity. The purpose of this study is to find a region in the leg that is both suitable for in vivo measurement of Am deposited in the bones and has a good correlation with the total skeletal Am burden. In all analyzed cases, the femur was the bone with the highest percentage of Am deposited in the leg (48.8%). In the five cases that have complete whole skeletal analysis, the percentage of Am activity in the knee relative to entire skeletal activity was 4.8%, and the average value of its coefficient of variation was 10.6%. The percentage of Am in the leg relative to total skeletal activity was 20% with an average coefficient of variation of 13.63%. The Am activity in the knee as well as in the leg was strongly correlated (R = 99.5% and R = 99.1%, respectively) with the amount of Am activity in the entire skeleton using a simple linear relationship. The highest correlation was found between the amount of Am deposited in the knee and the amount of Am deposited in the entire skeleton. This correlation is important because it might enable an accurate assessment of the total skeletal Am burden to be performed from in vivo monitoring of the knee region. In all analyzed cases, an excellent correlation (R = 99.9%) was found between the amount of Am activity in the knee and the amount of Am activity in the entire leg. The results of this study suggest three simple models: two models to predict the total skeletal activity based on either leg or knee activity, and the third model to predict the total leg activity based on knee activity. The results also suggest that the

  8. Measurement of 239Pu in urine samples at ultra-trace levels using a 1 MV compact AMS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Mendoza, H.; Chamizo, E.; Yllera, A.; García-León, M.; Delgado, A.

    2010-04-01

    Routine bioassay monitoring of Pu intake in exposed workers of research and nuclear industry is usually performed by alpha spectrometry. This technique involves large sample volumes of urine and time-consuming preparative and counting protocols. Compact accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) facilities make feasible the determination of ultra low-level Pu activity concentrations and Pu isotopic ratios in biological samples (blood, urine and feces), being a rapid and cost-effective measurement technique. The plutonium results in urine samples presented here have been obtained on the 1 MV compact AMS system sited at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA), in Seville, Spain. In this work, a different methodological approach has been developed alternative to the "classical" preparation of urine samples for alpha spectrometry. The procedure avoids the Pu precipitation step, and involves acid sample evaporation and acid digestion in a microwave oven. Finally, purification of plutonium was achieved by using chromatography columns filled up with BioRad AG1X2 anion exchange resin (Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc.). The total time needed for analysis is about 10 h, unlike the "classical" methods based on alpha spectrometry which need about 1 week. At present, it has been demonstrated that this method allows quantifying 239Pu activity concentrations in urine of, at least, 30 μBq (13 fg 239Pu). We can conclude that the procedure would be suitable to perform in vitro routine bioassay measurements. Moreover, the innovative application of AMS opens new and interesting analytical alternatives in this field.

  9. Toward determining the uncertainties associated with the seismic histories retrieved from in situ 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide fault scarp dating: model reappraisal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesson, Jim; Benedetti, Lucilla

    2016-04-01

    How the past seismic activity of faults has varied over the last 20 ky is a crucial information for seismic hazard assessment and for the understanding of fault-interaction processes. Chlorine 36 in situ produced cosmogenic nuclide is increasingly used to retrieve past earthquakes histories on seismically exhumed limestone normal fault-scarps. Schlagenhauf et al. in 2010 developed a modeling code with a forward approach enabling the test of scenarii generated with a priori constraints (number of events, age and slip of events and pre-exposure time). The main shortcomings of this forward approach were the limited number of testable scenarii and the difficulty to derive the associated uncertainties. We present here a reappraisal methodology with an inverse approach using an optimization algorithm. This modelling approach enables 1-exploring the parameter space (age and slip of events), 2-finding the best scenario without a priori constraints and 3-precisely quantifying the associated uncertainties by determining the range of plausible models. Through a series of synthetic tests, we observed that the algorithm revealed a great capacity to constrain event slips and ages in a short computational time (several hours) with an accuracy that can reach 0.1 ky and 0.5 m for the age and slip of exhumation event, respectively. We also explore the influence of the pre-exposure history (amount of 36Cl accumulated when the sampled fault-plane was still buried under the colluvial wedge) and show that it has an important impact on the generated scenarii. This new modeling also allows now to accurately determining this parameter. Finally, the results show that any given [36Cl] profile results in a unique exhumation solution. We then apply this new model to the Magnola fault (Italy) dataset (Schlgenhauf et al. 2011). In agreement the previously published results, our model also results in 3 intense periods of seismic activity. However, the contribution of the pre-exposure history is

  10. Slip rate variability over the Holocene period in the middle Aterno fault system (Italy), retrieved from in situ 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide dating of exhumed fault-plane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesson, Jim; Benedetti, Lucilla; Pucci, Stefano; Villani, Fabio; Bourles, Didier; Keddadouche, Karim; Aumaitre, Georges

    2016-04-01

    Numerous numerical modeling studies have described and quantified non-stochastic spatio-temporal variations of earthquake occurrences within fault-networks, such as temporal clustered earthquakes or fault synchronization. However, very few long-enough paleoseismological and geological records are available to test those models against well-constrained dataset and thus account for such variability in the fault behavior. The prerequisites for improving our understanding of fault-rupture processes and thus our capacity to better assess seismic hazard are to acquire paleoseismological records that enable to derive both long-term slip-rate and short-term variability, on a large population of faults and/or within a fault system. These conditions met in Central Apennines, an extensional province where substantial paleoseismological dataset accurately described the Holocene seismic history of a dense network of normal faults. In this study we use 36Cl in situ cosmogenic nuclide to retrieve the seismic history of 3 faults belonging to the Middle Aterno fault system, from north to south: the Bazzano fault, the Roccapreturo fault and the Sulmona fault, a portion of which ruptured during the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake in Italy. We use a new modeling approach to determine the age and slip of past seismic events from the 36Cl concentration profiles. This model is based on an inverse approach and uses an optimization algorithm enabling all the parameter space (number of events, age and slip of events, pre-exposure) to be explored without a priori constraints (see Tesson et al. in session TS4.2/NH4.16/SM3.8). Using this new approach, we precisely determine the slip events occurrences over the Holocene period of those three faults. The results indicate that the three studied faults have ruptured between 4.5 and 5.5 ka, while the southernmost part of the system has also ruptured between at 1.5-3 ka (Sulmona fault and southern segment of Roccapreturo). Those results are in agreement

  11. The status of the AMS system at MALT in its 20th year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Chuichiro; Tsuchiya, Yoko S.; Ito, Seiji; Morita, Akira; Kusuno, Haruka; Miyake, Yasuto; Honda, Maki; Bautista VII, Angel T.; Kawamoto, Marina; Tokuyama, Hironori

    2015-10-01

    MALT (Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem accelerator, The University of Tokyo) was designed for a 'highly sensitive and precise elemental and isotopic microanalysis system' using an ion-beam generated by a Pelletron™ 5UD tandem accelerator. Currently, a multi-nuclide AMS (10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 129I) system is available and shows good performance in both precision and sensitivity, and the accelerator serves for PIXE, NRA, ERDA/RBS measurements as well. The total operation time of the accelerator has been over 95,000 hours since the start of MALT, 20 years ago. After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, many projects related to 129I have been conducted. The retrospective reconstruction of the 131I distribution at the accident from 129I is one of the most important missions for dose evaluation of the residents. The accident-derived 129I is also quite useful as a tracer for the general iodine dynamics in the environment. As a new tool for environmental assessment related to nuclear activity, including the global fallout from past atmospheric nuclear bomb testing, effects from the spent fuel reprocessing plant, and nuclear accidents such as Chernobyl and FDNPP, a 236U-AMS system is now under development.

  12. Exploring the cliff retreat response to base level change using SFM photogrammetry and cosmogenic 36Cl, Coal Cliffs, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, C.; Ward, D.

    2015-12-01

    The retreat of cliffbands is an important erosional process within the relatively undeformed sedimentary layers of the Colorado Plateau. Many iconic cliff landforms, including those of Monument Valley and Grand Canyon, are maintained by the interaction of these different rock types. A several kilometer thickness of incised sandstone and shale formations allow this region to act as a natural laboratory for studying the effects of variable lithologies on landscape evolution. Cliffband morphology and retreat on the plateau are controlled by several factors that may vary over time and space, including lithology, rate and distribution of rockfall debris, bedrock structure, baselevel, and climate. The relative importance of each factor in setting rates of cliff retreat are not entirely clear. Because regional headwaters are commonly sourced at cliff bases, these landforms are often the final and slowest areas to respond to baselevel changes, allowing rockfall and other local stochastic processes to overwhelm the erosional response to a baselevel forcing. The roles of these processes are difficult to assess because very few measurements of retreat rates over geomorphic timescales (103-106 years) have been produced, and thus changes in cliffband position through time have only been constrained by inferences made from the regional erosional history. Here, we control for climate and rock type by focusing on a continuous, 40-kilometer section of the lithologically consistent Coal Cliffs in Emery County, Utah. This area presents several natural experiments illustrating cliffband response to different forcings, including relict surfaces reflecting a baselevel change, drainage divides across which the adjustment to base level change may be asynchronous, a zone wherein the caprock layer has been removed by backscarp erosion, and a generally continuous gradient in cliff height from 50 to >200 meters along the cliffline. We employ terrestrial Cl36 exposure dating on terraces, talus

  13. Determination of the biogenic secondary organic aerosol fraction in the boreal forest by AMS and NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finessi, E.; Decesari, S.; Paglione, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Gilardoni, S.; Fuzzi, S.; Saarikoski, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Hillamo, R.; Allan, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Tiitta, P.; Laaksonen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Facchini, M. C.

    2011-08-01

    The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA) in the boreal forest, based on measurements including both filter sampling (PM1) and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS) were employed to measure on-line air mass concentrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for organic functional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed separately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrometer organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group compositions. The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic backbones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls). Such component, contributing on average 50 % of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component showed features consistent with less oxygenated aerosols and was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investigations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated to the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA), based on the comparison with spectral profiles obtained from

  14. Development of the MICROMEGAS detector for measuring the energy spectrum of alpha particles by using a 241Am source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Yoon; Ham, Cheolmin; Shin, Jae Won; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Andriamonje, Samuel; Kadi, Yacine; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    We have developed MICROMEGAS (MICRO MEsh GASeous) detectors for detecting a particles emitted from an 241Am standard source. The voltage applied to the ionization region of the detector is optimized for stable operation at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The energy of a particles from the 241Am source can be varied by changing the flight path of the a particle from the 241Am source. The channel numbers of the experimentally-measured pulse peak positions for different energies of the a particles are associated with the energies deposited by the alpha particles in the ionization region of the detector as calculated by using GEANT4 simulations; thus, the energy calibration of the MICROMEGAS detector for a particles is done. For the energy calibration, the thickness of the ionization region is adjusted so that a particles may completely stop in the ionization region and their kinetic energies are fully deposited in the region. The efficiency of our MICROMEGAS detector for a particles under the present conditions is found to be ~97.3%.

  15. Simultaneous factor analysis of organic particle and gas mass spectra: AMS and PTR-MS measurements at an urban site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowik, J. G.; Vlasenko, A.; McGuire, M.; Evans, G. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2009-03-01

    During the winter component of the SPORT (Seasonal Particle Observations in the Region of Toronto) field campaign, particulate non-refractory chemical composition and concentration of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), respectively. Sampling was performed in downtown Toronto ~15 m from a major road. The mass spectra from the AMS and PTR-MS were combined into a unified dataset, which was analyzed using positive matrix factorization (PMF). The two instruments were given equal weight in the PMF analysis by application of a scaling factor to the uncertainties of each instrument. A residual based metric, Δesc, was used to evaluate the relative weight. The PMF analysis yielded a 5-factor solution that included factors characteristic of regional transport, local traffic emissions, charbroiling, and oxidative processing. The unified dataset provides information on particle and VOC sources and atmospheric processing that cannot be obtained from the datasets of the individual instruments, such as apportionment of oxygenated VOCs to direct emission sources vs. secondary reaction products, improved correlation of oxygenated aerosol factors with photochemical age, and increased detail regarding the composition of oxygenated organic aerosol factors. This analysis represents the first application of PMF to a unified AMS/PTR-MS dataset.

  16. Simultaneous factor analysis of organic particle and gas mass spectra: AMS and PTR-MS measurements at an urban site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowik, J. G.; Vlasenko, A.; McGuire, M.; Evans, G. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2010-02-01

    During the winter component of the SPORT (Seasonal Particle Observations in the Region of Toronto) field campaign, particulate non-refractory chemical composition and concentration of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), respectively. Sampling was performed in downtown Toronto ~15 m from a major road. The mass spectra from the AMS and PTR-MS were combined into a unified dataset, which was analysed using positive matrix factorization (PMF). The two instruments were given balanced weight in the PMF analysis by the application of a scaling factor to the uncertainties of each instrument. A residual based metric, Δesc, was used to evaluate the instrument relative weight within each solution. The PMF analysis yielded a 6-factor solution that included factors characteristic of regional transport, local traffic emissions, charbroiling and oxidative processing. The unified dataset provides information on emission sources (particle and VOC) and atmospheric processing that cannot be obtained from the datasets of the individual instruments: (1) apportionment of oxygenated VOCs to either direct emission sources or secondary reaction products; (2) improved correlation of oxygenated aerosol factors with photochemical age; and (3) increased detail regarding the composition of oxygenated organic aerosol factors. This analysis represents the first application of PMF to a unified AMS/PTR-MS dataset.

  17. Measurement of fission yields from the 241Am(2nth,f) reaction at the Lohengrin Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouroux, Ch.; Blanc, A.; Bidaud, A.; Capellan, N.; Chabod, S.; Chebboubi, A.; Faust, H.; Kessedjian, G.; Köster, U.; Lemaitre, J.-F.; Letourneau, A.; Martin, F.; Materna, T.; Panebianco, S.; Sage, Ch.; Serot, O.

    2013-12-01

    The study of fission yields has a major impact on the characterization and understanding of the fission process and is mandatory for reactor applications. While the yields are known for the major actinides (235U, 239Pu) in the thermal neutron-induced fission, only few measurements have been performed on 242Am. This paper presents the results of a measurement at the Lohengrin mass spectrometer (ILL, France) on the reaction 241Am(2nth,f): a total of 41 mass yields in the light and the heavy peaks have been measured and compared with the fission process simulation code GEF. Modus operandi and first results of a second experiment performed in May 2013 on the same reaction but with the goal of extracting the isotopic yields are presented as well: 8 mass yields were re-measured and 18 isotopic yields have been investigated and are being analyzed. Results concerning the kinetic energy and its comparison with the GEF Code are also presented in this paper.

  18. Recent AMS measurements of {sup 14}C in soil organic matter: Understanding controls of carbon storage and turnover in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Trumbore, S.E.; Torn, M.S.; Chadwick, O.A.

    1996-10-01

    Radiocarbon measurements are one of the best tools available for determining the rates of carbon and turnover of in soil organic matter. AMS measurements of radiocarbon are essential they allow measurement of {sup 14}C in archived soils with very low carbon content, in physically or chemically fractionated soil organic matter, in dissolved organic carbon leached from soils, as well as in CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} produced during decomposition. We report recent results demonstrating the importance of applying AMS soil radiocarbon measurements to questions of soil C dynamics. We used the increase in {open_quote}bomb{close_quote} {sup 14}C between archived an modem soil profiles sampled along an elevation transect in the Sierra Nevada mountains, California, to determine the role of temperature in determining the rate of turnover of fast-cycling soil organic matter. To study the role of soil mineralogy in determining how carbon is stabilized in {open_quote}passive{close_quote} soil organic matter pools, we compare soil mineralogy and C and {sup 14}C storage in soils along a chronosequence in the Hawaiian islands. Implications for the global C cycle will be discussed.

  19. Alpha and conversion electron spectroscopy of 238,239Pu and 241Am and alpha-conversion electron coincidence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Warren, Glen A.

    2016-09-01

    A technique to determine the isotopic constituents of a mixed actinide sample has been proposed by a coincident alpha-conversion electron measurement. This presents a unique signature to allow the unfolding of isotopes that possess overlapping alpha particle energy and reduce backgrounds of an unseparated sample. The work presented here are results of conversion electron spectroscopy of 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu using a dual-stage peltier-cooled 25 mm2 silicon drift detector and alpha spectroscopy with a passivated ion implanted planar silicon detector. The conversion electron spectra were evaluated from 20-55 keV based on fits to the dominant conversion electron emissions, which allowed the relative conversion electron emission intensities to be determined. These measurements provide crucial singles spectral information and calibration to aid in the coincident measurement approach. Furthermore, an alpha-conversion electron spectrometer was assembled using the silicon based detectors described and results of a coincident spectrum analysis is reported for 241Am.

  20. Deriving aerosol hygroscopic mixing state from size-resolved CCN activity and HR-ToF-AMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattu, Deepika; Tripathi, S. N.; Chakraborty, Abhishek

    2016-10-01

    The ability of a particle to uptake water and form a cloud droplet depends on its hygroscopicity. To understand its impact on cloud properties and ultimately radiative forcing, knowledge of chemically-resolved mixing state information or the one based on hygroscopic growth is crucial. Typically, global models assume either pure internal or external mixing state which might not be true for all conditions and sampling locations. To investigate into this, the current study employed an indirect approach to infer the probable mixing state. The hygroscopic parameters derived from κ-Kohler theory using size-resolved CCN measurements (κCCN) and bulk/size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurementsAMS) were compared. The accumulation mode particles were found to be more hygroscopic (κCCN = 0.24) than Aitken mode (κCCN = 0.13), perhaps due to increased ratio of inorganic to organic mass fraction. The activation diameter calculated from size-resolved CCN activity measurements at 5 different supersaturation (SS) levels varied in the range of 115 nm-42 nm with κCCN = 0.13-0.23 (avg = 0.18 ± 0.10 (±1σ)). Further, κAMS>κCCN was observed possibly due to the fact that organic and inorganic mass present in the Aitken mode was not correctly represented by bulk chemical composition and size-resolved fractional contribution of oxidized OA was not accurately accounted. Better correlation of organic fraction (forg) and κCCN at lower SS explained this behaviour. The decrease in κCCN with the time of the day was more pronounced at lower SS because of the relative mass reduction of soluble inorganic species by ∼17%. Despite the large differences between κ measured from two approaches, less over-prediction (up to 18%) between measured and predicted CCN concentration suggested lower impact of chemical composition and mixing state at higher SS. However, at lower SS, presences of externally mixed CCN-inactive aerosols lead to CCN over-prediction reflecting the

  1. Integration of AMS and ERDS Measurement Data into NARAC Dispersion Models FY05 Technology Integration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K; Arnold, E; Bonner, D; Eme, B; Fischer, K; Gash, J; Nasstrom, J; Walker, H; Guber, A; Logan, C; Wasiolek, P; Fulton, J

    2005-09-20

    Staff from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Bechtel Nevada Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) completed the proposed work for the Technology Integration Project titled Integration of AMS and ERDS Measurement Data into NARAC Dispersion Models. The objectives of this project were to develop software to convert Aerial Measurement Survey (AMS) and Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) field measurement data into a standard electronic format for transmission to the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), and to streamline aspects of the NARAC operational atmospheric dispersion modeling system to quickly process these data for use in generating consequence calculations based on refined, field measurement-based estimates of the source strength. Although NARAC continues to develop and maintain a state-of-the-art atmospheric dispersion modeling system, model predictions are constrained by the availability of information to properly characterize the source term. During an actual atmospheric release, very little may be known initially about the source material properties, amount, or release time and location. Downwind measurements often provide the best information about the scope and nature of the release. The timely integration of field measurement data with model calculations is an obvious approach toward improving the model consequence predictions. By optimizing these predictions a more accurate representation of the consequences may be provided to (a) predict contamination levels which may be below the detectable limit of sensors, but which may still pose a significant hazard, (b) determine contamination is areas where measurements have not yet been made, and (c) prioritize the locations of future measurement surveys. By automating and streamlining much of the related field measurement data processing, these optimized predictions may be provided within a significantly reduced period, and with a reduction in

  2. AMS Data Analysis Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Malchow, Russell L.

    2015-04-20

    This presentation discusses standard techniques and processes used for radiation mapping (RM) via an AMS, Aerial Measurement System. The advantages and shortcomings of standard AMS-based RM are presented, along with some suggested areas for improvement. Issues touched on include what gets counted, data quality, background correction, data processing, altitude correction, isotope extraction, contouring, and time shift.

  3. Simultaneous HTDMA and HR-ToF-AMS measurements at the HKUST Supersite in Hong Kong in 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Ming Chee; Lee, Berto P.; Li, Yong Jie; Chan, Chak K.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the results of simultaneous aerosol hygroscopicity and composition measurements using a Humidified Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) and an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) at the HKUST Supersite, located at a coastal suburban site in Hong Kong. Growth factors (GFs) at 90% relative humidity and the size-resolved composition of ambient aerosols at dry electrical mobility diameters of 75, 100, 150, and 200 nm were measured in May, September, and November 2011. Bimodal GF distributions with a dominant more hygroscopic (MH) mode and a small fraction of the nonhygroscopic or less hygroscopic mode (number fraction < 0.2) were observed throughout the study. The average MH mode GF (1.44-1.52) over the second half of September was significantly lower than that in other periods (1.53-1.64) due to the high organic loading under the influence of the continental airstream. The average ensemble mean growth factor (GF*) of maritime aerosols was higher (1.53-1.59) than that of continental aerosols (1.45-1.48). Closure between the aerosol hygroscopicity and chemical composition was also evaluated. Over 90% of measured data and predictions based on Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model with a constant GF of the organic fraction (GForg) of 1.18 are within 10% closure. Approximations for GForg using the fraction of m/z 44 in organic mass spectra, the oxygen-to-carbon atomic ratio, and PMF-resolved organic factors from HR-ToF-AMS measurements did not yield better closure results, likely because of the overall dominance of sulfate over the whole study period. Finally, GForg of 1 to 1.5 (with κorg up to 0.29) was found to best fit the additional water content unexplained by the inorganic species.

  4. Use of in vivo counting measurements to estimate internal doses from (241)Am in workers from the Mayak production association.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Alexandra B; Suslova, Klara G; Efimov, Alexander V; Miller, Scott C

    2014-08-01

    Comparisons between results of in vivo counting measurements of americium burden and results from radiochemical analyses of organ samples taken at autopsy of 11 cases of former Mayak workers were made. The in vivo counting measurements were performed 3-8 y before death. The best agreement between in vivo counting measurements for americium and autopsy data was observed for the skull. For lungs and liver, the ratios of burden measured by in vivo counting to those obtained from radiochemical analyses data ranged from 0.7-3.8, while those for the skull were from 1.0-1.1. There was a good correlation between the estimates of americium burden in the entire skeleton obtained from in vivo counting with those obtained from autopsy data. Specifically, the skeletal burden ratio, in vivo counting/autopsy, averaged 0.9 ± 0.1. The prior human americium model, D-Am2010, used in vivo counting measurements for americium in the skeleton to estimate the contents of americium and plutonium at death. The results using this model indicate that in vivo counting measurements of the skull can be used to estimate internal doses from americium in the Mayak workers. Additionally, these measurements may also be used to provide a qualitative assessment of internal doses from plutonium. PMID:24978284

  5. DOE/NNSA Aerial Measuring System (AMS): Flying the 'Real' Thing

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Lyons

    2011-06-24

    This slide show documents aerial radiation surveys over Japan. Map product is a compilation of daily aerial measuring system missions from the Fukushima Daiichi power plant to 80 km radius. In addition, other flights were conducted over US military bases and the US embassy.

  6. Target preparation for milligram sized 14C samples and data evaluation for AMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andree, Michael; Beer, Jürg; Oeschger, Hans; Bonani, G.; Hofmann, H. J.; Morenzoni, E.; Nessi, M.; Suter, M.; Wölfli, W.

    1984-11-01

    Our preparation technique produces in a glow-discharge an amorphous carbon deposit on a copper substrate. The process starts with 1.6 cm 3 CO 2 STP (900 μg carbon) which is reduced over hot zinc to CO and subsequently cracked in the discharge. The yield of the process is typically 80%. With these targets in the Zürich ion source ion currents up to 20 μA are obtained. The background of samples prepared with this technique is presently around 30 ka (2.5% MODERN). The precision after half an hour measuring time for a modern sample is 0.7% and 2.7% for a three half-lives old sample, including the errors of the background and the NBS oxalic acid measurement. The method we use to correct for the background of the preparation and the accelerator as well as for the fractionation in the accelerator is presented.

  7. A rapid method for measuring intracellular pH using BCECF-AM.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Pinar; Mutharasan, Raj

    2002-08-15

    A rapid intracellular pH (pH(i)) measurement method based on initial rate of increase of fluorescence ratio of 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5,6-carboxyfluorescein upon dye addition to a cell suspension in growth medium is reported. A dye transport model that describes dye concentration and fluorescence values in intracellular and extracellular spaces provides the mathematical basis for the approach. Experimental results of ammonium chloride challenge response of the two suspension cells, Spodoptera frugiperda and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, successfully compared with results obtained using traditional perfusion method. Since the cell suspension does not require any preparation, measurement of pH(i) can be completed in about 1 min minimizing any potential errors due to dye leakage. PMID:12204343

  8. A batch preparation method for graphite targets with low background for AMS [sup 14]C measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, Hiroyuki International Research Center for Japanese Studies, Nishikyp-ku, Kyoto ); Masuzawa, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Eiji ); Makamura, Toshio )

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed a method of graphitization from CO[sub 2] samples for accurate [sup 14]C measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry. Their batch method, using a sealed Vycor tube, reduces the risk of contamination during graphitization and makes it possible to prepare many samples in a short time (typically 20 samples per day). They also describe details of the target-preparation method involving carbon isotopic fractionation during graphitization, yield of graphite from CO[sub 2], ion-beam intensity of the target, and background (or blank) level estimated using bituminous coal.

  9. The use of chlorine isotope measurements to trace water movements at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, A.E.

    1989-08-01

    The rates of water movements in the tuffs at Yucca Mountain are important for assessing the performance of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Measurements of cosmogenic 3.0 {times} 10{sup 5} yr {sup 36}Cl in tuff from the unsaturated zone and in water from the saturated zone can provide information about water movements over times of 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 6} years. The data derived from the analysis of cuttings from a dry-drilled hole at Yucca Mountain indicate the presence of a {sup 36}Cl background that must be taken into account for proper interpretation of the {sup 36}Cl interpretation of the {sup 36}Cl results. Similarly, the {sup 36}Cl measured in water from the saturated zone requires additional work for correct interpretation. Fallout of {sup 36}Cl from nuclear weapons tests between 1952 and 1962 provided a tracer for an infiltration study. Measurements of the {sup 36}Cl bomb pulse in tuffs from the unsaturated zone show potential for tracing recent water flow in faults and fractures. 5 refs.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of the BEGe detector response function for in vivo measurements of 241Am in the skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantínová, K.; Fojtík, P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on the procedure of the BEGe detector characterization for the Monte Carlo calibrations. A project is under way to improve the counting and operating capabilities of the Whole Body Counter (WBC) installed in SÚRO, v.v.i. (NRPI) Prague, Czech Republic. Possible emergency monitoring should mainly benefit from the rapid, safe and flexible operation of the WBC. The system of the WBC for the detection of low energy X and gamma radiation comprises four HPGe detectors intended for the routine, emergency, and research measurements of persons internally contaminated with low-energy photon emitters, mainly actinides. Among them, 241Am is the main subject of interest. A precise detection efficiency calibration of the detector is required for the measurement of activity in individual organs and tissues. The use of physical phantoms in the calibrations is often supplemented with the application of voxel phantoms and a Monte Carlo technique that are used for the calculation of the detector response function and the full energy peak efficiency. Both experimental and computational approaches have been used for the calibration of the BEGe (Broad Energy Germanium) detector. In this paper, the process of the Monte Carlo simulation of the detector response function and the peak efficiency calculation is described. Results of the simulations are provided in the paper and discussed.

  11. Spatial dependent diffusion of cosmic rays and the excess of primary electrons derived from high precision measurements by AMS-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chao; Guo, Yi-Qing; Hu, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The precise spectra of Cosmic Ray (CR) electrons and positrons have been published by the measurement of AMS-02. It is reasonable to regard the difference between the electron and positron spectra (ΔΦ = Φe- -Φe+) as being dominated by primary electrons. The resulting electron spectrum shows no sign of spectral softening above 20 GeV, which is in contrast with the prediction of the standard model of CR propagation. In this work, we generalize the analytic one-dimensional two-halo model of diffusion to a three-dimensional realistic calculation by implementing spatial variant diffusion coefficients in the DRAGON package. As a result, we can reproduce the spectral hardening of protons observed by several experiments, and predict an excess of high energy primary electrons which agrees with the measurement reasonably well. Unlike the break spectrum obtained for protons, the model calculation predicts a smooth electron excess and thus slightly over-predicts the flux from tens of GeV to 100 GeV. To understand this issue, further experimental and theoretical studies are necessary. Supported by Natural Sciences Foundation of China (11135010)

  12. Real-Time Secondary Aerosol Formation Measurements using a Photooxidation Reactor (PAM) and AMS in Urban Air and Biomass Smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, A. M.; Cubison, M.; Hayes, P. L.; Brune, W. H.; Hu, W.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; Alvarez, S. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Bon, D.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Sullivan, A. P.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Recent field studies reveal large formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) under urban polluted ambient conditions, while SOA formation in biomass burning smoke appears to be variable but sometimes substantial. To study this formation in real-time, a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) photooxidation reactor was deployed with submicron aerosol size and chemical composition measurements during two studies: FLAME-3, a biomass-burning study at USDA Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula in 2009, MT and CalNex-LA in Pasadena, CA in 2010. A high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) alternated sampling unprocessed and PAM-processed aerosol. The PAM reactor produces OH concentrations up to 4 orders of magnitude higher than in ambient air, achieving equivalent aging of ~2 weeks in 5 minutes of processing. The OH intensity was also scanned every 20 min. in both field studies. Results show the value of PAM-AMS as a tool for in-situ evaluation of changes in OA concentration and composition due to SOA formation and POA oxidation. In FLAME-3, net SOA formation was variable among smokes from different biomasses; however, OA oxidation was always observed. The average SOA enhancement factor was 1.7 +/- 0.5 of the initial POA. Reactive VOCs such as toluene, monoterpenes, and acetaldehyde, as measured from a PIT-MS, decreased with increased PAM processing; however, formic acid, acetone, and some unidentified OVOCs increased after significant exposure to high oxidant levels suggesting multigenerational chemistry. Results from CalNex-LA show enhancement of SOA and inorganic aerosol from gas-phase precursors. This enhanced OA mass increase from PAM processing is maximum at night and correlates with trimethylbenzene concentrations, which indicates the dominance of short-lived SOA precursors in the LA Basin. A traditional SOA model with mostly aromatic precursors underpredicts the amount of SOA formed by about an order-of-magnitude, which

  13. Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) Measurements of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios In Soil Extracts Supplied by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

    2005-02-28

    Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-239+240 ({sup 239+240}Pu) activities concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for a series of chemically purified soil extracts received from the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC) in New Mexico. Samples were analyzed without further purification at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This report also includes a brief description of the AMS system and internal laboratory procedures used to ensure the quality and reliability of the measurement data.

  14. 14C AMS measurements in tree rings to estimate local fossil CO 2 in Bosco Fontana forest (Mantova, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capano, Manuela; Marzaioli, Fabio; Sirignano, Carmina; Altieri, Simona; Lubritto, Carmine; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Terrasi, Filippo

    2010-04-01

    Radiocarbon concentration in atmosphere changes overtime due to anthropogenic and natural factors. Species growth preserves the local atmospheric radiocarbon signature over their life span in the annual tree rings and make it possible to use tree rings for the monitoring of changes in fossil-fuel emissions due to an increase of traffic exhaust, during the last decades. In this paper, the CIRCE AMS system has been used to measure the 14C concentration in tree rings of plants grown near an industrial area and a very busy State Road, in a forest in north Italy. Preliminary results related to tree rings of several years of plants respectively near and far the emitting sources are displayed, in order to estimate the local pollution effect. It is possible to find a dilution in years 2000 and 2006 in both the trees analysed, but not enough data have been analysed yet in order to distinguish the fossil dilution derived from the street vehicular traffic or that from the industries.

  15. The use of multiple probe molecules for the study of the acid-base properties of aluminium hydroxyfluoride having the hexagonal tungsten bronze structure: FTIR and [36Cl] radiotracer studies.

    PubMed

    Dambournet, Damien; Leclerc, Hervé; Vimont, Alexandre; Lavalley, Jean-Claude; Nickkho-Amiry, Mahmood; Daturi, Marco; Winfield, John M

    2009-03-01

    The combination of several probe molecules has enabled the construction of a detailed picture of the surface of aluminium hydroxyl fluoride, AlF(2.6)(OH)(0.4), which has the hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) structure. Using pyridine as a probe leads to features at 1628 cm(-1), ascribed to very strong Lewis acid sites, and at 1620-1623 cm(-1), which is the result of several different types of Lewis sites. This heterogeneity is indicated also from CO adsorption at 100 K; the presence of five different types of Lewis site is deduced and is suggested to arise from the hydroxylated environment. Brønsted acid sites of medium strength are indicated by adsorption of lutidine and CO. Adsorption of lutidine occurs at OH groups, which are exposed at the surface and CO reveals that these OH groups have a single environment that can be correlated with their specific location inside the bulk, assuming that the surface OH group may reflect the bulk OH periodicity. A correlation between the data obtained from CO and pyridine molecules has been established using co-adsorption experiments, which also highlight the inductive effect produced by pyridine. Adsorption of the strong Brønsted acid, anhydrous hydrogen chloride, detected by monitoring the beta(-) emission of [(36)Cl]-HCl at the surface, indicates that surface hydroxyl groups can behave also as a Brønsted base and that H(2)O-HCl interactions, either within the hexagonal channels or at the surface are possible. Finally, the formation of strongly bound H(36)Cl as a result of the room temperature dehydrochlorination of [(36)Cl]-labelled tert-butyl chloride provides additional evidence that HTB-AlF(2.6)(OH)(0.4) can behave as a Lewis acid. PMID:19224038

  16. The new 6 MV AMS-facility DREAMS at Dresden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Heller, René; Hanf, Daniel; Rugel, Georg; Merchel, Silke

    2013-01-01

    A new 6 MV electrostatic tandem accelerator has been put into operation at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR). The system is equipped for accelerator mass spectrometry and opens a new research field at HZDR and the Helmholtz Association. It will be also used for ion beam analysis as well as for material modification via high-energy ion implantation. The research activity at the DREsden Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility (DREAMS) based on a 6 MV Tandetron is primarily dedicated to the long-lived radioisotopes of 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, and 129I. DREAMS background levels have been found to be at 4.5 × 10-16 for 10Be/9Be, 8 × 10-16 for 26Al/27Al, 3 × 10-15 for 36Cl/35Cl and 8 × 10-15 for 41Ca/40Ca, respectively. The observed background of 2 × 10-13 for 129I/127I originates from intrinsic 129I from AgI produced from commercial KI. The introduction of quality assurance approaches for AMS, such as the use of traceable calibration materials and taking part in interlaboratory comparisons, guarantees high accuracy data for future DREAMS users. During first experiments an energy calibration of the accelerator has been carried out using the nuclear reaction 1H(15N,γα)12C yielding an energy correction factor of 1.019.

  17. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and HR-ToF-AMS measurements at a coastal site in Hong Kong: size-resolved CCN activity and closure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, J. W.; Yeung, M. C.; Li, Y. J.; Lee, B. Y. L.; Chan, C. K.

    2014-04-01

    The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties of atmospheric aerosols were measured on 1-30 May 2011 at a coastal site in Hong Kong. Size-resolved CCN activation curves, the ratio of number concentration of CCN (NCCN) to aerosol concentration (NCN) as a function of particle size, were obtained at supersaturation (SS) = 0.15%, 0.35%, 0.50%, and 0.70% using a DMT CCN counter (CCNc) and a TSI scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The mean bulk size-integrated NCCN ranged from ∼500 cm-3 at SS = 0.15% to ∼2100 cm-3 at SS = 0.70%, and the mean bulk NCCN / NCN ratio ranged from 0.16 at SS = 0.15% to 0.65 at SS = 0.70%. The average critical mobility diameters (D50) at SS = 0.15%, 0.35%, 0.50%, and 0.70% were 116 nm, 67 nm, 56 nm, and 46 nm, respectively. The corresponding average hygroscopic parameters (κCCN) were 0.39, 0.36, 0.31, and 0.28. The decrease in κCCN can be attributed to the increase in organic to inorganic volume ratio as particle size decreases, as measured by an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The κCCN correlates reasonably well with κAMS based on size-resolved AMS measurements: κAMS = κorg × forg + κinorg × finorg, where forg and finorg are the organic and inorganic volume fractions, respectively, κorg = 0.1 and κinorg = 0.6, with a R2 of 0.51. In closure analysis, NCCN was estimated by integrating the measured size-resolved NCN for particles larger than D50 derived from κ assuming internal mixing state. Estimates using κAMS from size-resolved AMS measurements show that the measured and predicted NCCN were generally within 10% of each other at all four SS. The deviation increased to 26% when κAMS was calculated from bulk PM1 AMS measurements of particles because PM1 was dominated by particles of 200 nm to 500 nm in diameter, which had a larger inorganic fraction than those of D50 (particle diameter < 200 nm). A constant κ = 0.33 (the average value of size-resolved κAMS over the

  18. Testing the 14C ages and conservative behavior of dissolved 14C in a carbonate aquifer in Yucca Flat, Nevada (USA), using 36Cl from groundwater and packrat middens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwicklis, Edward; Farnham, Irene

    2014-09-01

    Corrected groundwater 14C ages from the carbonate aquifer in Yucca Flat at the former Nevada Test Site (now the Nevada National Security Site), USA, were evaluated by comparing temporal variations of groundwater 36Cl/Cl estimated with these 14C ages with published records of meteoric 36Cl/Cl variations preserved in packrat middens (piles of plant fragments, fecal matter and urine). Good agreement between these records indicates that the groundwater 14C ages are reasonable and that 14C is moving with chloride without sorbing to the carbonate rock matrix or fracture coatings, despite opposing evidence from laboratory experiments. The groundwater 14C ages are consistent with other hydrologic evidence that indicates significant basin infiltration ceased 8,000 to 10,000 years ago, and that recharge to the carbonate aquifer is from paleowater draining through overlying tuff confining units along major faults. This interpretation is supported by the relative age differences as well as hydraulic head differences between the alluvial and volcanic aquifers and the carbonate aquifer. The carbonate aquifer 14C ages suggest that groundwater velocities throughout much of Yucca Flat are about 2 m/yr, consistent with the long-held conceptual model that blocking ridges of low-permeability rock hydrologically isolate the carbonate aquifer in Yucca Flat from the outlying regional carbonate flow system.

  19. Wideband Power Amplifier Modeling Incorporating Carrier Frequency Dependent AM/AM and AM/PM Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkacenko, A.

    2013-05-01

    In this article, we present a complex baseband model for a wideband power amplifier that incorporates carrier frequency dependent amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) (i.e., AM/AM and AM/PM) characteristics in the design process. The structure used to implement the amplifier model is a Wiener system which accounts for memory effects caused by the frequency selective nature of the amplifier, in addition to the nonlinearities caused by gain compression and saturation. By utilizing piecewise polynomial nonlinearities in the structure, it is shown how to construct the Wiener model to exactly accommodate all given AM/AM and AM/PM measurement constraints. Simulation results using data from a 50 W 32-way Ka-band solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) are provided, highlighting the differences in degradation incurred for a wideband input signal as compared with a narrowband input.

  20. Multiscale structural characterizations of mixed U(iv)-An(iii) oxalates (An(iii) = Pu or Am) combining XAS and XRD measurements.

    PubMed

    Arab-Chapelet, B; Martin, P M; Costenoble, S; Delahaye, T; Scheinost, A C; Grandjean, S; Abraham, F

    2016-04-28

    Mixed actinide(III,IV) oxalates of the general formula M2.2UAn(C2O4)5·nH2O (An = Pu or Am and M = H3O(+) and N2H5(+)) have been quantitatively precipitated by oxalic precipitation in nitric acid medium (yield >99%). Thorough multiscale structural characterization using XRD and XAS measurements confirmed the existence of mixed actinide oxalate solid solutions. The XANES analysis confirmed that the oxidation states of the metallic cations, tetravalent for uranium and trivalent for plutonium and americium, are maintained during the precipitation step. EXAFS measurements show that the local environments around U(+IV), Pu(+III) and Am(+III) are comparable, and the actinides are surrounded by ten oxygen atoms from five bidentate oxalate anions. The mean metal-oxygen distances obtained by XAS measurements are in agreement with those calculated from XRD lattice parameters. PMID:26979820

  1. A quantitative PGNAA study for use in aqueous solution measurements using Am-Be neutron source and BGO scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghal-Eh, N.; Ahmadi, P.; Doost-Mohammadi, V.

    2016-02-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system including an Am-Be neutron source and BGO scintillation detector are used for quantitative analysis of bulk samples. Both Monte Carlo-simulated and experimental data are considered as input data libraries for two different procedures based on neural network and least squares methods. The results confirm the feasibility and precision of the proposed methods.

  2. Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffee, M.; Elmore, D.; Granger, D.; Muzikar, P.

    2002-12-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is a dedicated research and service facility for accelerator mass spectrometry. AMS is an ultra-sensitive analytical technique used to measure low levels of long-lived cosmic-ray-produced and anthropogenic radionuclides, and rare trace elements. We measure 10Be (T1/2 = 1.5 My), 26Al (.702 My), 36Cl (.301 My), and 129I (16 My), in geologic samples. Applications include dating the cosmic-ray-exposure time of rocks on Earth's surface, determining rock and sediment burial ages, measuring the erosion rates of rocks and soils, and tracing and dating ground water. We perform sample preparation and separation chemistries for these radio-nuclides for our internal research activities and for those external researchers not possessing this capability. Our chemical preparation laboratories also serve as training sites for members of the geoscience community developing these techniques at their institutions. Research at Purdue involves collaborators among members of the Purdue Departments of Physics, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Chemistry, Agronomy, and Anthropology. We also collaborate and serve numerous scientists from other institutions. We are currently in the process of modernizing the facility with the goals of higher precision for routinely measured radio-nuclides, increased sample throughput, and the development of new measurement capabilities for the geoscience community.

  3. The modified FACS calcein AM retention assay: A high throughput flow cytometer based method to measure cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, M A; Yasuda, E; de Jong, G; Levie, S E; Go, D; Spits, H; van Helden, P M; Hazenberg, M D

    2016-07-01

    Current methods to determine cellular cytotoxicity in vitro are hampered by background signals that are caused by auto-fluorescent target and effector cells and by non-specific cell death. We combined and adjusted existing cell viability assays to develop a method that allows for highly reproducible, accurate, single cell analysis by high throughput FACS, in which non-specific cell death is corrected for. In this assay the number of living, calcein AM labeled cells that are green fluorescent are quantified by adding a fixed number of unlabeled calibration beads to the analysis. Using this modified FACS calcein AM retention method, we found EC50 values to be highly reproducible and considerably lower compared to EC50 values obtained by conventional assays, displaying the high sensitivity of this assay. PMID:27084117

  4. Crystal chemistry of mimetite, Pb10(AsO4)6Cl1.48O0.26, and finnemanite, Pb10(AsO3)6Cl2.

    PubMed

    Baikie, Tom; Ferraris, Cristiano; Klooster, Wim T; Madhavi, S; Pramana, Stevin S; Pring, Allan; Schmidt, G; White, T J

    2008-02-01

    The crystal chemistries of synthetic mimetite, Pb(10)(As(5+)O(4))(6)(Cl(2 - x)O(x/2)), a neutral apatite, and finnemanite, Pb(10)(As(3+)O(3))(6)Cl(2), a reduced apatite, were characterized using a combination of X-ray powder diffraction, neutron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Both phases conform to hexagonal P6(3)/m symmetry; however, the temperature-driven transformation of clinomimetite to mimetite described earlier was not confirmed. The average mimetite structure is best described through the introduction of partially occupied oxygen sites. A better understanding of the mixed arsenic speciation in apatites can guide the formulation of waste form ceramics and improve models of long-term durability after landfill disposal. PMID:18204209

  5. Alchemical Free Energy Calculations and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Measurements of Aminoadamantanes Bound to the Closed State of Influenza A/M2TM.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Harris; Drakopoulos, Antonios; Tzitzoglaki, Christina; Homeyer, Nadine; Kolarov, Felix; Gkeka, Paraskevi; Freudenberger, Kathrin; Liolios, Christos; Gauglitz, Günter; Cournia, Zoe; Gohlke, Holger; Kolocouris, Antonios

    2016-05-23

    Adamantane derivatives, such as amantadine and rimantadine, have been reported to block the transmembrane domain (TM) of the M2 protein of influenza A virus (A/M2) but their clinical use has been discontinued due to evolved resistance in humans. Although experiments and simulations have provided adequate information about the binding interaction of amantadine or rimantadine to the M2 protein, methods for predicting binding affinities of whole series of M2 inhibitors have so far been scarcely applied. Such methods could assist in the development of novel potent inhibitors that overcome A/M2 resistance. Here we show that alchemical free energy calculations of ligand binding using the Bennett acceptance ratio (BAR) method are valuable for determining the relative binding potency of A/M2 inhibitors of the aminoadamantane type covering a binding affinity range of only ∼2 kcal mol(-1). Their binding affinities measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) against the A/M2TM tetramer from the Udorn strain in its closed form at pH 8 were used as experimental probes. The binding constants of rimantadine enantiomers against M2TMUdorn were measured for the first time and found to be equal. Two series of alchemical free energy calculations were performed using 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipids to mimic the membrane environment. A fair correlation was found for DPPC that was significantly improved using DMPC, which resembles more closely the DPC lipids used in the ITC experiments. This demonstrates that binding free energy calculations by the BAR approach can be used to predict relative binding affinities of aminoadamantane derivatives toward M2TM with good accuracy. PMID:27105206

  6. Contribution of AMS measurements in understanding the migmatitic terrains of Pointe Géologie, Terre Adélie (East-Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bascou, Jérôme; Henry, Bernard; Ménot, René-Pierre; Funaki, Minoru; Barruol, Guilhem

    2013-09-01

    A detailed magnetic mapping using Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) technique was carried out in Pointe Géologie archipelago (Terre Adélie, East Antarctica) that represents a hot crust having experienced a long-lived anatectic event during Paleoproterozoic times, 1.69 Ga ago. AMS measurements allowed to better analyse the tectonic structure of the crystalline basement that is built up by rocks affected by various degrees of partial melting and then, devoid of clear strain markers. AMS sampling was performed from main rocks types of Pointe Géologie: migmatites including leucosomes and melanosomes, coarse-grained pink granites, anatexites and mylonitic gneisses. For melanosomes, the magnetic foliation is dominantly in agreement with the observed field foliation, i.e. dominantly N-S sub-vertical in shear zones and gently inclined in dome structures. AMS technique reveals a sub-horizontal magnetic lineation in migmatites from shear zones and a gently plunging one in dome structures. Magnetic properties of leucosomes and of coarse-pink granitic dykes contrast with melanosomes. The bulk susceptibility and anisotropy degree are significantly lower in granitic magmas that in melanosomes. In addition, in well-defined leucosomes, granitic dykes and anatexites, the magnetic ellipsoid is characterized by a higher plunge of the magnetic lineation, which tends to be vertical. This is associated to a rheological contrast between the solid-state deformation suffered by oxide grains in the melanosomes and their reorientation in a viscous flow during the transfer of felsic melt to the granitic dykes. Magnetic structure of leucosomes, granitic dykes and anatexites highlights the role of the gravity-induced upwelling of a crust undergoing high degree of partial melting in a transpressional regime.

  7. Measurement of the {sup 241}Am(n,2n) reaction cross section from 7.6 MeV to 14.5 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tonchev, A. P.; Crowell, A. S.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C. R.; Hutcheson, A.; Tornow, W.; Angell, C. T.; Boswell, M.; Hammond, S.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Pedroni, R. S.; Becker, J. A.; Dashdorj, D.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Bond, E.; Chadwick, M. B.

    2008-05-15

    The (n,2n) cross section of the radioactive isotope {sup 241}Am (T{sub 1/2}=432.6 y) has been measured in the incident neutron energy range from 7.6 to 14.5 MeV in steps of a few MeV using the activation technique. Monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction by bombarding a pressurized deuterium gas cell with an energetic deuteron beam at the TUNL 10-MV Van de Graaff accelerator facility. The induced {gamma}-ray activity of {sup 240}Am was measured with high-resolution HPGe detectors. The cross section was determined relative to Al, Ni, and Au neutron activation monitor foils, measured in the same geometry. Good agreement is obtained with previous measurements at around 9 and 14 MeV, whereas for a large discrepancy is observed when our data are compared to those reported by Perdikakis et al. near 11 MeV. Very good agreement is found with the END-B/VII evaluation, whereas the JENDL-3.3 evaluation is in fair agreement with our data.

  8. Neutron-induced fission cross section measurement of 233U, 241Am and 243Am in the energy range 0.5 MeV En 20 MeV at nTOF at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Belloni, F.; Milazzo, P. M.; Calviani, M.; Colonna, N.; Mastinu, P. F.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P. A.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Cerutti, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapico, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Koehler, Paul; The n_TOF Collaboration,

    2012-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross section measurements of 233U, 243Am and 241Am relative to 235U have been carried out at the neutron time-of-flight facility n TOF at CERN. A fast ionization chamber has been employed. All samples were located in the same detector; therefore the studied elements and the reference 235U target are subject to the same neutron beam.

  9. Actinides AMS at CIRCE and 236U and Pu measurements of structural and environmental samples from in and around a mothballed nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, M.; Fifield, L. K.; Sabbarese, C.; Tims, S. G.; De Cesare, N.; D'Onofrio, A.; D'Arco, A.; Esposito, A. M.; Petraglia, A.; Roca, V.; Terrasi, F.

    2013-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is presently the most sensitive technique for the measurement of long-lived actinides, e.g. 236U and 239Pu. A new actinide line is in operation at the Center for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental heritage (CIRCE) in Caserta, Italy. Using the actinide line a uranium mass sensitivity of around 4 μg has been reached measuring with a 16-strip silicon detector, and a 239Pu background level of below 0.1 fg has been obtained. In this work we also discuss preliminary results for environmental and structural samples from in and around the Garigliano nuclear power plant (GNPP), presently in the decommissioning phase. Measurements on environmental samples from the vicinity of the plant allow the assessment of contamination, if any, over the years. Measurements of structural samples from the plant are relevant to the optimization of the decommissioning program for the GNPP.

  10. Assessment of the neutron emission anisotropy factor of a sealed AmBe source by means of measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loreti, S.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-10-01

    The neutron emission anisotropy factor of a sealed Americium-Beryllium source is experimentally determined and compared to Monte Carlo simulations. The measurements were done at the Italian Institute for Metrology of Ionizing Radiations using a long counter neutron detector and a "X.3" type AmBe sealed neutron source. Experimental data are compared to simulations performed with the MCNP code where the precise structure of the source is taken into account starting from its technical design. The contributions of the single structural parts are described to point out the effective sources of the emission anisotropy.

  11. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages reveal a 9.3 ka BP glacier advance and the Late Weichselian-Early Holocene glacial history of the Drangajökull region, northwest Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjólfsson, Skafti; Schomacker, Anders; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Keiding, Jakob K.

    2015-10-01

    We present twenty-four new cosmogenic isotope (36Cl) surface exposure ages from erratic boulders, moraine boulders and glacially eroded bedrock that constrain the late Weichselian to Holocene glacial history of the Drangajökull region, northwest Iceland. The results suggest a topographically controlled ice sheet over the Vestfirðir (Westfjords) peninsula during the last glaciation. Cold based non-erosive sectors of the ice sheet covered most of the mountains while fjords and valleys were occupied with erosive, warm-based ice. Old36Cl exposure ages from highlands and mountain plateaux (L8; 76.5 ka and H1; 41.6 ka) in combination with younger erratic boulders (L7; 26.2 and K1-K4; 15.0-13.8 ka) superimposed on such surfaces suggest the presence of non-erosive ice over uplands and plateaux in the Vestfirðir peninsula during the last glaciation. Glacially scoured terrain and erratic boulders yielding younger exposure ages (L1-L6; 11.3-9.1 ka and R1, R6-R7; 10.6-9.4 ka) in the lowland areas indicate that the valleys and fjords of the Vestfirðir peninsula were occupied by warm-based, dynamic ice during the last glaciation. The deglaciation of mountain Leirufjall by 26.2 ka BP suggests that ice thinning and deglaciation of some mountains and plateaux preceded any significant lateral retreat of the ice sheet. Subsequently this initial ice thinning was followed by break-up of the shelf based ice sheet off Vestfirðir about 15 ka BP. Hence, the new exposure ages suggest a stepwise asynchronous deglaciation on land, following the shelf break-up with some valleys and most of the highlands, ice free by 14-15 ka BP. The outermost moraine at the mouth of Leirufjörður is dated to 9.3 ka BP, and we suggest the moraine to be formed by a glacier re-advance in response to a cooler climate forced by the reduced Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation at around 9.3 ka BP. A system of moraines proximal to the 9.3 ka moraine in Leirufjörður as well as a 9.4 ka deglaciation age

  12. The gender-specific chest wall thickness prediction equations for routine measurements of 239Pu and 241Am within the lungs using HPGe detectors.

    PubMed

    Vickers, L R

    1996-03-01

    The current chest wall thickness prediction equation is not applicable to use in routine lung counting measurements for detection of low energy photons (17--60 keV) within the lungs of male and female subjects. The current chest wall thickness prediction equation was derived for the NaI-CsI "phoswich" detection system, which is not the routine detection system in use; the subject position was supine, which is not the routine position; the equation did not account for the intercostal tissue thicknesses of muscle and adipose which significantly attenuate low energy photons (17--60keV); it was derived from male subjects only and is used to predict the chest wall thickness of female subjects for whom it is not applicable. The current chest wall thickness prediction equation yields unacceptable percent errors in the HPGe detection efficiency calibration for 239Pu and 241Am (17- and 59.5-keV photons, respectively) relative to the gender-specific HPGe chest wall thickness prediction equations of this paper (+284% to --73% for 239Pu; (+)42% to --39% for 241Am). As a result, use of the current chest wall thickness prediction equation yields unacceptable percent errors (proportional in magnitude to the percent errors in the detection efficiency calibration) in the calculation of the minimum detectable activity (Bq) or in an initial assessment of a radioactive contamination exposure detected by a routine lung count measurement. PMID:8609026

  13. AMS and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, Walter

    2010-04-01

    This paper attempts to draw a connection between information that can be gained from measurements with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and the study of climate change on earth. The power of AMS to help in this endeavor is demonstrated by many contributions to these proceedings. Just like in archaeology, we are entering a phase of an 'integrated approach' to understand the various components of climate change. Even though some basic understanding emerged, we are still largely in a situation of a phenomenological description of climate change. Collecting more data is therefore of paramount interest. Based on a recent suggestion of 'geo-engineering' to take out CO 2 from the atmosphere, this radical step will also be briefly discussed.

  14. Measuring transfer of 14C-PCB from maternal diet to milk in a goat model using an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janle, E.; Sojka, J.; Jackson, G. S.; Lachcik, P.; Einstien, J. A.; Santerre, C. R.

    2007-06-01

    Environmental pollutants pose a substantial risk to nursing infants. Many of these toxicants (i.e. PCBs, PBDEs, mercury) are passed from the maternal diet to the nursing infant in breast milk. Determining the toxicokinetics has been difficult to measure due to ethical limitations. Since extremely small amounts of 14C can be measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS), a goat model was used to establish a minimum oral dose of 14C-labeled PCB (2,2‧,4,4‧,5,5‧-hexachlorobiphenyl-UL-14C) that could be given to a lactating animal and traced into the milk. An oral dose of 66 nCi/kg body weight (1.84 μg PCB/kg bw) was administered. Plasma and milk samples were collected for 2 months after dosing. The concentration of 14C label reached a peak value of 1.71 ng/ml PCB equivalents in the milk on day 2 and then declined to about 135 pg/ml PCB equivalents in the milk at 3 weeks. A second goat was administered a smaller dose (22 nCi/kg bw; 616 ng PCB/kg bw). A peak concentration of 485 pg PCB equivalents/ml milk occurred at 3 days and declined to 77.6 pg PCB equivalents/ml milk by 3 weeks. Our results indicated that an even lower dosage of labeled-PCB could be used due to the extreme sensitivity of AMS measurement. Extrapolating from current data it is estimated that the dose could be reduced by a factor of 20 (31 ng PCB/kg bw; 1.1 nCi/kg bw) and still be detectable after 2 months. Thus, the potential exists for developing protocols for studying toxicokinetics in humans using radiologically- and toxicologically-benign doses of labeled environmental toxicants.

  15. Comparisons between point response function measurements and theory for the clouds and the Earth's radiant energy system (CERES) TRMM and the EOS-AM spacecraft thermistor bolometer sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paden, Jack; Smith, G. Louis; Lee, Robert B., III; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Priestley, Kory J.; Bitting, Herbert C.; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert S.

    1998-10-01

    All physical measuring devices have finite response times determined by the characteristics of their optical, electrical, and thermal components. In a system which is not time-critical, one merely waits for the system to stabilize, and then reads the measurement. In a system which is in motion, such as the CERES scanners, the spatial location of any measurement is dependent upon the response time of the detector. In order for the remotely sensed data to be accurately geolocated, the systematic delays between the time-of-observation of the scene and the time-of-measurement must be determined. The first CERES instrument was launched aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) platform from Japans Tanegashima Island Space Center on 28 November 1997. The next two CERES instruments are scheduled for dual launch on the EOS/AM-1 platform in late 1998. In this paper we specifically address the delay between the time of observation of a scene, and its actual measurement as determined from Point Response Function Source data taken in the CERES calibration chamber at TRW in Redondo Beach; and we compare the theoretically generated Point Spread Functions to these measurements. The agreement between the measured and theoretical contours in excellent, in the total and shortwave channels. For all 3 instruments, the calculated time-delay of 0.023ms to the centroid,and the measured peak delay of 0.022ms are very consistent. The result of on-orbit coastline detection algorithms are currently being analyzed in comparison with the PSF delays used in the geolocation algorithms in order to further validate the proper geolocation of the measured data.

  16. The Radiolysis of AmVI Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce J. Mincher

    2013-06-01

    The reduction of bismuthate-produced AmVI by 60Co gamma-rays was measured using post-irradiation UV/Vis spectroscopy. The reduction of AmVI by radiolysis was rapid, producing AmV as the sole product. Relatively low absorbed doses in the ~0.3 kGy range quantitatively reduced a solution of 2.5 x 10-4 M AmVI. The addition of bismuthate to samples during irradiation did not appear to protect AmVI from radiolytic reduction during these experiments. It was also shown here that AmV is very stable toward radiation. The quantitative reduction of the AmVI concentration here corresponds to 1.4 hours of exposure to a process solution, however the actual americium concentrations will be higher and the expected contact times short when using centrifugal contactors. Thus, the reduction rate found in these initial experiments may not be excessive.

  17. 50 CFR 622.41 - Annual catch limits (ACLs), annual catch targets (ACTs), and accountability measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... grouper (Other SWG) combined (including black grouper, scamp, yellowfin grouper, and yellowmouth grouper)—(1) Commercial sector. The IFQ program for groupers and tilefishes in the Gulf of Mexico serves as... program for groupers and tilefishes in the Gulf of Mexico serves as the accountability measure...

  18. AMS Measurements in National Parks of Aerosol Mass, Size and Composition, Comparison with Filter Samples and Correlation with Particle Hygroscopicity and Optical Extinction Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M.; Taylor, N. F.; Collins, D. R.; Kumar, N.; Allen, J.; Newburn, M.; Lowenthal, D. H.; Zielinska, B.

    2011-12-01

    We report a comparison of results from aerosol studies at Great Smoky Mountain National Park (2006), Mt. Rainier National Park (2009) and Acadia National Park (2011), all class I visibility areas associated with IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments) sites. This collaborative study was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and was done with the cooperation of the National Park Service and the EPA. The atmospheric aerosol composition in these sites is influenced by a number of anthropogenic as well as biogenic sources, providing a rich environment for fundamental aerosol studies. The primary purpose of these studies was to add state-of-the-art aerosol instrumentation to the standard light extinction and aerosol measurements at the site, used to determine parameters for the IMPROVE light extinction reconstruction equation, adopted by the EPA to estimate light extinction from atmospheric aerosol concentrations and Rayleigh scattering. The combination of these diverse measurements also provides significant insight into fundamental aerosol properties such as aging and radiative forcing. New instrumentation included a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Aerodyne Q-AMS-Smoky Mountain Study), a high resolution aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS - Mt. Rainier and Acadia studies) for real time measurements that directly address the relationship between sulfate, nitrate, and OC size and concentration, which is related to cloud and dry gas-to-particle conversion as air masses age during transport, the relationship between WSOC hygroscopic growth and oxygenated organic (OOA) composition, the OCM/OC ratio, and the chemical composition that determines the ambient hygroscopic state. The OCM/OC ratio and organic water uptake was addressed with high-volume and medium volume PM2.5 aerosol samples. Aerosols were collected daily on Teflon coated glass fiber filters (TGFF) in four high-volume PM2.5 samplers

  19. Juno II (AM-14)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Juno II (AM-14) on the launch pad just prior to launch, March 3, 1959. The payload of AM-14 was Pioneer IV, America's first successful lunar mission. The Juno II was a modification of Jupiter ballistic missile

  20. Development of a method for fast and automatic radiocarbon measurement of aerosol samples by online coupling of an elemental analyzer with a MICADAS AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, G.; Zhang, Y. L.; Agrios, K.; Szidat, S.

    2015-10-01

    A fast and automatic method for radiocarbon analysis of aerosol samples is presented. This type of analysis requires high number of sample measurements of low carbon masses, but accepts precisions lower than for carbon dating analysis. The method is based on online Trapping CO2 and coupling an elemental analyzer with a MICADAS AMS by means of a gas interface. It gives similar results to a previously validated reference method for the same set of samples. This method is fast and automatic and typically provides uncertainties of 1.5-5% for representative aerosol samples. It proves to be robust and reliable and allows for overnight and unattended measurements. A constant and cross contamination correction is included, which indicates a constant contamination of 1.4 ± 0.2 μg C with 70 ± 7 pMC and a cross contamination of (0.2 ± 0.1)% from the previous sample. A Real-time online coupling version of the method was also investigated. It shows promising results for standard materials with slightly higher uncertainties than the Trapping online approach.

  1. Astroparticle Physiscs with AMS02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incagli, Marco

    2010-03-01

    AMS02 (Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer) is the second version of a typical particle physics detector which will be installed, starting from summer 2010, on the International Space Station (ISS) to measure the spectrum of charged cosmic rays in the region 1 GeV-1 TeV, with a high capability of identifying and measuring energy and direction of photons. Thanks to the large acceptance, to the long flight duration (at least 3 years) and to the state of the art of the techniques for particle identification, AMS has the possibility of achieving the highest sensitivity in the search of WIMP Dark Matter in this energy domain, through the contemporary measuremnt of the absolute and relative spectra of electrons and positrons, protons and antiprotons, photons and, eventually, antideuterons. The AMS02 experiment is also able to verify the existence of antimatter in the universe through the measurement of the ratio antihelium/helium at the 10-9 level. AMS02 will measure also with high precision the nuclei spectra up to iron, providing relevant informations on the theories of transport and diffusion of cosmic rays.

  2. The first four years of the AMS-facility DREAMS: Status and developments for more accurate radionuclide data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugel, Georg; Pavetich, Stefan; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Enamorado Baez, Santiago Miguel; Scharf, Andreas; Ziegenrücker, René; Merchel, Silke

    2016-03-01

    DREAMS, the DREsden AMS-facility, is performing routine accelerator mass spectrometry of 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, and 129I for a wide range of applications. All DREAMS-data is normalised directly to primary standards or traceable to those via cross-calibration of secondary standards. Recent technical developments such as a low-memory ion source for 36Cl and 129I and sophisticated tuning strategies for 129I led to improved-accuracy data. Tests of ion source output have been performed with different metal binders, sample-to-binder mixing ratios, and compaction pressures in order to find optimal parameters. The highest and most stable outputs have been obtained for 10Be, 26Al, and 41Ca for the following binders and mixing ratios (by weight): BeO:Nb, 1:4; Al2O3:Ag, 1:1; CaF2:Ag, 1:4. Higher beam currents generally result in reduced statistical uncertainty. Cross-contamination and long-term memory seem to be underestimated problems asking for further tests and improvements such as the development of low-level in-house-standards.

  3. Heat capacities and thermal conductivities of AmO 2 and AmO 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Akinori; Ichise, Kenichi; Arai, Yasuo

    2011-07-01

    The thermal diffusivity of AmO 2 was measured from 473 to 773 K and that of AmO 1.5 between 473 and 1373 K using a laser flash method. The enthalpy increment of AmO 2 was measured from 335 to 1081 K and that of AmO 1.5 between 335 and 1086 K using drop calorimetry. The heat capacities of AmO 2 and AmO 1.5 were derived from the enthalpy increment measurements. The thermal conductivity was determined from the measured thermal diffusivity, heat capacity and bulk density. The heat capacities of AmO 2 was found larger than that of AmO 1.5. The thermal conductivities of AmO 2 and AmO 1.5 were found to decrease with increasing temperature in the investigated temperature range. The thermal conductivity of AmO 1.5 with A -type hexagonal structure was smaller than that of AmO 2 with C-type fluorite structure but larger than that of sub-stoichiometric AmO 1.73.

  4. Nuclear-physics characteristics of short-lived odd-odd {sup 232}Pa, {sup 238}Np and {sup 242g}Am nuclides (measurement results and prospects for further researches)

    SciTech Connect

    Fomushkin, Eduard F.; Abramovich, Sergei N.; Andreev, Mikhail F.

    1998-10-26

    In VNIIEF there were measured cross-sections of {sup 232}Pa and {sup 238}Np fission caused by thermal neutrons. The obtained data do not agree with the results of measurements carried out in Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA). Possible reasons of the result divergence are discussed. There are considered the measurement prospects for fission and radiation capture cross-sections of thermal neutrons by the nuclei of {sup 232}Pa, {sup 238}Np and {sup 242g}Am, including the measurements performed with the aid of ILL (Grenoble, France) reactor and some devices for neutron researches.

  5. AMS in Phytonutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Dueker, S R; Buchholz, B A

    2003-08-26

    As public interest in phytonutrition continues to increase, the result will be an augmented demand for extensive phytochemical research. The fact that foods are inherently phytochemically complex dictates a need to apply scientific techniques, which can detect synergistic interaction among the many active principles and adjuvant substances in the plant, and furthermore, modify the activities of these components. As illustrated by the experiments discussed in this presentation, the advantages of AMS are unique and extensive. These advantages are best summarized by Dr. John Vogel, an originator of biological AMS experimentation: ''AMS brings (at least) three advantages to biochemical tracing: high sensitivity for finding low probability events or for use of physiologic-sized doses; small sample sizes for painless biopsies or highly specific biochemical separations; and reduction of overall radioisotope exposures, inventories, and waste streams.'' AMS opens the door to increased phytochemical tracing in humans to obtain biochemical data concerning human health at dietary relevant levels of exposure. AMS, thus, obviates the need for uncertain extrapolations from animal models, which express marginal relevance to human metabolism. The unparalleled capabilities and benefits of AMS will undoubtedly establish this particular MS technique as an important analytical tool in phytochemical research.

  6. Measurement of long-lived radionuclides in surface soil around F1NPP accident site by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Yasuto; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Sasa, Kimikazu; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2015-10-01

    In March 2011, vast amounts of radionuclides were released into the environment due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F1NPP) accident. However, very little work has been done concerning accident-derived long-lived nuclides such as 129I (T1/2 = 1.57 × 107 year) and 36Cl (T1/2 = 3.01 × 105 year). 129I and 131I are both produced by 235U fission in nuclear reactors. Being isotopes of iodine, these nuclides are expected to behave similarly in the environment. This makes 129I useful for retrospective reconstruction of 131I distribution during the initial stages of the accident. On the other hand, 36Cl is generated during reactor operation via neutron capture reaction of 35Cl, an impurity in the coolant or reactor component. Resulting 36Cl/Cl ratio within the reactor is thus much higher compared to that in environment. Similar to 129I, 36Cl is expected to have leaked out during the accident and it is important to evaluate its effects. In this study, 129I concentrations were determined in several surface soil samples collected around F1NPP. Average 129I/131I ratio was estimated to be 26.1 ± 5.8 as of March 11, 2011, consistent with calculations using ORIGEN2 code and other published data. 36Cl/Cl ratios in some of the soil samples were likewise measured and ranged from 1.1 × 10-12 to 2.6 × 10-11. These are higher compared to ratios measured around F1NPP before the accident. A positive correlation between 36Cl and 129I concentration was observed.

  7. Progress on multi-nuclide AMS of JAEA-AMS-TONO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito-Kokubu, Yoko; Matsubara, Akihiro; Miyake, Masayasu; Nishizawa, Akimitsu; Ohwaki, Yoshio; Nishio, Tomohiro; Sanada, Katsuki; Hanaki, Tatsumi

    2015-10-01

    The JAEA-AMS-TONO (Japan Atomic Energy Agency's Accelerator Mass Spectrometer established at the Tono Geoscience Center) facility has been used for the dating of geological samples. The AMS system is versatile, based on a 5 MV tandem Pelletron-type accelerator. Since its establishment in 1997, the AMS system has been used for measurement of carbon-14 (14C) mainly for 14C dating studies in neotectonics and hydrogeology, in support of JAEA's research on geosphere stability applicable to the long-term isolation of high-level radioactive waste. Results of the measurement of 14C in soils and plants has been applied to the dating of fault activity and volcanism. Development of beryllium-10 (10Be) and aluminum-26 (26Al) AMS systems are now underway to enhance the capability of the multi-nuclide AMS in studies of dating by cosmogenic nuclides. The 10Be-AMS system has already been used for routine measurements in applied studies and improvements of the measurement technique have been made. Now we plan to fine tune the system and perform test measurements to develop the 26Al-AMS system.

  8. Chemical Composition of Semivolatile Compounds and Organic Aerosol in a Pine Forest: Bulk and Speciated Measurements by In-situ TAG-AMS and Offline GCxGC/HRTOFMS at BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. W.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Zhao, Y.; Hohaus, T.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Teng, A.; Huang, I.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) represent an important source of organic aerosol (OA) in remote forested regions. Understanding their composition is essential to identifying their sources and processing, but the chemical complexity often limits such analysis. Here we present concurrent bulk and speciated measurements of semivolatile and particle-phase organic compounds using a novel combined instrument (TAG-AMS) at Manitou Forest, CO during the BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011 campaign. The Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (TAG) provides on-line organic speciation of ambient SVOCs with bihourly time resolution, while the AMS provides bulk mass spectral analysis of the concurrent OA sample. This deployment was a unique and experimental version of the TAG-AMS instrument, with a prototype filter cell designed to quantitatively collect and analyze SVOCs. The combined instrument provides quantitative measurements of organic and inorganic mass loadings, and elemental and PMF analysis of the bulk OA, simultaneously with detailed organic speciation of SVOCs. Additionally, filter samples are analyzed by comprehensive GCxGC/HR-TOF-MS to assist in compound identification by TAG. The system provided around-the-clock measurements for a 2-week period. Online and offline measurements reveal > 100 compounds, a subset of which is observed at a bihourly time resolution, and is used to identify the sources of organic aerosol in the region. Bihourly measurements of sesquiterpenes, which represent a major fraction of observed SVOCs, are used to investigate their emission sources and subsequent processing into OA. These observations are also compared to a previous study conducted at a similar pine forest in California.

  9. Elements in biological AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; McAninch, J.; Freeman, S.

    1996-08-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) provides high detection sensitivity for isotopes whose half-lives are between 10 years and 100 million years. {sup 14}C is the most developed of such isotopes and is used in tracing natural and anthropogenic organic compounds in the Earth`s biosphere. Thirty-three elements in the main periodic table and 17 lanthanides or actinides have long lived isotopes, providing potential tracers for research in elemental biochemistry. Overlap of biologically interesting heavy elements and possible AMS tracers is discussed.

  10. Hydrologic and geochemical controls on the transport of radionuclides in natural undisturbed arid environments as determined by accelerator mass spectrometry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nimz, G; Caffee, M W; McAninch, J

    2000-04-01

    This project developed techniques for measuring globally distributed radionuclides that occur today in extremely low abundances (''fallout'' from the era of atmospheric nuclear testing), and then applied these techniques to better understand the mechanisms by which radionuclides migrate. The techniques employ accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a relatively new analytical tool that permits this work to be conducted for the first time. The goal in this project was to develop AMS analytical techniques for {sup 129}I (fallout concentration: {approx} 10{sup 6} atoms/g) {sup 99}Tc ({approx} 10{sup 9} atoms/g), {sup 90}Sr ({approx}10{sup 7} atoms/gram soil), and {sup 93}Zr ({approx} 10{sup 9} atoms/g), and improved methods for {sup 36}Cl ({approx} 10{sup 9} atoms/g). As a demonstration of the analytical techniques, and as an investigation of identified problems associated with characterizing moisture and radionuclide movement in unsaturated desert soils, we developed a vadose zone research site at the Nevada Test Site. Our findings can be summarized as follows: (1) The distribution of chloride and {sup 36}Cl at the research site indicates that the widely-used ''chloride accumulation'' method for estimating moisture flux is erroneous; some mechanism for attenuation of chloride exists, violating an assumption of the accumulation method; (2) {sup 129}I is fractionated into several soil compartments that have varying migration abilities; the two most mobile can be tentatively identified as Fe/Mn oxyhydroxides and organic acids based on our sequential leaching techniques; (3) These most mobile constituents are capable of migrating at a rate greater than that of {sup 36}Cl, usually considered the most mobile solute in hydrologic systems; these constituents may be colloidal in character, of neutral surface charge, and therefore conservative in aqueous migration; (4) {sup 99}Tc is readily measurable by AMS, as we demonstrate by the first AMS {sup 99}Tc measurements of

  11. The Schoolma'am.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Frances R.

    In the 1930s and reprinted in 1974, approximately 85 percent of the teachers in U.S. public schools were women--"schoolma'ams." This book provides a portrait of women teachers of that era, as well as a comprehensive overview of their lives, their careers, the conditions under which they taught in rural and urban schools, and the educational…

  12. High-precision measurements of {sup 14}C as a circulation tracer in the Pacific, Indian, and Southern Oceans with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Reden, Karl F. von; Peden, John C.; Schneider, Robert J.; Bellino, Mary; Donoghue, Joanne; Elder, Kathryn L.; Gagnon, Alan R.; Long, Patricia; McNichol, Ann P.; Morin, Tracey; Stuart, Dana; Hayes, John M.; Key, Robert M.

    1999-04-26

    The National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Facility (NOSAMS) has completed the carbon isotope analysis of a major fraction of the 13,500 sea water samples collected in the framework of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) from three of the major world oceans between 1991 and 1996. We will describe the AMS technique employed at NOSAMS and, using 3-D data visualization techniques we will demonstrate the present status of the data set and offer some preliminary conclusions about the distribution of natural and anthropogenic {sup 14}C in the oceans. In particular, we will be able to compare some of the data with results from the Geochemical Ocean Sections Study (GEOSECS, 1972-1978) to obtain information about the time dependence of oceanic circulation processes, tracing the {sup 14}C signal introduced into the oceans during the atmospheric nuclear bomb tests in the 1950's and 1960's.

  13. How to convert biological carbon into graphite for AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Getachew, G; Kim, S; Burri, B J; Kelly, P B; Haack, K W; Ognibene, T J; Buchholz, B A; Vogel, J S; Modrow, J; Clifford, A J

    2006-07-27

    Isotope tracer studies, particularly radiocarbon measurements, play a key role in biological, nutritional, and environmental research. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is now the most sensitive detection method for radiocarbon, but AMS is not widely used in kinetic studies of humans. Part of the reason is the expense, but costs would decrease if AMS were used more widely. One component in the cost is sample preparation for AMS. Biological and environmental samples are commonly reduced to graphite before they are analyzed by AMS. Improvements and mechanization of this multi-step procedure is slowed by a lack of organized educational materials for AMS sample preparation that would allow new investigators to work with the technique without a substantial outlay of time and effort. We present a detailed sample preparation protocol for graphitizing biological samples for AMS and include examples of nutrition studies that have used this procedure.

  14. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Overview

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is flying to the station on STS-134. The AMS experiment is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector being operated by an international team composed of 60 ...

  15. Delirium Research: Where Am I?

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Delirium Research Where Am I? Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table of Contents ... to do. Read More "Delirium Research" Articles Where Am I? / Digging Into the Mysteries of Delirium / The ...

  16. AMS 13 - Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier

    2015-10-01

    As a result of significant improvements over the last years of the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) technique, not only numerous new dedicated facilities were installed during recent years, but also an increasing number of applications emerged. Among these newly installed accelerators, some are used by private companies mainly for biomedical applications, confirming a trend at work for 30 years of the transfer of this technology from the academic world to the commercial world.

  17. Investigation of the 241Am(n ,2 n )240Am cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamara, A.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Diakaki, M.; Tsinganis, A.; Patronis, N.; Axiotis, M.; Lagoyannis, A.

    2016-01-01

    The 241Am(n ,2 n )240Am reaction cross section has been measured at four energies, 10.0, 10.4, 10.8, and 17.1 MeV, by means of the activation technique, relative to the 27Al(n ,α )24Na reaction reference cross section. Quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the 2H(d ,n )3He and the 3H(d ,n )4He reactions at the 5.5 MV Tandem T11/25 accelerator laboratory of NCSR "Demokritos". The high purity 241Am targets were provided by JRC-IRMM, Geel, Belgium. The induced γ -ray activity of 240Am was measured with high-resolution high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. Auxiliary Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the mcnp code. The present results are in agreement with data obtained earlier and predictions obtained with the empire code.

  18. A new system for the simultaneous measurement of δ13C and δ15N by IRMS and radiocarbon by AMS on gaseous samples: Design features and performances of the gas handling interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braione, Eugenia; Maruccio, Lucio; Quarta, Gianluca; D'Elia, Marisa; Calcagnile, Lucio

    2015-10-01

    We present the general design features and preliminary performances of a new system for the simultaneous AMS-14C and IRMS δ13C and δ15N measurements on samples with masses in the μg range. The system consists of an elemental analyzer (EA), a gas splitting unit (GSU), a IRMS system, a gas handling interface (GHI) and a sputtering ion source capable of accepting gaseous samples. A detailed description of the system and of the control software supporting unattended operation are presented together with the first performance tests carried out by analyzing samples with masses ranging from 8 μgC to 2.4 mgC. The performances of the system were tested in term of stability of the ion beam extracted from the ion source, precision and accuracy of the results by comparing the measured isotopic ratios with those expected for reference materials.

  19. "I Am Working-Class": Subjective Self-Definition as a Missing Measure of Social Class and Socioeconomic Status in Higher Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Mark; Denson, Nida; Kilpatrick, Sue; Matthews, Kelly E.; Stehlik, Tom; Zyngier, David

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a critical appraisal of the measurement of students' social class and socioeconomic status (SES) in the context of widening higher education participation. Most assessments of social class and SES in higher education have focused on objective measurements based on the income, occupation, and education of students'…

  20. Recycling Of Bomb Produced Cl 36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarev, V.; Blinov, A.; Huber, Th.; Kubo, F.; Nolte, E.

    The success of accelerated mass-spectrometry (AMS) has allowed the measuring of very small quantities of radioactive nuclides with the ratio to their stable isotope up to 10-14. With the help of this method the concentration of 36Cl in natural samples can be investigated. The main sources of 36Cl in the atmosphere are a) The natural production in nuclear reactions induced by the interaction of high energy cosmic rays with atmospheric Ar. b) The production by the interaction of high neutron fluxes emitted by the nuclear weapon tests with stable chlorine. c) The production in different reactors with the following release (e.g. Chernobyl accident). The analysis of 36Cl time profile in Greenland showed the fast removal of chlorine from the atmosphere so that nowadays only the natural production of 36Cl is of importance. However the measurement of 36Cl in modern precipitation revealed the significant excess of its concentration over the simulated predictions. The recycling of chlorine as an explanation of the observed discrepancy is ar- gued. The biosphere could take up a part of the fallen down bomb produced 36Cl and releases it into the troposphere in the form of CH3Cl. To check the hypothesis the experiment to collect methyl chloride from the air and to measure 36Cl was set up. The high observed ratio 36 Cl/Cl proves that the chlorine recycling really takes place. Additionally, in order to get more information about the distribution of 36Cl the measurements of its concentration in lakes with long flushing times were performed. With the help of modeling the different sources of 36Cl can be distinguished. The dominant source of 36Cl in many Alpine lakes is chlorine, released during the accident on the Chernobyl nuclear power plant.

  1. Complex formation of Am(III) and Am(IV) with phosphate ions in acetonitrile solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, S.A.; Lebedev, I.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1988-05-01

    The first dissociation constant of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in acetonitrile solution (K/sub 1//sup 0/ = 1.75/centered dot/10/sup /minus/13/) and the constant of formation of H(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2//sup /minus// dimers (K/sub d//sup 0/ = 8/centered dot/10/sup 2/) were determined by the method of pH-potentiometry. The complex formation of Am(III) in acetonitrile solutions containing 0.05-2.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ was investigated by a spectrophotometric method; the stability constants of the complexes AmH/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup 2+/ (/beta//sub 1//sup III/ = 1.0/centered dot/10/sup 12/) and Am(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2//sup +/ (/beta//sub 2//sup III/ = 4.3/centered dot/10/sup 24/) were determined. The formal potentials of the couple Am/sup (IV)//Am/sup (III)/ in 0.3-1.9 M solutions of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in acetonitrile were measured, and the stability constant of the phosphate complex of tetravalent americium Am(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 3//sup +/ (/beta//sub 3//sup IV/ = 2.5/centered dot/10/sup 46/) was calculated according to the value of the shift of the potential relative to the standard.

  2. Excited levels of /sup 238/Np from spectroscopic measurements of the /sup 237/Np(n,. gamma. )/sup 238/Np reaction and /sup 242m/Am alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.; Ruhter, W.; Mann, L.

    1981-06-01

    The gamma rays and conversion electrons emitted following neutron capture in a /sup 237/Np target have been measured by use of the GAMS and BILL spectrometers at Grenoble. Gamma ray and alpha particle measurements of /sup 242m/Am alpha decay (Ge(Li)..gamma.. singles, ..gamma..-..gamma.. coincidences, ..cap alpha.. singles) have been made at Livermore. The data from these measurements have been combined with earlier measurements (Ionescu 1979, Asaro 1964) to produce a more detailed level scheme for /sup 238/Np. Approximately 36 levels have been identified from all of the experimental evidence. The experimentally-observed bandhead energies can be compared with predicted values derived from a simple linear addition of excitation energies observed in neighboring odd-mass nuclei. Values for the Gallagher-Moszkowski splitting of each configurational pair were obtained from theoretical calculations (Piepenbring 1978). We have assigned configurations to ten rotational bands whose bandhead energies range from 0 to 342 keV and which represent all but one of the configurations predicted to occur below 385 keV.

  3. Recent results from the AMS-02 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchi, Manuela

    2015-12-01

    The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer operating onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The main goals of the detector are the search for antimatter and dark matter in space, as well as the measurement of cosmic ray composition and flux. Precise measurements of cosmic ray positrons and electrons are presented in this document, based on 41×109 events collected during the first 30 months of operations.

  4. Why Am I So Sad?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chloe & Nurb Meet The Brain (Movie) Quiz: Do You Need a Flu Shot? Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Why Am I So Sad? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Am I So Sad? ... Do Kids Feel Sad About? Are Sad Feelings Normal? How Can You Deal With Sad Feelings? en español ¿Por qué ...

  5. Seasonal characteristics of fine particulate matter (PM) based on high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometric (HR-ToF-AMS) measurements at the HKUST Supersite in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. J.; Lee, B. P.; Su, L.; Fung, J. C. H.; Chan, C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) remains poorly understood due to the lack of comprehensive measurements at high time resolution for tracking its dynamic features and the lack of long-term observation for tracking its seasonal variability. Here, we present highly time-resolved and seasonal compositions and characteristics of non-refractory components in PM with a diameter less than 1 μm (NR-PM1) at a suburban site in Hong Kong. The measurements were made with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) Air Quality Research Supersite for 4 months, with one in each season of the year. The average NR-PM1 concentration of ~ 15 μg m-3 is higher than those AMS measurements made in South Korea and Japan, but lower than those in North China, the Yangtze River Delta and the nearby Pearl River Delta. The seasonal dependence of the total NR-PM1 monthly averaged concentrations was small, but that of the fractions of the species in NR-PM1 was significant. Site characteristic plays an important role in the relative fractions of species in NR-PM1 and our results are generally consistent with measurements at other non-urban sites in this regard. Detailed analyses were conducted on the AMS data in the aspects of (1) species concentrations, (2) size distributions, (3) degree of oxygenation of organics, and (4) positive matrix factorization (PMF)-resolved organic factors in a seasonal context, as well as with air mass origin from back-trajectory analysis. Sulfate had the highest fraction in NR-PM1 (> 40%), and the surrogates of secondary organic species - semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SVOOA) and low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LVOOA) - prevailed (~ 80%) in the organic portion of NR-PM1. Local contributions to the organic portion of NR-PM1 at this suburban site was strongly dependent on season. The hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) factor related to

  6. Seasonal characteristics of fine particulate matter (PM) based on high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometric (HR-ToF-AMS) measurements at the HKUST Supersite in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. J.; Lee, B. P.; Su, L.; Fung, J. C. H.; Chan, C. K.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) remains poorly understood due to the lack of comprehensive measurements at high time resolution for tracking its dynamic features and the lack of long-term observation for tracking its seasonal variability. Here, we present highly time-resolved and seasonal compositions and characteristics of non-refractory components in PM with diameter less than 1 μm (NR-PM1) at a suburban site in Hong Kong. The measurements were made with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) Air Quality Research Supersite for four months, with one in each season of the year. The average NR-PM1 concentration of ~15 μg m-3 is higher than those AMS measurements made in South Korea and Japan, but lower than those in North China, the Yangtze River Delta and the nearby Pearl River Delta. The seasonal dependence of the total NR-PM1 monthly averaged concentrations was small but that of the fractions of the species in NR-PM1 was significant. Site characteristic plays an important role in the relative fractions of species in NR-PM1 and our results are generally consistent with measurements at other non-urban sites in this regard. Detailed analyses were conducted on the AMS data in the aspects of (1) species concentrations, (2) size distributions, (3) degree of oxygenation of organics, and (4) positive matrix factorization (PMF)-resolved organic factors in a seasonal context, as well as with air mass origin from back-trajectory analysis. Sulfate had the highest fraction in NR-PM1 (> 40%) and the surrogates of secondary organic species, semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SVOOA) and low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LVOOA), prevailed (~80%) in the organic portion of NR-PM1. Local contributions to the organic portion of NR-PM1 at this suburban site was strongly dependent on season. The hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) factor related to local

  7. 'Who am I?'.

    PubMed

    Schellinski, Kristina

    2014-04-01

    The dreams and existential questions of those, who came into being in order to replace a dead person, pivot around a central cry: 'Who am I?' If conceived, born or designated as a replacement child, such an individual may suffer-even as an adult-from a rarely recognized unconscious confusion of identity, compounded by grief and survivors' guilt. From before the child is born, the archetypal forces of death and life are joined in a fateful constellation; the soul of the replacement child bears the shadow of death from the very beginning of life. Hope for the replacement child lies in an emergence of true self as soul recreates original life. Analysis can help the replacement child experience a 'rebirth into true life', not as 'the one who returned', but as a psychologically newborn individual; the path of individuation countering the replacement child's identification with the dead. Jungian analysis offers unique concepts for understanding and healing the replacement child; C.G. Jung himself was born after two stillborn babies and an infant that lived only five days. PMID:24673274

  8. Towards TCCON Tropics: Assessment and Measurements of Carbon and its Climate Impacts in Southeast Asia (T3AM C2lImA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morino, I.; Velazco, V. A.; Schwandner, F. M.; Macatangay, R. C.; Griffith, D. W. T.

    2015-12-01

    TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network) measurements of CO2 and CH4 have been and are currently used extensively and globally for satellite validation, for comparison with atmospheric chemistry models and to study atmosphere-biosphere exchanges of carbon. With the global effort to cap greenhouse gas emissions, TCCON has become vital for validating satellite-based greenhouse gas data from past, current and future missions like Japanese GOSAT (Greenhouse Gas Observing SATellite) and GOSAT-2, NASA's OCO-2 (Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2) and OCO-3, ESA's Carbon Monitoring Satellite (CarbonSat), Chinese TanSat, and others. The lack of reliable validation data for the satellite-based greenhouse gas observing missions in the tropical regions is a common limitation in global carbon-cycle modeling studies that have a tropical component. The international CO2 modeling community have specified a requirement for "expansion of the CO2 observation network within the tropics" to reduce uncertainties in regional estimates of CO2 sources and sinks using atmospheric transport models. A TCCON site in the western tropical Pacific is a logical next step in obtaining additional knowledge that would greatly contribute to the understanding of the Earth's atmosphere and better constraining a major tropical region experiencing tremendous economic and population growth. Here, we present a complete site assessment for a possible TCCON site in the Philippines and our decision on the site where a new TCCON FTS will be installed. This site assessment was conducted in cooperation with the Energy Development Corporation (EDC, Philippines), National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES, Japan), University of Wollongong (UoW, Australia), NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the University of the Philippines (UP-IESM), the TCCON science team, and the GOSAT-2 science team.

  9. Counting Statistics and Ion Interval Density in AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J S; Ognibene, T; Palmblad, M; Reimer, P

    2004-08-03

    Confidence in the precisions of AMS and decay measurements must be comparable for the application of the {sup 14}C calibration to age determinations using both technologies. We confirmed the random nature of the temporal distribution of {sup 14}C ions in an AMS spectrometer for a number of sample counting rates and properties of the sputtering process. The temporal distribution of ion counts was also measured to confirm the applicability of traditional counting statistics.

  10. Measurement of Absolute Fission Yields in the Fast Neutron-Induced Fission of Actinides: {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm by Track-Etch-cum-Gamma Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, R.H.; Naik, H.; Pandey, A.K.; Kalsi, P.C.; Singh, R.J.; Ramaswami, A.; Nair, A.G.C.

    2000-07-15

    The absolute fission yields of 46 fission products in {sup 238}U (99.9997 at.%), 46 fission products in {sup 237}Np, 27 fission products in {sup 238}Pu (99.21 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 240}Pu (99.48 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 243}Am (99.998 at.%), and 32 fission products in {sup 244}Cm (99.43 at.%) induced by fast neutrons were determined using a fission track-etch-cum-gamma spectrometric technique. In the case of highly alpha-active and sparingly available actinides - e.g., {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm - a novel recoil catcher technique to collect the fission products on a Lexan polycarbonate foil followed by gamma-ray spectrometry was developed during the course of this work. This completely removed interferences from (a) gamma rays of daughter products in secular equilibrium with the target nuclide (e.g., {sup 243}Am-{sup 239}Np), (b) activation products of the catcher foil [e.g., {sup 24}Na from Al(n,{alpha})], and (c) activation products of the target [e.g., {sup 238}Np from {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) and {sup 239}Np from {sup 238}U(n,{gamma})] reactions, making the gamma spectrometric analysis very simple and accurate. The high-yield asymmetric fission products were analyzed by direct gamma spectrometry, whereas the low-yield symmetric products (e.g., Ag, Cd, and Sb) as well as some of the asymmetric fission products (e.g., Br) and rare earths (in the case of {sup 238}U and {sup 237}Np) were radiochemically separated and then analyzed by gamma-ray spectrometry. The neutron spectra in the irradiation positions of the reactors were measured and delineated in the thermal to 10-MeV region using threshold activation detectors. The present data were compared with the ENDF/VI and UKFY2 evaluated data files. From the measured cumulative yields, the mass-chain yields have been deduced using charge distribution systematics. The mass yields, along with similar data for other fast neutron-induced fissioning systems, show several

  11. AMS/DOE Graduate Fellowship

    SciTech Connect

    None None

    2011-06-15

    The American Meteorological Society (AMS) Fellowship Program was established in 1991. To date, AMS has awarded over 150 Fellowships. This five year DOE award provided for one Fellowship a year for five years. The objective of this program is to provide enough funding to a student so as to allow the student to focus solely on coursework requirements, thus allowing them to begin their research at an earlier date.

  12. RICH - A new AMS facility at the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudin, Mathieu; Van Strydonck, Mark; van den Brande, Tess; Synal, Hans-Arno; Wacker, Luckas

    2015-10-01

    Since 1989 the radiocarbon dating lab has their own graphitization system for 14C AMS dating but RICH (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage) did not possess their own AMS and measurements were carried out in collaboration with other AMS facilities. In April 2013 the Micadas (Mini Carbon Dating System) AMS was installed at RICH in Brussels and after 1.5 year operation the high stability and performance of the Micadas can be demonstrated by repeated analyses of primary standard OXA II and secondary standards. Results of unknown samples measured on the RICH-Micadas and on other AMS systems are in good agreement.

  13. AM(VI) PARTITIONING STUDIES: FY14 FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce J Mincher

    2014-10-01

    The use of higher oxidation states of americium in partitioning from the lanthanides is under continued investigation by the sigma team. This is based on the hypothesis that Am(VI) can be produced and remain stable in irradiated first cycle raffinate solution long enough to perform solvent extraction for separations. The stability of Am(VI) to autoreduction was measured using millimolar americium concentrations in a 1-cm cell with a Cary 6000 UV/Vis spectrophotometer for data acquisition. At millimolar americium concentrations, Am(VI) is stable enough against its own autoreduction for separations purposes. A second major accomplishment during FY14 was the hot test. Americium oxidation and extraction was performed using a centrifugal contactor-based test bed consisting of an extraction stage and two stripping stages. Sixty-three percent americium extraction was obtained in one extraction stage, in agreement with batch contacts. Promising electrochemical oxidation results have also been obtained, using terpyridine ligand derivatized electrodes for binding of Am(III). Approximately 50 % of the Am(III) was oxidized to Am(V) over the course of 1 hour. It is believed that this is the first demonstration of the electrolytic oxidation of americium in a non-complexing solution. Finally, an initial investigation of Am(VI) extraction using diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA) was performed.

  14. Tagging fast neutrons from an (241)Am/(9)Be source.

    PubMed

    Scherzinger, J; Annand, J R M; Davatz, G; Fissum, K G; Gendotti, U; Hall-Wilton, R; Håkansson, E; Jebali, R; Kanaki, K; Lundin, M; Nilsson, B; Rosborge, A; Svensson, H

    2015-04-01

    Shielding, coincidence, and time-of-flight measurement techniques are employed to tag fast neutrons emitted from an (241)Am/(9)Be source resulting in a continuous polychromatic energy-tagged beam of neutrons with energies up to 7MeV. The measured energy structure of the beam agrees qualitatively with both previous measurements and theoretical calculations. PMID:25644080

  15. AMS-02 fits dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázs, Csaba; Li, Tong

    2016-05-01

    In this work we perform a comprehensive statistical analysis of the AMS-02 electron, positron fluxes and the antiproton-to-proton ratio in the context of a simplified dark matter model. We include known, standard astrophysical sources and a dark matter component in the cosmic ray injection spectra. To predict the AMS-02 observables we use propagation parameters extracted from observed fluxes of heavier nuclei and the low energy part of the AMS-02 data. We assume that the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion coupling to third generation fermions via a spin-0 mediator, and annihilating to multiple channels at once. The simultaneous presence of various annihilation channels provides the dark matter model with additional flexibility, and this enables us to simultaneously fit all cosmic ray spectra using a simple particle physics model and coherent astrophysical assumptions. Our results indicate that AMS-02 observations are not only consistent with the dark matter hypothesis within the uncertainties, but adding a dark matter contribution improves the fit to the data. Assuming, however, that dark matter is solely responsible for this improvement of the fit, it is difficult to evade the latest CMB limits in this model.

  16. Texas A&M University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osters, Sandi

    2009-01-01

    Texas A&M University is a research extensive institution located in College Station. More than 45,000 students attend the university (about 20% are graduate or professional students). Academically, the university is known for its engineering, business, and agricultural and veterinary medicine programs, although there are more than 150 programs of…

  17. Biomedical applications of AMS at ANU

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, L.K.; Cresswell, R.G.; Day, J.P.; King, S.J.

    1995-12-01

    Studies utilising {sup 26}Al have constituted the bulk of the biomedical AMS program at the ANU`s 14UD accelerator. Projects underway or completed include: the dependence on chemical form of aluminum uptake from the gut; the partitioning of Al among the various components of cells and blood; and uptake of Al by Alzheimer`s patients. In addition, capabilities for measuring {sup 32}Si, {sup 41}Ca and plutonium in a biomedical context have been established during the past year. Results of the {sup 26}Al studies and an outline of the methodology for the other isotopes will be presented and discussed.

  18. Status report on the Erlangen AMS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, A.; Uhl, T.; Luppold, W.; Rottenbach, A.; Kritzler, K.; Ohneiser, A.; Kretschmer, W.

    2007-06-01

    The Erlangen AMS facility has been in routine operation since 1995. We present the current status of the facility and recent developments in our laboratory. The main focuses of our research are further improvement and automation of the sample preparation, the development of new sample preparation techniques like the dating of iron artefacts, and the development of an efficient automated gas feeding system for a gas ion source for the measurement of microgram samples for, e.g. environmental or future biomedical applications. The current background level and the long term stability of the facility are presented and discussed.

  19. AMS of the Minor Plutonium Isotopes.

    PubMed

    Steier, P; Hrnecek, E; Priller, A; Quinto, F; Srncik, M; Wallner, A; Wallner, G; Winkler, S

    2013-01-01

    VERA, the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator, is especially equipped for the measurement of actinides, and performs a growing number of measurements on environmental samples. While AMS is not the optimum method for each particular plutonium isotope, the possibility to measure (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu, (242)Pu and (244)Pu on the same AMS sputter target is a great simplification. We have obtained a first result on the global fallout value of (244)Pu/(239)Pu = (5.7 ± 1.0) × 10(-5) based on soil samples from Salzburg prefecture, Austria. Furthermore, we suggest using the (242)Pu/(240)Pu ratio as an estimate of the initial (241)Pu/(239)Pu ratio, which allows dating of the time of irradiation based solely on Pu isotopes. We have checked the validity of this estimate using literature data, simulations, and environmental samples from soil from the Salzburg prefecture (Austria), from the shut down Garigliano Nuclear Power Plant (Sessa Aurunca, Italy) and from the Irish Sea near the Sellafield nuclear facility. The maximum deviation of the estimated dates from the expected ages is 6 years, while relative dating of material from the same source seems to be possible with a precision of less than 2 years. Additional information carried by the minor plutonium isotopes may allow further improvements of the precision of the method. PMID:23565016

  20. AMS of the Minor Plutonium Isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Steier, P.; Hrnecek, E.; Priller, A.; Quinto, F.; Srncik, M.; Wallner, A.; Wallner, G.; Winkler, S.

    2013-01-01

    VERA, the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator, is especially equipped for the measurement of actinides, and performs a growing number of measurements on environmental samples. While AMS is not the optimum method for each particular plutonium isotope, the possibility to measure 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu and 244Pu on the same AMS sputter target is a great simplification. We have obtained a first result on the global fallout value of 244Pu/239Pu = (5.7 ± 1.0) × 10−5 based on soil samples from Salzburg prefecture, Austria. Furthermore, we suggest using the 242Pu/240Pu ratio as an estimate of the initial 241Pu/239Pu ratio, which allows dating of the time of irradiation based solely on Pu isotopes. We have checked the validity of this estimate using literature data, simulations, and environmental samples from soil from the Salzburg prefecture (Austria), from the shut down Garigliano Nuclear Power Plant (Sessa Aurunca, Italy) and from the Irish Sea near the Sellafield nuclear facility. The maximum deviation of the estimated dates from the expected ages is 6 years, while relative dating of material from the same source seems to be possible with a precision of less than 2 years. Additional information carried by the minor plutonium isotopes may allow further improvements of the precision of the method. PMID:23565016

  1. Pinpointing cosmic ray propagation with the AMS-02 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pato, Miguel; Hooper, Dan; Simet, Melanie E-mail: dhooper@fnal.gov

    2010-06-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02), which is scheduled to be deployed onboard the International Space Station later this year, will be capable of measuring the composition and spectra of GeV-TeV cosmic rays with unprecedented precision. In this paper, we study how the projected measurements from AMS-02 of stable secondary-to-primary and unstable ratios (such as boron-to-carbon and beryllium-10-to-beryllium-9) can constrain the models used to describe the propagation of cosmic rays throughout the Milky Way. We find that within the context of fairly simple propagation models, all of the model parameters can be determined with high precision from the projected AMS-02 data. Such measurements are less constraining in more complex scenarios, however, which allow for departures from a power-law form for the diffusion coefficient, for example, or for inhomogeneity or stochasticity in the distribution and chemical abundances of cosmic ray sources.

  2. Radio emission from AM Herculis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Dulk, G. A.; Chanmugam, G.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of the quiescent microwave emission of the magnetic cataclysmic variable AM Herculis are presented. The emission, which declined from a mean value of 0.58 mJy at 4.9 GHz to about 0.3 mJy, in rough coincidence with the entry of AM Herculis into an optical low state (mid-1983), is explained in terms of optically thick gyrosynchrotron emission. It is noted that the observation of a coherent outburst at 4.9 GHz, interpreted as the result of a cyclotron maser on the red dwarf secondary, indicates that the secondary is magnetized. Possible implications are briefly explored. Comparisons between this system and other stellar continuum radio sources are made.

  3. Decay counting in the age of AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, James R.

    1987-11-01

    Up to the advent of AMS, all the accomplishments of 14C dating, and the studies of 10Be and other long-lived radionuclides, were made by low-level decay counting, the technique pioneered by W.F. Libby. It will hardly be news to people at this conference that, while much was accomplished in the three decades when counting prevailed, the world has now changed decisively. I will try to give an account of where low-level counting was "before the revolution," and of what its usefulness is today. There are still some remarkable examples of its application, the best being the neutrino experiment of Raymond Davis, and its potential successors. Some cosmogenic nuclides, whose half-lives are less than 10 3 yr, are still best measured by decay; this will continue unless the overall ion yield of AMS systems rises markedly from present levels. One long-lived nuclide, 53Mn, is still best measured by neutron activation as 312-day 54Mn, but this may not continue.

  4. The potential of He stripping in heavy ion AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vockenhuber, C.; Alfimov, V.; Christl, M.; Lachner, J.; Schulze-König, T.; Suter, M.; Synal, H.-A.

    2013-01-01

    The use of helium as a stripper gas for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) measurements of heavy ions is presented. At ion stripping energies of about 500 keV and below we observe a significant increase of the mean charge state when using helium instead of other gases. Moreover, scattering losses are reduced with helium because of its lower mass compared to other commonly used stripper gases. Thus, highly efficient AMS measurements for 41Ca, 129I and 236U with transmissions through the accelerator in the range of 40-50% are now possible.

  5. Fission probabilities of 242Am,243Cm , and 244Cm induced by transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessedjian, G.; Jurado, B.; Barreau, G.; Marini, P.; Mathieu, L.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Aiche, M.; Boutoux, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Ducasse, Q.

    2015-04-01

    We have measured the fission probabilities of 242Am,243Cm , and 244Cm induced by the transfer reactions 243Am(3He,4He) ,243Am(3He,t ) , and 243Am(3He,d ) , respectively. The details of the experimental procedure and a rigorous uncertainty analysis, including a correlation matrix, are presented. For 243Cm our data show clear structures well below the fission threshold. To our knowledge, it is the first time that these structures have been observed for this nucleus. We have compared the measured fission probabilities to calculations based on the statistical model to obtain information on the fission barriers of the produced fissioning nuclei.

  6. Development of Tritium AMS for Biomedical Sciences Research

    SciTech Connect

    Dingley, K H; Chiarappa-Zucca, M L

    2002-01-01

    Tritium ({sup 3}H) is a radioisotope that is extensively utilized in biological research. Normally in the biological sciences, {sup 3}H is quantified by liquid scintillation counting. For the most sensitive measurements, liquid scintillation counting requires large samples and counting times of several-hours. In contrast, provisional studies at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry have demonstrated that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be-used to quantify {sup 3}H in milligram-sized biological samples with a 100 1000-fold improvement in detection limits when compared to scintillation counting. This increased sensitivity is expected to have great impact in the biological research community. However, before {sup 3}H AMS can be used routinely and successfully, two areas of concern needed to be addressed: (1) sample preparation methods needed to be refined and standardized, and (2) smaller and simpler AMS instrumentation needed to be developed. To address these concerns, the specific aims of this project were to: (1) characterize small dedicated {sup 3}H AMS spectrometer (2) develop routine and robust biological sample preparation methods, and (3) with the aid of our external collaborations, demonstrate the application of {sup 3}H AMS in the biomedical sciences. Towards these goals, the {sup 3}H AMS instrument was installed and optimized to enhance performance. The sample preparation methodology was established for standard materials (water and tributyrin) and biological samples. A number of biological and environmental studies which require {sup 3}H AMS were undertaken with university collaborators and our optimized analysis methods were employed to measure samples from these projects.

  7. Search for New Physics with AMS-02 Transition Radiation Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chanhoon

    Today the universe consists of 4.6% of ordinary matter, 23.3% of dark matter and 72.1% of dark energy. The dark matter is generally assumed be stable, non-relativistic and only weakly interacting. But we do not know what the dark matter is made of and how it is distributed within our Galaxy. In general, the cosmic antiparticles are expected as secondary products of interactions of the primary cosmic-rays (CRs) with the interstellar medium during propagation. While the measurements of CR positrons have become more precise, the results still do not match with the pure secondary origins. AMS-02 is a large acceptance precision particle spectrometer approved for installation on the International Space Station (ISS). A key feature of AMS-02 is precise particle identification for measurements of primary cosmic ray anti-particle spectra with negligible background up to a momentum of 500 GeV/c to allow indirect searches for dark matter. To efficiently separate positrons/electrons from protons/anti-protons, AMS-02 will be equipped with a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) with 5248 straw tube proportional counters filled with a Xe/CO2 (80/20) mixture. The AMS-02 TRD was fully assembled and integrated into AMS-02 in 2007. In 2008 AMS-02 had recorded cosmic ray particles on ground to demonstrate full functionality of the device. For the AMS-02 TRD it will be shown that the detector response is as expected and the gas tightness will allow operation in space for 20 years with a gas supply of 25 kg.

  8. 7 CFR 1280.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1280.602 Section 1280.602... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1280.602 Administrator, AMS. Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or any officer or employee of...

  9. 7 CFR 1230.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1230.602 Section 1230.602... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.602 Administrator, AMS. The term Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or...

  10. 7 CFR 1221.201 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1221.201 Section 1221.201... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures for the Conduct of Referenda Definitions § 1221.201 Administrator, AMS. Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or any officer or employee...

  11. 7 CFR 1221.201 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1221.201 Section 1221.201... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures for the Conduct of Referenda Definitions § 1221.201 Administrator, AMS. Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or any officer or employee...

  12. 7 CFR 1230.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1230.602 Section 1230.602... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.602 Administrator, AMS. The term Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or...

  13. 7 CFR 1280.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1280.602 Section 1280.602... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1280.602 Administrator, AMS. Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or any officer or employee of...

  14. 7 CFR 1230.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1230.602 Section 1230.602... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.602 Administrator, AMS. The term Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or...

  15. 7 CFR 1280.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1280.602 Section 1280.602... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1280.602 Administrator, AMS. Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or any officer or employee of...

  16. 7 CFR 1230.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1230.602 Section 1230.602... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.602 Administrator, AMS. The term Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or...

  17. 7 CFR 1230.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1230.602 Section 1230.602... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.602 Administrator, AMS. The term Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or...

  18. 7 CFR 1280.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1280.602 Section 1280.602... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1280.602 Administrator, AMS. Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or any officer or employee of...

  19. 7 CFR 1221.201 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1221.201 Section 1221.201... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures for the Conduct of Referenda Definitions § 1221.201 Administrator, AMS. Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or any officer or employee...

  20. 7 CFR 1280.602 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1280.602 Section 1280.602... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1280.602 Administrator, AMS. Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or any officer or employee of...

  1. 7 CFR 1221.201 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1221.201 Section 1221.201... INFORMATION ORDER Procedures for the Conduct of Referenda Definitions § 1221.201 Administrator, AMS. Administrator, AMS, means the Administrator of the Agricultural Marketing Service, or any officer or employee...

  2. Content-Based Networking: DTN, AMS, Sharednet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott

    2006-01-01

    A detailed viewgraph presentation on DTN, AMS, and Sharednet content-based networking is shown. The contents include: 1) DARPA Content-Based Networking Summary of Requirements; 2) Concept; 3) Key Features of AMS; 4) Overview of Sharednet; 5) SharedNet Deployment History; 6) SharedNet AMS DTN; 7) Detailed Structure; and 8) Bottom line.

  3. 47 CFR 1.10004 - What am I allowed to do if I am approved?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What am I allowed to do if I am approved? 1.10004 Section 1.10004 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE International Bureau Filing System § 1.10004 What am I allowed to do if I am approved? If you are approved...

  4. 47 CFR 1.10004 - What am I allowed to do if I am approved?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What am I allowed to do if I am approved? 1.10004 Section 1.10004 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE International Bureau Filing System § 1.10004 What am I allowed to do if I am approved? If you are approved...

  5. Biological AMS at Uppsala University: Status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Forsgard, Niklas; Possnert, Göran

    2010-04-01

    In January 2007 a new research program was initiated at Uppsala University focusing on the biological applications of AMS. We have used a 5 MV Pelletron Tandem accelerator to study biological samples. With Microdosing applications in mind, a variety of measurements have been performed on human blood, plasma and urine that have been labeled with a 14C-labeled pharmaceutical drug covering a concentration range, spanning 3 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, by studying small sample amounts and low concentrations, we have demonstrated sensitivity in the hundred zeptomole range for a small pharmaceutical substance in human blood. Another application of interest, based on the enhanced 14C activity from the cold war bomb-peak, is dating of DNA molecules providing fundamental data for the regenerative medicine and stem cell research community. We show data on a sensitive carrier method for measuring the isotopic ratio of small biological sample in the few μgC range.

  6. Internal gastargets in AmPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaan, A. P.; Postma, O.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van Leeuwen, E.; Doets, M.; Kraan, M.

    1997-05-01

    Internal gas targets in AmPS A.P. Kaan, O. Postma, J.F.J. van den Brand, E. van Leeuwen, M. Doets, M. Kra= an National Institute for Nuclear Physics and High Energy Physics; Kruislaan 409; 1098 SJ Amsterdam; Holland In the Amsterdam Puls Stretcher/storage ring AmPS(1 GeV electrons), we designed a set-up in order to accommodate a gas target with a density of 1016 mol/cm2. The storage cell needed for this purpose is a aluminium tube with a length of 40 cm, a diameter of 15 mm and a wall thickness of 25 =B5m. Three sets of conductance limiters on both sides of the target, combined with dry turbopumps are designed to be used as differential pumping stations. These limiters cause discontinuities in the beam path and must therefor be retractable and radio frequency compatible in both positions. Low =B5 materials must be used because of the depolarisation effects of changing magnetic fields. The calculations show that the flow resistance's are sufficient to reduce the load of the getter pumps to a level with which the lifetime of the pump elements remain acceptable. The design of the mechanics and the vacuum system will be explained. Recent results from the measurements after installation in combination with the influence on the lifetime on the beam will be presented

  7. Uncertainties of DS86 and prospects for residual radioactivity measurement.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, K; Hoshi, M; Hasai, H

    1999-12-01

    Residual radioactivity data of 152Eu, 60Co and 36Cl have been accumulated and it has been revealed in the thermal neutron region that a systematic discrepancy exists between the measured data and activation calculation based on the DS86 neutrons in Hiroshima. Recently 63Ni produced in copper samples by the fast neutron reaction 63Cu(n,p)63Ni has been of interest for evaluation of fast neutrons. Reevaluation of atomic-bomb neutrons and prospects based on residual activity measurements have been discussed. PMID:10805002

  8. Urinary amylase / urinary creatinine ratio (uAm/uCr) - a less-invasive parameter for management of hyperamylasemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The serum level of amylase (sAm) is commonly used as a biochemical marker for diagnosis and management of pancreatic disorders. However, the use of the urine level of amylase (uAm) is limited in practice, because the diagnostic ability of uAm is inferior to that of sAm. In the present study, the possible concordance of uAm-rerated parameters with sAm was investigated, and evaluate the usefulness of uAm for management of hyperamylasemia. Methods From June 1995 to October 2009, 804 samples of both urine and blood were collected from 128 patients in order to measure the serum level of amylase (sAm) and the urine level of amylase (uAm) and creatinine (uCr). Concordance of parameters using uAm compared to sAm was assessed. Parameters used were uAm, amylase creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR), and the ratio of uAm to uCr (uAm/uCr). Results uAm/uCr had the best correlation with sAm (r = 0.779, p < 0.001) compared to uAm (r = 0.620, p < 0.001) and to ACCR (r = 0.374, p < 0.001), when sAm was over the standard level. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of uAm/uCr (0.884) was significantly higher than that of uAm (0.766) and of ACCR (0.666) (p < 0.001 for each). The cutoff value of uAm/uCr was 569.8, with a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 83.1%. Conclusions The uAm/uCr ratio correlated with sAm, and may be an alternative to sAm for prediction of hyperamylasemia. Use of urine samples results in a decreased need for blood sampling, which is especially beneficial in pediatric patients. PMID:24330759

  9. Chlorine-36 in granite samples from the Hiroshima A-bomb site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Matsuhiro, T.; Takahashi, T.; Sasa, K.; Sueki, K.; Hoshi, M.; Fujita, S.; Shizuma, K.; Hasai, H.

    2004-08-01

    36Cl is a long-lived radioisotope, which, because it is created mainly through a thermal neutron capture process by 35Cl, may be used to estimate the strength of thermal neutron flux from A-bombs or nuclear fuel facilities. The 36Cl contents in granite samples from the Hiroshima A-bomb site have been measured by the Cl-36 accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system at the University of Tsukuba. The 36Cl/Cl ratios deduced from the 36Cl measurements are compared with independent evaluations based upon the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02) of the radiation doses received by the survivors of the Hiroshima A-bomb. The measurements corresponded well up to a ground distance of 1100 m, which proved the effectiveness of the DS02. Measurements of the 36Cl/Cl ratio of unexposed granite samples were 1.92 × 10-13 on average, and because the measured ratio for samples at a ground distance of 1163 m was 2.50 × 10-13, the assessment of the neutron flux by the 36Cl measurements of samples beyond about 1100 m is not practical. This limitation arises from the inability to distinguish bomb-induced Cl-36 from activation due to ambient sources.

  10. Electronic and magnetic properties of Am and Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, N.

    1985-02-01

    A review of the present status of the analyses of the optical spectra of Am and Cm in various oxidation states is given. From these analyses, the magnetic properties of the ground states of these ions can be determined. These predicted values are compared with the various magnetic measurements available.

  11. The Basis for Developing Samarium AMS for Fuel Cycle Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Biegalski, S R; Whitney, S M; Tumey, S J; Weaver, C J

    2008-10-13

    Modeling of nuclear reactor fuel burnup indicates that the production of samarium isotopes can vary significantly with reactor type and fuel cycle. The isotopic concentrations of {sup 146}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, and {sup 151}Sm are potential signatures of fuel reprocessing, if analytical techniques can overcome the inherent challenges of lanthanide chemistry, isobaric interferences, and mass/charge interferences. We review the current limitations in measurement of the target samarium isotopes and describe potential approaches for developing Sm-AMS. AMS sample form and preparation chemistry will be discussed as well as possible spectrometer operating conditions.

  12. Space Flight Qualification Program for the AMS-2 Commercial Cryocoolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirey, K. A.; Banks, I. S.; Breon, S. R.; Boyle, R. F.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMS-02) experiment is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector containing a large superfluid helium-cooled superconducting magnet. Highly sensitive detector plates inside the magnet measure a particle's speed, momentum, charge, and path. The AMS-02 experiment will study the properties and origin of cosmic particles and nuclei including antimatter and dark matter. AMS-02 will be installed on the International Space Station on Utilization Flight-4. The experiment will be run for at least three years. To extend the life of the stored cryogen and minimize temperature gradients around the magnet, four Stirling-cycle Sunpower M87N cryocoolers will be integrated with AMS-02. The cryocooler cold tip will be connected via a flexible strap to the outer vapor cooled shield of the dewar. Initial thermal analysis shows the lifetime of the experiment is increased by a factor of 2.8 with the use of the cryocooler. The AMS-02 project selected the Sunpower M87 cryocoolers and has asked NASA Goddard to qualify the cryocoolers for space flight use. This paper describes the interfaces with the cryocoolers and presents data collected during testing of the two engineering model cryocoolers. Tests include thermal performance characterization and launch vibration testing. Magnetic field compatibility testing will be presented in a separate paper at the conference.

  13. Method comparison for 241Am emergency urine bioassay.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunsheng; Sadi, Baki; Benkhedda, Karima; St-Amant, Nadereh; Moodie, Gerry; Ko, Raymond; Dinardo, Anthony; Kramer, Gary

    2010-10-01

    241Am is one of the high-risk radionuclides that might be used in a terrorist attack. 241Am in urine bioassay can identify the contaminated individuals who need immediate medical intervention and decontamination. This paper compares three methods for the measurement of 241Am in urine, namely liquid scintillation counting (LSC), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and gamma spectrometry (GS), at two levels, 20 and 2 Bq l(-1). All three methods satisfied the ANSI N13.30 radio-bioassay criteria for accuracy and repeatability. ICP-MS offered the best sensitivity and fastest sample turnaround; however, the ICP-MS system used in this work may not be available in many bioassay laboratories. LSC and GS are more commonly available instruments. GS requires minimal or no sample preparation, which makes it a good candidate method. Moreover, the sample throughput can be significantly improved if the GS and LSC methods are automated. PMID:20573683

  14. The AMS-02 lead-scintillating fibres Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adloff, C.; Basara, L.; Bigongiari, G.; Bosi, F.; Brun, P.; Cadoux, F.; Cervelli, F.; Chambert, V.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Coignet, G.; Cougoulat, G.; Di Falco, S.; Dubois, J. M.; Elles, S.; Falchini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Fougeron, D.; Fouque, N.; Galeotti, S.; Gallucci, G.; Gherarducci, F.; Girard, L.; Giuseppe, F.; Goy, C.; Hermel, R.; Incagli, M.; Jacquemier, J.; Journet, L.; Kossakowski, R.; Lepareur, V.; Li, Z. H.; Lieunard, B.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, Y. S.; Maestro, P.; Magazzù, C.; Maire, M.; Orsini, A.; Paniccia, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Peltier, F.; Piendibene, M.; Pilo, F.; Pochon, J.; Rambure, T.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Spinella, F.; Tang, X. W.; Tassan-Viol, J.; Tazzioli, A.; Vannini, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Zhuang, H. L.

    2013-06-01

    The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the AMS-02 experiment is a fine grained lead-scintillating fibres sampling calorimeter that allows for a precise three-dimensional imaging of the longitudinal and lateral shower development. It provides a high (≥106) electron/hadron discrimination with the other AMS-02 detectors [1] and good energy resolution. The calorimeter also provides a standalone photon trigger capability to AMS-02. The mechanical assembly was realized to ensure minimum weight, still supporting the intrinsically heavy calorimeter during launch. ECAL light collection system and electronics are designed to measure electromagnetic particles over a wide energy range, from GeV up to TeV. A full-scale flight-like model was tested using electrons and proton beams with energies ranging from 6 to 250 GeV.

  15. Low energy AMS of americium and curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christl, Marcus; Dai, Xiongxin; Lachner, Johannes; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2014-07-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has evolved over the past years as one of the most sensitive, selective, and robust techniques for actinide analyses. While analyses of U and Pu isotopes have already become routine at the ETH Zurich 0.5 MV AMS system "Tandy", there is an increasing demand for highly sensitive analyses of the higher actinides such as Am and Cm for bioassay applications and beyond. In order to extend the actinide capabilities of the compact ETH Zurich AMS system and to develop new, more sensitive bioassay routines, a pilot study was carried out. The aim was to investigate and document the performance and the potential background of Am and Cm analyses with low energy AMS. Our results show that 241Am and Cm isotopes can be determined relative to a 243Am tracer if samples and AMS standards are prepared identically with regard to the matrix elements, in which the sample is dispersed. In this first test, detection limits for Cm and Am isotopes are all in the sub-femtogram range and even below 100 ag for Cm isotopes. In a systematic background study in the mass range of the Cm isotopes, two formerly unknown metastable triply charged Th molecules were found on amu(244) and amu(248). The presence of such a background is not a principal problem for AMS if the stripper pressure is increased accordingly. Based on our first results, we conclude that ultra-trace analyses of Am and Cm isotopes for bioassay are very well possible with low energy AMS.

  16. Neutron transmission and capture of 241Am

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampoudis, C.; Kopecky, S.; Plompen, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.; Gunsing, F.; Sage, C.; Bouland, O.; Noguere, G.

    2013-03-01

    A set of neutron transmission and capture experiments based on the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique, were performed in order to determine the 241Am capture cross section in the energy range from 0.01 eV to 1 keV. The GELINA facility of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) served as the neutron source. A pair of C6D6 liquid scintillators was used to register the prompt gamma rays emerging from the americium sample, while a Li-glass detector was used in the transmission setup. Results from the capture and transmission data acquired are consistent with each other, but appear to be inconsistent with the evaluated data files. Resonance parameters have been derived for the data up to the energy of 100 eV.

  17. Correlation of PET and AMS analyses for early kinetics of 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Hamabe, Yoshimi; Miyaoka, Teiji; Theeraladanon, Chumpol; Oka, Takashi; Matsui, Takao; Inoue, Tomio

    2010-04-01

    The draft of the guidelines for microdosing in clinical trials was published in Japan in 2008 following the guidelines of the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It recommends utilizing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), and positron emission tomography (PET) for monitoring drug metabolites in preclinical studies. In this study, we clarified the correlation in measuring result between PET and AMS. The AMS measurement was undergone by using AMS system of Institute of Accelerator Analysis Ltd. (IAA, Kawasaki, Japan). First the back ground 14C level of blood in mice was measured by AMS. Second, we clarified the relationship between AMS and PET by using 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG). The correlation coefficient ( r) of the measurements using PET ( 18F-FDG) and AMS ( 14C-FDG) were quite high at 0.97 ( Y = 7.54 E - 05 X + 0.02, p < 0.001). The blood clearance profile of 18F-FDG was nearly identical with that of 14C-FDG. These results indicate that the AMS analysis has excellent correlation with the PET method.

  18. 33 CFR 103.505 - Elements of the Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elements of the Area Maritime...) Plan § 103.505 Elements of the Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan. The AMS Plan should address the following elements, as applicable: (a) Details of both operational and physical measures that are in...

  19. AM1* parameters for manganese and iron.

    PubMed

    Kayi, Hakan; Clark, Timothy

    2010-06-01

    We report the parameterization of AM1* for the elements manganese and iron. The basis sets for both metals contain one set each of s-, p- and d-orbitals. AM1* parameters are now available for H, C, N, O and F (which use the original AM1 parameters), Al, Si, P, S, Cl, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Zr, Mo, I and Au. The performance and typical errors of AM1* are discussed for Mn and Fe, and are compared with available NDDO Hamiltonians. PMID:19937261

  20. Photometry and dynamics of the minor mergers AM 1228-260 and AM 2058-381

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Jimenez, J. A.; Pastoriza, M. G.; Bonatto, C.; Rodrigues, I.; Krabbe, A. C.; Winge, Cláudia

    2015-08-01

    We investigate interaction effects on the dynamics and morphology of the galaxy pairs AM 2058-381 and AM 1228-260. This work is based on r' images and long-slit spectra obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Gemini South Telescope. The luminosity ratio between the main (AM 2058A) and secondary (AM 2058B) components of the first pair is a factor of ˜ 5, while for the other pair, the main (AM 1228A) component is 20 times more luminous than the secondary (AM 1228B). The four galaxies have pseudo-bulges, with a Sérsic index n < 2. Their observed radial velocities profiles (RVPs) present several irregularities. The receding side of the RVP of AM 2058A is displaced with respect to the velocity field model, while there is a strong evidence that AM 2058B is a tumbling body, rotating along its major axis. The RVPs for AM 1228A indicate a misalignment between the kinematic and photometric major axes. The RVP for AM 1228B is quite perturbed, very likely due to the interaction with AM 1228A. NFW halo parameters for AM 2058A are similar to those of the Milky Way and M 31. The halo mass of AM 1228A is roughly 10 per cent that of AM 2058A. The mass-to-light (M/L) of AM 2058 agrees with the mean value derived for late-type spirals, while the low M/L for AM 1228A may be due to the intense star formation ongoing in this galaxy.

  1. 47 CFR 1.10004 - What am I allowed to do if I am approved?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What am I allowed to do if I am approved? 1.10004 Section 1.10004 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection International Bureau Filing System § 1.10004 What am I allowed to do if I...

  2. 47 CFR 1.10004 - What am I allowed to do if I am approved?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What am I allowed to do if I am approved? 1.10004 Section 1.10004 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection International Bureau Filing System § 1.10004 What am I allowed to do if I...

  3. 47 CFR 1.10004 - What am I allowed to do if I am approved?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What am I allowed to do if I am approved? 1.10004 Section 1.10004 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection International Bureau Filing System § 1.10004 What am I allowed to do if I...

  4. A&M. Plot plan of administration and A&M areas. Shows relationships ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Plot plan of administration and A&M areas. Shows relationships among administration buildings and to A&M building (TAN-607), railroad turntable. Ralph M. Parsons 902-2&3-ANP-U 3. Date: December 1952. INEEL index code no. 032-0100-00-693-106690 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Results from the first international AM0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. L.; Jenkins, P.; Brinker, D.; Scheiman, D.; Anspaugh, B.; Gomez, T.; Lisbona, E. F.; Aoyama, K.; Imaizumi, M.; Pichetto, V.; Yiqiang, Y.; Goodbody, C.

    2003-01-01

    AM0 solar cell calibration laboratories throughout the world are working together to create standard methods for AM0 calibration. In an effort to compare the results of different calibration methods, five different laboratories calibrated GaAs and Si solar cells. The results of this inter-comparison are presented herein.

  6. Reprocessing of 10B-contaminated 10Be AMS targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, K. J.; Pedro, J. B.; Smith, A. M.; Child, D. P.; Fink, D.

    2013-01-01

    10Be accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an increasingly important tool in studies ranging from exposure age dating and palaeo-geomagnetism to the impact of solar variability on the Earth’s climate. High levels of boron in BeO AMS targets can adversely impact the quality of 10Be measurements through interference from the isobar 10B. Numerous methods in chemical sample preparation and AMS measurement have been employed in order to reduce the impact of excessive boron rates. We present details of a method developed to chemically reprocess a set of forty boron-contaminated BeO targets derived from modern Antarctic ice. Previously, the excessive boron levels in these samples, as measured in an argon-filled absorber cell preceding the ionisation detector, had precluded routine AMS measurement. The procedure involved removing the BeO + Nb mixture from the target holders and dissolving the BeO in hot concentrated H2SO4. The solution was then heated with HF to remove the boron as volatile BF3 before re-precipitating as Be(OH)2 and calcining to BeO. This was again mixed with niobium and pressed into fresh target holders. Following reprocessing, the samples gave boron rates reduced by 10-100×, which were sufficiently low and similar to previous successful batches of ice core, snow and associated blank samples, thus allowing a successful 10Be measurement in the absence of any boron correction. Overall recovery of the BeO for this process averaged 40%. Extensive testing of relevant processing equipment and reagents failed to determine the source of the boron. As a precautionary measure, a similar H2SO4 + HF step has been subsequently added to the standard ice processing method.

  7. Beneficial uses of /sup 241/Am

    SciTech Connect

    Mangeng, C.A.; Thayer, G.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report assesses the uses of /sup 241/Am and the associated costs and supply. The study shows that /sup 241/Am-fueled radioisotope thermoelectric generators in the range of 1 to 5 W electrical provide the most promising use of kilogram amounts of this isotope. For medical uses, where purity is essential, irradiation of /sup 241/Am can produce 97% pure /sup 238/Pu at $21,000/g. Using a pyro-metallurgical process, /sup 241/Am could be recovered from molten salt extraction (MSE) residues at an estimated incremental cost of $83/g adjusted to reflect the disposal costs of waste products. This cost of recovery is less than the $300/g cost for disposal of the /sup 241/Am contained in the MSE residues.

  8. Measurement of plutonium and other actinide elements at the center for accelerator mass spectrometry: a comparative assessments of competing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T H; McAninch, J

    1999-02-01

    initiatives. One potential measurement technique for meeting these requirements is accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). AMS is a widely accepted analytical technique for measurement of isotopes such as 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl (Vogel et al., 1995) but has only recently been demonstrated for the quantitative detection of actinides (Fifield et al., 1996). The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operates the most versatile and most productive AMS instrument in the world (Roberts et al., 1996). The addition of a Heavy Ion Beamline and associated hardware for actinide detection are in an advanced stage of development. Detection limits for actinide elements are expected to be on the order of 1 ´ 10 6 atoms (~0.5 fg) or lower with an initial measurement capacity of a few hundred samples per year. The ultimate detection sensitivity is expected to be ~1 ´ 10 5 atoms. Here we provide a review of non-conventional measurement techniquesÑincluding AMSÑfor the determination of low-levels of 239 Pu and other actinide elements in environmental samples. We include a discussion of potential measurement interferences and sample preparation requirements for the different techniques, and outline our proposed AMS system design and strategic approach for the development of low-level actinide detection capability at CAMS.

  9. Methods and applications of HPLC-AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dueker, Stephen R.; Lin, Yumei; Clifford, Andrew J.; Vogel, John S.

    2000-10-01

    Pharmacokinetics of physiologic doses of nutrients, pesticides, and herbicides can easily be traced in humans using a 14C-labeled compound. Basic kinetics can be monitored in blood or urine by measuring the elevation in the 14C content above the control predose tissue and converting to equivalents of the parent compound. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is an excellent method for the chemical separation of complex mixtures whose profiles afford estimation of biochemical pathways of metabolism. Compounds elute from the HPLC systems with characteristic retention times and can be collected in fractions that can then be graphitized for AMS measurement. Unknowns are tentatively identified by co-elution with known standards and chemical tests that reveal functional groupings. Metabolites are quantified with the 14C signal. Thoroughly accounting for the carbon inventory in the LC solvents, ion-pairing agents, samples, and carriers adds some complexity to the analysis. In most cases the total carbon inventory is dominated by carrier. Baseline background and stability need to be carefully monitored. Limits of quantitation near 10 amol of 14C per HPLC fraction are typically achieved. Baselines are maintained by limiting injected 14C activity <0.17 Bq (4.5 pCi) on the HPLC column.

  10. Actinides AMS at CIRCE in Caserta (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, M.; Gialanella, L.; Rogalla, D.; Petraglia, A.; Guan, Y.; De Cesare, N.; D'Onofrio, A.; Quinto, F.; Roca, V.; Sabbarese, C.; Terrasi, F.

    2010-04-01

    The operation of Nuclear Power Plants and atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons performed in the past, together with production, transport and reprocessing of nuclear fuel, lead to the release into the environment of a wide range of radioactive nuclides, such as uranium, plutonium, fission and activation products. These nuclides are present in the environment at ultra trace levels. Their detection requires sensitive techniques like AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry). In order to perform isotopic ratio measurements of the longer-lived actinides, e.g., of 236U relative to the primary 238U and various Pu isotopes relative to 239Pu, an upgrade of the CIRCE accelerator (Center for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental Heritage) in Caserta, Italy, is underway. In this paper we report on the results of simulations aiming to define the best ion optics and to understand the origin of possible measurement background. The design of a high resolution TOF- E (Time of Flight-Energy) detector system is described, which will be used to identify the rare isotopes among interfering background signals.

  11. Metabolism of AM404 From Acetaminophen at Human Therapeutic Dosages in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Shun; Shiraishi, Seiji; Miyano, Kanako; Sudo, Yuka; Toda, Akiko; Mogi, Masayuki; Hara, Mayumi; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Kawasaki, Yoshihiko; Taniguchi, Mikio; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acetaminophen, an analgesic and antipyretic drug, has been used clinically for more than a century. Previous studies showed that acetaminophen undergoes metabolic transformations to form an analgesic compound, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) arachidonamide (AM404), in the rodent brain. However, these studies were performed with higher concentrations of acetaminophen than are used in humans. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to examine the metabolism of AM404 from acetaminophen in the rat brain at a concentration of 20 mg/kg, which is used in therapeutic practice in humans, and to compare the pharmacokinetics between them. Materials and Methods: We used rat brains to investigate the metabolism of AM404 from acetaminophen at concentrations (20 mg/kg) used in humans. In addition, we determined the mean pharmacokinetic parameters for acetaminophen and its metabolites, including AM404. Results: The maximum plasma concentrations of acetaminophen and AM404 in the rat brain were 15.8 µg/g and 150 pg/g, respectively, with corresponding AUC0-2h values of 8.96 μg hour/g and 117 pg hour/g. The tmax for both acetaminophen and AM404 was 0.25 hour. Conclusions: These data suggest that AM404’s concentration-time profile in the brain is similar to those of acetaminophen and its other metabolites. Measurement of blood acetaminophen concentration seems to reflect the concentration of the prospective bioactive substance, AM404. PMID:27110534

  12. On the reliability of AMS in ilmenite-type granites: an insight from the Marimanha pluton, central Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva-Urcia, B.; Casas, A. M.; Ramón, M. J.; Leiss, B.; Mariani, E.; Román-Berdiel, T.

    2012-04-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) at room temperature has been used for decades to obtain the petrofabric orientation in granites as a kinematic marker to establish models explaining the emplacement of plutons. To assess the significance of AMS in terms of mineral orientation, we have performed a multidisciplinary study at five sites of an ilmenite-type pluton (Marimanha, central Pyrenees) with significant facies changes. To test the reliability of AMS measurements at room temperature, the following methods were applied: low temperature AMS; image analyses and X-ray texture goniometry (XTG) of biotites; and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to obtain c-axes directions of quartz. The total (para-, ferro- and dia-)magnetic fabric analysed by AMS is compared with the paramagnetic fabric (low-T AMS), mica orientation (with image analyses and XTG) and the diamagnetic fabric (EBSD). Results indicate that weakly oriented paramagnetic minerals can give well-defined magnetic fabrics (AMS at room and low temperatures). Furthermore, the AMS ellipsoid is the result of composite biotite fabrics resulting from both orientation and spatial distribution of crystals, as demonstrated by 2-D mathematical models presented in this study. AMS is the most effective technique for quickly measuring composite fabrics. In addition, the advantage of using AMS analyses is twofold: (1) it is a fast way of analysing standard samples that can give clues for subsequent image/mineral orientation analysis and (2) it is a volume-related method that gives a picture of the rock fabric as a whole.

  13. Automatic Mode Switch (AMS) Causes Less Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Jorat, Mohammadvahid; Nikoo, Mohammadhossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac resynchronization devices are part of modern heart failure management. After implantation, we analyze and program devices in an attempt to ensure their success. Biventricular pacing should be 98% or more for the lowest mortality and best symptom improvement. Case Presentation: In this case series, we present a combination of far field sensing and automatic mode switching (AMS) in six patients. It is found that this combination causes ventricular sensing (VS) episodes with wide QRS and no synchronization. We turn off the AMS and alleviate the problem. Conclusions: Switching AMS off may increase biventricular pacing in some patients. PMID:26949695

  14. Computing Strategy of the AMS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choutko, V.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Shan, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a high energy physics experiment operating on board of the International Space Station (ISS). The detector was installed on ISS in May 2011 and is expected to continuously take cosmic rays data through Year 2024 and beyond. The computing strategy of the AMS experiment is discussed in the paper, including software design, data processing, data reconstruction and simulation, detector performance evaluation, and data production overview. In particular, parallelization of reconstruction and simulation of AMS data is discussed in detail.

  15. Space Station Live: First Findings from the AMS

    NASA Video Gallery

    PAO Officer Kyle Herring interviews Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Project Manager Trent Martin about the first findings from the AMS. A small team from Johnson Space Center collaborates with AM...

  16. Challenge of COPD: Am I at Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Challenge of COPD Am I at Risk? Past Issues / Fall 2014 ... or the American Lung Association's COPD information section. COPD Learn More Breathe Better ® Program The COPD Learn ...

  17. Space Station Live: Installing the AMS

    NASA Video Gallery

    PAO Officer Kyle Herring interviews NASA astronaut Mike Fincke about his contribution during STS-134, the shuttle mission that installed the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) in May 2011. As a miss...

  18. Interfacing AM/FM with distribution SCADA

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, M.A. )

    1993-01-01

    This article examines an upgrade to Union Electric's (UE's) distribution SCADA system by interfacing it with UE's automated mapping and facility management (AM/FM) system to give dispatchers a way to relate facility outages geographically with a real-time monitoring system. The topics of the article are the original SCADA system, the AM/FM system, and the new SCADA system, the man-machine and machine-machine interface, and further applications.

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry with fully stripped 26Al, 63Cl, 41Ca and (su59)Ni ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faestermann, H.; Kato, K.; Korschinek, G.; Krauthan, P.; Nolte, E.; Rühm, W.; Zerle, L.

    1990-04-01

    The detection system of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) with completely stripped ions of 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca and 59Ni at the Munich accelerator laboratory and measurements with these ions are presented. Detection limits are given. The presented applications are: dating of groundwater of the Milk River aquifer and deduction of the neutron fluence and spectrum of the Hiroshima A-bomb.

  20. SCADA -- AM/FM interface: Platforms, technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.F. )

    1994-05-01

    Efficient utility operations is enhanced by close interoperation between automated mapping/facility management (AM/FM) and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems. Important benefits of such integration are improvements in service quality and reduced maintenance costs. Development of an AM/FM -- SCADA interface to provide automatic database and display generation for SCADA through AM/FM functions is continuing by Valmet Automation. To minimize or eliminate vendor-dependence, the AM/FM-SCADA interface is compliant with the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) utility communication architecture (UCA). The utility industry is changing at an unprecedented rate. To remain a leader, or even to keep pace, utilities must be flexible and innovative. Competition forces companies to become more streamlined and efficient. These forces make the requirements for automation go beyond simple SCADA. Among several developing trends in the industry is the emergence of AM/FM. Collectively, these trends indicate the need to increase efficiency in the design, operation and maintenance of the transmission and distribution system. To accomplish its mission, SCADA and AM/FM must be a highly integrated system to provide timely information to its users. Open systems, the client-server paradigm and better information integration tools facilitate meeting these needs. UCA specification provides the technological glue, to achieve application integration between heterogeneous systems.

  1. A&M. Aerial view of turntable and A&M building (TAN607). Pool, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Aerial view of turntable and A&M building (TAN-607). Pool, hot shop, cold shop, and machine shop are completed. Track leading to left edge of view goes to the IET. Ancient lake shoreline and berm beyond A&M building. Camera facing east. Administrative buildings beyond berm. Date: November 24, 1954. INEEL negative no. 13205 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Direct coupling of a laser ablation cell to an AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacker, L.; Münsterer, C.; Hattendorf, B.; Christl, M.; Günther, D.; Synal, H.-A.

    2013-01-01

    In rare cases, cleaned samples can be directly inserted into a negative ion source of an AMS and still meet the requirements for long-term and stable measurements. We present the coupling of a laser ablation system to the gas ion source of an AMS system (MICADAS, ETH Zurich) for direct and continuous CO2 introduction. Solid carbonate samples like stalagmites or corals are suitable sample materials, which can be ablated and decomposed continuously using a pulsed laser focused onto the surface of a solid sample, which is placed in an airtight ablation cell. CO2 formed during the ablation of a CaCO3 sample is continually flushed with He into the gas ion source. The production rate of CO2 can be adjusted via the laser pulse repetition rate (1-20 Hz), the crater diameter (1-150 μm) and the energy density applied (0.2-3 mJ/pulse) of the laser (frequency quintupled Nd:YAG at 213 nm with 5 ns pulse duration). In our first test, measurements of one sample with known age were replicated within one sigma. Blanks showed 5% contamination of modern carbon of yet unknown origin. In order to develop LA-AMS into a routine sampling tool the ablation cell geometry and settings of the gas ion source have to be further optimized.

  3. Interpretation of AMS-02 results: correlations among dark matter signals

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Andrea De; Riotto, Antonio; Xue, Wei E-mail: antonio.riotto@unige.ch

    2013-05-01

    The AMS-02 collaboration has recently released data on the positron fraction e{sup +}/(e{sup −}+e{sup +}) up to energies of about 350 GeV. If one insists on interpreting the observed excess as a dark matter signal, then we find it is best described by a TeV-scale dark matter annihilating into τ{sup +}τ{sup −}, although this situation is already severely constrained by gamma-ray measurements.The annihilation into μ{sup +}μ{sup −} is allowed by gamma-rays more than τ{sup +}τ{sup −}, but it gives a poorer fit to AMS-02 data. Moreover, since electroweak corrections induce correlations among the fluxes of stable particles from dark matter annihilations, the recent AMS-02 data imply a well-defined prediction for the correlated flux of antiprotons. Under the assumption that their future measurements will not show any antiproton excess above the background, the dark matter interpretation of the positron rise will possibly be ruled out by only making use of data from a single experiment. This work is the first of a program where we emphasize the role of correlations among dark matter signals.

  4. OSO-8 X-ray observations of AM Herculis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, J. H.; Lampton, M.; Boldt, E.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    Hard X-ray observations of the binary system AM Her were coincident with soft X-ray and ground-based optical measurements. In the 2-60 KeV band, variability was detected with an eclipse during phases 0.5 to 0.7 with respect to the 0. d 12892 period optical minima, synchronous with the known soft X-ray eclipse. The 2-60 KeV uneclipsed flux was 9.5 x 10 to the minus 10th power erg sq cm/sec, of which 86% lies above 10 keV. Thus AM Her contains a hard source located near the similarly eclipsed soft X-ray source. The X-ray data are interpreted in terms of thermal bremsstrahlung from accretion onto a white dwarf.

  5. The Earth Observing System AM Spacecraft - Thermal Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalmers, D.; Fredley, J.; Scott, C.

    1993-01-01

    Mission requirements for the EOS-AM Spacecraft intended to monitor global changes of the entire earth system are considered. The spacecraft is based on an instrument set containing the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER), Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT). Emphasis is placed on the design, analysis, development, and verification plans for the unique EOS-AM Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS) aimed at providing the required environments for all the onboard equipment in a densely packed layout. The TCS design maximizes the use of proven thermal design techniques and materials, in conjunction with a capillary pumped two-phase heat transport system for instrument thermal control.

  6. Neutron and gamma-ray spectra of 239PuBe and 241AmBe.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; Manzanares-Acuña, Eduardo; Becerra-Ferreiro, Ana María; Carrillo-Nuñez, Aureliano

    2002-08-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray spectra of 239PuBe and 241AmBe were measured and their dosimetric features were calculated. Neutron spectra were measured using a multisphere neutron spectrometer with a 6LiI(Eu) scintillator. The 239PuBe neutron spectrum was measured in an open environment, while the 241AmBe neutron spectrum was measured in a closed environment. Gamma-ray spectra were measured using a NaI(Tl) scintillator using the same experimental conditions for both sources. The effect of measuring conditions for the 241AmBe neutron spectrum indicates the presence of epithermal and thermal neutrons. The low-resolution neutron spectra obtained with the multisphere spectrometer allows one to calculate the dosimetric features of neutron sources. At 100 cm both sources produce approximately the same count rate as that of the 4.4 MeV gamma-ray per unit of alpha emitter activity. PMID:12150274

  7. Electronic structure of polycrystalline Cd metal using 241Am radioisotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaka, M. S.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Sharma, B. K.

    2014-04-01

    Electronic structure study of the polycrystalline cadmium metal is reported. The experimental measurement is undertaken on a polycrystalline sheet sample using 59.54 keV radioisotope of 241Am. These results are compared with the ab initio calculations. The theoretical calculations are performed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method employing the density functional theories (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) and augmented plane wave (APW) methods. The spherically averaged APW and LCAO based theoretical Compton profiles are in good agreement with the experimental measurement however the APW based theoretical calculations show best agreement.

  8. Fission dynamics study in 243Am and 254Fm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, K.; Ghosh, T. K.; Roy, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chaudhuri, A.; Bhattacharya, C.; Pandey, R.; Kundu, S.; Mukherjee, G.; Rana, T. K.; Meena, J. K.; Mohanto, G.; Dubey, R.; Saneesh, N.; Sugathan, P.; Guin, R.; Das, S.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2016-06-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions in the reactions 11B + 232Th and 11B + 243Am were measured in an energy range around the barrier. No sudden change in the width of the mass distribution as a function of center-of-mass energy was observed at near-barrier energies, indicating no quasifission transition in the near-barrier energies. Interestingly, the previous measurements of fission fragment angular anisotropies for the same systems showed significant departure from the statistical saddle-point model predictions at near-barrier energies, indicating the presence of nonequilibrium fission processes.

  9. 47 CFR 73.128 - AM stereophonic broadcasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AM stereophonic broadcasting. 73.128 Section 73.128 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.128 AM stereophonic broadcasting. (a) An Am broadcast station may, without specific authority from...

  10. 47 CFR 73.128 - AM stereophonic broadcasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AM stereophonic broadcasting. 73.128 Section 73.128 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.128 AM stereophonic broadcasting. (a) An Am broadcast station may, without specific authority from...

  11. Determination of the242 m Am nuclear moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekk, K.; Göring, S.; Kälber, W.; Meisel, G.; Rebel, H.; Sameh, A. Ali

    1988-09-01

    The hyperfine structure of Am atoms was investigated in an atomic beam by laser spectroscopy. The observed splittings were evaluated with respect to the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of242 m Am. The results are: μ I (242 m Am)=+0.97(5)nm, Q(242 m Am)=+6.5(2.0)b.

  12. 47 CFR 1.30003 - Installations on an AM antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Installations on an AM antenna. 1.30003 Section... Random Selection Disturbance of AM Broadcast Station Antenna Patterns § 1.30003 Installations on an AM antenna. (a) Installations on a nondirectional AM tower. When antennas are installed on a...

  13. 47 CFR 73.14 - AM broadcast definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AM broadcast definitions. 73.14 Section 73.14 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.14 AM broadcast definitions. AM broadcast band. The band of frequencies extending from 535 to 1705 kHz....

  14. 47 CFR 73.14 - AM broadcast definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AM broadcast definitions. 73.14 Section 73.14 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.14 AM broadcast definitions. AM broadcast band. The band of frequencies extending from 535 to 1705 kHz....

  15. 47 CFR 73.14 - AM broadcast definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false AM broadcast definitions. 73.14 Section 73.14 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.14 AM broadcast definitions. AM broadcast band. The band of frequencies extending from 535 to 1705 kHz....

  16. 47 CFR 73.44 - AM transmission system emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AM transmission system emission limitations. 73... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.44 AM transmission system emission limitations... with the ANSI/EIA-549-1988, NRSC-1 AM Preemphasis/Deemphasis and Broadcast Transmission...

  17. 47 CFR 73.44 - AM transmission system emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false AM transmission system emission limitations. 73... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.44 AM transmission system emission limitations... with the ANSI/EIA-549-1988, NRSC-1 AM Preemphasis/Deemphasis and Broadcast Transmission...

  18. 47 CFR 73.44 - AM transmission system emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AM transmission system emission limitations. 73... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.44 AM transmission system emission limitations... with the ANSI/EIA-549-1988, NRSC-1 AM Preemphasis/Deemphasis and Broadcast Transmission...

  19. 47 CFR 73.44 - AM transmission system emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AM transmission system emission limitations. 73... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.44 AM transmission system emission limitations... with the ANSI/EIA-549-1988, NRSC-1 AM Preemphasis/Deemphasis and Broadcast Transmission...

  20. 47 CFR 73.44 - AM transmission system emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false AM transmission system emission limitations. 73... SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.44 AM transmission system emission limitations... with the ANSI/EIA-549-1988, NRSC-1 AM Preemphasis/Deemphasis and Broadcast Transmission...

  1. Multiscale AM-FM Methods for Diabetic Retinopathy Lesion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Victor; Barriga, Eduardo; Murillo, Sergio; Pattichis, Marios; Davis, Herbert; Russell, Stephen; Abràmoff, Michael; Soliz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We propose the use of multiscale amplitude-modulation frequency-modulation (AM-FM) methods for discriminating between normal and pathological retinal images. The method presented in this paper is tested using standard images from the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS). We use 120 regions of 40×40 pixels containing 4 types of lesions commonly associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and two types of normal retinal regions that were manually selected by a trained analyst. The region types included: microaneurysms, exudates, neovascularization on the retina, hemorrhages, normal retinal background, and normal vessels patterns. The cumulative distribution functions of the instantaneous amplitude, the instantaneous frequency magnitude, and the relative instantaneous frequency angle from multiple scales are used as texture features vectors. We use distance metrics between the extracted feature vectors to measure interstructure similarity. Our results demonstrate a statistical differentiation of normal retinal structures and pathological lesions based on AM-FM features. We further demonstrate our AM-FM methodology by applying it to classification of retinal images from the MESSIDOR database. Overall, the proposed methodology shows significant capability for use in automatic DR screening. PMID:20129850

  2. AMS: Area Message Service for SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, M.; Mackenzie, R.; Millsom, D.; Zelazny, M.

    1993-04-01

    The Area Message Service (AMS) is a TCP/IP based messaging service currently in use at SLAC. A number of projects under development here at SLAC require and application level interface to the 4.3BSD UNIX socket level communications functions using TCP/IP over ethernet. AMS provides connection management, solicited message transfer, unsolicited message transfer, and asynchronous notification of pending messages. AMS is written completely in ANSI `C` and is currently portable over three hardware/operating system/network manager platforms, VAX/VMS/Multinet, PC/MS-DOS/Pathworks, VME 68K/pSOS/pNA. The basic architecture is a client-server connection where either end of the interface may be the server. This allows for connections and data flow to be initiated from either end of the interface. Included in the paper are details concerning the connection management, the handling of the multi-platform code, and the implementation process.

  3. A comprehensive appraisal of 241Am in soils around Rocky Flats, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Litaor, M I; Allen, L

    1996-09-01

    Soils east of Rocky Flats Plant (RFETS) near Golden, Colorado, were contaminated with actinides because of accidental release of oils laden with plutonium isotopes. Consequently, these soils were contaminated by 241Am due to radioactive decay of 241Pu (t1/2 = 14.4 y). A spatial analysis of 241Am activity in soils east of RFETS was conducted to elucidate the magnitude and the mode of 241Am dispersion in the soil environment. 241Am activity of 178 soil samples ranged from 0.037 Bq kg-1 to 10,004 Bq kg-1 with a mean of 214 Bq kg-1, median of 7.28 Bq kg-1, standard deviation of 942 Bq kg-1, and a coefficient of variation of 4.3. Spatial analysis of 241Am in soils around RFETS was conducted using indicator kriging, which is a nonparametric technique especially suitable to model a conditional cumulative distribution function (ccdf) of highly skewed environmental data such as 241Am. The ccdf was used to generate an E-type (mean of the conditional cdf) surface. The resulted surfaces were consistent with the hypothesis that the westerly winds were the dominant mechanism of americium dispersal. The spatial distribution and dispersal mechanisms of 241Am were similar to those of 239+240Pu. The ccdf was also used to construct probability of exceedence maps of 241Am in soils. For the purpose of this report two threshold values for the probability maps were selected: (1) the mean measured background activity of 241Am (0.4 Bq kg-1), and (2) the programmatic preliminary remediation goal for residential occupancy scenario (87.7 Bq kg-1). The probability-of-exceedance maps provide estimates of spatial uncertainty associated with each threshold. The E-type maps in conjunction with the probability-of-exceedance maps provide a robust framework for future cleanup options and land use decisions. PMID:8698577

  4. Wear Mechanism Maps for Magnesium Alloy AM60 and Composite AM60-9% (Al2O3)f

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah Khan, Muhammad Zafar

    The purpose of this work was to study the tribological behaviour of squeeze cast Mg alloy AM60 and its composite AM60-9% (Al2O3) f. Dry sliding wear tests were performed on specimens of these materials using a block-on-ring tribometer which was equipped with a COF and temperature measurement system. Wear, COF and temperature maps were constructed to illustrate the effect of temperature and COF on the wear behaviour of the Mg alloy and it's composite. Four wear regimes namely low, mild, transient and severe wear were identified. The transition from mild to severe wear regime was found to be dependent on the bulk temperature of the specimen. Oxidational wear prevailed in low and mild wear whereas plastic deformation induced wear and melt wear controlled the wear rates in transient and severe wear regimes, respectively. This study shows that the incorporation of Al2O3 fibres in AM60 alloy improved the wear resistance of the resulting composite by delaying the transition from mild to severe wear.

  5. Complexation of Am(III) by oxalate in NaClO{sub 4} media

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G.R.; Chen, J.F.

    1995-09-01

    The complexation of Am(III) by oxalate has been investigated in solutions of NaClO{sub 4} up to 9.0 M ionic strength at 25{degrees}C. The dissociation constants of oxalic acid were determined by potentiometric titration, while the stability constants of the Am(III)-oxalate complexation were measured by the solvent extraction technique. A thermodynamic model was constructed to predict the apparent equilibrium constants at different ionic strengths by applying the Pitzer equation using parameters for the Na{sup +}-HOx{sup -}, Na{sup +}-Ox{sup -}, AmOx{sup +}-ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, and Na{sup +}-Am(Ox){sub 2}{sup -} interactions obtained by fitting the data.

  6. Ultra-weak magnetic fields in Am stars: β UMa and θ Leo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazère, A.; Petit, P.; Lignières, F.; Aurière, M.; Böhm, T.; Wade, G.

    2014-12-01

    An extremely weak circularly-polarized signature was recently discovered in spectral lines of the chemically peculiar Am star Sirius A (Petit et al. 2011). This signal was interpreted as a Zeeman signature related to a sub-gauss longitudinal magnetic field, constituting the first detection of a surface magnetic field in an Am star. We present here ultra-deep spectropolarimetric observations of two other bright Am stars, β UMa and θ Leo, observed with the NARVAL spectropolarimeter. The line profiles of the two stars display circularly-polarized signatures similar in shape to the observations gathered for Sirius A. These new detections suggest that very weak magnetic fields may be present in the photospheres of a significant fraction of intermediate-mass stars, although the strongly asymmetric Zeeman signatures measured so far in Am stars (featuring a prominent positive lobe and no detected negative lobe) are not expected in the standard theory of the Zeeman effect.

  7. Behavior of 241Am in fast reactor systems - a safeguards perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Beddingfield, David H; Lafleur, Adrienne M

    2009-01-01

    Advanced fuel-cycle developments around the world currently under development are exploring the possibility of disposing of {sup 241}Am from spent fuel recycle processes by burning this material in fast reactors. For safeguards practitioners, this approach could potentially complicate both fresh- and spent-fuel safeguards measurements. The increased ({alpha},n) production in oxide fuels from the {sup 241}Am increases the uncertainty in coincidence assay of Pu in MOX assemblies and will require additional information to make use of totals-based neutron assay of these assemblies. We have studied the behavior of {sup 241}Am-bearing MOX fuel in the fast reactor system and the effect on neutron and gamma-ray source-terms for safeguards measurements. In this paper, we will present the results of simulations of the behavior of {sup 241}Am in a fast breeder reactor system. Because of the increased use of MOX fuel in thermal reactors and advances in fuel-cycle designs aimed at americium disposal in fast reactors, we have undertaken a brief study of the behavior of americium in these systems to better understand the safeguards impacts of these new approaches. In this paper we will examine the behavior of {sup 241}Am in a variety of nuclear systems to provide insight into the safeguards implications of proposed Am disposition schemes.

  8. A new plastic scintillation resin for single-step separation, concentration and measurement of technetium-99.

    PubMed

    Barrera, J; Tarancón, A; Bagán, H; García, J F

    2016-09-14

    Technetium is a synthetic element with no stable isotopes, produced as waste in nuclear power plants and in cyclotrons used for nuclear medicine. The element has high mobility, in the form of TcO4(-); its determination is therefore important for environmental protection. Technetium is found in low concentrations and therefore common methods for its analysis include long treatments in several steps and require large amounts of reagents for its purification and preconcentration. Plastic scintillation resins (PSresin) are novel materials used to separate, preconcentrate and measure radionuclides in a single step. The objective of this study is to prepare and characterise a PSresin for the preconcentration and measurement of (99)Tc. The study first evaluates the reproducibility of the production of PSresins between batches and over time; showing good reproducibility and storage stability. Next, we studied the effect of some common non-radioactive interferences, showing small influences on measurement, and radioactive interferences ((36)Cl and (238)U/(234)U). (36)Cl can be removed by a simple treatment with 0.5 M HCl and (238)U/(234)U can be removed from the column by cleaning with a mixture of 0.1 M HNO3 and 0.1 M HF. In the latter case, a slight change in the morphology of the PSresin caused an increase in detection efficiency. Finally, the PSresin was applied to the measurement of real spiked samples (sea water and urine) with deviations lower than 10% in all cases. PMID:27566363

  9. 7 CFR 1220.601 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1220.601 Section 1220.601 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  10. 7 CFR 1220.601 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1220.601 Section 1220.601 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  11. 7 CFR 1220.601 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1220.601 Section 1220.601 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  12. 7 CFR 1220.601 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1220.601 Section 1220.601 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  13. 7 CFR 1220.601 - Administrator, AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrator, AMS. 1220.601 Section 1220.601 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH,...

  14. 7 CFR 65.105 - AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false AMS. 65.105 Section 65.105 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG...

  15. 7 CFR 65.105 - AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false AMS. 65.105 Section 65.105 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG...

  16. 7 CFR 65.105 - AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false AMS. 65.105 Section 65.105 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG...

  17. 7 CFR 65.105 - AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false AMS. 65.105 Section 65.105 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG...

  18. 7 CFR 65.105 - AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false AMS. 65.105 Section 65.105 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG...

  19. Determination of the (241)Am activity in real contaminated slag.

    PubMed

    Burda, O; Arnold, D; Wershofen, H

    2016-03-01

    One of the main tasks of the EMRP IND04 MetroMetal project "Ionising Radiation Metrology for the Metallurgical Industry" was to develop sets of reference sources in various matrices such as cast steel, slag and fume dust for the calibration of the gamma spectrometric detector prototypes developed in the frame of the project. This work is focused on the characterisation of real contaminated slag material with (241)Am using the transmission measurements in combination with Monte-Carlo simulations. The method and the results are presented and discussed. PMID:26688357

  20. Solving the stellar 62Ni problem with AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillmann, I.; Faestermann, T.; Korschinek, G.; Lachner, J.; Maiti, M.; Poutivtsev, M.; Rugel, G.; Walter, S.; Käppeler, F.; Erhard, M.; Junghans, A. R.; Nair, C.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2010-04-01

    An accurate knowledge of the neutron capture cross sections of 62,63Ni is crucial since both isotopes take key positions which affect the whole reaction flow in the weak s process up to A≈90. No experimental value for the 63Ni(n,γ) cross section exists so far, and until recently the experimental values for 62Ni(n,γ) at stellar temperatures (kT=30keV) ranged between 12 and 37 mb. This latter discrepancy could now be solved by two activations with following AMS using the GAMS setup at the Munich tandem accelerator which are also in perfect agreement with a recent time-of-flight measurement. The resulting (preliminary) Maxwellian cross section at kT = 30 keV was determined to be <σ>=23.4±4.6mb. Additionally, we have measured the 64Ni(γ,n)63Ni cross section close to threshold. Photoactivations at 13.5 MeV, 11.4 MeV and 10.3 MeV were carried out with the ELBE accelerator at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. A first AMS measurement of the sample activated at 13.5 MeV revealed a cross section smaller by more than a factor of 2 compared to NON-SMOKER predictions.

  1. A&M. TAN607. Elevation for secondphase expansion of A&M Building. Work ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607. Elevation for second-phase expansion of A&M Building. Work areas south of the Carpentry Shop. High-bay shop, decontamination room at south-most end. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. Ralph M. Parsons 1299-5-ANP/GE-3-607-A 106. Date: August 1956. INEEL index code no. 034-0607-00-693-107166 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. A&M. A&M building (TAN607). Camera facing east. From left to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. A&M building (TAN-607). Camera facing east. From left to right, pool section, hot shop, cold shop, and machine shop. Biparting doors to hot shop are in open position behind shroud. Four rail tracks lead to hot shop and cold shop. Date: August 20, 1954. INEEL negative no. 11706 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. [Removal Congo Red from Aqueous Solution Using Poly (AM-co-DVB)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luan-luan; Liao, Yun-wen; Gao, He-jun; Wang, Zhong-zhi; Shuai, Chao

    2015-06-01

    Poly(AM-co-DVB) was synthesized by acrylamide(AM) and divinylbenzene(DVB) via the crosslinking reaction. The microscope structure and thermal stability of Poly(AM-co-DVB) were characterized by FT-IR, SEM and TG. Congo red (CR) was used to measure the adsorptive capacity of Poly (AM-co-DVB). The effects of initial pH, contact time and temperature on the adsorption of CR on Poly (AM-co-DVB) were investigated in this work. The kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics of the adsorption process were also discussed. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacities were 319.1 mg x g(-1) at pH = 7.25 and contact time = 3 h. The adsorption kinetics was well fitted by a pseudo-second-order model and the adsorption isotherms agreed well with the Langmuir model. The adsorption process was spontaneous process. Above all, the adsorption capacity of Poly (AM-co-DVB) on Congo red is significant. PMID:26387325

  4. Determination of plutonium in environmental samples by AMS and alpha spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hrnecek, E; Steier, P; Wallner, A

    2005-01-01

    Environmental samples from nuclear weapons test sites at the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa (French Polynesia, south Pacific) have been analyzed for their content of plutonium isotopes by applying the independent techniques of decay counting (Alpha Spectrometry) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Here, we propose the combination of both techniques which results in a maximum of information on the isotopic signature of Pu in environmental samples. Plutonium was chemically separated from the bulk material by anion exchange. (242)Pu was used as an internal standard for both AMS and alpha spectrometry. The samples for alpha spectrometry were prepared by micro-precipitation with NdF(3). After alpha spectrometry, the samples were reprocessed for AMS. Pu was co-precipitated with Fe(OH)(3) and finally, solid samples were prepared. At the VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) facility, the various Pu isotopes were separated by their isotopic masses and quantified by the AMS technique. A good agreement of the results obtained from the AMS measurements was found with those obtained from Alpha Spectrometry. Overall, the data agree on average within 10% of each other. Isotope ratios for (238)Pu, (239)Pu and (240)Pu can be extracted from our investigations. Alpha spectrometry delivers data for the (238)Pu and the combination of ((239+240))Pu concentrations in those samples. In addition, the AMS technique provides information on the individual concentrations of (240)Pu and (239)Pu. PMID:15982894

  5. A new AMS facility based on a Cockcroft-Walton type 1 MV tandetron at IFIN-HH Magurele, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Enachescu, M.; Ghita, D. G.; Calinescu, C. I.; Petre, A.; Mosu, D. V.; Klein, M.

    2014-01-01

    A 1 MV AMS machine was recently installed in the National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering IFIN-HH, Bucharest Romania. It is the second AMS facility at IFIN-HH having the goal not only to continue but mainly to enlarge the research area of this highly sensitive analyzing method. The multi-element AMS was developed by HVEE to measure 14C, 10Be, and 26Al, and 129I. The results of an acceptance test are presented and demonstrate that this machine is capable of routine 14C age dating and of measurements of other radioisotopes in terms of accuracy and precision as well as a low background level.

  6. Twelve years of follow up of cases with old 241Am internal contamination.

    PubMed

    Malátová, Irena; Vrba, Tomás; Becková, Vera; Pospísilová, Helena

    2010-10-01

    A group of workers internally contaminated with Am have been followed for about 12 years. The source of contamination was AmO2 powder used for production of AmBe neutron sources and other applications. The production of some radionuclide sources included chemical treatment of the original material, which transformed the americium into the nitrate, but mostly powder metallurgy was used for production of sources for smoke detectors. In vivo measurement of the workers was performed with two LEGe detectors placed near the head of the measured person. Calibration was performed with four different physical skull phantoms of different origin and a voxel phantom with Monte Carlo simulation, which was developed to fit the head sizes of individual persons. Samples of urine and feces were analyzed by means of radiochemical separation followed by alpha-spectrometry. Separation of 241Am from mineralized excreta was performed by combined anion exchange and extraction chromatographic techniques. As a tracer, 243Am was used. When the measured data (83 data on skeletal activity, activity in 389 bioassay samples) were compared with International Commission on Radiological Protection's and Leggett's biokinetic models of americium, it was found that in most cases, after more than 15 y since the intake, the excretion rate was lower (or skeletal activity higher) than predicted. On the other hand, the ratio of excreted activity in urine and feces agrees well with model predictions. PMID:20838090

  7. Counting alveolar macrophages (AM) from expectorate samples of exposed workers as a test for lung irritation from occupational exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gullvag, B.; Mylius, E.; Nilsen, A.

    1985-05-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) have a natural function in the human body in keeping the lung tissue sterile and in dealing with any foreign material contaminating the airways. AM increase in number when the lungs are exposed to inhaled particles or gases. These investigations have shown that the number of AM changes in relation to the quantity and the type of compounds inhaled, and that this change can be measured by differential counting of the total number of free lung cells, or of AM alone in samples recovered by lung lavage. A method had been developed by which AM are counted in expectorate samples from exposed workers. A primary aluminum reduction plant was chosen, because the kind and degree of chemical pollution of the working atmosphere had already been relatively well investigated.

  8. The AM5600 ambulatory blood pressure recording system.

    PubMed

    Richey; Jones; Harshfield; Somes; Johnson; Bailey; Soberman

    1997-08-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe our experience with the AM5600 (Advanced Medical Products, inc.) ambulatory blood pressure recorder-Holter monitor which has the unique features of providing full disclosure Holter data and the storage of Korotkoff signals for each blood pressure measurement. METHODS: We performed a total of 236 recording sessions with 118 normotensive subjects aged 49-74 years. We then selected 25 of the recordings randomly and examined them on two different occasions, first with the aid of the Korotkoff signals and later using the traditional technique, without the aid of the Korotkoff signals. RESULTS: Two hundred and sixteen (91.5%) recordings were completed successfully. Within these data sets, on average 82.3 +/- 12.1% of the measurements per recording were considered acceptable after examination of the Korotkoff signals. This comparison between the traditional and the Korotkoff technique resulted in a sensitivity 11.3% and a specificity 99.2% of those of the traditional method. CONCLUSION: The performance of the AM5600 is satisfactory and the storage of Korotkoff signals improves the detection of artifacts. PMID:10234116

  9. 50 CFR 648.163 - Bluefish Accountability Measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES..., irrespective of whether the fishery-level ACL is exceeded. If a state has increased or reduced quota through... each of the states involved in the combined quota, irrespective of whether the fishery-level ACL...

  10. 50 CFR 648.233 - Spiny dogfish Accountability Measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES...-annual period described in § 648.232(e)(1) will be harvested and shall close the EEZ to fishing for...

  11. 50 CFR 648.163 - Bluefish Accountability Measures (AMs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... outlined in § 648.162(b)(2), then the following procedure will be followed: (1) If biomass is below the... estimate of biomass is below the BMSY threshold (i.e., B/BMSY is less than 0.5), the stock is under a... possible thereafter, once catch data are available, as a single-year adjustment. (2) If biomass is...

  12. The new LLNL AMS sample changer

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.L.; Norman, P.J.; Garibaldi, J.L.; Hornady, R.S.

    1993-09-07

    The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LLNL has installed a new 64 position AMS sample changer on our spectrometer. This new sample changer has the capability of being controlled manually by an operator or automatically by the AMS data acquisition computer. Automatic control of the sample changer by the data acquisition system is a necessary step towards unattended AMS operation in our laboratory. The sample changer uses a fiber optic shaft encoder for rough rotational indexing of the sample wheel and a series of sequenced pneumatic cylinders for final mechanical indexing of the wheel and insertion and retraction of samples. Transit time from sample to sample varies from 4 s to 19 s, depending on distance moved. Final sample location can be set to within 50 microns on the x and y axis and within 100 microns in the z axis. Changing sample wheels on the new sample changer is also easier and faster than was possible on our previous sample changer and does not require the use of any tools.

  13. Bowen fluorescence in AM Herculis stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schachter, Jonathan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Kahn, Steven M.; Paerels, Frits B. S.

    1991-01-01

    The study relates the observations of the Bowen fluorescence lines in AM Her and EF Eri, two AM Her systems. The implications of source variability and the checks performed in order to verify the accuracy of the data are reviewed. The line ratios for H I and He II are shown to deviate considerably from those expected; in this light, the H I and He II emission in AM Her is analyzed in detail. This approach makes it possible to put limits on line and continuum optical depths as well as temperatures. These limits along with the observed Bowen emission are used to construct a picture of the emission-line regions in the two sources, producing the values for the size, density, and temperature of a region. The derived value of the size is found to be significantly less than the size of the Roche lobe of the white dwarf, while the large range of densities is attributed to the exponential temperature dependence in the expression used for density.

  14. AMICA, an astro-mapper for AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfardini, Alessandro; Trampus, Paolo; Battiston, Roberto; Gargiulo, Corrado

    2006-07-01

    The alpha magnetic spectrograph (AMS) is a composite particle detector to be accommodated on the International Space Station (ISS). AMS is mainly devoted to galactic, charged cosmic rays studies, antimatter and dark matter searches. Besides the main, classical physics goals, capabilities in the field of GeV and multi-GeV gamma astrophysics have been established and are under investigation by a number of groups. Due to the unsteadiness of the ISS platform, a star-mapper device is required in order to fully exploit the intrinsic arc-min angular resolution provided by the silicon tracker. A star-mapper is conceptually an imaging, optical instrument able to autonomously recognize a stellar field and to calculate its own orientation with respect to an inertial reference frame. AMICA (Astro Mapper for Instruments Check of Attitude) on AMS is responsible for providing real-time information that is going to be used off-line for compensating the large uncertainties in the ISS flight attitude and the structural degrees of freedom. In this paper, we describe in detail the AMICA sub-system, the accommodation/integration issues and the in-flight alignment procedure adopting identified galactic (Pulsars) and extra-galactic (AGNs) sources.

  15. Technological developments for strontium-90 determination using AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Yukihiko; Sueki, Keisuke; Sasa, Kimikazu; Matsunaka, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Shibayama, Nao; Izumi, Daiki; Kinoshita, Norikazu; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is one of method used for 90Sr determination. It would enable rapid 90Sr measurements from environmental samples such as water, soil, and milk. However, routine analysis of 90Sr using AMS has not yet been achieved because of difficulties associated with isobaric separation and production of intense negative ion beams characterized by currents from hundreds of nanoamperes to several microamperes. We have developed a rapid procedure for preparing samples with optimum compositions for use with AMS, which enables production of intense Sr beam currents from an ion source. Samples of SrF2 were prepared from a standard Sr solution and agricultural soil. The time required to prepare a SrF2 sample from a soil sample was 10 h. Negative 88SrF3- ions were successfully extracted at 500 nA from mixed samples of SrF2 and PbF2. In the present work, negative ions of 90Zr, included as an impurity, were accelerated with a tandem accelerator operated at a terminal voltage of 5 MV. Ions characterized by a charge state of 6+ were channeled into a gas counter. An atomic ratio of 90Zr/88Sr of 3 × 10-8 was estimated for the soil sample. No signal was detected from the assay of PbF2, which was pressed in an aluminum cathode, for a mass number of 90. PbF2 revealed good performance in the production of negative SrF3- molecular ion beams and detection of 90Sr with a gas counter.

  16. Evidence from cosmic ray exposure (CRE) dating for the existence of a pre-Minoan caldera on Santorini, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassas, C. D.; Bourlès, D. L.; Braucher, R.; Druitt, T. H.; Nomikou, P.; Léanni, L.

    2016-05-01

    Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) dating was performed on the caldera cliffs of Santorini with the aim of detecting cliff segments predating the Minoan eruption (17th century BCE). The methodology involved the determination of in situ-produced cosmogenic 36Cl concentration in basaltic-to-rhyodacitic whole rocks cropping out in the cliffs. After the samples were processed following the chemical protocol of 36Cl preparation for silicate rocks, 36Cl concentrations were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Important challenges during the implementation procedure were related to large amounts of radiogenic 36Cl, complex modeling of inherited 36Cl, and dominance of the thermal and epithermal (low-energy) neutron capture production pathway. Nevertheless, quantitative assessments on the basis of the contribution of the low-energy neutron capture pathway percent to the total production rate validated the calculated CRE dates. Current CRE ages demonstrate that an ancient caldera existed on pre-Minoan Santorini, occupying at least the northern half of the modern-day caldera.

  17. Think Big: Leadership Projects for AMS and Montessori Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattin-McNichols, John

    2014-01-01

    The American Montessori Society's (AMS) 2014 Living Legacy recipient, John Chattin-McNichols, delivered the keynote address at the Annual Conference in Dallas, TX, on March 27, 2014, In his speech, he described three overall highlights of AMS: (1) AMS is now a world-leading organization; (2) It must become a learning organization; and (3)…

  18. 47 CFR 73.45 - AM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false AM antenna systems. 73.45 Section 73.45... Broadcast Stations § 73.45 AM antenna systems. (a) All applicants for new, additional, or different AM... existing station must specify an antenna system, the efficiency of which complies with the requirements...

  19. 47 CFR 73.45 - AM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AM antenna systems. 73.45 Section 73.45... Broadcast Stations § 73.45 AM antenna systems. (a) All applicants for new, additional, or different AM... existing station must specify an antenna system, the efficiency of which complies with the requirements...

  20. 47 CFR 73.45 - AM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false AM antenna systems. 73.45 Section 73.45... Broadcast Stations § 73.45 AM antenna systems. (a) All applicants for new, additional, or different AM... existing station must specify an antenna system, the efficiency of which complies with the requirements...

  1. 47 CFR 73.45 - AM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AM antenna systems. 73.45 Section 73.45... Broadcast Stations § 73.45 AM antenna systems. (a) All applicants for new, additional, or different AM... existing station must specify an antenna system, the efficiency of which complies with the requirements...

  2. 47 CFR 73.45 - AM antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AM antenna systems. 73.45 Section 73.45... Broadcast Stations § 73.45 AM antenna systems. (a) All applicants for new, additional, or different AM... existing station must specify an antenna system, the efficiency of which complies with the requirements...

  3. 47 CFR 73.49 - AM transmission system fencing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AM transmission system fencing requirements. 73.49 Section 73.49 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.49 AM transmission system fencing...

  4. 47 CFR 73.49 - AM transmission system fencing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false AM transmission system fencing requirements. 73.49 Section 73.49 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.49 AM transmission system fencing...

  5. 47 CFR 73.49 - AM transmission system fencing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AM transmission system fencing requirements. 73.49 Section 73.49 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.49 AM transmission system fencing...

  6. 47 CFR 73.49 - AM transmission system fencing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AM transmission system fencing requirements. 73.49 Section 73.49 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.49 AM transmission system fencing...

  7. 47 CFR 73.49 - AM transmission system fencing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false AM transmission system fencing requirements. 73.49 Section 73.49 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.49 AM transmission system fencing...

  8. Development of a fraction collector for coupling gas chromatography with an AMS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottenbach, Andreas; Uhl, T.; Hain, A.; Scharf, A.; Kritzler, K.; Kretschmer, W.

    2008-05-01

    It has been shown that microscale 14C measurements are possible by using a gas handling system and a gas ion source [T. Uhl, W. Kretschmer, W. Luppold, A. Scharf, AMS measurements from microgram to milligram, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. (2005) 474 (240th ed.), T. Uhl, W. Luppold, A. Rottenbach, A. Scharf, K. Kritzler, W. Kretschmer, Development of an automatic gas handling system for microscale AMS (14C) measurements, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. (2007) 303 (259th ed.)]. In Erlangen a gas handling system was especially developed for environmental and biomedical investigations. For the separation of the compound of interest a standard gas chromatograph (GC) is used. To minimize the sample contamination and sample loss we have designed a fraction collector that connects a GC and an elemental analyzer (EA) directly. The selected compound is combusted in the EA and the resulting CO2 is then transferred into the gas handling system for AMS measurements. From the beginning of GC preparation up to the AMS measurement the sample is in a closed line. All operations are fully automated, so no manual operations are necessary. This guarantees high cleanness and maximum sample yield. Preliminary measurements are done using modern and old ethyl alcohol (from fermentation and of petrochemical origin, respectively). The results are consistent with their expected values although cross contamination and background signal increased as the sample mass was decreased.

  9. /sup 242/Am/sup m/ fission cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, J.C.; White, R.M.; Howe, R.E.; Landrum, J.H.; Dougan, R.J.; Dupzyk, R.J.

    1984-06-01

    The neutron-induced fission cross section of /sup 242/Am/sup m/ has been measured over the energy region from 10/sup -3/ eV to approx.20 MeV in a series of experiments utilizing a linac-produced ''white'' neutron source and a monoenergetic source of 14.1 MeV neutrons. The cross section was measured relative to that of /sup 235/U in the thermal (0.001 to approx.3 eV) and high energy (1 keV to approx.20 MeV) regions and normalized to the ENDF/B-V /sup 235/U(n,f) evaluated cross section. In the resonance energy region (0.5 eV to 10 keV) the neutron flux was measured using thin lithium glass scintillators and the relative cross section thus obtained was normalized to the thermal energy measurement. This procedure allowed a consistency check between the thermal and high energy data. The cross section data have a statistical accuracy of approx.0.5% at thermal energies and in the 1-MeV energy region, and a systematic uncertainty of approx.5%. We confirmed that /sup 242/Am/sup m/ has the largest thermal fission cross section known with a 2200 m/sec value of 6328 b. Results of a Breit-Wigner sum-of-single-levels analysis of 48 fission resonances up to 20 eV are presented and the connection of these resonance properties to the large thermal cross section is discussed. Our measurements are compared with previously reported results.

  10. AMS-02 results support the secondary origin of cosmic ray positrons.

    PubMed

    Blum, Kfir; Katz, Boaz; Waxman, Eli

    2013-11-22

    We show that the recent AMS-02 positron fraction measurement is consistent with a secondary origin for positrons and does not require additional primary sources such as pulsars or dark matter. The measured positron fraction at high energy saturates the previously predicted upper bound for secondary production, obtained by neglecting radiative losses. This coincidence, which will be further tested by upcoming AMS-02 data at higher energy, is a compelling indication for a secondary source. Within the secondary model, the AMS-02 data imply a cosmic ray propagation time in the Galaxy of <10(6) yr and an average traversed interstellar matter density of ~1 cm(-3), comparable to the density of the Milky Way gaseous disk, at a rigidity of 300 GV. PMID:24313471

  11. A new AMS facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Chopra, S.; Pattanaik, J. K.; Ojha, S.; Gargari, S.; Joshi, R.; Kanjilal, D.

    2015-10-01

    Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), a national facility of government of India, is having a 15UD Pelletron accelerator for multidisciplinary ion beam based research programs. Recently, a new accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) facility has been developed after incorporating many changes in the existing 15UD Pelletron accelerator. A clean chemistry laboratory for 10Be and 26Al with all the modern facilities has also been developed for the chemical processing of samples. 10Be measurements on sediment samples, inter laboratory comparison results and 26Al measurements on standard samples are presented in this paper. In addition to the 10Be and 26Al AMS facilities, a new 14C AMS facility based on a dedicated 500 kV tandem ion accelerator with two cesium sputter ion sources, is also being setup at IUAC.

  12. 21 CFR 822.24 - What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.24 Section 822.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... SURVEILLANCE Responsibilities of Manufacturers § 822.24 What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? You must submit your plan to conduct...

  13. 21 CFR 822.24 - What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.24 Section 822.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... SURVEILLANCE Responsibilities of Manufacturers § 822.24 What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? You must submit your plan to conduct...

  14. 21 CFR 822.24 - What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? 822.24 Section 822.24 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... SURVEILLANCE Responsibilities of Manufacturers § 822.24 What are my responsibilities once I am notified that I am required to conduct postmarket surveillance? You must submit your plan to conduct...

  15. Rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5900 balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5900 12.7-mm (1/2-in.) dia was determined in five-ball fatigue testers. The 10% life with the warm headed AMS 5900 balls was equivalent to that of AMS 5749 and over eight times that of AISI M-50. The AMS balls fabricated by cold heading had small surface cracks which initiated fatigue spalls where these cracks were crossed by running tracks. The cold-headed AMS 5900 balls had a 10% fatigue life an order of magnitude less than that of the warm headed balls even when failures on the cold headed balls at visible surface cracks were omitted.

  16. Separate influences of acoustic AM and FM sensitivity on the phonological decoding skills of impaired and normal readers.

    PubMed

    Witton, Caroline; Stein, John F; Stoodley, Catherine J; Rosner, Burton S; Talcott, Joel B

    2002-08-15

    Developmental dyslexia is associated with deficits in the processing of basic auditory stimuli. Yet it is unclear how these sensory impairments might contribute to poor reading skills. This study better characterizes the relationship between phonological decoding skills, the lack of which is generally accepted to comprise the core deficit in reading disabilities, and auditory sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM). Thirty-eight adult subjects, 17 of whom had a history of developmental dyslexia, completed a battery of psychophysical measures of sensitivity to FM and AM at different modulation rates, along with a measure of pseudoword reading accuracy and standardized assessments of literacy and cognitive skills. The subjects with a history of dyslexia were significantly less sensitive than controls to 2-Hz FM and 20-Hz AM only. The absence of a significant group difference for 2-Hz AM shows that the dyslexics do not have a general deficit in detecting all slow modulations. Thresholds for detecting 2-Hz and 240-Hz FM and 20-Hz AM correlated significantly with pseudoword reading accuracy. After accounting for various cognitive skills, however, multiple regression analyses showed that detection thresholds for both 2-Hz FM and 20-Hz AM were significant and independent predictors of pseudoword reading ability in the entire sample. Thresholds for 2-Hz AM and 240-Hz FM did not explain significant additional variance in pseudoword reading skill. It is therefore possible that certain components of auditory processing of modulations are related to phonological decoding skills, whereas others are not. PMID:12191454

  17. Future of the NOSAMS Tandetron AMS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Reden, Karl F.

    2010-04-01

    The NOSAMS 3 MV Tandetron AMS system will soon reach its 20th anniversary of operation. A critical review of all aspects of the system is necessary to assess the analytical, economical and operational factors that enter into the consideration of either an upgrade or a replacement of the instrument. Recent in-house experience with the design and construction of a large-acceptance 14C AMS system gives us a benchmark with which to compare the expected outcome of an upgrade. The present ion analysis efficiency of our Tandetron system is roughly 1%, well below the 4% value of our new system. This affects the lower limit of analyzable sample size, speed of analysis, exposure to systematic errors, and the upper limit of achievable single-sample counting statistics. At first glance it may seem obvious that a replacement (even at higher cost) would be preferable to an upgrade. However, it will be shown that there are good reasons to consider the latter. One of the most compelling is the fact that the Tandetron is a state-of-the-art and superior high-current accelerator design with minimal signs of aging and very low-maintenance. Ion beam modeling calculations show that the main transmission limitation of the instrument is caused by the design of our injector, a four-magnet "Recombinator", making it difficult to perform reliable AMS with negative currents exceeding 80 μA. To be acceptable, an upgrade should bring the Tandetron to at least 3% ion efficiency by replacing the injector with a properly matched high-transmission device.

  18. Educational Opportunities in Pro-Am Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienberg, R. T.; Stencel, R. E.

    2006-08-01

    While many backyard stargazers take up the hobby just for fun, many others are attracted to it because of their keen interest in learning more about the universe. The best way to learn science is to do science. Happily, the technology available to today's amateur astronomers — including computer-controlled telescopes, CCD cameras, powerful astronomical software, and the Internet — gives them the potential to make real contributions to scientific research and to help support local educational objectives. Meanwhile, professional astronomers are losing access to small telescopes as funding is shifted to larger projects, including survey programs that will soon discover countless interesting objects needing follow-up observations. Clearly the field is ripe with opportunities for amateurs, professionals, and educators to collaborate. Amateurs will benefit from mentoring by expert professionals, pros will benefit from observations and data processing by increasingly knowledgeable amateurs, and educators will benefit from a larger pool of skilled talent to help them carry out astronomy-education initiatives. We will look at some successful pro-am collaborations that have already borne fruit and examine areas where the need and/or potential for new partnerships is especially large. In keeping with the theme of this special session, we will focus on how pro-am collaborations in astronomy can contribute to science education both inside and outside the classroom, not only for students of school age but also for adults who may not have enjoyed particularly good science education when they were younger. Because nighttime observations with sophisticated equipment are not always possible in formal educational settings, we will also mention other types of pro-am partnerships, including those involving remote observing, data mining, and/or distributed computing.

  19. The Orbital Period of AM Canum Venaticorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David A.; Skillman, David R.; Kemp, Jonathan; Patterson, Joseph; Vanmunster, Tonny; Fried, Robert E.; Retter, Alon

    1998-02-01

    We report the discovery of a strictly periodic signal at 1028.7325+/-0.0004 s in the light curve of the cataclysmic variable AM Canum Venaticorum. This brings to an end the long search for the true binary period of this important star, which represents the latest known stage of binary star evolution. It provides a more secure and quantitative basis for testing theories of binary evolution. And it provides strong evidence in favor of the ``permanent superhump'' interpretation of this star and other cataclysmic variables of extreme mass ratio.

  20. The AMS experiment: Results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertucci, B.; AMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment operates since May 2011 on board of the International Space Station to search for primordial anti-matter, to study the light anti-matter components in the Cosmic Rays (CR) and to perform a precision study of the CR composition and energy spectrum. More than 60 billion events have been collected by the instrument up to now thanks to its large acceptance and the long exposure time. In this contribution we will discuss the most recent results, reviewing the instrument design and performances as well as the data analysis procedures enabling their achievement.

  1. Performance in space of the AMS-02 RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovacchini, F.

    2014-12-01

    AMS-02 was successfully installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in May 2011, to perform precise measurements of galactic cosmic rays in the 100 MV to few TV magnetic rigidity range. Among several specialized sub-detectors, AMS-02 includes a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH), which provides a precise measurement of the particle charge and velocity. The Cherenkov light is produced in a radiator made of silica aerogel and sodium fluoride and collected by means of an array of photomultiplier tubes. Since its launch to space, the detector has been taking data without failures; its functionality and data integrity are monitored and show stable response. In order to achieve the optimal detector performance, calibrations have been performed to account for the dependence of the photodetectors response on temperature and for effective non-uniformities in the detector. The knowledge gathered of the photon yield at the percent level resulted in a charge resolution of 0.3 charge units for He and 0.5 charge units for Si ions. The required precision in the measurements of the particle velocity at the per mil level demanded a more accurate determination of the aerogel refractive index. A map of the aerogel radiator refractive index has been directly inferred from in-flight high statistics data with a precision of Δn / n < 2 ×10-5 on average and its stability with time has also been checked. Finally, a velocity resolution of ~ 0.8 ×10-3 for He and ~ 0.5 ×10-3 for Z > 5 ions has been obtained.

  2. The in vitro reduction of sodium [36Cl]-chlorate in bovine ruminal fluid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium chlorate effectively reduces or eliminates the numbers of gram-negative pathogenic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tracts of live cattle. Limitations to the in vivo efficacy of chlorate are its rapid absorption from the gastrointestinal tract and its presumed reduction to chloride within the...

  3. Total radioactive residues and residues of [36Cl]chlorate in market size broilers.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The oral administration of chlorate salts reduces the numbers of Gram-negative pathogens in gastrointestinal tracts of live food animals. Although the efficacy of chlorate salts has been demonstrated repeatedly, the technology cannot be introduced into commercial settings without first demonstrating...

  4. Neutron capture production rates of cosmogenic 60Co, 59Ni and 36Cl in stony meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spergel, M. S.; Reedy, R. C.; Lazareth, O. W.; Levy, P. W.

    1986-01-01

    Results for neutron flux calculations in stony meteoroids (of various radii and compositions) and production rates for Cl-36, Ni-59, and Co-60 are reported. The Ni-59/Co-60 ratio is nearly constant with depth in most meteorites: this effect is consistent with the neutron flux and capture cross section properties. The shape of the neutron flux energy spectrum, varies little with depth in a meteorite. The size of the parent meteorite can be determined from one of its fragments, using the Ni-59/Co-60 ratios, if the parent meteorite was less than 75 g/cm(2) in radius. If the parent meteorite was larger, a lower limit on the size of the parent meteorite can be determined from a fragment. In C3 chondrites this is not possible. In stony meteorites with R less than 50 g/cm(2) the calculated Co-60 production rates (mass less than 4 kg), are below 1 atom/min g-Co. The highest Co-60 production rates occur in stony meteorites with radius about 250 g/cm(2) (1.4 m across). In meteorites with radii greater than 400 g/cm(2), the maximum Co-60 production rate occurs at a depth of about 175 g/cm(2) in L-chondrite, 125 g/cm(2) in C3 chrondrite, and 190 g/cm(2) in aubrites.

  5. TISSUE RESIDUES, METABOLISM, AND EXCRETION OF NA[36CL]O3 IN RATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel pre-harvest technology that reduces certain pathogenic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tracts of food animals involves feeding an experimental sodium chlorate-containing product (ECP) to animals 24-72 h prior to slaughter. In order to determine the metabolism and disposition of the active ...

  6. TISSUE DISTRIBUTION, ELIMINATION, AND METABOLISM OF SODIUM [36CL]PERCHLORATE IN LACTATING GOATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate has contaminated water sources throughout the US, but particularly in the arid Southwest, an area containing large numbers of people and few water sources. Recent studies have demonstrated that perchlorate is present in alfalfa and that perchlorate is secreted into the milk of cows. Stud...

  7. The in vitro reduction of sodium [36Cl]-chlorate in bovine ruminal fluid.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium chlorate effectively reduces or eliminates the numbers of gram-negative pathogenic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tracts of live cattle. Limitations to the in vivo efficacy of chlorate are its rapid absorption from the gastrointestinal tract and its presumed reduction to chloride within the...

  8. TISSUE DISTRIBUTION, ELIMINATION, AND METABOLISM OF SODIUM 36CL-PERCHLORATE IN LACTATING GOATS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate has contaminated water sources throughout the US, but particularly in the arid Southwest, an area containing large numbers of people and few water sources. Recent studies have demonstrated that perchlorate is present in alfalfa and that perchlorate is secreted into the milk of cows. Only...

  9. 47 CFR 73.1692 - Broadcast station construction near or installation on an AM broadcast tower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the indirect method (see § 73.51). Upon the completion of the installation, antenna impedance... completion of construction, antenna impedance measurements of the AM station shall be made. In addition... simultaneously with the filing of the application for license to cover this permit, the results of the...

  10. 47 CFR 73.1692 - Broadcast station construction near or installation on an AM broadcast tower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the indirect method (see § 73.51). Upon the completion of the installation, antenna impedance... completion of construction, antenna impedance measurements of the AM station shall be made. In addition... simultaneously with the filing of the application for license to cover this permit, the results of the...

  11. A reduced scale e.m. calorimeter prototype for the AMS-02 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelli, F.; Chen, G.; Coignet, G.; Di Falco, S.; Falchini, E.; Lomtadze, T.; Liu, Z.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Paoletti, R.; Pilo, F.; Turini, N.; Valle, G.; Vannini, C.; Venanzoni, G.; Yu, Z.

    2002-09-01

    A reduced scale prototype of the Pb-SciFi sampling e.m. calorimeter for the AMS-02 experiment was tested at CERN SPS beam line X5 at energies from 5 to 250 GeV. The detector was equalized with minimum ionizing particles and calibrated with electron beams. Effective sampling thickness, linearity and energy resolution were measured.

  12. Determination of 241Am in Urine Using Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS)

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ge; Saunders, David; Jones, Robert L.; Caldwell, Kathleen L.

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of 241Am in urine at low levels is important for assessment of individuals’ or populations’ accidental, environmental, or terrorism-related internal contamination, but no convenient, precise method has been established to rapidly determine these low levels. Here we report a new analytical method to measure 241Am as developed and validated at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) by means of the selective retention of Am from urine directly on DGA resin, followed by SF-ICP-MS detection. The method provides rapid results with a Limit of Detection (LOD) of 0.22 pg/L (0.028 Bq/L), which is lower than 1/3 of the C/P CDG for 241Am at 5 days post-exposure. The results obtained by this method closely agree with CDC values as measured by Liquid Scintillation Counting, and with National Institute of Standards Technology (NIST) Certified Reference Materials (CRM) target values. PMID:27375308

  13. Frequency-dependent AMS of rocks: A tool for the investigation of the fabric of ultrafine magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrouda, František; Ježek, Josef

    2014-08-01

    In some geological processes, new very fine-grained magnetic minerals may originate. The variation in content of these minerals is routinely investigated by frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility, which is traditionally interpreted in terms of the presence of viscous superparamagnetic (SP) particles in addition to stable single domain (SSD) and multidomain (MD) magnetic particles. In addition, the fabric of these grains can be investigated through the frequency-dependent AMS. Through standard AMS measurement at different frequencies, one can evaluate the contribution of SP particles to the whole-rock AMS; appropriate methods were developed. Various rocks, soils and ceramics, showing frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility, were investigated. Measurable changes of AMS with operating frequency were revealed and attempts are made of their fabric interpretation.

  14. Case Study: Three Acute 241Am Inhalation Exposures with DTPA Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Cannon, Curt; Lewis, Loren L.

    2010-10-01

    Three workers incurred inhalation exposures to 241Am oxide as a result of waste sorting and compaction activities. The magnitudes of the exposures were not fully recognized until the following day when an in vivo chest count identified a significant lung deposition of 241Am in a male worker, and DTPA chelation therapy was initiated. Two additional workers (one female and one male) were then identified as sufficiently exposed to also warrant therapy. In vivo bioassay measurements were performed over the ensuing 6 months to quantify the 241Am activity in the lungs, liver, and skeleton. Urine and fecal samples were collected and showed readily detectable 241Am. Clinical lab tests and medical evaluations all showed normal results. There were no significant adverse clinical health effects from the therapy. The estimated 241Am inhalation intakes for the three workers were 1800 Bq, 630 Bq, and 150 Bq. Lung retention showed somewhat longer pulmonary clearance half-times than standard inhalation class W or absorption Type M assumptions. The three underwent slightly different therapy regimes, with therapy effectiveness factors (defined as the ratio of the reference doses without therapy relative to the final assessed doses) of 4.65, 1.93, and 1.67, respectively.

  15. ORFEUS and EUVE observations of AM herculis

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.W.; Paerels, F.B.S.; Raymond, J.C.

    1995-04-06

    Far-UV spectra of AM Her in a high optical state were obtained in 1993 September with the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) spectrometer aboard the ORFEUS telescope. The UCB spectrometer has a spectral resolution {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} 3000 and covers the 390-1170 {Angstrom} bandpass, but interstellar absorption leaves no detectable -flux below the Lyman limit. Spectra of AM Her were acquired during the intervals 04:19:40-04:36:26 UT on September 16 and 08:34:03-09:09:06 UT on September 17 of 1993. The corresponding magnetic phases are 0.75-0.84 and 0.88-1.07 according to the linear polarization ephemeris of S. Tapia. The main spectral features are the 0 VI doublet, C III {lambda}977, and He II {lambda}1085 (Balmer {gamma}). The bright C III {lambda}1176 multiplet, which is detected by IUE, is at the very end of the spectrum. At the full spectral resolution of the instrument, the 0 VI doublet shows broad and narrow components similar to that of the optical emission lines. The intensity ratio of the narrow component of the 0 VI doublet is {approximately} 1.3:1, much closer to the optically thick limit of 1:1 than the optically thin ratio of 2:1.

  16. Saturation effects in the AMS-1 tracker dE/dx data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, J. I.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.

    2001-05-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectroscoper (AMS) is a particle detector to be installed in the International Space Station to search for, among other, cosmic anti-nuclei. This instruments includes a silicon tracker immersed in the magnetic field for charge and sign assignment. The exponentially decreasing abundance of cosmic nuclei as function of atomic number (Z) requires accurate predictive power if dE/dx measurements are to be used in Z identification. We analyzed dE/dx from AMS prototype (AMS-1) flight test carried out on the NASA's Discovery Shuttle in 1998. The data show appreciable deviations from the Z2 dependence predicted by Bethe-Bloch equation. An interpretation of this phenomenon, based on our Energy Deposition by Secondary Electrons (EDSE) model, is proposed which reproduces the general features of the data. .

  17. Qualifying the Sunpower M-87N Cryocooler for Operation in the AMS-02 Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustafi, Shuvo; Banks, Stuart; Shirey, Kimberly; Warner, Brent; Leidecker, Henning; Breon, Susan; Boyle, Rob

    2003-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMs-02) experiment consists of a superfluid helium dewar. The outer vapor cooled shields of the dewar are to be held at 77 K by four Sunpower M87N cryocoolers. These cryocoolers have magnetic components that might interact with the external applied field generated by the superconducting magnet, thereby degrading the cryocoolers' performance. Engineering models of the Sunpower M87N are being tested at NASA Goddard Space Flight in order to qualify them to operate in a magnetic environment similar to the AMS-02 magnetic environment. AMS-02 will be a space station based particle detector studying the properties and origin of cosmic particles including antimatter and dark matter. It uses a superconducting magnet that is cooled by the superfluid helium dewar. Highly sensitive detector plates inside the magnet will measure a particle's momentum and charge.

  18. Multi-component dark matter in the light of new AMS-02 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chang; Huang, Da; Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2015-10-01

    We study the possible positron/electron excesses within the multi-component leptonically decaying dark matter (DM) scenario by fitting the most recent AMS-02 data on the positron fraction and total e+ + e- flux. We show that both the single- and two-component DM models are able to fit the two AMS-02 datasets. However, the single-component DM model favors the e+/e- energy cutoff from the DM decay less than 1 TeV through the τ-channel, which is already well constrained by the diffuse γ-ray spectrum measured by Fermi-LAT. For the two-component case with closing the τ-mode for the heavy DM particle, we find that the new AMS-02 data allows the heavy DM cutoff larger than 1 TeV, providing a good description of the high-energy behavior of the total e+ + e- flux and satisfying the diffuse γ-ray constraint.

  19. Genomic and functional features of the biosurfactant producing Bacillus sp. AM13.

    PubMed

    Shaligram, Shraddha; Kumbhare, Shreyas V; Dhotre, Dhiraj P; Muddeshwar, Manohar G; Kapley, Atya; Joseph, Neetha; Purohit, Hemant P; Shouche, Yogesh S; Pawar, Shrikant P

    2016-09-01

    Genomic studies provide deeper insights into secondary metabolites produced by diverse bacterial communities, residing in various environmental niches. This study aims to understand the potential of a biosurfactant producing Bacillus sp. AM13, isolated from soil. An integrated approach of genomic and chemical analysis was employed to characterize the antibacterial lipopeptide produced by the strain AM13. Genome analysis revealed that strain AM13 harbors a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) cluster; highly similar with known biosynthetic gene clusters from surfactin family: lichenysin (85 %) and surfactin (78 %). These findings were substantiated with supplementary experiments of oil displacement assay and surface tension measurements, confirming the biosurfactant production. Further investigation using LCMS approach exhibited similarity of the biomolecule with biosurfactants of the surfactin family. Our consolidated effort of functional genomics provided chemical as well as genetic leads for understanding the biochemical characteristics of the bioactive compound. PMID:27492417

  20. Use of chlorine-36 to determine regional-scale aquifer dispersivity, eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho/USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cecil, L.D.; Welhan, J.A.; Green, J.R.; Grape, S.K.; Sudicky, E.R.

    2000-01-01

    Chlorine-36 (36Cl) derived from processed nuclear waste that was disposed at the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) through a deep injection well in 1958, was detected 24-28 yr later in groundwater monitoring wells approximately 26 km downgradient from the source. Groundwater samples covering the period 1966-1995 were selected from the US Geological Survey's archived-sample library at the INEEL and analyzed for 36Cl by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The smaller 36Cl peak concentrations in water from the far-field monitoring wells relative to the input suggest that aquifer dispersivity may be large. However, the sharpness of the 1958 disposal peak of 36Cl is matched by the measured 36Cl concentrations in water from these wells. This implies that a small aquifer dispersivity may be attributed to preferential groundwater flowpaths. Assuming that tracer arrival times at monitoring wells are controlled by preferential flow, a 1-D system-response model was used to estimate dispersivity by comparing the shape of predicted 36Cl-concentration curves to the shape of 36Cl-concentration curves measured in water from these observation wells. The comparisons suggest that a 1-D dispersivity of 5 m provides the best fit to the tracer data. Previous work using a 2-D equivalent porous-media model concluded that longitudinal dispersivity (equivalent to 1-D dispersivity in our model) was 90 m (Ackerman, 1991). A 90 m dispersivity value eliminates the 1958 disposal peak in our model output curves. The implications of the arrival of 36Cl at downgradient monitoring wells are important for three reasons: (1) the arrival times and associated 36Cl concentrations provide quantitative constraints on residence times, velocities, and dispersivities in the aquifer; (2) they help to refine our working hypotheses of groundwater flow in this aquifer and (3) they may suggest a means of estimating the distribution of preferential flowpaths

  1. Perhaps I am one of the lucky ones.

    PubMed

    Heenan, Michael

    2010-01-01

    I recently participated in the Ontario Hospital Association (OHA) webinar on quality and safety, in which I was asked to address the topic of engaging physicians in performance measurement, quality and safety. I am not a physician, but much of my work in healthcare has involved working with clinical leaders in these areas. At St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, we started our quality and safety journey by creating a medical quality scorecard specifically designed for physicians. The card, written in physician-friendly versus business language, enabled physicians to drop the traditional business quadrants of finance and human resources and select four quadrants focused on clinical process and outcome indicators that matched their daily practice. Quality improvement initiatives resulting from the scorecard included the launch of a sepsis-management campaign in the emergency room and a new approach to neonatal safety. PMID:24953801

  2. The cosmic ray antiproton background for AMS-02

    SciTech Connect

    Kappl, Rolf; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang E-mail: martin.winkler@desy.de

    2014-09-01

    The AMS-02 experiment is measuring the cosmic ray antiproton flux with high precision. The interpretation of the upcoming data requires a thorough understanding of the secondary antiproton background. In this work, we employ newly available data of the NA49 experiment at CERN, in order to recalculate the antiproton source term arising from cosmic ray spallations on the interstellar matter. We systematically account for the production of antiprotons via hyperon decay and discuss the possible impact of isospin effects on antineutron production. A detailed comparison of our calculation with the existing literature as well as with Monte Carlo based evaluations of the antiproton source term is provided. Our most important result is an updated prediction for the secondary antiproton flux which includes a realistic assessment of the particle physics uncertainties at all energies.

  3. Ionospheric electron density profile estimation using commercial AM broadcast signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, De; Ma, Hong; Cheng, Li; Li, Yang; Zhang, Yufeng; Chen, Wenjun

    2015-08-01

    A new method for estimating the bottom electron density profile by using commercial AM broadcast signals as non-cooperative signals is presented in this paper. Without requiring any dedicated transmitters, the required input data are the measured elevation angles of signals transmitted from the known locations of broadcast stations. The input data are inverted for the QPS model parameters depicting the electron density profile of the signal's reflection area by using a probabilistic inversion technique. This method has been validated on synthesized data and used with the real data provided by an HF direction-finding system situated near the city of Wuhan. The estimated parameters obtained by the proposed method have been compared with vertical ionosonde data and have been used to locate the Shijiazhuang broadcast station. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed ionospheric sounding method is feasible for obtaining useful electron density profiles.

  4. A feasibility study for transportable 241Am-in-lung and 241Am-in-nose-blow monitoring systems for use following a weapons accident.

    PubMed

    Youngman, M J; Etherington, G; Smith, J R H

    2003-01-01

    In a nuclear weapon accident involving fire or conventional explosion, most of the radiation dose received by people in the immediate vicinity would result from inhalation of 239Pu. This is accompanied by the nuclide 241Am, which is much easier to determine by external counting because of the 60 keV gamma ray emission. In the event of an accident, a priority would be to identify any people who have had intakes of 239Pu which were so large that decorporation therapy should be considered. Direct measurement of lung content provides the most rapid and convenient method for assessing intakes by inhalation. A transportable system has been considered as this could be deployed close to the site of the accident and would allow rapid measurements to be made. The feasibility of a transportable 241Am-in-nose-blow and nasal swab measurement system has also been considered. This would be used to help select people for 241Am-in-lung measurements. PMID:14527011

  5. AMS of an Analogue Non-Scale Model Simulating Diapiric Pluton Emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrouda, F.; Kratinova, Z.; Zavada, P.; Schulmann, K.

    2004-12-01

    Development of magnetic fabric within a pluton during its diapiric ascent was investigated using an analogue non-scale model of plaster of Paris containing small amount of fine-grained (less than 0.09 mm) homogeneously mixed magnetite, with resulting bulk susceptibility being in the order of 10-3 [SI]. The apparatus for this modelling consists of a manual squeezer with calibrated spring and a perspex container. Stratified coloured to visualize internal flow geometries, weak plaster layer at the bottom of the container was forced to intrude overlying fine-grained (>0.017mm) sand through a hole in a board attached to the squeezer. A retarding compound was admixed into the plaster to postpone the solidification of plaster. After solidifying the model, small oriented cylindrical specimens (7 mm in diameter and 6 mm in height) were drilled and their anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) was measured with the KLY-4S Kappabridge. The magnetic fabric in the margins of the vertical column of the diapir is characterized by high degree of AMS (P'=1.26-1.30), neutral to oblate AMS ellipsoid (T=0.2-0.6) and vertical magnetic lineations and foliations. In the vent area, the degree of AMS is also high, but the AMS ellipsoid being strongly prolate (T= -1 to -0.8) with vertical magnetic lineations. In the interior of the plug above the vent zone, abrupt transition into horizontal lineations and foliations take place and the low degree of AMS (P'=1.05-1.10) marks the area where strongly prolate magnetic fabric is being gradually changed into the magnetic fabric characterized by neutral to oblate AMS ellipsoid. This type of magnetic fabric extends to the apical part of the body. In the extrusive portions of the diapir, oblate magnetic fabric increases in anisotropy (T=0.8-1, P'=1.26-1.29), while the front of the radial extrusion shows horizontal lineations parallel to the margin and neutral AMS ellipsoids (T=0.2-0.6,P'=1.23-1.26). This changeover of fabric thus indicates

  6. Preparation of a multi-isotope plutonium AMS standard and preliminary results of a first inter-lab comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, B.-A.; Dunai, T. J.; Dewald, A.; Heinze, S.; Feuerstein, C.; Strub, E.; Fifield, L. K.; Froehlich, M. B.; Tims, S. G.; Wallner, A.; Christl, M.

    2015-10-01

    The motivation of this work is to establish a new multi-isotope plutonium standard for isotopic ratio measurements with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), since stocks of existing solutions are declining. To this end, certified reference materials (CRMs) of each of the individual isotopes 239Pu, 240Pu, 242Pu and 244Pu were obtained from JRC IRMM (Joint Research Center Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements). These certified reference materials (IRMM-081a, IRMM-083, IRMM-043 and IRMM-042a) were diluted with nitric acid and mixed to obtain a stock standard solution with an isotopic ratio of approximately 1.0:1.0:1.0:0.1 (239Pu:240Pu:242Pu:244Pu). From this stock solution, samples were prepared for measurement of the plutonium isotopic composition by AMS. These samples have been measured in a round-robin exercise between the AMS facilities at CologneAMS, at the ANU Canberra and ETH Zurich to verify the isotopic ratio and to demonstrate the reproducibility of the measurements. The results show good agreement both between the different AMS measurements and with the gravimetrically determined nominal ratios.

  7. How are we doing? AMS survey reveals member satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Penn, Casey L

    2008-06-01

    Members expressed overall satisfaction with their AMS membership and agreed that, through their membership, they benefit from a collective voice and a stronger influence where health issues are concerned. How do you rate your Arkansas Medical Society? The Society always wants to hear comments and suggestions from its members. Call AMS at 224-8967 or come by and visit the AMS staff at 10 Corporate Hill Drive in Little Rock. PMID:18564464

  8. The accretion halo in AM Herculis systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achilleos, N.; Wickramasinghe, D. T.; Wu, Kinwah

    1992-01-01

    Previous phase-resolved spectropolarimetric observations of the AM Herculis systems V834 Centauri (E1405-451) and EF Eridani have shown broad, Zeeman-shifted absorption features during the bright phases. These features are thought to be nonphotospheric in origin, and to arise from a cool 'halo' of unshocked gas surrounding the accretion shock on the surface of the white dwarf primary. Preliminary models for the accretion halo region are presented and these models are used to perform a more detailed analysis of the relevant data for these two systems than has previously been done. To explain the observed halo Zeeman features, geometries which are consistent with the presence of linearly extended cyclotron emission regions are required. Such regions have previously been deduced from different considerations by other investigators. The estimated masses for the accretion halo are comparable to the mass of the cyclotron emission region.

  9. French Pro/Am collaborations in exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santerne, A.; Moutou, C.; Vanhuysse, M.; Bouchy, F.; Buil, C.; Cochard, F.; Thizy, O.; Martinez, P.; Desnoux, V.; Pujol, M.; Colas, F.

    2011-10-01

    Amateur astronomers have access to huge telescope time and can reach photometric precision up to a few mmag as well as radial velocity precision up to ˜ 50m.s-1 on brightest stars. We will first present some results of french amateur astronomers in transit photometry and radial velocity and then, we will present an over-view of all the collaborations which can be done between professional and amateur astronomers in the competitive exoplanet domain, and especially the current collaboration between french Pro & Am astronomers which was used in publication in A&A. Finally, we will present a new internet wiki page which goal is to develop such collaboration in different countries.

  10. Investigating Uranium Isotopic Distributions in Environmental Samples Using AMS and MC-ICPMS

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Brown, T A; Hamilton, T F; Hutcheon, I D; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Ramon, E C; Tumey, S J; Williams, R W

    2005-12-09

    Major, minor, and trace uranium isotopes were measured at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in environmentally acquired samples using different instruments to span large variations in concentrations. Multi-collector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) can be used to measure major and minor isotopes: {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) can be used to measure minor and trace isotopes: {sup 234}U, {sup 236}U, and {sup 233}U. The main limit of quantification for minor or trace uranium isotopes is the abundance sensitivity of the measurement technique; i.e., the ability to measure a minor or trace isotope of mass M in the presence of a major isotope at M{+-}1 mass units. The abundance sensitivity for {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U isotope ratio measurements using MC-ICPMS is around {approx}2x10{sup -6}. This compares with a {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U abundance sensitivity of {approx}1x10{sup -7} for the current AMS system, with the expectation of 2-3 orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity with the addition of another high energy filter. Comparing {sup 236}U/{sup 234}U from MC-ICPMS and AMS produced agreement within {approx}10% for samples at {sup 236}U levels high enough to be measurable by both techniques.

  11. Investigating uranium isotopic distributions in environmental samples using AMS and MC-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, B. A.; Brown, T. A.; Hamilton, T. F.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Marchetti, A. A.; Martinelli, R. E.; Ramon, E. C.; Tumey, S. J.; Williams, R. W.

    2007-06-01

    Major, minor and trace uranium isotopes were measured at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in environmentally acquired samples using different instruments to span large variations in concentrations. Multi-collector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) can be used to measure major and minor isotopes: 238U, 235U, 234U and 236U. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) can be used to measure minor and trace isotopes: 234U, 236U and 233U. The main limit of quantification for minor or trace uranium isotopes is the abundance sensitivity of the measurement technique; i.e. the ability to measure a minor or trace isotope of mass M in the presence of a major isotope at M ± 1 mass units. The abundance sensitivity for 236U/235U isotope ratio measurements using MC-ICPMS is around ∼2 × 10-6. This compares with a 236U/235U abundance sensitivity of ∼1 × 10-7 for the current AMS system, with the expectation of 2-3 orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity with the addition of another high energy filter. Comparing 236U/234U from MC-ICPMS and AMS produced agreement within ∼10% for samples at 236U levels high enough to be measurable by both techniques.

  12. Status of the "new" AMS facility in Trondheim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Marie-Josée; Vaernes, Einar; Svarva, Helene Løvstrand; Larsen, Eiliv; Gulliksen, Steinar; Klein, Matthias; Mous, Dirk J. W.

    2015-10-01

    The Radiocarbon Laboratory of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim has a long history, dating back to the 1950s. Its relatively new AMS facility is based on a 1 MV Tandetron from High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V. that is equipped with a hybrid solid/gas SO-110 ion source, a low energy spectrometer supporting sequential injection, a high energy analysis system consisting of a magnet and an electrostatic deflector, allowing insertion of an absorber foil for isobar suppression, and a two dimensional gas ionisation detector (E and ΔE). The system is at present capable of measuring 10Be, 14C, and 26Al and can be easily modified to measure isotopes of higher masses. Acceptance tests results for 10Be1+, 14C2+, 26Al1+, and 26Al3+ are presented. The laboratory measures only 14C at present and the routine procedures are described. The system has demonstrated a very low background (70,000 14C years BP or 2·10-16 on Alfa Aesar 40795 graphite powder, -200 mesh, 99.9995%) for 14C when charge state 2+ is measured and the interference of Li ions in the detector is minimal. Some ion optical peculiarities of the system are also discussed.

  13. Neutron capture cross section of {sup 241}Am

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Clement, R. R.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Kawano, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Parker, W. E.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.

    2008-09-15

    The neutron capture cross section of {sup 241}Am for incident neutrons from 0.02 eV to 320 keV has been measured with the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The thermal neutron capture cross section was determined to be 665{+-}33 b. Our result is in good agreement with other recent measurements. Resonance parameters for E{sub n}<12 eV were obtained using an R-matrix fit to the measured cross section. The results are compared with values from the ENDF/B-VII.0, Mughabghab, JENDL-3.3, and JEFF-3.1 evaluations. {gamma}{sub n} neutron widths for the first three resonances are systematically larger by 5-15% than the ENDF/B-VII.0 values. The resonance integral above 0.5 eV was determined to be 1553{+-}7 b. Cross sections in the resolved and unresolved energy regions above 12 eV were calculated using the Hauser-Feshbach theory incorporating the width-fluctuation correction of Moldauer. The calculated results agree well with the measured data, and the extracted averaged resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those for the resolved resonances.

  14. A novel upgrade to Helsinki AMS: Fast switching of isotopes with electrostatic deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palonen, V.; Tikkanen, P.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed and installed electrostatic deflectors at the injection magnet entrance and exit to enable fast switching between isotopes in AMS measurements. The fast selection of the injected isotope, stable isotope current measurements, and rare isotope detection are all performed with three synchronized real-time NI-PXI computers. With the improvements, we are able to attain a precision of better than 0.2% for the 14C/13C ratio of modern samples.

  15. Cosmic ray propagation and dark matter in light of the latest AMS-02 data

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hong-Bo; Wu, Yue-Liang; Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2015-09-21

    The AMS-02 experiment is measuring the high energy cosmic rays with unprecedented accuracy. We explore the possibility of determining the cosmic-ray propagation models using the AMS-02 data alone. A global Bayesian analysis of the constraints on the cosmic-ray propagation models from the preliminary AMS-02 data on the Boron to Carbon nuclei flux ratio and proton flux is performed, with the assumption that the primary nucleon source is a broken power law in rigidity. The ratio of the diffusion coefficient D{sub 0} to the diffusive halo height Z{sub h} is determined with high accuracy D{sub 0}/Z{sub h}≃2.00±0.07 cm{sup 2}s{sup −1}kpc{sup −1}, and the value of the halo width is found to be Z{sub h}≃3.3 kpc with uncertainty less than 50%. As a consequence, the typical uncertainties in the positron fraction predicted from dark matter (DM) annihilation is reduced to a factor of two, and that in the antiproton flux is about an order of magnitude. Both of them are significantly smaller than that from the analyses prior to AMS-02. Taking into account the uncertainties and correlations in the propagation parameters, we derive conservative upper limits on the cross sections for DM annihilating into various standard model final states from the current PAMELA antiproton data. We also investigate the reconstruction capability of the future high precision AMS-02 antiproton data on the DM properties. The results show that for DM particles lighter than ∼100 GeV and with typical thermal annihilation cross section, the cross section can be well reconstructed with uncertainties about a factor of two for the AMS-02 three-year data taking.

  16. Astragalus membranaceus (AM) enhances growth performance and antioxidant stress profiles in bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus).

    PubMed

    Elabd, Hiam; Wang, Han-Ping; Shaheen, Adel; Yao, Hong; Abbass, Amany

    2016-06-01

    This study was designed to assess the potential effects of Astragalus membranaceus (AM) on the growth performance and antioxidative stress response in bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) exposed to challenging cold water temperature conditions. In this regard, fish with an average weight of 43 ± 1 g were divided into four groups and fed daily with an AM-free diet (control), and 1.5, 3, and 4.5 % (w/w) AM-incorporated diets for an 8-week period. Oxidative stress response, biochemical, and growth parameters were measured, and subgroups of fish were exposed to the outside challenging cold pond water temperature (1.6-9.9 °C) with an average of 7.0 ± 0.1 °C beyond the optimal temperature. The results showed that incorporating AM in the diet significantly improved growth performance parameters (body mass gain, specific growth rate, length, condition factor, and feed conversion ratio) and biochemicals (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine transaminase activities, and glucose and cortisol concentrations). In addition, markedly up-regulated superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase activities were observed in AM-treated fish groups over the control. Conclusively, feeding AM diets significantly increased (P < 0.05) growth performance and antioxidative stress profiles throughout the entire experiment, and this increase was much more pronounced at 8 weeks after the water temperature began to rise, which can be related to the nature of Bluegill fish as it is known to be a warm water fish. These findings are considered to be of great importance for sustainable aquaculture. PMID:26729192

  17. 241Am and 243Am charge distributions from muonic x-ray spectroscopy and the quadrupole moment of the 240Am fission isomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. W.; Shera, E. B.; Hoehn, M. V.; Naumann, R. A.; Zumbro, J. D.; Bemis, C. E.

    1985-10-01

    The muonic K, L, and M X-ray spectra from 241Am and 243Am have been investigated. Analysis of these spectra yields intrinsic nuclear quadrupole moments [Q0241 = 12.16(15) e b and Q0243 = 12.10(17) e b] and Barrett radii. By combining these results with those from a previous optical isotope-shift study, the intrinsic quadrupole moment for the fission isomer 240fAm is deduced [Q0240f = 29.0(1.3) e b].

  18. Am phases in the matrix of a U–Pu–Zr alloy with Np, Am, and rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, Dawn E.; Kennedy, J. Rory; Madden, James W.; O’Holleran, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Phases and microstructures in the matrix of an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with 3 wt% Am, 2% Np, and 8% rare-earth elements were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The matrix consists primarily of two phases, both of which contain Am: ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) (~70 at% U, 5% Np, 14% Pu, 1% Am, and 10% Zr) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 (~25% U, 2% Np, 10-15% Pu, 1-2% Am, and 55-60 at% Zr). These phases are similar to those in U-Pu-Zr alloys, although the Zr content in ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) is higher than that in ζ-(U, Pu) and the Zr content in δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 is lower than that in δ-UZr2. Nanocrystalline actinide oxides with structures similar to UO2 occurred in some areas, but may have formed by reactions with the atmosphere during sample handling. Planar features consisting of a central zone of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) bracketed by zones of δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 bound irregular polygons ranging in size from a few micrometers to a few tens of micrometers across. The rest of the matrix consists of elongated domains of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2. Each of these domains is a few tens of nanometers across and a few hundred nanometers long. The domains display strong preferred orientations involving areas a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers across.

  19. Limits on dark matter from AMS-02 antiproton and positron fraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo-Qiang; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-05-01

    Herein we derive limits on dark matter annihilation cross section and lifetime using measurements of the AMS-02 antiproton ratio and positron fraction data. In deriving the limits, we consider the scenario of secondary particles accelerated in supernova remnants (SNRs), which has been argued to be able to reasonably account for the AMS-02 high-energy positron/antiproton fraction/ratio data. We parametrize the contribution of secondary particles accelerated in SNRs and then fit the observational data within the conventional cosmic ray propagation model by adopting the galprop code. We use the likelihood ratio test to determine the 95% confidence level upper limits of possible dark matter (DM) contribution to the antiproton/positron fractions measured by AMS-02. Under the assumption taken in this work, we find that our limits are stronger than that set by the Fermi-LAT gamma ray Pass 8 data observation on the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies. We show that the solar modulation (cosmic ray propagation) parameters can play a non-negligible role in modifying the constraints on dark matter annihilation cross section and lifetime for mχ<100 GeV (mχ>100 GeV ), where mχ is the rest mass of dark matter particles. We also find that constrains on DM parameters from AMS-02 data would become more stringent when the solar modulation is weak. Using these results, we also put limits on the effective field theory of dark matter.

  20. AMS method for depth profiling of trace elements concentration in materials - Construction and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Enachescu, M.

    2015-10-01

    The need to investigate the behavior of solid state materials on the impact/retention/repulsion/contamination/impregnation with special trace elements or radioactive elements has driven us to develop a modified Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) analyzing method that is able to perform the measurement of the concentration depth profile of an element in a host material. This upgraded method that we call AMS-depth profiling method (AMS-DP) measures continuously the concentration of a trace element in a given sample material as a function of the depth from the surface (e.g., tritium in carbon, deuterium in tungsten, etc.). However, in order to perform depth profiling, common AMS facilities have to undergo several changes: a new replaceable sample target-holder has to be constructed to accept small plates of solid material as samples; their position has to be adjusted in the focus point of the sputter beam; crater rim effects of the produced hole in the sample have to be avoided or removed from the registered events in the detector; suitable reference samples have to be prepared and used for calibration. All procedures are presented in the paper together with several applications.

  1. Evaluation of the Eberline AMS-3A and AMS-4 Beta continuous air monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.L.; Sisk, D.R.

    1996-03-01

    Eberline AMS-3A-1 and AMS-4 beta continuous air monitors were tested against the criteria set forth in the ANSI Standards N42.18, Specification and Performance of On-site Instrumentation for Continuously Monitoring Radioactivity in Effluents, and ANSI N42.17B, Performance Specification for Health Physics Instrumentation - Occupational Airborne Radioactivity Monitoring Instrumentation. ANSI N42.18 does not, in general, specify testing procedures for demonstrating compliance with the criteria set forth in the standard; therefore, wherever possible, the testing procedures given in ANSI N42.17B were adopted. In all cases, the more restrictive acceptance criteria and/or the more demanding test conditions of the two standards were used.

  2. Operation of the "Small" BioAMS spectrometers at CAMS: Past and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ognibene, T. J.; Haack, K. W.; Bench, G.; Brown, T. A.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    2015-10-01

    A summary of results from the solid samples run on our compact 1 MV AMS system over its 13.5 years of operation is presented. On average 7065 samples per year were measured with that average dropping to 3278 samples per year following the deployment of our liquid sample capability. Although the dynamic range of our spectrometer is 4.5 orders in magnitude, most of the measured graphitic samples had 14C/C concentrations between 0.1 and 1 modern. The measurements of our ANU sucrose standard followed a Gaussian distribution with an average of 1.5082 ± 0.0134 modern. The LLNL biomedical AMS program supported many different types of experiments, however, the large majority of samples measured were derived from animal model systems. We have transitioned all of our biomedical AMS measurements to the recently installed 250 kV SSAMS instrument with good agreement compared in measured 14C/C isotopic ratios between sample splits. Finally, we present results from replacement of argon stripping gas with helium in the SSAMS with a 22% improvement in ion transmission through the accelerator and high-energy analyzing magnet.

  3. AMS/NRCan Joint Survey Report: Aerial Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Wasiolek, Piotr; Stampahar, Jez; Malchow, Rusty; Stampahar, Tom; Lukens, Mike; Seywerd, Henry; Fortin, Richard; Harvey, Brad; Sinclair, Laurel

    2014-12-31

    In January 2014 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) and the Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) Nuclear Emergency Response project conducted a series of joint surveys at a number of locations in Nevada including the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The goal of this project was to compare the responses of the two agencies’ aerial radiation detection systems and data analysis techniques. This test included varied radioactive surface contamination levels and isotopic composition experienced at the NNSS and the differing data processing techniques utilized by the respective teams. Because both teams used the commercial aerial radiation detection systems from Radiation Solutions, Inc., the main focus of the campaign was to investigate the data acquisition techniques, data analysis, and ground-truth verification. The NRCan system consisted of four 4" × 4" × 16" NaI(Tl) scintillator crystals of which two were externally mounted in a modified commercial cargo basket certified for the Eurocopter AS350; the NNSA AMS system consisted of twelve 2" × 4" × 16" NaI(Tl) crystals in externally mounted dedicated pods. For NRCan, the joint survey provided an opportunity to characterize their system’s response to extended sources of various fission products at the NNSS. Since both systems play an important role in their respective countries’ national framework of radiological emergency response and are subject to multiple mutual cooperation agreements, it was important for each country to obtain more thorough knowledge of how they would employ these important assets and define the roles that they would each play in an actual response.

  4. AM 2217-490: A polar ring galaxy under construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas-Lemes, P.; Rodrigues, I.; Faúndez-Abans, M.; Dors, O.

    2014-10-01

    This work is part of a series of case studies of Polar Ring Galaxies (PRGs) (see also Posters GAL-1: 163, GAL-2: 178). A PRG is formed by an early type host galaxy (e.g. lenticular or elliptical), surrounded by a ring of gas and stars orbiting approximately at the polar plane of the host galaxy. AM2217-490 is an interesting case of PRG in formation, with a still asymmetrical ring that surrounds the host galaxy. Apparently, this bluish structure (characteristic of the rings of PRGs), is not yet in equilibrium with the host galaxy. This study is based on spectra on the range 6250-7250 Å obtained with the CTIO 1.5 m telescope - Chile. From them, we measure a heliocentric radial velocity of 9152± 18 km/s. The value of the ionization parameter (log U = -3.5) is similar to that in interacting galaxies (Freitas-Lemes et al. 2013, submitted to MNRAS; and Krabbe et al. 2013, MNRAS Accepted), and lower than that of isolated ones. The electron density shows little variation along the major axis of the host galaxy, and a mean value typical of interacting galaxies. Diagnostic diagrams show that the nuclear region harbors an AGN, following a trend among polar ring galaxies. The low-resolution images of the SDSS show no tails or bridges connecting the galaxy to other objects, however, in a radius of 5 arcmin there are three other galaxies with similar speeds, featuring a group. A plausible hypothesis is that one of these galaxies may have interacted with AM2217-490, donating material to form the ring.

  5. Pulmonary administration of Am80 regenerates collapsed alveoli.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hitomi; Horiguchi, Michiko; Ozawa, Chihiro; Akita, Tomomi; Hirota, Keiji; Shudo, Koichi; Terada, Hiroshi; Makino, Kimiko; Kubo, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Chikamasa

    2014-12-28

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an intractable pulmonary disease, which causes widespread and irreversible alveoli collapse. Nevertheless, there is no effective drug therapy that regenerates lung tissue or prevents the progression of COPD and clinical management of patients remains mostly supportive. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether Am80 is useful as a novel pulmonary emphysema therapeutic drug. In this study, we treated the human alveolar epithelial stem cells with Am80 to clarify the differentiation-inducing mechanism and administrated Am80 transpulmonarily into elastase-induced COPD model mice to evaluate the effect of Am80 on pulmonary emphysema. First, we accordingly investigated whether Am80 had a differentiation-inducing effect on human alveolar epithelial stem cells, Am80 induced differentiation of human alveolar epithelial stem cells to alveolar type I and II cells dose dependently, and the proportion of differentiated into type I and type II alveolar epithelial cells as a result of treatment with 10 μM of Am80 for 7 days was approximately 20%. Second, we attempted to identify the major factor involved in the differentiation-inducing effect of human alveolar epithelial stem cells induced by Am80 using microarray analysis. In a microarray analysis, WNT1, lectin, SLIT, chordin, ck12, ck11, and neurexin3 showed the largest variation in the Am80-treated group compared with the controls. In quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction assay, Am80 resulted in significant reduction in the WNT1 expression ratio whereas increase in the neurexin3 expression ratio. We evaluated the repairs effect for collapsed alveoli by Am80 of pulmonary administration. In untreated and Am80-treated mice the average CT value at 2 days was, respectively, -506 and -439 and there was a significant difference. Likewise, the assessment of the distance between alveolar walls, Lm, confirmed that there was a significant difference between control (68.0±3.8 μm) and

  6. Study of Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections of U, Am, and Cm at n{sub T}OF

    SciTech Connect

    Milazzo, P. M.; Abbondanno, U.; Belloni, F.; Fujii, K.; Aerts, G.; Andriamonje, S.; Berthoumieux, E.; Dridi, W.; Ferrant, L.; Gunsing, F.; Pancin, J.; Perrot, L.; Plukis, A.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Cano-Ott, D.

    2010-08-04

    Neutron induced fission cross sections of several isotopes have been measured at the CERN n{sub T}OF spallation neutron facility. Between them some measurements involve isotopes ({sup 233}U, {sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 245}Cm) relevant for applications to nuclear technologies. The n{sub T}OF facility delivers neutrons with high instantaneous flux and in a wide energy range, from thermal up to 250 MeV. The experimental apparatus consists of an ionization chamber that discriminates fission fragments and {alpha} particles coming from natural radioactivity of the samples. All the measurements were performed referring to the standard cross section of {sup 235}U.

  7. Photon interaction studies using 241Am g-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Karunakaran Nair, K.; Abdullah, K. K.; Varier, K. M.

    2006-09-01

    We have carried out some photon interaction measurements using 59.54 keV γ-rays from a ^{241}Am source. These include γ attenuation studies as well as photoelectric absorption studies in various samples. The attenuation studies have been made using leaf and wood samples, samples like sand, sugar etc., which contain particles of varying sizes as well as pellets and aqueous solutions of rare earth compounds. In the case of the leaf and wood samples, we have used the γ-ray attenuation technique for the determination of the water content in fresh and dried samples. The variation of the attenuation coefficient with particle size has been investigated for sand and sugar samples. The attenuation studies as well as the photoelectric studies in the case of rare earth elements have been carried out on samples containing such elements whose K-absorption edge energies lie below and close to the γ-energy used. Suitable compounds of the rare earth elements have been chosen as mixture absorbers in these investigations. A narrow beam good geometry set-up was used for the attenuation measurements. A well-shielded scattering geometry was used for the photoelectric measurements. The mixture rule was invoked to extract the values of the mass attenuation coefficients for the elements from those of the corresponding compounds. The results are consistent with theoretical values derived from the XCOM package.

  8. Search for Antimatter with the AMS Cosmic Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cristinziani, Markus

    2003-03-24

    Antimatter search results of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) detector are presented. About 10{sup 8} triggers were collected in the 1998 precursor flight onboard space shuttle Discovery. This ten day mission exposed the detector on a 51.7{sup o} orbit at an altitude around 350km. Identification of charged cosmic rays is achieved by multiple energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Bending inside the 0.15T magnetic volume yields a measurement of the absolute value of the particle's rigidity. The supplemental knowledge of the sense of traversal identifies the sign of the charge. In the rigidity range 1 < R < 140 GV no antinucleus at any rigidity was detected, while 2.86 x 10{sup 6} helium and 1.65 x 10{sup 5} heavy nuclei were precisely measured. Hence, upper limits on the flux ratio {bar Z}/Z are given. Different prior assumptions on the antimatter spectrum are considered and corresponding limits are given.

  9. EOS-AM1 Nickel Hydrogen Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Charles W.; Keys, Denney J.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Wannemacher, Hari E.; Vaidyanathan, Harry

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports the interim results of the Earth Observing System AM-1 project (EOS-AM-1) nickel hydrogen cell life test being conducted under contract to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) at the Lockheed Martin Missile and Space (LMMS) facility in East Windsor, NJ; and at COMSAT Labs., Clarksburg, MD. The purpose of die tests is to verify that the EOS-AM-1 cell design can meet five years of real-time Low Earth Orbit (LEO) cycling. The tests include both real-time LEO and accelerated stress tests. At LMMS, the first real-time LEO simulated 99 minute orbital cycle started on February 7, 1994 and the test has been running continuously since that time, with 18,202 LEO cycles completed as of September 1, 1997. Each cycle consists of a 64 minute charge (VT at 1.507 volts per cell, 1.06 C/D ratio, followed by 0.6 ampere trickle charge) and a 35 minute constant power discharge at 177 watts (22.5% DOD). At COMSAT, the accelerated stress test consists of 90 minute orbital cycles at 60% DOD with a 30 minute discharge at 60 amperes and a 60 minute charge at 40 amperes (VT at 1.54 volts per cell to 1.09 C/D ratio, followed by 0.6 ampere trickle charge). The real-time LEO life test battery consists of seven, 50AH (nameplate rating) Eagle-Picher, Inc. (EPI) Mantech cells manufactured into three, 3-cell pack assemblies (there are two place holder cells that are not part of the life test electrical circuit). The test pack is configured to simulate the conductive thermal design of the spacecraft battery, including: conductive aluminum sleeves, 3-cell pack aluminum baseplate, and honeycomb panel all mounted to a liquid (-5 C) cold plate. The entire assembly is located in a thermal chamber operating at +30 C. The accelerated stress test unit consists of five cells mounted in machined aluminum test sleeves and is operating at +10 C. The real-time LEO life test battery has met all performance requirements through the first 18

  10. Measuring $\

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jessica Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The MINOS Experiment consists of two steel-scintillator calorimeters, sampling the long baseline NuMI muon neutrino beam. It was designed to make a precise measurement of the ‘atmospheric’ neutrino mixing parameters, Δm2 atm. and sin2 (2 atm.). The Near Detector measures the initial spectrum of the neutrino beam 1km from the production target, and the Far Detector, at a distance of 735 km, measures the impact of oscillations in the neutrino energy spectrum. Work performed to validate the quality of the data collected by the Near Detector is presented as part of this thesis. This thesis primarily details the results of a vμ disappearance analysis, and presents a new sophisticated fitting software framework, which employs a maximum likelihood method to extract the best fit oscillation parameters. The software is entirely decoupled from the extrapolation procedure between the detectors, and is capable of fitting multiple event samples (defined by the selections applied) in parallel, and any combination of energy dependent and independent sources of systematic error. Two techniques to improve the sensitivity of the oscillation measurement were also developed. The inclusion of information on the energy resolution of the neutrino events results in a significant improvement in the allowed region for the oscillation parameters. The degree to which sin2 (2θ )= 1.0 could be disfavoured with the exposure of the current dataset if the true mixing angle was non-maximal, was also investigated, with an improved neutrino energy reconstruction for very low energy events. The best fit oscillation parameters, obtained by the fitting software and incorporating resolution information were: | Δm2| = 2.32+0.12 -0.08×10-3 eV2 and sin2 (2θ ) > 0.90(90% C.L.). The analysis provides the current world best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass

  11. 40 CFR 310.5 - Am I eligible for reimbursement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Am I eligible for reimbursement? 310.5 Section 310.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE RELEASES Provisions Who Can Be Reimbursed? § 310.5 Am I eligible for reimbursement?...

  12. 40 CFR 310.5 - Am I eligible for reimbursement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Am I eligible for reimbursement? 310.5 Section 310.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE RELEASES Provisions Who Can Be Reimbursed? § 310.5 Am I eligible for reimbursement?...

  13. 40 CFR 310.5 - Am I eligible for reimbursement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Am I eligible for reimbursement? 310.5 Section 310.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE RELEASES Provisions Who Can Be Reimbursed? § 310.5 Am I eligible for reimbursement?...

  14. 40 CFR 310.5 - Am I eligible for reimbursement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Am I eligible for reimbursement? 310.5 Section 310.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE RELEASES Provisions Who Can Be Reimbursed? § 310.5 Am I eligible for reimbursement?...

  15. 40 CFR 310.5 - Am I eligible for reimbursement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Am I eligible for reimbursement? 310.5 Section 310.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE RELEASES Provisions Who Can Be Reimbursed? § 310.5 Am I eligible for reimbursement?...

  16. 47 CFR 1.571 - Processing AM broadcast station applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Processing AM broadcast station applications. 1.571 Section 1.571 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Broadcast Applications and Proceedings General Filing Requirements § 1.571 Processing AM broadcast...

  17. Application of TOS/AMS to TDRS E and F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The development of the Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS) and the study of an Apogee and Maneuvering Stage (AMS) to be used in conjunction with the TOS are presented. A definition of the TOS/AMS configuration is provided along with a detailed design analysis including layout drawings, component definition, performance, sts and spacecraft interface definition, schedules, cost estimates, and specifications documents.

  18. Some Validation Data for the Achievement Motives Scale (AMS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rand, Per

    1978-01-01

    A Norwegian version of the Achievement Motives Scale (AMS) was administered to Oslo sixth-graders, along with verbal, numeric, test anxiety, and lie/defensiveness tests. Results showed the relationships to academic performance predicted by achievement theory. Even when related to the personality scales, the AMS showed promising qualities.…

  19. 50 CFR 648.201 - AMs and harvest controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Atlantic Herring Fishery § 648.201 AMs and harvest controls. (a) AMs. (1) Management area closure. If NMFS..., transferring, or landing >2,000 lb (907.2 kg) of Atlantic herring per trip in such an area, and from landing herring more than once per calendar day, except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this...

  20. Beam optics of the AmPS extraction line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, R.

    1991-01-01

    The beam optics of the AmPS (Amsterdam Pulse Stretcher) are described. Definitions are outlined, and the beam elements and parameters are given. Developments relating to the electrostatic septum, chicane, beam transformer and bending through 90 degrees are described. The performance of the AmPS and beam diagnostics are discussed.

  1. On-farm Production and Utilization of AM Fungus Inoculum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On-farm production of arbuscular mycorrhizal [AM] fungus inoculum can make the benefits to crop growth and yield of inoculation with AM fungi available to more farmers by reducing costs. This article details the step by step procedure and management decisions that are needed for the on-farm product...

  2. Plant uptake and transport of /sup 241/Am

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, A.; Romney, E.M.; Mueller, R.T. Sr.; soufi, S.M.

    1981-07-01

    We conducted several experiments with /sup 241/Am to obtain a more complete understanding of how this transuranium element is absorbed and transported in plants. In a plant species (Tamarix pentandra Pall.) that has salt glands in the leaves excreting NaCl and other ions, /sup 241/Am was not pumped through these glands. Cyanide, which forms complexes with any metals, when applied to a calcareous soil, greatly increased the transport of /sup 241/Am into stems and leaves of bush bean plants. Radioactive cyanide (/sup 14/C) was also transported to leaves and stems. When radish was grown in both calcareous and noncalcareous soils, /sup 241/Am appeared to be fixed on the peel so firmly that it was resistant to removal by HNO/sub 3/ washing. The chelating agent DTPA induced increased transport of /sup 241/Am to leaves and into the fleshy roots of the radish.

  3. Biochemical paths in humans and cells: Frontiers of AMS bioanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.; Palmblad, N. M.; Ognibene, T.; Kabir, M. M.; Buchholz, B. A.; Bench, G.

    2007-06-01

    The publication rate of 3H and 14C use in biomedical research decreased by a factor of three since 1990 when the first applications of AMS in biomedicine were published. Against this decrease, the high sensitivity of AMS for these isotopes in small isolated samples has made significant contributions. New smaller spectrometers and increased commercial availability of AMS have solved some of the issues surrounding availability and cost, but improved quantitation in non-isotopic methods now compete with some early uses of AMS. We review the strength of AMS for quantifying rare biochemical events and chemical passages through individual people or cells and consider these as the frontiers of quantitation leading to profitable science unavailable to other techniques.

  4. Measurement of deuteron induced gamma-ray emission differential cross sections on natCl from 1.0 to 2.0 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokar, A.; Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this research work, measured differential cross sections for gamma-ray emission from the nuclear reactions 35Cl(d,pγ1-0)36Cl (Eγ = 788 keV), 35Cl(d,pγ2-0)36Cl (Eγ = 1165 keV), 37Cl(d,pγ1-0)38Cl (Eγ = 671 keV) and 37Cl(d,pγ2-0)38Cl (Eγ = 755 keV) are presented. For these measurements a thin natural BaCl2 target evaporated onto a 50 μm-thick Mo foil was used. The gamma-rays and backscattered deuterons were detected simultaneously. An HPGe detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to the beam direction was employed to collect gamma-rays while an ion implanted Si detector placed at a scattering angle of 165° was used to detect backscattered deuterons. The validity of the obtained differential cross sections was verified through a thick target benchmarking experiment. The overall systematic uncertainty of cross section values was estimated to be ±10%.

  5. Effects of noise reduction on AM perception for hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Ives, D Timothy; Kalluri, Sridhar; Strelcyk, Olaf; Sheft, Stanley; Miermont, Franck; Coez, Arnaud; Bizaguet, Eric; Lorenzi, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Noise reduction (NR) systems are commonplace in modern digital hearing aids. Though not improving speech intelligibility, NR helps the hearing-aid user in terms of lowering noise annoyance, reducing cognitive load and improving ease of listening. Previous psychophysical work has shown that NR does in fact improve the ability of normal-hearing (NH) listeners to discriminate the slow amplitude-modulation (AM) cues representative of those found in speech. The goal of this study was to assess whether this improvement of AM discrimination with NR can also be observed for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. AM discrimination was measured at two audio frequencies of 500 Hz and 2 kHz in a background noise with a signal-to-noise ratio of 12 dB. Discrimination was measured for ten HI and ten NH listeners with and without NR processing. The HI listeners had a moderate sensorineural hearing loss of about 50 dB HL at 2 kHz and normal hearing (≤ 20 dB HL) at 500 Hz. The results showed that most of the HI listeners tended to benefit from NR at 500 Hz but not at 2 kHz. However, statistical analyses showed that HI listeners did not benefit significantly from NR at any frequency region. In comparison, the NH listeners showed a significant benefit from NR at both frequencies. For each condition, the fidelity of AM transmission was quantified by a computational model of early auditory processing. The parameters of the model were adjusted separately for the two groups (NH and HI) of listeners. The AM discrimination performance of the HI group (with and without NR) was best captured by a model simulating the loss of the fast-acting amplitude compression applied by the normal cochlea. This suggests that the lack of benefit from NR for HI listeners results from loudness recruitment. PMID:24899379

  6. AM251 induces apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in A375 human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Sara; Fogli, Stefano; Romanini, Antonella; Pellegrino, Mario; Adinolfi, Barbara; Podestà, Adriano; Costa, Barbara; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Martini, Claudia; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Nieri, Paola

    2015-08-01

    Human cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive and chemotherapy-resistant type of cancer. AM251 is a cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor antagonist/inverse agonist with off-target antitumor activity against pancreatic and colon cancer cells. The current study aimed to characterize the in-vitro antimelanoma activity of AM251. The BRAF V600E mutant melanoma cell line, A375, was used as an in-vitro model system. Characterization tools included a cell viability assay, nuclear morphology assessment, gene expression, western blot, flow cytometry with Annexin V-FITC/7-AAD double staining, cell cycle analyses, and measurements of changes in intracellular cAMP and calcium concentrations. AM251 exerted a marked cytotoxic effect against A375 human melanoma cells with potency comparable with that observed for cisplatin without significant changes in the human dermal fibroblasts viability. AM251, at a concentration that approximates the IC50, downregulated genes encoding antiapoptotic proteins (BCL2 and survivin) and increased transcription levels of proapoptotic BAX, induced alteration of Annexin V reactivity, DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation in the cell nuclei, and G2/M phase arrest.AM251 also induced a 40% increase in the basal cAMP levels, but it did not affect intracellular calcium concentrations. The involvement of GPR55, TRPA1, and COX-2 in the AM251 mechanism of action was excluded. The combination of AM251 with celecoxib produced a synergistic antitumor activity, although the mechanism underlying this effect remains to be elucidated. This study provides the first evidence of a proapoptotic effect and G2/M cell cycle arrest of AM251 on A375 cells. This compound may be a potential prototype for the development of promising diarylpyrazole derivatives to be evaluated in human cutaneous melanoma. PMID:25974027

  7. Deciphering viscous flow of frictional melts with the mini-AMS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Eric C.; Chou, Yu-Min; Kuo, Ruo Lin; Yeh, En-Chao; Leibovitz, Natalie R.; Meado, Andrea L.; Campbell, Lucy; Geissman, John W.

    2016-09-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is widely used to analyze magmatic flow in intrusive igneous bodies including plutons, sills and dikes. This method, owing its success to the rapid nature of measurements, provides a proxy for the orientation of markers with shape anisotropy that flow and align in a viscous medium. AMS specimens typically are 25 mm diameter right cylinders or 20 mm on-a-side cubes, representing a volume deemed statistically representative. Here, we present new AMS results, based on significantly smaller cubic specimens, which are 3.5 mm on a side, hence∼250 times volumetrically smaller than conventional specimens. We show that, in the case of frictional melts, which inherently have an extremely small grain size, this small volume is in most cases sufficient to characterize the pseudotachylyte fabric, particularly when magnetite is present. Further, we demonstrate that the mini-AMS method provides new opportunities to investigate the details of frictional melt flow in these coseismic miniature melt bodies. This new method offers significant potential to investigate frictional melt flow in pseudotachylyte veins including contributions to the lubrication of faults at shallow to moderate depths.

  8. Biocorrosion behavior of biodegradable nanocomposite fibers coated layer-by-layer on AM50 magnesium implant.

    PubMed

    Abdal-Hay, Abdalla; Hasan, Anwarul; Kim, Yu-Kyoung; Yu-Kyoung; Lee, Min-Ho; Hamdy, Abdel Salam; Khalil, Khalil Abdelrazek

    2016-01-01

    This article demonstrates the use of hybrid nanofibers to improve the biodegradation rate and biocompatibility of AM50 magnesium alloy. Biodegradable hybrid membrane fiber layers containing nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) particles and poly(lactide)(PLA) nanofibers were coated layer-by-layer (LbL) on AM50 coupons using a facile single-step air jet spinning (AJS) approach. The corrosion performance of coated and uncoated coupon samples was investigated by means of electrochemical measurements. The results showed that the AJS 3D membrane fiber layers, particularly the hybrid membrane layers containing a small amount of nHA (3 wt.%), induce a higher biocorrosion resistance and effectively decrease the initial degradation rate compared with the neat AM50 coupon samples. The adhesion strength improved highly due to the presence of nHA particles in the AJS layer. Furthermore, the long biodegradation rates of AM50 alloy in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) were significantly controlled by the AJS-coatings. The results showed a higher cytocompatibility for AJS-coatings compared to that for neat Mg alloys. The nanostructured nHA embedded hybrid PLA nanofiber coating can therefore be a suitable coating material for Mg alloy as a potential material for biodegradable metallic orthopedic implants. PMID:26478426

  9. Upgrading of the AMS facility at the Koffler 14UD Pelletron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovits, D.; Paul, M.; Ben-Dov, Y.; Bordeanu, C.; Ghelberg, S.; Heber, O.; Hass, M.; Shahar, Y.; Verri, G.

    2004-08-01

    The AMS facility based on a 14UD Pelletron tandem accelerator has been upgraded in recent years to support an active and diversified research program. A new dedicated AMS ion source beam line merging at 45° with the existing injection line through a 45° electrostatic deflector is in operation. The multi-sample high-intensity Cs sputter ion source stands on a separate 120 kV platform and is remote-controlled through a hybrid infrared-fiber-optics link operated either manually or by the accelerator-control computer, ensuring safe and reliable operation. Independent current preamplifiers are used in Faraday cup current readings down to the pA range. The accelerator computer-control system was upgraded to LabView 6.1, allowing a PC server to control and read out all hardware components while one or more remote PC clients run the AMS software. Ad hoc sequences of commands, written in a script macro language, are run from a client computer to perform an automated AMS measurement. The present capabilities of the facility in terms of detected radionuclides and their sensitivities are listed.

  10. Methods and applications of HPLC-AMS (WBio 5)

    SciTech Connect

    Bucholz, B A; Clifford, A J; Duecker, S R; Lin, Y; Vogel, J S

    1999-09-29

    Pharmacokinetics of physiologic doses of nutrients, pesticides, and herbicides can easily be traced in humans using a {sup 14}C-labelled compound. Basic kinetics can be monitored in blood or urine by measuring the elevation in the {sup 14}C content above the control predose tissue and converting to equivalents of the parent compound. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) is an excellent method for the chemical separation of complex mixtures whose profiles afford estimation of biochemical pathways of metabolism. Compounds elute from the HPLC systems with characteristic retention times and can be collected in fractions that can then be graphitized for AMS measurement. Unknowns are identified by coelution with known standards and chemical tests that reveal functional groupings. Metabolites are quantified with the {sup 14}C signal. Thoroughly accounting for the carbon inventory in the LC solvents, ion-pairing agents, samples, and carriers adds some complexity to the analysis. In most cases the total carbon inventory is dominated by carrier. Baseline background and stability need to be carefully monitored. Limits of quantitation near 10 amol of {sup 14}C per HPLC fraction are typically achieved. Baselines are maintained by limiting injected {sup 14}C activity <0.17 Bq (4.5 pCi) on the HPLC column.

  11. AMS studies in Portuguese variscan granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant'Ovaia, Helena; Martins, Helena; Noronha, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    A large volume of Variscan granitic rocks outcrop in Central Iberian Zone which are well documented concerning geological mapping, petrography and geochemistry but whose magnetic characteristics and fabric remain unknown. In this study we summarize the available AMS data from approximately 644 sampling stations (5152 samples) on different massifs of Variscan Portuguese granites. Despite their different geological, petrographic and geochemical characteristics, magnetic susceptibility (K) values obtained for the majority of the studied granites range from 15 to 300 × 10-6 SI. The dominant paramagnetic behaviour of the granite bodies reflects the presence of ilmenite as the main iron oxide. This feature indicates the reduced conditions involved in the granite melt formation during the Variscan orogeny. The two-mica granites show K values ranging between 15 to 70 × 10-6 SI which are lower than values displayed by the biotite-rich facies scattered within the interval of 70 and 300 × 10-6 SI. The magnetite-bearing granites are scarce but represented in Lavadores, Gerês and Manteigas. Even so, only the Lavadores body could be considered as a true magnetite-type granite (K >3.0 × 10-3 SI) in face of its K, comprised between 1550 and 19303 × 10-6 SI. Magnetic anisotropy can be used as a "marker" for the deformation experienced by granite mushes during their crustal emplacement and further cooling. Magnetic anisotropy can thus be correlated with the finite deformation of a rock, as record by mineral fabrics. Post-tectonic granites, such as those from Vila Pouca de Aguiar, Pedras Salgadas, Caria, Vila da Ponte, Chaves and Lamas de Olo, have a magnetic anisotropy <2.5% which corresponds to a deformation hardly visible to the naked eye. Nevertheless, at microscopic scale, these granites display almost ubiquitous magmatic to submagmatic microstructures (rare wavy extinction in quartz, erratic subgrain boundaries in quartz and, eventually, folded or kinked biotites). For

  12. Development of an AMS method to study oceanic circulation characteristics using cosmogenic 39Ar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collon, P.H.; Bichler, M.; Caggiano, J.; Cecil, L.D.; El, Masri Y.; Golser, R.; Jiang, C.L.; Heinz, A.; Henderson, D.; Kutschera, W.; Lehmann, B.E.; Leleux, P.; Loosli, H.H.; Pardo, R.C.; Paul, M.; Rehm, K.E.; Schlosser, P.; Scott, R.H.; Smethie, W.M., Jr.; Vondrasek, R.

    2004-01-01

    Initial experiments at the ATLAS facility [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 92 (1994) 241] resulted in a clear detection of cosmogenic 39Ar signal at the natural level. The present paper summarizes the recent developments of 39Ar AMS measurements at ATLAS: the use of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) positive ion source equipped with a special quartz liner to reduce 39K background, the development of a gas handling system for small volume argon samples, the acceleration of 39Ar8+ ions to 232 MeV, and the final separation of 39Ar from 39K in a gas-filled spectrograph. The first successful AMS measurements of 39Ar in ocean water samples from the Southern Atlantic ventilation experiment (SAVE) are reported. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. AMS Weather Studies and AMS Ocean Studies: Dynamic, College-Level Geoscience Courses Emphasizing Current Earth System Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, J. A.; Geer, I. W.; Moran, J. M.; Weinbeck, R. S.; Mills, E. W.; Blair, B. A.; Hopkins, E. J.; Kiley, T. P.; Ruwe, E. E.

    2008-12-01

    AMS Weather Studies and AMS Ocean Studies are introductory college-level courses developed by the American Meteorological Society, with NSF and NOAA support, for local offering at undergraduate institutions nationwide. The courses place students in a dynamic and highly motivational educational environment where they investigate the atmosphere and world ocean using real-world and real-time environmental data. Over 360 colleges throughout the United States have offered these courses in course environments ranging from traditional lecture/laboratory to completely online. AMS Diversity Projects aim to increase undergraduate student access to the geosciences through implementation of the courses at minority-serving institutions and training programs for MSI faculty. The AMS Weather Studies and AMS Ocean Studies course packages consist of a hard-cover, 15-chapter textbook, Investigations Manual with 30 lab-style activities, and course website containing weekly current weather and ocean investigations. Course instructors receive access to a faculty website and CD containing answer keys and course management system-compatible files, which allow full integration to a college's e-learning environment. The unique aspect of the courses is the focus on current Earth system data through weekly Current Weather Studies and Current Ocean Studies investigations written in real time and posted to the course website, as well as weekly news files and a daily weather summary for AMS Weather Studies. Students therefore study meteorology or oceanography as it happens, which creates a dynamic learning environment where student relate their experiences and observations to the course, and actively discuss the science with their instructor and classmates. With NSF support, AMS has held expenses-paid course implementation workshops for minority-serving institution faculty planning to offer AMS Weather Studies or AMS Ocean Studies. From May 2002-2007, AMS conducted week-long weather workshops

  14. Results of the 2015 testbeam of a 180 nm AMS High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Casse, G.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Di Bello, F. A.; Ferrere, D.; Golling, T.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Iacobucci, G.; Lanni, F.; Liu, H.; Meloni, F.; Meng, L.; Miucci, A.; Muenstermann, D.; Nessi, M.; Perić, I.; Rimoldi, M.; Ristic, B.; Barrero Pinto, M. Vicente; Vossebeld, J.; Weber, M.; Wu, W.; Xu, L.

    2016-07-01

    Active pixel sensors based on the High-Voltage CMOS technology are being investigated as a viable option for the future pixel tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High-Luminosity LHC. This paper reports on the testbeam measurements performed at the H8 beamline of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron on a High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype produced in 180 nm AMS technology. Results in terms of tracking efficiency and timing performance, for different threshold and bias conditions, are shown.

  15. Superprolate shape of the spontaneous-fission isomer /sup 240/Am/sup m/

    SciTech Connect

    Pauling, L.

    1980-10-01

    A superprolate structure for nuclei with Aapprox.240 proposed in 1965 on the basis of the polyspheron theory leads to the value 0.66 for the deformation parameter ..beta... This value agrees well with a recently reported experimental value, 0.66 +- 0.04 for the spontaneous-fission isomer /sup 240/Am/sup m/, obtained by Bemis et al. from their measurement of the optical isomer shift. This agreement provides additional support for the proposed superprolate structure.

  16. Search for Dark Matter with the AMS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Palomares, Carmen

    2006-11-28

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a particle physics detector designed to operate on the International Space Station (ISS). The aim of AMS is the direct detection of charged particles in the rigidity range from 0.5 GV to few TV erform high statistics studies of cosmic rays in space and search for antimatter and dark matter. The most favored candidate to conform the cold dark matter is a non-relativistic interacting, massive particle (WIMP). AMS will be able to detect simultaneously the main signatures of the annihilation of such as particle: {gamma}, e+,p-bar in an energy range never reached before.

  17. Comparative Convergence Analysis of Nonlinear AMLI-Cycle Multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaozhe; Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Xu, Jinchao

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of our paper is to provide a comprehensive convergence analysis of the nonlinear algebraic multilevel iteration (AMLI)-cycle multigrid (MG) method for symmetric positive definite problems. We show that the nonlinear AMLI-cycle MG method is uniformly convergent, based on classical assumptions for approximation and smoothing properties. Furthermore, under only the assumption that the smoother is convergent, we show that the nonlinear AMLI-cycle method is always better (or not worse) than the respective V-cycle MG method. Finally, numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the theoretical results.

  18. Detection of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances by Medium Frequency Doppler Sounding Using AM Radio Transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilcote, M. A.; Labelle, J. W.; Lind, F. D.; Coster, A. J.; Galkin, I. A.; Miller, E.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    Nighttime traveling ionosphere disturbances (TIDs) propagating in the lower F region of the ionosphere were detected from time variations in the Doppler shifts of commercial AM radio broadcast stations. Three separately deployed receivers, components of the Intercepted Signals for Ionospheric Science (ISIS) Array software radio instrumentation network, recorded signals from two radio stations during eleven nights in March-April, 2012. Combining these measurements established that variations in the frequencies of the received signals, with amplitudes up to a few tenths of a Hertz, resulted from Doppler shifts produced by the ionosphere. At times, TIDs were detected as large amplitude variations in the Doppler shift with approximately 40-minute period correlated across the array. For one study interval, 0000-0400 UT on April 13, 2012, simultaneous GPS-TEC, digisonde, and superDARN coherent backscatter radar measurements confirmed the detection of TIDs with the same period. Detection of the AM signals at widely spaced receivers allowed the phase velocity and wavelength of the TIDs to be inferred, with some limitations due to differing reflection heights for the different frequencies. These measurements will be compared to phase velocities and wavelengths determined from combining an array of GPS receivers; discrepancies due to the altitude sensitivity of the techniques or other effects will be discussed. These results demonstrate that AM radio signals can be used for detection of nighttime TIDs.

  19. Detection of traveling ionospheric disturbances by medium-frequency Doppler sounding using AM radio transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilcote, M.; LaBelle, J.; Lind, F. D.; Coster, A. J.; Miller, E. S.; Galkin, I. A.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2015-03-01

    Nighttime traveling ionosphere disturbances (TIDs) propagating in the lower F region of the ionosphere have been detected by measuring time variations in the Doppler shifts of commercial AM radio broadcast signals. Three receivers, components of the Intercepted Signals for Ionospheric Science (ISIS) Array software radio instrumentation network in the northeastern United States, recorded signals from two radio stations during 11 nights in March-April, 2012. By combining these measurements, TIDs were detected as approximately 40min periodic variations in the frequencies of the received signals resulting from Doppler shifts produced by the ionosphere. The variations had amplitudes of up to a few tenths of a hertz and were correlated across the array. For one study interval, 0000-0400 UT on 13 April 2012, simultaneous GPS total electron content, Digisonde®, and Super Dual-Auroral Radar Network coherent backscatter radar measurements confirmed the detection of TIDs with the same characteristics. Besides TIDs, the receiver network often detected large (nearly 1 Hz) upward (downward) Doppler shifts of the AM broadcast signals at the dawn (dusk) terminator. These results demonstrate that AM radio signals can be used for detection and monitoring of nighttime TIDs and related effects.

  20. An integrated data-analysis and database system for AMS 14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Henrik; Olsen, Jesper; Heinemeier, Jan

    2010-04-01

    AMSdata is the name of a combined database and data-analysis system for AMS 14C and stable-isotope work that has been developed at Aarhus University. The system (1) contains routines for data analysis of AMS and MS data, (2) allows a flexible and accurate description of sample extraction and pretreatment, also when samples are split into several fractions, and (3) keeps track of all measured, calculated and attributed data. The structure of the database is flexible and allows an unlimited number of measurement and pretreatment procedures. The AMS 14C data analysis routine is fairly advanced and flexible, and it can be easily optimized for different kinds of measuring processes. Technically, the system is based on a Microsoft SQL server and includes stored SQL procedures for the data analysis. Microsoft Office Access is used for the (graphical) user interface, and in addition Excel, Word and Origin are exploited for input and output of data, e.g. for plotting data during data analysis.

  1. AMS radiocarbon dating of very large Grandidier's baobabs (Adansonia grandidieri)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrut, Adrian; von Reden, Karl F.; Danthu, Pascal; Leong Pock-Tsy, Jean-Michel; Rakosy, Laszlo; Patrut, Roxana T.; Lowy, Daniel A.; Margineanu, Dragos

    2015-10-01

    The article reports the AMS radiocarbon investigation of the two largest known Adansonia grandidieri specimens. The two baobabs, which are named Tsitakakoike and Pregnant baobab, are located in Southwestern Madagascar, near Andombiro. A third specimen from this area, the House baobab, was also investigated. According to measurements, Tsitakakoike is the biggest individual above ground level of all Adansonia species. The House baobab was selected for its exposed structure, which is identical to the closed ring-shaped structure with false cavities identified by us in large and old Adansonia digitata specimens. According to our research, Tsitakakoike and the Pregnant baobab have multi-stemmed cylindrical trunks which are mainly hollow; the two very large baobabs also possess a ring-shaped structure. The radiocarbon dates of the oldest wood samples collected from the large trunks were 1274 ± 20 BP for Tsitakakoike and 930 ± 20 BP for the Pregnant baobab. According to their original positions and to the architectures of the two A. grandidieri, the ages of Tsitakakoike and Pregnant baobab would be between 1300 and 1500 years. Therefore, A. grandidieri becomes the third Adansonia species with individuals that can live over 1000 years, according to accurate dating results.

  2. A simple Bragg detector design for AMS and IBA applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Arnold Milenko; Döbeli, Max; Seiler, Martin; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-08-01

    A new compact Bragg type gas ionization chamber (GIC) has been built for use as particle counter in AMS and IBA applications. The detector stands out due to its simple concept, which does not include a Frisch grid. Test experiments have been performed with ions in the mass range from He to Th and energies ranging from 30 keV to 2.5 MeV, in order to find optimal measurement conditions and to characterize the detector performance. For projectiles heavier than Al at energies below 2.5 MeV the obtained energy resolution is comparable with that of a state-of-the-art GIC with Frisch grid and clearly outperforms solid state detectors. Additionally the operation of this simplified Bragg GIC in the electron multiplication mode was investigated for the first time, which allows the detection of radiocarbon ions at energies below 50 keV with an energy resolution of the order of 10 keV.

  3. 33 CFR 103.300 - Area Maritime Security (AMS) Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... direction of the COTP and shall assist in the development, review, and update of the AMS Plan for their area of responsibility. For the purposes of this subchapter, Port Security Committees that...

  4. 33 CFR 103.300 - Area Maritime Security (AMS) Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... direction of the COTP and shall assist in the development, review, and update of the AMS Plan for their area of responsibility. For the purposes of this subchapter, Port Security Committees that...

  5. Am I at Risk? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Challenge of COPD Am I at Risk? Past Issues / Fall 2014 ... or the American Lung Association's COPD information section. COPD Learn More Breathe Better ® Program The COPD Learn ...

  6. Radio emission from AM Herculis-type binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanmugam, G.; Dulk, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A VLA search for 4.9 GHz radiation from the magnetic cataclysmic variable AM Her, along with the similar EF Eri binary, has led to the discovery of AM Her radio emission having a flux density of 0.67 + or - 0.052 mJy, where 1 mJy is equal to 10 to the -29th W/sq m per Hz. Neither AM Her circular polarization nor EF Eri were detected. The AM Her data are shown to be consistent with a model in which radiation is due to geosynchrotron emission from electrons of energies of a few hundred keV, which are trapped in the magnetosphere of the white dwarf element of the cataclysmic variable.

  7. 78 FR 69629 - Revitalization of the AM Radio Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... addition to the standard general contact information, FCC Form 338 solicits minimal technical data, as well...- friendly features such as real-time data and information displays. The AM band is also subject...

  8. 66. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE COOLING BUILDING, LOOKING AM DAMPERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE COOLING BUILDING, LOOKING AM DAMPERS, HIGH TEMPERATURE AND LOW TEMPERATURE COOLERS. APRIL 11, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  9. Strain analysis in quartzites with negative magnetic susceptibility using AMS and EBSD data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendraprasad Renjith, A.; Mamtani, Manish A.

    2016-04-01

    This study is being done with the objective of trying to understand whether the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) data can provide information about strain in quartzites with negative magnetic susceptibility. For this, nine quartzite samples have been collected from Rengali Province (located in the eastern part of India) with bulk magnetic susceptibility between -13.6 x 10-6 SI units and -3.06 x 10-6 SI units. Since these rocks did not show any visible foliation or lineation, AMS analysis was performed using KLY-4S Kappabridge and the orientation of three principal axes of the AMS ellipsoid (K1>K2>K3) were determined. Thin sections were prepared parallel to the K1K3 plane of the AMS ellipsoid (plane parallel to lineation and perpendicular to foliation), which is equivalent to the XZ plane of the strain ellipsoid. SEM based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis, shape preferred orientation (SPO) analysis and strain analysis were carried out in these sections. Recently, Renjith et al. (2016) used the same samples to establish that the AMS in quartzites gives information about the SPO and not the CPO. To further evaluate the robustness of AMS in strain analysis, the authors have integrated the degree of magnetic anisotropy (Pj - a measure of the eccentricity of AMS ellipsoid; Tarling and Hrouda, 1993) with the intensity of SPO (κ ; Piazolo and Passchier, 2002), and the strain (E - calculated using AMOCADO; Gerik and Kruhl, 2009) from the same samples from Rengali. EBSD data were used as the basis for the above calculations. Whilst the orientation of long axis of quartz grains from EBSD statistical data was used to calculate κ , the grain boundary map generated from EBSD analysis was used as the basis to determine strain (E). It is found that the sample with minimum Pj also has a minimum κ and E, and vice-versa. Hence it is concluded that one-to-one correlation exists between the degree of magnetic anisotropy, strain and intensity of SPO in

  10. Synthesis of Am80 (tamibarotene) prodrug candidates, congeners and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Muratake, Hideaki; Amano, Yohei; Toda, Takahiro; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi; Shudo, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Compound 1 (IT-M-07000) was previously reported as a candidate prodrug of Am80 (Tamibarotene; used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia), and shown to be efficiently metabolized to Am80 via β-oxidation. Here, we describe in detail the synthesis of 1, together with another tetradeuterated candidate prodrug, IT-YA-00616 (2), as well as two congeners, and several metabolic intermediates of 1 previously detected in mouse plasma. PMID:23902867

  11. Column strength of magnesium alloy AM-57S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, M

    1942-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the column strength of extruded magnesium alloy AM-57S. Column specimens were tested with round ends and with flat ends. It was found that the compressive properties should be used in computations for column strengths rather than the tensile properties because the compressive yield strength was approximately one-half the tensile yield strength. A formula for the column strength of magnesium alloy AM-57S is given.

  12. Chernobyl accident and the problem of {sup 241}Am

    SciTech Connect

    Pazukhin, E.M.; Drozd, I.P.; Tokarevskii, V.V.

    1995-07-01

    The accumulation and decay of {sup 241}Am formed in the reactor of the fourth block of the Chernobyl atomic energy station at the time of the accident of April 26, 1986 are analyzed. Possible pathways for {sup 241}Am uptake in man are examined. The maximum equivalent dose after 70 years is estimated for a critical population living at the edge of the exclusion zone.

  13. Measurement of residual 152Eu activity induced by atomic bomb neutrons in Nagasaki and the contribution of environmental neutrons to this activity.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Ishikawa, Masayori; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi; Oka, Takamitsu; Fujita, Shoichiro; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Yamashita, Tomoaki; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2003-06-01

    Residual 152Eu activities induced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb were measured for nine mineral samples located up to 1,061 m in the slant range and one control sample at 2,850 m from the hypocenter. A chemical separation to prepare europium-enriched samples was performed for all samples, and gamma ray measurements were carried out with a low background well-type germanium detector. In this paper, the measured specific activities of 152Eu are compared with activation calculations based on the DS86 neutron fluence and the 93Rev one. The calculated-to-measured ratios are also compared with those of 60Co and 36Cl. The present results indicate that the measurements agree to the calculation within a factor of three as observed in the nuclear tests at Nevada. The activation level of environmental neutrons and the detection limit for 152Eu are also discussed. PMID:13678342

  14. 129I AMS at 0.5 MV tandem accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfimov, Vasily; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2010-04-01

    The 129I measurement program has been established at the 0.5 MV 'Tandy' accelerator of the PSI/ETH Zürich AMS facility. This development was made possible by using a SiN window instead of Mylar one in a gas ionization detector. The setting up of the 129I measurement at Tandy is simple, the acquired performance is stable and reliable, and the quality of results is equal to or better than at our larger EN-tandem. With this setup, high sample throughput, which is required in many 129I studies, can be easily achieved. The measurements are performed in the +3 charge state. At this charge state the major difficulty in the 129I +3 identification is caused by a highly abundant 43 +1 ( m = 43, q = +1) molecule interference. This is a positive molecular ion, because its intensity reduces exponentially with an increase in gas stripper pressure. We conclude that this molecule is 27Al 16O + ( m/ q = 43/1 = 129/3) and comes from the break-up of (Al 2O 3 + Al) - ( m = 129) precursor at the terminal: (Al 2O 3 + Al) - → 27Al 16O +. The expected isobaric interferences 43Ca +1 and 86Sr +2, which also originate from the break-up of molecules in the stripper, were found to be low and do not disturb the 129I +3 measurements. The best repeatable performance with our standard sample material was achieved at 0.14 μg/cm 2 Ar gas stripper pressure with machine blanks showing ˜6 × 10 -14 normalized 129I/I ratio and 9% transmission through the accelerator. However, high 27Al 16O + molecular rates were observed from the user samples, and in order to destroy these molecules we had to increase the stripper pressure to ˜0.22 μg/cm 2. This increase in the stripper pressure degraded the machine blank values to ˜9 × 10 -14 and reduced transmission to 8%. Nevertheless, the achieved measurement conditions are sufficient for measurement of nearly all 129I samples that have been submitted to PSI/ETH over the last few years.

  15. Local structure and charge distribution in mixed uranium-americium oxides: effects of oxygen potential and Am content.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Damien; Martin, Philippe M; Jankowiak, Aurélien; Gavilan, Elisabeth; Scheinost, Andreas C; Herlet, Nathalie; Dehaudt, Philippe; Blanchart, Philippe

    2011-12-19

    Partitioning and transmutation (P&T) of minor actinides (MA) is currently studied to reduce the nuclear waste inventory. In this context, the fabrication of MA bearing materials is of great interest to achieve an effective recycling of these highly radioactive elements. To ensure the in-pile behavior, nuclear oxide fuels have to respect several criteria including preservation of the fluorite structure and defined oxygen to metal ratio (O/M). In the case of Am bearing materials, such as U(1-y)Am(y)O(2±x) (y = 0.10, 0.15, 0.20), the O/M determination is quite challenging using conventional methods (TGA, XRD) because of the particular thermodynamic properties of Am. Despite the lack of experimental data in the U-Am-O system, thermodynamical models are currently developed to effectively assess the O/M ratio. In this work, the O/M ratios were calculated for various oxygen potentials using the cation molar fraction determined by XAS measurements. These results are an important addition to the experimental data available for the U-Am-O system. Moreover, XRD and XAS indicated that the fabrication of fluorite U(1-y)Am(y)O(2±x) solid solution was achieved for all Am content and oxygen potentials investigated. On the basis of the molar fraction, a description of the solid solution was proposed depending on the considered sintering conditions. Finally, the occurrence of an unexpected charge compensation mechanism was pointed out. PMID:22087707

  16. Ginkgo biloba for the prevention of severe acute mountain sickness (AMS) starting one day before rapid ascent.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, Jeffrey H; Seto, Todd B; Mor, Joanne; Onopa, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that 5 days of prophylactic ginkgo decreases the incidence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) during gradual ascent. This trial was designed to determine if ginkgo is an effective prophylactic agent if begun 1 day prior to rapid ascent. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 26 participants residing at sea level received ginkgo (60 mg TID) or placebo starting 24 h before ascending Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Subjects were transported from sea level to the summit (4205 m) over 3 hours, including 1 hour at 2835 m. The Lake Louise Self-report Questionnaire constituted the primary outcome measure at baseline, 2835 m, and after 4 h at 4205 m. AMS was defined as a Lake Louise Self-report Score (LLSR) >/= 3 with headache. Subjects who developed severe AMS were promptly transported to lower altitude for the remainder of the study. The ginkgo (n = 12) and placebo (n = 14) groups were well matched (58% vs. 50% female; median age 28 yr, range 22-53 vs. 33 yr, range 21-53; 58% vs. 57% Caucasian). Two (17%) subjects on ginkgo and nine (64%) on placebo developed severe AMS and required descent for their safety (p = 0.021); all recovered without sequelae. Median LLSR at 4205 m was significantly lower for ginkgo versus placebo (4, range 1-8 vs. 5, range 2-9, p = 0.03). Ginkgo use did not reach statistical significance for lowering incidence of AMS compared with placebo (ginkgo 7/12, 58.3% vs. placebo 13/14, 92.9%, p = 0.07). Twenty-one of 26 (81%) subjects developed AMS overall. This is the first study to demonstrate that 1 day of pretreatment with ginkgo 60 mg TID may significantly reduce the severity of AMS prior to rapid ascent from sea level to 4205 m. PMID:12006162

  17. Determination of 241Am in sediments by isotope dilution high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID HR ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Agarande, M; Benzoubir, S; Bouisset, P; Calmet, D

    2001-08-01

    Trace levels (pg kg(-1)) of 241Am in sediments were determined by isotope dilution high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID HR ICP-MS) using a microconcentric nebulizer. 241Am was isolated from major elements like Ca and Fe by different selective precipitations. In further steps. Am was first separated from other transuranic elements and purified by anion exchange and extraction chromatography prior to the mass spectrometric measurements. The ID HR ICP-MS results are compared with isotope dilution alpha spectrometry. PMID:11393755

  18. An interface for the direct coupling of small liquid samples to AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ognibene, T. J.; Thomas, A. T.; Daley, P. F.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    2015-10-01

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Discrete samples containing at least a few 10 s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3-5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targets for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. Liquid sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.

  19. An interface for the direct coupling of small liquid samples to AMS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ognibene, T. J.; Thomas, A. T.; Daley, P. F.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    2015-05-28

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL’s Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Discrete samples containing at least a few 10 s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3–5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targetsmore » for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. As a result, liquid sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.« less

  20. An interface for the direct coupling of small liquid samples to AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, T. J.; Thomas, A. T.; Daley, P. F.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    2015-05-28

    We describe the moving wire interface attached to the 1-MV AMS system at LLNL’s Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for the analysis of nonvolatile liquid samples as either discrete drops or from the direct output of biochemical separatory instrumentation, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Discrete samples containing at least a few 10 s of nanograms of carbon and as little as 50 zmol 14C can be measured with a 3–5% precision in a few minutes. The dynamic range of our system spans approximately 3 orders in magnitude. Sample to sample memory is minimized by the use of fresh targets for each discrete sample or by minimizing the amount of carbon present in a peak generated by an HPLC containing a significant amount of 14C. As a result, liquid sample AMS provides a new technology to expand our biomedical AMS program by enabling the capability to measure low-level biochemicals in extremely small samples that would otherwise be inaccessible.