Science.gov

Sample records for 3d coupled hydrodynamic

  1. Coupled 1D-3D hydrodynamic modelling, with application to the Pearl River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twigt, Daniel J.; de Goede, Erik D.; Zijl, Firmijn; Schwanenberg, Dirk; Chiu, Alex Y. W.

    2009-12-01

    Within the hydrodynamic modelling community, it is common practice to apply different modelling systems for coastal waters and river systems. Whereas for coastal waters 3D finite difference or finite element grids are commonly used, river systems are generally modelled using 1D networks. Each of these systems is tailored towards specific applications. Three-dimensional coastal water models are designed to model the horizontal and vertical variability in coastal waters and are less well suited for representing the complex geometry and cross-sectional areas of river networks. On the other hand, 1D river network models are designed to accurately represent complex river network geometries and complex structures like weirs, barrages and dams. A disadvantage, however, is that they are unable to resolve complex spatial flow variability. In real life, however, coastal oceans and rivers interact. In deltaic estuaries, both tidal intrusion of seawater into the upstream river network and river discharge into open waters play a role. This is frequently approached by modelling the systems independently, with off-line coupling of the lateral boundary forcing. This implies that the river and the coastal model run sequentially, providing lateral discharge (1D) and water level (3D) forcing to each other without the possibility of direct feedback or interaction between these processes. An additional disadvantage is that due to the time aggregation usually applied to exchanged quantities, mass conservation is difficult to ensure. In this paper, we propose an approach that couples a 3D hydrodynamic modelling system for coastal waters (Delft3D) with a 1D modelling system for river hydraulics (SOBEK) online. This implies that contrary to off-line coupling, the hydrodynamic quantities are exchanged between the 1D and 3D domains during runtime to resolve the real-time exchange and interaction between the coastal waters and river network. This allows for accurate and mass conserving

  2. Coupling Magnetic Fields and ALE Hydrodynamics for 3D Simulations of MFCG's

    SciTech Connect

    White, D; Rieben, R; Wallin, B

    2006-09-20

    We review the development of a full 3D multiphysics code for the simulation of explosively driven Magnetic Flux Compression Generators (MFCG) and related pulse power devices. In a typical MFCG the device is seeded with an initial electric current and the device is then detonated. The detonation compresses the magnetic field and amplifies the current. This is a multiphysics problem in that detonation kinetics, electromagnetic diffusion and induction, material deformation, and thermal effects are all important. This is a tightly coupled problem in that the different physical quantities have comparable spatial and temporal variation, and hence should be solved simultaneously on the same computational mesh.

  3. The early phases of galaxy clusters formation in IR: coupling hydrodynamical simulations with GRASIL-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granato, Gian Luigi; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia; Domínguez-Tenreiro, Rosa; Obreja, Aura; Borgani, Stefano; De Lucia, Gabriella; Murante, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    We compute and study the infrared and sub-mm properties of high-redshift (z ≳ 1) simulated clusters and protoclusters. The results of a large set of hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations including active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback, have been treated with the recently developed radiative transfer code GRASIL-3D, which accounts for the effect of dust reprocessing in an arbitrary geometry. Here, we have slightly generalized the code to adapt it to the present purpose. Then we have post-processed boxes of physical size 2 Mpc encompassing each of the 24 most massive clusters identified at z = 0, at several redshifts between 0.5 and 3, producing IR and sub-mm mock images of these regions and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the radiation coming out from them. While this field is in its infancy from the observational point of view, rapid development is expected in the near future thanks to observations performed in the far-IR and sub-mm bands. Notably, we find that in this spectral regime our prediction are little affected by the assumption required by this post-processing, and the emission is mostly powered by star formation (SF) rather than accretion on to super massive black hole (SMBH). The comparison with the little observational information currently available, highlights that the simulated cluster regions never attain the impressive star formation rates suggested by these observations. This problem becomes more intriguing taking into account that the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the same simulations turn out to be too massive. It seems that the interplay between the feedback schemes and the star formation model should be revised, possibly incorporating a positive feedback mode.

  4. 3D Hydrodynamic Simulations of Relativistic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. A.; Miller, M. A.; Duncan, G. C.; Swift, C. M.

    1998-12-01

    We present the results of validation runs and the first extragalactic jet simulations performed with a 3D relativistic numerical hydrodynamic code employing a solver of the RHLLE type and using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR; Duncan & Hughes, 1994, Ap. J., 436, L119). Test problems include the shock tube, blast wave and spherical shock reflection (implosion). Trials with the code show that as a consequence of AMR it is viable to perform exploratory runs on workstation class machines (with no more than 128Mb of memory) prior to production runs. In the former case we achieve a resolution not much less than that normally regarded as the minimum needed to capture the essential physics of a problem, which means that such runs can provide valuable guidance allowing the optimum use of supercomputer resources. We present initial results from a program to explore the 3D stability properties of flows previously studied using a 2D axisymmetric code, and our first attempt to explore the structure and morphology of a relativistic jet encountering an ambient density gradient that mimics an ambient inhomogeneity or cloud.

  5. Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-11-07

    DYNA3D is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, includingmore » frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation.« less

  6. Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    2000-11-07

    DYNA3D is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation.

  7. FARGO3D: Hydrodynamics/magnetohydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez Llambay, Pablo; Masset, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    A successor of FARGO (ascl:1102.017), FARGO3D is a versatile HD/MHD code that runs on clusters of CPUs or GPUs, with special emphasis on protoplanetary disks. FARGO3D offers Cartesian, cylindrical or spherical geometry; 1-, 2- or 3-dimensional calculations; and orbital advection (aka FARGO) for HD and MHD calculations. As in FARGO, a simple Runge-Kutta N-body solver may be used to describe the orbital evolution of embedded point-like objects. There is no need to know CUDA; users can develop new functions in C and have them translated to CUDA automatically to run on GPUs.

  8. 3D hydrodynamic focusing microfluidics for emerging sensing technologies.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Michael A; Boyd, Darryl A; Mott, David R; Ligler, Frances S

    2015-05-15

    While the physics behind laminar flows has been studied for 200 years, understanding of how to use parallel flows to augment the capabilities of microfluidic systems has been a subject of study primarily over the last decade. The use of one flow to focus another within a microfluidic channel has graduated from a two-dimensional to a three-dimensional process and the design principles are only now becoming established. This review explores the underlying principles for hydrodynamic focusing in three dimensions (3D) using miscible fluids and the application of these principles for creation of biosensors, separation of cells and particles for sample manipulation, and fabrication of materials that could be used for biosensors. Where sufficient information is available, the practicality of devices implementing fluid flows directed in 3D is evaluated and the advantages and limitations of 3D hydrodynamic focusing for the particular application are highlighted. PMID:25041926

  9. 3-D HYDRODYNAMIC MODELING IN A GEOSPATIAL FRAMEWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, J; Alfred Garrett, A; Larry Koffman, L; David Hayes, D

    2006-08-24

    3-D hydrodynamic models are used by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to simulate the transport of thermal and radionuclide discharges in coastal estuary systems. Development of such models requires accurate bathymetry, coastline, and boundary condition data in conjunction with the ability to rapidly discretize model domains and interpolate the required geospatial data onto the domain. To facilitate rapid and accurate hydrodynamic model development, SRNL has developed a pre- and post-processor application in a geospatial framework to automate the creation of models using existing data. This automated capability allows development of very detailed models to maximize exploitation of available surface water radionuclide sample data and thermal imagery.

  10. Regularity criterion for the 3D Hall-magneto-hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mimi

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the regularity problem for the 3D incompressible resistive viscous Hall-magneto-hydrodynamic (Hall-MHD) system. The Kolmogorov 41 phenomenological theory of turbulence [14] predicts that there exists a critical wavenumber above which the high frequency part is dominated by the dissipation term in the fluid equation. Inspired by this idea, we apply an approach of splitting the wavenumber combined with an estimate of the energy flux to obtain a new regularity criterion. The regularity condition presented here is weaker than conditions in the existing criteria (Prodi-Serrin type criteria) for the 3D Hall-MHD system.

  11. 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer modeling of η Carinae's colliding winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, T. I.; Clementel, N.; Gull, T. R.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.; Icke, V.

    We present results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system η Carinae. We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to recent 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, in 3D, at the resolution of the original SPH simulations. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary star mass-loss rates. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing. While we initially focus on η Car, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty `pinwheel' (WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where various observed time-variable emission and absorption lines form in these unique objects.

  12. 3D Hydrodynamical and Radiative Transfer Modeling of Eta Carinae's Colliding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas Ignatius; Clementel, Nicola; Gull, Theodore R.; Kruip, Chael J. H.; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Icke, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system Eta Carinae (Clementel, Madura, et al. 2014, MNRAS, 443, 2475 and Clementel, Madura, et al. 2015, MNRAS, 447, 2445). We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium in 3D. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary-star mass-loss rates. We show how the SimpleX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in Eta Carinae's spatially extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SimpleX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the Eta Carinae system, such as the LBV primary's mass-loss rate and the companion star's temperature and luminosity. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing (Madura et al. 2015, arXiv:1503.00716). While we initially focus specifically on Eta Carinae, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty ‘pinwheel’ (WR 112, WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  13. Photospheric Emission from Collapsar Jets in 3D Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hirotaka; Matsumoto, Jin; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Warren, Donald C.; Barkov, Maxim V.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the photospheric emission from a relativistic jet breaking out from a massive stellar envelope based on relativistic hydrodynamical simulations and post-process radiation transfer calculations in three dimensions. To investigate the impact of three-dimensional (3D) dynamics on the emission, two models of injection conditions are considered for the jet at the center of the progenitor star: one with periodic precession and another without precession. We show that structures developed within the jet due to the interaction with the stellar envelope, as well as due to the precession, have a significant imprint on the resulting emission. Particularly, we find that the signature of precession activity by the central engine is not smeared out and can be directly observed in the light curve as a periodic signal. We also show that non-thermal features, which can account for observations of gamma-ray bursts, are produced in the resulting spectra even though only thermal photons are injected initially and the effect of non-thermal particles is not considered.

  14. 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Models of Betelgeuse's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, S.; Mackey, J.; Langer, N.

    2013-05-01

    Betelgeuse, the bright red supergiant (RSG) in Orion, is a runaway star. Its supersonic motion through the interstellar medium has resulted in the formation of a bow shock, a cometary structure pointing in the direction of motion. We present the first 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the formation and evolution of Betelgeuse's bow shock. We show that the bow shock morphology depends substantially on the growth timescale for Rayleigh-Taylor versus Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. We discuss our models in light of the recent Herschel, GALEX and VLA observations. If the mass in the bow shock shell is low (~few × 10-3 M⊙), as seems to be implied by the AKARI and Herschel observations, then Betelgeuse's bow shock is very young and is unlikely to have reached a steady state. The circular, smooth bow shock shell is consistent with this conclusion. We further discuss the implications of our results, in particular, the possibility that Betelgeuse may have only recently entered the RSG phase.

  15. Salinity and eutrophication management by in situ continuous real-time monitoring and 3D modelling (hydrodynamics coupled with water quality): the case of the Berre lagoon (Mediterranean, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Laurent; Emma, Gouze

    2010-05-01

    . Since 2008, these three buoys have been also equipped with nitrate, chlorophyll and oxygen probes. Thanks to these measurements, a 3D hydrodynamic model (TELEMAC©) has been developped and validated to better qualify and quantify the relationships between the salinity of the lagoon, the fresh water inputs (from the powerplant and from the rivers), the water exchanges through the Caronte channel and the wind mixing. This model is currently used by the electricity producer to manage fresh water discharges complying with salinity indicators fixed by the European Court of Justice. Then, a biogeochemical model (DelWAQ©) coupled with the hydrodynamic model has been developped to understand the ecosystem functioning and to assess the hydroelectric powerplant implication in the eutrophication of the lagoon. Simulations reproduce quite well: 1/ the seasonal variations of nutrients, 2/ biogeochemical processes, 3/ anoxia events in connection with stratification periods at deep stations and 4/ are able to calculate nutrients budgets over a year. The results show that high primary production rates are based on high dynamical mineralization processes. The allochtonous nutrients sources are not sufficient to feed the phytoplanktonic demand (less than 1%). This models coupling is the only way to compile the physical and biogeochemical variables and processes. It's a tool aiming at a better assessment of the high complexity of the lagoon nutrients cycles. It will help us to understand the powerplant implication for the eutrophication with respect to the anthropised rivers. Moreover we would be able to test various managing scenarii (e.g. drop of nutrients loads) and to suggest new rehabilitation strategies.

  16. 3D Kinematics and Hydrodynamic Analysis of Freely Swimming Cetacean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yan; Sheinberg, Dustin; Liu, Geng; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank; Javed, Joveria

    2015-11-01

    It's widely thought that flexibility and the ability to control flexibility are crucial elements in determining the performance of animal swimming. However, there is a lack of quantification of both span-wise and chord-wise deformation of Cetacean's flukes and associated hydrodynamic performance during actively swimming. To fill this gap, we examined the motion and flexure of both dolphin fluke and orca fluke in steady swimming using a combined experimental and computational approach. It is found that the fluke surface morphing can effectively modulate the flow structures and influence the propulsive performance. Findings from this work are fundamental for understanding key kinematic features of effective Cetacean propulsors, and for quantifying the hydrodynamic force production that naturally occurs during different types of swimming. This work is supported by ONR MURI N00014-14-1-0533 and NSF CBET-1313217.

  17. Using the symmetries in 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Pérez, Juan P.; González, José A.

    2011-10-01

    We apply the cartoon SPH technique to solve numerically the Newtonian Euler's equations in scenarios with spherical symmetry with the standard Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method, using the equations written in cartesian coordinates. This implementation allow us to increase the resolution of the simulations in order to obtain accurate results. We test it using the Shock tube and the isothermal collapse of a perfect fluid in spherical symmetry.

  18. Application of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models for better environmental management of finfish culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Navas, Juan; Telfer, Trevor C.; Ross, Lindsay G.

    2011-04-01

    Hydrographic conditions, and particularly current speeds, have a strong influence on the management of fish cage culture. These hydrodynamic conditions can be used to predict particle movement within the water column and the results used to optimise environmental conditions for effective site selection, setting of environmental quality standards, waste dispersion, and potential disease transfer. To this end, a 3D hydrodynamic model, MOHID, has been coupled to a particle tracking model to study the effects of mean current speed, quiescent water periods and bulk water circulation in Mulroy Bay, Co. Donegal Ireland, an Irish fjard (shallow fjordic system) important to the aquaculture industry. A Lagangrian method simulated the instantaneous release of "particles" emulating discharge from finfish cages to show the behaviour of waste in terms of water circulation and water exchange. The 3D spatial models were used to identify areas of mixed and stratified water using a version of the Simpson-Hunter criteria, and to use this in conjunction with models of current flow for appropriate site selection for salmon aquaculture. The modelled outcomes for stratification were in good agreement with the direct measurements of water column stratification based on observed density profiles. Calculations of the Simpson-Hunter tidal parameter indicated that most of Mulroy Bay was potentially stratified with a well mixed region over the shallow channels where the water is faster flowing. The fjard was characterised by areas of both very low and high mean current speeds, with some areas having long periods of quiescent water. The residual current and the particle tracking animations created through the models revealed an anticlockwise eddy that may influence waste dispersion and potential for disease transfer, among salmon cages and which ensures that the retention time of waste substances from cages is extended. The hydrodynamic model results were incorporated into the ArcView TM GIS

  19. 3D hydrodynamic interactions lead to divergences in 2D diffusion.

    PubMed

    Bleibel, Johannes; Domínguez, Alvaro; Oettel, Martin

    2015-05-20

    We investigate the influence of 3D hydrodynamic interactions on confined colloidal suspensions, where only the colloids are restricted to one or two dimensions. In the absence of static interactions among the colloids, i.e., an ideal gas of colloidal particles with a finite hydrodynamic radius, we find a divergent collective diffusion coefficient. The origin of the divergence is traced back to the dimensional mismatch of 3D hydrodynamic interactions and the colloidal particles moving only in 1D or 2D. Our results from theory are confirmed by Stokesian dynamics simulations and supported by light scattering observational data for particles at a fluid interface. PMID:25923320

  20. 3D hydrodynamic interactions lead to divergences in 2D diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleibel, Johannes; Domínguez, Alvaro; Oettel, Martin

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the influence of 3D hydrodynamic interactions on confined colloidal suspensions, where only the colloids are restricted to one or two dimensions. In the absence of static interactions among the colloids, i.e., an ideal gas of colloidal particles with a finite hydrodynamic radius, we find a divergent collective diffusion coefficient. The origin of the divergence is traced back to the dimensional mismatch of 3D hydrodynamic interactions and the colloidal particles moving only in 1D or 2D. Our results from theory are confirmed by Stokesian dynamics simulations and supported by light scattering observational data for particles at a fluid interface.

  1. Fast parallel interferometric 3D tracking of numerous optically trapped particles and their hydrodynamic interaction.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Dominic; Tränkle, Benjamin; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2011-10-24

    Multi-dimensional, correlated particle tracking is a key technology to reveal dynamic processes in living and synthetic soft matter systems. In this paper we present a new method for tracking micron-sized beads in parallel and in all three dimensions - faster and more precise than existing techniques. Using an acousto-optic deflector and two quadrant-photo-diodes, we can track numerous optically trapped beads at up to tens of kHz with a precision of a few nanometers by back-focal plane interferometry. By time-multiplexing the laser focus, we can calibrate individually all traps and all tracking signals in a few seconds and in 3D. We show 3D histograms and calibration constants for nine beads in a quadratic arrangement, although trapping and tracking is easily possible for more beads also in arbitrary 2D arrangements. As an application, we investigate the hydrodynamic coupling and diffusion anomalies of spheres trapped in a 3 × 3 arrangement. PMID:22109012

  2. The hydrodynamic part of the 3D CEMBS model for the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzierzbicka-Glowacka, Lidia; Jakacki, Jaromir; Janecki, Maciej; Nowicki, Artur

    2013-04-01

    The paper presents a hydrodynamic part of the coupled ice-ocean model 3D CEMBS designed for the Baltic Sea. It is based on the Community Earth System Model (CESM from the National Center for Atmospheric Research). It was adopted for the Baltic Sea as a coupled sea-ice model. It consists of the Community Ice Code (CICE model, version 4.0) and the Parallel Ocean Program (version 2.1). The models are linked through the coupler (CPL7) based on the Model Coupling Toolkit library. The ocean model has 21 vertical levels and horizontal grid of 600x640 cells. Horizontal resolution is approximately 2km. It is forced by atmospheric fields from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts and in operational mode from 48-hour atmospheric forecasts provided by the UM model from the Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling of Warsaw University (ICM). The study was financially supported by the Polish State Committee of Scientific Research (grants: No N N305 111636, N N306 353239). The partial support for this study was also provided by the project Satellite Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Environment - SatBaltyk founded by European Union through European Regional Development Fund contract no. POIG 01.01.02-22-011/09. Calculations were carried out at the Academy Computer Centre in Gdansk.

  3. A coupled RELAPS-3D/CFD methodology with a proof-of-principle calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Aumiller, D.L.; Tomlinson, E.T.; Bauer, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    The RELAP5-3D computer code was modified to make the explicit coupling capability in the code fully functional. As a test of the modified code, a coupled RELAP5/RELAP5 analysis of the Edwards-O'Brien blowdown problem was performed which showed no significant deviations from the standard RELAP5-3D predictions. In addition, a multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code was modified to permit explicit coupling to RELAP5-3D. Several calculations were performed with this code. The first analysis used the experimental pressure history from a point just upstream of the break as a boundary condition. This analysis showed that a multiphase CFD code could calculate the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic conditions during a rapid blowdown transient. Finally, a coupled RELAP5/CFD analysis was performed. The results are presented in this paper.

  4. Exact Relativistic Ideal Hydrodynamical Solutions in (1+3)D with Longitudinal and Transverse Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jinfeng; Koch, Volker

    2009-05-20

    A new method for solving relativistic ideal hydrodynamics in (1+3)D is developed. Longitudinal and transverse radial flows are explicitly embedded into the ansatz for velocity field and the hydrodynamic equations are reduced to a single equation for the transverse velocity field only, which is analytically more tractable as compared with the full hydrodynamic equations. As an application we use the method to find analytically all possible solutions whose transverse velocity fields have power dependence on proper time and transverse radius. Possible application to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions and possible generalizations of the method are discussed.

  5. Recent Hydrodynamics Improvements to the RELAP5-3D Code

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Riemke; Cliff B. Davis; Richard.R. Schultz

    2009-07-01

    The hydrodynamics section of the RELAP5-3D computer program has been recently improved. Changes were made as follows: (1) improved turbine model, (2) spray model for the pressurizer model, (3) feedwater heater model, (4) radiological transport model, (5) improved pump model, and (6) compressor model.

  6. Monolithic cell counter based on 3D hydrodynamic focusing in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiè, Petra; Bragheri, Francesca; Osellame, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Hydrodynamic focusing is a powerful technique frequently used in microfluidics that presents a wide range of applications since it allows focusing the sample flowing in the device to a narrow region in the center of the microchannel. In fact thanks to the laminarity of the fluxes in microchannels it is possible to confine the sample solution with a low flow rate by using a sheath flow with a higher flow rate. This in turn allows the flowing of one sample element at a time in the detection region, thus enabling analysis on single particles. Femtosecond laser micromachining is ideally suited to fabricate device integrating full hydrodynamic focusing functionalities thanks to the intrinsic 3D nature of this technique, especially if compared to expensive and complicated lithographic multi-step fabrication processes. Furthermore, because of the possibility to fabricate optical waveguides with the same technology, it is possible to obtain compact optofluidic devices to perform optical analysis of the sample even at the single cell level, as is the case for optical cell stretchers and sorters. In this work we show the fabrication and the fluidic characterization of extremely compact devices having only two inlets for 2D (both in vertical and horizontal planes) as well as full 3D symmetric hydrodynamic focusing. In addition we prove one of the possible application of the hydrodynamic focusing module, by fabricating and validating (both with polystyrene beads and erythrocytes) a monolithic cell counter obtained by integrating optical waveguides in the 3D hydrodynamic focusing device.

  7. Oxygen spectral line synthesis: 3D non-LTE with CO5BOLD hydrodynamical model atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakapavičius, D.; Steffen, M.; Kučinskas, A.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Freytag, B.; Caffau, E.; Cayrel, R.

    In this work we present first results of our current project aimed at combining the 3D hydrodynamical stellar atmosphere approach with non-LTE (NLTE) spectral line synthesis for a number of key chemical species. We carried out a full 3D-NLTE spectrum synthesis of the oxygen IR 777 nm triplet, using a modified and improved version of our NLTE3D package to calculate departure coefficients for the atomic levels of oxygen in a CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamical solar model atmosphere. Spectral line synthesis was subsequently performed with the Linfor3D code. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the lines of the oxygen triplet produce deeper cores under NLTE conditions, due to the diminished line source function in the line forming region. This means that the solar oxygen IR 777 nm lines should be stronger in NLTE, leading to negative 3D NLTE-LTE abundance corrections. Qualitatively this result would support previous claims for a relatively low solar oxygen abundance. Finally, we outline several further steps that need to be taken in order to improve the physical realism and numerical accuracy of our current 3D-NLTE calculations.

  8. Wind forcing of upland lake hydrodynamics: implementation and validation of a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, L.; French, J.; Burningham, H.; Evans, C.; Battarbee, R.

    2010-12-01

    Upland lakes act as important archives of environmental change, yet inferences based on the analysis of sediment cores are frequently compromised by an incomplete understanding of the hydrodynamic processes controlling the distribution and completeness of lake sediment sequences and their linkages to wider environmental factors. Many upland lakes are characterized by complex vertical and horizontal circulation patterns induced by the action of wind on the water surface. Wind forcing is important not only for the resuspension of bottom sediments in shallow marginal areas, but may also control the broader distribution of sediment accumulation. The work presented here represents the first stage of a project aimed at elucidating the linkages between wind forcing and the distribution of bottom sediments in upland lakes and the extent to which simple 'sediment focusing' models provide an adequate basis for predicting optimal locations for the acquisition of core samples for palaeolimnological analysis. As a first step, a 3D numerical hydrodynamic model is implemented for Llyn Conwy, a small oligotrophic upland lake in North Wales, UK. This utilises the community ocean model, FVCOM, that solves the Navier-Stokes equations in 3D on an unstructured triangular mesh using the finite volume method. A new graphical user interface has been developed for FVCOM to facilitate pre- and post-processing of lake modelling problems. At Llyn Conwy, the model is forced using local meteorological data and validated against vertical temperature profiles recorded by a long-term buoy deployment and short-term observations of vertical current structure measured using an upward-looking acoustic doppler profiler and surface circulation obtained from GPS drifters. Challenges in the application of FVCOM to a small lake include the design of a mesh that ensures numerical stability whilst resolving a complex bathymetry, and the need for careful treatment of model 'spin-up'. Once calibrated, the

  9. Description of a parallel, 3D, finite element, hydrodynamics-diffusion code

    SciTech Connect

    Milovich, J L; Prasad, M K; Shestakov, A I

    1999-04-11

    We describe a parallel, 3D, unstructured grid finite element, hydrodynamic diffusion code for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications and the ancillary software used to run it. The code system is divided into two entities, a controller and a stand-alone physics code. The code system may reside on different computers; the controller on the user's workstation and the physics code on a supercomputer. The physics code is composed of separate hydrodynamic, equation-of-state, laser energy deposition, heat conduction, and radiation transport packages and is parallelized for distributed memory architectures. For parallelization, a SPMD model is adopted; the domain is decomposed into a disjoint collection of subdomains, one per processing element (PE). The PEs communicate using MPI. The code is used to simulate the hydrodynamic implosion of a spherical bubble.

  10. Sub-micrometer-precision, three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing via “microfluidic drifting”

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Zhang, Xiangjun; Mao, Xiaole; Rufo, Joseph; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Guo, Feng; Zhao, Yanhui; Lapsley, Michael; Li, Peng; McCoy, J. Philip; Levine, Stewart J.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we demonstrate single-layered, “microfluidic drifting” based three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing devices with particle/cell focal positioning approaching submicron precision along both lateral and vertical directions. By systematically optimizing channel geometries and sample/sheath flow rates, a series of “microfluidic drifting” based 3D hydrodynamic focusing devices with different curvature angles are designed and fabricated. Their performances are then evaluated by confocal microscopy, fast camera imaging, and side-view imaging techniques. Using a device with a curvature angle of 180°, we have achieved a standard deviation of ±0.45 µm in particle focal position and a coefficient of variation (CV) of 2.37% in flow cytometric measurements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the best CV that has been achieved by a microfluidic flow cytometry device. Moreover, the device showed the capability to distinguish 8 peaks when subjected to a stringent 8-peak rainbow calibration test, signifying the ability to perform sensitive, accurate tests similar to commercial flow cytometers. We have further tested and validated our device by detection of HEK-293 cells. With its advantages in simple fabrication (i.e., single-layered device), precise 3D hydrodynamic focusing (i.e., submicrometer precision along both lateral and vertical directions), and high detection resolution (i.e., low CV), our method could serve as an important basis for high-performance, mass-producible microfluidic flow cytometry. PMID:24287742

  11. Sub-micrometer-precision, three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing via "microfluidic drifting".

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Zhang, Xiangjun; Mao, Xiaole; Rufo, Joseph; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Guo, Feng; Zhao, Yanhui; Lapsley, Michael; Li, Peng; McCoy, J Philip; Levine, Stewart J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-21

    In this article, we demonstrate single-layered, "microfluidic drifting" based three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing devices with particle/cell focal positioning approaching submicron precision along both lateral and vertical directions. By systematically optimizing channel geometries and sample/sheath flow rates, a series of "microfluidic drifting" based 3D hydrodynamic focusing devices with different curvature angles are designed and fabricated. Their performances are then evaluated using confocal microscopy, fast camera imaging, and side-view imaging techniques. Using a device with a curvature angle of 180°, we have achieved a standard deviation of ±0.45 μm in particle focal position and a coefficient of variation (CV) of 2.37% in flow cytometric measurements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the best CV that has been achieved using a microfluidic flow cytometry device. Moreover, the device showed the capability to distinguish 8 peaks when subjected to a stringent 8-peak rainbow calibration test, signifying the ability to perform sensitive, accurate tests similar to commercial flow cytometers. We have further tested and validated our device by detection of HEK-293 cells. With its advantages in simple fabrication (i.e., single-layered device), precise 3D hydrodynamic focusing (i.e., submicrometer precision along both lateral and vertical directions), and high detection resolution (i.e., low CV), our method could serve as an important basis for high-performance, mass-producible microfluidic flow cytometry. PMID:24287742

  12. How do hydrodynamic instabilities affect 3D transport in geophysical vortices?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Özgökmen, Tamay M.

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) transport within geophysical vortices (e.g. ocean eddies) is important in understanding processes at a variety of scales, ranging from plankton production to climate variability. 3D transport can be affected by hydrodynamic instabilities of geophysical vortices; however, how the instabilities affecting 3D transport is not clear. Focusing on barotropic, inertial and 3D instabilities, we investigate the joint impacts of instabilities on 3D transport by using analytical methods and direct numerical simulations. We discover for the first time that material can be exchanged through 3D pathways which link a family of vortices generated by the instabilities in a single, initially unstable vortex. We also show that instabilities can increase the magnitude of vertical velocity, mixing rate and vertical material exchange. Besides, we find that instabilities can cause the kinetic energy wavenumber spectrum to have a power-law regime different than the classic regimes of k - 5 / 3 and k-3, and propose a new energy spectrum to interpret the non-classic regime.

  13. Hydrodynamic growth experiments with the 3-D, “native-roughness” modulations on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D.; Clark, D. S.; Coppari, F.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W.; Landen, O.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrodynamic instability growth experiments with threedimensional (3-D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on plastic (CH) shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The initial capsule outer-surface roughness was similar to the standard specifications (“native roughness”) used in a majority of implosions on NIF. At a convergence ratio of ∼3, the measured tent modulations were close to those predicted by 3-D simulations (within ∼15-20%), while measured 3-D, broadband modulations were ∼3-4 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the increased instability amplitudes due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. These new experiments results have prompted looking for ways to reduce UV light exposure during target fabrication.

  14. How Do Hydrodynamic Instabilities Affect 3D Transport in Geophysical Vortices?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding three-dimensional (3D) transport in ocean eddies is important for processes at a variety of scales, ranging from plankton production to climate variability. It is well known that geophysical vortices are subject to various hydrodynamic instabilities. Yet the influence of these instabilities on 3D material transport in vortex systems is not well investigated. Focusing on barotropic, inertial and 3D instabilities, we analyze these instabilities with normal-mode method, and reproduce their characteristics via highly-resolved numerical simulations using a spectral element Navier-Stokes solver. By comparing the simulation results of stable and unstable vortices, we investigate the joint impacts of instabilities on 3D transport through three major aspects: (i) energy transfer, (ii) overturning transport of the secondary circulation, and (iii) rates of vertical exchange and mixing. It is found that instabilities can enhance local nonlinear interactions and cause the kinetic energy wavenumber spectrum to have slopes between the conventional -5/3 and -3 at inertial ranges. The cascade of a new quantity is proposed to explain these non-conventional slopes. One of our main results is the discovery of material exchange between the central vortex and satellite vortices through 3D pathways, called funnels. These funnels modify the concept of elliptic regions that can trap material when confined to 2D dynamics. Thus, we show that a family of vortices, created by the hydrodynamic instabilities of the initially unstable vortex, can still continue to operate in unity in order to complete the 3D transport in these systems. We also show that flow instabilities can double the magnitude of vertical velocity, increase the rate of vertical exchange by an order of magnitude and enhance mixing rate more than 100%.

  15. Numerical 3D Hydrodynamics Study of Gravitational Instabilities in a Circumbinary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Karna Mahadev; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Michael, Scott; Cai, Kai; Durisen, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 3D hydrodynamical study of gravitational instabilities (GIs) in a circumbinary protoplanetary disk around a Solar mass star and a brown dwarf companion (0.02 M⊙). GIs can play an important, and at times dominant, role in driving the structural evolution of protoplanetary disks. The reported simulations were performed employing CHYMERA, a radiative 3D hydrodynamics code developed by the Indiana University Hydrodynamics Group. The simulations include disk self-gravity and radiative cooling governed by realistic dust opacities. We examine the role of GIs in modulating the thermodynamic state of the disks, and determine the strengths of GI-induced density waves, non-axisymmetric density structures, radial mass transport, and gravitational torques. The principal goal of this study is to determine how the presence of the companion affects the nature and strength of GIs. Results are compared with a parallel simulation of a protoplanetary disk without the presence of the brown dwarf binary companion. We detect no fragmentation in either disk. A persistent vortex forms in the inner region of both disks. The vortex seems to be stabilized by the presence of the binary companion.

  16. Simulation of surface tension in 2D and 3D with smoothed particle hydrodynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingyu

    2010-09-01

    The methods for simulating surface tension with smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method in two dimensions and three dimensions are developed. In 2D surface tension model, the SPH particle on the boundary in 2D is detected dynamically according to the algorithm developed by Dilts [G.A. Dilts, Moving least-squares particle hydrodynamics II: conservation and boundaries, International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering 48 (2000) 1503-1524]. The boundary curve in 2D is reconstructed locally with Lagrangian interpolation polynomial. In 3D surface tension model, the SPH particle on the boundary in 3D is detected dynamically according to the algorithm developed by Haque and Dilts [A. Haque, G.A. Dilts, Three-dimensional boundary detection for particle methods, Journal of Computational Physics 226 (2007) 1710-1730]. The boundary surface in 3D is reconstructed locally with moving least squares (MLS) method. By transforming the coordinate system, it is guaranteed that the interface function is one-valued in the local coordinate system. The normal vector and curvature of the boundary surface are calculated according to the reconstructed boundary surface and then surface tension force can be calculated. Surface tension force acts only on the boundary particle. Density correction is applied to the boundary particle in order to remove the boundary inconsistency. The surface tension models in 2D and 3D have been applied to benchmark tests for surface tension. The ability of the current method applying to the simulation of surface tension in 2D and 3D is proved.

  17. Interchain coupling and 3D modeling of trans-polyacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Bronold, F.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    In spite of the success of the SSH model for trans-polyacetylene in interpreting many experimental results (e.g. optical and magnetic properties) there remain some aspects of the real material which are outside the scope of the simple 1D model. Especially ordering phenomena of doped and undoped trans-polyacetylene as well as transport properties (e.g. electronic and thermal conductivity) are beyond a 1D description. There are many attempts to construct a transport theory for this novel class of materials using solitons or polaxons as the basic ingredients. But so far it is not yet clear whether these typical 1D excitations still exist in crystalline transpolyacetylene. Therefore, to clarify the role which intrinsic self-localized nonlinear excitations characteristic of 1D models play in the bulk (3D) material, we study the stability of a polaronic excitation against interchain coupling. As a preliminary step we consider first two coupled t-(CH){sub x}-chains where the {pi}-electrons are allowed to hop from one chain to the other. Then we introduce a 3D generalization of the SSH model and study a polaron in a 3D crystalline environment.

  18. Interchain coupling and 3D modeling of trans-polyacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Bronold, F.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1992-09-01

    In spite of the success of the SSH model for trans-polyacetylene in interpreting many experimental results (e.g. optical and magnetic properties) there remain some aspects of the real material which are outside the scope of the simple 1D model. Especially ordering phenomena of doped and undoped trans-polyacetylene as well as transport properties (e.g. electronic and thermal conductivity) are beyond a 1D description. There are many attempts to construct a transport theory for this novel class of materials using solitons or polaxons as the basic ingredients. But so far it is not yet clear whether these typical 1D excitations still exist in crystalline transpolyacetylene. Therefore, to clarify the role which intrinsic self-localized nonlinear excitations characteristic of 1D models play in the bulk (3D) material, we study the stability of a polaronic excitation against interchain coupling. As a preliminary step we consider first two coupled t-(CH){sub x}-chains where the {pi}-electrons are allowed to hop from one chain to the other. Then we introduce a 3D generalization of the SSH model and study a polaron in a 3D crystalline environment.

  19. 3D RNA and Functional Interactions from Evolutionary Couplings.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Caleb; Riesselman, Adam J; Ingraham, John B; Gross, Torsten; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S

    2016-05-01

    Non-coding RNAs are ubiquitous, but the discovery of new RNA gene sequences far outpaces the research on the structure and functional interactions of these RNA gene sequences. We mine the evolutionary sequence record to derive precise information about the function and structure of RNAs and RNA-protein complexes. As in protein structure prediction, we use maximum entropy global probability models of sequence co-variation to infer evolutionarily constrained nucleotide-nucleotide interactions within RNA molecules and nucleotide-amino acid interactions in RNA-protein complexes. The predicted contacts allow all-atom blinded 3D structure prediction at good accuracy for several known RNA structures and RNA-protein complexes. For unknown structures, we predict contacts in 160 non-coding RNA families. Beyond 3D structure prediction, evolutionary couplings help identify important functional interactions-e.g., at switch points in riboswitches and at a complex nucleation site in HIV. Aided by increasing sequence accumulation, evolutionary coupling analysis can accelerate the discovery of functional interactions and 3D structures involving RNA. PMID:27087444

  20. Influence of a postural change of the swimmer's head in hydrodynamic performances using 3D CFD.

    PubMed

    Popa, Catalin Viorel; Arfaoui, Ahlem; Fohanno, Stéphane; Taïar, Redha; Polidori, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    This study deals with recent researches undertaken by the authors in the field of hydrodynamics of human swimming. The aim of this numerical study was to investigate the flow around the entire swimmer's body. The results presented in this article focus on the combination of a 3D computational fluid dynamics code and the use of the k-ω turbulence model, in the range of Reynolds numbers representative of a swimming level varying from national to international competition. Emphasis is placed on the influence of a postural change of the swimmer's head in hydrodynamic performances, which is directly related to the reduction of overall drag. These results confirm and complete those, less accurate, of a preliminary 2D study recently published by the authors and allow the authors to optimise the swimmer's head position in underwater swimming. PMID:22587390

  1. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of hydrodynamically-coupled stainless steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.

    1996-12-01

    Spent nuclear fuel is usually stored temporarily on the site of nuclear power plants. The spent fuel storage racks are nuclear-safety-related stainless steel structures required to be analyzed for seismic loads. When the storage pool is subjected to three-dimensional (3-D) floor seismic excitations, rack modules, stored fuel bundles, adjacent racks and pool walls, and surrounding water are hydrodynamically coupled. Hydrodynamic coupling (HC) significantly affects the dynamic responses of the racks that are free-standing and submerged in water within the pool. A nonlinear time-history dynamic analysis is usually needed to describe the motion behavior of the racks that are both geometrically nonlinear and material nonlinear in nature. The nonlinearities include the friction resistance between the rack supporting legs and the pool floor, and various potential impacts of fuel-rack, rack-rack, and rack-pool wall. The HC induced should be included in the nonlinear dynamic analysis using the added-hydrodynamic-mass concept based on potential theory per the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) acceptance criteria. To this end, a finite element analysis constitutes a feasible and effective tool. However, most people perform somewhat simplified 1-D, or 2-D, or 3-D single rack and 2-D multiple rack analyses. These analyses are incomplete because a 3-D single rack model behaves quite differently from a 2-D mode. Furthermore, a 3-D whole pool multi-rack model behaves differently than a 3-D single rack model, especially when the strong HC effects are unsymmetrical. In this paper 3-D nonlinear dynamic time-history analyses were performed in a more quantitative manner using sophisticated finite element models developed for a single rack as well as all twelve racks in the whole-pool. Typical response results due to different HC effects are determined and discussed.

  2. Simulations of implosions with a 3D, parallel, unstructured-grid, radiation-hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, T B; Milovich, J L; Prasad, M K; Rathkopf, J; Shestakov, A I

    1998-12-28

    An unstructured-grid, radiation-hydrodynamics code is used to simulate implosions. Although most of the problems are spherically symmetric, they are run on 3D, unstructured grids in order to test the code's ability to maintain spherical symmetry of the converging waves. Three problems, of increasing complexity, are presented. In the first, a cold, spherical, ideal gas bubble is imploded by an enclosing high pressure source. For the second, we add non-linear heat conduction and drive the implosion with twelve laser beams centered on the vertices of an icosahedron. In the third problem, a NIF capsule is driven with a Planckian radiation source.

  3. A harmonic polynomial cell (HPC) method for 3D Laplace equation with application in marine hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yan-Lin Faltinsen, Odd M.

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new efficient and accurate numerical method based on harmonic polynomials to solve boundary value problems governed by 3D Laplace equation. The computational domain is discretized by overlapping cells. Within each cell, the velocity potential is represented by the linear superposition of a complete set of harmonic polynomials, which are the elementary solutions of Laplace equation. By its definition, the method is named as Harmonic Polynomial Cell (HPC) method. The characteristics of the accuracy and efficiency of the HPC method are demonstrated by studying analytical cases. Comparisons will be made with some other existing boundary element based methods, e.g. Quadratic Boundary Element Method (QBEM) and the Fast Multipole Accelerated QBEM (FMA-QBEM) and a fourth order Finite Difference Method (FDM). To demonstrate the applications of the method, it is applied to some studies relevant for marine hydrodynamics. Sloshing in 3D rectangular tanks, a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank, fully-nonlinear wave focusing on a semi-circular shoal, and the nonlinear wave diffraction of a bottom-mounted cylinder in regular waves are studied. The comparisons with the experimental results and other numerical results are all in satisfactory agreement, indicating that the present HPC method is a promising method in solving potential-flow problems. The underlying procedure of the HPC method could also be useful in other fields than marine hydrodynamics involved with solving Laplace equation.

  4. Delft3D-FLOW on PRACE infrastructures for real life hydrodynamic applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donners, John; Genseberger, Menno; Jagers, Bert; de Goede, Erik; Mourits, Adri

    2013-04-01

    PRACE, the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe, offers access to the largest high-performance computing systems in Europe. PRACE invites and helps industry to increase their innovative potential through the use of the PRACE infrastructure. This poster describes different efforts to assist Deltares with porting the open-source simulation software Delft3D-FLOW to PRACE infrastructures. Analysis of the performance on these infrastructures has been done for real life flow applications. Delft3D-FLOW is a 2D and 3D shallow water solver which calculates non-steady flow and transport phenomena resulting from tidal and meteorological forcing on a curvilinear, boundary fitted grid in Cartesian or spherical coordinates. It also includes a module which sediment transport (both suspended and bed total load) and morphological changes for an arbitrary number of cohesive and non-cohesive fractions. As Delft3D-FLOW has been developed over several decades, with a variety of functionality and over 350k lines of source code, porting to PRACE infrastructures needs some effort. At the moment Delft3D-FLOW uses MPI with domain decomposition in one direction as its parallellisation approach. Because it is hard to identify scaling issues if one immediately starts with a complex case with many features enabled, different cases with increasing complexity have been used to investigate scaling of this parallellisation approach on several PRACE platforms. As a base reference case we started with a schematic high-resolution 2D hydrodynamic model of the river Waal that turned out to be surprisingly well-suited to the highly-parallel PRACE machines. Although Delft3D-FLOW employs a sophisticated build system, several modifications were required to port it to most PRACE systems due to the use of specific, highly-tuned compilers and MPI-libraries. After this we moved to a 3D hydrodynamic model of Rotterdam harbour that includes sections of the rivers Rhine and Meuse and a part of the North

  5. A 3D hydrodynamic fate and transport model for herbicides in Sacca di Goro coastal lagoon (Northern Adriatic).

    PubMed

    Carafa, R; Marinov, D; Dueri, S; Wollgast, J; Ligthart, J; Canuti, E; Viaroli, P; Zaldívar, J M

    2006-10-01

    Sacca di Goro is a shallow coastal microtidal lagoon with a surface area of 26 km2, and an average depth of about 1.5m. Fresh water pollutant loads from Po River branches and several drainage canals lead to anthropogenic eutrophication, frequent summer anoxia crises and chemical contamination. Such events not only affect the lagoon ecosystem but also cause serious economic losses, the lagoon being the second largest producer of clams in Italy. The present work aims at using a fate model coupled with COHERENS 3D hydrodynamic model to simulate and to explain the spatial distribution and temporal variations of s-triazines herbicides in the Sacca di Goro lagoon. The simulation results of spatial and temporal dynamic behaviour of atrazine, simazine and terbuthylazine have been compared with experimental data obtained during an annual monitoring programme. PMID:16643962

  6. Non-LTE oxygen line formation in 3D hydrodynamic model stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarsi, A. M.; Asplund, M.; Collet, R.; Leenaarts, J.

    2016-02-01

    The O I 777 nm lines are among the most commonly used diagnostics for the oxygen abundances in the atmospheres of FGK-type stars. However, they form in conditions that are far from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We explore the departures from LTE of atomic oxygen, and their impact on O I lines, across the STAGGER-grid of three-dimensional hydrodynamic model atmospheres. For the O I 777 nm triplet, we find significant departures from LTE. These departures are larger in stars with larger effective temperatures, smaller surface gravities, and larger oxygen abundances. We present grids of predicted 3D non-LTE based equivalent widths for the O I 616 nm, [O I] 630 nm, [O I] 636 nm, and O I 777 nm lines, as well as abundance corrections to 1D LTE based results.

  7. Size-Controlled Fabrication of Polyaniline Microfibers Based on 3D Hydrodynamic Focusing Approach.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Imsung; Song, Simon; Uh, Kyungchan; Lee, Chan Woo; Kim, Jong-Man

    2015-07-01

    Owing to the relatively high conductivity and unique redox behavior, polyaniline (PANI) has been one of the most technologically promising conducting polymers. Although various methodologies have been developed, fabrication of PANI microfibers has been a challenging task owing to the poor solubility in most organic solvents. By taking advantage of a microfluidic technology and organic soluble acid labile t-Boc-protected PANI (t-Boc-PANI) as the conducting polymer precursor, fabrication of PANI microfibers in a size-controlled manner is possible. Introduction of a THF solution containing t-Boc-PANI, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) as a core flow, and water as a sheath flow into a microfluidic channel with a 3D hydrodynamic focusing effect results in crystallization of the polymer fiber. By changing the flow rate, linear PANI microfibers that range from 16.2 to 39.4 μm in diameter are readily obtained. PMID:25882095

  8. 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the Galactic supernova remnant CTB 109

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolte, J.; Sasaki, M.; Breitschwerdt, D.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Using detailed 3D hydrodynamic simulations we study the nature of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) CTB 109 (G109.1-1.0), which is well known for its semicircular shape and a bright diffuse X-ray emission feature inside the SNR. Aims: Our model has been designed to explain the observed morphology, with a special emphasis on the bright emission feature inside the SNR. Moreover, we determine the age of the remnant and compare our findings with X-ray observations. With CTB 109 we test a new method of detailed numerical simulations of diffuse young objects, using realistic initial conditions derived directly from observations. Methods: We performed numerical 3D simulations with the RAMSES code. The initial density structure has been directly taken from 12CO emission data, adding an additional dense cloud, which, when it is shocked, causes the bright emission feature. Results: From parameter studies we obtained the position (ℓ,b) = (109.1545°,-1.0078°) for an elliptical cloud with ncloud = 25 cm-3 based on the preshock density from Chandra data and a maximum diameter of 4.54 pc, whose encounter with the supernova (SN) shock wave generates the bright X-ray emission inside the SNR. The calculated age of the remnant is about 11 000 yr according to our simulations. In addition, we can also determine the most probable site of the SN explosion. Conclusions: Hydrodynamic simulations can reproduce the morphology and the observed size of the SNR CTB 109 remarkably well. Moreover, the simulations show that it is very plausible that the bright X-ray emission inside the SNR is the result of an elliptical dense cloud shocked by the SN explosion wave. We show that numerical simulations using observational data for an initial model can produce meaningful results.

  9. New Insights on Pulsating White Dwarfs from 3D Radiation-Hydrodynamical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Fontaine, Gilles; Ludwig, Hans-Günter

    2015-08-01

    We have recently computed a grid of 3D radiation-hydrodynamical simulations for the atmosphere of 70 pure-hydrogen DA white dwarfs in the range 7.0 < log g < 9.0. This includes the full ZZ Ceti instability strip where DA white dwarfs are pulsating, by far the most common type of degenerate pulsators. We have significantly improved the theoretical framework to study these objects by removing the free parameters of 1D convection, which were previously a major modeling hurdle. We will compare our new models with the observed sample of ZZ Ceti stars and highlight the improved derived properties of these objects. In particular, the new spectroscopically determined 3D atmospheric parameters allow for an improved definition of instability strip edges. We have also made new predictions for the size of convection zones, which significantly impact the position where the pulsations are driven, and the region of the HR diagram where white dwarfs are expected to pulsate. Finally, we will present new results from non-adiabatic pulsation calculations.

  10. 3D mathematical model system for melt hydrodynamics in the silicon single crystal FZ-growth process with rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacis, K.; Muiznieks, A.; Ratnieks, G.

    2005-06-01

    A system of three-dimensional numerical models is described to analyse the melt hydrodynamics in the floating zone crystal growth by the needle-eye technique under a rotating magnetic field for the production of high quality silicon single crystals of large diameters big( 100dots 200 mm big). Since the pancake inductor has only one turn, the high frequency (HF) electromagnetic (EM) field and the distribution of heat sources and EM forces on the melt free surface have distinct asymmetric features. This asymmetry together with the displacement of the crystal and feed rod axis and crystal rotation manifests itself as three dimensional hydrodynamic, thermal and dopant concentration fields in the molten zone and causes variations of resistivity in the grown single crystal, which are known as the so-called rotational striations. Additionally, the rotating magnetic field can be used to influence the melt hydrodynamics and to reduce the flow asymmetry. In the present 3D model system, the shape of the molten zone is obtained from symmetric FZ shape calculations. The asymmetric HF EM field is calculated by the 3D boundary element method. The low-frequency rotating magnetic field and a corresponding force density distribution in the melt are calculated by the 3D finite element method. The obtained asymmetric HF field power distribution on the free melt surface, the corresponding HF EM forces and force density of the rotating magnetic field are used for the coupled calculation of 3D steady-state hydrodynamic and temperature fields in the molten zone on a body fitted structured 3D grid by a commercial program package with a control volume approach. Beside the EM forces, also the buoyancy and Marangoni forces are considered. After HD calculations a corresponding 3D dopant concentration field is calculated and used to derive the variations resistivity in the grown crystal. The capability of the system of models is illustrated by a calculation example of a realistic FZ system

  11. 3D Printing Meets Computational Astrophysics: Deciphering the Structure of Eta Carinae’s Colliding Winds Using 3D Prints of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, Theodore R.; Clementel, Nicola; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Kruip, Chael; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Teodoro, Mairan

    2015-01-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (>120 MSun), highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) binary Eta Carinae. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (Makerbot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of Eta Carinae's inner (r ~110 AU) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. These 3D prints reveal important, previously unknown 'finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ~1.045) that protrude radially outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively-cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the hot, adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unknown physical features highlight the important role 3D printing can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  12. High-resolution modelling of 3D hydrodynamics in coastal archipelagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettunen, Elina; Tuomi, Laura; Ropponen, Janne; Lignell, Risto

    2016-04-01

    Dynamics of the coastal seas are affected by eutrophication, over-fishing, coastal construction and climate change. To enable the sustainable development of these areas, monitoring and modelling of the state of the sea are needed. The Archipelago Sea, located in the northern part of the semi-enclosed and brackish water Baltic Sea, is one of the most complex coastal areas with over 40 000 small islands and islets. It is also very vulnerable area already heavily stressed with eutrophication. Applicable modelling tools are needed to support the decision making and to provide sufficiently reliable information on the effects of the planned actions on the state of the coastal waters. We used 3D hydrodynamic model COHERENS to model the Archipelago Sea area with high spatial resolution of 0.25 nmi. Boundary conditions for this limited area were provided from coarser resolution, 2 nmi, Baltic Sea grid. In order to evaluate the performance of the high-resolution coastal model implementation a comprehensive measurement dataset was gathered, including hydrographic data from three intensive monitoring stations and several more rarely visited monitoring or research stations. The hydrodynamic model was able to simulate the surface temperature and salinity fields and their seasonal variation with good accuracy in this complex area. The sharp depth gradients typical for this area provided some challenges to the modelling. There was some over mixing and related to too strong vertical currents in the steep slopes of the deeper fault lines. Also the water exchange between the more open sea and coastal areas through narrow channels between the islands is not sufficiently well reproduced with the current resolution, leading to too high bottom temperatures.

  13. Excitation of anti-symmetric coupled spoof SPPs in 3D SIS waveguides based on coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-li, Tian; Yang, Chen; Jian-long, Liu; Kai, Guo; Ke-ya, Zhou; Yang, Gao; Shu-tian, Liu

    2016-07-01

    According to the electromagnetic field distributions, there exist two kinds of coupled spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs), the symmetric and anti-symmetric modes, in the three-dimensional (3D) subwavelength spoof–insulator–spoof (SIS) waveguide. We study the dispersion and excitation of the two kinds of coupled SSPPs supported by the 3D SIS waveguide. The evolution of the dispersion with the thickness and gap width of the waveguide is numerically investigated, and we give a theoretical analysis according to the coupling mechanism. Specially, based on the coupling mechanism, we design a zipper structure, through which the excitation and propagation of the anti-symmetric coupled modes can be realized effectively. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CBA01702) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61377016, 61575055, 10974039, 61307072, 61308017, and 61405056).

  14. Linking 1D evolutionary to 3D hydrodynamical simulations of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristini, A.; Meakin, C.; Hirschi, R.; Arnett, D.; Georgy, C.; Viallet, M.

    2016-03-01

    Stellar evolution models of massive stars are important for many areas of astrophysics, for example nucleosynthesis yields, supernova progenitor models and understanding physics under extreme conditions. Turbulence occurs in stars primarily due to nuclear burning at different mass coordinates within the star. The understanding and correct treatment of turbulence and turbulent mixing at convective boundaries in stellar models has been studied for decades but still lacks a definitive solution. This paper presents initial results of a study on convective boundary mixing (CBM) in massive stars. The ‘stiffness’ of a convective boundary can be quantified using the bulk Richardson number ({{Ri}}{{B}}), the ratio of the potential energy for restoration of the boundary to the kinetic energy of turbulent eddies. A ‘stiff’ boundary ({{Ri}}{{B}}˜ {10}4) will suppress CBM, whereas in the opposite case a ‘soft’ boundary ({{Ri}}{{B}}˜ 10) will be more susceptible to CBM. One of the key results obtained so far is that lower convective boundaries (closer to the centre) of nuclear burning shells are ‘stiffer’ than the corresponding upper boundaries, implying limited CBM at lower shell boundaries. This is in agreement with 3D hydrodynamic simulations carried out by Meakin and Arnett (2007 Astrophys. J. 667 448-75). This result also has implications for new CBM prescriptions in massive stars as well as for nuclear burning flame front propagation in super-asymptotic giant branch stars and also the onset of novae.

  15. 3D hydrodynamics and shear rates' variability in the United States Pharmacopeia Paddle Dissolution Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Ameur, Houari; Bouzit, Mohamed

    2013-08-16

    The 3D hydrodynamics and shear rates distributions within the United States Pharmacopeia Apparatus 2 have been investigated in this paper. With the help of a CFD package, several geometric modifications to the device were evaluated in this study. Specially, we examine the influence of impeller clearance, blade diameter, shape of the vessel base and shape of the lower part of blade. Increasing the impeller clearance was observed to exacerbate the heterogeneity in shear and would likely result in greater variability in dissolution measurements. Use of moderate blade diameter and dished bottom were observed to reduce shear heterogeneity in the regions where tablets are most likely to visit during testing. The comparative analysis shows better reproducibility and accelerated dissolution rates with the modified vessel shape, the dished bottom can enhance mixing near the vessel base when compared with the flat bottom. Increasing length of the lower edge of the paddle was observed to generate high radial pumping and to enlarge the dead zone located at the center of the vessel base. PMID:23680733

  16. 3-D hydrodynamic modelling of flood impacts on a building and indoor flooding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gems, Bernhard; Mazzorana, Bruno; Hofer, Thomas; Sturm, Michael; Gabl, Roman; Aufleger, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Given the current challenges in flood risk management and vulnerability assessment of buildings exposed to flood hazards, this study presents three-dimensional numerical modelling of torrential floods and its interaction with buildings. By means of a case study application, the FLOW-3D software is applied to the lower reach of the Rio Vallarsa torrent in the village of Laives (Italy). A single-family house on the flood plain is therefore considered in detail. It is exposed to a 300-year flood hydrograph. Different building representation scenarios, including an entire impervious building envelope and the assumption of fully permeable doors, light shafts and windows, are analysed. The modelling results give insight into the flooding process of the building's interior, the impacting hydrodynamic forces on the exterior and interior walls, and further, they quantify the impact of the flooding of a building on the flow field on the surrounding flood plain. The presented study contributes to the development of a comprehensive physics-based vulnerability assessment framework. For pure water floods, this study presents the possibilities and limits of advanced numerical modelling techniques within flood risk management and, thereby, the planning of local structural protection measures.

  17. Interface requirements to couple thermal-hydraulic codes to 3D neutronic codes

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbuch, S.; Austregesilo, H.; Velkov, K.

    1997-07-01

    The present situation of thermalhydraulics codes and 3D neutronics codes is briefly described and general considerations for coupling of these codes are discussed. Two different basic approaches of coupling are identified and their relative advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The implementation of the coupling for 3D neutronics codes in the system ATHLET is presented. Meanwhile, this interface is used for coupling three different 3D neutronics codes.

  18. Dynamic coupling of three hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnack, J. N.; Philip, G. T.; Rungoe, M.; Smith, G.; Johann, G.; Larsen, O.; Gregersen, J.; Butts, M. B.

    2008-12-01

    The need for integrated modelling is evidently present within the field of flood management and flood forecasting. Engineers, modellers and managers are faced with flood problems which transcend the classical hydrodynamic fields of urban, river and coastal flooding. Historically the modeller has been faced with having to select one hydrodynamic model to cover all the aspects of the potentially complex dynamics occurring in a flooding situation. Such a single hydrodynamic model does not cover all dynamics of flood modelling equally well. Thus the ideal choice may in fact be a combination of models. Models combining two numerical/hydrodynamic models are becoming more standard, typically these models combine a 1D river model with a 2D overland flow model or alternatively a 1D sewer/collection system model with a 2D overland solver. In complex coastal/urban areas the flood dynamics may include rivers/streams, collection/storm water systems along with the overland flow. The dynamics within all three areas is of the same time scale and there is feedback in the system across the couplings. These two aspects dictate a fully dynamic three way coupling as opposed to running the models sequentially. It will be shown that the main challenges of the three way coupling are time step issues related to the difference in numerical schemes used in the three model components and numerical instabilities caused by the linking of the model components. MIKE FLOOD combines the models MIKE 11, MIKE 21 and MOUSE into one modelling framework which makes it possible to couple any combination of river, urban and overland flow fully dynamically. The MIKE FLOOD framework will be presented with an overview of the coupling possibilities. The flood modelling concept will be illustrated through real life cases in Australia and in Germany. The real life cases reflect dynamics and interactions across all three model components which are not possible to reproduce using a two-way coupling alone. The

  19. PCB modeling in the Gulf of Lions using a 3D coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Thouvenin, Bénédicte; Tixier, Céline; Tronczynski, Jacek; Garreau, Pierre; Verney, Romaric; Carlotti, Francois; Espinasse, Boris; Queguiner, Bernard; Baklouti, Melika

    2013-04-01

    Polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) are synthetic chlorinated organic compounds, which were widely used in many industrial materials. These compounds are persistent, bioaccumulable and toxic for living organisms. The riverine and atmospheric fluxes are the major routes of entry for these chemicals into marine ecosystems, where they are now embedded in natural biogeochemical cycles (Lohmann et al. 2007). Because of bioaccumulation and biomagnification processes in food webs, even nowadays, these compounds may attain dangerous concentration levels especially in the top predators including marine mammals. The contamination of marine biota by PCBs in Mediterranean has also become a matter of concern as the concentrations in some species are at levels putting them at risk for significant biological effects. This may pose potential human health risks in commercial edible species (Carpenter 2006). Planktonic populations play a key role in the trophic food webs in marine ecosystems by the mobilisation and transfer of energy and organic matter towards higher trophic levels. This work aims at a better understanding of the role of plankton in the transfer of PCBs to higher trophic levels in the Gulf of Lions (Mediterranean) by coupling of biogeochemical, ecological and hydrodynamical processes. Modeling is a powerful tool for coupling processes of different disciplines and scales. The recent development of 3D hydrodynamic, hydrosedimentary and biogeochemical models in the Mediterranean (André et al, 2005,2009, Ulses et al, 2008, Dufois et al, 2008, Auger et al, 2011), enables feasibility testing of coupling these models with transfer processes of chemical contaminants. The lack of detailed observations in the sea and the significant uncertainty on contaminants inputs prevent from a proper validation of such modeling tests. However, these tools are very useful to assess the influence of fast processes on the transfer of contaminants to bioaccumulative species. Sensitivity analysis

  20. Review of solutions for 3D hydrodynamic modeling applied to aquaculture in South Pacific atoll lagoons.

    PubMed

    Andréfouët, S; Ouillon, S; Brinkman, R; Falter, J; Douillet, P; Wolk, F; Smith, R; Garen, P; Martinez, E; Laurent, V; Lo, C; Remoissenet, G; Scourzic, B; Gilbert, A; Deleersnijder, E; Steinberg, C; Choukroun, S; Buestel, D

    2006-10-01

    A workshop organized in French Polynesia in November 2004 allowed reviewing the current methods to model the three-dimensional hydrodynamic circulation in semi-enclosed atoll lagoons for aquaculture applications. Mollusk (e.g. pearl oyster, clam) aquaculture is a major source of income for South Pacific countries such as French Polynesia or Cook Islands. This aquaculture now requires a better understanding of circulation patterns to improve the spatial use of the lagoons, especially to define the best area to set larvae collectors. The pelagic larval duration of the relevant species (<20 days) and the size of the semi-closed lagoons (few hundreds of km2) drive the specifications of the model in terms of the spatial and temporal scale. It is considered that, in contrast with fish, mollusk larvae movements are limited and that their cycle occurs completely in the lagoon, without an oceanic stage. Atolls where aquaculture is productive are generally well-bounded, or semi-closed, without significant large and deep openings to the ocean. Nevertheless part of the lagoon circulation is driven by oceanic water inputs through the rim, ocean swells, tides and winds. Therefore, boundary conditions of the lagoon system are defined by the spatial structure of a very shallow rim (exposition and number of hoas), the deep ocean swell climate, tides and wind regimes. To obtain a realistic 3D numerical model of lagoon circulation with adequate forcing, it is thus necessary to connect in an interdisciplinary way a variety of methods (models, remote sensing and in situ data collection) to accurately represent the different components of the lagoon system and its specific boundary conditions. We review here the current methods and tools used to address these different components for a hypothetical atoll of the Tuamotu Archipelago (French Polynesia), representative of the semi-closed lagoons of the South Pacific Ocean. We hope this paper will serve as a guide for similar studies

  1. Generalized hydrodynamics model for strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaw, A.; Murillo, M. S.

    2015-07-01

    Beginning with the exact equations of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy, we obtain the density, momentum, and stress tensor-moment equations. We close the moment equations with two closures, one that guarantees an equilibrium state given by density-functional theory and another that includes collisions in the relaxation of the stress tensor. The introduction of a density functional-theory closure ensures self-consistency in the equation-of-state properties of the plasma (ideal and excess pressure, electric fields, and correlations). The resulting generalized hydrodynamics thus includes all impacts of Coulomb coupling, viscous damping, and the high-frequency (viscoelastic) response. We compare our results with those of several known models, including generalized hydrodynamic theory and models obtained using the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander approximation and the quasilocalized charge approximation. We find that the viscoelastic response, including both the high-frequency elastic generalization and viscous wave damping, is important for correctly describing ion-acoustic waves. We illustrate this result by considering three very different systems: ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, and dense plasmas. The new model is validated by comparing its results with those of the current autocorrelation function obtained from molecular-dynamics simulations of Yukawa plasmas, and the agreement is excellent. Generalizations of this model to mixtures and quantum systems should be straightforward.

  2. 3D neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled analysis of MYRRHA

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, M.; Martin-Fuertes, F.

    2012-07-01

    The current tendency in multiphysics calculations applied to reactor physics is the use of already validated computer codes, coupled by means of an iterative approach. In this paper such an approach is explained concerning neutronics and thermal-hydraulics coupled analysis with MCNPX and COBRA-IV codes using a driver program and file exchange between codes. MCNPX provides the neutronic analysis of heterogeneous nuclear systems, both in critical and subcritical states, while COBRA-IV is a subchannel code that can be used for rod bundles or core thermal-hydraulics analysis. In our model, the MCNP temperature dependence of nuclear data is handled via pseudo-material approach, mixing pre-generated cross section data set to obtain the material with the desired cross section temperature. On the other hand, COBRA-IV has been updated to allow for the simulation of liquid metal cooled reactors. The coupled computational tool can be applied to any geometry and coolant, as it is the case of single fuel assembly, at pin-by-pin level, or full core simulation with the average pin of each fuel-assembly. The coupling tool has been applied to the critical core layout of the SCK-CEN MYRRHA concept, an experimental LBE cooled fast reactor presently in engineering design stage. (authors)

  3. Transitional behavior in hydrodynamically coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, S.; Debono, L.; Phillips, D. B.; Simpson, S. H.

    2015-02-01

    In this article we consider the complete set of synchronized and phase-locked states available to pairs of hydrodynamically coupled colloidal rotors, consisting of spherical beads driven about circular paths in the same, and in opposing senses. Oscillators such as these have previously been used as coarse grained, minimal models of beating cilia. Two mechanisms are known to be important in establishing synchrony. The first involves perturbation of the driving force, and the second involves deformation of the rotor trajectory. We demonstrate that these mechanisms are of similar strength, in the regime of interest, and interact to determine observed behavior. Combining analysis and simulation with experiments performed using holographic optical tweezers, we show how varying the amplitude of the driving force perturbation leads to a transition from synchronized to phase-locked states. Analogies with biological systems are discussed, as are implications for the design of biomimetic devices.

  4. One-layer microfluidic device for hydrodynamic 3D self-flow-focusing operating in low flow speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghighi, Yasaman; Gnyawali, Vaskar; Strohm, Eric M.; Tsai, Scott S. H.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic 3D flow-focusing techniques in microfluidics are categorized as (a) sheathless techniques which require high flow rates and long channels, resulting in high operating cost and high flow rates which are inappropriate for applications with flow rate limitations, and (b) sheath-flow based techniques which usually require excessive sheath flow rate to achieve hydrodynamic 3D flow-focusing. Many devices based on these principles use complicated fabrication methods to create multi-layer microchannels. We have developed a sheath-flow based microfluidic device that is capable of hydrodynamic 3D self-flow-focusing. In this device the main flow (black ink) in a low speed, and a sheath flow, enter through two inlets and enter a 180 degree curved channel (300 × 300 μm cross-section). Main flow migrates outwards into the sheath-flow due to centrifugal effects and consequently, vertical focusing is achieved at the end of the curved channel. Then, two other sheath flows horizontally confine the main flow to achieve horizontal focusing. Thus, the core flow is three-dimensionally focused at the center of the channel at the downstream. Using centrifugal force for 3D flow-focusing in a single-layer fabricated microchannel has been previously investigated by few groups. However, their demonstrated designs required high flow speed (>1 m/s) which is not suitable for many applications that live biomedical specie are involved. Here, we introduce a new design which is operational in low flow speed (<0.05 m/s) and is suitable for applications involving live cells. This microfluidic device can be used in detecting, counting and isolating cells in many biomedical applications.

  5. Hierarchical Statistical 3D ' Atomistic' Simulation of Decanano MOSFETs: Drift-Diffusion, Hydrodynamic and Quantum Mechanical Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Brown, A. R.; Slavcheva, G.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    When MOSFETs are scaled to deep submicron dimensions the discreteness and randomness of the dopant charges in the channel region introduces significant fluctuations in the device characteristics. This effect, predicted 20 year ago, has been confirmed experimentally and in simulation studies. The impact of the fluctuations on the functionality, yield, and reliability of the corresponding systems shifts the paradigm of the numerical device simulation. It becomes insufficient to simulate only one device representing one macroscopical design in a continuous charge approximation. An ensemble of macroscopically identical but microscopically different devices has to be characterized by simulation of statistically significant samples. The aims of the numerical simulations shift from predicting the characteristics of a single device with continuous doping towards estimating the mean values and the standard deviations of basic design parameters such as threshold voltage, subthreshold slope, transconductance, drive current, etc. for the whole ensemble of 'atomistically' different devices in the system. It has to be pointed out that even the mean values obtained from 'atomistic' simulations are not identical to the values obtained from continuous doping simulations. In this paper we present a hierarchical approach to the 'atomistic' simulation of aggressively scaled decanano MOSFETs. A full scale 3D drift-diffusion'atomostic' simulation approach is first described and used for verification of the more economical, but also more restricted, options. To reduce the processor time and memory requirements at high drain voltage we have developed a self-consistent option based on a thin slab solution of the current continuity equation only in the channel region. This is coupled to the Poisson's equation solution in the whole simulation domain in the Gummel iteration cycles. The accuracy of this approach is investigated in comparison with the full self-consistent solution. At low drain

  6. Matter coupling in 3D ‘minimal massive gravity’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitakis, Alex S.; Routh, Alasdair J.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2014-12-01

    The ‘minimal massive gravity’ model of massive gravity in three spacetime dimensions (which has the same anti-de Sitter (AdS) bulk properties as ‘topologically massive gravity’ but improved boundary properties) is coupled to matter. Consistency requires a particular matter source tensor, which is quadratic in the stress tensor. The consequences are explored for an ideal fluid in the context of asymptotically de Sitter (dS) cosmological solutions, which bounce smoothly from contraction to expansion. Various vacuum solutions are also found, including warped (A)dS, and (for special values of parameters) static black holes and an (A)dS2× {{S}1} vacuum.

  7. Coupling the 3D hydro-morphodynamic model Telemac-3D-sisyphe and seismic measurements to estimate bedload transport rates in a small gravel-bed river.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostache, Renaud; Krein, Andreas; Barrière, Julien

    2014-05-01

    Coupling the 3D hydro-morphodynamic model Telemac-3D-sisyphe and seismic measurements to estimate bedload transport rates in a small gravel-bed river. Renaud Hostache, Andreas Krein, Julien Barrière During flood events, amounts of river bed material are transported via bedload. This causes problems, like the silting of reservoirs or the disturbance of biological habitats. Some current bedload measuring techniques have limited possibilities for studies in high temporal resolutions. Optical systems are usually not applicable because of high turbidity due to concentrated suspended sediment transported. Sediment traps or bedload samplers yield only summative information on bedload transport with low temporal resolution. An alternative bedload measuring technique is the use of seismological systems installed next to the rivers. The potential advantages are observations in real time and under undisturbed conditions. The study area is a 120 m long reach of River Colpach (21.5 km2), a small gravel bed river in Northern Luxembourg. A combined approach of hydro-climatological observations, hydraulic measurements, sediment sampling, and seismological measurements is used in order to investigate bedload transport phenomena. Information derived from seismic measurements and results from a 3-dimensional hydro-morphodynamic model are exemplarily discussed for a November 2013 flood event. The 3-dimensional hydro-morphodynamic model is based on the Telemac hydroinformatic system. This allows for dynamically coupling a 3D hydrodynamic model (Telemac-3D) and a morphodynamic model (Sisyphe). The coupling is dynamic as these models exchange their information during simulations. This is a main advantage as it allows for taking into account the effects of the morphologic changes of the riverbed on the water hydrodynamic and the bedload processes. The coupled model has been calibrated using time series of gauged water depths and time series of bed material collected sequentially (after

  8. 3D conductive coupling for efficient generation of prominent Fano resonances in metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguang; Liu, Zhe; Li, Jiafang; Li, Wuxia; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a 3D conductive coupling mechanism for the efficient generation of prominent and robust Fano resonances in 3D metamaterials (MMs) formed by integrating vertical U-shape split-ring resonators (SRRs) or vertical rectangular plates along a planar metallic hole array with extraordinary optical transmission (EOT). In such a configuration, intensified vertical E-field is induced along the metallic holes and naturally excites the electric resonances of the vertical structures, which form non-radiative "dark" modes. These 3D conductive "dark" modes strongly interfere with the "bright" resonance mode of the EOT structure, generating significant Fano resonances with both prominent destructive and constructive interferences. The demonstrated 3D conductive coupling mechanism is highly universal in that both 3D MMs with vertical SRRs and vertical plates exhibit the same prominent Fano resonances despite their dramatic structural difference, which is conceptually different from conventional capacitive and inductive coupling mechanisms that degraded drastically upon small structural deviations. PMID:27296109

  9. Cholla: 3D GPU-based hydrodynamics code for astrophysical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Evan E.; Robertson, Brant E.

    2016-07-01

    Cholla (Computational Hydrodynamics On ParaLLel Architectures) models the Euler equations on a static mesh and evolves the fluid properties of thousands of cells simultaneously using GPUs. It can update over ten million cells per GPU-second while using an exact Riemann solver and PPM reconstruction, allowing computation of astrophysical simulations with physically interesting grid resolutions (>256^3) on a single device; calculations can be extended onto multiple devices with nearly ideal scaling beyond 64 GPUs.

  10. Separation efficiency of a hydrodynamic separator using a 3D computational fluid dynamics multiscale approach.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Vivien; Dufresne, Matthieu; Vazquez, Jose; Fischer, Martin; Morin, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to predict the solid separation efficiency of a hydrodynamic separator. The numerical difficulty concerns the discretization of the geometry to simulate both the global behavior and the local phenomena that occur near the screen. In this context, a CFD multiscale approach was used: a global model (at the scale of the device) is used to observe the hydrodynamic behavior within the device; a local model (portion of the screen) is used to determine the local phenomena that occur near the screen. The Eulerian-Lagrangian approach was used to model the particle trajectories in both models. The global model shows the influence of the particles' characteristics on the trapping efficiency. A high density favors the sedimentation. In contrast, particles with small densities (1,040 kg/m(3)) are steered by the hydrodynamic behavior and can potentially be trapped by the separator. The use of the local model allows us to observe the particle trajectories near the screen. A comparison between two types of screens (perforated plate vs expanded metal) highlights the turbulent effects created by the shape of the screen. PMID:24622557

  11. Coupling hydrodynamic and wave propagation modeling for waveform modeling of SPE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larmat, C. S.; Steedman, D. W.; Rougier, E.; Delorey, A.; Bradley, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to bring empirical and theoretical advances to the problem of detection and identification of underground nuclear explosions. This paper presents effort to improve knowledge of the processes that affect seismic wave propagation from the hydrodynamic/plastic source region to the elastic/anelastic far field thanks to numerical modeling. The challenge is to couple the prompt processes that take place in the near source region to the ones taking place later in time due to wave propagation in complex 3D geologic environments. In this paper, we report on results of first-principles simulations coupling hydrodynamic simulation codes (Abaqus and CASH), with a 3D full waveform propagation code, SPECFEM3D. Abaqus and CASH model the shocked, hydrodynamic region via equations of state for the explosive, borehole stemming and jointed/weathered granite. LANL has been recently employing a Coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) modeling capability. This has allowed the testing of a new phenomenological model for modeling stored shear energy in jointed material. This unique modeling capability has enabled highfidelity modeling of the explosive, the weak grout-filled borehole, as well as the surrounding jointed rock. SPECFEM3D is based on the Spectral Element Method, a direct numerical method for full waveform modeling with mathematical accuracy (e.g. Komatitsch, 1998, 2002) thanks to its use of the weak formulation of the wave equation and of high-order polynomial functions. The coupling interface is a series of grid points of the SEM mesh situated at the edge of the hydrodynamic code domain. Displacement time series at these points are computed from output of CASH or Abaqus (by interpolation if needed) and fed into the time marching scheme of SPECFEM3D. We will present validation tests and waveforms modeled for several SPE tests conducted so far, with a special focus on effect of the local topography.

  12. Remarks on the uniqueness of weak solution for the 3D viscous magneto-hydrodynamics equations in {B1_{infty,infty}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jian; Zhang, Qian

    2016-03-01

    A uniqueness result of weak solution for the 3D viscous magneto-hydrodynamics equations in {B^1_{infty,infty}} is proved by means of the Fourier localization technique and the losing derivative estimates.

  13. Hydrodynamics Versus Intracellular Coupling in the Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaranta, Greta; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Tam, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The influence of hydrodynamic forces on eukaryotic flagella synchronization is investigated by triggering phase locking between a controlled external flow and the flagella of C. reinhardtii. Hydrodynamic forces required for synchronization are over an order of magnitude larger than hydrodynamic forces experienced in physiological conditions. Our results suggest that synchronization is due instead to coupling through cell internal fibers connecting the flagella. This conclusion is confirmed by observations of the vfl3 mutant, with impaired mechanical connection between the flagella.

  14. PCB modeling in the Gulf of Lions using a 3D coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Thouvenin, Bénédicte; Tixier, Céline; Tronczynski, Jacek; Garreau, Pierre; Verney, Romaric; Carlotti, Francois; Espinasse, Boris; Queguiner, Bernard; Baklouti, Melika

    2013-04-01

    Polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) are synthetic chlorinated organic compounds, which were widely used in many industrial materials. These compounds are persistent, bioaccumulable and toxic for living organisms. The riverine and atmospheric fluxes are the major routes of entry for these chemicals into marine ecosystems, where they are now embedded in natural biogeochemical cycles (Lohmann et al. 2007). Because of bioaccumulation and biomagnification processes in food webs, even nowadays, these compounds may attain dangerous concentration levels especially in the top predators including marine mammals. The contamination of marine biota by PCBs in Mediterranean has also become a matter of concern as the concentrations in some species are at levels putting them at risk for significant biological effects. This may pose potential human health risks in commercial edible species (Carpenter 2006). Planktonic populations play a key role in the trophic food webs in marine ecosystems by the mobilisation and transfer of energy and organic matter towards higher trophic levels. This work aims at a better understanding of the role of plankton in the transfer of PCBs to higher trophic levels in the Gulf of Lions (Mediterranean) by coupling of biogeochemical, ecological and hydrodynamical processes. Modeling is a powerful tool for coupling processes of different disciplines and scales. The recent development of 3D hydrodynamic, hydrosedimentary and biogeochemical models in the Mediterranean (André et al, 2005,2009, Ulses et al, 2008, Dufois et al, 2008, Auger et al, 2011), enables feasibility testing of coupling these models with transfer processes of chemical contaminants. The lack of detailed observations in the sea and the significant uncertainty on contaminants inputs prevent from a proper validation of such modeling tests. However, these tools are very useful to assess the influence of fast processes on the transfer of contaminants to bioaccumulative species. Sensitivity analysis

  15. 3D hydrodynamic lift force model for AREVA fuel assembly in EDF PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Ekomie, S.; Bigot, J.; Dolleans, Ph.; Vallory, J.

    2007-07-01

    The accurate knowledge of the hydrodynamic lift force acting on a fuel assembly in PWR core is necessary to design the hold-down system of this assembly. This paper presents the model used by AREVA NP and EDF for computing this force. It results from a post-processing of sub-channel thermal-hydraulic codes respectively porous medium approach code THYC (EDF) and sub-channel type code FLICA III-F (AREVA NP). This model is based on the application of the Euler's theorem. Some hypotheses used to simplify the complexity of fuel assembly geometry are supported by CFD calculations. Then the model is compared to some experimental results obtained on a single fuel assembly inserted in the HERMES-T test facility located in CEA - Cadarache. Finally, the model is applied to calculate the lift force for the whole core. Various loading patterns including homogenous and mixed cores have been investigated and compared. (authors)

  16. 3D analysis of eddy current loss in the permanent magnet coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zina; Meng, Zhuo

    2016-07-01

    This paper first presents a 3D analytical model for analyzing the radial air-gap magnetic field between the inner and outer magnetic rotors of the permanent magnet couplings by using the Amperian current model. Based on the air-gap field analysis, the eddy current loss in the isolation cover is predicted according to the Maxwell's equations. A 3D finite element analysis model is constructed to analyze the magnetic field spatial distributions and vector eddy currents, and then the simulation results obtained are analyzed and compared with the analytical method. Finally, the current losses of two types of practical magnet couplings are measured in the experiment to compare with the theoretical results. It is concluded that the 3D analytical method of eddy current loss in the magnet coupling is viable and could be used for the eddy current loss prediction of magnet couplings.

  17. 3D analysis of eddy current loss in the permanent magnet coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zina; Meng, Zhuo

    2016-07-01

    This paper first presents a 3D analytical model for analyzing the radial air-gap magnetic field between the inner and outer magnetic rotors of the permanent magnet couplings by using the Amperian current model. Based on the air-gap field analysis, the eddy current loss in the isolation cover is predicted according to the Maxwell's equations. A 3D finite element analysis model is constructed to analyze the magnetic field spatial distributions and vector eddy currents, and then the simulation results obtained are analyzed and compared with the analytical method. Finally, the current losses of two types of practical magnet couplings are measured in the experiment to compare with the theoretical results. It is concluded that the 3D analytical method of eddy current loss in the magnet coupling is viable and could be used for the eddy current loss prediction of magnet couplings. PMID:27475575

  18. Evolution of M82-like starburst winds revisited: 3D radiative cooling hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melioli, C.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Geraissate, F. G.

    2013-04-01

    In this study we present three-dimensional radiative cooling hydrodynamical simulations of galactic winds generated particularly in M82-like starburst galaxies. We have considered intermittent winds induced by supernova (SN) explosions within super star clusters randomly distributed (in space and time) in the central region of the galaxy (within a radius of R = 150 pc) and were able to reproduce the observed M82 wind conditions with its complex morphological outflow structure. We have found that the environmental conditions in the disc in the nearly recent past are crucial to determine whether the wind will develop a large-scale rich filamentary structure, as in M82 wind, or not. If a sufficiently large number of super stellar clusters are built up in a starburst mainly over a period of a few million years, then the simulations reproduce the multiphase gas observed in M82-like winds, i.e. with filaments of sizes about 20-300 pc, velocities of ˜200-500 km s-1, densities in the range 10-1-10 cm-3, embedded in a hot, low-density gas with a density smaller than 10-2 cm-3 and a velocity of ˜2000 km s-1. Otherwise, a `superbubble-like' wind develops, with very poor or no cold filamentary structures. Also, the numerical evolution of the SN ejecta has allowed us to obtain the abundance distribution over the first ˜3 kpc extension of the wind and we have found that the SN explosions change significantly the metallicity only of the hot, low-density wind component for which we obtained abundances ˜5-10 Z⊙ in fair consistency with the observations. Moreover, we have found that the SN-driven wind transports to outside the disc large amounts of energy, momentum and gas, but the more massive high-density component reaches only intermediate altitudes smaller than 1.5 kpc. Therefore, no significant amounts of gas mass are lost to the intergalactic medium and the mass evolution of the galaxy is not much affected by the starburst events occurring in the nuclear region.

  19. 3D conductive coupling for efficient generation of prominent Fano resonances in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiguang; Liu, Zhe; Li, Jiafang; Li, Wuxia; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a 3D conductive coupling mechanism for the efficient generation of prominent and robust Fano resonances in 3D metamaterials (MMs) formed by integrating vertical U-shape split-ring resonators (SRRs) or vertical rectangular plates along a planar metallic hole array with extraordinary optical transmission (EOT). In such a configuration, intensified vertical E-field is induced along the metallic holes and naturally excites the electric resonances of the vertical structures, which form non-radiative “dark” modes. These 3D conductive “dark” modes strongly interfere with the “bright” resonance mode of the EOT structure, generating significant Fano resonances with both prominent destructive and constructive interferences. The demonstrated 3D conductive coupling mechanism is highly universal in that both 3D MMs with vertical SRRs and vertical plates exhibit the same prominent Fano resonances despite their dramatic structural difference, which is conceptually different from conventional capacitive and inductive coupling mechanisms that degraded drastically upon small structural deviations.

  20. 3D conductive coupling for efficient generation of prominent Fano resonances in metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiguang; Liu, Zhe; Li, Jiafang; Li, Wuxia; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a 3D conductive coupling mechanism for the efficient generation of prominent and robust Fano resonances in 3D metamaterials (MMs) formed by integrating vertical U-shape split-ring resonators (SRRs) or vertical rectangular plates along a planar metallic hole array with extraordinary optical transmission (EOT). In such a configuration, intensified vertical E-field is induced along the metallic holes and naturally excites the electric resonances of the vertical structures, which form non-radiative “dark” modes. These 3D conductive “dark” modes strongly interfere with the “bright” resonance mode of the EOT structure, generating significant Fano resonances with both prominent destructive and constructive interferences. The demonstrated 3D conductive coupling mechanism is highly universal in that both 3D MMs with vertical SRRs and vertical plates exhibit the same prominent Fano resonances despite their dramatic structural difference, which is conceptually different from conventional capacitive and inductive coupling mechanisms that degraded drastically upon small structural deviations. PMID:27296109

  1. Surface-effect corrections for solar-like oscillations using 3D hydrodynamical simulations. I. Adiabatic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoi, T.; Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Caffau, E.; Mosser, B.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The CoRoT and Kepler space-borne missions have provided us with a wealth of high-quality observational data that allows for seismic inferences of stellar interiors. This requires the computation of precise and accurate theoretical frequencies, but imperfect modeling of the uppermost stellar layers introduces systematic errors. To overcome this problem, an empirical correction has been introduced by Kjeldsen et al. (2008, ApJ, 683, L175) and is now commonly used for seismic inferences. Nevertheless, we still lack a physical justification allowing for the quantification of the surface-effect corrections. Aims: Our aim is to constrain the surface-effect corrections across the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram using a set of 3D hydrodynamical simulations. Methods: We used a grid of these simulations computed with the CO5BOLD code to model the outer layers of solar-like stars. Upper layers of the corresponding 1D standard models were then replaced by the layers obtained from the horizontally averaged 3D models. The frequency differences between these patched models and the 1D standard models were then calculated using the adiabatic approximation and allowed us to constrain the Kjeldsen et al. power law, as well as a Lorentzian formulation. Results: We find that the surface effects on modal frequencies depend significantly on both the effective temperature and the surface gravity. We further provide the variation in the parameters related to the surface-effect corrections using their power law as well as a Lorentzian formulation. Scaling relations between these parameters and the elevation (related to the Mach number) is also provided. The Lorentzian formulation is shown to be more robust for the whole frequency spectrum, while the power law is not suitable for the frequency shifts in the frequency range above νmax. Finally, we show that, owing to turbulent pressure, the elevation of the uppermost layers modifies the location of the hydrogen ionization zone and

  2. Collective strong coupling with homogeneous Rabi frequencies using a 3D lumped element microwave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angerer, Andreas; Astner, Thomas; Wirtitsch, Daniel; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Putz, Stefan; Majer, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    We design and implement 3D-lumped element microwave cavities that spatially focus magnetic fields to a small mode volume. They allow coherent and uniform coupling to electron spins hosted by nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond. We achieve large homogeneous single spin coupling rates, with an enhancement of more than one order of magnitude compared to standard 3D cavities with a fundamental resonance at 3 GHz. Finite element simulations confirm that the magnetic field distribution is homogeneous throughout the entire sample volume, with a root mean square deviation of 1.54%. With a sample containing 1017 nitrogen vacancy electron spins, we achieve a collective coupling strength of Ω = 12 MHz, a cooperativity factor C = 27, and clearly enter the strong coupling regime. This allows to interface a macroscopic spin ensemble with microwave circuits, and the homogeneous Rabi frequency paves the way to manipulate the full ensemble population in a coherent way.

  3. The Transient 3-D Transport Coupled Code TORT-TD/ATTICA3D for High-Fidelity Pebble-Bed HTGR Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seubert, Armin; Sureda, Antonio; Lapins, Janis; Bader, Johannes; Laurien, Eckart

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the 3D discrete ordinates-based coupled code system TORT-TD/ATTICA3D that aims at steady state and transient analyses of pebble-bed high-temperature gas cooled reactors. In view of increasing computing power, the application of time-dependent neutron transport methods becomes feasible for best estimate evaluations of safety margins. The calculation capabilities of TORT-TD/ATTICA3D are presented along with the coupling approach, with focus on the time-dependent neutron transport features of TORT-TD. Results obtained for the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR-400 benchmark demonstrate the transient capabilities of TORT-TD/ATTICA3D.

  4. Flexible simulation framework to couple processes in complex 3D models for subsurface utilization assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; Nakaten, Benjamin; De Lucia, Marco; Nakaten, Natalie; Otto, Christopher; Pohl, Maik; Tillner, Elena; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of the geological subsurface for production and storage of hydrocarbons, chemical energy and heat as well as for waste disposal requires the quantification and mitigation of environmental impacts as well as the improvement of georesources utilization in terms of efficiency and sustainability. The development of tools for coupled process simulations is essential to tackle these challenges, since reliable assessments are only feasible by integrative numerical computations. Coupled processes at reservoir to regional scale determine the behaviour of reservoirs, faults and caprocks, generally demanding for complex 3D geological models to be considered besides available monitoring and experimenting data in coupled numerical simulations. We have been developing a flexible numerical simulation framework that provides efficient workflows for integrating the required data and software packages to carry out coupled process simulations considering, e.g., multiphase fluid flow, geomechanics, geochemistry and heat. Simulation results are stored in structured data formats to allow for an integrated 3D visualization and result interpretation as well as data archiving and its provision to collaborators. The main benefits in using the flexible simulation framework are the integration of data geological and grid data from any third party software package as well as data export to generic 3D visualization tools and archiving formats. The coupling of the required process simulators in time and space is feasible, while different spatial dimensions in the coupled simulations can be integrated, e.g., 0D batch with 3D dynamic simulations. User interaction is established via high-level programming languages, while computational efficiency is achieved by using low-level programming languages. We present three case studies on the assessment of geological subsurface utilization based on different process coupling approaches and numerical simulations.

  5. Flux limiters in the coupling of radiation and hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaid, M.; Klar, A.; Dubroca, B.

    2004-07-01

    Two numerical approximations to radiative heat transfer problem based on asymptotic and entropy approaches are proposed for hydrodynamics radiation coupling. We compare the radiative fluxes between the two approaches and we show that the coupling based on the entropy approach is flux limited, while the other approach does not preserve this condition. Relaxation schemes are considered for the hydrodynamic part, and an iterative procedure is used for radiation. The new splitting algorithm avoids the use of Riemann solvers and Newton iterations. Numerical examples are carried out on two and three dimensional problems.

  6. Effects of the LBV Primary's Mass-loss Rate on the 3D Hydrodynamics of eta Carinae's Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, Thomas I.; Gull, Theodore R.; Cocoran, M.; Okazaki, A.; Owocki, S.; Russell, C.; Hamaguchi, K.; Clementel, N; Groh, J.; Hillier, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    At the heart of eta Carinae's spectacular "Homunculus" nebula lies an extremely luminous (L(sub Total) greater than approximately 5 × 10(exp 6) solar luminosity) colliding wind binary with a highly eccentric (e approximately 0.9), 5.54-year orbit (Figure 1). The primary of the system, a Luminous Blue Variable (LBV), is our closest (D approximately 2.3 kpc) and best example of a pre-hypernova or pre-gamma ray burst environment. The remarkably consistent and periodic RXTE X-ray light curve surprisingly showed a major change during the system's last periastron in 2009, with the X-ray minimum being approximately 50% shorter than the minima of the previous two cycles1. Between 1998 and 2011, the strengths of various broad stellar wind emission lines (e.g. Halpha, Fe II) in line-of-sight (l.o.s.) also decreased by factors of 1.5 - 3 relative to the continuum2. The current interpretation for these changes is that they are due to a gradual factor of 2 - 4 drop in the primary's mass-loss rate over the last approximately 15 years1, 2. However, while a secular change is seen for a direct view of the central source, little to no change is seen in profiles at high stellar latitudes or reflected off of the dense, circumbinary material known as the "Weigelt blobs"2, 3. Moreover, model spectra generated with CMFGEN predict that a factor of 2 - 4 drop in the primary's mass-loss rate should lead to huge changes in the observed spectrum, which thus far have not been seen. Here we present results from large- (plus or minus 1620 AU) and small- (plus or minus 162 AU) domain, full 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of eta Car's massive binary colliding winds for three different primary-star mass-loss rates (2.4, 4.8, and 8.5 × 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr). The goal is to investigate how the mass-loss rate affects the 3D geometry and dynamics of eta Car's optically-thick wind and spatially-extended wind-wind collision (WWC) regions, both of which are known sources of

  7. Hydrodynamics of Normal Atomic Gases with Spin-orbit Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yan-Hua; Yu, Zhenhua

    2015-01-01

    Successful realization of spin-orbit coupling in atomic gases by the NIST scheme opens the prospect of studying the effects of spin-orbit coupling on many-body physics in an unprecedentedly controllable way. Here we derive the linearized hydrodynamic equations for the normal atomic gases of the spin-orbit coupling by the NIST scheme with zero detuning. We show that the hydrodynamics of the system crucially depends on the momentum susceptibilities which can be modified by the spin-orbit coupling. We reveal the effects of the spin-orbit coupling on the sound velocities and the dipole mode frequency of the gases by applying our formalism to the ideal Fermi gas. We also discuss the generalization of our results to other situations. PMID:26483090

  8. Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion for the 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo; Calandra, Henri

    2016-06-01

    Laplace-domain waveform inversion reconstructs long-wavelength subsurface models by using the zero-frequency component of damped seismic signals. Despite the computational advantages of Laplace-domain waveform inversion over conventional frequency-domain waveform inversion, an acoustic assumption and an iterative matrix solver have been used to invert 3D marine datasets to mitigate the intensive computing cost. In this study, we develop a Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion algorithm for 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media by using a parallel sparse direct solver library (MUltifrontal Massively Parallel Solver, MUMPS). We precisely simulate a real marine environment by coupling the 3D acoustic and elastic wave equations with the proper boundary condition at the fluid-solid interface. In addition, we can extract the elastic properties of the Earth below the sea bottom from the recorded acoustic pressure datasets. As a matrix solver, the parallel sparse direct solver is used to factorize the non-symmetric impedance matrix in a distributed memory architecture and rapidly solve the wave field for a number of shots by using the lower and upper matrix factors. Using both synthetic datasets and real datasets obtained by a 3D wide azimuth survey, the long-wavelength component of the P-wave and S-wave velocity models is reconstructed and the proposed modeling and inversion algorithm are verified. A cluster of 80 CPU cores is used for this study.

  9. Quantification of avian embryonic cardiac outflow hemodynamics through 3D-0D coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Stephanie; Vignon-Clementel, Irene; Butcher, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Outflow malformations account for over 20% of CHDs in the US. While the etiology of these malformations is poorly understood, most can be traced back to perturbations in the patterning of the pharyngeal arch arteries (PAAs), the precursors to the great vessels. Here, we examine the effects of normal and aberrant PAA flow, through the use of two computational models. A 0D electric analog model allows for rapid computation and global tuning of the embryo's vasculature relative to the arches. A second 3D-0D model replaces the electric analog representation of the arches with a 3D reconstruction, thereby leading to more extensive pressure and flow characterization. We obtain 3D arch artery reconstructions from nano-CT stacks and couple them to 0D outlets. In contrast to standard boundary conditions, such coupling maintains the physiologically desired cranial-caudal flow split in control embryos and predicts how this will change with vessel occlusion. We use flow inputs from Doppler velocity tracings to compute 0D and 3D-0D pulsatile hemodynamic simulations in HH18 (day 3), HH24 (day 4), and HH26 (day 5) geometries. We then calculate flow distributions and wall shear stress maps for control embryos. From here, we modify HH18 geometries to simulate varying levels of PAA occlusion. Pulsatile simulations are run in each geometry and results compared to that of controls. Results serve as a basis for examining flow-mediated growth and adaptation in cardiac outflow morphogenesis.

  10. Peach Bottom 2 Turbine Trip Simulation Using TRAC-BF1/COS3D, a Best-Estimate Coupled 3-D Core and Thermal-Hydraulic Code System

    SciTech Connect

    Ui, Atsushi; Miyaji, Takamasa

    2004-10-15

    The best-estimate coupled three-dimensional (3-D) core and thermal-hydraulic code system TRAC-BF1/COS3D has been developed. COS3D, based on a modified one-group neutronic model, is a 3-D core simulator used for licensing analyses and core management of commercial boiling water reactor (BWR) plants in Japan. TRAC-BF1 is a plant simulator based on a two-fluid model. TRAC-BF1/COS3D is a coupled system of both codes, which are connected using a parallel computing tool. This code system was applied to the OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Benchmark. Since the two-group cross-section tables are provided by the benchmark team, COS3D was modified to apply to this specification. Three best-estimate scenarios and four hypothetical scenarios were calculated using this code system. In the best-estimate scenario, the predicted core power with TRAC-BF1/COS3D is slightly underestimated compared with the measured data. The reason seems to be a slight difference in the core boundary conditions, that is, pressure changes and the core inlet flow distribution, because the peak in this analysis is sensitive to them. However, the results of this benchmark analysis show that TRAC-BF1/COS3D gives good precision for the prediction of the actual BWR transient behavior on the whole. Furthermore, the results with the modified one-group model and the two-group model were compared to verify the application of the modified one-group model to this benchmark. This comparison shows that the results of the modified one-group model are appropriate and sufficiently precise.

  11. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012©. RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance.

  12. 3D quaternionic condensation and spin textures with Hopf invariants from synthetic spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Congjun; Li, Yi; Zhou, Xiangfa

    2013-03-01

    We study unconventional condensations of two-component bosons in a harmonic trap subject to the 3D σ --> . p --> -type spin-orbit (SO) coupling. The topology of condensate wavefunctions manifests in the quaternionic representation. The spatial distributions of the S3 quaternionic phase exhibit 3D skyrmion configurations, while those of the S2 spin orientation possess non-zero Hopf invariants. As increasing SO coupling strength, spin textures evolve from concentric distributions to lattice structures at weak interactions. Strong interactions change condensates into spin-polarized plane-wave states, or, superpositions of two plane-waves exhibiting helical spin spirals. This project is supported by AFOSR FA9550-11-1- 0067(YIP) and NSF-DMR-1105945.

  13. Constraints on Decreases in Eta Carinae's Mass-loss from 3D Hydrodynamic Simulations of Its Binary Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Owocki, S. P.; Groh, J. H.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Teodoro, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the mass-loss rate of the primary star Eta-A in the massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae dropped by a factor of 2-3 between 1999 and 2010. We present result from large- (+/- 1545 au) and small- (+/- 155 au) domain, 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Car's colliding winds for three Eta-A mass-loss rates ( (dot-M(sub Eta-A) = 2.4, 4.8 and 8.5 × 10(exp -4) M(solar)/ yr), investigating the effects on the dynamics of the binary wind-wind collision (WWC). These simulations include orbital motion, optically thin radiative cooling and radiative forces. We find that dot-M Eta-A greatly affects the time-dependent hydrodynamics at all spatial scales investigated. The simulations also show that the post-shock wind of the companion star Eta-B switches from the adiabatic to the radiative-cooling regime during periastron passage (Phi approx.= 0.985-1.02). This switchover starts later and ends earlier the lower the value of dot-M Eta-A and is caused by the encroachment of the wind of Eta-A into the acceleration zone of Eta-B's wind, plus radiative inhibition of Eta-B's wind by Eta-A. The SPH simulations together with 1D radiative transfer models of Eta-A's spectra reveal that a factor of 2 or more drop in dot-M EtaA should lead to substantial changes in numerous multiwavelength observables. Recent observations are not fully consistent with the model predictions, indicating that any drop in dot- M Eta-A was likely by a factor of approx. < 2 and occurred after 2004. We speculate that most of the recent observed changes in Eta Car are due to a small increase in the WWC opening angle that produces significant effects because our line of sight to the system lies close to the dense walls of the WWC zone. A modest decrease in dot-M Eta-A may be responsible, but changes in the wind/stellar parameter of Eta-B, while less likely, cannot yet be fully ruled out. We suggest observations during Eta-Car's next periastron in 2014 to further

  14. Constraints on decreases in η Carinae's mass-loss from 3D hydrodynamic simulations of its binary colliding winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Owocki, S. P.; Groh, J. H.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Teodoro, M.

    2013-12-01

    Recent work suggests that the mass-loss rate of the primary star ηA in the massive colliding wind binary η Carinae dropped by a factor of 2-3 between 1999 and 2010. We present results from large- (±1545 au) and small- (±155 au) domain, 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of η Car's colliding winds for three ηA mass-loss rates (dot{M}_{η A}= 2.4, 4.8 and 8.5 × 10-4 M⊙ yr-1), investigating the effects on the dynamics of the binary wind-wind collision (WWC). These simulations include orbital motion, optically thin radiative cooling and radiative forces. We find that dot{M}_{η A} greatly affects the time-dependent hydrodynamics at all spatial scales investigated. The simulations also show that the post-shock wind of the companion star ηB switches from the adiabatic to the radiative-cooling regime during periastron passage (φ ≈ 0.985-1.02). This switchover starts later and ends earlier the lower the value of dot{M}_{η A} and is caused by the encroachment of the wind of ηA into the acceleration zone of ηB's wind, plus radiative inhibition of ηB's wind by ηA. The SPH simulations together with 1D radiative transfer models of ηA's spectra reveal that a factor of 2 or more drop in dot{M}_{η A} should lead to substantial changes in numerous multiwavelength observables. Recent observations are not fully consistent with the model predictions, indicating that any drop in dot{M}_{η A} was likely by a factor of ≲2 and occurred after 2004. We speculate that most of the recent observed changes in η Car are due to a small increase in the WWC opening angle that produces significant effects because our line of sight to the system lies close to the dense walls of the WWC zone. A modest decrease in dot{M}_{η A} may be responsible, but changes in the wind/stellar parameters of ηB, while less likely, cannot yet be fully ruled out. We suggest observations during η Car's next periastron in 2014 to further test for decreases in dot{M}_{η A}. If

  15. Nonlinear Generalized Hydrodynamic Wave Equations in Strongly Coupled Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Veeresha, B. M.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.

    2008-09-07

    A set of nonlinear equations for the study of low frequency waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium is derived using the phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model and is used to study the modulational stability of dust acoustic waves to parallel perturbations. Dust compressibility contributions arising from strong Coulomb coupling effects are found to introduce significant modifications in the threshold and range of the instability domain.

  16. 3D neutronic codes coupled with thermal-hydraulic system codes for PWR, and BWR and VVER reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbuch, S.; Velkov, K.; Lizorkin, M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the objectives of code development for coupling 3D neutronics codes with thermal-hydraulic system codes. The present status of coupling ATHLET with three 3D neutronics codes for VVER- and LWR-reactors is presented. After describing the basic features of the 3D neutronic codes BIPR-8 from Kurchatov-Institute, DYN3D from Research Center Rossendorf and QUABOX/CUBBOX from GRS, first applications of coupled codes for different transient and accident scenarios are presented. The need of further investigations is discussed.

  17. 3D Hydrodynamic Simulations with Yguazú-A Code to Model a Jet in a Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro-Corzo, S. A. R.; Velazquez, P.; Diaz, A.

    2009-05-01

    We present preliminary results for a galaxy's jet expanding into an intra-cluster medium (ICM). We attempt to model the jet-gas interaction and the evolution of a extragalactic collimated jet placed at center of computational grid, which it is modeled as a cylinder ejecting gas in the z-axis direction with fixed velocity. It has precession motion around z-axis (period of 10^5 sec.) and orbital motion in XY-plane (period of 500 yr.). This jet is embedded in the ICM, which is modeled as surrounding wind in the XZ plane. We carried out 3D hydrodynamical simulations using Yguazú-A code. This simulation do not include radiative losses. In order to compare the numerical results with observations, we generated synthetic X-ray emission images. X-ray observations with high-resolution of rich cluster of galaxies show diffuse emission with filamentary structure (sometimes called as cooling flow or X-ray filament). Radio observations show a jet-like emission of the central region of the cluster. Joining these observations, in this work we explore the possibility that the jet-ambient gas interaction leads to a filamentary morphology in the X-ray domain. We have found that simulation considering orbital motion offers the possibility to explain the diffuse emission observed in the X-ray domain. The circular orbital motion, additional to precession motion, contribute to disperse the shocked gas and the X-ray appearance of the 3D simulation reproduce some important details of Abel 1795 X-ray emission (Rodriguez-Martinez et al. 2006, A&A, 448, 15): A bright bow-shock at north (spot), where interact directly the jet and the ICM and which is observed in the X-ray image. Meanwhile, in the south side there is no bow-shock X-ray emission, but the wake appears as a X-ray source. This wake is part of the diffuse shocked ambient gas region.

  18. Modelling of river plume dynamics in Öre estuary (Baltic Sea) with Telemac-3D hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The main property of river plumes is their buoyancy, fresh water discharged by rivers is less dense than the receiving, saline waters. To study the processes of plume formation in case of river discharge into a brackish estuary where salinity is low (3.5 - 5 psu) a three dimensional hydrodynamic model was applied to the Öre estuary in the Baltic Sea. This estuary is a small fjord-like bay in the north part of the Baltic Sea. Size of the bay is about 8 by 8 km with maximum depth of 35 metres. River Öre has a small average freshwater discharge of 35 m3/s. But in spring during snowmelt the discharge can be many times higher. For example, in April 2015 the discharge increased from 8 m3/s to 160 m3/s in 18 days. To study river plume dynamics a finite element based three dimensional baroclinic model TELEMAC - 3D is used. The TELEMAC modelling suite is developed by the National Laboratory of Hydraulics and Environment (LNHE) of Electricité de France (EDF). Modelling domain was approximated by an unstructured mesh with element size varies from 50 to 500 m. In vertical direction a sigma-coordinate with 20 layers was used. Open sea boundary conditions were obtained from the Baltic Sea model HIROMB-BOOS using COPERNICUS marine environment monitoring service. Comparison of modelling results with observations obtained by BONUS COCOA project's field campaign in Öre estuary in 2015 shows that the model plausible simulate river plume dynamics. Modelling of age of freshwater is also discussed. This work resulted from the BONUS COCOA project was supported by BONUS (Art 185), funded jointly by the EU and the Swedish Research Council Formas.

  19. User Guide for the R5EXEC Coupling Interface in the RELAP5-3D Code

    SciTech Connect

    Forsmann, J. Hope; Weaver, Walter L.

    2015-04-01

    This report describes the R5EXEC coupling interface in the RELAP5-3D computer code from the users perspective. The information in the report is intended for users who want to couple RELAP5-3D to other thermal-hydraulic, neutron kinetics, or control system simulation codes.

  20. Isotropization and Hydrodynamization in Weakly Coupled Heavy-Ion Collisions.

    PubMed

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Zhu, Yan

    2015-10-30

    We numerically solve the (2+1)-dimensional effective kinetic theory of weak coupling QCD under longitudinal expansion, relevant for early stages of heavy-ion collisions. We find agreement with viscous hydrodynamics and classical Yang-Mills simulations in the regimes where they are applicable. By choosing initial conditions that are motivated by a color-glass-condensate framework, we find that for Q_{s}=2 GeV and α_{s}=0.3 the system is approximately described by viscous hydrodynamics well before τ≲1.0 fm/c. PMID:26565462

  1. 3D modelling of coupled mass and heat transfer of a convection-oven roasting process.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Gernaey, Krist V; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    A 3D mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer describing oven roasting of meat has been developed from first principles. The proposed mechanism for the mass transfer of water is modified and based on a critical literature review of the effect of heat on meat. The model equations are based on a conservation of mass and energy, coupled through Darcy's equations of porous media - the water flow is mainly pressure-driven. The developed model together with theoretical and experimental assessments were used to explain the heat and water transport and the effect of the change in microstructure (permeability, water binding capacity and elastic modulus) that occur during the meat roasting process. The developed coupled partial differential equations were solved by using COMSOL Multiphysics®3.5 and state variables are predicted as functions of both position and time. The proposed mechanism was partially validated by experiments in a convection oven where temperatures were measured online. PMID:23305831

  2. Radiation Coupling with the FUN3D Unstructured-Grid CFD Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The HARA radiation code is fully-coupled to the FUN3D unstructured-grid CFD code for the purpose of simulating high-energy hypersonic flows. The radiation energy source terms and surface heat transfer, under the tangent slab approximation, are included within the fluid dynamic ow solver. The Fire II flight test, at the Mach-31 1643-second trajectory point, is used as a demonstration case. Comparisons are made with an existing structured-grid capability, the LAURA/HARA coupling. The radiative surface heat transfer rates from the present approach match the benchmark values within 6%. Although radiation coupling is the focus of the present work, convective surface heat transfer rates are also reported, and are seen to vary depending upon the choice of mesh connectivity and FUN3D ux reconstruction algorithm. On a tetrahedral-element mesh the convective heating matches the benchmark at the stagnation point, but under-predicts by 15% on the Fire II shoulder. Conversely, on a mixed-element mesh the convective heating over-predicts at the stagnation point by 20%, but matches the benchmark away from the stagnation region.

  3. Automated design of coupled RF cavities using 2-D and 3-D codes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Peter; Christiansen, D. W.; Greninger, P. T.; Spalek, G.

    2001-01-01

    Coupled RF cavities in the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project have been designed using a procedure in which a 2-D code (CCT) searches for a design that meets frequency and coupling requirements, while a 3-D code (HFSS) is used to obtain empirical factors used by CCT to characterize the coupling slot between cavities. Using assumed values of the empirical factors, CCT runs the Superfish code iteratively to solve for a trial cavity design that has a specified frequency and coupling. The frequency shifts and the coupling constant k of the slot are modeled in CCT using a perturbation theory, the results of which are adjusted using the empirical factors. Given a trial design, HFSS is run using periodic boundary conditions to obtain a mode spectrum. The mode spectrum is processed using the DISPER code to obtain values of the coupling and the frequencies with slots. These results are used to calculate a new set of empirical factors, which are fed back into CCT for another design iteration. Cold models have been fabricated and tested to validate the codes, and results will be presented.

  4. Coupling frontal photopolymerization and surface instabilities for a novel 3D patterning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Alessandra; Hennessy, Matthew; Matar, Omar; Douglas, Jack; Cabral, João

    2015-03-01

    Patterning of soft matter provides an exceptional route for the generation of micro/nanostructured and functional surfaces. We describe a new 3D fabrication process based on coupling frontal photopolymerization (FPP) with precisely controlled, yet spontaneous, interfacial wrinkling. FPP is a complex spatio-temporal process that can lead to well-defined propagating fronts of network formation, both stable and unstable. We investigate this process focusing on the interfacial monomer-to-polymer conversion profile and its wave propagation. A simple coarse-grained model is found to describe remarkably well the planar frontal logarithmic kinetics, capturing the effects of UV light exposure time (or dose) and temperature, as well as the front position. In defined conditions, surface instabilities are introduced and interfere with wave planarity, resulting in the formation of ``minimal'' surfaces with complex 3D geometries. Building on this understanding on the propagation of wavefronts of network formation during photopolymerization, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of 3D patterned polymer materials with tunable shapes with optical and surface functionality.

  5. Room temperature strong light-matter coupling in 3D THz meta-atoms (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulillo, Bruno; Manceau, Jean-Michel; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund; Colombelli, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate strong light-matter coupling at room temperature in the terahertz (THz) spectral region using 3D meta-atoms with extremely sub-wavelength volumes. Using an air-bridge fabrication scheme, we have implemented sub-wavelength 3D THz micro-resonators that rely on suspended loop antennas connected to semiconductor-filled patch cavities. We have experimentally shown that they possess the functionalities of lumped LC resonators: their frequency response can be adjusted by independently tuning the inductance associated the antenna element or the capacitance provided by the metal-semiconductor-metal cavity. Moreover, the radiation coupling and efficiency can be engineered acting on the design of the loop antenna, similarly to conventional RF antennas. Here we take advantage of this rich playground in the context of cavity electrodynamics/intersubband polaritonics. In the strong light-matter coupling regime, a cavity and a two-level system exchange energy coherently at a characteristic rate called the vacuum Rabi frequency ΩR which is dominant with respect to all other loss mechanisms involved. The signature, in the frequency domain, is the appearance of a splitting between the bare cavity and material system resonances: the new states are called upper and a lower polariton branches. So far, most experimental demonstrations of strong light-matter interaction between an intersubband transition and a deeply sub-wavelength mode in the THz or mid-infrared ranges rely on wavelength-scale or larger resonators such as photonic crystals, diffractive gratings, dielectric micro-cavities or patch cavities. Lately, planar metamaterials have been used to enhance the light-matter interaction and strongly reduce the interaction volume by engineering the electric and magnetic resonances of the individual subwavelength constituents. In this contribution we provide evidence of strong coupling between a THz intersubband transition and an extremely sub-wavelength mode (≈λ/10

  6. Particle Acceleration in the Low Corona Over Broad Longitudes: Coupling MHD and 3D Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.; Schwadron, N.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work on the coupling between the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module (EPREM, a 3D energetic particle model) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS, an MHD code developed at Predictive Science, Inc.) has demonstrated the efficacy of compression regions around fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for particle acceleration low in the corona (˜ 3 - 6 solar radii). These couplings show rapid particle acceleration over a broad longitudinal extent (˜ 80 degrees) resulting from the pile-up of magnetic flux in the compression regions and their subsequent expansion. The challenge for forming large SEP events in such compression-acceleration scenarios is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration region while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream (away from the Sun) from the compression region. We present here the most recent simulation results including energetic particle and CME plasma profiles, the subsequent flux and dosages at 1AU, and an analysis of the compressional regions as efficient accelerators.

  7. Linearly perturbed MHD equilibria and 3D eddy current coupling via the control surface method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portone, A.; Villone, F.; Liu, Y.; Albanese, R.; Rubinacci, G.

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, a coupling strategy based on the control surface concept is used to self-consistently couple linear MHD solvers to 3D codes for the eddy current computation of eddy currents in the metallic structures surrounding the plasma. The coupling is performed by assuming that the plasma inertia (and, with it, all Alfven wave-like phenomena) can be neglected on the time scale of interest, which is dictated by the relevant electromagnetic time of the metallic structures. As is shown, plasma coupling with the metallic structures results in perturbations to the inductance matrix operator. In particular, by adopting the Fourier decomposition in poloidal and toroidal modes, it turns out that each toroidal mode can be associated with a matrix (additively) perturbing the inductance matrix that commonly describes the magnetic coupling of currents in vacuum. In this way, the treatment of resistive wall modes instabilities of various toroidal mode numbers and their possible cross-talk through the currents induced in the metallic structures can be easily studied.

  8. Dynamic regimes of hydrodynamically coupled self-propelling particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llopis, I.; Pagonabarraga, I.

    2006-09-01

    We analyze the collective dynamics of self-propelling particles (spps) which move at small Reynolds numbers including the hydrodynamic coupling to the suspending solvent through numerical simulations. The velocity distribution functions show marked deviations from Gaussian behavior at short times, and the mean-square displacement at long times shows a transition from diffusive to ballistic motion for appropriate driving mechanism at low concentrations. We discuss the structures the spps form at long times and how they correlate to their dynamic behavior.

  9. A 3D coupled hydro-mechanical granular model for the prediction of hot tearing formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistaninia, M.; Phillion, A. B.; Drezet, J.-M.; Rappaz, M.

    2012-07-01

    A new 3D coupled hydro-mechanical granular model that simulates hot tearing formation in metallic alloys is presented. The hydro-mechanical model consists of four separate 3D modules. (I) The Solidification Module (SM) is used for generating the initial solid-liquid geometry. Based on a Voronoi tessellation of randomly distributed nucleation centers, this module computes solidification within each polyhedron using a finite element based solute diffusion calculation for each element within the tessellation. (II) The Fluid Flow Module (FFM) calculates the solidification shrinkage and deformation-induced pressure drop within the intergranular liquid. (III) The Semi-solid Deformation Module (SDM) is used to simulate deformation of the granular structure via a combined finite element / discrete element method. In this module, deformation of the solid grains is modeled using an elasto-viscoplastic constitutive law. (IV) The Failure Module (FM) is used to simulate crack initiation and propagation with the fracture criterion estimated from the overpressure required to overcome the capillary forces at the liquid-gas interface. The FFM, SDM, and FM are coupled processes since solid deformation, intergranular flow, and crack initiation are deeply linked together. The granular model predictions have been validated against bulk data measured experimentally and calculated with averaging techniques.

  10. Sensitivity Tuning through Additive Heterogeneous Plasmon Coupling between 3D Assembled Plasmonic Nanoparticle and Nanocup Arrays.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sujin; Zhou, Xiangfei; Liu, Gang Logan

    2016-07-01

    Plasmonic substrates have fixed sensitivity once the geometry of the structure is defined. In order to improve the sensitivity, significant research effort has been focused on designing new plasmonic structures, which involves high fabrication costs; however, a method is reported for improving sensitivity not by redesigning the structure but by simply assembling plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) near the evanescent field of the underlying 3D plasmonic nanostructure. Here, a nanoscale Lycurgus cup array (nanoLCA) is employed as a base colorimetric plasmonic substrate and an assembly template. Compared to the nanoLCA, the NP assembled nanoLCA (NP-nanoLCA) exhibits much higher sensitivity for both bulk refractive index sensing and biotin-streptavidin binding detection. The limit of detection of the NP-nanoLCA is at least ten times smaller when detecting biotin-streptavidin conjugation. The numerical calculations confirm the importance of the additive plasmon coupling between the NPs and the nanoLCA for a denser and stronger electric field in the same 3D volumetric space. Tunable sensitivity is accomplished by controlling the number of NPs in each nanocup, or the number density of the hot spots. This simple yet scalable and cost-effective method of using additive heterogeneous plasmon coupling effects will benefit various chemical, medical, and environmental plasmon-based sensors. PMID:27206214

  11. A Mean Field Analysis of the Exchange Coupling (J) For 2- and 3-D Structured Tetracyanoethylenide (TCNE -)-based Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, Amber C.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Miller, Joel S.

    2012-01-01

    Mean field expressions based on the simple Heisenberg model were derived to correlate the inter- and intralayer exchange coupling to the critical temperatures, Tc, for several TCNE (tetracyanoethylene) based magnets with extended 2- and 3-D structure types. These expressions were used to estimate the exchange coupling, J, for 2-D ferrimagnetic [MII(TCNE)(NCMe)2]+ (M = Mn, Fe), 3-D antiferromagnetic MnII(TCNE)[C4(CN)8]1/2, and 3-D ferrimagnetic MnII(TCNE)3/2(I3)1/2. The sign and magnitude of the exchange coupling are in accord with previously reported magnetic data.

  12. Studies of coupled cavity LINAC (CCL) accelerating structures with 3-D codes

    SciTech Connect

    Spalek, G.

    2000-08-01

    The cw CCL being designed for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project accelerates protons from 96 MeV to 211 MeV. It consists of 99 segments each containing up to seven accelerating cavities. Segments are coupled by intersegment coupling cavities and grouped into supermodules. The design method needs to address not only basic cavity sizing for a given coupling and pi/2 mode frequency, but also the effects of high power densities on the cavity frequency, mechanical stresses, and the structure's stop band during operation. On the APT project, 3-D RF (Ansoft Corp.'s HFSS) and coupled RF/structural (Ansys Inc.'s ANSYS) codes are being used. to develop tools to address the above issues and guide cooling channel design. The code's predictions are being checked against available low power Aluminum models. Stop band behavior under power will be checked once the tools are extended to CCDTL structures that have been tested at high power. A summary of calculations made to date and agreement with measured results will be presented.

  13. Influence of the Aral Sea negative water balance on its seasonal circulation and ventilation patterns: use of a 3d hydrodynamic model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirjacobs, D.; Grégoire, M.; Delhez, E.; Nihoul, J.

    2003-04-01

    Within the context of the EU INCO-COPERNICUS program "Desertification in the Aral Sea Region: A study of the Natural and Anthropogenic Impacts" (Contract IAC2-CT-2000-10023), a large-scale 3D hydrodynamic model was adapted to address specifically the macroscale processes affecting the Aral Sea water circulation and ventilation. The particular goal of this research is to simulate the effect of lasting negative water balance on the 3D seasonal circulation, temperature, salinity and water-mixing fields of the Aral Sea. The original Aral Sea seasonal hydrodynamism is simulated with the average seasonal forcings corresponding to the period from 1956 to 1960. This first investigation concerns a period of relative stability of the water balance, before the beginning of the drying process. The consequences of the drying process on the hydrodynamic of the Sea will be studied by comparing this first results with the simulation representing the average situation for the years 1981 to 1985, a very low river flow period. For both simulation periods, the forcing considered are the seasonal fluctuations of wind fields, precipitation, evaporation, river discharge and salinity, cloud cover, air temperature and humidity. The meteorological forcings were adapted to the common optimum one-month temporal resolution of the available data sets. Monthly mean kinetic energy flux and surface tensions were calculated from daily ECMWF wind data. Monthly in situ precipitation, surface air temperature and humidity fields were interpolated from data obtained from the Russian Hydrological and Meteorological Institute. Monthly water discharge and average salinity of the river water were considered for both Amu Darya and Syr Darya river over each simulation periods. The water mass conservation routines allowed the simulation of a changing coastline by taking into account local drying and flooding events of particular grid points. Preliminary barotropic runs were realised (for the 1951

  14. Earth's Magnetosphere 3D Simulation by Coupling Particle-In-Cell and Magnetohydrodynamics Models: Parametric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraka, S. M.; Ben-Jaffel, L. B.

    2014-12-01

    We use particle-in-cell PIC 3D Electromagnetic, relativistic global code to address large-scale problems in magnetosphere electrodynamics. Terrestrial bow shock is simulated as an example. 3D Magnetohydrodynamics model ,MHD GUMICS in CCMC project, have been used in parallel with PIC under same scaled Solar wind (SW) and IMF conditions. We report new results from the coupling between the two models. Further investigations are required for confirmations of these results. In both codes the Earth's bow shock position is found at ~14.8 RE along the Sun-Earth line, and ~29 RE on the dusk side which is consistent with past in situ observation. Both simulations reproduce the theoretical jump conditions at the shock. However, PIC code density and temperature distributions are inflated and slightly shifted sunward when compared to MHD results. Reflected ions upstream of the bow shock may cause this sunward shift for density and temperature. Distribution of reflected ions and electrons are shown in the foreshock region, within the transition of the shock and in the downstream. The current version of PIC code can be run under modest computing facilities and resources. Additionally, existing MHD simulations should be useful to calibrate scaled properties of plasma resulting from PIC simulations for comparison with observations. Similarities and drawbacks of the results obtained by the two models are listed. The ultimate goal of using these different models in a complimentary manner rather than competitive is to better understand the macrostructure of the magnetosphere

  15. Finite element modeling of a 3D coupled foot-boot model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tian-Xia; Teo, Ee-Chon; Yan, Ya-Bo; Lei, Wei

    2011-12-01

    Increasingly, musculoskeletal models of the human body are used as powerful tools to study biological structures. The lower limb, and in particular the foot, is of interest because it is the primary physical interaction between the body and the environment during locomotion. The goal of this paper is to adopt the finite element (FE) modeling and analysis approaches to create a state-of-the-art 3D coupled foot-boot model for future studies on biomechanical investigation of stress injury mechanism, foot wear design and parachute landing fall simulation. In the modeling process, the foot-ankle model with lower leg was developed based on Computed Tomography (CT) images using ScanIP, Surfacer and ANSYS. Then, the boot was represented by assembling the FE models of upper, insole, midsole and outsole built based on the FE model of the foot-ankle, and finally the coupled foot-boot model was generated by putting together the models of the lower limb and boot. In this study, the FE model of foot and ankle was validated during balance standing. There was a good agreement in the overall patterns of predicted and measured plantar pressure distribution published in literature. The coupled foot-boot model will be fully validated in the subsequent works under both static and dynamic loading conditions for further studies on injuries investigation in military and sports, foot wear design and characteristics of parachute landing impact in military. PMID:21676642

  16. Automatic segmentation of bladder and prostate using coupled 3D deformable models.

    PubMed

    Costa, María Jimena; Delingette, Hervé; Novellas, Sébastien; Ayache, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a fully automatic method for the coupled 3D localization and segmentation of lower abdomen structures. We apply it to the joint segmentation of the prostate and bladder in a database of CT scans of the lower abdomen of male patients. A flexible approach on the bladder allows the process to easily adapt to high shape variation and to intensity inhomogeneities that would be hard to characterize (due, for example, to the level of contrast agent that is present). On the other hand, a statistical shape prior is enforced on the prostate. We also propose an adaptive non-overlapping constraint that arbitrates the evolution of both structures based on the availability of strong image data at their common boundary. The method has been tested on a database of 16 volumetric images, and the validation process includes an assessment of inter-expert variability in prostate delineation, with promising results. PMID:18051066

  17. Accelerating DynEarthSol3D on tightly coupled CPU-GPU heterogeneous processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Tuan; Choo, Kyoshin; Tan, Eh; Jang, Byunghyun; Choi, Eunseo

    2015-06-01

    DynEarthSol3D (Dynamic Earth Solver in Three Dimensions) is a flexible, open-source finite element solver that models the momentum balance and the heat transfer of elasto-visco-plastic material in the Lagrangian form using unstructured meshes. It provides a platform for the study of the long-term deformation of earth's lithosphere and various problems in civil and geotechnical engineering. However, the continuous computation and update of a very large mesh poses an intolerably high computational burden to developers and users in practice. For example, simulating a small input mesh containing around 3000 elements in 20 million time steps would take more than 10 days on a high-end desktop CPU. In this paper, we explore tightly coupled CPU-GPU heterogeneous processors to address the computing concern by leveraging their new features and developing hardware-architecture-aware optimizations. Our proposed key optimization techniques are three-fold: memory access pattern improvement, data transfer elimination and kernel launch overhead minimization. Experimental results show that our proposed implementation on a tightly coupled heterogeneous processor outperforms all other alternatives including traditional discrete GPU, quad-core CPU using OpenMP, and serial implementations by 67%, 50%, and 154% respectively even though the embedded GPU in the heterogeneous processor has significantly less number of cores than high-end discrete GPU.

  18. 3D position determination in monolithic crystals coupled to SiPMs for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etxebeste, Ane; Barrio, John; Muñoz, Enrique; Oliver, Josep F.; Solaz, Carles; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-05-01

    The interest in using continuous monolithic crystals in positron emission tomography (PET) has grown in the last years. Coupled to silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), the detector can combine high sensitivity and high resolution, the two main factors to be maximized in a positron emission tomograph. In this work, the position determination capability of a detector comprised of a 12× 12× 10 mm3 LYSO crystal coupled to an 8× 8 -pixel array of SiPMs is evaluated. The 3D interaction position of γ-rays is estimated using an analytical model of the light distribution including reflections on the facets of the crystal. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to evaluate different crystal reflectors and geometries. The method has been characterized and applied to different cases. Intrinsic resolution obtained with the position estimation method used in this work, applied to experimental data, achieves sub-millimetre resolution values. Average resolution over the detector surface for 5 mm thick crystal is  ∼0.9 mm FWHM and  ∼1.2 mm FWHM for 10 mm thick crystal. Depth of interaction resolution is close to 2 mm FWHM in both cases, while the FWTM is  ∼5.3 mm for 5 mm thick crystal and  ∼9.6 mm for 10 mm thick crystal.

  19. 3D position determination in monolithic crystals coupled to SiPMs for PET.

    PubMed

    Etxebeste, Ane; Barrio, John; Muñoz, Enrique; Oliver, Josep F; Solaz, Carles; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-05-21

    The interest in using continuous monolithic crystals in positron emission tomography (PET) has grown in the last years. Coupled to silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), the detector can combine high sensitivity and high resolution, the two main factors to be maximized in a positron emission tomograph. In this work, the position determination capability of a detector comprised of a [Formula: see text] mm(3) LYSO crystal coupled to an [Formula: see text]-pixel array of SiPMs is evaluated. The 3D interaction position of γ-rays is estimated using an analytical model of the light distribution including reflections on the facets of the crystal. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to evaluate different crystal reflectors and geometries. The method has been characterized and applied to different cases. Intrinsic resolution obtained with the position estimation method used in this work, applied to experimental data, achieves sub-millimetre resolution values. Average resolution over the detector surface for 5 mm thick crystal is  ∼0.9 mm FWHM and  ∼1.2 mm FWHM for 10 mm thick crystal. Depth of interaction resolution is close to 2 mm FWHM in both cases, while the FWTM is  ∼5.3 mm for 5 mm thick crystal and  ∼9.6 mm for 10 mm thick crystal. PMID:27119737

  20. 3D Simulation of the Growth of Alloy Semiconductor Quantum Dots Considering Morphological and Compositional Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junyan; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Narayanaswamy, Sridhar

    2012-02-01

    Fabrication of quantum dots (QDs) with high density may be realized by self-assembly via heteroepitaxial growth of thin films. Since the electronic and optoelectronic properties of QDs are sensitive to size, morphology, strain and especially composition, it is of great importance to control their composition profiles and morphology, and engineer the strain in them. Since the growth is a dynamic process, which carries out via surface diffusion driven primarily by strain relaxation and entropy change due to chemical intermixing, a strong coupling between morphological and composition evolutions during this process leads to a rather complex dynamics, which has not been fully understood. In this work, a 3-D finite element model is developed, which is capable of modeling the formation, self-assembly and coarsening of hetero-epitaxial alloy islands by considering the coupling of morphological and compositional evolution. Several interesting experimental observations, such as fast coarsening kinetics; asymmetries in composition profile and island shape; lateral motion of alloy islands have been observed in our simulations. Our model predictions have painted a rather complete picture for the entire dynamic evolution during the growth of nanoscale heteroepitaxial islands.

  1. Applications of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models in the San Francisco bay-delta estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Donovan, J.M.; Wong, H.F.N.

    2005-01-01

    Three applications of three-dimensional hydrodynamic and particle-tracking models are currently underway by the United States Geological Survey in the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary. The first application is to the San Francisco Bay and a portion of the coastal ocean. The second application is to an important, gated control channel called the Delta Cross Channel, located within the northern portion of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The third application is to a reach of the San Joaquin River near Stockton, California where a significant dissolved oxygen problem exists due, in part, to conditions associated with the deep-water ship channel for the Port of Stockton, California. This paper briefly discusses the hydrodynamic and particle tracking models being used and the three applications. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  2. Induced Polarization with Electromagnetic Coupling: 3D Spectral Imaging Theory, EMSP Project No. 73836

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, F. Dale; Sogade, John

    2004-12-14

    This project was designed as a broad foundational study of spectral induced polarization (SIP) for characterization of contaminated sites. It encompassed laboratory studies of the effects of chemistry on induced polarization, development of 3D forward modeling and inversion codes, and investigations of inductive and capacitive coupling problems. In the laboratory part of the project a physico-chemical model developed in this project was used to invert laboratory IP spectra for the grain size and the effective grain size distribution of the sedimentary rocks as well as the formation factor, porosity, specific surface area, and the apparent fractal dimension. Furthermore, it was established that the IP response changed with the solution chemistry, the concentration of a given solution chemistry, valence of the constituent ions, and ionic radius. In the field part of the project, a 3D complex forward and inverse model was developed. It was used to process data acquired at two frequencies (1/16 Hz and 1/ 4Hz) in a cross-borehole configuration at the A-14 outfall area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) during March 2003 and June 2004. The chosen SRS site was contaminated with Tetrachloroethylene (TCE) and Trichloroethylene (PCE) that were disposed in this area for several decades till the 1980s. The imaginary conductivity produced from the inverted 2003 data correlated very well with the log10 (PCE) concentration derived from point sampling at 1 ft spacing in five ground-truth boreholes drilled after the data acquisition. The equivalent result for the 2004 data revealed that there were significant contaminant movements during the period March 2003 and June 2004, probably related to ground-truth activities and nearby remediation activities. Therefore SIP was successfully used to develop conceptual models of volume distributions of PCE/TCE contamination. In addition, the project developed non-polarizing electrodes that can be deployed in boreholes for years. A total of 28

  3. Coupling Hydrologic and Hydrodynamic Models to Estimate PMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, G.; Weingartner, R.

    2015-12-01

    Most sophisticated probable maximum flood (PMF) estimations derive the PMF from the probable maximum precipitation (PMP) by applying deterministic hydrologic models calibrated with observed data. This method is based on the assumption that the hydrological system is stationary, meaning that the system behaviour during the calibration period or the calibration event is presumed to be the same as it is during the PMF. However, as soon as a catchment-specific threshold is reached, the system is no longer stationary. At or beyond this threshold, retention areas, new flow paths, and changing runoff processes can strongly affect downstream peak discharge. These effects can be accounted for by coupling hydrologic and hydrodynamic models, a technique that is particularly promising when the expected peak discharge may considerably exceed the observed maximum discharge. In such cases, the coupling of hydrologic and hydraulic models has the potential to significantly increase the physical plausibility of PMF estimations. This procedure ensures both that the estimated extreme peak discharge does not exceed the physical limit based on riverbed capacity and that the dampening effect of inundation processes on peak discharge is considered. Our study discusses the prospect of considering retention effects on PMF estimations by coupling hydrologic and hydrodynamic models. This method is tested by forcing PREVAH, a semi-distributed deterministic hydrological model, with randomly generated, physically plausible extreme precipitation patterns. The resulting hydrographs are then used to externally force the hydraulic model BASEMENT-ETH (riverbed in 1D, potential inundation areas in 2D). Finally, the PMF estimation results obtained using the coupled modelling approach are compared to the results obtained using ordinary hydrologic modelling.

  4. 3-D GRMHD Simulations of Disk-Jet Coupling and Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Fuerst, S.; Wu, K.; Hardee, P.; Richardson, G.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-11-01

    We have performed a fully three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulation of jet formation from a thin accretion disk around a Schwarzschild black hole with a free-falling corona. The initial simulation results show that a bipolar jet (velocity ~ 0.3c) is created as shown by previous two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations with mirror symmetry at the equator. The 3-D simulation ran over one hundred light-crossing time units (τS = rS/c where rS ≡ 2GM/c2) which is considerably longer than the previous simulations. We show that the jet is initially formed as predicted due in part to magnetic pressure from the twisting the initially uniform magnetic field and from gas pressure associated with shock formation in the region around r = 3rS. At later times, the accretion disk becomes thick and the jet fades resulting in a wind that is ejected from the surface of the thickened (torus-like) disk. It should be noted that no streaming matter from a donor is included at the outer boundary in the simulation (an isolated black hole not binary black hole). The wind flows outwards with a wider angle than the initial jet. The widening of the jet is consistent with the outward moving torsional Alfvén waves (TAWs). This evolution of disk-jet coupling suggests that the jet fades with a thickened accretion disk due to the lack of streaming material from an accompanying star. We have also calculated the free-free emission from a disk/outflow near a rotating black hole using our axisymmetric GRMHD simulation using a covariant radiative transfer formulation. Our calculation shows radiation from a shock, and hence the disk-jet coupling region is observable.

  5. 3D simulations of gas puff effects on edge density and ICRF coupling in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Bobkov, V.; Lunt, T.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Coster, D.; Bilato, R.; Jacquet, P.; Brida, D.; Feng, Y.; Wolfrum, E.; Guimarais, L.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-03-01

    In recent experiments, a local gas puff was found to be an effective way to tailor the scrape-off layer (SOL) density and improve the ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) power coupling in tokamaks. In order to quantitatively reproduce these experiments, to understand the corresponding physics and to optimize the gas valve positions and rates, simulations were carried out with the 3D edge plasma transport code EMC3-EIRENE in ASDEX Upgrade. An inter-ELM phase of an H-mode discharge with a moderate gas puff rate (1.2  ×  1022 electrons s-1) is used in our simulations. We simulated cases with gas puff in the lower divertor, the outer mid-plane and the top of the machine while keeping other conditions the same. Compared with the lower divertor gas puff, the outer mid-plane gas puff can increase the local density in front of the antennas most effectively, while a toroidally uniform but significantly smaller enhancement is found for the top gas puff. Good agreement between our simulations and experiments is obtained. With further simulations, the mechanisms of SOL density tailoring via local gas puffing and the strategies of gas puff optimization are discussed in the paper.

  6. An example of neutronic penalizations in reactivity transient analysis using 3D coupled chain HEMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, F.; Normand, B.; Sargeni, A.

    2012-07-01

    HEMERA (Highly Evolutionary Methods for Extensive Reactor Analyses), is a fully coupled 3D computational chain developed jointly by IRSN and CEA. It is composed of CRONOS2 (core neutronics, cross sections library from APOLLO2), FLICA4 (core thermal-hydraulics) and the system code CATHARE. Multi-level and multi-dimensional models are developed to account for neutronics, core thermal-hydraulics, fuel thermal analysis and system thermal-hydraulics, dedicated to best-estimate, conservative simulations and sensitivity analysis. In IRSN, the HEMERA chain is widely used to study several types of reactivity accidents and for sensitivity studies. Just as an example of the HEMERA possibilities, we present here two types of neutronic penalizations and their impact on a power transient due to a REA (Rod Ejection Accident): in the first one, we studied a bum-up distribution modification and in the second one, a delayed-neutron fraction modification. Both modifications are applied to the whole core or localized in a few assemblies. Results show that it is possible to use global or local changes but 1) in case of bum-up modification, the total core power can increase when assembly peak power decrease so, care has to be taken if the goal is to maximize a local power peak and 2) for delayed-neutron fraction, a local modification can have the same effect as the one on the whole core, provided that it is large enough. (authors)

  7. Verification Test Suite (VERTS) For Rail Gun Applications using ALE3D: 2-D Hydrodynamics & Thermal Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, F M; Solberg, J; White, D

    2008-04-17

    A verification test suite has been assessed with primary focus on low reynolds number flow of liquid metals. This is representative of the interface between the armature and rail in gun applications. The computational multiphysics framework, ALE3D, is used. The main objective of the current study is to provide guidance and gain confidence in the results obtained with ALE3D. A verification test suite based on 2-D cases is proposed and includes the lid-driven cavity and the Couette flow are investigated. The hydro and thermal fields are assumed to be steady and laminar in nature. Results are compared with analytical solutions and previously published data. Mesh resolution studies are performed along with various models for the equation of state.

  8. Scaling and performance of a 3-D radiation hydrodynamics code on message-passing parallel computers: final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J C; Norman, M

    1999-10-28

    This report details an investigation into the efficacy of two approaches to solving the radiation diffusion equation within a radiation hydrodynamic simulation. Because leading-edge scientific computing platforms have evolved from large single-node vector processors to parallel aggregates containing tens to thousands of individual CPU's, the ability of an algorithm to maintain high compute efficiency when distributed over a large array of nodes is critically important. The viability of an algorithm thus hinges upon the tripartite question of numerical accuracy, total time to solution, and parallel efficiency.

  9. Detection of unlabeled particles in the low micrometer size range using light scattering and hydrodynamic 3D focusing in a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Guisheng; Jensen, Thomas G; Kutter, Jörg P

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we describe a microfluidic device composed of integrated microoptical elements and a two-layer microchannel structure for highly sensitive light scattering detection of micro/submicrometer-sized particles. In the two-layer microfluidic system, a sample flow stream is first constrained in the out-of-plane direction into a narrow sheet, and then focused in-plane into a small core region, obtaining on-chip three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing. All the microoptical elements, including waveguides, microlens, and fiber-to-waveguide couplers, and the in-plane focusing channels are fabricated in one SU-8 layer by standard photolithography. The channels for out-of-plane focusing are made in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer by a single cast using a SU-8 master. Numerical and experimental results indicate that the device can realize 3D hydrodynamic focusing reliably over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (0.5 < Re < 20). Polystyrene particles of three sizes (2, 1, and 0.5 μm) were measured in the microfluidic device with integrated optics, demonstrating the feasibility of this approach to detect particles in the low micrometer size range by light scattering detection. PMID:22740459

  10. A Generalized Hydrodynamics Model for Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaw, Abdourahmane; Murillo, Michael Sean

    2015-11-01

    Starting with the equations of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy, we obtain the density, momentum and stress tensor-moment equations. The closure proceeds in two steps. The first that guarantees an equilibrium state is given by density functional theory. It ensures self consistency in the equation-of-state properties of the plasma. The second involves modifying the two-body distribution function to include collisions in the relaxation of the stress tensor. The resulting generalized hydrodynamics thus includes all impacts of Coulomb coupling, viscous damping, and the high-frequency response. We compare our results with those of several known models, including generalized hydrodynamic theory and models obtained using the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander approximation and the quasi-localized charge approximation. We find that the viscoelastic response, including both the high-frequency elastic generalization and viscous wave damping, is important for correctly describing ion-acoustic waves. We illustrate this result by considering three very different systems: ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, and dense plasmas. The new model is validated by comparing its results with those obtained from molecular-dynamics simulations of Yukawa plasmas, and the agreement is excellent. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant No. FA9550-12-1-0344).

  11. On Evaluating circulation and temperature stratification under changing water levels in Lake Mead with a 3D hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Acharya, K.; Chen, D.; Stone, M.; Yu, Z.; Young, M.; Zhu, J.; Shafer, D. S.; Warwick, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    Sustained drought in the western United States since 2000 has led to a significant drop (about 35 meters) in the water level of Lake Mead, the largest reservoir by volume in United States. The drought combined with rapid urban development in southern Nevada and emergence of invasive species has threatened the water quality and ecological processes in Lake Mead. A three-dimensional hydrodynamic model, Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC), was applied to investigate lake circulation and temperature stratification in parts of Lake Mead (Las Vegas Bay and Boulder Basin) under changing water levels. Besides the inflow from Las Vegas Wash and the Colorado River, the model considered atmospheric changes as well as the boundary conditions restricted by the operation of Hoover Dam. The model was calibrated and verified by using observed data including water level, velocity, and temperature from 2003 and 2005. The model was applied to study the hydrodynamic processes at water level 366.8 m (year 2000) and at water level 338.2 m (year 2008). The high-stage simulation described the pre-drought lake hydrodynamic processes while the low-stage simulation highlighted the drawdown impact on such processes. The results showed that both inflow and wind-driven mixing process played major roles in the thermal stratification and lake circulation in both cases. However, the atmospheric boundary played a more important role than inflow temperature on thermal stratification of Lake Mead during water level decline. Further, the thermal stratification regime and flow circulation pattern in shallow lake regions (e.g.., the Boulder Basin area) were most impacted. The temperature of the lake at the high-stage was more sensitive to inflow temperatures than at low-stage. Furthermore, flow velocities decreased with the decreasing water level due to reduction in wind impacts, particularly in shallow areas of the lake. Such changes in temperature and lake current due to present drought have a

  12. Dynamic coupling between fluid flow and vein growth in fractures: a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J.-O.; Enzmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid flow is one of the main mass transport mechanisms in the Earth's crust and abundant mineral vein networks are important indicators for fluid flow and fluid rock interaction. These systems are dynamic and part of the so called RTM processes (reaction-transport-mechanics). Understanding of mineral vein systems requires coupling of these processes. Here we present a conceptional model for dynamic vein growth of syntaxial, posttectonic veins generated by advective fluid flow and show first results of a numerical model for this scenario. Vein generation requires three processes to occur: (i) fracture generation by mechanical stress e.g. hydro-fracturing, (ii) flow of a supersaturated fluid on that fracture and (iii) crystallization of phase(s) on or in the fracture. 3D synthetic fractures are generated with the SynFrac code (Ogilvie, et al. 2006). Subsequently solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation for this fracture are computed by a computational fluid dynamics code called GeoDict (Wiegmann 2007). Transport (advective and diffusive) of chemical species to growth sites in the fracture and vein growth are computed by a self-written MATLAB script. The numerical model discretizes the wall rock and fracture geometry by volumetric pixels (voxels). Based on this representation, the model computes the three basic functions for vein generation: (a) nucleation, (b) fluid flow with transport of chemical species and (c) growth. The following conditions were chosen for these three modules. Nucleation is heterogeneous and occurs instantaneously at the wall rock/fracture interface. Advective and diffusive flow of a supersaturated fluid and related transport of chemical species occurs according to the computed fluid flow field by GeoDict. Concentration of chemical species at the inflow is constant, representing external fluid buffering. Changes/decrease in the concentration of chemical species occurs only due to vein growth. Growth of nuclei is limited either by transport of

  13. 3-D GRMHD Simulations of Disk-Jet Coupling and Associated Variabilities and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K. I.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed the fully three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulation of jet formation from a thin accretion disk around a Schwarzschild black hole with a free-falling corona. The initial simulation results show that a bipolar jet is created as shown by previous two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations with mirror symmetry at the equator. The 3-D simulation ran over one hundred light-crossing time units which is considerably longer than the previous simulations. We show that the jet is initially formed as predicted due in part to magnetic pressure from the twisting the initially uniform magnetic field and from gas pressure associated with shock formation in the region around r = 3 r_S. At later times, the accretion disk becomes thick and the jet fades resulting in a wind that is ejected from the surface of the thickened (torus-like) disk. It should be noted that no streaming matter from a donor is included at the outer boundary in the simulation (an isolated black hole not binary black hole). The wind flows outwards with a wider angle than the initial jet. The widening of the jet is consistent with the outward moving torsional Alfven waves (TAWs). This evolution of disk-jet coupling suggests that the jet fades with a thickened accretion disk due to the lack of streaming material from an accompanying star. We will report initial results of emission calculated based on simulations with Kerr metric using a new ray-tracing method developed by S. Feurst and K. Wu. Images include free-free emission, absorption, and electron scattering. Fluorescent iron line emission and its variabilities from black holes will also be calculated based on simulation results.

  14. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, 3D Cloud-Resolving Model and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional singlecolumn models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from Merent geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloudscale model (termed a super-parameterization or multiscale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameteridon NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D Goddard cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF in being developed and production nms will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), (3) A cloud library generated by Goddard MMF, and 3D GCE model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  15. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, 3D Cloud-Resolving Model and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud- resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF in being developed and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes, ( 2 ) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), (3) A cloud library generated by Goddard MMF, and 3D GCE model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  16. 3-D Surface Depression Profiling Using High Frequency Focused Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Kautz, Harold E.; Abel, Phillip B.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. This article shows quantitative surface topography profiles as obtained using only high-frequency focused air-coupled ultrasonic pulses. The profiles were obtained using a profiling system developed by NASA Glenn Research Center and Sonix, Inc (via a formal cooperative agreement). (The air transducers are available as off-the-shelf items from several companies.) The method is simple and reproducible because it relies mainly on knowledge and constancy of the sound velocity through the air. The air transducer is scanned across the surface and sends pulses to the sample surface where they are reflected back from the surface along the same path as the incident wave. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface are acquired and converted to depth/surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in air (V). The system has the ability to resolve surface depression variations as small as 25 microns, is useable over a 1.4 mm vertical depth range, and can profile large areas only limited by the scan limits of the particular ultrasonic system. (Best-case depth resolution is 0.25 microns which may be achievable with improved isolation from vibration and air currents.) The method using an optimized configuration is reasonably rapid and has all quantitative analysis facilities on-line including 2-D and 3-D visualization capability, extreme value filtering (for faulty data), and leveling capability. Air-coupled surface profilometry is applicable to plate-like and curved samples. In this article, results are shown for several proof-of-concept samples, plastic samples burned in microgravity on the STS-54 space shuttle mission, and a partially-coated cylindrical ceramic

  17. A generic semi-implicit coupling methodology for use in RELAP5-3D{copyright}

    SciTech Connect

    Aumiller, D.L.; Tomlinson, E.T.; Weaver, W.L.

    2000-09-01

    A generic semi-implicit coupling methodology has been developed and implemented in the RELAP5-3D{copyright} computer program. This methodology allows RELAP5-3D{copyright} to be used with other computer programs to perform integrated analyses of nuclear power reactor systems and related experimental facilities. The coupling methodology potentially allows different programs to be used to model different portions of the system. The programs are chosen based on their capability to model the phenomena that are important in the simulation in the various portions of the system being considered. The methodology was demonstrated using a test case in which the test geometry was divided into two parts each of which was solved as a RELAP5-3D{copyright} simulation. This test problem exercised all of the semi-implicit coupling features which were installed in RELAP5-3D0. The results of this verification test case show that the semi-implicit coupling methodology produces the same answer as the simulation of the test system as a single process.

  18. Fully-coupled analysis of jet mixing problems. Three-dimensional PNS model, SCIP3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, D. E.; Sinha, N.; Dash, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical procedures formulated for the analysis of 3D jet mixing problems, as incorporated in the computer model, SCIP3D, are described. The overall methodology closely parallels that developed in the earlier 2D axisymmetric jet mixing model, SCIPVIS. SCIP3D integrates the 3D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) jet mixing equations, cast in mapped cartesian or cylindrical coordinates, employing the explicit MacCormack Algorithm. A pressure split variant of this algorithm is employed in subsonic regions with a sublayer approximation utilized for treating the streamwise pressure component. SCIP3D contains both the ks and kW turbulence models, and employs a two component mixture approach to treat jet exhausts of arbitrary composition. Specialized grid procedures are used to adjust the grid growth in accordance with the growth of the jet, including a hybrid cartesian/cylindrical grid procedure for rectangular jets which moves the hybrid coordinate origin towards the flow origin as the jet transitions from a rectangular to circular shape. Numerous calculations are presented for rectangular mixing problems, as well as for a variety of basic unit problems exhibiting overall capabilities of SCIP3D.

  19. Turbulence in strongly coupled dusty plasmas using generalized hydrodynamic description

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Dharodi, Vikram Singh; Das, Amita; Patel, Bhavesh G.; Kaw, Predhiman

    2015-02-15

    The properties of decaying turbulence have been studied with the help of a Generalized Hydrodynamic (GHD) fluid model in the context of strongly coupled dusty plasma medium in two dimensions. The GHD model treats the strongly coupled dusty plasma system as a visco-elastic medium. The incompressible limit of the GHD model is considered here. The studies carried out here are, however, applicable to a wider class of visco-elastic systems, and are not merely confined to the dusty plasma medium. Our simulations studies show that an initial spectrum that is confined in a limited domain of wave numbers becomes broad, even when the Reynold's number is much less than the critical value required for the onset of turbulence in Newtonian fluids. This is a signature of elastic turbulence, where Weissenberg's number also plays an important role on the onset of turbulence. This feature has been observed in several experiments. It is also shown that the existence of memory relaxation time parameter and the transverse shear wave inhibit the normal process (for 2-D systems) of inverse spectral cascade in this case. A detailed simulation study has been carried out for the understanding of this inhibition.

  20. HIFI-C: a robust and fast method for determining NMR couplings from adaptive 3D to 2D projections.

    PubMed

    Cornilescu, Gabriel; Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L; Eghbalnia, Hamid R

    2007-08-01

    We describe a novel method for the robust, rapid, and reliable determination of J couplings in multi-dimensional NMR coupling data, including small couplings from larger proteins. The method, "High-resolution Iterative Frequency Identification of Couplings" (HIFI-C) is an extension of the adaptive and intelligent data collection approach introduced earlier in HIFI-NMR. HIFI-C collects one or more optimally tilted two-dimensional (2D) planes of a 3D experiment, identifies peaks, and determines couplings with high resolution and precision. The HIFI-C approach, demonstrated here for the 3D quantitative J method, offers vital features that advance the goal of rapid and robust collection of NMR coupling data. (1) Tilted plane residual dipolar couplings (RDC) data are collected adaptively in order to offer an intelligent trade off between data collection time and accuracy. (2) Data from independent planes can provide a statistical measure of reliability for each measured coupling. (3) Fast data collection enables measurements in cases where sample stability is a limiting factor (for example in the presence of an orienting medium required for residual dipolar coupling measurements). (4) For samples that are stable, or in experiments involving relatively stronger couplings, robust data collection enables more reliable determinations of couplings in shorter time, particularly for larger biomolecules. As a proof of principle, we have applied the HIFI-C approach to the 3D quantitative J experiment to determine N-C' RDC values for three proteins ranging from 56 to 159 residues (including a homodimer with 111 residues in each subunit). A number of factors influence the robustness and speed of data collection. These factors include the size of the protein, the experimental set up, and the coupling being measured, among others. To exhibit a lower bound on robustness and the potential for time saving, the measurement of dipolar couplings for the N-C' vector represents a realistic

  1. Coupled Neutron-Photon, 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry, Time Dependent, Monte Carlo Transport Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-06-24

    Version 07 TART2012 is a coupled neutron-photon Monte Carlo transport code designed to use three-dimensional (3-D) combinatorial geometry. Neutron and/or photon sources as well as neutron induced photon production can be tracked. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART2012 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared tomore » other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART2012 extends the general utility of the code to even more areas of application than available in previous releases by concentrating on improving the physics, particularly with regard to improved treatment of neutron fission, resonance self-shielding, molecular binding, and extending input options used by the code. Several utilities are included for creating input files and displaying TART results and data. TART2012 uses the latest ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, data. New for TART2012 is the use of continuous energy neutron cross sections, in addition to its traditional multigroup cross sections. For neutron interaction, the data are derived using ENDF-ENDL2005 and include both continuous energy cross sections and 700 group neutron data derived using a combination of ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, and ENDL data. The 700 group structure extends from 10-5 eV up to 1 GeV. Presently nuclear data are only available up to 20 MeV, so that only 616 of the groups are currently used. For photon interaction, 701 point photon data were derived using the Livermore EPDL97 file. The new 701 point structure extends from 100 eV up to 1 GeV, and is currently used over this entire energy range. TART2012 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that one use only the most recent version of TART2012 and its data files. Check author’s homepage for related information: http

  2. HIGH-TEMPERATURE PROCESSING OF SOLIDS THROUGH SOLAR NEBULAR BOW SHOCKS: 3D RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATIONS WITH PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, A. C.; Morris, M. A.; Desch, S. J.

    2013-10-20

    A fundamental, unsolved problem in solar system formation is explaining the melting and crystallization of chondrules found in chondritic meteorites. Theoretical models of chondrule melting in nebular shocks have been shown to be consistent with many aspects of thermal histories inferred for chondrules from laboratory experiments; but, the mechanism driving these shocks is unknown. Planetesimals and planetary embryos on eccentric orbits can produce bow shocks as they move supersonically through the disk gas, and are one possible source of chondrule-melting shocks. We investigate chondrule formation in bow shocks around planetoids through three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. A new radiation transport algorithm that combines elements of flux-limited diffusion and Monte Carlo methods is used to capture the complexity of radiative transport around bow shocks. An equation of state that includes the rotational, vibrational, and dissociation modes of H{sub 2} is also used. Solids are followed directly in the simulations and their thermal histories are recorded. Adiabatic expansion creates rapid cooling of the gas, and tail shocks behind the embryo can cause secondary heating events. Radiative transport is efficient, and bow shocks around planetoids can have luminosities ∼few× 10{sup –8} L{sub ☉}. While barred and radial chondrule textures could be produced in the radiative shocks explored here, porphyritic chondrules may only be possible in the adiabatic limit. We present a series of predicted cooling curves that merit investigation in laboratory experiments to determine whether the solids produced by bow shocks are represented in the meteoritic record by chondrules or other solids.

  3. Large-eddy simulations of 3D Taylor-Green vortex: comparison of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, Lattice Boltzmann and Finite Volume methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajzer, A.; Pozorski, J.; Szewc, K.

    2014-08-01

    In the paper we present Large-eddy simulation (LES) results of 3D Taylor- Green vortex obtained by the three different computational approaches: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) and Finite Volume Method (FVM). The Smagorinsky model was chosen as a subgrid-scale closure in LES for all considered methods and a selection of spatial resolutions have been investigated. The SPH and LBM computations have been carried out with the use of the in-house codes executed on GPU and compared, for validation purposes, with the FVM results obtained using the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM. A comparative study in terms of one-point statistics and turbulent energy spectra shows a good agreement of LES results for all methods. An analysis of the GPU code efficiency and implementation difficulties has been made. It is shown that both SPH and LBM may offer a significant advantage over mesh-based CFD methods.

  4. A microfluidic opto-caloric switch for sorting of particles by using 3D-hydrodynamic focusing based on SLE fabrication capabilities.

    PubMed

    Meineke, G; Hermans, M; Klos, J; Lenenbach, A; Noll, R

    2016-03-01

    In a miniaturised flow switch fluid flows are controlled by reducing the local viscosity via absorption of laser radiation. Through this, the local flow rates are increased to switch the outlet port of a fluid flow carrying the analyte. The microfluidic chip is fabricated using Selective Laser-Induced Etching (SLE). SLE allows novel 3D-hydrodynamic focusing, realising circular shaped channel cross-sections and adapting interaction volume geometries to the profile of the laser radiation for optimised absorption. The performance of the switch is validated experimentally with a dyed analyte and video image processing. The ability to sort particles like cells is demonstrated at 8 Hz using polystyrene beads having a diameter of 8 μm. PMID:26862603

  5. 3D thermal modeling of TRISO fuel coupled with neutronic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jianwei; Uddin, Rizwan

    2010-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Gas Reactor (VHTR) is widely considered as one of the top candidates identified in the Next Generation Nuclear Power-plant (NGNP) Technology Roadmap under the U.S . Depanment of Energy's Generation IV program. TRlSO particle is a common element among different VHTR designs and its performance is critical to the safety and reliability of the whole reactor. A TRISO particle experiences complex thermo-mechanical changes during reactor operation in high temperature and high burnup conditions. TRISO fuel performance analysis requires evaluation of these changes on micro scale. Since most of these changes are temperature dependent, 3D thermal modeling of TRISO fuel is a crucial step of the whole analysis package. In this paper, a 3D numerical thermal model was developed to calculate temperature distribution inside TRISO and pebble under different scenarios. 3D simulation is required because pebbles or TRISOs are always subjected to asymmetric thermal conditions since they are randomly packed together. The numerical model was developed using finite difference method and it was benchmarked against ID analytical results and also results reported from literature. Monte-Carlo models were set up to calculate radial power density profile. Complex convective boundary condition was applied on the pebble outer surface. Three reactors were simulated using this model to calculate temperature distribution under different power levels. Two asymmetric boundary conditions were applied to the pebble to test the 3D capabilities. A gas bubble was hypothesized inside the TRISO kernel and 3D simulation was also carried out under this scenario. Intuition-coherent results were obtained and reported in this paper.

  6. Simulation of unsteady state performance of a secondary air system by the 1D-3D-Structure coupled method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Li, Peng; Li, Yulong

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the calculation method for unsteady state conditions in the secondary air systems in gas turbines. The 1D-3D-Structure coupled method was applied. A 1D code was used to model the standard components that have typical geometric characteristics. Their flow and heat transfer were described by empirical correlations based on experimental data or CFD calculations. A 3D code was used to model the non-standard components that cannot be described by typical geometric languages, while a finite element analysis was carried out to compute the structural deformation and heat conduction at certain important positions. These codes were coupled through their interfaces. Thus, the changes in heat transfer and structure and their interactions caused by exterior disturbances can be reflected. The results of the coupling method in an unsteady state showed an apparent deviation from the existing data, while the results in the steady state were highly consistent with the existing data. The difference in the results in the unsteady state was caused primarily by structural deformation that cannot be predicted by the 1D method. Thus, in order to obtain the unsteady state performance of a secondary air system more accurately and efficiently, the 1D-3D-Structure coupled method should be used.

  7. Analysis of riverine suspended particulate matter fluxes (Gulf of Lion, Mediterranean Sea) using a synergy of ocean color observations with a 3-D hydrodynamic sediment transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fouest, Vincent; Chami, Malik; Verney, Romaric

    2015-02-01

    The export of riverine suspended particulate matter (SPM) in the coastal ocean has major implications for the biogeochemical cycles. In the Mediterranean Sea (France), the Rhone River inputs of SPM into the Gulf of Lion (GoL) are highly variable in time, which severely impedes the assessment of SPM fluxes. The objectives of this study are (i) to investigate the prediction of the land-to-ocean flux of SPM using the complementarity (i.e., synergy) between a hydrodynamic sediment transport model and satellite observations, and (ii) to analyze the spatial distribution of the SPM export. An original approach that combines the MARS-3D model with satellite ocean color data is proposed. Satellite-derived SPM and light penetration depth are used to initialize MARS-3D and to validate its predictions. A sensitivity analysis is performed to quantify the impact of riverine SPM size composition and settling rate on the horizontal export of SPM. The best agreement between the model and the satellite in terms of SPM spatial distribution and export is obtained for two conditions: (i) when the relative proportion of "heavy and fast" settling particles significantly increases relative to the "light and slow" ones, and (ii) when the settling rate of heavy and light SPM increases by fivefold. The synergy between MARS-3D and the satellite data improved the SPM flux predictions by 48% near the Rhone River mouth. Our results corroborate the importance of implementing satellite observations within initialization procedures of ocean models since data assimilation techniques may fail for river floods showing strong seasonal variability.

  8. A 3-D variational assimilation scheme in coupled transport-biogeochemical models: Forecast of Mediterranean biogeochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teruzzi, Anna; Dobricic, Srdjan; Solidoro, Cosimo; Cossarini, Gianpiero

    2014-01-01

    Increasing attention is dedicated to the implementation of suitable marine forecast systems for the estimate of the state of the ocean. Within the framework of the European MyOcean infrastructure, the pre-existing short-term Mediterranean Sea biogeochemistry operational forecast system has been upgraded by assimilating remotely sensed ocean color data in the coupled transport-biogeochemical model OPATM-BFM using a 3-D variational data assimilation (3D-VAR) procedure. In the present work, the 3D-VAR scheme is used to correct the four phytoplankton functional groups included in the OPATM-BFM in the period July 2007 to September 2008. The 3D-VAR scheme decomposes the error covariance matrix using a sequence of different operators that account separately for vertical covariance, horizontal covariance, and covariance among biogeochemical variables. The assimilation solution is found in a reduced dimensional space, and the innovation for the biogeochemical variables is obtained by the sequential application of the covariance operators. Results show a general improvement in the forecast skill, providing a correction of the basin-scale bias of surface chlorophyll concentration and of the local-scale spatial and temporal dynamics of typical bloom events. Further, analysis of the assimilation skill provides insights into the functioning of the model. The computational costs of the assimilation scheme adopted are low compared to other assimilation techniques, and its modular structure facilitates further developments. The 3D-VAR scheme results especially suitable for implementation within a biogeochemistry operational forecast system.

  9. 3-D Modelling of Electromagnetic, Thermal, Mechanical and Metallurgical Couplings in Metal Forming Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Chenot, Jean-Loup; Bay, Francois

    2007-04-07

    The different stages of metal forming processes often involve - beyond the mechanical deformations processes - other physical coupled problems, such as heat transfer, electromagnetism or metallurgy. The purpose of this paper is to focus on problems involving electromagnetic couplings. After a brief recall on electromagnetic modeling, we shall then focus on induction heating processes and present some results regarding heat transfer, as well as mechanical couplings. A case showing coupling for metallurgic microstructure evolution will conclude this paper.

  10. Design and performance of a fiber array coupled multi-channel photon counting, 3D imaging, airborne lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Genghua; Shu, Rong; Hou, Libing; Li, Ming

    2014-06-01

    Photon counting lidar has an ultra-high sensitivity which can be hundreds even thousands of times higher than the linear detection lidar. It can significantly increase the system's capability of detection rang and imaging density, saving size and power consumings in airborne or space-borne applications. Based on Geiger-mode Si avalanche photodiodes (Si-APD), a prototype photon counting lidar which used 8 APDs coupled with a 1×8-pixel fiber array has been made in June, 2011. The experiments with static objects showed that the photon counting lidar could operate in strong solar background with 0.04 receiving photoelectrons on average. Limited by less counting times in moving platforms, the probability of detection and the 3D imaging density would be lower than that in static platforms. In this paper, a latest fiber array coupled multi-channel photon counting, 3D imaging, airborne lidar system is introduced. The correlation range receiver algorithm of photon counting 3D imaging is improved for airborne signal photon events extraction and noise filter. The 3D imaging experiments in the helicopter shows that the false alarm rate is less than 6×10-7, and the correct rate is better than 99.9% with 4 received photoelectrons and 0.7MHz system noise on average.

  11. 3D dust clouds (Yukawa Balls) in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Melzer, A.; Passvogel, M.; Miksch, T.; Ikkurthi, V. R.; Schneider, R.; Block, D.; Piel, A.

    2010-06-16

    Three-dimensional finite systems of charged dust particles confined to concentric spherical shells in a dusty plasma, so-called 'Yukawa balls', have been studied with respect to their static and dynamic properties. Here, we review the charging of particles in a dusty plasma discharge by computer simulations and the respective particle arrangements. The normal mode spectrum of Yukawa balls is measured from the 3D thermal Brownian motion of the dust particles around their equilibrium positions.

  12. Moment coupling in the interaction of atoms and their ions with a 3d-electron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarim, A. V.; Smirnov, B. M.; Capitelli, M.; Laricchiuta, A.

    2011-09-15

    The moment coupling of an interacting ion and an atom with a 3d-electron shell is analyzed for the ground state of identical atoms and ions where resonant charge exchange proceeds with transition of a 4s-electron. The interaction of the ion charge with the atom quadrupole moment is important for this system along with the exchange interactions and spin-orbit interactions inside an isolated atom and an ion. The quadrupole moment for 3d-atoms in the ground states is evaluated. The hierarchy of interactions in a molecular ion is analyzed depending on ion-atom distances and is compared with the standard Hund scheme. The resonant charge exchange proceeds effectively at separations corresponding to an intermediate case between cases 'a' and 'c' of the Hund coupling scheme.

  13. European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR) SAR ATWS Accident Analyses by using 3D Code Internal Coupling Method

    SciTech Connect

    Gagner, Renata; Lafitte, Helene; Dormeau, Pascal; Stoudt, Roger H.

    2004-07-01

    Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) accident analyses make part of the Safety Analysis Report of the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR), covering Risk Reduction Category A (Core Melt Prevention) events. This paper deals with three of the most penalizing RRC-A sequences of ATWS caused by mechanical blockage of the control/shutdown rods, regarding their consequences on the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) and core integrity. A new 3D code internal coupling calculation method has been introduced. (authors)

  14. Some recent advances in 3D crack and contact analysis of elastic solids with transverse isotropy and multifield coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Qiu

    2015-10-01

    Significant progress has been made in mixed boundary-value problems associated with three-dimensional (3D) crack and contact analyses of advanced materials featuring more complexities compared to the conventional isotropic elastic materials. These include material anisotropy and multifield coupling, two typical characteristics of most current multifunctional materials. In this paper we try to present a state-of-the-art description of 3D exact/analytical solutions derived for crack and contact problems of elastic solids with both transverse isotropy and multifield coupling in the latest decade by the potential theory method in the spirit of V. I. Fabrikant, whose ingenious breakthrough brings new vigor and vitality to the old research subject of classical potential theory. We are particularly interested in crack and contact problems with certain nonlinear features. Emphasis is also placed on the coupling between the temperature field (or the like) and other physical fields (e.g., elastic, electric, and magnetic fields). We further highlight the practical significance of 3D contact solutions, in particular in applications related to modern scanning probe microscopes.

  15. Forcing Ferromagnetic Coupling Between Rare-Earth-Metal and 3d Ferromagnetic Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Biplab; Antoniak, Carolin; Burkert, Till; Krumme, Bernhard; Warland, Anne; Stromberg, Frank; Praetorius, Christian; Fauth, Kai; Wende, Heiko; Eriksson, Olle

    2010-04-01

    Using density functional calculations, we have studied the magnetic properties of nanocomposites composed of rare-earth-metal elements in contact with 3d transition metals (Fe and Cr). We demonstrate the possibility to obtain huge magnetic moments in such nanocomposites, of order 10μB/rare-earth-metalatom, with a potential to reach the maximum magnetic moment of Fe-Co alloys at the top of the so-called Slater-Pauling curve. A first experimental proof of concept is given by thin-film synthesis of Fe/Gd and Fe/Cr/Gd nanocomposites, in combination with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

  16. 3D multi-scale analysis of coupled heat and moisture transport and its parallel implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruis, Jaroslav

    2016-06-01

    Parallel implementation of two-scale model of coupled heat and moisture transport is described. The coupled heat and moisture transport is based on the Künzel model. Motivation for the two-scale analysis comes from the requirement to describe distribution of the relative humidity and temperature in historical masonry structures.

  17. Coupled aeroelastic oscillations of a turbine blade row in 3D transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnesin, Vitaly; Kolodyazhnaya, Lyubov; Rzadkowski, Romuald

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents the mutual time - marching method to predict the aeroelastic stability of an oscillating blade row in 3D transonic flow. The ideal gas flow through a blade row is governed by the time dependent Euler equations in conservative form which are integrated by using the explicit monotonous second order accurate Godunov-Kolgan finite volume scheme and moving hybrid H-O grid. The structure analysis uses the modal approach and 3D finite element dynamic model of blade. The blade movement is assumed as a linear combination of the first modes of blade natural oscillations with the modal coefficients depending on time. To demonstrate the capability and correctness of the method, two experimentally investigated test cases have been selected, in which the blades had performed tuned harmonic bending or torsional vibrations (The 1st and 4th standard configurations of the “Workshop on Aeroelasticity in Turbomachines” by Bolcs and Fransson, 1986). The calculated results of aeroelastic behaviour of the blade row (4th standard configuration), are presented over a wide frequency range under different start regimes of interblade phase angle.

  18. 2D fluid model analysis for the effect of 3D gas flow on a capacitively coupled plasma deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The wide applicability of capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) deposition has increased the interest in developing comprehensive numerical models, but CCP imposes a tremendous computational cost when conducting a transient analysis in a three-dimensional (3D) model which reflects the real geometry of reactors. In particular, the detailed flow features of reactive gases induced by 3D geometric effects need to be considered for the precise calculation of radical distribution of reactive species. Thus, an alternative inclusive method for the numerical simulation of CCP deposition is proposed to simulate a two-dimensional (2D) CCP model based on the 3D gas flow results by simulating flow, temperature, and species fields in a 3D space at first without calculating the plasma chemistry. A numerical study of a cylindrical showerhead-electrode CCP reactor was conducted for particular cases of SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film. The proposed methodology produces numerical results for a 300 mm wafer deposition reactor which agree very well with the deposition rate profile measured experimentally along the wafer radius.

  19. Progress and Challenges in Coupled Hydrodynamic-Ecological Estuarine Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical modeling has emerged over the last several decades as a widely accepted tool for investigations in environmental sciences. In estuarine research, hydrodynamic and ecological models have moved along parallel tracks with regard to complexity, refinement, computational po...

  20. Coupling between Microstrip Lines Embedded in Polyimide Layers for 3D-MMICs on Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Tentzeris, Emmanouil M.; Papapolymerou, John

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional circuits built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing SilSiGe monolithic microwavdmillimeter-wave integrated circuits on CMOS (low resistivity) Si wafers. However, the closely spaced transmission lines are susceptible to high levels of coupling, which degrades circuit performance. In this paper, Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis and measured characteristics of novel shielding structures that significantly reduce coupling between embedded microstrip lines are presented. A discussion of the electric and magnetic field distributions for the coupled microstrip lines is presented to provide a physical rationale for the presented results.

  1. Comparison of 3D kinetic and hydrodynamic models to ROSINA-COPS measurements of the neutral coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, Andre; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Calmonte, Ursina; Combi, Michael; De Keyser, Johan; Fiethe, Björn; Fougere, Nicolas; Fuselier, Stephen; Gasc, Sébastien; Gombosi, Tamas; Hansen, Kenneth; Hässig, Myrtha; Huang, Zhenguang; Jäckel, Annette; Jia, Xianzhe; Le Roy, Lena; Mall, Urs A.; Rème, Henri; Rubin, Martin; Tenishev, Valeriy; Tóth, Gábor; Tzou, Chia-Yu; Wurz, Peter

    2015-11-01

    67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) is a Jupiter-family comet and the object of investigation of the European Space Agency mission Rosetta. This report presents the first full 3D simulation results of 67P's neutral gas coma. In this study we include results from a direct simulation Monte Carlo method, a hydrodynamic code, and a purely geometric calculation which computes the total illuminated surface area on the nucleus. All models include the triangulated 3D shape model of 67P as well as realistic illumination and shadowing conditions. The basic concept is the assumption that these illumination conditions on the nucleus are the main driver for the gas activity of the comet. As a consequence, the total production rate of 67P varies as a function of solar insolation. The best agreement between the model and the data is achieved when gas fluxes on the night side are in the range of 7% to 10% of the maximum flux, accounting for contributions from the most volatile components. To validate the output of our numerical simulations we compare the results of all three models to in situ gas number density measurements from the ROSINA COPS instrument. We are able to reproduce the overall features of these local neutral number density measurements of ROSINA COPS for the time period between early August 2014 and January 1 2015 with all three models. Some details in the measurements are not reproduced and warrant further investigation and refinement of the models. However, the overall assumption that illumination conditions on the nucleus are at least an important driver of the gas activity is validated by the models. According to our simulation results we find the total production rate of 67P to be constant between August and November 2014 with a value of about 1 × 1026 molecules s-1.

  2. A Coupled Finite-Volume Model for 2-D Surface and 3-D Subsurface Flows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface-subsurface interactions are an intrinsic component of the hydrologic response within a watershed; therefore, hydrologic modeling tools should consider these interactions to provide reliable predictions, especially during rainfall-runoff processes. This paper presents a fully implicit coupled...

  3. Integrating sediment biogeochemistry into 3D oceanic models: A study of benthic-pelagic coupling in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capet, Arthur; Meysman, Filip J. R.; Akoumianaki, Ioanna; Soetaert, Karline; Grégoire, Marilaure

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) ecosystem models of shelf environments should properly account for the biogeochemical cycling within the sea floor. However, a full and explicit representation of sediment biogeochemistry into 3D ocean models is computationally demanding. Here, we describe a simplified approach to include benthic processes in 3D ocean models, which includes a parameterization of the different pathways for organic matter mineralization and allows for organic matter remobilization by bottom currents and waves. This efficient approach enables decadal simulations that resolve the inertial contribution of the sea floor to the biogeochemical cycling in shelf environments. The model was implemented to analyze the benthic-pelagic coupling in the northwestern shelf of the Black Sea. Three distinct biogeochemical provinces were identified on the basis of fluxes and rates associated with benthic-pelagic coupling. Our model simulations suitably capture the seasonal variability of in situ flux data as well as their regional variation, which stresses the importance of incorporating temporally varying sediment biogeochemistry and resuspension/redeposition cycles in shelf ecosystem models.

  4. The 3D split-ring cavity lattice: a new metastructure for engineering arrays of coupled microwave harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Tobar, Michael E.

    2015-02-01

    A new electromagnetic cavity structure, a lattice of 3D cavities consisting of an array of posts and gaps is presented. The individual cavity elements are based on the cylindrical re-entrant (or Klystron) cavity. We show that these cavities can also be thought of as 3D split-ring resonators, which is confirmed by applying symmetry transformations, each of which is an electromagnetic resonator with spatially separated magnetic and electric field. The characteristics of the cavity is used to mimic phonon behaviour of a one-dimensional (1D) chain of atoms. It is demonstrated how magnetic field coupling can lead to phonon-like dispersion curves with acoustical and optical branches. The system is able to reproduce a number of effects typical to 1D lattices exhibiting acoustic vibration, such as band gaps, phonon trapping, and effects of impurities. In addition, quasicrystal emulations predict the results expected from this class of ordered structures. The system is easily scalable to simulate two-dimensional and 3D lattices and shows a new way to engineer arrays of coupled microwave resonators with a variety of possible applications to hybrid quantum systems proposed.

  5. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines Embedded in Polyimide Layers for 3D-MMICs on Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Tentzeris, Emmanouil M.; Papapolymerou, John

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional circuits built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing Si/SiGe monolithic microwave/millimeter-wave integrated circuits on CMOS (low resistivity) Si wafers. However, the closely spaced transmission lines are susceptible to high levels of coupling, which degrades circuit performance. In this paper, Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis and measured characteristics of novel shielding structures that significantly reduce coupling between embedded microstrip lines are presented.

  6. Tightly Coupled Low Cost 3D RISS/GPS Integration Using a Mixture Particle Filter for Vehicular Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Georgy, Jacques; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2011-01-01

    Satellite navigation systems such as the global positioning system (GPS) are currently the most common technique used for land vehicle positioning. However, in GPS-denied environments, there is an interruption in the positioning information. Low-cost micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS)-based inertial sensors can be integrated with GPS and enhance the performance in denied GPS environments. The traditional technique for this integration problem is Kalman filtering (KF). Due to the inherent errors of low-cost MEMS inertial sensors and their large stochastic drifts, KF, with its linearized models, has limited capabilities in providing accurate positioning. Particle filtering (PF) was recently suggested as a nonlinear filtering technique to accommodate for arbitrary inertial sensor characteristics, motion dynamics and noise distributions. An enhanced version of PF called the Mixture PF is utilized in this study to perform tightly coupled integration of a three dimensional (3D) reduced inertial sensors system (RISS) with GPS. In this work, the RISS consists of one single-axis gyroscope and a two-axis accelerometer used together with the vehicle’s odometer to obtain 3D navigation states. These sensors are then integrated with GPS in a tightly coupled scheme. In loosely-coupled integration, at least four satellites are needed to provide acceptable GPS position and velocity updates for the integration filter. The advantage of the tightly-coupled integration is that it can provide GPS measurement update(s) even when the number of visible satellites is three or lower, thereby improving the operation of the navigation system in environments with partial blockages by providing continuous aiding to the inertial sensors even during limited GPS satellite availability. To effectively exploit the capabilities of PF, advanced modeling for the stochastic drift of the vertically aligned gyroscope is used. In order to benefit from measurement updates for such drift, which are

  7. Tightly coupled low cost 3D RISS/GPS integration using a mixture particle filter for vehicular navigation.

    PubMed

    Georgy, Jacques; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2011-01-01

    Satellite navigation systems such as the global positioning system (GPS) are currently the most common technique used for land vehicle positioning. However, in GPS-denied environments, there is an interruption in the positioning information. Low-cost micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS)-based inertial sensors can be integrated with GPS and enhance the performance in denied GPS environments. The traditional technique for this integration problem is Kalman filtering (KF). Due to the inherent errors of low-cost MEMS inertial sensors and their large stochastic drifts, KF, with its linearized models, has limited capabilities in providing accurate positioning. Particle filtering (PF) was recently suggested as a nonlinear filtering technique to accommodate for arbitrary inertial sensor characteristics, motion dynamics and noise distributions. An enhanced version of PF called the Mixture PF is utilized in this study to perform tightly coupled integration of a three dimensional (3D) reduced inertial sensors system (RISS) with GPS. In this work, the RISS consists of one single-axis gyroscope and a two-axis accelerometer used together with the vehicle's odometer to obtain 3D navigation states. These sensors are then integrated with GPS in a tightly coupled scheme. In loosely-coupled integration, at least four satellites are needed to provide acceptable GPS position and velocity updates for the integration filter. The advantage of the tightly-coupled integration is that it can provide GPS measurement update(s) even when the number of visible satellites is three or lower, thereby improving the operation of the navigation system in environments with partial blockages by providing continuous aiding to the inertial sensors even during limited GPS satellite availability. To effectively exploit the capabilities of PF, advanced modeling for the stochastic drift of the vertically aligned gyroscope is used. In order to benefit from measurement updates for such drift, which are

  8. A hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics coupled model for evaluating bioreactors derived from CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ding, Jie; Guo, Wan-Qian; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2010-12-01

    Investigating how a bioreactor functions is a necessary precursor for successful reactor design and operation. Traditional methods used to investigate flow-field cannot meet this challenge accurately and economically. Hydrodynamics model can solve this problem, but to understand a bioreactor in sufficient depth, it is often insufficient. In this paper, a coupled hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics model was formulated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to simulate a gas-liquid-solid three-phase biotreatment system for the first time. The hydrodynamics model is used to formulate prediction of the flow field and the reaction kinetics model then portrays the reaction conversion process. The coupled model is verified and used to simulate the behavior of an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor for biohydrogen production. The flow patterns were visualized and analyzed. The coupled model also demonstrates a qualitative relationship between hydrodynamics and biohydrogen production. The advantages and limitations of applying this coupled model are discussed. PMID:20727741

  9. Influence of Young's moduli in 3D fluid-structure coupled models of the human cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnke, Frank; Semmelbauer, Sebastian; Marquardt, Torsten

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic wave propagation in the human cochlea was studied using a tapered box-model with linear assumptions respective to all mechanical parameters. The discretisation and evaluation is conducted by a commercial finite element package (ANSYS). The main difference to former models of the cochlea was the representation of the basilar membrane by a 3D elastic solid. The Young's moduli of this solid were modified to study their influence on the travelling wave. The lymph in the scala vestibuli and scala tympani was represented by a viscous and nearly incompressible fluid finite element approach. Our results show the maximum displacement for f = 2kHz at half of the length of the cochlea in accordance with former experiments. For low frequencies f <200 Hz nearly zero phase shifts were found, whereas for f =1 kHz it reaches values up to -12 cycles depending on the degree of orthotropy.

  10. Correlated 3D Nanoscale Mapping and Simulation of Coupled Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electron tomography in combination with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) experiments and simulations was used to unravel the interplay between structure and plasmonic properties of a silver nanocuboid dimer. The precise 3D geometry of the particles fabricated by means of electron beam lithography was reconstructed through electron tomography, and the full three-dimensional information was used as an input for simulations of energy-loss spectra and plasmon resonance maps. Excellent agreement between experiment and theory was found throughout, bringing the comparison between EELS imaging and simulations to a quantitative and correlative level. In addition, interface mode patterns, normally masked by the projection nature of a transmission microscopy investigation, could be unambiguously identified through tomographic reconstruction. This work overcomes the need for geometrical assumptions or symmetry restrictions of the sample in simulations and paves the way for detailed investigations of realistic and complex plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26495933

  11. Coupling 2-D cylindrical and 3-D x-y-z transport computations

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Shumays, I.K.; Yehnert, C.E.; Pitcairn, T.N.

    1998-06-30

    This paper describes a new two-dimensional (2-D) cylindrical geometry to three-dimensional (3-D) rectangular x-y-z splice option for multi-dimensional discrete ordinates solutions to the neutron (photon) transport equation. Of particular interest are the simple transformations developed and applied in order to carry out the required spatial and angular interpolations. The spatial interpolations are linear and equivalent to those applied elsewhere. The angular interpolations are based on a high order spherical harmonics representation of the angular flux. Advantages of the current angular interpolations over previous work are discussed. An application to an intricate streaming problem is provided to demonstrate the advantages of the new method for efficient and accurate prediction of particle behavior in complex geometries.

  12. Plasma Biomarker Discovery Using 3D Protein Profiling Coupled with Label-Free Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Lynn A.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Speicher, David W.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of human plasma samples for biomarker discovery remains quite challenging. One promising alternative to chemical derivatization with stable isotope labels for quantitative comparisons is direct, label-free, quantitative comparison of raw LC–MS data. But, in order to achieve high-sensitivity detection of low-abundance proteins, plasma proteins must be extensively pre-fractionated, and results from LC–MS runs of all fractions must be integrated efficiently in order to avoid misidentification of variations in fractionation from sample to sample as “apparent” biomarkers. This protocol describes a powerful 3D protein profiling method for comprehensive analysis of human serum or plasma proteomes, which combines abundant protein depletion and high-sensitivity GeLC–MS/MS with label-free quantitation of candidate biomarkers. PMID:21468938

  13. Benchmark of Lower Hybrid coupling codes (Brambilla, GRILL3D-U, TOPLHA) with the FTU conventional grill experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccuzzi, Silvio; Maggiora, Riccardo; Milanesio, Daniele; Mirizzi, Francesco; Panaccione, Luigi

    2011-12-01

    The present work compares and experimentally validates the results coming out from the following three Lower Hybrid (LH) coupling codes: Brambilla code (M. Brambilla), GRILL3D-U (Mikhail Irzak, A. F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russia) and TOPLHA (Politecnico di Torino, Italy). The conventional grill antenna, operating in FTU in different scenarios, is used as benchmark. The validation with experimental data is carried out with respect to the average reflection coefficients at the input of a row of the grill, considering two different phasings between adjacent waveguides: -90 ° and -75 °. A comparison between calculated power spectra is also presented. Good agreement can be observed for all the simulated plasma profiles and waveguide phasings between experimental data and codes, in particular for the most recent numerical tools, namely GRILL3D-U and TOPLHA.

  14. A 3-D variational assimilation scheme in coupled transport-biogeochemical models: Forecast of Mediterranean biogeochemical properties

    PubMed Central

    Teruzzi, Anna; Dobricic, Srdjan; Solidoro, Cosimo; Cossarini, Gianpiero

    2014-01-01

    [1] Increasing attention is dedicated to the implementation of suitable marine forecast systems for the estimate of the state of the ocean. Within the framework of the European MyOcean infrastructure, the pre-existing short-term Mediterranean Sea biogeochemistry operational forecast system has been upgraded by assimilating remotely sensed ocean color data in the coupled transport-biogeochemical model OPATM-BFM using a 3-D variational data assimilation (3D-VAR) procedure. In the present work, the 3D-VAR scheme is used to correct the four phytoplankton functional groups included in the OPATM-BFM in the period July 2007 to September 2008. The 3D-VAR scheme decomposes the error covariance matrix using a sequence of different operators that account separately for vertical covariance, horizontal covariance, and covariance among biogeochemical variables. The assimilation solution is found in a reduced dimensional space, and the innovation for the biogeochemical variables is obtained by the sequential application of the covariance operators. Results show a general improvement in the forecast skill, providing a correction of the basin-scale bias of surface chlorophyll concentration and of the local-scale spatial and temporal dynamics of typical bloom events. Further, analysis of the assimilation skill provides insights into the functioning of the model. The computational costs of the assimilation scheme adopted are low compared to other assimilation techniques, and its modular structure facilitates further developments. The 3D-VAR scheme results especially suitable for implementation within a biogeochemistry operational forecast system. PMID:26213670

  15. Simulating HFIR Core Thermal Hydraulics Using 3D-2D Model Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, Adam R; Freels, James D; Ekici, Kivanc

    2013-01-01

    A model utilizing interdimensional variable coupling is presented for simulating the thermal hydraulic interactions of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The model s domain consists of a single, explicitly represented three-dimensional fuel plate and a simplified two-dimensional coolant channel slice. In simplifying the coolant channel, and thus the number of mesh points in which the Navier-Stokes equations must be solved, the computational cost and solution time are both greatly reduced. In order for the reduced-dimension coolant channel to interact with the explicitly represented fuel plate, however, interdimensional variable coupling must be enacted along all shared boundaries. The primary focus of this paper is in detailing the collection, storage, passage, and application of variables across this interdimensional interface. Comparisons are made showing the general speed-up associated with this simplified coupled model.

  16. Identification of couple-stress moduli of vertebral trabecular bone based on the 3D internal architectures.

    PubMed

    Goda, Ibrahim; Ganghoffer, Jean-François

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a homogeneous, orthotropic couple-stress continuum model as a substitute of the 3D periodic heterogeneous cellular solid model of vertebral trabecular bone. Vertebral trabecular bone is modeled as a porous material with an idealized periodic structure made of 3D open cubic cells, which is effectively orthotropic. The chosen architecture is based on studies of samples taken from the central part of vertebral bodies. The effective properties are obtained based on the response of the representative volume element under prescribed boundary conditions. Mixed boundary conditions comprising both traction and displacement boundary conditions are applied on the structure boundaries. In this contribution, the effective mechanical constants of the effective couple-stress continuum are deduced by an equivalent strain energy method. The characteristic lengths for bending and torsion are identified from the resulting homogenized orthotropic moduli. We conduct this study computationally using a finite element approach. Vertebral trabecular bone is modeled either as a cellular solid or as a two-phase material consisting of bone tissue (stiff phase) forming a trabecular network, and a surrounding soft tissue referring to the bone marrow present in the pores. Both the bone tissue forming the network and the pores are assumed to be homogeneous linear elastic, and isotropic media. The scale effects on the predicted couple stress moduli of these networks are investigated by varying the size of the bone specimens over which the boundary conditions are applied. The analysis using mixed boundary conditions gives results that are independent of unit cell size when computing the first couple stress tensor, while it is dependent on the cell size as to the second couple stress tensor moduli. This study provides overall guidance on how the size of the trabecular specimen influence couple stresses elastic moduli of cellular materials, with focus on bones

  17. Scattering and coupling effects of electromagnetic waves in 3D networks of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defos Du Rau, M.; Pessan, F.; Ruffie, G.; Vignéras-Lefebvre, V.; Parneix, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of electromagnetic scattering from a 3D system of spheres is considered and an iterative solution that accounts for multiple scattering is proposed. The Mie formalism used for a single sphere is extended to account for multiple scattered fields between several particles. The translational addition theorems for spherical wave functions are used to express the electromagnetic field scattered by a sphere S_i in terms of an incident field for a sphere S_k in a spherical coordinates system attached to the sphere S_k. In this work, the numerical convergence of the method is discussed and associated computational times are given. Numerical computations including Radar Cross Section (RCS) and radiation patterns for various 3D configurations are presented. Some of them are compared with free-space measurements made in the 8 to 100 GHz frequency band using vectorial network analyzers. 11.55.-m S-matrix theory; analytic structure of amplitudes Cet article étudie la diffusion des ondes électromagnétiques par des réseaux tridimensionnels de sphères et propose une méthode itérative pour prendre en compte les effets de multidiffusion. Le formalisme de Mie utilisé dans le cas d'une sphère est étendu pour calculer les champs "multidiffusés" entre plusieurs particules. Les théorèmes d'addition et de translation des fonctions d'onde sphériques sont utilisés pour exprimer le champ diffusé par une sphère S_i comme étant incident sur une sphère S_k, dans un système de coordonnées sphériques lié au centre de S_k. La convergence numérique de la méthode est discutée et des temps de calcul sont donnés. Des résultats numériques tels que des Surfaces Équivalentes Radar (SER) et des diagrammes de rayonnement pour différentes configurations tridimensionnelles sont montrés. Certains d'entre eux sont comparés à des mesures en espace libre faites à l'aide d'analyseurs de réseaux vectoriels dans la bande de fréquence 8{-}100 GHz.

  18. Using High Frequency Focused Water-Coupled Ultrasound for 3-D Surface Depression Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. A prior study was performed demonstrating that focused air-coupled ultrasound at 1 MHz was capable of profiling surfaces with 25 micron depth resolution and 400 micron lateral resolution over a 1.4 mm depth range. In this article, the question of whether higher-frequency focused water-coupled ultrasound can improve on these specifications is addressed. 10 and 25 MHz focused ultrasonic transducers were employed in the water-coupled mode. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface were acquired and converted to depth / surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in water (V). Results are compared for the two frequencies used and with those from the 1 MHz air-coupled configuration.

  19. Simultaneous real-time 3D photoacoustic tomography and EEG for neurovascular coupling study in an animal model of epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Xiao, Jiaying; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Neurovascular coupling in epilepsy is poorly understood; its study requires simultaneous monitoring of hemodynamic changes and neural activity in the brain. Approach. Here for the first time we present a combined real-time 3D photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and electrophysiology/electroencephalography (EEG) system for the study of neurovascular coupling in epilepsy, whose ability was demonstrated with a pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) induced generalized seizure model in rats. Two groups of experiments were carried out with different wavelengths to detect the changes of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR) signals in the rat brain. We extracted the average PAT signals of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), and compared them with the EEG signal. Main results. Results showed that the seizure process can be divided into three stages. A ‘dip’ lasting for 1-2 min in the first stage and the following hyperfusion in the second stage were observed. The HbO2 signal and the HbR signal were generally negatively correlated. The change of blood flow was also estimated. All the acquired results here were in accordance with other published results. Significance. Compared to other existing functional neuroimaging tools, the method proposed here enables reliable tracking of hemodynamic signal with both high spatial and high temporal resolution in 3D, so it is more suitable for neurovascular coupling study of epilepsy.

  20. Unsteady Analysis of Inlet-Compressor Acoustic Interactions Using Coupled 3-D and 1-D CFD Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, A.; Cole, G. L.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that the dynamic response of a mixed compression supersonic inlet is very sensitive to the boundary condition imposed at the subsonic exit (engine face) of the inlet. In previous work, a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) inlet code (NPARC) was coupled at the engine face to a 3-D turbomachinery code (ADPAC) simulating an isolated rotor and the coupled simulation used to study the unsteady response of the inlet. The main problem with this approach is that the high fidelity turbomachinery simulation becomes prohibitively expensive as more stages are included in the simulation. In this paper, an alternative approach is explored, wherein the inlet code is coupled to a lesser fidelity 1-D transient compressor code (DYNTECC) which simulates the whole compressor. The specific application chosen for this evaluation is the collapsing bump experiment performed at the University of Cincinnati, wherein reflections of a large-amplitude acoustic pulse from a compressor were measured. The metrics for comparison are the pulse strength (time integral of the pulse amplitude) and wave form (shape). When the compressor is modeled by stage characteristics the computed strength is about ten percent greater than that for the experiment, but the wave shapes are in poor agreement. An alternate approach that uses a fixed rise in duct total pressure and temperature (so-called 'lossy' duct) to simulate a compressor gives good pulse shapes but the strength is about 30 percent low.

  1. Analysis of Annular Thermoelectric Couples with Nonuniform Temperature Distribution by Means of 3-D Multiphysics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauknecht, Andreas; Steinert, Torsten; Spengler, Carsten; Suck, Gerrit

    2013-07-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) modules with annular geometry are very attractive for waste heat recovery within the automotive world, especially when integrated as stacks into tubular heat exchangers. The required temperature difference is built up between the coolant, which flows inside an inner tube, and the exhaust gas, which flows around an outer tube. The flow pattern of the exhaust gas can be axial or circumferential, which can lead to higher heat transfer coefficients on the outer surface of the tube. However, this multidimensional construction in combination with a complex flow pattern can lead to a nonuniform heat flux. Additionally, the system experiences a nonuniform temperature distribution which consequently leads to complex conditions regarding the electrical potential. The relevant effects are investigated using a three-dimensional (3-D) numerical model implemented in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation environment Star-CCM+. The model supports temperature-dependent characteristics of the materials, contact resistances, and parasitic effects in the TE module. Furthermore, it involves techniques to quickly find the exact maximum power point of the TE module with the given boundary conditions. Using the validated model the influence of the nonuniform temperature distribution is investigated with emphasis on the electrical output and TE efficiency.

  2. Assessing soil water storage distribution under sprinkler irrigation by coupling 3D simulations and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Uday; Shabeeb, Ahmed; dragonetti, giovanna; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Coppola, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    This work analyzed the variability of sprinkler irrigation application over a bare soil, both in terms of water application efficiency and uniformity, by integrating and comparing the information on the irrigation depth data (ID), as measured by catch cans, soil water storage in the upper root zone, as measured by TDR probes, and a 3D simulations of water flow in soils. Three irrigation tests were performed at three different pressures (2, 3 and 4 bar). A lateral water redistribution was observed and simulated after each irrigation event by comparing spatial distributions of site-specific water application efficiency (AEs), as well as ratios of site-specific actual water storage increase (SWEs) and irrigation depth (IDs) to the water content before irrigation. Because of soil water redistribution processes, distribution uniformity based on soil storages was systematically higher than the catch can uniformity. The obvious consequence of lateral water redistribution processes was that the soil smoothing action on non-uniformity observed at the surface increased both with depth and over time. At a given depth the uniformity of soil water storages always attained the same value, whatever the pressure considered and the catch can-based uniformity coefficient. It was concluded that, for the case of random distribution of ID, the uniformity of water storages is driven by the soil behavior rather than by the irrigation system.

  3. Collective dynamics in a binary mixture of hydrodynamically coupled microrotors.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Kyongmin; Lushi, Enkeleida; Vlahovska, Petia M

    2015-05-01

    We study, numerically, the collective dynamics of self-rotating nonaligning particles by considering a monolayer of spheres driven by constant clockwise or counterclockwise torques. We show that hydrodynamic interactions alter the emergence of large-scale dynamical patterns compared to those observed in dry systems. In dilute suspensions, the flow stirred by the rotors induces clustering of opposite-spin rotors, while at higher densities same-spin rotors phase separate. Above a critical rotor density, dynamic hexagonal crystals form. Our findings underscore the importance of inclusion of the many-body, long-range hydrodynamic interactions in predicting the phase behavior of active particles. PMID:26001020

  4. A 3D partial-equilibrium model to simulate coupled hydrogeological, microbiological, and geochemical processes in subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanikumar, M. S.; McGuire, Jennifer T.

    2004-06-01

    This paper reports the development and application of a three-dimensional multi-component reactive transport model (BGTK) to simulate a wide range of biogeochemical processes in subsurface environments. The model can handle both equilibrium and kinetically controlled reactions and is based on the well tested modular models RT3D [Clement et al., 1998] and PHREEQC-2 [Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999]. Here we describe the details of the new coupled model and demonstrate its capabilities using test problems involving microbial transport in a laboratory column and redox zonation in a contaminated aquifer.

  5. Development of a 3D finite element model evaluating air-coupled ultrasonic measurements of nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrig, Matthias P.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2016-02-01

    This research presents a 3D numerical finite element (FE) model which, previously developed, precisely simulates non-contact, air-coupled measurements of nonlinear Rayleigh wave propagation. The commercial FE-solver ABAQUS is used to perform the simulations. First, frequency dependent pressure wave attenuation is investigated numerically to reconstruct the sound pressure distribution along the active surface of the non-contact receiver. Second, constitutive law and excitation source properties are optimized to match nonlinear ultrasonic experimental data. Finally, the FE-model data are fit with analytical solutions showing a good agreement and thus, indicating the significance of the study performed.

  6. A 3-D Coupled CFD-DSMC Solution Method With Application to the Mars Sample Return Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    A method to obtain coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (CFD-DSMC), 3-D flow field solutions for highly blunt bodies at low incidence is presented and applied to one concept of the Mars Sample Return Orbiter vehicle as a demonstration of the technique. CFD is used to solve the high-density blunt forebody flow defining an inflow boundary condition for a DSMC solution of the afterbody wake flow. By combining the two techniques in flow regions where most applicable, the entire mixed flow field is modeled in an appropriate manner.

  7. A 3D Model to Compute Lightning and HIRF Coupling Effects on Avionic Equipment of an Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, E.; Tristant, F.; Guiffaut, C.; Terrade, F.; Reineix, A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes the 3D FDTD model of an aircraft developed to compute the lightning and HIRF (High Intentity Radiated Fields) coupling effects on avionic equipment and all the wire harness associated. This virtual prototype aims at assisting the aircraft manufacturer during the lightning and HIRF certification processes. The model presented here permits to cover a frequency range from lightning spectrum to the low frequency HIRF domain, i.e. 0 to 100 MHz. Moreover, the entire aircraft, including the frame, the skin, the wire harness and the equipment are taken into account in only one model. Results obtained are compared to measurements on a real aircraft.

  8. Intra-chain superexchange couplings in quasi-1D 3d transition-metal magnetic compounds.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Hongping; Tang, Yingying; Zhang, Suyun; He, Zhangzhen

    2016-07-13

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of the quasi-1D transition-metal borates PbMBO4 (M  =  Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co) have been investigated by density functional theory, including electronic correlation. The results evidence PbCrBO4 and PbFeBO4 as antiferromagnetic (AFM) semiconductors (intra-chain AFM and inter-chain FM) and PbMnBO4 as a ferromagnetic (FM) semiconductor (both intra- and inter-chain FM) in accordance with experimental observations. For non-synthesized PbTiBO4, PbVBO4, and PbCoBO4, the ground-state magnetic structures are paramagnetic, FM, and paramagnetic, respectively. In this series of compounds, there are two kinds of superexchange couplings dominating their magnetic properties, i.e. the direction M-M delocalization superexchange and indirect M-O-M correlation superexchange. For PbMBO4 with M (3+) d  (n) , n  ⩽  3 (M  =  V and Cr), the main intra-chain spin coupling is the M-M t 2g-t 2g direct delocalization superexchange, while for PbMBO4 with M (3+) d  (n) , n  >  3 (M  =  Mn and Fe), the main intra-chain spin coupling is the near 90° M-O-M e g-p-e g indirect correlation superexchange. PMID:27213502

  9. 3D-PIC simulation of an inductively coupled ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrich, Robert; Muehlich, Nina Sarah; Becker, Michael; Heiliger, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Inductively coupled ion sources are applied to a wide range of plasma applications, especially surface modifications. The knowledge of the behavior and precise information of the plasma parameters are of main importance. These values are tedious to measure without influencing the discharge. By applying our fully three-dimensional PlasmaPIC tool we are able to reach these plasma parameters with a spatial and temporal resolution which is quite hard to achieve experimentally. PlasmaPIC is used for modeling discharges in arbitrary geometries without limitations to any symmetry. By this means we are able to demonstrate that the plasma density has an irrotational character. Furthermore, we will show the dependence of the plasma parameters of different working conditions. We will show that for gridded inductively coupled ion sources the neutral gas pressure inside the discharge chamber depends on the extraction of ions. This effect is considered in PlasmaPIC by a self-consistent coupling of the neutral gas simulation and the plasma simulation whereas the neutral gas distribution is calculated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). This work has been supported by the ``Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Energie.'' Grant 50RS1507.

  10. Intra-chain superexchange couplings in quasi-1D 3d transition-metal magnetic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Hongping; Tang, Yingying; Zhang, Suyun; He, Zhangzhen

    2016-07-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of the quasi-1D transition-metal borates PbMBO4 (M  =  Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co) have been investigated by density functional theory, including electronic correlation. The results evidence PbCrBO4 and PbFeBO4 as antiferromagnetic (AFM) semiconductors (intra-chain AFM and inter-chain FM) and PbMnBO4 as a ferromagnetic (FM) semiconductor (both intra- and inter-chain FM) in accordance with experimental observations. For non-synthesized PbTiBO4, PbVBO4, and PbCoBO4, the ground-state magnetic structures are paramagnetic, FM, and paramagnetic, respectively. In this series of compounds, there are two kinds of superexchange couplings dominating their magnetic properties, i.e. the direction M–M delocalization superexchange and indirect M–O–M correlation superexchange. For PbMBO4 with M 3+ d  n , n  ⩽  3 (M  =  V and Cr), the main intra-chain spin coupling is the M–M t 2g–t 2g direct delocalization superexchange, while for PbMBO4 with M 3+ d  n , n  >  3 (M  =  Mn and Fe), the main intra-chain spin coupling is the near 90° M–O–M e g–p–e g indirect correlation superexchange.

  11. Study of the plankton ecosystem variability using a coupled hydrodynamics biogeochemical modelling in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessouri, Fayçal; Ulses, Caroline; Estournel, Claude; Marsaleix, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean Sea presents a wide variety of trophic regimes since the large and intense spring bloom of the North-Western Mediterranean Sea (NWMS) that follows winter convection to the extreme oligotrophic regions of the South-eastern basin. The Mediterranean Sea displays a strong time variability revealing its high sensitivity to climate and anthropic pressures. In this context, it is crucial to develop tools allowing to understand the evolution of the Mediterranean hydrology and marine ecosystem as a response to external forcing. Numerical coupled hydrodynamic and biogeochemical modelling carefully calibrated in the different regions of the basin is the only tool that can answer this question. However, this important step of calibration is particularly difficult because of the lack of coherent sets of data describing the seasonal evolution of the main parameters characterizing the physical and biogeochemical environment in the different sub-basins. The chlorophyll satellite data from 4km MODIS products, a multiple in situ data from MerMEX MOOSE and DEWEX cruises and Bio-Argo floats from NAOS project are believed to be an opportunity to strongly improve the realism of ecosystem models. The model is a 3D coupled simulation using NemoMed12 for hydrodynamics and ECO 3MS for biogeochemistry and covers the whole Mediterranean Sea and runs at 1/12°. The relevant variables mentioned are phytoplankton, organic and inorganic matters faced to water masses dynamics, over ten years since summer 2003. After a short validation, we will expose two topics: First, through this coupling we quantify the nutrients fluxes across the Mediterranean straits over the years. For example, we found an annual net average around 150 Giga moles NO3 per year at Gibraltar, where we expect low annual fluctuations. In contrast, the Strait of Sicily shows greater annual variability going from 70 to 92 Giga moles NO3 per year. All the fluxes are resumed in a detailed diagram of the transport

  12. Improvements in Fabrication of 3D SU-8 Prisms for Low-Coupling-Loss Interconnections Between Fibers and Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Minh-Hang; Chu, Thi-Xuan; Nguyen, Long; Nguyen, Hai-Binh; Lee, Chun-Wei; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Chen, Te-Chang; Lee, Ming-Chang

    2016-07-01

    Fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) SU-8 (an epoxy-based negative photoresist from MicroChem) prisms as low-loss couplers for interconnection between optical components, particularly optical fibers and silicon-on-isolator waveguides (SOI WGs), which have mismatched mode sizes, has been investigated. With an interfacial structure formed by a 3D SU-8 prism partly overlaying an SOI WG end with a portion of buried oxide (BOX) removed under the interface, low-loss coupling is ensured and the transmission efficiency can reach 70%. To fabricate these 3D SU-8 prisms, a simple method with two photolithography steps was used for SU-8 hinges and CYTOP (an amorphous fluoropolymer from AGC Chemicals) prism windows, with mild soft and hard bakes, to define the prism profiles with diluted SU-8 filled in the CYTOP prism windows. A buffered oxide etchant is used to remove BOX parts under the interfaces. Some of the fabricated structures were tested, demonstrating the contribution of overlaying SU-8 prisms to the transmission efficiency of optical interconnections between fibers and SOI WGs.

  13. Modeling partially coupled objects with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    A very simple phenomenological model is presented to model objects that are partially coupled (i.e. welded or bonded) where usually the coupled interface is weaker than the bulk material. The model works by letting objects fully interact in compression and having the objects only partially interact in tension. A disconnect factor is provided to adjust the tensile interaction to simulate coupling strengths. Three cases of an example impact calculation are shown-no coupling, full coupling and partial coupling.

  14. Assessing quality of urban underground spaces by coupling 3D geological models: The case study of Foshan city, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weisheng; Yang, Liang; Deng, Dongcheng; Ye, Jing; Clarke, Keith; Yang, Zhijun; Zhuang, Wenming; Liu, Jianxiong; Huang, Jichun

    2016-04-01

    Urban underground spaces (UUS), especially those containing natural resources that have not yet been utilized, have been recognized as important for future sustainable development in large cities. One of the key steps in city planning is to estimate the quality of urban underground space resources, since they are major determinants of suitable land use. Yet geological constraints are rarely taken into consideration in urban planning, nor are the uncertainties in the quality of the available assessments. Based on Fuzzy Set theory and the analytic hierarchy process, a 3D stepwise process for the quality assessment of geotechnical properties of natural resources in UUS is presented. The process includes an index system for construction factors; area partitioning; the extraction of geological attributes; the creation of a relative membership grade matrix; the evaluation of subject and destination layers; and indeterminacy analysis. A 3D geological model of the study area was introduced into the process that extracted geological attributes as constraints. This 3D geological model was coupled with borehole data for Foshan City, Guangdong province, South China, and the indeterminacies caused by the cell size and the geological strata constraints were analyzed. The results of the case study show that (1) a relatively correct result can be obtained if the cell size is near to the average sampling distance of the boreholes; (2) the constraints of the 3D geological model have a major role in establishing the UUS quality level and distribution, especially at the boundaries of the geological bodies; and (3) the assessment result is impacted by an interaction between the cell resolution and the geological model used.

  15. The research of 1D / 3D coupling simulation on pump and pipe system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. Z.; Liu, Q. L.; Wu, P.; Wang, L. Q.; Paulus, T.; Wang, B. G.; Oesterle, M.

    2012-11-01

    The research of performances of hydraulic mechanical depends on static complete characteristic curves, which have great difference compared with the actual work condition and have accidents potential. So we need a new way to compute the dynamic system, which is more reasonable. So the method to couple one dimensional simulation and three dimensional CFD analysis based on Flowmaster and Fluent is explored, and the dynamic characteristics and internal flow of the pumping system are analyzed. First, a pipe system model is created in Flowmaster and a pump model is created in Fluent; then VB code and scheme code are used to realize the automated operation for Flowmaster and Fluent; at last, the exchange of data between these two parts is realized by an interface program. In this paper, the interaction between pumps and pipe system are analyzed by coupling one-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations. This study would be helpful to identify the influences of the rapid adjustment process on stability of system and provide guides for design of pump system.

  16. Coupled simulation of chemical lasers based on intracavity partially coherent light model and 3D CFD model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kenan; Huai, Ying; Jia, Shuqin; Jin, Yuqi

    2011-12-19

    Coupled simulation based on intracavity partially coherent light model and 3D CFD model is firstly achieved in this paper. The dynamic equation of partially coherent intracavity field is derived based on partially coherent light theory. A numerical scheme for the coupled simulation as well as a method for computing the intracavity partially coherent field is given. The presented model explains the formation of the sugar scooping phenomenon, and enables studies on the dependence of the spatial mode spectrum on physical parameters of laser cavity and gain medium. Computational results show that as the flow rate of iodine increases, higher order mode components dominate in the partially coherent field. Results obtained by the proposed model are in good agreement with experimental results. PMID:22274214

  17. TART97 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1997-11-22

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on- line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and its data riles.

  18. A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-06-12

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly fast: if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system canmore » save you a great deal of time and energy. TART 97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and ist data files.« less

  19. 3-D Coupled FE Analysis and Experimental Validation of Restrained Welding to Control Angular Distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damale, A. V.; Nandurkar, K. N.

    2012-10-01

    Welding induced distortion is one of the critical defects in the welded structures. Angular distortion is most pronounced which badly affects the welded structures. Non-uniform heating during welding develops this angular distortion. Various methods are available to control/minimize the welding distortions. One of the methods available to control this distortion is restraining, in which clamping pressure is applied on the deforming edges of the plates. In the present study, a 3-dimensional coupled transient thermal analysis is done for simulating the restraining phenomenon of welding. The developed transient thermal heat source was used to simulate the arc welding phenomenon. The element birth and death technique was used for simulating filler material deposition. Thermal model was verified by comparing the macrograph of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model and the weld and verification of structural model was done by comparing the measured and predicted angular distortions. Experimental and Finite Element (FE) analysis is done for both conventional welding and welding under restraining pressure. Transient thermal and non-linear structural analyses were carried out in order to predict angular distortions. The Finite Element Method analysis and experimental verification is done for manual metal arc welding process.

  20. Compact 3D lidar based on optically coupled horizontal and vertical scanning mechanism for the autonomous navigation of robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min-Gu; Baeg, Seung-Ho; Lee, Ki-Min; Lee, Hae-Seok; Baeg, Moon-Hong; Park, Jong-Ok; Kim, Hong-Ki

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a new 3D LIDAR sensor, named KIDAR-B25, for measuring 3D image information with high range accuracy, high speed and compact size. To measure a distance to the target object, we developed a range measurement unit, which is implemented by the direct Time-Of-Flight (TOF) method using TDC chip, a pulsed laser transmitter as an illumination source (pulse width: 10 ns, wavelength: 905 nm, repetition rate: 30kHz, peak power: 20W), and an Si APD receiver, which has high sensitivity and wide bandwidth. Also, we devised a horizontal and vertical scanning mechanism, climbing in a spiral and coupled with the laser optical path. Besides, control electronics such as the motor controller, the signal processing unit, the power distributor and so on, are developed and integrated in a compact assembly. The key point of the 3D LIDAR design proposed in this paper is to use the compact scanning mechanism, which is coupled with optical module horizontally and vertically. This KIDAR-B25 has the same beam propagation axis for emitting pulse laser and receiving reflected one with no optical interference each other. The scanning performance of the KIDAR-B25 has proven with the stable operation up to 20Hz (vertical), 40Hz (horizontal) and the time is about 1.7s to reach the maximum speed. The range of vertical plane can be available up to +/-10 degree FOV (Field Of View) with a 0.25 degree angular resolution. The whole horizontal plane (360 degree) can be also available with 0.125 degree angular resolution. Since the KIDAR-B25 sensor has been planned and developed to be used in mobile robots for navigation, we conducted an outdoor test for evaluating its performance. The experimental results show that the captured 3D imaging data can be usefully applicable to the navigation of the robot for detecting and avoiding the moving objects with real time.

  1. Accurate gradient approximation for complex interface problems in 3D by an improved coupling interface method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Yu-Chen; Chern, I.-Liang; Chang, Chien C.

    2014-10-01

    Most elliptic interface solvers become complicated for complex interface problems at those “exceptional points” where there are not enough neighboring interior points for high order interpolation. Such complication increases especially in three dimensions. Usually, the solvers are thus reduced to low order accuracy. In this paper, we classify these exceptional points and propose two recipes to maintain order of accuracy there, aiming at improving the previous coupling interface method [26]. Yet the idea is also applicable to other interface solvers. The main idea is to have at least first order approximations for second order derivatives at those exceptional points. Recipe 1 is to use the finite difference approximation for the second order derivatives at a nearby interior grid point, whenever this is possible. Recipe 2 is to flip domain signatures and introduce a ghost state so that a second-order method can be applied. This ghost state is a smooth extension of the solution at the exceptional point from the other side of the interface. The original state is recovered by a post-processing using nearby states and jump conditions. The choice of recipes is determined by a classification scheme of the exceptional points. The method renders the solution and its gradient uniformly second-order accurate in the entire computed domain. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the second order accuracy of the presently proposed method in approximating the gradients of the original states for some complex interfaces which we had tested previous in two and three dimensions, and a real molecule (1D63) which is double-helix shape and composed of hundreds of atoms.

  2. Accurate gradient approximation for complex interface problems in 3D by an improved coupling interface method

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Yu-Chen; Chern, I-Liang; Chang, Chien C.

    2014-10-15

    Most elliptic interface solvers become complicated for complex interface problems at those “exceptional points” where there are not enough neighboring interior points for high order interpolation. Such complication increases especially in three dimensions. Usually, the solvers are thus reduced to low order accuracy. In this paper, we classify these exceptional points and propose two recipes to maintain order of accuracy there, aiming at improving the previous coupling interface method [26]. Yet the idea is also applicable to other interface solvers. The main idea is to have at least first order approximations for second order derivatives at those exceptional points. Recipe 1 is to use the finite difference approximation for the second order derivatives at a nearby interior grid point, whenever this is possible. Recipe 2 is to flip domain signatures and introduce a ghost state so that a second-order method can be applied. This ghost state is a smooth extension of the solution at the exceptional point from the other side of the interface. The original state is recovered by a post-processing using nearby states and jump conditions. The choice of recipes is determined by a classification scheme of the exceptional points. The method renders the solution and its gradient uniformly second-order accurate in the entire computed domain. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the second order accuracy of the presently proposed method in approximating the gradients of the original states for some complex interfaces which we had tested previous in two and three dimensions, and a real molecule ( (1D63)) which is double-helix shape and composed of hundreds of atoms.

  3. Regional airflow and particle distribution in the lung with a 3D-1D coupled subject-specific boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiwoong; Yin, Youbing; Hoffman, Eric; Tawhai, Merryn; Lin, Ching-Long

    2010-11-01

    Correct prediction of regional distribution of inhaled aerosol particles is vital to improve pulmonary medicine. Physiologically consistent regional ventilations of airflow and aerosol particles are simulated with a 3D-1D coupled subject-specific boundary condition (BC). In 3D CT-resolved 7-generation airways, large eddy simulations are performed to capture detailed airflow characteristics and Lagrangian particle simulations are carried to track the particle transport and deposition. Results are compared with two traditional outlet BCs: uniform velocity and uniform pressure. Proposed BC is eligible for physiologically consistent airflow distribution in the lung, while the others are not. The regional ventilation and deposition of particles reflect the regional ventilation of airflow. In this study, two traditional BCs yield up to 98% (334%) over-prediction in lobar particle ventilation (deposition) fraction. Upper to lower particle ventilation ratios of both left and right lungs read ˜0.4 with the proposed BC, while those for the other two BCs vary with the error up to 73%.

  4. Numerical Simulation of 3D Thermo-Elastic Fatigue Crack Growth Problems Using Coupled FE-EFG Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Himanshu; Singh, Akhilendra; Singh, Indra Vir

    2016-06-01

    In this work, finite element method (FEM) and element free Galerkin method (EFGM) are coupled for solving 3D crack domains subjected to cyclic thermal load of constant amplitude. Crack growth contours and fatigue life have been obtained for each of the considered numerical examples. Thermo-elastic problems are decoupled into thermal and elastic problems . Firstly, the unknown temperature field is obtained by solving heat conduction equation, then, it is used as the input load in the elastic problem to calculate the displacement and stress fields. The geometrical discontinuity across crack surface is modelled by extrinsically enriched EFGM and the remaining part of the domain is approximated by standard finite element method. At the crack interface, a ramp function based interpolation scheme has been implemented. This coupled approach combines the advantages of both EFGM and FEM. A linear successive crack increment approach is used to model crack growth. The growing crack surface is traced by level set function. Standard Paris law is used for life estimation of the three-dimensional crack models. Different cases of planar and non-planar crack problems have been solved and their results are compared with the results obtained using extended finite element method to check accuracy, efficiency and robustness of the coupled FE-EFG approach implemented in this study.

  5. Reproducible preparation of nanospray tips for capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry using 3D printed grinding device.

    PubMed

    Tycova, Anna; Prikryl, Jan; Foret, Frantisek

    2016-04-01

    The use of high quality fused silica capillary nanospray tips is critical for obtaining reliable and reproducible electrospray/MS data; however, reproducible laboratory preparation of such tips is a challenging task. In this work, we report on the design and construction of low-cost grinding device assembled from 3D printed and commercially easily available components. Detailed description and characterization of the grinding device is complemented by freely accessible files in stl and skp format allowing easy laboratory replication of the device. The process of sharpening is aimed at achieving maximal symmetricity, surface smoothness and repeatability of the conus shape. Moreover, the presented grinding device brings possibility to fabricate the nanospray tips of desired dimensions regardless of the commercial availability. On several samples of biological nature (reserpine, rabbit plasma, and the mixture of three aminoacids), performance of fabricated tips is shown on CE coupled to MS analysis. The special interest is paid to the effect of tip sharpness. PMID:26626777

  6. First attempt at interpreting millimetric observations of CO in comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) using 3D+t hydrodynamical coma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissier, J.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Rodionov, A. V.; Crifo, J.-F.

    2010-02-01

    Context. Millimetre line observations of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) close to perihelion, completed using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer, have detected temporal variations in the CO J(2-1) 230 GHz line shape, and in the position of its maximum emission brightness within the field-of-view, whose heuristic analysis has suggested the presence in the coma of a slowly rotating spiral-shaped enhancement of the CO density. Aims: Here, we reanalyse these data using a physically consistent model of the coma. Methods: We consider a large, rotating, icy nucleus with an arbitrarily aspherical shape and an adhoc rotation mode, and compute its tridimensional, time-dependent (”3D+t”) mixed CO + H2O coma, using a previously developed tridimensional hydrodynamical code (HDC). The line emission of CO is then computed using a molecular excitation and radiation transfer code (ERC). In the present, pioneering phase, the HDC and ERC both contain crude, and not thoroughly mutually consistent approximations. Several alternative CO surface flux distributions are considered, and the resulting CO 230 GHz line spectra and brightness maps are compared with observations. Results: We find that when an uniform surface flux of CO is assumed, the spiral structures created by the nucleus asphericity in the CO coma are too faint to account for the observational data, whereas we confirm earlier conclusions based on a heuristic approach that the assumption of an area of suitable dimensions and localization with increased CO flux leads to results in agreement with a large subset of (but not all) the data. This suggests that the true CO coma production map may be more complex than the presently assumed rather simple-minded one. Refined and mutually consistent HDC and ERC are needed for a more satisfactory interpretation of the present and any similar future data. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG

  7. A coupling simulation based on a hydrodynamics and water quality model of the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nianqing; Westrich, Bernhard; Jiang, Simin; Wang, Yan

    2011-01-01

    SummaryThe rapid economic development has caused heavy pollution in the Pearl River Delta Region (PRDR) and neighboring regions. In order to investigate the polluted characteristics, a coupled modelling approach has been deployed and the study area in the Pear River Delta is divided into two modelling systems: a river network that is simulated by a 1D hydrodynamic and water quality model, and an estuary that is modelled by a 3D model. The 1D river network model is coupled with the 3D estuary model based on the mass conservation criteria. The hydrodynamic (HD) model is based on 1D hydrostatic shallow water equations, and is solved by the Alternating Direction Implicit Approach. The water quality (WQ) model component is based on advection-diffusion equations. Some physical and bio-chemical processes are included in the WQ model to address the water pollution problems by different pollution substances, in particular, to the chemical oxygen demand (COD). The water quality data of the main rivers from 2004 to 2007 were collected, processed and evaluated. Because no detailed water quality data in the river is available, the COD source pollution intensity in the water quality model is taking the pollutant load from the confluence of the main five outlets of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) for 1996-2007 as surrogate. The results show that the pollutants from the PRDR have a large impact on the quality of the Hong Kong seawater and much more serious in the wet season with high river discharge. An insight of the flow and transportation mechanism in the river and estuary system has been obtained through the paper, and a reliable basis to control water pollution of the Pearl River Delta is provided in this paper.

  8. Regional-scale geomechanical impact assessment of underground coal gasification by coupled 3D thermo-mechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Christopher; Kempka, Thomas; Kapusta, Krzysztof; Stańczyk, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) has the potential to increase the world-wide coal reserves by utilization of coal deposits not mineable by conventional methods. The UCG process involves combusting coal in situ to produce a high-calorific synthesis gas, which can be applied for electricity generation or chemical feedstock production. Apart from its high economic potentials, UCG may induce site-specific environmental impacts such as fault reactivation, induced seismicity and ground subsidence, potentially inducing groundwater pollution. Changes overburden hydraulic conductivity resulting from thermo-mechanical effects may introduce migration pathways for UCG contaminants. Due to the financial efforts associated with UCG field trials, numerical modeling has been an important methodology to study coupled processes considering UCG performance. Almost all previous UCG studies applied 1D or 2D models for that purpose, that do not allow to predict the performance of a commercial-scale UCG operation. Considering our previous findings, demonstrating that far-field models can be run at a higher computational efficiency by using temperature-independent thermo-mechanical parameters, representative coupled simulations based on complex 3D regional-scale models were employed in the present study. For that purpose, a coupled thermo-mechanical 3D model has been developed to investigate the environmental impacts of UCG based on a regional-scale of the Polish Wieczorek mine located in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin. The model size is 10 km × 10 km × 5 km with ten dipping lithological layers, a double fault and 25 UCG reactors. Six different numerical simulation scenarios were investigated, considering the transpressive stress regime present in that part of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin. Our simulation results demonstrate that the minimum distance between the UCG reactors is about the six-fold of the coal seam thickness to avoid hydraulic communication between the single UCG

  9. Coupling ANIMO and MT3DMS for 3D regional-scale modeling of nutrient transport in soil and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, G.; Del Val Alonso, L.; Groenendijk, P.; Griffioen, J.

    2012-12-01

    We developed an on-line coupling between the 1D/quasi-2D nutrient transport model ANIMO and the 3D groundwater transport model code MT3DMS. ANIMO is a detailed, process-oriented model code for the simulation of nitrate leaching to groundwater, N- and P-loads on surface waters and emissions of greenhouse gasses. It is the leading nutrient fate and transport code in the Netherlands where it is used primarily for the evaluation of fertilization related legislation. In addition, the code is applied frequently in international research projects. MT3DMS is probably the most commonly used groundwater solute transport package worldwide. The on-line model coupling ANIMO-MT3DMS combines the state-of-the-art descriptions of the biogeochemical cycles in ANIMO with the advantages of using a 3D approach for the transport through the saturated domain. These advantages include accounting for regional lateral transport, considering groundwater-surface water interactions more explicitly, and the possibility of using MODFLOW to obtain the flow fields. An additional merit of the on-line coupling concept is that it preserves feedbacks between the saturated and unsaturated zone. We tested ANIMO-MT3DMS by simulating nutrient transport for the period 1970-2007 in a Dutch agricultural polder catchment covering an area of 118 km2. The transient groundwater flow field had a temporal resolution of one day and was calculated with MODFLOW-MetaSWAP. The horizontal resolution of the model grid was 100x100m and consisted of 25 layers of varying thickness. To keep computation times manageable, we prepared MT3DMS for parallel computing, which in itself is a relevant development for a large community of groundwater transport modelers. For the parameterization of the soil, we applied a standard classification approach, representing the area by 60 units with unique combinations of soil type, land use and geohydrological setting. For the geochemical parameterization of the deeper subsurface, however, we

  10. SABAE-HW3D: a Meteor-Hydrological Model Coupling the Land Surface to Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukili, Y.; Woodbury, A. D.

    2007-12-01

    A new coupled model linking the land surface scheme SABAE-HW with the saturated groundwater flow is introduced. SABAE-HW stands for: Soil Atmosphere Boundary, Accurate Evaluations of Heat and Water. It was presented (Loukili et al., 2007) as a parallel extension to the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS) which permits a free choice of soil column depth and layers. This development is important as it allows for the coupling of the atmosphere, land surface and subsurface zones. The generic domain under study is subdivided into soil columns whose surface areas represent GCM grid squares. The depths of columns extend to the saturated zone where a water table lower boundary condition is prescribed. In each column the unsaturated flow is forced by the corresponding meteorological data, and the moisture (liquid and frozen) and temperature profiles are computed by SABAE-HW using the half hour time step. The horizontal flow in the saturated zone is described by the vertically integrated model incorporating a storage term, and discretized using a finite volume scheme operating on the same GCM quadrilateral mesh. Since the saturated flow model affords larger time steps, bottom drainages from soil columns are summed up and input as cell recharges. Meanwhile, as the water table fluctuates, the individual column's mesh is allowed to deform. This physically based coupling strategy was selected for its superiority in providing stable and consistent results. In fact, the convergence to steady state situations in both the unsaturated and saturated zones is realized in many validation numerical tests. Moreover, our SABAE-HW3D code was successfully benchmarked against the finite element code Seep/W (Geo-Slope International, 2002) for steady and transient groundwater flows through different soil types. Even when handling coarse grids, SABAE-HW3D solutions are free of moisture oscillation and under or overshoot near the water table. The model is used to understand and assess properly

  11. 3D Numerical Simulation on Thermal Flow Coupling Field of Stainless Steel During Twin-Roll Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lianlian; Liao, Bo; Guo, Jing; Liu, Ligang; Hu, Hongyan; Zhang, Yue; Yang, Qingxiang

    2014-01-01

    The surface crack and lateral crack of the AISI 304 stainless steel thin strip produced by twin-roll casting were observed. The temperature at the center of outlet during twin-roll-casting process was determined by infrared thermometer. In order to avoid the surface cracks of the casting strip, the thermal flow coupling field of AISI 304 stainless steel during twin-roll-casting process was simulated by a 3D fluid-structure coupling model. According to the simulation result, the effect of the casting speed on thermal flow field was analyzed and the process parameters were optimized. Moreover, by studying heat flux curves, the heat transfer mechanism between molten pool and roll was analyzed. The results show that, with the increase of the casting speed, the temperature of the molten pool increases and the solidification point moves toward the outlet. Meanwhile, the whirlpool above gets larger. Based on the solidification front position, the optimized process parameters are 1500 °C and 0.37 m/s. The heat transfer mechanism between molten pool and roll contains direct contacting heat transfer and air gap heat transfer.

  12. Particle Acceleration in the Low Corona Over Broad Longitudes: Coupling Between 3D Magnetohydrodynamic and Energetic Particle Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.; Schwadron, N.; Lee, M. A.; Booth, A. C.; Spence, H.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.; Kozarev, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent work on the coupling between 3D energetic particle models (e.g., the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Model, EPREM) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs, e.g., the PSI MAS model) has demonstrated the efficacy of compression regions in front of fast CMEs for particle acceleration from remarkably low in the corona (3-6 solar radii). Typically particle acceleration becomes rapid beyond 3Rs and often in regions where compression regions have not yet formed active shocks. The challenge for forming large SEP events in such compression-acceleration scenarios is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration region while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream (away from the Sun) from the compression region. Simulations show rapid particle acceleration in the range of 3-8 Rs over a broad longitudinal region (80°) resulting from the pile-up of magnetic flux in the compression and the subsequent expansion of these fields. These results have important implications for multi-instrument observations that will allow Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter to test the developing paradigm of SEP acceleration and transport from coronal compressions. We present here recent coupled simulations for SEP acceleration and transport, including energetic particle and CME plasma profiles. The broadness of the longitudinal profile from such events may be a key observational test of compression acceleration in the low corona.

  13. Handy Compton camera using 3D position-sensitive scintillators coupled with large-area monolithic MPPC arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Takeuchi, K.; Kato, T.; Nakamori, T.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Adachi, S.; Uchiyama, T.; Yamamoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    The release of radioactive isotopes (mainly 137Cs, 134Cs and 131I) from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant remains a serious problem in Japan. To help identify radiation hotspots and ensure effective decontamination operation, we are developing a novel Compton camera weighting only 1 kg and measuring just ∼10 cm2 in size. Despite its compactness, the camera realizes a wide 180° field of vision with a sensitivity about 50 times superior to other cameras being tested in Fukushima. We expect that a hotspot producing a 5 μSv/h dose at a distance of 3 m can be imaged every 10 s, with angular resolution better than 10° (FWHM). The 3D position-sensitive scintillators and thin monolithic MPPC arrays are the key technologies developed here. By measuring the pulse-height ratio of MPPC-arrays coupled at both ends of a Ce:GAGG scintillator block, the depth of interaction (DOI) is obtained for incident gamma rays as well as the usual 2D positions, with accuracy better than 2 mm. By using two identical 10 mm cubic Ce:GAGG scintillators as a scatterer and an absorber, we confirmed that the 3D configuration works well as a high-resolution gamma camera, and also works as spectrometer achieving typical energy resolution of 9.8% (FWHM) for 662 keV gamma rays. We present the current status of the prototype camera (weighting 1.5 kg and measuring 8.5×14×16 cm3 in size) being fabricated by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Although the camera still operates in non-DOI mode, angular resolution as high as 14° (FWHM) was achieved with an integration time of 30 s for the assumed hotspot described above.

  14. Hydrodynamic coupling of particle inclusions embedded in curved lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Jon Karl; Atzberger, Paul J

    2016-08-10

    We develop theory and computational methods to investigate particle inclusions embedded within curved lipid bilayer membranes. We consider the case of spherical lipid vesicles where inclusion particles are coupled through (i) intramembrane hydrodynamics, (ii) traction stresses with the external and trapped solvent fluid, and (iii) intermonolayer slip between the two leaflets of the bilayer. We investigate relative to flat membranes how the membrane curvature and topology augment hydrodynamic responses. We show how both the translational and rotational mobility of protein inclusions are effected by the membrane curvature, ratio of intramembrane viscosity to solvent viscosity, and intermonolayer slip. For general investigations of many-particle dynamics, we also discuss how our approaches can be used to treat the collective diffusion and hydrodynamic coupling within spherical bilayers. PMID:27373277

  15. Development of Fully Coupled Aeroelastic and Hydrodynamic Models for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, J. M.; Sclavounos, P. D.

    2006-01-01

    Aeroelastic simulation tools are routinely used to design and analyze onshore wind turbines, in order to obtain cost effective machines that achieve favorable performance while maintaining structural integrity. These tools employ sophisticated models of wind-inflow; aerodynamic, gravitational, and inertial loading of the rotor, nacelle, and tower; elastic effects within and between components; and mechanical actuation and electrical responses of the generator and of control and protection systems. For offshore wind turbines, additional models of the hydrodynamic loading in regular and irregular seas, the dynamic coupling between the support platform motions and wind turbine motions, and the dynamic characterization of mooring systems for compliant floating platforms are also important. Hydrodynamic loading includes contributions from hydrostatics, wave radiation, and wave scattering, including free surface memory effects. The integration of all of these models into comprehensive simulation tools, capable of modeling the fully coupled aeroelastic and hydrodynamic responses of floating offshore wind turbines, is presented.

  16. Coupling poroelasticity and CFD for cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tully, Brett; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2009-06-01

    This research uses a novel coupling of poroelastic theory and computational fluid dynamics to investigate acute hydrocephalus resulting from stenosis of the cerebral aqueduct. By coupling poroelastic theory with a multidimensional simulation of the cerebral aqueduct we are able to investigate, for the first time, the impact of physically relevant stenosis patterns on ventricular enlargement, accounting for the nonintuitive long time history responses of the ventricular system. Preliminary findings demonstrate clearly the importance that the fluidic-poroelastic coupling plays: ventricular enlargement is significantly smaller with local stenosis patterns and almost all of the observable pressure drop occurs across the stenosis. Short timescale effects [O(heartbeat)] are explored and their contribution to the long timescales interrogated. PMID:19304478

  17. Development of a 3D Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum (SPAC) coupled to a Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.; Lorenzetti, D.; Tang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Exchange of water between the atmosphere and biosphere via evapotranspiration (ET) influences global hydrological, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. Isotopic analysis has shown that evapotranspiration over the continents is largely dominated by transpiration. Water is taken up from soil by plant roots, transported through the plant's vascular system, and evaporated from the leaves. Yet current Land Surface Models (LSMs) integrated into Earth System Models (ESMs) treat plant roots as passive components. These models distribute the ET sink vertically over the soil column, neglect the vertical pressure distribution along the plant vascular system, and assume that leaves can directly access water from any soil layer within the root zone. Numerous studies have suggested that increased warming due to climate change will lead drought and heat-induced tree mortality. A more mechanistic treatment of water dynamics in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (SPAC) is essential for investigating the fate of ecosystems under a warmer climate. In this work, we describe a 3D SPAC model that can be coupled to a LSM. The SPAC model uses the variably saturated Richards equations to simulate water transport. The model uses individual governing equations and constitutive relationships for the various SPAC components (i.e., soil, root, and xylem). Finite volume spatial discretization and backward Euler temporal discretization is used to solve the SPAC model. The Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) is used to numerically integrate the discretized system of equations. Furthermore, PETSc's multi-physics coupling capability (DMComposite) is used to solve the tightly coupled system of equations of the SPAC model. Numerical results are presented for multiple test problems.

  18. Development of a 3D Coupled Physical-Biogeochemical Model for the Marseille Coastal Area (NW Mediterranean Sea): What Complexity Is Required in the Coastal Zone?

    PubMed Central

    Fraysse, Marion; Pinazo, Christel; Faure, Vincent Martin; Fuchs, Rosalie; Lazzari, Paolo; Raimbault, Patrick; Pairaud, Ivane

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial inputs (natural and anthropogenic) from rivers, the atmosphere and physical processes strongly impact the functioning of coastal pelagic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to develop a tool for the examination of these impacts on the Marseille coastal area, which experiences inputs from the Rhone River and high rates of atmospheric deposition. Therefore, a new 3D coupled physical/biogeochemical model was developed. Two versions of the biogeochemical model were tested, one model considering only the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles and a second model that also considers the phosphorus (P) cycle. Realistic simulations were performed for a period of 5 years (2007–2011). The model accuracy assessment showed that both versions of the model were able of capturing the seasonal changes and spatial characteristics of the ecosystem. The model also reproduced upwelling events and the intrusion of Rhone River water into the Bay of Marseille well. Those processes appeared to greatly impact this coastal oligotrophic area because they induced strong increases in chlorophyll-a concentrations in the surface layer. The model with the C, N and P cycles better reproduced the chlorophyll-a concentrations at the surface than did the model without the P cycle, especially for the Rhone River water. Nevertheless, the chlorophyll-a concentrations at depth were better represented by the model without the P cycle. Therefore, the complexity of the biogeochemical model introduced errors into the model results, but it also improved model results during specific events. Finally, this study suggested that in coastal oligotrophic areas, improvements in the description and quantification of the hydrodynamics and the terrestrial inputs should be preferred over increasing the complexity of the biogeochemical model. PMID:24324589

  19. Coupling and Hydrodynamic Limit for the Inclusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opoku, Alex; Redig, Frank

    2015-08-01

    We show propagation of local equilibrium for the symmetric inclusion process (SIP) after diffusive rescaling of space and time, as well as the local equilibrium property of the non-equilibrium steady state in the boundary driven SIP. The main tool is self-duality and a coupling between SIP particles and independent random walkers.

  20. Running Faster Together: Huge Speed up of Thermal Ratchets due to Hydrodynamic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Frenkel, Daan

    2012-10-01

    We present simulations that reveal a surprisingly large effect of hydrodynamic coupling on the speed of thermal ratchet motors. The model that we use considers particles performing thermal ratchet motion in a hydrodynamic solvent. Using particle-based, mesoscopic simulations that maintain local momentum conservation, we analyze quantitatively how the coupling to the surrounding fluid affects ratchet motion. We find that coupling can increase the mean velocity of the moving particles by almost 2 orders of magnitude, precisely because ratchet motion has both a diffusive and a deterministic component. The resulting coupling also leads to the formation of aggregates at longer times. The correlated motion that we describe increases the efficiency of motor-delivered cargo transport and we speculate that the mechanism that we have uncovered may play a key role in speeding up molecular motor-driven intracellular transport.

  1. A 3D MOF constructed from dysprosium(III) oxalate and capping ligands: ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Ming; Zhang, De-Qing; Zhu, Dao-Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel 3D MOF based on dysprosium(iii) oxalate and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), {[Dy(C2O4)1.5phen]·0.5H2O}n (1), has been hydrothermally synthesized. The Dy(3+) ion acts as a typical Y-shaped node, linking to each other to generate an interesting 3D topology structure. Complex 1 is the first 3D DyMOF displaying both ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation. PMID:26961387

  2. The CO2 system in the Mediterranean Sea inferred from a 3D coupled physical-biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulses, Caroline; Kessouri, Fayçal; Estournel, Claude; Marsaleix, Patrick; Beuvier, Jonathan; Somot, Samuel; Touratier, Frank; Goyet, Catherine; Coppola, Laurent; Diamond, Emilie; Metzl, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The semi-enclosed Mediterranean Sea characterized by short residence times is considered as a region particularly sensitive to natural and anthropogenic forcing. Due to scarce CO2 measurements in the whole basin, the CO2 system, for instance the air-sea CO2 exchanges and the effects of the increase of atmospheric CO2, are poorly characterized. 3D physical-biogeochemical coupled models are unique tools that can provide integrated view and gain understanding in the temporal and spatial variation of the CO2 system variables (dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, partial pressure of CO2 and pH). An extended version of the biogeochemical model Eco3m-S (Auger et al., 2014), that describes the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and silica, was forced by a regional circulation model (Beuvier et al., 2012) to investigate the CO2 system in the Mediterranean Sea over a 13-years period (2001-2013). First, the quality of the modelling was evaluated through comparisons with satellite and in situ observations collected in the whole basin over the study period (Touratier and Goyet, 2009; 2011 ; Rivaro et al., 2010 ; Pujo-Pay et al., 2011 ; Alvarez et al, 2014). The model reasonably reproduced the various biological regimes (north-western phytoplanctonic bloom regime, oligotrophic eastern regime, etc.) as well as the recorded spatial distribution and temporal variations of the carbonate system variables. The coupled model was then used to estimate the air-sea pCO2 exchanges and the transport of DIC and TA towards the Atlantic Ocean at the Strait of Gibraltar.

  3. Kohn-Sham Band Structure Benchmark Including Spin-Orbit Coupling for 2D and 3D Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, William; Blum, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Accurate electronic band structures serve as a primary indicator of the suitability of a material for a given application, e.g., as electronic or catalytic materials. Computed band structures, however, are subject to a host of approximations, some of which are more obvious (e.g., the treatment of the exchange-correlation of self-energy) and others less obvious (e.g., the treatment of core, semicore, or valence electrons, handling of relativistic effects, or the accuracy of the underlying basis set used). We here provide a set of accurate Kohn-Sham band structure benchmarks, using the numeric atom-centered all-electron electronic structure code FHI-aims combined with the ``traditional'' PBE functional and the hybrid HSE functional, to calculate core, valence, and low-lying conduction bands of a set of 2D and 3D materials. Benchmarks are provided with and without effects of spin-orbit coupling, using quasi-degenerate perturbation theory to predict spin-orbit splittings. This work is funded by Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft.

  4. Photopatterning of hydrogel scaffolds coupled to filter materials using stereolithography for perfused 3D culture of hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Neiman, Jaclyn A Shepard; Raman, Ritu; Chan, Vincent; Rhoads, Mary G; Raredon, Micha Sam B; Velazquez, Jeremy J; Dyer, Rachel L; Bashir, Rashid; Hammond, Paula T; Griffith, Linda G

    2015-04-01

    In vitro models that recapitulate the liver's structural and functional complexity could prolong hepatocellular viability and function to improve platforms for drug toxicity studies and understanding liver pathophysiology. Here, stereolithography (SLA) was employed to fabricate hydrogel scaffolds with open channels designed for post-seeding and perfused culture of primary hepatocytes that form 3D structures in a bioreactor. Photopolymerizable polyethylene glycol-based hydrogels were fabricated coupled to chemically activated, commercially available filters (polycarbonate and polyvinylidene fluoride) using a chemistry that permitted cell viability, and was robust enough to withstand perfused culture of up to 1 µL/s for at least 7 days. SLA energy dose, photoinitiator concentrations, and pretreatment conditions were screened to determine conditions that maximized cell viability and hydrogel bonding to the filter. Multiple open channel geometries were readily achieved, and included ellipses and rectangles. Rectangular open channels employed for subsequent studies had final dimensions on the order of 350 µm by 850 µm. Cell seeding densities and flow rates that promoted cell viability were determined. Perfused culture of primary hepatocytes in hydrogel scaffolds in the presence of soluble epidermal growth factor (EGF) prolonged the maintenance of albumin production throughout the 7-day culture relative to 2D controls. This technique of bonding hydrogel scaffolds can be employed to fabricate soft scaffolds for a number of bioreactor configurations and applications. PMID:25384798

  5. Automotive Underhood Thermal Management Analysis Using 3-D Coupled Thermal-Hydrodynamic Computer Models: Thermal Radiation Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pannala, S; D'Azevedo, E; Zacharia, T

    2002-02-26

    The goal of the radiation modeling effort was to develop and implement a radiation algorithm that is fast and accurate for the underhood environment. As part of this CRADA, a net-radiation model was chosen to simulate radiative heat transfer in an underhood of a car. The assumptions (diffuse-gray and uniform radiative properties in each element) reduce the problem tremendously and all the view factors for radiation thermal calculations can be calculated once and for all at the beginning of the simulation. The cost for online integration of heat exchanges due to radiation is found to be less than 15% of the baseline CHAD code and thus very manageable. The off-line view factor calculation is constructed to be very modular and has been completely integrated to read CHAD grid files and the output from this code can be read into the latest version of CHAD. Further integration has to be performed to accomplish the same with STAR-CD. The main outcome of this effort is to obtain a highly scalable and portable simulation capability to model view factors for underhood environment (for e.g. a view factor calculation which took 14 hours on a single processor only took 14 minutes on 64 processors). The code has also been validated using a simple test case where analytical solutions are available. This simulation capability gives underhood designers in the automotive companies the ability to account for thermal radiation - which usually is critical in the underhood environment and also turns out to be one of the most computationally expensive components of underhood simulations. This report starts off with the original work plan as elucidated in the proposal in section B. This is followed by Technical work plan to accomplish the goals of the project in section C. In section D, background to the current work is provided with references to the previous efforts this project leverages on. The results are discussed in section 1E. This report ends with conclusions and future scope of work in section F.

  6. Hydrodynamic coupling of two sharp-edged beams vibrating in a viscous fluid

    PubMed Central

    Intartaglia, Carmela; Soria, Leonardo; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study flexural vibrations of two thin beams that are coupled through an otherwise quiescent viscous fluid. While most of the research has focused on isolated beams immersed in placid fluids, inertial and viscous hydrodynamic coupling is ubiquitous across a multitude of engineering and natural systems comprising arrays of flexible structures. In these cases, the distributed hydrodynamic loading experienced by each oscillating structure is not only related to its absolute motion but is also influenced by its relative motion with respect to the neighbouring structures. Here, we focus on linear vibrations of two identical beams for low Knudsen, Keulegan–Carpenter and squeeze numbers. Thus, we describe the fluid flow using unsteady Stokes hydrodynamics and we propose a boundary integral formulation to compute pertinent hydrodynamic functions to study the fluid effect. We validate the proposed theoretical approach through experiments on centimetre-size compliant cantilevers that are subjected to underwater base-excitation. We consider different geometric arrangements, beam interdistances and excitation frequencies to ascertain the model accuracy in terms of the relevant non-dimensional parameters. PMID:24511249

  7. Predictions of non-LTE spectra from large scale 3D magneto-hydrodynamic modelling of wire array Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niasse, Nicolas; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2012-10-01

    The last few years have seen considerable advances in the application of high performance computing techniques to 3D simulations of wire array Z-pinches. Whilst the intense soft X-ray radiation output is the principle application of wire arrays, the ability to encompass spectrally detailed models of this emission within such 3D calculations was thought to be computationally prohibitive. We have developed a non-LTE atomic and radiation physics model with detailed configuration accounting and n-l splitting which is sufficiently streamlined to run in-line with large scale 3D simulations. In order to handle the volume of data generated by the spectral treatment of the billions of numerical cells, a novel data structure derived from a self-balancing binary search tree was developed, enabling the use of non-LTE DCA calculations within large scale 3D simulations for the first time. A brief description of the model is provided and the application of the simulations to understanding the X-ray generation processes within wire array Z-pinches on the Z generator at Sandia National Laboratory is reported. The contribution of the ion temperature and the motion of the unstable plasma at stagnation to the Doppler widths of the lines is described in detail.

  8. Modeling the coupling of reaction kinetics and hydrodynamics in a collapsing cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Sudib; Deymier, Pierre; Muralidharan, Krishna; Frantziskonis, G.; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a model of cavitation based on the multiphase Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) that allows for coupling between the hydrodynamics of a collapsing cavity and supported solute chemical species. We demonstrate that this model can also be coupled to deterministic or stochastic chemical reactions. In a two-species model of chemical reactions (with a major and a minor specie), the major difference observed between the deterministic and stochastic reactions takes the form of random fluctuations in concentration of the minor species. We demonstrate that advection associated with the hydrodynamics of a collapsing cavity leads to highly inhomogeneous concentration of solutes. In turn these inhomogeneities in concentration may lead to significant increase in concentration-dependent reaction rates and can result in a local enhancement in the production of minor species.

  9. A hybrid model for coupling kinetic corrections of fusion reactivity to hydrodynamic implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; McDevitt, C. J.; Guo, Zehua; Berk, H. L.

    2014-03-01

    Inertial confinement fusion requires an imploded target in which a central hot spot is surrounded by a cold and dense pusher. The hot spot/pusher interface can take complicated shape in three dimensions due to hydrodynamic mix. It is also a transition region where the Knudsen and inverse Knudsen layer effect can significantly modify the fusion reactivity in comparison with the commonly used value evaluated with background Maxwellians. Here, we describe a hybrid model that couples the kinetic correction of fusion reactivity to global hydrodynamic implosion simulations. The key ingredient is a non-perturbative treatment of the tail ions in the interface region where the Gamow ion Knudsen number approaches or surpasses order unity. The accuracy of the coupling scheme is controlled by the precise criteria for matching the non-perturbative kinetic model to perturbative solutions in both configuration space and velocity space.

  10. Dynamically Coupled Food-web and Hydrodynamic Modeling with ADH-CASM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piercy, C.; Swannack, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    Oysters and freshwater mussels are "ecological engineers," modifying the local water quality by filtering zooplankton and other suspended particulate matter from the water column and flow hydraulics by impinging on the near-bed flow environment. The success of sessile, benthic invertebrates such as oysters depends on environmental factors including but not limited to temperature, salinity, and flow regime. Typically food-web and other types of ecological models use flow and water quality data as direct input without regard to the feedback between the ecosystem and the physical environment. The USACE-ERDC has developed a coupled hydrodynamic-ecological modeling approach that dynamically couples a 2-D hydrodynamic and constituent transport model, Adaptive Hydraulics (ADH), with a bioenergetics food-web model, the Comprehensive Aquatics Systems Model (CASM), which captures the dynamic feedback between aquatic ecological systems and the environment. We present modeling results from restored oyster reefs in the Great Wicomico River on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay, which quantify ecosystem services such as the influence of the benthic ecosystem on water quality. Preliminary results indicate that while the influence of oyster reefs on bulk flow dynamics is limited due to the localized influence of oyster reefs, large reefs and the associated benthic ecosystem can create measurable changes in the concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon in the areas around reefs. We also present a sensitivity analysis to quantify the relative sensitivity of the coupled ADH-CASM model to both hydrodynamic and ecological parameter choice.

  11. Nitrogen transfers off Walvis Bay: a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical modeling approach in the Namibian upwelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutknecht, E.; Dadou, I.; Marchesiello, P.; Cambon, G.; Le Vu, B.; Sudre, J.; Garçon, V.; Machu, E.; Rixen, T.; Kock, A.; Flohr, A.; Paulmier, A.; Lavik, G.

    2013-06-01

    Eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUS) are regions of high primary production often associated with oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). They represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N) cycle. By exporting organic matter (OM) and nutrients produced in the coastal region to the open ocean, EBUS can play an important role in sustaining primary production in subtropical gyres. However, losses of fixed inorganic N through denitrification and anammox processes take place in oxygen depleted environments such as EBUS, and can potentially mitigate the role of these regions as a source of N to the open ocean. EBUS can also represent a considerable source of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere, affecting the atmospheric budget of N2O. In this paper a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical model (ROMS/BioEBUS) is used to investigate the N budget in the Namibian upwelling system. The main processes linked to EBUS and associated OMZs are taken into account. The study focuses on the northern part of the Benguela upwelling system (BUS), especially the Walvis Bay area (between 22° S and 24° S) where the OMZ is well developed. Fluxes of N off the Walvis Bay area are estimated in order to understand and quantify (1) the total N offshore export from the upwelling area, representing a possible N source that sustains primary production in the South Atlantic subtropical gyre; (2) export production and subsequent losses of fixed N via denitrification and anammox under suboxic conditions (O2 < 25 mmol O2 m-3); and (3) the N2O emission to the atmosphere in the upwelling area. In the mixed layer, the total N offshore export is estimated as 8.5 ± 3.9 × 1010 mol N yr-1 at 10° E off the Walvis Bay area, with a mesoscale contribution of 20%. Extrapolated to the whole BUS, the coastal N source for the subtropical gyre corresponds to 0.1 ± 0.04 mol N m-2 yr-1. This N flux represents a major source of N for the gyre compared with other N sources, and contributes 28% of the new primary

  12. Basis set limit electronic excitation energies, ionization potentials, and electron affinities for the 3d transition metal atoms: Coupled cluster and multireference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabanov, Nikolai B.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2006-08-01

    Recently developed correlation consistent basis sets for the first row transition metal elements Sc-Zn have been utilized to determine complete basis set (CBS) scalar relativistic electron affinities, ionization potentials, and 4s23dn -2-4s1dn -1 electronic excitation energies with single reference coupled cluster methods [CCSD(T), CCSDT, and CCSDTQ] and multireference configuration interaction with three reference spaces: 3d4s, 3d4s4p, and 3d4s4p3d'. The theoretical values calculated with the highest order coupled cluster techniques at the CBS limit, including extrapolations to full configuration interaction, are well within 1kcal/mol of the corresponding experimental data. For the early transition metal elements (Sc-Mn) the internally contracted multireference averaged coupled pair functional method yielded excellent agreement with experiment; however, the atomic properties for the late transition metals (Mn-Zn) proved to be much more difficult to describe with this level of theory, even with the largest reference function of the present work.

  13. Methodology toward 3D micro X-ray fluorescence imaging using an energy dispersive charge-coupled device detector.

    PubMed

    Garrevoet, Jan; Vekemans, Bart; Tack, Pieter; De Samber, Björn; Schmitz, Sylvia; Brenker, Frank E; Falkenberg, Gerald; Vincze, Laszlo

    2014-12-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) methodology based on a novel 2D energy dispersive CCD detector has been developed and evaluated at the P06 beamline of the Petra-III storage ring (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. This method is based on the illumination of the investigated sample cross-section by a horizontally focused beam (vertical sheet beam) while fluorescent X-rays are detected perpendicularly to the sheet beam by a 2D energy dispersive (ED) CCD detector allowing the collection of 2D cross-sectional elemental images of a certain depth within the sample, limited only by signal self-absorption effects. 3D elemental information is obtained by a linear scan of the sample in the horizontal direction across the vertically oriented sheet beam and combining the detected cross-sectional images into a 3D elemental distribution data set. Results of the 3D μXRF analysis of mineral inclusions in natural deep Earth diamonds are presented to illustrate this new methodology. PMID:25346101

  14. Coupled 2D-3D finite element method for analysis of a skin panel with a discontinuous stiffener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. T.; Lotts, C. G.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Krishnamurthy, T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a computationally efficient analysis method which was used to predict detailed stress states in a typical composite compression panel with a discontinuous hat stiffener. A global-local approach was used. The global model incorporated both 2D shell and 3D brick elements connected by newly developed transition elements. Most of the panel was modeled with 2D elements, while 3D elements were employed to model the stiffener flange and the adjacent skin. Both linear and geometrically nonlinear analyses were performed on the global model. The effect of geometric nonlinearity induced by the eccentric load path due to the discontinuous hat stiffener was significant. The local model used a fine mesh of 3D brick elements to model the region at the end of the stiffener. Boundary conditions of the local 3D model were obtained by spline interpolation of the nodal displacements from the global analysis. Detailed in-plane and through-the-thickness stresses were calculated in the flange-skin interface near the end of the stiffener.

  15. Coherent dynamic structure factors of strongly coupled plasmas: A generalized hydrodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Di; Zhao, Bin; Hu, GuangYue; Gong, Tao; Xia, YuQing; Zheng, Jian

    2016-05-01

    A generalized hydrodynamic fluctuation model is proposed to simplify the calculation of the dynamic structure factor S(ω, k) of non-ideal plasmas using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. In this model, the kinetic and correlation effects are both included in hydrodynamic coefficients, which are considered as functions of the coupling strength (Γ) and collision parameter (kλei), where λei is the electron-ion mean free path. A particle-particle particle-mesh molecular dynamics simulation code is also developed to simulate the dynamic structure factors, which are used to benchmark the calculation of our model. A good agreement between the two different approaches confirms the reliability of our model.

  16. Improving Ground Motion Simulation Capabilities for Underground Explosion Monitoring: Coupling Hydrodynamic-To Solvers and Studies of Emplacement Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Rodgers, A.; Lomov, I.; Petersson, A.; Sjogreen, B.; Vorobiev, O.; Chipman, V.

    2011-12-01

    We report research being performed to improve underground nuclear explosion (UNE) monitoring by developing capabilities for hydrodynamic modeling of ground motions. This effort involves work along two thrusts: 1) we are coupling hydrodynamic (non-linear shock) and seismic (linear anelastic) wave propagation codes; and 2) we are investigating the effect of source emplacement conditions on ground motions in the near field due to nonlinearity and comparing with the empirical models. For both thrusts we are modeling explosion motions using GEODYN, a fully three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic code developed at LLNL. This code incorporates many important features for modeling shock waves in geologic materials, including non-linear response (e.g. porosity, tensile failure, yielding), topography, gravity, 3D material heterogeneities and adaptive mesh refinement. The calculation accuracy is well validated with the analytical solutions to the Lamb's problem and to the finite dilatational volume source at depth in a linear elastic medium. In order to propagate full waveform solutions from hydrodynamic simulations to distances where seismic measurements are made we are coupling GEODYN to WPP (LLNL's anelastic finite difference code for seismic wave simulation). Complex motions computed by GEODYN for explosions are recorded on a dense grid spanning the ranges where motions become linear (elastic). These wavefield records are processed and embedded into the WPP domain where they are introduced as a boundary driving source and continue to propagate as elastic waves at much lower numerical cost than with nonlinear GEODYN. The coupling scheme is validated by comparing the analytical, direct GEODYN solutions and WPP solutions to the finite dilatational volume source at depth in a linear elastic medium, and also by comparing the direct GEODYN solutions and WPP solutions to a complex 1kt chemical explosion in nonlinear granite at stations beyond the elastic radius. The excellent

  17. Fullwave coupling to a 3D antenna code using Green's function formulation of wave-particle response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John; Bonoli, P. T.; Bilato, R.; Brambilla, M.; Maggiora, R.; Lancellotti, V.

    2006-10-01

    Using the fullwave code, TORIC, and the 3D antenna code, TOPICA, we construct a complete linear system for the RF driven plasma. The 3D finite element antenna code, TOPICA, requires an admittance, Y, for the plasma, where B=YE. In this work, TORIC was modified to allow excitation of the (Eη, Eζ) electric field components at the plasma surface, corresponding to a single poloidal and toroidal mode number combination (m,n). This leads to the tensor response: Yn= ( ll Yηη& YηζYζη& Yζζ), where each of the Yn submatrices is Nm in size. It is shown that the admittance matrix is equivalent to a Green's function calculation for the fullwave system and the net work done is less than twice a single fullwave calculation. The admittance calculation is used with loading calculation from TOPICA to construct self consistent plasma and antenna currents.

  18. 3D Time-domain wave modeling in fluid-solid coupled media: a cell-based finite-difference method approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Min, D.; Lim, S.; Yang, J.; Kwon, B.; Yoo, H.

    2009-12-01

    In a conventional marine seismic data analysis, pressure data have been usually interpreted on the basis of acoustic wave equation. The acoustic wave equation, however, only deals with P-wave propagation, and it cannot correctly describe the wave propagation in acoustic-elastic (fluid-solid) coupled media. Recently, in 4C OBC survey (4-component ocean bottom cable), it is possible to acquire both pressure and 3-component displacements (measured at the sea-bottom). Combining pressure and displacement data allows us to interpret subsurface structures more accurately. In order to accurately simulate wave propagation in fluid-solid coupled media, we need an acoustic-elastic coupled modeling algorithm, which deals with displacements in elastic region and pressure in acoustic region. For waveform inversion and reverse-time migration that require a great number of forward modeling, it is essential to develop an efficient scheme that reduces computing time and computer core memory. In this study, we present a 3D time-domain acoustic-elastic coupled modeling algorithm on the basis of the cell-based finite difference method. The cell-based method has proven to properly describe the free-surface boundary, which indicates that it will also properly describe the fluid-solid interface boundaries. In the acoustic-elastic coupled modeling, we first compose cell-based finite differences individually for the 3D acoustic and elastic media, and then combine the differences using the fluid-solid interface boundary conditions. Considering that the 2D acoustic-elastic coupled modeling algorithm gives numerical solutions comparable to analytic solutions, we expect that the 3D acoustic-elastic coupled modeling will correctly describe wave propagation in the fluid-solid coupled media. We apply our algorithm to 3D horizontal two- and three-layer models. Numerical experiments show that the cell-based coupled modeling algorithm properly describes S- and converted waves as well as P-waves. The

  19. Integrated Biogeomorphological Modeling Using Delft3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Q.; Jagers, B.

    2011-12-01

    The skill of numerical morphological models has improved significantly from the early 2D uniform, total load sediment models (with steady state or infrequent wave updates) to recent 3D hydrodynamic models with multiple suspended and bed load sediment fractions and bed stratigraphy (online coupled with waves). Although there remain many open questions within this combined field of hydro- and morphodynamics, we observe an increasing need to include biological processes in the overall dynamics. In riverine and inter-tidal environments, there is often an important influence by riparian vegetation and macrobenthos. Over the past decade more and more researchers have started to extend the simulation environment with wrapper scripts and other quick code hacks to estimate their influence on morphological development in coastal, estuarine and riverine environments. Although one can in this way quickly analyze different approaches, these research tools have generally not been designed with reuse, performance and portability in mind. We have now implemented a reusable, flexible, and efficient two-way link between the Delft3D open source framework for hydrodynamics, waves and morphology, and the water quality and ecology modules. The same link will be used for 1D, 2D and 3D modeling on networks and both structured and unstructured grids. We will describe the concepts of the overall system, and illustrate it with some first results.

  20. Coupled discrete element and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the die filling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2015-08-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder compaction process chain, where defects in the final part can be introduced—or prevented. Simulation of this process is therefore a goal for many part producers and has been studied by some researchers already. In this work, we focus on the influence of the surrounding air on the powder flow. We demonstrate the implementing and coupling of the discrete element method for the granular powder and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the gas flow. Application of the method to the die filling process is demonstrated.

  1. Stationary and Transient Fluctuation Theorems for Effective Heat Fluxes between Hydrodynamically Coupled Particles in Optical Traps.

    PubMed

    Bérut, A; Imparato, A; Petrosyan, A; Ciliberto, S

    2016-02-12

    We experimentally study the statistical properties of the energy fluxes between two trapped Brownian particles, interacting through dissipative hydrodynamic coupling, and submitted to an effective temperature difference ΔT, obtained by random forcing the position of one trap. We identify effective heat fluxes between the two particles and show that they satisfy an exchange fluctuation theorem in the stationary state. We also show that after the sudden application of a temperature gradient ΔT, the total hot-cold flux satisfies a transient exchange fluctuation theorem for any integration time, whereas the total cold-hot flux only does it asymptotically for long times. PMID:26919017

  2. Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling in a Dynamic Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    For liquid-propellant combustion, the Landau/Levich hydrodynamic models have been combined and extended to account for a dynamic dependence of the burning rate on the local pressure and temperature fields. Analysis of these extended models is greatly facilitated by exploiting the realistic smallness of the gas-to-liquid density ratio rho. Neglecting thermal coupling effects, an asymptotic expression was then derived for the cellular stability boundary A(sub p)(k) where A(sub p) is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the disturbance wavenumber. The results explicitly indicate the stabilizing effects of gravity on long-wave disturbances, and those of viscosity and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for critical negative values of A(sub p). In the limit of weak gravity, hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion becomes a long-wave, instability phenomenon, whereas at normal gravity, this instability is first manifested through O(1) wavenumbers. In addition, surface tension and viscosity (both liquid and gas) each produce comparable effects in the large-wavenumber regime, thereby providing important modifications to the previous analyses in which one or more of these effects was neglected. For A(sub p)= O, the Landau/Levich results are recovered in appropriate limiting cases, although this typically corresponds to a hydrodynamically unstable parameter regime for p << 1. In addition to the classical cellular form of hydrodynamic stability, there exists a pulsating form corresponding to the loss of stability of steady, planar burning to time-dependent perturbations. This occurs for negative values of the parameter A(sub p), and is thus absent from the original Landau/Levich models. In the extended model, however, there exists a stable band of negative pressure sensitivities bounded above by the Landau type of instability, and below by this pulsating form of hydrodynamic

  3. 3D mapping of geological contacts by coupling Aerial Laser Scanning, Gigapixel photography and open access pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Liliane; Guerin, Antoine; Abellán, Antonio; Carrea, Dario; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sources of geological data exist nowadays, most of them are in 2D (e.g. geological maps, geological panoramic sketch), and only a few are in 3D (e.g. block diagram). One of the current challenges in geological mapping consists not only in providing a more consistent 3D data, but also in pursuing a gathering and a harmonisation of the geological information in order to obtain a more consistent interpretations of the 3D geological models. New remote sensing techniques have significantly improved the representation of three-dimensional surfaces during the last decade, especially for steep and inaccessible rockcliffs. Therefore, we present an exploratory study aiming to find a reliable method for carrying out a three-dimensional mapping of geological contacts using a High Resolution Digital Elevation Model (HRDEM) with a 1 meter cell size. To this end, we selected the "Scex Rouge Mountain" as pilot study area. This outcrop, which is located in the Diablerets Massif (Vaud, Swiss Alps), has the particularity to present very distinguishable folded geological boundaries on its Southern face. The Southern slope belongs to the Wildhorn nappe, which is mainly composed of sedimentary rocks. The top-layer is composed of siliceous limestones, the well-visible fold layer is the "Pygurus layer" and consist of sandy limestone. Finally the bottom-layer includes marly schist and clayey limestones. At first, different sources of information has been draped on the HRDEM of the Scex Rouge Mountain, including not only classical geological maps (1:25 000) but also different sources of imagery (e.g. gigapixel panoramas, open access images, etc.). In a second step, several three-dimensional polylines have been drawn following the geological limit on each drapped HRDEM. Then we investigated the accuracy of 2D classical geological maps by comparing these geological limits with the drawn 3D polylines. Furthermore, in order to evaluate the accuracy of the method, a ground truth needs

  4. Carbon-proton scalar couplings in RNA. 3D heteronuclear and 2D isotope-edited NMR of a [sup 13]C-labeled extra-stable hairpin

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, J.V.; Landry, S.M.; Varani, G.; Tinoco, I. Jr. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-29

    Long range carbon-proton scalar couplings were measured for an RNA hairpin of 12 nucleotides using 3D and [sup 13]C-edited 2D NMR. The large one-bond carbon-proton scalar couplings ([sup 1]J[sub CH]) and small n-bond couplings ([sup 1]J[sub CH]) produce ECOSY type cross-peaks, thus facilitating the determination of the sign and magnitude of the smaller [sup 2]J[sub CH] or [sup 3]J[sub CH]. The UUCGRNA hairpin (5[prime]-rGGACUUCGGUCC-3[prime]), whose structure has been determined by our laboratory, was uniformly [sup 13]C-labeled at 30% isotopic enrichment. The observed [sup 1]J[sub CH] couplings were then correlated to the known structure. The signs of [sup 2]J[sub C4[prime]H5[prime

  5. Fullwave coupling to a 3D antenna code using Green's function formulation of wave-particle response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John; Bonoli, Paul; Brambilla, Marco; Lancelloti, Vito; Maggiora, Riccardo; Carter, Mark

    2006-04-01

    Using the fullwave code, TORIC ,and the 3D antenna code, TOPICA, we construct a complete linear system for the RF driven plasma. The 3D finite element antenna code, TOPICA, requires an admittance, Y, for the plasma, where B=YE. In this work TORIC was modified to allow excitation of the (Eη, Eζ) electric field components at the plasma surface, corresponding to a single poloidal and toroidal mode number combination (m,n). This leads the tensor response: Y=( *20c Yηη & Yηζ Yζη & Yζζ ), where each of the Yn submatrices is Nm in size. It is shown that the admittance matrix is equivalent to a Greens function calculation for the fullwave system and in addition, the net work done in the calculation is on the order of twice a single fullwave calculation. After the admittance calculation is done, the response of a plasma to an antenna driven at a given frequency can be calculated by only running the TOPICA code for a new antenna geometry. In tests of loading, TOPICA has been able reproduce loading of the Alcator D antenna (S12 coefficient accurately.).

  6. 3D Dynamics of Magnetic Flux Ropes Across Scales: Solar Eruptions and Sun-Earth Plasma Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James

    2012-10-01

    Central to the understanding of the eruptive phenomena on the Sun and their impact on the terrestrial plasma environment is the dynamics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs)---a 3D magnetic flux rope configuration---and the evolution of their magnetic fields. I will discuss the basic physics of CME eruption and solar flare energy release in the context of the analytic erupting flux rope model of CMEs. In this ideal MHD model, a CME is treated as a 3D flux rope with its two stationary footpoints anchored in the Sun. The model structure is non-axisymmetric and embedded in a model corona/solar wind. The initial flux rope is driven out of equilibrium by ``injection'' of poloidal flux and propagates under the Lorentz hoop force from the Sun to 1 AU, across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Comparisons of the model results and recent STEREO observations show that the solutions that best fit the observed CME position-time data (to within 1-2% of data) also correctly replicate the temporal profiles of associated flare X-ray emissions (GOES data) and the in situ magnetic field and plasma data of the CME ejecta at 1 AU where such data are available (e.g., ACE and STEREO/IMPAXCT/PLASTIC data), providing a unified basis of understanding CME dynamics and flare energetics.

  7. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines and Finite Ground Coplanar Lines Embedded in Polyimide Layers for 3D-MMICs on Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Bushyager, N.; Papapolymerou, J.; Tentzeris, E. M.; Laskar, J.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional circuits built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing Si/SiGe monolithic microwave/mm-wave integrated circuits on CMOS (low resistivity) Si wafers. It is expected that these circuits will replace the ones fabricated on GaAs and reduce the overall system cost. However, the closely spaced transmission lines that are required for a high-density circuit environment are susceptible to high levels of cross-coupling, which degrades the overall circuit performance. In this paper, theoretical and experimental results on coupling and ways to reduce it are presented for two types of transmission lines: a) the microstrip line and b) the Finite Ground Coplanar (FGC) line. For microstrip lines it is shown that a fence of metalized via-holes can significantly reduce coupling, especially in the case when both lines are on the same polyimide layer or when the shielding structure extends through several polyimide layers. For closely spaced microstrip lines, coupling is lower for a metal filled trench shield than a via-hole fence. Coupling amongst microstrip lines is dependent on the ratio of line separation to polyimide thickness and is primarily due to magnetic fields. For FGC lines it is shown that they have in general low coupling that can be reduced significantly when there is even a small gap between the ground planes of each line. FGC lines have approximately 8 dB lower coupling than coupled coplanar waveguides (CPW). In addition, forward and backward characteristics of the FGC lines do not resemble those of other transmission lines such as microstrip. Therefore, the coupling mechanism of the FGC lines is different compared to thin film microstrip lines.

  8. Coupling of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics with Finite Volume method for free-surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrone, S.; Di Mascio, A.; Le Touzé, D.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for the solution of free surface flows with large front deformation and fragmentation is presented. The algorithm is obtained by coupling a classical Finite Volume (FV) approach, that discretizes the Navier-Stokes equations on a block structured Eulerian grid, with an approach based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, implemented in a Lagrangian framework. The coupling procedure is formulated in such a way that each solver is applied in the region where its intrinsic characteristics can be exploited in the most efficient and accurate way: the FV solver is used to resolve the bulk flow and the wall regions, whereas the SPH solver is implemented in the free surface region to capture details of the front evolution. The reported results clearly prove that the combined use of the two solvers is convenient from the point of view of both accuracy and computing time.

  9. Fdf in US3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, Collin; Ferrero, Pietro; Candler, Graham; Givi, Peyman

    2013-11-01

    The scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) methodology is implemented into the computer code US3D. This is an unstructured Eulerian finite volume hydrodynamic solver and has proven very effective for simulation of compressible turbulent flows. The resulting SFMDF-US3D code is employed for large eddy simulation (LES) on unstructured meshes. Simulations are conducted of subsonic and supersonic flows under non-reacting and reacting conditions. The consistency and the accuracy of the simulated results are assessed along with appraisal of the overall performance of the methodology. The SFMDF-US3D is now capable of simulating high speed flows in complex configurations.

  10. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines with Finite Width Ground Plane Embedded in Polyimide Layers for 3D-MMICs on Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Dalton, Edan; Tentzeris, Emmanouil M.; Papapolymerou, John; Williams, W. Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional circuits built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing Si/SiGe monolithic microwave/millimeter-wave integrated circuits on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) (low resistivity) Si wafers. Thin film microstrip lines (TFMS) with finite width ground planes embedded in the polyimide are often used. However, the closely spaced TFMS lines are susceptible to high levels of coupling, which degrades circuit performance. In this paper, Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis and experimental measurements are used to show that the ground planes must be connected by via holes to reduce coupling in both the forward and backward directions.

  11. Mutual coupling of hydrologic and hydrodynamic models - a viable approach for improved large-scale inundation estimates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, Jannis; Winsemius, Hessel; van Beek, Ludovicus; Haag, Arjen; Bierkens, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Due to their increasing occurrence rate and associated economic costs, fluvial floods are large-scale and cross-border phenomena that need to be well understood. Sound information about temporal and spatial variations of flood hazard is essential for adequate flood risk management and climate change adaption measures. While progress has been made in assessments of flood hazard and risk on the global scale, studies to date have made compromises between spatial resolution on the one hand and local detail that influences their temporal characteristics (rate of rise, duration) on the other. Moreover, global models cannot realistically model flood wave propagation due to a lack of detail in channel and floodplain geometry, and the representation of hydrologic processes influencing the surface water balance such as open water evaporation from inundated water and re-infiltration of water in river banks. To overcome these restrictions and to obtain a better understanding of flood propagation including its spatio-temporal variations at the large scale, yet at a sufficiently high resolution, the present study aims to develop a large-scale modeling tool by coupling the global hydrologic model PCR-GLOBWB and the recently developed hydrodynamic model DELFT3D-FM. The first computes surface water volumes which are routed by the latter, solving the full Saint-Venant equations. With DELFT3D FM being capable of representing the model domain as a flexible mesh, model accuracy is only improved at relevant locations (river and adjacent floodplain) and the computation time is not unnecessarily increased. This efficiency is very advantageous for large-scale modelling approaches. The model domain is thereby schematized by 2D floodplains, being derived from global data sets (HydroSHEDS and G3WBM, respectively). Since a previous study with 1way-coupling showed good model performance (J.M. Hoch et al., in prep.), this approach was extended to 2way-coupling to fully represent evaporation

  12. Variability of the hydrogen in the martian upper atmosphere as simulated by a 3D atmosphere-exosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaufray, J.-Y.; Gonzalez-Galindo, F.; Forget, F.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Leblanc, F.; Modolo, R.; Hess, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present the temporal variability of the atomic and molecular hydrogen density derived from a 3D General Circulation Model describing the martian atmosphere from the surface to the exobase. A kinetic exospheric model is used to compute the hydrogen density above the exobase. We use these models to study the diurnal and seasonal variations of the hydrogen density and the Jeans escape rate as well as their variations with solar activity, assuming a classic dust scenario. We find that the diurnal variations of the hydrogen density are important with a peak in the dawn region during equinoxes and a peak on the nightside during solstices. These features result from the dynamics of the martian upper atmosphere. The variations of the atomic hydrogen Jeans escape with seasons and solar activity are in the range 1.3 × 1025 s-1-4.4 × 1026 s-1. A factor ∼8 is due to the seasonal variations with a maximum during the winter solstice in the northern hemisphere and a minimum during the summer solstice in the northern hemisphere that we attribute to the variation of the Mars-Sun distance. A factor ∼5 is due to the solar cycle with a maximum escape rate at high solar activity. The variations of the molecular hydrogen Jeans escape with seasons and solar activity are in the range 3 × 1022 s-1-6 × 1024 s-1. A factor ∼10 is due to the seasonal variations with a maximum during the winter solstice in the northern hemisphere and a minimum during the summer solstice in the northern hemisphere. A factor ∼20 is due to the solar cycle with a maximum escape rate at high solar activity. If Jeans escape is the major escape channel for hydrogen, the hydrogen escape is never limited by diffusion. The hydrogen density above 10,000 km presents seasonal and solar cycle variations similar to the Jeans escape rate at all latitudes and local times. This 3D temporal model of the hydrogen thermosphere/exosphere will be useful to interpret future MAVEN observations and the consequences of the

  13. A coupled 3D-1D numerical monodomain solver for cardiac electrical activation in the myocardium with detailed Purkinje network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Christian; Lange, Matthias; Palamara, Simone; Lassila, Toni; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for the electrophysiology in the heart to handle the electrical propagation through the Purkinje system and in the myocardium, with two-way coupling at the Purkinje-muscle junctions. In both the subproblems the monodomain model is considered, whereas at the junctions a resistor element is included that induces an orthodromic propagation delay from the Purkinje network towards the heart muscle. We prove a sufficient condition for convergence of a fixed-point iterative algorithm to the numerical solution of the coupled problem. Numerical comparison of activation patterns is made with two different combinations of models for the coupled Purkinje network/myocardium system, the eikonal/eikonal and the monodomain/monodomain models. Test cases are investigated for both physiological and pathological activation of a model left ventricle. Finally, we prove the reliability of the monodomain/monodomain coupling on a realistic scenario. Our results underlie the importance of using physiologically realistic Purkinje-trees with propagation solved using the monodomain model for simulating cardiac activation.

  14. Modified Iterated perturbation theory in the strong coupling regime and its application to the 3d FCC lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-François; Sémon, Patrick; Shastry, B. Sriram; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2012-02-01

    The Dynamical Mean-Field theory(DMFT) approach to the Hubbard model requires a method to solve the problem of a quantum impurity in a bath of non-interacting electrons. Iterated Perturbation Theory(IPT)[1] has proven its effectiveness as a solver in many cases of interest. Based on general principles and on comparisons with an essentially exact Continuous-Time Quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC)[2], here we show that the standard implementation of IPT fails when the interaction is much larger than the bandwidth. We propose a slight modification to the IPT algorithm by requiring that double occupancy calculated with IPT gives the correct value. We call this method IPT-D. We show how this approximate impurity solver compares with respect to CTQMC. We consider a face centered cubic lattice(FCC) in 3d for different physical properties. We also use IPT-D to study the thermopower using two recently proposed approximations[3]S^* and SKelvin that do not require analytical continuation and show how thermopower is essentially the entropy per particle in the incoherent regime but not in the coherent one.[1]H.Kajueter et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 131(1996)[2]P. Werner, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 076405(2006)[3]B.S. Sriram Shastry Rep. Prog. Phys. 72 016501(2009)

  15. Regional seismic wavefield computation on a 3-D heterogeneous Earth model by means of coupled traveling wave synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2002-01-01

    I present a new algorithm for calculating seismic wave propagation through a three-dimensional heterogeneous medium using the framework of mode coupling theory originally developed to perform very low frequency (f < ???0.01-0.05 Hz) seismic wavefield computation. It is a Greens function approach for multiple scattering within a defined volume and employs a truncated traveling wave basis set using the locked mode approximation. Interactions between incident and scattered wavefields are prescribed by mode coupling theory and account for the coupling among surface waves, body waves, and evanescent waves. The described algorithm is, in principle, applicable to global and regional wave propagation problems, but I focus on higher frequency (typically f ??????0.25 Hz) applications at regional and local distances where the locked mode approximation is best utilized and which involve wavefields strongly shaped by propagation through a highly heterogeneous crust. Synthetic examples are shown for P-SV-wave propagation through a semi-ellipsoidal basin and SH-wave propagation through a fault zone.

  16. Nanostructured exchange coupled hard/soft composites: From the local magnetization profile to an extended 3d simple model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russier, V.; Younsi, K.; Bessais, L.

    2012-03-01

    In nanocomposite magnetic materials the exchange coupling between phases plays a central role in the determination of the extrinsic magnetic properties of the material: coercive field,remanence magnetization. Exchange coupling is therefore of crucial importance in composite systems made of magnetically hard and soft grains or in partially crystallized media including nanosized crystallites in a soft matrix. It has been shown also to be a key point in the control of stratified hard/soft media coercive field in the research for optimized recording media. A signature of the exchange coupling due to the nanostructure is generally obtained on the magnetization curve M(H) with a plateau characteristic of the domain wall compression at the hard/soft interface ending at the depinning of the wall inside the hard phase. This compression/depinning behavior is clearly evidenced through one dimensional description of the interface, which is rigorously possible only in stratified media. Starting from a local description of the hard/soft interface in a model for nanocomposite system we show that one can extend this kind of behavior for system of hard crystallites embedded in a soft matrix.

  17. Coupling Hydrodynamics to Nonequilibrium Degrees of Freedom in Strongly Interacting Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Michal P.; Janik, Romuald A.; Spaliński, Michał; Witaszczyk, Przemysław

    2014-12-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics simulations of quark-gluon plasma play a pivotal role in our understanding of heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. They are based on a phenomenological description due to Müller, Israel, Stewart (MIS) and others, which incorporates viscous effects and ensures a well-posed initial value problem. Focusing on the case of conformal plasma we propose a generalization which includes, in addition, the dynamics of the least damped far-from-equilibrium degree of freedom found in strongly coupled plasmas through the AdS/CFT correspondence. We formulate new evolution equations for general flows and then test them in the case of N =4 super Yang-Mills plasma by comparing their solutions alongside solutions of MIS theory with numerical computations of isotropization and boost-invariant flow based on holography. In these tests the new equations reproduce the results of MIS theory when initialized close to the hydrodynamic stage of evolution, but give a more accurate description of the dynamics when initial conditions are set in the preequilibrium regime.

  18. Coupling hydrodynamics to nonequilibrium degrees of freedom in strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma.

    PubMed

    Heller, Michal P; Janik, Romuald A; Spaliński, Michał; Witaszczyk, Przemysław

    2014-12-31

    Relativistic hydrodynamics simulations of quark-gluon plasma play a pivotal role in our understanding of heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. They are based on a phenomenological description due to Müller, Israel, Stewart (MIS) and others, which incorporates viscous effects and ensures a well-posed initial value problem. Focusing on the case of conformal plasma we propose a generalization which includes, in addition, the dynamics of the least damped far-from-equilibrium degree of freedom found in strongly coupled plasmas through the AdS/CFT correspondence. We formulate new evolution equations for general flows and then test them in the case of N=4 super Yang-Mills plasma by comparing their solutions alongside solutions of MIS theory with numerical computations of isotropization and boost-invariant flow based on holography. In these tests the new equations reproduce the results of MIS theory when initialized close to the hydrodynamic stage of evolution, but give a more accurate description of the dynamics when initial conditions are set in the preequilibrium regime. PMID:25615302

  19. 3-D radiative transfer in large-eddy simulations - experiences coupling the TenStream solver to the UCLA-LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakub, Fabian; Mayer, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The recently developed 3-D TenStream radiative transfer solver was integrated into the University of California, Los Angeles large-eddy simulation (UCLA-LES) cloud-resolving model. This work documents the overall performance of the TenStream solver as well as the technical challenges of migrating from 1-D schemes to 3-D schemes. In particular the employed Monte Carlo spectral integration needed to be reexamined in conjunction with 3-D radiative transfer. Despite the fact that the spectral sampling has to be performed uniformly over the whole domain, we find that the Monte Carlo spectral integration remains valid. To understand the performance characteristics of the coupled TenStream solver, we conducted weak as well as strong-scaling experiments. In this context, we investigate two matrix preconditioner: geometric algebraic multigrid preconditioning (GAMG) and block Jacobi incomplete LU (ILU) factorization and find that algebraic multigrid preconditioning performs well for complex scenes and highly parallelized simulations. The TenStream solver is tested for up to 4096 cores and shows a parallel scaling efficiency of 80-90 % on various supercomputers. Compared to the widely employed 1-D delta-Eddington two-stream solver, the computational costs for the radiative transfer solver alone increases by a factor of 5-10.

  20. Incorporating 3-D Subsurface Hydrologic Processes within the Community Land Surface Model (CLM): Coupling PFLOTRAN and CLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, G.; Mills, R. T.; Hoffman, F. M.; Thornton, P. E.; Lichtner, P. C.; Hammond, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown a positive soil moisture-rainfall feedback through observational data, as well as, modeling studies. Spatial variability of topography, soils, and vegetation play a significant role in determining the response of land surface states (soil moisture) and fluxes (runoff, evapotranspirtiaon); but their explicit accounting within Land Surface Models (LSMs) is computa- tionally expensive. Additionally, anthropogenic climate change is altering the hydrologic cycle at global and regional scales. Characterizing the sensitivity of groundwater recharge is critical for understanding the effects of climate change on water resources. In order to explicitly represent lateral redistribution of soil moisture and unified treatment of the unsaturated-saturated zone in the subsurface within the CLM, we propose coupling PFLOTRAN and CLM. PFLOTRAN is a parallel multiphase-multicomponent subsurface reactive flow and transport code for modeling subsurface processes and has been devel- oped under a DOE SciDAC-2 project. PFLOTRAN is written in Fortran 90 using a modular, object-oriented approach. PFLOTRAN utilizes fully implicit time-stepping and is built on top of the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc). The PFLOTRAN model is capable of simulating fluid flow through porous media with fluid phases of air, water, and supercritical CO2. PFLOTRAN has been successfully employed on up to 131,072 cores on Jaguar, the massively parallel Cray XT4/XT5 at ORNL, for problems composed of up to 2 billion degrees of freedom. In this work, we will present a strategy of coupling the two models, CLM and PFLOTRAN, along with a few preliminary results obtained from the coupled model.

  1. Broken detailed balance observed for hydrodynamically coupled colloidal particles in two optical traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christoph F.; Gladrow, Jannes; Fakhri, Nikta; Broedersz, Chase P.

    Optical traps can be approximated as harmonic potentials for refractile colloidal particles. If two particles are trapped by two optical traps at close distance, particles remain hydrodynamically coupled. With two traps at different laser powers, one can create a non-equilibrium situation, where one particle can feed energy to the other particle. We show that this situation leads to the breaking of detailed balance that can be visualized as finite flux in a coarse-grained phase space spanned by the displacements of the two particles. We test if the slight temperature difference caused by different laser powers drives the flux or if it is due to energy dissipation associated with scattered light, a second-order effect for non-absorbing particles.

  2. Photobioreactors for microalgal cultures: A Lagrangian model coupling hydrodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Giuseppe; Gargiulo, Luigi; Lettieri, Paola; Mazzei, Luca; Salatino, Piero; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Closed photobioreactors have to be optimized in terms of light utilization and overall photosynthesis rate. A simple model coupling the hydrodynamics and the photosynthesis kinetics has been proposed to analyze the photosynthesis dynamics due to the continuous shuttle of microalgae between dark and lighted zones of the photobioreactor. Microalgal motion has been described according to a stochastic Lagrangian approach adopting the turbulence model suitable for the photobioreactor configuration (single vs. two-phase flows). Effects of light path, biomass concentration, turbulence level and irradiance have been reported in terms of overall photosynthesis rate. Different irradiation strategies (internal, lateral and rounding) and several photobioreactor configurations (flat, tubular, bubble column, airlift) have been investigated. Photobioreactor configurations and the operating conditions to maximize the photosynthesis rate have been pointed out. Results confirmed and explained the common experimental observation that high concentrated cultures are not photoinhibited at high irradiance level. PMID:26148307

  3. Waveform Modeling of 3D Structure of D" Region Using A Coupled SEM/Normal Mode Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, A.; Gung, Y.; Capadeville, Y.; Romanowicz, B.

    2003-12-01

    The presence of strong lateral heterogeneity in D" is now well documented and presents challenges for seismic modeling. The main challenges are the limited global sampling of D" and the theoretical limits of validity of the present modeling tools, such as standard ray theory and mode approaches. We use coupled normal mode/Spectral Element Method (SEM) to compute synthetic seismograms of Sdiff in the D" part of a tomographic model(SAW24b16, Mégnin and Romanowicz, 2000) down to corner frequency 1/12s. SEM allows to take into account strong heterogeneity in a rigorous manner. The coupled method is much faster than standard SEM, when the numerical part of the computation is restricted to the D" region. In the rest of the mantle, the wave field is computed using efficient normal mode summation. As a first step, we consider a radially symmetric model outside of the D" region, and compare Sdiff synthetics with observed waveforms for a collection of deep earthquakes, for which the effect of strong heterogeneity in the crust and upper mantle is avoided. Observed and synthetic travel time trends are very consistent and in many cases the observed residuals are significantly larger. This indicates that the tomographic model only represents the smooth features of the real structure. Observed waveform amplitudes and SEM synthetics are somewhat less consistent. We compare the predictions for 800 Sdiff phases using SEM with those obtained by more approximate methods : ray theory and NACT (Non-linear asymptotic coupling theory, a normal mode perturbation approach). We discuss systematic trends in the travel times predicted by the different methods, compared to observations. Starting with the tomographic model, and correcting for mantle structure outside of D" using approximate NACT predictions, we next invert for perturbations to the tomographic model, using the coupled SEM/mode computation for the forward part of the modeling, in several regions of D" under the Pacific, which are

  4. Analytic free-form lens design in 3D: coupling three ray sets using two lens surfaces.

    PubMed

    Duerr, Fabian; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C; Meuret, Youri; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-05-01

    The two-dimensional analytic optics design method presented in a previous paper [Opt. Express 20, 5576-5585 (2012)] is extended in this work to the three-dimensional case, enabling the coupling of three ray sets with two free-form lens surfaces. Fermat's principle is used to deduce additional sets of functional differential equations which make it possible to calculate the lens surfaces. Ray tracing simulations demonstrate the excellent imaging performance of the resulting free-form lenses described by more than 100 coefficients. PMID:22565708

  5. Consistent Temperature Coupling with Thermal Fluctuations of Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics and Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ganzenmüller, Georg C.; Hiermaier, Stefan; Steinhauser, Martin O.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a thermodynamically consistent and energy-conserving temperature coupling scheme between the atomistic and the continuum domain. The coupling scheme links the two domains using the DPDE (Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy) thermostat and is designed to handle strong temperature gradients across the atomistic/continuum domain interface. The fundamentally different definitions of temperature in the continuum and atomistic domain – internal energy and heat capacity versus particle velocity – are accounted for in a straightforward and conceptually intuitive way by the DPDE thermostat. We verify the here-proposed scheme using a fluid, which is simultaneously represented as a continuum using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics, and as an atomistically resolved liquid using Molecular Dynamics. In the case of equilibrium contact between both domains, we show that the correct microscopic equilibrium properties of the atomistic fluid are obtained. As an example of a strong non-equilibrium situation, we consider the propagation of a steady shock-wave from the continuum domain into the atomistic domain, and show that the coupling scheme conserves both energy and shock-wave dynamics. To demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to real systems, we consider shock loading of a phospholipid bilayer immersed in water in a multi-scale simulation, an interesting topic of biological relevance. PMID:23300586

  6. Coastal fog prediction with a coupled model (1D+3D) system using the data from a 300 m met tower as input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Yum, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Visibility degradation due to fog can be very hazardous both to ground transportation and aviation traffic. However, prediction of fog using numerical models is difficult because fog formation is usually determined by local meteorological conditions that are hard to be measured and modeled with sufficient resolution. For this reason, there have been several attempts to build a coupled system of a fine resolution 1D model and a 3D mesoscale model with a usual grid resolution. In this study we uses the coupled system of the 1D PAFOG model and the 3D WRF model to simulate fogs formed at a southern coastal region of Korea, where the National Center for Intensive Observation of Severe Weather (NCIO) is located. Unique to NCIO is that it has a 300 m meteorological tower on which some basic meteorological variables (temperature, dew point temperature and winds) are measured at eleven different altitudes. In addition comprehensive cloud physics measurements are made with various remote sensing instruments such as cloud radar, wind profiler, microwave radiometer, micro rain radar. Several fog cases are identified during 2015 and will be simulated by the coupled system. The comprehensive set of measurement data from NCIO will be utilized as input to the model system and for evaluating the results. Particularly the data for initial and boundary conditions, which are tightly connected to the coupled model predictability, are extracted from the tower measurement. Furthermore, various sensitivity experiments will be done to enhance our understanding of the coastal fog formation mechanism. Detailed results will be discussed at the conference.

  7. 3D Two-way coupled TEHD analysis on the lubricating characteristics of thrust bearings in pump-turbine units by combining CFD and FEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Liming; Luo, Yongyao; Wang, Zhengwei; Liu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The thermal elastic hydro dynamic (TEHD) lubrication analysis for the thrust bearing is usually conducted by combining Reynolds equation with finite element analysis (FEA). But it is still a problem to conduct the computation by combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and FEA which can simulate the TEHD more accurately. In this paper, by using both direct and separate coupled solutions together, steady TEHD lubrication considering the viscosity-temperature effect for a bidirectional thrust bearing in a pump-turbine unit is simulated combining a 3D CFD model for the oil film with a 3D FEA model for the pad and mirror plate. Cyclic symmetry condition is used in the oil film flow as more reasonable boundary conditions which avoids the oil temperature assumption at the leading and trailing edge. Deformations of the pad and mirror plate are predicted and discussed as well as the distributions of oil film thickness, pressure, temperature. The predicted temperature shows good agreement with measurements, while the pressure shows a reasonable distribution comparing with previous studies. Further analysis of the three-coupled-field reveals the reason of the high pressure and high temperature generated in the film. Finally, the influence of rotational speed of the mirror plate on the lubrication characteristics is illustrated which shows the thrust load should be balanced against the oil film temperature and pressure in optimized designs. This research proposes a thrust bearing computation method by combining CFD and FEA which can do the TEHD analysis more accurately.

  8. TART98 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry time dependent Monte Carlo Transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D E

    1998-11-22

    TART98 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART98 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART98 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART98 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART98 and its data files.

  9. Coupled effects of hydrodynamic and solution chemistry conditions on long-term nanoparticle transport and deposition in saturated porous media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aims to systematically explore the coupled effects of hydrodynamic and solution chemistry conditions on the long-term transport and deposition kinetics of nanoparticles (NPs) in saturated porous media. Column transport experiments were carried out at various solution ionic strengths (IS),...

  10. A Coupled fcGCM-GCE Modeling System: A 3D Cloud Resolving Model and a Regional Scale Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and ore sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1998 and 1999). Also, at Goddard, we have implemented several Goddard microphysical schemes (21CE, several 31CE), Goddard radiation (including explicity calculated cloud optical properties), and Goddard Land Information (LIS, that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models) into a next generation regional scale model, WRF. In this talk, I will present: (1) A Brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (microphysical and land processes), (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications), and (4) The characteristics of the four-dimensional cloud data

  11. An efficient formulation of the coupled finite element-integral equation technique for solving large 3D scattering problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1993-01-01

    It is often desirable to calculate the electromagnetic fields inside and about a complicated system of scattering bodies, as well as in their far-field region. The finite element method (FE) is well suited to solving the interior problem, but the domain has to be limited to a manageable size. At the truncation of the FE mesh one can either impose approximate (absorbing) boundary conditions or set up an integral equation (IE) for the fields scattered from the bodies. The latter approach is preferable since it results in higher accuracy. Hence, the two techniques can be successfully combined by introducing a surface that encloses the scatterers, applying a FE model to the inner volume and setting up an IE for the tangential fields components on the surface. Here the continuity of the tangential fields is used bo obtain a consistent solution. A few coupled FE-IE methods have recently appeared in the literature. The approach presented here has the advantage of using edge-based finite elements, a type of finite elements with degrees of freedom associated with edges of the mesh. Because of their properties, they are better suited than the conventional node based elements to represent electromagnetic fields, particularly when inhomogeneous regions are modeled, since the node based elements impose an unnatural continuity of all field components across boundaries of mesh elements. Additionally, our approach is well suited to handle large size problems and lends itself to code parallelization. We will discuss the salient features that make our approach very efficient from the standpoint of numerical computation, and the fields and RCS of a few objects are illustrated as examples.

  12. Use of RELAP5-3D for Dynamic Analysis of a Closed-Loop Brayton Cycle Coupled To a Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, Larry D.

    2007-01-30

    This paper describes results of a dynamic system model for a pair of closed Brayton-cycle (CBC) loops running in parallel that are connected to a nuclear gas reactor. The model assumes direct coupling between the reactor and the Brayton-cycle loops. The RELAP5-3D (version 2.4.1) computer program was used to perform the analysis. Few reactors have ever been coupled to closed Brayton-cycle systems. As such their behavior under dynamically varying loads, startup and shut down conditions, and requirements for safe and autonomous operation are largely unknown. The model described in this paper represents the reactor, turbine, compressor, recuperator, heat rejection system and alternator. The initial results of the model indicate stable operation of the reactor-driven Brayton-cycle system. However, for analysts with mostly pressurized water reactor experience, the Brayton cycle loops coupled to a gas-cooled reactor also indicate some counter-intuitive behavior for the complete coupled system. This model has provided crucial information in evaluating the reactor design and would have been further developed for use in developing procedures for safe start up, shut down, safe-standby, and other autonomous operating modes had the plant development cycle been completed.

  13. Use of RELAP5-3D for Dynamic Analysis of a Closed-Loop Brayton Cycle Coupled To a Nuclear Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Larry D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes results of a dynamic system model for a pair of closed Brayton-cycle (CBC) loops running in parallel that are connected to a nuclear gas reactor. The model assumes direct coupling between the reactor and the Brayton-cycle loops. The RELAP5-3D (version 2.4.1) computer program was used to perform the analysis. Few reactors have ever been coupled to closed Brayton-cycle systems. As such their behavior under dynamically varying loads, startup and shut down conditions, and requirements for safe and autonomous operation are largely unknown. The model described in this paper represents the reactor, turbine, compressor, recuperator, heat rejection system and alternator. The initial results of the model indicate stable operation of the reactor-driven Brayton-cycle system. However, for analysts with mostly pressurized water reactor experience, the Brayton cycle loops coupled to a gas-cooled reactor also indicate some counter-intuitive behavior for the complete coupled system. This model has provided crucial information in evaluating the reactor design and would have been further developed for use in developing procedures for safe start up, shut down, safe-standby, and other autonomous operating modes had the plant development cycle been completed.

  14. Effects of Secondary Circuit Modeling on Results of Pressurized Water Reactor Main Steam Line Break Benchmark Calculations with New Coupled Code TRAB-3D/SMABRE

    SciTech Connect

    Daavittila, Antti; Haemaelaeinen, Anitta; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Riitta

    2003-05-15

    All of the three exercises of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Regulatory Commission pressurized water reactor main steam line break (PWR MSLB) benchmark were calculated at VTT, the Technical Research Centre of Finland. For the first exercise, the plant simulation with point-kinetic neutronics, the thermal-hydraulics code SMABRE was used. The second exercise was calculated with the three-dimensional reactor dynamics code TRAB-3D, and the third exercise with the combination TRAB-3D/SMABRE. VTT has over ten years' experience of coupling neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes, but this benchmark was the first time these two codes, both developed at VTT, were coupled together. The coupled code system is fast and efficient; the total computation time of the 100-s transient in the third exercise was 16 min on a modern UNIX workstation. The results of all the exercises are similar to those of the other participants. In order to demonstrate the effect of secondary circuit modeling on the results, three different cases were calculated. In case 1 there is no phase separation in the steam lines and no flow reversal in the aspirator. In case 2 the flow reversal in the aspirator is allowed, but there is no phase separation in the steam lines. Finally, in case 3 the drift-flux model is used for the phase separation in the steam lines, but the aspirator flow reversal is not allowed. With these two modeling variations, it is possible to cover a remarkably broad range of results. The maximum power level reached after the reactor trip varies from 534 to 904 MW, the range of the time of the power maximum being close to 30 s. Compared to the total calculated transient time of 100 s, the effect of the secondary side modeling is extremely important.

  15. Space Weather at Mars: 3-D studies using one-way coupling between the Multi-fluid MHD, M-GITM and M-AMPS models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chuanfei

    This dissertation presents numerical simulation results of the solar wind interaction with the Martian upper atmosphere by using three comprehensive 3-D models: the Mars Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (M-GITM), the Mars exosphere Monte Carlo model Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (M-AMPS), and the BATS-R-US Mars multi-fluid MHD (MF-MHD) model. The coupled framework has the potential to provide improved predictions for ion escape rates for comparison with future data to be returned by the MAVEN mission (2014-2016) and thereby improve our understanding of present day escape processes. Estimates of ion escape rates over Mars history must start from properly validated models that can be extrapolated into the past. This thesis aims to build a model library for the NASA Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission, which will thus enhance the science return from the MAVEN mission. In this thesis, we aim to address the following four main scientific questions by adopting the one-way coupled framework developed here: (1) What are the Martian ion escape rates at the current epoch and ancient times? (2) What controls the ion escape processes at the current epoch? How are the ion escape variations connected to the solar cycle, crustal field orientation and seasonal variations? (3) How do the variable 3-D cold neutral thermosphere and hot oxygen corona affect the solar wind-Mars interaction? (4) How does the Martian atmosphere respond to extreme variations (e.g., ICMEs) in the solar wind and its interplanetary environment? These questions are closely related to the primary scientific goals of NASA's MAVEN mission and European Space Agency's Mars Express (MEX) mission. We reasonably answer all these four questions at the end of this thesis by employing the one-way coupled framework and comparing the simulation results with both MEX and MAVEN observational data.

  16. Hydrodynamical simulations of coupled and uncoupled quintessence models - II. Galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Knebe, Alexander; Lewis, Geraint F.; Yepes, Gustavo

    2014-04-01

    We study the z = 0 properties of clusters (and large groups) of galaxies within the context of interacting and non-interacting quintessence cosmological models, using a series of adiabatic SPH simulations. Initially, we examine the average properties of groups and clusters, quantifying their differences in ΛCold Dark Matter (ΛCDM), uncoupled Dark Energy (uDE) and coupled Dark Energy (cDE) cosmologies. In particular, we focus upon radial profiles of the gas density, temperature and pressure, and we also investigate how the standard hydrodynamic equilibrium hypothesis holds in quintessence cosmologies. While we are able to confirm previous results about the distribution of baryons, we also find that the main discrepancy (with differences up to 20 per cent) can be seen in cluster pressure profiles. We then switch attention to individual structures, mapping each halo in quintessence cosmology to its ΛCDM counterpart. We are able to identify a series of small correlations between the coupling in the dark sector and halo spin, triaxiality and virialization ratio. When looking at spin and virialization of dark matter haloes, we find a weak (5 per cent) but systematic deviation in fifth force scenarios from ΛCDM.

  17. Hydrodynamical simulations of coupled and uncoupled quintessence models - I. Halo properties and the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Knebe, Alexander; Lewis, Geraint F.; Wales, Scott; Yepes, Gustavo

    2014-04-01

    We present the results of a series of adiabatic hydrodynamical simulations of several quintessence models (both with a free and an interacting scalar field) in comparison to a standard Λ cold dark matter cosmology. For each we use 2 × 10243 particles in a 250 h-1 Mpc periodic box assuming 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmology. In this work we focus on the properties of haloes in the cosmic web at z = 0. The web is classified into voids, sheets, filaments and knots depending on the eigenvalues of the velocity shear tensor, which are an excellent proxy for the underlying overdensity distribution. We find that the properties of objects classified according to their surrounding environment show a substantial dependence on the underlying cosmology; for example, while Vmax shows average deviations of ≈5 per cent across the different models when considering the full halo sample, comparing objects classified according to their environment, the size of the deviation can be as large as 20 per cent. We also find that halo spin parameters are positively correlated to the coupling, whereas halo concentrations show the opposite behaviour. Furthermore, when studying the concentration-mass relation in different environments, we find that in all cosmologies underdense regions have a larger normalization and a shallower slope. While this behaviour is found to characterize all the models, differences in the best-fitting relations are enhanced in (coupled) dark energy models, thus providing a clearer prediction for this class of models.

  18. 3-D Modeling of Directional Solidification of a Non-Dilute Alloy with Temperature and Concentration Fields Coupling via Materials Properties Dependence and via Double Diffusive Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1998-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the HgCdTe growth by the vertical Bridgman method was performed using FIDAP finite element code. Double-diffusive melt convection is analyzed, as the primary factor at controls inhomogeneity of the solidified material. Temperature and concentration fields in the model are also coupled via material properties, such as thermal and solutal expansion coefficients with the dependence on both temperature and concentration, and melting temperature evaluation from pseudobinary CdTe-HgTe phase diagram. Experimental measurements were used to obtain temperature boundary conditions. Parametric study of the melt convection dependence on the gravity conditions was undertaken. It was found, that the maximum convection velocity in the melt can be reduced under certain conditions. Optimal conditions to obtain a near flat solidified interface are discussed. The predicted interface shape is in agreement with one obtained experimentally by quenching. The results of 3-D calculations are compared with previous 2- D findings. A video film featuring 3-D melt convection will be presented.

  19. 6-Substituted Pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine Thienoyl Regioisomers as Targeted Antifolates for Folate Receptor α and the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter in Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Wallace, Adrianne; Raghavan, Sudhir; Deis, Siobhan M.; Wilson, Mike R.; Yang, Si; Polin, Lisa; White, Kathryn; Kushner, Juiwanna; Orr, Steven; George, Christina; O’Connor, Carrie; Hou, Zhanjun; Mitchell-Ryan, Shermaine; Dann, Charles E.; Matherly, Larry H.; Gangjee, Aleem

    2016-01-01

    2-Amino-4-oxo-6-substituted-pyrrolo[2,3-d]-pyrimidine antifolate thiophene regioisomers of AGF94 (4) with a thienoyl side chain and three-carbon bridge lengths [AGF150 (5) and AGF154 (7)] were synthesized as potential antitumor agents. These analogues inhibited proliferation of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) sublines expressing folate receptors (FRs) α or β (IC50s < 1 nM) or the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) (IC50 < 7 nM). Compounds 5 and 7 inhibited KB, IGROV1, and SKOV3 human tumor cells at subnanomolar concentrations, reflecting both FRα and PCFT uptake. AGF152 (6) and AGF163 (8), 2,4-diamino-5-substituted-furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine thiophene regioisomers, also inhibited growth of FR-expressing CHO and KB cells. All four analogues inhibited glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GARFTase). Crystal structures of human GARFTase complexed with 5 and 7 were reported. In severe combined immunodeficient mice bearing SKOV3 tumors, 7 was efficacious. The selectivity of these compounds for PCFT and for FRα and β over the ubiquitously expressed reduced folate carrier is a paradigm for selective tumor targeting. PMID:26317331

  20. 3-D radiative transfer in large-eddy simulations - experiences coupling the TenStream solver to the UCLA-LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakub, F.; Mayer, B.

    2015-10-01

    The recently developed three-dimensional TenStream radiative transfer solver was integrated into the UCLA-LES cloud resolving model. This work documents the overall performance of the TenStream solver as well as the technical challenges migrating from 1-D schemes to 3-D schemes. In particular the employed Monte-Carlo-Spectral-Integration needed to be re-examined in conjunction with 3-D radiative transfer. Despite the fact that the spectral sampling has to be performed uniformly over the whole domain, we find that the Monte-Carlo-Spectral-Integration remains valid. To understand the performance characteristics of the coupled TenStream solver, we conducted weak- as well as strong-scaling experiments. In this context, we investigate two matrix-preconditioner (GAMG and block-jacobi ILU) and find that algebraic multigrid preconditioning performs well for complex scenes and highly parallelized simulations. The TenStream solver is tested for up to 4096 cores and shows a parallel scaling efficiency of 80-90 % on various supercomputers. Compared to the widely employed 1-D δ-Eddington two-stream solver, the computational costs for the radiative transfer solver alone increases by a factor of five to ten.

  1. patGPCR: A Multitemplate Approach for Improving 3D Structure Prediction of Transmembrane Helices of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongjie; Lü, Qiang; Quan, Lijun; Qian, Peide; Xia, Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    The structures of the seven transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors are critically involved in many aspects of these receptors, such as receptor stability, ligand docking, and molecular function. Most of the previous multitemplate approaches have built a “super” template with very little merging of aligned fragments from different templates. Here, we present a parallelized multitemplate approach, patGPCR, to predict the 3D structures of transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors. patGPCR, which employs a bundle-packing related energy function that extends on the RosettaMem energy, parallelizes eight pipelines for transmembrane helix refinement and exchanges the optimized helix structures from multiple templates. We have investigated the performance of patGPCR on a test set containing eight determined G-protein-coupled receptors. The results indicate that patGPCR improves the TM RMSD of the predicted models by 33.64% on average against a single-template method. Compared with other homology approaches, the best models for five of the eight targets built by patGPCR had a lower TM RMSD than that obtained from SWISS-MODEL; patGPCR also showed lower average TM RMSD than single-template and multiple-template MODELLER. PMID:23554839

  2. Medium term modelling of coupled hydrodynamics, turbulence and sediment pathways in a region of freshwater influence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoudry, Laurent; Brown, Jenny; Souza, Alex; Norman, Danielle; Olsen, Karine

    2014-05-01

    Liverpool Bay, in the northwest of the UK, is a shallow, hypertidal region of freshwater influence. In this region, baroclinic processes significantly affect the residual circulation, which in turn influences the long term transport of sediment. A nested modelling system is implemented to simulate the coupled hydro and sediment dynamics in the bay. We use the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory Coastal Ocean Modelling System (POLCOMS), which is based on a three-dimensional baroclinic numerical model formulated in spherical polar terrain-following coordinates. The hydrodynamic model solves the three-dimensional, hydrostatic, Boussinesq equations of motion separated into depth-varying and depth-independent parts to allow time splitting between barotropic and baroclinic components. This model is coupled to the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), to the WAve Model (WAM), and includes state-of-the-art Eulerian and Lagrangian sediment transport models. We implement POLCOMS to Liverpool Bay at a horizontal resolution of approximately 180 m. The bathymetry consists of digitized hydrographic charts combined with LIDAR and multibeam data. Three-dimensional baroclinic effects, river inputs, surface heating and offshore density structure are all considered. Liverpool Bay is subjected to a spring tidal range in excess of 10 m and thus intertidal areas are significant. Wetting and drying algorithms are therefore also implemented. A nesting approach is employed to prescribe offshore boundary conditions for elevations, currents, temperature and salinity. Boundary values are obtained from numerical simulations for the entire Irish and are then used to force the three-dimensional hydrodynamics in the Liverpool Bay domain. Atmospheric forcing consists of hourly wind velocity and atmospheric pressure, and three-hourly cloud cover, humidity and air temperature. We focus here on numerical simulations for a full year, 2008, which is considered to be a typical year for atmospheric

  3. Simulation of short-term pressure regulation during the tilt test in a coupled 3D-0D closed-loop model of the circulation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Kevin D; Figueroa, C Alberto

    2015-08-01

    Short-term fluctuations in arterial pressures arising from normal physiological function are buffered by a negative feedback system known as the arterial baroreflex. Initiated by altered biomechanical stretch in the vessel wall, the baroreflex coordinates a systemic response that alters heart rate, cardiac contractility and peripheral vessel vasoconstriction. In this work, a coupled 3D-0D formulation for the short-term pressure regulation of the systemic circulation is presented. Including the baroreflex feedback mechanisms, a patient-specific model of the large arteries is subjected to a simulated head up tilt test. Comparative simulations with and without baroreflex control highlight the critical role that the baroreflex has in regulating variations in pressures within the systemic circulation. PMID:25567754

  4. Improved Large-Scale Inundation Modelling by 1D-2D Coupling and Consideration of Hydrologic and Hydrodynamic Processes - a Case Study in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, J. M.; Bierkens, M. F.; Van Beek, R.; Winsemius, H.; Haag, A.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of fluvial floods is paramount to accurate flood hazard and risk modeling. Currently, economic losses due to flooding constitute about one third of all damage resulting from natural hazards. Given future projections of climate change, the anticipated increase in the World's population and the associated implications, sound knowledge of flood hazard and related risk is crucial. Fluvial floods are cross-border phenomena that need to be addressed accordingly. Yet, only few studies model floods at the large-scale which is preferable to tiling the output of small-scale models. Most models cannot realistically model flood wave propagation due to a lack of either detailed channel and floodplain geometry or the absence of hydrologic processes. This study aims to develop a large-scale modeling tool that accounts for both hydrologic and hydrodynamic processes, to find and understand possible sources of errors and improvements and to assess how the added hydrodynamics affect flood wave propagation. Flood wave propagation is simulated by DELFT3D-FM (FM), a hydrodynamic model using a flexible mesh to schematize the study area. It is coupled to PCR-GLOBWB (PCR), a macro-scale hydrological model, that has its own simpler 1D routing scheme (DynRout) which has already been used for global inundation modeling and flood risk assessments (GLOFRIS; Winsemius et al., 2013). A number of model set-ups are compared and benchmarked for the simulation period 1986-1996: (0) PCR with DynRout; (1) using a FM 2D flexible mesh forced with PCR output and (2) as in (1) but discriminating between 1D channels and 2D floodplains, and, for comparison, (3) and (4) the same set-ups as (1) and (2) but forced with observed GRDC discharge values. Outputs are subsequently validated against observed GRDC data at Óbidos and flood extent maps from the Dartmouth Flood Observatory. The present research constitutes a first step into a globally applicable approach to fully couple

  5. Coupled hydrodynamic model for laser-plasma interaction and hot electron generation.

    PubMed

    Colaïtis, A; Duchateau, G; Ribeyre, X; Maheut, Y; Boutoux, G; Antonelli, L; Nicolaï, Ph; Batani, D; Tikhonchuk, V

    2015-10-01

    We present a formulation of the model of laser-plasma interaction (LPI) at hydrodynamical scales that couples the plasma dynamics with linear and nonlinear LPI processes, including the creation and propagation of high-energy electrons excited by parametric instabilities and collective effects. This formulation accounts for laser beam refraction and diffraction, energy absorption due to collisional and resonant processes, and hot electron generation due to the stimulated Raman scattering, two-plasmon decay, and resonant absorption processes. Hot electron (HE) transport and absorption are described within the multigroup angular scattering approximation, adapted for transversally Gaussian electron beams. This multiscale inline LPI-HE model is used to interpret several shock ignition experiments, highlighting the importance of target preheating by HEs and the shortcomings of standard geometrical optics when modeling the propagation and absorption of intense laser pulses. It is found that HEs from parametric instabilities significantly increase the shock pressure and velocity in the target, while decreasing its strength and the overall ablation pressure. PMID:26565161

  6. Coupled hydrodynamic model for laser-plasma interaction and hot electron generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaïtis, A.; Duchateau, G.; Ribeyre, X.; Maheut, Y.; Boutoux, G.; Antonelli, L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Batani, D.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2015-10-01

    We present a formulation of the model of laser-plasma interaction (LPI) at hydrodynamical scales that couples the plasma dynamics with linear and nonlinear LPI processes, including the creation and propagation of high-energy electrons excited by parametric instabilities and collective effects. This formulation accounts for laser beam refraction and diffraction, energy absorption due to collisional and resonant processes, and hot electron generation due to the stimulated Raman scattering, two-plasmon decay, and resonant absorption processes. Hot electron (HE) transport and absorption are described within the multigroup angular scattering approximation, adapted for transversally Gaussian electron beams. This multiscale inline LPI-HE model is used to interpret several shock ignition experiments, highlighting the importance of target preheating by HEs and the shortcomings of standard geometrical optics when modeling the propagation and absorption of intense laser pulses. It is found that HEs from parametric instabilities significantly increase the shock pressure and velocity in the target, while decreasing its strength and the overall ablation pressure.

  7. Emergence of polar order and cooperativity in hydrodynamically coupled model cilia

    PubMed Central

    Bruot, Nicolas; Cicuta, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    As a model of ciliary beat, we use two-state oscillators that have a defined direction of oscillation and have strong synchronization properties. By allowing the direction of oscillation to vary according to the interaction with the fluid, with a timescale longer than the timescale of synchronization, we show in simulations that several oscillators can align in a direction set by the geometrical configuration of the system. In this system, the alignment depends on the state of synchronization of the system, and is therefore linked to the beat pattern of the model cilia. By testing various configurations from two to 64 oscillators, we deduce empirically that, when the synchronization state of neighbouring oscillators is in phase, the angles of the oscillators align in a configuration of high hydrodynamic coupling. In arrays of oscillators that break the planar symmetry, a global direction of alignment emerges reflecting this polarity. In symmetric configurations, where several directions are geometrically equivalent, the array still displays strong internal cooperative behaviour. It also appears that the shape of the array is more important than the lattice type and orientation in determining the preferred direction. PMID:23883957

  8. Coupling of a hydrodynamic numerical model, extreme value analysis and climate change for a flooding assessment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Byron Quan; Garrè, Luca

    2015-04-01

    The effects of climate change for future flooding events are one of the most debated issues for risk managers and spatial planners today. It is essential to incorporate the expected impacts of climate change and information of past events in order to assess the flood hazard where long term infrastructure has been planned or has been installed. In this study, an integrated procedure for detailed analysis of river flooding in a localized area was developed and applied. This was achieved by coupling hydrodynamic (using LIDAR data) and statistical (extreme values) modeling, that allowed to obtain flood probabilities for the near and distant future. This was done via a regression line which allowed the inclusion of genuinely recorded flooding measurements together with model-generated flooding occurrences. A better reproduction of the flooding behavior in the tail of the extreme distribution was achieved, and by virtue of this, some shortcomings of extreme value extrapolation encountered in the present application were surpassed. The procedure was applied to measurements of flooding in the Rhine river in The Netherlands and provides useful flooding information for the development of hazard maps and future adaptation measures.

  9. Coupling of an individual-based model of anchovy with lower trophic level and hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuheng; Wei, Hao; Kishi, Michio J.

    2013-03-01

    Anchovy ( Engraulis japonicus), a small pelagic fish and food of other economic fishes, is a key species in the Yellow Sea ecosystem. Understanding the mechanisms of its recruitment and biomass variation is important for the prediction and management of fishery resources. Coupled with a hydrodynamic model (POM) and a lower trophic level ecosystem model (NEMURO), an individual-based model of anchovy is developed to study the influence of physical environment on anchovy's biomass variation. Seasonal variations of circulation, water temperature and mix-layer depth from POM are used as external forcing for NEMURO and the anchovy model. Biomasses of large zooplankton and predatory zooplankton which anchovy feeds on are output from NEMURO and are controlled by the consumption of anchovy on them. Survival fitness theory related to temperature and food is used to determine the swimming action of anchovy in the model. The simulation results agree well with observations and elucidate the influence of temperature in over-wintering migration and food in feeding migration.

  10. Electromagnetic coupling and array packing induce exchange of dominance on complex modes in 3D periodic arrays of spheres with large permittivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Campione, Salvatore; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-01-25

    In this study, we investigate the effect on wave propagation of array packing and electromagnetic coupling between spheres in a three-dimensional (3D) lattice of microspheres with large permittivity that exhibit strong magnetic polarizability. We report on the complex wavenumber of Bloch waves in the lattice when each sphere is assumed to possess both electric and magnetic dipoles and full electromagnetic coupling is accounted for. While for small material-filling fractions we always determine one dominant mode with low attenuation constant, the same does not happen for large filling fractions, when electromagnetic coupling is included. In the latter case we peculiarly observemore » two dominant modes with low attenuation constant, dominant in different frequency ranges. The filling fraction threshold for which two dominant modes appear varies for different metamaterial constituents, as proven by considering spheres made by either titanium dioxide or lead telluride. As further confirmation of our findings, we retrieve the complex propagation constant of the dominant mode(s) via a field fitting procedure employing two sets of waves (direct and reflected) pertaining to two distinct modes, strengthening the presence of the two distinct dominant modes for increasing filling fractions. However, given that one mode only, with transverse polarization, at any given frequency, is dominant and able to propagate inside the lattice, we are able to accurately treat the metamaterial that is known to exhibit artificial magnetism as a homogeneous material with effective parameters, such as the refractive index. Results clearly show that the account of both electric and magnetic scattering processes in evaluating all electromagnetic intersphere couplings is essential for a proper description of the electromagnetic propagation in lattices.« less

  11. Femtosecond laser processing of evanescence field coupled waveguides in single mode glass fibers for optical 3D shape sensing and navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltermann, Christian; Baumann, Anna Lena; Bethmann, Konrad; Doering, Alexander; Koch, Jan; Angelmahr, Martin; Schade, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Fiber Bragg grating based optical shape sensing is a new and promising approach to gather position and path information in environments where classical imaging systems fail. Especially a real-time in-vivo navigation of medical catheter or endoscope without any further requirements (such as the continuous exposure to x-rays) could provide a huge advantage in countless areas in medicine. Multicore fibers or bundles of glass fibers have been suggested for realizing such shape sensors, but to date all suffer from severe disadvantages. We present the realization of a third approach. With femtosecond laser pulses local waveguides are inscribed into the cladding of a standard single mode glass fiber. The evanescence field of the main fiber core couples to two S-shaped waveguides, which carry the light to high reflective fiber Bragg gratings located approx. 30 μm away from the centered fiber core in an orthogonal configuration. Part of the reflected light is coupled back to the fiber core and can be read out by a fiber Bragg grating interrogator. A typical spectrum is presented as well as the sensor signal for bending in all directions and with different radii. The entire sensor plane has an elongation of less than 4 mm and therefore enables even complicated and localized navigation applications such as medical catheters. Finally a complete 3D shape sensor in a single mode fiber is presented together with an exemplary application for motion capturing.

  12. Targeting Nonsquamous Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer via the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter with 6-Substituted Pyrrolo[2,3-d]Pyrimidine Thienoyl Antifolates.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mike R; Hou, Zhanjun; Yang, Si; Polin, Lisa; Kushner, Juiwanna; White, Kathryn; Huang, Jenny; Ratnam, Manohar; Gangjee, Aleem; Matherly, Larry H

    2016-04-01

    Pemetrexed (PMX) is a 5-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine antifolate used for therapy of nonsquamous nonsmall cell lung cancer (NS-NSCLC). PMX is transported by the reduced folate carrier (RFC) and proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT). Unlike RFC, PCFT is active at acidic pH levels characterizing the tumor microenvironment. By real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry, PCFT transcripts and proteins were detected in primary NS-NSCLC specimens. In six NS-NSCLC cell lines (A549, H1437, H460, H1299, H1650, and H2030), PCFT transcripts and proteins were detected by real-time RT-PCR and western blots, respectively. 6-Substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine thienoyl antifolates related to PMX [compound 1 (C1) and compound 2 (C2), respectively] are selective substrates for PCFT over RFC. In the NS-NSCLC cell lines, both [(3)H]PMX and [(3)H]C2 were transported by PCFT. C1 and C2 inhibited proliferation of the NS-NSCLC cell lines; A549, H460, and H2030 cells were more sensitive to C1 than to PMX. C1 and C2 inhibited glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase in de novo purine nucleotide biosynthesis. When treated at pH 6.8, which favors PCFT uptake, C1 and C2 inhibited clonogenicity of H460 cells greater than PMX; PMX inhibited clonogenicity more than C1 or C2 at pH 7.2, which favors RFC transport over PCFT. Knockdown of PCFT in H460 cells resulted in decreased [(3)H]PMX and [(3)H]C2 transport and decreased growth inhibition by C1 and C2, and to a lesser extent by PMX. In vivo efficacy of C1 was seen toward H460 tumor xenografts in severe-combined immunodeficient mice. Our results suggest that 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine thienoyl antifolates offer significant promise for treating NS-NSCLC by selective uptake by PCFT. PMID:26837243

  13. Geodetic imaging of potential seismogenic asperities on the Xianshuihe-Anninghe-Zemuhe fault system, southwest China, with a new 3-D viscoelastic interseismic coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guoyan; Xu, Xiwei; Chen, Guihua; Liu, Yajing; Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Wang, Hua; Yu, Guihua; Tan, Xibin; Xu, Caijun

    2015-03-01

    We use GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements to image the spatial variation of interseismic coupling on the Xianshuihe-Anninghe-Zemuhe (XAZ) fault system. A new 3-D viscoelastic interseismic deformation model is developed to infer the rotation and strain rates of blocks, postseismic viscoelastic relaxation, and interseismic slip deficit on the fault surface discretized with triangular dislocation patches. The inversions of synthetic data show that the optimal weight ratio and smoothing factor are both 1. The successive joint inversions of geodetic data with different viscosities reveal six potential fully coupled asperities on the XAZ fault system. Among them, the potential asperity between Shimian and Mianning, which does not exist in the case of 1019 Pa s, is confirmed by the published microearthquake depth profile. Besides, there is another potential partially coupled asperity between Daofu and Kangding with a length scale up to 140 km. All these asperity sizes are larger than the minimum resolvable wavelength. The minimum and maximum slip deficit rates near the Moxi town are 7.0 and 12.7 mm/yr, respectively. Different viscosities have little influence on the roughness of the slip deficit rate distribution and the fitting residuals, which probably suggests that our observations cannot provide a good constraint on the viscosity of the middle lower crust. The calculation of seismic moment accumulation on each segment indicates that the Songlinkou-Selaha (S4), Shimian-Mianning (S7), and Mianning-Xichang (S8) segments are very close to the rupture of characteristic earthquakes. However, the confidence level is confined by sparse near-fault observations.

  14. Dam-Break Flooding and Structural Damage in a Residential Neighborhood: Performance of a coupled hydrodynamic-damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, B. F.; Gallegos, H. A.; Schubert, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Baldwin Hills dam-break flood and associated structural damage is investigated in this study. The flood caused high velocity flows exceeding 5 m/s which destroyed 41 wood-framed residential structures, 16 of which were completed washed out. Damage is predicted by coupling a calibrated hydrodynamic flood model based on the shallow-water equations to structural damage models. The hydrodynamic and damage models are two-way coupled so building failure is predicted upon exceedance of a hydraulic intensity parameter, which in turn triggers a localized reduction in flow resistance which affects flood intensity predictions. Several established damage models and damage correlations reported in the literature are tested to evaluate the predictive skill for two damage states defined by destruction (Level 2) and washout (Level 3). Results show that high-velocity structural damage can be predicted with a remarkable level of skill using established damage models, but only with two-way coupling of the hydrodynamic and damage models. In contrast, when structural failure predictions have no influence on flow predictions, there is a significant reduction in predictive skill. Force-based damage models compare well with a subset of the damage models which were devised for similar types of structures. Implications for emergency planning and preparedness as well as monetary damage estimation are discussed.

  15. Simulating Sediment Transport Processes in San Francisco Bay Using Coupled Hydrodynamic, Wave, and Sediment Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bever, A. J.; MacWilliams, M.

    2012-12-01

    Under the conceptual model of sediment transport in San Pablo Bay, a sub-embayment of San Francisco Bay, proposed by Krone (1979), sediment typically enters San Pablo Bay during large winter and spring flows and is redistributed during summer conditions through wind wave resuspension and transport by tidal currents. A detailed understanding of how the waves and tides redistribute sediment within San Francisco Bay is critical for predicting how future sea level rise and a reduction in the sediment supply to the Bay will impact existing marsh and mudflat habitat, tidal marsh restoration projects, and ongoing maintenance dredging of the navigation channels. The three-dimensional UnTRIM San Francisco Bay-Delta Model was coupled with the Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) wave model and the SediMorph morphological model, to develop a three-dimensional hydrodynamic, wind wave, and sediment transport model of the San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Numerical simulations of sediment resuspension due to tidal currents and wind waves and the subsequent transport of this sediment by tidal currents are used to quantify the spatial and temporal variability of sediment fluxes on the extensive shoals in San Pablo Bay under a range of tidal and wind conditions. The results demonstrate that suspended sediment concentration and sediment fluxes within San Pablo Bay are a complex product of tides and waves interacting spatially throughout the Bay, with concentrations responding to local resuspension and sediment advection. Sediment fluxes between the San Pablo Bay shoals and the deeper channel are highest during spring tides, and are elevated for up to a week following wave events, even though the greatest influence of the wave event occurs abruptly.

  16. Strongly coupled single-phase flow problems: Effects of density variation, hydrodynamic dispersion, and first order decay

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Pruess, K.

    1995-03-01

    We have developed TOUGH2 modules for strongly coupled flow and transport that include full hydrodynamic dispersion. T2DM models two-dimensional flow and transport in systems with variable salinity, while T2DMR includes radionuclide transport with firstorder decay of a parent-daughter chain of radionuclide components in variable salinity systems. T2DM has been applied to a variety of coupled flow problems including the pure solutal convection problem of Elder and the mixed free and forced convection salt-dome flow problem. In the Elder and salt-dome flow problems, density changes of up to 20% caused by brine concentration variations lead to strong coupling between the velocity and brine concentration fields. T2DM efficiently calculates flow and transport for these problems. We have applied T2DMR to the dispersive transport and decay of radionuclide tracers in flow fields with permeability heterogeneities and recirculating flows. Coupling in th ese problems occurs by velocity-dependent hydrodynamic dispersion. Our results show that the maximum daughter species concentration may occur fully within a recirculating or low-velocity region. In all of the problems, we observe very efficient handling of the strongly coupled flow and transport processes.

  17. Coupled 3D Time-Dependent Wave-Packet Approach in Hyperspherical Coordinates: The D(+)+H2 Reaction on the Triple-Sheeted DMBE Potential Energy Surface.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sandip; Sahoo, Tapas; Adhikari, Satrajit; Sharma, Rahul; Varandas, António J C

    2015-12-17

    We implement a coupled three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent wave packet formalism for the 4D reactive scattering problem in hyperspherical coordinates on the accurate double many body expansion (DMBE) potential energy surface (PES) for the ground and first two singlet states (1(1)A', 2(1)A', and 3(1)A') to account for nonadiabatic processes in the D(+) + H2 reaction for both zero and nonzero values of the total angular momentum (J). As the long-range interactions in D(+) + H2 contribute significantly due to nonadiabatic effects, the convergence profiles of reaction probabilities for the reactive noncharge transfer (RNCT), nonreactive charge transfer (NRCT), and reactive charge transfer (RCT) processes are shown for different collisional energies with respect to the helicity (K) and total angular momentum (J) quantum numbers. The total and state-to-state cross sections are presented as a function of the collision energy for the initial rovibrational state v = 0, j = 0 of the diatom, and the calculated cross sections compared with other theoretical and experimental results. PMID:26436891

  18. Lifetime of inner-shell hole states of Ar (2p) and Kr (3d) using equation-of-motion coupled cluster method

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Aryya; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav

    2015-07-14

    Auger decay is an efficient ultrafast relaxation process of core-shell or inner-shell excited atom or molecule. Generally, it occurs in femto-second or even atto-second time domain. Direct measurement of lifetimes of Auger process of single ionized and double ionized inner-shell state of an atom or molecule is an extremely difficult task. In this paper, we have applied the highly correlated complex absorbing potential-equation-of-motion coupled cluster (CAP-EOMCC) approach which is a combination of CAP and EOMCC approach to calculate the lifetime of the states arising from 2p inner-shell ionization of an Ar atom and 3d inner-shell ionization of Kr atom. We have also calculated the lifetime of Ar{sup 2+}(2p{sup −1}3p{sup −1}) {sup 1}D, Ar{sup 2+}(2p{sup −1}3p{sup −1}) {sup 1}S, and Ar{sup 2+}(2p{sup −1}3s{sup −1}) {sup 1}P double ionized states. The predicted results are compared with the other theoretical results as well as experimental results available in the literature.

  19. Eutectic morphology evolution and Sr-modification in Al-Si based alloys studied by 3D phase-field simulation coupled to Calphad data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiken, J.; Apel, M.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of Al-Si cast alloys are mainly controlled by the morphology of the eutectic silicon. Phase-field simulations were carried out to study the evolution of the multidimensional branched eutectic structures in 3D. Coupling to a Calphad database provided thermodynamic data for the multicomponent multiphase Al-Si-Sr-P system. A major challenge was to model the effect of the trace element Sr. Minor amounts of Sr are known to modify the silicon morphology from coarse flakes to fine coral-like fibers. However, the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. Two different in literature most discussed mechanisms were modelled: a) an effect of Sr on the growth kinetics of eutectic silicon and b) the formation of Al2Si2Sr on AlP particles, which consumes most potent nucleation sites and forces eutectic silicon to form with lower frequency and higher undercooling. The phase-field simulations only revealed a successful modification of the eutectic morphology when both effects acted in combination. Only in this case a clear depression of the eutectic temperature was observed. The required phase formation sequence L → fcc-(Al) → AlP → Al2Si2Sr → (Si) determines critical values for the Sr and P content.

  20. Numerical Solution of 3D Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations Coupled with Classical Density Functional Theory for Modeling Ion and Electron Transport in a Confined Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Da; Zheng, Bin; Lin, Guang; Sushko, Maria L.

    2014-08-29

    We have developed efficient numerical algorithms for the solution of 3D steady-state Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) with excess chemical potentials described by the classical density functional theory (cDFT). The coupled PNP equations are discretized by finite difference scheme and solved iteratively by Gummel method with relaxation. The Nernst-Planck equations are transformed into Laplace equations through the Slotboom transformation. Algebraic multigrid method is then applied to efficiently solve the Poisson equation and the transformed Nernst-Planck equations. A novel strategy for calculating excess chemical potentials through fast Fourier transforms is proposed which reduces computational complexity from O(N2) to O(NlogN) where N is the number of grid points. Integrals involving Dirac delta function are evaluated directly by coordinate transformation which yields more accurate result compared to applying numerical quadrature to an approximated delta function. Numerical results for ion and electron transport in solid electrolyte for Li ion batteries are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data and the results from previous studies.

  1. Parallel shear flow instabilities in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids: A comparison of generalized hydrodynamic model and molecular dynamics results

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwin, J.; Ganesh, R.

    2010-10-15

    Using a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model, the growth rate spectra of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability has been obtained analytically for a step shear profile in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids. The class of shear flows studied is assumed to be incompressible in nature. The growth rate spectra calculated exhibit viscous damping at high mode numbers, destabilization at stronger coupling, and in the limit {tau}{sub m} (viscoelastic relaxation time){yields}0, reduce to the regular Navier-Stokes growth rate spectra. A direct comparison is made with previous molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [Ashwin J. and R. Ganesh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 215003 (2010)] of KH instability. We find that for a given value of Reynolds number R and coupling parameter 1<{Gamma}<100, the GH and MD growth rates are in a qualitative agreement. The inclusion of the effect of shear heating as an effective coupling parameter {Gamma}{sub e} appears to improve the quantitative comparison as well.

  2. Performance analysis of coupled and uncoupled hydrodynamic and wave models in the northern Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, Claudia; Coluccelli, Alessandro; Valentini, Andrea; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bonaldo, Davide; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Carniel, Sandro; Falcieri, Francesco; Paccagnella, Tiziana; Ravaioli, Mariangela; Riminucci, Francesco; Sclavo, Mauro; Russo, Aniello

    2014-05-01

    The complex dynamics of the Adriatic Sea are the result of geographical position, orography and bathymetry, as well as rivers discharge and meteorological conditions that influence, more strongly, the shallow northern part. Such complexity requires a constant monitoring of marine conditions in order to support several activities (marine resources management, naval operations, emergency management, shipping, tourism, as well as scientific ones). Platforms, buoys and mooring located in Adriatic Sea supply almost continuously real time punctual information, which can be spatially extended, with some limitations, by drifters and remote sensing. Operational forecasting systems represent valid tools to provide a complete tridimensional coverage of the area, with a high spatial and temporal resolution. The Hydro-Meteo-Clima Service of the Emilia-Romagna Environmental Agency (ARPA-SIMC, Bologna, Italy) and the Dept. of Life and Environmental Sciences of Università Politecnica delle Marche (DISVA-UNIVPM, Ancona, Italy), in collaboration with the Institute of Marine Science of the National Research Council (ISMAR-CNR, Italy) operationally run several wave and hydrodynamic models on the Adriatic Sea. The main implementations are based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), the wave model Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), and the coupling of the former two models in the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) system. Horizontal resolutions of the different systems range from the 2 km of AdriaROMS to the 0.5 km of the recently implemented northern Adriatic COAWST. Forecasts are produced every day for the subsequent 72 hour with hourly resolution. All the systems compute the fluxes exchanged through the interface with the atmosphere from the numerical weather prediction system named COSMO-I7, an implementation for Italy of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO) model, at 7 km horizontal resolution. Considering the several operational

  3. Computational hydrodynamics and optical performance of inductively-coupled plasma adaptive lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, M.; Urzay, J.; Mani, A.

    2015-06-01

    This study addresses the optical performance of a plasma adaptive lens for aero-optical applications by using both axisymmetric and three-dimensional numerical simulations. Plasma adaptive lenses are based on the effects of free electrons on the phase velocity of incident light, which, in theory, can be used as a phase-conjugation mechanism. A closed cylindrical chamber filled with Argon plasma is used as a model lens into which a beam of light is launched. The plasma is sustained by applying a radio-frequency electric current through a coil that envelops the chamber. Four different operating conditions, ranging from low to high powers and induction frequencies, are employed in the simulations. The numerical simulations reveal complex hydrodynamic phenomena related to buoyant and electromagnetic laminar transport, which generate, respectively, large recirculating cells and wall-normal compression stresses in the form of local stagnation-point flows. In the axisymmetric simulations, the plasma motion is coupled with near-wall axial striations in the electron-density field, some of which propagate in the form of low-frequency traveling disturbances adjacent to vortical quadrupoles that are reminiscent of Taylor-Görtler flow structures in centrifugally unstable flows. Although the refractive-index fields obtained from axisymmetric simulations lead to smooth beam wavefronts, they are found to be unstable to azimuthal disturbances in three of the four three-dimensional cases considered. The azimuthal striations are optically detrimental, since they produce high-order angular aberrations that account for most of the beam wavefront error. A fourth case is computed at high input power and high induction frequency, which displays the best optical properties among all the three-dimensional simulations considered. In particular, the increase in induction frequency prevents local thermalization and leads to an axisymmetric distribution of electrons even after introduction of

  4. Computational hydrodynamics and optical performance of inductively-coupled plasma adaptive lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Mortazavi, M.; Urzay, J. Mani, A.

    2015-06-15

    This study addresses the optical performance of a plasma adaptive lens for aero-optical applications by using both axisymmetric and three-dimensional numerical simulations. Plasma adaptive lenses are based on the effects of free electrons on the phase velocity of incident light, which, in theory, can be used as a phase-conjugation mechanism. A closed cylindrical chamber filled with Argon plasma is used as a model lens into which a beam of light is launched. The plasma is sustained by applying a radio-frequency electric current through a coil that envelops the chamber. Four different operating conditions, ranging from low to high powers and induction frequencies, are employed in the simulations. The numerical simulations reveal complex hydrodynamic phenomena related to buoyant and electromagnetic laminar transport, which generate, respectively, large recirculating cells and wall-normal compression stresses in the form of local stagnation-point flows. In the axisymmetric simulations, the plasma motion is coupled with near-wall axial striations in the electron-density field, some of which propagate in the form of low-frequency traveling disturbances adjacent to vortical quadrupoles that are reminiscent of Taylor-Görtler flow structures in centrifugally unstable flows. Although the refractive-index fields obtained from axisymmetric simulations lead to smooth beam wavefronts, they are found to be unstable to azimuthal disturbances in three of the four three-dimensional cases considered. The azimuthal striations are optically detrimental, since they produce high-order angular aberrations that account for most of the beam wavefront error. A fourth case is computed at high input power and high induction frequency, which displays the best optical properties among all the three-dimensional simulations considered. In particular, the increase in induction frequency prevents local thermalization and leads to an axisymmetric distribution of electrons even after introduction of

  5. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  6. Advanced Tsunami Numerical Simulations and Energy Considerations by use of 3D-2D Coupled Models: The October 11, 1918, Mona Passage Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Venegas, Alberto M.; Horrillo, Juan; Pampell-Manis, Alyssa; Huérfano, Victor; Mercado, Aurelio

    2015-06-01

    The most recent tsunami observed along the coast of the island of Puerto Rico occurred on October 11, 1918, after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake in the Mona Passage. The earthquake was responsible for initiating a tsunami that mostly affected the northwestern coast of the island. Runup values from a post-tsunami survey indicated the waves reached up to 6 m. A controversy regarding the source of the tsunami has resulted in several numerical simulations involving either fault rupture or a submarine landslide as the most probable cause of the tsunami. Here we follow up on previous simulations of the tsunami from a submarine landslide source off the western coast of Puerto Rico as initiated by the earthquake. Improvements on our previous study include: (1) higher-resolution bathymetry; (2) a 3D-2D coupled numerical model specifically developed for the tsunami; (3) use of the non-hydrostatic numerical model NEOWAVE (non-hydrostatic evolution of ocean WAVE) featuring two-way nesting capabilities; and (4) comprehensive energy analysis to determine the time of full tsunami wave development. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes model tsunami solution using the Navier-Stokes algorithm with multiple interfaces for two fluids (water and landslide) was used to determine the initial wave characteristic generated by the submarine landslide. Use of NEOWAVE enabled us to solve for coastal inundation, wave propagation, and detailed runup. Our results were in agreement with previous work in which a submarine landslide is favored as the most probable source of the tsunami, and improvement in the resolution of the bathymetry yielded inundation of the coastal areas that compare well with values from a post-tsunami survey. Our unique energy analysis indicates that most of the wave energy is isolated in the wave generation region, particularly at depths near the landslide, and once the initial wave propagates from the generation region its energy begins to stabilize.

  7. Surface water, groundwater and unified 3D-crack network as a triple coupling dynamic system for a river watershed functioning - manifestation in catastrophic floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonova, Tatiana; Tulenev, Nikita; Trifonov, Dmitriy; Arakelian, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    1. Surface water and groundwater interaction model under conditions of huge level of precipitation in catastrophic floods and mudflows for mountain river watershed is introduced. Seismic processes and volcanic activity impact on the formation of disastrous floods due to dramatic change of the pressure field in groundwater horizons, is under discussion for such a triple coupling system, i.e. surface water - groundwater - crack network. Under the conception we analyze recent (2013) catastrophic water events: the catastrophic floods in Western Europe (May-June, 2013), in the Amur river basin, Russia/China (Aug.-Sept, 2013) and in Colorado, USA (Sept. 12-15,2013). In addition, a separate analysis is carried out for debris event in the Krimsk-city, Caucasus (Krasnodar) region, Russia (July 06-07, 2012). 2. There is a group of problems determined by dramatic discrepancies in water mass balance and other vital parameters, on the one hand, by estimation for different types of atmospheric precipitation (both torrential rain and continuous precipitations) and, on the other hand, for observable natural water events (i.e. catastrophic floods and/or mudflows/debris) on concrete territory. Analysis of many facts result in conclusion that we have the hard comparable/coincidence parameters under traditional conception for discussed events as an isolated/closed (river + rain) runoff-system. In contrast, the reasonable point of view does exist if we take into account the contribution of extra water source, which should be localized in river channel, i.e. functioning of open [(river + rain) + groundwater] flow-system has a principal meaning to understand the events occurrence. 3. The analysis and modeling for the events are carried out by us taking into account the following databases: (i) groundwater map dislocation, it resources and flow balance in studied areas, especially near the land surface being unstable in hydrological sense by many reasons, as well due to heavy rain

  8. Development of a coupled discrete element (DEM)-smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation method for polyhedral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassauer, Benjamin; Liedke, Thomas; Kuna, Meinhard

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, the direct coupling of a discrete element method (DEM) with polyhedral particles and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is presented. The two simulation techniques are fully coupled in both ways through interaction forces between the solid DEM particles and the fluid SPH particles. Thus this simulation method provides the possibility to simulate the individual movement of polyhedral, sharp-edged particles as well as the flow field around these particles in fluid-saturated granular matter which occurs in many technical processes e.g. wire sawing, grinding or lapping. The coupled method is exemplified and validated by the simulation of a particle in a shear flow, which shows good agreement with analytical solutions.

  9. Resolving the coupled effects of hydrodynamics and DLVO forces on colloid attachment in porous media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transport of colloidal particles in porous media is governed by the rate at which the colloids strike and stick to collector surfaces. Classic filtration theory has considered the influence of system hydrodynamics on determining the rate that colloids strike collector surfaces, but has neglected the...

  10. 3D radiative transfer in colliding wind binaries: Application of the SimpleX algorithm to 3D SPH simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Clementel, Nicola; Kruip, Chael; Icke, Vincent; Gull, Theodore

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in a massive binary system. We accomplish this by applying the SIMPLEX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Delaunay grid to recent 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the colliding winds in the binary system η Carinae. We use SIMPLEX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, in 3D, at the resolution of the original SPH simulations. We show how the SIMPLEX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in η Car's extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SIMPLEX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the η Car system, such as the primary's mass-loss rate and the companion's temperature and luminosity. While we initially focus specifically on the η Car binary, the numerical methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR140, WR137, WR19) and dusty 'pinwheel' (WR104, WR98a) binary systems. One of the biggest remaining mysteries is how dust can form and survive in such systems that contain a hot, luminous O star. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SIMPLEX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  11. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  12. Experiments performed with bubbly flow in vertical pipes at different flow conditions covering the transition region: simulation by coupling Eulerian, Lagrangian and 3D random walks models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Cobo, José; Chiva, Sergio; El Aziz Essa, Mohamed; Mendes, Santos

    2012-08-01

    Two phase flow experiments with different superficial velocities of gas and water were performed in a vertical upward isothermal cocurrent air-water flow column with conditions ranging from bubbly flow, with very low void fraction, to transition flow with some cap and slug bubbles and void fractions around 25%. The superficial velocities of the liquid and the gas phases were varied from 0.5 to 3 m/s and from 0 to 0.6 m/s, respectively. Also to check the effect of changing the surface tension on the previous experiments small amounts of 1-butanol were added to the water. These amounts range from 9 to 75 ppm and change the surface tension. This study is interesting because in real cases the surface tension of the water diminishes with temperature, and with this kind of experiments we can study indirectly the effect of changing the temperature on the void fraction distribution. The following axial and radial distributions were measured in all these experiments: void fraction, interfacial area concentration, interfacial velocity, Sauter mean diameter and turbulence intensity. The range of values of the gas superficial velocities in these experiments covered the range from bubbly flow to the transition to cap/slug flow. Also with transition flow conditions we distinguish two groups of bubbles in the experiments, the small spherical bubbles and the cap/slug bubbles. Special interest was devoted to the transition region from bubbly to cap/slug flow; the goal was to understand the physical phenomena that take place during this transition A set of numerical simulations of some of these experiments for bubbly flow conditions has been performed by coupling a Lagrangian code, that tracks the three dimensional motion of the individual bubbles in cylindrical coordinates inside the field of the carrier liquid, to an Eulerian model that computes the magnitudes of continuous phase and to a 3D random walk model that takes on account the fluctuation in the velocity field of the

  13. Development and evaluation of a coupled hydrodynamic (FVCOM) and water quality model (CE-QUAL-ICM)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeyun; Labiosa, Rochelle G.; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Chen, Changsheng; Qi, Jianhua; Cerco, Carl

    2010-01-08

    Recent and frequent fish-kills in waters otherwise known for their pristine high quality, created increased awareness and urgent concern regarding potential for degradation of water quality in Puget Sound through coastal eutrophication caused by increased nutrient loading. Following a detailed review of leading models and tools available in public domain, FVCOM and CE-QUAL-ICM models were selected to conduct hydrodynamic and water quality simulations for the fjordal waters of Puget Sound.

  14. Viscous Analysis of Pulsating Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sacksteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has recently been shown to arise during liquid-propellant deflagration in those parameter regimes where the pressure-dependent burning rate is characterized by a negative pressure sensitivity. This type of instability can coexist with the classical cellular, or Landau form of hydrodynamic instability, with the occurrence of either dependent on whether the pressure sensitivity is sufficiently large or small in magnitude. For the inviscid problem, it has been shown that, when the burning rate is realistically allowed to depend on temperature as well as pressure, sufficiently large values of the temperature sensitivity relative to the pressure sensitivity causes like pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability to become dominant. In that regime, steady, planar burning becomes intrinsically unstable to pulsating disturbances whose wave numbers are sufficiently small. This analysis is extended to the fully viscous case, where it is shown that although viscosity is stabilizing for intermediate and larger wave number perturbations, the intrinsic pulsating instability for small wave numbers remains. Under these conditions, liquid-propellant combustion is predicted to be characterized by large unsteady cells along the liquid/gas interface.

  15. Numerical simulation of landslide-generated waves using a soil-water coupling smoothed particle hydrodynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chuanqi; An, Yi; Wu, Qiang; Liu, Qingquan; Cao, Zhixian

    2016-06-01

    We simulate the generation of a landslide-induced impulse wave with a newly-developed soil-water coupling model in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) framework. The model includes an elasto-plastic constitutive model for soil, a Navier-Stokes equation based model for water, and a bilateral coupling model at the interface. The model is tested with simulated waves induced by a slow and a fast landslide. Good agreement is obtained between simulation results and experimental data. The generated wave and the deformation of the landslide body can both be resolved satisfactorily. All parameters in our model have their physical meaning in soil mechanics and can be obtained from conventional soil mechanics experiments directly. The influence of the dilatancy angle of soil shows that the non-associated flow rule must be selected, and the value of the dilatancy angle should not be chosen arbitrarily, if it is not determined with relative experiments.

  16. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  17. Hybrid Approaches for Simulation of Coastal Hydrodynamics --- Coupling of FVCOM/CFD and FVCOM/Shallow Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Wu, X.; Cheng, W.; Skraatz, S.

    2010-12-01

    As a consequence of many emerging issues such as the catastrophic Gulf of Mexico oil spill and potential coastline flooding due to sea level rise, there is an urgent need to develop our capabilities to predict small-scale and really 3D phenomena. In order to meet the need, we propose hybrid approaches and domain decomposition to couple different models designed for different physics and scales. In this presentation, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and FVCOM are coupled to simulate small-scale flow problems in coastal settings. The former is used to capture local flows, and the latter is employed to compute the large-scale background currents. In addition, a 2D shallow water model is coupled with FVCOM. In this situation, the 2D model is utilized to predict coastline flows and FVCOM is applied to simulate the deep water currents. The hybrid approaches are realized using two-way coupling and Chimera overset grids. Two numerical examples, which correspond to the two types of coupling, will be discussed. The first example is a thermal discharge from a multiport diffuser at the seabed, each of the ports is 10 cm in diameters, into estuary with sizes in hundreds of kilometers (Fig. 1a and b). The second example is flooding into lands and urban areas. The results clearly illustrate the feasibility and potential of the proposed approaches in prediction of multi-physics/multi-scale coastal ocean flows. Difficulty and unresolved issues will be discussed also. Fig. 1a FVCOM mesh. The discharge is located at mouth of Hudson next to NYC Fig. 1b Simulated 3D thermal plume of the discharge

  18. A coupled hydrodynamic and breach formation model to simulate floodplain inundations: the case study of the Bacchiglione River (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, D.; D'Alpaos, A.; Carniello, L.; Defina, A.; Genevois, R.

    2011-12-01

    We present a numerical hydrodynamic model which couples a previously described model solving the two-dimensional shallow water equations modified in order to deal with partially wet and very irregular domains with a conceptual model simulating the process of breach formation and development in fluvial levees. The coupled model allows us to simulate flood propagation over unchanneled areas adjacent to the river segment thus providing a quantitative estimate of the consequent inundations of such areas. The two dimensional depth integrated momentum and continuity equations are modified to take into account the bottom irregularities that strongly affect the hydrodynamics in partially dry areas, as for example, in the first stages of an inundation process. The breach formation module allows one to simulate the formation of failures either by piping or by overtopping of existing levees. Because in general a river has a limited inner capacity with respect to reservoirs, the coupling of the above models makes it possible to account for the highly variable hydraulic conditions, both in space and time, which occur close to the breach. This is deemed to be a necessary feature of this type of models because the evolution of the breach itself, and therefore the extension of the flooded areas, strongly depend on the altered driving hydrodynamic conditions which characterize the flow field both within the channel and over the adjacent areas. The model therefore provides a better description of the process of breach formation compared to classical models which assume static driving hydraulic conditions in proximity of the breach. Moreover, the use of a conceptual model for breach formation, either by piping or by overtopping, reduces the computational effort therefore allowing for the extensive application of the coupled model to actual case studies. We have applied the model to a case study in which the effects of breach formation across the Bacchiglione River (North

  19. Using a coupled eco-hydrodynamic model to predict habitat for target species following dam removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomsic, C.A.; Granata, T.C.; Murphy, R.P.; Livchak, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    A habitat suitability index (HSI) model was developed for a water quality sensitive fish (Greater Redhorse) and macroinvertebrate (Plecoptera) species to determine the restoration success of the St. John Dam removal for the Sandusky River (Ohio). An ArcGIS?? model was created for pre- and post-dam removal scenarios. Inputs to the HSI model consist of substrate distributions from river surveys, and water level and velocity time series, outputs from a hydrodynamic model. The ArcGIS?? model predicted habitat suitability indices at 45 river cross-sections in the hydrodynamic model. The model was programmed to produce polygon layers, using graphical user interfaces that were displayed in the ArcGIS?? environment. The results of the model clearly show an increase of habitat suitability from pre- to post-dam removal periods and in the former reservoir. The change in suitability of the model is attributed mostly to the change in depth in the river following the dam removal for both the fish and invertebrate species. The results of the invertebrate model followed the same positive trend as species enumerations from the river basin. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  1. Micropollutant dynamics in Vidy Bay--a coupled hydrodynamic-photolysis model to assess the spatial extent of ecotoxicological risk.

    PubMed

    Bonvin, Florence; Razmi, Amir M; Barry, David A; Kohn, Tamar

    2013-08-20

    The direct discharge of effluent wastewater into Vidy Bay (Lake Geneva) results in the formation of an effluent plume with locally high concentrations of wastewater-derived micropollutants. The micropollutant hotspots above the wastewater outfall present a potential ecotoxicological risk, yet the spatial extent of the plume and the associated ecotoxicological risk zone remain unclear. This work combines the two main processes affecting the spreading of the plume, namely dilution of micropollutants due to mixing and degradation by photolysis, into a coupled hydrodynamic-photolysis model, with which we estimated the spatial extent of the risk zone in Vidy Bay. The concentration of micropollutants around the wastewater outfall was simulated for typical wind scenarios and seasons relevant to Vidy Bay, and the resulting ecotoxicological risk was evaluated. Specifically, we determined the direct and indirect photolysis rate constants for 24 wastewater-derived micropollutants and implemented these in a hydrodynamic particle tracking model, which tracked the movement of water parcels from the wastewater outfall. Simulations showed that owing to thermal stratification, the zone of ecotoxicological risk is largest in summer and extends horizontally over 300 m from the outfall. Photolysis processes contribute to reducing the plume extent mainly under unstratified conditions when the plume surfaces. Moreover, it was shown that only a few compounds, mainly antibiotics, dominate the total ecotoxicological risk. PMID:23919891

  2. The simulation of a criticality accident excursion occurring in a simple fast metal system using the coupled neutronic-hydrodynamic method

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.L.

    1996-12-31

    Analysis of a criticality accident scenario occuring in a simple fast metal system using the coupled neutronic-hydrodynamic method is demonstrated by examining the last Godiva-I criticality accident. The basis tools and information for creating a coupled neutronic-hydrodynamic code are presented. Simplifying assumptions and approximations for creating an idealized model for the Godiva-I system are discussed. Estimates of the total energy generation and the maximum attainable kinetic energy yield are the most important results that are obtained from the code. With modifications, the methodology presented in this paper can be extended to analyze criticality accident excursions in other kinds of nuclear systems.

  3. Protein Simulations in Fluids: Coupling the OPEP Coarse-Grained Force Field with Hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sterpone, Fabio; Derreumaux, Philippe; Melchionna, Simone

    2015-04-14

    A novel simulation framework that integrates the OPEP coarse-grained (CG) model for proteins with the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) methodology to account for the fluid solvent at mesoscale level is presented. OPEP is a very efficient, water-free and electrostatic-free force field that reproduces at quasi-atomistic detail processes like peptide folding, structural rearrangements, and aggregation dynamics. The LB method is based on the kinetic description of the solvent in order to solve the fluid mechanics under a wide range of conditions, with the further advantage of being highly scalable on parallel architectures. The capabilities of the approach are presented, and it is shown that the strategy is effective in exploring the role of hydrodynamics on protein relaxation and peptide aggregation. The end result is a strategy for modeling systems of thousands of proteins, such as in the case of dense protein suspensions. The future perspectives of the multiscale approach are also discussed. PMID:26574390

  4. Coupling hydrodynamics and radiation calculations for star-jet interactions in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cita, V. M.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Khangulyan, D.; Perucho, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Stars and their winds can contribute to the non-thermal emission in extragalactic jets. Because of the complexity of jet-star interactions, the properties of the resulting emission are closely linked to those of the emitting flows. Aims: We simulate the interaction between a stellar wind and a relativistic extragalactic jet and use the hydrodynamic results to compute the non-thermal emission under different conditions. Methods: We performed relativistic axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a relativistic jet interacting with a supersonic, non-relativistic stellar wind. We computed the corresponding streamlines out of the simulation results and calculated the injection, evolution, and emission of non-thermal particles accelerated in the jet shock, focusing on electrons or e±-pairs. Several cases were explored, considering different jet-star interaction locations, magnetic fields, and observer lines of sight. The jet luminosity and star properties were fixed, but the results are easily scalable when these parameters are changed. Results: Individual jet-star interactions produce synchrotron and inverse Compton emission that peaks from X-rays to MeV energies (depending on the magnetic field), and at ~100-1000 GeV (depending on the stellar type), respectively. The radiation spectrum is hard in the scenarios explored here as a result of non-radiative cooling dominance, as low-energy electrons are efficiently advected even under relatively high magnetic fields. Interactions of jets with cold stars lead to an even harder inverse Compton spectrum because of the Klein-Nishina effect in the cross section. Doppler boosting has a strong effect on the observer luminosity. Conclusions: The emission levels for individual interactions found here are in the line of previous, more approximate, estimates, strengthening the hypothesis that collective jet-star interactions could significantly contribute at high energies under efficient particle acceleration.

  5. Measurements of the Conduction-Zone Length and Mass Ablation Rate to Study the Hydrodynamic Coupling in Cryogenic Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Epstein, R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Seka, W.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-11-01

    The ablation-front trajectory and the averaged mass ablation rate is measured in direct-drive cryogenic target implosions on the OMEGA Laser System by imaging the soft x rays emitted by the coronal plasma. The length of the conduction zone is determined by coupling x-ray and scattered-light measurements. These measurements are compared to hydrodynamic simulations to study the modeling of the hydrodynamic coupling for various beam and target radii. Reducing the beam focal-spot radius relative to the target radius is a method that is being studied to reduce cross-beam energy transfer and increase the hydrodynamic efficiency. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  6. User's manual for PELE3D: a computer code for three-dimensional incompressible fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    McMaster, W H

    1982-05-07

    The PELE3D code is a three-dimensional semi-implicit Eulerian hydrodynamics computer program for the solution of incompressible fluid flow coupled to a structure. The fluid and coupling algorithms have been adapted from the previously developed two-dimensional code PELE-IC. The PELE3D code is written in both plane and cylindrical coordinates. The coupling algorithm is general enough to handle a variety of structural shapes. The free surface algorithm is able to accommodate a top surface and several independent bubbles. The code is in a developmental status since all the intended options have not been fully implemented and tested. Development of this code ended in 1980 upon termination of the contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  7. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  8. Coupled effects of hydrodynamics and biogeochemistry on Zn mobility and speciation in highly contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Xie, Minwei; Jarrett, Brooke A; Da Silva-Cadoux, Cécile; Fetters, Kyle J; Burton, G Allen; Gaillard, Jean-François; Packman, Aaron I

    2015-05-01

    Porewater transport and diagenetic reactions strongly regulate the mobility of metals in sediments. We executed a series of laboratory experiments in Gust chamber mesocosms to study the effects of hydrodynamics and biogeochemical transformations on the mobility and speciation of Zn in contaminated sediments from Lake DePue, IL. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) indicated that the oxidation of surficial sediments promoted the formation of more mobile Zn species. Bulk chemical measurements of porewater, overlying water, and sediment also suggested that this process liberated aqueous metals to porewater and facilitated Zn efflux to the overlying water. In addition, sediment resuspension events increased the release of aqueous metals to both surficial porewater and the overlying water column. XAS analysis indicated that resuspension increased dissolution of Zn-sequestering mineral phases. These results show that both steady slow porewater transport and rapid episodic resuspension are important to the release of metal from fine-grained, low-permeability contaminated sediments. Thus, information on metals speciation and mobility under time-varying overlying flow conditions is essential to understanding the long-term behavior of metals in contaminated sediments. PMID:25875468

  9. Estimating cyanobacterial bloom transport by coupling remotely sensed imagery and a hydrodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Timothy T; Stumpf, Richard P; Tomlinson, Michelle C; Schwab, David J; Watabayashi, Glen Y; Christensen, John D

    2011-10-01

    The ability to forecast the transport of harmful cyanobacterial blooms in the Laurentian Great Lakes is beneficial to natural resource managers concerned with public health. This manuscript describes a method that improves the prediction of cyanobacterial bloom transport with the use of a preoperational hydrodynamic model and high temporal resolution satellite imagery. Two scenarios were examined from separate cyanobacterial blooms in western Lake Erie, USA. The first scenario modeled bloom position and extent over the span of 13 days. A geographic center, or centroid, was calculated and assigned to the bloom from observed satellite imagery. The bloom centroid was projected forward in time, and the projected position was compared to the final observed bloom centroid. Image pixels flagged as cyanobacterial bloom were compared between the initial image and the final image, and this was assumed as persistence. The second bloom scenario was modeled for a period of 12 days, and the results were framed in an ecological context in an effort to gain further understanding of cyanobacterial bloom dynamics. These modeling techniques can be incorporated into an operational forecasting system. PMID:22073654

  10. Solar abundances and 3D model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Caffau, Elisabetta; Steffen, Matthias; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Freytag, Bernd; Cayrel, Roger

    2010-03-01

    We present solar photospheric abundances for 12 elements from optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. The abundance analysis was conducted employing 3D hydrodynamical (CO5BOLD) as well as standard 1D hydrostatic model atmospheres. We compare our results to others with emphasis on discrepancies and still lingering problems, in particular exemplified by the pivotal abundance of oxygen. We argue that the thermal structure of the lower solar photosphere is very well represented by our 3D model. We obtain an excellent match of the observed center-to-limb variation of the line-blanketed continuum intensity, also at wavelengths shortward of the Balmer jump.

  11. Hydrodynamic Coupling in Microbially Mediated Fracture Mineralization: Formation of Self-Organized Groundwater Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunn, R. J.; El Mountassir, G.; MacLachlan, E.; Moir, H.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence of fossilized microorganisms embedded within mineral veins and mineral-filled fractures has been observed in a wide range of geological environments. Microorganisms can act as sites for mineral nucleation and also contribute to mineral precipitation by inducing local geochemical changes. In this study, we explore fundamental controls on microbially induced mineralization in rock fractures. Specifically, we systematically investigate the influence of hydrodynamics (velocity, flow rate, aperture) on microbially mediated calcite precipitation. We use a case study of microbially induced calcite precipitation as a model biomineralization system to investigate potential feedback mechanisms between the temporally varying patterns of mineral precipitation within a fracture and the resulting variations in the local velocity field. Fractures are represented as a series of precision-etched parallel channels between a pair of sealed Perspex plates. Multiple channels are designed to maintain a constant flow rate, whilst independently adjusting channel aperture and width to explore the effects of aperture and fluid velocity on biomineral precipitation. Our experimental results demonstrate that a feedback mechanism exists between the gradual reduction in fracture aperture due to precipitation, and its effect on the local fluid velocity. This feedback results in mineral fill distributions that focus flow into a small number of self-organizing channels that remain open, ultimately controlling the final aperture profile that governs flow within the fracture. This feedback mechanism exists because precipitation on the fracture walls (as opposed to in solution) requires the bacteria to be transported to the fracture surface. Bacteria settle out of a quiescent solution at a velocity that is dependent on individual floc size and density. This settling velocity competes with the bed shear velocity, inhibiting deposition via entrainment. As precipitation progresses, the flow

  12. Separation, detection and characterization of nanomaterials in municipal wastewaters using hydrodynamic chromatography coupled to ICPMS and single particle ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Kim; Hadioui, Madjid; Wilkinson, Kevin J

    2016-07-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENP) are increasingly being incorporated into consumer products and reaching the environment at a growing rate. Unfortunately, few analytical techniques are available that allow the detection of ENP in complex environmental matrices. The major limitations with existing techniques are their relatively high detection limits and their inability to distinguish ENP from other chemical forms (e.g. ions, dissolved) or from natural colloids. Of the matrices that are considered to be a priority for method development, ENP are predicted to be found at relatively high concentrations in wastewaters and wastewater biosolids. In this paper, we demonstrate the capability of hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), in its classical and single particle modes (SP ICPMS), to identify ENP in wastewater influents and effluents. The paper first focuses on the detection of standard silver nanoparticles (Ag NP) and their mixtures, showing that significant dissolution of the Ag NP was likely to occur. For the Ag NP, detection limits of 0.03 μg L(-1) were found for the HDC ICPMS whereas 0.1 μg L(-1) was determined for the HDC SP ICPMS (based on results for the 80 nm Ag NP). In the second part of the paper, HDC ICPMS and HDC SP ICPMS were performed on some unspiked natural samples (wastewaters, river water). While nanosilver was below detection limits, it was possible to identify some (likely natural) Cu nanoparticles using the developed separation technology. PMID:26970748

  13. Computational study of 3-D hot-spot initiation in shocked insensitive high-explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, F. M.; Howard, W. M.; Fried, L. E.; Manaa, M. R.; Nichols, A., III; Levesque, G.

    2012-03-01

    High-explosive (HE) material consists of large-sized grains with micron-sized embedded impurities and pores. Under various mechanical/thermal insults, these pores collapse generating hightemperature regions leading to ignition. A hydrodynamic study has been performed to investigate the mechanisms of pore collapse and hot spot initiation in TATB crystals, employing a multiphysics code, ALE3D, coupled to the chemistry module, Cheetah. This computational study includes reactive dynamics. Two-dimensional high-resolution large-scale meso-scale simulations have been performed. The parameter space is systematically studied by considering various shock strengths, pore diameters and multiple pore configurations. Preliminary 3-D simulations are undertaken to quantify the 3-D dynamics.

  14. The Coupled Spectral Element/Normal Mode Method: Application to the Testing of Several Approximations Based on Normal Mode Theory for the Computation of Seismograms in a Realistic 3D Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdeville, Y.; Gung, Y.; Romanowicz, B.

    2002-12-01

    The spectral element method (SEM) has recently been adapted successfully for global spherical earth wave propagation applications. Its advantage is that it provides a way to compute exact seismograms in a 3D earth, without restrictions on the size or wavelength of lateral heterogeneity at any depth, and can handle diffraction and other interactions with major structural boundaries. Its disadvantage is that it is computationally heavy. In order to partly address this drawback, a coupled SEM/normal mode method was developed (Capdeville et al., 2000). This enables us to more efficiently compute bodywave seismograms to realistically short periods (10s or less). In particular, the coupled SEM/normal mode method is a powerful tool to test the validity of some analytical approximations that are currently used in global waveform tomography, and that are considerably faster computationally. Here, we focus on several approximations based on normal mode perturbation theory: the classical "path-average approximation" (PAVA) introduced by Woodhouse and Dziewonski (1984) and well suited for fundamental mode surface waves (1D sensitivity kernels); the non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT), which introduces coupling between mode branches and 2D kernels in the vertical plane containing the source and the receiver (Li and Tanimoto, 1993; Li and Romanowicz, 1995); an extension of NACT which includes out of plane focusing terms computed asymptotically (e.g. Romanowicz, 1987) and introduces 3D kernels; we also consider first order perturbation theory without asymptotic approximations, such as developed for example by Dahlen et al. (2000). We present the results of comparisons of realistic seismograms for different models of heterogeneity, varying the strength and sharpness of the heterogeneity and its location in depth in the mantle. We discuss the consequences of different levels of approximations on our ability to resolve 3D heterogeneity in the earth's mantle.

  15. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish

  16. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  17. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  18. Evaluation of 3D radio-frequency electromagnetic fields for any matching and coupling conditions by the use of basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberi, Gianluigi; Fontana, Nunzia; Monorchio, Agostino; Stara, Riccardo; Retico, Alessandra; Tosetti, Michela

    2015-12-01

    A procedure for evaluating radio-frequency electromagnetic fields in anatomical human models for any matching and coupling conditions is introduced. The procedure resorts to the extraction of basis functions: such basis functions, which represent the fields produced by each individual port without any residual coupling, are derived through an algebraic procedure which uses the S parameter matrix and the fields calculated in one (only) full-wave simulation. The basis functions are then used as building-blocks for calculating the fields for any other S parameter matrix. The proposed approach can be used both for volume coil driven in quadrature and for parallel transmission configuration.

  19. TOUGH2Biot - A simulator for coupled thermal-hydrodynamic-mechanical processes in subsurface flow systems: Application to CO2 geological storage and geothermal development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hongwu; Xu, Tianfu; Jin, Guangrong

    2015-04-01

    Coupled thermal-hydrodynamic-mechanical processes have become increasingly important in studying the issues affecting subsurface flow systems, such as CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers and geothermal development. In this study, a mechanical module based on the extended Biot consolidation model was developed and incorporated into the well-established thermal-hydrodynamic simulator TOUGH2, resulting in an integrated numerical THM simulation program TOUGH2Biot. A finite element method was employed to discretize space for rock mechanical calculation and the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion was used to determine if the rock undergoes shear-slip failure. Mechanics is partly coupled with the thermal-hydrodynamic processes and gives feedback to flow through stress-dependent porosity and permeability. TOUGH2Biot was verified against analytical solutions for the 1D Terzaghi consolidation and cooling-induced subsidence. TOUGH2Biot was applied to evaluate the thermal, hydrodynamic, and mechanical responses of CO2 geological sequestration at the Ordos CCS Demonstration Project, China and geothermal exploitation at the Geysers geothermal field, California. The results demonstrate that TOUGH2Biot is capable of analyzing change in pressure and temperature, displacement, stress, and potential shear-slip failure caused by large scale underground man-made activity in subsurface flow systems. TOUGH2Biot can also be easily extended for complex coupled process problems in fractured media and be conveniently updated to parallel versions on different platforms to take advantage of high-performance computing.

  20. Animal study assessing safety of an acoustic coupling fluid that holds the potential to avoid surgically induced artifacts in 3D ultrasound guided operations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of ultrasound in brain tumor surgery is common. The difference in attenuation between brain and isotonic saline may cause artifacts that degrade the ultrasound images, potentially affecting resection grades and safety. Our research group has developed an acoustic coupling fluid that attenuates ultrasound energy like the normal brain. We aimed to test in animals if the newly developed acoustic coupling fluid may have harmful effects. Methods Eight rats were included for intraparenchymal injection into the brain, and if no adverse reactions were detected, 6 pigs were to be included with injection of the coupling fluid into the subarachnoid space. Animal behavior, EEG registrations, histopathology and immunohistochemistry were used in assessment. Results In total, 14 animals were included, 8 rats and 6 pigs. We did not detect any clinical adverse effects, seizure activity on EEG or histopathological signs of tissue damage. Conclusion The novel acoustic coupling fluid intended for brain tumor surgery appears safe in rats and pigs under the tested circumstances. PMID:24666721

  1. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  2. 3D modelling of the Black Sea ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capet, A.; Gregoire, M.; Beckers, J.-M.; Joassin, P.; Naithani, J.; Soetart, K.

    2009-04-01

    A coupled physical-biogeochemical model has been developed to simulate the ecosystem of the Black Sea at the end of the 80's when eutrophication and invasion by gelatinous organisms seriously affected the stability and dynamics of the system. The biogeochemical model describes the cycle of carbon, nitrogen, silicate, oxygen and phosphorus through the foodweb from bacteria to gelatinous carnivores and explicitly represents processes in the anoxic layer down to the bottom. For calibration and analyses purposes, the coupled model has first been run in 1D at several places in the Black Sea. The biogeochemical model involves some hundred parameters which have been first calibrated by hand using published values. Then, an identifiability analysis has been performed in order to determine a subset of 15 identifiable parameters. An automatic calibration subroutine has been used to fine tune these parameters. In 1D, the model solution exhibits a complex dynamics with several years of transient adjustment. This complexity is imparted by the explicit modelling of top predators. The model has been calibrated and validated using a large set of data available in the Black Sea TU Ocean Base. The calibrated biogeochemical model is implemented in a 3D hydrodynamical model of the Black Sea. Results of these 3D simulations will be presented and compared with maps of in-situ data reconstructed from available data base using the software DIVA (Data Interpolation and Variational analysis).

  3. Strongly Coupled 3D Hybrids of N-doped Porous Carbon Nanosheet/CoNi Alloy-Encapsulated Carbon Nanotubes for Enhanced Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yang; Cui, Shumao; Wen, Zhenhai; Guo, Xiaoru; Feng, Xinliang; Chen, Junhong

    2015-11-25

    A novel 3D nanoarchitecture comprising in situ-formed N-doped CoNi alloy-encapsulated carbon nanotubes (CoNi-NCNTs) grown on N-doped porous carbon nanosheets (NPCNs) is designed and constructed for both oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). When evaluated as an electrocatalyst for ORR, the hybrid shows efficient catalytic activity, high selectivity, superior durability, and strong tolerance against methanol crossover compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Such good oxygen reduction reaction performance is comparable to most of the previously reported results and the synergistic effect is found to boost the catalytic performance. Moreover, the constructed hybrid exhibits an excellent ORR activity with a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at 1.59 V and an onset potential of 1.57 V, even beyond the state-of-the-art Ir/C catalyst in alkaline media. The enhancement in electrochemical performance can be attributed to the unique morphology and defect structures, high porosity, good conductive networks, and strongly interacting CoNi-NCNT and NPCN in the hybrid. These results suggest the possibility for the development of effective nanocarbon electrocatalysts to replace commercial noble metal catalysts for direct use in fuel cells and water splitting devices. PMID:26449376

  4. Coupling curvature-dependent and shear stress-stimulated neotissue growth in dynamic bioreactor cultures: a 3D computational model of a complete scaffold.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Y; Papantoniou, I; Luyten, F P; Geris, L

    2016-02-01

    The main challenge in tissue engineering consists in understanding and controlling the growth process of in vitro cultured neotissues toward obtaining functional tissues. Computational models can provide crucial information on appropriate bioreactor and scaffold design but also on the bioprocess environment and culture conditions. In this study, the development of a 3D model using the level set method to capture the growth of a microporous neotissue domain in a dynamic culture environment (perfusion bioreactor) was pursued. In our model, neotissue growth velocity was influenced by scaffold geometry as well as by flow- induced shear stresses. The neotissue was modeled as a homogenous porous medium with a given permeability, and the Brinkman equation was used to calculate the flow profile in both neotissue and void space. Neotissue growth was modeled until the scaffold void volume was filled, thus capturing already established experimental observations, in particular the differences between scaffold filling under different flow regimes. This tool is envisaged as a scaffold shape and bioprocess optimization tool with predictive capacities. It will allow controlling fluid flow during long-term culture, whereby neotissue growth alters flow patterns, in order to provide shear stress profiles and magnitudes across the whole scaffold volume influencing, in turn, the neotissue growth. PMID:26758425

  5. A 2D magnetic and 3D mechanical coupled finite element model for the study of the dynamic vibrations in the stator of induction motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J.; Belahcen, A.; Detoni, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled Finite Element Model in order to study the vibrations in induction motors under steady-state. The model utilizes a weak coupling strategy between both magnetic and elastodynamic fields on the structure. Firstly, the problem solves the magnetic vector potential in an axial cut and secondly the former solution is coupled to a three dimensional model of the stator. The coupling is performed using projection based algorithms between the computed magnetic solution and the three-dimensional mesh. The three-dimensional model of the stator includes both end-windings and end-shields in order to give a realistic picture of the motor. The present model is validated using two steps. Firstly, a modal analysis hammer test is used to validate the material characteristic of this complex structure and secondly an array of accelerometer sensors is used in order to study the rotating waves using multi-dimensional spectral techniques. The analysis of the radial vibrations presented in this paper firstly concludes that slot harmonic components are visible when the motor is loaded. Secondly, the multidimensional spectrum presents the most relevant mechanical waves on the stator such as the ones produced by the space harmonics or the saturation of the iron core. The direct retrieval of the wave-number in a multi-dimensional spectrum is able to show the internal current distribution in a non-intrusive way. Experimental results for healthy induction motors are showing mechanical imbalances in a multi-dimensional spectrum in a more straightforward form.

  6. Using the Flow-3D General Moving Object Model to Simulate Coupled Liquid Slosh - Container Dynamics on the SPHERES Slosh Experiment: Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulman, Richard; Kirk, Daniel; Marsell, Brandon; Roth, Jacob; Schallhorn, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The SPHERES Slosh Experiment (SSE) is a free floating experimental platform developed for the acquisition of long duration liquid slosh data aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The data sets collected will be used to benchmark numerical models to aid in the design of rocket and spacecraft propulsion systems. Utilizing two SPHERES Satellites, the experiment will be moved through different maneuvers designed to induce liquid slosh in the experiment's internal tank. The SSE has a total of twenty-four thrusters to move the experiment. In order to design slosh generating maneuvers, a parametric study with three maneuvers types was conducted using the General Moving Object (GMO) model in Flow-30. The three types of maneuvers are a translation maneuver, a rotation maneuver and a combined rotation translation maneuver. The effectiveness of each maneuver to generate slosh is determined by the deviation of the experiment's trajectory as compared to a dry mass trajectory. To fully capture the effect of liquid re-distribution on experiment trajectory, each thruster is modeled as an independent force point in the Flow-3D simulation. This is accomplished by modifying the total number of independent forces in the GMO model from the standard five to twenty-four. Results demonstrate that the most effective slosh generating maneuvers for all motions occurs when SSE thrusters are producing the highest changes in SSE acceleration. The results also demonstrate that several centimeters of trajectory deviation between the dry and slosh cases occur during the maneuvers; while these deviations seem small, they are measureable by SSE instrumentation.

  7. Relativistic multireference Fock-space coupled-cluster calculation of the forbidden 6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}6s5d {sup 3}D{sub 1} magnetic-dipole transition in ytterbium

    SciTech Connect

    Sur, Chiranjib; Chaudhuri, Rajat K.

    2007-07-15

    We report the forbidden 6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}6s5d {sup 3}D{sub 1} magnetic-dipole transition amplitude computed using multireference Fock-space coupled-cluster theory. Our computed transition matrix element (1.34x10{sup -4}){mu}{sub B} is in excellent agreement with the experimental value (1.33x10{sup -4}){mu}{sub B}. This value in combination with other known quantities will be helpful in determining the parity-nonconserving amplitude for the 6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}6s5d {sup 3}D{sub 1} transition in atomic Yb. To our knowledge, this calculation is the most accurate to date, and can be very important in the search for physics beyond the standard model. We further report the 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}6s6p {sup 1}P{sub 1} and 6s5d {sup 3}D{sub 1}{yields}6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} transition matrix elements, which are also in good agreement with the earlier theoretical estimates.

  8. Coupled Effects of Vadose Zone Hydrodynamics and Anionic Surfactant Aerosol-22 on the Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum in Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnault, C. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Powelson, D.; Baveye, P.; Peng, Z.; Yu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a microbial pathogen that may be found in soil, surface and groundwater resources. We studied their transport behavior under conditions where both C. parvum oocysts and chemicals that may affect their mobility are present in soils. Surfactants occur widely in soils due to agricultural practices such as wastewater irrigation and application of agrichemicals. Surfactants decrease the surface tension of the soil solution, which may reduce the ability of C. parvum oocysts to be retained at gas-water interfaces. Understanding the fate and transport of C. parvum oocysts following land application of manure and use of surfactants in rural and agricultural watersheds is critical to assess the threat to water resources. We investigated the coupled effects of vadose zone hydrodynamics and an anionic surfactant Aerosol-22 on the transport of C. parvum oocysts in natural structured and non-structured agricultural or range soils from Illinois and Utah. Column transport experiments consisted of unsaturated flow subject to macropore and fingered flows resulting from simulated rainfall with and without surfactant. To assess the behavior of C. parvum oocysts in soils, the breakthrough and distribution of C. parvum oocysts in soil profiles were obtained using qPCR. We observed that surfactant enhanced the transport of C. parvum oocysts when preferential flow paths are present. However, when the interconnection between macropores is not established in the soils, surfactant limited the transport of C. parvum oocysts through the soil matrix by forming oocyst-surfactant-Ca flocs.

  9. Numerical investigation of fluid mud motion using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and two-dimensional fluid mud coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Zhang, Qinghe; Hao, Linnan

    2015-03-01

    A water-fluid mud coupling model is developed based on the unstructured grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) to investigate the fluid mud motion. The hydrodynamics and sediment transport of the overlying water column are solved using the original three-dimensional ocean model. A horizontal two-dimensional fluid mud model is integrated into the FVCOM model to simulate the underlying fluid mud flow. The fluid mud interacts with the water column through the sediment flux, current, and shear stress. The friction factor between the fluid mud and the bed, which is traditionally determined empirically, is derived with the assumption that the vertical distribution of shear stress below the yield surface of fluid mud is identical to that of uniform laminar flow of Newtonian fluid in the open channel. The model is validated by experimental data and reasonable agreement is found. Compared with numerical cases with fixed friction factors, the results simulated with the derived friction factor exhibit the best agreement with the experiment, which demonstrates the necessity of the derivation of the friction factor.

  10. 3-D transient analysis of pebble-bed HTGR by TORT-TD/ATTICA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Seubert, A.; Sureda, A.; Lapins, J.; Buck, M.; Bader, J.; Laurien, E.

    2012-07-01

    As most of the acceptance criteria are local core parameters, application of transient 3-D fine mesh neutron transport and thermal hydraulics coupled codes is mandatory for best estimate evaluations of safety margins. This also applies to high-temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR). Application of 3-D fine-mesh transient transport codes using few energy groups coupled with 3-D thermal hydraulics codes becomes feasible in view of increasing computing power. This paper describes the discrete ordinates based coupled code system TORT-TD/ATTICA3D that has recently been extended by a fine-mesh diffusion solver. Based on transient analyses for the PBMR-400 design, the transport/diffusion capabilities are demonstrated and 3-D local flux and power redistribution effects during a partial control rod withdrawal are shown. (authors)

  11. 3D microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-02-01

    In order to circumvent the fact that only one observer can view the image from a stereoscopic microscope, an attachment was devised for displaying the 3D microscopic image on a large LCD monitor for viewing by multiple observers in real time. The principle of operation, design, fabrication, and performance are presented, along with tolerance measurements relating to the properties of the cellophane half-wave plate used in the design.

  12. Global 3-D model of oceanic mercury coupled to carbon biogeochemistry and particle dynamics: application to the transport and fate or riverine mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Jacob, D. J.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Amos, H. M.; Long, M. S.; Sunderland, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers are estimated to deliver 27 Mmol a-1 of mercury (Hg) to ocean margins, which is comparable to the global atmospheric deposition flux of Hg to the ocean. Previous studies presumed that most of this riverine Hg is sequestered by settling to the coastal regions. However, there has been little investigation of the mechanism and efficiency with which this sequestration takes place, and the implications for riverine influence in different ocean regions. Here we develop a global 3-D chemical transport model for Hg in the ocean (MITgcm-Hg) with ecology (DARWIN model). We track offshore export of the discharged Hg from heterogeneous river systems over different ocean regions, and how it is influenced by the interaction of Hg in a variety of geochemical forms with carbon and suspended particles. We constrain our model assumptions with available offshore observations that bear strong riverine signals. Modeling results suggest that some of the riverine Hg is highly refractory, sorbs strongly to particles and does not follow equilibrium partitioning with the dissolved phase. Simulated global Hg evasion from riverine sources is 50 times larger without this refractory particulate pool, which results in a total evasion flux two times larger than our current best estimate. Based on a typology system of global rivers, we calculate that 10% to 60% of the particulate Hg from different rivers settles in ocean margin sediments because of subgrid sedimentation processes. The remaining 7.5 Mmol a-1 (28% of total river discharge) is available for offshore transport, where it undergoes further sedimentation to the shelf (5.3 Mmol a-1) as well as evasion to the atmosphere (0.44 Mmol a-1). Only 1.7 Mmol a-1 (6.4% of the global riverine Hg) reaches the open ocean, although that fraction varies from 2.6% in East Asia because of the blockage of Korean Peninsula to 25% in east North America facilitated by the Gulf Stream. We find large riverine influences over coastal oceans off East Asia

  13. River flood events as natural tracers for investigating the hydrological dynamics of a coupled river-aquifer system: preliminary results from 3D crosshole electrical resistivity monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscia, I.; Greenhalgh, S. A.; Linde, N.; Doetsch, J.; Vogt, T.; Green, A. G.

    2009-12-01

    This research, on geoelectric monitoring of changing aquifer conditions associated with flood events of the River Thur in Switzerland, forms part of the much wider RECORD (REstored CORridor Dynamics) project. Major precipitation and snow-melt events cause rapid undamped fluctuations of discharge along the entire length of the river. River water that infiltrates the neighbouring aquifer normally has higher electrical resistivity than that of the groundwater during the early stages of flood events. This enables us to use infiltration during such events as a natural tracer in 3D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) experiments. Over a 10 x 15 m areal array, we have installed eighteen 12-m-deep monitoring boreholes spaced 3.5 m apart that completely penetrate the underlying 7-m-thick aquifer. Each borehole has been instrumented with ten 0.7-m-spaced electrodes that span the thickness of the aquifer. A multichannel resistivity meter, programmed to cycle through various 4-point electrode configurations of the 180 electrodes in a rolling sub-sequence, allows the collection of a 15,000-measurement data set every ~7 hours. Fourteen of these boreholes are also equipped with STS sensors that provide time-series of water-table depth and water temperature and electrical conductivity. Three-dimensional static ERT inversion at stable hydrological conditions was performed to investigate the resolving capability of our measuring sequence and to define the main lithological structures within the aquifer. Preliminary analyses of the ERT time series collected during a major flooding event this past summer suggest that the data are sensitive to three factors: water-level fluctuations in the aquifer, water-temperature variations, and electrical conductivity changes associated with changing salinity of the groundwater. The total changes in apparent resistivity are of the order of 20%. Since our primary interest is in the salinity effect that might be used to delineate

  14. Calculations of non-gray gas radiative heat transfer by coupling the discrete ordinates method with the Leckner model in 3D rectangular enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi Azarkhavarani, M. E.; Hosseini Abardeh, R.; Rahmani, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study a new approach for radiation heat flux calculations by coupling the discrete ordinates method with the Leckner global model is introduced. The aim is to analyze the radiative heat transfer problem within a three-dimensional enclosure filled with non-gray gas mixture of H2O and CO2 . A computer code developed by this approach is applied to radiative calculations in three groups of well-known test cases published previously; considering homogeneous and inhomogeneous isothermal and non-isothermal participating media. All results are compared with well-known calculations based on statistical narrow band model. Also a new series of predictions for a medium with non-black walls and various mixture of H2O and CO2 is performed to demonstrate the applicability of the Leckner model. The effect of different compositions of H2O and CO2 on the radiative transfer within modern combustors is also examined. Based on the results obtained, it is believed that the discrete ordinates method coupled with the Leckner global model despite of its inherent simplicity and low computational cost is sufficiently accurate. For its convenient use, this method is suitable for a wide range of engineering calculations of participating media as well as for its link to previously written computational fluid dynamics codes.

  15. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  16. Structure and thermodynamic properties of (C5H12N)CuBr3: a new weakly coupled antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 chain complex lying in the 1D-3D dimensional cross-over regime.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bingying; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Shiyan

    2014-04-01

    Single crystals of a metal organic complex (C5H12N)CuBr3 (C5H12N = piperidinium, pipH for short) have been synthesized, and the structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. (pipH)CuBr3 crystallizes in the monoclinic group C2/c. Edging-sharing CuBr5 units link to form zigzag chains along the c axis, and the neighboring Cu(II) ions with spin-1/2 are bridged by bibromide ions. Magnetic susceptibility data down to 1.8 K can be well fitted by the Bonner-Fisher formula for the antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 chain, giving the intrachain magnetic coupling constant J ≈ -17 K. At zero field, (pipH)CuBr3 shows three-dimensional (3D) order below TN = 1.68 K. Calculated by the mean-field theory, the interchain coupling constant J' = -0.91 K is obtained and the ordered magnetic moment m0 is about 0.23 μB. This value of m0 makes (pipH)CuBr3 a rare compound suitable to study the 1D-3D dimensional cross-over problem in magnetism, since both 3D order and one-dimensional (1D) quantum fluctuations are prominent. In addition, specific heat measurements reveal two successive magnetic transitions with lowering temperature when external field μ0H ≥ 3 T is applied along the a' axis. The μ0H-T phase diagram of (pipH)CuBr3 is roughly constructed. PMID:24617285

  17. [Simultaneous resolution and determination of tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine by alternating penalty trilinear decomposition algorithm coupled with 3D emission-excitation matrix fluorometry].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jin; Ren, Feng-lian; Song, Ge; Liao, Lü; Yu, Wen-feng; Zeng, Tao

    2007-10-01

    A new method using alternating penalty trilinear decomposition algorithm coupled with excitation-emission matrix fluorometry has been developed for simultaneous resolution and determination of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan. Their correlation coefficients were 0.9987, 0.9995 and 0.9993 respectively. The contents of tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan in Hibiscus syriacus L. leaves were also be determined by this method after being extracted by ultrasonic. The coefficients of variation and the recoveries of the three amino acids were 0.84%, 0.36%, 1.59% and 101.0%-92.7%, 106.5%-93.0%, 103.0%-95.0% respectively. All these show that this is a simple, fast and cridible method. PMID:18306802

  18. Performance and field tests of a handheld Compton camera using 3-D position-sensitive scintillators coupled to multi-pixel photon counter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, A.; Kataoka, J.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Takeuchi, K.; Okochi, H.; Ogata, H.; Kuroshima, H.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Adachi, S.; Uchiyama, T.; Suzuki, H.

    2014-11-01

    After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, radiation decontamination has become particularly urgent. To help identify radiation hotspots and ensure effective decontamination operation, we have developed a novel Compton camera based on Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 scintillators and multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) arrays. Even though its sensitivity is several times better than that of other cameras being tested in Fukushima, we introduce a depth-of-interaction (DOI) method to further improve the angular resolution. For gamma rays, the DOI information, in addition to 2-D position, is obtained by measuring the pulse-height ratio of the MPPC arrays coupled to ends of the scintillator. We present the detailed performance and results of various field tests conducted in Fukushima with the prototype 2-D and DOI Compton cameras. Moreover, we demonstrate stereo measurement of gamma rays that enables measurement of not only direction but also approximate distance to radioactive hotspots.

  19. Hydrodynamic chromatography online with single particle-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for ultratrace detection of metal-containing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pergantis, Spiros A; Jones-Lepp, Tammy L; Heithmar, Edward M

    2012-08-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) determination has recently gained considerable interest since a growing number of engineered NPs are being used in commercial products. As a result, their potential to enter the environment and biological systems is increasing. In this study, we report on the development of a hyphenated analytical technique for the detection and characterization of metal-containing NPs, i.e., their metal mass fraction, size, and number concentration. Hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC), suitable for sizing NPs within the range of 5 to 300 nm, was coupled online to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), providing for an extremely selective and sensitive analytical tool for the detection of NPs. However, a serious drawback when operating the ICPMS in its conventional mode is that it does not provide data regarding NP number concentrations and, thus, any information about the metal mass fraction of individual NPs. To address this limitation, we developed single particle (SP) ICPMS coupled online to HDC as an analytical approach suitable for simultaneously determining NP size, NP number concentration, and NP metal content. Gold (Au) NPs of various sizes were used as the model system. To achieve such characterization metrics, three calibrations were required and used to convert ICPMS signal spikes into NPs injected, NP retention time on the HDC column to NP size, and ions detected per signal spike or per NP to metal content in each NP. Two calibration experiments were required in order to make all three calibrations. Also, contour plots were constructed in order to provide for a convenient and most informative viewing of this data. An example of this novel analytical approach was demonstrated for the analysis of Au NPs that had been spiked into drinking water at the ng Au L(-1) level. The described technique gave limits of detection for 60 nm Au NPs of approximately 2.2 ng Au L(-1) or expressed in terms of NP number concentrations of 600 Au NPs mL(-1

  20. Unsteady coupled 3D calculations of melt flow, interface shape, and species transport for directional solidification of silicon in a traveling magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadzis, K.; Vizman, D.; Friedrich, J.

    2013-03-01

    Directional solidification of large multi-crystalline silicon ingots is a distinctly unsteady process with a complex interaction between melt flow, crystallization interface, and species transport. Both the different time-scales and the three-dimensional character make numerical simulations of this process a challenging task. The complexity of such simulations increases further if external magnetic fields are used to enhance the melt flow. In this contribution, several three-dimensional coupled unsteady calculations are carried out for a 22×22×11 cm3 silicon melt directionally solidified in a traveling magnetic field. The justification of various approximations in the numerical models is discussed with an emphasis on the frequently used quasi steady-state models for the calculation of the interface shape. It is shown that an upward traveling magnetic field leads to a symmetric concave interface shape while a downward field results in a convex interface with a distinct asymmetry at the current supplies. These results agree in both unsteady and quasi steady-state calculations, but only unsteady calculations reveal the flow-induced local oscillations of the interface. The unsteady segregation process of carbon and oxygen impurities exhibits a non-uniform concentration along the crystallization interface although the bulk concentration is near to the complete mixing limit in the cases with a traveling magnetic field.

  1. Magnetic interactions and magnetic anisotropy in exchange coupled 4f-3d systems: a case study of a heterodinuclear Ce3+-Fe3+ cyanide-bridged complex.

    PubMed

    Sorace, Lorenzo; Sangregorio, Claudio; Figuerola, Albert; Benelli, Cristiano; Gatteschi, Dante

    2009-01-01

    We report here a detailed single-crystal EPR and magnetic study of a homologous series of complexes of the type Ln-M (Ln = La(III), Ce(III); M = Fe(III), Co(III)). We were able to obtain a detailed picture of the low-lying levels of Ce(III) and Fe(III) centres through the combined use of single-crystal EPR and magnetic susceptibility data. We show that classical ligand field theory can be of great help in rationalising the energies of the low-lying levels of both the transition-metal and rare-earth ions. The combined analysis of single-crystal EPR and magnetic data of the coupled system Ce-Fe confirmed the great complexity of the interactions involving rare-earth elements. With little uncertainty, it turned out clearly that the description of the interaction involving the lowest lying spin levels requires the introduction of the isotropic, anisotropic and antisymmetric terms. PMID:19115307

  2. Simultaneous Assimilation of Physical and Biological Observations into a 3D Coupled Marine Ecosystem Model Using Joint and Dual Kalman Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoteit, I.; Korres, G.; Triantafyllou, G.

    2007-05-01

    Two assimilation systems based on a suboptimal extended Kalman filter have been developed to simultaneously assimilate physical and biochemical data into a complex ecosystem model of the Eastern Mediterranean. The three-dimensional ecosystem model is composed of two on-line coupled sub-models: the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) and the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM). The filter is a variant of the extended Kalman filter which operates with low-rank error covariance matrices to reduce computational burden. Two different approaches have been considered: the "joint approach" and the "dual approach". In the first approach, one filter is used in which the state vector of the filter is composed of all prognostic variables of POM and ERSEM models. Basically, the numerical models are integrated forward in time to produce the (physical and biochemical) forecasts. The observations are then assimilated jointly to correct all forecast variables using the cross-correlations between all physical and biochemical forecast errors, which simultaneously provides the analyses for the physics and for the ecology. The dual approach consists of two filters, operating separately on the physics and on the ecology. We describe the two assimilation systems and discuss results of assimilation experiments.

  3. Multiviewer 3D monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Aye, Tin M.; Kim, Dai Hyun; Esterkin, Vladimir; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-09-01

    Physical Optics Corporation has developed an advanced 3-D virtual reality system for use with simulation tools for training technical and military personnel. This system avoids such drawbacks of other virtual reality (VR) systems as eye fatigue, headaches, and alignment for each viewer, all of which are due to the need to wear special VR goggles. The new system is based on direct viewing of an interactive environment. This innovative holographic multiplexed screen technology makes it unnecessary for the viewer to wear special goggles.

  4. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  5. Reactive Flow Modeling of Liquid Explosives via ALE3D/Cheetah Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, I W; Bastea, S; Fried, L E

    2010-03-10

    We carried out reactive flow simulations of liquid explosives such as nitromethane using the hydrodynamic code ALE3D coupled with equations of state and reaction kinetics modeled by the thermochemical code Cheetah. The simulation set-up was chosen to mimic cylinder experiments. For pure unconfined nitromethane we find that the failure diameter and detonation velocity dependence on charge diameter are in agreement with available experimental results. Such simulations are likely to be useful for determining detonability and failure behavior for a wide range of experimental conditions and explosive compounds.

  6. Application of computational fluid dynamics and fluid structure interaction techniques for calculating the 3D transient flow of journal bearings coupled with rotor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Yu, Guichang; Liu, Shulian; Zheng, Shuiying

    2012-09-01

    Journal bearings are important parts to keep the high dynamic performance of rotor machinery. Some methods have already been proposed to analysis the flow field of journal bearings, and in most of these methods simplified physical model and classic Reynolds equation are always applied. While the application of the general computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-fluid structure interaction (FSI) techniques is more beneficial for analysis of the fluid field in a journal bearing when more detailed solutions are needed. This paper deals with the quasi-coupling calculation of transient fluid dynamics of oil film in journal bearings and rotor dynamics with CFD-FSI techniques. The fluid dynamics of oil film is calculated by applying the so-called "dynamic mesh" technique. A new mesh movement approach is presented while the dynamic mesh models provided by FLUENT are not suitable for the transient oil flow in journal bearings. The proposed mesh movement approach is based on the structured mesh. When the journal moves, the movement distance of every grid in the flow field of bearing can be calculated, and then the update of the volume mesh can be handled automatically by user defined function (UDF). The journal displacement at each time step is obtained by solving the moving equations of the rotor-bearing system under the known oil film force condition. A case study is carried out to calculate the locus of the journal center and pressure distribution of the journal in order to prove the feasibility of this method. The calculating results indicate that the proposed method can predict the transient flow field of a journal bearing in a rotor-bearing system where more realistic models are involved. The presented calculation method provides a basis for studying the nonlinear dynamic behavior of a general rotor-bearing system.

  7. Mode-coupling approach to polymer diffusion in an unentangled melt. II. The effect of viscoelastic hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farago, J.; Meyer, H.; Baschnagel, J.; Semenov, A. N.

    2012-05-01

    A mode-coupling theory (MCT) version (called hMCT thereafter) of a recently presented theory [Farago, Meyer, and Semenov, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.178301 107, 178301 (2011)] is developed to describe the diffusional properties of a tagged polymer in a melt. The hMCT accounts for the effect of viscoelastic hydrodynamic interactions (VHIs), that is, a physical mechanism distinct from the density-based MCT (dMCT) described in the first paper of this series. The two versions of the MCT yield two different contributions to the asymptotic behavior of the center-of-mass velocity autocorrelation function (c.m. VAF). We show that in most cases the VHI mechanism is dominant; for long chains and prediffusive times it yields a negative tail ∝-N-1/2t-3/2 for the c.m. VAF. The case of non-momentum-conserving dynamics (Langevin or Monte Carlo) is discussed as well. It generally displays a distinctive behavior with two successive relaxation stages: first -N-1t-5/4 (as in the dMCT approach), then -N-1/2t-3/2. Both the amplitude and the duration of the first t-5/4 stage crucially depend on the Langevin friction parameter γ. All results are also relevant for the early time regime of entangled melts. These slow relaxations of the c.m. VAF, thus account for the anomalous subdiffusive regime of the c.m. mean square displacement widely observed in numerical and experimental works.

  8. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  9. DRACO development for 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatenejad, Milad; Moses, Gregory

    2006-10-01

    The DRACO (r-z) lagrangian radiation-hydrodynamics laser fusion simulation code is being extended to model 3D hydrodynamics in (x-y-z) coordinates with hexahedral cells on a structured grid. The equation of motion is solved with a lagrangian update with optional rezoning. The fluid equations are solved using an explicit scheme based on (Schulz, 1964) while the SALE-3D algorithm (Amsden, 1981) is used as a template for computing cell volumes and other quantities. A second order rezoner has been added which uses linear interpolation of the underlying continuous functions to preserve accuracy (Van Leer, 1976). Artificial restoring force terms and smoothing algorithms are used to avoid grid distortion in high aspect ratio cells. These include alternate node couplers along with a rotational restoring force based on the Tensor Code (Maenchen, 1964). Electron and ion thermal conduction is modeled using an extension of Kershaw's method (Kershaw, 1981) to 3D geometry. Test problem simulations will be presented to demonstrate the applicability of this new version of DRACO to the study of fluid instabilities in three dimensions.

  10. Coupled 3D-neutronics / thermal-hydraulics analysis of an unprotected loss-of-flow accident for a 3600 MWth SFR core

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K.; Chenu, A.; Mikityuk, K.; Krepel, J.; Chawla, R.

    2012-07-01

    The core behaviour of a large (3600 MWth) sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is investigated in this paper with the use of a coupled TRACE/PARCS model. The SFR neutron spectrum is characterized by several performance advantages, but also leads to one dominating neutronics drawback - a positive sodium void reactivity. This implies a positive reactivity effect when sodium coolant is removed from the core. In order to evaluate such feedback in terms of the dynamics, a representative unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) transient, i.e. flow run-down without SCRAM in which sodium boiling occurs, is analyzed. Although analysis of a single transient cannot allow general conclusions to be drawn, it does allow better understanding of the underlying physics and can lead to proposals for improving the core response during such an accident. The starting point of this study is the reference core design considered in the framework of the Collaborative Project on the European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP-ESFR). To reduce the void effect, the core has been modified by introducing an upper sodium plenum (along with a boron layer) and by reducing the core height-to-diameter ratio. For the ULOF considered, a sharp increase in core power results in melting of the fuel in the case of the reference core. In the modified core, a large dryout leads to melting of the clad. It seems that, for the hypothetical event considered, fuel failure cannot be avoided with just improvement of the neutronics design; therefore, thermal-hydraulics optimization has been considered. An innovative assembly design is proposed to prevent sodium vapour blocking the fuel channel. This results in preventing a downward propagation of the sodium boiling to the core center, thus limiting it to the upper region. Such a void map introduces a negative coolant density reactivity feedback, which dominates the total reactivity change. As a result, the power level and the fuel temperature are effectively reduced, and a large dryout

  11. FARGO3D: A New GPU-oriented MHD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez-Llambay, Pablo; Masset, Frédéric S.

    2016-03-01

    We present the FARGO3D code, recently publicly released. It is a magnetohydrodynamics code developed with special emphasis on the physics of protoplanetary disks and planet-disk interactions, and parallelized with MPI. The hydrodynamics algorithms are based on finite-difference upwind, dimensionally split methods. The magnetohydrodynamics algorithms consist of the constrained transport method to preserve the divergence-free property of the magnetic field to machine accuracy, coupled to a method of characteristics for the evaluation of electromotive forces and Lorentz forces. Orbital advection is implemented, and an N-body solver is included to simulate planets or stars interacting with the gas. We present our implementation in detail and present a number of widely known tests for comparison purposes. One strength of FARGO3D is that it can run on either graphical processing units (GPUs) or central processing units (CPUs), achieving large speed-up with respect to CPU cores. We describe our implementation choices, which allow a user with no prior knowledge of GPU programming to develop new routines for CPUs, and have them translated automatically for GPUs.

  12. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  13. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  14. 3D polarimetric purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, José J.; San José, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    From our previous definition of the indices of polarimetric purity for 3D light beams [J.J. Gil, J.M. Correas, P.A. Melero and C. Ferreira, Monogr. Semin. Mat. G. de Galdeano 31, 161 (2004)], an analysis of their geometric and physical interpretation is presented. It is found that, in agreement with previous results, the first parameter is a measure of the degree of polarization, whereas the second parameter (called the degree of directionality) is a measure of the mean angular aperture of the direction of propagation of the corresponding light beam. This pair of invariant, non-dimensional, indices of polarimetric purity contains complete information about the polarimetric purity of a light beam. The overall degree of polarimetric purity is obtained as a weighted quadratic average of the degree of polarization and the degree of directionality.

  15. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  16. 'Bonneville' in 3-D!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic of the crater called 'Bonneville' after driving approximately 13 meters (42.7 feet) to get a better vantage point. Spirit's current position is close enough to the edge to see the interior of the crater, but high enough and far enough back to get a view of all of the walls. Because scientists and rover controllers are so pleased with this location, they will stay here for at least two more martian days, or sols, to take high resolution panoramic camera images of 'Bonneville' in its entirety. Just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

  17. Evaluation of 3-D turbula mixing coupled with focused subsampling as a method to obtain representative laboratory subsamples of rock and soil for analysis when performing the CARB 435 test protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, C.; Bailey, R.; Suess, T.

    2012-12-01

    Rock and samples submitted to asbestos testing laboratories for CARB 435 method analysis typically range from one pint (~1 kg) to five gallons (~40kg) in size with contained rock fragments as large as 3" in diameter. Extracting a representative test sample, which requires 8 sample preps containing ~3 mg per grain mount of ~200 mesh powder, is a non-trivial and poorly understood process. The CARB 435 test method calls for crushing and pulverizing of rock/soil samples, but gives no guidance as to how to extract a representative sample from the resulting powdered material, allowing for large errors due to poor lab subsampling protocols (too often a simple scoop off the top). This talk presents the results of a series of experiments which evaluate the efficacy and efficiency of 3-D turbula powder sample mixing coupled with focused multiple sampling thief extractions from the mixed powder to obtain representative subsamples for CARB 435 method analysis.

  18. 3D Models of Symbiotic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, S.; Booth, R.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Ramstedt, S.; Vlemmings, W.; Maercker, M.

    2015-12-01

    Symbiotic binaries consist of a cool, mass-losing giant and an accreting, compact companion. We present 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) models of two such interacting binaries, RS Oph and Mira AB. RS Oph is also a recurrent nova system, thus we model multiple quiescent mass transfer-nova outburst cycles. The resulting circumstellar structures of both systems are highly complex with the formation of spirals, arcs, shells, equatorial and bipolar outflows. We compare the models to recent observations and discuss the implications of our results for related systems, e.g., bipolar nebulae and jets, chemically peculiar stars, and the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  19. Do Practical Standard Coupled Cluster Calculations Agree Better than Kohn–Sham Calculations with Currently Available Functionals When Compared to the Best Available Experimental Data for Dissociation Energies of Bonds to 3d Transition Metals?

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xuefei; Zhang, Wenjing; Tang, Mingsheng; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-05-12

    Coupled-cluster (CC) methods have been extensively used as the high-level approach in quantum electronic structure theory to predict various properties of molecules when experimental results are unavailable. It is often assumed that CC methods, if they include at least up to connected-triple-excitation quasiperturbative corrections to a full treatment of single and double excitations (in particular, CCSD(T)), and a very large basis set, are more accurate than Kohn–Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). In the present work, we tested and compared the performance of standard CC and KS methods on bond energy calculations of 20 3d transition metal-containing diatomic molecules against the most reliable experimental data available, as collected in a database called 3dMLBE20. It is found that, although the CCSD(T) and higher levels CC methods have mean unsigned deviations from experiment that are smaller than most exchange-correlation functionals for metal–ligand bond energies of transition metals, the improvement is less than one standard deviation of the mean unsigned deviation. Furthermore, on average, almost half of the 42 exchange-correlation functionals that we tested are closer to experiment than CCSD(T) with the same extended basis set for the same molecule. The results show that, when both relativistic and core–valence correlation effects are considered, even the very high-level (expensive) CC method with single, double, triple, and perturbative quadruple cluster operators, namely, CCSDT(2)Q, averaged over 20 bond energies, gives a mean unsigned deviation (MUD(20) = 4.7 kcal/mol when one correlates only valence, 3p, and 3s electrons of transition metals and only valence electrons of ligands, or 4.6 kcal/mol when one correlates all core electrons except for 1s shells of transition metals, S, and Cl); and that is similar to some good xc functionals (e.g., B97-1 (MUD(20) = 4.5 kcal/mol) and PW6B95 (MUD(20) = 4.9 kcal/mol)) when the same basis set is used

  20. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  1. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  2. Radiation hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1982-12-31

    This course was intended to provide the participant with an introduction to the theory of radiative transfer, and an understanding of the coupling of radiative processes to the equations describing compressible flow. At moderate temperatures (thousands of degrees), the role of the radiation is primarily one of transporting energy by radiative processes. At higher temperatures (millions of degrees), the energy and momentum densities of the radiation field may become comparable to or even dominate the corresponding fluid quantities. In this case, the radiation field significantly affects the dynamics of the fluid, and it is the description of this regime which is generally the charter of radiation hydrodynamics. The course provided a discussion of the relevant physics and a derivation of the corresponding equations, as well as an examination of several simplified models. Practical applications include astrophysics and nuclear weapons effects phenomena.

  3. PRONTO3D users` instructions: A transient dynamic code for nonlinear structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, S.W.; Mello, F.J.; Heinstein, M.W.; Swegle, J.W.; Ratner, J.A.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1998-06-01

    This report provides an updated set of users` instructions for PRONTO3D. PRONTO3D is a three-dimensional, transient, solid dynamics code for analyzing large deformations of highly nonlinear materials subjected to extremely high strain rates. This Lagrangian finite element program uses an explicit time integration operator to integrate the equations of motion. Eight-node, uniform strain, hexahedral elements and four-node, quadrilateral, uniform strain shells are used in the finite element formulation. An adaptive time step control algorithm is used to improve stability and performance in plasticity problems. Hourglass distortions can be eliminated without disturbing the finite element solution using either the Flanagan-Belytschko hourglass control scheme or an assumed strain hourglass control scheme. All constitutive models in PRONTO3D are cast in an unrotated configuration defined using the rotation determined from the polar decomposition of the deformation gradient. A robust contact algorithm allows for the impact and interaction of deforming contact surfaces of quite general geometry. The Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics method has been embedded into PRONTO3D using the contact algorithm to couple it with the finite element method.

  4. An improved parallel SPH approach to solve 3D transient generalized Newtonian free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jinlian; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Weigang; Li, Gang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a corrected parallel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (C-SPH) method is proposed to simulate the 3D generalized Newtonian free surface flows with low Reynolds number, especially the 3D viscous jets buckling problems are investigated. The proposed C-SPH method is achieved by coupling an improved SPH method based on the incompressible condition with the traditional SPH (TSPH), that is, the improved SPH with diffusive term and first-order Kernel gradient correction scheme is used in the interior of the fluid domain, and the TSPH is used near the free surface. Thus the C-SPH method possesses the advantages of two methods. Meanwhile, an effective and convenient boundary treatment is presented to deal with 3D multiple-boundary problem, and the MPI parallelization technique with a dynamic cells neighbor particle searching method is considered to improve the computational efficiency. The validity and the merits of the C-SPH are first verified by solving several benchmarks and compared with other results. Then the viscous jet folding/coiling based on the Cross model is simulated by the C-SPH method and compared with other experimental or numerical results. Specially, the influences of macroscopic parameters on the flow are discussed. All the numerical results agree well with available data, and show that the C-SPH method has higher accuracy and better stability for solving 3D moving free surface flows over other particle methods.

  5. LOCA hydroloads calculations with multidimensional nonlinear fluid/structure interaction. Volume 3. Fluid/structure interaction studies using 3-D STEALTH/WHAMSE. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Santee, G.E. Jr.; Chang, F.H.; Mortensen, G.A.; Brockett, G.F.; Gross, M.B.; Belytschko, T.B.

    1982-11-01

    This report, the third in a series of reports for RP-1065, describes the final step in the stepwise approach for developing the three-dimensional, nonlinear, fluid-structure interaction methodology to assess the hydroloads on a large PWR during the subcooled portions of a hypothetical LOCA. The final step in the methodology implements enhancements and special modifications to the STEALTH 3D computer program and the WHAMSE 3D computer program. After describing the enhancements, the individual and the coupled computer programs are assessed by comparing calculational results with either analytical solutions or with experimental data. The coupled 3D STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program is then applied to the simulation of HDR Test V31.1 to further assess the program and to investigate the role that fluid-structure interaction plays in the hydrodynamic loading of reactor internals during subcooled blowdown.

  6. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  7. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  8. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  9. GestAction3D: A Platform for Studying Displacements and Deformations of 3D Objects Using Hands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingrand, Diane; Renevier, Philippe; Pinna-Déry, Anne-Marie; Cremaschi, Xavier; Lion, Stevens; Rouel, Jean-Guilhem; Jeanne, David; Cuisinaud, Philippe; Soula*, Julien

    We present a low-cost hand-based device coupled with a 3D motion recovery engine and 3D visualization. This platform aims at studying ergonomic 3D interactions in order to manipulate and deform 3D models by interacting with hands on 3D meshes. Deformations are done using different modes of interaction that we will detail in the paper. Finger extremities are attached to vertices, edges or facets. Switching from one mode to another or changing the point of view is done using gestures. The determination of the more adequate gestures is part of the work

  10. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  11. Coupling a nano-particle with isothermal fluctuating hydrodynamics: Coarse-graining from microscopic to mesoscopic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Español, Pep; Donev, Aleksandar

    2015-12-01

    We derive a coarse-grained description of the dynamics of a nanoparticle immersed in an isothermal simple fluid by performing a systematic coarse graining of the underlying microscopic dynamics. As coarse-grained or relevant variables, we select the position of the nanoparticle and the total mass and momentum density field of the fluid, which are locally conserved slow variables because they are defined to include the contribution of the nanoparticle. The theory of coarse graining based on the Zwanzing projection operator leads us to a system of stochastic ordinary differential equations that are closed in the relevant variables. We demonstrate that our discrete coarse-grained equations are consistent with a Petrov-Galerkin finite-element discretization of a system of formal stochastic partial differential equations which resemble previously used phenomenological models based on fluctuating hydrodynamics. Key to this connection between our "bottom-up" and previous "top-down" approaches is the use of the same dual orthogonal set of linear basis functions familiar from finite element methods (FEMs), both as a way to coarse-grain the microscopic degrees of freedom and as a way to discretize the equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics. Another key ingredient is the use of a "linear for spiky" weak approximation which replaces microscopic "fields" with a linear FE interpolant inside expectation values. For the irreversible or dissipative dynamics, we approximate the constrained Green-Kubo expressions for the dissipation coefficients with their equilibrium averages. Under suitable approximations, we obtain closed approximations of the coarse-grained dynamics in a manner which gives them a clear physical interpretation and provides explicit microscopic expressions for all of the coefficients appearing in the closure. Our work leads to a model for dilute nanocolloidal suspensions that can be simulated effectively using feasibly short molecular dynamics simulations as input

  12. Coupling a nano-particle with isothermal fluctuating hydrodynamics: Coarse-graining from microscopic to mesoscopic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Español, Pep; Donev, Aleksandar

    2015-12-21

    We derive a coarse-grained description of the dynamics of a nanoparticle immersed in an isothermal simple fluid by performing a systematic coarse graining of the underlying microscopic dynamics. As coarse-grained or relevant variables, we select the position of the nanoparticle and the total mass and momentum density field of the fluid, which are locally conserved slow variables because they are defined to include the contribution of the nanoparticle. The theory of coarse graining based on the Zwanzing projection operator leads us to a system of stochastic ordinary differential equations that are closed in the relevant variables. We demonstrate that our discrete coarse-grained equations are consistent with a Petrov-Galerkin finite-element discretization of a system of formal stochastic partial differential equations which resemble previously used phenomenological models based on fluctuating hydrodynamics. Key to this connection between our “bottom-up” and previous “top-down” approaches is the use of the same dual orthogonal set of linear basis functions familiar from finite element methods (FEMs), both as a way to coarse-grain the microscopic degrees of freedom and as a way to discretize the equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics. Another key ingredient is the use of a “linear for spiky” weak approximation which replaces microscopic “fields” with a linear FE interpolant inside expectation values. For the irreversible or dissipative dynamics, we approximate the constrained Green-Kubo expressions for the dissipation coefficients with their equilibrium averages. Under suitable approximations, we obtain closed approximations of the coarse-grained dynamics in a manner which gives them a clear physical interpretation and provides explicit microscopic expressions for all of the coefficients appearing in the closure. Our work leads to a model for dilute nanocolloidal suspensions that can be simulated effectively using feasibly short molecular dynamics

  13. Coupling a nano-particle with isothermal fluctuating hydrodynamics: Coarse-graining from microscopic to mesoscopic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Donev, Aleksandar

    2015-12-21

    We derive a coarse-grained description of the dynamics of a nanoparticle immersed in an isothermal simple fluid by performing a systematic coarse graining of the underlying microscopic dynamics. As coarse-grained or relevant variables, we select the position of the nanoparticle and the total mass and momentum density field of the fluid, which are locally conserved slow variables because they are defined to include the contribution of the nanoparticle. The theory of coarse graining based on the Zwanzing projection operator leads us to a system of stochastic ordinary differential equations that are closed in the relevant variables. We demonstrate that our discrete coarse-grained equations are consistent with a Petrov-Galerkin finite-element discretization of a system of formal stochastic partial differential equations which resemble previously used phenomenological models based on fluctuating hydrodynamics. Key to this connection between our "bottom-up" and previous "top-down" approaches is the use of the same dual orthogonal set of linear basis functions familiar from finite element methods (FEMs), both as a way to coarse-grain the microscopic degrees of freedom and as a way to discretize the equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics. Another key ingredient is the use of a "linear for spiky" weak approximation which replaces microscopic "fields" with a linear FE interpolant inside expectation values. For the irreversible or dissipative dynamics, we approximate the constrained Green-Kubo expressions for the dissipation coefficients with their equilibrium averages. Under suitable approximations, we obtain closed approximations of the coarse-grained dynamics in a manner which gives them a clear physical interpretation and provides explicit microscopic expressions for all of the coefficients appearing in the closure. Our work leads to a model for dilute nanocolloidal suspensions that can be simulated effectively using feasibly short molecular dynamics simulations as input

  14. Modular 3-D Transport model

    EPA Science Inventory

    MT3D was first developed by Chunmiao Zheng in 1990 at S.S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc. with partial support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Starting in 1990, MT3D was released as a pubic domain code from the USEPA. Commercial versions with enhanced capab...

  15. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  16. LLNL-Earth3D

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  17. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible. PMID:7919882

  18. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  19. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-02-26

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  20. LaMEM: a massively parallel 3D staggered-grid finite-difference code for coupled nonlinear themo-mechanical modeling of lithospheric deformation with visco-elasto-plastic rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Anton; Kaus, Boris

    2015-04-01

    This software project aims at bringing the 3D lithospheric deformation modeling to a qualitatively different level. Our code LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model) is based on the following building blocks: * Massively-parallel data-distributed implementation model based on PETSc library * Light, stable and accurate staggered-grid finite difference spatial discretization * Marker-in-Cell pedictor-corector time discretization with Runge-Kutta 4-th order * Elastic stress rotation algorithm based on the time integration of the vorticity pseudo-vector * Staircase-type internal free surface boundary condition without artificial viscosity contrast * Geodynamically relevant visco-elasto-plastic rheology * Global velocity-pressure-temperature Newton-Raphson nonlinear solver * Local nonlinear solver based on FZERO algorithm * Coupled velocity-pressure geometric multigrid preconditioner with Galerkin coarsening Staggered grid finite difference, being inherently Eulerian and rather complicated discretization method, provides no natural treatment of free surface boundary condition. The solution based on the quasi-viscous sticky-air phase introduces significant viscosity contrasts and spoils the convergence of the iterative solvers. In LaMEM we are currently implementing an approximate stair-case type of the free surface boundary condition which excludes the empty cells and restores the solver convergence. Because of the mutual dependence of the stress and strain-rate tensor components, and their different spatial locations in the grid, there is no straightforward way of implementing the nonlinear rheology. In LaMEM we have developed and implemented an efficient interpolation scheme for the second invariant of the strain-rate tensor, that solves this problem. Scalable efficient linear solvers are the key components of the successful nonlinear problem solution. In LaMEM we have a range of PETSc-based preconditioning techniques that either employ a block factorization of

  1. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  2. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  3. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  4. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  5. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  6. A non-intrusive partitioned approach to couple smoothed particle hydrodynamics and finite element methods for transient fluid-structure interaction problems with large interface motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Leduc, Julien; Nunez-Ramirez, Jorge; Combescure, Alain; Marongiu, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    We propose a non-intrusive numerical coupling method for transient fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems simulated by means of different discretization methods: smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and finite element (FE) methods for the fluid and the solid sub-domains, respectively. As a partitioned coupling method, the present algorithm can ensure a zero interface energy during the whole period of numerical simulation, even in the presence of large interface motion. In other words, the time integrations of the two sub-domains (second order Runge-Kutta scheme for fluid and Newmark integrator for solid) are synchronized. Thanks to this energy-conserving feature, one can preserve the minimal order of accuracy in time and the numerical stability of the FSI simulations, which are validated with a 1D and a 2D trivial numerical test cases. Additionally, some other 2D FSI simulations involving large interface motion have also been carried out with the proposed SPH-FE coupling method. Finally, an example of aquaplaning problem is given in order to show the feasibility of such coupling method in multi-dimensional applications with complicated structural geometries.

  7. New Algorithms for Large-scale 3D Radiation Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, Eric J.

    2009-05-01

    Radiation transport is critical not only for analysis of astrophysical objects but also for the dynamical transport of energy within. Increased fidelity and dimensionality of the other components of such models requires a similar improvement in the radiation transport. Modern astrophysical simulations can be large enough that the values for a single variable for the entire computational domain cannot be stored on a single compute node. The natural solution is to decompose the physical domain into pieces with each node responsible for a single sub-domain. Using localized plus "ghost" zone data works well for problems like explicit hydrodynamics or nuclear reaction networks with modest impact from inter-process communication. Unfortunately, radiation transport is an inherently non-local process that couples the entire model domain together and efficient algorithms are needed to conquer this problem. In this poster, I present the early development of a new parallel, 3-D transport code using ray tracing to formally solve the transport equation across numerically decomposed domains. The algorithm model takes advantage of one-sided communication to develop a scalable, parallel formal solver. Other aspects and future direction of the parallel code development such as scalability and the inclusion of scattering will also be discussed.

  8. Pros and Cons of ID vs. 3D Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in computing capability have led to tremendous improvements in 3D modeling. Entire active regions are being simulated in what might be described as a first principles way, in which plasma heating is treated self consistently rather than through the specification of heating functions. There are limitations to this approach, however, as actual heating mechanisms on the Sun involve spatial scales orders of magnitude smaller than what these simulations can resolve. Other simulations begin to resolve these scales, but they only treat a tiny volume and do not include the all important coupling with larger scales or with other parts of the atmosphere, and so cannot be readily compared with observations. Finally, ID hydrodynamic models capture the field-aligned evolution of the plasma extremely well and are ideally suited for data comparison, but they treat the heating in a totally ad hoc manner. All of these approaches have important contributions to make, but we must be aware of their limitations. I will highlight some of the strengths. and weaknesses of each.

  9. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models. PMID:26066320

  10. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  11. Coupled effects of solution chemistry and hydrodynamics on the mobility and transport of quantum dot nanomaterials in the Vadose Zone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the coupled effects of solution chemistry and vadose zone processes on the mobility of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles, laboratory scale transport experiments were performed. The complex coupled effects of ionic strength, size of QD aggregates, surface tension, contact angle, infiltrat...

  12. Arena3D: visualization of biological networks in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; O'Donoghue, Seán I; Satagopam, Venkata P; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Pafilis, Evangelos; Schneider, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Background Complexity is a key problem when visualizing biological networks; as the number of entities increases, most graphical views become incomprehensible. Our goal is to enable many thousands of entities to be visualized meaningfully and with high performance. Results We present a new visualization tool, Arena3D, which introduces a new concept of staggered layers in 3D space. Related data – such as proteins, chemicals, or pathways – can be grouped onto separate layers and arranged via layout algorithms, such as Fruchterman-Reingold, distance geometry, and a novel hierarchical layout. Data on a layer can be clustered via k-means, affinity propagation, Markov clustering, neighbor joining, tree clustering, or UPGMA ('unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean'). A simple input format defines the name and URL for each node, and defines connections or similarity scores between pairs of nodes. The use of Arena3D is illustrated with datasets related to Huntington's disease. Conclusion Arena3D is a user friendly visualization tool that is able to visualize biological or any other network in 3D space. It is free for academic use and runs on any platform. It can be downloaded or lunched directly from . Java3D library and Java 1.5 need to be pre-installed for the software to run. PMID:19040715

  13. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  14. Non-isothermal 3D SDPD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Potami, Raffaele; Gatsonis, Nikolaos

    2012-11-01

    The study of fluids at micro and nanoscale requires new modeling and computational approaches. Smooth Particle Dissipative Dynamics (SDPD) is a mesh-free method that provides a bridge between the continuum equations of hydrodynamics embedded in the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics approach and the molecular nature embedded in the DPD approach. SDPD is thermodynamically consistent, does not rely on arbitrary coefficients for its thermostat, involves realistic transport coefficients, and includes fluctuation terms. SDPD is implemented in our work for arbitrary 3D geometries with a methodology to model solid wall boundary conditions. We present simulations for isothermal flows for verification of our approach. The entropy equation is implemented with a velocity-entropy Verlet integration algorithm Flows with heat transfer are simulated for verification of the SDPD. We present also the self-diffusion coefficient derived from SDPD simulations for gases and liquids. Results show the scale dependence of self-diffusion coefficient on SDPD particle size. Computational Mathematics Program of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under grant/contract number FA9550-06-1-0236.

  15. Wavefront construction in 3-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, S.R. Hildebrand, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    Travel time computation in inhomogeneous media is essential for pre-stack Kirchhoff imaging in areas such as the sub-salt province in the Gulf of Mexico. The 2D algorithm published by Vinje, et al, has been extended to 3D to compute wavefronts in complicated inhomogeneous media. The 3D wavefront construction algorithm provides many advantages over conventional ray tracing and other methods of computing travel times in 3D. The algorithm dynamically maintains a reasonably consistent ray density without making a priori guesses at the number of rays to shoot. The determination of caustics in 3D is a straight forward geometric procedure. The wavefront algorithm also enables the computation of multi-valued travel time surfaces.

  16. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  17. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  18. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue. PMID:27600217

  19. Large-scale 3D simulations of ICF and HEDP targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinak, Michael M.

    2000-10-01

    The radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA continues to be developed and applied to 3D simulations of a variety of targets for both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density physics. Several packages have been added enabling this code to perform ICF target simulations with similar accuracy as two-dimensional codes of long-time historical use. These include a laser ray trace and deposition package, a heavy ion deposition package, implicit Monte Carlo photonics, and non-LTE opacities, derived from XSN or the linearized response matrix approach.(R. More, T. Kato, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 814 (1998), S. Libby, F. Graziani, R. More, T. Kato, Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Laser Interactions and Related Plasma Phenomena, (AIP, New York, 1997).) LTE opacities can also be calculated for arbitrary mixtures online by combining tabular values generated by different opacity codes. Thermonuclear burn, charged particle transport, neutron energy deposition, electron-ion coupling and conduction, and multigroup radiation diffusion packages are also installed. HYDRA can employ ALE hydrodynamics; a number of grid motion algorithms are available. Multi-material flows are resolved using material interface reconstruction. Results from large-scale simulations run on up to 1680 processors, using a combination of massively parallel processing and symmetric multiprocessing, will be described. A large solid angle simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in a NIF ignition capsule has resolved simultaneously the full spectrum of the most dangerous modes that grow from surface roughness. Simulations of a NIF hohlraum illuminated with the initial 96 beam configuration have also been performed. The effect of the hohlraum’s 3D intrinsic drive asymmetry on the capsule implosion will be considered. We will also discuss results from a Nova experiment in which a copper sphere is crushed by a planar shock. Several interacting hydrodynamic instabilities, including

  20. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  1. Real-time forecasting of Hong Kong beach water quality by 3D deterministic model.

    PubMed

    Chan, S N; Thoe, W; Lee, J H W

    2013-03-15

    Bacterial level (e.g. Escherichia coli) is generally adopted as the key indicator of beach water quality due to its high correlation with swimming associated illnesses. A 3D deterministic hydrodynamic model is developed to provide daily water quality forecasting for eight marine beaches in Tsuen Wan, which are only about 8 km from the Harbour Area Treatment Scheme (HATS) outfall discharging 1.4 million m(3)/d of partially-treated sewage. The fate and transport of the HATS effluent and its impact on the E. coli level at nearby beaches are studied. The model features the seamless coupling of near field jet mixing and the far field transport and dispersion of wastewater discharge from submarine outfalls, and a spatial-temporal dependent E. coli decay rate formulation specifically developed for sub-tropical Hong Kong waters. The model prediction of beach water quality has been extensively validated against field data both before and after disinfection of the HATS effluent. Compared with daily beach E. coli data during August-November 2011, the model achieves an overall accuracy of 81-91% in forecasting compliance/exceedance of beach water quality standard. The 3D deterministic model has been most valuable in the interpretation of the complex variation of beach water quality which depends on tidal level, solar radiation and other hydro-meteorological factors. The model can also be used in optimization of disinfection dosage and in emergency response situations. PMID:23337883

  2. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  3. Faint object 3D spectroscopy with PMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Martin M.; Becker, Thomas; Kelz, Andreas; Bohm, Petra

    2004-09-01

    PMAS is a fiber-coupled lens array type of integral field spectrograph, which was commissioned at the Calar Alto 3.5m Telescope in May 2001. The optical layout of the instrument was chosen such as to provide a large wavelength coverage, and good transmission from 0.35 to 1 μm. One of the major objectives of the PMAS development has been to perform 3D spectrophotometry, taking advantage of the contiguous array of spatial elements over the 2-dimensional field-of-view of the integral field unit. With science results obtained during the first two years of operation, we illustrate that 3D spectroscopy is an ideal tool for faint object spectrophotometry.

  4. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  5. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  6. The EISCAT_3D Science Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjulin, A.; Mann, I.; McCrea, I.; Aikio, A. T.

    2013-05-01

    EISCAT_3D will be a world-leading international research infrastructure using the incoherent scatter technique to study the atmosphere in the Fenno-Scandinavian Arctic and to investigate how the Earth's atmosphere is coupled to space. The EISCAT_3D phased-array multistatic radar system will be operated by EISCAT Scientific Association and thus be an integral part of an organisation that has successfully been running incoherent scatter radars for more than thirty years. The baseline design of the radar system contains a core site with transmitting and receiving capabilities located close to the intersection of the Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish borders and five receiving sites located within 50 to 250 km from the core. The EISCAT_3D project is currently in its Preparatory Phase and can smoothly transit into implementation in 2014, provided sufficient funding. Construction can start 2016 and first operations in 2018. The EISCAT_3D Science Case is prepared as part of the Preparatory Phase. It is regularly updated with annual new releases, and it aims at being a common document for the whole future EISCAT_3D user community. The areas covered by the Science Case are atmospheric physics and global change; space and plasma physics; solar system research; space weather and service applications; and radar techniques, new methods for coding and analysis. Two of the aims for EISCAT_3D are to understand the ways natural variability in the upper atmosphere, imposed by the Sun-Earth system, can influence the middle and lower atmosphere, and to improve the predictivity of atmospheric models by providing higher resolution observations to replace the current parametrised input. Observations by EISCAT_3D will also be used to monitor the direct effects from the Sun on the ionosphere-atmosphere system and those caused by solar wind magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction. In addition, EISCAT_3D will be used for remote sensing the large-scale behaviour of the magnetosphere from its

  7. INCORPORATING DYNAMIC 3D SIMULATION INTO PRA

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R Prescott; Curtis Smith

    2011-07-01

    Through continued advancement in computational resources, development that was previously done by trial and error production is now performed through computer simulation. These virtual physical representations have the potential to provide accurate and valid modeling results and are being used in many different technical fields. Risk assessment now has the opportunity to use 3D simulation to improve analysis results and insights, especially for external event analysis. By using simulations, the modeler only has to determine the likelihood of an event without having to also predict the results of that event. The 3D simulation automatically determines not only the outcome of the event, but when those failures occur. How can we effectively incorporate 3D simulation into traditional PRA? Most PRA plant modeling is made up of components with different failure modes, probabilities, and rates. Typically, these components are grouped into various systems and then are modeled together (in different combinations) as a “system” with logic structures to form fault trees. Applicable fault trees are combined through scenarios, typically represented by event tree models. Though this method gives us failure results for a given model, it has limitations when it comes to time-based dependencies or dependencies that are coupled to physical processes which may themselves be space- or time-dependent. Since, failures from a 3D simulation are naturally time related, they should be used in that manner. In our simulation approach, traditional static models are converted into an equivalent state diagram representation with start states, probabilistic driven movements between states and terminal states. As the state model is run repeatedly, it converges to the same results as the PRA model in cases where time-related factors are not important. In cases where timing considerations are important (e.g., when events are dependent upon each other), then the simulation approach will typically

  8. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia. PMID:26854878

  9. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  10. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2003-05-12

    This project is in its first full year after the combining of two previously funded projects: ''3D Code Development'' and ''Dynamic Material Properties''. The motivation behind this move was to emphasize and strengthen the ties between the experimental work and the computational model development in the materials area. The next year's activities will indicate the merging of the two efforts. The current activity is structured in two tasks. Task A, ''Simulations and Measurements'', combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. Task B, ''ALE3D Development'', is a continuation of the non-materials related activities from the previous project.

  11. 3D MHD Simulations of Radial Wire Array Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Niasse, N.; Chittenden, J. P.; Bland, S. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F. A.; Hall, G. N.; Lebedev, S. V.; Calamy, H.; Zucchini, F.; Lassalle, F.; Bedoch, J. P.

    2009-01-21

    Recent experiments carried out on the MAGPIE (1 MA, 250 ns), OEDIPE (730 kA, 1.5 {mu}s) and SPHINX (4 MA, 700 ns)[1] facilities have shown the relatively high level of scalability of the Radial Wire Array Z-pinches. These configurations where the wires stretch radially outwards from a central cathode offer numerous advantages over standard cylindrical arrays. In particular, imploding in a very stable and compact way, they seem suitable for coupling to small scale hohlraums. Making use of the 3D resistive magneto-hydrodynamic code GORGON[2] developed at Imperial College, the dynamic of the radial wire arrays is investigated. Influence of the cathode hotspots and wires angle on the x-ray emissions is also discussed. Comparison with experiments is offered to validate the numerical studies.

  12. 3D MHD Simulations of Radial Wire Array Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niasse, N.; Chittenden, J. P.; Bland, S. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F. A.; Hall, G. N.; Lebedev, S. V.; Calamy, H.; Zucchini, F.; Lassalle, F.; Bedoch, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments carried out on the MAGPIE (1 MA, 250 ns), OEDIPE (730 kA, 1.5 μs) and SPHINX (4 MA, 700 ns)[1] facilities have shown the relatively high level of scalability of the Radial Wire Array Z-pinches. These configurations where the wires stretch radially outwards from a central cathode offer numerous advantages over standard cylindrical arrays. In particular, imploding in a very stable and compact way, they seem suitable for coupling to small scale hohlraums. Making use of the 3D resistive magneto-hydrodynamic code GORGON[2] developed at Imperial College, the dynamic of the radial wire arrays is investigated. Influence of the cathode hotspots and wires angle on the x-ray emissions is also discussed. Comparison with experiments is offered to validate the numerical studies.

  13. Seasonal dynamics and stoichiometry of the planktonic community in the NW Mediterranean Sea: a 3D modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Raybaud, Virginie; Espinasse, Boris; Carlotti, François; Queguiner, Bernard; Thouvenin, Bénédicte; Garreau, Pierre; Baklouti, Melika

    2014-01-01

    The 3D hydrodynamic Model for Applications at Regional Scale (MARS3D) was coupled with a biogeochemical model developed with the Ecological Modular Mechanistic Modelling (Eco3M) numerical tool. The three-dimensional coupled model was applied to the NW Mediterranean Sea to study the dynamics of the key biogeochemical processes in the area in relation with hydrodynamic constraints. In particular, we focused on the temporal and spatial variability of intracellular contents of living and non-living compartments. The conceptual scheme of the biogeochemical model accounts for the complex food web of the NW Mediterranean Sea (34 state variables), using flexible plankton stoichiometry. We used mechanistic formulations to describe most of the biogeochemical processes involved in the dynamics of marine pelagic ecosystems. Simulations covered the period from September 1, 2009 to January 31, 2011 (17 months), which enabled comparison of model outputs with situ measurements made during two oceanographic cruises in the region (Costeau-4: April 27-May 2, 2010 and Costeau-6: January 23-January 27, 2011).

  14. Effect of hydrodynamic interactions in confined active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezhilan, Barath; Saintillan, David

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of biologically active suspensions in confined geometries is investigated by incorporating accurate boundary conditions within the kinetic theory framework [Saintillan and Shelley, Phys. Fluids. (2008)]. Even in the absence of wall hydrodynamic interactions or imposed flow, swimming microorganisms have a tendency to accumulate at confining boundaries due to self-propulsion. Satisfying a zero wall-normal translational flux condition on the active particle probability distribution function captures this effect. Using a moment-closure approximation, analytical expressions for the equilibrium concentration/polarization profiles are derived in the dilute limit. As particle density increases, we expect particle-particle hydrodynamic interactions to become significant and to destabilize these equilibrium distributions. Using a linear stability analysis and 3D finite volume simulation of the equations for the orientational moments, we study in detail the effect of fluid coupling on the stability properties of the equilibrium states in confined active suspensions.

  15. Sub- and super-luminar propagation of structures satisfying Poynting-like theorem for incompressible generalized hydrodynamic fluid model depicting strongly coupled dusty plasma medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharodi, Vikram; Das, Amita; Patel, Bhavesh; Kaw, Predhiman

    2016-01-01

    The strongly coupled dusty plasma has often been modelled by the Generalized Hydrodynamic (GHD) model used for representing visco-elastic fluid systems. The incompressible limit of the model which supports transverse shear wave mode is studied in detail. In particular, dipole structures are observed to emit transverse shear waves in both the limits of sub- and super-luminar propagation, where the structures move slower and faster than the phase velocity of the shear waves, respectively. In the sub-luminar limit the dipole gets engulfed within the shear waves emitted by itself, which then backreacts on it and ultimately the identity of the structure is lost. However, in the super-luminar limit the emission appears like a wake from the tail region of the dipole. The dipole, however, keeps propagating forward with little damping but minimal distortion in its form. A Poynting-like conservation law with radiative, convective, and dissipative terms being responsible for the evolution of W, which is similar to "enstrophy" like quantity in normal hydrodynamic fluid systems, has also been constructed for the incompressible GHD equations. The conservation law is shown to be satisfied in all the cases of evolution and collision amidst the nonlinear structures to a great accuracy. It is shown that monopole structures which do not move at all but merely radiate shear waves, the radiative term, and dissipative losses solely contribute to the evolution of W. The dipolar structures, on the other hand, propagate in the medium and hence convection also plays an important role in the evolution of W.

  16. SNL3dFace

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  17. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  18. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  19. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  20. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  1. Optoplasmonics: hybridization in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, L.; Gervinskas, G.; Žukauskas, A.; Malinauskas, M.; Brasselet, E.; Juodkazis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Femtosecond laser fabrication has been used to make hybrid refractive and di ractive micro-optical elements in photo-polymer SZ2080. For applications in micro- uidics, axicon lenses were fabricated (both single and arrays), for generation of light intensity patterns extending through the entire depth of a typically tens-of-micrometers deep channel. Further hybridisation of an axicon with a plasmonic slot is fabricated and demonstrated nu- merically. Spiralling chiral grooves were inscribed into a 100-nm-thick gold coating sputtered over polymerized micro-axicon lenses, using a focused ion beam. This demonstrates possibility of hybridisation between optical and plasmonic 3D micro-optical elements. Numerical modelling of optical performance by 3D-FDTD method is presented.

  2. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W = 4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure.

  3. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  4. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  5. 360-degree 3D profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanhe; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wenyi; Tan, Yushan

    1997-12-01

    A new method of 360 degree turning 3D shape measurement in which light sectioning and phase shifting techniques are both used is presented in this paper. A sine light field is applied in the projected light stripe, meanwhile phase shifting technique is used to calculate phases of the light slit. Thereafter wrapped phase distribution of the slit is formed and the unwrapping process is made by means of the height information based on the light sectioning method. Therefore phase measuring results with better precision can be obtained. At last the target 3D shape data can be produced according to geometric relationships between phases and the object heights. The principles of this method are discussed in detail and experimental results are shown in this paper.

  6. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  7. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  8. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  9. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  10. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  11. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  12. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer themore » second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.« less

  13. Fervent: chemistry-coupled, ionizing and non-ionizing radiative feedback in hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczynski, C.; Glover, S. C. O.; Klessen, R. S.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a radiative transfer code module for the magnetohydrodynamical adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH 4. It is coupled to an efficient chemical network which explicitly tracks the three hydrogen species H, H2, H+ as well as C+ and CO. The module is geared towards modelling all relevant thermal feedback processes of massive stars, and is able to follow the non-equilibrium time-dependent thermal and chemical state of the present-day interstellar medium as well as that of dense molecular clouds. We describe in detail the implementation of all relevant thermal stellar feedback mechanisms, i.e. photoelectric, photoionization and H2 dissociation heating as well as pumping of molecular hydrogen by UV photons. All included radiative feedback processes are extensively tested. We also compare our module to dedicated photodissociation region (PDR) codes and find good agreement in our modelled hydrogen species once our radiative transfer solution reaches equilibrium. In addition, we show that the implemented radiative feedback physics is insensitive to the spatial resolution of the code and show under which conditions it is possible to obtain well-converged evolution in time. Finally, we briefly explore the robustness of our scheme for treating combined ionizing and non-ionizing radiation.

  14. Dual cloud point extraction coupled with hydrodynamic-electrokinetic two-step injection followed by micellar electrokinetic chromatography for simultaneous determination of trace phenolic estrogens in water samples.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yingying; Li, Jinhua; Liu, Junshen; Lu, Wenhui; Ma, Jiping; Chen, Lingxin

    2013-07-01

    A dual cloud point extraction (dCPE) off-line enrichment procedure coupled with a hydrodynamic-electrokinetic two-step injection online enrichment technique was successfully developed for simultaneous preconcentration of trace phenolic estrogens (hexestrol, dienestrol, and diethylstilbestrol) in water samples followed by micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) analysis. Several parameters affecting the extraction and online injection conditions were optimized. Under optimal dCPE-two-step injection-MEKC conditions, detection limits of 7.9-8.9 ng/mL and good linearity in the range from 0.05 to 5 μg/mL with correlation coefficients R(2) ≥ 0.9990 were achieved. Satisfactory recoveries ranging from 83 to 108% were obtained with lake and tap water spiked at 0.1 and 0.5 μg/mL, respectively, with relative standard deviations (n = 6) of 1.3-3.1%. This method was demonstrated to be convenient, rapid, cost-effective, and environmentally benign, and could be used as an alternative to existing methods for analyzing trace residues of phenolic estrogens in water samples. PMID:23657452

  15. Isogeometric analysis of Lagrangian hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevs, Y.; Akkerman, I.; Benson, D. J.; Scovazzi, G.; Shashkov, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    Isogeometric analysis of Lagrangian shock hydrodynamics is proposed. The Euler equations of compressible hydrodynamics in the weak form are discretized using Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) in space. The discretization has all the advantages of a higher-order method, with the additional benefits of exact symmetry preservation and better per-degree-of-freedom accuracy. An explicit, second-order accurate time integration procedure, which conserves total energy, is developed and employed to advance the equations in time. The performance of the method is examined on a set of standard 2D and 3D benchmark examples, where good quality of the computational results is attained.

  16. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  17. 3D Models of Stellar Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, S.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Booth, R.; Maercker, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Vlemmings, W.; Harries, T.; Mackey, J.; Langer, N.; Corradi, R.

    2014-04-01

    Symbiotic binaries consist of a cool, evolved mass-losing giant and an accreting compact companion. As symbiotic nebulae show similar morphologies to those in planetary nebulae (so much so that it is often difficult to distinguish between the two), they are ideal laboratories for understanding the role a binary companion plays in shaping the circumstellar envelopes in these evolved systems. We will present 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) models of interacting binaries, e.g. R Aquarii and Mira, and discuss the formation of spiral outflows, arcs, shells and equatorial density enhancements.We will also discuss the implications of the former for planetary nebulae, e.g. the Egg Nebula and Cat's Eye, and the latter for the formation of bipolar geometries, e.g. M2-9. We also investigate accretion and angular momentum evolution in symbiotic binaries which may be important to understand the formation of jets and more episodic mass-loss features we see in circumstellar envelopes and the orbital characteristics of binary central stars of planetary nebulae.

  18. Coupling Hydrodynamic Modeling and Empirical Measures of Bed Mobility: Implications for Restoring Spawning Gravel Quality on a Large Regulated River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, C. L.; Smith, B. J.; Lisle, T. E.; Lang, M. M.

    2005-05-01

    Flow releases are increasingly being used as a tool to restore spawning gravel quality downstream of large dams. Often times, the primary goal of a peak flow release is to flush fine sediment from incubation habitat and restore active river processes; thus understanding the portion of the bed that is entrained and the flow required for full mobility is important. However, a critical knowledge gap for implementing these experimental floods is predicting the potential scouring of spawning redds in downstream reaches. To address these questions we need to understand the relationships between river discharge, bed mobility, and scour depths in areas heavily utilized by spawning salmon. Our approach couples numerical flow modeling and empirical data to quantify spatially explicit zones of differential bed mobility and identify specific areas where scour is deep enough to impact redd viability. Boundary shear stress values were predicted using the USGS's Multi-Dimensional Surface Water Modeling System for a segment of the Trinity River below Lewiston Dam. From model-generated shear stress and fine-scale mapping of local particle size distributions, Shields stress values were calculated to identify areas of differential bed mobility. Our data suggest that full mobility is limited to a central, yet discontinuous core along the thalweg, which expands with increasing flow strengths. Spatial analysis revealed that Chinook salmon tend not to spawn in areas that became fully mobile during bankfull flood events. Scour depths in areas preferentially used for spawning were less than in other portions of the bed and were not deep enough to impact incubating eggs or embryos. This site-selection preference allows fish to spawn in areas that are relatively safe from deep scour. However, the trade-off for spawning in stable areas is that flushing of fine sediment from the subsurface occurs very infrequently and gravel permeability is likely to become limiting for egg and embryo survival

  19. The PRISM3D paleoenvironmental reconstruction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.; Robinson, M.; Haywood, A.M.; Salzmann, U.; Hill, Daniel; Sohl, L.E.; Chandler, M.; Williams, Mark; Foley, K.; Stoll, D.K.

    2010-01-01

    The Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) paleoenvironmental reconstruction is an internally consistent and comprehensive global synthesis of a past interval of relatively warm and stable climate. It is regularly used in model studies that aim to better understand Pliocene climate, to improve model performance in future climate scenarios, and to distinguish model-dependent climate effects. The PRISM reconstruction is constantly evolving in order to incorporate additional geographic sites and environmental parameters, and is continuously refined by independent research findings. The new PRISM three dimensional (3D) reconstruction differs from previous PRISM reconstructions in that it includes a subsurface ocean temperature reconstruction, integrates geochemical sea surface temperature proxies to supplement the faunal-based temperature estimates, and uses numerical models for the first time to augment fossil data. Here we describe the components of PRISM3D and describe new findings specific to the new reconstruction. Highlights of the new PRISM3D reconstruction include removal of Hudson Bay and the Great Lakes and creation of open waterways in locations where the current bedrock elevation is less than 25m above modern sea level, due to the removal of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and the reduction of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The mid-Piacenzian oceans were characterized by a reduced east-west temperature gradient in the equatorial Pacific, but PRISM3D data do not imply permanent El Niño conditions. The reduced equator-to-pole temperature gradient that characterized previous PRISM reconstructions is supported by significant displacement of vegetation belts toward the poles, is extended into the Arctic Ocean, and is confirmed by multiple proxies in PRISM3D. Arctic warmth coupled with increased dryness suggests the formation of warm and salty paleo North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) and a more vigorous thermohaline circulation system that may

  20. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  1. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  2. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  3. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  4. Vacant Lander in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rear hazard-identification camera shows the now-empty lander that carried the rover 283 million miles to Meridiani Planum, Mars. Engineers received confirmation that Opportunity's six wheels successfully rolled off the lander and onto martian soil at 3:01 a.m. PST, January 31, 2004, on the seventh martian day, or sol, of the mission. The rover is approximately 1 meter (3 feet) in front of the lander, facing north.

  5. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  6. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  7. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  8. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaw, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W=4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure. We also simulate jets with the more realistic initial conditions for injecting jets for helical mangetic field, perturbed density, velocity, and internal energy, which are supposed to be caused in the process of jet generation. Three possible explanations for the observed variability are (i) tidal disruption of a star falling into the black hole, (ii) instabilities in the relativistic accretion disk, and (iii) jet-related PRocesses. New results will be reported at the meeting.

  9. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  10. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  11. 3D Ion Temperature Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; You, Setthivoine; Balandin, Alexander; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2009-11-01

    The TS-4 experiment at the University of Tokyo collides two spheromaks to form a single high-beta compact toroid. Magnetic reconnection during the merging process heats and accelerates the plasma in toroidal and poloidal directions. The reconnection region has a complex 3D topology determined by the pitch of the spheromak magnetic fields at the merging plane. A pair of multichord passive spectroscopic diagnostics have been established to measure the ion temperature and velocity in the reconnection volume. One setup measures spectral lines across a poloidal plane, retrieving velocity and temperature from Abel inversion. The other, novel setup records spectral lines across another section of the plasma and reconstructs velocity and temperature from 3D vector and 2D scalar tomography techniques. The magnetic field linking both measurement planes is determined from in situ magnetic probe arrays. The ion temperature is then estimated within the volume between the two measurement planes and at the reconnection region. The measurement is followed over several repeatable discharges to follow the heating and acceleration process during the merging reconnection.

  12. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  13. Ship Hydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafrance, Pierre

    1978-01-01

    Explores in a non-mathematical treatment some of the hydrodynamical phenomena and forces that affect the operation of ships, especially at high speeds. Discusses the major components of ship resistance such as the different types of drags and ways to reduce them and how to apply those principles for the hovercraft. (GA)

  14. ALE3D Simulations of Gap Closure and Surface Ignition for Cookoff Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; McClelland, M A; Nichols, A L

    2006-06-22

    We are developing ALE3D models to describe the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior during the heating, ignition and explosive phases of various cookoff phenomena. The candidate models and numerical strategies are being evaluated using benchmark cookoff experiments. ALE3D is a three-dimensional computer code capable of solving the model equations in a coupled fashion through all the phases of the cookoff in a single calculation. For the cookoff experiments, we are interested in representing behavior on widely varying timescales. We have used an implicit hydrodynamics option during the heating phase and an explicit solution method during the explosive phase. To complicate the modeling problem, high heat fluxes cause rapid temperature increases in boundary layers and lead to the formation of gaps between energetic and structural materials and ignition on surfaces. The initially solid energetic and structural materials react to produce gases, which fill the gaps. These materials can also melt and flow. Since an implicit solution method is used, simple no-strength materials models can no longer be used for liquids and gases. In this paper, we discuss and demonstrate choices of materials models for solid/liquid/gas mixtures to be used in conjunction with the implicit solution method. In addition, results are given for mesh movement strategies applied to the opening, closing, and surface ignition within gaps.

  15. Computational Study of 3-D Hot-Spot Initiation in Shocked Insensitive High-Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, F. M.; Howard, W. M.; Fried, L. E.

    2011-06-01

    High explosive shock sensitivity is controlled by a combination of mechanical response, thermal properties, and chemical properties. The interplay of these physical phenomena in realistic condensed energetic materials is currently lacking. A multiscale computational framework is developed investigating hot spot (void) ignition in a single crystal of an insensitive HE, TATB. Atomistic MD simulations are performed to provide the key chemical reactions and these reaction rates are used in 3-D multiphysics simulations. The multiphysics code, ALE3D, is linked to the chemistry software, Cheetah, and a three-way coupled approach is pursued including hydrodynamics, thermal and chemical analyses. A single spherical air bubble is embedded in the insensitive HE and its collapse due to shock initiation is evolved numerically in time; while the ignition processes due chemical reactions are studied. Our current predictions showcase several interesting features regarding hot spot dynamics including the formation of a ``secondary'' jet. Results obtained with hydro-thermo-chemical processes leading to ignition growth will be discussed for various pore sizes and different shock pressures. LLNL-ABS-471438. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. 3D Printing and Digital Rock Physics for Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M. J.; Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging techniques for the analysis of porous structures have revolutionized our ability to quantitatively characterize geomaterials. Digital representations of rock from CT images and physics modeling based on these pore structures provide the opportunity to further advance our quantitative understanding of fluid flow, geomechanics, and geochemistry, and the emergence of coupled behaviors. Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, has revolutionized production of custom parts with complex internal geometries. For the geosciences, recent advances in 3D printing technology may be co-opted to print reproducible porous structures derived from CT-imaging of actual rocks for experimental testing. The use of 3D printed microstructure allows us to surmount typical problems associated with sample-to-sample heterogeneity that plague rock physics testing and to test material response independent from pore-structure variability. Together, imaging, digital rocks and 3D printing potentially enables a new workflow for understanding coupled geophysical processes in a real, but well-defined setting circumventing typical issues associated with reproducibility, enabling full characterization and thus connection of physical phenomena to structure. In this talk we will discuss the possibilities that these technologies can bring to geosciences and present early experiences with coupled multiscale experimental and numerical analysis using 3D printed fractured rock specimens. In particular, we discuss the processes of selection and printing of transparent fractured specimens based on 3D reconstruction of micro-fractured rock to study fluid flow characterization and manipulation. Micro-particle image velocimetry is used to directly visualize 3D single and multiphase flow velocity in 3D fracture networks. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U

  17. Modeling Warm Dense Matter Experiments using the 3D ALE-AMR Code and the Move Toward Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A; Eder, E; Liu, W; Barnard, J; Friedman, A; Logan, G; Fisher, A; Masers, N; Bertozzi, A

    2011-11-04

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The NDCX II will be used in studies of material in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. We discuss recent efforts to adapt the 3D ALE-AMR code to model WDM experiments on NDCX II. The code, which combines Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), has physics models that include ion deposition, radiation hydrodynamics, thermal diffusion, anisotropic material strength with material time history, and advanced models for fragmentation. Experiments at NDCX-II will explore the process of bubble and droplet formation (two-phase expansion) of superheated metal solids using ion beams. Experiments at higher temperatures will explore equation of state and heavy ion fusion beam-to-target energy coupling efficiency. Ion beams allow precise control of local beam energy deposition providing uniform volumetric heating on a timescale shorter than that of hydrodynamic expansion. The ALE-AMR code does not have any export control restrictions and is currently running at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at LBNL and has been shown to scale well to thousands of CPUs. New surface tension models that are being implemented and applied to WDM experiments. Some of the approaches use a diffuse interface surface tension model that is based on the advective Cahn-Hilliard equations, which allows for droplet breakup in divergent velocity fields without the need for imposed perturbations. Other methods require seeding or other methods for droplet breakup. We also briefly discuss the effects of the move to exascale computing and related

  18. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalas, Dimitri

    Basic Radiation Theory Specific Intensity Photon Number Density Photon Distribution Function Mean Intensity Radiation Energy Density Radiation Energy Flux Radiation Momentum Density Radiation Stress Tensor (Radiation Pressure Tensor) Thermal Radiation Thermodynamics of Thermal Radiation and a Perfect Gas The Transfer Equation Absorption, Emission, and Scattering The Equation of Transfer Moments of the Transfer Equation Lorentz Transformation of the Transfer Equation Lorentz Transformation of the Photon 4-Momentum Lorentz Transformation of the Specific Intensity, Opacity, and - Emissivity Lorentz Transformation of the Radiation Stress Energy Tensor The Radiation 4-Force Density Vector Covariant Form of the Transfer Equation Inertial-Frame Equations of Radiation Hydrodynamics Inertial-Frame Radiation Equations Inertial-Frame Equations of Radiation Hydrodynamics Comoving-Frame Equation of Transfer Special Relativistic Derivation (D. Mihalas) Consistency Between Comoving-Frame and Inertial-Frame Equations Noninertial Frame Derivation (J. I. Castor) Analysis of O (v/c) Terms Lagrangian Equations of Radiation Hydrodynamics Momentum Equation Gas Energy Equation First Law of Thermodynamics for the Radiation Field First Law of Thermodynamics for the Radiating Fluid Mechanical Energy Equation Total Energy Equation Consistency of Different Forms of the Radiating-Fluid Energy - and Momentum Equations Consistency of Inertial-Frame and Comoving-Frame Radiation Energy - and Momentum Equations Radiation Diffusion Radiation Diffusion Nonequilibrium Diffusion The Problem of Flux Limiting Shock Propagation: Numerical Methods Acoustic Waves Numerical Stability Systems of Equations Implications of Shock Development Implications of Diffusive Energy Transport Illustrative Example Numerical Radiation Hydrodynamics Radiating Fluid Energy and Momentum Equations Computational Strategy Energy Conservation Formal Solution Multigroup Equations An Astrophysical Example Adaptive-Grid Radiation

  19. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  20. Surface Plasmons in 3D Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogar, Anshul; Vig, Sean; Cho, Gil; Thaler, Alexander; Xiao, Yiran; Hughes, Taylor; Wong, Man-Hong; Chiang, Tai-Chang; MacDougall, Greg; Abbamonte, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Most studies of three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators have concentrated on their one-electron properties as exhibited by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) or by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Many-body interactions are often neglected in the treatment of models of topological insulators, such as in the Kane-Mele and Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang models. Using angle-resolved inelastic electron scattering from the surface, I will present data on the collective mode that owes its existence to the presence of many-body interactions, the surface plasmon (SP), in two known 3D topological insulators, Bi2Se3 and Bi0.5Sb1.5Se1 . 5 + xTe1 . 5 - x. Surprisingly, the SP was prominent even after depressing the Fermi energy into the bulk band gap. Having studied the SP as a function of doping, momentum transfer and its aging properties, I will present evidence to suggest that bulk-surface coupling is crucial in explaining many of its properties. A simple model with dynamic bulk screening will be presented showing qualitative agreement with the observations. Lastly, the relation of the observed surface plasmon to the predicted spin-plasmon mode and to the kinks seen in the electronic dispersion as measured by ARPES will be discussed. The work was supported as part of the Center for Emergent Superconductivity, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science.

  1. Quantifying the heterogeneity of hypoxic and anoxic areas in the Baltic Sea by a simplified coupled hydrodynamic-oxygen consumption model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Andreas; Hinrichsen, Hans-Harald; Getzlaff, Klaus; Myrberg, Kai

    2014-06-01

    The Baltic Sea deep waters suffer from extended areas of hypoxia and anoxia. Their intra- and inter-annual variability is mainly determined by saline inflows which transport oxygenated water to deeper layers. During the last decades, oxygen conditions in the Baltic Sea have generally worsened and thus, the extent of hypoxic as well as anoxic bottom water has increased considerably. Climate change may further increase hypoxia due to changes in the atmospheric forcing conditions resulting in less deep water renewal Baltic inflows, decreased oxygen solubility and increased respiration rates. Feedback from climate change can amplify effects from eutrophication. A decline in oxygen conditions has generally a negative impact on marine life in the Baltic Sea. Thus, a detailed description of the evolution of oxygenated, hypoxic and anoxic areas is particularly required when studying oxygen-related processes such as habitat utilization of spawning fish, survival rates of their eggs as well as settlement probability of juveniles. One of today's major challenges is still the modeling of deep water dissolved oxygen, especially for the Baltic Sea with its seasonal and quasi-permanent extended areas of oxygen deficiency. The detailed spatial and temporal evolution of the oxygen concentrations in the entire Baltic Sea have been simulated for the period 1970-2010 by utilizing a hydrodynamic Baltic Sea model coupled to a simple pelagic and benthic oxygen consumption model. Model results are in very good agreement with CTD/O2-profiles taken in different areas of the Baltic Sea. The model proved to be a useful tool to describe the detailed evolution of oxygenated, hypoxic and anoxic areas in the entire Baltic Sea. Model results are further applied to determine frequencies of the occurrence of areas of oxygen deficiency and cod reproduction volumes.

  2. Application of Remote Sensing for Parameterization and Validation of a Coupled Hydrodynamic - Marsh Equilibrium Model for the Coastal Landscapes of the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weishampel, J. F.; Alizad, K.; Angelo, J. J.; Bacopoulos, P.; Bilskie, M. V.; Daranpob, A.; Hagen, S. C.; Medeiros, S. C.; Morris, J. T.; Passeri, D.; Smar, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    To simulate the complex spatial patterns of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise requires linking local-scale vegetative growth and associated sediment feedbacks to estuary-wide hydrological processes. The strategy employed by the Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise in the Northern Gulf of Mexico project (EESLR-NGOM) is to combine a high-resolution process-based model (i.e., Marsh Equilibrium Model) with a broad-scale hydrodynamics model (i.e., ADCIRC). Because of the large spatial extent of these heterogeneous wetland systems in the NGOM, remote sensing is required to initialize the model and to assess its performance. A LiDAR-derived digital elevation model (DEM) constrained by field-based real time kinematic (RTK) measures provide the topography of the marsh platform, adjacent upland berms, and the distribution of tidal creeks which influences the reciprocal dynamic between hydrologic flows and biomass accumulation. Statistical relationships between the aboveground biomass levels of the dominant species (i.e., big cordgrass - Spartina cynosuroides and black needlerush - Juncus roemerianus) and passive (e.g., Landsat and ASTER) and active (e.g., LiDAR and IfSAR) remote sensing provide the initial conditions of the vegetation across the salt marsh landscapes. The remotely-sensed patterns of biomass will also serve as a spatial validation of the coupled model. However, preliminary analyses of the remotely sensed and field data for the estuarine marsh vegetation at Apalachicola Bay revealed significant intra- and inter-annual differences in the biomass relationships. This high degree of spatio-temporal variation suggests that a more qualitative approach (e.g., high, medium, and low biomass levels) may be needed to interpret model accuracy.;

  3. ShowMe3D

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  4. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  5. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  6. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  7. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  8. 3D Inverse problem: Seawater intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steklova, K.; Haber, E.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of seawater intrusions (SWI) is challenging as it involves solving the governing equations for variable density flow, multiple time scales and varying boundary conditions. Due to the nonlinearity of the equations and the large aquifer domains, 3D computations are a costly process, particularly when solving the inverse SWI problem. In addition the heads and concentration measurements are difficult to obtain due to mixing, saline wedge location is sensitive to aquifer topography, and there is general uncertainty in initial and boundary conditions and parameters. Some of these complications can be overcome by using indirect geophysical data next to standard groundwater measurements, however, the inverse problem is usually simplified, e.g. by zonation for the parameters based on geological information, steady state substitution of the unknown initial conditions, decoupling the equations or reducing the amount of unknown parameters by covariance analysis. In our work we present a discretization of the flow and solute mass balance equations for variable groundwater (GW) flow. A finite difference scheme is to solve pressure equation and a Semi - Lagrangian method for solute transport equation. In this way we are able to choose an arbitrarily large time step without losing stability up to an accuracy requirement coming from the coupled character of the variable density flow equations. We derive analytical sensitivities of the GW model for parameters related to the porous media properties and also the initial solute distribution. Analytically derived sensitivities reduce the computational cost of inverse problem, but also give insight for maximizing information in collected data. If the geophysical data are available it also enables simultaneous calibration in a coupled hydrogeophysical framework. The 3D inverse problem was tested on artificial time dependent data for pressure and solute content coming from a GW forward model and/or geophysical forward model. Two

  9. Unsteady 3D Turbulent Flow Separation around a ROV Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, Costel; Lungu, Adrian

    2009-09-01

    Turbulent separated flows around ellipsoids of various aspect ratios are investigated using a numerical method. The Reynolds averaged equations for continuity and momentum are solved by cell-centered finite-volume method for the primitive variables to describe the 3D turbulent incompressible flow. The objectives of the study are: (a) to investigate the propulsive performances of a moving Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV hereafter) ellipsoidal body; (b) to validate the computational solutions through comparisons with the experimental data; (c) to investigate the effects of the angle of attack on the separation pattern as well as on the hydrodynamic forces and moments.

  10. MESA: A 3-D Eulerian hydrocode for penetration mechanics studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Holian, K.S.; Henninger, R.

    1991-01-01

    We describe an explicit, finite-difference hydrocode, called MESA, and compare calculations to metal and ceramic plate impacts with spall and to Taylor cylinder tests. The MESA code was developed with support from DARPA, the Army and the Marine Corps for use in armor/anti-armor problems primarily, but the code has been used for a number of other applications. MESA includes 2-D and 3-D Eulerian hydrodynamics, a number of material strength and fracture models, and a programmed burn high explosives model. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  11. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breakinga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, Donald A.

    2015-05-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  12. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A.

    2015-05-15

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma c