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Sample records for 3d heat conduction

  1. Assessing the RELAPS-3D Heat Conduction Enclosure Model

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, Larry D.

    2008-09-30

    Three heat conduction problems that have exact solutions are modeled with RELAP5-3D using the conduction enclosure model. These comparisons are designed to be used in the RELAP5-3D development assessment scheduled to be completed in 2009. It is shown that with proper input choices and adequate model detail the exact solutions can be matched. In addition, this analysis identified an error and the required correction in the cylindrical and spherical heat conductor models in RELAP5-3D which will be corrected in a future version of RELAP5-3D.

  2. A 3-D FINITE ELEMENT FORMULATION FOR THE DETERMINATION OF UNKNOWN BOUNDARY CONDITIONS IN HEAT CONDUCTION

    E-print Network

    Dennis, Brian

    in heat conduction is presented. The present FEM formulation is capable of deter- mining temperatures are presented. KEYWORDS inverse problems, finite element method, inverse heat conduction NOMENCLATURE ¢¡¤£ Damping matrix ¢¥¤¦§£ Stiffness matrix ¨ Fourier coefficient of heat conduction © Heat flux vector Heat

  3. 2D divertor heat flux distribution using a 3D heat conduction solver in National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    PubMed

    Gan, K F; Ahn, J-W; Park, J-W; Maingi, R; McLean, A G; Gray, T K; Gong, X; Zhang, X D

    2013-02-01

    The divertor heat flux footprint in tokamaks is often observed to be non-axisymmetric due to intrinsic error fields, applied 3D magnetic fields or during transients such as edge localized modes. Typically, only 1D radial heat flux profiles are analyzed; however, analysis of the full 2D divertor measurements provides opportunities to study the asymmetric nature of the deposited heat flux. To accomplish this an improved 3D Fourier analysis method has been successfully applied in a heat conduction solver (TACO) to determine the 2D heat flux distribution at the lower divertor surface in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) tokamak. This advance enables study of helical heat deposition onto the divertor. In order to account for heat transmission through poorly adhered surface layers on the divertor plate, a heat transmission coefficient, defined as the surface layer thermal conductivity divided by the thickness of the layer, was introduced to the solution of heat conduction equation. This coefficient is denoted as ? and a range of values were tested in the model to ensure a reliable heat flux calculation until a specific value of ? led to the constant total deposited energy in the numerical solution after the end of discharge. A comparison between 1D heat flux profiles from TACO and from a 2D heat flux calculation code, THEODOR, shows good agreement. Advantages of 2D heat flux distribution over the conventional 1D heat flux profile are also discussed, and examples of 2D data analysis in the study of striated heat deposition pattern as well as the toroidal degree of asymmetry of peak heat flux and heat flux width are demonstrated. PMID:23464209

  4. 2D divertor heat flux distribution using a 3D heat conduction solver in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, K. F.; Ahn, J.-W.; Park, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; McLean, A. G.; Gray, T. K.; Gong, X.; Zhang, X. D.

    2013-02-01

    The divertor heat flux footprint in tokamaks is often observed to be non-axisymmetric due to intrinsic error fields, applied 3D magnetic fields or during transients such as edge localized modes. Typically, only 1D radial heat flux profiles are analyzed; however, analysis of the full 2D divertor measurements provides opportunities to study the asymmetric nature of the deposited heat flux. To accomplish this an improved 3D Fourier analysis method has been successfully applied in a heat conduction solver (TACO) to determine the 2D heat flux distribution at the lower divertor surface in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) tokamak. This advance enables study of helical heat deposition onto the divertor. In order to account for heat transmission through poorly adhered surface layers on the divertor plate, a heat transmission coefficient, defined as the surface layer thermal conductivity divided by the thickness of the layer, was introduced to the solution of heat conduction equation. This coefficient is denoted as ? and a range of values were tested in the model to ensure a reliable heat flux calculation until a specific value of ? led to the constant total deposited energy in the numerical solution after the end of discharge. A comparison between 1D heat flux profiles from TACO and from a 2D heat flux calculation code, THEODOR, shows good agreement. Advantages of 2D heat flux distribution over the conventional 1D heat flux profile are also discussed, and examples of 2D data analysis in the study of striated heat deposition pattern as well as the toroidal degree of asymmetry of peak heat flux and heat flux width are demonstrated.

  5. Existence and uniqueness results for viscous, heat-conducting 3-D fluid with vacuum

    E-print Network

    Ting Zhang; Daoyuan Fang

    2007-02-07

    We consider the 3-D full Navier-Stokes equations whose the viscosity coefficients and the thermal conductivity coefficient depend on the density and the temperature. We prove the local existence and uniqueness of the strong solution in a domain $\\Omega\\subset\\mathbb{R}^3$. The initial density may vanish in an open set and $\\Omega$ could be a bounded or unbounded domain. We also prove a blow-up criterion for the solution. Finally, we show the blow-up of the smooth solution to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in $\\mathbb{R}^n$ ($n\\geq1$) when the initial density has compactly support and the initial total momentum is nonzero.

  6. Study of non-axisymmetric divertor footprints using 2-D IR and visible cameras and a 3-D heat conduction solver in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, J.-W.; Gan, K. F.; Scotti, F.; Lore, J. D.; Maingi, R.; Canik, J. M.; Gray, T. K.; McLean, A. G.; Roquemore, A. L.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2013-07-01

    Toroidally non-axisymmetric divertor profiles during the 3-D field application and for ELMs are studied with simultaneous observation by a new wide angle visible camera and a high speed IR camera. A newly implemented 3-D heat conduction code, TACO, is used to obtain divertor heat flux. The wide angle camera data confirmed the previously reported result on the validity of vacuum field line tracing on the prediction of split strike point pattern by 3-D fields as well as the phase locking of ELM heat flux to the 3-D fields. TACO calculates the 2-D heat flux distribution allowing assessment of toroidal asymmetry of peak heat flux and heat flux width. The degree of asymmetry (?DA) is defined to quantify the asymmetric heat deposition on the divertor surface and is found to have a strong positive dependence on peak heat flux.

  7. Conducting Polymer 3D Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, Luigi; Vazquez, Patricia; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Castillo-León, Jaime; Emnéus, Jenny; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared with electrodes coated with only metal. An electrochemical characterization of gold/polypyrrole electrodes showed exceptional electrochemical behavior and activity. PC12 cells were finally cultured on the investigated materials as a preliminary biocompatibility assessment. These results show that the described electrodes are possibly suitable for future in-vitro neurological measurements. PMID:22163508

  8. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore »representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  9. 1D-to-3D transition of phonon heat conduction in polyethylene using molecular dynamics simulations

    E-print Network

    Henry, Asegun

    The thermal conductivity of nanostructures generally decreases with decreasing size because of classical size effects. The axial thermal conductivity of polymer chain lattices, however, can exhibit the opposite trend, ...

  10. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  11. 1D-to-3D transition of photon heat conduction in polyethylene using molecular dynamics simulations

    E-print Network

    Henry, Asegun Sekou Famake

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have demonstrated that the mechanical stretching of bulk polyethylene can increase its thermal conductivity by more than two orders of magnitude, from 0.35 W/mK to over 40W/mK, which is comparable to steel. ...

  12. 3D Regression Heat Map Analysis of Population Study Data.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Paul; Lawonn, Kai; Glaser, Sylvia; Niemann, Uli; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Volzke, Henry; Preim, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies comprise heterogeneous data about a subject group to define disease-specific risk factors. These data contain information (features) about a subject's lifestyle, medical status as well as medical image data. Statistical regression analysis is used to evaluate these features and to identify feature combinations indicating a disease (the target feature). We propose an analysis approach of epidemiological data sets by incorporating all features in an exhaustive regression-based analysis. This approach combines all independent features w.r.t. a target feature. It provides a visualization that reveals insights into the data by highlighting relationships. The 3D Regression Heat Map, a novel 3D visual encoding, acts as an overview of the whole data set. It shows all combinations of two to three independent features with a specific target disease. Slicing through the 3D Regression Heat Map allows for the detailed analysis of the underlying relationships. Expert knowledge about disease-specific hypotheses can be included into the analysis by adjusting the regression model formulas. Furthermore, the influences of features can be assessed using a difference view comparing different calculation results. We applied our 3D Regression Heat Map method to a hepatic steatosis data set to reproduce results from a data mining-driven analysis. A qualitative analysis was conducted on a breast density data set. We were able to derive new hypotheses about relations between breast density and breast lesions with breast cancer. With the 3D Regression Heat Map, we present a visual overview of epidemiological data that allows for the first time an interactive regression-based analysis of large feature sets with respect to a disease. PMID:26529689

  13. Reduction of Thermal Conductivity by Nanoscale 3D Phononic Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000?K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal. PMID:23378898

  14. Analytical solution for the 3D steady state conduction in a solid subjected to a moving rectangular heat source and surface cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Talaat; Boucheffa, Abderrahmane

    2009-02-01

    Heating of solids, e.g. by friction or welding, plays an important role in the thermomechanical behaviour of materials. An analytical model to compute the three-dimensional temperature distribution in a solid, subjected to a moving rectangular heat source with surface cooling is proposed in this article. A frequential integral transform and a finite cosine Fourier integral transform are used to solve the advection-diffusion equation related to this problem. The obtained solution is explicit and does not impose any restriction on the speed, the dimensions and the heat convection coefficient. It is presented in series form which converges rapidly. To cite this article: T. Osman, A. Boucheffa, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  15. 3D THERMOGRAPHY FOR QUANTIFICATION OF HEAT GENERATION RESULTING FROM

    E-print Network

    Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    3D THERMOGRAPHY FOR QUANTIFICATION OF HEAT GENERATION RESULTING FROM INFLAMMATION THERMOGRAPHIE 3D-invasive imaging technology to allow early, accurate and quantitative detection of inflammation. Thermography has and to assist with diagnosis of biomechanical problems. However, thermography is still viewed as an accessory

  16. Conductance through step junctions in 3D topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alos-Palop, Mireia; Tiwari, Rakesh P.; Blaauboer, Miriam

    2012-02-01

    An effective continuous model for low-energy surface states of a 3D topological insulator was presented by Zhang et al., Nat. Phys. 5, 438 (2009). We present a general solution for this 3D model in a surface different from the standard (111)-surface. In our solution, surface states consist of a single Dirac cone with a Fermi velocity different from the one in (111)-surfaces, and the energy has an elliptical dispersion in k-space. We then study transport through a step junction composed of a (111)-surface -- side-surface -- (111)-surface and predict that the conductance saturates at 2/3 G0, independent of eccentricity and velocity mismatch at the interfaces. We compare our model with a junction in a plane with only (111)-states where conductance saturation does depend on velocity mismatch. We also analyze the Fano factor and highlight experimentally relevant situations where our predictions could be tested.

  17. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Shahini, Aref; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Walker, Kenneth J; Eastman, Margaret A; Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Smith, Brenda J; Ricci, John L; Madihally, Sundar V; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent microscope. Increasing the concentration of the conductive polymer in the scaffold enhanced the cell viability, indicating the improved microstructure of the scaffolds or boosted electrical signaling among cells. These results show that these conductive scaffolds are not only structurally more favorable for bone tissue engineering, but also can be a step forward in combining the tissue engineering techniques with the method of enhancing the bone healing by electrical stimuli. PMID:24399874

  18. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shahini, Aref; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Walker, Kenneth J; Eastman, Margaret A; Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Smith, Brenda J; Ricci, John L; Madihally, Sundar V; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent microscope. Increasing the concentration of the conductive polymer in the scaffold enhanced the cell viability, indicating the improved microstructure of the scaffolds or boosted electrical signaling among cells. These results show that these conductive scaffolds are not only structurally more favorable for bone tissue engineering, but also can be a step forward in combining the tissue engineering techniques with the method of enhancing the bone healing by electrical stimuli. PMID:24399874

  19. Hydraulic conductivity imaging from 3-D transient hydraulic tomography at several pumping/observation densities

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    Hydraulic conductivity imaging from 3-D transient hydraulic tomography at several pumping August 2013; accepted 7 September 2013; published 13 November 2013. [1] 3-D Hydraulic tomography (3-D HT (primarily hydraulic conductivity, K) is estimated by joint inversion of head change data from multiple

  20. Intermittent Dissipation and Heating in 3D Kinetic Plasma Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Roytershteyn, V; Karimabadi, H; Parashar, T; Wu, P; Shay, M

    2015-05-01

    High resolution, fully kinetic, three dimensional (3D) simulation of collisionless plasma turbulence shows the development of turbulence characterized by sheetlike current density structures spanning a range of scales. The nonlinear evolution is initialized with a long wavelength isotropic spectrum of fluctuations having polarizations transverse to an imposed mean magnetic field. We present evidence that these current sheet structures are sites for heating and dissipation, and that stronger currents signify higher dissipation rates. The analyses focus on quantities such as J·E, electron, and proton temperatures, and conditional averages of these quantities based on local electric current density. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma, like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due to current sheet formation, leading to the expectation that heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmas may be highly nonuniform. Comparison with previous results from 2D kinetic simulations, as well as high frequency solar wind observational data, are discussed. PMID:25978241

  1. Coolant side heat transfer with rotation: User manual for 3D-TEACH with rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, S. A.; James, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    This program solves the governing transport equations in Reynolds average form for the flow of a 3-D, steady state, viscous, heat conducting, multiple species, single phase, Newtonian fluid with combustion. The governing partial differential equations are solved in physical variables in either a Cartesian or cylindrical coordinate system. The effects of rotation on the momentum and enthalpy calculations modeled in Cartesian coordinates are examined. The flow of the fluid should be confined and subsonic with a maximum Mach number no larger than 0.5. This manual describes the operating procedures and input details for executing a 3D-TEACH computation.

  2. Conduction heat transfer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    VanSant, J.H.

    1983-08-01

    This text is a collection of solutions to a variety of heat conduction problems found in numerous publications, such as textbooks, handbooks, journals, reports, etc. Its purpose is to assemble these solutions into one source that can facilitate the search for a particular problem solution. Generally, it is intended to be a handbook on the subject of heat conduction. There are twelve sections of solutions which correspond with the class of problems found in each. Geometry, state, boundary conditions, and other categories are used to classify the problems. Each problem is concisely described by geometry and condition statements, and many times a descriptive sketch is also included. The introduction presents a synopsis on the theory, differential equations, and boundary conditions for conduction heat transfer. Some discussion is given on the use and interpretation of solutions. Supplementary data such as mathematical functions, convection correlations, and thermal properties are included for aiding the user in computing numerical values from the solutions. 155 figs., 92 refs., 9 tabs.

  3. Temperature distributions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell from 3-D numerical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rainey, E. S. G.; Kavner, A.; Hernlund, J. W.

    2013-11-28

    We present TempDAC, a 3-D numerical model for calculating the steady-state temperature distribution for continuous wave laser-heated experiments in the diamond anvil cell. TempDAC solves the steady heat conduction equation in three dimensions over the sample chamber, gasket, and diamond anvils and includes material-, temperature-, and direction-dependent thermal conductivity, while allowing for flexible sample geometries, laser beam intensity profile, and laser absorption properties. The model has been validated against an axisymmetric analytic solution for the temperature distribution within a laser-heated sample. Example calculations illustrate the importance of considering heat flow in three dimensions for the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. In particular, we show that a “flat top” input laser beam profile does not lead to a more uniform temperature distribution or flatter temperature gradients than a wide Gaussian laser beam.

  4. Conduction heat transfer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    VanSant, J.H.

    1980-03-01

    This text is a collection of solutions to a variety of heat conduction problems found in numerous publications, such as textbooks, handbooks, journals, reports, etc. Its purpose is to assemble these solutions into one source that can facilitate the search for a particular problem solution. Generally, it is intended to be a handbook on the subject of heat conduction. This material is useful for engineers, scientists, technologists, and designers of all disciplines, particularly those who design thermal systems or estimate temperatures and heat transfer rates in structures. More than 500 problem solutions and relevant data are tabulated for easy retrieval. There are twelve sections of solutions which correspond with the class of problems found in each. Geometry, state, boundary conditions, and other categories are used to classify the problems. A case number is assigned to each problem for cross-referencing, and also for future reference. Each problem is concisely described by geometry and condition statements, and many times a descriptive sketch is also included. At least one source reference is given so that the user can review the methods used to derive the solutions. Problem solutions are given in the form of equations, graphs, and tables of data, all of which are also identified by problem case numbers and source references.

  5. 3D coupled heat and mass transfer processes at the scale of sedimentary basisn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacace, M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Kaiser, B. O.

    2014-12-01

    We use coupled 3D simulations of fluid, heat, and transport based on a 3D structural model of a complex geological setting, the Northeast German Basin (NEGB). The geological structure of the NEGB is characterized by a relatively thick layer of Permian Zechstein salt, structured in differnet diapirs (up to 5000 m thick) and pillows locally reaching nearly the surface. Salt is thermally more conductive than other sediments, hydraulically impervious but highly solvable. Thus salt structures have first order influence on the temperature distribution, the deep flow regime and the salinity of groundawater bearing aquifers. In addition, the post-Permian sedimentary sequence is vertically subdivided into several aquifers and aquitards. The shallow Quaternary to late Tertiary freshwater aquifer is separated from the underlying Mesozoic saline aquifers by an embedded Tertiary clay enriched aquitard (Rupelian Aquitard). An important feature of this aquitard is that hydraulic connections between the upper and lower aquifers exist in areas where the Rupelian Aquitard is missing (hydrogeological windows). By means of 3D numerical simulations we explore the role of heat conduction, pressure, and density driven groundwater flow as well as fluid viscosity-related and salinity-dependent effects on the resulting flow and temperature fields. Our results suggest that the regional temperature distribution within the basin results from interactions between regional pressure forces and thermal diffusion locally enhanced by thermal conductivity contrasts between the different sedimentary rocks with the highly conductive salt. Buoyancy forces triggered by temperature-dependent fluid density variations affect only locally the internal thermal configuration. Locations, geometry, and wavelengths of convective thermal anomalies are mainly controlled by the permeability field and thickness values of the respective geological layers. Numerical results from 3D thermo-haline numerical simulations suggest that hydrogeological windows act as preferential domains of hydraulic interconnectivity between the different aquifers at depth, and enable vigorous heat and mass transport which causes a mixing of warm and saline groundwater with cold and less saline groundwater within both aquifers.

  6. 3D and NDT using scanning from heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacemi, M.; Stolz, C.; Aubreton, O.

    2015-04-01

    A nondestructive inspection method using an infrared detection system is presented in this paper; the system uses a YAG laser as excitation point. The material thermal response to this excitation is processed for the detection of volume defects, this technique integrated into a 3D scanning system allows us to get a 3D scan of the object as well as defects detection.

  7. Thermal Conduction Path Analysis in 3-D ICs Boris Vaisband1

    E-print Network

    Friedman, Eby G.

    Thermal Conduction Path Analysis in 3-D ICs Boris Vaisband1 , Ioannis Savidis2 , and Eby G the horizontal and vertical dimensions. The dependence of the thermal conductivity on temperature is integrated, since the thermal conductivity of silicon dioxide is 200 times smaller than the thermal conductivity

  8. Polyvinyl chloride film local isometric heat treatment for hidden 3D printing on polymer packaging

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Polyvinyl chloride film local isometric heat treatment for hidden 3D printing on polymer packaging with poor vision, but capable of tactile marking recognition and reading Braille. This 3D printing is based of 3D printing, including tactile sign formation conditions. VC 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Appl

  9. Scanning from heating: 3D shape estimation of transparent objects from local surface heating.

    PubMed

    Eren, Gonen; Aubreton, Olivier; Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Sanchez Secades, L A; Fofi, David; Naskali, A Teoman; Truchetet, Frederic; Ercil, Aytul

    2009-07-01

    Today, with quality becoming increasingly important, each product requires three-dimensional in-line quality control. On the other hand, the 3D reconstruction of transparent objects is a very difficult problem in computer vision due to transparency and specularity of the surface. This paper proposes a new method, called Scanning From Heating (SFH), to determine the surface shape of transparent objects using laser surface heating and thermal imaging. Furthermore, the application to transparent glass is discussed and results on different surface shapes are presented. PMID:19582061

  10. Residual resistance of 2D and 3D structures and Joule heat release.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V L; Kozub, V I

    2011-06-22

    We consider a residual resistance and Joule heat release in 2D nanostructures as well as in ordinary 3D conductors. We assume that elastic scattering of conduction electrons by lattice defects is predominant. Within a rather intricate situation in such systems we discuss in detail two cases. (1) The elastic scattering alone (i.e. without regard of inelastic mechanisms of scattering) leads to a transition of the mechanical energy (stored by the electrons under the action of an electric field) into heat in a traditional way. This process can be described by the Boltzmann equation where it is possible to do the configuration averaging over defect positions in the electron-impurity collision term. The corresponding conditions are usually met in metals. (2) The elastic scattering can be considered with the help of the standard electron-impurity collision integral only in combination with some additional averaging procedure (possibly including inelastic scattering or some mechanisms of electron wavefunction phase destruction). This situation is typical for degenerate semiconductors with a high concentration of dopants and conduction electrons. Quite often, heat release can be observed via transfer of heat to the lattice, i.e. via inelastic processes of electron-phonon collisions and can take place at distances much larger than the size of the device. However, a direct heating of the electron system can be registered too by, for instance, local measurements of the current noise or direct measurement of an electron distribution function. PMID:21628783

  11. Compilation of 3D global conductivity model of the Earth for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Dmitry; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Palshin, Nikolay

    2015-12-01

    We have compiled a global three-dimensional (3D) conductivity model of the Earth with an ultimate goal to be used for realistic simulation of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC), posing a potential threat to man-made electric systems. Bearing in mind the intrinsic frequency range of the most intense disturbances (magnetospheric substorms) with typical periods ranging from a few minutes to a few hours, the compiled 3D model represents the structure in depth range of 0-100 km, including seawater, sediments, earth crust, and partly the lithosphere/asthenosphere. More explicitly, the model consists of a series of spherical layers, whose vertical and lateral boundaries are established based on available data. To compile a model, global maps of bathymetry, sediment thickness, and upper and lower crust thicknesses as well as lithosphere thickness are utilized. All maps are re-interpolated on a common grid of 0.25×0.25 degree lateral spacing. Once the geometry of different structures is specified, each element of the structure is assigned either a certain conductivity value or conductivity versus depth distribution, according to available laboratory data and conversion laws. A numerical formalism developed for compilation of the model, allows for its further refinement by incorporation of regional 3D conductivity distributions inferred from the real electromagnetic data. So far we included into our model four regional conductivity models, available from recent publications, namely, surface conductance model of Russia, and 3D conductivity models of Fennoscandia, Australia, and northwest of the United States.

  12. A simple, low-cost conductive composite material for 3D printing of electronic sensors.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Simon J; Bradley, Robert J; Purssell, Christopher P; Billson, Duncan R; Hutchins, David A

    2012-01-01

    3D printing technology can produce complex objects directly from computer aided digital designs. The technology has traditionally been used by large companies to produce fit and form concept prototypes ('rapid prototyping') before production. In recent years however there has been a move to adopt the technology as full-scale manufacturing solution. The advent of low-cost, desktop 3D printers such as the RepRap and Fab@Home has meant a wider user base are now able to have access to desktop manufacturing platforms enabling them to produce highly customised products for personal use and sale. This uptake in usage has been coupled with a demand for printing technology and materials able to print functional elements such as electronic sensors. Here we present formulation of a simple conductive thermoplastic composite we term 'carbomorph' and demonstrate how it can be used in an unmodified low-cost 3D printer to print electronic sensors able to sense mechanical flexing and capacitance changes. We show how this capability can be used to produce custom sensing devices and user interface devices along with printed objects with embedded sensing capability. This advance in low-cost 3D printing with offer a new paradigm in the 3D printing field with printed sensors and electronics embedded inside 3D printed objects in a single build process without requiring complex or expensive materials incorporating additives such as carbon nanotubes. PMID:23185319

  13. A Simple, Low-Cost Conductive Composite Material for 3D Printing of Electronic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Simon J.; Bradley, Robert J.; Purssell, Christopher P.; Billson, Duncan R.; Hutchins, David A.

    2012-01-01

    3D printing technology can produce complex objects directly from computer aided digital designs. The technology has traditionally been used by large companies to produce fit and form concept prototypes (‘rapid prototyping’) before production. In recent years however there has been a move to adopt the technology as full-scale manufacturing solution. The advent of low-cost, desktop 3D printers such as the RepRap and Fab@Home has meant a wider user base are now able to have access to desktop manufacturing platforms enabling them to produce highly customised products for personal use and sale. This uptake in usage has been coupled with a demand for printing technology and materials able to print functional elements such as electronic sensors. Here we present formulation of a simple conductive thermoplastic composite we term ‘carbomorph’ and demonstrate how it can be used in an unmodified low-cost 3D printer to print electronic sensors able to sense mechanical flexing and capacitance changes. We show how this capability can be used to produce custom sensing devices and user interface devices along with printed objects with embedded sensing capability. This advance in low-cost 3D printing with offer a new paradigm in the 3D printing field with printed sensors and electronics embedded inside 3D printed objects in a single build process without requiring complex or expensive materials incorporating additives such as carbon nanotubes. PMID:23185319

  14. Evaluation of the RETRAN-3D Wall Friction Models and Heat Transfer Coefficient Correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Craig E.; Shatford, John G.; Harrison, James F.; Agee, Lance J

    2003-04-15

    This paper presents an evaluation of many of the RETRAN-3D two-phase pressure drop and heat transfer models by comparing model prediction to a large body of experimental data.RETRAN-3D has been used to evaluate multiple two-phase pressure drop models utilizing an extensive experimental two-phase pressure drop database. The experimental pressure drop data cover both heated and adiabatic tests in upflow and horizontal configurations for a wide range of key parameters such as pressure, mass flux, quality, and pipe diameters. Two RETRAN-3D two-phase friction options and the Friedel two-phase friction model are tested and compared to the data. For the two-phase friction models compared herein, the modified Baroczy model available in RETRAN-3D is the best choice for all adiabatic and diabatic situations.The RETRAN-3D code has also been used to simulate a wide variety of heat transfer experiments. These heat transfer data cover single-phase and two-phase conditions over a large range of pressure, heat flux, and mass flux values. The performance of the RETRAN-3D default forced convection heat transfer coefficient correlations is evaluated. The Petukhov correlations provide comparable results for single-phase liquid, but the Dittus-Boelter model provides markedly better statistics for single-phase vapor. The RETRAN five-equation model that combines the Dittus-Boelter and Thom correlations provides the best overall subcooled and saturated boiling statistics and scatter chart behavior.

  15. Physical modeling of small shallow conductive 3-D targets with high-frequency electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Birken, R.A.; Poulton, M.; Sterngerg, B.K.

    1996-09-01

    The goal of this study is to show that physical modeling can provide important support for three-dimensional (3D) interpretation of electromagnetic geophysical data for environmental problems. This is specially true when high-frequency electromagnetic methods are used, which are difficult to model with existing 3D forward modeling programs. Existing electromagnetic geophysical systems usually operate in the frequency range of a few hertz to several hundred hertz. For environmental problems, such as characterization of waste sites, systems with higher frequencies are desirable. This is because at lower frequencies, the depth of investigation is too deep for environmental characterizations. This leads to subsurface images, which don`t have enough resolution to map small shallow objects. Electromagnetic 3D modeling programs which solve the full wave equation are still not widely available, even though 3D modeling has improved remarkably during the last few years (Oristaglio and Spies, 1995). Since such a program was not available for this study, we used a specialized 3D program EM1DSH (Zhou, 1989). With this program, we can model layered-earth cases, taking dielectric effects into account over the whole frequency range of interest. Stewart et al. (1994) published ellipticity curves for similar system configurations and frequency ranges that indicate that dielectric effects can not be neglected for model calculations using frequencies above several 100 kHz. EM1DSH can also model thin conductive sheets in a two-layer earth but neglecting dielectric effects. Therefore we are only able to model and compare our field data with 3D forward modeling results for the lower frequencies. One way of bridging the gap between the interpretation needs and limitations of existing 3D forward modeling programs is to conduct physical modeling experiments. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  16. An invariant descriptor for conjugate forced convection-conduction cooling of 3D protruding heaters in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini Alves, Thiago; Santos, Paulo H. D.; Barbur, Murilo A.

    2015-09-01

    In this research, the temperatures of threedimensional (3D) protruding heaters mounted on a conductive substrate in a horizontal rectangular channel with laminar airflow are related to the independent power dissipation in each heater by using a matrix G + with invariant coefficients, which are dimensionless. These coefficients are defined in this study as the conjugate influence coefficients ( g +) caused by the forced convection- conduction nature of the heaters' cooling process. The temperature increase of each heater in the channel is quantified to clearly identify the contributions attributed to the self-heating and power dissipation in the other heaters (both upstream and downstream). The conjugate coefficients are invariant with the heat generation rate in the array of heaters when assuming a defined geometry, invariable fluid and flow rate, and constant substrate and heater conductivities. The results are numerically obtained by considering three 3D protruding heaters on a twodimensional (2D) array by ANSYS/Fluent™ 15.0 software. The conservation equations are solved by a coupled procedure within a single calculation domain comprising of solid and fluid regions and by considering a steady state laminar airflow with constant properties. Some examples are shown, indicating the effects of substrate thermal conductivity and Reynolds number on conjugate influence coefficients.

  17. An invariant descriptor for conjugate forced convection-conduction cooling of 3D protruding heaters in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini Alves, Thiago; Santos, Paulo H. D.; Barbur, Murilo A.

    2015-09-01

    In this research, the temperatures of threedimensional (3D) protruding heaters mounted on a conductive substrate in a horizontal rectangular channel with laminar airflow are related to the independent power dissipation in each heater by using a matrix G + with invariant coefficients, which are dimensionless. These coefficients are defined in this study as the conjugate influence coefficients (g +) caused by the forced convection- conduction nature of the heaters' cooling process. The temperature increase of each heater in the channel is quantified to clearly identify the contributions attributed to the self-heating and power dissipation in the other heaters (both upstream and downstream). The conjugate coefficients are invariant with the heat generation rate in the array of heaters when assuming a defined geometry, invariable fluid and flow rate, and constant substrate and heater conductivities. The results are numerically obtained by considering three 3D protruding heaters on a twodimensional (2D) array by ANSYS/Fluent™ 15.0 software. The conservation equations are solved by a coupled procedure within a single calculation domain comprising of solid and fluid regions and by considering a steady state laminar airflow with constant properties. Some examples are shown, indicating the effects of substrate thermal conductivity and Reynolds number on conjugate influence coefficients.

  18. Estimation of the thermal conductivity of hemp based insulation material from 3D tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sawalhi, R.; Lux, J.; Salagnac, P.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we are interested in the structural and thermal characterization of natural fiber insulation materials. The thermal performance of these materials depends on the arrangement of fibers, which is the consequence of the manufacturing process. In order to optimize these materials, thermal conductivity models can be used to correlate some relevant structural parameters with the effective thermal conductivity. However, only a few models are able to take into account the anisotropy of such material related to the fibers orientation, and these models still need realistic input data (fiber orientation distribution, porosity, etc.). The structural characteristics are here directly measured on a 3D tomographic image using advanced image analysis techniques. Critical structural parameters like porosity, pore and fiber size distribution as well as local fiber orientation distribution are measured. The results of the tested conductivity models are then compared with the conductivity tensor obtained by numerical simulation on the discretized 3D microstructure, as well as available experimental measurements. We show that 1D analytical models are generally not suitable for assessing the thermal conductivity of such anisotropic media. Yet, a few anisotropic models can still be of interest to relate some structural parameters, like the fiber orientation distribution, to the thermal properties. Finally, our results emphasize that numerical simulations on 3D realistic microstructure is a very interesting alternative to experimental measurements.

  19. One-Dimensional Heat Conduction

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-03-09

    ICARUS-LLNL was developed to solve one-dimensional planar, cylindrical, or spherical conduction heat transfer problems. The IBM PC version is a family of programs including ICARUSB, an interactive BASIC heat conduction program; ICARUSF, a FORTRAN heat conduction program; PREICAR, a BASIC preprocessor for ICARUSF; and PLOTIC and CPLOTIC, interpretive BASIC and compiler BASIC plot postprocessor programs. Both ICARUSB and ICARUSF account for multiple material regions and complex boundary conditions, such as convection or radiation. In addition,more »ICARUSF accounts for temperature-dependent material properties and time or temperature-dependent boundary conditions. PREICAR is a user-friendly preprocessor used to generate or modify ICARUSF input data. PLOTIC and CPLOTIC generate plots of the temperature or heat flux profile at specified times, plots of the variation of temperature or heat flux with time at selected nodes, or plots of the solution grid. First developed in 1974 to allow easy modeling of complex one-dimensional systems, its original application was in the nuclear explosive testing program. Since then it has undergone extensive revision and been applied to problems dealing with laser fusion target fabrication, heat loads on underground tests, magnetic fusion switching tube anodes, and nuclear waste isolation canisters.« less

  20. Validation of Heat Transfer and Film Cooling Capabilities of the 3-D RANS Code TURBO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The capabilities of the 3-D unsteady RANS code TURBO have been extended to include heat transfer and film cooling applications. The results of simulations performed with the modified code are compared to experiment and to theory, where applicable. Wilcox s k-turbulence model has been implemented to close the RANS equations. Two simulations are conducted: (1) flow over a flat plate and (2) flow over an adiabatic flat plate cooled by one hole inclined at 35 to the free stream. For (1) agreement with theory is found to be excellent for heat transfer, represented by local Nusselt number, and quite good for momentum, as represented by the local skin friction coefficient. This report compares the local skin friction coefficients and Nusselt numbers on a flat plate obtained using Wilcox's k-model with the theory of Blasius. The study looks at laminar and turbulent flows over an adiabatic flat plate and over an isothermal flat plate for two different wall temperatures. It is shown that TURBO is able to accurately predict heat transfer on a flat plate. For (2) TURBO shows good qualitative agreement with film cooling experiments performed on a flat plate with one cooling hole. Quantitatively, film effectiveness is under predicted downstream of the hole.

  1. Ice-Templated Assembly Strategy to Construct 3D Boron Nitride Nanosheet Networks in Polymer Composites for Thermal Conductivity Improvement.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaoliang; Yao, Yimin; Gong, Zhengyu; Wang, Fangfang; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-12-01

    Owing to the growing heat removal issue of modern electronic devices, polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have drawn much attention in the past few years. However, a traditional method to enhance the thermal conductivity of the polymers by addition of inorganic fillers usually creates composite with not only limited thermal conductivity but also other detrimental effects due to large amount of fillers required. Here, novel polymer composites are reported by first constructing 3D boron nitride nanosheets (3D-BNNS) network using ice-templated approach and then infiltrating them with epoxy matrix. The obtained polymer composites exhibit a high thermal conductivity (2.85 W m(-1) K(-1) ), a low thermal expansion coefficient (24-32 ppm K(-1) ), and an increased glass transition temperature (Tg ) at relatively low BNNSs loading (9.29 vol%). These results demonstrate that this approach opens a new avenue for design and preparation of polymer composites with high thermal conductivity. The polymer composites are potentially useful in advanced electronic packaging techniques, namely, thermal interface materials, underfill materials, molding compounds, and organic substrates. PMID:26479262

  2. A Model of Heat Conduction

    E-print Network

    Pierre Collet; Jean-Pierre Eckmann

    2008-04-18

    We define a deterministic ``scattering'' model for heat conduction which is continuous in space, and which has a Boltzmann type flavor, obtained by a closure based on memory loss between collisions. We prove that this model has, for stochastic driving forces at the boundary, close to Maxwellians, a unique non-equilibrium steady state.

  3. Electromagnetic Response Inversion for a 3D Distribution of Conductivity/Dielect

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-10-24

    NLCGCS inverts electromagnetic responses for a 3D distribution of electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity within the earth for geophysical applications using single processor computers. The software comes bundled with a graphical user interface to aid in model construction and analysis and viewing of earth images. The solution employs both dipole and finite size source configurations for harmonic oscillatory sources. A new nonlinear preconditioner is included in the solution to speed up solution convergence.

  4. FURN3D: A computer code for radiative heat transfer in pulverized coal furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-08-01

    A computer code FURN3D has been developed for assessing the impact of burning different coals on heat absorption pattern in pulverized coal furnaces. The code is unique in its ability to conduct detailed spectral calculations of radiation transport in furnaces fully accounting for the size distributions of char, soot and ash particles, ash content, and ash composition. The code uses a hybrid technique of solving the three-dimensional radiation transport equation for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. The technique achieves an optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy by combining the discrete ordinate method (S{sub 4}), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P, approximation in different range of optical thicknesses. The code uses spectroscopic data for estimating the absorption coefficients of participating gases C0{sub 2}, H{sub 2}0 and CO. It invokes Mie theory for determining the extinction and scattering coefficients of combustion particulates. The optical constants of char, soot and ash are obtained from dispersion relations derived from reflectivity, transmissivity and extinction measurements. A control-volume formulation is adopted for determining the temperature field inside the furnace. A simple char burnout model is employed for estimating heat release and evolution of particle size distribution. The code is written in Fortran 77, has modular form, and is machine-independent. The computer memory required by the code depends upon the number of grid points specified and whether the transport calculations are performed on spectral or gray basis.

  5. FURN3D: A computer code for radiative heat transfer in pulverized coal furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-08-01

    A computer code FURN3D has been developed for assessing the impact of burning different coals on heat absorption pattern in pulverized coal furnaces. The code is unique in its ability to conduct detailed spectral calculations of radiation transport in furnaces fully accounting for the size distributions of char, soot and ash particles, ash content, and ash composition. The code uses a hybrid technique of solving the three-dimensional radiation transport equation for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. The technique achieves an optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy by combining the discrete ordinate method (S[sub 4]), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P, approximation in different range of optical thicknesses. The code uses spectroscopic data for estimating the absorption coefficients of participating gases C0[sub 2], H[sub 2]0 and CO. It invokes Mie theory for determining the extinction and scattering coefficients of combustion particulates. The optical constants of char, soot and ash are obtained from dispersion relations derived from reflectivity, transmissivity and extinction measurements. A control-volume formulation is adopted for determining the temperature field inside the furnace. A simple char burnout model is employed for estimating heat release and evolution of particle size distribution. The code is written in Fortran 77, has modular form, and is machine-independent. The computer memory required by the code depends upon the number of grid points specified and whether the transport calculations are performed on spectral or gray basis.

  6. Methodology for the Assessment of 3D Conduction Effects in an Aerothermal Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Anthony Brandon

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for the assessment of three-dimensional conduction effects during test in a Aerothermal Wind Tunnel. The test objectives were to duplicate and extend tests that were performed during the 1960's on thermal conduction on proturberance on a flat plate. Slides review the 1D versus 3D conduction data reduction error, the analysis process, CFD-based analysis, loose coupling method that simulates a wind tunnel test run, verification of the CFD solution, Grid convergence, Mach number trend, size trends, and a Sumary of the CFD conduction analysis. Other slides show comparisons to pretest CFD at Mach 1.5 and 2.16 and the geometries of the models and grids.

  7. Heat Conduction in a One-Dimensional Harmonic Chain with Three-Dimensional Vibrations

    E-print Network

    Li, Baowen

    Heat Conduction in a One-Dimensional Harmonic Chain with Three-Dimensional Vibrations Zonghua LIU1 chain connected by three-dimensional (3D) harmonic springs, the coefficient of heat conduction changes where the coefficient is independent of the lattice constant. KEYWORDS: heat conduction, harmonic chain

  8. A Numerical Study on the Thermal Conductivity of 3D Woven C/C Composites at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigang, Ai; Rujie, He; Yongmao, Pei

    2015-03-01

    Experimental data for Carbon/Carbon (C/C) constituent materials are combined with a three dimensional steady state heat transfer finite element analysis to demonstrate the average in-plane and out-of-plane thermal conductivities (TCs) of C/C composites. The finite element analysis is carried out at two distinct length scales: (a) a micro scale comparable with the diameter of carbon fibres and (b) a meso scale comparable with the carbon fibre yarns. Micro-scale model calculate the TCs at the fibre yarn scale in the three orthogonal directions (x, y and z). The output results from the micro-scale model are then incorporated in the meso-scale model to obtain the global TCs of the 3D C/C composite. The simulation results are quite consistent with the theoretical and experimental counterparts reported in references. Based on the numerical approach, TCs of the 3D C/C composite are calculated from 300 to 2500 K. Particular attention is given in elucidating the variations of the TCs with temperature. The multi-scale models provide an efficient approach to predict the TCs of 3D textile materials, which is helpful for the thermodynamic property analysis and structure design of the C/C composites.

  9. Direct synthesis of graphene 3D-coated Cu nanosilks network for antioxidant transparent conducting electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongmei; Wang, Huachun; Wu, Chenping; Lin, Na; Soomro, Abdul Majid; Guo, Huizhang; Liu, Chuan; Yang, Xiaodong; Wu, Yaping; Cai, Duanjun; Kang, Junyong

    2015-06-01

    Transparent conducting film occupies an important position in various optoelectronic devices. To replace the costly tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), promising materials, such as metal nanowires and graphene, have been widely studied. Moreover, a long-pursued goal is to consolidate these two materials together and express their outstanding properties simultaneously. We successfully achieved a direct 3D coating of a graphene layer on an interlacing Cu nanosilks network by the low pressure chemical vapor deposition method. High aspect ratio Cu nanosilks (13 nm diameter with 40 ?m length) were synthesized through the nickel ion catalytic process. Large-size, transparent conducting film was successfully fabricated with Cu nanosilks ink by the imprint method. A magnetic manipulator equipped with a copper capsule was used to produce high Cu vapor pressure on Cu nanosilks and realize the graphene 3D-coating. The coated Cu@graphene nanosilks network achieved high transparency, low sheet resistance (41 Ohm sq-1 at 95% transmittance) and robust antioxidant ability. With this technique, the transfer process of graphene is no longer needed, and a flexible, uniform and high-performance transparent conducting film could be fabricated in unlimited size.Transparent conducting film occupies an important position in various optoelectronic devices. To replace the costly tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), promising materials, such as metal nanowires and graphene, have been widely studied. Moreover, a long-pursued goal is to consolidate these two materials together and express their outstanding properties simultaneously. We successfully achieved a direct 3D coating of a graphene layer on an interlacing Cu nanosilks network by the low pressure chemical vapor deposition method. High aspect ratio Cu nanosilks (13 nm diameter with 40 ?m length) were synthesized through the nickel ion catalytic process. Large-size, transparent conducting film was successfully fabricated with Cu nanosilks ink by the imprint method. A magnetic manipulator equipped with a copper capsule was used to produce high Cu vapor pressure on Cu nanosilks and realize the graphene 3D-coating. The coated Cu@graphene nanosilks network achieved high transparency, low sheet resistance (41 Ohm sq-1 at 95% transmittance) and robust antioxidant ability. With this technique, the transfer process of graphene is no longer needed, and a flexible, uniform and high-performance transparent conducting film could be fabricated in unlimited size. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Photographs, transmission spectra, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01711d

  10. Turbomachinery Heat Transfer and Loss Modeling for 3D Navier-Stokes Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Ameri, Ali

    2005-01-01

    This report's contents focus on making use of NASA Glenn on-site computational facilities,to develop, validate, and apply models for use in advanced 3D Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes to enhance the capability to compute heat transfer and losses in turbomachiney.

  11. Characterization of 3D interconnected microstructural network in mixed ionic and electronic conducting ceramic composites.

    PubMed

    Harris, William M; Brinkman, Kyle S; Lin, Ye; Su, Dong; Cocco, Alex P; Nakajo, Arata; DeGostin, Matthew B; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Wang, Jun; Chen, Fanglin; Chu, Yong S; Chiu, Wilson K S

    2014-05-01

    The microstructure and connectivity of the ionic and electronic conductive phases in composite ceramic membranes are directly related to device performance. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) including chemical mapping combined with X-ray nanotomography (XNT) have been used to characterize the composition and 3-D microstructure of a MIEC composite model system consisting of a Ce0.8Gd0.2O2 (GDC) oxygen ion conductive phase and a CoFe2O4 (CFO) electronic conductive phase. The microstructural data is discussed, including the composition and distribution of an emergent phase which takes the form of isolated and distinct regions. Performance implications are considered with regards to the design of new material systems which evolve under non-equilibrium operating conditions. PMID:24615571

  12. A miniature microbial fuel cell with conducting nanofibers-based 3D porous biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huawei; Halverson, Larry J.; Dong, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Miniature microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has received growing interest due to its potential applications in high-throughput screening of bacteria and mutants to elucidate mechanisms of electricity generation. This paper reports a novel miniature MFC with an improved output power density and short startup time, utilizing electrospun conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanofibers as a 3D porous anode within a 12 ?l anolyte chamber. This device results in 423 ?W cm?3 power density based on the volume of the anolyte chamber, using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model biocatalyst without any optimization of bacterial culture. The device also excels in a startup time of only 1hr. The high conductivity of the electrospun nanofibers makes them suitable for efficient electron transfer. The mean pore size of the conducting nanofibers is several micrometers, which is favorable for bacterial penetration and colonization of surfaces of the nanofibers. We demonstrate that S. oneidensis can fully colonize the interior region of this nanofibers-based porous anode. This work represents a new attempt to explore the use of electrospun PEDOT nanofibers as a 3D anode material for MFCs. The presented miniature MFC potentially will provide a high-sensitivity, high-throughput tool to screen suitable bacterial species and mutant strains for use in large-size MFCs.

  13. Direct synthesis of graphene 3D-coated Cu nanosilks network for antioxidant transparent conducting electrode.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongmei; Wang, Huachun; Wu, Chenping; Lin, Na; Soomro, Abdul Majid; Guo, Huizhang; Liu, Chuan; Yang, Xiaodong; Wu, Yaping; Cai, Duanjun; Kang, JunYong

    2015-06-28

    Transparent conducting film occupies an important position in various optoelectronic devices. To replace the costly tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), promising materials, such as metal nanowires and graphene, have been widely studied. Moreover, a long-pursued goal is to consolidate these two materials together and express their outstanding properties simultaneously. We successfully achieved a direct 3D coating of a graphene layer on an interlacing Cu nanosilks network by the low pressure chemical vapor deposition method. High aspect ratio Cu nanosilks (13 nm diameter with 40 ?m length) were synthesized through the nickel ion catalytic process. Large-size, transparent conducting film was successfully fabricated with Cu nanosilks ink by the imprint method. A magnetic manipulator equipped with a copper capsule was used to produce high Cu vapor pressure on Cu nanosilks and realize the graphene 3D-coating. The coated Cu@graphene nanosilks network achieved high transparency, low sheet resistance (41 Ohm sq(-1) at 95% transmittance) and robust antioxidant ability. With this technique, the transfer process of graphene is no longer needed, and a flexible, uniform and high-performance transparent conducting film could be fabricated in unlimited size. PMID:26018299

  14. Characterization of 3D interconnected microstructural network in mixed ionic and electronic conducting ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William M.; Brinkman, Kyle S.; Lin, Ye; Su, Dong; Cocco, Alex P.; Nakajo, Arata; Degostin, Matthew B.; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen Karen; Wang, Jun; Chen, Fanglin; Chu, Yong S.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2014-04-01

    The microstructure and connectivity of the ionic and electronic conductive phases in composite ceramic membranes are directly related to device performance. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) including chemical mapping combined with X-ray nanotomography (XNT) have been used to characterize the composition and 3-D microstructure of a MIEC composite model system consisting of a Ce0.8Gd0.2O2 (GDC) oxygen ion conductive phase and a CoFe2O4 (CFO) electronic conductive phase. The microstructural data is discussed, including the composition and distribution of an emergent phase which takes the form of isolated and distinct regions. Performance implications are considered with regards to the design of new material systems which evolve under non-equilibrium operating conditions.The microstructure and connectivity of the ionic and electronic conductive phases in composite ceramic membranes are directly related to device performance. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) including chemical mapping combined with X-ray nanotomography (XNT) have been used to characterize the composition and 3-D microstructure of a MIEC composite model system consisting of a Ce0.8Gd0.2O2 (GDC) oxygen ion conductive phase and a CoFe2O4 (CFO) electronic conductive phase. The microstructural data is discussed, including the composition and distribution of an emergent phase which takes the form of isolated and distinct regions. Performance implications are considered with regards to the design of new material systems which evolve under non-equilibrium operating conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06684c

  15. Pattern Transformation of Heat-Shrinkable Polymer by Three-Dimensional (3D) Printing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quan; Yan, Dong; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-03-01

    A significant challenge in conventional heat-shrinkable polymers is to produce controllable microstructures. Here we report that the polymer material fabricated by three-dimensional (3D) printing technique has a heat-shrinkable property, whose initial microstructure can undergo a spontaneous pattern transformation under heating. The underlying mechanism is revealed by evaluating internal strain of the printed polymer from its fabricating process. It is shown that a uniform internal strain is stored in the polymer during the printing process and can be released when heated above its glass transition temperature. Furthermore, the internal strain can be used to trigger the pattern transformation of the heat-shrinkable polymer in a controllable way. Our work provides insightful ideas to understand a novel mechanism on the heat-shrinkable effect of printed material, but also to present a simple approach to fabricate heat-shrinkable polymer with a controllable thermo-structural response.

  16. Pattern Transformation of Heat-Shrinkable Polymer by Three-Dimensional (3D) Printing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan; Yan, Dong; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    A significant challenge in conventional heat-shrinkable polymers is to produce controllable microstructures. Here we report that the polymer material fabricated by three-dimensional (3D) printing technique has a heat-shrinkable property, whose initial microstructure can undergo a spontaneous pattern transformation under heating. The underlying mechanism is revealed by evaluating internal strain of the printed polymer from its fabricating process. It is shown that a uniform internal strain is stored in the polymer during the printing process and can be released when heated above its glass transition temperature. Furthermore, the internal strain can be used to trigger the pattern transformation of the heat-shrinkable polymer in a controllable way. Our work provides insightful ideas to understand a novel mechanism on the heat-shrinkable effect of printed material, but also to present a simple approach to fabricate heat-shrinkable polymer with a controllable thermo-structural response. PMID:25757881

  17. Extremal structures of multiphase heat conducting composites

    E-print Network

    Cherkaev, Andrej

    Extremal structures of multiphase heat conducting composites A.V. Cherkaev \\Lambda L.V. Gibiansky y­ usual properties: their heat conductivity in one direction is equal to the harmonic or arithmetic mean of the phases' heat conductivities and the conductivity in an orthogonal direction does not equal either

  18. M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) Transient Conduction Heat Transfer 1 Transient Heat Conduction

    E-print Network

    Bahrami, Majid

    M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) Transient Conduction Heat Transfer 1 Transient Heat Conduction In general, temperature of a body varies with time) Transient Conduction Heat Transfer 2 Fig. 2: Temperature of a lump system. Using above

  19. 3D topographic correction of the BSR heat flow and detection of focused fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tao; Li, Hong-Lin; Zou, Chang-Chun

    2014-06-01

    The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is a seismic indicator of the bottom of a gas hydrate stability zone. Its depth can be used to calculate the seafloor surface heat flow. The calculated BSR heat flow variations include disturbances from two important factors: (1) seafloor topography, which focuses the heat flow over regions of concave topography and defocuses it over regions of convex topography, and (2) the focused warm fluid flow within the accretionary prism coming from depths deeper than BSR. The focused fluid flow can be detected if the contribution of the topography to the BSR heat flow is removed. However, the analytical equation cannot solve the topographic effect at complex seafloor regions. We prove that 3D finite element method can model the topographic effect on the regional background heat flow with high accuracy, which can then be used to correct the topographic effect and obtain the BSR heat flow under the condition of perfectly flat topography. By comparing the corrected BSR heat flow with the regional background heat flow, focused fluid flow regions can be detected that are originally too small and cannot be detected using present-day equipment. This method was successfully applied to the midslope region of northern Cascadia subducting margin. The results suggest that the Cucumber Ridge and its neighboring area are positive heat flow anomalies, about 10%-20% higher than the background heat flow after 3D topographic correction. Moreover, the seismic imaging associated the positive heat flow anomaly areas with seabed fracture-cavity systems. This suggests flow of warm gas-carrying fluids along these high-permeability pathways, which could result in higher gas hydrate concentrations.

  20. New transfer functions for probing 3-D mantle conductivity from ground and sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Olsen, Nils

    2014-05-01

    The C-response is a conventional transfer function in global electromagnetic induction research and is classically determined from local observations of magnetic variations in the vertical and the horizontal components. Its estimation and interpretation rely on the assumptions that the source of the considered variations is well approximated by a large-scale symmetric (magnetospheric) ring current that can be described by a single spherical harmonic, P10, and that conductivity in the Earth is only a function of depth. However, there is growing evidence for a more complex structure of the magnetospheric source. We investigate the variability of C-responses due to non-P10 contributions to the source. We show that this variability, which we denote as 'source effect' (as opposed to the well-known ocean effect), is significant and persists at all periods. If inverting estimated C-responses for mantle conductivity, this source effect will inevitably be mistaken for conductivity anomalies. To overcome the problem connected with the assumptions for deriving C-responses, we introduce new transfer functions that relate the local vertical component of the magnetic variation to different spherical harmonic coefficients describing the magnetospheric source. The latter are derived from observations of magnetic variations in the horizontal components. The new transfer functions are subsequently estimated with a robust multivariate data analysis tool. By analyzing 16 years of data, collected at the global network of geomagnetic observatories, we demonstrate that the new transfer functions exhibit a significant increase in coherence compared to C-responses, especially at high latitudes. The concept is easily extended to other data types. For example, by relating the voltage variations in abandoned submarine telecommunication cables to spherical harmonic coefficients in the same way as described above, one can define yet another array of transfer functions. In spite of the fact that the newly introduced transfer functions allow for a consistent treatment of a complex spatial structure of the source, the sparse and irregular distribution of geomagnetic observatories and submarine cables impedes a reliable inversion of these data for 3-D mantle conductivity on a global scale. However, in combination with matrix Q-responses estimated from Swarm satellite data, the new transfer functions can be used to probe the 3-D conductivity structure of Earth's mantle.

  1. Improved variational bounds for conductive periodic composites with 3D microstructures and nonuniform thermal resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Ruiz, G.; Bravo-Castillero, J.; Brenner, R.; Cruz, M. E.; Guinovart-Díaz, R.; Pérez-Fernández, L. D.; Rodríguez-Ramos, R.

    2015-10-01

    Improved variational bounds for the effective conductivity of a matrix-inclusion conductive periodic composite are obtained. The studied composite is macroscopically anisotropic with nonuniform interfacial thermal resistance between isotropic phases. The homogenization theory is applied to a three-dimensional heat conduction problem which is stated in terms of nondimensional parameters. The Biot number is explicitly given in the variational formulation of the local problems and in the related minimization problems. The approach is based on the Lipton-Vernescu variational principles which allow to derive narrower bounds by incorporating more detailed morphological information. The bounds depend on the concentration and the conductivity of each phase, the periodic distribution and the shape of the inclusions, the Biot number and the nonuniform interfacial resistance.

  2. Finite-Difference Algorithm for Simulating 3D Electromagnetic Wavefields in Conductive Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Bartel, L. C.; Knox, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) wavefields are routinely used in geophysical exploration for detection and characterization of subsurface geological formations of economic interest. Recorded EM signals depend strongly on the current conductivity of geologic media. Hence, they are particularly useful for inferring fluid content of saturated porous bodies. In order to enhance understanding of field-recorded data, we are developing a numerical algorithm for simulating three-dimensional (3D) EM wave propagation and diffusion in heterogeneous conductive materials. Maxwell's equations are combined with isotropic constitutive relations to obtain a set of six, coupled, first-order partial differential equations governing the electric and magnetic vectors. An advantage of this system is that it does not contain spatial derivatives of the three medium parameters electric permittivity, magnetic permeability, and current conductivity. Numerical solution methodology consists of explicit, time-domain finite-differencing on a 3D staggered rectangular grid. Temporal and spatial FD operators have order 2 and N, where N is user-selectable. We use an artificially-large electric permittivity to maximize the FD timestep, and thus reduce execution time. For the low frequencies typically used in geophysical exploration, accuracy is not unduly compromised. Grid boundary reflections are mitigated via convolutional perfectly matched layers (C-PMLs) imposed at the six grid flanks. A shared-memory-parallel code implementation via OpenMP directives enables rapid algorithm execution on a multi-thread computational platform. Good agreement is obtained in comparisons of numerically-generated data with reference solutions. EM wavefields are sourced via point current density and magnetic dipole vectors. Spatially-extended inductive sources (current carrying wire loops) are under development. We are particularly interested in accurate representation of high-conductivity sub-grid-scale features that are common in industrial environments (borehole casing, pipes, railroad tracks). Present efforts are oriented toward calculating the EM responses of these objects via a First Born Approximation approach. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Modelling of transient heat conduction with diffuse interface methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettrich, J.; Choudhury, A.; Tschukin, O.; Schoof, E.; August, A.; Nestler, B.

    2014-12-01

    We present a survey on different numerical interpolation schemes used for two-phase transient heat conduction problems in the context of interface capturing phase-field methods. Examples are general transport problems in the context of diffuse interface methods with a non-equal heat conductivity in normal and tangential directions to the interface. We extend the tonsorial approach recently published by Nicoli M et al (2011 Phys. Rev. E 84 1-6) to the general three-dimensional (3D) transient evolution equations. Validations for one-dimensional, two-dimensional and 3D transient test cases are provided, and the results are in good agreement with analytical and numerical reference solutions.

  4. M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) Steady Conduction Heat Transfer 1 Steady Heat Conduction

    E-print Network

    Bahrami, Majid

    M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) Steady Conduction Heat Transfer 1 Steady Heat Conduction In thermodynamics, we considered the amount of heat transfer as a system as 2 / mW A Q q Steady Heat Conduction in Plane Walls Conduction is the transfer of energy from

  5. Parallel computing simulation of electrical excitation and conduction in the 3D human heart.

    PubMed

    Di Yu; Dongping Du; Hui Yang; Yicheng Tu

    2014-01-01

    A correctly beating heart is important to ensure adequate circulation of blood throughout the body. Normal heart rhythm is produced by the orchestrated conduction of electrical signals throughout the heart. Cardiac electrical activity is the resulted function of a series of complex biochemical-mechanical reactions, which involves transportation and bio-distribution of ionic flows through a variety of biological ion channels. Cardiac arrhythmias are caused by the direct alteration of ion channel activity that results in changes in the AP waveform. In this work, we developed a whole-heart simulation model with the use of massive parallel computing with GPGPU and OpenGL. The simulation algorithm was implemented under several different versions for the purpose of comparisons, including one conventional CPU version and two GPU versions based on Nvidia CUDA platform. OpenGL was utilized for the visualization / interaction platform because it is open source, light weight and universally supported by various operating systems. The experimental results show that the GPU-based simulation outperforms the conventional CPU-based approach and significantly improves the speed of simulation. By adopting modern computer architecture, this present investigation enables real-time simulation and visualization of electrical excitation and conduction in the large and complicated 3D geometry of a real-world human heart. PMID:25570947

  6. Modeling of radiative heat transfer in 3D complex boiler with non-gray sooting media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borjini, Mohamed Naceur; Guedri, Kamel; Saïd, Rachid

    2007-06-01

    The radiative heat transfer problem is solved for 3D complex industrial boiler with five baffles containing a mixture of carbon dioxide and water vapor for non-uniform temperature fields. A numerical formulation using the FTn finite volume method coupled with the bounded high-order resolution CLAM scheme, the blocked-off-region procedure and the narrow-band based weighted-sum-of-gray-gases (WSGG) [Kim OJ, Song T-H. Data base of WSGGM-based spectral model for radiation properties of combustion products, JQSRT 2000; 64: 379 94] model is adapted. The effect of soot volumetric fraction, particle temperature and uniform particle concentration on the radiative heat flux and radiative heat source is investigated and discussed. Also the advantages, in non-gray media, of the FTnFVM compared to the classical FVM are highlighted.

  7. 3D modelling of coupled mass and heat transfer of a convection-oven roasting process.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Gernaey, Krist V; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    A 3D mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer describing oven roasting of meat has been developed from first principles. The proposed mechanism for the mass transfer of water is modified and based on a critical literature review of the effect of heat on meat. The model equations are based on a conservation of mass and energy, coupled through Darcy's equations of porous media - the water flow is mainly pressure-driven. The developed model together with theoretical and experimental assessments were used to explain the heat and water transport and the effect of the change in microstructure (permeability, water binding capacity and elastic modulus) that occur during the meat roasting process. The developed coupled partial differential equations were solved by using COMSOL Multiphysics®3.5 and state variables are predicted as functions of both position and time. The proposed mechanism was partially validated by experiments in a convection oven where temperatures were measured online. PMID:23305831

  8. A phase-field method for 3D simulation of two-phase heat transfer , H. Babaee a

    E-print Network

    Dong, Suchuan "Steven"

    A phase-field method for 3D simulation of two-phase heat transfer X. Zheng a , H. Babaee a , S s t r a c t We formulate new multi-phase convective heat transfer equations by combining the three for convergence in time/space including a conjugate heat transfer problem and also for a realistic tran- sient

  9. Cross over from 3D variable range hopping to the 2D weak localization conduction mechanism in disordered carbon with the extent of graphitization.

    PubMed

    Raj, Kovummal Govind; Joy, Pattayil Alias

    2015-06-28

    The changes in the electrical transport properties and mechanism of conduction in disordered carbon, with the extent of graphitization, are studied and discussed. With heat treatment induced graphitic ordering, the electrical properties are considerably modified, inducing a crossover from strong localization to weak localization behavior. Accordingly, the conduction mechanism is modified from the 3-dimensional variable range hopping (3D VRH) model to the 2-dimensional weak localization (2D WL) model. Results show that carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon interactions play major roles in developing the weak localization behavior with the extent of graphitization. PMID:26035227

  10. A boundary element method with surface conductive absorbers for 3-D analysis of nanophotonics

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Lei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    2010-01-01

    Fast surface integral equation (SIE) solvers seem to be ideal approaches for simulating 3-D nanophotonic devices, as these devices generate fields both in an interior channel and in the infinite exterior domain. However, ...

  11. Conductive-bridging random access memory: challenges and opportunity for 3D architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Debanjan; Roy, Sourav; Panja, Rajeswar; Dutta, Mrinmoy; Rahaman, Sheikh Ziaur; Mahapatra, Rajat; Maikap, Siddheswar

    2015-04-01

    The performances of conductive-bridging random access memory (CBRAM) have been reviewed for different switching materials such as chalcogenides, oxides, and bilayers in different structures. The structure consists of an inert electrode and one oxidized electrode of copper (Cu) or silver (Ag). The switching mechanism is the formation/dissolution of a metallic filament in the switching materials under external bias. However, the growth dynamics of the metallic filament in different switching materials are still debated. All CBRAM devices are switching under an operation current of 0.1 ?A to 1 mA, and an operation voltage of ±2 V is also needed. The device can reach a low current of 5 pA; however, current compliance-dependent reliability is a challenging issue. Although a chalcogenide-based material has opportunity to have better endurance as compared to an oxide-based material, data retention and integration with the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process are also issues. Devices with bilayer switching materials show better resistive switching characteristics as compared to those with a single switching layer, especially a program/erase endurance of >105 cycles with a high speed of few nanoseconds. Multi-level cell operation is possible, but the stability of the high resistance state is also an important reliability concern. These devices show a good data retention of >105 s at >85°C. However, more study is needed to achieve a 10-year guarantee of data retention for non-volatile memory application. The crossbar memory is benefited for high density with low power operation. Some CBRAM devices as a chip have been reported for proto-typical production. This review shows that operation current should be optimized for few microamperes with a maintaining speed of few nanoseconds, which will have challenges and also opportunities for three-dimensional (3D) architecture.

  12. Conductive-bridging random access memory: challenges and opportunity for 3D architecture.

    PubMed

    Jana, Debanjan; Roy, Sourav; Panja, Rajeswar; Dutta, Mrinmoy; Rahaman, Sheikh Ziaur; Mahapatra, Rajat; Maikap, Siddheswar

    2015-01-01

    The performances of conductive-bridging random access memory (CBRAM) have been reviewed for different switching materials such as chalcogenides, oxides, and bilayers in different structures. The structure consists of an inert electrode and one oxidized electrode of copper (Cu) or silver (Ag). The switching mechanism is the formation/dissolution of a metallic filament in the switching materials under external bias. However, the growth dynamics of the metallic filament in different switching materials are still debated. All CBRAM devices are switching under an operation current of 0.1 ?A to 1 mA, and an operation voltage of ±2 V is also needed. The device can reach a low current of 5 pA; however, current compliance-dependent reliability is a challenging issue. Although a chalcogenide-based material has opportunity to have better endurance as compared to an oxide-based material, data retention and integration with the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process are also issues. Devices with bilayer switching materials show better resistive switching characteristics as compared to those with a single switching layer, especially a program/erase endurance of >10(5) cycles with a high speed of few nanoseconds. Multi-level cell operation is possible, but the stability of the high resistance state is also an important reliability concern. These devices show a good data retention of >10(5) s at >85°C. However, more study is needed to achieve a 10-year guarantee of data retention for non-volatile memory application. The crossbar memory is benefited for high density with low power operation. Some CBRAM devices as a chip have been reported for proto-typical production. This review shows that operation current should be optimized for few microamperes with a maintaining speed of few nanoseconds, which will have challenges and also opportunities for three-dimensional (3D) architecture. PMID:25977660

  13. Heat conduction fronts in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam

    1994-01-01

    We present arguments which suggest that many of the x-ray, some optical, and some UV observations of planetary nebulae, can be explained by the presence of heat conduction fronts. The heat flows from the hot bubble formed by the shocked fast wind to the cool shell and halo. Heat conduction fronts are likely to account for emission of x rays from plasma at lower temperature than the expected temperature of the hot bubble. In the presence of magnetic fields, only a small fraction of the fast wind luminosity emerges as radiation. Heat conduction fronts can naturally produce some unusual line flux ratios, which are observed in some planetary nebulae. Heat conduction fronts may heat the halo and cause some material at the inner surface of the shell to expand slower than the rest of the shell. In the presence of an asymmetrical magnetic field, this flow, the x-ray intensity, and the emission lines, may acquire asymmetrical structure as well.

  14. Heat conductivity in linear mixing systems

    E-print Network

    Baowen Li; Giulio Casati; Jiao Wang

    2002-08-06

    We present analytical and numerical results on the heat conduction in a linear mixing system. In particular we consider a quasi one dimensional channel with triangular scatterers with internal angles irrational multiples of pi and we show that the system obeys Fourier law of heat conduction. Therefore deterministic diffusion and normal heat transport which are usually associated to full hyperbolicity, actually take place in systems without exponential instability.

  15. North Cascadia heat flux and fluid flow from gas hydrates: Modeling 3-D topographic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-lin; He, Tao; Spence, George D.

    2014-01-01

    The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) of gas hydrate is well imaged from two perpendicular seismic grids in the region of a large carbonate mound, informally called Cucumber Ridge off Vancouver Island. We use a new method to calculate 3-D heat flow map from the BSR depths, in which we incorporate 3-D topographic corrections after calibrated by the drilling results from nearby (Integrated) Ocean Drilling Program Site 889 and Site U1327. We then estimate the associated fluid flow by relating it to the topographically corrected heat flux anomalies. In the midslope region, a heat flux anomaly of 1 mW/m2 can be associated with an approximate focused fluid flow rate of 0.09 mm/yr. Around Cucumber Ridge, high rates of focused fluid flow were observed at steep slopes with values more than double the average regional diffusive fluid discharge rate of 0.56 mm/yr. As well, in some areas of relatively flat seafloor, the focused fluid flow rates still exceeded 0.5 mm/yr. On the seismic lines the regions of focused fluid flow were commonly associated with seismic blanking zones above the BSR and sometimes with strong reflectors below the BSR, indicating that the faults/fractures provide high-permeability pathways for fluids to carry methane from BSR depths to the seafloor. These high fluid flow regions cover mostly the western portion of our area with gas hydrate concentration estimations of ~6% based on empirical correlations from Hydrate Ridge in south off Oregon, significantly higher than previously recognized values of ~2.5% in the eastern portion determined from Site U1327.

  16. Anisotropic heat transport in integrable and chaotic 3-D magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Blazevski, D.; Chacon, Luis

    2012-01-01

    A study of anisotropic heat transport in 3-D chaotic magnetic fields is presented. The approach is based on the recently proposed Lagrangian-Green s function (LG) method in Ref. [1] that allows an efficient and accurate integration of the parallel transport equation applicable to general magnetic fields with local or non-local parallel flux closures. We focus on reversed shear magnetic field configurations known to exhibit separatrix reconnection and shearless transport barriers. The role of reconnection and magnetic field line chaos on temperature transport is studied. Numerical results are presented on the anomalous relaxation of radial temperature gradients in the presence of shearless Cantori partial barri- ers. Also, numerical evidence of non-local effective radial temperature transport in chaotic fields is presented. Going beyond purely parallel transport, the LG method is generalized to include finite perpendicular diffusivity, and the problem of temperature flattening inside a magnetic island is studied.

  17. The effect of anisotropic heat transport on magnetic islands in 3-D configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Schlutt, M. G.; Hegna, C. C.

    2012-08-15

    An analytic theory of nonlinear pressure-induced magnetic island formation using a boundary layer analysis is presented. This theory extends previous work by including the effects of finite parallel heat transport and is applicable to general three dimensional magnetic configurations. In this work, particular attention is paid to the role of finite parallel heat conduction in the context of pressure-induced island physics. It is found that localized currents that require self-consistent deformation of the pressure profile, such as resistive interchange and bootstrap currents, are attenuated by finite parallel heat conduction when the magnetic islands are sufficiently small. However, these anisotropic effects do not change saturated island widths caused by Pfirsch-Schlueter current effects. Implications for finite pressure-induced island healing are discussed.

  18. 3D Bridged Carbon Nanoring/Graphene Hybrid Paper as a High-Performance Lateral Heat Spreader.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianwei; Shi, Gang; Jiang, Cai; Ju, Su; Jiang, Dazhi

    2015-12-01

    Graphene paper (GP) has attracted great attention as a heat dissipation material due to its unique thermal transfer property exceeding the limit of graphite. However, the relatively poor thermal transfer properties in the normal direction of GP restricts its wider applications in thermal management. In this work, a 3D bridged carbon nanoring (CNR)/graphene hybrid paper is constructed by the intercalation of polymer carbon source and metal catalyst particles, and the subsequent in situ growth of CNRs in the confined intergallery spaces between graphene sheets through thermal annealing. Further investigation demonstrates that the CNRs are covalently bonded to the graphene sheets and highly improve the thermal transport in the normal direction of the CNR/graphene hybrid paper. This full-carbon architecture shows excellent heat dissipation ability and is much more efficient in removing hot spots than the reduced GP without CNR bridges. This highly thermally conductive CNR/graphene hybrid paper can be easily integrated into next generation commercial high-power electronics and stretchable/foldable devices as high-performance lateral heat spreader materials. This full-carbon architecture also has a great potential in acting as electrodes in supercapacitors or hydrogen storage devices due to the high surface area. PMID:26476622

  19. Information filtering via biased heat conduction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Qiang

    2011-09-01

    The process of heat conduction has recently found application in personalized recommendation [Zhou et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 4511 (2010)], which is of high diversity but low accuracy. By decreasing the temperatures of small-degree objects, we present an improved algorithm, called biased heat conduction, which could simultaneously enhance the accuracy and diversity. Extensive experimental analyses demonstrate that the accuracy on MovieLens, Netflix, and Delicious datasets could be improved by 43.5%, 55.4% and 19.2%, respectively, compared with the standard heat conduction algorithm and also the diversity is increased or approximately unchanged. Further statistical analyses suggest that the present algorithm could simultaneously identify users' mainstream and special tastes, resulting in better performance than the standard heat conduction algorithm. This work provides a creditable way for highly efficient information filtering. PMID:22060533

  20. Information filtering via biased heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Qiang

    2011-09-01

    The process of heat conduction has recently found application in personalized recommendation [Zhou , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA PNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.1000488107107, 4511 (2010)], which is of high diversity but low accuracy. By decreasing the temperatures of small-degree objects, we present an improved algorithm, called biased heat conduction, which could simultaneously enhance the accuracy and diversity. Extensive experimental analyses demonstrate that the accuracy on MovieLens, Netflix, and Delicious datasets could be improved by 43.5%, 55.4% and 19.2%, respectively, compared with the standard heat conduction algorithm and also the diversity is increased or approximately unchanged. Further statistical analyses suggest that the present algorithm could simultaneously identify users' mainstream and special tastes, resulting in better performance than the standard heat conduction algorithm. This work provides a creditable way for highly efficient information filtering.

  1. 3D Conducting Polymer Platforms for Electrical Control of Protein Conformation and Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Alwin Ming-Doug; Inal, Sahika; Williams, Tiffany; Wang, Karin; Leleux, Pierre; Estevez, Luis; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Fischbach, Claudia; Malliaras, George G.; Gourdon, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) macroporous scaffolds made from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) via an ice-templating method. The scaffolds offer tunable pore size and morphology, and are electrochemically active. When a potential is applied to the scaffolds, reversible changes take place in their electrical doping state, which in turn enables precise control over the conformation of adsorbed proteins (e.g., fibronectin). Additionally, the scaffolds support the growth of mouse fibroblasts (3T3-L1) for 7 days, and are able to electrically control cell adhesion and pro-angiogenic capability. These 3D matrix-mimicking platforms offer precise control of protein conformation and major cell functions, over large volumes and long cell culture times. As such, they represent a new tool for biological research with many potential applications in bioelectronics, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. PMID:26413300

  2. Cryogenic regenerator including sarancarbon heat conduction matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Petrick, S. Walter (Inventor); Britcliffe, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A saran carbon matrix is employed to conduct heat through the heat storing volume of a cryogenic regenerator. When helium is adsorbed into the saran carbon matrix, the combination exhibits a volumetric specific heat much higher than previously used lead balls. A helium adsorbed saran regenerator should allow much lower refrigerator temperatures than those practically obtainable with lead based regenerators for regenerator type refrigeration systems.

  3. Development methods of steam turbines 3D geometry optical control for effective heat power equipment quality improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoynishnikov, Sergey

    2014-08-01

    A method for steam turbines 3D geometry optical control for effective heat power equipment quality improvement is proposed. It is shown that technical characteristics of the developed optical phase triangulation method for precision contactless geometry diagnostics of steam turbines meet modern requirements to 3D geometry measuring instruments and are perspective for further development. It is shown that used phase step method provides measurement error less than 0.024% of measurement range.

  4. Versatile Method for Producing 2D and 3D Conductive Biomaterial Composites Using Sequential Chemical and Electrochemical Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Severt, Sean Y; Ostrovsky-Snider, Nicholas A; Leger, Janelle M; Murphy, Amanda R

    2015-11-18

    Flexible and conductive biocompatible materials are attractive candidates for a wide range of biomedical applications including implantable electrodes, tissue engineering, and controlled drug delivery. Here, we demonstrate that chemical and electrochemical polymerization techniques can be combined to create highly versatile silk-conducting polymer (silk-CP) composites with enhanced conductivity and electrochemical stability. Interpenetrating silk-CP composites were first generated via in situ deposition of polypyrrole during chemical polymerization of pyrrole. These composites were sufficiently conductive to serve as working electrodes for electropolymerization, which allowed an additional layer of CP to be deposited on the surface. This sequential method was applied to both 2D films and 3D sponge-like silk scaffolds, producing conductive materials with biomimetic architectures. Overall, this two-step technique expanded the range of available polymers and dopants suitable for the synthesis of mechanically robust, biocompatible, and highly conductive silk-based materials. PMID:26544990

  5. The Conduction of Heat through Cryogenic Regenerative Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Superczynski, W. F.; Green, G. F.

    2006-04-01

    The need for improved regenerative cryocooler efficiency may require the replacement of conventional matrices with ducts. The ducts can not be continuous in the direction of temperature gradient when using conventional materials to prevent unacceptable conduction losses. However, this discontinuity creates a complex geometry to model and determine conduction losses. Chesapeake Cryogenics, Inc. has designed, fabricated and tested an apparatus for measuring the heat conduction through regenerative heat exchangers implementing different matrices. Data is presented for stainless steel photo etched disk, phophorus-bronze embossed ribbon coils and screens made of both stainless steel and phosphorus-bronze. The heat conduction was measured with the regenerators evacuated and pressurized with helium gas. In this test apparatus, helium gas presence increased the heat leak significantly. A description of the test apparatus, instrumentation, experimental methods and data analysis are presented.

  6. Compact pulsed laser having improved heat conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C. (inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A highly efficient, compact pulsed laser having high energy to weight and volume ratios is provided. The laser utilizes a cavity reflector that operates as a heat sink and is essentially characterized by having a high heat conductivity, by being a good electrical insulator and by being substantially immune to the deleterious effects of ultra-violet radiation. Manual portability is accomplished by eliminating entirely any need for a conventional circulating fluid cooling system.

  7. Measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Kuriyama, T.; Kuriyama, F.; Radebaugh, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental apparatus for the measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens as well as some experimental results taken with the apparatus. Screens are stacked in a fiberglass-epoxy cylinder, which is 24.4 mm in diameter and 55 mm in length. The cold end of the stacked screens is cooled by a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler at cryogenic temperature, and the hot end is maintained at room temperature. Heat conduction through the screens is determined from the temperature gradient in a calibrated heat flow sensor mounted between the cold end of the stacked screens and the GM cryocooler. The samples used for these experiments consisted of 400-mesh stainless steel screens, 400-mesh phosphor bronze screens, and two different porosities of 325-mesh stainless steel screens. The wire diameter of the 400-mesh stainless steel and phosphor bronze screens was 25.4 micrometers and the 325-mesh stainless steel screen wire diameters were 22.9 micrometers and 27.9 micrometers. Standard porosity values were used for the experimental data with additional porosity values used on selected experiments. The experimental results showed that the helium gas between each screen enhanced the heat conduction through the stacked screens by several orders of magnitude compared to that in vacuum. The conduction degradation factor is the ratio of actual heat conduction to the heat conduction where the regenerator material is assumed to be a solid rod of the same cross sectional area as the metal fraction of the screen. This factor was about 0.1 for the stainless steel and 0.022 for the phosphor bronze, and almost constant for the temperature range of 40 to 80 K at the cold end.

  8. Diagnostic of structures in heat and power generating industries with utilization of 3D digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malesa, M.; Kujawi?ska, M.; Malowany, K.; Siwek, B.

    2013-04-01

    In the paper we present implementation of 3D DIC method for in-situ diagnostic measurements of expansion bellows in heating chambers. The simultaneous measurements of a supply and a return pipeline were carried out in a heating chamber in Warsaw at the peak of the heating season in cooperation with Dalkia Warszawa. Results of the measurements enabled assessment of the risk of failure of expansion bellows. In-situ measurements were preceded by feasibility tests carried out in the Institute of Heat Engineering of Warsaw University of Technology. Potential implementations and a direction of future works are discussed in conclusions.

  9. Scattering times and surface conductivity of Dirac fermions in a 3D topological insulator film with localised impurities.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Parijat; Bellotti, Enrico

    2015-10-14

    The zero gap surface states of a 3D-topological insulator host highly mobile Dirac fermions with spin locked to the momentum. The high mobility attributed to the absence of back scattering is reduced in the presence of impurities on the surface. In particular, we discuss and compare scattering times for localised impurities on the surface, scattering between states of opposite helicity located on different surfaces coupled through a hybridisation potential and the role of magnetic impurities. Magnetic impurities give rise to an additional spin suppression factor. The role of warped bands and their influence on topological factors that can enhance the overall surface mobility is examined. Finally, employing a linearised Boltzmann equation approach, surface conductivity calculations for Dirac fermions in a 3D TI is outlined. PMID:26402336

  10. Scattering times and surface conductivity of Dirac fermions in a 3D topological insulator film with localised impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Parijat; Bellotti, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    The zero gap surface states of a 3D-topological insulator host highly mobile Dirac fermions with spin locked to the momentum. The high mobility attributed to the absence of back scattering is reduced in the presence of impurities on the surface. In particular, we discuss and compare scattering times for localised impurities on the surface, scattering between states of opposite helicity located on different surfaces coupled through a hybridisation potential and the role of magnetic impurities. Magnetic impurities give rise to an additional spin suppression factor. The role of warped bands and their influence on topological factors that can enhance the overall surface mobility is examined. Finally, employing a linearised Boltzmann equation approach, surface conductivity calculations for Dirac fermions in a 3D TI is outlined.

  11. Self-Sensing, Ultralight, and Conductive 3D Graphene/Iron Oxide Aerogel Elastomer Deformable in a Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang; Li, Hui; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Hu, Han; Zhao, Zongbin; Li, Jihao; Li, Jingye; Qiao, Yu; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-04-28

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene aerogels (GA) show promise for applications in supercapacitors, electrode materials, gas sensors, and oil absorption due to their high porosity, mechanical strength, and electrical conductivity. However, the control, actuation, and response properties of graphene aerogels have not been well studied. In this paper, we synthesized 3D graphene aerogels decorated with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4/GA) by self-assembly of graphene with simultaneous decoration by Fe3O4 nanoparticles using a modified hydrothermal reduction process. The aerogels exhibit up to 52% reversible magnetic field-induced strain and strain-dependent electrical resistance that can be used to monitor the degree of compression/stretching of the material. The density of Fe3O4/GA is only about 5.8 mg cm(-3), making it an ultralight magnetic elastomer with potential applications in self-sensing soft actuators, microsensors, microswitches, and environmental remediation. PMID:25792130

  12. Finite Heat conduction in 2D Lattices

    E-print Network

    Lei Yang; Yang Kongqing

    2001-07-30

    This paper gives a 2D hamonic lattices model with missing bond defects, when the capacity ratio of defects is enough large, the temperature gradient can be formed and the finite heat conduction is found in the model. The defects in the 2D harmonic lattices impede the energy carriers free propagation, by another words, the mean free paths of the energy carrier are relatively short. The microscopic dynamics leads to the finite conduction in the model.

  13. Global 3-D imaging of mantle conductivity based on inversion of observatory C-responses—II. Data analysis and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Alexey; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2012-12-01

    The global 3-D electrical conductivity distribution in the mantle (in the depth range between 400 and 1600 km) is imaged by inverting C-responses estimated on a global net of geomagnetic observatories. Very long time-series (up to 51 years; 1957-2007) of hourly means of three components of the geomagnetic field from 281 geomagnetic observatories are collected and analysed. Special attention is given to data processing in order to obtain unbiased C-responses with trustworthy estimates of experimental errors in the period range from 2.9 to 104.2 d. After careful inspection of the obtained C-responses the data from 119 observatories are chosen for the further analysis. Squared coherency is used as a main quality indicator to detect (and then to exclude from consideration) observatories with a large noise-to-signal ratio. During this analysis we found that—along with the C-responses from high-latitude observatories (geomagnetic latitudes higher than 58°)—the C-responses from all low-latitude observatories (geomagnetic latitudes below 11°) also have very low squared coherencies, and thus cannot be used for global induction studies. We found that the C-responses from the selected 119 mid-latitude observatories show a huge variability both in real and imaginary parts, and we investigated to what extent the ocean effect can explain such a scatter. By performing the systematic model calculations we conclude that: (1) the variability due to the ocean effect is substantial, especially at shorter periods, and it is seen for periods up to 40 d or so; (2) the imaginary part of the C-responses is to a larger extent influenced by the oceans; (3) two types of anomalous C-response behaviour associated with the ocean effect can be distinguished; (4) to accurately reproduce the ocean effect a lateral resolution of 1°× 1° of the conductance distribution is needed, and (5) the ocean effect alone does not explain the whole variability of the observed C-responses. We also detected that part of the variability in the real part of the C-responses is due to the auroral effect. In addition we discovered that the auroral effect in the C-responses reveals strong longitudinal variability, at least in the Northern Hemisphere. Europe appears to be the region with smallest degree of distortion compared with North America and northern Asia. We found that the imaginary part of the C-responses is weakly affected by the auroral source, thus confirming the fact that in the considered period range the electromagnetic (EM) induction from the auroral electrojet is small. Assuming weak dependence of the auroral signals on the Earth's conductivity at considered periods, and longitudinal variability of the auroral effect, we developed a scheme to correct the experimental C-responses for this effect. With these developments and findings in mind we performed a number of regularized 3-D inversions of our experimental data in order to detect robust features in the recovered 3-D conductivity images. Although differing in details, all our 3-D inversions reveal a substantial level of lateral heterogeneity in the mantle at the depths between 410 and 1600 km. Conductivity values vary laterally by more than one order of magnitude between resistive and conductive regions. The maximum lateral variations of the conductivity have been detected in the layer at depths between 670 and 900 km. By comparing our global 3-D results with the results of independent global and semi-global 3-D conductivity studies, we conclude that 3-D conductivity mantle models produced so far are preliminary as different groups obtain disparate results, thus complicating quantitative comparison with seismic tomography or/and geodynamic models. In spite of this, our 3-D EM study and most other 3-D EM studies reveal at least two robust features: reduced conductivity beneath southern Europe and northern Africa, and enhanced conductivity in northeastern China.

  14. Large variable conductance heat pipe. Transverse header

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, F.

    1975-01-01

    The characteristics of gas-loaded, variable conductance heat pipes (VCHP) are discussed. The difficulties involved in developing a large VCHP header are analyzed. The construction of the large capacity VCHP is described. A research project to eliminate some of the problems involved in large capacity VCHP operation is explained.

  15. Heat conduction in one dimensional chains

    E-print Network

    Bambi Hu; Baowen LI; Hong Zhao

    1997-12-05

    We study numerically the thermal conductivity in several different one dimensional chains. We show that the phonon-lattice interaction is the main ingredient of the Fourier heat law. Our argument provides a rather satisfactory explanation to all existing numerical results concerning this problem.

  16. Heat conductivity of a pion gas

    E-print Network

    Antonio Dobado Gonzalez; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Juan M. Torres Rincon

    2007-02-13

    We evaluate the heat conductivity of a dilute pion gas employing the Uehling-Uehlenbeck equation and experimental phase-shifts parameterized by means of the SU(2) Inverse Amplitude Method. Our results are consistent with previous evaluations. For comparison we also give results for an (unphysical) hard sphere gas.

  17. Hydrogels of a conducting conjugated polymer as 3-D enzyme electrode.

    PubMed

    Asberg, Peter; Inganäs, Olle

    2003-11-30

    We have utilized the highly conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) aqueous dispersion (PEDOT/PSS) to build a conducting hydrogel matrix. Together with appropriate biomolecules this constitutes a hydrogel bio-electrode. The open hydrogel structure makes diffusion of analytes surrounding the cells into the matrix electrode easier. If enzymes are utilized, osmium is used as mediator between the prosthetic group of the enzyme and the conducting polymer matrix. Osmium also functions as a crosslink point to poly-4-vinylpyridine, which together with the magnesium crosslinked PEDOT/PSS gives a rigid hydrogel. The enzyme Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was used as a model enzyme to evaluate the enzyme-enhanced electrode. We evaluated the electrode at pH 7, which is the pH choice for many biological systems. From cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements we deduced that a very low reduction potential was needed to reduce the prosthetic group. Constant potential amperometry were performed to demonstrate the biosensor capabilities. A differential sensitivity of 0.13 A M(-1) cm(-2) through the 0-30 microM concentration range was achieved. Both the biostability and the influence on conductivity, important aspects when for example making nerve- or cell-electrodes, were investigated. PMID:14611755

  18. Inversion of multi-frequency electromagnetic induction data for 3D characterization of hydraulic conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosten, Troy R.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Schultz, Gregory M.; Curtis, Gary P.; Lane, John W., Jr.

    2011-04-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) instruments provide rapid, noninvasive, and spatially dense data for characterization of soil and groundwater properties. Data from multi-frequency EMI tools can be inverted to provide quantitative electrical conductivity estimates as a function of depth. In this study, multi-frequency EMI data collected across an abandoned uranium mill site near Naturita, Colorado, USA, are inverted to produce vertical distribution of electrical conductivity ( EC) across the site. The relation between measured apparent electrical conductivity ( ECa) and hydraulic conductivity ( K) is weak (correlation coefficient of 0.20), whereas the correlation between the depth dependent EC obtained from the inversions, and K is sufficiently strong to be used for hydrologic estimation (correlation coefficient of - 0.62). Depth-specific EC values were correlated with co-located K measurements to develop a site-specific ln( EC)-ln( K) relation. This petrophysical relation was applied to produce a spatially detailed map of K across the study area. A synthetic example based on ECa values at the site was used to assess model resolution and correlation loss given variations in depth and/or measurement error. Results from synthetic modeling indicate that optimum correlation with K occurs at ~ 0.5 m followed by a gradual correlation loss of 90% at 2.3 m. These results are consistent with an analysis of depth of investigation (DOI) given the range of frequencies, transmitter-receiver separation, and measurement errors for the field data. DOIs were estimated at 2.0 ± 0.5 m depending on the soil conductivities. A 4-layer model, with varying thicknesses, was used to invert the ECa to maximize available information within the aquifer region for improved correlations with K. Results show improved correlation between K and the corresponding inverted EC at similar depths, underscoring the importance of inversion in using multi-frequency EMI data for hydrologic estimation.

  19. Inversion of multi-frequency electromagnetic induction data for 3D characterization of hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brosten, T.R.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Schultz, G.M.; Curtis, G.P.; Lane, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) instruments provide rapid, noninvasive, and spatially dense data for characterization of soil and groundwater properties. Data from multi-frequency EMI tools can be inverted to provide quantitative electrical conductivity estimates as a function of depth. In this study, multi-frequency EMI data collected across an abandoned uranium mill site near Naturita, Colorado, USA, are inverted to produce vertical distribution of electrical conductivity (EC) across the site. The relation between measured apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and hydraulic conductivity (K) is weak (correlation coefficient of 0.20), whereas the correlation between the depth dependent EC obtained from the inversions, and K is sufficiently strong to be used for hydrologic estimation (correlation coefficient of -0.62). Depth-specific EC values were correlated with co-located K measurements to develop a site-specific ln(EC)-ln(K) relation. This petrophysical relation was applied to produce a spatially detailed map of K across the study area. A synthetic example based on ECa values at the site was used to assess model resolution and correlation loss given variations in depth and/or measurement error. Results from synthetic modeling indicate that optimum correlation with K occurs at ~0.5m followed by a gradual correlation loss of 90% at 2.3m. These results are consistent with an analysis of depth of investigation (DOI) given the range of frequencies, transmitter-receiver separation, and measurement errors for the field data. DOIs were estimated at 2.0??0.5m depending on the soil conductivities. A 4-layer model, with varying thicknesses, was used to invert the ECa to maximize available information within the aquifer region for improved correlations with K. Results show improved correlation between K and the corresponding inverted EC at similar depths, underscoring the importance of inversion in using multi-frequency EMI data for hydrologic estimation. ?? 2011.

  20. Heat Rejection from a Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Radiator Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Gibson, M. A.; Hervol, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    A titanium-water heat pipe radiator having an innovative proprietary evaporator configuration was evaluated in a large vacuum chamber equipped with liquid nitrogen cooled cold walls. The radiator was manufactured by Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT), Lancaster, PA, and delivered as part of a Small Business Innovative Research effort. The radiator panel consisted of five titanium-water heat pipes operating as thermosyphons, sandwiched between two polymer matrix composite face sheets. The five variable conductance heat pipes were purposely charged with a small amount of non-condensable gas to control heat flow through the condenser. Heat rejection was evaluated over a wide range of inlet water temperature and flow conditions, and heat rejection was calculated in real-time utilizing a data acquisition system programmed with the Stefan-Boltzmann equation. Thermography through an infra-red transparent window identified heat flow across the panel. Under nominal operation, a maximum heat rejection value of over 2200 Watts was identified. The thermal vacuum evaluation of heat rejection provided critical information on understanding the radiator s performance, and in steady state and transient scenarios provided useful information for validating current thermal models in support of the Fission Power Systems Project.

  1. Boosting Proton Conductivity in Highly Robust 3D Inorganic Cationic Extended Frameworks through Ion Exchange with Dihydrogen Phosphate Anions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chengliang; Wang, Yaxing; Chen, Lanhua; Yin, Xuemiao; Shu, Jie; Sheng, Daopeng; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2015-12-01

    The limited long-term hydrolytic stability of rapidly emerging 3D-extended framework materials (MOFs, COFs, MOPs, etc.) is still one of major barriers for their practical applications as new solid-state electrolytes in fuel cells. To obtain hydrolytically stable materials, two H2 PO4 (-) -exchanged 3D inorganic cationic extended frameworks (CEFs) were successfully prepared by a facile anion-exchange method. Both anion-exchanged CEFs (YbO(OH)P and NDTBP) show significantly enhanced proton conductivity when compared with the original materials (YbO(OH)Cl and NDTB) with an increase of up to four orders-of-magnitude, reaching 2.36×10(-3) and 1.96×10(-2) ?S?cm(-1) at 98?% RH and 85?°C for YbO(OH)P and NDTBP, respectively. These values are comparable to the most efficient proton-conducting MOFs. In addition, these two anion-exchanged materials are stable in boiling water, which originates from the strong electrostatic interaction between the H2 PO4 (-) anion and the cationic host framework, showing a clear advance over all the acid-impregnated materials (H2 SO4 @MIL-101, H3 PO4 @MIL-101, and H3 PO4 @Tp-Azo) as practical solid-state fuel-cell electrolytes. This work offers a new general and efficient approach to functionalize 3D-extended frameworks through an anion-exchange process and achieves water-stability with ultra-high proton conductivity above 10(-2) ?S?cm(-1) . PMID:26489981

  2. Hierarchical self-assembly of hexagonal single-crystal nanosheets into 3D layered superlattices with high conductivity.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yulun; Shen, Yuhua; Yang, Liangbao; Han, Bin; Huang, Fangzhi; Li, Shikuo; Chu, Zhuwang; Xie, Anjian

    2012-06-21

    While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and self-assemble, in a suitable single solution environment. In cyclohexane, 1D amorphous nanofibers transformed to 1D nanorods as building blocks, and then to 2D single-crystal nanosheets with a hexagonal phase, and lastly to 3D ordered layered superlattices with the narrowest polydispersity value (M(w)/M(n) = 1.47). Remarkably, all the instructions for the hierarchical self-assembly are encoded in the layered shape in other non-polar solvents (hexane, octane) and their conductivity in the ?-? stacking direction is improved to about 50 S cm(-1), which is even higher than that of the highest previously reported value (16 S cm(-1)). The method used in this study is greatly expected to be readily scalable to produce superlattices of conductive polymers with high quality and low cost. PMID:22609947

  3. Effects of anisotropic heat conduction on solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J. A.; Viskanta, R.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional solidification influenced by anisotropic heat conduction has been considered. The interfacial energy balance was derived to account for the heat transfer in one direction (x or y) depending on the temperature gradient in both the x and y directions. A parametric study was made to determine the effects of the Stefan number, aspect ratio, initial superheat, and thermal conductivity ratios on the solidification rate. Because of the imposed boundary conditions, the interface became skewed and sometimes was not a straight line between the interface position at the upper and lower adiabatic walls (spatially nonlinear along the height). This skewness depends on the thermal conductivity ratio k(yy)/k(yx). The nonlinearity of the interface is influenced by the solidification rate, aspect ratio, and k(yy/k(yx).

  4. Electromagnetic Scattering From a Rectangular Cavity Recessed in a 3-D Conducting Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.; Reddy, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    The problem of electromagnetic (EM) scattering from an aperture backed by a rectangular cavity recessed in a three-dimensional conducting body is analyzed using the coupled field integral equation approach. Using the free-space Green's function, EM fields scattered outside the cavity are determined in terms of (1) an equivalent electric surface current density flowing on the three-dimensional conducting surface of the object including the cavity aperture and (2) an equivalent magnetic surface current density flowing over the aperture only. The EM fields inside the cavity are determined using the waveguide modal expansion functions. Making the total tangential electric and magnetic fields across the aperture continuous and subjecting the total tangential electric field on the outer conducting three-dimensional surface of the object to zero, a set of coupled integral equations is obtained. The equivalent electric and magnetic surface currents are then obtained by solving the coupled integral equation using the Method of Moments. The numerical results on scattering from rectangular cavities embedded in various three-dimensional objects are compared with the results obtained by other numerical techniques.

  5. 3D slicing of radiogenic heat production in Bahariya Formation, Tut oil field, North-Western Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Al-Alfy, I M; Nabih, M A

    2013-03-01

    A 3D block of radiogenic heat production was constructed from the subsurface total gamma ray logs of Bahariya Formation, Western Desert, Egypt. The studied rocks possess a range of radiogenic heat production varying from 0.21 ?Wm(-3) to 2.2 ?Wm(-3). Sandstone rocks of Bahariya Formation have higher radiogenic heat production than the average for crustal sedimentary rocks. The high values of density log of Bahariya Formation indicate the presence of iron oxides which contribute the uranium radioactive ores that increase the radiogenic heat production of these rocks. The average radiogenic heat production produced from the study area is calculated as 6.3 kW. The histogram and cumulative frequency analyses illustrate that the range from 0.8 to 1.2 ?Wm(-3) is about 45.3% of radiogenic heat production values. The 3D slicing of the reservoir shows that the southeastern and northeastern parts of the study area have higher radiogenic heat production than other parts. PMID:23291561

  6. Qualitative aspects in dualphaselag heat conduction Ram on Quintanilla 1

    E-print Network

    Racke, Reinhard

    Qualitative aspects in dual­phase­lag heat conduction Ramâ?? on Quintanilla 1 Department of Applied.racke@uni­konstanz.de Abstract: We consider the system of dual­phase­lag heat conduction proposed by Tzou [21]. First, we prove of heat conduction based on Fourier's law predicts infinite heat propagation speed. Heat transmission

  7. A 3D Two-Temperature Solar Wind Model with Alfven Wave Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Holst, Bart

    2010-05-01

    The Space Weather Modeling Framework(SWMF), developed at the University of Michigan, is a high performance simulation tool to model a wide variety physics domains ranging from solar corona and heliosphere to the magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere of the Earth and can run these models in a coupled fashion. We have developed a new physically consistent, three-dimensional solar wind model within the SWMF, that account for the different electron and ion temperatures. We use field-aligned heat conduction for both the electron and ions. The collisions between the electrons and ions are taken into account: Close to the sun the electrons and ions are tightly coupled, but completely decouple beyond approximately two solar radii. In our model, we use Alfven waves to accelerate the wind. The ions are heated by the Kolmogorov dissipation of the Alfven waves. The velocities at 1AU obtained from the semi-emperical Wang-Sheeley-Arge model in combination with conservation of total energy along the field lines determines the Alfven wave amplitude at the photospheric level. We compare this two-temperature model with a one-temperature model for Carrington rotation 2077.

  8. A 3D Two-Temperature Solar Wind Model with Alfven Wave Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Holst, Bart; Manchester, W. B.

    2010-05-01

    The Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), developed at the University of Michigan, is a high performance simulation tool to model a wide variety physics domains ranging from solar corona and heliosphere to the magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere of the Earth and can run these models in a coupled fashion. We have developed a new physically consistent, three-dimensional solar wind model within the SWMF, that account for the different electron and ion temperatures. We use field-aligned heat conduction for both the electron and ions. The collisions between the electrons and ions are taken into account: Close to the sun the electrons and ions are tightly coupled, but completely decouple beyond approximately 1.5 solar radii. In our model, we use Alfven waves to accelerate the wind. The ions are heated by the Kolmogorov dissipation of the Alfven waves. The velocities at 1AU obtained from the semi-emperical Wang-Sheeley-Arge model in combination with conservation of total energy along the field lines determines the Alfven wave amplitude at the photospheric level. The density and temperature at the solar boundary are obtained from EUVI tomography. This new model is validated for Carrington rotation 2077 at 1AU. We compare this two-temperature model with a one-temperature model. Since we properly treat the thermodynamics in the new solar wind model, we expect great improvement for the modeling of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and CME-driven shocks.

  9. A new heat transfer analysis in machining based on two steps of 3D finite element modelling and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddag, B.; Kagnaya, T.; Nouari, M.; Cutard, T.

    2013-01-01

    Modelling machining operations allows estimating cutting parameters which are difficult to obtain experimentally and in particular, include quantities characterizing the tool-workpiece interface. Temperature is one of these quantities which has an impact on the tool wear, thus its estimation is important. This study deals with a new modelling strategy, based on two steps of calculation, for analysis of the heat transfer into the cutting tool. Unlike the classical methods, considering only the cutting tool with application of an approximate heat flux at the cutting face, estimated from experimental data (e.g. measured cutting force, cutting power), the proposed approach consists of two successive 3D Finite Element calculations and fully independent on the experimental measurements; only the definition of the behaviour of the tool-workpiece couple is necessary. The first one is a 3D thermomechanical modelling of the chip formation process, which allows estimating cutting forces, chip morphology and its flow direction. The second calculation is a 3D thermal modelling of the heat diffusion into the cutting tool, by using an adequate thermal loading (applied uniform or non-uniform heat flux). This loading is estimated using some quantities obtained from the first step calculation, such as contact pressure, sliding velocity distributions and contact area. Comparisons in one hand between experimental data and the first calculation and at the other hand between measured temperatures with embedded thermocouples and the second calculation show a good agreement in terms of cutting forces, chip morphology and cutting temperature.

  10. Interfacial Heat Conduction in Modern Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodson, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Heat conduction through interfaces in electronic nanostructures grows more important with the dimensional scaling trends throughout the semiconductor industry. The complexity of interfacial transport has increased owing to frequent examples of severe lattice mismatch and strain, boundaries with nanoscale non-planar features and, in some cases, the critical role of electron-phonon interactions. This talk will describe measurements and modeling of phonon heat conduction through interfaces in some of the latest semiconductor nanotechnologies and feature a range of material combinations. Examples include GaN-diamond and silicon-diamond composites, chalcogenide-metal multilayers, metal-semiconductor nanolayer stacks, and nonplanar interfaces in modern nanotransistors and interconnect structures. Applications range from conventional CMOS electronics and phase change memory to quantum cascade lasers and RF amplifiers for satellites.

  11. Heat conduction of laser vanadate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zagumennyi, A I; Zavartsev, Yu D; Kutovoi, S A; Shcherbakov, I A; Popov, P A; Zerouk, F

    2008-03-31

    The heat conduction of laser vanadate crystals GdVO{sub 4} and YVO{sub 4} and their solid solutions is measured in the temperature interval from 50 to 350 K. Mixed rare-earth vanadates have the common chemical formula Re'{sub 1-x}Re''{sub x}VO{sub 4}, where Re' and Re'' are two or more types of ions from a series La{sup 3+}, Pr{sup 3+}, Nd{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+}, Lu{sup 3+}, Sc{sup 3+}, Y{sup 3+}. The heat conduction of Nd:YVO{sub 4} measured at room temperature proved to be more than twice higher than that reported in the literature and in certificate characteristics of laser Nd:YVO{sub 4} elements manufactured by numerous commercial companies. The empirical dependences of the heat conduction along the crystallographic axes <100> and <001> on the composition of rare-earth vanadates Re'{sub 1-x}Re''{sub x}VO{sub 4}, are obtained in the temperature interval from 200 to 350 K. (active media)

  12. Equilibrium molecular dynamics study of heat conduction in octane

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yi Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Fluids are important components in heat transfer systems. Understanding heat conduction in liquids at the atomic level would allow better design of liquids with specific heat transfer properties. However, heat transfer in ...

  13. Hierarchical self-assembly of hexagonal single-crystal nanosheets into 3D layered superlattices with high conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yulun; Shen, Yuhua; Yang, Liangbao; Han, Bin; Huang, Fangzhi; Li, Shikuo; Chu, Zhuwang; Xie, Anjian

    2012-05-01

    While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and self-assemble, in a suitable single solution environment. In cyclohexane, 1D amorphous nanofibers transformed to 1D nanorods as building blocks, and then to 2D single-crystal nanosheets with a hexagonal phase, and lastly to 3D ordered layered superlattices with the narrowest polydispersity value (Mw/Mn = 1.47). Remarkably, all the instructions for the hierarchical self-assembly are encoded in the layered shape in other non-polar solvents (hexane, octane) and their conductivity in the ?-? stacking direction is improved to about 50 S cm-1, which is even higher than that of the highest previously reported value (16 S cm-1). The method used in this study is greatly expected to be readily scalable to produce superlattices of conductive polymers with high quality and low cost.While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and self-assemble, in a suitable single solution environment. In cyclohexane, 1D amorphous nanofibers transformed to 1D nanorods as building blocks, and then to 2D single-crystal nanosheets with a hexagonal phase, and lastly to 3D ordered layered superlattices with the narrowest polydispersity value (Mw/Mn = 1.47). Remarkably, all the instructions for the hierarchical self-assembly are encoded in the layered shape in other non-polar solvents (hexane, octane) and their conductivity in the ?-? stacking direction is improved to about 50 S cm-1, which is even higher than that of the highest previously reported value (16 S cm-1). The method used in this study is greatly expected to be readily scalable to produce superlattices of conductive polymers with high quality and low cost. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM, and TEM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30743j

  14. Conductive polymer-mediated 2D and 3D arrays of Mn3O4 nanoblocks and mesoporous conductive polymers as their replicas.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yoshitaka; Kageyama, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Riho; Oaki, Yuya; Imai, Hiroaki

    2015-11-28

    Orientation-controlled 2D and 3D microarrays of Mn3O4 nanocuboids that were mediated by a conductive polymer were fabricated by evaporation-induced self-assembly of the oxide nanoblocks and subsequent polymerization of pyrrole in the interparticle spaces. Free-standing mesoporous polypyrroles (PPy) having chain- and square-grid-like nanovoid arrays were obtained as replicas of the composite assemblies by dissolving the oxide nanoblocks. The PPy-mediated manganese oxide arrays exhibited stable electrochemical performance as an ultrathin anode of a lithium-ion secondary battery. PMID:26508371

  15. Long and high conductance helium heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gully, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on the development and the thermal tests of two superfluid helium heat pipes. They feature a copper braid located inside a 6 mm outer diameter stainless tube fitted with copper ends for mechanical anchoring. The copper braid is the support of the Rollin superfluid helium film which is essential in the heat transfer. The extremely low thickness of the liquid film allows for a low filling pressure, making the technology very simple without the need for any external hot reservoir and with the possibility to easily bend the tube. We present the design and discuss the thermal performance of two heat pipes tested for several filling pressures, adverse tilt angles and in 1.4-2.0 K temperature range. A minimum filling pressure (0.6 MPa) is needed to get significant transport capacity. A 12 mW transport capacity is achieved for 3.0 MPa filling pressure. It is shown that the long heat pipe (1.2 m) and the short one (0.25 m) have similar thermal performance in adverse tilt. At 1.7 K the long heat pipe, 120 g in weight, reaches a transport capacity of 5.7 mW/4.2 mW for a tilt angle of 0 / 60° and a thermal conductance of 600 mW/K for 4 mW transferred power. When the condenser reaches the super-fluid transition temperature, the Rollin film accelerates the cool down of the evaporator down to 1.7 K with a heating power applied to the evaporator.

  16. Heat conductivity in linear mixing systems Baowen Li,1

    E-print Network

    Heat conductivity in linear mixing systems Baowen Li,1 Giulio Casati,1,2 and Jiao Wang1,3 1 on the heat conduction in a linear mixing system. In particular we consider a quasi-one-dimensional channel obeys the Fourier law of heat conduction. Therefore, deterministic diffusion and normal heat transport

  17. Microscale Heat Conduction Models and Doppler Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2015-01-22

    The objective of this project is to establish an approach for providing the fundamental input that is needed to estimate the magnitude and time- dependence of the Doppler feedback mechanism in Very High Temperature reactors. This mechanism is the foremost contributor to the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature reactors that use fuel based on Tristructural-Isotropic (TRISO) coated particles. Therefore, its correct prediction is essential to the conduct of safety analyses for these reactors. Since the effect is directly dependent on the actual temperature reached by the fuel during transients, the underlying phenomena of heat deposition, heat transfer and temperature rise must be correctly predicted. To achieve the above objective, this project will explore an approach that accounts for lattice effects as well as local temperature variations and the correct definition of temperature and related local effects.

  18. Unravelling the Proton Conduction Mechanism from Room Temperature to 553 K in a 3D Inorganic Coordination Framework.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaxing; Tao, Zetian; Yin, Xuemiao; Shu, Jie; Chen, Lanhua; Sheng, Daopeng; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2015-10-19

    The preparation of proton-conducting materials that are functional and stable at intermediate temperatures (393-573 K) is a focal point of fuel cell development. The purely inorganic material, HNd(IO3)4, which possesses a dense 3D framework structure, can reach a maximum of 4.6 × 10(-4) S·cm(-1) at 353 K and 95% relative humidity and exhibit a high conductivity of 8.0 × 10(-5) S·cm(-1) from 373 to 553 K under the flow of wet N2. HNd(IO3)4 exhibits a variety of improvements including high thermal stability, low solubility in water, and resistance to reducing atmosphere. The proton conductivity in such a wide temperature range originates from the intrinsic liberated protons in the structure and the resulting 1D hydrogen-bonding network confirmed by bond valence sum calculation and solid-state NMR analysis. Moreover, two different activation energies are observed in different temperature regions (0.23 eV below 373 K and 0.026 eV from 373 to 553 K), indicating that two types of proton motion are responsible for proton diffusion, as further domenstrated by temperature-dependent open-circuit voltage hysteresis in a tested fuel cell assembly as well as variable-temperature and double quantum filtered solid-state NMR measurements. PMID:26444097

  19. Parallelized solvers for heat conduction formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joe; Kwang, Abel

    1991-01-01

    Based on multilevel partitioning, this paper develops a structural parallelizable solution methodology that enables a significant reduction in computational effort and memory requirements for very large scale linear and nonlinear steady and transient thermal (heat conduction) models. Due to the generality of the formulation of the scheme, both finite element and finite difference simulations can be treated. Diverse model topologies can thus be handled, including both simply and multiply connected (branched/perforated) geometries. To verify the methodology, analytical and numerical benchmark trends are verified in both sequential and parallel computer environments.

  20. Conductive polymer-mediated 2D and 3D arrays of Mn3O4 nanoblocks and mesoporous conductive polymers as their replicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Yoshitaka; Kageyama, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Riho; Oaki, Yuya; Imai, Hiroaki

    2015-11-01

    Orientation-controlled 2D and 3D microarrays of Mn3O4 nanocuboids that were mediated by a conductive polymer were fabricated by evaporation-induced self-assembly of the oxide nanoblocks and subsequent polymerization of pyrrole in the interparticle spaces. Free-standing mesoporous polypyrroles (PPy) having chain- and square-grid-like nanovoid arrays were obtained as replicas of the composite assemblies by dissolving the oxide nanoblocks. The PPy-mediated manganese oxide arrays exhibited stable electrochemical performance as an ultrathin anode of a lithium-ion secondary battery.Orientation-controlled 2D and 3D microarrays of Mn3O4 nanocuboids that were mediated by a conductive polymer were fabricated by evaporation-induced self-assembly of the oxide nanoblocks and subsequent polymerization of pyrrole in the interparticle spaces. Free-standing mesoporous polypyrroles (PPy) having chain- and square-grid-like nanovoid arrays were obtained as replicas of the composite assemblies by dissolving the oxide nanoblocks. The PPy-mediated manganese oxide arrays exhibited stable electrochemical performance as an ultrathin anode of a lithium-ion secondary battery. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05912g

  1. Constructing a model of 3D radiogenic heat production in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmot Noller, N. M.; Daly, J. S.

    2012-04-01

    Heat production values in the crust and mantle rock inform heat flow density data to provide crucial information about the structure of the Earth's lithosphere. In addition, accurate models of horizontal and vertical distribution of heat production can help to define geothermal exploration targets. Low-enthalpy district scale space heating and Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) using hot, dry rock may provide sustainable energy resources in regions currently perceived as having low geothermal energy potential. Ireland is located within stable lithosphere, unaffected by recent tectonism and volcanism, and has an estimated heat flow range below the measured global continental average. Nevertheless, borehole data indicate that heat production is variable across the island, with anomalously high rates observed, for example, in Cavan, Meath and Antrim. Data coverage is, however, poor. Radioactive isotopic decay generates heat in rock. By using established heat production constants and known concentrations of unstable isotopes of uranium, thorium and potassium, along with rock density values, a heat production rate in ?W m -3 is obtained. With the objective of compiling the first comprehensive database of information about the Irish lithosphere, in three dimensions, the authors present here initial results obtained from published and unpublished whole-rock major and trace element analyses. The presence of systematic trends correlating heat production to properties such as age and lithology are also investigated. Offering insight into the vertical component of heat production distribution, Irish xenoliths emplaced in Lower Carboniferous volcanics are regarded as a reliable proxy for the present-day lower crust. Their geochemical composition gives heat production values that are higher than expected for the depths indicated by their thermobarometric data, suggesting that heat production rates do not simply reduce with depth.

  2. ME 6010 CONDUCTION HEAT TRANSFER 1998 Catalog Data: ME 6010. Conduction Heat Transfer. Lec. 3. Cr. 3.

    E-print Network

    Panchagnula, Mahesh

    . Undergraduate conduction and convection heat transfer, or equivalent 2. Advanced undergraduate mathematicsME 6010 CONDUCTION HEAT TRANSFER 1998 Catalog Data: ME 6010. Conduction Heat Transfer. Lec. 3. Cr heat transfer and to demonstrate the variety of analytical and numerical techniques used

  3. RELAP5-3D Modeling of Heat Transfer Components (Intermediate Heat Exchanger and Helical-Coil Steam Generator) for NGNP Application

    SciTech Connect

    N. A. Anderson; P. Sabharwall

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is aimed at the research and development of a helium-cooled high-temperature gas reactor that could generate both electricity and process heat for the production of hydrogen. The heat from the high-temperature primary loop must be transferred via an intermediate heat exchanger to a secondary loop. Using RELAP5-3D, a model was developed for two of the heat exchanger options a printed-circuit heat exchanger and a helical-coil steam generator. The RELAP5-3D models were used to simulate an exponential decrease in pressure over a 20 second period. The results of this loss of coolant analysis indicate that heat is initially transferred from the primary loop to the secondary loop, but after the decrease in pressure in the primary loop the heat is transferred from the secondary loop to the primary loop. A high-temperature gas reactor model should be developed and connected to the heat transfer component to simulate other transients.

  4. Information filtering via weighted heat conduction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, by taking into account effects of the user and object correlations on a heat conduction (HC) algorithm, a weighted heat conduction (WHC) algorithm is presented. We argue that the edge weight of the user-object bipartite network should be embedded into the HC algorithm to measure the object similarity. The numerical results indicate that both the accuracy and diversity could be improved greatly compared with the standard HC algorithm and the optimal values reached simultaneously. On the Movielens and Netflix datasets, the algorithmic accuracy, measured by the average ranking score, can be improved by 39.7% and 56.1% in the optimal case, respectively, and the diversity could reach 0.9587 and 0.9317 when the recommendation list equals to 5. Further statistical analysis indicates that, in the optimal case, the distributions of the edge weight are changed to the Poisson form, which may be the reason why HC algorithm performance could be improved. This work highlights the effect of edge weight on a personalized recommendation study, which maybe an important factor affecting personalized recommendation performance.

  5. Modeling a Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger with RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    The main purpose of this report is to design a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and carry out Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simulation using RELAP5-3D. Helium was chosen as the coolant in the primary and secondary sides of the heat exchanger. The design of PCHE is critical for the LOCA simulations. For purposes of simplicity, a straight channel configuration was assumed. A parallel intermediate heat exchanger configuration was assumed for the RELAP5 model design. The RELAP5 modeling also required the semicircular channels in the heat exchanger to be mapped to rectangular channels. The initial RELAP5 run outputs steady state conditions which were then compared to the heat exchanger performance theory to ensure accurate design is being simulated. An exponential loss of pressure transient was simulated. This LOCA describes a loss of coolant pressure in the primary side over a 20 second time period. The results for the simulation indicate that heat is initially transferred from the primary loop to the secondary loop, but after the loss of pressure occurs, heat transfers from the secondary loop to the primary loop.

  6. Experimental Investigation and 3D Finite Element Prediction of Temperature Distribution during Travelling Heat Sourced from Oxyacetylene Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar Alkali, Adam; Lenggo Ginta, Turnad; Majdi Abdul-Rani, Ahmad

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a 3D transient finite element modelling of the workpiece temperature field produced during the travelling heat sourced from oxyacetylene flame. The proposed model was given in terms of preheat-only test applicable during thermally enhanced machining using the oxyacetylene flame as a heat source. The FEA model as well as the experimental test investigated the surface temperature distribution on 316L stainless steel at scanning speed of 100mm/min, 125mm/min 160mm/min, 200mm/min and 250mm/min. The parametric properties of the heat source maintained constant are; lead distance Ld =10mm, focus height Fh=7.5mm, oxygen gas pressure Poxy=15psi and acetylene gas pressure Pacty=25psi. An experimental validation of the temperature field induced on type 316L stainless steel reveal that temperature distribution increases when the travelling speed decreases.

  7. The 3D thermal analysis is performed for the radiation heat load at all stages of the HRS op-

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    direction is modeled by the equivalent thermal conductivity of the insulated cable in that direction Figure 2. Current engineering model of Heat and Radiation Shield. Gray--stainless steel, other colors

  8. Heat conduction in X-ray clusters: Spitzer over 3

    E-print Network

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2002-03-04

    Effective heat conduction in a random variable magnetic field should be equal to one third of the Spitzer's value. Recent observations indicate that this heat conduction is sufficient to account for the bremsstrahlung in cooling X-ray clusters.

  9. Heat transfer in 3-D serpentine channels with right-angle turns

    SciTech Connect

    Chintada, S.; Ko, K.H.; Anand, N.K.

    1999-12-01

    Laminar flow and heat transfer in square serpentine channels with right-angle turns, which have applications in heat exchangers, were numerically studied. A finite volume code in FORTRAN was developed to solve this problem. For solving the flow field, a colocated-grid formulation was used, as opposed to the staggered-grid formulation, and the SIMPLE algorithm was used to link the velocity and pressure. The line-by-line method was used to solve the algebraic equations. The temperature field was solved for the uniform-wall-heat-flux boundary condition. The developed numerical code was validated by solving for fully developed flow and heat transfer in a square straight channel. The grid-independent solution was established for a reference case of serpentine channel with the highest Reynolds number. Periodically fully developed flow and heat transfer fields in serpentine channels were solved for different geometry parameters, for different Reynolds numbers, and for two different Prandtl numbers (for air and water, respectively). The enhancement of the heat transfer mechanism was explained by studying the plotted flow-field velocity vectors in different planes. The heat transfer performance of serpentine channels is better than that for straight channels for Pr = 7.0 and is worse than that for straight channels for Pr = 0.7.

  10. A numerical investigation of the 3-D flow in shell and tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Prithiviraj, M.; Andrews, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    A three-dimensional computer program for simulation of the flow and heat transfer inside Shell and Tube Heat Exchangers has been developed. The simulation of shell and tube heat exchangers is based on a distributed resistance method that uses a modified two equation {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model along with non-equilibrium wall functions. Volume porosities and non-homogeneous surface permeabilities account for the obstructions due to the tubes and arbitrary arrangement of baffles. Sub-models are described for baffle-shell and baffle-tube leakage, shellside and tubeside heat transfer, with geometry generators for tubes, baffles, and nozzle inlets and outlets. The sub-models in HEATX use parameters that have not been altered from their published values. Computed heat transfer and pressure drop are compared with experimental data from the Delaware project (Bell, 1963). Numerically computed pressure drops are also compared for different baffle cuts, and different number of baffles with the experiments of Halle et al. (1984) which were performed in an industrial sized heat exchanger at Argonne National Labs. Discussion of the results is given with particular reference to global and local properties such as pressure drop, temperature variation, and heat transfer coefficients. Good agreement is obtained between the experiments and HEATX computations for the shellside pressure drop and outlet temperatures for the shellside and tubeside streams.

  11. A generalization of Beck's method for Inverse Heat Conduction Problems

    E-print Network

    Reinhardt, Hans-Jürgen

    A generalization of Beck's method for Inverse Heat Conduction Problems H.-J. Reinhardt and Dinh Nho H`ao 1 Introduction Inverse Heat Conduction Problems (abbr.: IHCP) occur whenever surface are used. In this paper we present the Inverse Heat Conduction Problem in a general setting and outline

  12. Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Inverse Problems in Heat Conduction

    E-print Network

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Inverse Problems in Heat Conduction Jingbo Wang and Nicholas inverse problems in heat conduction with consideration of uncertainties in the measured temperature data. § Corresponding author: Nicholas Zabaras (zabaras@cornell.edu) #12;Bayesian model for inverse heat conduction 2 1

  13. COMPRESSIBLE NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS WITH HYPERBOLIC HEAT CONDUCTION

    E-print Network

    Racke, Reinhard

    COMPRESSIBLE NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS WITH HYPERBOLIC HEAT CONDUCTION YUXI HU AND REINHARD RACKE heat conduction, i.e., replacing the Fourier's law by Cattaneo's law. First, by using Kawashima: Compressible Navier-Stokes; hyperbolic heat conduction; global so- lution; singular limit AMS classification

  14. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A VISCOELASTIC FLUID WITH ANISOTROPIC HEAT CONDUCTION

    E-print Network

    Wapperom, Peter

    NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A VISCOELASTIC FLUID WITH ANISOTROPIC HEAT CONDUCTION P. WAPPEROM and M contraction. Key words: shift factors, dissipation, anisotropic heat conduction, finite elements, streamline with Fourier's law, where the heat conduction may be anisotropic. In the derivation of a temperature equation

  15. October 2011 SDI FEP Issues Heat Conduction Issues (HC)

    E-print Network

    October 2011 ­ SDI FEP Issues Heat Conduction Issues (HC) SDI(HC) -1 DOE needs to provide of the run-of-mine salt would conduct less heat away from the heater than that analyzed here, and potentially temperature halite and run-of-mine salt would conduct less heat away from the heater and potentially produce

  16. Heat conduction in 2d nonlinear lattices

    E-print Network

    A. Lippi; R. Livi

    1999-10-26

    The divergence of the heat conductivity in the thermodynamic limit is investigated in 2d-lattice models of anharmonic solids with nearest-neighbour interaction from single-well potentials. Two different numerical approaches based on nonequilibrium and equilibrium simulations provide consistent indications in favour of a logarithmic divergence in "ergodic", i.e. highly chaotic, dynamical regimes. Analytical estimates obtained in the framework of linear-response theory confirm this finding, while tracing back the physical origin of this {\\sl anomalous} transport to the slow diffusion of the energy of long-wavelength effective Fourier modes. Finally, numerical evidence of {\\sl superanomalous} transport is given in the weakly chaotic regime, typically found below some energy density threshold.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heat Conduction in Nanostructures: Effect of Heat Bath

    E-print Network

    Li, Baowen

    Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heat Conduction in Nanostructures: Effect of Heat Bath Jie CHEN1 on heat conduction in nanostructures exemplified by silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and silicon/germanium nano produce consistent results with experiment in large heat bath parameter range. KEYWORDS: heat conduction

  18. A quasi-3D analysis of the thermal performance of a flat heat pipe G. Carbajal a,*, C.B. Sobhan b

    E-print Network

    Wadley, Haydn

    A quasi-3D analysis of the thermal performance of a flat heat pipe G. Carbajal a,*, C.B. Sobhan b form 29 January 2007 Available online 8 May 2007 Abstract The thermal performance of a flat heat pipe. The transient temperature distribution on a solid aluminum plate was compared with the flat heat pipe results

  19. The WOCE-era 3-D Pacific Ocean circulation and heat budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, A. M.; Mecking, S.; Robbins, P. E.; Toole, J. M.; Johnson, G. C.; Talley, L.; Cook, M.; Wijffels, S. E.

    2009-09-01

    To address questions concerning the intensity and spatial structure of the three-dimensional circulation within the Pacific Ocean and the associated advective and diffusive property flux divergences, data from approximately 3000 high-quality hydrographic stations collected on 40 zonal and meridional cruises have been merged into a physically consistent model. The majority of the stations were occupied as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), which took place in the 1990s. These data are supplemented by a few pre-WOCE surveys of similar quality, and time-averaged direct-velocity and historical hydrographic measurements about the equator. An inverse box model formalism is employed to estimate the absolute along-isopycnal velocity field, the magnitude and spatial distribution of the associated diapycnal flow and the corresponding diapycnal advective and diffusive property flux divergences. The resulting large-scale WOCE Pacific circulation can be described as two shallow overturning cells at mid- to low latitudes, one in each hemisphere, and a single deep cell which brings abyssal waters from the Southern Ocean into the Pacific where they upwell across isopycnals and are returned south as deep waters. Upwelling is seen to occur throughout most of the basin with generally larger dianeutral transport and greater mixing occurring at depth. The derived pattern of ocean heat transport divergence is compared to published results based on air-sea flux estimates. The synthesis suggests a strongly east/west oriented pattern of air-sea heat flux with heat loss to the atmosphere throughout most of the western basins, and a gain of heat throughout the tropics extending poleward through the eastern basins. The calculated meridional heat transport agrees well with previous hydrographic estimates. Consistent with many of the climatologies at a variety of latitudes as well, our meridional heat transport estimates tend toward lower values in both hemispheres.

  20. 3D Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Buoyant Flow and Heat Transport in a Curved Open Channel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-dimensional buoyancy-extended version of kappa-epsilon turbulence model was developed for simulating the turbulent flow and heat transport in a curved open channel. The density- induced buoyant force was included in the model, and the influence of temperature stratification on flow field was...

  1. 3D crustal-scale heat-flow regimes at a developing active margin (Taranaki Basin, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, K. F.; Funnell, R. H.; Nicol, A.; Fohrmann, M.; Bland, K. J.; King, P. R.

    2013-04-01

    The Taranaki Basin in the west of New Zealand's North Island has evolved from a rifted Mesozoic Gondwana margin to a basin straddling the Neogene convergent Australian-Pacific plate margin. However, given its proximity to the modern subduction front, Taranaki Basin is surprisingly cold when compared to other convergent margins. To investigate the effects of active margin evolution on the thermal regime of the Taranaki Basin we developed a 3D crustal-scale forward model using the petroleum industry-standard basin-modelling software Petromod™. The crustal structure inherited from Mesozoic Gondwana margin breakup and processes related to modern Hikurangi convergent margin initiation are identified to be the main controls on the thermal regime of the Taranaki Basin. Present-day surface heat flow across Taranaki on average is 59 mW/m2, but varies by as much as 30 mW/m2 due to the difference in crustal heat generation between mafic and felsic basement terranes alone. In addition, changes in mantle heat advection, tectonic subsidence, crustal thickening and basin inversion, together with related sedimentary processes result in variability of up to 10 mW/m2. Modelling suggests that increased heating of the upper crust due to additional mantle heat advection following the onset of subduction is an ongoing process and heating has only recently begun to reach the surface, explaining the relatively low surface heat flow. We propose that the depth of the subducted slab and related mantle convection processes control the thermal and structural regimes in the Taranaki Basin. The thermal effects of the subduction initiation process are modified and overprinted by the thickness, structure and composition of the lithosphere.

  2. Exploring Geothermal Energy Potential in Ireland through 3-D Geophysical-Petrological Modelling of Surface Heat-Flow and Crustal and Upper-Mantle Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullea, J.; Muller, M. R.; Jones, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    Little is known of Ireland's deep, low-enthalpy geothermal resources and the potential for space heating and/or electricity generation based on geothermal energy to displace Ireland's significant reliance on carbon-based fuels. IRETHERM (www.iretherm.ie) is a four-and-a-half year, all-island, academic-government-industry collaborative project, initiated in 2011, with the overarching objective of developing a strategic and holistic understanding of Ireland's geothermal energy potential through integrated modelling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One of the challenges in searching for deep geothermal resources in the relatively unexplored setting of Ireland lies in identifying those areas most likely to support significantly elevated temperatures at depth. Available borehole data, although sparse and clustered around areas of mineral and hydrocarbon interest, suggest a marked regional increase in surface heat-flow across Ireland, from ~40 mW/m2 in the south to >80 mW/m2 in the north. The origins of both the observed regional heat-flow trend and local temperature anomalies have not been investigated and are not currently understood. Although variations in the structure of the crust and lithosphere have been revealed by a number of active-source seismic and teleseismic experiments, their effects on surface heat-flow have not been modelled. Bulk 3-D variation in crustal heat-production across Ireland, which may contribute significantly to the observed regional and local temperature variations, has also not been determined. We investigate the origins of Ireland's regional heat-flow trend and regional and local temperature variations using the software package LitMod. This software combines petrological and geophysical modelling of the lithosphere and sub-lithospheric upper mantle within an internally consistent thermodynamic-geophysical framework, where all relevant properties are functions of temperature, pressure and chemical composition. The major regional controls on surface heat-flow and crustal temperatures are (a) crustal thickness, (b) crustal heat-production and (c) lithospheric thickness. These unknown geological variables are modelled in LitMod3D against geophysical observations at surface - heat-flow, topography, gravity and geoid data - to identify a crustal and lithospheric-mantle model that satisfies and accounts for all the observations at surface (most importantly in our context, heat-flow). We present a range of 3-D crustal and lithospheric-mantle models that satisfy all observable constraints and account for the regional sources of heat in Ireland. These models provide the basis for isolating local temperature anomalies and for assessing the extent to which local lithological variation in heat-production and thermal conductivity affects the distribution of temperatures in our target depth range of 2000 - 6000 m. Significant, well defined temperature anomalies that emerge from this work will be targeted for further assessment during IRETHERM's planned field program of magnetotelluric and controlled source electromagnetic surveys.

  3. Heat Transfer and Friction-Factor Methods Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes 3d Rough

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-01-21

    Three-dimensional roughened internally enhanced tubes have been shown to be one of the most energy efficient for turbulent, forced convection applications. However, there is only one prediction method presented in the open literature and that is restricted to three-dimensional sand-grain roughness. Other roughness types are being proposed: hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. There are no validated heat-transfer and friction-factor prediction methods for these different roughness shapes that can be used inmore »the transition and fully rough region. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor values, for a broad range of three-dimensional roughness types such as hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. Users of this program are heat-exchangers designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  4. 3D CFD ELECTROCHEMICAL AND HEAT TRANSFER MODEL OF AN INTERNALLY MANIFOLDED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Grant L. Hawkes; James E. O'Brien; Greg Tao

    2011-11-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in an internally manifolded planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) stack. This design is being evaluated at the Idaho National Laboratory for hydrogen production from nuclear power and process heat. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, operating potential, steam-electrode gas composition, oxygen-electrode gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Single-cell and five-cell results will be presented. Flow distribution through both models is discussed. Flow enters from the bottom, distributes through the inlet plenum, flows across the cells, gathers in the outlet plenum and flows downward making an upside-down ''U'' shaped flow pattern. Flow and concentration variations exist downstream of the inlet holes. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, oxygen-electrode and steam-electrode current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal efficiency, cell electrical efficiency, and Gibbs free energy are discussed and reported herein.

  5. Compact laser through improved heat conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1975-01-01

    A 16-joule-pulse laser has been developed in which a boron nitride heat-conductor enclosure is used to remove heat from the elements. Enclosure is smaller and lighter than systems in which cooling fluids are used.

  6. Solid water phantom heat conduction: Heating and cooling rates.

    PubMed

    Butson, Martin J; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K N

    2008-01-01

    Solid water is often the phantom material of choice for dosimetry procedures in radiotherapy high-energy X-ray and electron beam radiation calibration and quality assurance. This note investigates variation in heat conduction that can occur for a common commercially available solid water stack phantom when a temperature differential occurs between the phantom and ambient temperature. These variations in temperature can then affect radiation measurements and thus the accuracy of radiation dosimetry. In this manuscript, we aim to investigate the variations in temperature which can occur in radiation measurement incorporated (RMI) solid water phantoms, their thermal properties and the effects on radiation dosimetry which can occur because of temperature differentials. Results have shown that the rate of temperature change at a phantom center is a complex function but appears relatively proportional to the surface area of the phantom in normal clinical usage. It is also dependent on the thermal conductivity of any material in contact with the phantom; and the nature of the phantom construction, i.e., the number and thickness of slices within the phantom. A thermal time constant of approximately 20 min was measured for a 2-cm solid water phantom slice when located on a steel workbench in comparison to 60 min when located on a wooden workbench (linac couch insert). It is found that for larger solid water stack phantoms, a transient (within 1 degrees C) thermal equilibrium exists at the center for up to 2 h, before the temperature begins to change. This is assumed to be due to the insulating properties of multiple slices within the stack, whereby very small air spaces are introduced inhibiting the heat conduction through the phantom material. It is therefore recommended that the solid water/phantom material is kept within the treatment room for closest thermal accuracy conditions or at least placed within the room approximately 10 h before dosimetry measurements. If these options are not available, a standard linear interpolation method for calculation of temperature should be used to minimize uncertainty of temperature measurements. PMID:20041049

  7. Inverse Heat Conduction Using Measured Back Surface Temperature and Heat Flux

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yuwen

    . (1) h = convection heat transfer coefficient, W=m2 K k = thermal conductivity, W=m K L = thicknessInverse Heat Conduction Using Measured Back Surface Temperature and Heat Flux Jianhua Zhou, Yuwen are not directly measurable, but they can be estimated by solving an inverse heat conduction problem based

  8. Universality of anomalous one-dimensional heat conductivity Stefano Lepri*

    E-print Network

    Politi, Antonio

    Universality of anomalous one-dimensional heat conductivity Stefano Lepri* Istituto Nazionale di of heat conductivity for d 2. After the publication of the first convincing numerical evidence behavior is addressed with reference to the problem of heat transport in one-dimensional crystals, modeled

  9. Heat Conduction in Fine Scale Mixtures With Interfacial Contact Resistance

    E-print Network

    Heat Conduction in Fine Scale Mixtures With Interfacial Contact Resistance Robert Lipton Department of the imperfect heat conduction problem (1.3) - (1.6) is given by Z k1[ k2 k(x)ruk r dx + #12; Z k [uk][ ]ds = Z of Mathematical Sciences Worcester Polytechnic Institute 100 Institute Road Worcester, MA 01609 Abstract Heat

  10. Confirmatory analysis of the AP1000 passive residual heat removal heat exchanger with 3-D computational fluid dynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schwall, James R.; Karim, Naeem U.; Thakkar, Jivan G.; Taylor, Creed; Schulz, Terry; Wright, Richard F.

    2006-07-01

    The AP1000 is an 1100 MWe advanced nuclear power plant that uses passive safety features to enhance plant safety and to provide significant and measurable improvements in plant simplification, reliability, investment protection and plant costs. The AP1000 received final design approval from the US-NRC in 2004. The AP1000 design is based on the AP600 design that received final design approval in 1999. Wherever possible, the AP1000 plant configuration and layout was kept the same as AP600 to take advantage of the maturity of the design and to minimize new design efforts. As a result, the two-loop configuration was maintained for AP1000, and the containment vessel diameter was kept the same. It was determined that this significant power up-rate was well within the capability of the passive safety features, and that the safety margins for AP1000 were greater than those of operating PWRs. A key feature of the passive core cooling system is the passive residual heat removal heat exchanger (PRHR HX) that provides decay heat removal for postulated LOCA and non-LOCA events. The PRHR HX is a C-tube heat exchanger located in the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) above the core promoting natural circulation heat removal between the reactor cooling system and the tank. Component testing was performed for the AP600 PRHR HX to determine the heat transfer characteristics and to develop correlations to be used for the AP1000 safety analysis codes. The data from these tests were confirmed by subsequent integral tests at three separate facilities including the ROSA facility in Japan. Owing to the importance of this component, an independent analysis has been performed using the ATHOS-based computational fluid dynamics computer code PRHRCFD. Two separate models of the PRHR HX and IRWST have been developed representing the ROSA test geometry and the AP1000 plant geometry. Confirmation of the ROSA test results were used to validate PRHRCFD, and the AP1000 plant model was used to confirm the heat removal capacity for the full-sized heat exchanger. The results of these simulations show that the heat removal capacity of the PRHR HX is conservatively represented in the AP1000 safety analyses. (authors)

  11. Extended Development of Variable Conductance Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniuk, D.; Edwards, D. K.; Luedke, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    A high-capacity vapor-modulated heat pipe was designed and tested. In 1977, a program was undertaken to use the aforementioned heat pipe to study protection from freezing-point failure, increase control sensitivity, and transient behavior under a wide range of operating conditions in order to determine the full performance potential of the heat pipe. A new concept, based on the vapor-induced-dry-out principle, was developed for passive feedback temperature control as a heat pipe diode. This report documents this work and describes: (1) the experimental and theoretical investigation of the performance of the vapor-modulated heat pipe; and (2) the design, fabrication and test of the heat pipe diode.

  12. LavaSIM: the effect of heat transfer in 3D on lava flow characteristics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, E.

    2013-12-01

    Characteristics of lava flow are governed by many parameters like lava viscosity, effusion rate, ground topography, etc. The accuracy and applicability of lava flow simulation code is evaluated whether the numerical simulation can reproduce these features quantitatively, which is important from both strategic and scientific points of views. Many lava flow simulation codes are so far proposed, and they are classified into two categories, i.e., the deterministic and the probabilistic models. LavaSIM is one of the former category models, and has a disadvantage of time consuming. But LavaSIM can solves the equations of continuity, motion, energy by step and has an advantage in the calculation of three-dimensional analysis with solid-liquid two phase flow, including the heat transfer between lava, solidified crust, air, water and ground, and three-dimensional convection in liquid lava. In other word, we can check the detailed structure of lava flow by LavaSIM. Therefore, this code can produce both channeled and fan-dispersive flows. The margin of the flow is solidified by cooling and these solidified crusts control the behavior of successive lava flow. In case of a channel flow, the solidified margin supports the stable central main flow and elongates the lava flow distance. The cross section of lava flow shows that the liquid lava flows between solidified crusts. As for the lava extrusion flow rate, LavaSIM can include the time function as well as the location of the vents. In some cases, some parts of the solidified wall may be broken by the pressure of successive flow and/or re-melting. These mechanisms could characterize complex features of the observed lava flows at many volcanoes in the world. To apply LavaSIM to the benchmark tests organized by V-hub is important to improve the lava flow evaluation technique.

  13. 3D near-to-surface conductivity reconstruction by inversion of VETEM data using the distorted Born iterative method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, G.L.; Chew, W.C.; Cui, T.J.; Aydiner, A.A.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) subsurface imaging by using inversion of data obtained from the very early time electromagnetic system (VETEM) was discussed. The study was carried out by using the distorted Born iterative method to match the internal nonlinear property of the 3D inversion problem. The forward solver was based on the total-current formulation bi-conjugate gradient-fast Fourier transform (BCCG-FFT). It was found that the selection of regularization parameter follow a heuristic rule as used in the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm so that the iteration is stable.

  14. Superfluid Heat Conduction and the Cooling of Magnetized Neutron Stars

    E-print Network

    Deborah N. Aguilera; Vincenzo Cirigliano; José A. Pons; Sanjay Reddy; Rishi Sharma

    2008-07-29

    We report on a new mechanism for heat conduction in the neutron star crust. We find that collective modes of superfluid neutron matter, called superfluid phonons (sPhs), can influence heat conduction in magnetized neutron stars. They can dominate the heat conduction transverse to magnetic field when the magnetic field $B \\gsim 10^{13}$ G. At density $\\rho \\simeq 10^{12}-10^{14} $ g/cm$^3$ the conductivity due to sPhs is significantly larger than that due to lattice phonons and is comparable to electron conductivity when temperature $\\simeq 10^8$ K. This new mode of heat conduction can limit the surface anisotropy in highly magnetized neutron stars. Cooling curves of magnetized neutron stars with and without superfluid heat conduction could show observationally discernible differences.

  15. Superfluid Heat Conduction and the Cooling of Magnetized Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, Deborah N.; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Reddy, Sanjay; Sharma, Rishi; Pons, Jose A.

    2009-03-06

    We report on a new mechanism for heat conduction in the neutron star crust. We find that collective modes of superfluid neutron matter, called superfluid phonons, can influence heat conduction in magnetized neutron stars. They can dominate the heat conduction transverse to the magnetic field when the magnetic field B > or approx. 10{sup 13} G. At a density of {rho}{approx_equal}10{sup 12}-10{sup 14} g/cm{sup 3}, the conductivity due to superfluid phonons is significantly larger than that due to lattice phonons and is comparable to electron conductivity when the temperature {approx_equal}10{sup 8} K. This new mode of heat conduction can limit the surface anisotropy in highly magnetized neutron stars. Cooling curves of magnetized neutron stars with and without superfluid heat conduction could show observationally discernible differences.

  16. Superfluid heat conduction and the cooling of magnetized neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Deborah N; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Pons, José A; Reddy, Sanjay; Sharma, Rishi

    2009-03-01

    We report on a new mechanism for heat conduction in the neutron star crust. We find that collective modes of superfluid neutron matter, called superfluid phonons, can influence heat conduction in magnetized neutron stars. They can dominate the heat conduction transverse to the magnetic field when the magnetic field B> approximately 10(13) G. At a density of rho approximately 10(12)-10(14) g/cm3, the conductivity due to superfluid phonons is significantly larger than that due to lattice phonons and is comparable to electron conductivity when the temperature approximately 10(8) K. This new mode of heat conduction can limit the surface anisotropy in highly magnetized neutron stars. Cooling curves of magnetized neutron stars with and without superfluid heat conduction could show observationally discernible differences. PMID:19392503

  17. Superfluid heat conduction and the cooling of magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Reddy, Sanjay; Sharma, Rishi; Aguilera, Deborah N

    2008-01-01

    We report on a new mechanism for heat conduction in the neutron star crust. We find that collective modes of superftuid neutron matter, called superfiuid phonons (sPhs), can influence heat conduction in magnetized neutron stars. They can dominate the heat conduction transverse to magnetic field when the magnetic field B {approx}> 10{sup 13} C. At density p {approx_equal} 10{sup 12}--10{sup 14} g/cm{sup 3} the conductivity due to sPhs is significantly larger than that due to lattice phonons and is comparable to electron conductivity at when temperature {approx_equal} 10{sup 8} K. This new mode of heat conduction can limit the surface anisotropy in highly magnetized neutron stars. Cooling curves of magnetized neutron stars with and without superfluid heat conduction show observationally discernible differences.

  18. Theory and design of variable conductance heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive review and analysis of all aspects of heat pipe technology pertinent to the design of self-controlled, variable conductance devices for spacecraft thermal control is presented. Subjects considered include hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, heat transfer into and out of the pipe, fluid selection, materials compatibility and variable conductance control techniques. The report includes a selected bibliography of pertinent literature, analytical formulations of various models and theories describing variable conductance heat pipe behavior, and the results of numerous experiments on the steady state and transient performance of gas controlled variable conductance heat pipes. Also included is a discussion of VCHP design techniques.

  19. Determining the fraction of dust heating from young and old stellar populations with 3D dust radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natale, Giovanni; Popescu, Cristina; Tuffs, Richard

    2015-08-01

    A major difficulty hampering the accuracy of UV/optical star formation rate tracers is the effect of interstellar dust, absorbing and scattering light produced by both young and old stellar populations (SPs). Although empirically calibrated corrections or energy balance SED fitting are often used for fast de-reddening of galaxy stellar emission, eventually only radiative transfer calculations can provide self-consistent predictions of galaxy model spectra, taking into account important factors such as galaxy inclination, different morphological components, non-local heating of the dust and scattered radiation. In addition, dust radiative transfer can be used to determine the fraction of monochromatic dust emission which is powered by either young or old SPs. This calculation needs to take into account the different response of the dust grains to the UV and optical radiation field, depending on the grain size and composition. We determined the dust heating fractions, on both global and local scales, for high-resolution galaxy models by using our 3D ray-tracing dust radiative transfer code "DART-Ray". We will show the results obtained using this method and discuss the consequences for star formation rate indicators.

  20. Heat conduction in carbon nanotube materials: Strong effect of intrinsic thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Heat conduction in carbon nanotube materials: Strong effect of intrinsic thermal conductivity conductivity of interconnected networks of bundles in carbon nanotube (CNT) films reveals a strong effect of the finite thermal conductivity kT of individual nanotubes on the conductivity k of the CNT materials

  1. Implementation of a 3D halo neutral model in the TRANSP code and application to projected neutral-beam-heated

    E-print Network

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Implementation of a 3D halo neutral model in the TRANSP code and application to projected neutral: medley@pppl.gov Abstract A 3D halo neutral code developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for the National Spherical Torus experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U). The 3D halo neutral code uses a "beam-in-a-box" model

  2. Constraints on the Lost City Hydrothermal System from borehole thermal data; 3-D models of heat flow and hydrothermal circulation in an oceanic core complex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarenko, S.; McCaig, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    A perennial problem in near-ridge hydrothermal circulation is that the only directly measurable data to test models is often vent fluid temperature. Surface heat flow measurements may be available but without the underlying thermal structure it is not known if they are transient and affected by local hydrothermal flow, or conductive. The Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex at 30 °N on the mid-Atlantic Ridge, offers a unique opportunity to better constrain hydrothermal circulation models. The temperature profile in gabbroic rocks of IODP Hole 1309D was measured in IODPExpedition 340T, and found to be near-conductive, but with a slight inflexion at ~750 mbsf indicating downward advection of fluid above that level. The lack of deep convection is especially remarkable given that the long-lived Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is located only 5km to the south. We have modelled hydrothermal circulation in the Massif using Comsol Multiphysics, comparing 2-D and 3-D topographic models and using temperature-dependent conductivity to give the best estimate of heatflow into the Massif. We can constrain maximum permeability in gabbro below 750 mbsf to 5e-17 m2. The thermal gradient in the upper part of the borehole can be matched with a permeability of 3e-14 m2 in a 750 m thick layer parallel to the surface of the massif, with upflow occurring in areas of high topography and downflow at the location of the borehole. However in 3-D the precise flow pattern is quite model dependent, and the thermal structure can be matched either by downflow centred on the borehole at lower permeability or centred a few hundred metres from the borehole at higher permeability. The borehole gradient is compatible with the longevity (>120 kyr) and outflow temperature (40-90 °C) of the LCHF either with a deep more permeable (1e-14 m2 to 1e-15 m2) domain beneath the vent site in 2-D or a permeable fault slot 500 to 1000m wide and parallel to the transform fault in 3-D. In both cases topography exerts a strong control on vent location, and steep boundaries between permeable and impermeable domains stabilise long term steady venting. Work is in progress to model the thermal evolution of the massif during fault exhumation over the last 1.2 million years, comparing this with the present day heatflow estimated from measurements.

  3. Influence of major fault zones on 3-D coupled fluid and heat transport for the Brandenburg region (NE German Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, Y.; Cacace, M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Noack, V.

    2014-04-01

    To quantify the influence of major fault zones on the groundwater and thermal field, 3-D finite-element simulations are carried out. Two fault zones - the Gardelegen and Lausitz escarpments - have been integrated into an existing 3-D structure of the Brandenburg region in northeastern Germany. Different geological scenarios in terms of modelled fault permeability have been considered, of which two end-member models are discussed in detail. In addition, results from these end-member simulations are compared to a reference case in which no faults are considered. The study provides interesting results with respect to the interaction between faults and surrounding sediments and how it affects the regional groundwater circulation system and thermal field. Impermeable fault zones seem to induce no remarkable effects on the temperature distribution; that is, the thermal field is similar to the no-fault model. In addition, tight faults have only a local impact on the fluid circulation within a domain of limited spatial extent centred on the fault zone. Fluid flow from the surrounding aquifers is deviated in close proximity of the fault zones acting as hydraulic barriers that prevent lateral fluid inflow into the fault zones. Permeable fault zones induce a pronounced thermal signature with alternating up- and downward flow along the same structures. Fluid flow along the plane of the faults is principally driven by existing hydraulic head gradients, but may be further enhanced by buoyancy forces. Within recharge domains, fluid advection induces a strong cooling in the fault zones. Discharge domains at shallow depth levels (~<-450 m) are instead characterized by the presence of rising warm fluids, which results in a local increase of temperatures which are up to 15 °C higher than in the no-fault case. This study is the first attempt to investigate the impact of major fault zones on a 3-D basin scale for the coupled fluid and heat transport in the Brandenburg region. The approach enables a quantification of mechanisms controlling fluid flow and temperature distribution both within surrounding sediments and fault zones as well as how they dynamically interact. Therefore, the results from the modelling provide useful indications for geothermal energy exploration.

  4. Anomalous heat conduction and anomalous diffusion in one dimensional systems

    E-print Network

    Baowen Li; Jiao Wang

    2003-06-23

    We establish a connection between anomalous heat conduction and anomalous diffusion in one dimensional systems. It is shown that if the mean square of the displacement of the particle is $ =2Dt^{\\alpha} (0conductivity can be expressed in terms of the system size $L$ as $\\kappa = cL^{\\beta}$ with $\\beta=2-2/\\alpha$. This result predicts that a normal diffusion ($\\alpha =1$) implies a normal heat conduction obeying the Fourier law ($\\beta=0$), a superdiffusion ($\\alpha>1$) implies an anomalous heat conduction with a divergent thermal conductivity ($\\beta>0$), and more interestingly, a subdiffusion ($\\alpha heat conduction with a convergent thermal conductivity ($\\beta<0$), consequently, the system is a thermal insulator in the thermodynamic limit. Existing numerical data support our results.

  5. Heat conduction errors and time lag in cryogenic thermometer installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshawsky, I.

    1973-01-01

    Installation practices are recommended that will increase rate of heat exchange between the thermometric sensing element and the cryogenic fluid and that will reduce the rate of undesired heat transfer to higher-temperature objects. Formulas and numerical data are given that help to estimate the magnitude of heat-conduction errors and of time lag in response.

  6. 3D mapping of chemical distribution from melting at lower mantle conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, S. M.; Nabiei, F.; Cantoni, M.; Badro, J.; Gaal, R.; Gillet, P.

    2014-12-01

    The laser-heated diamond anvil cell is a unique tool for subjecting materials to pressures over few hundreds of GPa and temperatures of thousands of Kelvins which enables us to experimentally simulate the inaccessible interiors of planets. However, small sample size, laser profile and thermally conductive diamonds cause temperature gradients of 1000s K over a few microns which also affects chemical and structural distribution of phases in the sample. We have examined samples of San Carlos olivine (Mg,Fe)2SiO3 powder melted in the diamond anvil cell by double-sided and single-sided laser heating for 3-6 minutes to ~3000 K at 35-37 GPa. Moreover, MgO is used as an insulating media in one of the sample. Recovered samples were analyzed by a combination of focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) detector. Images and chemical maps were acquired for ~300 slices with ~70 nm depth from each sample, comprising about half of the heated zone. Detailed chemical and structural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of lamellas prepared from the remaining section of the samples will also be presented. In all samples the heated zone included (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite-structured bridgmanite (PV) phase and two (Mg, Fe)O phases, one of which, magnesiowüstite (MW), is richer in iron than the other one, ferropericlase (FP). In double-side heated samples we observe a Fe-rich quenched melt core surrounded by MW phase. Our results show that with increasing heating time, Fe migrates to the molten center of the sample. In the single-side heated sample, the Fe-rich MW phase is concentrated in the center of heated zone. In all samples a FP crust was observed around the heated zone. This crust, however, is broken in the upper part (colder part) of the single-side heated sample due the high asymmetrical temperature gradient within the sample. The results confirm the importance of double-side heating and insulating media for generating homogenous central temperature and chemical distribution.

  7. HST3D; a computer code for simulation of heat and solute transport in three-dimensional ground-water flow systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Heat- and Soil-Transport Program (HST3D) simulates groundwater flow and associated heat and solute transport in three dimensions. The three governing equations are coupled through the interstitial pore velocity, the dependence of the fluid density on pressure, temperature, the solute-mass fraction , and the dependence of the fluid viscosity on temperature and solute-mass fraction. The solute transport equation is for only a single, solute species with possible linear equilibrium sorption and linear decay. Finite difference techniques are used to discretize the governing equations using a point-distributed grid. The flow-, heat- and solute-transport equations are solved , in turn, after a particle Gauss-reduction scheme is used to modify them. The modified equations are more tightly coupled and have better stability for the numerical solutions. The basic source-sink term represents wells. A complex well flow model may be used to simulate specified flow rate and pressure conditions at the land surface or within the aquifer, with or without pressure and flow rate constraints. Boundary condition types offered include specified value, specified flux, leakage, heat conduction, and approximate free surface, and two types of aquifer influence functions. All boundary conditions can be functions of time. Two techniques are available for solution of the finite difference matrix equations. One technique is a direct-elimination solver, using equations reordered by alternating diagonal planes. The other technique is an iterative solver, using two-line successive over-relaxation. A restart option is available for storing intermediate results and restarting the simulation at an intermediate time with modified boundary conditions. This feature also can be used as protection against computer system failure. Data input and output may be in metric (SI) units or inch-pound units. Output may include tables of dependent variables and parameters, zoned-contour maps, and plots of the dependent variables versus time. (Lantz-PTT)

  8. Efficient Reformulation of HOTFGM: Heat Conduction with Variable Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Yi; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Arnold, Steven M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGMs) have become one of the major research topics in the mechanics of materials community during the past fifteen years. FGMs are heterogeneous materials, characterized by spatially variable microstructure, and thus spatially variable macroscopic properties, introduced to enhance material or structural performance. The spatially variable material properties make FGMs challenging to analyze. The review of the various techniques employed to analyze the thermodynamical response of FGMs reveals two distinct and fundamentally different computational strategies, called uncoupled macromechanical and coupled micromechanical approaches by some investigators. The uncoupled macromechanical approaches ignore the effect of microstructural gradation by employing specific spatial variations of material properties, which are either assumed or obtained by local homogenization, thereby resulting in erroneous results under certain circumstances. In contrast, the coupled approaches explicitly account for the micro-macrostructural interaction, albeit at a significantly higher computational cost. The higher-order theory for functionally graded materials (HOTFGM) developed by Aboudi et al. is representative of the coupled approach. However, despite its demonstrated utility in applications where micro-macrostructural coupling effects are important, the theory's full potential is yet to be realized because the original formulation of HOTFGM is computationally intensive. This, in turn, limits the size of problems that can be solved due to the large number of equations required to mimic realistic material microstructures. Therefore, a basis for an efficient reformulation of HOTFGM, referred to as user-friendly formulation, is developed herein, and subsequently employed in the construction of the efficient reformulation using the local/global conductivity matrix approach. In order to extend HOTFGM's range of applicability, spatially variable thermal conductivity capability at the local level is incorporated into the efficient reformulation. Analytical solutions to validate both the user-friendly and efficient reformulations am also developed. Volume discretization sensitivity and validation studies, as well as a practical application of the developed efficient reformulation are subsequently carried out. The presented results illustrate the accuracy and implementability of both the user-friendly formulation and the efficient reformulation of HOTFGM.

  9. Thermal Conductivity of Composites Under Di erent Heating Scenarios

    E-print Network

    Thermal Conductivity of Composites Under Di#11;erent Heating Scenarios H.T. Banks #3; , J.H. Hogan y , R.E. Tirpak y , S. Wynne #3; October 5, 2003 Abstract We study the overall thermal conductivity thermal conductivities, such as diamond dust, carbon #12;bers, or aluminum particles, are added to create

  10. Heat conduction in relativistic neutral gases revisited

    E-print Network

    A. L. Garcia-Perciante; A. R. Mendez

    2010-09-30

    The kinetic theory of dilute gases to first order in the gradients yields linear relations between forces and fluxes. The heat flux for the relativistic gas has been shown to be related not only to the temperature gradient but also to the density gradient in the representation where number density, temperature and hydrodynamic velocity are the independent state variables. In this work we show the calculation of the corresponding transport coefficients from the full Boltzmann equation and compare the magnitude of the relativistic correction.

  11. Heat conduction in one dimensional nonintegrable systems

    E-print Network

    Bambi Hu; Baowen Li; Hong Zhao

    2000-02-14

    Two classes of 1D nonintegrable systems represented by the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) model and the discrete $\\phi^4$ model are studied to seek a generic mechanism of energy transport in microscopic level sustaining macroscopic behaviors. The results enable us to understand why the class represented by the $\\phi^4$ model has a normal thermal conductivity and the class represented by the FPU model does not even though the temperature gradient can be established.

  12. Heat conductivity of DNA double helix

    E-print Network

    Savin, Alexander V; Kikot, Irina P; Manevitch, Leonid I; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2010-01-01

    A coarse-grain (CG) model of DNA double helix is proposed in which each base is represented by 6 grains; the grains interact via effective potentials inferred from classical molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories based on a well-established all-atom potential function. Comparisons of 10 ns long MD trajectories between the CG and the corresponding all-atom model show similar root-mean-square deviations from the canonical B-form DNA, and similar structural fluctuations. At the same time, the CG model is 10 to 100 times faster depending on the length of the DNA fragment in the simulation. Analysis of dispersion curves derived from the CG model yields longitudinal sound velocity and torsional stiffness in close agreement with the experiment. The computational efficiency of the model makes it possible to calculate thermal conductivity of a single DNA molecule not yet available experimentally. For a uniform (poly-G) DNA the estimated conductivity coefficient is 0.3 W/mK which is half the value of thermal conductivity...

  13. Critical factors affecting the 3D microstructural formation in hybrid conductive adhesive materials studied by X-ray nano-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen Karen; Figueroa-Santos, Miriam Aileen; Petrash, Stanislas; Garcia-Miralles, Jose; Wang, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A `stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to elaborate such a phenomenon. The findings and the technique developed in this work will facilitate the future advancement of conductive adhesives to have a great impact in micro-electronics and other applications.Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A `stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to elaborate such a phenomenon. The findings and the technique developed in this work will facilitate the future advancement of conductive adhesives to have a great impact in micro-electronics and other applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06068g

  14. Anomalous heat conduction in asymmetric graphene Y junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chenhui; Pan, Feng; Niu, Chunyao; Chen, Weiguang; Jia, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Through MD simulation of the transient heat pulse propagation in asymmetric Y junction, we report a novel type of controllable heat conduction in graphene nanostructure. The Y junction consists of a steam breaking into a wide branch and a narrow branch. In contrast to the classic situation where heat conductivity is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the material, the transmitted part of the heat pulse in the narrow branch is anomalously much stronger than that in the wide branch. As we increase the width ratio between the wide branch and narrow branch, transmitted coefficient in the narrow branch decreases a little, while in the wide branch, it decreases sharply. Specifically under 2:1 width ratio, transmitted coefficient of the narrow branch is three times that of the coefficient of the wide branch. Further analysis shows that the anomalous heat conduction is primarily induced by the behavior of the longitude vibrational modes.

  15. Experimental evidence of hyperbolic heat conduction in processed meat

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, K.; Kumar, S.; Vedavarz, A.; Moallemi, M.K.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to present experimental evidence of the wave nature of heat propagation in processed meat and to demonstrate that the hyperbolic heat conduction model is an accurate representation, on a macroscopic level, of the heat conduction process in such biological material. The value of the characteristic thermal time of a specific material, processed bologna meat, is determined experimentally. As a part of the work different thermophysical properties are also measured. The measured temperature distributions in the samples are compared with the Fourier results and significant deviation between the two is observed, especially during the initial stages of the transient conduction process. The measured values are found to match the theoretical non-Fourier hyperbolic predictions very well. The superposition of waves occurring inside the meat sample due to the hyperbolic nature of heat conduction is also proved experimentally. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Kohlrausch Heat Conductivity Apparatus for Intermediate or Advanced Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, H. G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes student experiment in measuring heat conductivity according to Kohlrausch's method. Theory, apparatus design, and experimental procedure is outlined. Results for copper are consistent to within 2 percent. (LC)

  17. Weak coupling limits in a stochastic model of heat conduction

    E-print Network

    Frank Redig; Kiamars Vafayi

    2011-01-14

    We study the Brownian momentum process, a model of heat conduction, weakly coupled to heat baths. In two different settings of weak coupling to the heat baths, we study the non-equilibrium steady state and its proximity to the local equilibrium measure in terms of the strength of coupling. For three and four site systems, we obtain the two-point correlation function and show it is generically not multilinear.

  18. Global 3-D imaging of mantle electrical conductivity based on inversion of observatory C-responses - I. An approach and its verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvshinov, Alexey; Semenov, Alexey

    2012-06-01

    We present a novel frequency-domain inverse solution to recover the 3-D electrical conductivity distribution in the mantle. The solution is based on analysis of local C-responses. It exploits an iterative gradient-type method - limited-memory quasi-Newton method - for minimizing the penalty function consisting of data misfit and regularization terms. The integral equation code is used as a forward engine to calculate responses and data misfit gradients during inversion. An adjoint approach is implemented to compute misfit gradients efficiently. Further improvements in computational load come from parallelizing the scheme with respect to frequencies, and from setting the most time-consuming part of the forward calculations - calculation of Green's tensors - apart from the inversion loop. Convergence, performance, and accuracy of our 3-D inverse solution are demonstrated with a synthetic numerical example. A companion paper applies the strategy set forth here to real data.

  19. Heat conduction in relativistic systems: alternatives and perspectives

    E-print Network

    C. S. Lopez-Monsalvo

    2010-11-30

    The non-equilibrium thermodynamics of relativistic systems have a rich phenomenology. The simplest phenomenon in the class of dissipative processes is that of heat. This letter presents a brief summary of the efforts made to tackle the problem of relativistic heat conduction. In particular, we focus on the multi-fluid approach to relativistic dissipation.

  20. Stationary non-equilibrium properties for a heat conduction model

    E-print Network

    Cedric Bernardin

    2008-08-05

    We consider a stochastic heat conduction model for solids composed by N interacting atoms. The system is in contact with two heat baths at different temperature $T_\\ell$ and $T_r$. The bulk dynamics conserve two quantities: the energy and the deformation between atoms. If $T_\\ell \

  1. Nanometer-scale heat-conductivity measurements on biological samples.

    PubMed

    Haeberle, W; Pantea, M; Hoerber, J K H

    2006-01-01

    With semiconductor structures reaching the nanometer scale, heat conductivity measurements on the mesoscopic range of some tens of nanometers become an increasingly important aspect for the further improvement in digital processing and storage. Also the attempt to use atomic-force microscopy (AFM) technology for high-density data storage by writing information bits as nanometer-sized indentations into a polymer substrate with a heated cantilever tip asks for a careful investigation of the nano-scale heat-conductivity properties of polymers. Furthermore, in many AFM imaging applications, heat conductivity can provide additional information about the material the imaged structures consist of. In this respect, heat conductivity can also become very interesting in studies of usually quite heterogeneous biological samples, if the resolution can attain the nanometer range. In standard scanning thermal microscopy application, the tip forms a thermocouple, which precludes high-resolution imaging, as thermocouples cannot be made sufficiently small. In this paper, which focuses on biological applications, we demonstrate that by using an ultra sharp AFM cantilever with a Joule heating element above the tip structure different molecular components can be distinguished thanks to their different heat-conductivity properties. In this case, the resolution is determined by the actual tip size, and it can reach 10nm. PMID:16730408

  2. Normal heat conductivity in chains capable of dissociation

    E-print Network

    O. V. Gendelman; A. V. Savin

    2013-12-26

    The paper suggests a resolution for recent controversy over convergence of heat conductivity in one-dimensional chains with asymmetric nearest-neighbor potential. We conjecture that the convergence is promoted not by the mere asymmetry of the potential, but due to ability of the chain to dissociate. In other terms, the attractive part of the potential function should approach a finite value as the distance between the neighbors grows. To clarify this point, we study the simplest model of this sort -- a chain of linearly elastic disks with finite diameter. If the distance between the disk centers exceeds their diameter, the disks cease to interact. Formation of gaps between the disks is the only possible mechanism for scattering of the oscillatory waves. Heat conduction in this system turns out to be convergent. Moreover, an asymptotic behavior of the heat conduction coefficient for the case of large densities and relatively low temperatures obeys simple Arrhenius-type law. In the limit of low densities, the heat conduction coefficient converges due to triple disk collisions. Numeric observations in both limits are grounded by analytic arguments. In a chain with Lennard-Jones nearest-neighbor potential the heat conductivity also saturates in a thermodynamic limit and the coefficient also scales according to the Arrhenius law for low temperatures. This finding points on a universal role played by the possibility of dissociation, as convergence of the heat conduction coefficient is considered.

  3. Critical factors affecting the 3D microstructural formation in hybrid conductive adhesive materials studied by X-ray nano-tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Figueroa-Santos, Miriam Aileen; Petrash, Stanislas; Garcia-Miralles, Jose; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-21

    Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A 'stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to elaborate such a phenomenon. The findings and the technique developed in this work will facilitate the future advancement of conductive adhesives to have a great impact in micro-electronics and other applications. PMID:25474162

  4. Biotemplate synthesis of polyaniline@cellulose nanowhiskers/natural rubber nanocomposites with 3D hierarchical multiscale structure and improved electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodong; Lu, Canhui; Xu, Haoyu; Zhang, Xinxing; Zhou, Zehang

    2014-12-10

    Development of novel and versatile strategies to construct conductive polymer composites with low percolation thresholds and high mechanical properties is of great importance. In this work, we report a facile and effective strategy to prepare polyaniline@cellulose nanowhiskers (PANI@CNs)/natural rubber (NR) nanocomposites with 3D hierarchical multiscale structure. Specifically, PANI was synthesized in situ on the surface of CNs biotemplate to form PANI@CNs nanohybrids with high aspect ratio and good dispersity. Then NR latex was introduced into PANI@CNs nanohybrids suspension to enable the self-assembly of PANI@CNs nanohybrids onto NR latex microspheres. During cocoagulation process, PANI@CNs nanohybrids selectively located in the interstitial space between NR microspheres and organized into a 3D hierarchical multiscale conductive network structure in NR matrix. The combination of the biotemplate synthesis of PANI and latex cocoagulation method significantly enhanced the electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of the NR-based nanocomposites simultaneously. The electrical conductivity of PANI@CNs/NR nanocomposites containing 5 phr PANI showed 11 orders of magnitude higher than that of the PANI/NR composites at the same loading fraction,; meanwhile, the percolation threshold was drastically decreased from 8.0 to 3.6 vol %. PMID:25384188

  5. A variable conductance heat pipe flight experiment - Performance in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanous, D. J.; Marcus, B. D.; Kirkpatrick, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The Ames Heat Pipe Experiment (AHPE) is a variable conductance heat pipe/radiator system which was launched aboard the OAO-C spacecraft in August, 1972. All available flight data was reviewed and those from a few orbits were selected for correlation with predictions from an analytical model of the system. The principal conclusion of this study is that gas controlled variable conductance heat pipes can perform reliably for long time periods in the space environment and can effectively provide temperature stabilization for spacecraft electronics. Furthermore, the performance of such systems can be adequately predicted using existing analysis tools.

  6. Single-photon heat conduction in electrical circuits

    E-print Network

    P. J. Jones; J. A. M. Huhtamäki; K. Y. Tan; M. Möttönen

    2011-07-14

    We study photonic heat conduction between two resistors coupled weakly to a single superconducting microwave cavity. At low enough temperature, the dominating part of the heat exchanged between the resistors is transmitted by single-photon excitations of the fundamental mode of the cavity. This manifestation of single-photon heat conduction should be experimentally observable with the current state of the art. Our scheme can possibly be utilized in remote interference-free temperature control of electric components and environment engineering for superconducting qubits coupled to cavities.

  7. Heat Pipe Embedded AlSiC Plates for High Conductivity - Low CTE Heat Spreaders

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Matthew ); Weyant, J.; Garner, S. ); Occhionero, M. )

    2010-01-07

    Heat pipe embedded aluminum silicon carbide (AlSiC) plates are innovative heat spreaders that provide high thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Since heat pipes are two phase devices, they demonstrate effective thermal conductivities ranging between 50,000 and 200,000 W/m-K, depending on the heat pipe length. Installing heat pipes into an AlSiC plate dramatically increases the plate’s effective thermal conductivity. AlSiC plates alone have a thermal conductivity of roughly 200 W/m-K and a CTE ranging from 7-12 ppm/ deg C, similar to that of silicon. An equivalent sized heat pipe embedded AlSiC plate has effective thermal conductivity ranging from 400 to 500 W/m-K and retains the CTE of AlSiC.

  8. Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah; Zakaria, Nor Zaini

    2014-07-01

    For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

  9. Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah; Zakaria, Nor Zaini

    2014-07-10

    For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

  10. An Experiment in Heat Conduction Using Hollow Cylinders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortuno, M.; Marquez, A.; Gallego, S.; Neipp, C.; Belendez, A.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental apparatus was designed and built to allow students to carry out heat conduction experiments in hollow cylinders made of different materials, as well as to determine the thermal conductivity of these materials. The evolution of the temperature difference between the inner and outer walls of the cylinder as a function of time is…

  11. Quantal Heating of Conducting Electrons with Discrete Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Vitkalov, S. A.; Bykov, A. A.

    2011-12-23

    Usually heating of conducting electrons by dc electric field results in an increase of electron temperature. In this paper we show that the dc heating of 2D electrons, placed in quantized magnetic fields, results in a peculiar electron distribution, which has the same broadening or an effective 'temperature' as the unbiased electron system. The quantal heating, however, violates strongly the Ohm's Law. In the conducting system with discrete electron spectrum the quantal heating results in spectacular decrease of electron resistance and transition of the electrons into a state with zero differential resistance (ZDR). Finally the heating leads to apparent dc driven metal-insulator transition, which correlates with the transition into the ZDR state. The correlation is very unexpected and is not understood.

  12. Quantal Heating of Conducting Electrons with Discrete Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkalov, S. A.; Bykov, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    Usually heating of conducting electrons by dc electric field results in an increase of electron temperature. In this paper we show that the dc heating of 2D electrons, placed in quantized magnetic fields, results in a peculiar electron distribution, which has the same broadening or an effective "temperature" as the unbiased electron system. The quantal heating, however, violates strongly the Ohm's Law. In the conducting system with discrete electron spectrum the quantal heating results in spectacular decrease of electron resistance and transition of the electrons into a state with zero differential resistance (ZDR). Finally the heating leads to apparent dc driven metal-insulator transition, which correlates with the transition into the ZDR state. The correlation is very unexpected and is not understood.

  13. 3D finite volume groundwater and heat transport modeling with non-orthogonal grids, using a coordinate transformation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, W.; Rath, V.; Wolf, A.; Clauser, C.

    2008-03-01

    Many popular groundwater modeling codes are based on the finite differences or finite volume method for orthogonal grids. In cases of complex subsurface geometries this type of grid either leads to coarse geometric representations or to extremely fine meshes. We use a coordinate transformation method (CTM) to circumvent this shortcoming. In computational fluid dynamics (CFD), this method has been applied successfully to the general Navier-Stokes equation. The method is based on tensor analysis and performs a transformation of a curvilinear into a rectangular unit grid, on which a modified formulation of the differential equations is applied. Therefore, it is not necessary to reformulate the code in total. We applied the CTM to an existing three-dimensional code (SHEMAT), a simulator for heat conduction and advection in porous media. The finite volume discretization scheme for the non-orthogonal, structured, hexahedral grid leads to a 19-point stencil and a correspondingly banded system matrix. The implementation is straightforward and it is possible to use some existing routines without modification. The accuracy of the modified code is demonstrated for single phase flow on a two-dimensional analytical solution for flow and heat transport. Additionally, a simple case of potential flow is shown for a two-dimensional grid which is increasingly deformed. The result reveals that the corresponding error increases only slightly. Finally, a thermal free-convection benchmark is discussed. The result shows, that the solution obtained with the new code is in good agreement with the ones obtained by other codes.

  14. A new heat-conduction logging technique and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Li, Zishun; Zhu, Guotong; Fu, Zhifang

    2005-06-01

    The results of a heat-conduction experiment with a central point source in a sand barrel shows that the temperature of the heat source increase much faster in sand saturated with oil and air (dry sand) than in water sand. During cooling the temperature of the central heat source goes down slower in oil- or air-saturated sands than in water sands. Based on the theory of heat-conduction in porous media and the experimental results, we developed a new heat-conduction logging technique which utilizes an artificial heat source (dynamite charge or electric heater) to heat up target formations in the borehole and then measure the change of temperature at a later time. Post-frac oil production is shown to be directly proportional to the size of the temperature anomaly when other reservoir parameters are fairly consistent. The method is used to evaluate potential oil production for marginal reservoirs in the FY formation in Song-Liao basin of China.

  15. Heat conductance in nonlinear lattices at small temperature gradients

    E-print Network

    T. Yu. Astakhova; V. N. Likhachev; G. A. Vinogradov

    2010-06-09

    This paper proposes a new methodological framework within which the heat conductance in 1D lattices can be studied. The total process of heat conductance is separated into two parts where the first one is the equilibrium process at equal temperatures $T$ of both ends and the second one -- non-equilibrium with the temperature $\\Delta T$ of one end and zero temperature of the other. This approach allows significant decrease of computational time at $\\Delta T \\to 0$. The threshold temperature $T_{\\rm thr}$ is found which scales $T_{\\rm thr}(N) \\sim N^{-3}$ with the lattice size $N$ and by convention separates two mechanisms of heat conductance: phonon mechanism dominates at $T T_{\\rm thr}$. Solitons and breathers are directly visualized in numerical experiments. The problem of heat conductance in non-linear lattices in the limit $\\Delta T \\to 0$ can be reduced to the heat conductance of harmonic lattice with time-dependent stochastic rigidities determined by the equilibrium process at temperature $T$. The detailed analysis is done for the $\\beta$-FPU lattice though main results are valid for one-dimensional lattices with arbitrary potentials.

  16. Porous 3D graphene-based bulk materials with exceptional high surface area and excellent conductivity for supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long; Zhang, Fan; Yang, Xi; Long, Guankui; Wu, Yingpeng; Zhang, Tengfei; Leng, Kai; Huang, Yi; Ma, Yanfeng; Yu, Ao; Chen, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Until now, few sp2 carbon materials simultaneously exhibit superior performance for specific surface area (SSA) and electrical conductivity at bulk state. Thus, it is extremely important to make such materials at bulk scale with those two outstanding properties combined together. Here, we present a simple and green but very efficient approach using two standard and simple industry steps to make such three-dimensional graphene-based porous materials at the bulk scale, with ultrahigh SSA (3523?m2/g) and excellent bulk conductivity. We conclude that these materials consist of mainly defected/wrinkled single layer graphene sheets in the dimensional size of a few nanometers, with at least some covalent bond between each other. The outstanding properties of these materials are demonstrated by their superior supercapacitor performance in ionic liquid with specific capacitance and energy density of 231 F/g and 98 Wh/kg, respectively, so far the best reported capacitance performance for all bulk carbon materials. PMID:23474952

  17. Porous 3D graphene-based bulk materials with exceptional high surface area and excellent conductivity for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long; Zhang, Fan; Yang, Xi; Long, Guankui; Wu, Yingpeng; Zhang, Tengfei; Leng, Kai; Huang, Yi; Ma, Yanfeng; Yu, Ao; Chen, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Until now, few sp(2) carbon materials simultaneously exhibit superior performance for specific surface area (SSA) and electrical conductivity at bulk state. Thus, it is extremely important to make such materials at bulk scale with those two outstanding properties combined together. Here, we present a simple and green but very efficient approach using two standard and simple industry steps to make such three-dimensional graphene-based porous materials at the bulk scale, with ultrahigh SSA (3523 m(2)/g) and excellent bulk conductivity. We conclude that these materials consist of mainly defected/wrinkled single layer graphene sheets in the dimensional size of a few nanometers, with at least some covalent bond between each other. The outstanding properties of these materials are demonstrated by their superior supercapacitor performance in ionic liquid with specific capacitance and energy density of 231 F/g and 98 Wh/kg, respectively, so far the best reported capacitance performance for all bulk carbon materials. PMID:23474952

  18. Thermally conductive cementitious grout for geothermal heat pump systems

    DOEpatents

    Allan, Marita (Old Field, NY)

    2001-01-01

    A thermally conductive cement-sand grout for use with a geothermal heat pump system. The cement sand grout contains cement, silica sand, a superplasticizer, water and optionally bentonite. The present invention also includes a method of filling boreholes used for geothermal heat pump systems with the thermally conductive cement-sand grout. The cement-sand grout has improved thermal conductivity over neat cement and bentonite grouts, which allows shallower bore holes to be used to provide an equivalent heat transfer capacity. In addition, the cement-sand grouts of the present invention also provide improved bond strengths and decreased permeabilities. The cement-sand grouts can also contain blast furnace slag, fly ash, a thermoplastic air entraining agent, latex, a shrinkage reducing admixture, calcium oxide and combinations thereof.

  19. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Heat Conduction in Nanoscale Systems.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuan; Guo, Zeng-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Heat conduction in nanoscale systems has different behavior from bulk materials, which is applied to develop high performance thermoelectric material. The non-trivial behavior is caused by the ballistic-diffusive transport of heat carriers such as phonons. In this paper, we use the thermomass theory and phonon hydrodynamics model to establish a hydrodynamic model for phonon transport. In nanoscale systems, a Poiseuille flow of phonon gas is formed due to the boundary scattering. The thickness of boundary layer is proportional to the mean free paths of phonon. When the boundary layer thickness is comparable with the whole flow region, strong decrease of effective thermal conductivity happens. This method can serve as a fast evaluation method for nanoscale heat conduction. PMID:26353568

  20. Mechanical control of heat conductivity in molecular chains.

    PubMed

    Savin, A V; Gendelman, O V

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a possibility to control heat conductivity in molecular chains by means of external mechanical loads. To illustrate such possibilities we consider first well-studied one-dimensional chain with degenerate double-well potential of the nearest-neighbor interaction. We consider varying lengths of the chain with fixed number of particles. Number of possible energetically degenerate ground states strongly depends on the overall length of the chain, or, in other terms, on average length of the link between neighboring particles. These degenerate states correspond to mechanical equilibria; therefore, one can say that formation of such structures mimics a process of plastic deformation. We demonstrate that such modification of the chain length can lead to quite profound (almost fivefold) reduction of the heat conduction coefficient. Even more profound effect is revealed for a model with a single-well nonconvex potential. It is demonstrated that in a certain range of constant external forcing, this model becomes effectively double-well and has a multitude of possible states of equilibrium for fixed value of the external load. Due to this degeneracy, the heat-conduction coefficient can be reduced by two orders of magnitude. We suggest a mechanical model of a chain with periodic double-well potential, which allows control of the heat transport. The models considered may be useful for description of heat transfer in biological macromolecules and for control of the heat transport in microsystems. The possibility of the heat transport control in more realistic three-dimensional systems is illustrated by simulation of a three-dimensional model of polymer ?-helix. In this model, the mechanical stretching also brings about the structural inhomogeneity and, in turn, to essential reduction of the heat conductivity. PMID:24580199

  1. Neutrino Heat Conduction and Inhomogeneities in the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, A.; Hogan, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Constraints on parameters of inhomogeneous nucteosynthesis, namely, the overdensity and size of baryon lumps, are found by calculatig the blackbody neutrino heat conduction into the lumps, which tends to inflate them away. The scale size for efficient heat conduction is determined by the mean free path lambda of the neutrino, and so we compute lambda in our case of a high-temperature plasma with low chemical potential, and find a general result that many-body effects are unimportant, simplifying the calculation. We find that in the region of interest for nucleosynthesis, neutrino inflation is important for overdensities greater than 10(exp 4).

  2. A mechanical model for Fourier's law of heat conduction

    E-print Network

    David Ruelle

    2011-02-27

    Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics close to equilibrium is a physically satisfactory theory centered on the linear response formula of Green-Kubo. This formula results from a formal first order perturbation calculation without rigorous justification. A rigorous derivation of Fourier's law for heat conduction from the laws of mechanics remains thus a major unsolved problem. In this note we present a deterministic mechanical model of a heat-conducting chain with nontrivial interactions, where kinetic energy fluctuations at the nodes of the chain are removed. In this model the derivation of Fourier's law can proceed rigorously.

  3. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF QUASI-BALLISTIC HEAT CONDUCTION IN CARBON NANOTUBES

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF QUASI-BALLISTIC HEAT CONDUCTION IN CARBON NANOTUBES J Shiomi. While experimental attempts to characterize heat conduction of carbon nanotubes encounter technical difficulties, the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations hold an advantage as the heat conduction

  4. Why asymmetric interparticle interaction can result in convergent heat conductivity

    E-print Network

    Shunda Chen; Yong Zhang; Jiao Wang; Hong Zhao

    2013-09-27

    We show that the asymmetric inter-particle interactions may induce rapid decay of heat current autocorrelation in one-dimensional momentum conserving lattices. When the asymmetry degree and the temperature are appropriate, the decay is sufficient rapid for resulting a convergence conductivity practically. To understand the underlying mechanism, we further studied the relaxation behavior of the hydrodynamic modes. It is shown that for lattice with symmetric potential, the heat mode relaxs in the superdiffusive manner, while in the case of asymmetric potential, the heat mode may relax in the normal manner.

  5. Characterization of a contaminated wellfield using 3D electrical resistivity tomography implemented with geostatistical, discontinuous boundary, and known conductivity constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Slater, Lee D.; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Greenwood, William J.; Zachara, John M.

    2012-09-17

    Continuing advancements in subsurface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) are giving the method increasing capability for understanding shallow subsurface properties and processes. The inability of ERT imaging data to uniquely resolve subsurface structure and the corresponding need include constraining information remains one of the greatest limitations, and provides one of the greatest opportunities, for further advancing the utility of the method. In this work we describe and demonstrate a method of incorporating constraining information into an ERT imaging algorithm in the form on discontinuous boundaries, known values, and spatial covariance information. We demonstrate the approach by imaging a uranium-contaminated wellfield at the Hanford Site in southwestern Washington State, USA. We incorporate into the algorithm known boundary information and spatial covariance structure derived from the highly resolved near-borehole regions of a regularized ERT inversion. The resulting inversion provides a solution which fits the ERT data (given the estimated noise level), honors the spatial covariance structure throughout the model, and is consistent with known bulk-conductivity discontinuities. The results are validated with core-scale measurements, and display a significant improvement in accuracy over the standard regularized inversion, revealing important subsurface structure known influence flow and transport at the site.

  6. Tunable heat conduction through coupled Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chains.

    PubMed

    Su, Ruixia; Yuan, Zongqiang; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    We conduct a study on heat conduction through coupled Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) chains by using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our attention is dedicated to showing how the phonon transport is affected by the interchain coupling. It has been well accepted that the heat conduction could be impeded by the interchain interaction due to the interface phonon scattering. However, recent theoretical and experimental studies suggest that the thermal conductivity of nanoscale materials can be counterintuitively enhanced by the interaction with the substrate. In the present paper, by consecutively varying the interchain coupling intensity, we observed both enhancement and suppression of thermal transport through the coupled FPU chains. For weak interchain couplings, it is found that the heat flux increases with the coupling intensity, whereas in the case of strong interchain couplings, the energy transport is found to be suppressed by the interchain interaction. Based on the phonon spectral energy density method, we attribute the enhancement of the energy transport to the excited phonon modes (in addition to the intrinsic phonon modes), while the upward shift of the high-frequency phonon branch and the interface phonon-phonon scattering account for the suppressed heat conduction. PMID:25679599

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Lower Mantle Minerals and Heat Flux Across the Core-Mantle Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, C.; Rainey, E.; Kavner, A.

    2014-12-01

    The thermal conductivity properties of the minerals comprising the Earth's lowermost mantle control the core-mantle boundary heat flux, and are therefore critical properties for determining the thermal state and evolution of the Earth's interior. Here we present measurements of the thermal conductivity of lower mantle oxides and silicates as a function of pressure, temperature, and iron content determined in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell using a combination of measurements and 3-D modeling. Our models and measurements demonstrate that the measured steady-state temperature and its increase with increasing laser power depend on the sample thermal conductivity as well as the experimental geometry, enabling measurements of the pressure- and temperature- dependence of lattice thermal conductivity in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. We applied this technique to iron-bearing silicate perovskites and MgO at lower mantle pressure and temperature conditions. For MgO, we determine the increase in thermal conductivity k with density ? to be ?lnk/?ln?=4.7±0.6, which is in agreement with results obtained using other experimental and computational techniques. For (Mg0.8,Fe0.2)SiO3 perovskite, we find ?lnk/?ln?=2.9±0.6. We use these values in combination with independent computational and experimental results to determine thermal conductivity of lower mantle minerals up to core-mantle boundary conditions. We combine the mineralogical thermal conductivity estimates in a composite model and include an estimate for the radiative contribution to thermal conductivity. Our new value of the thermal conductivity of the lowermost mantle is ~5-6 W/m/K and is sensitive to the details of the lower mantle assemblage, but is relatively insensitive to pressure and temperature. We combine our mantle thermal conductivity with models for the lower mantle boundary layer to generate a series of two-dimensional maps of core-mantle boundary heat flux, which emphasize the importance of lateral variations in phase and boundary layer thickness. Our values imply a total core-mantle boundary heat flow of 6-8 TW, which is sufficient to drive plumes and convection, is consistent with current geochemical estimates for mantle heat content, and permits a slow growth rate for the inner core.

  8. Heat conduction in partial vacuum. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J R

    1980-09-01

    Methods developed for computing conduction heat losses from evacuated solar collectors are reported. Results of such calculations are given, including the minimum vacuum necessary to effectively eliminate conduction. Experiments performed at Owens-Illinois, Inc. to assess helium penetration rates into evacuated collectors are analyzed, and estimates are given as to the likely penetration rate of atmospheric helium. Conclusions are drawn as to the probable effect of helium penetration on the lifetimes of evacuated solar collectors.

  9. Modelling heat conduction in polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride films.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Rabczuk, Timon

    2015-01-01

    We conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) films. To this aim, we constructed large atomistic models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets with random and uniform grain configuration. By performing equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, we investigated the influence of the average grain size on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline h-BN films at various temperatures. Using the EMD results, we constructed finite element models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets to probe the thermal conductivity of samples with larger grain sizes. Our multiscale investigations not only provide a general viewpoint regarding the heat conduction in h-BN films but also propose that polycrystalline h-BN sheets present high thermal conductivity comparable to monocrystalline sheets. PMID:26286820

  10. Modelling heat conduction in polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride films

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C.; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Rabczuk, Timon

    2015-01-01

    We conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) films. To this aim, we constructed large atomistic models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets with random and uniform grain configuration. By performing equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, we investigated the influence of the average grain size on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline h-BN films at various temperatures. Using the EMD results, we constructed finite element models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets to probe the thermal conductivity of samples with larger grain sizes. Our multiscale investigations not only provide a general viewpoint regarding the heat conduction in h-BN films but also propose that polycrystalline h-BN sheets present high thermal conductivity comparable to monocrystalline sheets. PMID:26286820

  11. Vacuum Induction Melting Unit Induction heating is a process wherein induced eddy currents heat conductive materials. This heating

    E-print Network

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    Vacuum Induction Melting Unit Induction heating is a process wherein induced eddy currents heat conductive materials. This heating can be used to melt metals and make alloys. Vacuum Induction melting offers an attractive combination of a controlled atmosphere (vacuum or inert gas) and precise control

  12. Contact Heat Conductivity Under Conditions of High-Temperature Heat Transfer in Fibrous Heat-Insulating Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinchuk, P. S.

    2014-03-01

    A mathematical model for calculating the effective heat conductivity of fibrous materials at high temperatures and variable density has been suggested and substantiated. Consideration is focused basically on accounting for heat conduction in the solid phase of a fibrous material. The calculated results were compared with experimental data that demonstrated a good accuracy of the proposed model. The effective heat conductivity of a fibrous heat-insulating material has been calculated as a function of density for a number of temperatures within the range from 200 to 1000°C.

  13. Acoustic properties of pistonphones at low frequencies in the presence of pressure leakage and heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; He, Wen; He, Longbiao; Rong, Zuochao

    2015-12-01

    The wide concern on absolute pressure calibration of acoustic transducers at low frequencies prompts the development of the pistonphone method. At low frequencies, the acoustic properties of pistonphones are governed by the pressure leakage and the heat conduction effects. However, the traditional theory for these two effects applies a linear superposition of two independent correction models, which differs somewhat from their coupled effect at low frequencies. In this paper, acoustic properties of pistonphones at low frequencies in full consideration of the pressure leakage and heat conduction effects have been quantitatively studied, and the explicit expression for the generated sound pressure has been derived. With more practical significance, a coupled correction expression for these two effects of pistonphones has been derived. In allusion to two typical pistonphones, the NPL pistonphone and our developed infrasonic pistonphone, comparisons were done for the coupled correction expression and the traditional one, whose results reveal that the traditional one produces maximum insufficient errors of about 0.1 dB above the lower limiting frequencies of two pistonphones, while at lower frequencies, excessive correction errors with an explicit limit of about 3 dB are produced by the traditional expression. The coupled correction expression should be adopted in the absolute pressure calibration of acoustic transducers at low frequencies. Furthermore, it is found that the heat conduction effect takes a limiting deviation of about 3 dB for the pressure amplitude and a small phase difference as frequency decreases, while the pressure leakage effect remarkably drives the pressure amplitude to attenuate and the phase difference tends to be 90° as the frequency decreases. The pressure leakage effect plays a more important role on the low frequency property of pistonphones.

  14. An electrically conductive 3D scaffold based on a nonwoven web of poly(L-lactic acid) and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene).

    PubMed

    Niu, Xufeng; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Chiffot, Nicolas; King, Martin W; Zhang, Ze

    2015-08-01

    This study was to demonstrate that an extremely thin coating of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on nonwoven microfibrous poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) web is of sufficient electrical conductivity and stability in aqueous environment to sustain electrical stimulation (ES) to cultured human skin fibroblasts. The PEDOT imparted the web a surface resistivity of approximately 0.1 K?/square without altering the web morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that the surface chemistry of the PLLA/PEDOT is characteristic of both PLLA and PEDOT. The PEDOT-coated web also showed higher hydrophilicity, lower glass transition temperature and unchanged fiber crystallinity and thermal stability compared with the PLLA web. The addition of PEDOT to the web marginally increased the web's tensile strength and lowered the elongation. An electrical stability test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT structure was more stable than a polypyrrole treated PLLA fabric, showing only a slow deterioration in conductivity when exposed to culture medium. The cytotoxicity test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT scaffold was not cytotoxic and supported human dermal fibroblast adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Preliminary ES experiments have demonstrated that this conductive web mediated effective ES to fibroblasts. Therefore, this new conductive biodegradable scaffold may be used to electrically modulate cellular activity and tissue regeneration. PMID:25630631

  15. Duality and exact correlations for a model of heat conduction

    E-print Network

    C. Giardiná; J. Kurchan; F. Redig

    2006-12-07

    We study a model of heat conduction with stochastic diffusion of energy. We obtain a dual particle process which describes the evolution of all the correlation functions. An exact expression for the covariance of the energy exhibits long-range correlations in the presence of a current. We discuss the formal connection of this model with the simple symmetric exclusion process.

  16. Element-by-element factorization algorithms for heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, T. J. R.; Winget, J. M.; Park, K. C.

    1983-01-01

    Element-by-element solution strategies are developed for transient heat conduction problems. Results of numerical tests indicate the effectiveness of the procedures proposed. The small database requirements and attractive architectural features of the algorithms suggest considerable potential for solving large scale problems.

  17. A Correction Scheme for Thermal Conductivity Measurement Using the Comparative Cut-bar Technique Based on a 3D Numerical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas W. Marshall; Changhu Xing; Charles Folsom; Colby Jensen; Heng Ban

    2014-05-01

    As an important factor affecting the accuracy of the thermal conductivity measurement, systematic (bias) error in the guarded comparative axial heat flow (cut-bar) method was mostly neglected by previous researches. This bias is due primarily to the thermal conductivity mismatch between sample and meter bars (reference), which is common for a sample of unknown thermal conductivity. A correction scheme, based on a finite element simulation of the measurement system, was proposed to reduce the magnitude of the overall measurement uncertainty. This scheme was experimentally validated by applying corrections on four types of sample measurements in which the specimen thermal conductivity is much smaller, slightly smaller, equal and much larger than that of the meter bar. As an alternative to the optimum guarding technique proposed before, the correction scheme can be used to minimize uncertainty contribution from the measurement system with non-optimal guarding conditions. It is especially necessary for large thermal conductivity mismatches between sample and meter bars.

  18. Validation of a heat conduction model for finite domain, non-uniformly heated, laminate bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desgrosseilliers, Louis; Kabbara, Moe; Groulx, Dominic; White, Mary Anne

    2015-08-01

    Infrared thermographic validation is shown for a closed-form analytical heat conduction model for non-uniformly heated, laminate bodies with an insulated domain boundary. Experiments were conducted by applying power to rectangular electric heaters and cooled by natural convection in air, but also apply to constant-temperature heat sources and forced convection. The model accurately represents two-dimensional laminate heat conduction behaviour giving rise to heat spreading using one-dimensional equations for the temperature distributions and heat transfer rates under steady-state and pseudo-steady-state conditions. Validation of the model with an insulated boundary (complementing previous studies with an infinite boundary) provides useful predictions of heat spreading performance and simplified temperature uniformity calculations (useful in log-mean temperature difference style heat exchanger calculations) for real laminate systems such as found in electronics heat sinks, multi-ply stovetop cookware and interface materials for supercooled salt hydrates. Computational determinations of implicit insulated boundary condition locations in measured data, required to assess model equation validation, were also demonstrated. Excellent goodness of fit was observed (both root-mean-square error and R 2 values), in all cases except when the uncertainty of low temperatures measured via infrared thermography hindered the statistical significance of the model fit. The experimental validation in all other cases supports use of the model equations in design calculations and heat exchange simulations.

  19. High temperature electrically conducting ceramic heating element and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbach, C. R.; Page, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Improvements were made in both electrode technology and ceramic conductor quality to increase significantly the lifetime and thermal cycling capability of electrically conducting ceramic heater elements. These elements were operated in vacuum, inert and reducing environments as well as oxidizing atmospheres adding to the versatility of the conducting ceramic as an ohmic heater. Using stabilized zirconia conducting ceramic heater elements, a furnace was fabricated and demonstrated to have excellent thermal response and cycling capability. The furnace was used to melt platinum-20% rhodium alloy (melting point 1904 C) with an isothermal ceramic heating element having a nominal working cavity size of 2.5 cm diameter by 10.0 cm long. The furnace was operated to 1940 C with the isothermal ceramic heating element. The same furnace structure was fitted with a pair of main heater elements to provide axial gradient temperature control over a working cavity length of 17.8 cm.

  20. Loop heating by D.C. electric current and electromagnetic wave emissions simulated by 3-D EM particle zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakai, J. I.; Zhao, J.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that a current-carrying plasma loop can be heated by magnetic pinch driven by the pressure imbalance between inside and outside the loop, using a 3-dimensional electromagnetic (EM) particle code. Both electrons and ions in the loop can be heated in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, therefore the perpendicular temperature can be increased about 10 times compared with the parallel temperature. This temperature anisotropy produced by the magnetic pinch heating can induce a plasma instability, by which high-frequency electromagnetic waves can be excited. The plasma current which is enhanced by the magnetic pinch can also excite a kinetic kink instability, which can heat ions perpendicular to the magnetic field. The heating mechanism of ions as well as the electromagnetic emission could be important for an understanding of the coronal loop heating and the electromagnetic wave emissions from active coronal regions.

  1. Disparate quasiballistic heat conduction regimes from periodic heat sources on a substrate

    E-print Network

    Zeng, Lingping

    We report disparate quasiballistic heat conduction trends for periodic nanoscale line heaters deposited on a substrate, depending upon whether measurements are based on the peak temperature of the heaters or the temperature ...

  2. Connection between heat diffusion and heat conduction in one-dimensional systems

    E-print Network

    Shunda Chen; Yong Zhang; Jiao Wang; Hong Zhao

    2015-11-01

    Heat and energy are conceptually different, but often are assumed to be the same without justification. An effective method for investigating diffusion properties in equilibrium systems is discussed. With this method, we demonstrate that for one-dimensional systems, using the indices of particles as the space variable , which has been accepted as a convention, may lead to misleading conclusions. We then show that though in one-dimensional systems there is no general connection between energy diffusion and heat conduction, however, a general connection between heat diffusion and heat conduction may exist. Relaxation behavior of local energy current fluctuations and that of local heat current fluctuations are also studied. We find that they are significantly different, though the global energy current equals the globe heat current.

  3. Connection between heat diffusion and heat conduction in one-dimensional systems

    E-print Network

    Chen, Shunda; Wang, Jiao; Zhao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Heat and energy are conceptually different, but often are assumed to be the same without justification. An effective method for investigating diffusion properties in equilibrium systems is discussed. With this method, we demonstrate that for one-dimensional systems, using the indices of particles as the space variable , which has been accepted as a convention, may lead to misleading conclusions. We then show that though in one-dimensional systems there is no general connection between energy diffusion and heat conduction, however, a general connection between heat diffusion and heat conduction may exist. Relaxation behavior of local energy current fluctuations and that of local heat current fluctuations are also studied. We find that they are significantly different, though the global energy current equals the globe heat current.

  4. Thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and specific heat of copper-carbon fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuniya, Keiichi; Arakawa, Hideo; Kanai, Tsuneyuki; Chiba, Akio

    1988-01-01

    A new material of copper/carbon fiber composite is developed which retains the properties of copper, i.e., its excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, and the property of carbon, i.e., a small thermal expansion coefficient. These properties of the composite are adjustable within a certain range by changing the volume and/or the orientation of the carbon fibers. The effects of carbon fiber volume and arrangement changes on the thermal and electrical conductivity, and specific heat of the composite are studied. Results obtained are as follows: the thermal and electrical conductivity of the composite decrease as the volume of the carbon fiber increases, and were influenced by the fiber orientation. The results are predictable from a careful application of the rule of mixtures for composites. The specific heat of the composite was dependent, not on fiber orientation, but on fiber volume. In the thermal fatigue tests, no degradation in the electrical conductivity of this composite was observed.

  5. Heat, Light, and Videotapes: Experiments in Heat Conduction Using Liquid Crystal Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Michael E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents a range of experiments in heat conduction suitable for upper-level undergraduate laboratories that make use of heat sensitive liquid crystal film to measure temperature contours. Includes experiments mathematically described by Laplace's equation, experiments theoretically described by Poisson's equation, and experiments that involve…

  6. Analysis of gas heat conduction in evacuated tube solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Beikircher, T.; Spirkl, W.

    1996-08-01

    The authors investigated the gas heat conduction in two types of evacuated tubular solar collectors for a wide range of Knudsen numbers. For tube-in-tube collectors, they generalized a solution of the gas kinetic Boltzmann equation, which has been obtained by the four-momentum method, to polyatomic gases. The resulting equation coincides with Sherman`s interpolation formula. For a plate-in-tube collector, they measured the stationary heat loss for gas pressures varying between 10{sup {minus}2} and 10{sup 4} Pa. The accuracy of an earlier experiment was improved. For analysis they applied the temperature jump method: a heat conduction equation with boundary conditions of the third kind involving the temperature gradient and the pressure was numerically solved. The results with the temperature jump method agree with the experimental values nearly within the error bands. They also applied Sherman`s interpolation formula and found, as expected, that the heat conduction as function of the pressure is too steep. For both types of collectors, the influence of geometric parameters was theoretically studied.

  7. Analysis of gas heat conduction in evacuated tube solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Beikircher, T.; Spirkl, W.

    1996-12-31

    The authors investigated the gas heat conduction in two types of evacuated tubular solar collectors for a wide range of Knudsen numbers. For tube-in-tube collectors, they generalized a solution of the gas kinetic Boltzmann equation, which has been obtained by the 4-momentum method, to polyatomic gases. The resulting equation coincides with Sherman`s interpolation formula. For a plate-in-tube collector, they measured the stationary heat loss for gas pressures varying between 10{sup {minus}2} and 10{sup 4} Pa. The accuracy of an earlier experiment was improved. For analysis the authors applied the temperature jump method: a heat conduction equation with boundary conditions of the third kind involving the temperature gradient and the pressure was numerically solved. The results with the temperature jump method agree with the experimental values nearly within the error bands. They also applied Sherman`s interpolation formula and found, as expected, that the heat conduction as function of the pressure is too steep. For both types of collectors, the influence of geometric parameters was theoretically studied.

  8. Heating rate controller for thermally stimulated conductivity and thermoluminescence measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, E. G.; Littlejohn, M. A.; Oakley, E. M.; Hutchby , J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A temperature controller is described which enables the temperature of a sample mounted on a cold finger to be varied linearly with time. Heating rates between 0.5 and 10 K/min can be achieved for temperatures between 90 and 300 K. Provision for terminating the sample heating at any temperature between these extremes is available. The temperature can be held at the terminating temperature or be reduced to the starting temperature in a matter of minutes. The controller has been used for thermally stimulated conductivity measurements and should be useful for thermoluminescence measurements as well.

  9. Increasing Boiling Heat Transfer using Low Conductivity Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahamudur Rahman, Md; Pollack, Jordan; McCarthy, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    We report the counterintuitive mechanism of increasing boiling heat transfer by incorporating low-conductivity materials at the interface between the surface and fluid. By embedding an array of non-conductive lines into a high-conductivity substrate, in-plane variations in the local surface temperature are created. During boiling the surface temperature varies spatially across the substrate, alternating between high and low values, and promotes the organization of distinct liquid and vapor flows. By systematically tuning the peak-to-peak wavelength of this spatial temperature variation, a resonance-like effect is seen at a value equal to the capillary length of the fluid. Replacing ~18% of the surface with a non-conductive epoxy results in a greater than 5x increase in heat transfer rate at a given superheat temperature. This drastic and counterintuitive increase is shown to be due to optimized bubble dynamics, where ordered pathways allow for efficient removal of vapor and the return of replenishing liquid. The use of engineered thermal gradients represents a potentially disruptive approach to create high-efficiency and high-heat-flux boiling surfaces which are naturally insensitive to fouling and degradation as compared to other approaches.

  10. Increasing Boiling Heat Transfer using Low Conductivity Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mahamudur Rahman, Md; Pollack, Jordan; McCarthy, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We report the counterintuitive mechanism of increasing boiling heat transfer by incorporating low-conductivity materials at the interface between the surface and fluid. By embedding an array of non-conductive lines into a high-conductivity substrate, in-plane variations in the local surface temperature are created. During boiling the surface temperature varies spatially across the substrate, alternating between high and low values, and promotes the organization of distinct liquid and vapor flows. By systematically tuning the peak-to-peak wavelength of this spatial temperature variation, a resonance-like effect is seen at a value equal to the capillary length of the fluid. Replacing ~18% of the surface with a non-conductive epoxy results in a greater than 5x increase in heat transfer rate at a given superheat temperature. This drastic and counterintuitive increase is shown to be due to optimized bubble dynamics, where ordered pathways allow for efficient removal of vapor and the return of replenishing liquid. The use of engineered thermal gradients represents a potentially disruptive approach to create high-efficiency and high-heat-flux boiling surfaces which are naturally insensitive to fouling and degradation as compared to other approaches. PMID:26281890

  11. Primal 3D MRI

    E-print Network

    Kim, Panki

    ANATOMY.TV #12;- Primal 3D . 3D , , , , , , , MRI - , , , , - , , , , - , 3D Anatomy.TV #12;3D ATLAS #12;Home #12;3D ATLAS - 1 3D -Anatomy: 3D - MRI: MRI Anatomy - Slides: - Movies: #12;3D ATLAS - 2 Layers

  12. Qualitative aspects in dual-phase-lag heat conduction Ramon Quintanilla1

    E-print Network

    Racke, Reinhard

    Qualitative aspects in dual-phase-lag heat conduction Ram´on Quintanilla1 Department of Applied.racke@uni-konstanz.de Abstract: We consider the system of dual-phase-lag heat conduction proposed by Tzou [21]. First, we prove of heat conduction based on Fourier's law predicts infinite heat propagation speed. Heat transmission

  13. Revealing the complex conduction heat transfer mechanism of nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Sergis, A; Hardalupas, Y

    2015-12-01

    Nanofluids are two-phase mixtures consisting of small percentages of nanoparticles (sub 1-10 %vol) inside a carrier fluid. The typical size of nanoparticles is less than 100 nm. These fluids have been exhibiting experimentally a significant increase of thermal performance compared to the corresponding carrier fluids, which cannot be explained using the classical thermodynamic theory. This study deciphers the thermal heat transfer mechanism for the conductive heat transfer mode via a molecular dynamics simulation code. The current findings are the first of their kind and conflict with the proposed theories for heat transfer propagation through micron-sized slurries and pure matter. The authors provide evidence of a complex new type of heat transfer mechanism, which explains the observed abnormal heat transfer augmentation. The new mechanism appears to unite a number of popular speculations for the thermal heat transfer mechanism employed by nanofluids as predicted by the majority of the researchers of the field into a single one. The constituents of the increased diffusivity of the nanoparticle can be attributed to mismatching of the local temperature profiles between parts of the surface of the solid and the fluid resulting in increased local thermophoretic effects. These effects affect the region surrounding the solid manifesting interfacial layer phenomena (Kapitza resistance). In this region, the activity of the fluid and the interactions between the fluid and the nanoparticle are elevated. Isotropic increased nanoparticle mobility is manifested as enhanced Brownian motion and diffusion effects. PMID:26058515

  14. Large deviations in stochastic heat-conduction processes provide a gradient-flow structure for heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Peletier, Mark A.; Redig, Frank; Vafayi, Kiamars

    2014-09-01

    We consider three one-dimensional continuous-time Markov processes on a lattice, each of which models the conduction of heat: the family of Brownian Energy Processes with parameter m (BEP(m)), a Generalized Brownian Energy Process, and the Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) process. The hydrodynamic limit of each of these three processes is a parabolic equation, the linear heat equation in the case of the BEP(m) and the KMP, and a nonlinear heat equation for the Generalized Brownian Energy Process with parameter a (GBEP(a)). We prove the hydrodynamic limit rigorously for the BEP(m), and give a formal derivation for the GBEP(a). We then formally derive the pathwise large-deviation rate functional for the empirical measure of the three processes. These rate functionals imply gradient-flow structures for the limiting linear and nonlinear heat equations. We contrast these gradient-flow structures with those for processes describing the diffusion of mass, most importantly the class of Wasserstein gradient-flow systems. The linear and nonlinear heat-equation gradient-flow structures are each driven by entropy terms of the form -log ?; they involve dissipation or mobility terms of order ?² for the linear heat equation, and a nonlinear function of ? for the nonlinear heat equation.

  15. Large Deviations in Stochastic Heat-Conduction Processes Provide a Gradient-Flow Structure for Heat Conduction

    E-print Network

    Mark A. Peletier; Frank Redig; Kiamars Vafayi

    2014-03-19

    We consider three one-dimensional continuous-time Markov processes on a lattice, each of which models the conduction of heat: the family of Brownian Energy Processes with parameter $m$, a Generalized Brownian Energy Process, and the Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti process. The hydrodynamic limit of each of these three processes is a parabolic equation, the linear heat equation in the case of the BEP$(m)$ and the KMP, and a nonlinear heat equation for the GBEP($a$). We prove the hydrodynamic limit rigorously for the BEP$(m)$, and give a formal derivation for the GBEP($a$). We then formally derive the pathwise large-deviation rate functional for the empirical measure of the three processes. These rate functionals imply gradient-flow structures for the limiting linear and nonlinear heat equations. We contrast these gradient-flow structures with those for processes describing the diffusion of mass, most importantly the class of Wasserstein gradient-flow systems. The linear and nonlinear heat-equation gradient-flow structures are each driven by entropy terms of the form $-\\log \\rho$; they involve dissipation or mobility terms of order $\\rho^2$ for the linear heat equation, and a nonlinear function of $\\rho$ for the nonlinear heat equation.

  16. Heat conduction in one-dimensional nonintegrable systems Bambi Hu,1,2

    E-print Network

    Heat conduction in one-dimensional nonintegrable systems Bambi Hu,1,2 Baowen Li,1,3, * and Hong the underlying mechanism of the Fourier heat conduction law, the study of heat conduction has attracted the thermal con- ductivity is a constant independent of system size N. The Fourier heat conduction law (J d

  17. Studies of non-diffusive heat conduction through spatially periodic and time-harmonic thermal excitations

    E-print Network

    Collins, Kimberlee C. (Kimberlee Chiyoko)

    2015-01-01

    Studies of non-diffusive heat conduction provide insight into the fundamentals of heat transport in condensed matter. The mean free paths (MFPs) of phonons that are most important for conducting heat are well represented ...

  18. From 1D-Multi-Layer-Conductivity-Inversion to Pseudo-3D-Imaging of Quantified Electromagnetic Induction Data Acquired at a Heterogeneous Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hebel, Christian; Rudolph, Sebastian; Huisman, Johan A.; van der Kruk, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) systems enable the non-invasive spatial characterization of soil structural and hydrogeological variations, since the measured apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) can be related to changes in soil moisture, soil water, clay content and/or salinity. Due to the contactless operation, ECa maps of relatively large areas, i.e. field to (small) catchment scale, can be measured in reasonably short times. A multi-configuration EMI system with one electromagnetic field transmitter and various receivers with different offsets provide simultaneous ECa measurements that are representative of different sensing depths. Unfortunately, measured ECa values can only be considered as qualitative values due to external influences like the operator, cables or other metal objects. Of course, a better vertical characterization of the subsurface is possible when quantitative measurement values could be obtained. To obtain such quantitative ECa values, the measured EMI apparent conductivities are calibrated using a linear regression approach with predicted apparent conductivities obtained from a Maxwell-based full-solution forward model using inverted electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data as input. These calibrated apparent conductivities enable a quantitative multi-layer-inversion to resolve for the electrical conductivity of certain layers. To invert for a large scale three-layer model, a one-dimensional (1D) shuffled-complex-evolution inversion scheme was parallelized and run on JUROPA - one of the supercomputers of the Forschungszentrum Jülich. This novel inversion routine was applied to calibrated electromagnetic induction data acquired at the Selhausen test site (Germany), which has a size of about 190 x 70 m. The test site is weakly inclined and a distinct gradient in soil texture is present with considerably higher gravel content at the upper part of the field. Parallel profiles with approximately three meter distance were measured using three different coil offsets in HCP and VCP measurement modes. This resulted in six high spatial resolution data sets of approximately 60000 measurements with different sensing depths. A 5 m block-kriging was applied to all six data sets to re-grid the sampling points on the same regular grid. For each grid node, the six measured apparent conductivities were used in a three-layer inversion. The three-layer inversion results of electrical conductivity thus obtained were used to derive a three-dimensional (3D) model of subsurface heterogeneity, which clearly indicated lateral and vertical conductivity changes of the subsurface that are related to changes in soil texture and soil water content.

  19. Numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions and pulse heating effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes the numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions. The effects of a step heat loading, a sudden pulse heat loading, and an internal heat source are considered in conjunction with convection boundary conditions. Two methods of solution are presened for predicting the transient behavior of the propagating thermal disturbances. In the first method, MacCormack's predictor-corrector method is employed for integrating the hyperbolic system of equations. Next, the transfinite element method, which employs specially tailored elements, is used for accurately representing the transient response of the propagating thermal wave fronts. The agreement between the results of various numerical test cases validate the representative behavior of the thermal wave fronts. Both methods represent hyperbolic heat conduction behavior by effectively modeling the sharp discontinuities of the propagating thermal disturbances.

  20. Heat conduction nanocalorimeter for pl-scale single cell measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannessen, E. A.; Weaver, J. M. R.; Cobbold, P. H.; Cooper, J. M.

    2002-03-01

    An ultrasensitive nanocalorimeter for use with pl-scale biological samples using silicon microfabrication technology has been developed in which a 720 pl reaction vessel, a calibration heater, and a thermoelectric transducer of 125 ?K sensitivity were integrated into a single multilayer thin-film configuration. The resolution of the system ranged from 10 to 25 nW depending on the heat capacity, conductance and power density of the samples studied. The device has been used in heat conduction measurements of the energy released from the enzyme catalyzed hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide using purified catalase, and for the determination of the catalase activity within a single mouse hepatocyte. The nanocalorimeter has the potential for integration in a high-density array format, where the change in temperature from ultralow volume cellular assays could be used as a generic analytical tool for high throughput screening of bioactive compounds.

  1. An eigenvalue method for solving transient heat conduction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. M.; Skladany, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    The eigenvalue method, which has been used by researchers in structure mechanics, is applied to problems in heat conduction. Its formulation is decribed in terms of an examination of transient heat conduction in a square slab. Taking advantage of the availability of the exact solution, we compare the accuracy and other numerical properties of the eigenvalue method with those of existing numerical schemes. The comparsion shows that, overall, the eigenvalue method appears to be fairly attractive. Furthermore, only a few dominant eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenvectors need to be computed and retained to yield reasonably high accuracy. Greater savings are attained in the computation time for a transient problem with long time duration and a large computational domain.

  2. Kinematic Self-Similar Heat Conducting and Charge Solutions

    E-print Network

    M. Sharif; Wajiha Javed

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the plane symmetric kinematic self-similar heat conducting fluid and charge dust solutions of the Einstein field equations. These solutions are classified according to self-similarity of the first, second, zeroth and infinite kinds with different equations of state. We take the self-similar vector to be tilted, orthogonal and parallel to the fluid flow. For heat conducting fluid, it is found that there exist only \\emph{one} solution in parallel case. In all other possibilities, these solutions reduce to the perfect fluid kinematic self-similar solutions. For charge dust case, we also obtain only \\emph{one} kinematic self-similar solution.

  3. Non-steady state heat conduction in composite walls

    E-print Network

    Bernard Deconinck; Beatrice Pelloni; Natalie Sheils

    2014-02-12

    The problem of heat conduction in one-dimensional piecewise homogeneous composite materials is examined by providing an explicit solution of the one-dimensional heat equation in each domain. The location of the interfaces is known, but neither temperature nor heat flux are prescribed there. Instead, the physical assumptions of their continuity at the interfaces are the only conditions imposed. The problem of two semi-infinite domains and that of two finite-sized domains are examined in detail. We indicate also how to extend the solution method to the setting of one finite-sized domain surrounded on both sides by semi-infinite domains, and on that of three finite-sized domains.

  4. The Neighboring Column Approximation (NCA) - A fast approach for the calculation of 3D thermal heating rates in cloud resolving models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Carolin; Mayer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Due to computational costs, radiation is usually neglected or solved in plane parallel 1D approximation in today's numerical weather forecast and cloud resolving models. We present a fast and accurate method to calculate 3D heating and cooling rates in the thermal spectral range that can be used in cloud resolving models. The parameterization considers net fluxes across horizontal box boundaries in addition to the top and bottom boundaries. Since the largest heating and cooling rates occur inside the cloud, close to the cloud edge, the method needs in first approximation only the information if a grid box is at the edge of a cloud or not. Therefore, in order to calculate the heating or cooling rates of a specific grid box, only the directly neighboring columns are used. Our so-called Neighboring Column Approximation (NCA) is an analytical consideration of cloud side effects which can be considered a convolution of a 1D radiative transfer result with a kernel or radius of 1 grid-box (5 pt stencil) and which does usually not break the parallelization of a cloud resolving model. The NCA can be easily applied to any cloud resolving model that includes a 1D radiation scheme. Due to the neglect of horizontal transport of radiation further away than one model column, the NCA works best for model resolutions of about 100 m or lager. In this paper we describe the method and show a set of applications of LES cloud field snap shots. Correction terms, gains and restrictions of the NCA are described. Comprehensive comparisons to the 3D Monte Carlo Model MYSTIC and a 1D solution are shown. In realistic cloud fields, the full 3D simulation with MYSTIC shows cooling rates up to -150 K/d (100 m resolution) while the 1D solution shows maximum coolings of only -100 K/d. The NCA is capable of reproducing the larger 3D cooling rates. The spatial distribution of the heating and cooling is improved considerably. Computational costs are only a factor of 1.5-2 higher compared to a 1D solution.

  5. Synthesis, Structure, Multiband Optical, and Electrical Conductive Properties of a 3D Open Cubic Framework Based on [Cu8Sn6S24](z-) Clusters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Wang, Qiuran; Ma, Zhimin; He, Jianqiao; Wang, Zhe; Zheng, Chong; Lin, Jianhua; Huang, Fuqiang

    2015-06-01

    Two compounds with the formulas of Na4Cu32Sn12S48·4H2O and K11Cu32Sn12S48·4H2O were synthesized via flux (with thiourea as reactive flux) and hydrothermal method, respectively. The black crystals of Na4Cu32Sn12S48·4H2O and K11Cu32Sn12S48·4H2O both crystallize in the cubic space group of Fm3?c with the cell constants a = 17.921(2) Å and a = 18.0559(6) Å, respectively. The crystal structures feature a 3D open-framework with the unique [Cu8Sn6S24](z-) (z = 13 for Na4Cu32Sn12S48·4H2O; z = 14.75 for K11Cu32Sn12S48·4H2O) clusters acting as building blocks. The [Cu8Sn6S24](z-) cluster of the Th symmetry is built up by eight [CuS3] triangles and six [SnS4] tetrahedra. The powder samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction and optical absorption measurements. Both phase-pure compounds show multiabsorption character with a main absorption edge (2.0 eV for Na4Cu32Sn12S48·4H2O and 1.9 eV for K11Cu32Sn12S48·4H2O) and an additional absorption peak (1.61 eV for Na4Cu32Sn12S48·4H2O and 1.52 eV for K11Cu32Sn12S48·4H2O), which are perfectly consistent with the first-principle calculation results. The analyses of the density of states further reveal that the two optical absorption bands in each compound are attributed to the two transitions of Cu-3d-S-3p ? Sn-5s. The multiband nature of two compounds also enhances photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation, with which the degradation of methyl blue over Na4Cu32Sn12S48·4H2O reached 100% in 3 h. The 3D open-framework features also facilitate the ionic conductivity nature of the Na4Cu32Sn12S48·4H2O compound, which achieved ?10(-5) S/cm at room temperature. PMID:25955506

  6. Fuzzy and interval finite element method for heat conduction problem

    E-print Network

    Sarangam Majumdar; Sukanta Nayak; S. Chakraverty

    2012-09-26

    Traditional finite element method is a well-established method to solve various problems of science and engineering. Different authors have used various methods to solve governing differential equation of heat conduction problem. In this study, heat conduction in a circular rod has been considered which is made up of two different materials viz. aluminum and copper. In earlier studies parameters in the differential equation have been taken as fixed (crisp) numbers which actually may not. Those parameters are found in general by some measurements or experiments. So the material properties are actually uncertain and may be considered to vary in an interval or as fuzzy and in that case complex interval arithmetic or fuzzy arithmetic has to be considered in the analysis. As such the problem is discretized into finite number of elements which depend on interval/fuzzy parameters. Representation of interval/fuzzy numbers may give the clear picture of uncertainty. Hence interval/fuzzy arithmetic is applied in the finite element method to solve a steady state heat conduction problem. Application of fuzzy finite element method in the said problem gives fuzzy system of linear equations in general. Here new methods have also been proposed to handle such type of fuzzy system of linear equations. Corresponding results are computed and has been reported here.

  7. A heat exchanger model that includes axial conduction, parasitic heat loads, and property variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, G. F.

    2003-09-01

    High performance heat exchangers are a critical component in many cryogenic systems and the performance of these devices is typically very sensitive to axial conduction, property variations, and parasitic heat losses to the environment. This paper presents a numerical model of a heat exchanger in which these effects are explicitly modeled. The governing equations are derived, nondimensionalized, discretized, and solved on an exponentially distributed grid. The resulting numerical model is simple to implement and computationally efficient and can therefore easily be integrated into complex system models. The numerical model is validated against analytical solutions in the appropriate limits and then used to investigate the effect of heat exchanger end conditions (adiabatic vs fixed temperature) and radiation parasitics. The numerical model, which explicitly considers the combined effect of several loss mechanisms as they interact, is compared to simple models that consider these effects separately. Finally, the model is applied to an example heat exchanger core under a specific set of operating conditions in order to demonstrate its utility. This numerical model may also be used to examine the effect of property variations including temperature driven changes in specific heat capacity, metal conductivity, parasitic heat load, and heat transfer coefficients and is therefore useful in the design of a variety of cryogenic system components including counter- and parallel-flow heat exchangers for gas liquefaction, mixed-gas refrigeration, and reverse Brayton systems.

  8. The 3D conductive thermal field of the North Alpine Foreland Basin - Influence of the deep structure of the adjacent European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybycin, Anna M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Schneider, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The European Molasse Basin is a wedge shaped Tertiary foreland basin situated at the northern front of the European Alps. The adjoining Alps consists of tectonic nappes composed of mostly limestone, sandstone and shale stacked since the Cretaceous. This nappe structures are disrupted by uplifted crystalline cores, of which the Tauern Body is a prominent example. The basin itself, filled with clastic sediments (the Molasse), is underlain by Mesozoic sedimentary successions and a crystalline crust of Paleozoic age. The Mesozoic sediments include the Upper Jurassic karstified aquifer (Malm), which is intensively used for geothermal energy production these days. Looking on the temperature distribution in the basin area, a distinct negative thermal anomaly can be found in the southeast of Munich within the Malm aquifer, which is poorly understood so far but is of big relevance for the geothermal energy production in this area. With our study we aim to explain this thermal anomaly by investigating the structure of the basin and the temperature driving processes therein. Therefore, we used a data based lithospheric-scale 3D structural model of the basin and the adjacent Alpine area and calculated the present day conductive thermal field. Our results indicate that the pronounced negative thermal anomaly in the Malm aquifer is controlled by the position and the shape of the Tauern Body within the Alpine mass and the thermal conductivity contrast between the crystalline material of the Tauern Body and the Calcareous Alps.

  9. Thermal conductivity measurements of proton-heated warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, A.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Hua, R.; Kim, J.; King, J.; Sio, H.; McGuffey, C.; Kemp, G. E.; Freeman, R. R.; Beg, F. N.; Shepherd, R.; Ping, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of conductivity characteristics in the strongly coupled plasma regime is extremely important for ICF processes such as the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities, thermonuclear burn propagation waves, shell mixing, and efficient x-ray conversion of indirect drive schemes. Recently, an experiment was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility to measure the thermal conductivity of proton-heated warm dense matter. In the experiment, proton beams generated via target normal sheath acceleration were used to heat bi-layer targets with high-Z front layers and lower-Z back layers. The stopping power of a material is approximately proportional to Z2 so a sharp temperature gradient is established between the two materials. The subsequent thermal conduction from the higher-Z material to the lower-Z was measured with time resolved streaked optical pyrometry (SOP) and Fourier domain interferometry (FDI) of the rear surface. Results will be used to compare predictions from the thermal conduction equation and the Wiedemann-Franz Law in the warm dense matter regime. Data from the time resolved diagnostics for Au/Al and Au/C Targets of 20-200 nm thickness will be presented.

  10. Extremes of heat conduction-Pushing the boundaries of the thermal conductivity of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, DG

    2012-09-12

    Thermal conductivity is a familiar property of materials: silver conducts heat well, and plastic does not. In recent years, an interdisciplinary group of materials scientists, engineers, physicists, and chemists have succeeded in pushing back long-established limits in the thermal conductivity of materials. Carbon nanotubes and graphene are at the high end of the thermal conductivity spectrum due to their high sound velocities and relative lack of processes that scatter phonons. Unfortunately, the superlative thermal properties of carbon nanotubes have not found immediate application in composites or interface materials because of difficulties in making good thermal contact with the nanotubes. At the low end of the thermal conductivity spectrum, solids that combine order and disorder in the random stacking of two-dimensional crystalline sheets, so-called "disordered layered crystals," show a thermal conductivity that is only a factor of 2 larger than air. The cause of this low thermal conductivity may be explained by the large anisotropy in elastic constants that suppresses the density of phonon modes that propagate along the soft direction. Low-dimensional quantum magnets demonstrate that electrons and phonons are not the only significant carriers of heat. Near room temperature, the spin thermal conductivity of spin-ladders is comparable to the electronic thermal conductivities of metals. Our measurements of nanoscale thermal transport properties employ a variety of ultrafast optical pump-probe metrology tools that we have developed over the past several years. We are currently working to extend these techniques to high pressures (60 GPa), high magnetic fields (5 T), and high temperatures (1000 K).

  11. Numerical study of turbulent natural convection in a cube having finite thickness heat-conducting walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheremet, Mikhail A.; Miroshnichenko, Igor V.

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional transient natural convection in a cubic enclosure having finite thickness solid walls subject to opposing and horizontal temperature gradient has been investigated by a finite volume method. The turbulent flow considered into the volume is described mathematically by the 3D Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations using the standard k-? model with wall functions, including the energy equation. The velocity and temperature distributions were calculated at fixed Prandtl number, Pr = 0.7 and different values of the Rayleigh number, thermal conductivity ratio and dimensionless time. Three-dimensional velocity and temperature fields, temperature profiles at middle cross-sections and average Nusselt numbers have been presented. It has been found that an insertion of the third coordinate for the conjugate problem leads to a decrease in the average Nusselt number by 5.8 % in conditions of a stationary heat transfer mode.

  12. Evaluation of the thermal and hydraulic performances of a very thin sintered copper flat heat pipe for 3D microsystem packages

    E-print Network

    Tzanova, S; Avenas, Y; Schaeffer, Ch

    2008-01-01

    The reported research work presents numerical studies validated by experimental results of a flat micro heat pipe with sintered copper wick structure. The objectives of this project are to produce and demonstrate the efficiency of the passive cooling technology (heat pipe) integrated in a very thin electronic substrate that is a part of a multifunctional 3-D electronic package. The enhanced technology is dedicated to the thermal management of high dissipative microsystems having heat densities of more than 10W/cm2. Future applications are envisaged in the avionics sector. In this research 2D numerical hydraulic model has been developed to investigate the performance of a very thin flat micro heat pipe with sintered copper wick structure, using water as a refrigerant. Finite difference method has been used to develop the model. The model has been used to determine the mass transfer and fluid flow in order to evaluate the limits of heat transport capacity as functions of the dimensions of the wick and the vapou...

  13. A study on the non-Fourier heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo-Seung, Kim

    Heat conduction problem in many engineering situations has been analyzed by using the heat conduction equation based on the classical Fourier model. However, Fourier's law implies that any thermal disturbances on a body is instantaneously felt throughout the body, that is, the propagation speed of thermal disturbances is infinite. Clearly, this phenomenon is the paradoxical result from the physical point of view due to the fact that thermal waves travel with a finite speed. Despite this apparent paradox, the classical heat conduction equation based on Fourier model is quite acceptable for the majority of practical situations. However, it fails to adequately predict temperatures in situations for extremely short periods of time, extreme temperature gradients, and temperatures near absolute zero. Therefore, non-Fourier model has been used to alleviate these shortcomings in the analysis of the temperature field in the laser applications. The present study is concerned with the temperature response in an ortho tropic medium due to axisymmetric surface laser sources. The surface sources are activated on the solid surface with very high heat flux for a short period of time. Both the semi-infinite and finite medium are considered and the effect of the thermal reflection is observed in the finite medium. Most pulsed solid state lasers operate in the lowest-order spatial mode which is known as Gaussian mode. Since many high power CO2 lasers generally produce a complicated mixture of the Gaussian and doughnut modes, The two modes are considered in this study. The differences between the non-Fourier model and Fourier model have been compared, and the effects of both the isotropic and orthotropic property of the medium on the temperature field have been considered.

  14. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and flow structure in 3-D turbulent boundary layer with imbedded longitudinal vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J.Y.; Ryou, H.S.

    1997-03-01

    Heat transfer characteristics and flow structure in turbulent flows through a flat plate three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer containing built-in vortex generators have been analyzed by means of the space marching Crank-Nicolson finite difference method. The method solves the slender flow approximation of the steady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes and energy equations. This study used the eddy diffusivity model and standard {kappa}-{epsilon} model to predict heat transfer and flow field in the turbulent flow with imbedded longitudinal vortex. The results show boundary layer distortion due to vortices, such as strong spanwise flow divergence and boundary layer thinning. The heat transfer and skin friction show relatively good results in comparison with experimental data. The vortex core moves slightly away from the wall and grows slowly; consequently, the vortex influences the flow over a very long distance downstream. The enhancement of the heat transfer in the vicinity of the wall is due to the increasing spanwise separation of the vortices as they develop in the streamwise direction.

  15. MHD Simulations of a Moving Subclump with Heat Conduction

    E-print Network

    Naoki Asai; Naoya Fukuda; Ryoji Matsumoto

    2004-12-15

    High resolution observations of cluster of galaxies by Chandra have revealed the existence of an X-ray emitting comet-like galaxy C153 in the core of cluster of galaxies A2125. The galaxy C153 moving fast in the cluster core has a distinct X-ray tail on one side, obviously due to ram pressure stripping, since the galaxy C153 crossed the central region of A2125. The X-ray emitting plasma in the tail is substantially cooler than the ambient plasma. We present results of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the time evolution of a subclump like C153 moving in magnetized intergalactic matter. Anisotropic heat conduction is included. We found that the magnetic fields are essential for the existence of the cool X-ray tail, because in non-magnetized plasma the cooler subclump tail is heated up by isotropic heat conduction from the hot ambient plasma and does not form such a comet-like tail.

  16. Heat Conduction in Ceramic Coatings: Relationship Between Microstructure and Effective Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachanov, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic coatings and its relation to the microstructure continued. Results (obtained in Task 1) for the three-dimensional problem of heat conduction in a solid containing an inclusion (or, in particular, cavity - thermal insulator) of the ellipsoidal shape, were further advanced in the following two directions: (1) closed form expressions of H tensor have been derived for special cases of ellipsoidal cavity geometry: spheroid, crack-like spheroidal cavity and needle shaped spheroidal cavity; (2) these results for one cavity have been incorporated to construct heat energy potential for a solid with many spheroidal cavities (in the approximation of non-interacting defects). This problem constitutes a basic building block for further analyses.

  17. A 3D POM–MOF composite based on Ni(??) ion and 2,2´-bipyridyl-3,3´-dicarboxylic acid: Crystal structure and proton conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Meilin; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Sun, Jingjing; Duan, Xianying

    2013-06-01

    We have succeeded in constructing a 3D POM–MOF, (H[Ni(Hbpdc)(H?O)?]?[PW??O??]·8H?O)n (H?bpdc=2,2´-bipyridyl-3,3´-dicarboxylic acid), by the controllable self-assembly of H?bpdc, Keggin-anions and Ni²? ions based on the electrostatic and coordination interactions. Interestingly, Hbpdc? as polydentate organic ligands and Keggin-anion as polydentate inorganic ligands are covalently linked transition-metal nickel at the same time. The title complex represents a new example of introducing the metal N-heterocyclic multi-carboxylic acid frameworks into POMs chemistry. Based on Keggin-anions being immobilized as part of the metal N-heterocyclic multi-carboxylic acid framework, the title complex realizes four approaches in the 1D hydrophilic channel used to engender proton conductivity in MOFs. Its water adsorption isotherm at room temperature and pressure shows that the water content in it was 31 cm³ g?¹ at the maximum allowable humidity, corresponding to 3.7 water molecules per unit formula. It exhibits good proton conductivities (10??–10?³ S cm?¹) at 100 °C in the relative humidity range 35–98%. The corresponding activation energy (E{sub a}) of conductivity was estimated to be 1.01 eV. - Graphical abstract: A POM–MOF composite constructed by Keggin-type polyanion, Ni²? and H?bpdc shows good proton conductivities of 10??–10?³ S cm?¹ at 100 °C under 35–98% RH. - Highlights: • A POM–MOF was constructed by combining metal N-heterocyclic multi-carboxylic acid framework and Keggin anion. • It opens a pathway for design and synthesis of multifunctional hybrid materials based on two building units. • Three types of potential proton-carriers have been assembled in the 1D hydrophilic channels of the POM–MOF. • It achieved such proton conductivities as 10??–10?³ S cm?¹ at 100 °C in the RH range 35–98%.

  18. Sodium Variable Conductance Heat Pipe for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Walker, Kara

    2009-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the converter stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, and also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) has been designed to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor in an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). When the Stirling convertor is turned off, the VCHP will activate when the temperatures rises 30 C above the setpoint temperature. A prototype VCHP with sodium as the working fluid was fabricated and tested in both gravity aided and against gravity conditions for a nominal heater head temperature of 790 C. The results show very good agreement with the predictions and validate the model. The gas front was located at the exit of the reservoir when heater head temperature was 790 C while cooling was ON, simulating an operating Advanced Stirling Converter (ASC). When cooling stopped, the temperature increased by 30 C, allowing the gas front to move past the radiator, which transferred the heat to the case. After resuming the cooling flow, the front returned at the initial location turning OFF the VCHP. The against gravity working conditions showed a colder reservoir and faster transients.

  19. Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William G.; Tarau, Calin

    2008-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) was designed to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. A VCHP turns on with a delta T of 30 C, which is high enough to not risk standard ASRG operation but low enough to save most heater head life. This VCHP has a low mass, and low thermal losses for normal operation. In addition to the design, a proof-of-concept NaK VCHP was fabricated and tested. While NaK is normally not used in heat pipes, it has an advantage in that it is liquid at the reservoir operating temperature, while Na or K alone would freeze. The VCHP had two condensers, one simulating the heater head, and the other simulating the radiator. The experiments successfully demonstrated operation with the simulated heater head condenser off and on, while allowing the reservoir temperature to vary over 40 to 120 C, the maximum range expected. In agreement with previous NaK heat pipe tests, the evaporator delta T was roughly 70 C, due to distillation of the NaK in the evaporator.

  20. Long time existence of regular solutions to 3d Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the heat convection

    E-print Network

    Jolanta Socala; Wojciech M. Zajaczkowski

    2011-03-21

    We prove long time existence of regular solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the heat equation. We consider the system in non-axially symmetric cylinder with the slip boundary conditions for the Navier-Stokes equations and the Neumann condition for the heat equation. The long time existence is possible because we assumed that derivatives with respect to the variable along the axis of the cylinder of the initial velocity, initial temperature and the external force in $L_2$ norms are sufficiently small. We proved the existence of such solutions that velocity and temperature belong to $W_\\sigma^{2,1}(\\Omega\\times(0,T))$, where $\\sigma>{5\\over3}$. The existence is proved by the Leray-Schauder fixed point theorem.

  1. Non-Fourier heat conduction in a single-walled carbon nanotube: Classical molecular dynamics simulations

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Non-Fourier heat conduction in a single-walled carbon nanotube: Classical molecular dynamics of the simulations exhibit non-Fourier heat conduction where the distinct amount of heat is transported in a wavelike called non-Fourier heat conduction equations in order to investigate the applicability

  2. A note on stability in three-phase-lag heat conduction Ramon Quintanilla1

    E-print Network

    Racke, Reinhard

    A note on stability in three-phase-lag heat conduction Ram´on Quintanilla1 Department of Applied.racke@uni-konstanz.de Abstract: In this note we consider two cases in the theory of the heat conduction models with three the heat conduction, the latter also being called theories of second sound, where the propagation of heat

  3. Thermal Conductivity of One-Dimensional Lattices with Self-Consistent Heat Baths

    E-print Network

    Li, Baowen

    Thermal Conductivity of One-Dimensional Lattices with Self-Consistent Heat Baths: A Heuristic and breathers. KEYWORDS: heat conduction, classical transport, Langevin dynamics DOI: 10.1143/JPSJ.78.044001 1. Introduction Heat conduction exhibits diversified behaviors for one- dimensional lattices in terms of heat

  4. DSMC Convergence for Microscale Gas-Phase Heat Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, D. J.; Gallis, M. A.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The convergence of Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is investigated for gas-phase heat conduction at typical microscale conditions. A hard-sphere gas is confined between two fully accommodating walls of unequal temperature. Simulations are performed for small system and local Knudsen numbers, so continuum flow exists outside the Knudsen layers. The ratio of the DSMC thermal conductivity to the Chapman-Enskog value in the central region is determined for over 200 combinations of time step, cell size, and number of computational molecules per cell. In the limit of vanishing error, this ratio approaches 1.000 to within the correlation uncertainty. In the limit of infinite computational molecules per cell, the difference from unity depends quadratically on time step and cell size as these quantities become small. The coefficients of these quadratic terms are in good agreement with Green-Kubo values found by Hadjiconstantinou, Garcia, and co-workers. These results demonstrate that DSMC can accurately simulate microscale gas-phase heat conduction. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Numerical Model for Conduction-Cooled Current Lead Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.J.; Wang, X.L.; Brueck, H.D.; /DESY

    2011-06-10

    Current leads are utilized to deliver electrical power from a room temperature junction mounted on the vacuum vessel to a superconducting magnet located within the vacuum space of a cryostat. There are many types of current leads used at laboratories throughout the world; however, conduction-cooled current leads are often chosen for their simplicity and reliability. Conduction-cooled leads have the advantage of using common materials, have no superconducting/normal state transition, and have no boil-off vapor to collect. This paper presents a numerical model for conduction-cooled current lead heat loads. This model takes into account varying material and fluid thermal properties, varying thicknesses along the length of the lead, heat transfer in the circumferential and longitudinal directions, electrical power dissipation, and the effect of thermal intercepts. The model is validated by comparing the numerical model results to ideal cases where analytical equations are valid. In addition, the XFEL (X-Ray Free Electron Laser) prototype current leads are modeled and compared to the experimental results from testing at DESY's XFEL Magnet Test Stand (XMTS) and Cryomodule Test Bench (CMTB).

  6. The transient Dst electromagnetic induction signal at satellite altitudes for a realistic 3-D electrical conductivity in the crust and mantle

    E-print Network

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    The transient Dst electromagnetic induction signal at satellite altitudes for a realistic 3-D of electromagnetic induction (EM) is conventionally carried out in the frequency domain. We use a time, The transient Dst electromagnetic induction signal at satellite altitudes for a realistic 3-D electrical

  7. Numerical modeling of thermal conductive heating in fractured bedrock.

    PubMed

    Baston, Daniel P; Falta, Ronald W; Kueper, Bernard H

    2010-01-01

    Numerical modeling was employed to study the performance of thermal conductive heating (TCH) in fractured shale under a variety of hydrogeological conditions. Model results show that groundwater flow in fractures does not significantly affect the minimum treatment zone temperature, except near the beginning of heating or when groundwater influx is high. However, fracture and rock matrix properties can significantly influence the time necessary to remove all liquid water (i.e., reach superheated steam conditions) in the treatment area. Low matrix permeability, high matrix porosity, and wide fracture spacing can contribute to boiling point elevation in the rock matrix. Consequently, knowledge of these properties is important for the estimation of treatment times. Because of the variability in boiling point throughout a fractured rock treatment zone and the absence of a well-defined constant temperature boiling plateau in the rock matrix, it may be difficult to monitor the progress of thermal treatment using temperature measurements alone. PMID:20550586

  8. Variable conductance heat pipe technology. [research project resulting in heat pipe experiment on OAO-3 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. T.; Edwards, D. K.; Eninger, J. E.; Marcus, B. D.

    1974-01-01

    A research and development program in variable conductance heat pipe technology is reported. The project involved: (1) theoretical and/or experimental studies in hydrostatics, (2) hydrodynamics, (3) heat transfer into and out of the pipe, (4) fluid selection, and (5) materials compatibility. The development, fabrication, and test of the space hardware resulted in a successful flight of the heat pipe experiment on the OAO-3 satellite. A summary of the program is provided and a guide to the location of publications on the project is included.

  9. Combined conduction and radiation heat transfer in concentric cylindrical media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.

    1987-01-01

    The exact radiative transfer expressions for gray and nongray gases which are absorbing, emitting and nonscattering, contained between infinitely long concentric cylinders with black surfaces, are given in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Resulting energy equations due to the combination of conduction and radiation modes of heat transfer, under steady state conditions for gray and nongray media, are solved numerically using the undetermined parameters method. A single 4.3-micron band of CO2 is considered for the nongray problems. The present solutions for gray and nongray gases obtained in the plane-parallel limit (radius ratio approaches to one) are compared with the plane-parallel results reported in the literature.

  10. Tunable single-photon heat conduction in electrical circuits

    E-print Network

    P. J. Jones; J. A. M. Huhtamäki; M. Partanen; K. Y. Tan; M. Möttönen

    2012-05-21

    We build on the study of single-photon heat conduction in electronic circuits taking into account the back-action of the superconductor--insulator--normal-metal thermometers. In addition, we show that placing capacitors, resistors, and superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) into a microwave cavity can severely distort the spatial current profile which, in general, should be accounted for in circuit design. The introduction of SQUIDs also allows for in situ tuning of the photonic power transfer which could be utilized in experiments on superconducting quantum bits.

  11. Hierarchical Parallelism in Finite Difference Analysis of Heat Conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joseph; Krishna, Lala; Gute, Douglas

    1997-01-01

    Based on the concept of hierarchical parallelism, this research effort resulted in highly efficient parallel solution strategies for very large scale heat conduction problems. Overall, the method of hierarchical parallelism involves the partitioning of thermal models into several substructured levels wherein an optimal balance into various associated bandwidths is achieved. The details are described in this report. Overall, the report is organized into two parts. Part 1 describes the parallel modelling methodology and associated multilevel direct, iterative and mixed solution schemes. Part 2 establishes both the formal and computational properties of the scheme.

  12. AdS/CFT Correspondence with Heat Conduction

    E-print Network

    James Alsup; Chad Middleton; George Siopsis

    2007-06-28

    We study an extension of the gravity dual to a perfect fluid model found by Janik and Peschanski. By relaxing one of the constraints, namely invariance under reflection in the longitudinal direction, we introduce a metric ansatz which includes off-diagonal terms. We also include an $R$-charge following Bak and Janik. We solve the Maxwell-Einstein equations and through holographic renormalization, we show that the off-diagonal components of the bulk metric give rise to heat conduction in the corresponding CFT on the boundary.

  13. Pseudo-updated constrained solution algorithm for nonlinear heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tovichakchaikul, S.; Padovan, J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper develops efficiency and stability improvements in the incremental successive substitution (ISS) procedure commonly used to generate the solution to nonlinear heat conduction problems. This is achieved by employing the pseudo-update scheme of Broyden, Fletcher, Goldfarb and Shanno in conjunction with the constrained version of the ISS. The resulting algorithm retains the formulational simplicity associated with ISS schemes while incorporating the enhanced convergence properties of slope driven procedures as well as the stability of constrained approaches. To illustrate the enhanced operating characteristics of the new scheme, the results of several benchmark comparisons are presented.

  14. Version Date: October 30, 2001 A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Heat Conduction in Finite Length SWNTs

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 Version Date: October 30, 2001 A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Heat Conduction in Finite-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan Abstract The heat conduction in finite length single walled carbon nanotubes conductivity compared to the infinitely long nanotubes. The finite length effect on the heat conduction

  15. Anomalous Heat Conduction and Anomalous Diffusion in One-Dimensional Systems and Jiao Wang2

    E-print Network

    Li, Baowen

    Anomalous Heat Conduction and Anomalous Diffusion in One-Dimensional Systems Baowen Li1 and Jiao normal heat conduction obeying the Fourier law (#12; 0) and that superdiffusion ( > 1) implies anomalous heat conduction with a divergent thermal conductivity (#12; > 0). More interestingly, subdiffusion

  16. The form of Abstract Molecular dynamics simulations of diffusive-ballistic heat conduction

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    The form of Abstract Molecular dynamics simulations of diffusive-ballistic heat conduction amount of electrical current in the system. In this study, we have calculated SWNT heat conduction conduction characteristics and to gain fundamental understanding of heat conduction in quasi

  17. Long time estimate of solutions to 3d Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the heat convection

    E-print Network

    Jolanta Socala; Wojciech M. Zajaczkowski

    2011-03-21

    We examine the Navier-Stokes equations with homogeneous slip boundary conditions coupled with the heat equation with homogeneous Neumann conditions in a bounded domain in $R^3$. The considered domain is a cylinder with $x_3$-axis. The aim of this paper is to show long time estimates without smallness of the initial velocity, the initial temperature and the external force. To prove the estimate we need however smallness of $L_2$ norms of derivatives with respect to $x_3$ of the initial velocity, the initial temperature and the external force.

  18. Time fractional dual-phase-lag heat conduction equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huan-Ying; Jiang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-03-01

    We build a fractional dual-phase-lag model and the corresponding bioheat transfer equation, which we use to interpret the experiment results for processed meat that have been explained by applying the hyperbolic conduction. Analytical solutions expressed by H-functions are obtained by using the Laplace and Fourier transforms method. The inverse fractional dual-phase-lag heat conduction problem for the simultaneous estimation of two relaxation times and orders of fractionality is solved by applying the nonlinear least-square method. The estimated model parameters are given. Finally, the measured and the calculated temperatures versus time are compared and discussed. Some numerical examples are also given and discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11102102, 11472161, and 91130017), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2014AQ015), and the Independent Innovation Foundation of Shandong University, China (Grant No. 2013ZRYQ002).

  19. The Dance of Heating and Cooling in Galaxy Clusters: 3D Simulations of Self-Regulated AGN Outflows

    E-print Network

    Gaspari, M; Brighenti, F; D'Ercole, A

    2010-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that heating processes play a fundamental role in galaxy clusters, struggling in an intricate but fascinating `dance' with its antagonist, radiative cooling. Last generation observations, especially X-ray, are giving us tiny hints about the notes of this endless ballet. Cavities, shocks, turbulence and wide absorption-lines indicate the central active nucleus is injecting huge amount of energy in the intracluster medium. However, which is the real dominant engine of self-regulated heating? One of the model we propose are massive subrelativistic outflows, probably generated by a wind disc or just the result of the entrainment on kpc scale by the fast radio jet. Using a modified version of AMR code FLASH 3.2, we explored several feedback mechanisms which self-regulate the mechanical power. Two are the best schemes that answer our primary question, id est quenching cooling flow and at the same time preserving a cool core appearance for a long term evolution (7 Gyr): one more explosive (...

  20. Application of inverse heat conduction problem on temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zhou, G.; Dong, B.; Li, Q.; Liu, L. Q.

    2013-09-01

    For regenerative cooling devices, such as G-M refrigerator, pulse tube cooler or thermoacoustic cooler, the gas oscillating bring about temperature fluctuations inevitably, which is harmful in many applications requiring high stable temperatures. To find out the oscillating mechanism of the cooling temperature and improve the temperature stability of cooler, the inner temperature of the cold head has to be measured. However, it is difficult to measure the inner oscillating temperature of the cold head directly because the invasive temperature detectors may disturb the oscillating flow. Fortunately, the outer surface temperature of the cold head can be measured accurately by invasive temperature measurement techniques. In this paper, a mathematical model of inverse heat conduction problem is presented to identify the inner surface oscillating temperature of cold head according to the measured temperature of the outer surface in a GM cryocooler. Inverse heat conduction problem will be solved using control volume approach. Outer surface oscillating temperature could be used as input conditions of inverse problem and the inner surface oscillating temperature of cold head can be inversely obtained. A simple uncertainty analysis of the oscillating temperature measurement also will be provided.

  1. Heating, conduction and minimum temperatures in cooling flows

    E-print Network

    Mateusz Ruszkowski; Mitchell C. Begelman

    2002-08-12

    There is mounting observational evidence from Chandra for strong interaction between keV gas and AGN in cooling flows. It is now widely accepted that the temperatures of cluster cores are maintained at a level of 1 keV and that the mass deposition rates are lower than earlier ROSAT/Einstein values. Recent theoretical results suggest that thermal conduction can be very efficient even in magnetized plasmas. Motivated by these discoveries, we consider a ``double heating model'' which incorporates the effects of simultaneous heating by both the central AGN and thermal conduction from the hot outer layers of clusters. Using hydrodynamical simulations, we demonstrate that there exists a family of solutions that does not suffer from the cooling catastrophe. In these cases, clusters relax to a stable final state, which is characterized by minimum temperatures of order 1 keV and density and temperature profiles consistent with observations. Moreover, the accretion rates are much reduced, thereby reducing the need for excessive mass deposition rates required by the standard cooling flow models.

  2. High Temperature Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarau, Calin; Walker, Kara L.; Anderson, William G.

    2009-03-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling converter provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) is under development to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. The status of the ongoing effort in developing this technology is presented in this paper. An earlier, preliminary design had a radiator outside the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) casing, used NaK as the working fluid, and had the reservoir located on the cold side adapter flange. The revised design has an internal radiator inside the casing, with the reservoir embedded inside the insulation. A large set of advantages are offered by this new design. In addition to reducing the overall size and mass of the VCHP, simplicity, compactness and easiness in assembling the VCHP with the ASRG are significantly enhanced. Also, the permanently elevated temperatures of the entire VCHP allows the change of the working fluid from a binary compound (NaK) to single compound (Na). The latter, by its properties, allows higher performance and further mass reduction of the system. Preliminary design and analysis shows an acceptable peak temperature of the ASRG case of 140° C while the heat losses caused by the addition of the VCHP are 1.8 W.

  3. High Temperature Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Walker, Kara L.; Anderson, William G.

    2009-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) is under development to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. The status of the ongoing effort in developing this technology is presented in this paper. An earlier, preliminary design had a radiator outside the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) casing, used NaK as the working fluid, and had the reservoir located on the cold side adapter flange. The revised design has an internal radiator inside the casing, with the reservoir embedded inside the insulation. A large set of advantages are offered by this new design. In addition to reducing the overall size and mass of the VCHP, simplicity, compactness and easiness in assembling the VCHP with the ASRG are significantly enhanced. Also, the permanently elevated temperatures of the entire VCHP allows the change of the working fluid from a binary compound (NaK) to single compound (Na). The latter, by its properties, allows higher performance and further mass reduction of the system. Preliminary design and analysis shows an acceptable peak temperature of the ASRG case of 140 C while the heat losses caused by the addition of the VCHP are 1.8 W.

  4. Spectroscopic Evidence for the Formation of 3-D Crystallites During Isothermal Heating of Amorphous Ice on PT(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Waluyo, I.; Nordlund, D.; Naslund, L.-A.; Ogasawara, H.; Pettersson, L.G.M.; Nilsson, A.

    2009-05-26

    The formation of crystalline ice through isothermal heating of 80 layers amorphous ice on Pt(111) at 150 K is studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. An early indicator for inhomogeneous crystallization is provided by the uncharacteristically high Pt 4f photoelectron peak for crystalline ice compared with the corresponding uniformly thick amorphous case. O 1s photoelectron spectra unambiguously show that the first monolayer is exposed after crystallization at multilayer total coverage. Using the relative intensities between the first monolayer and multilayer contributions to the O 1s photoelectron spectra, we estimated that -46% and -80% of the first monolayer is exposed to vacuum with an average crystallite height of -41 and -31 layers for an equivalent total coverage of -23 and -7 layers, respectively.

  5. 3D CFD Electrochemical and Heat Transfer Model of an Integrated-Planar Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Hawkes; James E. O'Brien

    2008-10-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in a new novel integrated planar porous-tube supported solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model is of several integrated planar cells attached to a ceramic support tube. This design is being evaluated with modeling at the Idaho National Laboratory. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean per-cell area-specific-resistance (ASR) values decrease with increasing current density. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, cathode and anode exchange current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicated the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal efficiency, cell electrical efficiency, and Gibbs free energy are discussed and reported herein.

  6. Finite-difference modeling of borehole induction data in the presence of 3D electrical conductivity anisotropy using coupled scattered potentials

    E-print Network

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    to simulate borehole electromagnetic (EM) fields in arbitrary three-dimensional (3D) electrically anisotropic conventional electromagnetic (EM) field FD formulations (see, for instance, LaBrecque, 1999, Haber et al., 2000

  7. Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, William G.; Tarau, Calin

    2008-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) was designed to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. A VCHP was designed for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator, with a 850 °C heater head temperature. The VCHP turns on with a ?T of 30 °C, which is high enough to not risk standard ASRG operation but low enough to save most heater head life. This VCHP has a low mass, and low thermal losses for normal operation. In addition to the design, a proof-of-concept NaK VCHP was fabricated and tested. While NaK is normally not used in heat pipes, it has an advantage in that it is liquid at the reservoir operating temperature, while Na or K alone would freeze. The VCHP had two condensers, one simulating the heater head, and the other simulating the radiator. The experiments successfully demonstrated operation with the simulated heater head condenser off and on, while allowing the reservoir temperature to vary over 40 to 120 °C, the maximum range expected. In agreement with previous NaK heat pipe tests, the evaporator ?T was roughly 70 °C, due to distillation of the NaK in the evaporator.

  8. Endogenic heat from Enceladus' south polar fractures: New observations, and models of conductive surface heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, Oleg; Spencer, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Linear features dubbed "tiger stripes" in the south polar region of Enceladus have anomalously high heat fluxes and are the apparent source of the observed plume. Several explanations for the observed activity have been proposed, including venting from a subsurface reservoir of liquid water, sublimation of surface ice, dissociation of clathrates, and shear heating. Thermal modeling presented in this work, coupled with observations from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument, seeks to elucidate the underlying physical mechanism by constraining vent temperatures and thermal emission sources, using a model in which the observed thermal signature results primarily from conductive heating of the surface by warm subsurface fractures. The fractures feed surface vents, which may themselves contribute to the observed thermal emission. Model variables include vent temperature, presence of a surface insulating layer, vent width, time-variable heat input, and heat sources other than the central vent. Results indicate that CIRS spectra are best fitted with a model in which the surface is heated by narrow vents at temperatures as high as 223 K. Although equally good fits can be obtained for vent temperatures in the range of 130 to 155 K if the vents are wider (180 m and 22 m respectively) and dominate the emission spectrum, these models are probably less realistic because vents with these temperatures and widths cannot supply the observed H 2O vapor flux. The lack of emission angle dependence of the thermal emission when July 2005 and November 2006 CIRS observations are compared also argues against thermal emission being dominated by the vents themselves. Thus, results favor high-temperature models, possibly venting from a subsurface liquid water reservoir. However, a fracture filled with liquid water near the surface would produce significantly higher radiances than were detected unless masked by a thermally insulating surface layer. Models that best match the CIRS data are characterized by small fractions of the surface at high temperatures, which strengthens the case for the vents and/or their conductively-heated margins being the primary heat source. Models where the thermal emission is dominated by conductive heating of the surface from below by a laterally-extensive buried heat source cannot reproduce the observed spectrum. Models with a 10 cm thick upper insulating layer produce a poor match to the CIRS spectra, suggesting high thermal inertias near the tiger stripes. Finally, tiger stripe thermal emission measured by CIRS varied by less than 15% over the 16 month period from July 2005 to November 2006.

  9. Heat conduction through a trapped solid: effect of structural changes on thermal conductance

    E-print Network

    Debasish Chaudhuri; Abhishek Chaudhuri; Surajit Sengupta

    2007-03-20

    We study the conduction of heat across a narrow solid strip trapped by an external potential and in contact with its own liquid. Structural changes, consisting of addition and deletion of crystal layers in the trapped solid, are produced by altering the depth of the confining potential. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and, wherever possible, simple analytical calculations are used to obtain the thermal resistance in the liquid, solid and interfacial regions (Kapitza or contact resistance). We show that these layering transitions are accompanied by sharp jumps in the contact thermal resistance. Dislocations, if present, are shown to increase the thermal resistance of the strip drastically.

  10. Heat conduction in nanoscale materials: a statistical-mechanics derivation of the local heat flux.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiantao

    2014-09-01

    We derive a coarse-grained model for heat conduction in nanoscale mechanical systems. Starting with an all-atom description, this approach yields a reduced model, in the form of conservation laws of momentum and energy. The model closure is accomplished by introducing a quasilocal thermodynamic equilibrium, followed by a linear response approximation. Of particular interest is the constitutive relation for the heat flux, which is expressed nonlocally in terms of the spatial and temporal variation of the temperature. Nanowires made of copper and silicon are presented as examples. PMID:25314400

  11. Computational fluid dynamics analyses of lateral heat conduction, coolant azimuthal mixing and heat transfer predictions in a BR2 fuel assembly geometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.; Dionne, B.

    2011-05-23

    To support the analyses related to the conversion of the BR2 core from highly-enriched (HEU) to low-enriched (LEU) fuel, the thermal-hydraulics codes PLTEMP and RELAP-3D are used to evaluate the safety margins during steady-state operation (PLTEMP), as well as after a loss-of-flow, loss-of-pressure, or a loss of coolant event (RELAP). In the 1-D PLTEMP and RELAP simulations, conduction in the azimuthal and axial directions is not accounted. The very good thermal conductivity of the cladding and the fuel meat and significant temperature gradients in the lateral directions (axial and azimuthal directions) could lead to a heat flux distribution that is significantly different than the power distribution. To evaluate the significance of the lateral heat conduction, 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, using the CFD code STAR-CD, were performed. Safety margin calculations are typically performed for a hot stripe, i.e., an azimuthal region of the fuel plates/coolant channel containing the power peak. In a RELAP model, for example, a channel between two plates could be divided into a number of RELAP channels (stripes) in the azimuthal direction. In a PLTEMP model, the effect of azimuthal power peaking could be taken into account by using engineering factors. However, if the thermal mixing in the azimuthal direction of a coolant channel is significant, a stripping approach could be overly conservative by not taking into account this mixing. STAR-CD simulations were also performed to study the thermal mixing in the coolant. Section II of this document presents the results of the analyses of the lateral heat conduction and azimuthal thermal mixing in a coolant channel. Finally, PLTEMP and RELAP simulations rely on the use of correlations to determine heat transfer coefficients. Previous analyses showed that the Dittus-Boelter correlation gives significantly more conservative (lower) predictions than the correlations of Sieder-Tate and Petukhov. STAR-CD 3-D simulations were performed to compare heat transfer predictions from CFD and the correlations. Section III of this document presents the results of this analysis.

  12. HEAT CONDUCTION OF SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE IN VARIOUS ENVIRONMENTS

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    HEAT CONDUCTION OF SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE IN VARIOUS ENVIRONMENTS Junichiro Shiomi-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan ABSTRACT Some of our recent studies on the heat conduction of single-walled carbon, the heat conduction is investigated in more practical situations under the influence of inter

  13. A blow-up criterion for compressible viscous heat-conductive flows

    E-print Network

    are the specific heat at constant volume and thermal conductivity coefficient, respectively. P is the pressureA blow-up criterion for compressible viscous heat-conductive flows Jishan Fan Department boundary value problem for the three-dimensional Navier- Stokes equations of viscous heat-conductive fluids

  14. A note on stability in dualphaselag heat conduction Ram on Quintanilla 1

    E-print Network

    Racke, Reinhard

    A note on stability in dual­phase­lag heat conduction Ramâ?? on Quintanilla 1 Department of Applied Introduction There are several hyperbolic theories of heat conduction, also called theories of second sound a theory of heat conduction, # t + div q = 0 (1.1) 0 AMS subject classification: 35 L 35, 80 A 20 Keywords

  15. A MECHANICAL MODEL FOR FOURIER'S LAW OF HEAT CONDUCTION. by David Ruelle+.

    E-print Network

    Ruelle, David

    A MECHANICAL MODEL FOR FOURIER'S LAW OF HEAT CONDUCTION. by David Ruelle+. Abstract. Nonequilibrium mechanical model of a heat­conducting chain with nontrivial interactions, where kinetic energy fluctuations, as remarked by van Kampen [22]. A fundamental derivation of Fourier's law for heat conduction remains thus

  16. A HEAT CONDUCTION STUDY AT NON-CONTINUUM SCALES A Dissertation

    E-print Network

    Sen, Mihir

    A HEAT CONDUCTION STUDY AT NON-CONTINUUM SCALES A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate School Rights Reserved #12;A HEAT CONDUCTION STUDY AT NON-CONTINUUM SCALES Abstract by Alejandro Guajardo Cu´ellar An extensive and detailed description of heat conduction at the micro- and nano-scale is presented. During

  17. PAMM header will be provided by the publisher Multidimensional Inverse Heat Conduction Calculations

    E-print Network

    Reinhardt, Hans-Jürgen

    PAMM header will be provided by the publisher Multidimensional Inverse Heat Conduction Calculations for multidimensional inverse heat conduction problems. In this contri- bution, we outline and refer to several of our 2-d. calculations. The importance of inverse heat conduction problems and appropriate solution

  18. Influence of interfaces on diffusive-ballistic heat conduction of carbon Shiomi, Junichiro, Maruyama, Shigeo

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Influence of interfaces on diffusive-ballistic heat conduction of carbon nanotubes Shiomi temperature. Although the characteristics of intrinsic heat conduction of SWNTs have been explored extensively not only give rise to thermal boundary resistances but also influence the intrinsic heat conduction

  19. Molecular Dynamics of Diffusive-Ballistic Heat Conduction in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Molecular Dynamics of Diffusive-Ballistic Heat Conduction in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku Tokyo 113-8656, Japan Diffusive-ballistic heat conduction of finite-length single. A gradual transition from nearly pure ballistic to diffusive-ballistic heat conduction was identified from

  20. A Bayesian inference approach to the inverse heat conduction problem Jingbo Wang and Nicholas Zabaras1

    E-print Network

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    A Bayesian inference approach to the inverse heat conduction problem Jingbo Wang and Nicholas inference approach is presented for the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem. The posterior inverse heat conduction examples are presented to demonstrate the potential of the MCMC-based Bayesian

  1. Anomalous heat conduction and anomalous diffusion in nonlinear lattices, single walled nanotubes, and billiard gas channels

    E-print Network

    Li, Baowen

    Anomalous heat conduction and anomalous diffusion in nonlinear lattices, single walled nanotubes 2004; accepted 13 October 2004; published online 28 March 2005 We study anomalous heat conduction nanotubes, to billiard gas channels. We find that in all discussed systems, the anomalous heat conductivity

  2. A MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF HEAT CONDUCTION IN A CARBON NANOTUBE

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    A MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF HEAT CONDUCTION IN A CARBON NANOTUBE Shigeo Maruyama to be order of 100nm ~ 1µm, heat conduction of nanotubes with shorter than 1µm should have the nearly's law of heat conduction may not be obeyed for these almost one-dimensional materials when rather high

  3. Variational formulation of hyperbolic heat conduction problems applying Laplace transform technique

    E-print Network

    Variational formulation of hyperbolic heat conduction problems applying Laplace transform technique In this paper, a non-Fourier heat conduction problem is analyzed by employing newly developed theory-transformed hyperbolic heat conduction equation is developed. The results were used for evaluation of parameters used

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heat Conduction of Peapods Shigeo Maruyama, Yuki Taniguchi and Yasushi Shibuta

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heat Conduction of Peapods Shigeo Maruyama, Yuki Taniguchi-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan We have been studying the heat conduction along a single-walled carbon nanotubes configuration, thermal conductivity was calculated from temperature gradient and heat flux which was obtained

  5. Spatial behavior in phase-lag heat conduction Ramon Quintanilla and Reinhard Racke

    E-print Network

    Racke, Reinhard

    Spatial behavior in phase-lag heat conduction Ram´on Quintanilla and Reinhard Racke Abstract approximations to the heat conduction dual-phase-lag and three-phase- lag theories, reflecting Saint´e inequality 1 Introduction Fourier's heat conduction theory implies that thermal perturbations at some point

  6. Influence of surrounding materials on heat conduction of carbon nanotubes: Molecular dynamics simulations

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Influence of surrounding materials on heat conduction of carbon nanotubes: Molecular dynamics the characteristics of intrinsic heat conduction of SWNTs have been explored extensively for ideal thermal boundary boundary resistances but also influence the intrinsic heat conduction. In a system with significant

  7. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Heat Conduction of Finite Length SWNTs SHIGEO MARUYAMA

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Heat Conduction of Finite Length SWNTs SHIGEO MARUYAMA The heat conduction of finite length single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was simulated by the molecular is estimated, as order of 100nm 1µm, heat conduction of nanotubes with about 1µm length should have the nearly

  8. Heat conduction of single-walled carbon nanotube isotope-superlattice structures: A molecular dynamics study

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 Heat conduction of single-walled carbon nanotube isotope-superlattice structures: A molecular-mail address: maruyama@photon.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp Heat conduction of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) isotope and junctions, which alter the heat conduction. In general, these nanoscale impurities, having scales comparable

  9. A note on stability in dual-phase-lag heat conduction Ramon Quintanilla1

    E-print Network

    Racke, Reinhard

    A note on stability in dual-phase-lag heat conduction Ram´on Quintanilla1 Department of Applied Introduction There are several hyperbolic theories of heat conduction, also called theories of second sound a theory of heat conduction, t + div q = 0 (1.1) 0 AMS subject classification: 35 L 35, 80 A 20 Keywords

  10. From Anomalous Energy Diffusion to Levy Walks and Heat Conductivity in One-Dimensional Systems

    E-print Network

    Politi, Antonio

    From Anomalous Energy Diffusion to Levy Walks and Heat Conductivity in One-Dimensional Systems P invoked to explain anomalous heat conductivity in the context of non- interacting particles is here shown the divergence rate of heat conductivity which turns out to be 0:333 0:004, in perfect agreement

  11. Phase-lag heat conduction: decay rates for limit problems and well-posedness

    E-print Network

    Racke, Reinhard

    Phase-lag heat conduction: decay rates for limit problems and well-posedness Karin Borgmeyer, Ram approximations to dual-phase-lag and three-phase-lag heat conduction equations. However, for several limit cases analysis is rigorously proved exemplarily. 1 Introduction It is well known that Fourier's heat conduction

  12. Diffusive-Ballistic Heat Conduction of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanographene Junichiro Shiomi and Shigeo Maruyama*

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Diffusive-Ballistic Heat Conduction of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanographene Ribbons Junichiro Shiomi-3-5800-6983 Abstract Investigations of diffusive-ballistic heat conduction of finite-length single-walled carbon of the balance between ballistic and diffusive heat conduction. For both systems, the profile indicates

  13. Correlations and scaling in one-dimensional heat conduction J. M. Deutsch and Onuttom Narayan

    E-print Network

    Deutsch, Josh

    Correlations and scaling in one-dimensional heat conduction J. M. Deutsch and Onuttom Narayan of the heat current, through the Kubo formula, gives a thermal conductivity exponent of 1/3 in agreement.40.Mg I. INTRODUCTION Heat conduction in one-dimensional systems is a simple example of the general

  14. Diffusive-Ballistic Heat Conduction along a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Shigeo Maruyama

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Diffusive-Ballistic Heat Conduction along a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Shigeo Maruyama *E-mail address: maruyama@photon.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp The diffusive-ballistic heat conduction of finite unique stationary and non-stationary heat conduction characteristics [3,4]. Furthermore, several issues

  15. Efficient linear and nonlinear heat conduction with a quadrilateral element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented for performing efficient and stable finite element calculations of heat conduction with quadrilaterals using one-point quadrature. The stability in space is obtained by using a stabilization matrix which is orthogonal to all linear fields and its magnitude is determined by a stabilization parameter. It is shown that the accuracy is almost independent of the value of the stabilization parameter over a wide range of values; in fact, the values 3, 2 and 1 for the normalized stabilization parameter lead to the 5-point finite difference, 9-point finite difference and fully integrated finite element operators, respectively, for rectangular meshes; numerical experiments reported here show that the three have identical rates of convergence in the L2 norm. Eigenvalues of the element matrices, which are needed for stability limits, are also given. Numerical applications are used to show that the method yields accurate solutions with large increases in efficiency, particularly in nonlinear problems.

  16. Efficient linear and nonlinear heat conduction with a quadrilateral element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for performing efficient and stable finite element calculations of heat conduction with quadrilaterals using one-point quadrature. The stability in space is obtained by using a stabilization matrix which is orthogonal to all linear fields and its magnitude is determined by a stabilization parameter. It is shown that the accuracy is almost independent of the value of the stabilization parameter over a wide range of values; in fact, the values 3, 2, and 1 for the normalized stabilization parameter lead to the 5-point, 9-point finite difference, and fully integrated finite element operators, respectively, for rectangular meshes and have identical rates of convergence in the L2 norm. Eigenvalues of the element matrices, which are needed for stability limits, are also given. Numerical applications are used to show that the method yields accurate solutions with large increases in efficiency, particularly in nonlinear problems.

  17. Application of the boundary element method to transient heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, G. F.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    An advanced boundary element method (BEM) is presented for the transient heat conduction analysis of engineering components. The numerical implementation necessarily includes higher-order conforming elements, self-adaptive integration and a multiregion capability. Planar, three-dimensional and axisymmetric analyses are all addressed with a consistent time-domain convolution approach, which completely eliminates the need for volume discretization for most practical analyses. The resulting general purpose algorithm establishes BEM as an attractive alternative to the more familiar finite difference and finite element methods for this class of problems. Several detailed numerical examples are included to emphasize the accuracy, stability and generality of the present BEM. Furthermore, a new efficient treatment is introduced for bodies with embedded holes. This development provides a powerful analytical tool for transient solutions of components, such as casting moulds and turbine blades, which are cumbersome to model when employing the conventional domain-based methods.

  18. Thermal conductivity and specific heat of glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, D. G.; Olson, J. R.; Fischer, Henry E.; Watson, S. K.; Stephens, R. B.; Tait, R. H.; Ashworth, T.; Pohl, R. O.

    1991-12-01

    The effect of crystallization on the lattice vibrations of two glass ceramics, a magnesium aluminosilicate (Corning Code 9606) and a lithium aluminosilicate (Corning Code 9623), is studied through measurements of the thermal conductivity and specific heat below 300 K. Because of grain boundaries and magnetic impurities, measurements below a few kelvins are of limited value. At higher temperatures, however, the experimental results show that the lattice vibrations of one of the glass ceramics (Code 9606) change from glassy to crystalline upon crystallization. Those of Code 9623, however, remain glassy even in the fully crystallized state. In contrast to the crystalline Code 9606 sample, the Code 9623 sample accommodates large concentrations of interstitial lithium and magnesium ions in its crystal lattice, and it is suggested that the glasslike lattice vibrations in the Code 9623 sample are caused by these ions.

  19. High Temperature Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tarau, Calin; Walker, Kara L.; Anderson, William G.

    2009-03-16

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling converter provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) is under development to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. The status of the ongoing effort in developing this technology is presented in this paper. An earlier, preliminary design had a radiator outside the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) casing, used NaK as the working fluid, and had the reservoir located on the cold side adapter flange. The revised design has an internal radiator inside the casing, with the reservoir embedded inside the insulation. A large set of advantages are offered by this new design. In addition to reducing the overall size and mass of the VCHP, simplicity, compactness and easiness in assembling the VCHP with the ASRG are significantly enhanced. Also, the permanently elevated temperatures of the entire VCHP allows the change of the working fluid from a binary compound (NaK) to single compound (Na). The latter, by its properties, allows higher performance and further mass reduction of the system. Preliminary design and analysis shows an acceptable peak temperature of the ASRG case of 140 deg. C while the heat losses caused by the addition of the VCHP are 1.8 W.

  20. Manipulating Steady Heat Conduction by Sensu-shaped Thermal Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tiancheng; Bai, Xue; Liu, Dan; Gao, Dongliang; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T. L.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-05-01

    The ability to design the control of heat flow has innumerable benefits in the design of electronic systems such as thermoelectric energy harvesters, solid-state lighting, and thermal imagers, where the thermal design plays a key role in performance and device reliability. In this work, we employ one identical sensu-unit with facile natural composition to experimentally realize a new class of thermal metamaterials for controlling thermal conduction (e.g., thermal concentrator, focusing/resolving, uniform heating), only resorting to positioning and locating the same unit element of sensu-shape structure. The thermal metamaterial unit and the proper arrangement of multiple identical units are capable of transferring, redistributing and managing thermal energy in a versatile fashion. It is also shown that our sensu-shape unit elements can be used in manipulating dc currents without any change in the layout for the thermal counterpart. These could markedly enhance the capabilities in thermal sensing, thermal imaging, thermal-energy storage, thermal packaging, thermal therapy, and more domains beyond.

  1. Manipulating Steady Heat Conduction by Sensu-shaped Thermal Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Han, Tiancheng; Bai, Xue; Liu, Dan; Gao, Dongliang; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T L; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The ability to design the control of heat flow has innumerable benefits in the design of electronic systems such as thermoelectric energy harvesters, solid-state lighting, and thermal imagers, where the thermal design plays a key role in performance and device reliability. In this work, we employ one identical sensu-unit with facile natural composition to experimentally realize a new class of thermal metamaterials for controlling thermal conduction (e.g., thermal concentrator, focusing/resolving, uniform heating), only resorting to positioning and locating the same unit element of sensu-shape structure. The thermal metamaterial unit and the proper arrangement of multiple identical units are capable of transferring, redistributing and managing thermal energy in a versatile fashion. It is also shown that our sensu-shape unit elements can be used in manipulating dc currents without any change in the layout for the thermal counterpart. These could markedly enhance the capabilities in thermal sensing, thermal imaging, thermal-energy storage, thermal packaging, thermal therapy, and more domains beyond. PMID:25974383

  2. Manipulating Steady Heat Conduction by Sensu-shaped Thermal Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tiancheng; Bai, Xue; Liu, Dan; Gao, Dongliang; Li, Baowen; Thong, John T. L.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The ability to design the control of heat flow has innumerable benefits in the design of electronic systems such as thermoelectric energy harvesters, solid-state lighting, and thermal imagers, where the thermal design plays a key role in performance and device reliability. In this work, we employ one identical sensu-unit with facile natural composition to experimentally realize a new class of thermal metamaterials for controlling thermal conduction (e.g., thermal concentrator, focusing/resolving, uniform heating), only resorting to positioning and locating the same unit element of sensu-shape structure. The thermal metamaterial unit and the proper arrangement of multiple identical units are capable of transferring, redistributing and managing thermal energy in a versatile fashion. It is also shown that our sensu-shape unit elements can be used in manipulating dc currents without any change in the layout for the thermal counterpart. These could markedly enhance the capabilities in thermal sensing, thermal imaging, thermal-energy storage, thermal packaging, thermal therapy, and more domains beyond. PMID:25974383

  3. Heat flux determination at the AWJ cutting zone using IR thermography and inverse heat conduction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R.S.; Kovacevic, R.; Beardsley, H.E.

    1996-12-31

    In abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting, the cutting tool is a thin stream of high velocity abrasive waterjet slurry which can be considered as a moving line heat source that increases the temperature of the narrow zone along the cut kerf wall. A suitably defined inverse heat conduction problem which uses the experimentally determined temperature histories at various points in the workpiece, is adopted to determine the heat flux at the cutting zone. Temperature distribution in the workpiece and the cutting nozzle during AWJ cutting is monitored using infrared thermography. A suitable strategy for on-line monitoring of the radial and axial wear of the AWJ nozzle based on the nozzle temperature distribution is also proposed.

  4. High-conductivity, lightweight graphite foams (GF) can potentially increase heat transfer while

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    transfer while reducing both the size and weight of heat transfer devices ­ significantly impacting in increased heat transfer. This high thermal conductivity also allows a given amount of heat to be distributed be optimized for specific heat transfer applications. In addition, heat transfer devices for the electronics

  5. Spring 2005 Test #1 1. Steady state heat conduction in a slab with heat generation. (40 points)

    E-print Network

    McCready, Mark J.

    ChEg 356 Spring 2005 Test #1 2/17/05 1. Steady state heat conduction in a slab with heat generation for the temperature profile for the case of finite S (that is again with heat conduction), but this time the thermal are infinite and completely uniform. There is a heat generation rate of S W/m3 -s. The wall at x=0 is insulated

  6. Theory and design of variable conductance heat pipes: Steady state and transient performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. K.; Fleischman, G. L.; Marcus, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    Heat pipe technology pertinent to the design and application of self-controlled, variable conductance heat pipes for spacecraft thermal control is discussed. Investigations were conducted to: (1) provide additional confidence in existing design tools, (2) to generate new design tools, and (3) to develop superior variable conductance heat pipe designs. A computer program for designing and predicting the performance of the heat pipe systems was developed.

  7. Differential heating: A versatile method for thermal conductivity measurements in high-energy-density matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ping, Y.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Sio, H.; Correa, A.; Shepherd, R.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Sterne, P. A.; Whitley, H. D.; Fratanduono, D.; et al

    2015-09-04

    We propose a method for thermal conductivity measurements of high energy density matter based on differential heating. A temperature gradient is created either by surface heating of one material or at an interface between two materials by different energy deposition. The subsequent heat conduction across the temperature gradient is observed by various time-resolved probing techniques. Conceptual designs of such measurements using laser heating, proton heating, and x-ray heating are presented. As a result, the sensitivity of the measurements to thermal conductivity is confirmed by simulations.

  8. Summary Weusedthreemethodstomeasureboundarylayer conductance to heat transfer (gbH) and water vapor transfer

    E-print Network

    Martin, Timothy

    Summary Weusedthreemethodstomeasureboundarylayer conductance to heat transfer (gbH) and water vapor of transpiration). The boundary layer conductance to heat transfer is small enough that leaf temperature can become diffusion, the boundary layer around a leaf also provides resistance to the transfer of heat between a leaf

  9. Heat conduction in simple networks: The effect of interchain coupling Zonghua Liu1,2

    E-print Network

    Li, Baowen

    Heat conduction in simple networks: The effect of interchain coupling Zonghua Liu1,2 and Baowen Li2; published 16 November 2007 Heat conduction in simple networks consisting of different one dimensional nonlinear chains is studied. We find that the coupling between chains has a different function in heat

  10. Wave transmission, phonon localization, and heat conduction of a one-dimensional Frenkel-Kontorova chain

    E-print Network

    Li, Baowen

    Wave transmission, phonon localization, and heat conduction of a one-dimensional Frenkel the fundamental properties, such as the wave transmission, heat conduction, and other low these related properties, namely, the wave transmission, the heat conduc- tion, and the phonon localization in 1

  11. Optimal Operation of Finite-time Tricycles with Heat Conduction Losses Raj K. Pathria

    E-print Network

    Salamon, Peter

    (1) Optimal Operation of Finite-time Tricycles with Heat Conduction Losses Raj K. Pathria the heat conduction br anches for a wide variety of cost functions. One point on this boundary represents-principle limits to the finite-time operation of a cycling working fluid acting as an agent in the transfer of heat

  12. Solution of the Heat Equation for transient conduction by LaPlace

    E-print Network

    McCready, Mark J.

    Solution of the Heat Equation for transient conduction by LaPlace Transform This notebook has been for copying and dissemination Version: 3/17/98 #12;This notebook shows how to solve transient heat conduction in Mathematica. This problem is the heat transfer analog to the "Rayleigh" problem that starts on page 91

  13. Convection under a lid of finite conductivity: Heat flux scaling and application to continents

    E-print Network

    Tackley, Paul J.

    Convection under a lid of finite conductivity: Heat flux scaling and application to continents C. J. Tackley (2007), Convection under a lid of finite conductivity: Heat flux scaling and application April 2007; published 1 August 2007. [1] A scaling law for the heat flux out of a convective fluid

  14. Influence of Conductive Heat-Losses on the Propagation of Premixed Flames in Channels

    E-print Network

    Sidorov, Nikita

    Influence of Conductive Heat-Losses on the Propagation of Premixed Flames in Channels J. DAOU of arbitrary width, accounting for heat losses by conduction to the walls. The ratio of the width-3125, USA We study the propagation of premixed flames in two-dimensional channels accounting for heat

  15. Heat conduction across irregular and fractal-like surfaces M.G. Blyth a

    E-print Network

    Blyth, Mark

    Heat conduction across irregular and fractal-like surfaces M.G. Blyth a , C. Pozrikidis b on the rate of heat conduction from a two-dimensional isothermal surface into a semi- infinite medium wall shapes. Ã? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The study of heat

  16. SEP BIMOD variable conductance heat pipes acceptance and characterization tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemminger, J. A.

    1981-08-01

    A series of six heat pipes, similar in design to those flown on the Comunications Technology Satellite Hermes, for use in a prototype Solar Electric Propulsion BIMOD thrust module are evaluated. The results of acceptance and characterization tests performed on the heat pipe subassemble are reported. The performance of all the heat pipes met, or exceeded, design specifications.

  17. SEP BIMOD variable conductance heat pipes acceptance and characterization tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemminger, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A series of six heat pipes, similar in design to those flown on the Comunications Technology Satellite Hermes, for use in a prototype Solar Electric Propulsion BIMOD thrust module are evaluated. The results of acceptance and characterization tests performed on the heat pipe subassemble are reported. The performance of all the heat pipes met, or exceeded, design specifications.

  18. Thermographic validation of a novel, laminate body, analytical heat conduction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desgrosseilliers, Louis; Groulx, Dominic; White, Mary Anne

    2014-07-01

    The two-region fin model captures the heat spreading behaviour in multilayered composite bodies (i.e., laminates), heated only over a small part of their domains (finite heat source), where there is an inner layer that has a substantial capacity for heat conduction parallel to the heat exchange surface (convection cooling). This resulting heat conduction behaviour improves the overall heat transfer process when compared to heat conduction in homogeneous bodies. Long-term heat storage using supercooling salt hydrate phase change materials, stovetop cookware, and electronics cooling applications could all benefit from this kind of heat-spreading in laminates. Experiments using laminate films reclaimed from post-consumer Tetra Brik cartons were conducted with thin rectangular and circular heaters to confirm the laminate body, steady-state, heat conduction behaviour predicted by the two-region fin model. Medium to high accuracy experimental validation of the two-region fin model was achieved in Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates for forced external convection and natural convection, the latter for Cartesian only. These were conducted using constant heat flux finite heat source temperature profiles that were measured by infrared thermography. This validation is also deemed valid for constant temperature heat sources.

  19. Experimental investigation of plastic finned-tube heat exchangers, with emphasis on material thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lin; Li, Zhen; Guo, Zeng-Yuan

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, two modified types of polypropylene (PP) with high thermal conductivity up to 2.3 W/m K and 16.5 W/m K are used to manufacture the finned-tube heat exchangers, which are prospected to be used in liquid desiccant air conditioning, heat recovery, water source heat pump, sea water desalination, etc. A third plastic heat exchanger is also manufactured with ordinary PP for validation and comparison. Experiments are carried out to determine the thermal performance of the plastic heat exchangers. It is found that the plastic finned-tube heat exchanger with thermal conductivity of 16.5 W/m K can achieve overall heat transfer coefficient of 34 W/m{sup 2} K. The experimental results are compared with calculation and they agree well with each other. Finally, the effect of material thermal conductivity on heat exchanger thermal performance is studied in detail. The results show that there is a threshold value of material thermal conductivity. Below this value improving thermal conductivity can considerably improve the heat exchanger performance while over this value improving thermal conductivity contributes very little to performance enhancement. For the finned-tube heat exchanger designed in this paper, when the plastic thermal conductivity can reach over 15 W/m K, it can achieve more than 95% of the titanium heat exchanger performance and 84% of the aluminum or copper heat exchanger performance with the same dimension. (author)

  20. A MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF HEAT CONDUCTION OF A FINITE LENGTH SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    A MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF HEAT CONDUCTION OF A FINITE LENGTH SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE Heat conduction of finite length single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was simulated by the molecular by the phantom technique, and the thermal conductivity was calculated with Fourier's law from the measured

  1. Isotope Effects on Heat Conduction of Carbon Nanotubes Shigeo Maruyama, Yuki Taniguchi and Yasushi Shibuta

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Isotope Effects on Heat Conduction of Carbon Nanotubes Shigeo Maruyama, Yuki Taniguchi and Yasushi that the inclusion of only 1 % of 13 C natural isotope dramatically reduces the thermal conductivity of diamond. However, isotope effects on heat conduction of SWNTs have not been elucidated. We estimated isotope

  2. Transition from near-field thermal radiation to phonon heat conduction at sub-nanometre gaps

    E-print Network

    Chiloyan, Vazrik

    When the separation of two surfaces approaches sub-nanometre scale, the boundary between the two most fundamental heat transfer modes, heat conduction by phonons and radiation by photons, is blurred. Here we develop an ...

  3. Analysis of heat conduction in a disk brake system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talati, Faramarz; Jalalifar, Salman

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, the governing heat equations for the disk and the pad are extracted in the form of transient heat equations with heat generation that is dependant to time and space. In the derivation of the heat equations, parameters such as the duration of braking, vehicle velocity, geometries and the dimensions of the brake components, materials of the disk brake rotor and the pad and contact pressure distribution have been taken into account. The problem is solved analytically using Green’s function approach. It is concluded that the heat generated due to friction between the disk and the pad should be ideally dissipated to the environment to avoid decreasing the friction coefficient between the disk and the pad and to avoid the temperature rise of various brake components and brake fluid vaporization due to excessive heating.

  4. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  5. Heat Conduction with Flux Condition on a Free Patch

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttler, Kenneth L. Shillor, Meir

    2004-08-15

    A new free boundary or free patch problem for the heat equation is presented. In the problem a nonlinear heat flux condition is prescribed on a free portion of the boundary, the patch, the position of which depends on the solution. The existence of a weak solution is established using the theory of set-valued pseudo monotone operators.

  6. Abstract--3D IC technologies have recently attracted great attention due to the potential performance improvement, power

    E-print Network

    Cong, Jason "Jingsheng"

    , usually around 5-10m, are very large compared to the sizes of regular metal wires. In 3D IC structures, TS stages. Another critical challenge of 3D IC design is heat dissipation, which already posed a serious is very much smaller than the thermal conductivity of silicon (150 W/mK) and copper (401 W/mK). Therefore

  7. The role of heat conduction to the formation ofThe role of heat conduction to the formation of Planetary NebulPlanetary Nebul with H-deficient fast windswith H-deficient fast winds

    E-print Network

    The role of heat conduction to the formation ofThe role of heat conduction to the formation-dependent Radiation Hydrodynamics models with heat conduction for such conditions. We have then calculated of our work is that heat conduction is needed to explain X-ray properties of wind-blown bubbles also in H

  8. Heat conductivity of particle stacking structured SiO2 porous film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhilin; Wu, Yuting

    2011-11-01

    Particle stacking structured SiO2 porous films were prepared by sol-gel method. A model has been established to analyze the heat conductivity of these films. It is assumed that the heat energy mainly transfers through particles and their contact points. In particle stacking structured materials, a particle contacts with twelve contiguous particles, and forms twelve heat conduction branches. This model is suit to the conditions that: the size of particles in the porous material is uniform; heat conductivity of particle skeleton is much greater than particle clearance; and all contact area between particles approximately equal. The results show that: heat conductivity of particles stacking porous material is anisotropic, material heat conductivity depends on that of the particle skeleton and the ratio between radiuses of particle contact area and particle itself.

  9. Heat conductivity of particle stacking structured SiO2 porous film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhilin; Wu, Yuting

    2012-01-01

    Particle stacking structured SiO2 porous films were prepared by sol-gel method. A model has been established to analyze the heat conductivity of these films. It is assumed that the heat energy mainly transfers through particles and their contact points. In particle stacking structured materials, a particle contacts with twelve contiguous particles, and forms twelve heat conduction branches. This model is suit to the conditions that: the size of particles in the porous material is uniform; heat conductivity of particle skeleton is much greater than particle clearance; and all contact area between particles approximately equal. The results show that: heat conductivity of particles stacking porous material is anisotropic, material heat conductivity depends on that of the particle skeleton and the ratio between radiuses of particle contact area and particle itself.

  10. A two-parameter nondiffusive heat conduction model for data analysis in pump-probe experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanbao

    2014-12-01

    Nondiffusive heat transfer has attracted intensive research interests in last 50 years because of its importance in fundamental physics and engineering applications. It has unique features that cannot be described by the Fourier law. However, current studies of nondiffusive heat transfer still focus on studying the effective thermal conductivity within the framework of the Fourier law due to a lack of a well-accepted replacement. Here, we show that nondiffusive heat conduction can be characterized by two inherent material properties: a diffusive thermal conductivity and a ballistic transport length. We also present a two-parameter heat conduction model and demonstrate its validity in different pump-probe experiments. This model not only offers new insights of nondiffusive heat conduction but also opens up new avenues for the studies of nondiffusive heat transfer outside the framework of the Fourier law.

  11. Non-Fourier heat conduction in a single-walled carbon nanotube: Classical molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Shiomi, Junichiro; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2006-05-15

    Nonstationary heat conduction in a single-walled carbon nanotube was investigated by applying a local heat pulse with duration of subpicoseconds. The investigation was based on classical molecular dynamics simulations, where the heat pulse was generated as coherent fluctuations by connecting a thermostat to the local cell for a short duration. The heat conduction through the nanotube was observed in terms of spatiotemporal temperature profiles. Results of the simulations exhibit non-Fourier heat conduction where a distinct amount of heat is transported in a wavelike form. The geometry of carbon nanotubes allows us to observe such a phenomenon in the actual scale of the material. The resulting spatiotemporal profile was compared with the available macroscopic equations, the so-called non-Fourier heat conduction equations, in order to investigate the applicability of the phenomenological models to a quasi-one-dimensional system. The conventional hyperbolic diffusion equation fails to predict the heat conduction due to the lack of local diffusion. It is shown that this can be remedied by adopting a model with dual relaxation time. Further modal analyses using wavelet transformations reveal a significant contribution of the optical phonon modes to the observed wavelike heat conduction. The result suggests that, in carbon nanotubes with finite length where the long-wavelength acoustic phonons behave ballistically, even optical phonons can play a major role in the non-Fourier heat conduction.

  12. Simulating coronal condensation dynamics in 3D

    E-print Network

    Moschou, S P; Xia, C; Fang, X

    2015-01-01

    We present numerical simulations in 3D settings where coronal rain phenomena take place in a magnetic configuration of a quadrupolar arcade system. Our simulation is a magnetohydrodynamic simulation including anisotropic thermal conduction, optically thin radiative losses, and parametrised heating as main thermodynamical features to construct a realistic arcade configuration from chromospheric to coronal heights. The plasma evaporation from chromospheric and transition region heights eventually causes localised runaway condensation events and we witness the formation of plasma blobs due to thermal instability, that evolve dynamically in the heated arcade part and move gradually downwards due to interchange type dynamics. Unlike earlier 2.5D simulations, in this case there is no large scale prominence formation observed, but a continuous coronal rain develops which shows clear indications of Rayleigh-Taylor or interchange instability, that causes the denser plasma located above the transition region to fall do...

  13. Heat Transfer Simulation of Reactor Cavity Cooling System Experimental Facility using RELAP5-3D and Generation of View Factors using MCNP 

    E-print Network

    Wu, Huali

    2013-08-08

    As one of the most attractive reactor types, The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is designed to be passively safe with the incorporation of Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). In this paper, a RELAP5-3D ...

  14. Nonballistic heat conduction in an integrable random-exchange Ising chain studied with quantum master equations

    E-print Network

    Li, Baowen

    Nonballistic heat conduction in an integrable random-exchange Ising chain studied with quantum numerically investigate the heat conduction in a random-exchange Ising spin chain by using the quantum master equation. The chain is subject to a uniform transverse field h, while the exchange couplings Qn between

  15. Phase transitions in shape memory alloys with hyperbolic heat conduction and differential-algebraic models

    E-print Network

    Melnik, Roderick

    Phase transitions in shape memory alloys with hyperbolic heat conduction and differential are given. Keywords Phase transitions, Shape memory alloys, Hyperbolic heat conduction 1 Introduction One-called solid­solid phase transformations, in ``smart'' materials known as shape memory alloys (SMAs

  16. 77 FR 74027 - Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided with Multiple Heat-Conducting Paths and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... COMMISSION Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided with Multiple Heat- Conducting Paths and Products... integrated circuit packages provided with multiple heat-conducting paths and products containing same by..., California (collectively, ``ITRI''). 77 FR 39735 (Jul. 5, 2012). The complaint, as amended,...

  17. 77 FR 39735 - Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided With Multiple Heat-Conducting Paths and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... COMMISSION Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided With Multiple Heat- Conducting Paths and Products... the sale within the United States after importation of certain integrated circuit packages provided... integrated circuit packages provided with multiple heat-conducting paths and products containing same...

  18. The evolution of interstellar clouds in a streaming hot plasma including heat conduction

    E-print Network

    W. Vieser; G. Hensler

    2007-04-26

    To examine the evolution of giant molecular clouds in the stream of a hot plasma we performed two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations that take full account of self-gravity, heating and cooling effects and heat conduction by electrons. We use the thermal conductivity of a fully ionized hydrogen plasma proposed by Spitzer and a saturated heat flux according to Cowie & McKee in regions where the mean free path of the electrons is large compared to the temperature scaleheight. Significant structural and evolutionary differences occur between simulations with and without heat conduction. Dense clouds in pure dynamical models experience dynamical destruction by Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. In static models heat conduction leads to evaporation of such clouds. Heat conduction acting on clouds in a gas stream smooths out steep temperature and density gradients at the edge of the cloud because the conduction timescale is shorter than the cooling timescale. This diminishes the velocity gradient between the streaming plasma and the cloud, so that the timescale for the onset of KH instabilities increases, and the surface of the cloud becomes less susceptible to KH instabilities. The stabilisation effect of heat conduction against KH instability is more pronounced for smaller and less massive clouds. As in the static case more realistic cloud conditions allow heat conduction to transfer hot material onto the cloud's surface and to mix the accreted gas deeper into the cloud.

  19. Calculation of heat conductivity of organic liquids as function of temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Safarov, M.M.; Khadzhidov, Kh.

    1995-12-01

    Results of generalization of experimental data on heat conductivity of a series of organic liquids as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure are presented. The approximation dependence for calculation of heat conductivity of liquid organic compounds as a function of temperature, normal boiling temperature, and molar mass is obtained.

  20. Heat flow study at the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling site: Borehole temperature, thermal conductivity,

    E-print Network

    Huang, Shaopeng

    -pressure metamorphic belt. In this paper, we report measurements of borehole temperature, thermal conductivity conductivities and radiogenic heat productions on more than 400 core samples from CCSD MH. The measured thermalHeat flow study at the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling site: Borehole temperature, thermal

  1. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF HEAT TRANSFER IN MATERIALS WITH ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY

    E-print Network

    NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF HEAT TRANSFER IN MATERIALS WITH ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY: A FINITE/626-7370 URL: http://www.ima.umn.edu #12;Numerical simulation of heat transfer in materials with anisotropic, and Peter Philip May 24, 2005 Abstract We devise a finite volume scheme for nonlinear heat transfer

  2. A Simple Rate Law Experiment Using a Custom-Built Isothermal Heat Conduction Calorimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadso, Lars; Li, Xi.

    2008-01-01

    Most processes (whether physical, chemical, or biological) produce or consume heat: measuring thermal power (the heat production rate) is therefore a typical method of studying processes. Here we describe the design of a simple isothermal heat conduction calorimeter built for use in teaching; we also provide an example of its use in simultaneously…

  3. Numerical model for combined conductive and radiative heat transfer in annular packed beds

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiuto, K.; Saito, S.; Ito, K. . Dept. of Production Systems Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    A numerical model is developed for quantitatively analyzing combined conductive and radiative heat transfer in concentric annular packed beds. A packed bed is considered to be a continuous medium for heat transfer, but the porosity distribution within a packed bed is taken into account. To examine the validity of the proposed model, combined conductive and radiative heat transfer through annular packed beds of cordierite or porcelain beads is analyzed numerically using finite differences under conditions corresponding to heat transfer experiments of these packed beds. The resultant temperature profiles and heat transfer characteristics are compared with the experimental results.

  4. Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Cooling of Stirling Convertor and General Purpose Heat Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Schwendeman, Carl; Anderson, William G.; Cornell, Peggy A.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    In a Stirling Radioisotope Power System (RPS), heat must be continuously removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling convertor normally provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS at the cost of an early termination of the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) can be used to passively allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. In a previous NASA SBIR Program, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) developed a series of sodium VCHPs as backup cooling systems for Stirling RPS. The operation of these VCHPs was demonstrated using Stirling heater head simulators and GPHS simulators. In the most recent effort, a sodium VCHP with a stainless steel envelope was designed, fabricated and tested at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with a Stirling convertor for two concepts; one for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) back up cooling system and one for the Long-lived Venus Lander thermal management system. The VCHP is designed to activate and remove heat from the stopped convertor at a 19 degC temperature increase from the nominal vapor temperature. The 19 degC temperature increase from nominal is low enough to avoid risking standard ASRG operation and spoiling of the Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI). In addition, the same backup cooling system can be applied to the Stirling convertor used for the refrigeration system of the Long-lived Venus Lander. The VCHP will allow the refrigeration system to: 1) rest during transit at a lower temperature than nominal; 2) pre-cool the modules to an even lower temperature before the entry in Venus atmosphere; 3) work at nominal temperature on Venus surface; 4) briefly stop multiple times on the Venus surface to allow scientific measurements. This paper presents the experimental results from integrating the VCHP with an operating Stirling convertor and describes the methodology used to achieve their successful combined operation.

  5. The role of asymmetric inter-particle interactions in heat conduction

    E-print Network

    Chen, Shunda; Wang, Jiao; Zhao, Hong

    2012-01-01

    We numerically calculate the heat conductivity by using the Green-Kubo formula to confirm that asymmetric inter-particle interactions in one-dimensional momentum conserving lattices can induce normal heat conduction. The Lennard-Jones (L-J) inter-particle interactions are focused in view of their practical significance. The effects of the asymmetric inter-particle interactions on the cross-correlation coefficient between the heat and mass fluxes are also discussed.

  6. Investigation of Heat Conductivity in Relativistic Systems using a Partonic Cascade

    E-print Network

    M. Greif; F. Reining; I. Bouras; G. S. Denicol; Z. Xu; C. Greiner

    2013-01-07

    Motivated by the classical picture of heat flow we construct a stationary temperature gradient in a relativistic microscopic transport model. Employing the relativistic Navier-Stokes ansatz we extract the heat conductivity {\\kappa} for a massless Boltzmann gas using only binary collisions with isotropic cross sections. We compare the numerical results to analytical expressions from different theories and discuss the final results. The directly extracted value for the heat conductivity can be referred to as a literature reference within the numerical uncertainties.

  7. Heat transfer in vertical Bridgman growth of oxides - Effects of conduction, convection, and internal radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, S.; Derby, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the present investigation of crystalline phase internal radiation and heat conduction during the vertical Bridgman growth of a YAG-like oxide crystal, where transport through the melt is dominated by convection and conduction, heat is also noted to be conducted through ampoule walls via natural convection and enclosure radiation. The results of a quasi-steady-state axisymmetric Galerkin FEM indicate that heat transfer through the system is powerfully affected by the optical absorption coefficient of the crystal. The coupling of internal radiation through the crystal with conduction through the ampoule walls promotes melt/crystal interface shapes that are highly reflected near the ampoule wall.

  8. A two-fluid model for relativistic heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    López-Monsalvo, César S.

    2014-01-14

    Three years ago it was presented in these proceedings the relativistic dynamics of a multi-fluid system together with various applications to a set of topical problems [1]. In this talk, I will start from such dynamics and present a covariant formulation of relativistic thermodynamics which provides us with a causal constitutive equation for the propagation of heat in a relativistic setting.

  9. The dilemma of hyperbolic heat conduction and its settlement by incorporating spatially nonlocal effect at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y. Jun; Li, Chen-Lin; Xue, Zhang-Na; Tian, Xiao-Geng

    2016-01-01

    To model transiently thermal responses of numerous thermal shock issues at nano-scale, Fourier heat conduction law is commonly extended by introducing time rate of heat flux, and comes to hyperbolic heat conduction (HHC). However, solution to HHC under Dirichlet boundary condition depicts abnormal phenomena, e.g. heat conducts from the cold to the hot, and there are two temperatures at one location. In this paper, HHC model is further perfected with the aids of spatially nonlocal effect, and the exceeding temperature as well as the discontinuity at the wave front are avoided. The effect of nonlocal parameter on temperature response is discussed. From the analysis, the importance of size effect for nano-scale heat conduction is emphasized, indicating that spatial and temporal extensions should be simultaneously made to nano-scale heat conduction. Beyond that, it is found that heat flux boundary conditions should be directly given, instead of Neumann boundary condition, which does not make sense any longer for non-classical heat conductive models. And finally, it is observed that accurate solution to such problems may be obtained using Laplace transform method, especially for the time-dependent boundary conditions, e.g. heat flux boundary condition.

  10. Low heat conduction in white dwarf boundary layers?

    E-print Network

    F. K. Liu; F. Meyer; E. Meyer-Hofmeister; V. Burwitz

    2008-03-13

    X-ray spectra of dwarf novae in quiescence observed by Chandra and XMM-Newton provide new information on the boundary layers of their accreting white dwarfs. Comparison of observations and models allows us to extract estimates for the thermal conductivity in the accretion layer and reach conclusions on the relevant physical processes. We calculate the structure of the dense thermal boundary layer that forms under gravity and cooling at the white dwarf surface on accretion of gas from a hot tenuous ADAF-type coronal inflow. The distribution of density and temperature obtained allows us to calculate the strength and spectrum of the emitted X-ray radiation. They depend strongly on the values of thermal conductivity and mass accretion rate. We apply our model to the dwarf nova system VW Hyi and compare the spectra predicted for different values of the thermal conductivity with the observed spectrum. We find a significant deviation for all values of thermal conductivity that are a sizable fraction of the Spitzer conductivity. A good fit arises however for a conductivity of about 1% of the Spitzer value. This also seems to hold for other dwarf nova systems in quiescence. We compare this result with thermal conduction in other astrophysical situations. The highly reduced thermal conductivity in the boundary layer requires magnetic fields perpendicular to the temperature gradient. Locating their origin in the accretion of magnetic fields from the hot ADAF-type coronal flow we find that dynamical effects of these fields will lead to a spatially intermittent, localized accretion geometry at the white dwarf surface.

  11. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  12. Instructive Conductive 3D Silk Foam-Based Bone Tissue Scaffolds Enable Electrical Stimulation of Stem Cells for Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hardy, John G; Geissler, Sydney A; Aguilar, David; Villancio-Wolter, Maria K; Mouser, David J; Sukhavasi, Rushi C; Cornelison, R Chase; Tien, Lee W; Preda, R Carmen; Hayden, Rebecca S; Chow, Jacqueline K; Nguy, Lindsey; Kaplan, David L; Schmidt, Christine E

    2015-11-01

    Stimuli-responsive materials enabling the behavior of the cells that reside within them to be controlled are vital for the development of instructive tissue scaffolds for tissue engineering. Herein, we describe the preparation of conductive silk foam-based bone tissue scaffolds that enable the electrical stimulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs) to enhance their differentiation toward osteogenic outcomes. PMID:26033953

  13. Heat conduction in cooling flows. [in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; David, L. P.

    1988-01-01

    It has been suggested that electron conduction may significantly reduce the accretion rate (and star foramtion rate) for cooling flows in clusters of galaxies. A numerical hydrodynamics code was used to investigate the time behavior of cooling flows with conduction. The usual conduction coefficient is modified by an efficiency factor, mu, to realize the effects of tangled magnetic field lines. Two classes of models are considered, one where mu is independent of position and time, and one where inflow stretches the field lines and changes mu. In both cases, there is only a narrow range of initial conditions for mu in which the cluster accretion rate is reduced while a significant temperature gradient occurs. In the first case, no steady solution exists in which both conditions are met. In the second case, steady state solutions occur in which both conditions are met, but only for a narrow range of initial values where mu = 0.001.

  14. Cu/Diamond composite heat-conducting shims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galashov, E. N.; Yusuf, A. A.; Mandrik, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    Composite material with high thermal conductivity was obtained by the method of thermal sintering of a diamond (50 – 75%) with a size of 20 to 250 ?m in a matrix of copper.Coefficient of thermal conductivity of copper diamond composite materials was measured and is 450 – 650 W·m-1·K-1. The coefficient of thermal expansion CTE was measured and is 5.5 – 7.5 · 10-6/°C. The obtained copper diamond composite materials are promising objects for use in THz and microwave devices.

  15. Determination of temperature-dependent heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-06-01

    The cold cap is a layer of reacting glass batch floating on the surface of melt in an all-electric continuous glass melter. The heat needed for the conversion of the melter feed to molten glass must be transferred to and through the cold cap. Since the heat flux into the cold cap determines the rate of melting, the heat conductivity is a key property of the reacting feed. We designed an experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples that monitors the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible is heated at a constant rate. Then we used two methods to calculate the heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the reacting feed: the approximation of the temperature field by polynomial functions and the finite-volume method coupled with least-squares analysis. Up to 680°C, the heat conductivity of the reacting melter feed was represented by a linear function of temperature.

  16. Specially tailored transfinite-element formulations for hyperbolic heat conduction involving non-Fourier effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1989-01-01

    The phenomenon of hyperbolic heat conduction in contrast to the classical (parabolic) form of Fourier heat conduction involves thermal energy transport that propagates only at finite speeds, as opposed to an infinite speed of thermal energy transport. To accommodate the finite speed of thermal wave propagation, a more precise form of heat flux law is involved, thereby modifying the heat flux originally postulated in the classical theory of heat conduction. As a consequence, for hyperbolic heat conduction problems, the thermal energy propagates with very sharp discontinuities at the wave front. Accurate solutions are found for a class of one-dimensional hyperbolic heat conduction problems involving non-Fourier effects that can be used effectively for representative benchmark tests and for validating alternate schemes. Modeling/analysis formulations via specially tailored hybrid computations are provided for accurately modeling the sharp discontinuities of the propagating thermal wave front. Comparative numerical test models are presented for various hyperbolic heat conduction models involving non-Fourier effects to demonstrate the present formulations.

  17. TNF/S C3/D CONDUCT: A simulation model of the Army's command, control, communications, and intelligence (C3I) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noon, T. V.; Marx, E.

    1981-11-01

    A computer model (CONDUCT) has been developed that simulates corps and subordinate command, control, communications, and intelligence C3I functions with particular emphasis on the integration of the new generation of intelligence, surveillance, and target-acquisition systems within the developing 1982 and 1986 force structure. CONDUCT is an event-by-event simulation model written in GPSS-V (General Purpose Simulation System), representing the combat and combat support command/staff elements and communications nodes/nets for the operations and intelligence functions within a type corps. Maneuver and engineer units are represented to platoon level, artillery units to battery level, and target-acquisition and Combat Electronics Warfare Intelligence (CEWI) units to sensor team level. Major command posts and operations centers are subdivided into their primary functional areas. Also given are results from the initial 16 hr combat simulation.

  18. Heat conductivity in the beta-FPU lattice. Solitons and breathers as energy carriers

    E-print Network

    T. Yu. Astakhova; V. N. Likhachev; G. A. Vinogradov

    2011-03-18

    This paper consists of two parts. The first part proposes a new methodological framework within which the heat conductivity in 1D lattices can be studied. The total process of heat conductivity is decomposed into two contributions where the first one is the equilibrium process at equal temperatures T of both lattice ends and the second -- non-equilibrium process with the temperature \\Delta T of one end and zero temperature of the other. The heat conductivity in the limit \\Delta T \\to 0 is reduced to the heat conductivity of harmonic lattice. A threshold temperature T_{thr} scales T_{thr}(N) \\sim N^{-3} with the lattice size N. Some unusual properties of heat conductivity can be exhibited on nanoscales at low temperatures. The thermodynamics of the \\beta-FPU lattice can be adequately approximated by the harmonic lattice. The second part testifies in the favor of the soliton and breather contribution to the heat conductivity in contrast to [N. Li, B. Li, S. Flach, PRL 105 (2010) 054102]. In the continuum limit the \\beta-FPU lattice is reduced to the modified Korteweg - de Vries equation with soliton and breather solutions. Numerical simulations demonstrate their high stability. New method for the visualization of moving solitons and breathers is suggested. An accurate expression for the dependence of the sound velocity on temperature is also obtained. Our results support the conjecture on the solitons and breathers contribution to the heat conductivity.

  19. Method of integral cross sections in heat conduction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, V.V.; Papkovskaya, O.B.

    1995-10-01

    We substantiate estimates of the upper and lower bounds of the effective thermal conductivity of piecewise homogeneous bodies. A numerical scheme for calculating the temperature field has been developed and implemented, and a comparison between the results of calculations by different schemes has been carried out.

  20. Plate Fin Heat Exchanger Model with Axial Conduction and Variable Properties

    E-print Network

    Hansen, B J; Klebaner, A; 10.1063/1.4706971

    2012-01-01

    Future superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, as part of Project X at Fermilab, will be cooled to superfluid helium temperatures by a cryogenic distribution system supplying cold supercritical helium. To reduce vapor fraction during the final Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion into the superfluid helium cooling bath, counter-flow, plate-fin heat exchangers will be utilized. Due to their compact size and ease of fabrication, plate-fin heat exchangers are an effective option. However, the design of compact and high-effectiveness cryogenic heat exchangers operating at liquid helium temperatures requires consideration of axial heat conduction along the direction of flow, in addition to variable fluid properties. Here we present a numerical model that includes the effects of axial conduction and variable properties for a plate fin heat exchanger. The model is used to guide design decisions on heat exchanger material choice and geometry. In addition, the J-T expansion process is modeled with the heat exchanger ...

  1. Tables for solution of the heat-conduction equation with a time-dependent heating rate

    E-print Network

    Bergles A. E.

    1962-01-01

    Tables are presented for the solution of the transient onedimensional heat flow in a solid body of constant material properties with the heating rate at one boundary dependent on time. These tables allow convenient and ...

  2. Homotopy Analysis Method for Variable Thermal Conductivity Heat Flux Gage with Edge Contact Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Abdul; Khani, Farzad; Darvishi, Mohammad Taghi

    2010-10-01

    The homotopy analysis method (HAM) has been used to develop an analytical solution for the thermal performance of a circular-thin-foil heat flux gage with temperature dependent thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance between the edge of the foil and the heat sink. Temperature distributions in the foil are presented illustrating the effect of incident heat flux, radiation emission from the foil, variable thermal conductivity, and contact resistance between the foil and the heat sink. The HAM results agree up to four places of decimal with the numerical solutions generated using the symbolic algebra package Maple. This close comparison vouches for the high accuracy and stability of the analytic solution.

  3. Author's personal copy Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heat conduction

    E-print Network

    Pilon, Laurent

    -product of power, refrigeration, or heat pump cycles according to the second law of thermodynamics [1]. In 2009 pump, cryogenic refrigeration, and air liquefaction applications [3]. Organic Rankine cycles use heat harvesting Olsen cycle a b s t r a c t Waste heat can be directly converted into electrical energy

  4. Regional geothermal 3D modelling in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, S. E.; Balling, N.; Bording, T. S.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2012-04-01

    In the pursuit of sustainable and low carbon emission energy sources, increased global attention has been given to the exploration and exploitation of geothermal resources within recent decades. In 2009 a national multi-disciplinary geothermal research project was established. As a significant part of this project, 3D temperature modelling is to be carried out, with special emphasis on temperatures of potential geothermal reservoirs in the Danish area. The Danish subsurface encompasses low enthalpy geothermal reservoirs of mainly Triassic and Jurassic age. Geothermal plants at Amager (Copenhagen) and Thisted (Northern Jutland) have the capacity of supplying the district heating network with up to 14 MW and 7 MW, respectively, by withdrawing warm pore water from the Gassum (Lower Jurassic/Upper Triassic) and Bunter (Lower Triassic) sandstone reservoirs, respectively. Explorative studies of the subsurface temperature regime typically are based on a combination of observations and modelling. In this study, the open-source groundwater modelling code MODFLOW is modified to simulate the subsurface temperature distribution in three dimensions by taking advantage of the mathematical similarity between saturated groundwater flow (Darcy flow) and heat conduction. A numerical model of the subsurface geology in Denmark is built and parameterized from lithological information derived from joint interpretation of seismic surveys and borehole information. Boundary conditions are constructed from knowledge about the heat flow from the Earth's interior and the shallow ground temperature. Matrix thermal conductivities have been estimated from analysis of high-resolution temperature logs measured in deep wells and porosity-depth relations are included using interpreted main lithologies. The model takes into account the dependency of temperature and pressure on thermal conductivity. Moreover, a transient model based correction of the paleoclimatic thermal disturbance caused by the Weichselian glaciation is included in the model procedure. The ability of MODFLOW for simulating heat conduction is demonstrated in simple test cases. The regional geothermal model is then utilized for modelling the subsurface temperature distribution and contouring updated temperature maps for geothermal reservoirs in Denmark.

  5. Heat conduction in a one-dimensional chain of hard disks with substrate potential.

    PubMed

    Gendelman, O V; Savin, A V

    2004-02-20

    Heat conduction in a one-dimensional chain of equivalent rigid particles in the field of the external on-site potential is considered. The zero diameters of the particles correspond to the integrable case with the divergent heat conduction coefficient. By means of a simple analytical model it is demonstrated that for any nonzero particle size the integrability is violated and the heat conduction coefficient converges. The result of the analytical computation is verified by means of numerical simulation in a plausible diapason of parameters, and good agreement is observed. PMID:14995858

  6. Problems in suppressing cooling flows in clusters of galaxies by global heat conduction

    E-print Network

    Noam Soker

    2003-02-19

    I use a simple analytical model to show that simple heat conduction models cannot significantly suppress cluster cooling flows. I build a static medium where heat conduction globally balances radiative cooling, and then perturb it. I show that a perturbation extending over a large fraction of the cooling flow region will grow to the non-linear regime within a Hubble time. Such perturbations are reasonable in clusters which frequently experience mergers and/or AGN activity. This result strengthens previous findings which show that a steady solution does not exist for a constant heat conduction coefficient.

  7. Benchmark of 3D halo neutral simulation in TRANSP and FIDASIM and application to projected neutral-beam-heated NSTX-U plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Medley, S. S.; Gorelenkova, M. V.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Stagner, L.

    2014-10-01

    A cloud of halo neutrals is created in the vicinity of beam footprint during the neutral beam injection and the halo neutral density can be comparable with beam neutral density. Proper modeling of halo neutrals is critical to correctly interpret neutral particle analyzers (NPA) and fast ion D-alpha (FIDA) signals since these signals strongly depend on local beam and halo neutral density. A 3D halo neutral model has been recently developed and implemented inside TRANSP code. The 3D halo neutral code uses a ``beam-in-a-box'' model that encompasses both injected beam neutrals and resulting halo neutrals. Upon deposition by charge exchange, a subset of the full, one-half and one-third beam energy components produce thermal halo neutrals that are tracked through successive halo neutral generations until an ionization event occurs or a descendant halo exits the box. A benchmark between 3D halo neural model in TRANSP and in FIDA/NPA synthetic diagnostic code FIDASIM is carried out. Detailed comparison of halo neutral density profiles from two codes will be shown. The NPA and FIDA simulations with and without 3D halos are applied to projections of plasma performance for the National Spherical Tours eXperiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) and the effects of halo neutral density on NPA and FIDA signal amplitude and profile will be presented. Work supported by US DOE.

  8. An approximate substitution principle for viscous heat conducting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greitzer, E. M.; Paterson, R. W.; Tan, C. S.

    1985-09-01

    A new, approximate substitution principle is presented for a class of steady flows in which both heat transfer and momentum interchange by viscous stresses are significant. The principle, which has important implications for the design and scaling of mixing experiments, can be regarded as an extension of the Munk and Prim substitution principle (for steady isentropic flows) to nonisentropic flows (Munk and Prim, 1947). The concepts that are developed explain the scaling and distribution of various fluid dynamic properties observed in several different types of flow mixing experiments. Calculations are done to indicate the expected regimes of applicability of the approximate principle and comparison with experiment is made to show its utility in practical situations.

  9. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  10. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  11. 77 FR 74027 - Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided with Multiple Heat-Conducting Paths and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ...COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-851] Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided with Multiple Heat- Conducting...within the United States after importation of certain integrated circuit packages provided with multiple...

  12. Transition from near-field thermal radiation to phonon heat conduction at sub-nanometre gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiloyan, Vazrik; Garg, Jivtesh; Esfarjani, Keivan; Chen, Gang

    2015-04-01

    When the separation of two surfaces approaches sub-nanometre scale, the boundary between the two most fundamental heat transfer modes, heat conduction by phonons and radiation by photons, is blurred. Here we develop an atomistic framework based on microscopic Maxwell's equations and lattice dynamics to describe the convergence of these heat transfer modes and the transition from one to the other. For gaps >1 nm, the predicted conductance values are in excellent agreement with the continuum theory of fluctuating electrodynamics. However, for sub-nanometre gaps we find the conductance is enhanced up to four times compared with the continuum approach, while avoiding its prediction of divergent conductance at contact. Furthermore, low-frequency acoustic phonons tunnel through the vacuum gap by coupling to evanescent electric fields, providing additional channels for energy transfer and leading to the observed enhancement. When the two surfaces are in or near contact, acoustic phonons become dominant heat carriers.

  13. 77 FR 33486 - Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided With Multiple Heat-Conducting Paths and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided With Multiple Heat- Conducting Paths and Products.... International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided... sale within the United States after importation of certain integrated circuit packages provided...

  14. Molecular dynamics analysis of spectral characteristics of phonon heat conduction in silicon

    E-print Network

    Henry, Asegun Sekou Famake

    2006-01-01

    Due to the technological significance of silicon, its heat conduction mechanisms have been studied extensively. However, there have been some lingering questions surrounding the phonon mean free path and importance of ...

  15. Transition from near-field thermal radiation to phonon heat conduction at sub-nanometre gaps.

    PubMed

    Chiloyan, Vazrik; Garg, Jivtesh; Esfarjani, Keivan; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    When the separation of two surfaces approaches sub-nanometre scale, the boundary between the two most fundamental heat transfer modes, heat conduction by phonons and radiation by photons, is blurred. Here we develop an atomistic framework based on microscopic Maxwell's equations and lattice dynamics to describe the convergence of these heat transfer modes and the transition from one to the other. For gaps >1?nm, the predicted conductance values are in excellent agreement with the continuum theory of fluctuating electrodynamics. However, for sub-nanometre gaps we find the conductance is enhanced up to four times compared with the continuum approach, while avoiding its prediction of divergent conductance at contact. Furthermore, low-frequency acoustic phonons tunnel through the vacuum gap by coupling to evanescent electric fields, providing additional channels for energy transfer and leading to the observed enhancement. When the two surfaces are in or near contact, acoustic phonons become dominant heat carriers. PMID:25849305

  16. Effect of viscosity and wall heat conduction on shock attenuation in narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, A.; Puranik, B.

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, the effects due to viscosity and wall heat conduction on shock propagation and attenuation in narrow channels are numerically investigated. A two-dimensional viscous shock tube configuration is simulated, and heat conduction in the channel walls is explicitly included. The simulation results indicate that the shock attenuation is significantly less in case of an adiabatic wall, and the use of an isothermal wall model is adequate to take into account the wall heat conduction. A parametric study is performed to characterize the effects of viscous forces and wall heat conduction on shock attenuation, and the behaviour is explained on the basis of boundary layer formation in the post-shock region. A dimensionless parameter that describes the shock attenuation is correlated with the diaphragm pressure ratio and a dimensionless parameter which is expressed using the characteristic Reynolds number and the dimensionless shock travel.

  17. 3-D solar cells by electrochemical-deposited Se layer as extremely-thin absorber and hole conducting layer on nanocrystalline TiO2 electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duy-Cuong; Tanaka, Souichirou; Nishino, Hitoshi; Manabe, Kyohei; Ito, Seigo

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional selenium solar cell with the structure of Au/Se/porous TiO2/compact TiO2/fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass plates was fabricated by an electrochemical deposition method of selenium, which can work for the extremely thin light absorber and the hole-conducting layer. The effect of experimental conditions, such as HCl and H2SeO3 in an electrochemical solution and TiO2 particle size of porous layers, was optimized. This kind of solar cell did not use any buffer layer between an n-type electrode (porous TiO2) and a p-type absorber layer (selenium). The crystallinity of the selenium after annealing at 200°C for 3 min in the air was significantly improved. The cells with a selenium layer deposited at concentrations of HCl = 11.5 mM and H2SeO3 = 20 mM showed the best performance, resulting in 1- to 2-nm thickness of the Se layer, short-circuit photocurrent density of 8.7 mA/cm2, open-circuit voltage of 0.65 V, fill factor of 0.53, and conversion efficiency of 3.0%.

  18. Effects of friction and heat conduction on sound propagation in ducts. [analyzing complex aerodynamic noise problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huerre, P.; Karamcheti, K.

    1976-01-01

    The theory of sound propagation is examined in a viscous, heat-conducting fluid, initially at rest and in a uniform state, and contained in a rigid, impermeable duct with isothermal walls. Topics covered include: (1) theoretical formulation of the small amplitude fluctuating motions of a viscous, heat-conducting and compressible fluid; (2) sound propagation in a two dimensional duct; and (3) perturbation study of the inplane modes.

  19. Finite difference solutions of heat conduction problems in multi-layered bodies with complex geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masiulaniec, K. C.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Dewitt, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical procedure is presented for analyzing a wide variety of heat conduction problems in multilayered bodies having complex geometry. The method is based on a finite difference solution of the heat conduction equation using a body fitted coordinate system transformation. Solution techniques are described for steady and transient problems with and without internal energy generation. Results are found to compare favorably with several well known solutions.

  20. Heat conduction in anisotropic media: Nonlinear self-adjointness and conservation laws

    E-print Network

    Nail H. Ibragimov; Elena D. Avdonina

    2012-02-27

    Nonlinear self-adjointness of the anisotropic nonlinear heat equation is investigated. Mathematical models of heat conduction in anisotropic media with a source are considered and a class of self-adjoint models is identified. Conservation laws corresponding to the symmetries of the equations in question are computed.

  1. ASME Heat Transfer Division: Proceedings. Volume 1: Heat transfer in microgravity systems, radiative heat transfer and radiative heat transfer in low-temperature environments, and thermal contact conductance and inverse problems in heat transfer; HTD-Volume 332

    SciTech Connect

    Gopinath, A.; Sadhal, S.S.; Jones, P.D.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.; Woodbury, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    In the first section on heat transfer in microgravity, the papers cover phase-change phenomena and thermocapillary flows and surface effects. In the second section, several papers cover solution methods for radiative heat transfer while the rest cover heat transfer in low-temperature environments. The last section covers papers containing valuable information for thermal contact conductance of various materials plus papers on inverse problems in heat transfer. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  2. 3d And 2d Automatic Inverse Modelling Of Sedimentary Basin Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalholz, S. M.; Podladchikov, Yu. Yu.; Schmid, D.; Kaus, B. J. P.

    We present 3D and 2D forward models (TECMOD2D and 3D), which numerically simulate sedimentary basin formation and are coupled with automatic inversion algo- rithms. The forward models are based on depth-dependent kinematic stretching and/or asymmetric extension along faults. The inversion algorithm iteratively finds the opti- mal set of thinning factors or fault offsets (which fit any observed basin stratigraphy best) in such a way that symmetric versus asymmetric mode of extension is not as- sumed a priori. The inversion algorithms are able to fit thinning factors that corre- spond to multiple, finite rifting events. The 2D inversion algorithms generally find the optimal set of thinning factors within 10 to 20 iterations for given initial condi- tions. For 3D applications, the inversion algorithm has to fit the horizontal stretching direction in addition to the thinning factors. Necessary modifications of the 2D inver- sion algorithms for 3D applications are discussed. The 3D forward model includes the effects of finite rift duration, thermal sediment blanketing, sediment compaction, radiogenic heat production, lateral heat conduction and advection, flexural isostasy and depth of necking. The 2D model additionally includes faulting and new oceanic crust formation. A 3D forward run with a numerical resolution of 41x41x51 nodes and 28 time steps takes around 15 minutes on a standard PC (1.3 GHz). The influ- ence of finite rift duration, thermal sediment blanketing and lateral heat conduction on the basin subsidence is evaluated. The coupled forward/inverse models are applied to restore the palaeo heat flow at the basement-sediment contact using observed basin stratigraphies. The effects of thermal sediment blanketing and lateral heat conduction in combination with radiogenic heat production are shown to strongly influence the palaeo heat flow reconstructions.

  3. Effects of anisotropic conduction and heat pipe interaction on minimum mass space radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Karl W.; Lund, Kurt O.

    1991-01-01

    Equations are formulated for the two dimensional, anisotropic conduction of heat in space radiator fins. The transverse temperature field was obtained by the integral method, and the axial field by numerical integration. A shape factor, defined for the axial boundary condition, simplifies the analysis and renders the results applicable to general heat pipe/conduction fin interface designs. The thermal results are summarized in terms of the fin efficiency, a radiation/axial conductance number, and a transverse conductance surface Biot number. These relations, together with those for mass distribution between fins and heat pipes, were used in predicting the minimum radiator mass for fixed thermal properties and fin efficiency. This mass is found to decrease monotonically with increasing fin conductivity. Sensitivities of the minimum mass designs to the problem parameters are determined.

  4. Calculation of Heat Flux Across the Hot Surface of Continuous Casting Mold Through Two-Dimensional Inverse Heat Conduction Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin; Zhou, Lejun

    2015-10-01

    A novel method for the estimation of the mold hot surface heat flux based on the measured responding temperatures from two columns of thermocouples that embedded inside the mold during continuous casting has been developed. The method includes a Two-Dimensional Inverse transient Heat Conduction Problem (2D-IHCP) model that was solved by the conjugate gradient method with Adjoint Equation. The model was validated by comparing the results with those calculated by a robust One-Dimensional Inverse transient Heat Conduction Problem (1D-IHCP). The solution of a test problem indicated that the Mean Absolute Percentage Error of the estimated heat flux calculated by the new method is about 9 to 40 pct of those calculated by the 1D-IHCP. Then, the method is applied to compute the heat flux for a mold simulator experiment. The results indicated that the heat fluxes and temperatures across mold hot surface calculated by 2D-IHCP show the same variation tendency as those calculated by 1D-IHCP. However, the heat fluxes calculated by 2D-IHCP are about 1.2 to 2 times larger than those calculated by 1D-IHCP for the locations below the liquid mold flux surface and are about 50 to 90 pct of those calculated by 1D-IHCP for the locations above the liquid mold flux surface.

  5. Instability in Super-Conducting Magnets — A Review of Heat Input from Mechanical Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, D.

    2004-06-01

    At low temperatures, specific heats are low and therefore small amounts of heat can result in significant temperature rises. Heat inputs in the micro-Joule range, if sufficiently localised, may be sufficient to cause some magnets to quench. Any source of heat could be a potential source of a `training' step or of a spontaneous quench from steady state operating conditions. This paper examines the major mechanical effects that have the potential to release sufficient heat to cause a `quench' in a super-conducting magnet. Each of the potential heat sources is examined and the `evidence' that the heat source causes premature quenching in a superconducting magnet is considered. Electromagnetic disturbances, such as `super-currents' and `flux jumping' are not considered.

  6. About Influence of Gravity on Heat Conductivity Process of the Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, S. O.; Yadav, A.; Ray, Saibal; Rahaman, F.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study it is shown that the interaction of a quasi-static gravitational wave through density fluctuations give rise to a heat conductivity coefficient and hence rise in temperature. This fact is a very important characteristics needed to establish a heat equilibrium process of such massive body as the Earth and other Planets. To carry out this exercise, general mechanism has been provided, which makes a bridge between classical physics and quantum theory. The specific dependence of heat conductivity coefficient in wide region has also been calculated.

  7. 3D Plasmon Ruler

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    In this animation of a 3D plasmon ruler, the plasmonic assembly acts as a transducer to deliver optical information about the structural dynamics of an attached protein. (courtesy of Paul Alivisatos group)

  8. to bring down the largest single cost associated with tapping geothermal heat,and conducting

    E-print Network

    Gildor, Hezi

    to bring down the largest single cost associated with tapping geothermal heat,and conducting resource assessments of geothermal potential in the U.S. While the U.S.Geological Survey conducted an assessment of national geothermal resources in the 1970s,the project ran short of funding, according to Karl

  9. A Multi-Dimensional Cognitive Analysis of Undergraduate Physics Students' Understanding of Heat Conduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiou, Guo-Li; Anderson, O. Roger

    2010-01-01

    This study proposes a multi-dimensional approach to investigate, represent, and categorize students' in-depth understanding of complex physics concepts. Clinical interviews were conducted with 30 undergraduate physics students to probe their understanding of heat conduction. Based on the data analysis, six aspects of the participants' responses…

  10. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 205439 (2012) Suppression of phonon heat conduction in cross-section-modulated nanowires

    E-print Network

    2012-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 205439 (2012) Suppression of phonon heat conduction in cross with the high lattice thermal conductivity can be used as heat spreaders and interconnects7­10 for enhanced heat and the lattice thermal conductivity in the denominator: ZT = S2 T /(ph + el), where S is the Seebeck coefficient

  11. Mode-coupling theory and molecular dynamics simulation for heat conduction in a chain with transverse motions

    E-print Network

    Li, Baowen

    Mode-coupling theory and molecular dynamics simulation for heat conduction in a chain 2004) We study heat conduction in a 1D chain of particles with longitudinal as well as transverse, 66.70. f I. INTRODUCTION The problem of heat conduction is a well-studied field. More than two

  12. Heat transport in turbulent Rayleigh-Bnard convection: Effect of finite top-and bottom-plate conductivities

    E-print Network

    Ahlers, Guenter

    results illustrating the influence of the finite conductivity of the top and bottom plates on the heat that plates of finite conductivity diminish the heat transport in the fluid. The Nusselt number N for plates of the con- vection sample, when they have a finite conductivity, dimin- ish the heat transport in t

  13. Model of the plasma discharge in a Hall thruster with heat conduction E. Ahedo and J. M. Gallardo

    E-print Network

    Carlos III de Madrid, Universidad

    Model of the plasma discharge in a Hall thruster with heat conduction E. Ahedo and J. M. Gallardo E The inclusion of heat conduction into a one-dimensional, macroscopic model of the plasma inside a Hall thruster the simplified treatment of the electron energy equation, which included neither heat conduction nor the losses

  14. Thermal conductivity of cementitious grouts for geothermal heat pumps. Progress report FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Grout is used to seal the annulus between the borehole and heat exchanger loops in vertical geothermal (ground coupled, ground source, GeoExchange) heat pump systems. The grout provides a heat transfer medium between the heat exchanger and surrounding formation, controls groundwater movement and prevents contamination of water supply. Enhanced heat pump coefficient of performance (COP) and reduced up-front loop installation costs can be achieved through optimization of the grout thermal conductivity. The objective of the work reported was to characterize thermal conductivity and other pertinent properties of conventional and filled cementitious grouts. Cost analysis and calculations of the reduction in heat exchanger length that could be achieved with such grouts were performed by the University of Alabama. Two strategies to enhance the thermal conductivity of cementitious grouts were used simultaneously. The first of these was to incorporate high thermal conductivity filler in the grout formulations. Based on previous tests (Allan and Kavanaugh, in preparation), silica sand was selected as a suitable filler. The second strategy was to reduce the water content of the grout mix. By lowering the water/cement ratio, the porosity of the hardened grout is decreased. This results in higher thermal conductivity. Lowering the water/cement ratio also improves such properties as permeability, strength, and durability. The addition of a liquid superplasticizer (high range water reducer) to the grout mixes enabled reduction of water/cement ratio while retaining pumpability. Superplasticizers are commonly used in the concrete and grouting industry to improve rheological properties.

  15. Fourier Heat Conduction as a phenomenon described within the scope of the Second Law

    E-print Network

    Christopher G. Jesudason

    2014-07-29

    The historical development of the Carnot cycle necessitated the construction of isothermal and adiabatic pathways within the cycle that were also mechanically "reversible" which lead eventually to the Kelvin-Clausius development of the entropy function where the heat absorption is for the diathermal (isothermal) paths of the cycle only. It is deduced from traditional arguments that Fourier heat conduction involves mechanically "reversible" heat transfer with irreversible entropy increase. Here we model heat conduction as a thermodynamically reversible but mechanically irreversible process. The MD simulations conducted shows excellent agreement with the theory. Such views and results as these, if developed to a successful conclusion could imply that the Carnot cycle be viewed as describing a local process of energy-work conversion and that irreversible local processes might be brought within the scope of this cycle, implying a unified treatment of thermodynamically (i) irreversible, (ii) reversible, (iii) isothermal and (iv) adiabatic processes.

  16. Variable thermal properties and thermal relaxation time in hyperbolic heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Mcrae, D. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Numerical solutions were obtained for a finite slab with an applied surface heat flux at one boundary using both the hyperbolic (MacCormack's method) and parabolic (Crank-Nicolson method) heat conduction equations. The effects on the temperature distributions of varying density, specific heat, and thermal relaxation time were calculated. Each of these properties had an effect on the thermal front velocity (in the hyperbolic solution) as well as the temperatures in the medium. In the hyperbolic solutions, as the density or specific heat decreased with temperature, both the temperatures within the medium and the thermal front velocity increased. The value taken for the thermal relaxation time was found to determine the 'hyperbolicity' of the heat conduction model. The use of a time dependent relaxation time allowed for solutions where the thermal energy propagated as a high temperature wave initially, but approached a diffusion process more rapidly than was possible with a constant large relaxation time.

  17. Heat conduction: hyperbolic self-similar shock-waves in solids

    E-print Network

    Imre Ferenc Barna; Robert Kersner

    2012-04-19

    Analytic solutions for cylindrical thermal waves in solid medium is given based on the nonlinear hyperbolic system of heat flux relaxation and energy conservation equations. The Fourier-Cattaneo phenomenological law is generalized where the relaxation time and heat propagation coefficient have a general power law temperature dependence. From such laws one cannot form a second order parabolic or telegraph-type equation. We consider the original non-linear hyperbolic system itself with the self-similar Ansatz for the temperature distribution and for the heat flux. As results continuous and shock-wave solutions are presented. For physical establishment numerous materials with various temperature dependent heat conduction coefficients are mentioned.

  18. Ultrafine particle emissions from desktop 3D printers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Brent; Azimi, Parham; El Orch, Zeineb; Ramos, Tiffanie

    2013-11-01

    The development of low-cost desktop versions of three-dimensional (3D) printers has made these devices widely accessible for rapid prototyping and small-scale manufacturing in home and office settings. Many desktop 3D printers rely on heated thermoplastic extrusion and deposition, which is a process that has been shown to have significant aerosol emissions in industrial environments. However, we are not aware of any data on particle emissions from commercially available desktop 3D printers. Therefore, we report on measurements of size-resolved and total ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations resulting from the operation of two types of commercially available desktop 3D printers inside a commercial office space. We also estimate size-resolved (11.5 nm-116 nm) and total UFP (<100 nm) emission rates and compare them to emission rates from other desktop devices and indoor activities known to emit fine and ultrafine particles. Estimates of emission rates of total UFPs were large, ranging from ˜2.0 × 1010 # min-1 for a 3D printer utilizing a polylactic acid (PLA) feedstock to ˜1.9 × 1011 # min-1 for the same type of 3D printer utilizing a higher temperature acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) thermoplastic feedstock. Because most of these devices are currently sold as standalone devices without any exhaust ventilation or filtration accessories, results herein suggest caution should be used when operating in inadequately ventilated or unfiltered indoor environments. Additionally, these results suggest that more controlled experiments should be conducted to more fundamentally evaluate particle emissions from a wider arrange of desktop 3D printers.

  19. On Energy and Entropy Influxes in the Green-Naghdi Type III Theory of Heat Conduction

    E-print Network

    Swantje Bargmann; Antonino Favata; Paolo Podio-Guidugli

    2012-09-13

    The energy-influx/entropy-influx relation in the Green-Naghdi Type III theory of heat conduction is examined within a thermodynamical framework \\`a la Mueller-Liu, where that relation is not specified a priori irrespectively of the constitutive class under attention. It is shown that the classical assumption, i.e., that the entropy influx and the energy influx are proportional via the absolute temperature, holds true if heat conduction is, in a sense that is made precise, isotropic. In addition, it is proven that the standard assumption does not hold in case of transversely isotropic conduction.

  20. 3D Computer Vision and Video Computing 3D Vision3D Vision

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Zhigang

    3D Computer Vision and Video Computing 3D Vision3D Vision CSC I6716 Fall 2010 Topic 1 of Part II Camera Models Zhigang Zhu, City College of New York zhu@cs.ccny.cuny.edu #12;3D Computer Vision and Video Computing 3D Vision3D Vision Closely Related Disciplines Image Processing ­ images to mages Computer

  1. 3D Computer Vision and Video Computing 3D Vision3D Vision

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Zhigang

    1 3D Computer Vision and Video Computing 3D Vision3D Vision Topic 1 of Part II Camera Models CSC I6716 Spring2011 Zhigang Zhu, City College of New York zhu@cs.ccny.cuny.edu 3D Computer Vision and Video Computing 3D Vision3D Vision Closely Related Disciplines Image Processing ­ images to mages Computer

  2. Plate Fin Heat Exchanger Model with Axial Conduction and Variable Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, B.J.; White, M.J.; Klebaner, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-10

    Future superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, as part of Project X at Fermilab, will be cooled to superfluid helium temperatures by a cryogenic distribution system supplying cold supercritical helium. To reduce vapor fraction during the final Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion into the superfluid helium cooling bath, counter-flow, plate-fin heat exchangers will be utilized. Due to their compact size and ease of fabrication, plate-fin heat exchangers are an effective option. However, the design of compact and high-effectiveness cryogenic heat exchangers operating at liquid helium temperatures requires consideration of axial heat conduction along the direction of flow, in addition to variable fluid properties. Here we present a numerical model that includes the effects of axial conduction and variable properties for a plate fin heat exchanger. The model is used to guide design decisions on heat exchanger material choice and geometry. In addition, the J-T expansion process is modeled with the heat exchanger to analyze the effect of heat load and cryogenic supply parameters. A numerical model that includes the effects of axial conduction and variable properties for a plate fin heat exchanger was developed and the effect of various design parameters on overall heat exchanger size was investigated. It was found that highly conductive metals should be avoided in the design of compact JT heat exchangers. For the geometry considered, the optimal conductivity is around 3.5 W/m-K and can range from 0.3-10 W/m-K without a large loss in performance. The model was implemented with an isenthalpic expansion process. Increasing the cold side inlet temperature from 2K to 2.2 K decreased the liquid fraction from 0.856 to 0.839 which corresponds to a 0.12 g/s increase in supercritical helium supply needed to maintain liquid level in the cooling bath. Lastly, it was found that the effectiveness increased when the heat load was below the design value. Therefore, the heat exchanger should be sized on the high end of the required heat load.

  3. The effect of heat conduction on the interaction of disk and corona around black holes

    E-print Network

    E. Meyer-Hofmeister; F. Meyer

    2005-12-21

    Heat conduction plays an important role in the balance between heating and cooling in many astrophysical objects, e.g. cooling flows in clusters of galaxies. Here we investigate the effect of heat conduction on the interaction between a cool disk and a hot corona around black holes. Using the one-radial-zone approximation, we study the vertical structure of the disk corona and derive evaporation and coronal mass flow rates for various reduced thermal conductivities. We find lower evaporation rates and a shift in the evaporation maxima to smaller radii. This implies that the spectral state transition occurs at a lower mass flow rate and a disk truncation closer to the black hole. Reductions of thermal conductivity are thought to be magnetically caused and might vary from object to object by a different configuration of the magnetic fields.

  4. Conductivity heating a subterranean oil shale to create permeability and subsequently produce oil

    SciTech Connect

    Van Meurs, P.; DeRouffignac, E.P.; Vinegar, H.J.; Lucid, M.F.

    1989-12-12

    This patent describes an improvement in a process in which oil is produced from a subterranean oil shale deposit by extending at least one each of heat-injecting and fluid-producing wells into the deposit, establishing a heat-conductive fluid-impermeable barrier between the interior of each heat-injecting well and the adjacent deposit, and then heating the interior of each heat-injecting well at a temperature sufficient to conductively heat oil shale kerogen and cause pyrolysis products to form fractures within the oil shale deposit through which the pyrolysis products are displaced into at least one production well. The improvement is for enhancing the uniformity of the heat fronts moving through the oil shale deposit. Also described is a process for exploiting a target oil shale interval, by progressively expanding a heated treatment zone band from about a geometric center of the target oil shale interval outward, such that the formation or extension of vertical fractures from the heated treatment zone band to the periphery of the target oil shale interval is minimized.

  5. An analysis of the vapor flow and the heat conduction through the liquid-wick and pipe wall in a heat pipe with single or multiple heat sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ming-Ming; Faghri, Amir

    1990-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented for the overall performance of heat pipes with single or multiple heat sources. The analysis includes the heat conduction in the wall and liquid-wick regions as well as the compressibility effect of the vapor inside the heat pipe. The two-dimensional elliptic governing equations in conjunction with the thermodynamic equilibrium relation and appropriate boundary conditions are solved numerically. The solutions are in agreement with existing experimental data for the vapor and wall temperatures at both low and high operating temperatures.

  6. A 3D Analysis of Flight Behavior of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto Malaria Mosquitoes in Response to Human Odor and Heat

    PubMed Central

    Spitzen, Jeroen; Spoor, Cornelis W.; Grieco, Fabrizio; ter Braak, Cajo; Beeuwkes, Jacob; van Brugge, Sjaak P.; Kranenbarg, Sander; Noldus, Lucas P. J. J.; van Leeuwen, Johan L.; Takken, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Female mosquitoes use odor and heat as cues to navigate to a suitable landing site on their blood host. The way these cues affect flight behavior and modulate anemotactic responses, however, is poorly understood. We studied in-flight behavioral responses of females of the nocturnal malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto to human odor and heat. Flight-path characteristics in a wind tunnel (flow 20 cm/s) were quantified in three dimensions. With wind as the only stimulus (control), short and close to straight upwind flights were recorded. With heat alone, flights were similarly short and direct. The presence of human odor, in contrast, caused prolonged and highly convoluted flight patterns. The combination of odor+heat resulted in longer flights with more landings on the source than to either cue alone. Flight speed was greatest (mean groundspeed 27.2 cm/s) for odor+heat. Odor alone resulted in decreased flight speed when mosquitoes arrived within 30 cm of the source whereas mosquitoes exposed to odor+heat maintained a high flight speed while flying in the odor plume, until they arrived within 15 cm of the source. Human odor evoked an increase in crosswind flights with an additive effect of heat at close range (<15 cm) to the source. This was found for both horizontal and vertical flight components. However, mosquitoes nevertheless made upwind progress when flying in the odor+heat generated plume, suggesting that mosquitoes scan their environment intensively while they progress upwind towards their host. These observations may help to improve the efficacy of trapping systems for malaria mosquitoes by (1) optimizing the site of odor release relative to trap entry and (2) adding a heat source which enhances a landing response. PMID:23658792

  7. A 3D analysis of flight behavior of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto malaria mosquitoes in response to human odor and heat.

    PubMed

    Spitzen, Jeroen; Spoor, Cornelis W; Grieco, Fabrizio; ter Braak, Cajo; Beeuwkes, Jacob; van Brugge, Sjaak P; Kranenbarg, Sander; Noldus, Lucas P J J; van Leeuwen, Johan L; Takken, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Female mosquitoes use odor and heat as cues to navigate to a suitable landing site on their blood host. The way these cues affect flight behavior and modulate anemotactic responses, however, is poorly understood. We studied in-flight behavioral responses of females of the nocturnal malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto to human odor and heat. Flight-path characteristics in a wind tunnel (flow 20 cm/s) were quantified in three dimensions. With wind as the only stimulus (control), short and close to straight upwind flights were recorded. With heat alone, flights were similarly short and direct. The presence of human odor, in contrast, caused prolonged and highly convoluted flight patterns. The combination of odor+heat resulted in longer flights with more landings on the source than to either cue alone. Flight speed was greatest (mean groundspeed 27.2 cm/s) for odor+heat. Odor alone resulted in decreased flight speed when mosquitoes arrived within 30 cm of the source whereas mosquitoes exposed to odor+heat maintained a high flight speed while flying in the odor plume, until they arrived within 15 cm of the source. Human odor evoked an increase in crosswind flights with an additive effect of heat at close range (<15 cm) to the source. This was found for both horizontal and vertical flight components. However, mosquitoes nevertheless made upwind progress when flying in the odor+heat generated plume, suggesting that mosquitoes scan their environment intensively while they progress upwind towards their host. These observations may help to improve the efficacy of trapping systems for malaria mosquitoes by (1) optimizing the site of odor release relative to trap entry and (2) adding a heat source which enhances a landing response. PMID:23658792

  8. Heat conduction in a chain of dissociating particles: Effect of dimensionality.

    PubMed

    Zolotarevskiy, V; Savin, A V; Gendelman, O V

    2015-03-01

    The paper considers heat conduction in a model chain of composite particles with hard core and elastic external shell. Such model mimics three main features of realistic interatomic potentials--hard repulsive core, quasilinear behavior in a ground state, and possibility of dissociation. It has become clear recently that this latter feature has crucial effect on convergence of the heat conduction coefficient in thermodynamic limit. We demonstrate that in one-dimensional chain of elastic particles with hard core the heat conduction coefficient also converges, as one could expect. Then we explore effect of dimensionality on the heat transport in this model. For this sake, longitudinal and transversal motions of the particles are allowed in a long narrow channel. With varying width of the channel, we observe sharp transition from "one-dimensional" to "two-dimensional" behavior. Namely, the heat conduction coefficient drops by about order of magnitude for relatively small widening of the channel. This transition is not unique for the considered system. Similar phenomenon of transition to quasi-1D behavior with growth of aspect ratio of the channel is observed also in a gas of densely packed hard (billiard) particles, both for two- and three-dimensional cases. It is the case despite the fact that the character of transition in these two systems is not similar, due to different convergence properties of the heat conductivity. In the billiard model, the divergence pattern of the heat conduction coefficient smoothly changes from logarithmic to power-like law with increase of the length. PMID:25871074

  9. Thermoelastic damping in thin microrings with two-dimensional heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuming; Li, Pu

    2015-05-01

    Accurate determination of thermoelastic damping (TED) is very challenging in the design of micro-resonators. Microrings are widely used in many micro-resonators. In the past, to model the TED effect on the microrings, some analytical models have been developed. However, in the previous works, the heat conduction within the microring is modeled by using the one-dimensional approach. The governing equation for heat conduction is solved only for the one-dimensional heat conduction along the radial thickness of the microring. This paper presents a simple analytical model for TED in microrings. The two-dimensional heat conduction over the thermoelastic temperature gradients along the radial thickness and the circumferential direction are considered in the present model. A two-dimensional heat conduction equation is developed. The solution of the equation is represented by the product of an assumed sine series along the radial thickness and an assumed trigonometric series along the circumferential direction. The analytical results obtained by the present 2-D model show a good agreement with the numerical (FEM) results. The limitations of the previous 1-D model are assessed.

  10. Thermal conductivity from hierarchical heat sinks using carbon nanotubes and graphene nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lee, Cheng-En; Chen, Yu-Fu; Chang, Jeng-Kuei; Teng, Hsi-Sheng

    2015-11-28

    The in-plane (kip) and through-plane (ktp) thermal conductivities of heat sinks using carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene nanosheets (GNs), and CNT/GN composites are extracted from two experimental setups within the 323-373 K temperature range. Hierarchical three-dimensional CNT/GN frameworks display higher kip and ktp values, as compared to the CNT- and GN-based heat sinks. The kip and ktp values of the CNT/GN-based heat sink reach as high as 1991 and 76 W m(-1) K(-1) at 323 K, respectively. This improved thermal conductivity is attributed to the fact that the hierarchical heat sink offers a stereo thermal conductive network that combines point, line, and plane contact, leading to better heat transport. Furthermore, the compression treatment provided an efficient route to increase both kip and ktp values. This result reveals that the hierarchical carbon structures become denser, inducing more thermal conductive area and less thermal resistivity, i.e., a reduced possibility of phonon-boundary scattering. The correlation between thermal and electrical conductivity (?) can be well described by two empirical equations: kip = 567?ln(?) + 1120 and ktp = 20.6?ln(?) + 36.1. The experimental results are obtained within the temperature range of 323-373 K, suitably complementing the thermal management of chips for consumer electronics. PMID:26498343

  11. Thermal conductivity from hierarchical heat sinks using carbon nanotubes and graphene nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lee, Cheng-En; Chen, Yu-Fu; Chang, Jeng-Kuei; Teng, Hsi-Sheng

    2015-11-01

    The in-plane (kip) and through-plane (ktp) thermal conductivities of heat sinks using carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene nanosheets (GNs), and CNT/GN composites are extracted from two experimental setups within the 323-373 K temperature range. Hierarchical three-dimensional CNT/GN frameworks display higher kip and ktp values, as compared to the CNT- and GN-based heat sinks. The kip and ktp values of the CNT/GN-based heat sink reach as high as 1991 and 76 W m-1 K-1 at 323 K, respectively. This improved thermal conductivity is attributed to the fact that the hierarchical heat sink offers a stereo thermal conductive network that combines point, line, and plane contact, leading to better heat transport. Furthermore, the compression treatment provided an efficient route to increase both kip and ktp values. This result reveals that the hierarchical carbon structures become denser, inducing more thermal conductive area and less thermal resistivity, i.e., a reduced possibility of phonon-boundary scattering. The correlation between thermal and electrical conductivity (?) can be well described by two empirical equations: kip = 567 ln(?) + 1120 and ktp = 20.6 ln(?) + 36.1. The experimental results are obtained within the temperature range of 323-373 K, suitably complementing the thermal management of chips for consumer electronics.

  12. The radiant component of steam heat conductivity at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, S. V.; Dli, M. I.; Borisov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The problem of energy transfer by heat conduction and radiation is brought to a differential equation containing temperature derivatives at the boundaries and based on the selectively gray approximation of absorbing medium. A method for analytically solving the linearized problem radiant-conductive heat transfer in a flat layer of selectively absorbing medium is proposed, using which an unsymmetrical temperature profile more accurately approximating the experimental results can be obtained. The adequacy of the solution method is demonstrated by comparing the calculation results with the experimental and the results obtained using numerical methods. The effect the intermolecular interactions have on the optical properties of highly compressed media is analyzed. A dependence for determining the integral intensity of steam bands at pressures of up to 100 MPa is obtained. Quite satisfactory agreement is obtained between the calculated values of absorption intensities at increased pressures, including those for steam. The radiant component values obtained from steam heat conductivity measurements carried out in a wide range of temperatures taking into account the absorption selectivity and deviation of heat conductivity coefficients with absorption and for a transparent gas model are presented. The study results can be used for estimating the radiant component in heat conductivity measurements of absorbing fluids.

  13. Recovery of normal heat conduction in harmonic chains with correlated disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-González, I. F.; Izrailev, F. M.; Tessieri, L.

    2015-06-01

    We consider heat transport in one-dimensional harmonic chains with isotopic disorder, focusing our attention mainly on how disorder correlations affect heat conduction. Our approach reveals that long-range correlations can change the number of low-frequency extended states. As a result, with a proper choice of correlations one can control how the conductivity ? scales with the chain length N. We present a detailed analysis of the role of specific long-range correlations for which a size-independent conductivity is exactly recovered in the case of fixed boundary conditions. As for free boundary conditions, we show that disorder correlations can lead to a conductivity scaling as ? ? N\\varepsilon , with the scaling exponent ? being arbitrarily small (although not strictly zero), so that normal conduction is almost recovered even in this case.

  14. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  15. ht. J. Heat Mass Tmnsfer. Vol. 13,pp. 857469. Pergamon Press 1970. Printed in Great Britain THE CONDUCTION OF HEAT FROM SLIDING SOLIDS

    E-print Network

    Barber, James R.

    THE CONDUCTION OF HEAT FROM SLIDING SOLIDS J. R. BARBER Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of the lubricant. A number of solutions to the relevant heat conduction problem have been published, but these haveht. J. Heat Mass Tmnsfer. Vol. 13,pp. 857469. Pergamon Press 1970. Printed in Great Britain

  16. Enhancement of heat conduction in carbon nanotubes filled with fullerene molecules.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liu; Feng, Yanhui; Zhang, Xinxin

    2015-10-14

    Heat conduction in carbon nanopeapods (CNPs), i.e. carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled with fullerene C60 molecules, is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The enhancement mechanisms of CNP thermal conductivity, compared with bare CNTs, are discussed via the local heat flux onto a single atom, the relative contributions of different phonon oscillation frequencies to thermal conductivity and the phonon vibrational density of states. The result shows that filled C60 can increase the CNT thermal conductivity by up to 9.6 times in the temperature range of 100-500 K. The constructive phonon mode couplings between the tube and C60 in a frequency range of 0-20 THz, especially in x-, y-direction transverse acoustic modes and the radial breath mode, are primarily responsible for the increment of thermal conductivity. In addition, filled C60 molecules in CNPs enhance the mass transfer contribution to the total heat flux. This contribution accounts for 22-58% in CNPs, much higher than 12% in CNTs. With the temperature going up, the phonon scattering increases and the contribution from mass transfer to total heat flux decreases. Therefore, the CNP thermal conductivity decreases with rising temperature. This study sheds lights on nanoscale thermal/phonon engineering by utilization of CNTs and C60. PMID:26426675

  17. Radiative heat exchange of a meteor body in the approximation of radiant heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pilyugin, N.N.; Chernova, T.A.

    1986-07-01

    The problem of the thermal and dynamic destruction of large meteor bodies moving in planetary atmospheres is fundamental for the clarification of optical observations and anomalous phenomena in the atmosphere, the determination of the physicochemical properties of meteoroids, and the explanation of the fall of remnants of large meteorites. Therefore, it is important to calculate the coefficient of radiant heat exchange (which is the determining factor under these conditions) for large meteor bodies as they move with hypersonic velocities in an atmosphere. The solution of this problem enables one to find the ablation of a meteorite during its aerodynamic heating and to determine the initial conditions for the solution of problems of the breakup of large bodies and their subsequent motion and ablation. Hypersonic flow of an inviscid gas stream over an axisymmetric blunt body is analyzed with allowance for radiative transfer in a thick-thin approximation. The gas-dynamic problem of the flow of an optically thick gas over a large body is solved by the method of asymptotic joined expansions, using a hypersonic approximation and local self-similarity. An equation is obtained for the coefficient of radiant heat exchange and the peculiarities of such heat exchange for meteor bodies of large size are noted.

  18. Absence of local thermal equilibrium in two models of heat conduction

    E-print Network

    Abhishek Dhar; Deepak Dhar

    1998-12-14

    A crucial assumption in the conventional description of thermal conduction is the existence of local thermal equilibrium. We test this assumption in two simple models of heat conduction. Our first model is a linear chain of planar spins with nearest neighbour couplings, and the second model is that of a Lorentz gas. We look at the steady state of the system when the two ends are connected to heat baths at temperatures T1 and T2. If T1=T2, the system reaches thermal equilibrium. If T1 is not equal to T2, there is a heat current through the system, but there is no local thermal equilibrium. This is true even in the limit of large system size, when the heat current goes to zero. We argue that this is due to the existence of an infinity of local conservation laws in their dynamics.

  19. Empirical evaluation of diving wet suit material heat transfer and thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    West, P.B.

    1993-10-01

    This wet suit material testing program provides a quantitative thermal conductivity and heat transfer analysis, and comparison of various materials used in skin diving and SCUBA diving. Thermal resistance represents the primary subject examined, but due to compressibility of the baseline materials and its effect on heat transfer, this program also examines compression at simulated depth. This article reports the empirical heat transfer coefficients for both thermal conductivity and convection. Due to the limitations of the test apparatus, this analysis must restrict the convection evaluation to an approximately 20-cm-height, free-convection model. As a consequence, this model best simulates the overall heat transfer coefficient of a diver hovering in a horizontal position. This program also includes evaluations of some nonstandard materials in an effort to identify alternative wet suit materials.

  20. Transient modeling/analysis of hyperbolic heat conduction problems employing mixed implicit-explicit alpha method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; D'Costa, Joseph F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of mixed implicit-explicit finite element formulations for hyperbolic heat conduction problems involving non-Fourier effects. In particular, mixed implicit-explicit formulations employing the alpha method proposed by Hughes et al. (1987, 1990) are described for the numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction models, which involves time-dependent relaxation effects. Existing analytical approaches for modeling/analysis of such models involve complex mathematical formulations for obtaining closed-form solutions, while in certain numerical formulations the difficulties include severe oscillatory solution behavior (which often disguises the true response) in the vicinity of the thermal disturbances, which propagate with finite velocities. In view of these factors, the alpha method is evaluated to assess the control of the amount of numerical dissipation for predicting the transient propagating thermal disturbances. Numerical test models are presented, and pertinent conclusions are drawn for the mixed-time integration simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction models involving non-Fourier effects.

  1. Note on heat conduction in liquid metals. A comparison of laminar and turbulent flow effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talmage, G.

    1994-05-01

    The difference between heat transfer in liquid metals with electric currents and magnetic fields on the one hand and heat transfer in electrically insulating fluids and in conducting solids on the other is pointed out. Laminar and turbulent flow effects in liquid metal sliding electric contacts for homopolar machines are considered. Large temperature gradients can develop within a small region of liquid metal. A model of a liquid-metal sliding electrical contact is developed and analyzed.

  2. Thermal Characterization for a Modular 3-D Multichip Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Mark S.; Plante, Jeannette; Shaw, Harry

    2000-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has designed a high-density modular 3-D multichip module (MCM) for future spaceflight use. This MCM features a complete modular structure, i.e., each stack can be removed from the package without damaging the structure. The interconnection to the PCB is through the Column Grid Array (CGA) technology. Because of its high-density nature, large power dissipation from multiple layers of circuitry is anticipated and CVD diamond films are used in the assembly for heat conduction enhancement. Since each stacked layer dissipates certain amount of heat, designing effective heat conduction paths through each stack and balancing the heat dissipation within each stack for optimal thermal performance become a challenging task. To effectively remove the dissipated heat from the package, extensive thermal analysis has been performed with finite element methods. Through these analyses, we are able to improve the thermal design and increase the total wattage of the package for maximum electrical performance. This paper provides details on the design-oriented thermal analysis and performance enhancement. It also addresses issues relating to contact thermal resistance between the diamond film and the metallic heat conduction paths.

  3. Heat transfer enhancement by the Goertler vortices developed on a wall with a finite thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabazi, Innocent; Yoshikawa, Harunori; Peixinho, Jorge; Kahouadji, Lyes

    2013-11-01

    Görtler vortices appear in a flow over a concave wall as a result of centrifugal instability [Saric, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 26, 379 (1994)]. They may have a strong influence on heat transfer [Momayez et al., Int. J. heat Mass transfer 47, 3783 (2004)]. The purpose of this work is to model heat transfer by Görtler vortices using a weakly nonlinear analysis of Smith &-Haj- Hariri [Phys. Fluids A 5, 2815 (1993)]. We have investigated the coupling of the convective heat transfer by the stationary vortices with the heat conduction inside the solid wall. The finite thickness and thermal conductivity of the wall enter into the boundary conditions of the problem through the ratio ? of the wall thickness to the boundary layer thickness and through the ratio K of the thermal conductivities of the fluid and the wall. The parametric dependence Nu (? , K) of the Nusselt number is performed and it is shown that found the heat transfer is quite well modified by these two parameters. The local thermal stress can be estimated in order to analyze the effects on ageing of the wall material. The authors acknowledge the financial support of the french Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR), through the program ``Investissements d'Avenir'' (ANR-10-LABX-09-01), LabEx EMC3.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Formation of Cold Fronts in Clusters of Galaxies including Heat Conduction

    E-print Network

    Naoki Asai; Naoya Fukuda; Ryoji Matsumoto

    2004-04-07

    Recent Chandra observations of clusters of galaxies revealed the existence of a sharp ridge in the X-ray surface brightness where the temperature drops across the front. This front is called the cold front. We present the results of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the time evolution of a dense subcluster plasma moving in a cluster of galaxies. Anisotropic heat conduction along the magnetic field lines is included. In the models without magnetic fields, the numerical results indicate that the heat conduction from the hot ambient plasma heats the cold dense plasma of the subcluster and diffuses out the cold front. When magnetic fields exist in a cluster of galaxies, however, cold fronts can be maintained because the heat conduction across the magnetic field lines is suppressed. We found that, even when the magnetic fields in a cluster of galaxies are disordered, heat conduction across the front is restricted because the magnetic field lines are stretched along the front. Numerical results reproduced the X-ray intensity distribution observed in the A3667 cluster of galaxies.

  5. Flight data analysis and further development of variable-conductance heat pipes. [for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enginer, J. E.; Luedke, E. E.; Wanous, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Continuing efforts in large gains in heat-pipe performance are reported. It was found that gas-controlled variable-conductance heat pipes can perform reliably for long periods in space and effectively provide temperature stabilization for spacecraft electronics. A solution was formulated that allows the control gas to vent through arterial heat-pipe walls, thus eliminating the problem of arterial failure under load, due to trace impurities of noncondensable gas trapped in an arterial bubble during priming. This solution functions well in zero gravity. Another solution was found that allows priming at a much lower fluid charge. A heat pipe with high capacity, with close temperature control of the heat source and independent of large variations in sink temperature was fabricated.

  6. The temperature dependence of the heat conductivity of a liquid crystal studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarman, Sten; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2010-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the heat conductivity has been obtained for a liquid crystal model based on the Gay-Berne fluid, from the isotropic phase at high temperatures through the nematic phase to the smectic A phase at low temperatures. The ratio of the parallel and the perpendicular components of the heat conductivity is about 2.5:1 in the nematic phase, which is similar to that of real systems. Both Green-Kubo methods and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics methods have been applied and the results agree within in a relative error of a couple of percent, but the latter method is much more efficient.

  7. Normal heat conduction in one dimensional momentum conserving lattices with asymmetric interactions

    E-print Network

    Yi Zhong; Yong Zhang; Jiao Wang; Hong Zhao

    2012-07-02

    The heat conduction behavior of one dimensional momentum conserving lattice systems with asymmetric interparticle interactions is numerically investigated. It is found that with certain degree of interaction asymmetry, the heat conductivity measured in nonequilibrium stationary states converges in the thermodynamical limit, in clear contrast to the well accepted viewpoint that Fourier's law is generally violated in low dimensional momentum conserving systems. It suggests in nonequilibrium stationary states the mass gradient resulted from the asymmetric interactions may provide an additional phonon scattering mechanism other than that due to the nonlinear interactions.

  8. Are X-ray Clusters Cooled by Heat Conduction to the Surrounding Intergalactic Medium?

    E-print Network

    Abraham Loeb

    2002-04-29

    We show that X-ray clusters would have cooled substantially over a Hubble time by transport of heat from their hot interior to the their envelope, if the heat conductivity had not been heavily suppressed relative to the Spitzer value due to magnetic fields. The suppression is required in order for the observed abundance of hot X-ray clusters to be consistent with predictions from popular cosmological models. If a similar or stronger suppression factor applies to cluster cores, then thermal conduction can not be the mechanism that prevents cooling flows there.

  9. Application of axial grooves to cryogenic variable conductance heat pipe technology. [cryogenic thermal diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, P. J.; Groll, M.

    1976-01-01

    Tests results obtained with an ATS axial groove aluminum extrusion adapted for use as a cryogenic thermal diode and/or a variable conductance heat pipe are presented. Ethane at a nominal operating temperature of 185 C was used as working fluid. In addition to both active and passive gas control, diode designs utilizing gas blockage or liquid trap were investigated. Specific requirements and performance parameters such as transient behavior, reservoir sizes, shutdown energy, etc., were evaluated. Results are also presented for tests where the liquid trap was used as a secondary heat pipe to demonstrate thermal switching with simultaneous heat pipe operation and diode shutdown.

  10. Electrical conductivity of carbonaceous chondrites and electric heating of meteorite parent bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duba, AL

    1987-01-01

    Electromagnetic heating of rock-forming materials most probably was an important process in the early history of the solar system. Electrical conductivity experiments of representative materials such as carbonaceous chondrites are necessary to obtain data for use in electromagnetic heating models. With the assumption that carbon was present at grain boundaries in the material that comprised the meteorite parent bodies, the electrical heating of such bodies was calculated as a function of body size and solar distance using the T-Tauri model of Sonett and Herbert (1977). The results are discussed.

  11. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system, and (ii) that reconstruction algorithms which favor sparseness can significantly improve imaging performance. These methodologies should provide a means to optimize detector count and geometry for a multitude of 3D photoacoustic imaging applications.

  12. Estimating thermal diffusivity and specific heat from needle probe thermal conductivity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, W.F.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity and specific heat can be estimated from thermal conductivity measurements made using a standard needle probe and a suitably high data acquisition rate. Thermal properties are calculated from the measured temperature change in a sample subjected to heating by a needle probe. Accurate thermal conductivity measurements are obtained from a linear fit to many tens or hundreds of temperature change data points. In contrast, thermal diffusivity calculations require a nonlinear fit to the measured temperature change occurring in the first few tenths of a second of the measurement, resulting in a lower accuracy than that obtained for thermal conductivity. Specific heat is calculated from the ratio of thermal conductivity to diffusivity, and thus can have an uncertainty no better than that of the diffusivity estimate. Our thermal conductivity measurements of ice Ih and of tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate, made using a 1.6 mm outer diameter needle probe and a data acquisition rate of 18.2 pointss, agree with published results. Our thermal diffusivity and specific heat results reproduce published results within 25% for ice Ih and 3% for THF hydrate. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  13. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO076 : Cascade Variable-Conductance Heat Pipe, Tray F09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO076 : Cascade Variable-Conductance Heat Pipe, Tray F09 EL-1994-00302 LDEF (Prelaunch), AO076 : Cascade Variable-Conductance Heat Pipe, Tray F09 The prelaunch photograph was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the Cascade Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Experiment (CVCHPE) on the LDEF. The Cascade Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Experiment (CVCHPE) occupies a 6 inch deep LDEF peripheral experiment tray and consist of two series connected variable conductance heatpipes, a black chrome solar collector panel and a silvered TEFLON® radiator panel, a power source to support six thermistor-type temperature monitoring sensors and actuations of two valves. Fiberglass standoffs and internal insulation blankets thermally isolated the experiment from the experiment tray and the LDEF interior. The outside of the CVCHPE, except the collector and radiator panels, was covered with an aluminumized Kapton multilayer insulation (MLI) blanket with an outer layer of 0.076 mm thick Kapton. The two patches of thin film materials, part of Experiment S1001 by NASA GSFC, were attached to the cover of the external thermal blanket with Kapton tape. The experiment was assembled and mounted in the experiment tray with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners.

  14. Strong Solutions to Non-Stationary Channel Flows of Heat-Conducting Viscous Incompressible Fluids with Dissipative Heating

    E-print Network

    Michal Beneš

    2011-08-08

    We study an initial-boundary-value problem for time-dependent flows of heat-conducting viscous incompressible fluids in channel-like domains on a time interval $(0,T)$. For the parabolic system with strong nonlinearities and including the artificial (the so called "do nothing") boundary conditions, we prove the local in time existence, global uniqueness and smoothness of the solution on a time interval $(0,T^*)$, where $0< T^* \\leq T$.

  15. Determination of heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed: Extension to high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Jarrett A.; Pokorny, Richard; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2014-06-01

    The heat conductivity ({lambda}) and the thermal diffusivity (a) of reacting glass batch, or melter feed, control the heat flux into and within the cold cap, a layer of reacting material floating on the pool of molten glass in an all-electric continuous waste glass melter. After previously estimating {lambda} of melter feed at temperatures up to 680 deg C, we focus in this work on the {lambda}(T) function at T > 680 deg C, at which the feed material becomes foamy. We used a customized experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples, which monitored the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible with feed was heated at a constant rate from room temperature up to 1100°C. Approximating measured temperature profiles by polynomial functions, we used the heat transfer equation to estimate the {lambda}(T) approximation function, which we subsequently optimized using the finite-volume method combined with least-squares analysis. The heat conductivity increased as the temperature increased until the feed began to expand into foam, at which point the conductivity dropped. It began to increase again as the foam turned into a bubble-free glass melt. We discuss the implications of this behavior for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap.

  16. Cooling by Heat Conduction Inside Magnetic Flux Loops and the Moderate Cluster Cooling Flow Model

    E-print Network

    Noam Soker

    2003-11-02

    I study non-radiative cooling of X-ray emitting gas via heat conduction along magnetic field lines inside magnetic flux loops in cooling flow clusters of galaxies. I find that such heat conduction can reduce the fraction of energy radiated in the X-ray band by a factor of 1.5-2. This non-radiative cooling joins two other proposed non-radiative cooling processes, which can be more efficient. These are mixing of cold and hot gas, and heat conduction initiated by magnetic fields reconnection between hot and cold gas. These processes when incorporated into the moderate cooling flow model lead to a general cooling flow model with the following ingredients. (1) Cooling flow does occur, but with a mass cooling rate about 10 times lower than in old versions of the cooling flow model. Namely, heating occurs such that the effective age of the cooling flow is much below the cluster age, but the heating can't prevent cooling altogether. (2) The cooling flow region is in a non-steady state evolution. (3) Non-radiative cooling of X-ray emitting gas can bring the model to a much better agreement with observations. (4) The general behavior of the cooling flow gas, and in particular the role played by magnetic fields, make the intracluster medium in cooling flow clusters similar in some aspects to the active solar corona.

  17. BEM solution to transient free convective heat transfer in a viscous, electrically conducting, and heat generating fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Vajravelu, K.; Kassab, A.; Hadjinicolaou, A.

    1996-11-08

    The nonlinear partial differential equations for the transient free convective heat transfer in a viscous, electrically conducting, and heat-generating fluid past a vertical porous plate in the presence of free stream oscillations are solved by the boundary element method (BEM). Time-dependent fundamental solutions are employed in a time marching scheme to resolve the field variables. Numerical results are compared with previously reported analytical solutions in order to validate the developed BEM algorithm. These previous studies reported results for simpler versions of the problem, in which the convective effects in the momentum and energy equations were neglected in order to obtain analytical numerical solutions. The BEM results are shown to be in close agreement with the reported data. The effects of convection currents, the temperature-dependent heat sources (or sinks), the magnetic currents, and the viscous dissipation on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are assessed in a parametric study, which considers a variety of the dimensionless parameters Gr, Ec, Pr, M, and {gamma}. It is observed that {gamma} plays an important role in delaying the fluid flow reversal, present in the case of air, and acts to enhance the effect of Gr in augmenting the rate of heat transfer at the wall. The skin friction is observed to be an increasing function of Gr, Ec, and {gamma} and a decreasing function of M and Pr. However, the rate of heat transfer (in an absolute sense) is an increasing function of M, {gamma}, Gr, and Ec and a decreasing function of Pr. Of all the parameters, the Prandtl number has the strongest effect on the flow and heat transfer characteristics.

  18. One-dimensional heat conductivity exponent from a random collision model J. M. Deutsch and Onuttom Narayan

    E-print Network

    Deutsch, Josh

    One-dimensional heat conductivity exponent from a random collision model J. M. Deutsch and Onuttom to conductivity would predict that if the temperature gradient "T in a material is small, the heat current flowing January 2003; published 18 July 2003 We obtain numerically the thermal conductivity of a quasi

  19. Numerical study of conductive heat losses from a magmatic source at Phlegraean Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Maio, Rosa; Piegari, Ester; Mancini, Cecilia; Scandone, R.

    2015-01-01

    The thermal evolution of the Phlegraean magmatic system (southern Italy) is studied by analyzing the influence of the thermal property variations on the solution of the heat conduction equation. The aim of this paper is to verify if appropriate choices of thermal parameters can reproduce, at least to greater depths, the high temperatures measured in the geothermal wells, drilled inside the caldera, under the assumption of heat loss from a magma chamber by conduction. Since the main purpose is to verify the plausibility of such an assumption, rather simple models of the magmatic system are adopted and only major volcanic events (i.e., the Campanian Ignimbrite and the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff eruptions) are considered. The results of the simulated two-dimensional model scenarios show that by assuming an extended source region, whose emplacement time is longer than 40 ka, heat conduction mechanisms can provide temperatures as high as those measured at depths deeper than about 2000 m. On the other hand, the 1D simulations show that appropriate choices for the thermal conductivity depth profiles can reproduce the observed temperatures at depths deeper than about 1000 m. These findings question the apparent consensus that convection is the only dominant form of heat transfer at Phlegraean Fields and might motivate new research for reconstructing the thermal evolution of the Phlegraean magmatic system.

  20. Heat transfer in a gray tube with forced convection, internal radiation and axial wall conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, B. T. F.; Thompson, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    A method of successive approximations is employed to solve the problem of heat transfer to a transparent gas flowing through a radiating-conducting tube with turbulent forced convection between the tube wall and the gas, and with energy generation in the wall. Emphasis is given to the effect of emissivity of the wall to the tube and gas temperature profiles.

  1. Heat transfer and effective thermal conductivity analyses in carbon-based foams for use in thermal

    E-print Network

    Grujicic, Mica

    .1243/146442005X34485 Abstract: The applicability of carbon-based foams as an insulation material in the thermal are very effective thermal insulators, but they suffer from a number of shortcomings, primarily (aHeat transfer and effective thermal conductivity analyses in carbon-based foams for use in thermal

  2. TOPAZ - a finite element heat conduction code for analyzing 2-D solids

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1984-03-01

    TOPAZ is a two-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat conduction analysis. This report provides a user's manual for TOPAZ and a description of the numerical algorithms used. Sample problems with analytical solutions are presented. TOPAZ has been implemented on the CRAY and VAX computers.

  3. COYOTE: a finite-element computer program for nonlinear heat-conduction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1982-10-01

    COYOTE is a finite element computer program designed for the solution of two-dimensional, nonlinear heat conduction problems. The theoretical and mathematical basis used to develop the code is described. Program capabilities and complete user instructions are presented. Several example problems are described in detail to demonstrate the use of the program.

  4. An analytical solution to the one-dimensional heat conduction-convection equation in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat transfer in soil occurs by conduction and convection. Infiltrating water affects soil temperature distributions, and measuring soil temperature distributions below infiltrating water can provide a signal for the flux of water. In earlier work a sine wave function (hereinafter referred to as the...

  5. Reinforcing Concepts of Transient Heat Conduction and Convection with Simple Experiments and COMSOL Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez, Sergio; AungYong, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    To help students make the connection between the concepts of heat conduction and convection to real-world phenomenon, we developed a combined experimental and computational module that can be incorporated into lecture or lab courses. The experimental system we present requires materials and apparatus that are readily accessible, and the procedure…

  6. Vanishing shear viscosity in the magnetohydrodynamic equations with temperature-dependent heat conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao

    2015-09-01

    We establish an initial-boundary value problem for the compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations in one space dimension with large initial data when the heat conductivity is some positive power of the temperature. We prove that as the shear viscosity vanishes, global weak solutions convergence to a solution of the original equations with zero shear viscosity.

  7. Heat Flow, Thermal Conductivity, and the Plausibility of the White Mars Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Gulick, V. C.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the low thermal conductivity of CO2 ice and clathrate vs. water ice, we find that liquid water reservoirs would not be confined to the deep subsurface as predicted by the controversial White Mars model, even assuming low global heat flow. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Heat conduction in systems with Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser phase space structure

    E-print Network

    I. F. Herrera-González; H. I. Pérez-Aguilar; A. Mendoza-Suárez; E. S Tututi

    2012-09-28

    We study heat conduction in a billiard channel formed by two sinusoidal walls and the diffusion of particles in the corresponding channel of infinite length; the latter system has an infinite horizon, i.e., a particle can travel an arbitrary distance without colliding with the rippled walls. For small ripple amplitudes, the dynamics of the heat carriers is regular and analytical results for the temperature profile and heat flux are obtained using an effective potential. The study also proposes a formula for the temperature profile that is valid for any ripple amplitude. When the dynamics is regular, ballistic conductance and ballistic diffusion are present. The Poincar\\'e plots of the associated dynamical system (the infinitely long channel) exhibit the generic transition to chaos as ripple amplitude is increased.When no Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) curves are present to forbid the connection of all chaotic regions, the mean square displacement grows asymptotically with time t as tln(t).

  9. Soliton mechanism of the uranium nitride microdynamics and heat conductivity at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, V. A.; Dubovsky, O. A. Orlov, A. V.

    2011-12-15

    The microdynamics of soliton waves and localized modes of nonlinear acoustic and optical oscillations in uranium nitride has been investigated. It is shown that, upon heating, the energies of solitons in the gap between the optical and acoustic phonon bands increase, while the energies of local modes decrease. The experimentally observed quasi-resonance features, which are shifted in the gap with a change in temperature, can be manifestations of the revealed soliton waves and local modes. The microdynamics of uranium nitride heat conductivity with the stochastic generation of the observed solitons and local modes at remote energy absorption have been investigated. The temperature dependence of the heat conductivity coefficient has been determined from the temperature gradient and energy flux within the standard approach (which is to be generalized).

  10. The effect of discrete breathers on heat conduction in nonlinear chains

    E-print Network

    Daxing Xiong; Jiao Wang; Yong Zhang; Hong Zhao

    2011-08-22

    Intensive studies in the past decades have suggested that the heat conductivity $\\kappa$ diverges with the system size $L$ as $\\kappa\\sim L^{\\alpha}$ in one dimensional momentum conserving nonlinear lattices and the value of $\\alpha$ is universal. But in the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-$\\beta$ lattices with next-nearest-neighbor interactions we find that $\\alpha$ strongly depends on $\\gamma$, the ratio of the next-nearest-neighbor coupling to the nearest-neighbor coupling. We relate the $\\gamma$-dependent heat conduction to the interactions between the long-wavelength phonons and the randomly distributed discrete breathers. Our results provide an evidence to show that the nonlinear excitations affect the heat transport.

  11. Hybrid transfinite element modeling/analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems involving phase change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1988-01-01

    The present paper describes the applicability of hybrid transfinite element modeling/analysis formulations for nonlinear heat conduction problems involving phase change. The methodology is based on application of transform approaches and classical Galerkin schemes with finite element formulations to maintain the modeling versatility and numerical features for computational analysis. In addition, in conjunction with the above, the effects due to latent heat are modeled using enthalpy formulations to enable a physically realistic approximation to be dealt computationally for materials exhibiting phase change within a narrow band of temperatures. Pertinent details of the approach and computational scheme adapted are described in technical detail. Numerical test cases of comparative nature are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed formulations for numerical modeling/analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems involving phase change.

  12. Remediation of NAPL below the water table by steam-induced heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudbjerg, J.; Sonnenborg, T. O.; Jensen, K. H.

    2004-08-01

    Previous experimental studies have shown that NAPL will be removed when it is contacted by steam. However, in full-scale operations, steam may not contact the NAPL directly and this is the situation addressed in this study. A two-dimensional intermediate scale sand box experiment was performed where an organic contaminant was emplaced below the water table at the interface between a coarse and a fine sand layer. Steam was injected above the water table and after an initial heating period the contaminant was recovered at the outlet. The experiment was successfully modeled using the numerical code T2VOC and the dominant removal mechanism was identified to be heat conduction induced boiling of the separate phase contaminant. Subsequent numerical modeling showed that this mechanism was insensitive to the porous medium properties and that it could be evaluated by considering only one-dimensional heat conduction.

  13. Effect of heat treatment time on microstructure and electrical conductivity in LATP glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sonigra, Dhiren E-mail: ajit.kulkarni@iitb.ac.in; Soman, Swati E-mail: ajit.kulkarni@iitb.ac.in; Kulkarni, Ajit R. E-mail: ajit.kulkarni@iitb.ac.in

    2014-04-24

    Glass-ceramic is prepared by heat treatment of melt quenched 14Li{sub 2}O?9Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}?38TiO{sub 2}?39P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass in the vicinity of crystallization temperature. Growth of ceramic phase is controlled by tuning heat treatment time at fixed temperature. Ceramic phase was identified to be LiTi{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} from X Ray Diffraction analysis. Microstructural evolution of this phase with hold time was observed under high resolution Scanning Electron Microscope. DC conductivity is observed to increase by 4-5 orders of magnitude in this glass-ceramic compared to parent glass. However, formation of pores and cracks with very large heat treatment time seem to hinder further increase of conductivity.

  14. 3d X 3d X SrTiO3Ti 2p 3d

    E-print Network

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    XX 3d X 3d X X XX X XX SrTiO3Ti 2p 3d SrTiO3Ti 2p 3d 2p 2p SrTiO3 ts) 2p3/2 (t2g) 2p3/2 (e ) 2p1/2 (eg)2p SrTiO3 3d unit (t2g) (eg) (eg)2p1/2 (t2g)3d (Ti Fe Cu) arb. ( 2g) (Ti, Fe, Cu) y(ansitynten 3d In 3d 468464460456 · Photon Energy (e

  15. DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, T. )

    1989-05-01

    DYNA3D is an explicit, three-dimensional, finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. DYNA3D contains 30 material models and 10 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, Blatz-Ko rubber, high explosive burn, hydrodynamic without deviatoric stresses, elastoplastic hydrodynamic, temperature-dependent elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic with failure, soil and crushable foam with failure, Johnson/Cook plasticity model, pseudo TENSOR geological model, elastoplastic with fracture, power law isotropic plasticity, strain rate dependent plasticity, rigid, thermal orthotropic, composite damage model, thermal orthotropic with 12 curves, piecewise linear isotropic plasticity, inviscid two invariant geologic cap, orthotropic crushable model, Moonsy-Rivlin rubber, and resultant plasticity. The hydrodynamic material models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 10 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack 'Tuesday' high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, tabulated, and TENSOR pore collapse. DYNA3D generates three binary output databases. One contains information for complete states at infrequent intervals; 50 to 100 states is typical. The second contains information for a subset of nodes and elements at frequent intervals; 1,000 to 10,000 states is typical. The last contains interface data for contact surfaces.

  16. Existence and Uniqueness of Solutions to Heat Equations with Hysteresis Coupled with Navier-Stokes Equations in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuzuki, Yutaka

    2015-09-01

    This paper is concerned with a system of heat equations with hysteresis and Navier-Stokes equations. In Tsuzuki (J Math Anal Appl 423:877-897, 2015) an existence result is obtained for the problem in a 2-dimensional domain with the Navier-Stokes equation in a weak sense. However the result does not include uniqueness for the problem due to the low regularity for solutions. This paper establishes existence and uniqueness in 2- and 3-dimensional domains with the Navier-Stokes equation in a stronger sense. Moreover this work decides required height of regularity for the initial data by introducing the fractional power of the Stokes operator.

  17. A Review on the Finite Element Methods for Heat Conduction in Functionally Graded Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, R.; Jadon, V. K.; Singh, B.

    2015-01-01

    The review presented in this paper focuses mainly on the application of finite element methods for investigating the effect of heat transfer, variation of temperature and other parameters in the functionally graded materials. Different methods have been investigated for thermal conduction in functionally graded materials. The use of FEM for steady state heat transfer has been addressed in this work. The authors have also discussed the utilization of FEM based shear deformation theories and FEM in combination with other methods for the problems involving complexity of the shape and geometry of functionally graded materials. Finite element methods proved to be effective for the solution of heat transfer problem in functionally graded materials. These methods can be used for steady state heat transfer and as well as for transient state.

  18. Thermal conductivity of highly asymmetric binary mixtures: how important are heat/mass coupling effects?

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jeff; Bresme, Fernando

    2014-06-28

    The coupling of mass and heat fluxes is responsible for the Soret effect in fluid mixtures containing particles of dissimilar mass and/or size. We investigate using equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations the relevance of these coupling effects in determining the thermal transport in fluids consisting of binary mixtures where the individual components feature significant mass, 1?:?8, or size, 1?:?3, asymmetries. We quantify the thermal transport by using both boundary driven molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD) and the equilibrium Green-Kubo (GK) approach and investigate the impact of different heat flux definitions, relevant in kinetic theory and experiments, in the quantification of the thermal conductivity. We find that the thermal conductivities obtained from the different definitions agree within numerical accuracy, suggesting that the Soret coefficient does not lead to significant changes in the thermal conduction, even for the large asymmetries considered here, which lead to significant Soret coefficients (?10(-2) K(-1)). The asymmetry in size and mass introduces large differences in the specific enthalpy of the individual components that must be carefully considered to compute accurate thermal conductivities using the GK approach. Neglecting the enthalpic contributions, results in large overestimations of the thermal conductivity, typically between 20% and 50%. Further, we quantify the time dependent behavior of the internal energy and mass flux correlation functions and propose a microscopic mechanism for the heat transport in these asymmetric mixtures. PMID:24818599

  19. Heat conduction in double-walled carbon nanotubes with intertube additional carbon atoms.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liu; Feng, Yanhui; Tan, Peng; Zhang, Xinxin

    2015-07-01

    Heat conduction of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with intertube additional carbon atoms was investigated for the first time using a molecular dynamics method. By analyzing the phonon vibrational density of states (VDOS), we revealed that the intertube additional atoms weak the heat conduction along the tube axis. Moreover, the phonon participation ratio (PR) demonstrates that the heat transfer in DWCNTs is dominated by low frequency modes. The added atoms cause the mode weight factor (MWF) of the outer tube to decrease and that of the inner tube to increase, which implies a lower thermal conductivity. The effects of temperature, tube length, and the number and distribution of added atoms were studied. Furthermore, an orthogonal array testing strategy was designed to identify the most important structural factor. It is indicated that the tendencies of thermal conductivity of DWCNTs with added atoms change with temperature and length are similar to bare ones. In addition, thermal conductivity decreases with the increasing number of added atoms, more evidently for atom addition concentrated at some cross-sections rather than uniform addition along the tube length. Simultaneously, the number of added atoms at each cross-section has a considerably more remarkable impact, compared to the tube length and the density of chosen cross-sections to add atoms. PMID:26051798

  20. Real-time monitoring of 3D cell culture using a 3D capacitance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Han, Nalae; Lee, Rimi; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Yong-Beom; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures have recently received attention because they represent a more physiologically relevant environment compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. However, 2D-based imaging techniques or cell sensors are insufficient for real-time monitoring of cellular behavior in 3D cell culture. Here, we report investigations conducted with a 3D capacitance cell sensor consisting of vertically aligned pairs of electrodes. When GFP-expressing human breast cancer cells (GFP-MCF-7) encapsulated in alginate hydrogel were cultured in a 3D cell culture system, cellular activities, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis at different heights, could be monitored non-invasively and in real-time by measuring the change in capacitance with the 3D capacitance sensor. Moreover, we were able to monitor cell migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with our 3D capacitance sensor. PMID:26386332

  1. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Heat Conduction for Air up to 5000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Tzy-Cheng; Ahtye, Warren F.

    1961-01-01

    The theoretical value of the integral of thermal conductivity is compared with the experimental values from shock-tube measurements. The particular case considered is the one-dimensional nonsteady flow of heat through air at constant pressure. This approach has been previously described in NASA TR R-27. experiment was uncertain because of the large scatter in the experimental data. In this paper, an attempt is made to improve the correlation by use of a more refined calculation of the integral of thermal conductivity, and by use of improved experimental techniques and instrumentation. As a result of these changes, a much closer correlation is shown between the experimental and theoretical heat-flux potentials. This indicates that the predicted values of the coefficient of thermal conductivity for high-temperature air may be suitably accurate for many engineering needs, up to the limits of the test (4600 K).

  2. Fourier heat conduction as a phenomenon described within the scope of the second law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesudason, Christopher G.

    2014-12-01

    The historical development of the Carnot cycle necessitated the construction of isothermal and adiabatic pathways within the cycle that were also mechanically "reversible" which lead eventually to the Kelvin-Clausius development of the entropy function S where for any reversible closed path C, ?C dS = 0 based on an infinite number of concatenated Carnot engines that approximated the said path and where for each engine ?Q1/T1+?Q2/T2 = 0 where the Q's and T's are the heat absorption increments and temperature respectively with the subscripts indicating the isothermal paths (1;2) where for the Carnot engine, the heat absorption is for the diathermal (isothermal) paths of the cycle only. Since 'heat' has been defined as that form of energy that is transferred as a result of a temperature difference and a corollary of the Clausius statement of the Second law is that it is impossible for heat to be transferred from a cold to a hot reservoir with no other effect on the environment, these statements suggested that the local mode of transfer of 'heat' in the isothermal segments of the pathway does imply a Fourier heat conduction mechanism (to conform to the definition of 'heat') albeit of a "reversible" kind, but on the other hand, the Fourier mechanism is apparently irreversible, leading to an increase in entropy of the combined reservoirs at either end of the material involved in the conveyance of the heat energy. These and several other considerations lead Benofy and Quay (BQ) to postulate the Fourier heat conduction phenomenon to be an ancillary principle in thermodynamics, with this principle being strictly local in nature, where the global Second law statements could not be applied to this local process. Here we present equations that model heat conduction as a thermodynamically reversible but mechanically irreversible process where due to the belief in mechanical time reversible symmetry, thermodynamical reversibility has been unfortunately linked to mechanical reversibility, that has discouraged such an association. The modeling is based on an application of a "recoverable transition", defined and developed earlier on ideas derived from thermal desorption of particles from a surface where the Fourier heat conduction process is approximated as a series of such desorption processes. We recall that the original Carnot engine required both adiabatic and isothermal steps to complete the zero entropy cycle, and this construct lead to the consequent deduction that any Second law statement that refers to heat-work conversion processes are only globally relevant. Here, on the other hand, we examine Fourier heat conduction from MD simulation and model this process as a zero-entropy forward scattering process relative to each of the atoms in the lattice chain being treated as a system where the Carnot cycle can be applied individually. The equations developed predicts the "work" done to be equal to the energy transfer rate. The MD simulations conducted shows excellent agreement with the theory. Such views and results as these, if developed to a successful conclusion could imply that the Carnot cycle be viewed as describing a local process of energy-work conversion and that irreversible local processes might be brought within the scope of this cycle, implying a unified treatment of thermodynamically (i) irreversible, (ii) reversible, (iii) isothermal and (iv) adiabatic processes.

  3. Fourier heat conduction as a phenomenon described within the scope of the second law

    SciTech Connect

    Jesudason, Christopher G.

    2014-12-10

    The historical development of the Carnot cycle necessitated the construction of isothermal and adiabatic pathways within the cycle that were also mechanically 'reversible' which lead eventually to the Kelvin-Clausius development of the entropy function S where for any reversible closed path C, ?{sub C} dS = 0 based on an infinite number of concatenated Carnot engines that approximated the said path and where for each engine ?Q{sub 1}/T{sub 1}+?Q{sub 2}/T{sub 2}?=?0 where the Q's and T's are the heat absorption increments and temperature respectively with the subscripts indicating the isothermal paths (1;2) where for the Carnot engine, the heat absorption is for the diathermal (isothermal) paths of the cycle only. Since 'heat' has been defined as that form of energy that is transferred as a result of a temperature difference and a corollary of the Clausius statement of the Second law is that it is impossible for heat to be transferred from a cold to a hot reservoir with no other effect on the environment, these statements suggested that the local mode of transfer of 'heat' in the isothermal segments of the pathway does imply a Fourier heat conduction mechanism (to conform to the definition of 'heat') albeit of a 'reversible' kind, but on the other hand, the Fourier mechanism is apparently irreversible, leading to an increase in entropy of the combined reservoirs at either end of the material involved in the conveyance of the heat energy. These and several other considerations lead Benofy and Quay (BQ) to postulate the Fourier heat conduction phenomenon to be an ancillary principle in thermodynamics, with this principle being strictly local in nature, where the global Second law statements could not be applied to this local process. Here we present equations that model heat conduction as a thermodynamically reversible but mechanically irreversible process where due to the belief in mechanical time reversible symmetry, thermodynamical reversibility has been unfortunately linked to mechanical reversibility, that has discouraged such an association. The modeling is based on an application of a 'recoverable transition', defined and developed earlier on ideas derived from thermal desorption of particles from a surface where the Fourier heat conduction process is approximated as a series of such desorption processes. We recall that the original Carnot engine required both adiabatic and isothermal steps to complete the zero entropy cycle, and this construct lead to the consequent deduction that any Second law statement that refers to heat-work conversion processes are only globally relevant. Here, on the other hand, we examine Fourier heat conduction from MD simulation and model this process as a zero-entropy forward scattering process relative to each of the atoms in the lattice chain being treated as a system where the Carnot cycle can be applied individually. The equations developed predicts the 'work' done to be equal to the energy transfer rate. The MD simulations conducted shows excellent agreement with the theory. Such views and results as these, if developed to a successful conclusion could imply that the Carnot cycle be viewed as describing a local process of energy-work conversion and that irreversible local processes might be brought within the scope of this cycle, implying a unified treatment of thermodynamically (i) irreversible, (ii) reversible, (iii) isothermal and (iv) adiabatic processes.

  4. Evaluation of heat transfer in acupuncture needles: convection and conduction approaches.

    PubMed

    Tzou, Chieh-Han John; Yang, Tzyy-Yih; Chung, Ya-Chien

    2015-04-01

    Originating in ancient China, acupuncture using needles has been developed for thousands of years and has received attention for its reported medical remedies, such as pain relief and chronic disease treatment. Heat transfer through the needles, which might have effects on the biomechanism of acupuncture, providing a stimulus and regulating homeostasis, has never been studied. This article analyzes the significance of heat transfer through needles via convection and conduction, approached by means of computational analysis. The needle is a cylindrical body, and an axis symmetrical steady-state heat-transfer model that viscosity and static pressure was not applied. This article evaluates heat transfer via acupuncture needles by using five metal materials: silver, copper, brass, iron, and stainless steel. A silver needle of the type extensively applied in acupuncture can dissipate more than seven times as much heat as a stainless steel needle of the same type. Heat transfer through such a needle is significant, compared to natural body-energy consumption over a range of ambient temperatures. The mechanism by which heat flows in or out of the body through the needles may be crucial in the remedial efficacy of acupuncture. PMID:25952124

  5. High performance heat curing copper-silver powders filled electrically conductive adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hui-Wang; Jiu, Jin-Ting; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    In this study, high performance electrically conductive adhesives were fabricated from a vinyl ester resin, a thermal initiator, silver coated copper powders, and pure silver powders, without using any other coupling agent, dispersing agent, and reducing agent. The heat cured copper-silver powders filled electrically conductive adhesives presented low bulk resistivity (e.g., 4.53 × 10-5 ?·cm) due to the silver powders that had given high electrical conductivity to the adhesives, and high shear strength (e.g., 16.22 MPa) provided by the crosslinked structures of vinyl ester resin. These high performance copper-silver powders filled electrically conductive adhesives have lower cost than those filled by pure silver powders, which can be well used in the electronic packaging and can enlarge the application prospects of electrically conductive adhesives. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Novel Hits in the Correction of ?F508-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Protein: Synthesis, Pharmacological, and ADME Evaluation of Tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidines for the Potential Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pesci, Elisabetta; Bettinetti, Laura; Fanti, Paola; Galietta, Luis J V; La Rosa, Salvatore; Magnoni, Letizia; Pedemonte, Nicoletta; Sardone, Gian Luca; Maccari, Laura

    2015-12-24

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal genetic disease caused by mutations of the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) with a prevalence of the ?F508 mutation. Whereas the detailed mechanisms underlying disease have yet to be fully elucidated, recent breakthroughs in clinical trials have demonstrated that CFTR dysfunction can be corrected by drug-like molecules. On the basis of this success, a screening campaign was carried out, seeking new drug-like compounds able to rescue ?F508-CFTR that led to the discovery of a novel series of correctors based on a tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidine core. These molecules proved to be soluble, cell-permeable, and active in a disease relevant functional-assay. The series was then further optimized with emphasis on biological data from multiple cell systems while keeping physicochemical properties under strict control. The pharmacological and ADME profile of this corrector series hold promise for the development of more efficacious compounds to be explored for therapeutic use in CF. PMID:26561003

  7. The psychology of the 3D experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicke, Sophie H.; Ellis, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    With 3D televisions expected to reach 50% home saturation as early as 2016, understanding the psychological mechanisms underlying the user response to 3D technology is critical for content providers, educators and academics. Unfortunately, research examining the effects of 3D technology has not kept pace with the technology's rapid adoption, resulting in large-scale use of a technology about which very little is actually known. Recognizing this need for new research, we conducted a series of studies measuring and comparing many of the variables and processes underlying both 2D and 3D media experiences. In our first study, we found narratives within primetime dramas had the power to shift viewer attitudes in both 2D and 3D settings. However, we found no difference in persuasive power between 2D and 3D content. We contend this lack of effect was the result of poor conversion quality and the unique demands of 3D production. In our second study, we found 3D technology significantly increased enjoyment when viewing sports content, yet offered no added enjoyment when viewing a movie trailer. The enhanced enjoyment of the sports content was shown to be the result of heightened emotional arousal and attention in the 3D condition. We believe the lack of effect found for the movie trailer may be genre-related. In our final study, we found 3D technology significantly enhanced enjoyment of two video games from different genres. The added enjoyment was found to be the result of an increased sense of presence.

  8. 3D interactive pictorial maps 

    E-print Network

    Naz, Asma

    2005-02-17

    these maps interactive on the Web and have them accessible to a large number of viewers. The results show a number of interactive 3D pictorial maps of different countries and continents. These maps are initially built with Maya, a 3D modeling software... of simplififcation and exaggeration.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 8 3D polygonal text in Maya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 9 Final 3D model of Italy with text. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 10 Top view of 3D model of France...

  9. Transient temperature distributions in simple conducting bodies steadily heated through a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Hermon M

    1953-01-01

    An analysis is made of the transient heat-conduction effects in three simple semi-infinite bodies: the flat insulated plate, the conical shell, and the slender solid cone. The bodies are assumed to have constant initial temperatures and, at zero time, to begin to move at a constant speed and zero angle of attack through a homogeneous atmosphere. The heat input is taken as that through a laminar boundary layer. Radiation heat transfer and transverse temperature gradients are assumed to be zero. The appropriate heat-conduction equations are solved by an iteration method, the zeroeth-order terms describing the situation in the limit of small time. The method is presented and the solutions are calculated to three orders which are sufficient to give reasonably accurate results when the forward edge has attained one-half the total temperature rise (nose half-rise time). Flight Mach number and air properties occur as parameters in the result. Approximate expressions for the extent of the conduction region and nose half-rise times as functions of the parameters of the problem are presented. (author)

  10. Heat Conduction Analysis in a Tissue Phantom Calculated by FDTD and HCE Method

    SciTech Connect

    Endoh, Nobuyuki; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Saito, Yoshikazu; Ishizeki, Takahiro

    2005-03-28

    In order to study hyperthermia in tissue, it is important to predict accurately the heat distribution. This paper describes a preliminary study of the comparison between simulation and experiment for heat conduction in a simple tissue phantom. Since it is well known that the heat increase in tissue depends on the sound intensity and the absorption coefficient, the sound pressure distribution is calculated using a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The thermal diffusion profile in tissue generated by the energy of the sound pulse is also simulated using the Heat Conduction Equation (HCE) method. The calculation area is 100 x 40 [mm]. The simple tissue phantom is made of agar, water and graphite. The phantom whose attenuation coefficient is 1.1 dB/cm/MHz is placed in a temperature controlled water bath. This is kept at 37 deg. [C] while sound pulses of 1 MHz are emitted over 10 minutes. Temperatures at six points on the acoustic axis are measured in the phantom. The calculation and experiment results are compared to confirm the accuracy of the proposed method. As a result, the calculation results show the validity of the combined FDTD-HCE method for thermal conduction analysis.

  11. Variation of thermal conductivity and heat flux at the Earth's core mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, Michael W.; Walker, Andrew M.; Stackhouse, Stephen; Wookey, James; Forte, Alessandro M.; Brodholt, John P.; Dobson, David P.

    2014-03-01

    The two convective systems that dominate Earth's internal dynamics meet at the boundary between the rocky mantle and metallic liquid core. Energy transfer between processes driving plate tectonics and the geodynamo is controlled by thermal conduction in the lowermost mantle (D?). We use atomic scale simulations to determine the thermal conductivity of MgSiO3 perovskite and post-perovskite under D? conditions and probe how these two convective systems interact. We show that the thermal conductivity of post-perovskite (?12 W/mK) is 50% larger than that of perovskite under the same conditions (?8.5 W/mK) and is anisotropic, with conductivity along the a-axis being 40% higher than conductivity along the c-axis. This enhances the high heat flux into cold regions of D? where post-perovskite is stable, strengthening the feedback between convection in the core and mantle. Reminiscent of the situation in the lithosphere, there is potential for deformation induced texturing associated with mantle convection to modify how the mantle is heated from below. We test this by coupling our atomic scale results to models of texture in D? and suggest that anisotropic thermal conductivity may help to stabilise the roots of mantle plumes over their protracted lifetime.

  12. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  13. Documentation and verification of STRES3D, Version 4.0; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Asgian, M.I.; St. John, C.M.; Hardy, M.P.; Goodrich, R.R.

    1991-12-01

    STRES3D is a thermomechanical analysis code for predicting transient temperatures, stresses and displacements in an infinite and semi-infinite, conducting, homogeneous, elastic medium. The heat generated at the sources can be constant or decay exponentially with time. Superposition is used to integrate the effect of heat sources distributed in space and time to simulate the thermomechanical effect of placement of heat generating nuclear waste canisters in an underground repository. Heat sources can be defined by point, lines or plates with numerical integration of the kernal point source solution used to develop the line and plate sources. STRES3D is programmed using FORTRAN77 and is suitable for use on micro or larger computer systems.

  14. Asymptotic expansions of solutions of the heat conduction equation in internally bounded cylindrical geometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritchie, R.H.; Sakakura, A.Y.

    1956-01-01

    The formal solutions of problems involving transient heat conduction in infinite internally bounded cylindrical solids may be obtained by the Laplace transform method. Asymptotic series representing the solutions for large values of time are given in terms of functions related to the derivatives of the reciprocal gamma function. The results are applied to the case of the internally bounded infinite cylindrical medium with, (a) the boundary held at constant temperature; (b) with constant heat flow over the boundary; and (c) with the "radiation" boundary condition. A problem in the flow of gas through a porous medium is considered in detail.

  15. Nonequilibrium Temperature and Thermometry in Heat-Conducting Phi-4 Models

    E-print Network

    Wm. G. Hoover; Carol G. Hoover

    2008-02-23

    We analyze temperature and thermometry for simple nonequilibrium heat-conducting models. We show in detail, for both two- and three-dimensional systems, that the ideal gas thermometer corresponds to the concept of a local instantaneous mechanical kinetic temperature. For the Phi-4 models investigated here the mechanical temperature closely approximates the local thermodynamic equilibrium temperature. There is a significant difference between kinetic temperature and the nonlocal configurational temperature. Neither obeys the predictions of extended irreversible thermodynamics. Overall, we find that kinetic temperature, as modeled and imposed by the Nos\\'e-Hoover thermostats developed in 1984, provides the simplest means for simulating, analyzing, and understanding nonequilibrium heat flows.

  16. Thermal conductance of and heat generation in tire-pavement interface and effect on aircraft braking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. D.

    1976-01-01

    A finite-difference analysis was performed on temperature records obtained from a free rolling automotive tire and from pavement surface. A high thermal contact conductance between tire and asphalt was found on a statistical basis. Average slip due to squirming between tire and asphalt was about 1.5 mm. Consequent friction heat was estimated as 64 percent of total power absorbed by bias-ply, belted tire. Extrapolation of results to aircraft tire indicates potential braking improvement by even moderate increase of heat absorbing capacity of runway surface.

  17. Innovative hybrid heat sink materials with high thermal conductivities and tailored CTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzmantel, M.; Neubauer, E.

    2015-02-01

    This paper talks about high performance heat sinks and heat spreaders made by hybrid structures based on metaldiamond composites. Thermal conductivities can be tuned between 450 and 650 W/mK while maintaining customizable thermal expansion of 6-10 ppm/K (@30°C). Using different hybrid structures in combination with the metal-diamond core significant changes in thermal properties can be identified. Applications targeted are LED, disc laser and laser diode heatsinks with these high performance inserts without the need of CTE matched submounts.

  18. Coupled Ablation, Heat Conduction, Pyrolysis, Shape Change and Spallation of the Galileo Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Y.-K.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Galileo probe enters the atmosphere of Jupiter in December 1995. This paper presents numerical methodology and detailed results of our final pre-impact calculations for the heat shield response. The calculations are performed using a highly modified version of a viscous shock layer code with massive radiation coupled with a surface thermochemical ablation and spallation model and with the transient in-depth thermal response of the charring and ablating heat shield. The flowfield is quasi-steady along the trajectory, but the heat shield thermal response is dynamic. Each surface node of the VSL grid is coupled with a one-dimensional thermal response calculation. The thermal solver includes heat conduction, pyrolysis, and grid movement owing to surface recession. Initial conditions for the heat shield temperature and density were obtained from the high altitude rarefied-flow calculations of Haas and Milos. Galileo probe surface temperature, shape, mass flux, and element flux are all determined as functions of time along the trajectory with spallation varied parametrically. The calculations also estimate the in-depth density and temperature profiles for the heat shield. All this information is required to determine the time-dependent vehicle mass and drag coefficient which are necessary inputs for the atmospheric reconstruction experiment on board the probe.

  19. 3D Computer Vision and Video Computing 3D Vision3D Vision

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Zhigang

    1 3D Computer Vision and Video Computing 3D Vision3D Vision CSc I6716 Spring 2011 Topic 3 of Part II Stereo Vision p g Zhigang Zhu, City College of New York zhu@cs.ccny.cuny.edu 3D Computer Vision and Video Computing Stereo VisionStereo Vision Problem Infer 3D structure of a scene from two or more images

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