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Sample records for 3d reference frame

  1. Reference Frames and 3-D Shape Perception of Pictured Objects: On Verticality and Viewpoint-From-Above

    PubMed Central

    van Doorn, Andrea J.; Wagemans, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Research on the influence of reference frames has generally focused on visual phenomena such as the oblique effect, the subjective visual vertical, the perceptual upright, and ambiguous figures. Another line of research concerns mental rotation studies in which participants had to discriminate between familiar or previously seen 2-D figures or pictures of 3-D objects and their rotated versions. In the present study, we disentangled the influence of the environmental and the viewer-centered reference frame, as classically done, by comparing the performances obtained in various picture and participant orientations. However, this time, the performance is the pictorial relief: the probed 3-D shape percept of the depicted object reconstructed from the local attitude settings of the participant. Comparisons between the pictorial reliefs based on different picture and participant orientations led to two major findings. First, in general, the pictorial reliefs were highly similar if the orientation of the depicted object was vertical with regard to the environmental or the viewer-centered reference frame. Second, a viewpoint-from-above interpretation could almost completely account for the shears occurring between the pictorial reliefs. More specifically, the shears could largely be considered as combinations of slants generated from the viewpoint-from-above, which was determined by the environmental as well as by the viewer-centered reference frame. PMID:27433329

  2. Reference Frames and Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Clifford

    1989-01-01

    Stresses the importance of a reference frame in mechanics. Shows the Galilean transformation in terms of relativity theory. Discusses accelerated reference frames and noninertial reference frames. Provides examples of reference frames with diagrams. (YP)

  3. Reference frames and reference networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosy, Jaroslaw; Krynski, Jan

    2015-12-01

    The summary of research activities concerning reference frames and reference networks performed in Poland in a period of 2011-2014 is presented. It contains the results of research on implementation of IUGG2011 and IAU2012 resolutions on reference systems, implementation of the ETRS89 in Poland, operational work of permanent IGS/ EUREF stations in Poland, operational work of ILRS laser ranging station in Poland, active GNSS station networks in Poland, maintenance of vertical control in Poland, maintenance and modernization of gravity control, and maintenance of magnetic control in Poland. The bibliography of the related works is given in references.

  4. Celestial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.

    2013-09-01

    Concepts and Background: This paper gives an overview of modern celestial reference frames as realized at radio frequencies using the Very Long baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique. We discuss basic celestial reference frame concepts, desired properties, and uses. We review the networks of antennas used for this work. We briefly discuss the history of the science of astrometry touching upon the discovery of precession, proper motion, nutation, and parallax, and the field of radio astronomy. Building Celestial Frames: Next, we discuss the multi-step process of building a celestial frame: First candidate sources are identified based on point-like properties from single dish radio telescopes surveys. Second, positions are refined using connected element interferometers such as the Very Large Array, and the ATCA. Third, positions of approximately milli-arcsecond (mas) accuracy are determined using intercontinental VLBI surveys. Fourth, sub-mas positions are determined by multiyear programs using intercontinental VLBI. These sub-mas sets of positions are then verified by multiple teams in preparation for release to non-specialists in the form of an official IAU International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The process described above has until recently been largely restricted to work at S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz). However, in the last decade sub-mas work has expanded to include celestial frames at K-band (24 GHz), Ka-band (32 GHz), and Q-band (43 GHz). While these frames currently have the disadvantage of far smaller data sets, the astrophysical quality of the sources themselves improves at these higher frequencies and thus make these frequencies attractive for realizations of celestial reference frames. Accordingly, we review progress at these higher frequency bands. Path to the Future: We discuss prospects for celestial reference frames over the next decade. We present an example of an error budget for astrometric VLBI and discuss the budget's use as a tool for

  5. Line formation in accretion disks. 3D comoving frame calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkalla, R.

    1994-10-01

    The 3D radiative transfer equation is written in O(nu/c) in the comoving frame and solved by a short characteristics method for a two-level atom with complete redistribution. An Approximate-LAMBDA operator and various other acceleration techniques are applied to improve the rate of convergence. Line profiles and source functions are calculated for accretion disk models of cataclysmic variables (CV) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) homogeneous in density and temperature. We find that the velocity gradient in the disks makes it necessary for line transfer problems to use the full 3D radiative transfer equation.

  6. Ties Between Celestial And Planetary Reference Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, Mark H.; Folkner, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents new determination of relative orientation (or frame tie) between reference frame of extra-galactic radio sources and reference frame of planetary ephemeris. Method employed for improved frame-tie estimate relies on ability to measure orientation of Earth with respect to inertial reference frame. Improves orbit determination for interplanetary spacecraft.

  7. Astrophysics of Reference Frame Tie Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Kenneth J.; Boboltz, David; Fey, Alan Lee; Gaume, Ralph A.; Zacharias, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    The Astrophysics of Reference Frame Tie Objects Key Science program will investigate the underlying physics of SIM grid objects. Extragalactic objects in the SIM grid will be used to tie the SIM reference frame to the quasi-inertial reference frame defined by extragalactic objects and to remove any residual frame rotation with respect to the extragalactic frame. The current realization of the extragalactic frame is the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The ICRF is defined by the radio positions of 212 extragalactic objects and is the IAU sanctioned fundamental astronomical reference frame. This key project will advance our knowledge of the physics of the objects which will make up the SIM grid, such as quasars and chromospherically active stars, and relates directly to the stability of the SIM reference frame. The following questions concerning the physics of reference frame tie objects will be investigated.

  8. Frames of Reference in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    The classic film "Frames of Reference" effectively illustrates concepts involved with inertial and non-inertial reference frames. In it, Donald G. Ivey and Patterson Hume use the cameras perspective to allow the viewer to see motion in reference frames translating with a constant velocity, translating while accelerating, and rotating--all with…

  9. KB3D Reference Manual. Version 1.a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar; Siminiceanu, Radu; Carreno, Victor A.; Dowek, Gilles

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a reference manual describing the implementation of the KB3D conflict detection and resolution algorithm. The algorithm has been implemented in the Java and C++ programming languages. The reference manual gives a short overview of the detection and resolution functions, the structural implementation of the program, inputs and outputs to the program, and describes how the program is used. Inputs to the program can be rectangular coordinates or geodesic coordinates. The reference manual also gives examples of conflict scenarios and the resolution outputs the program produces.

  10. Independent Study Unit on Accelerated Reference Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poultney, S. K.

    1973-01-01

    Presents a list of topics, research areas, references, and laboratory equipment which is prepared to facilitate general-science students' understanding of physics aspects in accelerated reference frames after their study of circular motion and Galilean relativity in mechanics. (CC)

  11. Spatial Reference Frame of Incidentally Learned Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Yuhong V.; Swallow, Khena M.

    2013-01-01

    Visual attention prioritizes information presented at particular spatial locations. These locations can be defined in reference frames centered on the environment or on the viewer. This study investigates whether incidentally learned attention uses a viewer-centered or environment-centered reference frame. Participants conducted visual search on a…

  12. Frames of reference and students' conceptual understanding of seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Nalini Michelle

    This thesis focused on students' misconceptions in the topic of seasons. Its three investigations explored the central question of: How do frames of reference influence students' conceptual understanding of seasons? The results from these investigations found that some single frames of reference can limit students' understanding of seasons or confuse students, while additional frames of reference can enhance students' understanding. These three investigations were driven by the principles of design research methodology. They examined how frames of reference provided by: Starry Night(TM) software, 3D models and textbook diagrams influenced students' understanding of seasons. The first investigation compared two groups of students. One group, the Egocentric Group (n=15), used Starry Night(TM). The second group, the Egocentric Group (n=13), mainly used text diagrams and 3D models. This investigation isolated different frames of reference in students' explanations of seasons. The results from this first investigation revealed that different frames of reference limit students' explanations of seasons. The second investigation addressed findings from the first investigation and observed how sixteen, grade six students' explanations about seasons changed as they were exposed to different frames of reference over the course of seven days for two hours per day. Students gave written explanations to the same questions about seasons during the first, fourth and seventh days. The results in this investigation revealed that students' explanations of seasons changed gradually and incorporated their experiences as they were introduced to new frames of reference. The third investigation explored what was happening to the students' intuitive understanding of seasons as they moved between different frames of reference in a problem-solving situation. Qualitative discourse analysis from three pairs of students found that as students moved between different frames of reference they

  13. Toward a generalized plate motion reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. W.; Schaeffer, A. J.; Lebedev, S.; Conrad, C. P.

    2015-05-01

    An absolute plate motion (APM) model is required to address issues such as the thermochemical evolution of Earth's mantle. All APM models have to rely on indirect inferences, including those based on hot spots and seismic anisotropy, each with their own set of uncertainties. Here, we explore a seafloor spreading-aligned reference frame. We show that this reference frame fits azimuthal seismic anisotropy in the uppermost mantle very well. The corresponding Euler pole is close to those of hot spot reference frames, ridge motion minimizing models, and geodynamic estimates of net rotation and predicts clear trench motion patterns. We conclude that a net rotation pole guided by the spreading-aligned model (at 64°E, 61°S, with moderate rotation of ˜ 0.2 … 0.3°/Myr) could indeed represent a standard, comprehensive reference frame for present-day plate motions with respect to the deep mantle.

  14. Physics of Non-Inertial Reference Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalov, Timur F.

    2010-12-01

    Physics of non-inertial reference frames is a generalizing of Newton's laws to any reference frames. It is the system of general axioms for classical and quantum mechanics. The first, Kinematics Principle reads: the kinematic state of a body free of forces conserves and equal in absolute value to an invariant of the observer's reference frame. The second, Dynamics Principle extended Newton's second law to non-inertial reference frames and also contains additional variables there are higher derivatives of coordinates. Dynamics Principle reads: a force induces a change in the kinematic state of the body and is proportional to the rate of its change. It is mean that if the kinematic invariant of the reference frame is n-th derivative with respect the time, then the dynamics of a body being affected by the force F is described by the 2n-th differential equation. The third, Statics Principle reads: the sum of all forces acting a body at rest is equal to zero.

  15. Physics of Non-Inertial Reference Frames

    SciTech Connect

    Kamalov, Timur F.

    2010-12-22

    Physics of non-inertial reference frames is a generalizing of Newton's laws to any reference frames. It is the system of general axioms for classical and quantum mechanics. The first, Kinematics Principle reads: the kinematic state of a body free of forces conserves and equal in absolute value to an invariant of the observer's reference frame. The second, Dynamics Principle extended Newton's second law to non-inertial reference frames and also contains additional variables there are higher derivatives of coordinates. Dynamics Principle reads: a force induces a change in the kinematic state of the body and is proportional to the rate of its change. It is mean that if the kinematic invariant of the reference frame is n-th derivative with respect the time, then the dynamics of a body being affected by the force F is described by the 2n-th differential equation. The third, Statics Principle reads: the sum of all forces acting a body at rest is equal to zero.

  16. Ray Effect Mitigation Through Reference Frame Rotation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tencer, John

    2016-06-14

    The discrete ordinates method is a popular and versatile technique for solving the radiative transport equation, a major drawback of which is the presence of ray effects. Mitigation of ray effects can yield significantly more accurate results and enhanced numerical stability for combined mode codes. Moreover, when ray effects are present, the solution is seen to be highly dependent upon the relative orientation of the geometry and the global reference frame. It is an undesirable property. A novel ray effect mitigation technique of averaging the computed solution for various reference frame orientations is proposed.

  17. Multiple reference frames in haptic spatial processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volčič, R.

    2008-08-01

    The present thesis focused on haptic spatial processing. In particular, our interest was directed to the perception of spatial relations with the main focus on the perception of orientation. To this end, we studied haptic perception in different tasks, either in isolation or in combination with vision. The parallelity task, where participants have to match the orientations of two spatially separated bars, was used in its two-dimensional and three-dimensional versions in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3, respectively. The influence of non-informative vision and visual interference on performance in the parallelity task was studied in Chapter 4. A different task, the mental rotation task, was introduced in a purely haptic study in Chapter 5 and in a visuo-haptic cross-modal study in Chapter 6. The interaction of multiple reference frames and their influence on haptic spatial processing were the common denominators of these studies. In this thesis we approached the problems of which reference frames play the major role in haptic spatial processing and how the relative roles of distinct reference frames change depending on the available information and the constraints imposed by different tasks. We found that the influence of a reference frame centered on the hand was the major cause of the deviations from veridicality observed in both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional studies. The results were described by a weighted average model, in which the hand-centered egocentric reference frame is supposed to have a biasing influence on the allocentric reference frame. Performance in haptic spatial processing has been shown to depend also on sources of information or processing that are not strictly connected to the task at hand. When non-informative vision was provided, a beneficial effect was observed in the haptic performance. This improvement was interpreted as a shift from the egocentric to the allocentric reference frame. Moreover, interfering visual information presented

  18. Celestial Reference Frames at Multiple Radio Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    In 1997 the IAU adopted the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) built from S/X VLBI data. In response to IAU resolutions encouraging the extension of the ICRF to additional frequency bands, VLBI frames have been made at 24, 32, and 43 gigahertz. Meanwhile, the 8.4 gigahertz work has been greatly improved with the 2009 release of the ICRF-2. This paper discusses the motivations for extending the ICRF to these higher radio bands. Results to date will be summarized including evidence that the high frequency frames are rapidly approaching the accuracy of the 8.4 gigahertz ICRF-2. We discuss current limiting errors and prospects for the future accuracy of radio reference frames. We note that comparison of multiple radio frames is characterizing the frequency dependent systematic noise floor from extended source morphology and core shift. Finally, given Gaia's potential for high accuracy optical astrometry, we have simulated the precision of a radio-optical frame tie to be approximately10-15 microarcseconds ((1-sigma) (1-standard deviation), per component).

  19. 3-D model-based frame interpolation for distributed video coding of static scenes.

    PubMed

    Maitre, Matthieu; Guillemot, Christine; Morin, Luce

    2007-05-01

    This paper addresses the problem of side information extraction for distributed coding of videos captured by a camera moving in a 3-D static environment. Examples of targeted applications are augmented reality, remote-controlled robots operating in hazardous environments, or remote exploration by drones. It explores the benefits of the structure-from-motion paradigm for distributed coding of this type of video content. Two interpolation methods constrained by the scene geometry, based either on block matching along epipolar lines or on 3-D mesh fitting, are first developed. These techniques are based on a robust algorithm for sub-pel matching of feature points, which leads to semi-dense correspondences between key frames. However, their rate-distortion (RD) performances are limited by misalignments between the side information and the actual Wyner-Ziv (WZ) frames due to the assumption of linear motion between key frames. To cope with this problem, two feature point tracking techniques are introduced, which recover the camera parameters of the WZ frames. A first technique, in which the frames remain encoded separately, performs tracking at the decoder and leads to significant RD performance gains. A second technique further improves the RD performances by allowing a limited tracking at the encoder. As an additional benefit, statistics on tracks allow the encoder to adapt the key frame frequency to the video motion content. PMID:17491456

  20. On Translators' Cultural Frame of Functionist Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Zhiyi

    2009-01-01

    A deep cognition with translators' cultural frame of functionist reference can help instructors and teachers adjust and extend patterns and schemes of translation and generate the optimal classroom conditions for acquisition of the target language. The author of the paper, in the perspectives of motivational, cognitive and communicative…

  1. Cultural background shapes spatial reference frame proclivity

    PubMed Central

    Goeke, Caspar; Kornpetpanee, Suchada; Köster, Moritz; Fernández-Revelles, Andrés B.; Gramann, Klaus; König, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Spatial navigation is an essential human skill that is influenced by several factors. The present study investigates how gender, age, and cultural background account for differences in reference frame proclivity and performance in a virtual navigation task. Using an online navigation study, we recorded reaction times, error rates (confusion of turning axis), and reference frame proclivity (egocentric vs. allocentric reference frame) of 1823 participants. Reaction times significantly varied with gender and age, but were only marginally influenced by the cultural background of participants. Error rates were in line with these results and exhibited a significant influence of gender and culture, but not age. Participants’ cultural background significantly influenced reference frame selection; the majority of North-Americans preferred an allocentric strategy, while Latin-Americans preferred an egocentric navigation strategy. European and Asian groups were in between these two extremes. Neither the factor of age nor the factor of gender had a direct impact on participants’ navigation strategies. The strong effects of cultural background on navigation strategies without the influence of gender or age underlines the importance of socialized spatial cognitive processes and argues for socio-economic analysis in studies investigating human navigation. PMID:26073656

  2. Reference Frames in Earth Rotation Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrándiz, José M.; Belda, Santiago; Heinkelmann, Robert; Getino, Juan; Schuh, Harald; Escapa, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays the determination of the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) and the different Terrestrial Reference Frames (TRF) are not independent. The available theories of Earth rotation aims at providing the orientation of a certain reference system linked somehow to the Earth with respect to a given celestial system, considered as inertial. In the past years a considerable effort has been dedicated to the improvement of the TRF realizations, following the lines set up in the 1980's. However, the reference systems used in the derivation of the theories have been rather considered as something fully established, not deserving a special attention. In this contribution we review the definitions of the frames used in the main theoretical approaches, focusing on those used in the construction of IAU2000, and the extent to which their underlying hypotheses hold. The results are useful to determine the level of consistency of the predicted and determined EOP.

  3. Frames of Reference in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Joshua

    2012-12-01

    The classic film "Frames of Reference"1,2 effectively illustrates concepts involved with inertial and non-inertial reference frames. In it, Donald G. Ivey and Patterson Hume use the cameras perspective to allow the viewer to see motion in reference frames translating with a constant velocity, translating while accelerating, and rotating—all with respect to the Earth frame. The film is a classic for good reason, but today it does have a couple of drawbacks: 1) The film by nature only accommodates passive learning. It does not give students the opportunity to try any of the experiments themselves. 2) The dated style of the 50-year-old film can distract students from the physics content. I present here a simple setup that can recreate many of the movies demonstrations in the classroom. The demonstrations can be used to supplement the movie or in its place, if desired. All of the materials except perhaps the inexpensive web camera should likely be available already in most teaching laboratories. Unlike previously described activities, these experiments do not require travel to another location3 or an involved setup.4,5

  4. 340-GHz 3D radar imaging test bed with 10-Hz frame rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Duncan A.; Marsh, Paul N.; Bolton, David R.; Middleton, Robert J. C.; Hunter, Robert I.; Speirs, Peter J.; Macfarlane, David G.; Cassidy, Scott L.; Smith, Graham M.

    2012-06-01

    We present a 340 GHz 3D radar imaging test bed with 10 Hz frame rate which enables the investigation of strategies for the detection of concealed threats in high risk public areas. The radar uses a wideband heterodyne scheme and fast-scanning optics to achieve moderate resolution volumetric data sets, over a limited field of view, of targets at moderate stand-off ranges. The high frame rate is achieved through the use of DDS chirp generation, fast galvanometer scanners and efficient processing which combines CPU multi-threading and GPU-based techniques, and is sufficiently fast to follow smoothly the natural motion of people.

  5. Neutron radiographic image restoration using BM3D frames and nonlinear variance stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang, Qiao; Wei-jing, Zhao; Jia-ning, Sun

    2015-07-01

    Neutron radiography is a powerful tool for non-destructive investigations in industrial applications. However, the resulting images are degraded inevitably due to some physical limitations. In this paper, we propose a new scheme for neutron image restoration, which utilizes BM3D frames and nonlinear variance stabilization including generalized anscombe transformation and its exact unbiased inverse. Experimental results show that superior to the existing restoration methods, the proposed scheme improves the restoration quality efficiently and exhibits better visual results.

  6. A semi-automatic 2D-to-3D video conversion with adaptive key-frame selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Kuanyu; Xiong, Hongkai

    2014-11-01

    To compensate the deficit of 3D content, 2D to 3D video conversion (2D-to-3D) has recently attracted more attention from both industrial and academic communities. The semi-automatic 2D-to-3D conversion which estimates corresponding depth of non-key-frames through key-frames is more desirable owing to its advantage of balancing labor cost and 3D effects. The location of key-frames plays a role on quality of depth propagation. This paper proposes a semi-automatic 2D-to-3D scheme with adaptive key-frame selection to keep temporal continuity more reliable and reduce the depth propagation errors caused by occlusion. The potential key-frames would be localized in terms of clustered color variation and motion intensity. The distance of key-frame interval is also taken into account to keep the accumulated propagation errors under control and guarantee minimal user interaction. Once their depth maps are aligned with user interaction, the non-key-frames depth maps would be automatically propagated by shifted bilateral filtering. Considering that depth of objects may change due to the objects motion or camera zoom in/out effect, a bi-directional depth propagation scheme is adopted where a non-key frame is interpolated from two adjacent key frames. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme has better performance than existing 2D-to-3D scheme with fixed key-frame interval.

  7. URAT and the celestial reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Norbert

    2015-08-01

    The US Naval Observatory Robotic Astrometric Telescope (URAT) survey begun in April 2012 and the Northern Hemisphere program will be completed in 2015. Positions of over 228 million stars in the about R = 3 to 19 mag range were published with the URAT1 catalog release (CDS I/329) and positional accuracy near 10 mas per coordinate for mid-range magnitude objects.URAT directly observes Hipparcos stars as well as counterparts of extragalactic ICRF2 sources. The status of the current celestial reference frame is investigated with URAT data. The accuracy of Hipparcos positions at URAT epoch is analyzed. Radio-optical position differences are investigated for possible astrophysical offsets which would affect the Gaia to radio reference frame alignment accuracy.

  8. GAOUA realizations of the Celestial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatskiv, Ya.; Bolotin, S.; Kur'yanova, A.

    2005-09-01

    Short overview of the activity of the Main Astronomical observatory of National Academy of Science of Ukraine for maintenance and extension of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) is presented. Special attention is paid on the time stabilities of positions of radio sources (RS) and on the selection of a subset of RS to be used for maintenance of the ICRF. It is shown that seven RS qualified by the IERS as defining sources are unstable.

  9. Frames of reference in spatial language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Shusterman, Anna; Li, Peggy

    2016-08-01

    Languages differ in how they encode spatial frames of reference. It is unknown how children acquire the particular frame-of-reference terms in their language (e.g., left/right, north/south). The present paper uses a word-learning paradigm to investigate 4-year-old English-speaking children's acquisition of such terms. In Part I, with five experiments, we contrasted children's acquisition of novel word pairs meaning left-right and north-south to examine their initial hypotheses and the relative ease of learning the meanings of these terms. Children interpreted ambiguous spatial terms as having environment-based meanings akin to north and south, and they readily learned and generalized north-south meanings. These studies provide the first direct evidence that children invoke geocentric representations in spatial language acquisition. However, the studies leave unanswered how children ultimately acquire "left" and "right." In Part II, with three more experiments, we investigated why children struggle to master body-based frame-of-reference words. Children successfully learned "left" and "right" when the novel words were systematically introduced on their own bodies and extended these words to novel (intrinsic and relative) uses; however, they had difficulty learning to talk about the left and right sides of a doll. This difficulty was paralleled in identifying the left and right sides of the doll in a non-linguistic memory task. In contrast, children had no difficulties learning to label the front and back sides of a doll. These studies begin to paint a detailed account of the acquisition of spatial terms in English, and provide insights into the origins of diverse spatial reference frames in the world's languages. PMID:27423134

  10. Flexibly weighted integration of tactile reference frames.

    PubMed

    Badde, Stephanie; Röder, Brigitte; Heed, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    To estimate the location of a tactile stimulus, the brain seems to integrate different types of spatial information such as skin-based, anatomical coordinates and external, spatiotopic coordinates. The aim of the present study was to test whether the use of these coordinates is fixed, or whether they are weighted according to the task context. Participants made judgments about two tactile stimuli with different vibration characteristics, one applied to each hand. First, they always performed temporal order judgments (TOJ) of the tactile stimuli with respect to the stimulated hands that were either crossed or uncrossed. The resulting crossing effect, that is, impaired performance in crossed compared to uncrossed conditions, was used as a measure of reference frame weighting and was compared across conditions. Second, in dual judgment conditions participants subsequently made judgments about the stimulus vibration characteristics, either with respect to spatial location or with respect to temporal order. Responses in the spatial secondary task either accented anatomical (Experiment 1) or external (Experiment 2) coding. A TOJ crossing effect emerged in all conditions, and secondary tasks did not affect primary task performance in the uncrossed posture. Yet, the spatial secondary task resulted in improved crossed hands performance in the primary task, but only if the secondary judgment stressed the anatomical reference frame (Experiment 1), rather than the external reference frames (Experiment 2). Like the anatomically coded spatial secondary task, the temporal secondary task improved crossed hand performance of the primary task. The differential influence of the varying secondary tasks implies that integration weights assigned to the anatomical and external reference frames are not fixed. Rather, they are flexibly adjusted to the context, presumably through top-down modulation. PMID:25447059

  11. Reference frame requirements and the MERIT campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, I. I.; Zhu, S. Y.; Bock, Y.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis is given of how satellite, lunar laser, and very long base interferometry stations available during the MERIT Campaign in 1983/84 can contribute to the detection of short periodic variations in the rotational parameters of the earth, as well as the determination of the differences between the various Conventional Terrestrial and Inertial Reference Frames inherent in the above systems. Specific observational requirements are given both by objective and by country.

  12. Seismic response of 3D steel buildings considering the effect of PR connections and gravity frames.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Bojórquez, Edén; Haldar, Achintya; López-Barraza, Arturo; Rivera-Salas, J Luz

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear seismic responses of 3D steel buildings with perimeter moment resisting frames (PMRF) and interior gravity frames (IGF) are studied explicitly considering the contribution of the IGF. The effect on the structural response of the stiffness of the beam-to-column connections of the IGF, which is usually neglected, is also studied. It is commonly believed that the flexibility of shear connections is negligible and that 2D models can be used to properly represent 3D real structures. The results of the study indicate, however, that the moments developed on columns of IGF can be considerable and that modeling buildings as plane frames may result in very conservative designs. The contribution of IGF to the lateral structural resistance may be significant. The contribution increases when their connections are assumed to be partially restrained (PR). The incremented participation of IGF when the stiffness of their connections is considered helps to counteract the no conservative effect that results in practice when lateral seismic loads are not considered in IGF while designing steel buildings with PMRF. Thus, if the structural system under consideration is used, the three-dimensional model should be used in seismic analysis and the IGF and the stiffness of their connections should be considered as part of the lateral resistance system. PMID:24995357

  13. Seismic Response of 3D Steel Buildings considering the Effect of PR Connections and Gravity Frames

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Achintya; López-Barraza, Arturo; Rivera-Salas, J. Luz

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear seismic responses of 3D steel buildings with perimeter moment resisting frames (PMRF) and interior gravity frames (IGF) are studied explicitly considering the contribution of the IGF. The effect on the structural response of the stiffness of the beam-to-column connections of the IGF, which is usually neglected, is also studied. It is commonly believed that the flexibility of shear connections is negligible and that 2D models can be used to properly represent 3D real structures. The results of the study indicate, however, that the moments developed on columns of IGF can be considerable and that modeling buildings as plane frames may result in very conservative designs. The contribution of IGF to the lateral structural resistance may be significant. The contribution increases when their connections are assumed to be partially restrained (PR). The incremented participation of IGF when the stiffness of their connections is considered helps to counteract the no conservative effect that results in practice when lateral seismic loads are not considered in IGF while designing steel buildings with PMRF. Thus, if the structural system under consideration is used, the three-dimensional model should be used in seismic analysis and the IGF and the stiffness of their connections should be considered as part of the lateral resistance system. PMID:24995357

  14. 3D tensor factorization approach to single-frame model-free blind-image deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Kopriva, Ivica

    2009-09-15

    By applying a bank of 2D Gabor filters to a blurred image, single-frame blind-image deconvolution (SF BID) is formulated as a 3D tensor factorization (TF) problem, with the key contribution that neither origin nor size of the spatially invariant blurring kernel is required to be known or estimated. Mixing matrix, the original image, and its spatial derivatives are identified from the factors in the Tucker3 model of the multichannel version of the blurred image. Previous approaches to 2D Gabor-filter-bank-based SF BID relied on 2D representation of the multichannel version of the blurred image and matrix factorization methods such as nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) and independent component analysis (ICA). Unlike matrix factorization-based methods 3D TF preserves local structure in the image. Moreover, 3D TF based on the PARAFAC model is unique up to permutation and scales under very mild conditions. To achieve this, NMF and ICA respectively require enforcement of sparseness and statistical independence constraints on the original image and its spatial derivatives. These constraints are generally not satisfied. The 3D TF-based SF BID method is demonstrated on an experimental defocused red-green-blue image. PMID:19756121

  15. The celestial reference frame defined by VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C.; Shaffer, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    VLBI currently produces the most accurate positions of celestial objects. From 1979 to 1987, 114 extragalactic radio sources have been observed with dual-frequency Mark III VLBI as part of the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project and the NGS POLARIS/IRIS program. The formal statistical errors of conventional celestial coordinates are as small as 0.3 milliarcseconds. The fundamental quantity measured by VLBI is the arc length between radio sources. Thus, it is suggested that VLBI be used to establish a coordinate reference frame based solely on radio positions, and that this system not necessarily be coupled to right ascension and declination.

  16. On the Assessment of Global Terrestrial Reference Frame Temporal Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampatzidis, Dimitrios; Koenig, Rolf; Zhu, Shengyuan

    2015-04-01

    Global Terrestrial Reference Frames (GTRFs) as the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) provide reliable 4-D position information (3-D coordinates and their evolution through time). The given 3-D velocities play a significant role in precise position acquisition and are estimated from long term coordinate time series from the space-geodetic techniques DORIS, GNSS, SLR, and VLBI. GTRFs temporal evolution is directly connected with their internal stability: The more intense and inhomogeneous velocity field, the less stable TRF is derived. The assessment of the quality of the GTRF is mainly realized by comparing it to each individual technique's reference frame. E.g the comparison of GTRFs to SLR-only based TRF gives the sense of the ITRF stability with respect to the Geocenter and scale and their associated rates respectively. In addition, the comparison of ITRF to the VLBI-only based TRF can be used for the scale validation. However, till now there is not any specified methodology for the total assessment (in terms of origin, orientation and scale respectively) of the temporal evolution and GTRFs associated accuracy. We present a new alternative diagnostic tool for the assessment of GTRFs temporal evolution based on the well-known time-dependent Helmert type transformation formula (three shifts, three rotations and scale rates respectively). The advantage of the new methodology relies on the fact that it uses the full velocity field of the TRF and therefore all points not just the ones common to different techniques. It also examines simultaneously rates of origin, orientation and scale. The methodology is presented and implemented to the two existing GTRFs on the market (ITRF and DTRF which is computed from DGFI) , the results are discussed. The results also allow to compare directly each GTRF dynamic behavior. Furthermore, the correlations of the estimated parameters can also provide useful information to the proposed GTRFs assessment scheme.

  17. Convecting reference frames and invariant numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihlo, Alexander; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2014-09-01

    In the recent paper by Bernardini et al. [1] the discrepancy in the performance of finite difference and spectral models for simulations of flows with a preferential direction of propagation was studied. In a simplified investigation carried out using the viscous Burgers equation the authors attributed the poorer numerical results of finite difference models to a violation of Galilean invariance in the discretization and propose to carry out the computations in a reference frame moving with the bulk velocity of the flow. Here we further discuss this problem and relate it to known results on invariant discretization schemes. Non-invariant and invariant finite difference discretizations of Burgers equation are proposed and compared with the discretization using the remedy proposed by Bernardini et al.

  18. Reference-frame-independent quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Laing, Anthony; Rarity, John G.; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Scarani, Valerio

    2010-07-15

    We describe a quantum key distribution protocol based on pairs of entangled qubits that generates a secure key between two partners in an environment of unknown and slowly varying reference frame. A direction of particle delivery is required, but the phases between the computational basis states need not be known or fixed. The protocol can simplify the operation of existing setups and has immediate applications to emerging scenarios such as earth-to-satellite links and the use of integrated photonic waveguides. We compute the asymptotic secret key rate for a two-qubit source, which coincides with the rate of the six-state protocol for white noise. We give the generalization of the protocol to higher-dimensional systems and detail a scheme for physical implementation in the three-dimensional qutrit case.

  19. Enabling Lorentz boosted frame particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Li, Fei; Meyers, Michael D.; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2016-07-01

    When modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in a Lorentz boosted frame, the plasma is drifting relativistically at βb c towards the laser, which can lead to a computational speedup of ∼ γb2 = (1 - βb2)-1. Meanwhile, when LWFA is modeled in the quasi-3D geometry in which the electromagnetic fields and current are decomposed into a limited number of azimuthal harmonics, speedups are achieved by modeling three dimensional (3D) problems with the computational loads on the order of two dimensional r - z simulations. Here, we describe a method to combine the speedups from the Lorentz boosted frame and quasi-3D algorithms. The key to the combination is the use of a hybrid Yee-FFT solver in the quasi-3D geometry that significantly mitigates the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI) which inevitably arises in a Lorentz boosted frame due to the unphysical coupling of Langmuir modes and EM modes of the relativistically drifting plasma in these simulations. In addition, based on the space-time distribution of the LWFA data in the lab and boosted frame, we propose to use a moving window to follow the drifting plasma, instead of following the laser driver as is done in the LWFA lab frame simulations, in order to further reduce the computational loads. We describe the details of how the NCI is mitigated for the quasi-3D geometry, the setups for simulations which combine the Lorentz boosted frame, quasi-3D geometry, and the use of a moving window, and compare the results from these simulations against their corresponding lab frame cases. Good agreement is obtained among these sample simulations, particularly when there is no self-trapping, which demonstrates it is possible to combine the Lorentz boosted frame and the quasi-3D algorithms when modeling LWFA. We also discuss the preliminary speedups achieved in these sample simulations.

  20. Reference frames for reach planning in macaque dorsal premotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Batista, Aaron P; Santhanam, Gopal; Yu, Byron M; Ryu, Stephen I; Afshar, Afsheen; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2007-08-01

    When a human or animal reaches out to grasp an object, the brain rapidly computes a pattern of muscular contractions that can acquire the target. This computation involves a reference frame transformation because the target's position is initially available only in a visual reference frame, yet the required control signal is a set of commands to the musculature. One of the core brain areas involved in visually guided reaching is the dorsal aspect of the premotor cortex (PMd). Using chronically implanted electrode arrays in two Rhesus monkeys, we studied the contributions of PMd to the reference frame transformation for reaching. PMd neurons are influenced by the locations of reach targets relative to both the arm and the eyes. Some neurons encode reach goals using limb-centered reference frames, whereas others employ eye-centered reference fames. Some cells encode reach goals in a reference frame best described by the combined position of the eyes and hand. In addition to neurons like these where a reference frame could be identified, PMd also contains cells that are influenced by both the eye- and limb-centered locations of reach goals but for which a distinct reference frame could not be determined. We propose two interpretations for these neurons. First, they may encode reach goals using a reference frame we did not investigate, such as intrinsic reference frames. Second, they may not be adequately characterized by any reference frame. PMID:17581846

  1. Determination of an Infrared Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Edmund C.

    1998-01-01

    The mission of the European Space Agency's Hipparcos satellite was to provide high precision astrometric and photometric data for over 100,000 stars and somewhat lower precision data on over a million additional stars. These observations were made in the optical band (340 - 850 nm) and resulted in median precisions of better than 1 milli-arcsec (mas) in position and parallax and I mas/yr in proper motion. The Hipparcos frame is inertial within an estimated uncertainty of +/- 0.25 mas/yr. The other important wavelength band for astrometry has been the radio band. A reference frame has been defined based on absolute Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) positions of several hundreds of radio sources. There have been a number of projects to refine the link between the optical and radio reference frames. In recent years there has been increasing interest in the astrometry of infrared sources. For example, stars with circumstellar shells can be observed in both the optical and radio (e.g. SiO maser emission). The infrared emission from such sources is dominated by thermal dust emission. The spatial distribution of radiation in the three bands is expected to be quite different. In 1982 we proposed a number of infrared-selected sources (S(sub 10 micron) greater than or approx. equal to 100 J(sub y)) for inclusion in the Hipparcos Input Catalog. Most of those sources were observed, and in Sutton (1997) we report the optical astrometric results (position, proper motion, and parallax) for 87 such sources. These sources were selected to have reasonable agreement between infrared and optical positions, and so may be used as primary standards for future infrared astrometry. They are well distributed across the sky, but exhibit some bias towards the galactic plane and the northern hemisphere. We have also obtained a set of 1480 secondary standards (unpublished) A comparison between optical positions and 86 GHz SiO maser positions for 10 sources indicates coincidence at the 0

  2. Communication between inertial observers with partially correlated reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Smith, Alexander R. H.; Dragan, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    In quantum communication protocols the existence of a shared reference frame between two spatially separated parties is normally presumed. However, in many practical situations we are faced with the problem of misaligned reference frames. In this paper, we study communication between two inertial observers who have partial knowledge about the Lorentz transformation that relates their frames of reference. Since every Lorentz transformation can be decomposed into a pure boost followed by a rotation, we begin by analyzing the effects on communication when the parties have partial knowledge about the transformation relating their frames, when the transformation is either a rotation or a pure boost. This then enables us to investigate how the efficiency of communication is affected due to partially correlated inertial reference frames related by an arbitrary Lorentz transformation. Furthermore, we show how the results of previous studies where reference frames are completely uncorrelated are recovered from our results in appropriate limits.

  3. 3D-profile measurement of advanced semiconductor features by reference metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Iwaki, Yuuki; Takahashi, Satoru; Kawada, Hiroki; Ikota, Masami; Lorusso, Gian F.; Horiguchi, Naoto

    2016-03-01

    A method of sub-nanometer uncertainty for the 3D-profile measurement using TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) images is proposed to standardize 3D-profile measurement through reference metrology. The proposed method has been validated for profiles of Si lines, photoresist features and advanced-FinFET (Fin-shaped Field-Effect Transistor) features in our previous investigations. However, efficiency of 3D-profile measurement using TEM is limited by measurement time including processing of the sample. In this article, we demonstrate a novel on-wafer 3D-profile metrology as "FIB-to-CDSEM method" with FIB (Focused Ion Beam) slope cut and CD-SEM (Critical Dimension Secondary Electron Microscope) measuring. Using the method, a few micrometer wide on a wafer is coated and cut by 45 degree slope using FIB tool. Then, the wafer is transferred to CD-SEM to measure the cross section image by top down CD-SEM measurement. We apply FIB-to-CDSEM method to CMOS sensor device. 3D-profile and 3D-profile parameters such as top line width and side wall angles of CMOS sensor device are evaluated. The 3D-profile parameters also are measured by TEM images as reference metrology. We compare the 3D-profile parameters by TEM method and FIB-to-CDSEM method. The average values and correlations on the wafer are agreed well between TEM and FIB-to- CDSEM methods.

  4. Spatial vision within egocentric and exocentric frames of reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Ian P.

    1991-01-01

    It is remarkable that we are able to perceive a stable visual world and judge the directions, orientations, and movements of visual objects given that images move on the retina, the eyes move in the head, the head moves on the body, and the body moves in space. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying perceptual stability and spatial judgements requires precise definitions of relevant coordinate systems. An egocentric frame of reference is defined with respect to some part of the observer. There are four principal egocentric frames of reference, a station-point frame associated with the nodal point of the eye, an retinocentric frame associated with the retina, a headcentric frame associated with the head, and a bodycentric frame (torsocentric) associated with the torso. Additional egocentric frames can be identified with respect to any segment of the body. An egocentric task is one in which the position, orientation, or motion of an object is judged with respect to an egocentric frame of reference. A proprioceptive is a special kind of egocentric task in which the object being judged is also part of the body. An example of a proprioceptive task is that of directing the gaze toward the seen or unseen toe. An exocentric frame of reference is external to the observer. Geographical coordinates and the direction of gravity are examples of exocentric frames of reference. These various frames are listed in tabular form, together with examples of judgements of each type.

  5. Celestial reference frame RSC (GAOUA) 98 C 01.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotaj, O. A.; Tel'Nyuk-Adamchuk, V. V.; Yatskiv, Ya. S.

    The celestial reference frame RSC (GAOUA) 98 C 01 was constructed by applying the Kiev arc method to five initial frames submitted to the IERS during 1997. The frame comprises positions of 631 radio sources. The frame axes are aligned to those of the ICRF with an accuracy of 0.02 mas using all 212 defining common radio sources. The internal standard errors of right ascension and declination for the defining sources are equal to 0.11 and 0.13 mas, respectively. Results of intercomparison between the ICRF, five initial frames, and the compiled frame are discussed.

  6. Intuitive presentation of clinical forensic data using anonymous and person-specific 3D reference manikins.

    PubMed

    Urschler, Martin; Höller, Johannes; Bornik, Alexander; Paul, Tobias; Giretzlehner, Michael; Bischof, Horst; Yen, Kathrin; Scheurer, Eva

    2014-08-01

    The increasing use of CT/MR devices in forensic analysis motivates the need to present forensic findings from different sources in an intuitive reference visualization, with the aim of combining 3D volumetric images along with digital photographs of external findings into a 3D computer graphics model. This model allows a comprehensive presentation of forensic findings in court and enables comparative evaluation studies correlating data sources. The goal of this work was to investigate different methods to generate anonymous and patient-specific 3D models which may be used as reference visualizations. The issue of registering 3D volumetric as well as 2D photographic data to such 3D models is addressed to provide an intuitive context for injury documentation from arbitrary modalities. We present an image processing and visualization work-flow, discuss the major parts of this work-flow, compare the different investigated reference models, and show a number of cases studies that underline the suitability of the proposed work-flow for presenting forensically relevant information in 3D visualizations. PMID:24952238

  7. Simulating binocular vision for no-reference 3D visual quality measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu-Jie; Yu, Lu; Wu, Ming-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Perceptual quality measurement of three-dimensional (3D) visual signals has become a fundamental challenge in 3D imaging fields. This paper proposes a novel no-reference (NR) 3D visual quality measurement (VQM) metric that uses simulations of the primary visual cortex (V1) of binocular vision. As the major technical contribution of this study, perceptual properties of simple and complex cells are considered for NR 3D-VQM. More specifically, the metric simulates the receptive fields of simple cells (one class of V1 neurons) using Gaussian derivative functions, and the receptive fields of complex cells (the other class of V1 neurons) using disparity energy responses and binocular rivalry responses. Subsequently, various quality-aware features are extracted from the primary visual cortex; these will change in the presence of distortions. Finally, those features are mapped to the subjective quality score of the distorted 3D visual signal by using support vector regression (SVR). Experiments on two publicly available 3D databases confirm the effectiveness of our proposed metric, compared to the relevant full-reference (FR) and NR metrics. PMID:26368467

  8. Egocentric and allocentric reference frames for catching a falling object.

    PubMed

    Le Séac'h, Anne Brec'hed; Senot, Patrice; McIntyre, Joseph

    2010-04-01

    When programming movement, one must account for gravitational acceleration. This is particularly important when catching a falling object because the task requires a precise estimate of time-to-contact. Knowledge of gravity's effects is intimately linked to our definition of 'up' and 'down'. Both directions can be described in an allocentric reference frame, based on visual and/or gravitational cues, or in an egocentric reference frame in which the body axis is taken as vertical. To test which frame humans use to predict gravity's effect, we asked participants to intercept virtual balls approaching from above or below with artificially controlled acceleration that could be congruent or not with gravity. To dissociate between these frames, subjects were seated upright (trunk parallel to gravity) or lying down (body axis orthogonal to the gravitational axis). We report data in line with the use of an allocentric reference frame and discuss its relevance depending on available gravity-related cues. PMID:20024651

  9. Use of Reference Frames for Interplanetary Navigation at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heflin, Michael; Jacobs, Chris; Sovers, Ojars; Moore, Angelyn; Owen, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Navigation of interplanetary spacecraft is typically based on range, Doppler, and differential interferometric measurements made by ground-based telescopes. Acquisition and interpretation of these observations requires accurate knowledge of the terrestrial reference frame and its orientation with respect to the celestial frame. Work is underway at JPL to reprocess historical VLBI and GPS data to improve realizations of the terrestrial and celestial frames. Improvements include minimal constraint alignment, improved tropospheric modeling, better orbit determination, and corrections for antenna phase center patterns.

  10. Future National Reference Frames for the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, W. A.

    2015-12-01

    The mission of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is "to define, maintain and provide access to the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) to meet our nation's economic, social, and environmental needs." NSRS is the nation's system of latitude, longitude, elevation, and related geophysical and geodetic models and tools, which provides a consistent spatial reference framework for the broad spectrum of geoscientific applications and other positioning-related requirements. Technological developments - notably Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) - and user accuracy requirements necessitate that NGS endeavor to modernize the NSRS. Preparations are underway by NGS for a comprehensive NSRS makeover, to be completed in 2022 and delivered through a new generation of horizontal and vertical datums (reference frames), featuring unprecedented accuracy, repeatability, and efficiency of access. This evolution is outlined in the "National Geodetic Survey Ten-Year Strategic Plan, 2013-2023." This presentation will outline the motivation for this effort and the history, current status and planned evolution of NSRS. Fundamental to the delivery of the future reference frame paradigm are new geometric and geopotential (elevation) frameworks. The new geometric reference frame, realized through GNSS Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS), will replace the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD83) and will provide the nationwide framework for determination of latitude, longitude, and ellipsoid height. Designed to complement the new geometric reference frame, a corresponding geopotential reference frame - based on a national gravimetric geoid and replacing the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88) - will be developed and co-released. The gravimetric geoid - or definitional reference surface (zero elevation) - for the future geopotential reference frame will be built in part from airborne gravimetric data collected in

  11. Newton-Cartan Gravity in Noninertial Reference Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Leo; St. Germaine-Fuller, James; Wickramasekara, Sujeev

    2015-03-01

    We study Newton-Cartan gravity under transformations into all noninertial, nonrelativistic reference frames. These transformations form an infinite dimensional Lie group, called the Galilean line group, which contains as a subgroup the Galilei group. The fictitious forces of noninertial reference frames are encoded in the Cartan connection transformed under the Galilean line group. These fictitious forces, which are coordinate effects, do not contribute to the Ricci tensor. Only the 00-component of the Ricci tensor is non-zero and equals (4 π times) the matter density in all reference frames. While the Ricci field equation and Gauss' law are fulfilled by the physical matter density in inertial and linearly accelerating reference frames, in rotating reference frames Gauss' law holds for an effective mass density that differs from the physical matter density. This effective density has its origin in the simulated magnetic field of rotating frames, highlighting a striking difference between linearly and rotationally accelerating frames. The equations governing the simulated fields have the same form as Maxwell's equations, a surprising result given that these equations obey special relativity (and U (1) -gauge symmetry), rather than Galilean symmetry. This work was supported in part by the HHMI Undergraduate Science Education Award 52006298 and the Grinnell College Academic Affairs' CSFS and MAP programs.

  12. Are All Spatial Reference Frames Egocentric? Reinterpreting Evidence for Allocentric, Object-Centered, or World-Centered Reference Frames

    PubMed Central

    Filimon, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    The use and neural representation of egocentric spatial reference frames is well-documented. In contrast, whether the brain represents spatial relationships between objects in allocentric, object-centered, or world-centered coordinates is debated. Here, I review behavioral, neuropsychological, neurophysiological (neuronal recording), and neuroimaging evidence for and against allocentric, object-centered, or world-centered spatial reference frames. Based on theoretical considerations, simulations, and empirical findings from spatial navigation, spatial judgments, and goal-directed movements, I suggest that all spatial representations may in fact be dependent on egocentric reference frames. PMID:26696861

  13. Spatial vision within egocentric and exocentric frames of reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Ian P.

    1989-01-01

    The extent to which perceptual judgements within egocentric and exocentric frames of reference are subject to illusory disturbances and long term modifications is discussed. It is argued that well known spatial illusions, such as the oculogyral illusion and induced visual motion have usually been discussed without proper attention being paid to the frame of reference within which they occur, and that this has led to the construction of inadequate theories and inappropriate procedures for testing them.

  14. Reference frames in learning from maps and navigation.

    PubMed

    Meilinger, Tobias; Frankenstein, Julia; Watanabe, Katsumi; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Hölscher, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    In everyday life, navigators often consult a map before they navigate to a destination (e.g., a hotel, a room, etc.). However, not much is known about how humans gain spatial knowledge from seeing a map and direct navigation together. In the present experiments, participants learned a simple multiple corridor space either from a map only, only from walking through the virtual environment, first from the map and then from navigation, or first from navigation and then from the map. Afterwards, they conducted a pointing task from multiple body orientations to infer the underlying reference frames. We constructed the learning experiences in a way such that map-only learning and navigation-only learning triggered spatial memory organized along different reference frame orientations. When learning from maps before and during navigation, participants employed a map- rather than a navigation-based reference frame in the subsequent pointing task. Consequently, maps caused the employment of a map-oriented reference frame found in memory for highly familiar urban environments ruling out explanations from environmental structure or north preference. When learning from navigation first and then from the map, the pattern of results reversed and participants employed a navigation-based reference frame. The priority of learning order suggests that despite considerable difference between map and navigation learning participants did not use the more salient or in general more useful information, but relied on the reference frame established first. PMID:25416007

  15. Reference frame realized by RSC(GAOUA)97 C 01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotaj, O.; Tel'Nyuk-Adamchuk, V.; Yatskiv, Ya.

    The RSC(GAO UA)97 C 01 reference frame have been constructed using the method of arcs between the extragalactic radio sources developed by Yatskiv and Kuryanova. This continues the Kyiv series of compiled catalogues of radio source positions. The method enables to derive the uncertainty of source catalogues and to detect inconsistency of separate radio source position. A comparison between the catalogue constructed, on the one hand, and the reference frames RSC(IERS)95 C 02 and RSC(WGRF)95 R 02, on the other hand, has been carried out. Systematic differences and consistency of the frames mentioned are discussed.

  16. DOMINO: A fast 3D cartesian discrete ordinates solver for reference PWR simulations and SPN validation

    SciTech Connect

    Courau, T.; Moustafa, S.; Plagne, L.; Poncot, A.

    2013-07-01

    As part of its activity, EDF R and D is developing a new nuclear core simulation code named COCAGNE. This code relies on DIABOLO, a Simplified PN (SPN) method to compute the neutron flux inside the core for eigenvalue calculations. In order to assess the accuracy of SPN calculations, we have developed DOMINO, a new 3D Cartesian SN solver. The parallel implementation of DOMINO is very efficient and allows to complete an eigenvalue calculation involving around 300 x 10{sup 9} degrees of freedom within a few hours on a single shared-memory supercomputing node. This computation corresponds to a 26-group S{sub 8} 3D PWR core model used to assess the SPN accuracy. At the pin level, the maximal error for the SP{sub 5} DIABOLO fission production rate is lower than 0.2% compared to the S{sub 8} DOMINO reference for this 3D PWR core model. (authors)

  17. Single-frame digital phase-shifting 3D shape measurement using pixel-wise moiré-wavelength refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Kofman, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    A novel pixel-wise moiré-wavelength refinement technique was developed for system calibration in single-frame digital phase-shifting 3D shape measurement. The method requires projection of only a single binary grid and capture of a single image frame. Phase-shifted images are generated by digitally phase-shifting a synthetic grid superimposed on the captured frame. The grid patterns are removed from the generated images by wavelet-Fourier transform to extract moiré patterns, from which phase and surface height are computed. A wavelength-height function, computed during system calibration, accounts for moiré-wavelength variation over calibration depth in phase-to-height mapping. Novel pixel-wise wavelength and height (depth) refinement, using this function, improved measurement accuracy compared to measurement using a single global wavelength across all pixels. The method was demonstrated in measurement of a flat plate, hemispherical object, and manikin head.

  18. 3D Mandibular Superimposition: Comparison of Regions of Reference for Voxel-Based Registration

    PubMed Central

    Ruellas, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira; Yatabe, Marilia Sayako; Souki, Bernardo Quiroga; Benavides, Erika; Nguyen, Tung; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Franchi, Lorenzo; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena Soares

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim was to evaluate three regions of reference (Björk, Modified Björk and mandibular Body) for mandibular registration testing them in a patients’ CBCT sample. Methods Mandibular 3D volumetric label maps were built from CBCTs taken before (T1) and after treatment (T2) in a sample of 16 growing subjects and labeled with eight landmarks. Registrations of T1 and T2 images relative to the different regions of reference were performed, and 3D surface models were generated. Seven mandibular dimensions were measured separately for each time-point (T1 and T2) in relation to a stable reference structure (lingual cortical of symphysis), and the T2-T1 differences were calculated. These differences were compared to differences measured between the superimposed T2 (generated from different regions of reference: Björk, Modified Björk and Mandibular Body) over T1 surface models. ICC and the Bland-Altman method tested the agreement of the changes obtained by nonsuperimposition measurements from the patients’ sample, and changes between the overlapped surfaces after registration using the different regions of reference. Results The Björk region of reference (or mask) did work properly only in 2 of 16 patients. Evaluating the two other masks (Modified Björk and Mandibular body) on patients’ scans registration, the concordance and agreement of the changes obtained from superimpositions (registered T2 over T1) compared to results obtained from non superimposed T1 and T2 separately, indicated that Mandibular Body mask displayed more consistent results. Conclusions The mandibular body mask (mandible without teeth, alveolar bone, rami and condyles) is a reliable reference for 3D regional registration. PMID:27336366

  19. Asynchronous reference frame agreement in a quantum network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Tanvirul; Wehner, Stephanie

    2016-03-01

    An efficient implementation of many multiparty protocols for quantum networks requires that all the nodes in the network share a common reference frame. Establishing such a reference frame from scratch is especially challenging in an asynchronous network where network links might have arbitrary delays and the nodes do not share synchronised clocks. In this work, we study the problem of establishing a common reference frame in an asynchronous network of n nodes of which at most t are affected by arbitrary unknown error, and the identities of the faulty nodes are not known. We present a protocol that allows all the correctly functioning nodes to agree on a common reference frame as long as the network graph is complete and not more than t\\lt n/4 nodes are faulty. As the protocol is asynchronous, it can be used with some assumptions to synchronise clocks over a network. Also, the protocol has the appealing property that it allows any existing two-node asynchronous protocol for reference frame agreement to be lifted to a robust protocol for an asynchronous quantum network.

  20. Reference frames in virtual spatial navigation are viewpoint dependent

    PubMed Central

    Török, Ágoston; Nguyen, T. Peter; Kolozsvári, Orsolya; Buchanan, Robert J.; Nadasdy, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    Spatial navigation in the mammalian brain relies on a cognitive map of the environment. Such cognitive maps enable us, for example, to take the optimal route from a given location to a known target. The formation of these maps is naturally influenced by our perception of the environment, meaning it is dependent on factors such as our viewpoint and choice of reference frame. Yet, it is unknown how these factors influence the construction of cognitive maps. Here, we evaluated how various combinations of viewpoints and reference frames affect subjects' performance when they navigated in a bounded virtual environment without landmarks. We measured both their path length and time efficiency and found that (1) ground perspective was associated with egocentric frame of reference, (2) aerial perspective was associated with allocentric frame of reference, (3) there was no appreciable performance difference between first and third person egocentric viewing positions and (4) while none of these effects were dependent on gender, males tended to perform better in general. Our study provides evidence that there are inherent associations between visual perspectives and cognitive reference frames. This result has implications about the mechanisms of path integration in the human brain and may also inspire designs of virtual reality applications. Lastly, we demonstrated the effective use of a tablet PC and spatial navigation tasks for studying spatial and cognitive aspects of human memory. PMID:25249956

  1. Single Nanoparticle to 3D Supercage: Framing for an Artificial Enzyme System.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ren; Yang, Dan; Peng, Shengjie; Chen, Xigao; Huang, Yun; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Weijia; Yang, Shengyuan; Liu, Zhenbao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-11-01

    A facile strategy has been developed to fabricate Cu(OH)2 supercages (SCs) as an artificial enzyme system with intrinsic peroxidase-mimic activities (PMA). SCs with high catalytic activity and excellent recyclability were generated via direct conversion of amorphous Cu(OH)2 nanoparticles (NPs) at room temperature. More specifically, the process that takes a single nanoparticle to a 3D supercage involves two basic steps. First, with addition of a copper-ammonia complex, the Cu(2+) ions that are located on the surface of amorphous Cu(OH)2 NPs would evolve into a fine lamellar structure by coordination and migration and eventually convert to 1D nanoribbons around the NPs. Second, accompanied by the migration of Cu(2+), a hollow cavity is generated in the inner NPs, such that a single nanoparticle eventually becomes a nanoribbon-assembled 3D hollow cage. These Cu(OH)2 SCs were then engineered as an artificial enzymatic system with higher efficiency for intrinsic PMA than the peroxidase activity of a natural enzyme, horseradish peroxidase. PMID:26464081

  2. Transport equations of electrodiffusion processes in the laboratory reference frame.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Javier

    2006-02-23

    The transport equations of electrodiffusion processes use three reference frames for defining the fluxes: Fick's reference in diffusion, solvent-fixed reference in transference numbers, and laboratory fluxes in electric conductivity. The convenience of using only one reference frame is analyzed here from the point of view of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. A relation between the fluxes of ions and solvent and the electric current density is deduced first from a mass and volume balance. This is then used to show that (i) the laboratory and Fick's diffusion coefficients are identical and (ii) the transference numbers of both the solvent and the ion in the laboratory reference frame are related. Finally, four experimental methods for the measurement of ion transference numbers are analyzed critically. New expressions for evaluating transference numbers for the moving boundary method and the chronopotentiometry technique are deduced. It is concluded that the ion transport equation in the laboratory reference frame plays a key role in the description of electrodiffusion processes. PMID:16494340

  3. Reference frame-induced errors in VLBI Earth rotation determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinkelmann, Robert; Karbon, Maria; Liu, Li; Lu, Cuixian; Mora-Diaz, Julian A.; Nilsson, Tobias J.; Raposo-Pulido, Virginia; Soja, Benedikt; Xu, Minghui; Schuh, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Earth Rotation is defined as the transformation between the Geocentric Celestial Reference System (GCRS) and the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS). It is a three-dimensional rotation which is described by the precession/nutation Q, the Earth rotation R, and the polar motion W matrices (IERS Coventions 2010): xGCRS = QRWxITRS. The actual determination of Earth Rotation by Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is based on the reference frames involved in the VLBI analysis. VLBI is the only space-geodetic technique used for the realization of the International Celestial Reference System (ICRS), which is the geocentric celestial reference system (GCRS) practically realized to evaluate the above equation. Since the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) are obtained as 'session-wise parameters', they can suffer from any inconsistencies between session-wise TRF and CRF realizations. In this paper we assess the session-wise TRF and CRF differences by determining the respective transformation parameters of the adjusted terrestrial and celestial positions on a session basis to the catalogue coordinates, given by the International Terrestrial Reference Frame 2008 (ITRF2008) and the Second International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2).

  4. Connecting kinematic and dynamic reference frames by D-VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, Harald; Plank, Lucia; Madzak, Matthias; Böhm, Johannes

    2012-08-01

    In geodetic and astrometric practice, terrestrial station coordinates are usually provided in the kinematic International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) and radio source coordinates in the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF), whereas measurements of space probes such as satellites and spacecrafts, or planetary ephemerides rest upon dynamical theories. To avoid inconsistencies and errors during measurement and calculation procedures, exact frame ties between quasi - inertial, kinematic and dynamic reference frames have to be secured. While the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP), e.g. measured by VLBI, link the ITRF to the ICRF, the ties with the dynamic frames can be established with the differential Very Long Baseline Interferometry (D - VLBI) method. By observing space probes alternately t o radio sources, the relative position of the targets to each other on the sky can be determined with high accuracy. While D - VLBI is a common technique in astrophysics (source imaging) and deep space navigation, just recently there have been several effort s to use it for geodetic purposes. We present investigations concerning possible VLBI observations to satellites. This includes the potential usage of available GNNS satellites as well as specifically designed missions, as e.g. the GRASP mission proposed b y JPL/NASA and an international consortium, where the aspect of co - location in space of various techniques (VLBI, SLR, GNSS, DORIS) is the main focus.

  5. Turbulence modeling in non-inertial frames of reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of an arbitrary change of frame on the structure of turbulence models is examined from a fundamental theoretical standpoint. It is proven, as a rigorous consequence of the Navier-Stokes equations, that turbulence models must be form invariant under arbitrary translational accelerations of the reference frame and should only be affected by rotations through the intrinsic mean vorticity. A direct application of the invariance property along with the Taylor-Proudman Theorem, material frame-indifference in the limit of two-dimensional turbulence and Rapid Distortion Theory is shown to yield powerful constraints on the allowable form of turbulence models. Most of the commonly used turbulence models are demonstrated to be in serious violation of these constraints and consequently are inconsistent with the Navier-Stokes equations in non-inertial frames. Alternative models with improved non-inertial properties are developed and some simple applications to rotating turbulent flows are considered.

  6. The equations of relative motion in the orbital reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casotto, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of relative motion of two spacecraft in Earth-bound orbits is usually carried out on the basis of simplifying assumptions. In particular, the reference spacecraft is assumed to follow a circular orbit, in which case the equations of relative motion are governed by the well-known Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations. Circular motion is not, however, a solution when the Earth's flattening is accounted for, except for equatorial orbits, where in any case the acceleration term is not Newtonian. Several attempts have been made to account for the J_2 effects, either by ingeniously taking advantage of their differential effects, or by cleverly introducing ad-hoc terms in the equations of motion on the basis of geometrical analysis of the J_2 perturbing effects. Analysis of relative motion about an unperturbed elliptical orbit is the next step in complexity. Relative motion about a J_2-perturbed elliptic reference trajectory is clearly a challenging problem, which has received little attention. All these problems are based on either the Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations for circular reference motion, or the de Vries/Tschauner-Hempel equations for elliptical reference motion, which are both approximate versions of the exact equations of relative motion. The main difference between the exact and approximate forms of these equations consists in the expression for the angular velocity and the angular acceleration of the rotating reference frame with respect to an inertial reference frame. The rotating reference frame is invariably taken as the local orbital frame, i.e., the RTN frame generated by the radial, the transverse, and the normal directions along the primary spacecraft orbit. Some authors have tried to account for the non-constant nature of the angular velocity vector, but have limited their correction to a mean motion value consistent with the J_2 perturbation terms. However, the angular velocity vector is also affected in direction, which causes precession

  7. Evaluation of Bogie Frame Safety of Shanghai Metro Line 1 by 3D FEM Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiongyao, Xie; Guolong, Jin; Rulu, Wang

    2010-05-01

    The vehicle bogies of Shanghai metro line 1 began to crack just in the third year after the trains operated. More than 50 cracks occurred in the succeeding six year during the train operation. This paper evaluated the safety of the motorized bogies. First, the loading conditions imposed on the vehicle structure were calculated based on the measured data in service of the train, and compared with the original design load. Then, this paper calculated simulated the stress of the vehicle bogie by 3D FEM, and presented the distribution of every stress concentration point in Goodman fatigue diagram. The computational locations of the strength less than the safety are agreed with where cracks have happened. Finally, this paper calculated the fatigue life of the motor bracket of the bogie through S-N curve based on revised Miner theory. In conclusion, this paper think that the bogie cracks of Shanghai metro line 1 are contributed by the overburden fatigue load, and ignoring the lateral vibration load in the design of the vehicle bogie is the important cause that bogie cracks occurred far earlier than in the designed time.

  8. Mesoscopic mechanical resonators as quantum noninertial reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, B. N.; Blencowe, M. P.; Schwab, K. C.

    2015-10-01

    An atom attached to a micrometer-scale wire that is vibrating at a frequency ˜100 MHz and with displacement amplitude ˜1 nm experiences an acceleration magnitude ˜109ms -2 , approaching the surface gravity of a neutron star. As one application of such extreme noninertial forces in a mesoscopic setting, we consider a model two-path atom interferometer with one path consisting of the 100 MHz vibrating wire atom guide. The vibrating wire guide serves as a noninertial reference frame and induces an in principle measurable phase shift in the wave function of an atom traversing the wire frame. We furthermore consider the effect on the two-path atom wave interference when the vibrating wire is modeled as a quantum object, hence functioning as a quantum noninertial reference frame. We outline a possible realization of the vibrating wire, atom interferometer using a superfluid helium quantum interference setup.

  9. Kinematics and dynamics in noninertial quantum frames of reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelo, R. M.; Ribeiro, A. D.

    2012-11-01

    From the principle that there is no absolute description of a physical state, we advance the approach according to which one should be able to describe the physics from the perspective of a quantum particle. The kinematics seen from this frame of reference is shown to be rather unconventional. In particular, we discuss several subtleties emerging in the relative formulation of central notions, such as vector states, the classical limit, entanglement, uncertainty relations and the complementary principle. A Hamiltonian formulation is also derived which correctly encapsulates effects of fictitious forces associated with the accelerated motion of the frame. Our approach shows, therefore, how to formulate nonrelativistic quantum mechanics within noninertial reference frames which can be consistently described by the theory, with no appeal to classical elements.

  10. Work and energy in inertial and noninertial reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Rodolfo A.; Herrera, William J.; Manjarrés, Diego A.

    2009-03-01

    It is usual in introductory courses of mechanics to develop the work and energy formalism from Newton's laws. It has been shown how forces transform under a change of reference frame. No analogous study is usually done for the way in which work and energy transform under a change of reference frames. We analyze the behavior of energy and work under such transformations and explicitly show the expected invariance of the formalism under Galilean transformations for one particle and a system of particles. The case of noninertial systems is also analyzed and the fictitious work is characterized. In particular, we showed that the total fictitious work in the center of mass system vanishes even if the center of mass defines a noninertial frame. Some subtleties that arise from the formalism are illustrated by examples.

  11. Change of Reference Frame for Tactile Localization during Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagel, Birthe; Heed, Tobias; Roder, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Temporal order judgements (TOJ) for two tactile stimuli, one presented to the left and one to the right hand, are less precise when the hands are crossed over the midline than when the hands are uncrossed. This "crossed hand" effect has been considered as evidence for a remapping of tactile input into an external reference frame. Since late, but…

  12. The GAOUA series of compiled celestial reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotaj, O.; Tel'Nyuk-Adamchuk, V.; Yatskiv, Ya.

    2000-09-01

    The GAOUA series of compiled celestial reference frames is obtained by using the original Kyiv arc length approach for combination of initial RSC solutions which are yearly submitted to the IERS CB by various VLBI Analysis Centers. The presentation is concerned with an analysis of accuracies of these individual and combined solutions and that of the ICRF.

  13. Limited Aspects of Reality: Frames of Reference in Language Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Glenn; Svalberg, Agneta

    2013-01-01

    Language testers operate within two frames of reference: norm-referenced (NRT) and criterion-referenced testing (CRT). The former underpins the world of large-scale standardized testing that prioritizes variability and comparison. The latter supports substantive score meaning in formative and domain specific assessment. Some claim that the…

  14. Frames of Reference in African Proverbs on Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlieger, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-five proverbs relating to disability were collected from sub-Saharan African countries and analyzed for larger frames of reference of personhood and cosmogony. Themes include warnings against laughing at a disabled person, personhood, existential insecurity, acceptance of what is, and the function and nature of disability. (DB)

  15. Cross-Sensory Transfer of Reference Frames in Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jonathan W.; Avraamides, Marios N.

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments investigated whether visual cues influence spatial reference frame selection for locations learned through touch. Participants experienced visual cues emphasizing specific environmental axes and later learned objects through touch. Visual cues were manipulated and haptic learning conditions were held constant. Imagined perspective…

  16. The Bernoulli Equation in a Moving Reference Frame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2011-01-01

    Unlike other standard equations in introductory classical mechanics, the Bernoulli equation is not Galilean invariant. The explanation is that, in a reference frame moving with respect to constrictions or obstacles, those surfaces do work on the fluid, constituting an extra term that needs to be included in the work-energy calculation. A…

  17. Reference Frames during the Acquisition and Development of Spatial Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jonathan W.; McNamara, Timothy P.

    2010-01-01

    Four experiments investigated the role of reference frames during the acquisition and development of spatial knowledge, when learning occurs incrementally across views. In two experiments, participants learned overlapping spatial layouts. Layout 1 was first studied in isolation, and Layout 2 was later studied in the presence of Layout 1. The…

  18. Intrinsic frames of reference in haptic spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Philbeck, John W

    2013-11-01

    It has been proposed that spatial reference frames with which object locations are specified in memory are intrinsic to a to-be-remembered spatial layout (intrinsic reference theory). Although this theory has been supported by accumulating evidence, it has only been collected from paradigms in which the entire spatial layout was simultaneously visible to observers. The present study was designed to examine the generality of the theory by investigating whether the geometric structure of a spatial layout (bilateral symmetry) influences selection of spatial reference frames when object locations are sequentially learned through haptic exploration. In two experiments, participants learned the spatial layout solely by touch and performed judgments of relative direction among objects using their spatial memories. Results indicated that the geometric structure can provide a spatial cue for establishing reference frames as long as it is accentuated by explicit instructions (Experiment 1) or alignment with an egocentric orientation (Experiment 2). These results are entirely consistent with those from previous studies in which spatial information was encoded through simultaneous viewing of all object locations, suggesting that the intrinsic reference theory is not specific to a type of spatial memory acquired by the particular learning method but instead generalizes to spatial memories learned through a variety of encoding conditions. In particular, the present findings suggest that spatial memories that follow the intrinsic reference theory function equivalently regardless of the modality in which spatial information is encoded. PMID:24007919

  19. Frames of reference and categorical/coordinate spatial relations in a "what was where" task.

    PubMed

    Ruotolo, Francesco; Iachini, Tina; Ruggiero, Gennaro; van der Ham, Ineke J M; Postma, Albert

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how people use egocentric (i.e., with respect to their body) and allocentric (i.e., with respect to another element in the environment) references in combination with coordinate (metric) or categorical (abstract) spatial information to identify a target element. Participants were asked to memorize triads of 3D objects or 2D figures, and immediately or after a delay of 5 s, they had to verbally indicate what was the object/figure: (1) closest/farthest to them (egocentric coordinate task); (2) on their right/left (egocentric categorical task); (3) closest/farthest to another object/figure (allocentric coordinate task); (4) on the right/left of another object/figure (allocentric categorical task). Results showed that the use of 2D figures favored categorical judgments over the coordinate ones with either an egocentric or an allocentric reference frame, whereas the use of 3D objects specifically favored egocentric coordinate judgments rather than the allocentric ones. Furthermore, egocentric judgments were more accurate than allocentric judgments when the response was Immediate rather than delayed and 3D objects rather than 2D figures were used. This pattern of results is discussed in the light of the functional roles attributed to the frames of reference and spatial relations by relevant theories of visuospatial processing. PMID:27180248

  20. A Gauss-Seidel Iteration Scheme for Reference-Free 3-D Histological Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Daum, Volker; Steidl, Stefan; Maier, Andreas; Köstler, Harald; Hornegger, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of histological slice sequences offers great benefits in the investigation of different morphologies. It features very high-resolution which is still unmatched by in-vivo 3-D imaging modalities, and tissue staining further enhances visibility and contrast. One important step during reconstruction is the reversal of slice deformations introduced during histological slice preparation, a process also called image unwarping. Most methods use an external reference, or rely on conservative stopping criteria during the unwarping optimization to prevent straightening of naturally curved morphology. Our approach shows that the problem of unwarping is based on the superposition of low-frequency anatomy and high-frequency errors. We present an iterative scheme that transfers the ideas of the Gauss-Seidel method to image stacks to separate the anatomy from the deformation. In particular, the scheme is universally applicable without restriction to a specific unwarping method, and uses no external reference. The deformation artifacts are effectively reduced in the resulting histology volumes, while the natural curvature of the anatomy is preserved. The validity of our method is shown on synthetic data, simulated histology data using a CT data set and real histology data. In the case of the simulated histology where the ground truth was known, the mean Target Registration Error (TRE) between the unwarped and original volume could be reduced to less than 1 pixel on average after 6 iterations of our proposed method. PMID:25312918

  1. Using quasar physics to improve the celestial reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabala, Stanislav; Plank, Lucia; McCallum, Jamie; Boehm, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    Radio-loud quasars making up the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) are dynamic objects with significant structure that changes on timescales of months and years. This is a problem for reference frame stability, as realised through the geodetic and astrometric Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique, which has so far largely treated quasars as point sources in analysis. I will describe the source structure simulator recently implemented in the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS) package, and quantify the effects of various levels of source structure on the celestial and terrestrial reference frames, and Earth Orientation Parameters linking these two frames. We find that even relatively modest levels of quasar structure can produce systematic effects that affect derived quasar positions significantly in excess of the noise floor of the present ICRF realisation, ICRF2.I will also discuss the observed relationship between astrophysical properties of quasars, their structure and geodetic stability. By simulating quasar structure and evolution in VieVS, we have devised various quasar mitigation strategies. These include: (1) astrophysically-based quasar selection techniques; (2) scheduling sources by taking into account quasar structure; and (3) analyzing geodetic and astrometric VLBI observations using knowledge of quasar structure. I will describe our simulation results, and outline promising quasar structure mitigation strategies.

  2. Deriving a geocentric reference frame for satellite positioning and navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malla, R. P.; Wu, S.-C.

    1988-01-01

    With the advent of Earth-orbiting geodetic satellites, nongeocentric datums or reference frames have become things of the past. Accurate geocentric three-dimensional positioning is now possible and is of great importance for various geodetic and oceanographic applications. While relative positioning accuracy of a few centimeters has become a reality using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), the uncertainty in the offset of the adopted coordinate system origin from the geocenter is still believed to be on the order of 1 meter. Satellite laser ranging (SLR), however, is capable of determining this offset to better than 10 cm, but this is possible only after years of measurements. Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements provide a powerful tool for an accurate determination of this origin offset. Two strategies are discussed. The first strategy utilizes the precise relative positions that were predetermined by VLBI to fix the frame orientation and the absolute scaling, while the offset from the geocenter is determined from GPS measurements. Three different cases are presented under this strategy. The reference frame thus adopted will be consistent with the VLBI coordinate system. The second strategy establishes a reference frame by holding only the longitude of one of the tracking sites fixed. The absolute scaling is determined by the adopted gravitational constant (GM) of the Earth; and the latitude is inferred from the time signature of the Earth rotation in the GPS measurements. The coordinate system thus defined will be a geocentric Earth-fixed coordinate system.

  3. Quantum image coding with a reference-frame-independent scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Belin, Etienne

    2016-07-01

    For binary images, or bit planes of non-binary images, we investigate the possibility of a quantum coding decodable by a receiver in the absence of reference frames shared with the emitter. Direct image coding with one qubit per pixel and non-aligned frames leads to decoding errors equivalent to a quantum bit-flip noise increasing with the misalignment. We show the feasibility of frame-invariant coding by using for each pixel a qubit pair prepared in one of two controlled entangled states. With just one common axis shared between the emitter and receiver, exact decoding for each pixel can be obtained by means of two two-outcome projective measurements operating separately on each qubit of the pair. With strictly no alignment information between the emitter and receiver, exact decoding can be obtained by means of a two-outcome projective measurement operating jointly on the qubit pair. In addition, the frame-invariant coding is shown much more resistant to quantum bit-flip noise compared to the direct non-invariant coding. For a cost per pixel of two (entangled) qubits instead of one, complete frame-invariant image coding and enhanced noise resistance are thus obtained.

  4. Quantum image coding with a reference-frame-independent scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Belin, Etienne

    2016-04-01

    For binary images, or bit planes of non-binary images, we investigate the possibility of a quantum coding decodable by a receiver in the absence of reference frames shared with the emitter. Direct image coding with one qubit per pixel and non-aligned frames leads to decoding errors equivalent to a quantum bit-flip noise increasing with the misalignment. We show the feasibility of frame-invariant coding by using for each pixel a qubit pair prepared in one of two controlled entangled states. With just one common axis shared between the emitter and receiver, exact decoding for each pixel can be obtained by means of two two-outcome projective measurements operating separately on each qubit of the pair. With strictly no alignment information between the emitter and receiver, exact decoding can be obtained by means of a two-outcome projective measurement operating jointly on the qubit pair. In addition, the frame-invariant coding is shown much more resistant to quantum bit-flip noise compared to the direct non-invariant coding. For a cost per pixel of two (entangled) qubits instead of one, complete frame-invariant image coding and enhanced noise resistance are thus obtained.

  5. Determination and Maintenance of the Galileo Terrestrial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsche, Mathias

    2016-04-01

    A highly precise and stable Galileo Terrestrial Reference Frame (GTRF) is a crucial prerequisite for the provision of precise Galileo products and related services. The GTRF determination shall be compatible with the latest International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) providing the same level of accuracy, long-term stability, and reliability to the maximum extent possible. The connection to ITRF is realized and validated by stations of the International GNSS Service (IGS) and by geodetic local ties to stations equipped with other geodetic techniques. Primary GTRF input data are provided by the Orbit Validation Facility (OVF) including precise satellite orbit and clocks, ground tracking station coordinates and Earth rotation parameters. The OVF service is delivered by the GGSP consortium, a group of five European institutes having a strong geodetic background. In this presentation, we provide an up-to-date overview on the latest GTRF release and the current OVF status.

  6. 32 GHz Celestial Reference Frame Survey for Dec < -45 deg.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shinji; Phillips, Chris; Jacobs, Christopher; Sotuela, Ioana; Garcia miro, Cristina

    2012-04-01

    We propose to conduct a LBA survey of compact radio sources at 32 GHz near the south pole region. This is the first attempt to fill the gap in the existing 32 GHz catalogue establish by NASA Deep Space Network toward completing the full sky celestial reference frame at 32 GHz. The catalogue will be used for future spacecraft navigation by NASA and other space agencies as well as for radio astronomical observations with southern radio telescope arrays such as ATCA and LBA.

  7. Disentangling the External Reference Frames Relevant to Tactile Localization

    PubMed Central

    Backhaus, Jenny; Röder, Brigitte; Badde, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Different reference frames appear to be relevant for tactile spatial coding. When participants give temporal order judgments (TOJ) of two tactile stimuli, one on each hand, performance declines when the hands are crossed. This effect is attributed to a conflict between anatomical and external location codes: hand crossing places the anatomically right hand into the left side of external space. However, hand crossing alone does not specify the anchor of the external reference frame, such as gaze, trunk, or the stimulated limb. Experiments that used explicit localization responses, such as pointing to tactile stimuli rather than crossing manipulations, have consistently implicated gaze-centered coding for touch. To test whether crossing effects can be explained by gaze-centered coding alone, participants made TOJ while the position of the hands was manipulated relative to gaze and trunk. The two hands either lay on different sides of space relative to gaze or trunk, or they both lay on one side of the respective space. In the latter posture, one hand was on its "regular side of space" despite hand crossing, thus reducing overall conflict between anatomical and external codes. TOJ crossing effects were significantly reduced when the hands were both located on the same side of space relative to gaze, indicating gaze-centered coding. Evidence for trunk-centered coding was tentative, with an effect in reaction time but not in accuracy. These results link paradigms that use explicit localization and TOJ, and corroborate the relevance of gaze-related coding for touch. Yet, gaze and trunk-centered coding did not account for the total size of crossing effects, suggesting that tactile localization relies on additional, possibly limb-centered, reference frames. Thus, tactile location appears to be estimated by integrating multiple anatomical and external reference frames. PMID:27391805

  8. Disentangling the External Reference Frames Relevant to Tactile Localization.

    PubMed

    Heed, Tobias; Backhaus, Jenny; Röder, Brigitte; Badde, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Different reference frames appear to be relevant for tactile spatial coding. When participants give temporal order judgments (TOJ) of two tactile stimuli, one on each hand, performance declines when the hands are crossed. This effect is attributed to a conflict between anatomical and external location codes: hand crossing places the anatomically right hand into the left side of external space. However, hand crossing alone does not specify the anchor of the external reference frame, such as gaze, trunk, or the stimulated limb. Experiments that used explicit localization responses, such as pointing to tactile stimuli rather than crossing manipulations, have consistently implicated gaze-centered coding for touch. To test whether crossing effects can be explained by gaze-centered coding alone, participants made TOJ while the position of the hands was manipulated relative to gaze and trunk. The two hands either lay on different sides of space relative to gaze or trunk, or they both lay on one side of the respective space. In the latter posture, one hand was on its "regular side of space" despite hand crossing, thus reducing overall conflict between anatomical and external codes. TOJ crossing effects were significantly reduced when the hands were both located on the same side of space relative to gaze, indicating gaze-centered coding. Evidence for trunk-centered coding was tentative, with an effect in reaction time but not in accuracy. These results link paradigms that use explicit localization and TOJ, and corroborate the relevance of gaze-related coding for touch. Yet, gaze and trunk-centered coding did not account for the total size of crossing effects, suggesting that tactile localization relies on additional, possibly limb-centered, reference frames. Thus, tactile location appears to be estimated by integrating multiple anatomical and external reference frames. PMID:27391805

  9. Global GPS reference frame solutions of unlimited size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomkamp, H.

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports on the Dancer project, which is one of three related projects initiated by working group 1 of the International Association of Geodesy. The Dancer project develops JAVA parameter estimation software that runs in the form of a distributed process on the internet, in such a way that each processing node handles the data of a single geodetic instrument. By exchanging a minimum amount of information among all processing nodes, the same global normal equation solution is found by all instruments. The result is a fully scalable least squares solution that has no practical limit to the number of GPS receivers or other tracking devices that may be included in a single reference frame realization. High-end GPS users will also be able to run a Dancer process for their own data, without contributing to the reference frame solution but taking full advantage of its global consistency. This offers direct access to precise International Terrestrial Reference Frame and UTC realizations, anywhere on Earth where there is an internet connection. Mission control centres of low satellites with GPS receivers can run a Dancer process on the incoming data from the orbiting receiver, to introduce strong ties with other techniques such as Satellite Laser Ranging.

  10. The Effect of Companions on the SIM Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Turyshev, Slava G.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is a 10-m Michelson space-based optical interferometer designed for precision astrometry (4 microarcseconds, 3 microarcseconds/year) with better accuracy than before over a narrow field of view. One of the primary objectives of the SIM instrument is to determine accurately the directions to a grid of stars, together with their proper motions and parallax, improving a priori knowledge by nearly three orders of magnitude over Hipparcos and one order of magnitude over FAME's planned accuracy (Johnston, 2000). The instrument does not measure directly the angular separation between stars, but rather it measures the projection of each star's direction vector onto the interferometer baseline vector by measuring the pathlength delay of starlight as it passes through the two arms of the interferometer. The accuracy and stability of SIM's celestial reference frame is subject to degradation over the 5-year mission from the reflex motion induced by massive companions of the objects used to construct the celestial reference frame. The authors present the results of simulations that show the sensitivity of reference frame accuracy to companions as a function of mass and period. They assume that pre-launch ground surveys will eliminate all objects with RMS radial velocity greater than 10 m/s. They further assume that the standard astrometric parameters of position, parallax, and proper motion plus acceleration terms in right ascension and declination will be allowed to absorb reflex motion.

  11. On the errors and stability of reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanov, V. S.; Kurdubov, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    The distribution of systematic errors in the coordinates of 1217 extragalactic radio sources included in the latest version of the ICRF2 (International Celestial Reference Frame) reference catalog has been mapped for the first time by processing VLBI observations from international astrometric and geodetic programs spanning the period 1980-2012. These errors are shown to reach ±1.0 mas (milliarcseconds). However, for a sample of 752 sources observed more than 100 times, these errors do not exceed ±0.2 mas, suggesting that ICRF2 is inhomogeneous. In addition, the individual stability of dozens of extragalactic radio sources and ground-based stations included in the latest version of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame, ITRF2005, has been investigated. Significant linear trends and anomalous shifts reaching ±20 µas (microarcseconds) have been detected for many of the sources. Significant systematic shifts have also been found for some of the reference stations. The results obtained stimulate a search for new methods of analyzing VLBI observations and ways of their global adjustment that would provide greater homogeneity and stability of the ICRF and ITRF. This is needed both to increase the accuracy of determining the astrometric, geodetic, and geodynamic parameters derived from these observations and to facilitate their physical interpretation. The work has been performed with the QUASAR multifunction software package developed at the Institute of Applied Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

  12. Optical position meters analyzed in the noninertial reference frames

    SciTech Connect

    Tarabrin, Sergey P.; Seleznyov, Alexander A.

    2008-09-15

    In the framework of general relativity we develop a method for the analysis of the operation of the optical position meters in their photodetectors proper reference frames. These frames are noninertial in general due to the action of external fluctuative forces on meters test masses, including detectors. For comparison we also perform the calculations in the laboratory (globally inertial) reference frame and demonstrate that for certain optical schemes laboratory-based analysis results in unmeasurable quantities, in contrast to the detector-based analysis. We also calculate the response of the simplest optical meters to weak plane gravitational waves and fluctuative motions of their test masses. It is demonstrated that for the round-trip meter analysis in both the transverse-traceless (TT) and local Lorentz (LL) gauges produces equal results, while for the forward-trip meter corresponding results differ in accordance with different physical assumptions (e.g. procedure of clocks synchronization) implicitly underlying the construction of the TT and LL gauges.

  13. 32 GHz Celestial Reference Frame Survey for Dec. < -45 °

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, S.; Jacobs, C. S.; Phillips, C.; Sotuela, I.; García-Miró, C.

    2012-12-01

    We have been developing a celestial reference frame at 32 GHz using the 34-m Beam Wave Guide antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to complement the current IAU standard ICRF2 at S/X-band. However, the DSN VLBI network alone can only cover a limited part of the full sky, missing the declination range from -45 to -90 degrees. To extend the 32 GHz frame, we recently initiated a project to survey candidate sources in the southern sky using Canberra's DSS-34 antenna in conjunction with two elements of the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) that can observe at 32 GHz: the Mopra Radio Relescope and the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA).

  14. 32 GHz Celestial Reference Frame Survey for Dec < -45 deg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, S.; Phillips, C.; Sotuela, I.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; García-Miró, C.

    2012-03-01

    We have been developing a celestial reference frame at 32 GHz using the 34-m Beam Wave Guide antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to complement the current IAU standard ICRF2 at S/X-band. However, the DSN VLBI network alone can only cover a limited part of the full sky, missing the declination range from -45 to -90 degrees. To extend the 32 GHz frame, we recently initiated a project to survey candidate sources in the southern sky using Canberra's DSS-34 antenna in conjunction with two elements of the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) that can observe at 32 GHz: the Mopra Radio Relescope and the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA).

  15. On the transition towards slow manifold in shallow-water and 3D Euler equations in a rotating frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalov, A.

    1994-01-01

    The long-time, asymptotic state of rotating homogeneous shallow-water equations is investigated. Our analysis is based on long-time averaged rotating shallow-water equations describing interactions of large-scale, horizontal, two-dimensional motions with surface inertial-gravity waves field for a shallow, uniformly rotating fluid layer. These equations are obtained in two steps: first by introducing a Poincare/Kelvin linear propagator directly into classical shallow-water equations, then by averaging. The averaged equations describe interaction of wave fields with large-scale motions on time scales long compared to the time scale 1/f(sub o) introduced by rotation (f(sub o)/2-angular velocity of background rotation). The present analysis is similar to the one presented by Waleffe (1991) for 3D Euler equations in a rotating frame. However, since three-wave interactions in rotating shallow-water equations are forbidden, the final equations describing the asymptotic state are simplified considerably. Special emphasis is given to a new conservation law found in the asymptotic state and decoupling of the dynamics of the divergence free part of the velocity field. The possible rising of a decoupled dynamics in the asymptotic state is also investigated for homogeneous turbulence subjected to a background rotation. In our analysis we use long-time expansion, where the velocity field is decomposed into the 'slow manifold' part (the manifold which is unaffected by the linear 'rapid' effects of rotation or the inertial waves) and a formal 3D disturbance. We derive the physical space version of the long-time averaged equations and consider an invariant, basis-free derivation. This formulation can be used to generalize Waleffe's (1991) helical decomposition to viscous inhomogeneous flows (e.g. problems in cylindrical geometry with no-slip boundary conditions on the cylinder surface and homogeneous in the vertical direction).

  16. Stability study of realization of the celestial reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatskiv, Ya. S.; Bolotin, S. L.; Kur'yanova, A. N.

    2004-09-01

    We present a short overview of the activity of the IERS as well as the Main Astronomical Observatory (MAO) of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine for maintenance and extention of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). Special attention is given to the time stabilities of positions of radio sources (RS) and to the selection of a subset of RS to be used for maintenance of the ICRF. It is shown that seven RS qualified by the IERS as defining sources are unstable.

  17. Standardization of Observatories, Instruments and Reference Frames for Planetary Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Erard, S.; Le Sidaner, P.

    2015-10-01

    The recent developments on planetary science interoperability showed that a standardization of naming conventions was required for observatories (including ground based facilities and space mission), instruments (types and names) as well as reference frames used to describe planetary observations. A review of existing catalogs and naming for those entities is presented. We also report on the discussions that occurred within the IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance), IPDA (International Planetary Data Alliance) and VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access) working groups. A proposal for standard lists, possibly to be endorsed by IAU, is presented and discussed.

  18. Standardization of Observatories, Instruments and Reference Frames for Planetary Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Baptiste; Erard, Stéphane; Le Sidaner, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    The recent developments on planetary science interoperability showed that a standardization of naming conventions was required for observatories (including ground based facilities and space mission), instruments (types and names) as well as reference frames used to describe planetary observations. A review of existing catalogs and naming for those entities is presented. We also report on the discussions that occurred within the IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance), IPDA (International Planetary Data Alliance) and VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access) working groups. A proposal for standard lists, possibly to be endorsed by IAU, is presented and discussed.

  19. Distributions of Grain Boundary Normals in the Laboratory Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowinski, Krzysztof; Rohrer, Gregory S.

    2016-04-01

    Distributions of grain boundary normals with their components expressed in the laboratory reference frame are obtained for yttria and austenitic steel based on three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction data. The distributions exhibit various extrema that are attributed to the inaccuracy of the boundary surface reconstruction and to the discrete nature of the orientation data. We provide interpretation of the distributions with particular emphasis put on indicating the sources of these artifacts. Moreover, we verify the negligible impact of these issues on grain boundary plane and character distributions.

  20. Distributions of Grain Boundary Normals in the Laboratory Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowinski, Krzysztof; Rohrer, Gregory S.

    2016-06-01

    Distributions of grain boundary normals with their components expressed in the laboratory reference frame are obtained for yttria and austenitic steel based on three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction data. The distributions exhibit various extrema that are attributed to the inaccuracy of the boundary surface reconstruction and to the discrete nature of the orientation data. We provide interpretation of the distributions with particular emphasis put on indicating the sources of these artifacts. Moreover, we verify the negligible impact of these issues on grain boundary plane and character distributions.

  1. Inhibition within a Reference Frame during the Interpretation of Spatial Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Laura A.; Van Deman, Shannon R.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial terms such as "right" are potentially ambiguous because they can refer to different regions of space when defined by competing reference frames (e.g., my "right" within a relative reference frame versus an object's "right" within an intrinsic reference frame). In such situations, previous research has suggested that multiple reference…

  2. Building a 3d Reference Model for Canal Tunnel Surveying Using Sonar and Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisan, E.; Charbonnier, P.; Foucher, P.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Guillemin, S.; Koehl, M.

    2015-04-01

    Maintaining canal tunnels is not only a matter of cultural and historical preservation, but also a commercial necessity and a security issue. This contribution adresses the problem of building a full 3D reference model of a canal tunnel by merging SONAR (for underwater data recording) and LASER data (for the above-water parts). Although both scanning devices produce point clouds, their properties are rather different. In particular, SONAR data are very noisy and their processing raises several issues related to the device capacities, the acquisition setup and the tubular shape of the tunnel. The proposed methodology relies on a denoising step by meshing, followed by the registration of SONAR data with the geo-referenced LASER data. Since there is no overlap between point clouds, a 3-step procedure is proposed to robustly estimate the registration parameters. In this paper, we report a first experimental survey, which concerned the entrance of a canal tunnel. The obtained results are promising and the analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated fashion, in the limits of the involved technology.

  3. The Celestial Reference Frame at X/Ka-band: Status & Prospects for Improving the South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Alonso, J.; Clark, J. E.; Gamborino, L.; García-Miró, C.; Horiuchi, S.; Lobo, J.; Maddè, R.; Mercolino, M.; Naudet, C. J.; Snedeker, L. G.; Sotuela, I.; White, L. A.

    2012-10-01

    Deep space tracking and navigation are done in a quasi-inertial reference frame based upon the angular positions of distant active galactic nuclei (AGN).We discuss the construction of such a frame based on radio observations of AGN at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz). Compared to S/Xband frames such as the international standard ICRF2, X/Ka-band allows access to more compact source morphology and reduced core shift. Both these effects allow for a more well-defined and stable reference frame at X/Ka. Using sixty-seven 24-hour sessions with NASA's Deep Space Network, we detected over 482 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and declinations down to -45deg. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 µas level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mis-modelling, and limited southern geometry. We discuss our plans to address these errors with an emphasis on plans to use ESA's new 35-meter antenna in Malargüe, Argentina to greatly improve our southern hemisphere geometric coverage. We report successful fringe tests between ESA's 35-m antenna in Cebreros, Spain and the NASA 34-m in Robledo, Spain thereby validating the NASA-ESA interfaces and the portable VLBI recorder intended for use at Malargüe when that station is ready in the Fall of 2012. Allan variance tests on time scales of 1-1000 sec on the Cebreros-Robledo baseline were limited by tropospheric stability thus confirming that instrumental stability is not expected to be a limiting factor on these time scales once we go to Malargüe. In the next decade, we expect that ESA's optically based Gaia mission will produce a competitive frame. In anticipation of this development, we simulated a frame tie between our X/Ka frame and the Gaia frame. The simulation predicts a frame tie precision of 10-15 µas (1-sigma, per 3-D rotation component) with anticipated improvements in the radio reducing that to 5-10 µas per component by the time of Gaia's end of mission ca

  4. Spatial Reasoning With Multiple Intrinsic Frames of Reference

    PubMed Central

    Tamborello, Franklin P; Sun, Yanlong; Wang, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Establishing and updating spatial relationships between objects in the environment is vital to maintaining situation awareness and supporting many socio-spatial tasks. In a complex environment, people often need to utilize multiple reference systems that are intrinsic to different objects (intrinsic frame of reference, IFOR), but these IFORs may conflict with each other in one or more ways. Current spatial cognition theories do not adequately address how people handle multi-IFOR reasoning problems. Two experiments manipulated relative orientations of two task-relevant objects with intrinsic axes of orientation as well as their relative task salience. Response times (RTs) decreased with increasing salience of the targeted IFOR. In addition, RTs increased as a consequence of intrinsic orientation conflict, but not by amount of orientation difference. The results suggest that people encounter difficulties when they have to process two conflicting IFOR representations, and that they seem to prioritize processing of each IFOR by salience. PMID:21768066

  5. Galileo Terrestrial Reference Frame realization and beyond: the GGSP project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söhne, W.; Dach, R.; Springer, T.; Gendt, G.

    2009-04-01

    The GGSP prototype, a project funded by the 6th framework programme of the European Union and managed by the European GNSS Supervisory Authority (GSA), will be finished end of May this year. The main task of the GGSP prototype was the definition, realization and maintenance of the Galileo Terrestrial Reference Frame (GTRF) with the requirement to align the GTRF to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) within 3 cm (2 sigma) accuracy. With regard to the non-availability of Galileo signals in space the initialization and maintenance of the GTRF were realized with GPS observations only. Moreover, the GGSP prototype carried out orbit, clock and coordinate parameter estimation on a weekly basis, using a processing strategy known from the International GNSS Service (IGS). Beyond these activities, the consortium has been analysing the Galileo signals as transmitted by the two GIOVE spacecrafts. Since April 2008 the second test satellite GIOVE-B is in orbit while the first one, GIOVE-A, is transmitting the first Galileo signals for over three years now. A special feature of GIOVE-B is the onboard passive hydrogen maser (PHM). Known from terrestrial reference station, hydrogen masers are providing the highest short-term stability. It is expected that the PHM onboard GIOVE-B will show similar clock stability as terrestrial hydrogen masers. Using different sampling rates, the performance of the GIOVE-B onboard clock could be tested for different time intervals. We will use comparisons with onboard clocks of other GNSS as well as with clocks of terrestrial reference stations to illustrate the GIOVE-B clock behaviour. Moreover, some results of intersystem biases, between GPS and Galileo/GIOVE, will be presented.

  6. Reference-frame-independent quantum key distribution with source flaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can; Sun, Shi-Hai; Ma, Xiang-Chun; Tang, Guang-Zhao; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2015-10-01

    Compared with the traditional protocols of quantum key distribution (QKD), the reference-frame-independent (RFI)-QKD protocol has been generally proved to be very useful and practical, since its experimental implementation can be simplified without the alignment of a reference frame. In most RFI-QKD systems, the encoding states are always taken to be perfect, which, however, is not practical in realizations. In this paper, we consider the security of RFI QKD with source flaws based on the loss-tolerant method proposed by Tamaki et al. [Phys. Rev. A 90, 052314 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.052314]. As the six-state protocol can be realized with four states, we show that the RFI-QKD protocol can also be performed with only four encoding states instead of six encoding states in its standard version. Furthermore, the numerical simulation results show that the source flaws in the key-generation basis (Z basis) will reduce the key rate but are loss tolerant, while the ones in X and Y bases almost have no effect and the key rate remains almost the same even when they are very large. Hence, our method and results will have important significance in practical experiments, especially in earth-to-satellite or chip-to-chip quantum communications.

  7. Multiple 3D reference system analyses for Phobos grooves, a novel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simioni, Emanuele; Pajola, Maurizio; Massironi, Matteo; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    Grooves analysis has represented in the last decade a robust method for geomorphological study of small bodies, as is the case for asteroids 951 Gaspra (Veverka et al., 1994), 243 Ida (Belton et al., 1994), 433 Eros (Thomas et al., (2002), Buczkowski et al., 2008), 21 Lutetia (Massironi et al., 2011, *Besse et al., 2014*) and 4 Vesta (Buczkowski et al., 2*012). Hence, such source of information can be deeper used for a novel approach presented on Phobos with the aim of providing more hints on its harshly debated origin. Stereo-plots and cyclographs represent two methods, unified under the name of stereographic projections, commonly used to describe the statistic of the orientations (dip-angle and dip-direction) of different planes with respect to cardinal points and a reference horizontal plane (Bucher, 1944; Phillips, 1954; Ragan, 1985). However this reference system is ambiguous for any applications on small irregular bodies such as asteroids or comets since it does not permit to highlight systems of parallel anisotropies and to have an idea of their distribution with respect to a given surface feature (for example an impact crater). In this work we show a novel approach for stereographic projections focusing to a multi-reference system. The multi-reference system can be centered on a specific surface feature such as a crater and can alternatively use an absolute reference plane containing the center of figure of the body (to retrieve systems of parallel anisotropies) or a relative horizontal plane (to understand the distribution of the anisotropies with respect to the central feature). In this way we are able to well define the distribution of the grooves expected to be originated from a impact cratering event in a small body. Following this methodology, we have extracted 352 3D fracture planes from the attitudes of the grooves over the surface topography of Phobos and, for each plane, the local surface versor has been defined. Consequently, stereo-plots on

  8. Relating the Planetary Ephemerides and the Radio Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niell, A. E.; Newhall, X. X.; Preston, R. A.; Berge, G. L.; Muhleman, D. O.; Rudy, D. J.; Campbell, J. K.; Esposito, P. B.; Standish, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    The positions of Venus, Mars, and Jupiter were obtained in the VLBI radio reference frame by measuring the position of a satellite (natural or artificial) of each planet relative to an extragalactic source in the radio catalogue. From the results for Mars and Venus it is concluded that the offset in right ascension of the radio frame from the dynamical equinox defined in DE200 is 0.00 sec +/- 0.04 sec. The observations for Jupiter imply a correction to its position from DE200 of -0.18 sec +/- 0.04 sec in right ascension and -0.06 +/- 0.05 sec in declination on 1983 April 29. The right ascension of Jupiter relative to the inner planets has been measured independently using Doppler tracking data near Jupiter encounter from Pioneers 10 and 11 and from Voyagers 1 and 2 by tying the tracking station positions, through previous spacecraft missions, to the DE200 ephemerides of the inner planets. This technique yielded a correction to Jupiter's right ascension of -0.22 +/- 0.05 sec, in good agreement with the results from the direct radio measurements.

  9. Reframing Student Affairs Leadership: An Analysis of Organizational Frames of Reference and Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tull, Ashley; Freeman, Jerrid P.

    2011-01-01

    Examined in this study were the identified frames of reference and locus of control used by 478 student affairs administrators. Administrator responses were examined to identify frames of reference most commonly used and their preference order. Locus of control most commonly used and the relationship between frames of reference and locus of…

  10. Comparison of Realizations of the Terrestrial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C.; Macmillan, D.; Bolotin, S.; Le Bail, K.; Gordon, D.; Gipson, J.

    2015-01-01

    IGN and DGFI both generated realizations of the terrestrial reference frame under the auspices of the IERS from combination of the same space geodetic data. We compared the IGN and DGFI TRFs with a GSFC CALC/SOLVE TRF. WRMS position and velocity differences for the 40 most frequently observed sites were 2-3 mm and 0.3-0.4 mm/year. There was a scale difference of 0.39/0.09 ppb between the IGN/DGFI realizations and the GSFC solution. When we fixed positions and velocities to either the IGN or DGFI values in CALC/SOLVE solutions, the resulting EOP estimates were not significantly different from the estimates from a standard TRF solution.

  11. Galilei covariance and Einstein's equivalence principle in quantum reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, S. T.; Angelo, R. M.

    2015-02-01

    The covariance of the Schrödinger equation under Galilei boosts and the compatibility of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics with Einstein's equivalence principle have been constrained for so long to the existence of a superselection rule which would prevent a quantum particle from being found in superposition states of different masses. In an effort to avoid this expedient, and thus allow nonrelativistic quantum mechanics to account for unstable particles, recent works have suggested that the usual Galilean transformations are inconsistent with the nonrelativistic limit implied by the Lorentz transformation. Here we approach the issue in a fundamentally different way. Using a formalism of unitary transformations and employing quantum reference frames rather than immaterial coordinate systems, we show that the Schrödinger equation, although form variant, is fully compatible with the aforementioned principles of relativity.

  12. 32 GHz Celestial Reference Frame Survey for Dec < -45 deg.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shinji; Phillips, Chris; Stevens, Jamie; Jacobs, Christopher; Sotuela, Ioana; Garcia miro, Cristina

    2014-04-01

    (We resubmit this proposal to extend from the previous semester. The 24 hour blocks for ATCA and Mopra were granted in May 2012 but canceled because fringe test before the scheduled experiment failed although fringes were detected between Mopra and Tidbinbilla. During the last scheduled LBA session for this project we discovered ATCA/Mopra had an issue with frequency standard, which has now been resolved.) We propose to conduct a LBA survey of compact radio sources at 32 GHz near the south pole region. This is the first attempt to fill the gap in the existing 32 GHz catalogue establish by NASA Deep Space Network toward completing the full sky celestial reference frame at 32 GHz. The catalogue will be used for future spacecraft navigation by NASA and other space agencies as well as for radio astronomical observations with southern radio telescope arrays such as ATCA and LBA.

  13. 32 GHz Celestial Reference Frame Survey for Dec < -45 deg.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shinji; Phillips, Chris; Stevens, Jamie; Jacobs, Christopher; Sotuela, Ioana; Garcia miro, Cristina

    2013-04-01

    (We resubmit this proposal to extend from the previous semester. The 24 hour blocks for ATCA and Mopra were granted in May 2012 but canceled because fringe test before the scheduled experiment failed although fringes were detected between Mopra and Tidbinbilla. As it turned out ATCA had an issue with frequency standard, which has now been resolved.) We propose to conduct a LBA survey of compact radio sources at 32 GHz near the south pole region. This is the first attempt to fill the gap in the existing 32 GHz catalogue establish by NASA Deep Space Network toward completing the full sky celestial reference frame at 32 GHz. The catalogue will be used for future spacecraft navigation by NASA and other space agencies as well as for radio astronomical observations with southern radio telescope arrays such as ATCA and LBA.

  14. KS variables in rotating reference frame. Application to cometary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langner, K.; Breiter, S.

    2015-06-01

    The problem of Keplerian motion in the uniformly rotating reference frame has been solved in terms of the Kustaanheimo-Stiefel (KS) variables using canonical formalism. No recourse to the Cartesian variables or orbital elements has been required. The form of solution is well suited for the application as a part of symplectic integrator. The results show that the motion is actually the composition of four independent harmonic oscillations and of the rotation in two specific coordinate planes and their conjugate momenta planes. As an example of application, we use the KS symplectic integrator to study the motion of comet C/1997 J2 (Meunier-Dupuoy) under the action of Galactic tides. The comet is found to follow an orbit in commensurability with the Sun motion around the Galactic centre, but the perturbations are not qualified as a resonance.

  15. Lift-Off: Using Reference Imagery and Freehand Sketching to Create 3D Models in VR.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Bret; Keefe, Daniel F

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional modeling has long been regarded as an ideal application for virtual reality (VR), but current VR-based 3D modeling tools suffer from two problems that limit creativity and applicability: (1) the lack of control for freehand modeling, and (2) the difficulty of starting from scratch. To address these challenges, we present Lift-Off, an immersive 3D interface for creating complex models with a controlled, handcrafted style. Artists start outside of VR with 2D sketches, which are then imported and positioned in VR. Then, using a VR interface built on top of image processing algorithms, 2D curves within the sketches are selected interactively and "lifted" into space to create a 3D scaffolding for the model. Finally, artists sweep surfaces along these curves to create 3D models. Evaluations are presented for both long-term users and for novices who each created a 3D sailboat model from the same starting sketch. Qualitative results are positive, with the visual style of the resulting models of animals and other organic subjects as well as architectural models matching what is possible with traditional fine art media. In addition, quantitative data from logging features built into the software are used to characterize typical tool use and suggest areas for further refinement of the interface. PMID:26780801

  16. Accurate Realization of GPS Vertical Global Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elosegui, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project is to improve our current understanding of GPS error sources associated with estimates of radial velocities at global scales. An improvement in the accuracy of radial global velocities would have a very positive impact on a large number of geophysical studies of current general interest such as global sea-level and climate change, coastal hazards, glacial isostatic adjustment, atmospheric and oceanic loading, glaciology and ice mass variability, tectonic deformation and volcanic inflation, and geoid variability. A set of GPS error sources relevant to this project are those related to the combination of the positions and velocities of a set of globally distributed stations as determined &om the analysis of GPS data, including possible methods of combining and defining terrestrial reference frames. This is were our research activities during this reporting period have concentrated. During this reporting period, we have researched two topics: (1) The effect of errors on the GPS satellite antenna models (or lack thereof) on global GPS vertical position and velocity estimates; (2) The effect of reference W e definition and practice on estimates of the geocenter variations.

  17. The role of frames of reference in the development of responsiveness to shading information.

    PubMed

    Yonas, A; Kuskowski, M; Sternfels, S

    1979-06-01

    The use of frames of reference in interpreting shading information in pictures was studied with children from 3 to 8 years of age. After learning to discriminate tactually between a convexity and a concavity, the subjects were presented a photograph of the convexity and the concavity in which the only information for differential shape was provided by the relationship between the orientation of the shading on the shapes and the frames of reference. By changing the position of the subject's head, rotating the display, and changing the location of the source of illumination, the relevance of egocentric, environmental, and lighting-specified frames of reference was manipulated. Children in this age range were found to be sensitive to shading information for depth, both when that information was specified by only a single frame of reference and when all three frames of reference were relevant. Differences in the responsiveness to individual frames of reference were found: the egocentric (head-retina) frame of reference was most effective, followed by the environmental reference frame, and finally by the frame of reference based on the location of the light source in the space surrounding the photograph. Responsiveness to the environmental and lighting-based frames of reference increased with age, while responsiveness to the egocentric frame of reference was high for all age groups and did not increase with age. PMID:487887

  18. Realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame from VLBI Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.

    1997-12-01

    The International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) has now been realized with compact extragalactic objects whose radio-frequency positions are measured at the submilliarcsecond level by VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry). The ICRF replaces the FK5 as the defining realization of the celestial reference system as of 1 Jan 1998 according the resolution adopted by the IAU General Assembly in Kyoto. The ICRF catalog includes 212 defining sources, 294 candidate sources, and 102 other sources, the sum uniformly populating the celestial sphere. The majority are quasars with compact cores and many have optical counterparts. Because of the nature of the VLBI observations (precise angular measurements over a large portion of the sky in a 24-hr interval) and the absence of measurable real transverse motion of the objects, the ICRF can be constructed rigidly and with great precision using data of considerable temporal and geographic extent. The positions and uncertainties, typically <0.5 mas, represent the distillation of 1.6 million dual-frequency Mark III VLBI delay and delay rate observations acquired between August 1979 and July 1995 from various geodetic and astrometric observing programs using radio observatories on every continent. Following IAU resolutions, individual ICRF positions will evolve as more observations and improved models become available, but the orientation (axes) of the ICRF will be maintained by a statistical no-net-rotation condition between the catalog positions of successive realizations. Celestial positions are no longer referred to a system associated with the equator or the ecliptic. Further information about the ICRF can be found in Technical Note 23 of the International Earth Rotation Service.

  19. Approximation of a foreign object using x-rays, reference photographs and 3D reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Matt; Shanmugam, Mohan

    2013-12-01

    This case study describes how a 3D animation was created to approximate the depth and angle of a foreign object (metal bar) that had become embedded into a patient's head. A pre-operative CT scan was not available as the patient could not fit though the CT scanner, therefore a post surgical CT scan, x-ray and photographic images were used. A surface render was made of the skull and imported into Blender (a 3D animation application). The metal bar was not available, however images of a similar object that was retrieved from the scene by the ambulance crew were used to recreate a 3D model. The x-ray images were then imported into Blender and used as background images in order to align the skull reconstruction and metal bar at the correct depth/angle. A 3D animation was then created to fully illustrate the angle and depth of the iron bar in the skull. PMID:24206011

  20. Gaia Reference frame determination: the AVU/GSR pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchiato, Alberto; Abbas, Ummi; Becciani, Ugo; Bianchi, Luca; Bucciarelli, Beatrice; Crosta, Mariateresa; Lattanzi, Mario G.

    2015-08-01

    The main goal of the Gaia ESA mission is the production of a 5 parameters astrometric catalog - i.e. including positions, parallaxes and the two components of the proper motions - of about 1 billion stars of our Galaxy at an accuracy level going from the few micro-arcseconds of the brightest objects to some ~100 micro-arcseconds of the faintests. This goal will be reached by means of high-precision astrometric measurements conducted by a satellite sweeping continuously the celestial sphere during its 5-years mission.A fundamental step toward the realization of this catalog is the so-called ''Sphere Reconstruction'', which determines the celestial reference frame using the observations of a subset of up to 100 million ''primary stars'' among those observed by Gaia.From a mathematical point of view, these observations translate into a large number of equations, linearized with respect to the unknown parameters around known initial values, whose solution in the least-squares sense eventually provides the catalog with its errors, and determines the Gaia reference frame.This represents an extremely challenging problem because of the high accuracy of the observations and of the large number of unknowns involved. The former issue implies that an adequately accurate relativistic astrometric model has to be used, while the huge number of unknowns and observations puts this task at the forefront of the High-Performance Computing problems.These challenges, and the absolute character of the Gaia measurements and results, calls for a careful scientific validation of the sphere reconstruction, as it was done for the previous HIPPARCOS mission. For these reasons the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) decided to replicate the baseline process, named AGIS (Astrometric Global Iterative Solution) with another independent solution, named GSR (Global Sphere Reconstruction) which uses a different astrometric model and different algorithms for the system solution

  1. Towards an All-Sky 32 GHz Celestial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, S.; Phillips, C.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Sotuela, I.; García-Miró, C.

    2012-07-01

    We have been developing a celestial reference frame catalogue at 32 GHz using 34m Beam Wave Guide antennas of NASA Deep Space Network to complement the current IAU standard S/X-band ICRF2. However, the DSN VLBI network alone can only cover limited part of the full sky, missing in the declination range from -45 to -90 degree. To extend the 32 GHz catalogue, we recently initiated a project to survey candidate catalogue sources in the southern sky using Canberra DSS-34 antenna in conjunction with two elements of LBA that can observe at 32 GHz, the Mopra telescope and ATCA. We formed a list of 144 new 32 GHz candidate catalogue sources at -90 < Dec. < -45 deg. as target sources of this pilot survey. We selected those sources as expected to be reasonably strong and compact for our purpose, considering estimated flux densities at 32 GHz based on the results of the ATCA 20 GHz (AT20G) survey with 8.6 GHz flux density measurements, as well as characteristics of the X-band unresolved components based on the RFC2011c version catalogue sources. The candidate list of 144 sources includes 46 ICRF2 sources with 29 "Defining" objects. This would allow cross-checking with the S/X results of ICRF2. The ultimate goal of our project is to establish a reference source catalogue at 32 GHz for the south polar cap region, which has never been covered in existing catalogues at that frequency. The catalogue can be used for future space navigation as well as astronomical and geodetic observations with southern radio telescope arrays such as ATCA and LBA.

  2. Spatial reference frame of attention in a large outdoor environment

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuhong V.; Won, Bo-Yeong; Swallow, Khena M.; Mussack, Dominic M.

    2014-01-01

    A central question about spatial attention is whether it is referenced relative to the external environment or to the viewer. This question has received great interest in recent psychological and neuroscience research, with many but not all, finding evidence for a viewer-centered representation. However, these previous findings were confined to computer-based tasks that involved stationary viewers. Because natural search behaviors differ from computer-based tasks in viewer mobility and spatial scale, it is important to understand how spatial attention is coded in the natural environment. To this end, we created an outdoor visual search task in which participants searched a large (690 square feet), concrete, outdoor space to report which side of a coin on the ground faced up. They began search in the middle of the space and were free to move around. Attentional cuing by statistical learning was examined by placing the coin in one quadrant of the search space on 50% of the trials. As in computer-based tasks participants learned and used these regularities to guide search. However, cuing could be referenced to either the environment or the viewer. The spatial reference frame of attention shows greater flexibility in the natural environment than previously found in the lab. PMID:24842066

  3. GPS inferred geocentric reference frame for satellite positioning and navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malla, Rajendra P.; Wu, Sien-Chong

    1989-01-01

    Accurate geocentric three-dimensional positioning is of great importance for various geodetic and oceanographic applications. While relative positioning accuracy of a few centimeters has become a reality using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), the uncertainty in the offset of the adopted coordinate system origin from the geocenter is still believed to be of the order of one meter. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is capable of determining this offset to better than 10 cm, though, because of the limited number of satellites, this requires a long arc of data. The Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements provide a powerful alternative for an accurate determination of this origin offset in relatively short period of time. Two strategies are discussed, the first utilizes the precise relative positions predetermined by VLBI, whereas the second establishes a reference frame by holding only one of the tracking sites longitude fixed. Covariance analysis studies indicate that geocentric positioning to an accuracy of a few centimeters can be achieved with just one day of precise GPS pseudorange and carrier phase data.

  4. Spatial reference frame of attention in a large outdoor environment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhong V; Won, Bo-Yeong; Swallow, Khena M; Mussack, Dominic M

    2014-08-01

    A central question about spatial attention is whether it is referenced relative to the external environment or to the viewer. This question has received great interest in recent psychological and neuroscience research, with many but not all, finding evidence for a viewer-centered representation. However, these previous findings were confined to computer-based tasks that involved stationary viewers. Because natural search behaviors differ from computer-based tasks in viewer mobility and spatial scale, it is important to understand how spatial attention is coded in the natural environment. To this end, we created an outdoor visual search task in which participants searched a large (690 square ft), concrete, outdoor space to report which side of a coin on the ground faced up. They began search in the middle of the space and were free to move around. Attentional cuing by statistical learning was examined by placing the coin in 1 quadrant of the search space on 50% of the trials. As in computer-based tasks, participants learned and used these regularities to guide search. However, cuing could be referenced to either the environment or the viewer. The spatial reference frame of attention shows greater flexibility in the natural environment than previously found in the lab. PMID:24842066

  5. 3D-MAD: A Full Reference Stereoscopic Image Quality Estimator Based on Binocular Lightness and Contrast Perception.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chandler, Damon M

    2015-11-01

    Algorithms for a stereoscopic image quality assessment (IQA) aim to estimate the qualities of 3D images in a manner that agrees with human judgments. The modern stereoscopic IQA algorithms often apply 2D IQA algorithms on stereoscopic views, disparity maps, and/or cyclopean images, to yield an overall quality estimate based on the properties of the human visual system. This paper presents an extension of our previous 2D most apparent distortion (MAD) algorithm to a 3D version (3D-MAD) to evaluate 3D image quality. The 3D-MAD operates via two main stages, which estimate perceived quality degradation due to 1) distortion of the monocular views and 2) distortion of the cyclopean view. In the first stage, the conventional MAD algorithm is applied on the two monocular views, and then the combined binocular quality is estimated via a weighted sum of the two estimates, where the weights are determined based on a block-based contrast measure. In the second stage, intermediate maps corresponding to the lightness distance and the pixel-based contrast are generated based on a multipathway contrast gain-control model. Then, the cyclopean view quality is estimated by measuring the statistical-difference-based features obtained from the reference stereopair and the distorted stereopair, respectively. Finally, the estimates obtained from the two stages are combined to yield an overall quality score of the stereoscopic image. Tests on various 3D image quality databases demonstrate that our algorithm significantly improves upon many other state-of-the-art 2D/3D IQA algorithms. PMID:26186775

  6. Displacements and rotations of a body moving about an arbitrary axis in a global reference frame

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.

    1995-11-01

    Measurement of human joint motion frequently involves the use of markers to describe joint motion in a global reference frame. Results may be quite arbitrary if the reference frame is not properly chosen with respect to the joint`s rotational axis(es). In nature joint axes can exist at any orientation and location relative to an arbitrarily chosen global reference frame. An arbitrary axis is any axis that is not coincident with a reference coordinate. Calculations are made of the errors that result when joint motion occurs about an arbitrary axis in a global reference frame.

  7. Learning to Provide 3D Virtual Reference: A Library Science Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Megan; Purpur, Geraldine; Abbott, Lisa T.

    2009-01-01

    In spring semester 2009, two of the authors taught LIB 5020--Information Sources & Services to graduate library science students at Appalachian State University. The course covers information seeking patterns and provides an overview of reference services. The course is also designed to examine and evaluate library reference materials and other…

  8. Improved DORIS Reference Frame Solution from NASA GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank; Chinn, D. S.; Le Bail, K.; Zelensky, N. P.; Ray, R. D.; Beckley, B. D.; Beall, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    At GSFC, since 2008, we have been routinely processing data to DORIS and SLR satellites from 1993. A SINEX time series, based on processing of DORIS data from 1993 to 2008 (designated wd10) was included in the IDS combination for ITRF2008 (Le Bail et al., 2010; Valette et al., 2010). We have updated this series with the addition of new satellites Cryosat2 and Jason-2, and the new series (designated wd12) is routinely submitted to the IDS combination center for inclusion in the DORIS operational combination. In preparation for an eventual reprocessing of all the DORIS data for eventual inclusion in a new ITRF we are now updating our processing standards. As a first step, we update to the ITRF2008 reference frame as expressed through DPOD2008. In addition, we apply the GMF and GPT models for the troposphere, and we update the modeling for the change in pitch of SPOT-5 solar arrays after January 2008. Finally, we consider updated standards for static and time-variable gravity modeling. With this base series, we compute cumulative solution, expressed in ITRF2008, and examine the week-by-week station solution parameters, in particular scale, WRMS and Helmert transformation parameters. Finally we consider a joint solution with SLR, where the DORIS system is tied to SLR in two ways, first through the orbit computations using satellites tracked by both SLR and DORIS (e.g. TOPEX, Envisat, Jason-2, Cryosat2), and second through explicit ties at collocated sites. As one of the means of testing of these DORIS-only and SLR+DORIS solutions, we examine the vertical rates at sites in the vicinity of tide gauges.

  9. Form finding and analysis of extensible membranes attached to 2-D and 3-D frames intended for micro air vehicles via experimentally validated finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudaram, Yaakov Jack

    This work is concerned with a new method to apply consistent and known pretension to silicone rubber membranes intended for micro air vehicles as well as an understanding in the science of developed pre-tension in membranes constrained by 2- D and 3-D frames and structures. Pre-tension has a marked effect on the static and dynamic response of membrane wings and controls the overall deflections, as such control and measurement of the membrane pre-tension is important. Two different 2-D frame geometries were fabricated to evaluate the technique. For open-cell frames, the pretension was not uniform, whereas it was for closed-cell frames. Results show developed full-field stress and strain fields as a function of membrane attachment temperature and frame geometry along with experimental iterations to prove repeatability. The membranes can be stretched to a specific pretension according to the temperature at which it adheres to frames. Strain fields in membranes attached to 3-D frames at various temperatures are modeled through FEA utilizing Abaqus to be able to predict the developed membrane deformations, stresses, and strains. Rigid frames with various curvatures are built via appropriate molds and then adhered to silicone rubber membranes and elevated to various temperatures to achieve different pre-strains for experimental validation. Additional experiments are conducted for more complex frame geometries involving both convex and concave topologies embedded within frames. Results are then compared with the Abaqus outputs to validate the accuracy of the FEA model. Highly compliant wings have been used for MAV platforms, where the wing structure is determined by some combination of carbon fiber composites and a membrane skin, adhered in between the layers of composite material. Another new technique of attaching membranes firmly on wing structures is introduced, which involves the application of a technology known as corona treatment coupled with another method of

  10. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  11. Geodetic Reference System Transformations of 3d Archival Geospatial Data Using a Single SSC Terrasar-X Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilaki, D. I.; Stamos, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Many older maps were created using reference coordinate systems which are no longer available, either because no information to a datum was taken in the first place or the reference system is forgotten. In other cases the relationship between the map's coordinate system is not known with precision, meaning that its absolute error is much larger than its relative error. In this paper the georeferencing of medium-scale maps is computed using a single TerraSAR-X image. A single TerraSAR-X image has high geolocation accuracy but it has no 3D information. The map, however, provides the missing 3D information, and thus it is possible to compute the georeferencing of the map using the TerraSAR-X geolocation information, assembling the information of both sources to produce 3D points in the reference system of the TerraSAR-X image. Two methods based on this concept are proposed. The methods are tested with real world examples and the results are promising for further research.

  12. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  13. Spatial properties of non-retinotopic reference frames in human vision.

    PubMed

    Noory, Babak; Herzog, Michael H; Ogmen, Haluk

    2015-08-01

    Many visual attributes of a target stimulus are computed according to dynamic, non-retinotopic reference frames. For example, the motion trajectory of a reflector on a bicycle wheel is perceived as orbital, even though it is in fact cycloidal in retinal, as well as spatial coordinates. We cannot perceive the cycloidal motion because the linear motion of the bike is discounted for. In other words, the linear motion common to all bicycle components serves as a non-retinotopic reference frame, with respect to which the residual (orbital) motion of the reflector is computed. Very little is known about the underlying mechanisms involved in formation and operation of non-retinotopic reference frames. Here, we investigate spatial properties of non-retinotopic reference frames. We show that reference frames are not restricted within the boundaries of moving stimuli but extend over space. By using a variation of the Ternus-Pikler paradigm, we show that the spatial extent of a non-retinotopic reference frame is independent of the size of the inducing elements and the target position near the object boundary. While dynamic reference-frames interact with each other significantly, a static reference-frame has no effect on a dynamic one. The magnitude of interactions between two neighboring dynamic reference-frames increases as the distance between them reduces. Finally, our results indicate that the reference-frame strength is significantly attenuated if the locus of attention is shifted to the elements of the neighboring reference instead of the main reference. We suggest that these results can be conceptualized as reference frames that act and interact as fields. PMID:26049040

  14. Mathematical analysis of errors resulting from choice of reference frame coordinates in measuring human joint motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.

    1995-02-01

    Measurements of human joint motion frequently involve the use of opto-electronic and other motion analysis systems where some type of makers are used to establish joint motion within a global reference coordinate frame. Typically, this global reference coordinate frame is chosen to be most convenient for the person carrying out the experiment in which the joint motion is measured, and Euler angles are chosen as the measure of joint motion. Results, however, may be quite arbitrary and therefore rendered meaningless if the reference frame is not properly chosen with respect to the physical joint axis. In order to make a proper choice of coordinate axes in the reference frame, one must take into consideration both the location and the orientation of die physical joint axis relative to the reference frame`s axes. In nature, joint axes can exist at any orientation and location relative to an arbitrarily chosen global reference frame. An axis that is not properly aligned with the global reference frame is therefore called an arbitrary axis. We demonstrate that errors result when measurements and calculations are made in a global reference frame that is arbitrarily placed and oriented, with little regard for the physical axis. Slight offsets of global reference frame produce significant errors in recording rotations about the joint axis. We conclude that, in order to be able to reach valid conclusions from joint motion measurements, the reference frame with respect to which all are taken must be brought to the physical axis; furthermore, one of the reference axes must be aligned with the physical axis. Any other choice of reference axes will result in misleading an often erroneous results.

  15. Celestial Reference Frame at X/KA-Band (8.4/32 GHz) for Deep Space Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. E.; García-Miró, C.; Horiuchi, S.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Snedeker, L. G.; Sotuela, I.

    2012-10-01

    Deep space tracking and navigation are done in a quasi-inertial reference frame based upon the angular positions of distant active galactic nuclei (AGN). These objects, which are found at extreme distances characterized by median redshifts of z = 1, are ideal for reference frame definition because they exhibit no measurable parallax or proper motion. They are thought to be powered by super massive black holes whose gravitational energy drives galactic sized relativistic jets. These jets produce synchrotron emissions which are detectable by modern radio techniques such as Very Long baseline Interferometry (VLBI). We have constructed a reference frame based on sixty seven X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) VLBI observing sessions (2005 to present), each of ∼24 hours duration, using the intercontinental baselines of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN): Goldstone, California to Madrid, Spain and Canberra, Australia. We detected 482 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of 460 X/Ka sources in common with the international standard ICRF2 at S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) shows wRMS agreement of 180 μas in RA cos(dec) and 270 μas in Dec. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 μas level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mismodelling, and limited southern geometry. Compared to S/X-band frames (e.g. ICRF2 (Ma et al, 2009)), X/Ka-band allows access to more compact source morphology and reduced core shift. Both these improvements allow for a more well-defined and stable reference frame at X/Ka-band. In the next decade, the optically-based Gaia mission (Lindegren, 2008) may produce a frame with competitive precision. By accurately registering radio frames with Gaia, we could study wavelength dependent systematic errors. A simulated frame tie between our X/Ka radio frame and the Gaia optical frame predicts a frame tie precision of 10-15 μas (1-σ, per 3-D rotation component) with

  16. Geometric Cues, Reference Frames, and the Equivalence of Experienced-Aligned and Novel-Aligned Views in Human Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jonathan W.; Sjolund, Lori A.; Sturz, Bradley R.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial memories are often organized around reference frames, and environmental shape provides a salient cue to reference frame selection. To date, however, the environmental cues responsible for influencing reference frame selection remain relatively unknown. To connect research on reference frame selection with that on orientation via…

  17. Reynolds stress under a change of frame of reference.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y N; Durst, F

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, we study the characteristics of the Reynolds stress under a change of frame, as defined by the Euclidean group of transformation. We show that being subject to the dynamical processes induced from the mean Navier-Stokes equations, the invariance group of the fluctuating velocity and the Reynolds stress is no longer the Euclidean group of transformation, which is merely a kinematical aspect, but reduces to the extended Galilean group of transformation. As a consequence, in contrast to developing the constitutive equations for the Cauchy stress in continuum mechanics, wherein the principle of material frame-indifference is a guiding principle, the frame-dependent kinematical quantities, e.g., the mean spin tensor, may be allowed to play an effective role as the constitutive variable in turbulence modeling. PMID:11415004

  18. The Inertial Property of Approximately Inertial Frames of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chubykalo, Andrew E.; Espinoza, Augusto; Kosyakov, B. P.

    2011-01-01

    Is it possible to compare approximately inertial frames in the inertial property? If this is the case, the inertial property becomes a measurable quantity. We give a positive answer to this question, and discuss the general principle of design of devices for making the required measurements. This paper is intended for advanced undergraduate and…

  19. Conflict Management Styles Predicted by Managerial Frames of Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Epps, Pamela D.; Thompson, Bruce

    The measurement integrity of M. A. Rahim's Organizational Conflict Inventory (ROCI-II) and D. M. Roussel's Managerial Frames of Mind Survey (MFMS) was investigated, as was the relationship between scores on the two measures. Subjects were 369 managers from three types of organizations: (1) higher education; (2) not-for-profit public sector…

  20. Tracking down abstract linguistic meaning: neural correlates of spatial frame of reference ambiguities in language.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Gabriele; Haun, Daniel B M; Levinson, Stephen C

    2012-01-01

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigates a crucial parameter in spatial description, namely variants in the frame of reference chosen. Two frames of reference are available in European languages for the description of small-scale assemblages, namely the intrinsic (or object-oriented) frame and the relative (or egocentric) frame. We showed participants a sentence such as "the ball is in front of the man", ambiguous between the two frames, and then a picture of a scene with a ball and a man--participants had to respond by indicating whether the picture did or did not match the sentence. There were two blocks, in which we induced each frame of reference by feedback. Thus for the crucial test items, participants saw exactly the same sentence and the same picture but now from one perspective, now the other. Using this method, we were able to precisely pinpoint the pattern of neural activation associated with each linguistic interpretation of the ambiguity, while holding the perceptual stimuli constant. Increased brain activity in bilateral parahippocampal gyrus was associated with the intrinsic frame of reference whereas increased activity in the right superior frontal gyrus and in the parietal lobe was observed for the relative frame of reference. The study is among the few to show a distinctive pattern of neural activation for an abstract yet specific semantic parameter in language. It shows with special clarity the nature of the neural substrate supporting each frame of spatial reference. PMID:22363462

  1. Realization of ETRF2000 as a New Terrestrial Reference Frame in Republic of Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojevic, D.; Vasilic, V.

    2012-12-01

    The International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) is a joint service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and the International Astronomical Union (IAU), which provides the scientific community with the means for computing the transformation from the International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) to the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS). It further maintains the realizations of these systems by appropriate coordinate sets called "frames". The densification of terrestrial frame usually serves as official frame for positioning and navigation tasks within the territory of particular country. One of these densifications was recently performed in order to establish new reference frame for Republic of Serbia. The paper describes related activities resulting in ETRF2000 as a new Serbian terrestrial reference frame.

  2. Frames of reference utilized in the rehabilitation of individuals with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Henderson, S

    1999-02-01

    An occupational therapist's role with clients diagnosed with eating disorders, both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, has been described throughout the literature. However, the frames of reference and treatment approaches that occupational therapists implement have not been clearly established or validated. This paper outlines the symptomatology of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, and critically reviews the current literature concerning the frames of reference and treatment approaches used by occupational therapists when intervening with this population. The literature reviewed indicates that therapists are using a variety of frames of reference and treatment approaches. There appears to be an emphasis on the psychoanalytical and cognitive-behavioural frames of reference, although there is a lack of empirical evidence in regards to all frames of reference and treatment approaches. Reasons for the lack of current research with this population, and possible future areas of research are suggested. PMID:10462881

  3. Accuracy and Stability of a Terrestrial Reference Frame Realized from GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, B. J.; Bertiger, W.; Desai, S. D.; Harvey, N. E.; Sibois, A.; Weiss, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    We describe new realizations of the terrestrial reference frame (TRF) based exclusively on GPS data. One of the historical weaknesses of the GPS technique is determination of scale at the level necessary to support the most demanding applications of the TRF (e.g., sea-level change). This weakness is linked primarily to uncertainties in the the antenna phase variations (APV) of the GPS satellite transmitters, which are designed to support navigation rather than mm-level geodesy. Building on our prior work, we characterize the APV of the GPS satellite transmitters using GPS data collected by satellites in low-Earth orbit (LEO). LEO data offer a number of substantial advantages for characterizing the APV of the GPS satellites. The perspective afforded by GPS receivers in orbit is unmatched in terms of both spatial and temporal coverage. In addition, there is no troposphere signal to confound interpretation of the GPS data. More important, however, the scale (mean height) of the precise orbit solutions is well determined (cm-level) from dynamical constraints. This scale knowledge translates into improved scale for the TRF, assuming the APV of the reference LEO antenna is well understood. For our latest APV solutions, the GPS antenna on the TOPEX/POSEIDON mission (1992-2005) serves as our reference LEO antenna. A choke-ring on a 4-m boom extending above the spacecraft, the antenna configuration is very favorable from the standpoint of phase multipath. In addition, the intrinsic APV of the choke-ring antenna assembly was measured before launch at the JPL test range. Since T/P observed only the legacy (Block II/IIA) GPS satellites, we use data from the GRACE mission (2002-pr.) to transfer the T/P reference to the replenishment (Block IIR) GPS satellites. We apply the resulting APV models in weekly network solutions in order to realize the terrestrial reference frame from GPS alone. Current comparisons of our GPS-based TRF (1999-2012) with ITRF2008 yield 0.2 mm

  4. 2H and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance study of Cs3D(SO4)2 single crystals in laboratory and rotating frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Kim, Sun Ha; Jeong, Se-Young

    2013-01-01

    To understand the physical properties of Cs3D(SO4)2 single crystals, in which deuterium replaces hydrogen, the temperature dependence of the NMR spectrum and the spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory frame, T1, and in the rotating frame, T1ρ, for 2H and 133Cs are investigated using Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Our results for the 2H and 133Cs relaxation times provide no evidence of a phase transition. The strong temperature dependence of the 2H resonance lines is associated with deformation of the H(SO4)2- tetrahedra. Further, T1 and T1ρ for the 2H and 133Cs nuclei are governed by different mechanisms, which we discuss in terms of fast and slow motion.

  5. Second-Order Inelastic Dynamic Analysis of 3D Semi-Rigid Steel Frames Under Earthquake Loads with Three Components

    SciTech Connect

    Ozakgul, Kadir

    2008-07-08

    In this study, it has been presented an algorithm for second-order elastoplastic dynamic time-history analysis of three dimensional frames that have steel members with semirigid joints. The proposed analysis accounts for material, geometric and connection nonlinearities. Material nonlinearity have been modeled by the Ramberg-Osgood relation. While the geometric nonlinearity caused by axial force has been described by the use of the geometric stiffness matrix, the nonlinearity caused by the interaction between the axial force and bending moment has been also described by the use of the stability functions. The independent hardening model has been used to describe the nonlinear behaviour of semi-rigid connections. Dynamic equation of motion has been solved by Newmark's constant acceleration method in time history domain.

  6. Allocentric and egocentric reference frames in the processing of three-dimensional haptic space

    PubMed Central

    Kappers, Astrid M. L.

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of our study is to gain insight into the reference frames involved in three-dimensional haptic spatial processing. Previous research has shown that two-dimensional haptic spatial processing is prone to large systematic deviations. A weighted average model that identifies the origin of the systematic error patterns in the biasing influence of an egocentric reference frame on the allocentric reference frame was proposed as an explanation of the results. The basis of the egocentric reference frame was linked either to the hand or to the body. In the present study participants had to construct a field of parallel bars that could be oriented in three dimensions. First, systematic error patterns were found also in this three-dimensional haptic parallelity task. Second, among the different models tested for their accuracy in explaining the error patterns, the Hand-centered weighted average model proved to most closely resemble the data. A participant-specific weighting factor determined the biasing influence of the hand-centered egocentric reference frame. A shift from the allocentric towards the egocentric frame of reference of approximately 20% was observed. These results support the hypothesis that haptic spatial processing is a product of the interplay of diverse, but synergistically operating frames of reference. PMID:18368397

  7. Frames of Reference in Spatial Memories Acquired From Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mou, Weimin; Zhang, Kan; McNamara, Timothy P.

    2004-01-01

    Four experiments examined reference systems in spatial memories acquired from language. Participants read narratives that located 4 objects in canonical (front, back, left, right) or noncanonical (left front, right front, left back, right back) positions around them. Participants' focus of attention was first set on each of the 4 objects, and then…

  8. Resolving Ambiguity from Competing Spatial Frames of Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Codd, Judith; Bialystok, Ellen

    A 2-part investigation was conducted to examine the ways children resolve the inherent ambiguity of spatial descriptions in terms of cues indicated by the three constituents of spatial propositions: predicate, referent, and relatum. In the first study, it was hypothesized that certain objects, structural markers, and definite articles accompanying…

  9. Reference Frames and Coordinate Transformations for Advanced Post-Newtonian Theory of the Lunar Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yi; Kopeikin, S.

    2009-05-01

    We construct a set of reference frames for description of the orbital and rotational motion of the Moon. We use a scalar-tensor theory of gravity depending on two parameters of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism and utilize the concepts of the relativistic resolutions on reference frames adopted by the International Astronomical Union in 2000. We assume that the solar system is isolated and space-time is asymptotically flat. The primary reference frame has the origin at the solar-system barycentric (SSB) frame and spatial axes are going to infinity. The SSB frame is not rotating with respect to distant quasars. The secondary reference frame has the origin at the Earth-Moon barycenter (EMB). The EMB frame is local with its spatial axes spreading out to the orbits of Venus and Mars and not rotating dynamically in the sense that both the Coriolis and centripetal forces acting on a free-falling test particle, moving with respect to the EMB frame, are excluded. Two other local frames, the geocentric (GRS) and the selenocentric (SRS) frames, have the origin at the center of mass of the Earth and Moon respectively. They are both introduced in order to connect the coordinate description of the lunar motion, observer on the Earth, and a retro-reflector on the Moon to the observable quantities which are the proper time and the laser-ranging distance. We solve the gravity field equations and find the metric tensor and the scalar field in all frames. We also derive the post-Newtonian coordinate transformations between the frames and analyze the residual gauge freedom imposed by the scalar-tensor theory on the coordinate transformations.

  10. Full-Frame Reference for Test Photo of Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This pair of views shows how little of the full image frame was taken up by the Moon in test images taken Sept. 8, 2005, by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The Mars-bound camera imaged Earth's Moon from a distance of about 10 million kilometers (6 million miles) away -- 26 times the distance between Earth and the Moon -- as part of an activity to test and calibrate the camera. The images are very significant because they show that the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft and this camera can properly operate together to collect very high-resolution images of Mars. The target must move through the camera's telescope view in just the right direction and speed to acquire a proper image. The day's test images also demonstrate that the focus mechanism works properly with the telescope to produce sharp images.

    Out of the 20,000-pixel-by-6,000-pixel full frame, the Moon's diameter is about 340 pixels, if the full Moon could be seen. The illuminated crescent is about 60 pixels wide, and the resolution is about 10 kilometers (6 miles) per pixel. At Mars, the entire image region will be filled with high-resolution information.

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, launched on Aug. 12, 2005, is on course to reach Mars on March 10, 2006. After gradually adjusting the shape of its orbit for half a year, it will begin its primary science phase in November 2006. From the mission's planned science orbit about 300 kilometers (186 miles) above the surface of Mars, the high resolution camera will be able to discern features as small as one meter or yard across.

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, for the NASA Science Mission Directorate. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, prime contractor for the project, built the spacecraft. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo

  11. Four-Year-Olds Use a Mixture of Spatial Reference Frames.

    PubMed

    Negen, James; Nardini, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Keeping track of unseen objects is an important spatial skill. In order to do this, people must situate the object in terms of different frames of reference, including body position (egocentric frame of reference), landmarks in the surrounding environment (extrinsic frame reference), or other attached features (intrinsic frame of reference). Nardini et al. hid a toy in one of 12 cups in front of children, turned the array when they were not looking, and then asked them to point to the cup with the toy. This forced children to use the intrinsic frame (information about the array of cups) to locate the hidden toy. Three-year-olds made systematic errors by using the wrong frame of reference, 4-year-olds were at chance, and only 5- and 6-year-olds were successful. Can we better understand the developmental change that takes place at four years? This paper uses a modelling approach to re-examine the data and distinguish three possible strategies that could lead to the previous results at four years: (1) Children were choosing cups randomly, (2) Children were pointing between the egocentric/extrinsic-cued location and the correct target, and (3) Children were pointing near the egocentric/extrinsic-cued location on some trials and near the target on the rest. Results heavily favor the last possibility: 4-year-olds were not just guessing or trying to combine the available frames of reference. They were using the intrinsic frame on some trials, but not doing so consistently. These insights suggest that accounts of improving spatial performance at 4 years need to explain why there is a mixture of responses. Further application of the selected model also suggests that children become both more reliant on the correct frame and more accurate with any chosen frame as they mature. PMID:26133990

  12. From Laboratory to Practice: Neglected Issues in Implementing Frame-of-Reference Rate-Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauenstein, Neil M. A.; Foti, Roseanne J.

    1989-01-01

    Data collected at two law enforcement agencies were used to address three specific issues concerning frame-of-reference rater training: (1) prototype-anchored rating system; (2) sensitivity and threshold analyses to identify idiosyncratic raters; and (3) areas of performance where supervisors and subordinates were likely to disagree on frame of…

  13. Report of the panel on earth rotation and reference frames, section 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.; Dickman, Steven R.; Eubanks, Marshall T.; Feissel, Martine; Herring, Thomas A.; Mueller, Ivan I.; Rosen, Richard D.; Schutz, Robert E.; Wahr, John M.; Wilson, Charles R.

    1991-01-01

    Objectives and requirements for Earth rotation and reference frame studies in the 1990s are discussed. The objectives are to observe and understand interactions of air and water with the rotational dynamics of the Earth, the effects of the Earth's crust and mantle on the dynamics and excitation of Earth rotation variations over time scales of hours to centuries, and the effects of the Earth's core on the rotational dynamics and the excitation of Earth rotation variations over time scales of a year or longer. Another objective is to establish, refine and maintain terrestrial and celestrial reference frames. Requirements include improvements in observations and analysis, improvements in celestial and terrestrial reference frames and reference frame connections, and improved observations of crustal motion and mass redistribution on the Earth.

  14. Children's Location of a Point in Space: Effects of Dimensionality and Salience of Frame of Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Deborah A.; Hennessey, Steve, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Examines the effects of dimensionality and salience of frame of reference on children's location of a point in space. Subjects were eight boys and eight girls from each of first, second and third grades. (CM)

  15. Reference frames, gauge transformations and gravitomagnetism in the post-Newtonian theory of the lunar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yi; Kopeikin, Sergei

    2010-01-01

    We construct a set of reference frames for description of the orbital and rotational motion of the Moon. We use a scalar-tensor theory of gravity depending on two parameters of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism and utilize the concepts of the relativistic resolutions on reference frames adopted by the International Astronomical Union in 2000. We assume that the solar system is isolated and space-time is asymptotically flat. The primary reference frame has the origin at the solar-system barycenter (SSB) and spatial axes are going to infinity. The SSB frame is not rotating with respect to distant quasars. The secondary reference frame has the origin at the Earth-Moon barycenter (EMB). The EMB frame is local with its spatial axes spreading out to the orbits of Venus and Mars and not rotating dynamically in the sense that both the Coriolis and centripetal forces acting on a free-falling test particle, moving with respect to the EMB frame, are excluded. Two other local frames, the geocentric (GRF) and the selenocentric (SRF) frames, have the origin at the center of mass of the Earth and Moon respectively. They are both introduced in order to connect the coordinate description of the lunar motion, observer on the Earth, and a retro-reflector on the Moon to the observable quantities which are the proper time and the laser-ranging distance. We solve the gravity field equations and find the metric tensor and the scalar field in all frames. We also derive the post-Newtonian coordinate transformations between the frames and analyze the residual gauge freedom of the solutions of the field equations. We discuss the gravitomagnetic effects in the barycentric equations of the motion of the Moon and argue that they are beyond the current accuracy of lunar laser ranging (LLR) observations.

  16. Looking for systematic error in scale from terrestrial reference frames derived from DORIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Pascal; Soudarin, L.; Lemoine, F. G.

    2005-01-01

    The long-term stability of the scale of Terrestrial Reference Frames is directly linked with station height determination and is critical for several scientific studies, such as global mean sea level rise or ocean circulation with consequences on global warming studies. In recent International Terrestrial Reference Frame solutions, the DORIS technique was not sonsidered able to provide any useful information on scale. We have analyzed three different DORIS time series of coordinates performed independently using different software packages.

  17. Establishing a celestial VLBI reference frame. 1: Searching for VLBI sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. A.; Morabito, D. D.; Williams, J. G.; Slade, M. A.; Harris, A. W.; Finley, S. G.; Skjerve, L. J.; Tanida, L.; Spitzmesser, D. J.; Johnson, B.

    1978-01-01

    The Deep Space Network is currently engaged in establishing a new high-accuracy VLBI celestial reference frame. The present status of the task of finding suitable celestial radio sources for constructing this reference frame is discussed. To date, 564 VLBI sources were detected, with 166 of these lying within 10 deg of the ecliptic plane. The variation of the sky distribution of these sources with source strength is examined.

  18. The task of the relativistic oscillator in a non-inertial frame of reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepelkin, E. E.; Sadovnikov, B. I.; Inozemtseva, N. G.

    2016-09-01

    The relativistic theory is one of the most difficult parts of theoretical physics to understand by high school students and scientists alike. In this paper, the important aspects from this theory are considered. The case of the non-inertial reference frame in which the space–time interval was presented for the Lorentz-like transformations, and the condition by which the transition to the inertial reference frame takes place, is shown.

  19. Reference coordinate systems and frames: Concepts and realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Ivan I.

    1985-06-01

    Geodynamics has become the subject of intensive international research during the last decade, involving plate tectonics, both on the intra-plate and inter-plate scale, i.e., the study of crustal movements, and the study of earth rotation and of other dynamic phenomena such as the tides. Interrelated are efforts improving our knowledge of the gravity and magnetic fields of the earth. A common requirement for all these investigations is the necessity for a well-defined reference coordinate system (or systems) to which all relevant observations can be referred and in which theories or models for the dynamic behavior of the earth can be formulated. In view of the unprecedented progress in the ability of geodetic observational systems to measure crustal movements and the rotation of the earth, as well as in theory and model development, there is a great need for the theoretical definition, practical realization, and international acceptance of suitable coordinate system(s) to facilitate such work. This article deals with certain aspects of the establishment and maintenance of such a coordinate system.

  20. The role of perspective taking in how children connect reference frames when explaining astronomical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Julia D.; Bower, Corinne A.; Liben, Lynn S.

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the role of perspective-taking skills in how children explain spatially complex astronomical phenomena. Explaining many astronomical phenomena, especially those studied in elementary and middle school, requires shifting between an Earth-based description of the phenomena and a space-based reference frame. We studied 7- to 9-year-old children (N = 15) to (a) develop a method for capturing how children make connections between reference frames and to (b) explore connections between perspective-taking skill and the nature of children's explanations. Children's explanations for the apparent motion of the Sun and stars and for seasonal changes in constellations were coded for accuracy of explanation, connection between frames of reference, and use of gesture. Children with higher spatial perspective-taking skills made more explicit connections between reference frames and used certain gesture-types more frequently, although this pattern was evident for only some phenomena. Findings suggest that children - particularly those with lower perspective-taking skills - may need additional support in learning to explicitly connect reference frames in astronomy. Understanding spatial thinking among children who successfully made explicit connections between reference frames in their explanations could be a starting point for future instruction in this domain.

  1. A Unified Global Reference Frame of Vertical Crustal Movements by Satellite Laser Ranging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinhui; Wang, Ren; Sun, Fuping; Wang, Jinling

    2016-01-01

    Crustal movement is one of the main factors influencing the change of the Earth system, especially in its vertical direction, which affects people's daily life through the frequent occurrence of earthquakes, geological disasters, and so on. In order to get a better study and application of the vertical crustal movement,as well as its changes, the foundation and prerequisite areto devise and establish its reference frame; especially, a unified global reference frame is required. Since SLR (satellite laser ranging) is one of the most accurate space techniques for monitoring geocentric motion and can directly measure the ground station's geocentric coordinates and velocities relative to the centre of the Earth's mass, we proposed to take the vertical velocity of the SLR technique in the ITRF2008 framework as the reference frame of vertical crustal motion, which we defined as the SLR vertical reference frame (SVRF). The systematic bias between other velocity fields and the SVRF was resolved by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) and VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) velocity observations, and the unity of other velocity fields and SVRF was realized,as well. The results show that it is feasible and suitable to take the SVRF as a reference frame, which has both geophysical meanings and geodetic observations, so we recommend taking the SLR vertical velocity under ITRF2008 as the global reference frame of vertical crustal movement. PMID:26867197

  2. Frames of reference that address the impact of physical environments on occupational performance.

    PubMed

    Whedon, Caren A.

    2000-01-01

    A frame of reference is the mechanism for linking theory to practice. It may be the most practical and important tool a professional uses. As the practice of occupational therapy has evolved, so has the basis of information, or theories, on which it is grounded. From the theories, models have been developed that typically view occupational performance as a transaction between the person, occupation and environment. Occupational therapy practitioners use many frames of reference. Not all of them address all areas of occupational performance identified within this overarching model. Often the area of the environment does not receive attention. To do their jobs thoroughly, occupational therapy practitioners need frames of reference for thinking about the environment. The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore frames of reference that may be useful to occupational therapy practitioners when they are taking into consideration the physical environment. Included are the following frames of reference: ergonomics, industrial hygiene, environmental psychology, accessibility and feng shui. A case study is presented to illustrate the unique perspective of each frame of reference. PMID:12441533

  3. A Unified Global Reference Frame of Vertical Crustal Movements by Satellite Laser Ranging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinhui; Wang, Ren; Sun, Fuping; Wang, Jinling

    2016-01-01

    Crustal movement is one of the main factors influencing the change of the Earth system, especially in its vertical direction, which affects people’s daily life through the frequent occurrence of earthquakes, geological disasters, and so on. In order to get a better study and application of the vertical crustal movement, as well as its changes, the foundation and prerequisite areto devise and establish its reference frame; especially, a unified global reference frame is required. Since SLR (satellite laser ranging) is one of the most accurate space techniques for monitoring geocentric motion and can directly measure the ground station’s geocentric coordinates and velocities relative to the centre of the Earth’s mass, we proposed to take the vertical velocity of the SLR technique in the ITRF2008 framework as the reference frame of vertical crustal motion, which we defined as the SLR vertical reference frame (SVRF). The systematic bias between other velocity fields and the SVRF was resolved by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) and VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) velocity observations, and the unity of other velocity fields and SVRF was realized, as well. The results show that it is feasible and suitable to take the SVRF as a reference frame, which has both geophysical meanings and geodetic observations, so we recommend taking the SLR vertical velocity under ITRF2008 as the global reference frame of vertical crustal movement. PMID:26867197

  4. An EPID based method for performing high accuracy calibration between an optical external marker tracking device and the LINAC reference frame

    PubMed Central

    Grelewicz, Zachary; Kang, Hyejoo; Wiersma, Rodney D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: With the increasing use of external 3D optical tracking cameras to guide modern radiation therapy procedures, it has become vitally important to have an accurate camera to linear accelerator (LINAC) reference frame calibration. To eliminate errors present in current calibration procedures based on the manual hand alignment of a device using the light field crosshairs and in room guidance lasers, a semiautomated quantitative calibration approach requiring only use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was developed. Methods: A phantom comprised of seven highly IR reflective plastic BBs was placed on the LINAC treatment couch and imaged with both a 3D stereoscopic IR imager and the on board megavoltage (MV) EPID imager. Having knowledge of the optically determined 3D positions and projected EPID images of the BBs, simulated annealing was used to optimize the location of the BBs in the LINAC frame using four different optimization functions. Singular value decomposition was then used to calculate the transformation matrix between the camera and LINAC reference frames. Results were then compared to a traditional camera calibration method for overall accuracy. Results: Using modeled data, the simulated annealing process was able to determine the actual locations of the BBs with a RMSE of 0.23 mm. Using projection images acquired with an MV imager, the process was able to determine locations of BBs within .26 mm. The results depend on the choice of optimization function. Conclusions: Results show that the method can be used to provide highly accurate spatial registration between an external 3D imaging reference frame and the LINAC frame. The experimental MV imager results, while not as precise as the simulated results, exceed 1 mm accuracy and the current accepted AAPM TG-142 standard of ≤2 mm positioning accuracy. PMID:22559649

  5. Accurate Realization of GPS Vertical Global Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elosegui, Pedro

    2004-01-01

    The few millimeter per year level accuracy of radial global velocity estimates with the Global Positioning System (GPS) is at least an order of magnitude poorer than the accuracy of horizontal global motions. An improvement in the accuracy of radial global velocities would have a very positive impact on a number of geophysical studies of current general interest such as global sea-level and climate change, coastal hazards, glacial isostatic adjustment, atmospheric and oceanic loading, glaciology and ice mass variability, tectonic deformation and volcanic inflation, and geoid variability. The goal of this project is to improve our current understanding of GPS error sources associated with estimates of radial velocities at global scales. GPS error sources relevant to this project can be classified in two broad categories: (1) those related to the analysis of the GPS phase observable, and (2) those related to the combination of the positions and velocities of a set of globally distributed stations as determined from the analysis of GPS data important aspect in the first category include the effect on vertical rate estimates due to standard analysis choices, such as orbit modeling, network geometry, ambiguity resolution, as well as errors in models (or simply the lack of models) for clocks, multipath, phase-center variations, atmosphere, and solid-Earth tides. The second category includes the possible methods of combining and defining terrestrial reference flames for determining vertical velocities in a global scale. The latter has been the subject of our research activities during this reporting period.

  6. Visual Experience Determines the Use of External Reference Frames in Joint Action Control

    PubMed Central

    Dolk, Thomas; Liepelt, Roman; Prinz, Wolfgang; Fiehler, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Vision plays a crucial role in human interaction by facilitating the coordination of one's own actions with those of others in space and time. While previous findings have demonstrated that vision determines the default use of reference frames, little is known about the role of visual experience in coding action-space during joint action. Here, we tested if and how visual experience influences the use of reference frames in joint action control. Dyads of congenitally-blind, blindfolded-sighted, and seeing individuals took part in an auditory version of the social Simon task, which required each participant to respond to one of two sounds presented to the left or right of both participants. To disentangle the contribution of external—agent-based and response-based—reference frames during joint action, participants performed the task with their respective response (right) hands uncrossed or crossed over one another. Although the location of the auditory stimulus was completely task-irrelevant, participants responded overall faster when the stimulus location spatially corresponded to the required response side than when they were spatially non-corresponding: a phenomenon known as the social Simon effect (SSE). In sighted participants, the SSE occurred irrespective of whether hands were crossed or uncrossed, suggesting the use of external, response-based reference frames. Congenitally-blind participants also showed an SSE, but only with uncrossed hands. We argue that congenitally-blind people use both agent-based and response-based reference frames resulting in conflicting spatial information when hands are crossed and, thus, canceling out the SSE. These results imply that joint action control functions on the basis of external reference frames independent of the presence or (transient/permanent) absence of vision. However, the type of external reference frames used for organizing motor control in joint action seems to be determined by visual experience. PMID

  7. Flexible Reference Frames for Grasp Planning in Human Parietofrontal Cortex(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Leoné, Frank T M; Monaco, Simona; Henriques, Denise Y P; Toni, Ivan; Medendorp, W Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Reaching to a location in space is supported by a cortical network that operates in a variety of reference frames. Computational models and recent fMRI evidence suggest that this diversity originates from neuronal populations dynamically shifting between reference frames as a function of task demands and sensory modality. In this human fMRI study, we extend this framework to nonmanipulative grasping movements, an action that depends on multiple properties of a target, not only its spatial location. By presenting targets visually or somaesthetically, and by manipulating gaze direction, we investigate how information about a target is encoded in gaze- and body-centered reference frames in dorsomedial and dorsolateral grasping-related circuits. Data were analyzed using a novel multivariate approach that combines classification and cross-classification measures to explicitly aggregate evidence in favor of and against the presence of gaze- and body-centered reference frames. We used this approach to determine whether reference frames are differentially recruited depending on the availability of sensory information, and where in the cortical networks there is common coding across modalities. Only in the left anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) was coding of the grasping target modality dependent: predominantly gaze-centered for visual targets and body-centered for somaesthetic targets. Left superior parieto-occipital cortex consistently coded targets for grasping in a gaze-centered reference frame. Left anterior precuneus and premotor areas operated in a modality-independent, body-centered frame. These findings reveal how dorsolateral grasping area aIPS could play a role in the transition between modality-independent gaze-centered spatial maps and body-centered motor areas. PMID:26464989

  8. Interaction between allocentric and egocentric reference frames in deaf and hearing populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Tan, Xinyi; Shen, Lu; Wang, Aijun; Geng, Shuang; Chen, Qi

    2014-02-01

    Spatial position of an object can be represented in the human brain based on two types of reference frames: allocentric and egocentric. The perception/action hypothesis of the ventral/dorsal visual stream proposed that allocentric reference frame codes object positions relative to another object/background subserving conscious perception of the external world while egocentric reference frame codes object positions relative to the observer's body/body parts subserving goal-directed actions towards the objects. In three experiments of the present study, by asking congenitally deaf participants and hearing controls to perform allocentric and egocentric judgment tasks on the same stimulus set and by using the spatial congruency effect between allocentric and egocentric positions of the same target object to indicate the extent of influences between the two frames, we aimed to investigate whether the two frames and the potential interaction between them are altered after early deafness. Our results suggested that deaf participants' responses were significantly slower in the egocentric tasks as compared to hearing controls while the two groups showed comparable task performance in the allocentric tasks, indicating that egocentric reference frame was impaired after early deafness. Moreover, the pattern of interaction between the two frames was different between deaf and hearing groups: irrelevant egocentric positions caused more interference to allocentric processing than vice versa in the hearing group while the two frames caused equivalent interference to each other in the deaf group. Further control experiments suggested that the above effects were not caused by the impaired sense of balance in the congenitally deaf participants (via open-loop pointing test), and was independent of whether the speed of allocentric and egocentric processing was equivalent or not in the hearing group. PMID:24361477

  9. A spatial reference frame model of Beijing based on spatial cognitive experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu

    2006-10-01

    Orientation relation in the spatial relation is very important in GIS. People can obtain orientation information by making use of map reading and the cognition of the surrounding environment, and then create the spatial reference frame. City is a kind of special spatial environment, a person with life experiences has some spatial knowledge about the city where he or she lives in. Based on the spatial knowledge of the city environment, people can position, navigate and understand the meaning embodied in the environment correctly. Beijing as a real geographic space, its layout is very special and can form a kind of new spatial reference frame. Based on the characteristics of the layout of Beijing city, this paper will introduce a new spatial reference frame of Beijing and use two psychological experiments to validate its cognitive plausibility.

  10. Influences of indigenous language on spatial frames of reference in Aboriginal English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds-Wathen, Cris

    2014-06-01

    The Aboriginal English spoken by Indigenous children in remote communities in the Northern Territory of Australia is influenced by the home languages spoken by themselves and their families. This affects uses of spatial terms used in mathematics such as `in front' and `behind.' Speakers of the endangered Indigenous Australian language Iwaidja use the intrinsic frame of reference in contexts where speakers of Standard Australian English use the relative frame of reference. Children speaking Aboriginal English show patterns of use that parallel the Iwaidja contexts. This paper presents detailed examples of spatial descriptions in Iwaidja and Aboriginal English that demonstrate the parallel patterns of use. The data comes from a study that investigated how an understanding of spatial frame of reference in Iwaidja could assist teaching mathematics to Indigenous language-speaking students. Implications for teaching mathematics are explored for teachers without previous experience in a remote Indigenous community.

  11. Effects of adopting new precession, nutation and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S. Y.; Mueller, I. I.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of adopting definitive precession and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame was investigated. It is noted that the effect on polar motion is a diurnal periodic term with an amplitude increasing linearly in time whole on UT1 it is a linear term: general principles are given to determine the effects of small rotations of the frame of a conventional inertial reference system (CIS) on the frame of the conventional terrestrial reference system (CTS); seven CTS options are presented, one of which is necessary to accommodate such rotation. Accommodating possible future changes in the astronomical nutation is discussed. The effects of differences which may exist between the various CTS's and CIS's on Earth rotation parameters (ERP) and how these differences can be determined are examined. It is shown that the CTS differences can be determined from observations made at the same site. The CIS differences by comparing the ERP's are determined by the different techniques during the same time period.

  12. Experimental demonstration of genuine multipartite quantum nonlocality without shared reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhao; Zhang, Chao; Huang, Yun-Feng; Liu, Bi-Heng; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-03-01

    Multipartite quantum nonlocality is an important diagnostic tool and resource for both researches in fundamental quantum mechanics and applications in quantum information protocols. Shared reference frames among all parties are usually required for experimentally observing quantum nonlocality, which is not possible in many circumstances. Previous results have shown violations of bipartite Bell inequalities with approaching unit probability, without shared reference frames. Here we experimentally demonstrate genuine multipartite quantum nonlocality without shared reference frames, using the Svetlichny inequality. A significant violation probability of 0.58 is observed with a high-fidelity three-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. Furthermore, when there is one shared axis among all the parties, which is the usual case in fiber-optic or earth-satellite links, the experimental results demonstrate the genuine three-partite nonlocality with certainty. Our experiment will be helpful for applications in multipartite quantum communication protocols.

  13. Terrestrial and Celestial Reference Frame Realization with Highly Elliptical Orbit - The ESA STE-QUEST Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svehla, Drazen; Rothacher, Markus; Hugentobler, Urs; Nothnagel, Axel; Willis, Pascal; Biancale, Richard; Ziebart, Marek; Appleby, Graham; Schuh, Harald; Ádám, József; Iess, Luciano; Cacciapuoti, Luigi

    2014-05-01

    The Space-Time Explorer and QUantum Equivalence Principle Space Test (STE-QUEST) is a Medium Class fundamental physics mission pre-selected for the M3 slot of the ESA Cosmic Vision Programme to test Einstein's Equivalence Principle using atom interferometry and the general and special theory of relativity. Two secondary mission objectives are related to space geodesy: terrestrial and celestial reference frame of the Earth and relativistic geodesy aiming at the realization of unified reference frame for positioning, time, and temporal gravity. The highly elliptical orbit of the STE-QUEST satellite can be used for terrestrial reference frame realization by means of on board GNSS, SLR and VLBI radio source (STE-QUEST metrology link tracked by VLBI antenna - compatible with VLBI2010). By upgrading the on board GNSS receiver for DORIS tracking, the STE-QUEST mission will be similar to the GRASP mission proposal from JPL. Due to the highly elliptical orbit of STE-QUEST (apogee

  14. Gaia reference frame amid quasar variability and proper motion patterns in the data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachchan, R. K.; Hobbs, D.; Lindegren, L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Gaia's very accurate astrometric measurements will allow the optical realisation of the International Celestial Reference System to be improved by a few orders of magnitude. Several sets of quasars are used to define a kinematically stable non-rotating reference frame with the barycentre of the solar system as its origin. Gaia will also observe a large number of galaxies. Although they are not point-like, it may be possible to determine accurate positions and proper motions for some of their compact bright features. Aims: The optical stability of the quasars is critical, and we investigate how accurately the reference frame can be recovered. Various proper motion patterns are also present in the data, the best known is caused by the acceleration of the solar system barycentre, presumably, towards the Galactic centre. We review some other less well-known effects that are not part of standard astrometric models. Methods: We modelled quasars and galaxies using realistic sky distributions, magnitudes, and redshifts. Position variability was introduced using a Markov chain model. The reference frame was determined using the algorithm developed for the Gaia mission, which also determines the acceleration of the solar system. We also tested a method for measuring the velocity of the solar system barycentre in a cosmological frame. Results: We simulated the recovery of the reference frame and the acceleration of the solar system and conclude that they are not significantly disturbed by quasar variability, which is statistically averaged. However, the effect of a non-uniform sky distribution of the quasars can result in a correlation between the parameters describing the spin components of the reference frame and the acceleration components, which degrades the solution. Our results suggest that an attempt should be made to astrometrically determine the redshift-dependent apparent drift of galaxies that is due to our velocity relative to the cosmic microwave

  15. Gaia reference frame amid quasar variability and proper motion patterns in the data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachchan, R. K.; Hobbs, D.; Lindegren, L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Gaia's very accurate astrometric measurements will allow the optical realisation of the International Celestial Reference System to be improved by a few orders of magnitude. Several sets of quasars are used to define a kinematically stable non-rotating reference frame with the barycentre of the solar system as its origin. Gaia will also observe a large number of galaxies. Although they are not point-like, it may be possible to determine accurate positions and proper motions for some of their compact bright features. Aims: The optical stability of the quasars is critical, and we investigate how accurately the reference frame can be recovered. Various proper motion patterns are also present in the data, the best known is caused by the acceleration of the solar system barycentre, presumably, towards the Galactic centre. We review some other less well-known effects that are not part of standard astrometric models. Methods: We modelled quasars and galaxies using realistic sky distributions, magnitudes, and redshifts. Position variability was introduced using a Markov chain model. The reference frame was determined using the algorithm developed for the Gaia mission, which also determines the acceleration of the solar system. We also tested a method for measuring the velocity of the solar system barycentre in a cosmological frame. Results: We simulated the recovery of the reference frame and the acceleration of the solar system and conclude that they are not significantly disturbed by quasar variability, which is statistically averaged. However, the effect of a non-uniform sky distribution of the quasars can result in a correlation between the parameters describing the spin components of the reference frame and the acceleration components, which degrades the solution. Our results suggest that an attempt should be made to astrometrically determine the redshift-dependent apparent drift of galaxies that is due to our velocity relative to the cosmic microwave

  16. Quantum mechanics in noninertial reference frames: Relativistic accelerations and fictitious forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klink, W. H.; Wickramasekara, S.

    2016-06-01

    One-particle systems in relativistically accelerating reference frames can be associated with a class of unitary representations of the group of arbitrary coordinate transformations, an extension of the Wigner-Bargmann definition of particles as the physical realization of unitary irreducible representations of the Poincaré group. Representations of the group of arbitrary coordinate transformations become necessary to define unitary operators implementing relativistic acceleration transformations in quantum theory because, unlike in the Galilean case, the relativistic acceleration transformations do not themselves form a group. The momentum operators that follow from these representations show how the fictitious forces in noninertial reference frames are generated in quantum theory.

  17. On the dynamics of Armbruster Guckenheimer Kim galactic potential in a rotating reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmandouh, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we are interested in studying some dynamics aspects for the Armbruster Guckenheimer Kim galactic potential in a rotating reference frame. We introduce a non-integrability condition for this problem using Painlevé analysis. The equilibrium positions are given and their stability is studied. Furthermore, we prove the force resulting from the rotation of the reference frame can be used to stabilize the unstable maximum equilibrium positions. The periodic solutions near the equilibrium positions are constructed by applying Lyapunov method. The permitted region of motion is determined.

  18. A First Look at Terrestrial Reference Frame ITRF2013G Computed with Gipsy Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heflin, M. B.; Abbondanza, C.; Chin, M.; Gross, R. S.; Parker, J. W.; Wu, X.

    2014-12-01

    The ITRF2013 data set includes new sinex files from each of the four techniques DORIS, GPS, SLR, and VLBI. These files benefit from modeling upgrades implemented for reprocessing. In addition, five extra years of measurements have been acquired since 2008. We are developing GIPSY software tools to reduce the time and labor necessary to build the global reference frame. Automation is used to remove outliers and detect breaks before combining the files from each technique. All four techniques and ties are then combined to build the reference frame. We are specifically interested in the simplest configurations of sites and ties which can deliver long term accuracy at a sustainable cost.

  19. Interpretation versus Reference Framing: Assimilation and Contrast Effects in the Organizational Domain.

    PubMed

    Stapel; Koomen

    1998-11-01

    We examined conditions under which contextually activated information affects strategic decision-making and found that the subjective framing of organizational issues may be affected by variables other than semantic manipulation. Context information may be used as an interpretation frame (and lead to assimilation) or as a reference frame (and lead to contrast). Whether context information instigates assimilative interpretation or contrastive comparison processes may depend on the level of categorical context-target similarity. This is demonstrated in three experiments in which participants read an unambiguous business threat or opportunity scenario prior to judging an ambiguous, strategic issue. Findings are discussed in the light of previous judgment and decision-making studies of framing and context effects. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9831519

  20. First Report of the Stable North America Reference Frame (SNARF) Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, G.; Bennett, R. A.; Calais, E.; Herring, T. A.; Larson, K. M.; Miller, M. M.; Sella, G.; Snay, R. A.; Tamisiea, M. E.

    2004-05-01

    We report on the first SNARF Workshop funded by NSF EarthScope, held on Jan 27, 2004. The initial SNARF Working Group membership was approved by the UNAVCO Board and is charged with producing a standard reference frame (for studies in North America) and specifying standard procedures to realize such a frame to meet the needs of EarthScope and the UNAVCO community. SNARF is an official IAG working group under the North America Reference Frame (NAREF) sub-commission. There is also a public service element to these activities in that one objective is for SNARF to become part of the definition of the legal reference frame used in the USA and Canada (NAD83), a natural spin-off demanded by society's increasingly sophisticated needs following on the heels of scientific progress. Through the first workshop, the SNARF WG has already begun to address the pressing needs for a North America-fixed reference frame that is stable at the sub-millimeter level, and what is involved in defining a frame with such stability. Velocity solutions from GPS networks covering the North America-Pacific plate boundary (including the Plate Boundary Observatory under construction) are most naturally expressed with respect to the stable interiors of either the North America or Pacific plates. As well as providing a common frame by which to compare results from different analysis groups, such a system makes it easier to interpret the data in terms of where the total budget of relative plate motion is accomodated, and how deep plate boundary dynamics penetrate into the plate interior. Defining a stable frame at the sub-millimeter level requires adequate characterization of kinematics at that level across a sufficiently broad expanse of what may be termed the "plate interior," which deforms due to GIA and other mantle processes, coupled with lithospheric heterogeneity. A dynamically defined velocity datum (as opposed to a purely kinematic choice) is preferable to add interpretive value to site

  1. Maintenance of the Geodetic Reference Frame in the Global Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oria, A.; Brodsky, B. L.; Labrecque, J.; Miller, J. J.; Moreau, M.; Pearlman, M.; Nelson, R.

    2007-12-01

    In the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of the satellite coordinates and the underlying World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 84) reference frame are derived from observables such as pseudorandom noise (PRN) signals, and carrier phase, which are referenced to on-board atomic clocks. Systematic errors exist in both the estimated satellite coordinates and the reference frame. The reference frame utilizes external inputs in the form of International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) coordinates and constrains the results to be compatible with the ITRF coordinates for a set of global reference stations. The ITRF is, in turn, obtained from the combined analysis of GPS, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), and Doppler Orbitography and Radio-positioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) data. The current realization of the reference frame could be described as circular in that an independent method of external verification is currently not available. To ensure the continued successful operation of the GPS it is necessary to have the capability of analyzing systematic errors by an independent means from current radiometric observables and data from foreign sources. In practice, accuracy of the standards used for measurement should be better than the expected, required operational measurement accuracy by a factor of ten to ensure that the desired requirement is met. Currently, the accuracy of both the ITRF and the WGS 84 is estimated to be on the order of 1 to 2 parts per billion, leading to expected drifts of 0.6 to 1.2 cm per year. The experience of the last three decades has indicated an approximate improvement by a factor of ten per decade. Therefore, while current accuracy of the ITRF and WGS 84 reference frames marginally meets civilian and military requirements, it is very likely that, within the lifetime of GPS III, the accuracy of the reference frames will be unable to meet the anticipated requirements. This report examines

  2. How coordinate and categorical spatial relations combine with egocentric and allocentric reference frames in a motor task: effects of delay and stimuli characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ruotolo, Francesco; van der Ham, Ineke; Postma, Albert; Ruggiero, Gennaro; Iachini, Tina

    2015-05-01

    This study explores how people represent spatial information in order to accomplish a visuo-motor task. To this aim we combined two fundamental components of the human visuo-spatial system: egocentric and allocentric frames of reference and coordinate and categorical spatial relations. Specifically, participants learned the position of three objects and then had to judge the distance (coordinate information) and the relation (categorical information) of a target object with respect to themselves (egocentric frame) or with respect to another object (allocentric frame). They gave spatial judgments by reaching and touching the exact position or the side previously occupied by the target object. The possible influence of stimuli characteristics (3D objects vs. 2D images) and delay between learning phase and testing phase (1.5 vs. 5s) was also assessed. Results showed an advantage of egocentric coordinate judgments over the allocentric coordinate ones independently from the kind of stimuli used and the temporal parameters of the response, whereas egocentric categorical judgments were more accurate than allocentric categorical ones only with 3D stimuli and when an immediate response was requested. This pattern of data is discussed in the light of the "perception-action" model by Milner and Goodale [13] and of neuroimaging evidence about frames of reference and spatial relations. PMID:25698602

  3. Myths, Misconceptions, and Misunderstandings: A Different Spin on Coriolis--Applying Frame of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses misconceptions surrounding the Coriolis force and describes how it should be presented as a function within inertial and noninertial frames of reference. Not only does this demonstrate the nature of science as it strives to best interpret the natural world (and presents alternative explanations), but it offers a rich…

  4. The Second Realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame by Very Long Baseline Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fey, A. L.; Gordon, D.; Jacobs, C. S.; Ma, C.; Gaume, R. A.; Arias, E. F.; Bianco, G.; Boboltz, D. A.; Böckmann, S.; Bolotin, S.; Charlot, P.; Collioud, A.; Engelhardt, G.; Gipson, J.; Gontier, A.-M.; Heinkelmann, R.; Kurdubov, S.; Lambert, S.; Lytvyn, S.; MacMillan, D. S.; Malkin, Z.; Nothnagel, A.; Ojha, R.; Skurikhina, E.; Sokolova, J.; Souchay, J.; Sovers, O. J.; Tesmer, V.; Titov, O.; Wang, G.; Zharov, V.

    2015-08-01

    We present the second realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2) at radio wavelengths using nearly 30 years of Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations. ICRF2 contains precise positions of 3414 compact radio astronomical objects and has a positional noise floor of ∼40 μas and a directional stability of the frame axes of ∼10 μas. A set of 295 new “defining” sources was selected on the basis of positional stability and the lack of extensive intrinsic source structure. The positional stability of these 295 defining sources and their more uniform sky distribution eliminates the two greatest weaknesses of the first realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF1). Alignment of ICRF2 with the International Celestial Reference System was made using 138 positionally stable sources common to both ICRF2 and ICRF1. The resulting ICRF2 was adopted by the International Astronomical Union as the new fundamental celestial reference frame, replacing ICRF1 as of 2010 January 1.

  5. Quantum mechanics in non-inertial reference frames: Time-dependent rotations and loop prolongations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klink, W. H.; Wickramasekara, S.

    2013-09-01

    This is the fourth in a series of papers on developing a formulation of quantum mechanics in non-inertial reference frames. This formulation is grounded in a class of unitary cocycle representations of what we have called the Galilean line group, the generalization of the Galilei group to include transformations amongst non-inertial reference frames. These representations show that in quantum mechanics, just as the case in classical mechanics, the transformations to accelerating reference frames give rise to fictitious forces. In previous work, we have shown that there exist representations of the Galilean line group that uphold the non-relativistic equivalence principle as well as representations that violate the equivalence principle. In these previous studies, the focus was on linear accelerations. In this paper, we undertake an extension of the formulation to include rotational accelerations. We show that the incorporation of rotational accelerations requires a class of loop prolongations of the Galilean line group and their unitary cocycle representations. We recover the centrifugal and Coriolis force effects from these loop representations. Loops are more general than groups in that their multiplication law need not be associative. Hence, our broad theoretical claim is that a Galilean quantum theory that holds in arbitrary non-inertial reference frames requires going beyond groups and group representations, the well-established framework for implementing symmetry transformations in quantum mechanics.

  6. The Effects of Frame of Reference on Responses to Questions about Sexual Assault Victimization and Perpetration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Antonia; Parkhill, Michele R.; Koss, Mary P.

    2005-01-01

    Self-reports of sexual assault are affected by a variety of factors including the number of questions, question phrasing, and context. Participants (307 women, 166 men) were randomly assigned to one of two forms of a questionnaire. One form had the tactics used to obtain forced sex as the initial frame of reference, whereas the other form had the…

  7. Aligning Body and World: Stable Reference Frames Improve Young Children's Search for Hidden Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Lynn K.; Samuelson, Larissa K.; Spencer, John P.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated how young children's increasingly flexible use of spatial reference frames enables accurate search for hidden objects by using a task that 3-year-olds have been shown to perform with great accuracy and 2-year-olds have been shown to perform inaccurately. Children watched as an object was rolled down a ramp, behind a panel…

  8. Spatial Mental Representations Derived from Survey and Route Descriptions: When Individuals Prefer Extrinsic Frame of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meneghetti, Chiara; Pazzaglia, Francesca; De Beni, Rossana

    2011-01-01

    The present research investigates the role of individual differences in preference for adopting extrinsic frame of reference (EFR) in ability to represent mentally spatial information learned through survey and route descriptions. A sample of 191 participants (100 females and 91 males) was categorized as four groups with high (H-EFR), medium-high…

  9. Ipsilateral wrist-ankle movements in the sagittal plane encoded in extrinsic reference frame.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Tetsuro; Ishida, Yuki; Obu, Takashi; Crawshaw, Larry; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2013-04-01

    When performing oscillatory movements of two joints in the sagittal plane, there is a directional constraint for performing such movements. Previous studies could not distinguish whether the directional constraint reflected movement direction encoded in the extrinsic (outside the body) reference frame or in the intrinsic (the participants' torso/head) reference frame since participants performed coordinated movements in a sitting position where the torso/head was stationary relative to the external world. In order to discern the reference frame in the present study, participants performed paced oscillatory movements of the ipsilateral wrist and ankle in the sagittal plane in a standing position so that the torso/head moved relative to the external world. The coordinated movements were performed in one of two modes of coordination, moving the hand upward concomitant with either ankle plantarflexion or ankle dorsiflexion. The same directional mode relative to extrinsic space was more stable and accurate as compared with the opposite directional mode. When forearm position was changed from the pronated position to the supinated position, similar results were obtained, indicating that the results were independent of a particular coupling of muscles. These findings suggest that the directional constraint on ipsilateral joints movements in the sagittal plane reflects movement direction encoded in the extrinsic reference frame. PMID:23507257

  10. Does Changing the Reference Frame Affect Infant Categorization of the Spatial Relation BETWEEN?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Paul C.; Doran, Matthew M.; Papafragou, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Past research has shown that variation in the target objects depicting a given spatial relation disrupts the formation of a category representation for that relation. In the current research, we asked whether changing the orientation of the referent frame depicting the spatial relation would also disrupt the formation of a category representation…

  11. Operationalization of a Frame of Reference for Studying Organizational Culture in Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Larry G.

    A frame of reference for studying culture in middle schools was developed. Items for the Middle School Description Survey (MSDS), which was designed to test elements of the ideal middle school culture, were created based on middle school advocacy literature. The items were conceptually categorized according to E. H. Schein's (1985) cultural…

  12. Sometimes Losing Your Self in Space: Children's and Adults' Spontaneous Use of Multiple Spatial Reference Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surtees, Andrew D. R.; Noordzij, Matthijs L.; Apperly, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments tested 6- to 11-year-old children's and college students' use of different frames of reference when making judgments about descriptions of social and nonsocial scenes. In Experiment 1, when social and nonsocial scenes were mixed, both children and students (N = 144) showed spontaneous sensitivity to the intrinsic and the relative…

  13. Status Consistency of the Projected Frames of Reference of Rural Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelham, John T.

    The specific research objective of this paper was to make racial comparisons on the consistency dimension of the projected frames of reference of adolescent males from the rural South. Data were obtained from a population of high school sophomores in 3 Texas and 2 Georgia counties. Complete data were available for 223 white and 192 Negro males.…

  14. The Period of a Swinging Rod in an Oscillating Frame of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biezeveld, Hubert

    2012-01-01

    It was obvious long ago that for mechanical behavior a gravitational field and an accelerating frame of reference are equivalent. Or in other words: it is impossible to decide whether you are in an accelerating elevator or in a closed room on a planet with a different value of "g". In the first section of this article I will describe a simple…

  15. Differential Developmental Trajectories for Egocentric, Environmental and Intrinsic Frames of Reference in Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardini, Marko; Burgess, Neil; Breckenridge, Kate; Atkinson, Janette

    2006-01-01

    We studied the development of spatial frames of reference in children aged 3-6 years, who retrieved hidden toys from an array of identical containers bordered by landmarks under four conditions. By moving the child and/or the array between presentation and test, we varied the consistency of the hidden toy with (1) the body, and (2) the testing…

  16. Recovery of a geocentric reference frame using the present-day GPS system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malla, Rajendra P.; Wu, Sien-Chong

    1990-01-01

    A geocentric reference frame adopts the center of mass of the earth as the origin of the coordinate axes. The center of mass of the earth is the natural and unambiguous origin of a geocentric satellite dynamical system. But in practice a kinematically obtained terrestrial reference frame may assume an origin other than the geocenter. The establishment of a geocentric reference frame, to which all relevant observations and results can be referred and in which geodynamic theories or models for the dynamic behavior of earth can be formulated, requires the ability to accurately recover a given coordinate frame origin offset from the geocenter. GPS measurements, because of their abundance and broad distribution, provide a powerful tool to obtain this origin offset in a short period of time. Two effective strategies have been devised. Data from the First Central And South America (Casa Uno) geodynamics experiment has been studied, in order to demonstrate the ability of recovering the geocenter location with present day GPS satellites and receivers.

  17. On multi-timescale variability of temperature in China in modulated annual cycle reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Cheng; Wu, Zhaohua; Fu, Congbin; Zhou, Tianjun

    2010-09-01

    The traditional anomaly (TA) reference frame and its corresponding anomaly for a given data span changes with the extension of data length. In this study, the modulated annual cycle (MAC), instead of the widely used climatological mean annual cycle, is used as an alternative reference frame for computing climate anomalies to study the multi-timescale variability of surface air temperature (SAT) in China based on homogenized daily data from 1952 to 2004. The Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) method is used to separate daily SAT into a high frequency component, a MAC component, an interannual component, and a decadal-to-trend component. The results show that the EEMD method can reflect historical events reasonably well, indicating its adaptive and temporally local characteristics. It is shown that MAC is a temporally local reference frame and will not be altered over a particular time span by an extension of data length, thereby making it easier for physical interpretation. In the MAC reference frame, the low frequency component is found more suitable for studying the interannual to longer timescale variability (ILV) than a 13-month window running mean, which does not exclude the annual cycle. It is also better than other traditional versions (annual or summer or winter mean) of ILV, which contains a portion of the annual cycle. The analysis reveals that the variability of the annual cycle could be as large as the magnitude of interannual variability. The possible physical causes of different timescale variability of SAT in China are further discussed.

  18. The Role of Perspective Taking in How Children Connect Reference Frames When Explaining Astronomical Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Julia D.; Bower, Corinne A.; Liben, Lynn S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the role of perspective-taking skills in how children explain spatially complex astronomical phenomena. Explaining many astronomical phenomena, especially those studied in elementary and middle school, requires shifting between an Earth-based description of the phenomena and a space-based reference frame. We studied 7- to…

  19. Location memory biases reveal the challenges of coordinating visual and kinesthetic reference frames

    PubMed Central

    Simmering, Vanessa R.; Peterson, Clayton; Darling, Warren; Spencer, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Five experiments explored the influence of visual and kinesthetic/proprioceptive reference frames on location memory. Experiments 1 and 2 compared visual and kinesthetic reference frames in a memory task using visually-specified locations and a visually-guided response. When the environment was visible, results replicated previous findings of biases away from the midline symmetry axis of the task space, with stability for targets aligned with this axis. When the environment was not visible, results showed some evidence of bias away from a kinesthetically-specified midline (trunk anterior–posterior [a–p] axis), but there was little evidence of stability when targets were aligned with body midline. This lack of stability may reflect the challenges of coordinating visual and kinesthetic information in the absence of an environmental reference frame. Thus, Experiments 3–5 examined kinesthetic guidance of hand movement to kinesthetically-defined targets. Performance in these experiments was generally accurate with no evidence of consistent biases away from the trunk a–p axis. We discuss these results in the context of the challenges of coordinating reference frames within versus between multiple sensori-motor systems. PMID:17703284

  20. Layout Geometry in the Selection of Intrinsic Frames of Reference from Multiple Viewpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mou, Weimin; Zhao, Mintao; McNamara, Timothy P.

    2007-01-01

    Four experiments investigated the roles of layout geometry in the selection of intrinsic frames of reference in spatial memory. Participants learned the locations of objects in a room from 2 or 3 viewing perspectives. One view corresponded to the axis of bilateral symmetry of the layout, and the other view(s) was (were) nonorthogonal to the axis…

  1. Human Information and Argument Retrieval: Language Correlates and Attitudinal Frame of Reference; Rhetorical Invention: Attitudinally Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirde, Edward G.

    An act of rhetoric has attitudinal significance; that is, a part of rhetoric involves persuasion. Further, attitudinal frames of reference relate to and result from the retrieval of stored information (memory, etc.) and the generation of arguments. By studying the relative strength that subjects use in arguing an "issue-concept," the subjects'…

  2. The Reciprocal Internal/External Frame of Reference Model Using Grades and Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Möller, Jens; Zimmermann, Friederike; Köller, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Background: The reciprocal I/E model (RI/EM) combines the internal/external frame of reference model (I/EM) with the reciprocal effects model (REM). The RI/EM extends the I/EM longitudinally and the REM across domains. The model predicts that, within domains, mathematics and verbal achievement (VACH) and academic self-concept have positive effects…

  3. The NKG2008 GPS campaign - final transformation results and a new common Nordic reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkli, P.; Lidberg, M.; Jivall, L.; Nørbech, T.; Tangen, O.; Weber, M.; Pihlak, P.; Aleksejenko, I.; Paršeliunas, E.

    2016-03-01

    The NKG 2008 GPS campaign was carried out in September 28 - October 4, 2008. The purpose was to establish a common reference frame in the Nordic- Baltic-Arctic region, and to improve and update the transformations from the latest global ITRF reference frame to the national ETRS89 realizations of the Nordic/Baltic countries. Postglacial rebound in the Fennoscandian area causes intraplate deformations up to about 10 mm/yr to the Eurasian tectonic plate which need to be taken into account in order to reach centimetre level accuracies in the transformations. We discuss some possible alternatives and present the most applicable transformation strategy. The selected transformation utilizes the de facto transformation recommended by the EUREF but includes additional intraplate corrections and a new common Nordic-Baltic reference frame to serve the requirements of the Nordic/Baltic countries. To correct for the intraplate deformations in the Nordic-Baltic areawe have used the commonNordic deformation model NKG RF03vel. The new common reference frame, NKG ETRF00, was aligned to ETRF2000 at epoch 2000.0 in order to be close to the national ETRS89 realizations and to coincide with the land uplift epoch of the national height systems. We present here the realization of the NKG ETRF00 and transformation formulae together with the parameters to transform from global ITRF coordinates to Nordic/Baltic realizations of the ETRS89.

  4. An experimental Kalman filter approach to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Abbondanza, C.; Altamimi, Z.; Chin, T.; Gross, R.; Heflin, M.

    2012-04-01

    To monitor global geophysical changes with realistic uncertainties using millimeter-precision geodesy, it is essential to define, realize and maintain the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) consistently and accurately. Precise determinations of geocentric site positions and motions, satellite orbits, geocenter motion, Earth orientation and its variations, mean sea level rise, and polar ice mass changes at various time scales all depend critically on the accuracy and stability of the ITRF. By definition, the ITRF is a secular frame based on a linear model and consisting of mean epoch positions and velocities for a global set of stations. It is needed to serve as a standard reference frame in which geophysical results can be formulated and compared. The neglected up-to centimeter-level non-linear station motion can bias the linear station velocities, which can be significantly compounded for stations with short time-span. Here, we conceptually define an experimental reference frame with its origin at the nearly instantaneous center-of-mass (CM) of the total Earth system, by specifying the frame and combining different technique data weekly (daily for Earth orientation parameters). For co-located sites, available local ties are applied only once; but site motions are usually constrained to be the same. A Kalman filter and smoother algorithm has been developed and coupled to the ITRF/CATREF software to solve for geocentric coordinate time series, as well as a model of secular, periodical and stochastic motion components. Preliminary results using linear and linear plus sinusoidal motion models without stochastic components compare very favorably with the ITRF2005 solution. With only a subset of the ITRF2005 input data time series from 1996 onward, we have obtained reference frame solutions that differ from ITRF2005 in origin by 0.6 mm and 0.3 mm/yr. Filtering strategies and time series results will also be presented.

  5. Common Observables of Trench Migration and Plate Motion in Different Global Reference Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellart, W. P.; Stegman, D. A.; Freeman, J.; Moresi, L.

    2007-12-01

    Plate velocities and trench migration velocities are commonly described in some sort of global "absolute" reference frame. From calculating such motions for all plates and subduction zones on Earth, one might obtain insight into the importance of various driving and resistive forces of plate tectonics and plate boundary migration. Trench migration velocities and plate velocities have been calculated for all subduction zones on Earth in eight global reference frames. The calculations show that such velocities can differ substantially between different global reference frames (up to 4 cm/yr), in particular between one Pacific hotspot reference frame (HS3- NUVEL1A) and all the others. In addition, this reference frame shows a bimodal distribution of trench velocities, while all the others show a Gaussian distribution. Nevertheless, some common features are observed irrespective of the reference frame. First, trench retreat always dominates over trench advance, with 62-78% of the trench segments retreating, while the mean and median trench velocities are always positive (retreating). Second, trench retreat is always slow in the middle of wide subduction zones, i.e. far (>2000 km) from lateral slab edges (<2 cm/yr in seven reference frames). Third, fast trench retreat (>6 cm/yr) is only found close (<1500 km) to lateral slab edges. Fourth, plates with a substantial percentage of their circumference attached to a subducting slab (Pacific, Nazca, Cocos, Philippine, Australia) move trenchward. These calculations are predicted by three-dimensional geodynamic models of free subduction with a variable slab width (300-7000 km), in which the slab to upper mantle viscosity ratio is low (100-200). This suggests that trench velocities and plate velocities are indeed primarily controlled by the negative buoyancy and width of subducting slabs. It further suggests that slab/upper mantle viscosity ratios in nature are 100-200, as the models show trench motion dominated by retreat, and

  6. Quantum mechanics in non-inertial reference frames: Time-dependent rotations and loop prolongations

    SciTech Connect

    Klink, W.H.; Wickramasekara, S.

    2013-09-15

    This is the fourth in a series of papers on developing a formulation of quantum mechanics in non-inertial reference frames. This formulation is grounded in a class of unitary cocycle representations of what we have called the Galilean line group, the generalization of the Galilei group to include transformations amongst non-inertial reference frames. These representations show that in quantum mechanics, just as the case in classical mechanics, the transformations to accelerating reference frames give rise to fictitious forces. In previous work, we have shown that there exist representations of the Galilean line group that uphold the non-relativistic equivalence principle as well as representations that violate the equivalence principle. In these previous studies, the focus was on linear accelerations. In this paper, we undertake an extension of the formulation to include rotational accelerations. We show that the incorporation of rotational accelerations requires a class of loop prolongations of the Galilean line group and their unitary cocycle representations. We recover the centrifugal and Coriolis force effects from these loop representations. Loops are more general than groups in that their multiplication law need not be associative. Hence, our broad theoretical claim is that a Galilean quantum theory that holds in arbitrary non-inertial reference frames requires going beyond groups and group representations, the well-established framework for implementing symmetry transformations in quantum mechanics. -- Highlights: •A formulation of Galilean quantum mechanics in non-inertial reference frames is presented. •The Galilei group is generalized to infinite dimensional Galilean line group. •Loop prolongations of Galilean line group contain central extensions of Galilei group. •Unitary representations of the loops are constructed. •These representations lead to terms in the Hamiltonian corresponding to fictitious forces, including centrifugal and Coriolis

  7. Global, Regional and National Geodetic Reference Frames for Geodesy and Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosy, Jaroslaw

    2014-06-01

    In July 2003 the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) established the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). The GGOS is integrating the three basic components: geometry, the earth rotation and gravity. The backbone of this integration is the existing global ground network, based on the geodetic space techniques: very long baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging, global navigation satellite systems and Doppler orbitography and radiopositioning integrated by satellite. These techniques have to operate as one global entity and in one global reference frame. The global reference frame in the GGOS is a realization of the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS). The ITRS is a world spatial reference system co-rotating with the Earth in its diurnal motion in the space. The IAG Subcommision for the European Reference Frame (EUREF) in 1991 recommended that the terrestrial reference system for Europe should be coincident with ITRS at the epoch t 0 = 1989.0 and fixed to the stable part of the Eurasian Plate. It was named the European Terrestrial Reference System 89 (ETRS89). On the 2nd of June 2008, the Head Office of Geodesy and Cartography in Poland commenced operating the ASG-EUPOS multifunctional precise satellite positioning system. The ASG-EUPOS network defines the European Terrestrial Reference System ETRS89 in Poland. A close connection between the ASG-EUPOS stations and 15 out of 18 Polish EUREF permanent network stations controls the realization of the ETRS89 on Polish territory. This paper is a review of the global ITRS, as well as a regional and a national geodetic reference systems ETRS89.

  8. The ICRF-3: Proposed Roadmap to the Next Generation International Celestial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Arias, F.; Boboltz, D.; Boehm, J.; Bolotin, S.; Bourda, G.; Charlot, P.; de Witt, A.; Fey, A.; Gaume, R.; Gordon, D.; Heinkelmann, R.; Lambert, S.; Ma, C.; Malkin, Z.; Nothnagel, A.; Seitz, M.; Skurikhina, E.; Souchay, J.; Titov, O.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a 3rd generation radio-based International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF- 3) to improve upon the highly successful ICRF-2. Our goals are to improve the precision, spatial and frequency coverages relative to the ICRF-2 by 2018. This date is driven by the desire to create radio frames early enough to test the Gaia optical frame during its construction. Several specific actions are underway. A collaboration has been started to improve S/X-band precision of the 2000+ VLBA Calibrator Survey sources which are typically 5 times less precise than the rest of the ICRF-2. S/X-band southern precision improvements are planned from observations with southern antennas such as the AuScope and HartRAO, S. Africa. We seek to improve radio frequency coverage with X/Ka and K- band work. An X/Ka frame of 631 sources now has full sky coverage from the addition of a 2nd southern station in Argentina which should strengthen the southern hemisphere in general. A K-band collaboration has formed with similar coverage and southern precision goals. On the analysis front, special attention will be given to combination techniques both of VLBI catalogs and of multiple data types (e.g. VLBI+GPS). Finally, work is underway to identify and pinpoint sources bright enough in both radio and optical to allow for a robust frame tie between VLBI and Gaia optical frames.

  9. KALREF - A Kalman filter approach to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Abbondanza, C.; Altamimi, Z.; Chin, T. M.; Collilieux, X.; Gross, R. S.; Heflin, M. B.; Hurst, K. J.; Parker, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    To monitor global geophysical changes with realistic uncertainties using millimeter-precision geodesy, it is essential to define, realize and maintain the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) consistently and accurately. Precise determinations of geocentric site positions and motions, satellite orbits, geocenter motion, Earth orientation and its variations, mean sea level rise, and polar ice mass changes at various time scales all depend critically on the accuracy and stability of the ITRF. Currently, the ITRF is a secular frame based on a linear model and consisting of mean epoch positions and velocities for a global set of stations. With higher accuracy and density geodetic data increasingly used for near real time geophysical change determinations, a research version of Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) realized by station time series is needed, which combines strengths of different geodetic techniques and unifies the different technique time series in the single frame. Here, we conceptually define an experimental reference frame with its origin at the nearly instantaneous center-of-mass (CM) of the total Earth system, by specifying the frame and combining different technique data weekly (daily for Earth orientation parameters). For co-located sites, available local ties are applied only once; but site motions are usually constrained to be the same. A Kalman filter and smoother algorithm has been developed and coupled to the ITRF/CATREF software to solve for geocentric coordinate time series with a model of secular, periodical and stochastic motion components. Results using linear and linear plus sinusoidal motion models without stochastic components compare very favorably with the ITRF2005 solution. Filtering strategies and time series results using ITRF2005 and ITRF2008 input data will be presented.

  10. A Ka-Band Celestial Reference Frame with Applications to Deep Space Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. Eric; Garcia-Miro, Cristina; Horiuchi, Shinji; Sotuela, Ioana

    2011-01-01

    The Ka-band radio spectrum is now being used for a wide variety of applications. This paper highlights the use of Ka-band as a frequency for precise deep space navigation based on a set of reference beacons provided by extragalactic quasars which emit broadband noise at Ka-band. This quasar-based celestial reference frame is constructed using X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) from fifty-five 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network antennas in California, Australia, and Spain. We report on observations which have detected 464 sources covering the full 24 hours of Right Ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the international standard S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of approximately 200 micro-arcsec in alpha cos(delta) and approximately 300 micro-arcsec in delta. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 micro-arcsec level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of instrumental phase calibration, tropospheric refraction mis-modeling, and limited southern geometry. The motivation for extending the celestial reference frame to frequencies above 8 GHz is to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability and to support spacecraft navigation for Ka-band based NASA missions.

  11. A Ka-band Celestial Reference Frame with Applications to Deep Space Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. E.; García-Miró, C.; Horiuchi, S.; Sotuela, I.

    2011-10-01

    The Ka-band radio spectrum is now being used for a wide variety of applications. This paper highlights the use of Ka-band as a frequency for precise deep space navigation based on a set of reference beacons provided by extragalactic quasars which emit broadband noise at Ka-band. This quasar-based celestial reference frame is constructed using X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) from fifty-five 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network antennas in California, Australia, and Spain. We report on observations which have detected 464 sources covering the full 24 hours of Right Ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the international standard S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of ~200 micro-arcsec (μas) in α cos δ and ~300 μas in δ. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 μas level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of instrumental phase calibration, tropospheric refraction mis-modeling, and limited southern geometry. The motivation for extending the celestial reference frame to frequencies above 8 GHz is to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability and to support spacecraft navigation for Ka-band based NASA missions.

  12. The Gaia inertial reference frame and the tilting of the Milky Way disk

    SciTech Connect

    Perryman, Michael; Spergel, David N.; Lindegren, Lennart

    2014-07-10

    While the precise relationship between the Milky Way disk and the symmetry planes of the dark matter halo remains somewhat uncertain, a time-varying disk orientation with respect to an inertial reference frame seems probable. Hierarchical structure formation models predict that the dark matter halo is triaxial and tumbles with a characteristic rate of ∼2 rad H{sub 0}{sup −1} (∼30 μas yr{sup –1}). These models also predict a time-dependent accretion of gas, such that the angular momentum vector of the disk should be misaligned with that of the halo. These effects, as well as tidal effects of the LMC, will result in the rotation of the angular momentum vector of the disk population with respect to the quasar reference frame. We assess the accuracy with which the positions and proper motions from Gaia can be referred to a kinematically non-rotating system, and show that the spin vector of the transformation from any rigid self-consistent catalog frame to the quasi-inertial system defined by quasars should be defined to better than 1 μas yr{sup –1}. Determination of this inertial frame by Gaia will reveal any signature of the disk orientation varying with time, improve models of the potential and dynamics of the Milky Way, test theories of gravity, and provide new insights into the orbital evolution of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds.

  13. Using radio stars to link the Gaia and VLBI reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, Zinovy

    2016-09-01

    A possible method for linking the optical Gaia Celestial Reference Frame (GCRF) to the VLBI-based International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) is to use radio stars in a manner similar to that in the linking of the Hipparcos Celestial Reference Frame (HCRF) to ICRF. In this work, an obtainable accuracy of the orientation angles between GCRF and ICRF frames was estimated by Monte Carlo simulation. If the uncertainties in the radio star positions obtained by VLBI are in the range of 0.1-4 mas and those obtained by Gaia are in the range of 0.005-0.4 mas, the orientation angle uncertainties are 0.018-0.72 mas if 46 radio stars are used, 0.013-0.51 mas if 92 radio stars are used, and 0.010-0.41 mas if 138 radio stars are used. The general conclusion from this study is that a properly organized VLBI programme for radio star observation with a reasonable load on the VLBI network can allow for the realization of GCRF-ICRF link with an error of about 0.1 mas.

  14. KALREF—A Kalman filter and time series approach to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoping; Abbondanza, Claudio; Altamimi, Zuheir; Chin, T. Mike; Collilieux, Xavier; Gross, Richard S.; Heflin, Michael B.; Jiang, Yan; Parker, Jay W.

    2015-05-01

    The current International Terrestrial Reference Frame is based on a piecewise linear site motion model and realized by reference epoch coordinates and velocities for a global set of stations. Although linear motions due to tectonic plates and glacial isostatic adjustment dominate geodetic signals, at today's millimeter precisions, nonlinear motions due to earthquakes, volcanic activities, ice mass losses, sea level rise, hydrological changes, and other processes become significant. Monitoring these (sometimes rapid) changes desires consistent and precise realization of the terrestrial reference frame (TRF) quasi-instantaneously. Here, we use a Kalman filter and smoother approach to combine time series from four space geodetic techniques to realize an experimental TRF through weekly time series of geocentric coordinates. In addition to secular, periodic, and stochastic components for station coordinates, the Kalman filter state variables also include daily Earth orientation parameters and transformation parameters from input data frames to the combined TRF. Local tie measurements among colocated stations are used at their known or nominal epochs of observation, with comotion constraints applied to almost all colocated stations. The filter/smoother approach unifies different geodetic time series in a single geocentric frame. Fragmented and multitechnique tracking records at colocation sites are bridged together to form longer and coherent motion time series. While the time series approach to TRF reflects the reality of a changing Earth more closely than the linear approximation model, the filter/smoother is computationally powerful and flexible to facilitate incorporation of other data types and more advanced characterization of stochastic behavior of geodetic time series.

  15. A catalogue of QSOs and link stars for the HST link of the Hipparcos reference frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Graeme L.; Jauncey, David L.; Reynolds, John E.; Malin, David; Argue, A. N.

    1990-01-01

    A list of bright (less than 17 mag) southern QSOs and bright (less than 11 mag) stars that may be suitable for the Hubble Space Telescope link between the Hipparcos astrometric reference frame and the VLBI extragalactic frame is presented. The QSOs have been selected from various lists of radio objects and identifications. The stars have been selected from the Strasbourg (CDS) data base and from the Preliminary Second Cape Photographic Catalog, and supplemented with stars measured from the SERC IIIa-J Schmidt survey. These QSOs and stars have been included in the Hipparcos and HST schedule of observations.

  16. Age-related effects on spatial memory across viewpoint changes relative to different reference frames.

    PubMed

    Montefinese, Maria; Sulpizio, Valentina; Galati, Gaspare; Committeri, Giorgia

    2015-07-01

    Remembering object positions across different views is a fundamental competence for acting and moving appropriately in a large-scale space. Behavioural and neurological changes in elderly subjects suggest that the spatial representations of the environment might decline compared to young participants. However, no data are available on the use of different reference frames within topographical space in aging. Here we investigated the use of allocentric and egocentric frames in aging, by asking young and older participants to encode the location of a target in a virtual room relative either to stable features of the room (allocentric environment-based frame), or to an unstable objects set (allocentric objects-based frame), or to the viewer's viewpoint (egocentric frame). After a viewpoint change of 0° (absent), 45° (small) or 135° (large), participants judged whether the target was in the same spatial position as before relative to one of the three frames. Results revealed a different susceptibility to viewpoint changes in older than young participants. Importantly, we detected a worst performance, in terms of reaction times, for older than young participants in the allocentric frames. The deficit was more marked for the environment-based frame, for which a lower sensitivity was revealed as well as a worst performance even when no viewpoint change occurred. Our data provide new evidence of a greater vulnerability of the allocentric, in particular environment-based, spatial coding with aging, in line with the retrogenesis theory according to which cognitive changes in aging reverse the sequence of acquisition in mental development. PMID:25037856

  17. Evaluating seasonal loading models and their impact on global and regional reference frame alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Rong; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Ding, Kaihua; Yang, Shaomin; Wang, Qi

    2014-02-01

    Seasonal variations are observed in GPS time series, but are not included in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) models. Unmodeled seasonal variations at sites used for reference frame alignment are aliased into the reference frame parameters and bias all coordinates in the transformed solution. We augment ITRF2008 with seasonal loading models based either on Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) measurements or a suite of models for atmospheric pressure, continental hydrology, and nontidal ocean loading. We model the seasonal components using either annual and semiannual terms or a nonparametric approach. When we include a seasonal variation model, the weighted root-mean-square misfit after seven-parameter transformation decreases for 70-90% of the daily GPS solutions depending on the network and seasonal model used, relative to a baseline case using ITRF2008. When seasonal variations are included in the reference frame solution, the observed seasonal variations are more consistent with the GRACE-based model at 80-85% of the GPS sites that were not used in the frame alignment. The suite of forward models performs nearly as well as the GRACE-based model for North America, but substantially worse for other parts of the world. We interpret these findings to mean that the use of ITRF2008 without seasonal terms causes the amplitude of seasonal variations in the coordinate time series to be damped down relative to the true loading deformation and that the observed GPS time series are more consistent with a TRF model that includes seasonal variations. At present, a seasonal model derived from GRACE captures seasonal variations more faithfully than one based on hydrologic models.

  18. Examining reference frame interaction in spatial memory using a distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Street, Whitney N; Wang, Ranxiao Frances

    2016-02-01

    Previous research showed competition among reference frames in spatial attention and language. The present studies developed a new distribution analysis to examine reference frame interactions in spatial memory. Participants viewed virtual arrays of colored pegs and were instructed to remember them either from their own perspective or from the perspective aligned with the rectangular floor. Then they made judgments of relative directions from their respective encoding orientation. Those taking the floor-axis perspective showed systematic bias in the signed errors toward their egocentric perspective, while those taking their own perspective showed no systematic bias, both for random and symmetrical object arrays. The bias toward the egocentric perspective was observed when learning a real symmetric regular object array with strong environmental cues for the aligned axis. These results indicate automatic processing of the self reference while taking the floor-axis perspective but not vice versa, and suggest that research on spatial memory needs to consider the implications of competition effects in reference frame use. PMID:26032226

  19. The Celestial Reference Frame at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Clark, J. E.; Heflin, M. B.; Skjerve, L. J.; Sovers, O. J.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Moll, V. E.; Horiuchi, S.

    2010-01-01

    A celestial reference frame at X/Kaband (8.4/32 GHz) has been constructed using fiftyone 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network. We report on observations which have detected 436 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of 200 micro-arcsec ( mu as) in alpha cos delta and 290 mu as in delta. There is evidence for zonal errors at the 100 mu as level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mismodelling, and limited southern geometry. The motivations for extending the ICRF to frequencies above 8 GHz are to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability, to provide calibrators for phase referencing, and to support spacecraft navigation at Ka-band.

  20. The Celestial Reference Frame at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Clark, J. E.; Heflin, M. B.; Skjerve, L. J.; Sovers, O. J.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Moll, V. E.; Horiuchi, S.

    2011-01-01

    A celestial reference frame at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) has been constructed using fifty-one 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network. We report on observations which have detected 436 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of 200 micro-arcsec in a cos delta and 290 micro-arcsec in delta. There is evidence for zonal errors at the 100 micro-arcsec level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mismodelling, and limited southern geometry. The motivations for extending the ICRF to frequencies above 8 GHz are to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability, to provide calibrators for phase referencing, and to support spacecraft navigation at Ka-band.

  1. Adjustment of Sonar and Laser Acquisition Data for Building the 3D Reference Model of a Canal Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Moisan, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Pierre; Foucher, Philippe; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Guillemin, Samuel; Koehl, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the construction of a full 3D model of a canal tunnel by combining terrestrial laser (for its above-water part) and sonar (for its underwater part) scans collected from static acquisitions. The modeling of such a structure is challenging because the sonar device is used in a narrow environment that induces many artifacts. Moreover, the location and the orientation of the sonar device are unknown. In our approach, sonar data are first simultaneously denoised and meshed. Then, above- and under-water point clouds are co-registered to generate directly the full 3D model of the canal tunnel. Faced with the lack of overlap between both models, we introduce a robust algorithm that relies on geometrical entities and partially-immersed targets, which are visible in both the laser and sonar point clouds. A full 3D model, visually promising, of the entrance of a canal tunnel is obtained. The analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help with obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated way, in the limits of the involved technology. PMID:26690444

  2. Adjustment of Sonar and Laser Acquisition Data for Building the 3D Reference Model of a Canal Tunnel †

    PubMed Central

    Moisan, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Pierre; Foucher, Philippe; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Guillemin, Samuel; Koehl, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the construction of a full 3D model of a canal tunnel by combining terrestrial laser (for its above-water part) and sonar (for its underwater part) scans collected from static acquisitions. The modeling of such a structure is challenging because the sonar device is used in a narrow environment that induces many artifacts. Moreover, the location and the orientation of the sonar device are unknown. In our approach, sonar data are first simultaneously denoised and meshed. Then, above- and under-water point clouds are co-registered to generate directly the full 3D model of the canal tunnel. Faced with the lack of overlap between both models, we introduce a robust algorithm that relies on geometrical entities and partially-immersed targets, which are visible in both the laser and sonar point clouds. A full 3D model, visually promising, of the entrance of a canal tunnel is obtained. The analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help with obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated way, in the limits of the involved technology. PMID:26690444

  3. Research Activities for the DORIS Contribution to the Next International Terrestrial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soudarin, L.; Moreaux, G.; Lemoine, F.; Willis, P.; Stepanek, P.; Otten, M.; Govind, R.; Kuzin, S.; Ferrage, P.

    2012-01-01

    For the preparation of ITRF2008, the IDS processed data from 1993 to 2008, including data from TOPEX/Poseidon, the SPOT satellites and Envisat in the weekly solutions. Since the development of ITRF2008, the IDS has been engaged in a number of efforts to try and improve the reference frame solutions. These efforts include (i) assessing the contribution of the new DORIS satellites, Jason-2 and Cryosat2 (2008-2011), (ii) individually analyzing the DORIS satellite contributions to geocenter and scale, and (iii) improving orbit dynamics (atmospheric loading effects, satellite surface force modeling. . . ). We report on the preliminary results from these research activities, review the status of the IDS combination which is now routinely generated from the contributions of the IDS analysis centers, and discuss the prospects for continued improvement in the DORIS contribution to the next international reference frame.

  4. Proof-of-principle experiment of reference-frame-independent quantum key distribution with phase coding

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wen-Ye; Wang, Shuang; Li, Hong-Wei; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Yao, Yao; Huang, Jing-Zheng; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated a proof-of-principle experiment of reference-frame-independent phase coding quantum key distribution (RFI-QKD) over an 80-km optical fiber. After considering the finite-key bound, we still achieve a distance of 50 km. In this scenario, the phases of the basis states are related by a slowly time-varying transformation. Furthermore, we developed and realized a new decoy state method for RFI-QKD systems with weak coherent sources to counteract the photon-number-splitting attack. With the help of a reference-frame-independent protocol and a Michelson interferometer with Faraday rotator mirrors, our system is rendered immune to the slow phase changes of the interferometer and the polarization disturbances of the channel, making the procedure very robust. PMID:24402550

  5. The Relationship Between Global Mean Sea Level Rise and the Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, F.; Luthcke, S.; Zelensky, N.; Pavlis, E.; Beckley, B.; Ray, R.; Petrov, L.; Pavlis, D.; Rowlands, D.

    2006-01-01

    The Terrestrial Reference Frame is the fundamental means by which we relate observations in space and time. For example, in order to generate a homogeneous and consistent time series of geo-referenced altimeter measurements over the span of the Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1 missions, we must examine carefully the role of improvements in measurement modelling, force modelling, and improved reference frame realizations. In this paper, we quantify the effects of improvements in force modelling, for example the use of new GRACE-derived gravity models, the effect of time-variable gravity derived from GRACE on altimeter satellite orbits. In addition, we examine the effects of modelling geocenter in altimeteric satellite POD, and look at how the application of atmospheric loading might affect the time-series of precise orbits for Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1.

  6. Transfer of spatial reference frame using singlet states and classical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahder, Thomas B.

    2016-03-01

    A simple protocol is described for transferring spatial orientation from Alice to Bob (two spatially separated observers). The two observers are assumed to share quantum singlet states and classical communication. The protocol assumes that Alice and Bob have complete free will (measurement independence) and is based on maximizing the Shannon mutual information between Alice and Bob's measurement outcomes. Repeated use of this protocol for each spatial axis of Alice allows transfer of a complete three-dimensional reference frame, up to inversion of each of the axes. The technological complexity of this protocol is similar to that needed for BB84 quantum key distribution and hence is much simpler to implement than recently proposed schemes for transmission of reference frames. A second protocol based on a Bayesian formalism is also discussed.

  7. Reference frames for reaching when decoupling eye and target position in depth and direction

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, A.; Breveglieri, R.; Hadjidimitrakis, K.; Galletti, C.; Fattori, P.

    2016-01-01

    Spatial representations in cortical areas involved in reaching movements were traditionally studied in a frontoparallel plane where the two-dimensional target location and the movement direction were the only variables to consider in neural computations. No studies so far have characterized the reference frames for reaching considering both depth and directional signals. Here we recorded from single neurons of the medial posterior parietal area V6A during a reaching task where fixation point and reaching targets were decoupled in direction and depth. We found a prevalent mixed encoding of target position, with eye-centered and spatiotopic representations differently balanced in the same neuron. Depth was stronger in defining the reference frame of eye-centered cells, while direction was stronger in defining that of spatiotopic cells. The predominant presence of various typologies of mixed encoding suggests that depth and direction signals are processed on the basis of flexible coordinate systems to ensure optimal motor response. PMID:26876496

  8. Frames of reference for helicopter electronic maps - The relevance of spatial cognition and componential analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, Kelly; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1991-01-01

    Computer-generated map displays for NOE and low-level helicopter flight were formed according to prior research on maps, navigational problem solving, and spatial cognition in large-scale environments. The north-up map emphasized consistency of object location, wheareas, the track-up map emphasized map-terrain congruency. A component analysis indicates that different cognitive components, e.g., orienting and absolute object location, are supported to varying degrees by properties of different frames of reference.

  9. Generalization of Dexterous Manipulation Is Sensitive to the Frame of Reference in Which It Is Learned.

    PubMed

    Marneweck, Michelle; Knelange, Elisabeth; Lee-Miller, Trevor; Santello, Marco; Gordon, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that internal representations of manipulations of objects with asymmetric mass distributions that are generated within a specific orientation are not generalizable to novel orientations, i.e., subjects fail to prevent object roll on their first grasp-lift attempt of the object following 180° object rotation. This suggests that representations of these manipulations are specific to the reference frame in which they are formed. However, it is unknown whether that reference frame is specific to the hand, the body, or both, because rotating the object 180° modifies the relation between object and body as well as object and hand. An alternative, untested explanation for the above failure to generalize learned manipulations is that any rotation will disrupt grasp performance, regardless if the reference frame in which the manipulation was learned is maintained or modified. We examined the effect of rotations that (1) maintain and (2) modify relations between object and body, and object and hand, on the generalizability of learned two-digit manipulation of an object with an asymmetric mass distribution. Following rotations that maintained the relation between object and body and object and hand (e.g., rotating the object and subject 180°), subjects continued to use appropriate digit placement and load force distributions, thus generating sufficient compensatory moments to minimize object roll. In contrast, following rotations that modified the relation between (1) object and hand (e.g. rotating the hand around to the opposite object side), (2) object and body (e.g. rotating subject and hand 180°), or (3) both (e.g. rotating the subject 180°), subjects used the same, yet inappropriate digit placement and load force distribution, as those used prior to the rotation. Consequently, the compensatory moments were insufficient to prevent large object rolls. These findings suggest that representations of learned manipulation of objects with asymmetric mass

  10. Neural network simulations of the primate oculomotor system. II. Frames of reference.

    PubMed

    Moschovakis, A K

    1996-01-01

    Theories of motor control often assume that the location of visual stimuli is expressed in non retinotopic frames of reference. The saccadic system is known in enough detail for us to examine the evidential basis of this assumption. The organization of the neural circuit that controls saccades is first summarized. It is shown to consist of at least two interconnected modules. The first one is the burst generator, which resides in the reticular formation, and is entrusted with the tasks of impedance matching, synergist coactivation and reciprocal inhibition between antagonists. The second is a metric computer, which resides in the superior colliculus and the cerebral cortex, and computes the size and direction of the desired movement. Alternative models of the burst generator are presented and their "verisimilitude" is assessed in the light of evidence concerning saccadic trajectories, neuronal discharge patterns, interneuronal connections, as well as the results of lesion and stimulation experiments. Several models of the "metric computer" in the superior colliculus are then examined; their performance is again evaluated in the light of psychophysical, anatomical, physiological, and clinical evidence. It is demonstrated that the location of visual stimuli need not be expressed in nonretinotopic frames of reference for either the burst generator or the metric computer to issue appropriate commands to move the eyes. Instead, using information concerning intervening movements of the eyes to update the location of visual stimuli in a retinotopic frame of reference suffices for the planning and execution of correct saccades. More generally, it is proposed that the location of sensory stimuli need not be expressed in higher order frames of reference (e.g., centered in the body or even in extrapersonal space) provided that their location in a sensorium specific map is updated on the basis of effector movements. PMID:8886356

  11. Generalization of Dexterous Manipulation Is Sensitive to the Frame of Reference in Which It Is Learned

    PubMed Central

    Marneweck, Michelle; Knelange, Elisabeth; Lee-Miller, Trevor; Santello, Marco; Gordon, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that internal representations of manipulations of objects with asymmetric mass distributions that are generated within a specific orientation are not generalizable to novel orientations, i.e., subjects fail to prevent object roll on their first grasp-lift attempt of the object following 180° object rotation. This suggests that representations of these manipulations are specific to the reference frame in which they are formed. However, it is unknown whether that reference frame is specific to the hand, the body, or both, because rotating the object 180° modifies the relation between object and body as well as object and hand. An alternative, untested explanation for the above failure to generalize learned manipulations is that any rotation will disrupt grasp performance, regardless if the reference frame in which the manipulation was learned is maintained or modified. We examined the effect of rotations that (1) maintain and (2) modify relations between object and body, and object and hand, on the generalizability of learned two-digit manipulation of an object with an asymmetric mass distribution. Following rotations that maintained the relation between object and body and object and hand (e.g., rotating the object and subject 180°), subjects continued to use appropriate digit placement and load force distributions, thus generating sufficient compensatory moments to minimize object roll. In contrast, following rotations that modified the relation between (1) object and hand (e.g. rotating the hand around to the opposite object side), (2) object and body (e.g. rotating subject and hand 180°), or (3) both (e.g. rotating the subject 180°), subjects used the same, yet inappropriate digit placement and load force distribution, as those used prior to the rotation. Consequently, the compensatory moments were insufficient to prevent large object rolls. These findings suggest that representations of learned manipulation of objects with asymmetric mass

  12. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  13. The Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (GRASP) - A Mission to Enhance the Terrestrial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerem, R.; Bar-Sever, Y. E.; Grasp Team

    2011-12-01

    The Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (GRASP) is a small satellite mission concept, currently being proposed to NASA's Earth Venture 2 (EV-2) announcement of opportunity, that is dedicated to the enhancement of all the space geodetic techniques, promising revolutionary improvements to the definition of the TRF, its densification, and accessibility. GRASP collocates GNSS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS sensors on a supremely calibrated and modeled spacecraft, offering an innovative space-based approach to a heretofore intractable problem: establishing precise and stable ties between the key geodetic techniques used to define and disseminate the TRF. GRASP also offers a solution to another difficult problem, namely, the consistent calibration of the myriad antennas used to transmit and receive the ubiquitous signals of the present and future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). We will describe how errors in the TRF impact our ability to answer key science questions, such as mean sea level rise, and present new analysis of GRASP's capability to improve various aspects of the TRF. We will also discuss opportunities for the geodetic community to contribute, support, and enhance this mission.

  14. New Observations Testing the Adopted HIPPARCOS Link to the International Celestial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Ronald C.

    1998-10-01

    This paper tests the Hipparcos link to the extragalactic reference frame by using new data obtained after the release of the catalog, thereby providing an external check on the accuracy of the established link process. The new data consist of 689 positions of Hipparcos stars determined in the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) from CCD observations taken with the Flagstaff Astrometric Scanning Transit Telescope (FASTT). A comparison of the FASTT and Hipparcos catalog star positions observed in common finds that the axial rotations between the Hipparcos and ICRF reference frames are, respectively, (εx, εy, εz) = (-2.2+/-3.3, -2.2+/-3.3, 3.3+/-2.9) (s.e.) mas at epoch 1996.5. All of these rotations are small and insignificant with respect to their errors (εx and εy are less than 1 σ detections whereas εz is only a 1.1 σ detection). Hence, this paper finds that the Hipparcos link to the ICRF was well determined and is not seriously degrading with time.

  15. The consistency of the current conventional celestial and terrestrial reference frames and the conventional EOP series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinkelmann, R.; Belda-Palazon, S.; Ferrándiz, J.; Schuh, H.

    2015-08-01

    For applications in Earth sciences, navigation, and astronomy the celestial (ICRF) and terrestrial (ITRF) reference frames as well as the orientation among them, the Earth orientation parameters (EOP), have to be consistent at the level of 1 mm and 0.1 mm/yr (GGOS recommendations). We assess the effect of unmodelled geophysical signals in the regularized coordinates and the sensitivity with respect to different a priori EOP and celestial reference frames. The EOP are determined using the same VLBI data but with station coordinates fixed on different TRFs. The conclusion is that within the time span of data incorporated into ITRF2008 (Altamimi, et al., 2011) the ITRF2008 and the IERS 08 C04 are consistent. This consistency involves that non-linear station motion such as unmodelled geophysical signals partly affect the IERS 08 C04 EOP. There are small but not negligible inconsistencies between the conventional celestial reference frame, ICRF2 (Fey, et al., 2009), the ITRF2008 and the conventional EOP that are quantified by comparing VTRF2008 (Böckmann, et al., 2010) and ITRF2008.

  16. Spatial scale, rather than nature of task or locomotion, modulates the spatial reference frame of attention

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuhong V.; Won, Bo-Yeong

    2015-01-01

    Visuospatial attention is strongly biased to locations that frequently contained a search target before. However, the function of this bias depends on the reference frame in which attended locations are coded. Previous research has shown a striking difference between tasks administered on a computer monitor and in a large environment, with the former inducing viewer-centered learning and the latter environment-centered learning. Why does environment-centered learning fail on a computer? Here we tested three possibilities: differences in spatial scale, nature of task, and locomotion may influence the reference frame of attention. Participants searched for a target on a monitor placed flat on a stand. On each trial they stood at a different location around the monitor. The target was frequently located in a fixed area of the monitor, but changes in participants’ perspective rendered this area random relative to the participants. Under incidental learning conditions participants failed to acquire environment-centered learning even when (i) the task and display resembled the large-scale task, and (ii) the search task required locomotion. The difficulty in inducing environment-centered learning on a computer underscores the egocentric nature of visual attention. It supports the idea that spatial scale modulates the reference frame of attention. PMID:25867510

  17. Effects of adopting new precession, nutation and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S. Y.; Mueller, I. I.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of adopting new definitive precession and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame was investigated. It is noted that: (1) the effect on polar motion is a diurnal periodic term with an amplitude increasing linearly in time whole on UT1 it is a linear term; (2) general principles are given to determine the effects of small rotations of the frame of a conventional inertial reference system (CIS) on the frame of the conventional terrestrial reference system (CTS); (3) seven CTS options are presented, one of which is necessary to accommodate such rotation. Accommodating possible future changes in the astronomical nutation is discussed. The effects of differences which may exist between the various CTS's and CIS's on Earth rotation parameters (ERP) and how these differences can be determined are examined. It is shown that the CTS differences can be determined from observations made at the same site, while the CIS differences by comparing the ERP's determined by the different techniques during the same time period.

  18. Effects of non-tidal atmospheric loading on a Kalman filter-based terrestrial reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbondanza, C.; Altamimi, Z.; Chin, T. M.; Collilieux, X.; Dach, R.; Heflin, M. B.; Gross, R. S.; König, R.; Lemoine, F. G.; MacMillan, D. S.; Parker, J. W.; van Dam, T. M.; Wu, X.

    2013-12-01

    The International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) adopts a piece-wise linear model to parameterize regularized station positions and velocities. The space-geodetic (SG) solutions from VLBI, SLR, GPS and DORIS global networks used as input in the ITRF combination process account for tidal loading deformations, but ignore the non-tidal part. As a result, the non-linear signal observed in the time series of SG-derived station positions in part reflects non-tidal loading displacements not introduced in the SG data reduction. In this analysis, the effect of non-tidal atmospheric loading (NTAL) corrections on the TRF is assessed adopting a Remove/Restore approach: (i) Focusing on the a-posteriori approach, the NTAL model derived from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) surface pressure is removed from the SINEX files of the SG solutions used as inputs to the TRF determinations. (ii) Adopting a Kalman-filter based approach, a linear TRF is estimated combining the 4 SG solutions free from NTAL displacements. (iii) Linear fits to the NTAL displacements removed at step (i) are restored to the linear reference frame estimated at (ii). The velocity fields of the (standard) linear reference frame in which the NTAL model has not been removed and the one in which the model has been removed/restored are compared and discussed.

  19. Quantum reference frames associated with noncompact groups: The case of translations and boosts and the role of mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alexander R. H.; Piani, Marco; Mann, Robert B.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum communication without a shared reference frame or the construction of a relational quantum theory requires the notion of a quantum reference frame. We analyze aspects of quantum reference frames associated with noncompact groups, specifically, the group of spatial translations and Galilean boosts. We begin by demonstrating how the usually employed group average, used to dispense of the notion of an external reference frame, leads to unphysical states when applied to reference frames associated with noncompact groups. However, we show that this average does lead naturally to a reduced state on the relative degrees of freedom of a system, which was previously considered by Angelo et al. [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 44, 145304 (2011), 10.1088/1751-8113/44/14/145304]. We then study in detail the informational properties of this reduced state for systems of two and three particles in Gaussian states.

  20. The International Terrestrial Reference Frame: current status and future challenges (Vening Meinesz Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamimi, Zuheir

    2013-04-01

    The ability to assign accurate time-dependent coordinates to points on the Earth's surface is fundamental for many Earth observation applications. Also important is monitoring these coordinates over time in order to take into account all geophysical changes affecting the Earth's surface. Many areas of science, Earth observation, geo-referencing applications, and society at large, today depend on being able to determine positions to millimeter level precision. Point positions, to be meaningful and fully exploitable, have to be determined and expressed in a well-defined Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF). All current global and regional reference frames rely on the availability of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF), which is the most accurate realization of the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS). The positions of the thousands of geodetic stations distributed over the Earth's surface can now be determined with a precision at the level of a few millimeters and their variation over time at the level of, or better than, 1 mm/yr in a global geocentric frame. This performance is only possible as a result of the tremendous progress made in improving the hardware of the space geodetic techniques and in the high level algorithms, models, and scientific software packages developed by the analysis centers dealing with the geodetic observations accumulated over the last three decades. However, none of space geodetic techniques is able to provide all the parameters necessary to completely define a TRF (origin, scale and orientation). While satellite techniques are sensitive to the Earth center of mass (the point around which a satellite orbits; a natural TRF origin), VLBI is not (whose TRF origin is arbitrarily defined). The scale is dependent on the modeling of some physical parameters, and the absolute TRF orientation (unobservable by any technique) is arbitrary or conventionally defined through specific constraints. Therefore the value of the

  1. The role of the brain's frontal eye fields in constructing frame of reference.

    PubMed

    Wallentin, Mikkel

    2012-08-01

    Establishing contextual reference during discourse is a vital part of language function. Personal pronouns (e.g., he/she/it) are used to refer to previously experienced objects, utterances and events. These items, however, are often no longer present in the environment and have to be maintained and manipulated in working memory (WM). One aspect of this is the construction of a spatial frame of reference (e.g., "He was in front of it" where "he" is established as figure and "it" is the ground). The WM processes underlying this function may be different from those involved in establishing a non-spatial relation (e.g., "He was older than her"). The brain's frontal eye fields (FEFs), responsible for eye movement control, are known to be involved in processing spatial WM. This paper reviews both functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments and a subsequent behavioral interference study demonstrating a specific role for the FEFs and the brain's eye movement control system in manipulation of WM content for establishing object-centered spatial reference frames during verbally cued recall of recent visual and linguistic experiences. PMID:22806655

  2. The Simon effect based on the egocentric and allocentric reference frame.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Liu, Nan; Zou, Guiying; Li, Hui; Zeng, Hang; Chen, Jiedan; Chen, Qi

    2016-02-01

    The classic Simon effect refers to the phenomenon that responses are faster when the task-irrelevant egocentric stimulus location is on the same side as the response hand than when not. However, the spatial location of an object often varies according to which reference frame the object location was represented in, e.g., egocentric versus allocentric reference frame. It has been unknown, however, whether and how the Simon effect based on the egocentric and the allocentric reference interact, and whether the potential interaction between them is affected by task demands. To investigate these questions, we orthogonally crossed the stimulus-response compatibility induced by the egocentric and the allocentric positions during the Simon effect. Moreover, the irrelevant egocentric and allocentric positions were either explicitly represented via interleaving spatial and non-spatial tasks in Experiment 1 or not in Experiment 2. The results suggested that the Simon effect based on the egocentric locations occurred irrespective of whether the egocentric representations were explicitly coded based on current task demands or not. The Simon effect based on allocentric locations, however, seemed to occur only when the allocentric representations were explicitly induced. Moreover, the egocentric and allocentric Simon effect interacted in a similar way irrespective of task demands, with significantly delayed responses when both the egocentric and the allocentric locations were incongruent with the response code. PMID:26603042

  3. Framing spatial cognition: Neural representations of proximal and distal frames of reference and their roles in navigation

    PubMed Central

    Knierim, James J.; Hamilton, Derek A.

    2011-01-01

    The most common behavioral test of hippocampus-dependent, spatial learning and memory is the Morris water task, and the most commonly studied behavioral correlate of hippocampal neurons is the spatial specificity of place cells. Despite decades of intensive research, it is not completely understood how animals solve the water task and how place cells generate their spatially specific firing fields. Based on early work, it has become the accepted wisdom in the general neuroscience community that distal spatial cues are the primary sources of information used by animals to solve the water task (and similar spatial tasks) and by place cells to generate their spatial specificity. More recent research, along with earlier studies that were overshadowed by the emphasis on distal cues, put this common view into question by demonstrating primary influences of local cues and local boundaries on spatial behavior and place-cell firing. This paper first reviews the historical underpinnings of the “standard” view from a behavioral perspective, and then reviews newer results demonstrating that an animal's behavior in such spatial tasks is more strongly controlled by a local-apparatus frame of reference than by distal landmarks. The paper then reviews similar findings from the literature on the neurophysiological correlates of place cells and other spatially-correlated cells from related brain areas. A model is proposed by which distal cues primarily set the orientation of the animal's internal spatial coordinate system, via the head direction cell system, whereas local cues and apparatus boundaries primarily set the translation and scale of that coordinate system. PMID:22013211

  4. The Influence of the Terrestrial Reference Frame on Studies of Sea Level Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerem, R. S.; Bar-Sever, Y. E.; Haines, B. J.; Desai, S.; Heflin, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    The terrestrial reference frame (TRF) provides the foundation for the accurate monitoring of sea level using both ground-based (tide gauges) and space-based (satellite altimetry) techniques. For the latter, tide gauges are also used to monitor drifts in the satellite instruments over time. The accuracy of the terrestrial reference frame (TRF) is thus a critical component for both types of sea level measurements. The TRF is central to the formation of geocentric sea-surface height (SSH) measurements from satellite altimeter data. The computed satellite orbits are linked to a particular TRF via the assumed locations of the ground-based tracking systems. The manner in which TRF errors are expressed in the orbit solution (and thus SSH) is not straightforward, and depends on the models of the forces underlying the satellite's motion. We discuss this relationship, and provide examples of the systematic TRF-induced errors in the altimeter derived sea-level record. The TRF is also crucial to the interpretation of tide-gauge measurements, as it enables the separation of vertical land motion from volumetric changes in the water level. TRF errors affect tide gauge measurements through GNSS estimates of the vertical land motion at each tide gauge. This talk will discuss the current accuracy of the TRF and how errors in the TRF impact both satellite altimeter and tide gauge sea level measurements. We will also discuss simulations of how the proposed Geodetic Reference Antenna in SPace (GRASP) satellite mission could reduce these errors and revolutionize how reference frames are computed in general.

  5. Determining sex with the clavicle in a contemporary Spanish reference collection: A study on 3D images.

    PubMed

    Mediavilla, Elena Ruiz; Pérez, Bernardo Perea; González, Elena Labajo; Sánchez, José Antonio Sánchez; Fernández, Enrique Dorado; Sáez, Andrés Santiago

    2016-04-01

    Sexual dimorphism of the clavicle based on metric studies has been determined among different populations from different eras. Due to the need to know about sexual dimorphism in the Spanish population in order to apply the results to the field of Forensic Anthropology, a study has been carried out on a sample in the contemporary Spanish population, made up of the right and left clavicles of 50 males and 50 females. A metric, volumetric and curvature study was performed. To do so, 3D scanning was completed on the entire sample using the Picza 3D Laser Scanner, and the study was performed using reproductions. There were taken 6 metric measurements and 4 volumetric measurements using the Geomagic software, and for the study of curves, an index was calculated which related the direct length of the clavicle and its length as cast onto a surface. The data are presented for all of the variables, distinguishing between the right and left side, and there were processed using the statistical program PASW Statistics 18. The results show that the classification functions which best categorize the sample with an unique variable are volumetric, which classify the sample correctly in 94% of cases based on diaphysis volume, followed by total volume, which provides an accurate classification in 92% of all cases. The sagittal diameter at midshaft provides an accurate classification in 90% of cases and the maximum length in 88% of cases. The curvature index shows that there are no statistically significant differences by side and the only curvature index that shows significant differences by sex is the total anterior curve of the left clavicle being the males curve more pronounced. The validation study performed on a sample of 20 individuals confirms the high discriminatory power of the volume obtaining an accurate classification rate of 85-100% depending on the variable studied. PMID:26908024

  6. Numerical methods for the weakly compressible Generalized Langevin Model in Eulerian reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarnykh, Dmitrii; Litvinov, Sergey; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-06-01

    A well established approach for the computation of turbulent flow without resolving all turbulent flow scales is to solve a filtered or averaged set of equations, and to model non-resolved scales by closures derived from transported probability density functions (PDF) for velocity fluctuations. Effective numerical methods for PDF transport employ the equivalence between the Fokker-Planck equation for the PDF and a Generalized Langevin Model (GLM), and compute the PDF by transporting a set of sampling particles by GLM (Pope (1985) [1]). The natural representation of GLM is a system of stochastic differential equations in a Lagrangian reference frame, typically solved by particle methods. A representation in a Eulerian reference frame, however, has the potential to significantly reduce computational effort and to allow for the seamless integration into a Eulerian-frame numerical flow solver. GLM in a Eulerian frame (GLMEF) formally corresponds to the nonlinear fluctuating hydrodynamic equations derived by Nakamura and Yoshimori (2009) [12]. Unlike the more common Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS) equations these equations are derived from the underdamped Langevin equation and are not based on a local equilibrium assumption. Similarly to LLNS equations the numerical solution of GLMEF requires special considerations. In this paper we investigate different numerical approaches to solving GLMEF with respect to the correct representation of stochastic properties of the solution. We find that a discretely conservative staggered finite-difference scheme, adapted from a scheme originally proposed for turbulent incompressible flow, in conjunction with a strongly stable (for non-stochastic PDE) Runge-Kutta method performs better for GLMEF than schemes adopted from those proposed previously for the LLNS. We show that equilibrium stochastic fluctuations are correctly reproduced.

  7. Transformation properties of dynamic subgrid-scale models in a frame of reference undergoing rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuti, Kiyosi

    Theoretical consideration is presented for the transformation properties of the subgrid-scale (SGS) models for the SGS stress tensor in a non-inertial frame of reference undergoing rotation. As was previously shown (Speziale, C.G., Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dynamics 33, 199 (1985)), an extra correction term is yielded for the SGS stress tensor in the transformation of a rotating frame relative to an inertial framing. We derived the exact expression for the correction term for the spherical Gaussian filter function. Certain transformation rules are imposed on the SGS stress by the derived correction term, namely the SGS stress is not indifferent to a frame rotation, but the divergence of the SGS stress is frame indifferent. Conformity of the modelled SGS stress tensor estimated using the previous dynamic SGS models (the dynamic Smagorinsky, dynamic mixed and nonlinear models) with these transformation rules is examined. It is shown that values for certain model parameters contained in the mixed models can be theoretically determined by imposing these rules. We have conducted the a priori and a postepriori numerical assessments of the SGS models in decaying homogeneous turbulence which is subjected to rotation. All of the previous dynamic models were found to violate the rules except for the nonlinear model. The nonlinear model is form invariant, but the result obtained using the nonlinear model showed significant deviation from the DNS data. Failure of previous models was attributable to insufficient accuracy in approximating the modified cross term in the decomposition of the SGS stress tensor. A dynamic mixed model is proposed to eliminate the truncation error for the modelled correction term, in which multilevel filtering of the velocity field was utilized. The proposed model obeyed the transformation rules when the level of the multifiltering operation was large. It was shown that the defiltered model is derived in the limit of the infinite level of

  8. Impaired spatial working memory maintenance in schizophrenia involves both spatial coordinates and spatial reference frames.

    PubMed

    Mazhari, Shahrzad; Badcock, Johanna C; Waters, Flavie A; Dragović, Milan; Badcock, David R; Jablensky, Assen

    2010-10-30

    Spatial working memory (SWM) dysfunction is a central finding in schizophrenia; however, more evidence of impaired maintenance over time is required. Consequently, the present study examined SWM maintenance over short unfilled delays, and with encoding equated. The influence of a vertical reference frame to support maintenance was also investigated. The performance of 58 patients with schizophrenia and 50 healthy controls was assessed using the Visuo-Spatial Working Memory (VSWM) Test across three unfilled delays (0, 2, and 4s). Inaccuracy of direction and distance responses was examined at each delay duration. The results showed that performance was significantly less accurate for both distance and direction responses at 2 and 4s delays in schizophrenia, but was not significantly different from controls at the 0s delay. Patients showed a particularly marked loss of accuracy between the time interval of 0-2s. Furthermore, schizophrenia participants exhibited significantly greater response variability at the vertical axis of symmetry than controls at the 2 and 4s delays, but not at the 0s delay. These data clearly show both impaired maintenance over time and difficulty using a vertical frame of reference in schizophrenia. The latter findings may reflect, in part, dysfunctional reference-related inhibition. PMID:20493553

  9. Impact of seasonal and postglacial surface displacement on global reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krásná, Hana; Böhm, Johannes; King, Matt; Memin, Anthony; Shabala, Stanislav; Watson, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    The calculation of actual station positions requires several corrections which are partly recommended by the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) Conventions (e.g., solid Earth tides and ocean tidal loading) as well as other corrections, e.g. accounting for hydrology and atmospheric loading. To investigate the pattern of omitted non-linear seasonal motion we estimated empirical harmonic models for selected stations within a global solution of suitable Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions as well as mean annual models by stacking yearly time series of station positions. To validate these models we compare them to displacement series obtained from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data and to hydrology corrections determined from global models. Furthermore, we assess the impact of the seasonal station motions on the celestial reference frame as well as on Earth orientation parameters derived from real and also artificial VLBI observations. In the second part of the presentation we apply vertical rates of the ICE-5G_VM2_2012 vertical land movement grid on vertical station velocities. We assess the impact of postglacial uplift on the variability in the scale given different sampling of the postglacial signal in time and hence on the uncertainty in the scale rate of the estimated terrestrial reference frame.

  10. Current global plate kinematics from GPS (1995-2007) with the plate-consistent reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, Mikhail G.; Steblov, Grigory M.

    2008-04-01

    We present the vectors of rotation of 10 major lithospheric plates, estimated from continuous GPS observations at 192 globally distributed stations; 71 stations were selected as representing stable plate regions. All days for the period 1995.0-2007.0 were included in the analysis. In contrast to previous GPS plate models, our model is independent of international terrestrial reference frames (ITRF). The origin of our plate-consistent reference frame is the center of plate rotation (CP) rather than the center of mass of the entire Earth's system (CM) as in recent versions of ITRF. We estimate plate rotations and CP by minimizing the misfit between the horizontal velocities predicted by the plate model and the observed GPS velocities. If any version of ITRF is used as the reference frame, the drift of the ITRF origin relative to CP cannot be neglected in estimation of plate rotation vectors and plate-residual station velocities. The model of the plate kinematics presented here addresses the problem debated since the beginning of the space geodesy: how big are disagreements between the current plate motions and the motions averaged over several million years? We compare the vectors of relative plate rotations estimated here with the published vectors from GPS and geologic models. We also discuss the integrity of individual plates as exhibited by plate-residual station velocities. For seven largest plates, the RMS value of plate-residual station velocities in stable plate interiors is 0.5-0.9 mm/a; this value is an upper bound on deviation of real plates from infinite stiffness.