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Sample records for 3d ultrasound techniques

  1. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible. PMID:7919882

  2. 2-D array for 3-D Ultrasound Imaging Using Synthetic Aperture Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Nadim M.; Yen, Jesse T.

    2010-01-01

    A 2-D array of 256 × 256 = 65,536 elements, with total area 4 × 4 = 16 cm2, serves as a flexible platform for developing acquisition schemes for 3-D rectilinear ultrasound imaging at 10 MHz using synthetic aperture techniques. This innovative system combines a simplified interconnect scheme and synthetic aperture techniques with a 2-D array for 3-D imaging. A row-column addressing scheme is used to access different elements for different transmit events. This addressing scheme is achieved through a simple interconnect, consisting of one top, one bottom single layer flex circuits, which, compared to multi-layer flex circuits, are simpler to design, cheaper to manufacture and thinner so their effect on the acoustic response is minimized. We present three designs that prioritize different design objectives: volume acquisiton time, resolution, and sensitivity, while maintaining acceptable figures for the other design objectives. For example, one design overlooks time acquisition requirements, assumes good noise conditions, and optimizes for resolution, achieving −6 dB and −20 dB beamwidths of less than 0.2 and 0.5 millimeters, respectively, for an F/2 aperture. Another design can acquire an entire volume in 256 transmit events, with −6dB and −20 dB beamwidths in the order of 0.4 and 0.8 millimeters, respectively. PMID:16764446

  3. New fabrication techniques for ring-array transducers for real-time 3D intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Light, Edward D; Lieu, Victor; Smith, Stephen W

    2009-10-01

    We have previously described miniature 2D array transducers integrated into a Cook Medical, Inc. vena cava filter deployment device. While functional, the fabrication technique was very labor intensive and did not lend itself well to efficient fabrication of large numbers of devices. We developed two new fabrication methods that we believe can be used to efficiently manufacture these types of devices in greater than prototype numbers. One transducer consisted of 55 elements operating near 5 MHz. The interelement spacing is 0.20 mm. It was constructed on a flat piece of copper-clad polyimide and then wrapped around an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical, Inc. inferior vena cava (IVC) filter deployment device. We used a braided wiring technology from Tyco Electronics Corp. to connect the elements to our real-time 3D ultrasound scanner. Typical measured transducer element bandwidth was 20% centered at 4.7 MHz and the 50 Omega round trip insertion loss was --82 dB. The mean of the nearest neighbor cross talk was -37.0 dB. The second method consisted of a 46-cm long single layer flex circuit from MicroConnex that terminates in an interconnect that plugs directly into our system cable. This transducer had 70 elements at 0.157 mm interelement spacing operating at 4.8 MHz. Typical measured transducer element bandwidth was 29% and the 50 Omega round trip insertion loss was -83 dB. The mean of the nearest neighbor cross talk was -33.0 dB. PMID:20458877

  4. Can 3D ultrasound identify trochlea dysplasia in newborns? Evaluation and applicability of a technique.

    PubMed

    Kohlhof, Hendrik; Heidt, Christoph; Bähler, Alexandrine; Kohl, Sandro; Gravius, Sascha; Friedrich, Max J; Ziebarth, Kai; Stranzinger, Enno

    2015-06-01

    Femoro-patellar dysplasia is considered as a significant risk factor of patellar instability. Different studies suggest that the shape of the trochlea is already developed in early childhood. Therefore early identification of a dysplastic configuration might be relevant information for the treating physician. An easy applicable routine screening of the trochlea is yet not available. The purpose of this study was to establish and evaluate a screening method for femoro-patellar dysplasia using 3D ultrasound. From 2012 to 2013 we prospectively imaged 160 consecutive femoro-patellar joints in 80 newborns from the 36th to 61st gestational week that underwent a routine hip sonography (Graf). All ultrasounds were performed by a pediatric radiologist with only minimal additional time to the routine hip ultrasound. In 30° flexion of the knee, axial, coronal, and sagittal reformats were used to standardize a reconstructed axial plane through the femoral condyle and the mid-patella. The sulcus angle, the lateral-to-medial facet ratio of the trochlea and the shape of the patella (Wiberg Classification) were evaluated. In all examinations reconstruction of the standardized axial plane was achieved, the mean trochlea angle was 149.1° (SD 4.9°), the lateral-to-medial facet ratio of the trochlea ratio was 1.3 (SD 0.22), and a Wiberg type I patella was found in 95% of the newborn. No statistical difference was detected between boys and girls. Using standardized reconstructions of the axial plane allows measurements to be made with lower operator dependency and higher accuracy in a short time. Therefore 3D ultrasound is an easy applicable and powerful tool to identify trochlea dysplasia in newborns and might be used for screening for trochlea dysplasia. PMID:25843417

  5. High definition 3D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, A K; Krumm, J C; Kozlowski, D M; Kuhlmann, J L; Wilson, C; Little, C; Dickey, F M; Kwok, K S; Rogers, B; Walsh, N

    1997-01-01

    We have demonstrated high definition and improved resolution using a novel scanning system integrated with a commercial ultrasound machine. The result is a volumetric 3D ultrasound data set that can be visualized using standard techniques. Unlike other 3D ultrasound images, image quality is improved from standard 2D data. Image definition and bandwidth is improved using patent pending techniques. The system can be used to image patients or wounded soldiers for general imaging of anatomy such as abdominal organs, extremities, and the neck. Although the risks associated with x-ray carcinogenesis are relatively low at diagnostic dose levels, concerns remain for individuals in high risk categories. In addition, cost and portability of CT and MRI machines can be prohibitive. In comparison, ultrasound can provide portable, low-cost, non-ionizing imaging. Previous clinical trials comparing ultrasound to CT were used to demonstrate qualitative and quantitative improvements of ultrasound using the Sandia technologies. Transverse leg images demonstrated much higher clarity and lower noise than is seen in traditional ultrasound images. An x-ray CT scan was provided of the same cross-section for comparison. The results of our most recent trials demonstrate the advantages of 3D ultrasound and motion compensation compared with 2D ultrasound. Metal objects can also be observed within the anatomy. PMID:10168958

  6. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  7. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  8. Improved image guidance technique for minimally invasive mitral valve repair using real-time tracked 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Adam; Moore, John; Bainbridge, Daniel; Peters, Terry

    2016-03-01

    In the past ten years, numerous new surgical and interventional techniques have been developed for treating heart valve disease without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass. Heart valve repair is now being performed in a blood-filled environment, reinforcing the need for accurate and intuitive imaging techniques. Previous work has demonstrated how augmenting ultrasound with virtual representations of specific anatomical landmarks can greatly simplify interventional navigation challenges and increase patient safety. These techniques often complicate interventions by requiring additional steps taken to manually define and initialize virtual models. Furthermore, overlaying virtual elements into real-time image data can also obstruct the view of salient image information. To address these limitations, a system was developed that uses real-time volumetric ultrasound alongside magnetically tracked tools presented in an augmented virtuality environment to provide a streamlined navigation guidance platform. In phantom studies simulating a beating-heart navigation task, procedure duration and tool path metrics have achieved comparable performance to previous work in augmented virtuality techniques, and considerable improvement over standard of care ultrasound guidance.

  9. Editorial review: pediatric 3D ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound is an established diagnostic imaging technique in many specialties. However, in neonates, infants and children three-dimensional ultrasound still is underutilized, partially due to time constraints for post-processing and restricted availability, of devices as well as dedicated pediatric transducers. Also reimbursement issues still need to be addressed. This editorial review presents more or less established pediatric three-dimensional ultrasound applications with proven diagnostic benefit as well as potential future applications of three-dimensional/four-dimensional ultrasound in infants and children, aiming at enhancing research and promoting practical use of three-dimensional ultrasound in relevant pediatric conditions. Particularly, applications in neonatal neurosonography, ultrasound of the urogenital tract as well as some other small part and miscellaneous queries are highlighted. Additional other potential and future indications are discussed briefly, also mentioning restrictions and potential future developments. In summary, three-dimensional ultrasound holds some potential to widen sonographic diagnostic capabilities throughout childhood and hopefully will be increasingly investigated and introduced into clinical practice provided respective equipment and pediatric three-dimensional/four-dimensional ultrasound transducers become available. PMID:26676068

  10. Automatic needle segmentation in 3D ultrasound images using 3D Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Qiu, Wu; Ding, Mingyue; Zhang, Songgeng

    2007-12-01

    3D ultrasound (US) is a new technology that can be used for a variety of diagnostic applications, such as obstetrical, vascular, and urological imaging, and has been explored greatly potential in the applications of image-guided surgery and therapy. Uterine adenoma and uterine bleeding are the two most prevalent diseases in Chinese woman, and a minimally invasive ablation system using an RF button electrode which is needle-like is being used to destroy tumor cells or stop bleeding currently. Now a 3D US guidance system has been developed to avoid accidents or death of the patient by inaccurate localizations of the electrode and the tumor position during treatment. In this paper, we described two automated techniques, the 3D Hough Transform (3DHT) and the 3D Randomized Hough Transform (3DRHT), which is potentially fast, accurate, and robust to provide needle segmentation in 3D US image for use of 3D US imaging guidance. Based on the representation (Φ , θ , ρ , α ) of straight lines in 3D space, we used the 3DHT algorithm to segment needles successfully assumed that the approximate needle position and orientation are known in priori. The 3DRHT algorithm was developed to detect needles quickly without any information of the 3D US images. The needle segmentation techniques were evaluated using the 3D US images acquired by scanning water phantoms. The experiments demonstrated the feasibility of two 3D needle segmentation algorithms described in this paper.

  11. 3D Flow reconstruction using ultrasound PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelma, C.; Mari, J. M.; Foin, N.; Tang, M.-X.; Krams, R.; Caro, C. G.; Weinberg, P. D.; Westerweel, J.

    2011-04-01

    Ultrasound particle image velocimetry (PIV) can be used to obtain velocity fields in non-transparent geometries and/or fluids. In the current study, we use this technique to document the flow in a curved tube, using ultrasound contrast bubbles as flow tracer particles. The performance of the technique is first tested in a straight tube, with both steady laminar and pulsatile flows. Both experiments confirm that the technique is capable of reliable measurements. A number of adaptations are introduced that improve the accuracy and applicability of ultrasound PIV. Firstly, due to the method of ultrasound image acquisition, a correction is required for the estimation of velocities from tracer displacements. This correction accounts for the fact that columns in the image are recorded at slightly different instances. The second improvement uses a slice-by-slice scanning approach to obtain three-dimensional velocity data. This approach is here demonstrated in a strongly curved tube. The resulting flow profiles and wall shear stress distribution shows a distinct asymmetry. To meaningfully interpret these three-dimensional results, knowledge of the measurement thickness is required. Our third contribution is a method to determine this quantity, using the correlation peak heights. The latter method can also provide the third (out-of-plane) component if the measurement thickness is known, so that all three velocity components are available using a single probe.

  12. Automatic needle segmentation in 3D ultrasound images using 3D improved Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Qiu, Wu; Ding, Mingyue; Zhang, Songgen

    2008-03-01

    3D ultrasound (US) is a new technology that can be used for a variety of diagnostic applications, such as obstetrical, vascular, and urological imaging, and has been explored greatly potential in the applications of image-guided surgery and therapy. Uterine adenoma and uterine bleeding are the two most prevalent diseases in Chinese woman, and a minimally invasive ablation system using a needle-like RF button electrode is widely used to destroy tumor cells or stop bleeding. To avoid accidents or death of the patient by inaccurate localizations of the electrode and the tumor position during treatment, 3D US guidance system was developed. In this paper, a new automated technique, the 3D Improved Hough Transform (3DIHT) algorithm, which is potentially fast, accurate, and robust to provide needle segmentation in 3D US image for use of 3D US imaging guidance, was presented. Based on the coarse-fine search strategy and a four parameter representation of lines in 3D space, 3DIHT algorithm can segment needles quickly, accurately and robustly. The technique was evaluated using the 3D US images acquired by scanning a water phantom. The segmentation position deviation of the line was less than 2mm and angular deviation was much less than 2°. The average computational time measured on a Pentium IV 2.80GHz PC computer with a 381×381×250 image was less than 2s.

  13. Localization of liver tumors in freehand 3D laparoscopic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahin, O.; Martens, V.; Besirevic, A.; Kleemann, M.; Schlaefer, A.

    2012-02-01

    The aim of minimally invasive laparoscopic liver interventions is to completely resect or ablate tumors while minimizing the trauma caused by the operation. However, restrictions such as limited field of view and reduced depth perception can hinder the surgeon's capabilities to precisely localize the tumor. Typically, preoperative data is acquired to find the tumor(s) and plan the surgery. Nevertheless, determining the precise position of the tumor is required, not only before but also during the operation. The standard use of ultrasound in hepatic surgery is to explore the liver and identify tumors. Meanwhile, the surgeon mentally builds a 3D context to localize tumors. This work aims to upgrade the use of ultrasound in laparoscopic liver surgery. We propose an approach to segment and localize tumors intra-operatively in 3D ultrasound. We reconstruct a 3D laparoscopic ultrasound volume containing a tumor. The 3D image is then preprocessed and semi-automatically segmented using a level set algorithm. During the surgery, for each subsequent reconstructed volume, a fast update of the tumor position is accomplished via registration using the previously segmented and localized tumor as a prior knowledge. The approach was tested on a liver phantom with artificial tumors. The tumors were localized in approximately two seconds with a mean error of less than 0.5 mm. The strengths of this technique are that it can be performed intra-operatively, it helps the surgeon to accurately determine the location, shape and volume of the tumor, and it is repeatable throughout the operation.

  14. A 3D airborne ultrasound scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capineri, L.; Masotti, L.; Rocchi, S.

    1998-06-01

    This work investigates the feasibility of an ultrasound scanner designed to reconstruct three-dimensional profiles of objects in air. There are many industrial applications in which it is important to obtain quickly and accurately the digital reconstruction of solid objects with contactless methods. The final aim of this project was the profile reconstruction of shoe lasts in order to eliminate the mechanical tracers from the reproduction process of shoe prototypes. The feasibility of an ultrasonic scanner was investigated in laboratory conditions on wooden test objects with axial symmetry. A bistatic system based on five airborne polyvinylidenedifluoride (PVDF) transducers was mechanically moved to emulate a cylindrical array transducer that can host objects of maximum width and height 20 cm and 40 cm respectively. The object reconstruction was based on a simplified version of the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT): the time of flight (TOF) of the first in time echo for each receiving transducer was taken into account, a coarse spatial sampling of the ultrasonic field reflected on the array transducer was delivered and the reconstruction algorithm was based on the ellipsoidal backprojection. Measurements on a wooden cone section provided submillimetre accuracy in a controlled environment.

  15. Density-tapered spiral arrays for ultrasound 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Ramalli, Alessandro; Boni, Enrico; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Tortoli, Piero

    2015-08-01

    The current high interest in 3-D ultrasound imaging is pushing the development of 2-D probes with a challenging number of active elements. The most popular approach to limit this number is the sparse array technique, which designs the array layout by means of complex optimization algorithms. These algorithms are typically constrained by a few steering conditions, and, as such, cannot guarantee uniform side-lobe performance at all angles. The performance may be improved by the ungridded extensions of the sparse array technique, but this result is achieved at the expense of a further complication of the optimization process. In this paper, a method to design the layout of large circular arrays with a limited number of elements according to Fermat's spiral seeds and spatial density modulation is proposed and shown to be suitable for application to 3-D ultrasound imaging. This deterministic, aperiodic, and balanced positioning procedure attempts to guarantee uniform performance over a wide range of steering angles. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated by simulating and comparing the performance of spiral and dense arrays. A good trade-off for small vessel imaging is found, e.g., in the 60λ spiral array with 1.0λ elements and Blackman density tapering window. Here, the grating lobe level is -16 dB, the lateral resolution is lower than 6λ the depth of field is 120λ and, the average contrast is 10.3 dB, while the sensitivity remains in a 5 dB range for a wide selection of steering angles. The simulation results may represent a reference guide to the design of spiral sparse array probes for different application fields. PMID:26285181

  16. Automatic needle segmentation in 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mingyue; Cardinal, H. Neale; Guan, Weiguang; Fenster, Aaron

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, we propose to use 2D image projections to automatically segment a needle in a 3D ultrasound image. This approach is motivated by the twin observations that the needle is more conspicuous in a projected image, and its projected area is a minimum when the rays are cast parallel to the needle direction. To avoid the computational burden of an exhaustive 2D search for the needle direction, a faster 1D search procedure is proposed. First, a plane which contains the needle direction is determined by the initial projection direction and the (estimated) direction of the needle in the corresponding projection image. Subsequently, an adaptive 1D search technique is used to adjust the projection direction iteratively until the projected needle area is minimized. In order to remove noise and complex background structure from the projection images, a priori information about the needle position and orientation is used to crop the 3D volume, and the cropped volume is rendered with Gaussian transfer functions. We have evaluated this approach experimentally using agar and turkey breast phantoms. The results show that it can find the 3D needle orientation within 1 degree, in about 1 to 3 seconds on a 500 MHz computer.

  17. Automatic segmentation of the fetal cerebellum on ultrasound volumes, using a 3D statistical shape model.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Becker, Benjamín; Arámbula Cosío, Fernando; Guzmán Huerta, Mario E; Benavides-Serralde, Jesús Andrés; Camargo-Marín, Lisbeth; Medina Bañuelos, Verónica

    2013-09-01

    Previous work has shown that the segmentation of anatomical structures on 3D ultrasound data sets provides an important tool for the assessment of the fetal health. In this work, we present an algorithm based on a 3D statistical shape model to segment the fetal cerebellum on 3D ultrasound volumes. This model is adjusted using an ad hoc objective function which is in turn optimized using the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. Our algorithm was tested on ultrasound volumes of the fetal brain taken from 20 pregnant women, between 18 and 24 gestational weeks. An intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.8528 and a mean Dice coefficient of 0.8 between cerebellar volumes measured using manual techniques and the volumes calculated using our algorithm were obtained. As far as we know, this is the first effort to automatically segment fetal intracranial structures on 3D ultrasound data. PMID:23686392

  18. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm. PMID:23273891

  19. [An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Wu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; Xu, Hongwei; Liang, Huageng; Cai, Wenjuan; Fang, Mengjie; Wang, Yujie

    2013-07-01

    An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery was proposed. 3D ultrasound image was sliced into transverse, coronal and sagittal 2D images on the carotid bifurcation point. Then, the three images were processed respectively, and the carotid artery contours and thickness were obtained finally. This paper tries to overcome the disadvantages of current computer aided diagnosis method, such as high computational complexity, easily introduced subjective errors et al. The proposed method could get the carotid artery overall information rapidly, accurately and completely. It could be transplanted into clinical usage for atherosclerosis diagnosis and prevention. PMID:24195385

  20. The Application of Ultrasound in 3D Bio-Printing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is an emerging and promising technology in tissue engineering to construct tissues and organs for implantation. Alignment of self-assembly cell spheroids that are used as bioink could be very accurate after droplet ejection from bioprinter. Complex and heterogeneous tissue structures could be built using rapid additive manufacture technology and multiple cell lines. Effective vascularization in the engineered tissue samples is critical in any clinical application. In this review paper, the current technologies and processing steps (such as printing, preparation of bioink, cross-linking, tissue fusion and maturation) in 3D bio-printing are introduced, and their specifications are compared with each other. In addition, the application of ultrasound in this novel field is also introduced. Cells experience acoustic radiation force in ultrasound standing wave field (USWF) and then accumulate at the pressure node at low acoustic pressure. Formation of cell spheroids by this method is within minutes with uniform size and homogeneous cell distribution. Neovessel formation from USWF-induced endothelial cell spheroids is significant. Low-intensity ultrasound could enhance the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells. Its use is at low cost and compatible with current bioreactor. In summary, ultrasound application in 3D bio-printing may solve some challenges and enhance the outcomes. PMID:27164066

  1. A novel two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound imaging. It consists of a miniaturized single-element ultrasound transducer driven by a unique 2-axis liquid-immersible electromagnetic microactuator. With a mechanical scanning frequency of 19.532 Hz and an ultrasound pulse repetition rate of 5 kHz, the scanning transducer was scanned along 60 concentric paths with 256 detection points on each to simulate a physical 2D ultrasound transducer array of 60 × 256 elements. Using the scanning transducer, 3D pulse-echo ultrasound imaging of two silicon discs immersed in water as the imaging target was successfully conducted. The lateral resolution of the 3D ultrasound image was further improved with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer doesn't require complex and expensive multi-channel data acquisition (DAQ) electronics. Therefore, it could provide a new approach to achieve compact and low-cost 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging systems, especially for handheld operations.

  2. Real-Time 3D Contrast-Enhanced Transcranial Ultrasound and Aberration Correction

    PubMed Central

    Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Bennett, Ellen; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) transcranial ultrasound (US) and reconstructed 3D transcranial ultrasound have shown advantages over traditional methods in a variety of cerebrovascular diseases. We present the results from a novel ultrasound technique, namely real-time 3D contrast-enhanced transcranial ultrasound. Using real-time 3D (RT3D) ultrasound and micro-bubble contrast agent, we scanned 17 healthy volunteers via a single temporal window and 9 via the sub-occipital window and report our detection rates for the major cerebral vessels. In 71% of subjects, both of our observers identified the ipsilateral circle of Willis from the temporal window, and in 59% we imaged the entire circle of Willis. From the sub-occipital window, both observers detected the entire vertebrobasilar circulation in 22% of subjects, and in 44% the basilar artery. After performing phase aberration correction on one subject, we were able to increase the diagnostic value of the scan, detecting a vessel not present in the uncorrected scan. These preliminary results suggest that RT3D CE transcranial US and RT3D CE transcranial US with phase aberration correction have the potential to greatly impact the field of neurosonology. PMID:18395321

  3. Vascular Structure Identification in Intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Data

    PubMed Central

    Ilunga-Mbuyamba, Elisee; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Lindner, Dirk; Cruz-Aceves, Ivan; Arlt, Felix; Chalopin, Claire

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a method of vascular structure identification in intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) data is presented. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used in brain tumor surgery to investigate in real time the current status of cerebral structures. The use of an ultrasound contrast agent enables to highlight tumor tissue, but also surrounding blood vessels. However, these structures can be used as landmarks to estimate and correct the brain shift. This work proposes an alternative method for extracting small vascular segments close to the tumor as landmark. The patient image dataset involved in brain tumor operations includes preoperative contrast T1MR (cT1MR) data and 3D intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound data acquired before (3D-iCEUSstart) and after (3D-iCEUSend) tumor resection. Based on rigid registration techniques, a preselected vascular segment in cT1MR is searched in 3D-iCEUSstart and 3D-iCEUSend data. The method was validated by using three similarity measures (Normalized Gradient Field, Normalized Mutual Information and Normalized Cross Correlation). Tests were performed on data obtained from ten patients overcoming a brain tumor operation and it succeeded in nine cases. Despite the small size of the vascular structures, the artifacts in the ultrasound images and the brain tissue deformations, blood vessels were successfully identified. PMID:27070610

  4. Vascular Structure Identification in Intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Data.

    PubMed

    Ilunga-Mbuyamba, Elisee; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Lindner, Dirk; Cruz-Aceves, Ivan; Arlt, Felix; Chalopin, Claire

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a method of vascular structure identification in intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) data is presented. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used in brain tumor surgery to investigate in real time the current status of cerebral structures. The use of an ultrasound contrast agent enables to highlight tumor tissue, but also surrounding blood vessels. However, these structures can be used as landmarks to estimate and correct the brain shift. This work proposes an alternative method for extracting small vascular segments close to the tumor as landmark. The patient image dataset involved in brain tumor operations includes preoperative contrast T1MR (cT1MR) data and 3D intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound data acquired before (3D-iCEUS s t a r t ) and after (3D-iCEUS e n d ) tumor resection. Based on rigid registration techniques, a preselected vascular segment in cT1MR is searched in 3D-iCEUS s t a r t and 3D-iCEUS e n d data. The method was validated by using three similarity measures (Normalized Gradient Field, Normalized Mutual Information and Normalized Cross Correlation). Tests were performed on data obtained from ten patients overcoming a brain tumor operation and it succeeded in nine cases. Despite the small size of the vascular structures, the artifacts in the ultrasound images and the brain tissue deformations, blood vessels were successfully identified. PMID:27070610

  5. Assessing 3d Photogrammetry Techniques in Craniometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshobane, M. C.; de Bruyn, P. J. N.; Bester, M. N.

    2016-06-01

    Morphometrics (the measurement of morphological features) has been revolutionized by the creation of new techniques to study how organismal shape co-varies with several factors such as ecophenotypy. Ecophenotypy refers to the divergence of phenotypes due to developmental changes induced by local environmental conditions, producing distinct ecophenotypes. None of the techniques hitherto utilized could explicitly address organismal shape in a complete biological form, i.e. three-dimensionally. This study investigates the use of the commercial software, Photomodeler Scanner® (PMSc®) three-dimensional (3D) modelling software to produce accurate and high-resolution 3D models. Henceforth, the modelling of Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) and Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) skulls which could allow for 3D measurements. Using this method, sixteen accurate 3D skull models were produced and five metrics were determined. The 3D linear measurements were compared to measurements taken manually with a digital caliper. In addition, repetitive measurements were recorded by varying researchers to determine repeatability. To allow for comparison straight line measurements were taken with the software, assuming that close accord with all manually measured features would illustrate the model's accurate replication of reality. Measurements were not significantly different demonstrating that realistic 3D skull models can be successfully produced to provide a consistent basis for craniometrics, with the additional benefit of allowing non-linear measurements if required.

  6. 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation from 2D transversal ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Eunseop; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Jin, Changzhu; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2014-12-01

    Visualizing and analyzing the morphological structure of carotid bifurcations are important for understanding the etiology of carotid atherosclerosis, which is a major cause of stroke and transient ischemic attack. For delineation of vasculatures in the carotid artery, ultrasound examinations have been widely employed because of a noninvasive procedure without ionizing radiation. However, conventional 2D ultrasound imaging has technical limitations in observing the complicated 3D shapes and asymmetric vasodilation of bifurcations. This study aims to propose image-processing techniques for better 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation in a rat by using 2D cross-sectional ultrasound images. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging system with a probe centered at 40MHz was employed to obtain 2D transversal images. The lumen boundaries in each transverse ultrasound image were detected by using three different techniques; an ellipse-fitting, a correlation mapping to visualize the decorrelation of blood flow, and the ellipse-fitting on the correlation map. When the results are compared, the third technique provides relatively good boundary extraction. The incomplete boundaries of arterial lumen caused by acoustic artifacts are somewhat resolved by adopting the correlation mapping and the distortion in the boundary detection near the bifurcation apex was largely reduced by using the ellipse-fitting technique. The 3D lumen geometry of a carotid artery was obtained by volumetric rendering of several 2D slices. For the 3D vasodilatation of the carotid bifurcation, lumen geometries at the contraction and expansion states were simultaneously depicted at various view angles. The present 3D reconstruction methods would be useful for efficient extraction and construction of the 3D lumen geometries of carotid bifurcations from 2D ultrasound images. PMID:24965564

  7. 3D ultrasound image segmentation using wavelet support vector machines

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Hamed; Fei, Baowei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is clinically used in prostate biopsy and therapy. Segmentation of the prostate on TRUS images has many applications. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) segmentation method for TRUS images of the prostate is presented for 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy. Methods: This segmentation method utilizes a statistical shape, texture information, and intensity profiles. A set of wavelet support vector machines (W-SVMs) is applied to the images at various subregions of the prostate. The W-SVMs are trained to adaptively capture the features of the ultrasound images in order to differentiate the prostate and nonprostate tissue. This method consists of a set of wavelet transforms for extraction of prostate texture features and a kernel-based support vector machine to classify the textures. The voxels around the surface of the prostate are labeled in sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes. The weight functions are defined for each labeled voxel on each plane and on the model at each region. In the 3D segmentation procedure, the intensity profiles around the boundary between the tentatively labeled prostate and nonprostate tissue are compared to the prostate model. Consequently, the surfaces are modified based on the model intensity profiles. The segmented prostate is updated and compared to the shape model. These two steps are repeated until they converge. Manual segmentation of the prostate serves as the gold standard and a variety of methods are used to evaluate the performance of the segmentation method. Results: The results from 40 TRUS image volumes of 20 patients show that the Dice overlap ratio is 90.3% ± 2.3% and that the sensitivity is 87.7% ± 4.9%. Conclusions: The proposed method provides a useful tool in our 3D ultrasound image-guided prostate biopsy and can also be applied to other applications in the prostate. PMID:22755682

  8. 3D ultrasound imaging for prosthesis fabrication and diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Morimoto, A.K.; Bow, W.J.; Strong, D.S.

    1995-06-01

    The fabrication of a prosthetic socket for a below-the-knee amputee requires knowledge of the underlying bone structure in order to provide pressure relief for sensitive areas and support for load bearing areas. The goal is to enable the residual limb to bear pressure with greater ease and utility. Conventional methods of prosthesis fabrication are based on limited knowledge about the patient`s underlying bone structure. A 3D ultrasound imaging system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The imaging system provides information about the location of the bones in the residual limb along with the shape of the skin surface. Computer assisted design (CAD) software can use this data to design prosthetic sockets for amputees. Ultrasound was selected as the imaging modality. A computer model was developed to analyze the effect of the various scanning parameters and to assist in the design of the overall system. The 3D ultrasound imaging system combines off-the-shelf technology for image capturing, custom hardware, and control and image processing software to generate two types of image data -- volumetric and planar. Both volumetric and planar images reveal definition of skin and bone geometry with planar images providing details on muscle fascial planes, muscle/fat interfaces, and blood vessel definition. The 3D ultrasound imaging system was tested on 9 unilateral below-the- knee amputees. Image data was acquired from both the sound limb and the residual limb. The imaging system was operated in both volumetric and planar formats. An x-ray CT (Computed Tomography) scan was performed on each amputee for comparison. Results of the test indicate beneficial use of ultrasound to generate databases for fabrication of prostheses at a lower cost and with better initial fit as compared to manually fabricated prostheses.

  9. Incremental volume reconstruction and rendering for 3-D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohbuchi, Ryutarou; Chen, David; Fuchs, Henry

    1992-09-01

    In this paper, we present approaches toward an interactive visualization of a real time input, applied to 3-D visualizations of 2-D ultrasound echography data. The first, 3 degrees-of- freedom (DOF) incremental system visualizes a 3-D volume acquired as a stream of 2-D slices with location and orientation with 3 DOF. As each slice arrives, the system reconstructs a regular 3-D volume and renders it. Rendering is done by an incremental image-order ray- casting algorithm which stores and reuses the results of expensive resampling along the rays for speed. The second is our first experiment toward real-time 6 DOF acquisition and visualization. Two-dimensional slices with 6 DOF are reconstructed off-line, and visualized at an interactive rate using a parallel volume rendering code running on the graphics multicomputer Pixel-Planes 5.

  10. FPGA-based real-time anisotropic diffusion filtering of 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Pareja, Carlos R.; Dandekar, Omkar S.; Shekhar, Raj

    2005-02-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasonic imaging, especially the emerging real-time version of it, is particularly valuable in medical applications such as echocardiography, obstetrics and surgical navigation. A known problem with ultrasound images is their high level of speckle noise. Anisotropic diffusion filtering has been shown to be effective in enhancing the visual quality of 3D ultrasound images and as preprocessing prior to advanced image processing. However, due to its arithmetic complexity and the sheer size of 3D ultrasound images, it is not possible to perform online, real-time anisotropic diffusion filtering using standard software implementations. We present an FPGA-based architecture that allows performing anisotropic diffusion filtering of 3D images at acquisition rates, thus enabling the use of this filtering technique in real-time applications, such as visualization, registration and volume rendering.

  11. 3D freehand ultrasound for medical assistance in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Fabian; Fanti, Zian; Arambula Cosío, F.

    2013-11-01

    Image-guided interventions allow the physician to have a better planning and visualization of a procedure. 3D freehand ultrasound is a non-invasive and low-cost imaging tool that can be used to assist medical procedures. This tool can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. There are common medical practices that involve large needles to obtain an accurate diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. In this study we propose the use of 3D freehand ultrasound for planning and guiding such procedures as core needle biopsy and radiofrequency ablation. The proposed system will help the physician to identify the lesion area, using image-processing techniques in the 3D freehand ultrasound images, and guide the needle to this area using the information of position and orientation of the surgical tools. We think that this system can upgrade the accuracy and efficiency of these procedures.

  12. Validation of 3D surface reconstruction of vertebrae and spinal column using 3D ultrasound data--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc V; Vo, Quang N; Le, Lawrence H; Lou, Edmond H M

    2015-02-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a three-dimensional deformity of spine associated with vertebra rotation. The Cobb angle and axial vertebral rotation are important parameters to assess the severity of scoliosis. However, the vertebral rotation is seldom measured from radiographs due to time consuming. Different techniques have been developed to extract 3D spinal information. Among many techniques, ultrasound imaging is a promising method. This pilot study reported an image processing method to reconstruct the posterior surface of vertebrae from 3D ultrasound data. Three cadaver vertebrae, a Sawbones spine phantom, and a spine from a child with AIS were used to validate the development. The in-vitro result showed the surface of the reconstructed image was visually similar to the original objects. The dimension measurement error was <5 mm and the Pearson correlation was >0.99. The results also showed a high accuracy in vertebral rotation with errors of 0.8 ± 0.3°, 2.8 ± 0.3° and 3.6 ± 0.5° for the rotation values of 0°, 15° and 30°, respectively. Meanwhile, the difference in the Cobb angle between the phantom and the image was 4° and the vertebral rotation at the apex was 2°. The Cobb angle measured from the in-vivo ultrasound image was 4° different from the radiograph. PMID:25550193

  13. Breast tumour visualization using 3D quantitative ultrasound methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Raheem, Abdul; Tadayyon, Hadi; Liu, Simon; Hadizad, Farnoosh; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancer types accounting for 29% of all cancer cases. Early detection and treatment has a crucial impact on improving the survival of affected patients. Ultrasound (US) is non-ionizing, portable, inexpensive, and real-time imaging modality for screening and quantifying breast cancer. Due to these attractive attributes, the last decade has witnessed many studies on using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods in tissue characterization. However, these studies have mainly been limited to 2-D QUS methods using hand-held US (HHUS) scanners. With the availability of automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) technology, this study is the first to develop 3-D QUS methods for the ABUS visualization of breast tumours. Using an ABUS system, unlike the manual 2-D HHUS device, the whole patient's breast was scanned in an automated manner. The acquired frames were subsequently examined and a region of interest (ROI) was selected in each frame where tumour was identified. Standard 2-D QUS methods were used to compute spectral and backscatter coefficient (BSC) parametric maps on the selected ROIs. Next, the computed 2-D parameters were mapped to a Cartesian 3-D space, interpolated, and rendered to provide a transparent color-coded visualization of the entire breast tumour. Such 3-D visualization can potentially be used for further analysis of the breast tumours in terms of their size and extension. Moreover, the 3-D volumetric scans can be used for tissue characterization and the categorization of breast tumours as benign or malignant by quantifying the computed parametric maps over the whole tumour volume.

  14. 3D segmentation of prostate ultrasound images using wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Hamed; Yang, Xiaofeng; Halig, Luma V.; Fei, Baowei

    2011-03-01

    The current definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer is transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsy. However, the current procedure is limited by using 2D biopsy tools to target 3D biopsy locations. This paper presents a new method for automatic segmentation of the prostate in three-dimensional transrectal ultrasound images, by extracting texture features and by statistically matching geometrical shape of the prostate. A set of Wavelet-based support vector machines (WSVMs) are located and trained at different regions of the prostate surface. The WSVMs capture texture priors of ultrasound images for classification of the prostate and non-prostate tissues in different zones around the prostate boundary. In the segmentation procedure, these W-SVMs are trained in three sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes. The pre-trained W-SVMs are employed to tentatively label each voxel around the surface of the model as a prostate or non-prostate voxel by the texture matching. The labeled voxels in three planes after post-processing is overlaid on a prostate probability model. The probability prostate model is created using 10 segmented prostate data. Consequently, each voxel has four labels: sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes and one probability label. By defining a weight function for each labeling in each region, each voxel is labeled as a prostate or non-prostate voxel. Experimental results by using real patient data show the good performance of the proposed model in segmenting the prostate from ultrasound images.

  15. Glasses for 3D ultrasound computer tomography: phase compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapf, M.; Hopp, T.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT), developed at KIT, is a promising new imaging system for breast cancer diagnosis, and was successfully tested in a pilot study. The 3D USCT II prototype consists of several hundreds of ultrasound (US) transducers on a semi-ellipsoidal aperture. Spherical waves are sequentially emitted by individual transducers and received in parallel by many transducers. Reflectivity volumes are reconstructed by synthetic aperture focusing (SAFT). However, straight forward SAFT imaging leads to blurred images due to system imperfections. We present an extension of a previously proposed approach to enhance the images. This approach includes additional a priori information and system characteristics. Now spatial phase compensation was included. The approach was evaluated with a simulation and clinical data sets. An increase in the image quality was observed and quantitatively measured by SNR and other metrics.

  16. A 3-D chimera grid embedding technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benek, J. A.; Buning, P. G.; Steger, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) chimera grid-embedding technique is described. The technique simplifies the construction of computational grids about complex geometries. The method subdivides the physical domain into regions which can accommodate easily generated grids. Communication among the grids is accomplished by interpolation of the dependent variables at grid boundaries. The procedures for constructing the composite mesh and the associated data structures are described. The method is demonstrated by solution of the Euler equations for the transonic flow about a wing/body, wing/body/tail, and a configuration of three ellipsoidal bodies.

  17. 3D segmentation and reconstruction of endobronchial ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Xiaonan; Breslav, Mikhail; Higgins, William E.

    2013-03-01

    State-of-the-art practice for lung-cancer staging bronchoscopy often draws upon a combination of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) and multidetector computed-tomography (MDCT) imaging. While EBUS offers real-time in vivo imaging of suspicious lesions and lymph nodes, its low signal-to-noise ratio and tendency to exhibit missing region-of-interest (ROI) boundaries complicate diagnostic tasks. Furthermore, past efforts did not incorporate automated analysis of EBUS images and a subsequent fusion of the EBUS and MDCT data. To address these issues, we propose near real-time automated methods for three-dimensional (3D) EBUS segmentation and reconstruction that generate a 3D ROI model along with ROI measurements. Results derived from phantom data and lung-cancer patients show the promise of the methods. In addition, we present a preliminary image-guided intervention (IGI) system example, whereby EBUS imagery is registered to a patient's MDCT chest scan.

  18. Real-time, 3-D ultrasound with multiple transducer arrays.

    PubMed

    Fronheiser, Matthew P; Light, Edward D; Idriss, Salim F; Wolf, Patrick D; Smith, Stephen W

    2006-01-01

    Modifications were made to a commercial real-time, three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system for near simultaneous 3-D scanning with two matrix array transducers. As a first illustration, a transducer cable assembly was modified to incorporate two independent, 3-D intra-cardiac echo catheters, a 7 Fr (2.3 mm O.D.) side scanning catheter and a 14 Fr (4.7 mm O.D) forward viewing catheter with accessory port, each catheter using 85 channels operating at 5 MHz. For applications in treatment of atrial fibrillation, the goal is to place the sideviewing catheter within the coronary sinus to view the whole left atrium, including a pulmonary vein. Meanwhile, the forward-viewing catheter inserted within the left atrium is directed toward the ostium of a pulmonary vein for therapy using the integrated accessory port. Using preloaded, phasing data, the scanner switches between catheters automatically, at the push of a button, with a delay of about 1 second, so that the clinician can view the therapy catheter with the coronary sinus catheter and vice versa. Preliminary imaging studies in a tissue phantom and in vivo show that our system successfully guided the forward-viewing catheter toward a target while being imaged with the sideviewing catheter. The forward-viewing catheter then was activated to monitor the target while we mimicked therapy delivery. In the future, the system will switch between 3-D probes on a line-by-line basis and display both volumes simultaneously. PMID:16471436

  19. Integration of 3D intraoperative ultrasound for enhanced neuronavigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Keith D.; Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.

    2012-03-01

    True three-dimensional (3D) volumetric ultrasound (US) acquisitions stand to benefit intraoperative neuronavigation on multiple fronts. While traditional two-dimensional (2D) US and its tracked, hand-swept version have been recognized for many years to advantage significantly image-guided neurosurgery, especially when coregistered with preoperative MR scans, its unregulated and incomplete sampling of the surgical volume of interest have limited certain intraoperative uses of the information that are overcome through direct volume acquisition (i.e., through 2D scan-head transducer arrays). In this paper, we illustrate several of these advantages, including image-based intraoperative registration (and reregistration) and automated, volumetric displacement mapping for intraoperative image updating. These applications of 3D US are enabled by algorithmic advances in US image calibration, and volume rasterization and interpolation for multi-acquisition synthesis that will also be highlighted. We expect to demonstrate that coregistered 3D US is well worth incorporating into the standard neurosurgical navigational environment relative to traditional tracked, hand-swept 2D US.

  20. Visualization of hepatic arteries with 3D ultrasound during intra-arterial therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Maxime; Tang, An; Badoual, Anaïs.; Michaud, François; Bigot, Alexandre; Soulez, Gilles; Kadoury, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Liver cancer represents the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The prognosis is poor with an overall mortality of 95%. Moreover, most hepatic tumors are unresectable due to their advanced stage at discovery or poor underlying liver function. Tumor embolization by intra-arterial approaches is the current standard of care for advanced cases of hepatocellular carcinoma. These therapies rely on the fact that the blood supply of primary hepatic tumors is predominantly arterial. Feedback on blood flow velocities in the hepatic arteries is crucial to ensure maximal treatment efficacy on the targeted masses. Based on these velocities, the intra-arterial injection rate is modulated for optimal infusion of the chemotherapeutic drugs into the tumorous tissue. While Doppler ultrasound is a well-documented technique for the assessment of blood flow, 3D visualization of vascular anatomy with ultrasound remains challenging. In this paper we present an image-guidance pipeline that enables the localization of the hepatic arterial branches within a 3D ultrasound image of the liver. A diagnostic Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is first processed to automatically segment the hepatic arteries. A non-rigid registration method is then applied on the portal phase of the MRA volume with a 3D ultrasound to enable the visualization of the 3D mesh of the hepatic arteries in the Doppler images. To evaluate the performance of the proposed workflow, we present initial results from porcine models and patient images.

  1. 3D ultrasound computer tomography: update from a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Henrich, J.; Tukalo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Kaiser, C.; Knaudt, J.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a promising new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. We developed a 3D USCT system and tested it in a pilot study with encouraging results: 3D USCT was able to depict two carcinomas, which were present in contrast enhanced MRI volumes serving as ground truth. To overcome severe differences in the breast shape, an image registration was applied. We analyzed the correlation between average sound speed in the breast and the breast density estimated from segmented MRIs and found a positive correlation with R=0.70. Based on the results of the pilot study we now carry out a successive clinical study with 200 patients. For this we integrated our reconstruction methods and image post-processing into a comprehensive workflow. It includes a dedicated DICOM viewer for interactive assessment of fused USCT images. A new preview mode now allows intuitive and faster patient positioning. We updated the USCT system to decrease the data acquisition time by approximately factor two and to increase the penetration depth of the breast into the USCT aperture by 1 cm. Furthermore the compute-intensive reflectivity reconstruction was considerably accelerated, now allowing a sub-millimeter volume reconstruction in approximately 16 minutes. The updates made it possible to successfully image first patients in our ongoing clinical study.

  2. Multi-resolution Gabor wavelet feature extraction for needle detection in 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtaherian, Arash; Zinger, Svitlana; Mihajlovic, Nenad; de With, Peter H. N.; Huang, Jinfeng; Ng, Gary C.; Korsten, Hendrikus H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound imaging is employed for needle guidance in various minimally invasive procedures such as biopsy guidance, regional anesthesia and brachytherapy. Unfortunately, a needle guidance using 2D ultrasound is very challenging, due to a poor needle visibility and a limited field of view. Nowadays, 3D ultrasound systems are available and more widely used. Consequently, with an appropriate 3D image-based needle detection technique, needle guidance and interventions may significantly be improved and simplified. In this paper, we present a multi-resolution Gabor transformation for an automated and reliable extraction of the needle-like structures in a 3D ultrasound volume. We study and identify the best combination of the Gabor wavelet frequencies. High precision in detecting the needle voxels leads to a robust and accurate localization of the needle for the intervention support. Evaluation in several ex-vivo cases shows that the multi-resolution analysis significantly improves the precision of the needle voxel detection from 0.23 to 0.32 at a high recall rate of 0.75 (gain 40%), where a better robustness and confidence were confirmed in the practical experiments.

  3. Registration of 2D cardiac images to real-time 3D ultrasound volumes for 3D stress echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. Y. Esther; van Stralen, Marijn; Voormolen, Marco M.; van Burken, Gerard; Nemes, Attila; ten Cate, Folkert J.; Geleijnse, Marcel L.; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Bosch, Johan G.

    2006-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) stress echocardiography is a novel technique for diagnosing cardiac dysfunction, by comparing wall motion of the left ventricle under different stages of stress. For quantitative comparison of this motion, it is essential to register the ultrasound data. We propose an intensity based rigid registration method to retrieve two-dimensional (2D) four-chamber (4C), two-chamber, and short-axis planes from the 3D data set acquired in the stress stage, using manually selected 2D planes in the rest stage as reference. The algorithm uses the Nelder-Mead simplex optimization to find the optimal transformation of one uniform scaling, three rotation, and three translation parameters. We compared registration using the SAD, SSD, and NCC metrics, performed on four resolution levels of a Gaussian pyramid. The registration's effectiveness was assessed by comparing the 3D positions of the registered apex and mitral valve midpoints and 4C direction with the manually selected results. The registration was tested on data from 20 patients. Best results were found using the NCC metric on data downsampled with factor two: mean registration errors were 8.1mm, 5.4mm, and 8.0° in the apex position, mitral valve position, and 4C direction respectively. The errors were close to the interobserver (7.1mm, 3.8mm, 7.4°) and intraobserver variability (5.2mm, 3.3mm, 7.0°), and better than the error before registration (9.4mm, 9.0mm, 9.9°). We demonstrated that the registration algorithm visually and quantitatively improves the alignment of rest and stress data sets, performing similar to manual alignment. This will improve automated analysis in 3D stress echocardiography.

  4. Benchmarking of state-of-the-art needle detection algorithms in 3D ultrasound data volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtaherian, Arash; Zinger, Svitlana; de With, Peter H. N.; Korsten, Hendrikus H. M.; Mihajlovic, Nenad

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle interventions are widely practiced in medical diagnostics and therapy, i.e. for biopsy guidance, regional anesthesia or for brachytherapy. Needle guidance using 2D ultrasound can be very challenging due to the poor needle visibility and the limited field of view. Since 3D ultrasound transducers are becoming more widely used, needle guidance can be improved and simplified with appropriate computer-aided analyses. In this paper, we compare two state-of-the-art 3D needle detection techniques: a technique based on line filtering from literature and a system employing Gabor transformation. Both algorithms utilize supervised classification to pre-select candidate needle voxels in the volume and then fit a model of the needle on the selected voxels. The major differences between the two approaches are in extracting the feature vectors for classification and selecting the criterion for fitting. We evaluate the performance of the two techniques using manually-annotated ground truth in several ex-vivo situations of different complexities, containing three different needle types with various insertion angles. This extensive evaluation provides better understanding on the limitations and advantages of each technique under different acquisition conditions, which is leading to the development of improved techniques for more reliable and accurate localization. Benchmarking results that the Gabor features are better capable of distinguishing the needle voxels in all datasets. Moreover, it is shown that the complete processing chain of the Gabor-based method outperforms the line filtering in accuracy and stability of the detection results.

  5. The Ultrasound Brain Helmet: Simultaneous Multi-transducer 3D Transcranial Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Brooks D.

    In this work, I examine the problem of rapid imaging of stroke and present ultrasound-based approaches for addressing it. Specifically, this dissertation discusses aberration and attenuation due to the skull as sources of image degradation and presents a prototype system for simultaneous 3D bilateral imaging via both temporal acoustic windows. This system uses custom sparse array transducers built on flexible multilayer circuits that can be positioned for simultaneous imaging via both temporal acoustic windows, allowing for registration and fusion of multiple real-time 3D scans of cerebral vasculature. I examine hardware considerations for new matrix arrays—transducer design and interconnects—in this application. Specifically, it is proposed that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) may be increased by reducing the length of probe cables. This claim is evaluated as part of the presented system through simulation, experimental data, and in vivo imaging. Ultimately, gains in SNR of 7 dB are realized by replacing a standard probe cable with a much shorter flex interconnect; higher gains may be possible using ribbon-based probe cables. In vivo images are presented depicting cerebral arteries with and without the use of microbubble contrast agent that have been registered and fused using a search algorithm which maximizes normalized cross-correlation. The scanning geometry of a brain helmet-type system is also utilized to allow each matrix array to serve as a correction source for the opposing array. Aberration is estimated using cross-correlation of RF channel signals followed by least mean squares solution of the resulting overdetermined system. Delay maps are updated and real-time 3D scanning resumes. A first attempt is made at using multiple arrival time maps to correct multiple unique aberrators within a single transcranial imaging volume, i.e. several isoplanatic patches. This adaptive imaging technique, which uses steered unfocused waves transmitted by the opposing or

  6. 3D temperature field reconstruction using ultrasound sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuqian; Ma, Tong; Cao, Chengyu; Wang, Xingwei

    2016-04-01

    3D temperature field reconstruction is of practical interest to the power, transportation and aviation industries and it also opens up opportunities for real time control or optimization of high temperature fluid or combustion process. In our paper, a new distributed optical fiber sensing system consisting of a series of elements will be used to generate and receive acoustic signals. This system is the first active temperature field sensing system that features the advantages of the optical fiber sensors (distributed sensing capability) and the acoustic sensors (non-contact measurement). Signals along multiple paths will be measured simultaneously enabled by a code division multiple access (CDMA) technique. Then a proposed Gaussian Radial Basis Functions (GRBF)-based approach can approximate the temperature field as a finite summation of space-dependent basis functions and time-dependent coefficients. The travel time of the acoustic signals depends on the temperature of the media. On this basis, the Gaussian functions are integrated along a number of paths which are determined by the number and distribution of sensors. The inversion problem to estimate the unknown parameters of the Gaussian functions can be solved with the measured times-of-flight (ToF) of acoustic waves and the length of propagation paths using the recursive least square method (RLS). The simulation results show an approximation error less than 2% in 2D and 5% in 3D respectively. It demonstrates the availability and efficiency of our proposed 3D temperature field reconstruction mechanism.

  7. Techniques for interactive 3-D scientific visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Glinert, E.P. . Dept. of Computer Science); Blattner, M.M. Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX . Dept. of Biomathematics California Univ., Davis, CA . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Becker, B.G. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National La

    1990-09-24

    Interest in interactive 3-D graphics has exploded of late, fueled by (a) the allure of using scientific visualization to go where no-one has gone before'' and (b) by the development of new input devices which overcome some of the limitations imposed in the past by technology, yet which may be ill-suited to the kinds of interaction required by researchers active in scientific visualization. To resolve this tension, we propose a flat 5-D'' environment in which 2-D graphics are augmented by exploiting multiple human sensory modalities using cheap, conventional hardware readily available with personal computers and workstations. We discuss how interactions basic to 3-D scientific visualization, like searching a solution space and comparing two such spaces, are effectively carried out in our environment. Finally, we describe 3DMOVE, an experimental microworld we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 40 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Towards 3D ultrasound image based soft tissue tracking: a transrectal ultrasound prostate image alignment system.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Michael; Mozer, Pierre; Daanen, Vincent; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of real-time 3D ultrasound (US) makes it possible to consider image-based tracking of subcutaneous soft tissue targets for computer guided diagnosis and therapy. We propose a 3D transrectal US based tracking system for precise prostate biopsy sample localisation. The aim is to improve sample distribution, to enable targeting of unsampled regions for repeated biopsies, and to make post-interventional quality controls possible. Since the patient is not immobilized, since the prostate is mobile and due to the fact that probe movements are only constrained by the rectum during biopsy acquisition, the tracking system must be able to estimate rigid transformations that are beyond the capture range of common image similarity measures. We propose a fast and robust multi-resolution attribute-vector registration approach that combines global and local optimization methods to solve this problem. Global optimization is performed on a probe movement model that reduces the dimensionality of the search space and thus renders optimization efficient. The method was tested on 237 prostate volumes acquired from 14 different patients for 3D to 3D and 3D to orthogonal 2D slices registration. The 3D-3D version of the algorithm converged correctly in 96.7% of all cases in 6.5s with an accuracy of 1.41mm (r.m.s.) and 3.84mm (max). The 3D to slices method yielded a success rate of 88.9% in 2.3s with an accuracy of 1.37mm (r.m.s.) and 4.3mm (max). PMID:18044549

  9. Pitch–Catch Phase Aberration Correction of Multiple Isoplanatic Patches for 3-D Transcranial Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Having previously presented the ultrasound brain helmet, a system for simultaneous 3-D ultrasound imaging via both temporal bone acoustic windows, the scanning geometry of this system is utilized to allow each matrix array to serve as a correction source for the opposing array. Aberration is estimated using cross-correlation of RF channel signals, followed by least mean squares solution of the resulting overdetermined system. Delay maps are updated and real-time 3-D scanning resumes. A first attempt is made at using multiple arrival time maps to correct multiple unique aberrators within a single transcranial imaging volume, i.e., several isoplanatic patches. This adaptive imaging technique, which uses steered unfocused waves transmitted by the opposing, or beacon, array, updates the transmit and receive delays of 5 isoplanatic patches within a 64° × 64° volume. In phantom experiments, color flow voxels above a common threshold have also increased by an average of 92%, whereas color flow variance decreased by an average of 10%. This approach has been applied to both temporal acoustic windows of two human subjects, yielding increases in echo brightness in 5 isoplanatic patches with a mean value of 24.3 ± 9.1%, suggesting that such a technique may be beneficial in the future for performing noninvasive 3-D color flow imaging of cerebrovascular disease, including stroke. PMID:23475914

  10. [Cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy: diagnosis with 2D, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound and 3D power doppler of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, E; Gunev, D; Diavolov, V; Slavchev, B

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy is rare type of ectopic pregnancy. It is associated with severe complication if it is not diagnosed early in pregnancy. We present a case of difficult first-trimester diagnosis of Cesarean scar pregnancy. In this paper we discuss the incidence of this condition, the antenatal diagnosis, the prognosis and management and the importance of 2D and 3D ultrasound technique as a diagnostic tool. PMID:24501880

  11. Accuracy assessment of high frequency 3D ultrasound for digital impression-taking of prepared teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heger, Stefan; Vollborn, Thorsten; Tinschert, Joachim; Wolfart, Stefan; Radermacher, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Silicone based impression-taking of prepared teeth followed by plaster casting is well-established but potentially less reliable, error-prone and inefficient, particularly in combination with emerging techniques like computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of dental prosthesis. Intra-oral optical scanners for digital impression-taking have been introduced but until now some drawbacks still exist. Because optical waves can hardly penetrate liquids or soft-tissues, sub-gingival preparations still need to be uncovered invasively prior to scanning. High frequency ultrasound (HFUS) based micro-scanning has been recently investigated as an alternative to optical intra-oral scanning. Ultrasound is less sensitive against oral fluids and in principal able to penetrate gingiva without invasively exposing of sub-gingival preparations. Nevertheless, spatial resolution as well as digitization accuracy of an ultrasound based micro-scanning system remains a critical parameter because the ultrasound wavelength in water-like media such as gingiva is typically smaller than that of optical waves. In this contribution, the in-vitro accuracy of ultrasound based micro-scanning for tooth geometry reconstruction is being investigated and compared to its extra-oral optical counterpart. In order to increase the spatial resolution of the system, 2nd harmonic frequencies from a mechanically driven focused single element transducer were separated and corresponding 3D surface models were calculated for both fundamentals and 2nd harmonics. Measurements on phantoms, model teeth and human teeth were carried out for evaluation of spatial resolution and surface detection accuracy. Comparison of optical and ultrasound digital impression taking indicate that, in terms of accuracy, ultrasound based tooth digitization can be an alternative for optical impression-taking.

  12. 3D in vivo imaging of rat hearts by high frequency ultrasound and its application in myofiber orientation wrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ultrasound plays an important role in the imaging of hearts in basic cardiovascular research and clinical examinations. 3D ultrasound imaging can provide the geometry or motion information of the heart. Especially, the wrapping of cardiac fiber orientations to the ultrasound volume could supply useful information on the stress distributions and electric action spreading. However, how to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the heart of small animals in vivo for cardiac fiber wrapping is still a challenging problem. In this study, we provide an approach to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the rat hearts in vivo. The comparison between both in vivo and ex vivo geometries indicated 90.1% Dice similarity. In this preliminary study, the evaluations of the cardiac fiber orientation wrapping errors were 24.7° for the acute angle error and were 22.4° for the inclination angle error. This 3D ultrasound imaging and fiber orientation estimation technique have potential applications in cardiac imaging.

  13. 3D in vivo imaging of rat hearts by high frequency ultrasound and its application in myofiber orientation wrapping

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac ultrasound plays an important role in the imaging of hearts in basic cardiovascular research and clinical examinations. 3D ultrasound imaging can provide the geometry or motion information of the heart. Especially, the wrapping of cardiac fiber orientations to the ultrasound volume could supply useful information on the stress distributions and electric action spreading. However, how to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the heart of small animals in vivo for cardiac fiber wrapping is still a challenging problem. In this study, we provide an approach to acquire 3D ultrasound volumes of the rat hearts in vivo. The comparison between both in vivo and ex vivo geometries indicated 90.1% Dice similarity. In this preliminary study, the evaluations of the cardiac fiber orientation wrapping errors were 24.7° for the acute angle error and were 22.4° for the inclination angle error. This 3D ultrasound imaging and fiber orientation estimation technique have potential applications in cardiac imaging. PMID:26412926

  14. Preliminary results in large bone segmentation from 3D freehand ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanti, Zian; Torres, Fabian; Arámbula Cosío, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Computer Assisted Orthopedic Surgery (CAOS) requires a correct registration between the patient in the operating room and the virtual models representing the patient in the computer. In order to increase the precision and accuracy of the registration a set of new techniques that eliminated the need to use fiducial markers have been developed. The majority of these newly developed registration systems are based on costly intraoperative imaging systems like Computed Tomography (CT scan) or Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An alternative to these methods is the use of an Ultrasound (US) imaging system for the implementation of a more cost efficient intraoperative registration solution. In order to develop the registration solution with the US imaging system, the bone surface is segmented in both preoperative and intraoperative images, and the registration is done using the acquire surface. In this paper, we present the a preliminary results of a new approach to segment bone surface from ultrasound volumes acquired by means 3D freehand ultrasound. The method is based on the enhancement of the voxels that belongs to surface and its posterior segmentation. The enhancement process is based on the information provided by eigenanalisis of the multiscale 3D Hessian matrix. The preliminary results shows that from the enhance volume the final bone surfaces can be extracted using a singular value thresholding.

  15. Development of a Wireless and Near Real-Time 3D Ultrasound Strain Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaohong; Chen, Yongdong; Huang, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an important medical imaging tool for characterization of lesions. In this paper, we present a wireless and near real-time 3D ultrasound strain imaging system. It uses a 3D translating device to control a commercial linear ultrasound transducer to collect pre-compression and post-compression radio-frequency (RF) echo signal frames. The RF frames are wirelessly transferred to a high-performance server via a local area network (LAN). A dynamic programming strain estimation algorithm is implemented with the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) on the graphic processing unit (GPU) in the server to calculate the strain image after receiving a pre-compression RF frame and a post-compression RF frame at the same position. Each strain image is inserted into a strain volume which can be rendered in near real-time. We take full advantage of the translating device to precisely control the probe movement and compression. The GPU-based parallel computing techniques are designed to reduce the computation time. Phantom and in vivo experimental results demonstrate that our system can generate strain volumes with good quality and display an incrementally reconstructed volume image in near real-time. PMID:26954841

  16. Bone segmentation and fracture detection in ultrasound using 3D local phase features.

    PubMed

    Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Abugharbieh, Rafeef; Hodgson, Antony; Rohling, Robert

    2008-01-01

    3D ultrasound (US) is increasingly considered as a viable alternative imaging modality in computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) applications. Automatic bone segmentation from US images, however, remains a challenge due to speckle noise and various other artifacts inherent to US. In this paper, we present intensity invariant three dimensional (3D) local image phase features, obtained using 3D Log-Gabor filter banks, for extracting ridge-like features similar to those that occur at soft tissue/bone interfaces. Our contributions include the novel extension of 2D phase symmetry features to 3D and their use in automatic extraction of bone surfaces and fractured fragments in 3D US. We validate our technique using phantom, in vitro, and in vivo experiments. Qualitative and quantitative results demonstrate remarkably clear segmentations results of bone surfaces with a localization accuracy of better than 0.62 mm and mean errors in estimating fracture displacements below 0.65 mm, which will likely be of strong clinical utility. PMID:18979759

  17. 3D Modeling Techniques for Print and Digital Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Megan Ashley

    In developing my thesis, I looked to gain skills using ZBrush to create 3D models, 3D scanning, and 3D printing. The models created compared the hearts of several vertebrates and were intended for students attending Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. I used several resources to create a model of the human heart and was able to work from life while creating heart models from other vertebrates. I successfully learned ZBrush and 3D scanning, and successfully printed 3D heart models. ZBrush allowed me to create several intricate models for use in both animation and print media. The 3D scanning technique did not fit my needs for the project, but may be of use for later projects. I was able to 3D print using two different techniques as well.

  18. View synthesis techniques for 3D video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Dong; Lai, Po-Lin; Lopez, Patrick; Gomila, Cristina

    2009-08-01

    To facilitate new video applications such as three-dimensional video (3DV) and free-viewpoint video (FVV), multiple view plus depth format (MVD), which consists of both video views and the corresponding per-pixel depth images, is being investigated. Virtual views can be generated using depth image based rendering (DIBR), which takes video and the corresponding depth images as input. This paper discusses view synthesis techniques based on DIBR, which includes forward warping, blending and hole filling. Especially, we will emphasize on the techniques brought to the MPEG view synthesis reference software (VSRS). Unlike the case in the field of computer graphics, the ground truth depth images for nature content are very difficult to obtain. The estimated depth images used for view synthesis typically contain different types of noises. Some robust synthesis modes to combat against the depth errors are also presented in this paper. In addition, we briefly discuss how to use synthesis techniques with minor modifications to generate the occlusion layer information for layered depth video (LDV) data, which is another potential format for 3DV applications.

  19. On Alternative Approaches to 3D Image Perception: Monoscopic 3D Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Barry G.

    2015-06-01

    In the eighteenth century, techniques that enabled a strong sense of 3D perception to be experienced without recourse to binocular disparities (arising from the spatial separation of the eyes) underpinned the first significant commercial sales of 3D viewing devices and associated content. However following the advent of stereoscopic techniques in the nineteenth century, 3D image depiction has become inextricably linked to binocular parallax and outside the vision science and arts communities relatively little attention has been directed towards earlier approaches. Here we introduce relevant concepts and terminology and consider a number of techniques and optical devices that enable 3D perception to be experienced on the basis of planar images rendered from a single vantage point. Subsequently we allude to possible mechanisms for non-binocular parallax based 3D perception. Particular attention is given to reviewing areas likely to be thought-provoking to those involved in 3D display development, spatial visualization, HCI, and other related areas of interdisciplinary research.

  20. Evaluation of Gastric Volumes: Comparison of 3-D Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Buisman, Wijnand J; Mauritz, Femke A; Westerhuis, Wouter E; Gilja, Odd Helge; van der Zee, David C; van Herwaarden-Lindeboom, Maud Y A

    2016-07-01

    To investigate gastric accommodation, accurate measurements of gastric volumes are necessary. An excellent technique to measure gastric volumes is dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, dynamic MRI is expensive and not always available. A new 3-D ultrasound (US) method using a matrix transducer was developed to measure gastric volumes. In this prospective study, 14 healthy volunteers underwent a dynamic MRI and a 3-D US. Gastric volumes were calculated with intra-gastric liquid content and total gastric volume. Mean postprandial liquid gastric content was 397 ± 96.5 mL. Mean volume difference was 1.0 mL with limits of agreement of -8.9 to 10.9 mL. When gastric air was taken into account, mean total gastric volume was 540 ± 115.4 mL SD. Mean volume difference was 2.3 mL with limits of agreement of -21.1 to 26.4 mL. The matrix 3-D US showed excellent agreement with dynamic MRI. Therefore matrix 3-D US is a reliable alternative to measure gastric volumes. PMID:27067418

  1. Automated benign & malignant thyroid lesion characterization and classification in 3D contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U Rajendra; S, Vinitha Sree; Molinari, Filippo; Garberoglio, Roberto; Witkowska, Agnieszka; Suri, Jasjit S

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) based technique for automatic classification of benign and malignant thyroid lesions in 3D contrast-enhanced ultrasound images. The images were obtained from 20 patients. Fine needle aspiration biopsy and histology confirmed malignancy. Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and texture based features were extracted from the thyroid images. The resulting feature vectors were used to train and test three different classifiers: K-Nearest Neighbor (K-NN), Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN), and Decision Tree (DeTr) using ten-fold cross validation technique. Our results show that combination of DWT and texture features in the K-NN classifier resulted in a classification accuracy of 98.9%, a sensitivity of 98%, and a specificity of 99.8%. Thus, the preliminary results of the proposed technique show that it could be adapted as an adjunct tool that can give valuable second opinions to the doctors regarding the nature of the thyroid nodule. The technique is cost-effective, non-invasive, fast, completely automated and gives more objective and reproducible results compared to manual analysis of the ultrasound images. We however intend to establish the clinical applicability of this technique by evaluating it with more data in the future. PMID:23365926

  2. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J.; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm2 intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  3. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  4. Optimization Techniques for 3D Graphics Deployment on Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskela, Timo; Vatjus-Anttila, Jarkko

    2015-03-01

    3D Internet technologies are becoming essential enablers in many application areas including games, education, collaboration, navigation and social networking. The use of 3D Internet applications with mobile devices provides location-independent access and richer use context, but also performance issues. Therefore, one of the important challenges facing 3D Internet applications is the deployment of 3D graphics on mobile devices. In this article, we present an extensive survey on optimization techniques for 3D graphics deployment on mobile devices and qualitatively analyze the applicability of each technique from the standpoints of visual quality, performance and energy consumption. The analysis focuses on optimization techniques related to data-driven 3D graphics deployment, because it supports off-line use, multi-user interaction, user-created 3D graphics and creation of arbitrary 3D graphics. The outcome of the analysis facilitates the development and deployment of 3D Internet applications on mobile devices and provides guidelines for future research.

  5. Fast myocardial strain estimation from 3D ultrasound through elastic image registration with analytic regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Bidisha; Heyde, Brecht; Alessandrini, Martino; D'hooge, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Image registration techniques using free-form deformation models have shown promising results for 3D myocardial strain estimation from ultrasound. However, the use of this technique has mostly been limited to research institutes due to the high computational demand, which is primarily due to the computational load of the regularization term ensuring spatially smooth cardiac strain estimates. Indeed, this term typically requires evaluating derivatives of the transformation field numerically in each voxel of the image during every iteration of the optimization process. In this paper, we replace this time-consuming step with a closed-form solution directly associated with the transformation field resulting in a speed up factor of ~10-60,000, for a typical 3D B-mode image of 2503 and 5003 voxels, depending upon the size and the parametrization of the transformation field. The performance of the numeric and the analytic solutions was contrasted by computing tracking and strain accuracy on two realistic synthetic 3D cardiac ultrasound sequences, mimicking two ischemic motion patterns. Mean and standard deviation of the displacement errors over the cardiac cycle for the numeric and analytic solutions were 0.68+/-0.40 mm and 0.75+/-0.43 mm respectively. Correlations for the radial, longitudinal and circumferential strain components at end-systole were 0.89, 0.83 and 0.95 versus 0.90, 0.88 and 0.92 for the numeric and analytic regularization respectively. The analytic solution matched the performance of the numeric solution as no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were found when expressed in terms of bias or limits-of-agreement.

  6. DYNAMIC 3D QSAR TECHNIQUES: APPLICATIONS IN TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two dynamic techniques recently developed to account for conformational flexibility of chemicals in 3D QSARs are presented. In addition to the impact of conformational flexibility of chemicals in 3D QSAR models, the applicability of various molecular descriptors is discussed. The...

  7. A molecular image-directed, 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system for the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Baowei; Schuster, David M.; Master, Viraj; Akbari, Hamed; Fenster, Aaron; Nieh, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Systematic transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy is the standard method for a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, this biopsy approach uses two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound images to guide biopsy and can miss up to 30% of prostate cancers. We are developing a molecular image-directed, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imageguided biopsy system for improved detection of prostate cancer. The system consists of a 3D mechanical localization system and software workstation for image segmentation, registration, and biopsy planning. In order to plan biopsy in a 3D prostate, we developed an automatic segmentation method based wavelet transform. In order to incorporate PET/CT images into ultrasound-guided biopsy, we developed image registration methods to fuse TRUS and PET/CT images. The segmentation method was tested in ten patients with a DICE overlap ratio of 92.4% +/- 1.1 %. The registration method has been tested in phantoms. The biopsy system was tested in prostate phantoms and 3D ultrasound images were acquired from two human patients. We are integrating the system for PET/CT directed, 3D ultrasound-guided, targeted biopsy in human patients.

  8. Virtual 3d City Modeling: Techniques and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2013-08-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as Building, Tree, Vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. There are various terms used for 3D city models such as "Cybertown", "Cybercity", "Virtual City", or "Digital City". 3D city models are basically a computerized or digital model of a city contains the graphic representation of buildings and other objects in 2.5 or 3D. Generally three main Geomatics approach are using for Virtual 3-D City models generation, in first approach, researcher are using Conventional techniques such as Vector Map data, DEM, Aerial images, second approach are based on High resolution satellite images with LASER scanning, In third method, many researcher are using Terrestrial images by using Close Range Photogrammetry with DSM & Texture mapping. We start this paper from the introduction of various Geomatics techniques for 3D City modeling. These techniques divided in to two main categories: one is based on Automation (Automatic, Semi-automatic and Manual methods), and another is Based on Data input techniques (one is Photogrammetry, another is Laser Techniques). After details study of this, finally in short, we are trying to give the conclusions of this study. In the last, we are trying to give the conclusions of this research paper and also giving a short view for justification and analysis, and present trend for 3D City modeling. This paper gives an overview about the Techniques related with "Generation of Virtual 3-D City models using Geomatics Techniques" and the Applications of Virtual 3D City models. Photogrammetry, (Close range, Aerial, Satellite), Lasergrammetry, GPS, or combination of these modern Geomatics techniques play a major role to create a virtual 3-D City model. Each and every techniques and method has some advantages and some drawbacks. Point cloud model is a modern trend for virtual 3-D city model. Photo-realistic, Scalable, Geo-referenced virtual 3

  9. Comparison of 3-D synthetic aperture phased-array ultrasound imaging and parallel beamforming.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-10-01

    This paper demonstrates that synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) can be used to achieve real-time 3-D ultrasound phased-array imaging. It investigates whether SAI increases the image quality compared with the parallel beamforming (PB) technique for real-time 3-D imaging. Data are obtained using both simulations and measurements with an ultrasound research scanner and a commercially available 3.5- MHz 1024-element 2-D transducer array. To limit the probe cable thickness, 256 active elements are used in transmit and receive for both techniques. The two imaging techniques were designed for cardiac imaging, which requires sequences designed for imaging down to 15 cm of depth and a frame rate of at least 20 Hz. The imaging quality of the two techniques is investigated through simulations as a function of depth and angle. SAI improved the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) at low steering angles by 35%, and the 20-dB cystic resolution by up to 62%. The FWHM of the measured line spread function (LSF) at 80 mm depth showed a difference of 20% in favor of SAI. SAI reduced the cyst radius at 60 mm depth by 39% in measurements. SAI improved the contrast-to-noise ratio measured on anechoic cysts embedded in a tissue-mimicking material by 29% at 70 mm depth. The estimated penetration depth on the same tissue-mimicking phantom shows that SAI increased the penetration by 24% compared with PB. Neither SAI nor PB achieved the design goal of 15 cm penetration depth. This is likely due to the limited transducer surface area and a low SNR of the experimental scanner used. PMID:25265174

  10. Summary on Several Key Techniques in 3D Geological Modeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Several key techniques in 3D geological modeling including planar mesh generation, spatial interpolation, and surface intersection are summarized in this paper. Note that these techniques are generic and widely used in various applications but play a key role in 3D geological modeling. There are two essential procedures in 3D geological modeling: the first is the simulation of geological interfaces using geometric surfaces and the second is the building of geological objects by means of various geometric computations such as the intersection of surfaces. Discrete geometric surfaces that represent geological interfaces can be generated by creating planar meshes first and then spatially interpolating; those surfaces intersect and then form volumes that represent three-dimensional geological objects such as rock bodies. In this paper, the most commonly used algorithms of the key techniques in 3D geological modeling are summarized. PMID:24772029

  11. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation for assistant diagnosis of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxin; Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2016-04-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  12. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation to aid breast cancer image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2016-02-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer. PMID:26547117

  13. 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) prostate segmentation based on optimal feature learning framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter J.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2016-03-01

    We propose a 3D prostate segmentation method for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images, which is based on patch-based feature learning framework. Patient-specific anatomical features are extracted from aligned training images and adopted as signatures for each voxel. The most robust and informative features are identified by the feature selection process to train the kernel support vector machine (KSVM). The well-trained SVM was used to localize the prostate of the new patient. Our segmentation technique was validated with a clinical study of 10 patients. The accuracy of our approach was assessed using the manual segmentations (gold standard). The mean volume Dice overlap coefficient was 89.7%. In this study, we have developed a new prostate segmentation approach based on the optimal feature learning framework, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with manual segmentations.

  14. Accurate 3D reconstruction of complex blood vessel geometries from intravascular ultrasound images: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, K R; Thubrikar, M J; Fowler, B; Mostafavi, M T; Funk, M W

    2000-01-01

    We present a technique that accurately reconstructs complex three dimensional blood vessel geometry from 2D intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images. Biplane x-ray fluoroscopy is used to image the ultrasound catheter tip at a few key points along its path as the catheter is pulled through the blood vessel. An interpolating spline describes the continuous catheter path. The IVUS images are located orthogonal to the path, resulting in a non-uniform structured scalar volume of echo densities. Isocontour surfaces are used to view the vessel geometry, while transparency and clipping enable interactive exploration of interior structures. The two geometries studied are a bovine artery vascular graft having U-shape and a constriction, and a canine carotid artery having multiple branches and a constriction. Accuracy of the reconstructions is established by comparing the reconstructions to (1) silicone moulds of the vessel interior, (2) biplane x-ray images, and (3) the original echo images. Excellent shape and geometry correspondence was observed in both geometries. Quantitative measurements made at key locations of the 3D reconstructions also were in good agreement with those made in silicone moulds. The proposed technique is easily adoptable in clinical practice, since it uses x-rays with minimal exposure and existing IVUS technology. PMID:11105284

  15. GPU accelerated registration of a statistical shape model of the lumbar spine to 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khallaghi, Siavash; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Gong, Ren Hui; Chen, Elvis; Gill, Sean; Boisvert, Jonathan; Pichora, David; Borschneck, Dan; Fichtinger, Gabor; Mousavi, Parvin

    2011-03-01

    We present a parallel implementation of a statistical shape model registration to 3D ultrasound images of the lumbar vertebrae (L2-L4). Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy optimization technique, along with Linear Correlation of Linear Combination similarity metric have been used, to improve the robustness and capture range of the registration approach. Instantiation and ultrasound simulation have been implemented on a graphics processing unit for a faster registration. Phantom studies show a mean target registration error of 3.2 mm, while 80% of all the cases yield target registration error of below 3.5 mm.

  16. Automatic 3D segmentation of ultrasound images using atlas registration and statistical texture prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Schuster, David; Master, Viraj; Nieh, Peter; Fenster, Aaron; Fei, Baowei

    2011-03-01

    We are developing a molecular image-directed, 3D ultrasound-guided, targeted biopsy system for improved detection of prostate cancer. In this paper, we propose an automatic 3D segmentation method for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images, which is based on multi-atlas registration and statistical texture prior. The atlas database includes registered TRUS images from previous patients and their segmented prostate surfaces. Three orthogonal Gabor filter banks are used to extract texture features from each image in the database. Patient-specific Gabor features from the atlas database are used to train kernel support vector machines (KSVMs) and then to segment the prostate image from a new patient. The segmentation method was tested in TRUS data from 5 patients. The average surface distance between our method and manual segmentation is 1.61 +/- 0.35 mm, indicating that the atlas-based automatic segmentation method works well and could be used for 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

  17. Computer-Assisted Hepatocellular Carcinoma Ablation Planning Based on 3-D Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Su, Zhongzhen; Xu, Erjiao; Guan, Peishan; Li, Liu-Jun; Zheng, Rongqin

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate computer-assisted hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ablation planning based on 3-D ultrasound, 3-D ultrasound images of 60 HCC lesions from 58 patients were obtained and transferred to a research toolkit. Compared with virtual manual ablation planning (MAP), virtual computer-assisted ablation planning (CAP) consumed less time and needle insertion numbers and exhibited a higher rate of complete tumor coverage and lower rate of critical structure injury. In MAP, junior operators used less time, but had more critical structure injury than senior operators. For large lesions, CAP performed better than MAP. For lesions near critical structures, CAP resulted in better outcomes than MAP. Compared with MAP, CAP based on 3-D ultrasound imaging was more effective and achieved a higher rate of complete tumor coverage and a lower rate of critical structure injury; it is especially useful for junior operators and with large lesions, and lesions near critical structures. PMID:27126243

  18. Proximal femoral focal deficiency of the fetus - early 3D/4D prenatal ultrasound diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kudla, Marek J; Beczkowska-Kielek, Aleksandra; Kutta, Katarzyna; Partyka-Lasota, Justyna

    2016-09-01

    Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency (PFFD) is a rare congenital syndrome of unknown etiology. Additional disorders can be present up to 70% of PFFD cases. Management (including termination) depends on the severity of the malformation. We present a case of a 32-year-old woman referred for routine ultrasound examination in the 12th week of pregnancy. Detailed 3D/4D evaluation revealed asymmetry of lower limbs and diagnosis of isolated PFFD was established. Parents were fully informed and decided to continue the pregnancy. We stress here the importance of early 3D/4D ultrasound diagnosis. Our paper presents the earliest case where the diagnosis of PFFD was established with 3D/4D ultrasound. PMID:27622419

  19. Quantification of cerebral ventricle volume change of preterm neonates using 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yimin; Kishimoto, Jessica; Qiu, Wu; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Fenster, Aaron; Chiu, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a major cause of brain injury in preterm neonates. Quantitative measurement of ventricular dilation or shrinkage is important for monitoring patients and in evaluation of treatment options. 3D ultrasound (US) has been used to monitor the ventricle volume as a biomarker for ventricular dilation. However, volumetric quantification does not provide information as to where dilation occurs. The location where dilation occurs may be related to specific neurological problems later in life. For example, posterior horn enlargement, with thinning of the corpus callosum and parietal white matter fibres, could be linked to poor visuo-spatial abilities seen in hydrocephalic children. In this work, we report on the development and application of a method used to analyze local surface change of the ventricles of preterm neonates with IVH from 3D US images. The technique is evaluated using manual segmentations from 3D US images acquired in two imaging sessions. The surfaces from baseline and follow-up were registered and then matched on a point-by-point basis. The distance between each pair of corresponding points served as an estimate of local surface change of the brain ventricle at each vertex. The measurements of local surface change were then superimposed on the ventricle surface to produce the 3D local surface change map that provide information on the spatio-temporal dilation pattern of brain ventricles following IVH. This tool can be used to monitor responses to different treatment options, and may provide important information for elucidating the deficiencies a patient will have later in life.

  20. A framework for human spine imaging using a freehand 3D ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Purnama, Ketut E; Wilkinson, Michael H F; Veldhuizen, Albert G; van Ooijen, Peter M A; Lubbers, Jaap; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Sardjono, Tri A; Verkerke, Gijbertus J

    2010-01-01

    The use of 3D ultrasound imaging to follow the progression of scoliosis, i.e., a 3D deformation of the spine, is described. Unlike other current examination modalities, in particular based on X-ray, its non-detrimental effect enables it to be used frequently to follow the progression of scoliosis which sometimes may develop rapidly. Furthermore, 3D ultrasound imaging provides information in 3D directly in contrast to projection methods. This paper describes a feasibility study of an ultrasound system to provide a 3D image of the human spine, and presents a framework of procedures to perform this task. The framework consist of an ultrasound image acquisition procedure to image a large part of the human spine by means of a freehand 3D ultrasound system and a volume reconstruction procedure which was performed in four stages: bin-filling, hole-filling, volume segment alignment, and volume segment compounding. The overall results of the procedures in this framework show that imaging of the human spine using ultrasound is feasible. Vertebral parts such as the transverse processes, laminae, superior articular processes, and spinous process of the vertebrae appear as clouds of voxels having intensities higher than the surrounding voxels. In sagittal slices, a string of transverse processes appears representing the curvature of the spine. In the bin-filling stage the estimated mean absolute noise level of a single measurement of a single voxel was determined. Our comparative study for the hole-filling methods based on rank sum statistics proved that the pixel nearest neighbour (PNN) method with variable radius and with the proposed olympic operation is the best method. Its mean absolute grey value error was less in magnitude than the noise level of a single measurement. PMID:20231799

  1. Image enhancement and segmentation of fluid-filled structures in 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalana, Vikram; Dudycha, Stephen; McMorrow, Gerald

    2003-05-01

    Segmentation of fluid-filled structures, such as the urinary bladder, from three-dimensional ultrasound images is necessary for measuring their volume. This paper describes a system for image enhancement, segmentation and volume measurement of fluid-filled structures on 3D ultrasound images. The system was applied for the measurement of urinary bladder volume. Results show an average error of less than 10% in the estimation of the total bladder volume.

  2. 3D visualization techniques for the STEREO-mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, T.; Podlipnik, B.; Inhester, B.; Feng, L.; Ruan, P.

    The forthcoming STEREO-mission will observe the Sun from two different viewpoints We expect about 2GB data per day which ask for suitable data presentation techniques A key feature of STEREO is that it will provide for the first time a 3D-view of the Sun and the solar corona In our normal environment we see objects three dimensional because the light from real 3D objects needs different travel times to our left and right eye As a consequence we see slightly different images with our eyes which gives us information about the depth of objects and a corresponding 3D impression Techniques for the 3D-visualization of scientific and other data on paper TV computer screen cinema etc are well known e g two colour anaglyph technique shutter glasses polarization filters and head-mounted displays We discuss advantages and disadvantages of these techniques and how they can be applied to STEREO-data The 3D-visualization techniques are not limited to visual images but can be also used to show the reconstructed coronal magnetic field and energy and helicity distribution In the advent of STEREO we test the method with data from SOHO which provides us different viewpoints by the solar rotation This restricts the analysis to structures which remain stationary for several days Real STEREO-data will not be affected by these limitations however

  3. Postprocessing techniques for 3D non-linear structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    How graphics postprocessing techniques are currently used to examine the results of 3-D nonlinear analyses, some new techniques which take advantage of recent technology, and how these results relate to both the finite element model and its geometric parent are reviewed.

  4. Intelligent speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion algorithm for automated 3-D ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua; Shi, Xinling; Zhang, Junhua; Chen, Yue; Pang, Yun

    2015-02-01

    A novel 3-D filtering method is presented for speckle reduction and detail preservation in automated 3-D ultrasound images. First, texture features of an image are analyzed by using the improved quadtree (QT) decomposition. Then, the optimal homogeneous and the obvious heterogeneous regions are selected from QT decomposition results. Finally, diffusion parameters and diffusion process are automatically decided based on the properties of these two selected regions. The computing time needed for 2-D speckle reduction is very short. However, the computing time required for 3-D speckle reduction is often hundreds of times longer than 2-D speckle reduction. This may limit its potential application in practice. Because this new filter can adaptively adjust the time step of iteration, the computation time is reduced effectively. Both synthetic and real 3-D ultrasound images are used to evaluate the proposed filter. It is shown that this filter is superior to other methods in both practicality and efficiency. PMID:26366596

  5. 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound volume measurement validation in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model of lung tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornblower, V. D. M.; Yu, E.; Fenster, A.; Battista, J. J.; Malthaner, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy and reliability of volume measurements obtained using three-dimensional (3D) thoracoscopic ultrasound (US) imaging. Artificial 'tumours' were created by injecting a liquid agar mixture into spherical moulds of known volume. Once solidified, the 'tumours' were implanted into the lung tissue in both a porcine lung sample ex vivo and a surgical porcine model in vivo. 3D US images were created by mechanically rotating the thoracoscopic ultrasound probe about its long axis while the transducer was maintained in close contact with the tissue. Volume measurements were made by one observer using the ultrasound images and a manual-radial segmentation technique and these were compared with the known volumes of the agar. In vitro measurements had average accuracy and precision of 4.76% and 1.77%, respectively; in vivo measurements had average accuracy and precision of 8.18% and 1.75%, respectively. The 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound can be used to accurately and reproducibly measure 'tumour' volumes both in vivo and ex vivo.

  6. Automated 3D ultrasound elastography of the breast: a phantom validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Gijs A. G. M.; Holländer, Branislav; Menssen, Jan; Milkowski, Andy; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.; de Korte, Chris L.

    2016-04-01

    In breast cancer screening, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) was introduced as an alternative for mammography since the latter technique is less suitable for women with dense breasts. Although clinical studies show promising results, clinicians report two disadvantages: long acquisition times (>90 s) introducing breathing artefacts, and high recall rates due to detection of many small lesions of uncertain malignant potential. Technical improvements for faster image acquisition and better discrimination between benign and malignant lesions are thus required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if 3D ultrasound elastography using plane-wave imaging is feasible. Strain images of a breast elastography phantom were acquired by an ABVS-mimicking device that allowed axial and elevational movement of the attached transducer. Pre- and post-deformation volumes were acquired with different constant speeds (between 1.25 and 40.0 mm s-1) and by three protocols: Go-Go (pre- and post-volumes with identical start and end positions), Go-Return (similar to Go-Go with opposite scanning directions) and Control (pre- and post-volumes acquired per position, this protocol can be seen as reference). Afterwards, 2D and 3D cross-correlation and strain algorithms were applied to the acquired volumes and the results were compared. The Go-Go protocol was shown to be superior with better strain image quality (CNRe and SNRe) than Go-Return and to be similar as Control. This can be attributed to applying opposite mechanical forces to the phantom during the Go-Return protocol, leading to out-of-plane motion. This motion was partly compensated by using 3D cross-correlation. However, the quality was still inferior to Go-Go. Since these results were obtained in a phantom study with controlled deformations, the effect of possible uncontrolled in vivo tissue motion artefacts has to be addressed in future studies. In conclusion, it seems feasible to implement 3D ultrasound

  7. Automated 3D ultrasound elastography of the breast: a phantom validation study.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Gijs A G M; Holländer, Branislav; Menssen, Jan; Milkowski, Andy; Hansen, Hendrik H G; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-04-01

    In breast cancer screening, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) was introduced as an alternative for mammography since the latter technique is less suitable for women with dense breasts. Although clinical studies show promising results, clinicians report two disadvantages: long acquisition times (>90 s) introducing breathing artefacts, and high recall rates due to detection of many small lesions of uncertain malignant potential. Technical improvements for faster image acquisition and better discrimination between benign and malignant lesions are thus required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if 3D ultrasound elastography using plane-wave imaging is feasible. Strain images of a breast elastography phantom were acquired by an ABVS-mimicking device that allowed axial and elevational movement of the attached transducer. Pre- and post-deformation volumes were acquired with different constant speeds (between 1.25 and 40.0 mm s(-1)) and by three protocols: Go-Go (pre- and post-volumes with identical start and end positions), Go-Return (similar to Go-Go with opposite scanning directions) and Control (pre- and post-volumes acquired per position, this protocol can be seen as reference). Afterwards, 2D and 3D cross-correlation and strain algorithms were applied to the acquired volumes and the results were compared. The Go-Go protocol was shown to be superior with better strain image quality (CNRe and SNRe) than Go-Return and to be similar as Control. This can be attributed to applying opposite mechanical forces to the phantom during the Go-Return protocol, leading to out-of-plane motion. This motion was partly compensated by using 3D cross-correlation. However, the quality was still inferior to Go-Go. Since these results were obtained in a phantom study with controlled deformations, the effect of possible uncontrolled in vivo tissue motion artefacts has to be addressed in future studies. In conclusion, it seems feasible to implement 3D

  8. Case study: The Avengers 3D: cinematic techniques and digitally created 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Graham D.

    2013-03-01

    Marvel's THE AVENGERS was the third film Stereo D collaborated on with Marvel; it was a summation of our artistic development of what Digitally Created 3D and Stereo D's artists and toolsets affords Marvel's filmmakers; the ability to shape stereographic space to support the film and story, in a way that balances human perception and live photography. We took our artistic lead from the cinematic intentions of Marvel, the Director Joss Whedon, and Director of Photography Seamus McGarvey. In the digital creation of a 3D film from a 2D image capture, recommendations to the filmmakers cinematic techniques are offered by Stereo D at each step from pre-production onwards, through set, into post. As the footage arrives at our facility we respond in depth to the cinematic qualities of the imagery in context of the edit and story, with the guidance of the Directors and Studio, creating stereoscopic imagery. Our involvement in The Avengers was early in production, after reading the script we had the opportunity and honor to meet and work with the Director Joss Whedon, and DP Seamus McGarvey on set, and into post. We presented what is obvious to such great filmmakers in the ways of cinematic techniques as they related to the standard depth cues and story points we would use to evaluate depth for their film. Our hope was any cinematic habits that supported better 3D would be emphasized. In searching for a 3D statement for the studio and filmmakers we arrived at a stereographic style that allowed for comfort and maximum visual engagement to the viewer.

  9. 3D thermography imaging standardization technique for inflammation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Xiangyang; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Siebert, J. Paul

    2005-01-01

    We develop a 3D thermography imaging standardization technique to allow quantitative data analysis. Medical Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging is very sensitive and reliable mean of graphically mapping and display skin surface temperature. It allows doctors to visualise in colour and quantify temperature changes in skin surface. The spectrum of colours indicates both hot and cold responses which may co-exist if the pain associate with an inflammatory focus excites an increase in sympathetic activity. However, due to thermograph provides only qualitative diagnosis information, it has not gained acceptance in the medical and veterinary communities as a necessary or effective tool in inflammation and tumor detection. Here, our technique is based on the combination of visual 3D imaging technique and thermal imaging technique, which maps the 2D thermography images on to 3D anatomical model. Then we rectify the 3D thermogram into a view independent thermogram and conform it a standard shape template. The combination of these imaging facilities allows the generation of combined 3D and thermal data from which thermal signatures can be quantified.

  10. Catheter-Based Ultrasound for 3D Control of Thermal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris; Chen, Xin; Wootton, Jeffery; Juang, Titania; Nau, Will H.; Kinsey, Adam; Hsu, I.-Chow; Rieke, Viola; Pauly, Kim Butts; Sommer, Graham; Bouley, Donna

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound applicators have been investigated for delivering hyperthermia and thermal ablation for the treatment of cancer and benign diseases. Technology includes an intrauterine applicator integrated with an HDR ring applicator, interstitial applicators for hyperthermia delivery during brachytherapy, interstitial applicators for tumor ablation, and transurethral devices for conformal prostate ablation. Arrays of multiple sectored tubular transducers have been fabricated for interstitial and intrauterine hyperthermia applicators. High-power interstitial versions have been evaluated for percutaneous implantation with directional or dynamic angular control of thermal ablation. Transurethral applicators include curvilinear transducers with rotational sweeping of narrow heating patterns, and multi-sectored tubular devices capable of dynamic angular control without applicator movement. Performance was evaluated in phantom, excised tissue, in vivo experiments in canine prostate under MR temperature monitoring, clinical hyperthermia, and 3D-biothermal simulations with patient anatomy. Interstitial and intrauterine devices can tailor hyperthermia to large treatment volumes, with multisectored control useful to limit exposure to rectum and bladder. Curvilinear transurethral devices with sequential rotation produce target conforming coagulation zones that can cover either the whole gland or defined focal regions. Multi-sectored transurethral applicators can dynamically control the angular heating profile and target large regions of the prostate without applicator manipulation. High-power interstitial implants with directional devices can be used to effectively ablate defined target regions while avoiding sensitive tissues. MR temperature monitoring can effectively define the extent of thermal damage and provided a means for real-time control of the applicators. In summary, these catheter-based ultrasound devices allow for dynamic control of heating profiles

  11. Design of a 3D Navigation Technique Supporting VR Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudoin, Pierre; Otmane, Samir; Mallem, Malik

    2008-06-01

    Multimodality is a powerful paradigm to increase the realness and the easiness of the interaction in Virtual Environments (VEs). In particular, the search for new metaphors and techniques for 3D interaction adapted to the navigation task is an important stage for the realization of future 3D interaction systems that support multimodality, in order to increase efficiency and usability. In this paper we propose a new multimodal 3D interaction model called Fly Over. This model is especially devoted to the navigation task. We present a qualitative comparison between Fly Over and a classical navigation technique called gaze-directed steering. The results from preliminary evaluation on the IBISC semi-immersive Virtual Reality/Augmented Realty EVR@ platform show that Fly Over is a user friendly and efficient navigation technique.

  12. Recovery of liver motion and deformation due to respiration using laparoscopic freehand 3D ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Masahiko; Hirayama, Hiroaki; Sato, Yoshinobu; Konishi, Kozo; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Hashizume, Makoto; Tamura, Shinichi

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid method for intraoperative recovery of liver motion and deformation due to respiration by using a laparoscopic freehand 3D ultrasound (US) system. Using the proposed method, 3D US images of the liver can be extended to 4D US images by acquiring additional several sequences of 2D US images during a couple of respiration cycles. Time-varying 2D US images are acquired on several sagittal image planes and their 3D positions and orientations are measured using a laparoscopic ultrasound probe to which a miniature magnetic 3D position sensor is attached. During the acquisition, the probe is assumed to move together with the liver surface. In-plane 2D deformation fields and respiratory phase are estimated from the time-varying 2D US images, and then the time-varying 3D deformation fields on the sagittal image planes are obtained by combining 3D positions and orientations of the image planes. The time-varying 3D deformation field of the volume is obtained by interpolating the 3D deformation fields estimated on several planes. The proposed method was evaluated by in vivo experiments using a pig liver. PMID:17354794

  13. Mapping cardiac fiber orientations from high-resolution DTI to high-frequency 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2014-03-01

    The orientation of cardiac fibers affects the anatomical, mechanical, and electrophysiological properties of the heart. Although echocardiography is the most common imaging modality in clinical cardiac examination, it can only provide the cardiac geometry or motion information without cardiac fiber orientations. If the patient's cardiac fiber orientations can be mapped to his/her echocardiography images in clinical examinations, it may provide quantitative measures for diagnosis, personalized modeling, and image-guided cardiac therapies. Therefore, this project addresses the feasibility of mapping personalized cardiac fiber orientations to three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound image volumes. First, the geometry of the heart extracted from the MRI is translated to 3D ultrasound by rigid and deformable registration. Deformation fields between both geometries from MRI and ultrasound are obtained after registration. Three different deformable registration methods were utilized for the MRI-ultrasound registration. Finally, the cardiac fiber orientations imaged by DTI are mapped to ultrasound volumes based on the extracted deformation fields. Moreover, this study also demonstrated the ability to simulate electricity activations during the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) process. The proposed method has been validated in two rat hearts and three canine hearts. After MRI/ultrasound image registration, the Dice similarity scores were more than 90% and the corresponding target errors were less than 0.25 mm. This proposed approach can provide cardiac fiber orientations to ultrasound images and can have a variety of potential applications in cardiac imaging.

  14. Automated kidney detection for 3D ultrasound using scan line searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Matthias; Nadolny, Anne; Wesarg, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound (U/S) is a fast and non-expensive imaging modality that is used for the examination of various anatomical structures, e.g. the kidneys. One important task for automatic organ tracking or computer-aided diagnosis is the identification of the organ region. During this process the exact information about the transducer location and orientation is usually unavailable. This renders the implementation of such automatic methods exceedingly challenging. In this work we like to introduce a new automatic method for the detection of the kidney in 3D U/S images. This novel technique analyses the U/S image data along virtual scan lines. Here, characteristic texture changes when entering and leaving the symmetric tissue regions of the renal cortex are searched for. A subsequent feature accumulation along a second scan direction produces a 2D heat map of renal cortex candidates, from which the kidney location is extracted in two steps. First, the strongest candidate as well as its counterpart are extracted by heat map intensity ranking and renal cortex size analysis. This process exploits the heat map gap caused by the renal pelvis region. Substituting the renal pelvis detection with this combined cortex tissue feature increases the detection robustness. In contrast to model based methods that generate characteristic pattern matches, our method is simpler and therefore faster. An evaluation performed on 61 3D U/S data sets showed, that in 55 cases showing none or minor shadowing the kidney location could be correctly identified.

  15. Automatic 3D ultrasound calibration for image guided therapy using intramodality image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Kirmizibayrak, Can; Shamdasani, Vijay; Metz, Steve; Hristov, Dimitre

    2013-11-01

    Many real time ultrasound (US) guided therapies can benefit from management of motion-induced anatomical changes with respect to a previously acquired computerized anatomy model. Spatial calibration is a prerequisite to transforming US image information to the reference frame of the anatomy model. We present a new method for calibrating 3D US volumes using intramodality image registration, derived from the ‘hand-eye’ calibration technique. The method is fully automated by implementing data rejection based on sensor displacements, automatic registration over overlapping image regions, and a self-consistency error metric evaluated continuously during calibration. We also present a novel method for validating US calibrations based on measurement of physical phantom displacements within US images. Both calibration and validation can be performed on arbitrary phantoms. Results indicate that normalized mutual information and localized cross correlation produce the most accurate 3D US registrations for calibration. Volumetric image alignment is more accurate and reproducible than point selection for validating the calibrations, yielding <1.5 mm root mean square error, a significant improvement relative to previously reported hand-eye US calibration results. Comparison of two different phantoms for calibration and for validation revealed significant differences for validation (p = 0.003) but not for calibration (p = 0.795).

  16. Ultrasound and 3D Skin Imaging: Methods to Evaluate Efficacy of Striae Distensae Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bleve, Mariella; Capra, Priscilla; Pavanetto, Franca; Perugini, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Background. Over time, the striae rubra develop into striae alba that appear white, flat, and depressed. It is very important to determine the optimum striae management. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of these therapies, objective measurement tools are necessary. Objective. The aim of this study is to evaluate if ultrasonography and PRIMOS can be used to obtain an objective assessment of stretch marks type and stage; furthermore, we aim to apply these techniques to evaluate the efficacy of a topical treatment. Methods. 20 volunteers were enrolled with a two-month study. A marketed cosmetic product was used as the active over one body area. The controlateral area with stretch marks was treated with a “placebo” formulation without active, as a control. The instrumental evaluation was carried out at the beginning of the trial (baseline values or t0), after 1 month (t1), and at the end of the study (t2). Results. PRIMOS was able to measure and document striae distensae maturation; furthermore, ultrasound imaging permitted to visualize and diagnose the striae. Statistical analysis of skin roughness demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of Rp value only in a treated group. In fact, the Rp value represented a maximum peak height in the area selected. These results demonstrated that after two months of treatment only the striae rubra can be treated successfully. Conclusions. This work demonstrated that the 22MHz ultrasound can diagnose stretch marks; PRIMOS device can detect and measure striae distensae type and maturation. Furthermore, the high-frequency ultrasound and the 3D image device, described in this work, can be successfully employed in order to evaluate the efficacy of a topical treatment. PMID:22203840

  17. Ultrasound and 3D Skin Imaging: Methods to Evaluate Efficacy of Striae Distensae Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bleve, Mariella; Capra, Priscilla; Pavanetto, Franca; Perugini, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Background. Over time, the striae rubra develop into striae alba that appear white, flat, and depressed. It is very important to determine the optimum striae management. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of these therapies, objective measurement tools are necessary. Objective. The aim of this study is to evaluate if ultrasonography and PRIMOS can be used to obtain an objective assessment of stretch marks type and stage; furthermore, we aim to apply these techniques to evaluate the efficacy of a topical treatment. Methods. 20 volunteers were enrolled with a two-month study. A marketed cosmetic product was used as the active over one body area. The controlateral area with stretch marks was treated with a "placebo" formulation without active, as a control. The instrumental evaluation was carried out at the beginning of the trial (baseline values or t(0)), after 1 month (t(1)), and at the end of the study (t(2)). Results. PRIMOS was able to measure and document striae distensae maturation; furthermore, ultrasound imaging permitted to visualize and diagnose the striae. Statistical analysis of skin roughness demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of Rp value only in a treated group. In fact, the Rp value represented a maximum peak height in the area selected. These results demonstrated that after two months of treatment only the striae rubra can be treated successfully. Conclusions. This work demonstrated that the 22MHz ultrasound can diagnose stretch marks; PRIMOS device can detect and measure striae distensae type and maturation. Furthermore, the high-frequency ultrasound and the 3D image device, described in this work, can be successfully employed in order to evaluate the efficacy of a topical treatment. PMID:22203840

  18. GPU-Based Block-Wise Nonlocal Means Denoising for 3D Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Wenguang; Zhang, Xuming; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-01-01

    Speckle suppression plays an important role in improving ultrasound (US) image quality. While lots of algorithms have been proposed for 2D US image denoising with remarkable filtering quality, there is relatively less work done on 3D ultrasound speckle suppression, where the whole volume data rather than just one frame needs to be considered. Then, the most crucial problem with 3D US denoising is that the computational complexity increases tremendously. The nonlocal means (NLM) provides an effective method for speckle suppression in US images. In this paper, a programmable graphic-processor-unit- (GPU-) based fast NLM filter is proposed for 3D ultrasound speckle reduction. A Gamma distribution noise model, which is able to reliably capture image statistics for Log-compressed ultrasound images, was used for the 3D block-wise NLM filter on basis of Bayesian framework. The most significant aspect of our method was the adopting of powerful data-parallel computing capability of GPU to improve the overall efficiency. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can enormously accelerate the algorithm. PMID:24348747

  19. Novel 3-D laparoscopic magnetic ultrasound image guidance for lesion targeting

    PubMed Central

    Sindram, David; McKillop, Iain H; Martinie, John B; Iannitti, David A

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Accurate laparoscopic liver lesion targeting for biopsy or ablation depends on the ability to merge laparoscopic and ultrasound images with proprioceptive instrument positioning, a skill that can be acquired only through extensive experience. The aim of this study was to determine whether using magnetic positional tracking to provide three-dimensional, real-time guidance improves accuracy during laparoscopic needle placement. Methods: Magnetic sensors were embedded into a needle and laparoscopic ultrasound transducer. These sensors interrupted the magnetic fields produced by an electromagnetic field generator, allowing for real-time, 3-D guidance on a stereoscopic monitor. Targets measuring 5 mm were embedded 3–5 cm deep in agar and placed inside a laparoscopic trainer box. Two novices (a college student and an intern) and two experts (hepatopancreatobiliary surgeons) targeted the lesions out of the ultrasound plane using either traditional or 3-D guidance. Results: Each subject targeted 22 lesions, 11 with traditional and 11 with the novel guidance (n = 88). Hit rates of 32% (14/44) and 100% (44/44) were observed with the traditional approach and the 3-D magnetic guidance approach, respectively. The novices were essentially unable to hit the targets using the traditional approach, but did not miss using the novel system. The hit rate of experts improved from 59% (13/22) to 100% (22/22) (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The novel magnetic 3-D laparoscopic ultrasound guidance results in perfect targeting of 5-mm lesions, even by surgical novices. PMID:21083797

  20. Validity Study of Vertebral Rotation Measurement Using 3-D Ultrasound in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Li, Meng; Lou, Edmond H M; Chu, Winnie C W; Lam, Tsz-Ping; Cheng, Jack C Y; Wong, Man-Sang

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the validity of 3-D ultrasound measurements on the vertebral rotation of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) under clinical settings. Thirty curves (mean Cobb angle: 21.7° ± 15.9°) from 16 patients with AIS were recruited. 3-D ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed at the supine position. Each of the two raters measured the apical vertebral rotation using the center of laminae (COL) method in the 3-D ultrasound images and the Aaro-Dahlborn method in the magnetic resonance images. The intra- and inter-reliability of the COL method was demonstrated by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) (both [2, K] >0.9, p < 0.05). The COL method showed no significant difference (p < 0.05) compared with the Aaro-Dahlborn method. Furthermore, the agreement between these two methods was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman method, and high correlation was found (r > 0.9, p < 0.05). These results validated the proposed 3-D ultrasound method in the measurements of vertebral rotation in the patients with AIS. PMID:27083978

  1. Modeling of multi-view 3D freehand radio frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Klein, T; Hansson, M; Navab, Nassir

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays ultrasound (US) examinations are typically performed with conventional machines providing two dimensional imagery. However, there exist a multitude of applications where doctors could benefit from three dimensional ultrasound providing better judgment, due to the extended spatial view. 3D freehand US allows acquisition of images by means of a tracking device attached to the ultrasound transducer. Unfortunately, view dependency makes the 3D representation of ultrasound a non-trivial task. To address this we model speckle statistics, in envelope-detected radio frequency (RF) data, using a finite mixture model (FMM), assuming a parametric representation of data, in which the multiple views are treated as components of the FMM. The proposed model is show-cased with registration, using an ultrasound specific distribution based pseudo-distance, and reconstruction tasks, performed on the manifold of Gamma model parameters. Example field of application is neurology using transcranial US, as this domain requires high accuracy and data systematically features low SNR, making intensity based registration difficult. In particular, 3D US can be specifically used to improve differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) compared to conventional approaches and is therefore of high relevance for future application. PMID:23285579

  2. OVERALL PROCEDURES PROTOCOL AND PATIENT ENROLLMENT PROTOCOL: TESTING FEASIBILITY OF 3D ULTRASOUND DATA ACQUISITION AND RELIABILITY OF DATA RETRIEVAL FROM STORED 3D IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of collecting, transmitting,

    and analyzing 3-D ultrasound data in the context of a multi-center study of pregnant

    women. The study will also examine the reliability of measurements obtained from 3-D

    imag...

  3. Integrated endoscope for real-time 3D ultrasound imaging and hyperthermia: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Pua, Eric C; Qiu, Yupeng; Smith, S W

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this research is to determine the feasibility of using a single endoscopic probe for the combined purpose of real-time 3D (RT3D) ultrasound imaging of a target organ and the delivery of ultrasound therapy to facilitate the absorption of compounds for cancer treatment. Recent research in ultrasound therapy has shown that ultrasound-mediated drug delivery improves absorption of treatments for prostate, cervical and esophageal cancer. The ability to combine ultrasound hyperthermia and 3D imaging could improve visualization and targeting of cancerous tissues. In this study, numerical modeling and experimental measurements were developed to determine the feasibility of combined therapy and imaging with a 1 cm diameter endoscopic RT3D probe with 504 transmitters and 252 receive channels. This device operates at 5 MHz and has a 6.3 mm x 6.3 mm aperture to produce real time 3D pyramidal scans of 60-120 degrees incorporating 64 x 64 = 4096 image lines at 30 volumes/sec interleaved with a 3D steerable therapy beam. A finite-element mesh was constructed with over 128,000 elements in LS-DYNA to simulate the induced temperature rise from our transducer with a 3 cm deep focus in tissue. Quarter-symmetry of the transducer was used to reduce mesh size and computation time. Based on intensity values calculated in Field II using the transducer's array geometry, a minimum I(SPTA) of 3.6 W/cm2 is required from our endoscope probe in order to induce a temperature rise of 4 degrees C within five minutes. Experimental measurements of the array's power output capabilities were conducted using a PVDF hydrophone placed 3 cm away from the face of the transducer in a watertank. Using a PDA14 Signatec data acquisition board to capture full volumes of transmitted ultrasound data, it was determined that the probe can presently maintain intensity values up to 2.4 W/cm2 over indefinite times for therapeutic applications combined with intermittent 3D scanning to maintain targeting

  4. 3D Microfabrication Using Emulsion Mask Grayscale Photolithography Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tze Pin; Mohamed, Khairudin

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the rapid development of technology such as biochips, microfluidic, micro-optical devices and micro-electromechanical-systems (MEMS) demands the capability to create complex design of three-dimensional (3D) microstructures. In order to create 3D microstructures, the traditional photolithography process often requires multiple photomasks to form 3D pattern from several stacked photoresist layers. This fabrication method is extremely time consuming, low throughput, costly and complicated to conduct for high volume manufacturing scale. On the other hand, next generation lithography such as electron beam lithography (EBL), focused ion beam lithography (FIB) and extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUV) are however too costly and the machines require expertise to setup. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop a simplified method in producing 3D microstructures using single grayscale emulsion mask technique. By using this grayscale fabrication method, microstructures of thickness as high as 500μm and as low as 20μm are obtained in a single photolithography exposure. Finally, the fabrication of 3D microfluidic channel has been demonstrated by using this grayscale photolithographic technique.

  5. 3D Simulation of Ultrasound in the Ultra-Distal Human Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Jonathan J.; Luo, Gangming; Siffert, Robert S.

    The overall objective of this research is to develop an ultrasonic method for non-invasive assessment of the ultradistal radius (UDR). The specific objective of this study was to examine the propagation of ultrasound through the UDR and determine the relationships between bone mass and ultrasound, as well as the ability of ultrasound to discriminate between fracture and non-fracture cases. High-resolution peripheral-QCT (HR-pQCT) images were obtained from a set of 110 subjects that were part of a larger study on osteoporosis. Twenty-three of the subjects had experienced a UDR fracture within the past 2 years; the other 87 subjects served as controls. Each 3D image was used to simulate ultrasound measurements that would result from propagation through the UDR, from its anterior to its posterior surfaces. The simulation was carried out using Wave3000 (CyberLogic, Inc., New York, USA), which solves the full 3D viscoelastic wave equation using a finite difference time domain method. Bone mineral density associated with each radius was computed for each subject, and an ultrasound parameter known as net time delay (NTD) was evaluated. NTD has been shown to be highly correlated with total bone mass in both in vitro and clinical studies. Significant correlations were found between NTD and total bone mass (R2 = 0.91, p < 0.001). The data also showed a statistically significant difference in the NTD for the fracture and non-fracture cases (i.e., a decrease in mean NTD of 14% (P < 0.001), with a t-test statistic of 3.8). The study shows that ultrasound is correlated with bone mass at the UDR, as well as with fracture incidence. Therefore ultrasound may prove useful as a simple and convenient method for non-invasive assessment of osteoporosis and fracture risk. Work is ongoing to compare the simulated ultrasound data with clinical ultrasound measurements made on the same individuals.

  6. Model based assessment of vestibular jawbone thickness using high frequency 3D ultrasound micro-scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habor, Daniel; Neuhaus, Sarah; Vollborn, Thorsten; Wolfart, Stefan; Radermacher, Klaus; Heger, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Endosseous implants are well-established in modern dentistry. However, without appropriate therapeutic intervention, progressive peri-implant bone loss may lead to failing implants. Conventionally, the particularly relevant vestibular jawbone thickness is monitored using radiographic 3D imaging methods. Ionizing radiation, as well as imaging artifacts caused by metallic implants and superstructures are major drawbacks of these imaging modalities. In this study, a high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) based approach to assess the vestibular jawbone thickness is being introduced. It should be emphasized that the presented method does not require ultrasound penetration of the jawbone. An in-vitro study using two porcine specimens with inserted endosseous implants has been carried out to assess the accuracy of our approach. The implant of the first specimen was equipped with a gingiva former while a polymer superstructure was mounted onto the implant of the second specimen. Ultrasound data has been acquired using a 4 degree of freedom (DOF) high frequency (<50MHz) laboratory ultrasound scanner. The ultrasound raw data has been converted to polygon meshes including the surfaces of bone, gingiva, gingiva former (first specimen) and superstructure (second specimen). The meshes are matched with a-priori acquired 3D models of the implant, the superstructure and the gingiva former using a best-fit algorithm. Finally, the vestibular peri-implant bone thickness has been assessed in the resulting 3D models. The accuracy of this approach has been evaluated by comparing the ultrasound based thickness measurement with a reference measurement acquired with an optical extra-oral 3D scanner prior to covering the specimens with gingiva. As a final result, the bone thicknesses of the two specimens were measured yielding an error of -46+/-89μm (first specimen) and 70+/-93μm (second specimen).

  7. An optical system for detecting 3D high-speed oscillation of a single ultrasound microbubble

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Yuan, Baohong

    2013-01-01

    As contrast agents, microbubbles have been playing significant roles in ultrasound imaging. Investigation of microbubble oscillation is crucial for microbubble characterization and detection. Unfortunately, 3-dimensional (3D) observation of microbubble oscillation is challenging and costly because of the bubble size—a few microns in diameter—and the high-speed dynamics under MHz ultrasound pressure waves. In this study, a cost-efficient optical confocal microscopic system combined with a gated and intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera were developed to detect 3D microbubble oscillation. The capability of imaging microbubble high-speed oscillation with much lower costs than with an ultra-fast framing or streak camera system was demonstrated. In addition, microbubble oscillations along both lateral (x and y) and axial (z) directions were demonstrated. Accordingly, this system is an excellent alternative for 3D investigation of microbubble high-speed oscillation, especially when budgets are limited. PMID:24049677

  8. Microfluidic Techniques for Development of 3D Vascularized Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Anwarul; Paul, Arghya; Vrana, Nihal Engin; Zhao, Xin; Memic, Adnan; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Development of a vascularized tissue is one of the key challenges for the successful clinical application of tissue engineered constructs. Despite the significant efforts over the last few decades, establishing a gold standard to develop three dimensional (3D) vascularized tissues has still remained far from reality. Recent advances in the application of microfluidic platforms to the field of tissue engineering have greatly accelerated the progress toward the development of viable vascularized tissue constructs. Numerous techniques have emerged to induce the formation of vascular structure within tissues which can be broadly classified into two distinct categories, namely (1) prevascularization-based techniques and (2) vasculogenesis and angiogenesis-based techniques. This review presents an overview of the recent advancements in the vascularization techniques using both approaches for generating 3D vascular structure on microfluidic platforms. PMID:24906345

  9. A navigation system for flexible endoscopes using abdominal 3D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, R; Kaar, M; Bathia, Amon; Bathia, Amar; Lampret, A; Birkfellner, W; Hummel, J; Figl, M

    2014-09-21

    A navigation system for flexible endoscopes equipped with ultrasound (US) scan heads is presented. In contrast to similar systems, abdominal 3D-US is used for image fusion of the pre-interventional computed tomography (CT) to the endoscopic US. A 3D-US scan, tracked with an optical tracking system (OTS), is taken pre-operatively together with the CT scan. The CT is calibrated using the OTS, providing the transformation from CT to 3D-US. Immediately before intervention a 3D-US tracked with an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) is acquired and registered intra-modal to the preoperative 3D-US. The endoscopic US is calibrated using the EMTS and registered to the pre-operative CT by an intra-modal 3D-US/3D-US registration. Phantom studies showed a registration error for the US to CT registration of 5.1 mm±2.8 mm. 3D-US/3D-US registration of patient data gave an error of 4.1 mm compared to 2.8 mm with the phantom. From this we estimate an error on patient experiments of 5.6 mm. PMID:25170913

  10. Optimizing nonrigid registration performance between volumetric true 3D ultrasound images in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2011-03-01

    Compensating for brain shift as surgery progresses is important to ensure sufficient accuracy in patient-to-image registration in the operating room (OR) for reliable neuronavigation. Ultrasound has emerged as an important and practical imaging technique for brain shift compensation either by itself or through computational modeling that estimates whole-brain deformation. Using volumetric true 3D ultrasound (3DUS), it is possible to nonrigidly (e.g., based on B-splines) register two temporally different 3DUS images directly to generate feature displacement maps for data assimilation in the biomechanical model. Because of a large amount of data and number of degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) involved, however, a significant computational cost may be required that can adversely influence the clinical feasibility of the technique for efficiently generating model-updated MR (uMR) in the OR. This paper parametrically investigates three B-splines registration parameters and their influence on the computational cost and registration accuracy: number of grid nodes along each direction, floating image volume down-sampling rate, and number of iterations. A simulated rigid body displacement field was employed as a ground-truth against which the accuracy of displacements generated from the B-splines nonrigid registration was compared. A set of optimal parameters was then determined empirically that result in a registration computational cost of less than 1 min and a sub-millimetric accuracy in displacement measurement. These resulting parameters were further applied to a clinical surgery case to demonstrate their practical use. Our results indicate that the optimal set of parameters result in sufficient accuracy and computational efficiency in model computation, which is important for future application of the overall biomechanical modeling to generate uMR for image-guidance in the OR.

  11. Histological Evaluation of 3D MRI-Guided Transurethral Ultrasound Therapy in the Prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Siddharth; Boyes, Aaron; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Previous work from our group has shown that transurethral ultrasound therapy, with a single ultrasound transducer guided by temperature feedback from a single MRI plane (slice), can be used to treat a targeted region accurately in the prostate gland. We have extended this approach to a larger, 3D, targeted volume within the prostate, using a multi-element transducer controlled concurrently by temperature feedback from multiple imaging planes. Animals were placed supine in a 1.5 T clinical MRI, and the transurethral heating device was positioned with image guidance. A four-element transducer (each element was 5 mm long, operating at ˜8 MHz) was rotated to treat a targeted volume around the device. Temperature maps transverse to each element were acquired during heating and used to control the acoustic power of each element and the rate of rotation of the device. T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced (CE) MR images were obtained pre- and post-heating. Following the treatment, prostates were removed and fixed, axially sliced, stained with H&E, and digitally imaged at high-resolution to outline boundaries of cell death. Slice alignment and image registration techniques were developed to enable quantitative comparison of the axial MRI images and matching histological sections. Prostate sections showed clear regions of coagulative necrosis, extending ˜20 mm along the urethra, which correlated well with CE MRI data and transducer length. After registration, the outer border of coagulative necrosis on H&E conformed well to the target isotherm, similar to results from our previous (single element) acute studies. These results confirm that our previous analysis techniques for a single transducer can be extended to multiple elements, and that a large volumetric ablation of the prostate gland is feasible with a high degree of accuracy.

  12. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Allison; de Bever, Josh; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  13. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Allison; Bever, Josh de; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  14. Portable high-intensity focused ultrasound system with 3D electronic steering, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms: a preclinical study in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and accuracy of a new portable ultrasonography-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USg-HIFU) system with a 3-dimensional (3D) electronic steering transducer, a simultaneous ablation and imaging module, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: To address the accuracy of the transducer, hydrophones in a water chamber were used to assess the generation of sonic fields. An animal study was also performed in five pigs by ablating in vivo thighs by single-point sonication (n=10) or volume sonication (n=10) and ex vivo kidneys by single-point sonication (n=10). Histological and statistical analyses were performed. Results: In the hydrophone study, peak voltages were detected within 1.0 mm from the targets on the y- and z-axes and within 2.0-mm intervals along the x-axis (z-axis, direction of ultrasound propagation; y- and x-axes, perpendicular to the direction of ultrasound propagation). Twenty-nine of 30 HIFU sessions successfully created ablations at the target. The in vivo porcine thigh study showed only a small discrepancy (width, 0.5-1.1 mm; length, 3.0 mm) between the planning ultrasonograms and the pathological specimens. Inordinate thermal damage was not observed in the adjacent tissues or sonic pathways in the in vivo thigh and ex vivo kidney studies. Conclusion: Our study suggests that this new USg-HIFU system may be a safe and accurate technique for ablating soft tissues and encapsulated organs. PMID:25038809

  15. Tubular Enhanced Geodesic Active Contours for Continuum Robot Detection using 3D Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    Three dimensional ultrasound is a promising imaging modality for minimally invasive robotic surgery. As the robots are typically metallic, they interact strongly with the sound waves in ways that are not modeled by the ultrasound system’s signal processing algorithms. Consequently, they produce substantial imaging artifacts that can make image guidance difficult, even for experienced surgeons. This paper introduces a new approach for detecting curved continuum robots in 3D ultrasound images. The proposed approach combines geodesic active contours with a speed function that is based on enhancing the “tubularity” of the continuum robot. In particular, it takes advantage of the known robot diameter along its length. It also takes advantage of the fact that the robot surface facing the ultrasound probe provides the most accurate image. This method, termed Tubular Enhanced Geodesic Active Contours (TEGAC), is demonstrated through ex vivo intracardiac experiments to offer superior performance compared to conventional active contours. PMID:24231880

  16. A non-disruptive technology for robust 3D tool tracking for ultrasound-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Mung, Jay; Vignon, Francois; Jain, Ameet

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade ultrasound (US) has become the preferred modality for a number of interventional procedures, offering excellent soft tissue visualization. The main limitation however is limited visualization of surgical tools. A new method is proposed for robust 3D tracking and US image enhancement of surgical tools under US guidance. Small US sensors are mounted on existing surgical tools. As the imager emits acoustic energy, the electrical signal from the sensor is analyzed to reconstruct its 3D coordinates. These coordinates can then be used for 3D surgical navigation, similar to current day tracking systems. A system with real-time 3D tool tracking and image enhancement was implemented on a commercial ultrasound scanner and 3D probe. Extensive water tank experiments with a tracked 0.2mm sensor show robust performance in a wide range of imaging conditions and tool position/orientations. The 3D tracking accuracy was 0.36 +/- 0.16mm throughout the imaging volume of 55 degrees x 27 degrees x 150mm. Additionally, the tool was successfully tracked inside a beating heart phantom. This paper proposes an image enhancement and tool tracking technology with sub-mm accuracy for US-guided interventions. The technology is non-disruptive, both in terms of existing clinical workflow and commercial considerations, showing promise for large scale clinical impact. PMID:22003612

  17. Digital 3D Borobudur - Integration of 3D surveying and modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwardhi, D.; Menna, F.; Remondino, F.; Hanke, K.; Akmalia, R.

    2015-08-01

    The Borobudur temple (Indonesia) is one of the greatest Buddhist monuments in the world, now listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site. The present state of the temple is the result of restorations after being exposed to natural disasters several times. Today there is still a growing rate of deterioration of the building stones whose causes need further researches. Monitoring programs, supported at institutional level, have been effectively executed to observe the problem. The paper presents the latest efforts to digitally document the Borobudur Temple and its surrounding area in 3D with photogrammetric techniques. UAV and terrestrial images were acquired to completely digitize the temple, produce DEM, orthoimages and maps at 1:100 and 1:1000 scale. The results of the project are now employed by the local government organizations to manage the heritage area and plan new policies for the conservation and preservation of the UNESCO site. In order to help data management and policy makers, a web-based information system of the heritage area was also built to visualize and easily access all the data and achieved 3D results.

  18. Distributed network, wireless and cloud computing enabled 3-D ultrasound; a new medical technology paradigm.

    PubMed

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Medical technologies are indispensable to modern medicine. However, they have become exceedingly expensive and complex and are not available to the economically disadvantaged majority of the world population in underdeveloped as well as developed parts of the world. For example, according to the World Health Organization about two thirds of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In this paper we introduce a new medical technology paradigm centered on wireless technology and cloud computing that was designed to overcome the problems of increasing health technology costs. We demonstrate the value of the concept with an example; the design of a wireless, distributed network and central (cloud) computing enabled three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system. Specifically, we demonstrate the feasibility of producing a 3-D high end ultrasound scan at a central computing facility using the raw data acquired at the remote patient site with an inexpensive low end ultrasound transducer designed for 2-D, through a mobile device and wireless connection link between them. Producing high-end 3D ultrasound images with simple low-end transducers reduces the cost of imaging by orders of magnitude. It also removes the requirement of having a highly trained imaging expert at the patient site, since the need for hand-eye coordination and the ability to reconstruct a 3-D mental image from 2-D scans, which is a necessity for high quality ultrasound imaging, is eliminated. This could enable relatively untrained medical workers in developing nations to administer imaging and a more accurate diagnosis, effectively saving the lives of people. PMID:19936236

  19. Distributed Network, Wireless and Cloud Computing Enabled 3-D Ultrasound; a New Medical Technology Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Medical technologies are indispensable to modern medicine. However, they have become exceedingly expensive and complex and are not available to the economically disadvantaged majority of the world population in underdeveloped as well as developed parts of the world. For example, according to the World Health Organization about two thirds of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In this paper we introduce a new medical technology paradigm centered on wireless technology and cloud computing that was designed to overcome the problems of increasing health technology costs. We demonstrate the value of the concept with an example; the design of a wireless, distributed network and central (cloud) computing enabled three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system. Specifically, we demonstrate the feasibility of producing a 3-D high end ultrasound scan at a central computing facility using the raw data acquired at the remote patient site with an inexpensive low end ultrasound transducer designed for 2-D, through a mobile device and wireless connection link between them. Producing high-end 3D ultrasound images with simple low-end transducers reduces the cost of imaging by orders of magnitude. It also removes the requirement of having a highly trained imaging expert at the patient site, since the need for hand-eye coordination and the ability to reconstruct a 3-D mental image from 2-D scans, which is a necessity for high quality ultrasound imaging, is eliminated. This could enable relatively untrained medical workers in developing nations to administer imaging and a more accurate diagnosis, effectively saving the lives of people. PMID:19936236

  20. Integrated Interventional Devices For Real Time 3D Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Lee, Warren; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Pua, Eric C.; Light, Edward D.

    2006-05-01

    Two recent advances have expanded the potential of medical ultrasound: the introduction of real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging with catheter, transesophageal and laparoscopic probes and the development of interventional ultrasound therapeutic systems for focused ultrasound surgery, ablation and ultrasound enhanced drug delivery. This work describes devices combining both technologies. A series of transducer probes have been designed, fabricated and tested including: 1) a 12 French side scanning catheter incorporating a 64 element matrix array for imaging at 5MHz and a piston ablation transducer operating at 10 MHz. 2) a 14 Fr forward-scanning catheter integrating a 112 element 2-D array for imaging at 5 MHz encircled by an ablation annulus operating at 10 MHz. Finite element modeling was then used to simulate catheter annular and linear phased array transducers for ablation. 3) Linear phased array transducers were built to confirm the finite element analysis at 4 and 8 MHz including a mechanically focused 86 element 9 MHz array which transmits an ISPTA of 29.3 W/cm2 and creates a lesion in 2 minutes. 4) 2-D arrays of 504 channels operating at 5 MHz have been developed for transesophageal and laparascopic 3D imaging as well as therapeutic heating. All the devices image the heart anatomy including atria, valves, septa and en face views of the pulmonary veins.

  1. Super stereoscopy technique for comfortable and realistic 3D displays.

    PubMed

    Akşit, Kaan; Niaki, Amir Hossein Ghanbari; Ulusoy, Erdem; Urey, Hakan

    2014-12-15

    Two well-known problems of stereoscopic displays are the accommodation-convergence conflict and the lack of natural blur for defocused objects. We present a new technique that we name Super Stereoscopy (SS3D) to provide a convenient solution to these problems. Regular stereoscopic glasses are replaced by SS3D glasses which deliver at least two parallax images per eye through pinholes equipped with light selective filters. The pinholes generate blur-free retinal images so as to enable correct accommodation, while the delivery of multiple parallax images per eye creates an approximate blur effect for defocused objects. Experiments performed with cameras and human viewers indicate that the technique works as desired. In case two, pinholes equipped with color filters per eye are used; the technique can be used on a regular stereoscopic display by only uploading a new content, without requiring any change in display hardware, driver, or frame rate. Apart from some tolerable loss in display brightness and decrease in natural spatial resolution limit of the eye because of pinholes, the technique is quite promising for comfortable and realistic 3D vision, especially enabling the display of close objects that are not possible to display and comfortably view on regular 3DTV and cinema. PMID:25503026

  2. Simulated 3D ultrasound LV cardiac images for active shape model training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butakoff, Constantine; Balocco, Simone; Ordas, Sebastian; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper a study of 3D ultrasound cardiac segmentation using Active Shape Models (ASM) is presented. The proposed approach is based on a combination of a point distribution model constructed from a multitude of high resolution MRI scans and the appearance model obtained from simulated 3D ultrasound images. Usually the appearance model is learnt from a set of landmarked images. The significant level of noise, the low resolution of 3D ultrasound images (3D US) and the frequent failure to capture the complete wall of the left ventricle (LV) makes automatic or manual landmarking difficult. One possible solution is to use artificially simulated 3D US images since the generated images will match exactly the shape in question. In this way, by varying simulation parameters and generating corresponding images, it is possible to obtain a training set where the image matches the shape exactly. In this work the simulation of ultrasound images is performed by a convolutional approach. The evaluation of segmentation accuracy is performed on both simulated and in vivo images. The results obtained on 567 simulated images had an average error of 1.9 mm (1.73 +/- 0.05 mm for epicardium and 2 +/- 0.07 mm for endocardium, with 95% confidence) with voxel size being 1.1 × 1.1 × 0.7 mm. The error on 20 in vivo data was 3.5 mm (3.44 +/- 0.4 mm for epicardium and 3.73 +/- 0.4 mm for endocardium). In most images the model was able to approximate the borders of myocardium even when the latter was indistinguishable from the surrounding tissues.

  3. Skeletonization approach for characterization of benign vs. malignant single thyroid nodules using 3D contrast enhanced ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Filippo; Mantovani, Alice; Deandrea, Maurilio; Limone, Paolo; Garberoglio, Roberto; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) has potentialities in differential diagnosis between malignant and benign thyroid lesions, but interpretative pitfalls remain and accuracy is still poor. We developed an image processing technique for characterizing the intra-nodular vascularization of thyroid lesions. Twenty nodules (ten malignant) were analyzed by 3-D contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. The 3-D volumes were preprocessed and skeletonized. Seven vascular parameters were computed on the skeletons: number of vascular trees (NT); vascular density (VD); number of branching nodes (or branching points) (NB); mean vessel radius (MR); 2-D (DM) and 3-D (SOAM) tortuosity; and inflection count metric (ICM). Results showed that the malignant nodules had higher values of NT (83.1 vs. 18.1), VD (00.4 vs. 0.01), NB (1453 vs. 552), DM (51 vs. 18), ICM (19.9 vs. 8.7), and SOAM (26 vs. 11). Quantification of nodular vascularization based on 3-D contrast-enhanced ultrasound and skeletonization could help differential diagnosis of thyroid lesions.

  4. Real-time 3D ultrasound imaging on a next-generation media processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagoulatos, Niko; Noraz, Frederic; Kim, Yongmin

    2001-05-01

    3D ultrasound (US) provides physicians with a better understanding of human anatomy. By manipulating the 3D US data set, physicians can observe the anatomy in 3D from a number of different view directions and obtain 2D US images that would not be possible to directly acquire with the US probe. In order for 3D US to be in widespread clinical use, creation and manipulation of the 3D US data should be done at interactive times. This is a challenging task due to the large amount of data to be processed. Our group previously reported interactive 3D US imaging using a programmable mediaprocessor, Texas Instruments TMS320C80, which has been in clinical use. In this work, we present the algorithms we have developed for real-time 3D US using a newer and more powerful mediaprocessor, called MAP-CA. MAP-CA is a very long instruction word (VLIW) processor developed for multimedia applications. It has multiple execution units, a 32-kbyte data cache and a programmable DMA controller called the data streamer (DS). A forward mapping 6 DOF (for a freehand 3D US system based on magnetic position sensor for tracking the US probe) reconstruction algorithm with zero- order interpolation is achieved in 11.8 msec (84.7 frame/sec) per 512x512 8-bit US image. For 3D visualization of the reconstructed 3D US data sets, we used volume rendering and in particular the shear-warp factorization with the maximum intensity projection (MIP) rendering. 3D visualization is achieved in 53.6 msec (18.6 frames/sec) for a 128x128x128 8-bit volume and in 410.3 msec (2.4 frames/sec) for a 256x256x256 8-bit volume.

  5. Towards intraoperative monitoring of ablation using tracked 3D ultrasound elastography and internal palpation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Pezhman; Burgner, Jessica; Choti, Michael A.; Webster, Robert J., III; Hager, Gregory D.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2012-03-01

    B-mode ultrasound is widely used in liver ablation. However, the necrosis zone is typically not visible under b-mode ultrasound, since ablation does not necessarily change the acoustic properties of the tissue. In contrast, the change in tissue stiffness makes elastography ideal for monitoring ablation. Tissue palpation for elastography is typically applied at the imaging probe, by indenting it slightly into the tissue surface. However, in this paper we propose an alternate approach, where palpation is applied by a surgical instrument located inside the tissue. In our approach, the ablation needle is placed inside a steerable device called an active cannula and inserted into the tissue. A controlled motion is applied to the center of the ablation zone via the active cannula. Since the type and direction of motion is known, displacement can then be computed from two frames with the desired motion. The elastography results show the ablated region around the needle. While internal palpation provides excellent local contrast, freehand palpation from outside of the tissue via the transducer can provide a more global view of the region of the interest. For this purpose, we used a tracked 3D transducer to generate volumetric elastography images covering the ablated region. The tracking information is employed to improve the elastography results by selecting volume pairs suitable for elastography. This is an extension of our 2D frame selection technique which can cope with uncertainties associated with intra-operative elastography. In our experiments with phantom and ex-vivo tissue, we were able to generate high-quality images depicting the boundaries of the hard lesions.

  6. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Derek; Sherebrin, Shi; Izawa, Jonathan; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Biopsy of the prostate using ultrasound guidance is the clinical gold standard for diagnosis of prostate adenocarinoma. However, because early stage tumors are rarely visible under US, the procedure carries high false-negative rates and often patients require multiple biopsies before cancer is detected. To improve cancer detection, it is imperative that throughout the biopsy procedure, physicians know where they are within the prostate and where they have sampled during prior biopsies. The current biopsy procedure is limited to using only 2D ultrasound images to find and record target biopsy core sample sites. This information leaves ambiguity as the physician tries to interpret the 2D information and apply it to their 3D workspace. We have developed a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system that provides 3D intra-biopsy information to physicians for needle guidance and biopsy location recording. The system is designed to conform to the workflow of the current prostate biopsy procedure, making it easier for clinical integration. In this paper, we describe the system design and validate its accuracy by performing an in vitro biopsy procedure on US/CT multi-modal patient-specific prostate phantoms. A clinical sextant biopsy was performed by a urologist on the phantoms and the 3D models of the prostates were generated with volume errors less than 4% and mean boundary errors of less than 1 mm. Using the 3D biopsy system, needles were guided to within 1.36 +/- 0.83 mm of 3D targets and the position of the biopsy sites were accurately localized to 1.06 +/- 0.89 mm for the two prostates.

  7. Reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images based on Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay filters.

    PubMed

    Toonkum, Pollakrit; Suwanwela, Nijasri C; Chinrungrueng, Chedsada

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a new three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound reconstruction algorithm for generation of 3D images from a series of two-dimensional (2D) B-scans acquired in the mechanical linear scanning framework. Unlike most existing 3D ultrasound reconstruction algorithms, which have been developed and evaluated in the freehand scanning framework, the new algorithm has been designed to capitalize the regularity pattern of the mechanical linear scanning, where all the B-scan slices are precisely parallel and evenly spaced. The new reconstruction algorithm, referred to as the Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay (CRSG) filter, is a new variant of the Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing filter. The CRSG filter has been improved upon the original SG filter in two respects: First, the cyclic indicator function has been incorporated into the least square cost function to enable the CRSG filter to approximate nonuniformly spaced data of the unobserved image intensities contained in unfilled voxels and reduce speckle noise of the observed image intensities contained in filled voxels. Second, the regularization function has been augmented to the least squares cost function as a mechanism to balance between the degree of speckle reduction and the degree of detail preservation. The CRSG filter has been evaluated and compared with the Voxel Nearest-Neighbor (VNN) interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Speckle Reduction (ASR) filter, the VNN interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Weighted Median (AWM) filter, the Distance-Weighted (DW) interpolation, and the Adaptive Distance-Weighted (ADW) interpolation, on reconstructing a synthetic 3D spherical image and a clinical 3D carotid artery bifurcation in the mechanical linear scanning framework. This preliminary evaluation indicates that the CRSG filter is more effective in both speckle reduction and geometric reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images than the other methods. PMID:20696448

  8. 2D array transducers for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of interventional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Edward D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-02-01

    We describe catheter ring arrays for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of devices such as vascular grafts, heart valves and vena cava filters. We have constructed several prototypes operating at 5 MHz and consisting of 54 elements using the W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc. micro-miniature ribbon cables. We have recently constructed a new transducer using a braided wiring technology from Precision Interconnect. This transducer consists of 54 elements at 4.8 MHz with pitch of 0.20 mm and typical -6 dB bandwidth of 22%. In all cases, the transducer and wiring assembly were integrated with an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical deployment device for vena cava filters. Preliminary in vivo and in vitro testing is ongoing including simultaneous 3D ultrasound and x-ray fluoroscopy.

  9. Registration of Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound to Tomographic Images of the Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Brekken, Reidar; Iversen, Daniel Høyer; Tangen, Geir Arne; Dahl, Torbjørn

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an image-based method for registration of real-time 3-D ultrasound to computed tomography (CT) of the abdominal aorta, targeting future use in ultrasound-guided endovascular intervention. We proposed a method in which a surface model of the aortic wall was segmented from CT, and the approximate initial location of this model relative to the ultrasound volume was manually indicated. The model was iteratively transformed to automatically optimize correspondence to the ultrasound data. Feasibility was studied using data from a silicon phantom and in vivo data from a volunteer with previously acquired CT. Through visual evaluation, the ultrasound and CT data were seen to correspond well after registration. Both aortic lumen and branching arteries were well aligned. The processing was done offline, and the registration took approximately 0.2 s per ultrasound volume. The results encourage further patient studies to investigate accuracy, robustness and clinical value of the approach. PMID:27156015

  10. Key techniques for vision measurement of 3D object surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huachao; Zhang, Shubi; Guo, Guangli; Liu, Chao; Yu, Ruipeng

    2006-11-01

    Digital close-range photogrammetry system and machine vision are widely used in production control, quality inspection. The main aim is to provide accurate 3D objects or reconstruction of an object surface and give an expression to an object shape. First, the key techniques of camera calibration and target image positioning for 3D object surface vision measurement were briefly reviewed and analyzed in this paper. Then, an innovative and effect method for precise space coordinates measurements was proposed. Test research proved that the thought and methods we proposed about image segmentation, detection and positioning of circular marks were effective and valid. A propriety weight value for adding parameters, control points and orientation elements in bundle adjustment with self-calibration are advantageous to gaining high accuracy of space coordinates. The RMS error of check points is less than +/-1 mm, which can meet the requirement in industrial measurement with high accuracy.

  11. Fast and robust 3D ultrasound registration--block and game theoretic matching.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jyotirmoy; Klink, Camiel; Peters, Edward D; Niessen, Wiro J; Moelker, Adriaan; van Walsum, Theo

    2015-02-01

    Real-time 3D US has potential for image guidance in minimally invasive liver interventions. However, motion caused by patient breathing makes it hard to visualize a localized area, and to maintain alignment with pre-operative information. In this work we develop a fast affine registration framework to compensate in real-time for liver motion/displacement due to breathing. The affine registration of two consecutive ultrasound volumes in time is performed using block-matching. For a set of evenly distributed points in one volume and their correspondences in the other volume, we propose a robust outlier rejection method to reject false matches. The inliers are then used to determine the affine transformation. The approach is evaluated on 13 4D ultrasound sequences acquired from 8 subjects. For 91 pairs of 3D ultrasound volumes selected from these sequences, a mean registration error of 1.8mm is achieved. A graphics processing unit (GPU) implementation runs the 3D US registration at 8 Hz. PMID:25484018

  12. Random walk based segmentation for the prostate on 3D transrectal ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj V.; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a new semi-automatic segmentation method for the prostate on 3D transrectal ultrasound images (TRUS) by combining the region and classification information. We use a random walk algorithm to express the region information efficiently and flexibly because it can avoid segmentation leakage and shrinking bias. We further use the decision tree as the classifier to distinguish the prostate from the non-prostate tissue because of its fast speed and superior performance, especially for a binary classification problem. Our segmentation algorithm is initialized with the user roughly marking the prostate and non-prostate points on the mid-gland slice which are fitted into an ellipse for obtaining more points. Based on these fitted seed points, we run the random walk algorithm to segment the prostate on the mid-gland slice. The segmented contour and the information from the decision tree classification are combined to determine the initial seed points for the other slices. The random walk algorithm is then used to segment the prostate on the adjacent slice. We propagate the process until all slices are segmented. The segmentation method was tested in 32 3D transrectal ultrasound images. Manual segmentation by a radiologist serves as the gold standard for the validation. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieved a Dice similarity coefficient of 91.37+/-0.05%. The segmentation method can be applied to 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy and other applications.

  13. 3D ultrasound Nakagami imaging for radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Bruner, Debrorah; Tridandapani, Srini; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    Radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis is a debilitating side-effect affecting up to 80% of women receiving radiotherapy for their gynecological (GYN) malignancies. Despite the significant incidence and severity, little research has been conducted to identify the pathophysiologic changes of vaginal toxicity. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that ultrasound Nakagami shape and PDF parameters can be used to quantify radiation-induced vaginal toxicity. These Nakagami parameters are derived from the statistics of ultrasound backscattered signals to capture the physical properties (e.g., arrangement and distribution) of the biological tissues. In this paper, we propose to expand this Nakagami imaging concept from 2D to 3D to fully characterize radiation-induced changes to the vaginal wall within the radiation treatment field. A pilot study with 5 post-radiotherapy GYN patients was conducted using a clinical ultrasound scanner (6 MHz) with a mechanical stepper. A serial of 2D ultrasound images, with radio-frequency (RF) signals, were acquired at 1 mm step size. The 2D Nakagami shape and PDF parameters were calculated from the RF signal envelope with a sliding window, and then 3D Nakagami parameter images were generated from the parallel 2D images. This imaging method may be useful as we try to monitor radiation-induced vaginal injury, and address vaginal toxicities and sexual dysfunction in women after radiotherapy for GYN malignancies.

  14. Automatic nipple detection on 3D images of an automated breast ultrasound system (ABUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanshir Moghaddam, Mandana; Tan, Tao; Karssemeijer, Nico; Platel, Bram

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that applying Automated Breast Ultrasound in addition to mammography in women with dense breasts can lead to additional detection of small, early stage breast cancers which are occult in corresponding mammograms. In this paper, we proposed a fully automatic method for detecting the nipple location in 3D ultrasound breast images acquired from Automated Breast Ultrasound Systems. The nipple location is a valuable landmark to report the position of possible abnormalities in a breast or to guide image registration. To detect the nipple location, all images were normalized. Subsequently, features have been extracted in a multi scale approach and classification experiments were performed using a gentle boost classifier to identify the nipple location. The method was applied on a dataset of 100 patients with 294 different 3D ultrasound views from Siemens and U-systems acquisition systems. Our database is a representative sample of cases obtained in clinical practice by four medical centers. The automatic method could accurately locate the nipple in 90% of AP (Anterior-Posterior) views and in 79% of the other views.

  15. Quantitative Assessment of Cancer Vascular Architecture by Skeletonization of High-resolution 3-D Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Molinari, F.; Meiburger, K. M.; Giustetto, P.; Rizzitelli, S.; Boffa, C.; Castano, M.; Terreno, E.

    2014-01-01

    The accurate characterization and description of the vascular network of a cancer lesion is of paramount importance in clinical practice and cancer research in order to improve diagnostic accuracy or to assess the effectiveness of a treatment. The aim of this study was to show the effectiveness of liposomes as an ultrasound contrast agent to describe the 3-D vascular architecture of a tumor. Eight C57BL/6 mice grafted with syngeneic B16-F10 murine melanoma cells were injected with a bolus of 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocoline (DSPC)-based non-targeted liposomes and with a bolus of microbubbles. 3-D contrast-enhanced images of the tumor lesions were acquired in three conditions: pre-contrast, after the injection of microbubbles, and after the injection of liposomes. By using a previously developed reconstruction and characterization image processing technique, we obtained the 3-D representation of the vascular architecture in these three conditions. Six descriptive parameters of these networks were also computed: the number of vascular trees (NT), the vascular density (VD), the number of branches, the 2-D curvature measure, the number of vascular flexes of the vessels, and the 3-D curvature. Results showed that all the vascular descriptors obtained by liposome-based images were statistically equal to those obtained by using microbubbles, except the VD which was found to be lower for liposome images. All the six descriptors computed in pre-contrast conditions had values that were statistically lower than those computed in presence of contrast, both for liposomes and microbubbles. Liposomes have already been used in cancer therapy for the selective ultrasound-mediated delivery of drugs. This work demonstrated their effectiveness also as vascular diagnostic contrast agents, therefore proving that liposomes can be used as efficient “theranostic” (i.e. therapeutic + diagnostic) ultrasound probes. PMID:24206210

  16. 3D deformable organ model based liver motion tracking in ultrasound videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Bae; Hwang, Youngkyoo; Oh, Young-Taek; Bang, Won-Chul; Lee, Heesae; Kim, James D. K.; Kim, Chang Yeong

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a novel method of using 2D ultrasound (US) cine images during image-guided therapy to accurately track the 3D position of a tumor even when the organ of interest is in motion due to patient respiration. Tracking is possible thanks to a 3D deformable organ model we have developed. The method consists of three processes in succession. The first process is organ modeling where we generate a personalized 3D organ model from high quality 3D CT or MR data sets captured during three different respiratory phases. The model includes the organ surface, vessel and tumor, which can all deform and move in accord with patient respiration. The second process is registration of the organ model to 3D US images. From 133 respiratory phase candidates generated from the deformable organ model, we resolve the candidate that best matches the 3D US images according to vessel centerline and surface. As a result, we can determine the position of the US probe. The final process is real-time tracking using 2D US cine images captured by the US probe. We determine the respiratory phase by tracking the diaphragm on the image. The 3D model is then deformed according to respiration phase and is fitted to the image by considering the positions of the vessels. The tumor's 3D positions are then inferred based on respiration phase. Testing our method on real patient data, we have found the accuracy of 3D position is within 3.79mm and processing time is 5.4ms during tracking.

  17. A 5 MHz Cylindrical Dual-Layer Transducer Array for 3-D Transrectal Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuling; Nguyen, Man; Yen, Jesse T.

    2012-01-01

    2-D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) is being used in guiding prostate biopsies and treatments. In many cases, the TRUS probes are moved manually or mechanically to acquire volumetric information, making the imaging slow, user-dependent and unreliable. A real-time 3-D TRUS system could improve reliability and volume rates of imaging during these procedures. In this paper, we present a 5 MHz cylindrical dual-layer transducer array capable of real-time 3-D transrectal ultrasound without any mechanically moving parts. Compared to fully-sampled 2-D arrays, this design substantially reduces the channel count and fabrication complexity. This dual-layer transducer uses PZT elements for transmit and P[VDF-TrFE] copolymer elements for receive, respectively. The mechanical flexibility of both diced PZT and copolymer makes it practical for transrectal applications. Full synthetic aperture 3-D data sets were acquired by interfacing the transducer with a Verasonics Data Acquisition System (VDAS). Offline 3-D beamforming was then performed to obtain volumes of two wire phantoms and a cyst phantom. Generalized coherence factor (GCF) was applied to improve the contrast of images. The measured −6 dB fractional bandwidth of the transducer was 62% with a center frequency of 5.66 MHz. The measured lateral beamwidths were 1.28 mm and 0.91 mm in transverse and longitudinal directions respectively, compared with a simulated beamwidth of 0.92 mm and 0.74 mm. PMID:22972914

  18. 3D ultrasound volume stitching using phase symmetry and harris corner detection for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi, Rupin; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2010-03-01

    Stitching of volumes obtained from three dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) scanners improves visualization of anatomy in many clinical applications. Fast but accurate volume registration remains the key challenge in this area.We propose a volume stitching method based on efficient registration of 3D US volumes obtained from a tracked US probe. Since the volumes, after adjusting for probe motion, are coarsely registered, we obtain salient correspondence points in the central slices of these volumes. This is done by first removing artifacts in the US slices using intensity invariant local phase image processing and then applying the Harris Corner detection algorithm. Fast sub-volume registration on a small neighborhood around the points then gives fast, accurate 3D registration parameters. The method has been tested on 3D US scans of phantom and real human radius and pelvis bones and a phantom human fetus. The method has also been compared to volumetric registration, as well as feature based registration using 3D-SIFT. Quantitative results show average post-registration error of 0.33mm which is comparable to volumetric registration accuracy (0.31mm) and much better than 3D-SIFT based registration which failed to register the volumes. The proposed method was also much faster than volumetric registration (~4.5 seconds versus 83 seconds).

  19. The Evolution of 3D Microimaging Techniques in Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahagian, D.; Proussevitch, A.

    2009-05-01

    In the analysis of geomaterials, it is essential to be able to analyze internal structures on a quantitative basis. Techniques have evolved from rough qualitative methods to highly accurate quantitative methods coupled with 3-D numerical analysis. The earliest primitive method for "seeing'" what was inside a rock was multiple sectioning to produce a series of image slices. This technique typically completely destroyed the sample being analyzed. Another destructive method was developed to give more detailed quantitative information by forming plastic casts of internal voids in sedimentary and volcanic rocks. For this, void were filled with plastic and the rock dissolved away with HF to reveal plastic casts of internal vesicles. Later, new approaches to stereology were developed to extract 3D information from 2D cross-sectional images. This has long been possible for spheres because the probability distribution for cutting a sphere along any small circle is known analytically (greatest probability is near the equator). However, large numbers of objects are required for statistical validity, and geomaterials are seldom spherical, so crystals, vesicles, and other inclusions would need a more sophisticated approach. Consequently, probability distributions were developed using numerical techniques for rectangular solids and various ellipsoids so that stereological techniques could be applied to these. The "holy grail" has always been to obtain 3D quantitative images non-destructively. A key method is Computed X-ray Tomography (CXT), in which attenuation of X-rays is recorded as a function of angular position in a cylindrical sample, providing a 2D "slice" of the interior. When a series of these "slices" is stacked (in increments equivalent with the resolution of the X-ray to make cubic voxels), a 3D image results with quantitative information regarding internal structure, particle/void volumes, nearest neighbors, coordination numbers, preferred orientations, etc. CXT can

  20. Model fitting using RANSAC for surgical tool localization in 3-D ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Uhercík, Marián; Kybic, Jan; Liebgott, Hervé; Cachard, Christian

    2010-08-01

    Ultrasound guidance is used for many surgical interventions such as biopsy and electrode insertion. We present a method to localize a thin surgical tool such as a biopsy needle or a microelectrode in a 3-D ultrasound image. The proposed method starts with thresholding and model fitting using random sample consensus for robust localization of the axis. Subsequent local optimization refines its position. Two different tool image models are presented: one is simple and fast and the second uses learned a priori information about the tool's voxel intensities and the background. Finally, the tip of the tool is localized by finding an intensity drop along the axis. The simulation study shows that our algorithm can localize the tool at nearly real-time speed, even using a MATLAB implementation, with accuracy better than 1 mm. In an experimental comparison with several alternative localization methods, our method appears to be the fastest and the most robust one. We also show the results on real 3-D ultrasound data from a PVA cryogel phantom, turkey breast, and breast biopsy. PMID:20483680

  1. METHODS FOR USING 3-D ULTRASOUND SPECKLE TRACKING IN BIAXIAL MECHANICAL TESTING OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation. PMID:25616585

  2. Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique 3D-CAD-SAFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, V.; Kröning, M.; Chakhlov, S.; Fischer, W.

    2000-05-01

    Till the 80's ultrasonic holography has been used as an analyzing technique, a procedure which has been replaced by the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique "SAFT." This technique has been applied on metallic components in different power plants, mostly on pipe systems on pressure vessels or on specimen made of composite or concrete material. SAFT exists in different versions, either in 2D or 3D, for plane or arbitrarily shaped surfaces, for pulse echo or pitch- and catch arrangements. The defect sizes ranged from 100 μm in turbine shafts till fractures of meters in research pressure vessels. The paper covers the lastest results of the SAFT-reconstruction technique under Windows NT which has been guided by the experience obtained in the field. It contributes to the currently discussed question of the possible benefit using TOFD—techniques versus pulse echo techniques; the target has been a fatigue crack in a pipe segment which was investigated by different insonification angles, wave modes and probe arrangements. The results are evaluated with respect to signal-to-noise ratio improvement; problems of TOFD are demonstrated using an animation procedure which allows to walk through the weld in three orthogonal directions. A special example will be shown from a bore hole inspection of water power station valves where the reconstruction procedure follows the radial axial insonification planes. The multi-line SAFT images can be cut according to the situation of the crack position and orientation.

  3. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided system for thermal ablation of liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshat, Hamid R. S.; Cool, Derek W.; Barker, Kevin; Gardi, Lori; Kakani, Nirmal; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-03-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasound (2D US) imaging is commonly used for diagnostic and intraoperative guidance of interventional abdominal procedures including percutaneous thermal ablation of focal liver tumors with radiofrequency (RF) or microwave (MW) induced energy. However, in many situations 2D US may not provide enough anatomical detail and guidance information. Therefore, intra-procedural CT or MR imaging are used in many centers for guidance purposes. These modalities are costly and are mainly utilized to confirm tool placement rather than guiding the insertion. Three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) has been introduced to address these issues. In this paper, we present our integrated solution to provide 3D US images using a newly developed mechanical transducer with a large field-ofview and without the need for external tracking devices to combine diagnostic and planning information of different modalities for intraoperative guidance. The system provides tools to segment the target(s), plan the treatment, and detect the ablation applicators during the procedure for guiding purposes. We present experimental results used to ensure that our system generates accurate measurements and our early clinical evaluation results. The results suggest that 3D US used for focal liver ablation can provide a more reliable planning and guidance tool compared to 2D US only, and in many cases offers comparable measurements to other alternatives at significantly lower cost, faster time and with no harmful radiation.

  4. Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin; Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 {+-} 1.5% error, 4.4 {+-} 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 {+-} 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

  5. Improving 3d Spatial Queries Search: Newfangled Technique of Space Filling Curves in 3d City Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uznir, U.; Anton, F.; Suhaibah, A.; Rahman, A. A.; Mioc, D.

    2013-09-01

    The advantages of three dimensional (3D) city models can be seen in various applications including photogrammetry, urban and regional planning, computer games, etc.. They expand the visualization and analysis capabilities of Geographic Information Systems on cities, and they can be developed using web standards. However, these 3D city models consume much more storage compared to two dimensional (2D) spatial data. They involve extra geometrical and topological information together with semantic data. Without a proper spatial data clustering method and its corresponding spatial data access method, retrieving portions of and especially searching these 3D city models, will not be done optimally. Even though current developments are based on an open data model allotted by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) called CityGML, its XML-based structure makes it challenging to cluster the 3D urban objects. In this research, we propose an opponent data constellation technique of space-filling curves (3D Hilbert curves) for 3D city model data representation. Unlike previous methods, that try to project 3D or n-dimensional data down to 2D or 3D using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) or Hilbert mappings, in this research, we extend the Hilbert space-filling curve to one higher dimension for 3D city model data implementations. The query performance was tested using a CityGML dataset of 1,000 building blocks and the results are presented in this paper. The advantages of implementing space-filling curves in 3D city modeling will improve data retrieval time by means of optimized 3D adjacency, nearest neighbor information and 3D indexing. The Hilbert mapping, which maps a subinterval of the [0, 1] interval to the corresponding portion of the d-dimensional Hilbert's curve, preserves the Lebesgue measure and is Lipschitz continuous. Depending on the applications, several alternatives are possible in order to cluster spatial data together in the third dimension compared to its

  6. Improved Visualization of Intracranial Vessels with Intraoperative Coregistration of Rotational Digital Subtraction Angiography and Intraoperative 3D Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Podlesek, Dino; Meyer, Tobias; Morgenstern, Ute; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound can visualize and update the vessel status in real time during cerebral vascular surgery. We studied the depiction of parent vessels and aneurysms with a high-resolution 3D intraoperative ultrasound imaging system during aneurysm clipping using rotational digital subtraction angiography as a reference. Methods We analyzed 3D intraoperative ultrasound in 39 patients with cerebral aneurysms to visualize the aneurysm intraoperatively and the nearby vascular tree before and after clipping. Simultaneous coregistration of preoperative subtraction angiography data with 3D intraoperative ultrasound was performed to verify the anatomical assignment. Results Intraoperative ultrasound detected 35 of 43 aneurysms (81%) in 39 patients. Thirty-nine intraoperative ultrasound measurements were matched with rotational digital subtraction angiography and were successfully reconstructed during the procedure. In 7 patients, the aneurysm was partially visualized by 3D-ioUS or was not in field of view. Post-clipping intraoperative ultrasound was obtained in 26 and successfully reconstructed in 18 patients (69%) despite clip related artefacts. The overlap between 3D-ioUS aneurysm volume and preoperative rDSA aneurysm volume resulted in a mean accuracy of 0.71 (Dice coefficient). Conclusions Intraoperative coregistration of 3D intraoperative ultrasound data with preoperative rotational digital subtraction angiography is possible with high accuracy. It allows the immediate visualization of vessels beyond the microscopic field, as well as parallel assessment of blood velocity, aneurysm and vascular tree configuration. Although spatial resolution is lower than for standard angiography, the method provides an excellent vascular overview, advantageous interpretation of 3D-ioUS and immediate intraoperative feedback of the vascular status. A prerequisite for understanding vascular intraoperative ultrasound is image quality and a successful match with preoperative

  7. Vision-based endoscope tracking for 3D ultrasound image-guided surgical navigation.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Wang, J; Ando, T; Kubota, A; Yamashita, H; Sakuma, I; Chiba, T; Kobayashi, E

    2015-03-01

    This work introduces a self-contained framework for endoscopic camera tracking by combining 3D ultrasonography with endoscopy. The approach can be readily incorporated into surgical workflows without installing external tracking devices. By fusing the ultrasound-constructed scene geometry with endoscopic vision, this integrated approach addresses issues related to initialization, scale ambiguity, and interest point inadequacy that may be faced by conventional vision-based approaches when applied to fetoscopic procedures. Vision-based pose estimations were demonstrated by phantom and ex vivo monkey placenta imaging. The potential contribution of this method may extend beyond fetoscopic procedures to include general augmented reality applications in minimally invasive procedures. PMID:25263644

  8. Imaging fault zones using 3D seismic image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Rob; Purves, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Significant advances in structural analysis of deep water structure, salt tectonic and extensional rift basin come from the descriptions of fault system geometries imaged in 3D seismic data. However, even where seismic data are excellent, in most cases the trajectory of thrust faults is highly conjectural and still significant uncertainty exists as to the patterns of deformation that develop between the main faults segments, and even of the fault architectures themselves. Moreover structural interpretations that conventionally define faults by breaks and apparent offsets of seismic reflectors are commonly conditioned by a narrow range of theoretical models of fault behavior. For example, almost all interpretations of thrust geometries on seismic data rely on theoretical "end-member" behaviors where concepts as strain localization or multilayer mechanics are simply avoided. Yet analogue outcrop studies confirm that such descriptions are commonly unsatisfactory and incomplete. In order to fill these gaps and improve the 3D visualization of deformation in the subsurface, seismic attribute methods are developed here in conjunction with conventional mapping of reflector amplitudes (Marfurt & Chopra, 2007)). These signal processing techniques recently developed and applied especially by the oil industry use variations in the amplitude and phase of the seismic wavelet. These seismic attributes improve the signal interpretation and are calculated and applied to the entire 3D seismic dataset. In this contribution we will show 3D seismic examples of fault structures from gravity-driven deep-water thrust structures and extensional basin systems to indicate how 3D seismic image processing methods can not only build better the geometrical interpretations of the faults but also begin to map both strain and damage through amplitude/phase properties of the seismic signal. This is done by quantifying and delineating the short-range anomalies on the intensity of reflector amplitudes

  9. A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, R.; Song, A.; Li, X. D.; Lu, Y.; Yan, R.; Xu, B.; Li, X.

    2014-10-01

    A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect by deconvolution is proposed for noninvasive imaging of biological tissue. Compared with ultrasound current source density imaging, ultrasound Joule heat density tomography doesn't require any priori knowledge of conductivity distribution and lead fields, so it can gain better imaging result, more adaptive to environment and with wider application scope. For a general 3D volume conductor with broadly distributed current density field, in the AE equation the ultrasound pressure can't simply be separated from the 3D integration, so it is not a common modulation and basebanding (heterodyning) method is no longer suitable to separate Joule heat density from the AE signals. In the proposed method the measurement signal is viewed as the output of Joule heat density convolving with ultrasound wave. As a result, the internal 3D Joule heat density can be reconstructed by means of Wiener deconvolution. A series of computer simulations set for breast cancer imaging applications, with consideration of ultrasound beam diameter, noise level, conductivity contrast, position dependency and size of simulated tumors, have been conducted to evaluate the feasibility and performance of the proposed reconstruction method. The computer simulation results demonstrate that high spatial resolution 3D ultrasound Joule heat density imaging is feasible using the proposed method, and it has potential applications to breast cancer detection and imaging of other organs.

  10. A visual probe localization and calibration system for cost-effective computer-aided 3D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aziah; Logeswaran, Rajasvaran

    2007-08-01

    The 3D ultrasound systems produce much better reproductions than 2D ultrasound, but their prohibitively high cost deprives many less affluent organization this benefit. This paper proposes using the conventional 2D ultrasound equipment readily available in most hospitals, along with a single conventional digital camera, to construct 3D ultrasound images. The proposed system applies computer vision to extract position information of the ultrasound probe while the scanning takes place. The probe, calibrated in order to calculate the offset of the ultrasound scan from the position of the marker attached to it, is used to scan a number of geometrical objects. Using the proposed system, the 3D volumes of the objects were successfully reconstructed. The system was tested in clinical situations where human body parts were scanned. The results presented, and confirmed by medical staff, are very encouraging for cost-effective implementation of computer-aided 3D ultrasound using a simple setup with 2D ultrasound equipment and a conventional digital camera. PMID:17126314

  11. 3D Ultrasound Can Contribute to Planning CT to Define the Target for Partial Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berrang, Tanya S.; Truong, Pauline T. Popescu, Carmen; Drever, Laura; Kader, Hosam A.; Hilts, Michelle L.; Mitchell, Tracy; Soh, S.Y.; Sands, Letricia; Silver, Stuart; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The role of three-dimensional breast ultrasound (3D US) in planning partial breast radiotherapy (PBRT) is unknown. This study evaluated the accuracy of coregistration of 3D US to planning computerized tomography (CT) images, the seroma contouring consistency of radiation oncologists using the two imaging modalities and the clinical situations in which US was associated with improved contouring consistency compared to CT. Materials and Methods: Twenty consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled prospectively after breast-conserving surgery. Subjects underwent 3D US at CT simulation for adjuvant RT. Three radiation oncologists independently contoured the seroma on separate CT and 3D US image sets. Seroma clarity, seroma volumes, and interobserver contouring consistency were compared between the imaging modalities. Associations between clinical characteristics and seroma clarity were examined using Pearson correlation statistics. Results: 3D US and CT coregistration was accurate to within 2 mm or less in 19/20 (95%) cases. CT seroma clarity was reduced with dense breast parenchyma (p = 0.035), small seroma volume (p < 0.001), and small volume of excised breast tissue (p = 0.01). US seroma clarity was not affected by these factors (p = NS). US was associated with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in 8/20 (40%) cases. Of these 8 cases, 7 had low CT seroma clarity scores and 4 had heterogeneously to extremely dense breast parenchyma. Conclusion: 3D US can be a useful adjunct to CT in planning PBRT. Radiation oncologists were able to use US images to contour the seroma target, with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in cases with dense breast parenchyma and poor CT seroma clarity.

  12. 3D conformal MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy: results of gel phantom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Djin, W. A.; Burtnyk, M.; McCormick, S.; Bronskill, M.; Chopra, R.

    2011-09-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy shows promise for minimally invasive treatment of localized prostate cancer. Previous in-vivo studies demonstrated the feasibility of performing conservative treatments using real-time temperature feedback to control accurately the establishment of coagulative lesions within circumscribed prostate regions. This in-vitro study tested device configuration and control options for achieving full prostate treatments. A multi-channel MRI compatible ultrasound therapy system was evaluated in gel phantoms using 3 canine prostate models. Prostate profiles were 5 mm-step-segmented from T2-weighted MR images performed during previous in-vivo experiments. During ultrasound exposures, each ultrasound element was controlled independently by the 3D controller. Decisions on acoustic power, frequency, and device rotation rate were made in real time based on MR thermometry feedback and prostate radii. Low and high power treatment approaches using maximum acoustic powers of 10 or 20 W.cm-2 were tested as well as single and dual-frequency strategies (4.05/13.10 MHz). The dual-frequency strategy used either the fundamental frequency or the 3rd harmonic component, depending on the prostate radius. The 20 W.cm-2 dual frequency approach was the most efficient configuration in achieving full prostate treatments. Treatment times were about half the duration of those performed with 10 W.cm-2 configurations. Full prostate coagulations were performed in 16.3±6.1 min at a rate of 1.8±0.2 cm3.min-1, and resulted in very little undertreated tissue (<3%). Surrounding organs positioned beyond a safety distance of 1.4±1.0 mm from prostate boundaries were not damaged, particularly rectal wall tissues. In this study, a 3D, MR-thermometry-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy was validated in vitro in a tissue-mimicking phantom for performing full prostate treatment. A dual-frequency configuration with 20 W.cm-2 ultrasound intensity exposure showed good

  13. 3D transrectal ultrasound prostate biopsy using a mechanical imaging and needle-guidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Jeffrey; Cool, Derek; Gardi, Lori; Montreuil, Jacques; Gil, Elena; Bluvol, Jeremy; Knight, Kerry; Smith, David; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2008-03-01

    Prostate biopsy procedures are generally limited to 2D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging for biopsy needle guidance. This limitation results in needle position ambiguity and an insufficient record of biopsy core locations in cases of prostate re-biopsy. We have developed a multi-jointed mechanical device that supports a commercially available TRUS probe with an integrated needle guide for precision prostate biopsy. The device is fixed at the base, allowing the joints to be manually manipulated while fully supporting its weight throughout its full range of motion. Means are provided to track the needle trajectory and display this trajectory on a corresponding TRUS image. This allows the physician to aim the needle-guide at predefined targets within the prostate, providing true 3D navigation. The tracker has been designed for use with several end-fired transducers that can be rotated about the longitudinal axis of the probe to generate 3D images. The tracker reduces the variability associated with conventional hand-held probes, while preserving user familiarity and procedural workflow. In a prostate phantom, biopsy needles were guided to within 2 mm of their targets, and the 3D location of the biopsy core was accurate to within 3 mm. The 3D navigation system is validated in the presence of prostate motion in a preliminary patient study.

  14. Accuracy evaluation of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Walter J.; Nye, Jonathan A.; Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj A.; Votaw, John R.; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions.

  15. Visualization of a newborn's hip joint using 3D ultrasound and automatic image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overhoff, Heinrich M.; Lazovic, Djordje; von Jan, Ute

    1999-05-01

    Graf's method is a successful procedure for the diagnostic screening of developmental dysplasia of the hip. In a defined 2-D ultrasound (US) scan, which virtually cuts the hip joint, landmarks are interactively identified to derive congruence indicators. As the indicators do not reflect the spatial joint structure, and the femoral head is not clearly visible in the US scan, here 3-D US is used to gain insight to the hip joint in its spatial form. Hip joints of newborns were free-hand scanned using a conventional ultrasound transducer and a localizer system fixed on the scanhead. To overcome examiner- dependent findings the landmarks were detected by automatic segmentation of the image volume. The landmark image volumes and an automatically determined virtual sphere approximating the femoral head were visualized color-coded on a computer screen. The visualization was found to be intuitive and to simplify the diagnostic substantially. By the visualization of the 3-D relations between acetabulum and femoral head the reliability of diagnostics is improved by finding the entire joint geometry.

  16. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3D Ultrasound-guided Biopsy System

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Walter J.; Nye, Jonathan A.; Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj A.; Votaw, John R.; Fei, Baowei

    2013-01-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions. PMID:24392206

  17. 3-D statistical cancer atlas-based targeting of prostate biopsy using ultrasound image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Ramkrishnan; Shen, Dinggang; Davatzikos, Christos A.; Crawford, E. David; Barqawi, Albaha; Werahera, Priya; Kumar, Dinesh; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2008-03-01

    Prostate cancer is a multifocal disease and lesions are not distributed uniformly within the gland. Several biopsy protocols concerning spatially specific targeting have been reported urology literature. Recently a statistical cancer atlas of the prostate was constructed providing voxelwise probabilities of cancers in the prostate. Additionally an optimized set of biopsy sites was computed with 94 - 96% detection accuracy was reported using only 6-7 needles. Here we discuss the warping of this atlas to prostate segmented side-fire ultrasound images of the patient. A shape model was used to speed up registration. The model was trained from over 38 expert segmented subjects off-line. This training yielded as few as 15-20 degrees of freedom that were optimized to warp the atlas surface to the patient's ultrasound image followed by elastic interpolation of the 3-D atlas. As a result the atlas is completely mapped to the patient's prostate anatomy along with optimal predetermined needle locations for biopsy. These do not preclude the use of additional biopsies if desired. A color overlay of the atlas is also displayed on the ultrasound image showing high cancer zones within the prostate. Finally current biopsy locations are saved in the atlas space and may be used to update the atlas based on the pathology report. In addition to the optimal atlas plan, previous biopsy locations and alternate plans can also be stored in the atlas space and warped to the patient with no additional time overhead.

  18. Thermal analysis of the surrounding anatomy during 3-D MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound prostate therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Previous numerical simulations have shown that MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy can generate highly accurate volumes of thermal coagulation conforming to 3-D human prostate geometries. The goal of this work is to simulate, quantify and evaluate the thermal impact of these treatments on the rectum, pelvic bone, neurovascular bundles (NVB) and urinary sphincters. This study used twenty 3-D anatomical models of prostate cancer patients and detailed bio-acoustic simulations incorporating an active feedback algorithm which controlled a rotating, planar ultrasound transducer (17-4×3 mm elements, 4.7/9.7 MHz, 10 Wac/cm2). Heating of the adjacent surrounding anatomy was evaluated using thermal tolerances reported in the literature. Heating of the rectum poses the most important safety concern and is influenced largely by the water temperature flowing through an endorectal cooling device; temperatures of 7-37° C are required to limit potential damage to less than 10 mm3 on the outer 1 mm layer of rectum. Significant heating of the pelvic bone was predicted in 30% of the patient models with an ultrasound frequency of 4.7 MHz; setting the frequency to 9.7 MHz when the bone is less than 10 mm away from the prostate reduced heating in all cases below the threshold for irreversible damage. Heating of the NVB was significant in 75% of the patient models in the absence of treatment planning; this proportion was reduced to 5% by using treatment margins of up to 4 mm. To avoid damaging the urinary sphincters, margins from the transducer of 2-4 mm should be used, depending on the transurethral cooling temperature. Simulations show that MRI-guided transurethral therapy can treat the entire prostate accurately. Strategies have been developed which, along with careful treatment planning, can be used to avoid causing thermal injury to the rectum, pelvic bone, NVB and urinary sphincters.

  19. Ultrasound Techniques for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasound has proven to be a safe non-invasive technique for imaging organs and measuring cardiovascular function. It has unique advantages for application to problems with man in space including evaluation of cardiovascular function both in serial studies and during critical operations. In addition, specialized instrumentation may be capable of detecting the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. A spatial location and three-dimensional reconstruction system is being developed to improve the accuracy and reproducibility for serial comparative ultrasound studies of cardiovascular function. The three-dimensional method permits the acquisition of ultrasonic images from many views that can be recombined into a single reconstruction of the heart or vasculature. In addition to conventional imaging and monitoring systems, it is sometimes necessary or desirable to develop instrumentation for special purposes. One example of this type of development is the design of a pulsed-Doppler system to monitor cerebral blood flow during critical operations such as re-entry. A second example is the design of a swept-frequency ultrasound system for the detection of bubbles in the circulatory system and/or soft tissues as an early indication of the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. This system exploits the resonant properties of bubbles and can detect both fundamental and second harmonic emissions from the insonified region.

  20. A new combined prior based reconstruction method for compressed sensing in 3D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Muhammad S.; Islam, Rafiqul; Tahtali, Murat; Lambert, Andrew J.; Pickering, Mark R.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is one of the most popular medical imaging modalities, with 3D US imaging gaining popularity recently due to its considerable advantages over 2D US imaging. However, as it is limited by long acquisition times and the huge amount of data processing it requires, methods for reducing these factors have attracted considerable research interest. Compressed sensing (CS) is one of the best candidates for accelerating the acquisition rate and reducing the data processing time without degrading image quality. However, CS is prone to introduce noise-like artefacts due to random under-sampling. To address this issue, we propose a combined prior-based reconstruction method for 3D US imaging. A Laplacian mixture model (LMM) constraint in the wavelet domain is combined with a total variation (TV) constraint to create a new regularization regularization prior. An experimental evaluation conducted to validate our method using synthetic 3D US images shows that it performs better than other approaches in terms of both qualitative and quantitative measures.

  1. 3D endobronchial ultrasound reconstruction and analysis for multimodal image-guided bronchoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Xiaonan; Bascom, Rebecca; Gilbert, Christopher R.; Toth, Jennifer W.; Higgins, William E.

    2014-03-01

    State-of-the-art image-guided intervention (IGI) systems for lung-cancer management draw upon high-resolution three-dimensional multi-detector computed-tomography (MDCT) images and bronchoscopic video. An MDCT scan provides a high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) image of the chest that is used for preoperative procedure planning, while bronchoscopy gives live intraoperative video of the endobronchial airway tree structure. However, because neither source provides live extraluminal information on suspect nodules or lymph nodes, endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is often introduced during a procedure. Unfortunately, existing IGI systems provide no direct synergistic linkage between the MDCT/video data and EBUS data. Hence, EBUS proves difficult to use and can lead to inaccurate interpretations. To address this drawback, we present a prototype of a multimodal IGI system that brings together the various image sources. The system enables 3D reconstruction and visualization of structures depicted in the 2D EBUS video stream. It also provides a set of graphical tools that link the EBUS data directly to the 3D MDCT and bronchoscopic video. Results using phantom and human data indicate that the new system could potentially enable smooth natural incorporation of EBUS into the system-level work flow of bronchoscopy.

  2. Intracranial Catheter for Integrated 3D Ultrasound Imaging & Hyperthermia: Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herickhoff, Carl D.; Light, Edward D.; Bing, Kristin Frinkley; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Grant, Gerald A.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Dixon-Tulloch, Ellen; Shih, Timothy; Hsu, Stephen J.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of an intracranial catheter transducer capable of real-time 3D (RT3D) imaging and ultrasound hyperthermia, for application in the visualization and treatment of tumors in the brain. We designed and constructed a 12 Fr, integrated matrix and linear array catheter transducer prototype for combined RT3D imaging and heating capability. This dual-mode catheter incorporated 153 matrix array elements and 11 linear array elements, on a 0.2 mm pitch, with a total aperture size of 8.4 mm×2.3 mm. This array achieved a 3.5° C in vitro temperature rise at a 2 cm focal distance in tissue-mimicking material. The dual-mode catheter prototype was compared with a Siemens 10 Fr AcuNav™ catheter as a gold standard in experiments assessing image quality and therapeutic potential, and both probes were used in a canine brain model to image anatomical structures and color Doppler blood flow and to attempt in vivo heating.

  3. Registration of 3D ultrasound computer tomography and MRI for evaluation of tissue correspondences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; Dapp, R.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Gemmeke, H.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. In the current state of development it is essential to correlate USCT with a known imaging modality like MRI to evaluate how different tissue types are depicted. Due to different imaging conditions, e.g. with the breast subject to buoyancy in USCT, a direct correlation is demanding. We present a 3D image registration method to reduce positioning differences and allow direct side-by-side comparison of USCT and MRI volumes. It is based on a two-step approach including a buoyancy simulation with a biomechanical model and free form deformations using cubic B-Splines for a surface refinement. Simulation parameters are optimized patient-specifically in a simulated annealing scheme. The method was evaluated with in-vivo datasets resulting in an average registration error below 5mm. Correlating tissue structures can thereby be located in the same or nearby slices in both modalities and three-dimensional non-linear deformations due to the buoyancy are reduced. Image fusion of MRI volumes and USCT sound speed volumes was performed for intuitive display. By applying the registration to data of our first in-vivo study with the KIT 3D USCT, we could correlate several tissue structures in MRI and USCT images and learn how connective tissue, carcinomas and breast implants observed in the MRI are depicted in the USCT imaging modes.

  4. Semiautomated segmentation and 3D reconstruction of coronary trees: biplane angiography and intravascular ultrasound data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prause, Guido P. M.; DeJong, Steven C.; McKay, Charles R.; Sonka, Milan

    1996-04-01

    In this paper, we describe an approach to 3D reconstruction of the coronary tree based on combined use of biplane coronary angiography and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Shortly before the start of a constant-speed IVUS pullback, radiopaque dye is injected into the examined coronary tree and the heart is imaged with a calibrated biplane X-ray system. The 3D centerline of the coronary tree is reconstructed from the geometrically corrected biplane angiograms using an automated segmentation method and manual matching of corresponding branching points. The borders of vessel wall and plaque are automatically detected in the acquired pullback images and the IVUS cross sections are mapped perpendicular to the previously reconstructed 3D vessel centerline. In addition, the twist of the IVUS probe due to the curvature of the coronary artery is calculated for a torsion-free catheter and the whole vessel reconstruction is rotationally adjusted using available anatomic landmarks. The accuracy of the biplane reconstruction procedure is validated by means of a left coronary tree phantom. The feasibility of the entire approach is demonstrated in a cadaveric pig heart.

  5. 3D MRI-based tumor delineation of ocular melanoma and its comparison with conventional techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Daftari, Inder k; Aghaian, Elsa; O'Brien, Joan M.; Dillon, William; Phillips, Theodore L.

    2005-11-15

    The aim of this study is to (1) compare the delineation of the tumor volume for ocular melanoma on high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) T2-weighted fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images with conventional techniques of A- and B-scan ultrasound, transcleral illumination, and placement of tantalum markers around tumor base and (2) to evaluate whether the surgically placed marker ring tumor delineation can be replaced by 3D MRI based tumor delineation. High-resolution 3D T2-weighted fast spin echo (3D FSE) MRI scans were obtained for 60 consecutive ocular melanoma patients using a 1.5 T MRI (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI), in a standard head coil. These patients were subsequently treated with proton beam therapy at the UC Davis Cyclotron, Davis, CA. The tumor was delineated by placement of tantalum rings (radio-opaque markers) around the tumor periphery as defined by pupillary transillumination during surgery. A point light source, placed against the sclera, was also used to confirm ring agreement with indirect ophthalmoscopy. When necessary, intraoperative ultrasound was also performed. The patients were planned using EYEPLAN software and the tumor volumes were obtained. For analysis, the tumors were divided into four categories based on tumor height and basal diameter. In order to assess the impact of high-resolution 3D T2 FSE MRI, the tumor volumes were outlined on the MRI scans by two independent observers and the tumor volumes calculated for each patient. Six (10%) of 60 patients had tumors, which were not visible on 3D MRI images. These six patients had tumors with tumor heights {<=}3 mm. A small intraobserver variation with a mean of (-0.22{+-}4)% was seen in tumor volumes delineated by 3D T2 FSE MR images. The ratio of tumor volumes measured on MRI to EYEPLAN for the largest to the smallest tumor volumes varied between 0.993 and 1.02 for 54 patients. The tumor volumes measured directly on 3D T2 FSE MRI ranged from 4.03 to 0.075 cm{sup 3

  6. Segmentation of the common carotid artery with active shape models from 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2012-03-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major cause of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a new segmentation method for outlining both lumen and adventitia (inner and outer walls) of common carotid artery (CCA) from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images for carotid atherosclerosis diagnosis and evaluation. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17× 2× 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80mg atorvastain and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. We investigate the use of Active Shape Models (ASMs) to segment CCA inner and outer walls after statin therapy. The proposed method was evaluated with respect to expert manually outlined boundaries as a surrogate for ground truth. For the lumen and adventitia segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 93.6%+/- 2.6%, 91.8%+/- 3.5%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.28+/- 0.17mm and 0.34 +/- 0.19mm, maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.87 +/- 0.37mm and 0.74 +/- 0.49mm. The proposed algorithm took 4.4 +/- 0.6min to segment a single 3D US images, compared to 11.7+/-1.2min for manual segmentation. Therefore, the method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the fast, safety and economical monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression during therapy.

  7. Constitutive Modeling of Porcine Liver in Indentation Using 3D Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, P.; Socrate, S.; Zickler, T.E.; Howe, R.D.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present an inverse finite-element modeling framework for constitutive modeling and parameter estimation of soft tissues using full-field volumetric deformation data obtained from 3D ultrasound. The finite-element model is coupled to full-field visual measurements by regularization springs attached at nodal locations. The free ends of the springs are displaced according to the locally estimated tissue motion and the normalized potential energy stored in all springs serves as a measure of model-experiment agreement for material parameter optimization. We demonstrate good accuracy of estimated parameters and consistent convergence properties on synthetically generated data. We present constitutive model selection and parameter estimation for perfused porcine liver in indentation and demonstrate that a quasilinear viscoelastic model with shear modulus relaxation offers good model-experiment agreement in terms of indenter displacement (0.19 mm RMS error) and tissue displacement field (0.97 mm RMS error). PMID:19627823

  8. 3D prostate segmentation of ultrasound images combining longitudinal image registration and machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Fei, Baowei

    2012-02-01

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) segmentation method for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images, which is based on longitudinal image registration and machine learning. Using longitudinal images of each individual patient, we register previously acquired images to the new images of the same subject. Three orthogonal Gabor filter banks were used to extract texture features from each registered image. Patient-specific Gabor features from the registered images are used to train kernel support vector machines (KSVMs) and then to segment the newly acquired prostate image. The segmentation method was tested in TRUS data from five patients. The average surface distance between our and manual segmentation is 1.18 +/- 0.31 mm, indicating that our automatic segmentation method based on longitudinal image registration is feasible for segmenting the prostate in TRUS images.

  9. 3D prostate boundary segmentation from ultrasound images using 2D active shape models.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Adam C; Ladak, Hanif M

    2006-01-01

    Boundary outlining, or segmentation, of the prostate is an important task in diagnosis and treatment planning for prostate cancer. This paper describes an algorithm for semi-automatic, three-dimensional (3D) segmentation of the prostate boundary from ultrasound images based on two-dimensional (2D) active shape models (ASM) and rotation-based slicing. Evaluation of the algorithm used distance- and volume-based error metrics to compare algorithm generated boundary outlines to gold standard (manually generated) boundary outlines. The mean absolute distance between the algorithm and gold standard boundaries was 1.09+/-0.49 mm, the average percent absolute volume difference was 3.28+/-3.16%, and a 5x speed increase as compared manual planimetry was achieved. PMID:17946106

  10. A phantom with reduced complexity for spatial 3-D ultrasound calibration.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Sangita; Li, Yinbo; Molloy, Janelle; Hossack, John

    2005-08-01

    The design of a new phantom for 3-D ultrasound calibration is presented. The phantom provides a viable alternative to existing phantoms that are significantly more complex and require high precision fabrication. The phantom, referred to as a "plane-of-wires" phantom, consists of two wires mounted at the same fixed height above the bottom of a water tank. Data collection for calibration involved rotating and translating the phantom so that the wires remained in a single plane parallel to the tank bottom. The mean reconstruction accuracy of the plane-of-wires calibration is 0.66 mm at a mean depth of 12.3 mm, with a precision of 1.23 mm at the same mean depth. The calibration was used to determine the volume of a cube with known volume with an error of 2.51%. The calibration performance achieved is comparable with that of existing approaches. PMID:16085099

  11. Simulation of autonomous robotic multiple-core biopsy by 3D ultrasound guidance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kaicheng; Rogers, Albert J; Light, Edward D; Von Allmen, Daniel; Smith, Stephen W

    2010-04-01

    An autonomous multiple-core biopsy system guided by real-time 3D ultrasound and operated by a robotic arm with 6+1 degrees of freedom has been developed. Using a specimen of turkey breast as a tissue phantom, our system was able to first autonomously locate the phantom in the image volume and then perform needle sticks in each of eight sectors in the phantom in a single session, with no human intervention required. Based on the fraction of eight sectors successfully sampled in an experiment of five trials, a success rate of 93% was recorded. This system could have relevance in clinical procedures that involve multiple needle-core sampling such as prostate or breast biopsy. PMID:20687279

  12. Transvaginal 3D Image-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Robert; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a transvaginal image-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) device using piezocomposite HIFU array technology, and commercially-available ultrasound imaging. Potential applications include treatment of uterine fibroids and abnormal uterine bleeding. The HIFU transducer was an annular phased array, with a focal length range of 30-60 mm, an elliptically-shaped aperture of 35×60 mm, and an operating frequency of 3 MHz. A pillow-shaped bag with water circulation will be used for coupling the HIFU energy into the tissue. An intra-cavity imaging probe (C9-5, Philips) was integrated with the HIFU array such that the focal axis of the HIFU transducer was within the image plane. The entire device will be covered by a gel-filled condom when inserted in the vaginal cavity. To control it, software packages were developed in the LabView programming environment. An imaging algorithm processed the ultrasound image to remove noise patterns due to the HIFU signal. The device will be equipped with a three-dimensional tracking system, using a six-degrees-of-freedom articulating arm. Necrotic lesions were produced in a tissue-mimicking phantom and a turkey breast sample for all focal lengths. Various HIFU doses allow various necrotic lesion shapes, including thin ellipsoidal, spherical, wide cylindrical, and teardrop-shaped. Software control of the device allows multiple foci to be activated sequentially for desired lesion patterns. Ultrasound imaging synchronization can be achieved using hardware signals obtained from the imaging system, or software signals determined empirically for various imaging probes. The image-guided HIFU device will provide a valuable tool in visualization of uterine fibroid tumors for the purposes of planning and subsequent HIFU treatment of the tumor, all in a 3D environment. The control system allows for various lesions of different shapes to be optimally positioned in the tumor to cover the entire tumor

  13. CISUS: an integrated 3D ultrasound system for IGT using a modular tracking API

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Viswanathan, Anand; Pieper, Steve; Choti, Michael A.; Taylor, Russell H.; Kikinis, Ron; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2004-05-01

    Ultrasound has become popular in clinical/surgical applications, both as the primary image guidance modality and also in conjunction with other modalities like CT or MRI. Three dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) systems have also demonstrated usefulness in image-guided therapy (IGT). At the same time, however, current lack of open-source and open-architecture multi-modal medical visualization systems prevents 3DUS from fulfilling its potential. Several stand-alone 3DUS systems, like Stradx or In-Vivo exist today. Although these systems have been found to be useful in real clinical setting, it is difficult to augment their functionality and integrate them in versatile IGT systems. To address these limitations, a robotic/freehand 3DUS open environment (CISUS) is being integrated into the 3D Slicer, an open-source research tool developed for medical image analysis and surgical planning. In addition, the system capitalizes on generic application programming interfaces (APIs) for tracking devices and robotic control. The resulting platform-independent open-source system may serve as a valuable tool to the image guided surgery community. Other researchers could straightforwardly integrate the generic CISUS system along with other functionalities (i.e. dual view visualization, registration, real-time tracking, segmentation, etc) to rapidly create their medical/surgical applications. Our current driving clinical application is robotically assisted and freehand 3DUS-guided liver ablation, which is fully being integrated under the CISUS-3D Slicer. Initial functionality and pre-clinical feasibility are demonstrated on phantom and ex-vivo animal models.

  14. A method for 3D reconstruction of coronary arteries using biplane angiography and intravascular ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Bourantas, Christos V; Kourtis, Iraklis C; Plissiti, Marina E; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Katsouras, Christos S; Papafaklis, Michail I; Michalis, Lampros K

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a new method for the three-dimensional reconstruction of coronary arteries and its quantitative validation. Our approach is based on the fusion of the data provided by intravascular ultrasound images (IVUS) and biplane angiographies. A specific segmentation algorithm is used for the detection of the regions of interest in intravascular ultrasound images. A new methodology is also introduced for the accurate extraction of the catheter path. In detail, a cubic B-spline is used for approximating the catheter path in each biplane projection. Each B-spline curve is swept along the normal direction of its X-ray angiographic plane forming a surface. The intersection of the two surfaces is a 3D curve, which represents the reconstructed path. The detected regions of interest in the IVUS images are placed perpendicularly onto the path and their relative axial twist is computed using the sequential triangulation algorithm. Then, an efficient algorithm is applied to estimate the absolute orientation of the first IVUS frame. In order to obtain 3D visualization the commercial package Geomagic Studio 4.0 is used. The performance of the proposed method is assessed using a validation methodology which addresses the separate validation of each step followed for obtaining the coronary reconstruction. The performance of the segmentation algorithm was examined in 80 IVUS images. The reliability of the path extraction method was studied in vitro using a metal wire model and in vivo in a dataset of 11 patients. The performance of the sequential triangulation algorithm was tested in two gutter models and in the coronary arteries (marked with metal clips) of six cadaveric sheep hearts. Finally, the accuracy in the estimation of the first IVUS frame absolute orientation was examined in the same set of cadaveric sheep hearts. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed reconstruction method is reliable and capable of depicting the morphology of

  15. A preliminary evaluation work on a 3D ultrasound imaging system for 2D array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiaoli; Li, Xu; Yang, Jiali; Li, Chunyu; Song, Junjie; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a preliminary evaluation work on a pre-designed 3-D ultrasound imaging system. The system mainly consists of four parts, a 7.5MHz, 24×24 2-D array transducer, the transmit/receive circuit, power supply, data acquisition and real-time imaging module. The row-column addressing scheme is adopted for the transducer fabrication, which greatly reduces the number of active channels . The element area of the transducer is 4.6mm by 4.6mm. Four kinds of tests were carried out to evaluate the imaging performance, including the penetration depth range, axial and lateral resolution, positioning accuracy and 3-D imaging frame rate. Several strong reflection metal objects , fixed in a water tank, were selected for the purpose of imaging due to a low signal-to-noise ratio of the transducer. The distance between the transducer and the tested objects , the thickness of aluminum, and the seam width of the aluminum sheet were measured by a calibrated micrometer to evaluate the penetration depth, the axial and lateral resolution, respectively. The experiment al results showed that the imaging penetration depth range was from 1.0cm to 6.2cm, the axial and lateral resolution were 0.32mm and 1.37mm respectively, the imaging speed was up to 27 frames per second and the positioning accuracy was 9.2%.

  16. Characterization of neonatal patients with intraventricular hemorrhage using 3D ultrasound cerebral ventricle volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Jessica; Fenster, Aaron; Lee, David S. C.; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2015-03-01

    One of the major non-congenital cause of neurological impairment among neonates born very preterm is intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) - bleeding within the lateral ventricles. Most IVH patients will have a transient period of ventricle dilation that resolves spontaneously. However, those patients most at risk of long-term impairment are those who have progressive ventricle dilation as this causes macrocephaly, an abnormally enlarged head, then later causes increases intracranial pressure (ICP). 2D ultrasound (US) images through the fontanelles of the patients are serially acquired to monitor the progression of the ventricle dilation. These images are used to determine when interventional therapies such as needle aspiration of the built up CSF might be indicated for a patient. Initial therapies usually begin during the third week of life. Such interventions have been shown to decrease morbidity and mortality in IVH patients; however, this comes with risks of further hemorrhage or infection; therefore only patients requiring it should be treated. Previously we have developed and validated a 3D US system to monitor the progression of ventricle volumes (VV) in IVH patients. This system has been validated using phantoms and a small set of patient images. The aim of this work is to determine the ability of 3D US generated VV to categorize patients into those who will require interventional therapies, and those who will have spontaneous resolution. Patients with higher risks could therefore be monitored better, by re-allocating some of the resources as the low risks infants would need less monitoring.

  17. 3D ultrasound system to investigate intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, J.; de Ribaupierre, S.; Lee, D. S. C.; Mehta, R.; St. Lawrence, K.; Fenster, A.

    2013-11-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a common disorder among preterm neonates that is routinely diagnosed and monitored by 2D cranial ultrasound (US). The cerebral ventricles of patients with IVH often have a period of ventricular dilation (ventriculomegaly). This initial increase in ventricle size can either spontaneously resolve, which often shows clinically as a period of stabilization in ventricle size and eventual decline back towards a more normal size, or progressive ventricular dilation that does not stabilize and which may require interventional therapy to reduce symptoms relating to increased intracranial pressure. To improve the characterization of ventricle dilation, we developed a 3D US imaging system that can be used with a conventional clinical US scanner to image the ventricular system of preterm neonates at risk of ventriculomegaly. A motorized transducer housing was designed specifically for hand-held use inside an incubator using a transducer commonly used for cranial 2D US scans. This system was validated using geometric phantoms, US/MRI compatible ventricle volume phantoms, and patient images to determine 3D reconstruction accuracy and inter- and intra-observer volume estimation variability. 3D US geometric reconstruction was found to be accurate with an error of <0.2%. Measured volumes of a US/MRI compatible ventricle-like phantom were within 5% of gold standard water displacement measurements. Intra-class correlation for the three observers was 0.97, showing very high agreement between observers. The coefficient of variation was between 1.8-6.3% for repeated segmentations of the same patient. The minimum detectable difference was calculated to be 0.63 cm3 for a single observer. Results from ANOVA for three observers segmenting three patients of IVH grade II did not show any significant differences (p > 0.05) for the measured ventricle volumes between observers. This 3D US system can reliably produce 3D US images of the neonatal ventricular

  18. A compact mechatronic system for 3D ultrasound guided prostate interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Bax, Jeffrey; Smith, David; Bartha, Laura; Montreuil, Jacques; Sherebrin, Shi; Gardi, Lori; Edirisinghe, Chandima; Fenster, Aaron

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Ultrasound imaging has improved the treatment of prostate cancer by producing increasingly higher quality images and influencing sophisticated targeting procedures for the insertion of radioactive seeds during brachytherapy. However, it is critical that the needles be placed accurately within the prostate to deliver the therapy to the planned location and avoid complications of damaging surrounding tissues. Methods: The authors have developed a compact mechatronic system, as well as an effective method for guiding and controlling the insertion of transperineal needles into the prostate. This system has been designed to allow guidance of a needle obliquely in 3D space into the prostate, thereby reducing pubic arch interference. The choice of needle trajectory and location in the prostate can be adjusted manually or with computer control. Results: To validate the system, a series of experiments were performed on phantoms. The 3D scan of the string phantom produced minimal geometric error, which was less than 0.4 mm. Needle guidance accuracy tests in agar prostate phantoms showed that the mean error of bead placement was less then 1.6 mm along parallel needle paths that were within 1.2 mm of the intended target and 1 deg. from the preplanned trajectory. At oblique angles of up to 15 deg. relative to the probe axis, beads were placed to within 3.0 mm along a trajectory that were within 2.0 mm of the target with an angular error less than 2 deg. Conclusions: By combining 3D TRUS imaging system to a needle tracking linkage, this system should improve the physician's ability to target and accurately guide a needle to selected targets without the need for the computer to directly manipulate and insert the needle. This would be beneficial as the physician has complete control of the system and can safely maneuver the needle guide around obstacles such as previously placed needles.

  19. Mapping 3D Strains with Ultrasound Speckle Tracking: Method Validation and Initial Results in Porcine Scleral Inflation.

    PubMed

    Cruz Perez, Benjamin; Pavlatos, Elias; Morris, Hugh J; Chen, Hong; Pan, Xueliang; Hart, Richard T; Liu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate a high frequency ultrasound method for measuring distributive, 3D strains in the sclera during elevations of intraocular pressure. A 3D cross-correlation based speckle-tracking algorithm was implemented to compute the 3D displacement vector and strain tensor at each tracking point. Simulated ultrasound radiofrequency data from a sclera-like structure at undeformed and deformed states with known strains were used to evaluate the accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of strain estimation. An experimental high frequency ultrasound (55 MHz) system was built to acquire 3D scans of porcine eyes inflated from 15 to 17 and then 19 mmHg. Simulations confirmed good strain estimation accuracy and SNR (e.g., the axial strains had less than 4.5% error with SNRs greater than 16.5 for strains from 0.005 to 0.05). Experimental data in porcine eyes showed increasing tensile, compressive, and shear strains in the posterior sclera during inflation, with a volume ratio close to one suggesting near-incompressibility. This study established the feasibility of using high frequency ultrasound speckle tracking for measuring 3D tissue strains and its potential to characterize physiological deformations in the posterior eye. PMID:26563101

  20. Predicate-Based Focus-and-Context Visualization for 3D Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Schulte zu Berge, Christian; Baust, Maximilian; Kapoor, Ankur; Navab, Nassir

    2014-12-01

    Direct volume visualization techniques offer powerful insight into volumetric medical images and are part of the clinical routine for many applications. Up to now, however, their use is mostly limited to tomographic imaging modalities such as CT or MRI. With very few exceptions, such as fetal ultrasound, classic volume rendering using one-dimensional intensity-based transfer functions fails to yield satisfying results in case of ultrasound volumes. This is particularly due its gradient-like nature, a high amount of noise and speckle, and the fact that individual tissue types are rather characterized by a similar texture than by similar intensity values. Therefore, clinicians still prefer to look at 2D slices extracted from the ultrasound volume. In this work, we present an entirely novel approach to the classification and compositing stage of the volume rendering pipeline, specifically designed for use with ultrasonic images. We introduce point predicates as a generic formulation for integrating the evaluation of not only low-level information like local intensity or gradient, but also of high-level information, such as non-local image features or even anatomical models. Thus, we can successfully filter clinically relevant from non-relevant information. In order to effectively reduce the potentially high dimensionality of the predicate configuration space, we propose the predicate histogram as an intuitive user interface. This is augmented by a scribble technique to provide a comfortable metaphor for selecting predicates of interest. Assigning importance factors to the predicates allows for focus-and-context visualization that ensures to always show important (focus) regions of the data while maintaining as much context information as possible. Our method naturally integrates into standard ray casting algorithms and yields superior results in comparison to traditional methods in terms of visualizing a specific target anatomy in ultrasound volumes. PMID:26356952

  1. Semiautomatic registration of 3D transabdominal ultrasound images for patient repositioning during postprostatectomy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Presles, Benoît Rit, Simon; Sarrut, David; Fargier-Voiron, Marie; Liebgott, Hervé; Biston, Marie-Claude; Munoz, Alexandre; Pommier, Pascal; Lynch, Rod

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present work is to propose and evaluate registration algorithms of three-dimensional (3D) transabdominal (TA) ultrasound (US) images to setup postprostatectomy patients during radiation therapy. Methods: Three registration methods have been developed and evaluated to register a reference 3D-TA-US image acquired during the planning CT session and a 3D-TA-US image acquired before each treatment session. The first method (method A) uses only gray value information, whereas the second one (method B) uses only gradient information. The third one (method C) combines both sets of information. All methods restrict the comparison to a region of interest computed from the dilated reference positioning volume drawn on the reference image and use mutual information as a similarity measure. The considered geometric transformations are translations and have been optimized by using the adaptive stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Validation has been carried out using manual registration by three operators of the same set of image pairs as the algorithms. Sixty-two treatment US images of seven patients irradiated after a prostatectomy have been registered to their corresponding reference US image. The reference registration has been defined as the average of the manual registration values. Registration error has been calculated by subtracting the reference registration from the algorithm result. For each session, the method has been considered a failure if the registration error was above both the interoperator variability of the session and a global threshold of 3.0 mm. Results: All proposed registration algorithms have no systematic bias. Method B leads to the best results with mean errors of −0.6, 0.7, and −0.2 mm in left–right (LR), superior–inferior (SI), and anterior–posterior (AP) directions, respectively. With this method, the standard deviations of the mean error are of 1.7, 2.4, and 2.6 mm in LR, SI, and AP directions, respectively

  2. In vitro in-stent restenoses evaluated by 3D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lécart, Myriam; Cardinal, Marie-Hélène Roy; Qin, Zhao; Soulez, Gilles; Cloutier, Guy

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify in-stent restenoses with 3D B mode and power Doppler ultrasound (U.S.) imaging. In-stent restenoses were mimicked with vascular phantoms in which a nonferromagnetic prototype stent (Boston Scientific) and a ferromagnetic clinical stainless steel stent (Palmaz P295) were embedded. Each phantom had an 80% in-stent stenosis and a 75% stenosis located outside the stent. These phantoms were compared to a reference phantom reproducing both stenoses without stent. Data sets of 2D cross-sectional U.S. images were acquired in freehand scanning using a magnetic sensor attached to the U.S. probe and in mechanical linear scanning with the probe attached to a step motor device. Each 2D image was automatically segmented before 3D reconstruction of the vessel. Results indicate that the reference phantom (without stent) was accurately assessed with errors below 1.8% for the 75% stenosis and 3.2% for the 80% stenosis in both B mode and power Doppler for the two scanning methods. The 80% in-stent stenoses in Boston Scientific and Palmaz stents were, respectively, evaluated at 73.8 (+/-3.2)% and 75.8 (+/- 3)% in B mode and at 82 (+/- 2.5)% and 86.2 (+/- 6.4)% in power Doppler when freehand scans were used. For comparison, when linear scans were selected, in-stent stenoses in the Boston Scientific or Palmaz stent were, respectively, evaluated at 77.4 (+/- 2.0)% and 73.8 (+/- 2.5)% in B mode and at 87.0 (+/- 1.3)% and 85.6 (+/- 5.8)% in power Doppler. To conclude, 3D freehand U.S. is a valuable method to quantify in-stent restenoses, particularly in B mode. It is thus hoped that, in the clinical setting, noninvasive 3D U.S. may provide sufficient precision to grade in-stent restenoses. PMID:19291990

  3. Segmentation of multiple heart cavities in 3-D transesophageal ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Haak, Alexander; Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Mulder, Harriët W; Ren, Ben; Kirişli, Hortense A; Metz, Coert; van Burken, Gerard; van Stralen, Marijn; Pluim, Josien P W; van der Steen, Antonius F W; van Walsum, Theo; Bosch, Johannes G

    2015-06-01

    Three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is an excellent modality for real-time visualization of the heart and monitoring of interventions. To improve the usability of 3-D TEE for intervention monitoring and catheter guidance, automated segmentation is desired. However, 3-D TEE segmentation is still a challenging task due to the complex anatomy with multiple cavities, the limited TEE field of view, and typical ultrasound artifacts. We propose to segment all cavities within the TEE view with a multi-cavity active shape model (ASM) in conjunction with a tissue/blood classification based on a gamma mixture model (GMM). 3-D TEE image data of twenty patients were acquired with a Philips X7-2t matrix TEE probe. Tissue probability maps were estimated by a two-class (blood/tissue) GMM. A statistical shape model containing the left ventricle, right ventricle, left atrium, right atrium, and aorta was derived from computed tomography angiography (CTA) segmentations by principal component analysis. ASMs of the whole heart and individual cavities were generated and consecutively fitted to tissue probability maps. First, an average whole-heart model was aligned with the 3-D TEE based on three manually indicated anatomical landmarks. Second, pose and shape of the whole-heart ASM were fitted by a weighted update scheme excluding parts outside of the image sector. Third, pose and shape of ASM for individual heart cavities were initialized by the previous whole heart ASM and updated in a regularized manner to fit the tissue probability maps. The ASM segmentations were validated against manual outlines by two observers and CTA derived segmentations. Dice coefficients and point-to-surface distances were used to determine segmentation accuracy. ASM segmentations were successful in 19 of 20 cases. The median Dice coefficient for all successful segmentations versus the average observer ranged from 90% to 71% compared with an inter-observer range of 95% to 84%. The

  4. Intraoperative patient registration using volumetric true 3D ultrasound without fiducials

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Songbai; Roberts, David W.; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate patient registration is crucial for effective image-guidance in open cranial surgery. Typically, it is accomplished by matching skin-affixed fiducials manually identified in the operating room (OR) with their counterparts in the preoperative images, which not only consumes OR time and personnel resources but also relies on the presence (and subsequent fixation) of the fiducials during the preoperative scans (until the procedure begins). In this study, the authors present a completely automatic, volumetric image-based patient registration technique that does not rely on fiducials by registering tracked (true) 3D ultrasound (3DUS) directly with preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images. Methods: Multistart registrations between binary 3DUS and MR volumes were first executed to generate an initial starting point without incorporating prior information on the US transducer contact point location or orientation for subsequent registration between grayscale 3DUS and MR via maximization of either mutual information (MI) or correlation ratio (CR). Patient registration was then computed through concatenation of spatial transformations. Results: In ten (N = 10) patient cases, an average fiducial (marker) distance error (FDE) of 5.0 mm and 4.3 mm was achieved using MI or CR registration (FDE was smaller with CR vs MI in eight of ten cases), which are comparable to values reported for typical fiducial- or surface-based patient registrations. The translational and rotational capture ranges were found to be 24.0 mm and 27.0° for binary registrations (up to 32.8 mm and 36.4°), 12.2 mm and 25.6° for MI registrations (up to 18.3 mm and 34.4°), and 22.6 mm and 40.8° for CR registrations (up to 48.5 mm and 65.6°), respectively. The execution time to complete a patient registration was 12–15 min with parallel processing, which can be significantly reduced by confining the 3DUS transducer location to the center of craniotomy in MR before registration (an

  5. 3D Cultivation Techniques for Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Anastasia; Moll, Matthias; Gottwald, Eric; Nies, Cordula; Zantl, Roman; Wagner, Helga; Burkhardt, Britta; Sánchez, Juan J. Martínez; Ladurner, Ruth; Thasler, Wolfgang; Damm, Georg; Nussler, Andreas K.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in drug development is the prediction of in vivo toxicity based on in vitro data. The standard cultivation system for primary human hepatocytes is based on monolayer cultures, even if it is known that these conditions result in a loss of hepatocyte morphology and of liver-specific functions, such as drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. As it has been demonstrated that hepatocytes embedded between two sheets of collagen maintain their function, various hydrogels and scaffolds for the 3D cultivation of hepatocytes have been developed. To further improve or maintain hepatic functions, 3D cultivation has been combined with perfusion. In this manuscript, we discuss the benefits and drawbacks of different 3D microfluidic devices. For most systems that are currently available, the main issues are the requirement of large cell numbers, the low throughput, and expensive equipment, which render these devices unattractive for research and the drug-developing industry. A higher acceptance of these devices could be achieved by their simplification and their compatibility with high-throughput, as both aspects are of major importance for a user-friendly device.

  6. A computational model for estimating tumor margins in complementary tactile and 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsil, Arefin; Escoto, Abelardo; Naish, Michael D.; Patel, Rajni V.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional surgical methods are effective for treating lung tumors; however, they impose high trauma and pain to patients. Minimally invasive surgery is a safer alternative as smaller incisions are required to reach the lung; however, it is challenging due to inadequate intraoperative tumor localization. To address this issue, a mechatronic palpation device was developed that incorporates tactile and ultrasound sensors capable of acquiring surface and cross-sectional images of palpated tissue. Initial work focused on tactile image segmentation and fusion of position-tracked tactile images, resulting in a reconstruction of the palpated surface to compute the spatial locations of underlying tumors. This paper presents a computational model capable of analyzing orthogonally-paired tactile and ultrasound images to compute the surface circumference and depth margins of a tumor. The framework also integrates an error compensation technique and an algebraic model to align all of the image pairs and to estimate the tumor depths within the tracked thickness of a palpated tissue. For validation, an ex vivo experimental study was conducted involving the complete palpation of 11 porcine liver tissues injected with iodine-agar tumors of varying sizes and shapes. The resulting tactile and ultrasound images were then processed using the proposed model to compute the tumor margins and compare them to fluoroscopy based physical measurements. The results show a good negative correlation (r = -0.783, p = 0.004) between the tumor surface margins and a good positive correlation (r = 0.743, p = 0.009) between the tumor depth margins.

  7. Three different strategies for real-time prostate capsule volume computation from 3-D end-fire transrectal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Barqawi, Albaha B; Lu, Li; Crawford, E David; Fenster, Aaron; Werahera, Priya N; Kumar, Dinesh; Miller, Steve; Suri, Jasjit S

    2007-01-01

    estimation of prostate capsule volume via segmentation of the prostate from 3-D ultrasound volumetric ultrasound images is a valuable clinical tool, especially during biopsy. Normally, a physician traces the boundaries of the prostate manually, but this process is tedious, laborious, and subject to errors. The prostate capsule edge is computed using three different strategies: (a) least square approach, (b) level set approach, and (c) Discrete Dynamic Contour approach. (a) In the least square method, edge points are defined by searching for the optimal edge based on the average signal characteristics. These edge points constitute an initial curve which is later refined; (b) Level set approach. The images are modeled as piece-wise constant, and the energy functional is defined and minimized. This method is also automated; and (c) The Discrete Dynamic Contour (DDC). A trained user selects several points in the first image and an initial contour is obtained by a model based initialization. Based on this initialization condition, the contour is deformed automatically to better fit the image. This method is semi-automatic. The three methods were tested on database consisting of 15 prostate phantom volumes acquired using a Philips ultrasound machine using an end-fire TRUS. The ground truth (GT) is developed by tracing the boundary of prostate on a slice-by-slice basis. The mean volumes using the least square, level set and DDC techniques were 15.84 cc, 15.55 cc and 16.33 cc, respectively. We validated the methods by calculating the volume with GT and we got an average volume of 15. PMID:18002081

  8. Infrared thermography and ultrasound C-scan for non-destructive evaluation of 3D carbon fiber materials: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Genest, Marc; Robitaille, Francois; Maldague, Xavier; West, Lucas; Joncas, Simon; Leduc, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    3D Carbon fiber polymer matrix composites (3D CF PMCs) are increasingly used for aircraft construction due to their exceptional stiffness and strength-to-mass ratios. However, defects are common in the 3D combining areas and are challenging to inspect. In this paper, Stitching is used to decrease these defects, but causes some new types of defects. Infrared NDT (non-destructive testing) and ultrasound NDT are used. In particular, a micro-laser line thermography technique (micro-LLT) and a micro-laser spot thermography (micro-LST) with locked-in technique are used to detect the micro-defects. In addition, a comparative study is conducted by using pulsed thermography (PT), vibrothermography (VT). In order to confirm the types of the defects, microscopic inspection is carried out before NDT work, after sectioning and polishing a small part of the sample..

  9. Compressed Sensing Reconstruction of 3D Ultrasound Data Using Dictionary Learning and Line-Wise Subsampling.

    PubMed

    Lorintiu, Oana; Liebgott, Hervé; Alessandrini, Martino; Bernard, Olivier; Friboulet, Denis

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present a compressed sensing (CS) method adapted to 3D ultrasound imaging (US). In contrast to previous work, we propose a new approach based on the use of learned overcomplete dictionaries that allow for much sparser representations of the signals since they are optimized for a particular class of images such as US images. In this study, the dictionary was learned using the K-SVD algorithm and CS reconstruction was performed on the non-log envelope data by removing 20% to 80% of the original data. Using numerically simulated images, we evaluate the influence of the training parameters and of the sampling strategy. The latter is done by comparing the two most common sampling patterns, i.e., point-wise and line-wise random patterns. The results show in particular that line-wise sampling yields an accuracy comparable to the conventional point-wise sampling. This indicates that CS acquisition of 3D data is feasible in a relatively simple setting, and thus offers the perspective of increasing the frame rate by skipping the acquisition of RF lines. Next, we evaluated this approach on US volumes of several ex vivo and in vivo organs. We first show that the learned dictionary approach yields better performances than conventional fixed transforms such as Fourier or discrete cosine. Finally, we investigate the generality of the learned dictionary approach and show that it is possible to build a general dictionary allowing to reliably reconstruct different volumes of different ex vivo or in vivo organs. PMID:26057610

  10. Adaptive volume rendering of cardiac 3D ultrasound images: utilizing blood pool statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åsen, Jon Petter; Steen, Erik; Kiss, Gabriel; Thorstensen, Anders; Rabben, Stein Inge

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we introduce and investigate an adaptive direct volume rendering (DVR) method for real-time visualization of cardiac 3D ultrasound. DVR is commonly used in cardiac ultrasound to visualize interfaces between tissue and blood. However, this is particularly challenging with ultrasound images due to variability of the signal within tissue as well as variability of noise signal within the blood pool. Standard DVR involves a global mapping of sample values to opacity by an opacity transfer function (OTF). While a global OTF may represent the interface correctly in one part of the image, it may result in tissue dropouts, or even artificial interfaces within the blood pool in other parts of the image. In order to increase correctness of the rendered image, the presented method utilizes blood pool statistics to do regional adjustments of the OTF. The regional adaptive OTF was compared with a global OTF in a dataset of apical recordings from 18 subjects. For each recording, three renderings from standard views (apical 4-chamber (A4C), inverted A4C (IA4C) and mitral valve (MV)) were generated for both methods, and each rendering was tuned to the best visual appearance by a physician echocardiographer. For each rendering we measured the mean absolute error (MAE) between the rendering depth buffer and a validated left ventricular segmentation. The difference d in MAE between the global and regional method was calculated and t-test results are reported with significant improvements for the regional adaptive method (dA4C = 1.5 +/- 0.3 mm, dIA4C = 2.5 +/- 0.4 mm, dMV = 1.7 +/- 0.2 mm, d.f. = 17, all p < 0.001). This improvement by the regional adaptive method was confirmed through qualitative visual assessment by an experienced physician echocardiographer who concluded that the regional adaptive method produced rendered images with fewer tissue dropouts and less spurious structures inside the blood pool in the vast majority of the renderings. The algorithm has been

  11. [Radionuclide cisternography: SPECT- and 3D-technique].

    PubMed

    Henkes, H; Huber, G; Hierholzer, J; Cordes, M; Kujat, C; Piepgras, U

    1991-10-01

    Radionuclide cisternography is indicated in the clinical work-up for hydrocephalus, when searching for CSF leaks, and when testing whether or not intracranial cystic lesions are communicating with the adjacent subarachnoid space. This paper demonstrates the feasibility and diagnostic value of SPECT and subsequent 3D surface rendering in addition to conventional rectilinear CSF imaging in eight patients. Planar images allowed the evaluation of CSF circulation and the detection of CSF fistula. They were advantageous in examinations 48 h after application of 111In-DTPA. SPECT scans, generated 4-24 h after tracer application, were superior in the delineation of basal cisterns, especially in early scans; this was helpful in patients with pooling due to CSF fistula and in cystic lesions near the skull base. A major drawback was the limited image quality of delayed scans, when the SPECT data were degraded by a low count rate. 3D surface rendering was easily feasible from SPECT data and yielded high quality images. The presentation of the spatial distribution of nuclide-contaminated CSF proved especially helpful in the area of the basal cisterns. PMID:1956980

  12. 2D Ultrasound and 3D MR Image Registration of the Prostate for Brachytherapy Surgical Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shihui; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhiyong; Liu, Ranlu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound (US) images are widely used in minimally invasive prostate procedure for its noninvasive nature and convenience. However, the poor quality of US image makes it difficult to be used as guiding utility. To improve the limitation, we propose a multimodality image guided navigation module that registers 2D US images with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based on high quality preoperative models. A 2-step spatial registration method is used to complete the procedure which combines manual alignment and rapid mutual information (MI) optimize algorithm. In addition, a 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction model of prostate with surrounding organs is employed to combine with the registered images to conduct the navigation. Registration accuracy is measured by calculating the target registration error (TRE). The results show that the error between the US and preoperative MR images of a polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel model phantom is 1.37 ± 0.14 mm, with a similar performance being observed in patient experiments. PMID:26448009

  13. Chest-wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound images using thoracic volume classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Zhang, Wei; Mann, Ritse M.; Platel, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) systems are expected to improve effectiveness and efficiency of radiologists in reading automated 3D breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. One challenging task on developing CAD is to reduce a large number of false positives. A large amount of false positives originate from acoustic shadowing caused by ribs. Therefore determining the location of the chestwall in ABUS is necessary in CAD systems to remove these false positives. Additionally it can be used as an anatomical landmark for inter- and intra-modal image registration. In this work, we extended our previous developed chestwall segmentation method that fits a cylinder to automated detected rib-surface points and we fit the cylinder model by minimizing a cost function which adopted a term of region cost computed from a thoracic volume classifier to improve segmentation accuracy. We examined the performance on a dataset of 52 images where our previous developed method fails. Using region-based cost, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall decreased from 7.57±2.76 mm to 6.22±2.86 mm.art.

  14. Highly porous 3D nanofiber scaffold using an electrospinning technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geunhyung; Kim, WanDoo

    2007-04-01

    A successful 3D tissue-engineering scaffold must have a highly porous structure and good mechanical stability. High porosity and optimally designed pore size provide structural space for cell accommodation and migration and enable the exchange of nutrients between the scaffold and environment. Poly(epsilon-carprolactone) fibers were electrospun using an auxiliary electrode and chemical blowing agent (BA), and characterized according to porosity, pore size, and their mechanical properties. We also investigated the effect of the BA on the electrospinning processability. The growth characteristic of human dermal fibroblasts cells cultured in the webs showed the good adhesion with the blown web relative to a normal electrospun mat. The blown nanofiber web had good tensile properties and high porosity compared to a typical electrospun nanofiber scaffold. PMID:16924612

  15. Assessment of rhinoplasty techniques by overlay of before-and-after 3D images.

    PubMed

    Toriumi, Dean M; Dixon, Tatiana K

    2011-11-01

    This article describes the equipment and software used to create facial 3D imaging and discusses the validation and reliability of the objective assessments done using this equipment. By overlaying preoperative and postoperative 3D images, it is possible to assess the surgical changes in 3D. Methods are described to assess the 3D changes from the rhinoplasty techniques of nasal dorsal augmentation, increasing tip projection, narrowing the nose, and nasal lengthening. PMID:22004862

  16. Ultrasound elastography: principles, techniques, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dewall, Ryan J

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an emerging set of imaging modalities used to image tissue elasticity and are often referred to as virtual palpation. These techniques have proven effective in detecting and assessing many different pathologies, because tissue mechanical changes often correlate with tissue pathological changes. This article reviews the principles of ultrasound elastography, many of the ultrasound-based techniques, and popular clinical applications. Originally, elastography was a technique that imaged tissue strain by comparing pre- and postcompression ultrasound images. However, new techniques have been developed that use different excitation methods such as external vibration or acoustic radiation force. Some techniques track transient phenomena such as shear waves to quantitatively measure tissue elasticity. Clinical use of elastography is increasing, with applications including lesion detection and classification, fibrosis staging, treatment monitoring, vascular imaging, and musculoskeletal applications. PMID:23510006

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Vascular Heterogeneity in Breast Lesions Using Contrast-Enhanced 3-D Harmonic and Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F.; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions. PMID:25935933

  18. Numerical Modeling of 3-D Dynamics of Ultrasound Contrast Agent Microbubbles Using the Boundary Integral Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvisi, Michael; Manmi, Kawa; Wang, Qianxi

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are microbubbles stabilized with a shell typically of lipid, polymer, or protein and are emerging as a unique tool for noninvasive therapies ranging from gene delivery to tumor ablation. The nonspherical dynamics of contrast agents are thought to play an important role in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, for example, causing the emission of subharmonic frequency components and enhancing the uptake of therapeutic agents across cell membranes and tissue interfaces. A three-dimensional model for nonspherical contrast agent dynamics based on the boundary integral method is presented. The effects of the encapsulating shell are approximated by adapting Hoff's model for thin-shell, spherical contrast agents to the nonspherical case. A high-quality mesh of the bubble surface is maintained by implementing a hybrid approach of the Lagrangian method and elastic mesh technique. Numerical analyses for the dynamics of UCAs in an infinite liquid and near a rigid wall are performed in parameter regimes of clinical relevance. The results show that the presence of a coating significantly reduces the oscillation amplitude and period, increases the ultrasound pressure amplitude required to incite jetting, and reduces the jet width and velocity.

  19. Elsevier Trophoblast Research Award Lecture: Searching for an early pregnancy 3-D morphometric ultrasound marker to predict fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Collins, S L; Stevenson, G N; Noble, J A; Impey, L

    2013-03-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality, even in term babies. An effective screening test to identify pregnancies at risk of FGR, leading to increased antenatal surveillance with timely delivery, could decrease perinatal mortality and morbidity. Placental volume, measured with commercially available packages and a novel, semi-automated technique, has been shown to predict small for gestational age babies. Placental morphology measured in 2-D in the second trimester and ex-vivo post delivery, correlates with FGR. This has also been investigated using 2-D estimates of diameter and site of cord insertion obtained using the Virtual Organ Computer-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL) software. Data is presented describing a pilot study of a novel 3-D method for defining compactness of placental shape. We prospectively recruited women with a singleton pregnancy and BMI of <35. A 3-D ultrasound scan was performed between 11 and 13 + 6 weeks' gestation. The placental volume, total placental surface area and the area of the utero-placental interface were calculated using our validated technique. From these we generated dimensionless indices including sphericity (ψ), standardised placental volume (sPlaV) and standardised functional area (sFA) using Buckingham π theorem. The marker for FGR used was small for gestational age, defined as <10th customised birth weight centile (cSGA). Regression analysis examined which of the morphometric indices were independent predictors of cSGA. Data were collected for 143 women, 20 had cSGA babies. Only sPlaV and sFA were significantly correlated to birth weight (p < 0.001). Regression demonstrated all dimensionless indices were inter-dependent co-factors. ROC curves showed no advantage for using sFA over the simpler sPlaV. The generated placental indices are not independent of placental volume this early in gestation. It is hoped that another placental ultrasound marker based on vascularity can improve the

  20. The effect of object speed and direction on the performance of 3D speckle tracking using a 3D swept-volume ultrasound probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Emma J.; Miller, Naomi R.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Symonds-Tayler, J. Richard N.; Evans, Philip M.

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) soft tissue tracking using 3D ultrasound is of interest for monitoring organ motion during therapy. Previously we demonstrated feature tracking of respiration-induced liver motion in vivo using a 3D swept-volume ultrasound probe. The aim of this study was to investigate how object speed affects the accuracy of tracking ultrasonic speckle in the absence of any structural information, which mimics the situation in homogenous tissue for motion in the azimuthal and elevational directions. For object motion prograde and retrograde to the sweep direction of the transducer, the spatial sampling frequency increases or decreases with object speed, respectively. We examined the effect object motion direction of the transducer on tracking accuracy. We imaged a homogenous ultrasound speckle phantom whilst moving the probe with linear motion at a speed of 0-35 mm s-1. Tracking accuracy and precision were investigated as a function of speed, depth and direction of motion for fixed displacements of 2 and 4 mm. For the azimuthal direction, accuracy was better than 0.1 and 0.15 mm for displacements of 2 and 4 mm, respectively. For a 2 mm displacement in the elevational direction, accuracy was better than 0.5 mm for most speeds. For 4 mm elevational displacement with retrograde motion, accuracy and precision reduced with speed and tracking failure was observed at speeds of greater than 14 mm s-1. Tracking failure was attributed to speckle de-correlation as a result of decreasing spatial sampling frequency with increasing speed of retrograde motion. For prograde motion, tracking failure was not observed. For inter-volume displacements greater than 2 mm, only prograde motion should be tracked which will decrease temporal resolution by a factor of 2. Tracking errors of the order of 0.5 mm for prograde motion in the elevational direction indicates that using the swept probe technology speckle tracking accuracy is currently too poor to track homogenous tissue over

  1. Breast Density Analysis with Automated Whole-Breast Ultrasound: Comparison with 3-D Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Lee, Yan-Wei; Chan, Si-Wa; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a semi-automatic breast segmentation method was proposed on the basis of the rib shadow to extract breast regions from 3-D automated whole-breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. The density results were correlated with breast density values acquired with 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI images of 46 breasts were collected from 23 women without a history of breast disease. Each subject also underwent ABUS. We used Otsu's thresholding method on ABUS images to obtain local rib shadow information, which was combined with the global rib shadow information (extracted from all slice projections) and integrated with the anatomy's breast tissue structure to determine the chest wall line. The fuzzy C-means classifier was used to extract the fibroglandular tissues from the acquired images. Whole-breast volume (WBV) and breast percentage density (BPD) were calculated in both modalities. Linear regression was used to compute the correlation of density results between the two modalities. The consistency of density measurement was also analyzed on the basis of intra- and inter-operator variation. There was a high correlation of density results between MRI and ABUS (R(2) = 0.798 for WBV, R(2) = 0.825 for PBD). The mean WBV from ABUS images was slightly smaller than the mean WBV from MR images (MRI: 342.24 ± 128.08 cm(3), ABUS: 325.47 ± 136.16 cm(3), p < 0.05). In addition, the BPD calculated from MR images was smaller than the BPD from ABUS images (MRI: 24.71 ± 15.16%, ABUS: 28.90 ± 17.73%, p < 0.05). The intra-operator and inter-operator variant analysis results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in breast density measurement variation between the two modalities. Our results revealed a high correlation in WBV and BPD between MRI and ABUS. Our study suggests that ABUS provides breast density information useful in the assessment of breast health. PMID:26831342

  2. 3D Quantitative Assessment of Lesion Response to MR-guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Lynn J.; Lin, MingDe; Duran, Rafael; Schernthaner, Rüdiger E.; Hamm, Bernd; Geschwind, Jean-François; Hong, Kelvin; Chapiro, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To investigate the response after MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) treatment of uterine fibroids (UF) using a 3D quantification of total and enhancing lesion volume (TLV, ELV) on contrast-enhanced MRI (ceMRI) scans. Methods and Materials In a total of 24 patients, ceMRI scans were obtained at baseline and 24 hrs, 6, 12 and 24 months after MRgHIFU treatment. The dominant lesion was assessed using a semi-automatic quantitative 3D segmentation technique. Agreement between software-assisted and manual measurements was then analyzed using a linear regression model. Patients were classified as responders (R) or non-responders (NR) based on their symptom report after 6 months. Statistical analysis included the paired t-test and Mann-Whitney-test. Results Preprocedurally, the median TLV and ELV were 263.74cm3 (30.45–689.56cm3) and 210.13cm3 (14.43–689.53cm3), respectively. The 6-month follow-up demonstrated a reduction of TLV in 21 patients (87.5%) with a median TLV of 171.7cm3 (8.5–791.2cm3) (p<.0001). TLV remained stable with significant differences compared to baseline (p<.001 and p=.047 after 12 and 24 months). A reduction of ELV was apparent in 16 patients (66.6%) with a median ELV of 158.91cm3 (8.55–779.61cm3) after 6 months (p=.065). 3D quantification and manual measurements showed strong intermethod-agreement for fibroid volumes (R2=.889 and R2=.917) but greater discrepancy for enhancement calculations (R2=.659 and R2=.419) at baseline and 6 mo. No significant differences in TLV or ELV were observed between clinical R (n=15) and NR (n=3). Conclusion The 3D assessment has proven feasible and accurate in the quantification of fibroid response to MRgHIFU. Contrary to ELV, changes in TLV may be representative of the clinical outcome. PMID:26160057

  3. A 2D to 3D ultrasound image registration algorithm for robotically assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteghamatian, Mehdi; Pautler, Stephen E.; McKenzie, Charles A.; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-03-01

    Robotically assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) is an effective approach to resect the diseased organ, with stereoscopic views of the targeted tissue improving the dexterity of the surgeons. However, since the laparoscopic view acquires only the surface image of the tissue, the underlying distribution of the cancer within the organ is not observed, making it difficult to make informed decisions on surgical margins and sparing of neurovascular bundles. One option to address this problem is to exploit registration to integrate the laparoscopic view with images of pre-operatively acquired dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI that can demonstrate the regions of malignant tissue within the prostate. Such a view potentially allows the surgeon to visualize the location of the malignancy with respect to the surrounding neurovascular structures, permitting a tissue-sparing strategy to be formulated directly based on the observed tumour distribution. If the tumour is close to the capsule, it may be determined that the adjacent neurovascular bundle (NVB) needs to be sacrificed within the surgical margin to ensure that any erupted tumour was resected. On the other hand, if the cancer is sufficiently far from the capsule, one or both NVBs may be spared. However, in order to realize such image integration, the pre-operative image needs to be fused with the laparoscopic view of the prostate. During the initial stages of the operation, the prostate must be tracked in real time so that the pre-operative MR image remains aligned with patient coordinate system. In this study, we propose and investigate a novel 2D to 3D ultrasound image registration algorithm to track the prostate motion with an accuracy of 2.68+/-1.31mm.

  4. Critical assessment of intramodality 3D ultrasound imaging for prostate IGRT compared to fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Meer, Skadi van der; Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Hermans, Jolanda; Voncken, Robert; Heuvelmans, Denys; Gubbels, Carol; Fontanarosa, Davide; Visser, Peter; Lutgens, Ludy; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: A quantitative 3D intramodality ultrasound (US) imaging system was verified for daily in-room prostate localization, and compared to prostate localization based on implanted fiducial markers (FMs).Methods: Thirteen prostate patients underwent multiple US scans during treatment. A total of 376 US-scans and 817 matches were used to determine the intra- and interoperator variability. Additionally, eight other patients underwent daily prostate localization using both US and electronic portal imaging (EPI) with FMs resulting in 244 combined US-EPI scans. Scanning was performed with minimal probe pressure and a correction for the speed of sound aberration was performed. Uncertainties of both US and FM methods were assessed. User variability of the US method was assessed.Results: The overall US user variability is 2.6 mm. The mean differences between US and FM are: 2.5 {+-} 4.0 mm (LR), 0.6 {+-} 4.9 mm (SI), and -2.3 {+-} 3.6 mm (AP). The intramodality character of this US system mitigates potential errors due to transducer pressure and speed of sound aberrations.Conclusions: The overall accuracy of US (3.0 mm) is comparable to our FM workflow (2.2 mm). Since neither US nor FM can be considered a gold standard no conclusions can be drawn on the superiority of either method. Because US imaging captures the prostate itself instead of surrogates no invasive procedure is required. It requires more effort to standardize US imaging than FM detection. Since US imaging does not involve a radiation burden, US prostate imaging offers an alternative for FM EPI positioning.

  5. 3D perfused brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy and imaging: design, construction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, José M.; Jarosz, Boguslaw J.

    2015-03-01

    Thermal therapy has emerged as an independent modality of treating some tumors. In many clinics the hyperthermia, one of the thermal therapy modalities, has been used adjuvant to radio- or chemotherapy to substantially improve the clinical treatment outcomes. In this work, a methodology for building a realistic brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound low dose-rate thermal therapy of the brain is proposed. A 3D brain phantom made of the tissue mimicking material (TMM) had the acoustic and thermal properties in the 20-32 °C range, which is similar to that of a brain at 37 °C. The phantom had 10-11% by mass of bovine gelatin powder dissolved in ethylene glycol. The TMM sonicated at 1 MHz, 1.6 MHz and 2.5 MHz yielded the amplitude attenuation coefficients of 62  ±  1 dB m-1, 115  ±  4 dB m-1 and 175  ±  9 dB m-1, respectively. The density and acoustic speed determination at room temperature (~24 °C) gave 1040  ±  40 kg m-3 and 1545  ±  44 m s-1, respectively. The average thermal conductivity was 0.532 W m-1 K-1. The T1 and T2 values of the TMM were 207  ±  4 and 36.2  ±  0.4 ms, respectively. We envisage the use of our phantom for treatment planning and for quality assurance in MRI based temperature determination. Our phantom preparation methodology may be readily extended to other thermal therapy technologies.

  6. New techniques in 3D scalar and vector field visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1993-05-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have recently developed several techniques for volume visualization of scalar and vector fields, all of which use back-to-front compositing. The first renders volume density clouds by compositing polyhedral volume cells or their faces. The second is a ``splatting`` scheme which composites textures used to reconstruct the scalar or vector fields. One version calculates the necessary texture values in software, and another takes advantage of hardware texture mapping. The next technique renders contour surface polygons using semi-transparent textures, which adjust appropriately when the surfaces deform in a flow, or change topology. The final one renders the ``flow volume`` of smoke or dye tracer swept out by a fluid flowing through a small generating polygon. All of these techniques are applied to a climate model data set, to visualize cloud density and wind velocity.

  7. A Taxonomy of 3D Occluded Objects Recognition Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimanizadeh, Shiva; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Saba, Tanzila; Al-ghamdi, Jarallah Saleh

    2016-03-01

    The overall performances of object recognition techniques under different condition (e.g., occlusion, viewpoint, and illumination) have been improved significantly in recent years. New applications and hardware are shifted towards digital photography, and digital media. This faces an increase in Internet usage requiring object recognition for certain applications; particularly occulded objects. However occlusion is still an issue unhandled, interlacing the relations between extracted feature points through image, research is going on to develop efficient techniques and easy to use algorithms that would help users to source images; this need to overcome problems and issues regarding occlusion. The aim of this research is to review recognition occluded objects algorithms and figure out their pros and cons to solve the occlusion problem features, which are extracted from occluded object to distinguish objects from other co-existing objects by determining the new techniques, which could differentiate the occluded fragment and sections inside an image.

  8. New ultrasound techniques for lymph node evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xin-Wu; Jenssen, Christian; Saftoiu, Adrian; Ignee, Andre; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2013-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound (US) is the recommended imaging method for lymph node (LN) diseases with the advantages of high resolution, real time evaluation and relative low costs. Current indications of transcutaneous ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound include the detection and characterization of lymph nodes and the guidance for LN biopsy. Recent advances in US technology, such as contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), contrast enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (CE-EUS), and real time elastography show potential to improve the accuracy of US for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lymph nodes. In addition, CEUS and CE-EUS have been also used for the guidance of fine needle aspiration and assessment of treatment response. Complementary to size criteria, CEUS could also be used to evaluate response of tumor angiogenesis to anti-angiogenic therapies. In this paper we review current literature regarding evaluation of lymphadenopathy by new and innovative US techniques. PMID:23946589

  9. Pulse Compression Techniques for Laser Generated Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, R. F.; Madaras, E. I.

    1999-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound for nondestructive evaluation has an optical power density limit due to rapid high heating that causes material damage. This damage threshold limits the generated ultrasound amplitude, which impacts nondestructive evaluation inspection capability. To increase ultrasound signal levels and improve the ultrasound signal-to-noise ratio without exceeding laser power limitations, it is possible to use pulse compression techniques. The approach illustrated here uses a 150mW laser-diode modulated with a pseudo-random sequence and signal correlation. Results demonstrate the successful generation of ultrasonic bulk waves in aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials using a modulated low-power laser diode and illustrate ultrasound bandwidth control.

  10. A preliminary evaluation of 3D mesh animation coding techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Khaled; Zaharia, Titus; Preteux, Francoise

    2005-08-01

    This paper provides an overview of the state-of-the-art techniques recently developed within the emerging field of dynamic mesh compression. Static encoders, wavelet-based schemes, PCA-based approaches, differential temporal and spatio-temporal predictive techniques, and clustering-based representations are considered, presented, analyzed, and objectively compared in terms of compression efficiency, algorithmic and computational aspects and offered functionalities (such as progressive transmission, scalable rendering, computational and algorithmic aspects, field of applicability...). The proposed comparative study reveals that: (1) clustering-based approaches offer the best compromise between compression performances and computational complexity; (2) PCA-based representations are highly efficient on long animated sequences (i.e. with number of mesh vertices much smaller than the number of frames) at the price of prohibitive computational complexity of the encoding process; (3) Spatio-temporal Dynapack predictors provides simple yet effective predictive schemes that outperforms simple predictors such as those considered within the interpolator compression node adopted by the MPEG-4 within the AFX standard; (4) Wavelet-based approaches, which provide the best compression performances for static meshes show here again good results, with the additional advantage of a fully progressive representation, but suffer from an applicability limited to large meshes with at least several thousands of vertices per connected component.

  11. Heuristic Techniques Application In A 3-D Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazouz, A. Kader

    1989-02-01

    This paper discusses the application of a heuristic technique to stack regular and irregular shapes objects on the same container or on the same pallet. The computer representation of any object is based on the recursive octree method where each unit volume element is a voxel. Then, the choice of the space taken by any shape object within the volume is made through the heuristic approach. The heuristic technique developed is an evaluation function that compares all the available spaces based on weighing factors and threshold levels. The parameters used are shape, space available, contents of the object, and dimensions. The goal is to choose the most feasible available space every time an object is ready to be stacked. The heuristic algorithm is implemented within a knowledge based system to control a flexible material handling cell. Generally the cell comprises a material handling robot, a conveyance system that brings the objects to the cell where objects are distributed randomly to the cell, a vision system to identify the objects and verify the stacking procedure, and a computer to control and initiate the decision making process to stack all shape objects on the same volume.

  12. Task-specific evaluation of 3D image interpolation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevera, George J.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Miki, Yukio

    1998-06-01

    Image interpolation is an important operation that is widely used in medical imaging, image processing, and computer graphics. A variety of interpolation methods are available in the literature. However, their systematic evaluation is lacking. At a previous meeting, we presented a framework for the task independent comparison of interpolation methods based on a variety of medical image data pertaining to different parts of the human body taken from different modalities. In this new work, we present an objective, task-specific framework for evaluating interpolation techniques. The task considered is how the interpolation methods influence the accuracy of quantification of the total volume of lesions in the brain of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients. Sixty lesion detection experiments coming from ten patient studies, two subsampling techniques and the original data, and 3 interpolation methods is presented along with a statistical analysis of the results. This work comprises a systematic framework for the task-specific comparison of interpolation methods. Specifically, the influence of three interpolation methods in MS lesion quantification is compared.

  13. Consequences of Intermodality Registration Errors for Intramodality 3D Ultrasound IGRT.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Skadi; Seravalli, Enrica; Fontanarosa, Davide; Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther J; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Intramodality ultrasound image-guided radiotherapy systems compare daily ultrasound to reference ultrasound images. Nevertheless, because the actual treatment planning is based on a reference computed tomography image, and not on a reference ultrasound image, their accuracy depends partially on the correct intermodality registration of the reference ultrasound and computed tomography images for treatment planning. The error propagation in daily patient positioning due to potential registration errors at the planning stage was assessed in this work. Five different scenarios were simulated involving shifts or rotations of ultrasound or computed tomography images. The consequences of several workflow procedures were tested with a phantom setup. As long as the reference ultrasound and computed tomography images are made to match, the patient will be in the correct treatment position. In an example with a phantom measurement, the accuracy of the performed manual fusion was found to be ≤2 mm. In clinical practice, manual registration of patient images is expected to be more difficult. Uncorrected mismatches will lead to a systematically incorrect final patient position because there will be no indication that there was a misregistration between the computed tomography and reference ultrasound images. In the treatment room, the fusion with the computed tomography image will not be visible and based on the ultrasound images the patient position seems correct. PMID:26048909

  14. FINAL INTERIM REPORT, CANDIDATE SITES, MACHINES IN USE, DATA STORAGE AND TRANSMISSION METHODS: TESTING FEASIBILITY OF 3D ULTRASOUND DATA ACQUISITION AND RELIABILITY OF DATA RETRIEVAL FROM STORED 3D IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this Work Assignment, 02-03, is to examine the feasibility of collecting transmitting, and analyzing 3-D ultrasound data in the context of a multi-center study of pregnant women. The study will also examine the reliability of measurements obtained from 3-D images< ...

  15. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging. PMID:24464989

  16. Register cardiac fiber orientations from 3D DTI volume to 2D ultrasound image of rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lerakis, Stamatios; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound or echocardiography is one of the most widely used examinations for the diagnosis of cardiac diseases. However, it only supplies the geometric and structural information of the myocardium. In order to supply more detailed microstructure information of the myocardium, this paper proposes a registration method to map cardiac fiber orientations from three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) volume to the 2D ultrasound image. It utilizes a 2D/3D intensity based registration procedure including rigid, log-demons, and affine transformations to search the best similar slice from the template volume. After registration, the cardiac fiber orientations are mapped to the 2D ultrasound image via fiber relocations and reorientations. This method was validated by six images of rat hearts ex vivo. The evaluation results indicated that the final Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) achieved more than 90% after geometric registrations; and the inclination angle errors (IAE) between the mapped fiber orientations and the gold standards were less than 15 degree. This method may provide a practical tool for cardiologists to examine cardiac fiber orientations on ultrasound images and have the potential to supply additional information for diagnosis of cardiac diseases.

  17. Quantitative assessment of cancer vascular architecture by skeletonization of high-resolution 3-D contrast-enhanced ultrasound images: role of liposomes and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Molinari, F; Meiburger, K M; Giustetto, P; Rizzitelli, S; Boffa, C; Castano, M; Terreno, E

    2014-12-01

    The accurate characterization and description of the vascular network of a cancer lesion is of paramount importance in clinical practice and cancer research in order to improve diagnostic accuracy or to assess the effectiveness of a treatment. The aim of this study was to show the effectiveness of liposomes as an ultrasound contrast agent to describe the 3-D vascular architecture of a tumor. Eight C57BL/6 mice grafted with syngeneic B16-F10 murine melanoma cells were injected with a bolus of 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocoline (DSPC)-based non-targeted liposomes and with a bolus of microbubbles. 3-D contrast-enhanced images of the tumor lesions were acquired in three conditions: pre-contrast, after the injection of microbubbles, and after the injection of liposomes. By using a previously developed reconstruction and characterization image processing technique, we obtained the 3-D representation of the vascular architecture in these three conditions. Six descriptive parameters of these networks were also computed: the number of vascular trees (NT), the vascular density (VD), the number of branches, the 2-D curvature measure, the number of vascular flexes of the vessels, and the 3-D curvature. Results showed that all the vascular descriptors obtained by liposome-based images were statistically equal to those obtained by using microbubbles, except the VD which was found to be lower for liposome images. All the six descriptors computed in pre-contrast conditions had values that were statistically lower than those computed in presence of contrast, both for liposomes and microbubbles. Liposomes have already been used in cancer therapy for the selective ultrasound-mediated delivery of drugs. This work demonstrated their effectiveness also as vascular diagnostic contrast agents, therefore proving that liposomes can be used as efficient "theranostic" (i.e. therapeutic 1 diagnostic) ultrasound probes. PMID:24206210

  18. Long-term viability and proliferation of alginate-encapsulated 3-D HepG2 aggregates formed in an ultrasound trap.

    PubMed

    Bazou, D; Coakley, W T; Hayes, A J; Jackson, S K

    2008-08-01

    We report proof of principle here of a gel encapsulation technique that departs from the minimum surface area to volume restriction of spherical microcapsules and allows gelation of preformed high-density (>or=2x10(4) cells/aggregate) 3-D HepG2 cell aggregates. The process involves forming a discoid 3-D cell aggregate in an ultrasound standing wave trap (USWT), which is subsequently recovered and encapsulated in alginate/CaCl2 hydrogel. The size of the ultrasound-formed aggregates was dependent upon the initial cell concentration, and was in the range of 0.4-2.6 mm in diameter (for cell concentrations ranging between 10(4) and 5x10(6)/ml). At low cell concentrations (or=10(6)/ml, 3-D aggregates were generated. Cells in non- and encapsulated 3-D HepG2 aggregates remained 70-80% viable over 10 days in culture. The proliferative activity of the aggregates resulted in the doubling of the aggregate cell number and a subsequent increase in the aggregate thickness, while albumin secretion levels in encapsulated aggregates was 4.5 times higher compared to non-encapsulated, control aggregates. The results reported here suggest that the ultrasound trap can provide an alternative, novel approach of hydrogel cell encapsulation and thus rapidly (within 5 min) produce in vitro models for hepatocyte functional studies (for example, toxicity studies particularly if primary hepatocytes are used) in a tissue-mimetic manner. PMID:18490133

  19. Multi-modality fusion of CT, 3D ultrasound, and tracked strain images for breast irradiation planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Pezhman; Csoma, Csaba; Rivaz, Hassan; Fichtinger, Gabor; Zellars, Richard; Hager, Gregory; Boctor, Emad

    2009-02-01

    Breast irradiation significantly reduces the risk of recurrence of cancer. There is growing evidence suggesting that irradiation of only the involved area of the breast, partial breast irradiation (PBI), is as effective as whole breast irradiation. Benefits of PBI include shortened treatment time, and perhaps fewer side effects as less tissue is treated. However, these benefits cannot be realized without precise and accurate localization of the lumpectomy cavity. Several studies have shown that accurate delineation of the cavity in CT scans is very challenging and the delineated volumes differ dramatically over time and among users. In this paper, we propose utilizing 3D ultrasound (3D-US) and tracked strain images as complementary modalities to reduce uncertainties associated with current CT planning workflow. We present the early version of an integrated system that fuses 3D-US and real-time strain images. For the first time, we employ tracking information to reduce the noise in calculation of strain image by choosing the properly compressed frames and to position the strain image within the ultrasound volume. Using this system, we provide the tools to retrieve additional information from 3D-US and strain image alongside the CT scan. We have preliminarily evaluated our proposed system in a step-by-step fashion using a breast phantom and clinical experiments.

  20. Phase grouping-based needle segmentation in 3-D trans-rectal ultrasound-guided prostate trans-perineal therapy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wu; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2014-04-01

    A robust and efficient needle segmentation method used to localize and track the needle in 3-D trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate therapy is proposed. The algorithmic procedure begins by cropping the 3-D US image containing a needle; then all voxels in the cropped 3-D image are grouped into different line support regions (LSRs) based on the outer product of the adjacent voxels' gradient vector. Two different needle axis extraction methods in the candidate LSR are presented: least-squares fitting and 3-D randomized Hough transform. Subsequent local optimization refines the position of the needle axis. Finally, the needle endpoint is localized by finding an intensity drop along the needle axis. The proposed methods were validated with 3-D TRUS tissue-mimicking agar phantom images, chicken breast phantom images and patient images obtained during prostate cryotherapy. The results of the in vivo test indicate that our method can localize the needle accurately and robustly with a needle endpoint localization accuracy <1.43 mm and detection accuracy >84%, which are favorable for 3-D TRUS-guided prostate trans-perineal therapy. PMID:24462163

  1. Fast 3D dark-field reflection-mode photoacoustic microscopy in vivo with a 30-MHz ultrasound linear array

    PubMed Central

    Song, Liang; Maslov, Konstantin; Bitton, Rachel; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    We present an in vivo dark-field reflection-mode photoacoustic microscopy system that performs cross-sectional (B-scan) imaging at 50 Hz with realtime beamforming and 3D imaging consisting of 166 B-scan frames at 1 Hz with post-beamforming. To our knowledge, this speed is currently the fastest in photoacoustic imaging. A custom-designed light delivery system is integrated with a 30-MHz ultrasound linear array to realize dark-field reflection-mode imaging. Linear mechanical scanning of the array produces 3D images. The system has axial, lateral, and elevational resolutions of 25, 70, and 200 μm, respectively, and can image 3 mm deep in scattering biological tissues. Volumetric images of subcutaneous vasculature in rats are demonstrated in vivo. Fast 3D photoacoustic microscopy is anticipated to facilitate applications of photoacoustic imaging in biomedical studies that involve dynamics and clinical procedures that demand immediate diagnosis. PMID:19021408

  2. 3D shape measurements for non-diffusive objects using fringe projection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wei-Hung; Tseng, Bae-Heng; Cheng, Nai-Jen

    2013-09-01

    A scanning approach using holographic techniques to perform the 3D shape measurement for a non-diffusive object is proposed. Even though the depth discontinuity on the inspected surface is pretty high, the proposed method can retrieve the 3D shape precisely.

  3. Ultrasound techniques in the evaluation of the mediastinum, part I: endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) and transcutaneous mediastinal ultrasound (TMUS), introduction into ultrasound techniques

    PubMed Central

    Annema, Jouke Tabe; Clementsen, Paul; Cui, Xin Wu; Borst, Mathias Maximilian; Jenssen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has gained importance in pulmonary medicine over the last decades including conventional transcutaneous ultrasound (TUS), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS). Mediastinal lymph node staging affects the management of patients with both operable and inoperable lung cancer (e.g., surgery vs. combined chemoradiation therapy). Tissue sampling is often indicated for accurate nodal staging. Recent international lung cancer staging guidelines clearly state that endosonography (EUS and EBUS) should be the initial tissue sampling test over surgical staging. Mediastinal nodes can be sampled from the airways [EBUS combined with transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA)] or the esophagus [EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA)]. EBUS and EUS have a complementary diagnostic yield and in combination virtually all mediastinal lymph nodes can be biopsied. Additionally endosonography has an excellent yield in assessing granulomas in patients suspected of sarcoidosis. The aim of this review, in two integrative parts, is to discuss the current role and future perspectives of all ultrasound techniques available for the evaluation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy and mediastinal staging of lung cancer. A specific emphasis will be on learning mediastinal endosonography. Part I is dealing with an introduction into ultrasound techniques, mediastinal lymph node anatomy and diagnostic reach of ultrasound techniques and part II with the clinical work up of neoplastic and inflammatory mediastinal lymphadenopathy using ultrasound techniques and how to learn mediastinal endosonography. PMID:26543620

  4. Instantiation and registration of statistical shape models of the femur and pelvis using 3D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Barratt, Dean C; Chan, Carolyn S K; Edwards, Philip J; Penney, Graeme P; Slomczykowski, Mike; Carter, Timothy J; Hawkes, David J

    2008-06-01

    Statistical shape modelling potentially provides a powerful tool for generating patient-specific, 3D representations of bony anatomy for computer-aided orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) without the need for a preoperative CT scan. Furthermore, freehand 3D ultrasound (US) provides a non-invasive method for digitising bone surfaces in the operating theatre that enables a much greater region to be sampled compared with conventional direct-contact (i.e., pointer-based) digitisation techniques. In this paper, we describe how these approaches can be combined to simultaneously generate and register a patient-specific model of the femur and pelvis to the patient during surgery. In our implementation, a statistical deformation model (SDM) was constructed for the femur and pelvis by performing a principal component analysis on the B-spline control points that parameterise the freeform deformations required to non-rigidly register a training set of CT scans to a carefully segmented template CT scan. The segmented template bone surface, represented by a triangulated surface mesh, is instantiated and registered to a cloud of US-derived surface points using an iterative scheme in which the weights corresponding to the first five principal modes of variation of the SDM are optimised in addition to the rigid-body parameters. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using clinically realistic data obtained on three intact human cadavers (three whole pelves and six femurs). For each bone, a high-resolution CT scan and rigid-body registration transformation, calculated using bone-implanted fiducial markers, served as the gold standard bone geometry and registration transformation, respectively. After aligning the final instantiated model and CT-derived surfaces using the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, the average root-mean-square distance between the surfaces was 3.5mm over the whole bone and 3.7mm in the region of surgical interest. The corresponding distances after aligning the

  5. Evaluating the extent of cell death in 3D high frequency ultrasound by registration with whole-mount tumor histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, Roxana M.; Kolios, Michael C.; Moseley, Joanne L.; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: High frequency ultrasound imaging, 10-30 MHz, has the capability to assess tumor response to radiotherapy in mouse tumors as early as 24 h after treatment administration. The advantage of this technique is that the image contrast is generated by changes in the physical properties of dying cells. Therefore, a subject can be imaged before and multiple times during the treatment without the requirement of injecting specialized contrast agents. This study is motivated by a need to provide metrics of comparison between the volume and localization of cell death, assessed from histology, with the volume and localization of cell death surrogate, assessed as regions with increased echogeneity from ultrasound images. Methods: The mice were exposed to radiation doses of 2, 4, and 8 Gy. Ultrasound images were collected from each tumor before and 24 h after exposure to radiation using a broadband 25 MHz center frequency transducer. After radiotherapy, tumors exhibited hyperechoic regions in ultrasound images that corresponded to areas of cell death in histology. The ultrasound and histological images were rigidly registered. The tumors and regions of cell death were manually outlined on histological images. Similarly, the tumors and hyperechoic regions were outlined on the ultrasound images. Each set of contours was converted to a volumetric mesh in order to compare the volumes and the localization of cell death in histological and ultrasound images. Results: A shrinkage factor of 17{+-}2% was calculated from the difference in the tumor volumes evaluated from histological and ultrasound images. This was used to correct the tumor and cell death volumes assessed from histology. After this correction, the average absolute difference between the volume of cell death assessed from ultrasound and histological images was 11{+-}14% and the volume overlap was 70{+-}12%. Conclusions: The method provided metrics of comparison between the volume of cell death assessed from

  6. Reducing Non-Uniqueness in Satellite Gravity Inversion using 3D Object Oriented Image Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; van der Meijde, M.; Kerle, N.

    2013-12-01

    Non-uniqueness of satellite gravity interpretation has been usually reduced by using a priori information from various sources, e.g. seismic tomography models. The reduction in non-uniqueness has been based on velocity-density conversion formulas or user interpretation for 3D subsurface structures (objects) in seismic tomography models. However, these processes introduce additional uncertainty through the conversion relations due to the dependency on the other physical parameters such as temperature and pressure, or through the bias in the interpretation due to user choices and experience. In this research, a new methodology is introduced to extract the 3D subsurface structures from 3D geophysical data using a state-of-art 3D Object Oriented Image Analysis (OOA) technique. 3D OOA is tested using a set of synthetic models that simulate the real situation in the study area of this research. Then, 3D OOA is used to extract 3D subsurface objects from a real 3D seismic tomography model. The extracted 3D objects are used to reconstruct a forward model and its response is compared with the measured satellite gravity. Finally, the result of the forward modelling, based on the extracted 3D objects, is used to constrain the inversion process of satellite gravity data. Through this work, a new object-based approach is introduced to interpret and extract the 3D subsurface objects from 3D geophysical data. This can be used to constrain modelling and inversion of potential field data using the extracted 3D subsurface structures from other methods. In summary, a new approach is introduced to constrain inversion of satellite gravity measurements and enhance interpretation capabilities.

  7. Improving Semantic Updating Method on 3d City Models Using Hybrid Semantic-Geometric 3d Segmentation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkawi, K.-H.; Abdul-Rahman, A.

    2013-09-01

    Cities and urban areas entities such as building structures are becoming more complex as the modern human civilizations continue to evolve. The ability to plan and manage every territory especially the urban areas is very important to every government in the world. Planning and managing cities and urban areas based on printed maps and 2D data are getting insufficient and inefficient to cope with the complexity of the new developments in big cities. The emergence of 3D city models have boosted the efficiency in analysing and managing urban areas as the 3D data are proven to represent the real world object more accurately. It has since been adopted as the new trend in buildings and urban management and planning applications. Nowadays, many countries around the world have been generating virtual 3D representation of their major cities. The growing interest in improving the usability of 3D city models has resulted in the development of various tools for analysis based on the 3D city models. Today, 3D city models are generated for various purposes such as for tourism, location-based services, disaster management and urban planning. Meanwhile, modelling 3D objects are getting easier with the emergence of the user-friendly tools for 3D modelling available in the market. Generating 3D buildings with high accuracy also has become easier with the availability of airborne Lidar and terrestrial laser scanning equipments. The availability and accessibility to this technology makes it more sensible to analyse buildings in urban areas using 3D data as it accurately represent the real world objects. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) has accepted CityGML specifications as one of the international standards for representing and exchanging spatial data, making it easier to visualize, store and manage 3D city models data efficiently. CityGML able to represents the semantics, geometry, topology and appearance of 3D city models in five well-defined Level-of-Details (LoD), namely LoD0

  8. NEW 3D TECHNIQUES FOR RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION OF CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    New three-dimensional quantitative structure activity (3-D QSAR) techniques for prioritizing chemical inventories for endocrine activity will be presented. The Common Reactivity Pattern (COREPA) approach permits identification of common steric and/or electronic patterns associate...

  9. SIMULTANEOUS BILATERAL REAL-TIME 3-D TRANSCRANIAL ULTRASOUND IMAGING AT 1 MHZ THROUGH POOR ACOUSTIC WINDOWS

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Bennett, Ellen R.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a rapid, portable alternative imaging modality to examine stroke patients in pre-hospital or emergency room settings. However, in performing transcranial ultrasound examinations, 8%–29% of patients in a general population may present with window failure, in which case it is not possible to acquire clinically useful sonographic information through the temporal bone acoustic window. In this work, we describe the technical considerations, design and fabrication of low-frequency (1.2 MHz), large aperture (25.3 mm) sparse matrix array transducers for 3-D imaging in the event of window failure. These transducers are integrated into a system for real-time 3-D bilateral transcranial imaging—the ultrasound brain helmet—and color flow imaging capabilities at 1.2 MHz are directly compared with arrays operating at 1.8 MHz in a flow phantom with attenuation comparable to the in vivo case. Contrast-enhanced imaging allowed visualization of arteries of the Circle of Willis in 5 of 5 subjects and 8 of 10 sides of the head despite probe placement outside of the acoustic window. Results suggest that this type of transducer may allow acquisition of useful images either in individuals with poor windows or outside of the temporal acoustic window in the field. PMID:23415287

  10. Performance of ultrasound based measurement of 3D displacement using a curvilinear probe for organ motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Emma J.; Miller, Naomi R.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Evans, Phillip M.; Symonds-Tayler, J. Richard N.

    2007-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) soft tissue tracking is of interest for monitoring organ motion during therapy. Our goal is to assess the tracking performance of a curvilinear 3D ultrasound probe in terms of the accuracy and precision of measured displacements. The first aim was to examine the depth dependence of the tracking performance. This is of interest because the spatial resolution varies with distance from the elevational focus and because the curvilinear geometry of the transducer causes the spatial sampling frequency to decrease with depth. Our second aim was to assess tracking performance as a function of the spatial sampling setting (low, medium or high sampling). These settings are incorporated onto 3D ultrasound machines to allow the user to control the trade-off between spatial sampling and temporal resolution. Volume images of a speckle-producing phantom were acquired before and after the probe had been moved by a known displacement (1, 2 or 8 mm). This allowed us to assess the optimum performance of the tracking algorithm, in the absence of motion. 3D speckle tracking was performed using 3D cross-correlation and sub-voxel displacements were estimated. The tracking performance was found to be best for axial displacements and poorest for elevational displacements. In general, the performance decreased with depth, although the nature of the depth dependence was complex. Under certain conditions, the tracking performance was sufficient to be useful for monitoring organ motion. For example, at the highest sampling setting, for a 2 mm displacement, good accuracy and precision (an error and standard deviation of <0.4 mm) were observed at all depths and for all directions of displacement. The trade-off between spatial sampling, temporal resolution and size of the field of view (FOV) is discussed.

  11. Development of a 3D patient-specific planning platform for interstitial and transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Punit; Diederich, Chris J.

    2010-03-01

    Interstitial and transurethral catheter-based ultrasound devices are under development for treatment of prostate cancer and BPH, uterine fibroids, liver tumors and other soft tissue disease. Accurate 3D thermal modeling is essential for designing site-specific applicators, exploring treatment delivery strategies, and integration of patient-specific treatment planning of thermal ablations. We are developing a comprehensive 3D modeling and treatment planning platform for ultrasound ablation of tissue using catheter-based applicators. We explored the applicability of assessing thermal effects in tissue using critical temperature, thermal dose and Arrhenius thermal damage thresholds and performed a comparative analysis of dynamic tissue properties critical to accurate modeling. We used the model to assess the feasibility of automatic feedback control with MR thermometry, and demonstrated the utility of the modeling platform for 3D patient-specific treatment planning. We have identified critical temperature, thermal dose and thermal damage thresholds for assessing treatment endpoint. Dynamic changes in tissue attenuation/absorption and perfusion must be included for accurate prediction of temperature profiles and extents of the ablation zone. Lastly, we demonstrated use of the modeling platform for patient-specific treatment planning.

  12. 2D and 3D endoanal and translabial ultrasound measurement variation in normal postpartum measurements of the anal sphincter complex

    PubMed Central

    MERIWETHER, Kate V.; HALL, Rebecca J.; LEEMAN, Lawrence M.; MIGLIACCIO, Laura; QUALLS, Clifford; ROGERS, Rebecca G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Women may experience anal sphincter anatomy changes after vaginal or Cesarean delivery. Therefore, accurate and acceptable imaging options to evaluate the anal sphincter complex (ASC) are needed. ASC measurements may differ between translabial (TL-US) and endoanal ultrasound (EA-US) imaging and between 2D and 3D ultrasound. The objective of this analysis was to describe measurement variation between these modalities. Methods Primiparous women underwent 2D and 3D TL-US imaging of the ASC six months after a vaginal birth (VB) or Cesarean delivery (CD). A subset of women also underwent EA-US measurements. Measurements included the internal anal sphincter (IAS) thickness at proximal, mid, and distal levels and the external anal sphincter (EAS) at 3, 6, 9, and 12 o’clock positions as well as bilateral thickness of the pubovisceralis muscle (PVM). Results 433 women presented for US: 423 had TL-US and 64 had both TL-US and EA-US of the ASC. All IAS measurements were significantly thicker on TL-US than EA-US (all p<0.01), while EAS measurements were significantly thicker on EA-US (p<0.01). PVM measurements with 3D or 2D imaging were similar (p>0.20). On both TL-US and EA-US, there were multiple sites where significant asymmetry existed in left versus right measurements. Conclusion The ultrasound modality used to image the ASC introduces small but significant changes in measurements, and the direction of the bias depends on the muscle and location being imaged. PMID:25344221

  13. Role of 3D MRI with proset technique in the evaluation of lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Grasso, D; Borreggine, C; Melchionda, D; Bristogiannis, C; Stoppino, L P; Macarini, L

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (3D MRI) using the ProSet technique in the diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy and to compare morphological findings with clinical and neurophysiological data. 40 patients suffering from L5 or S1 mono-radiculopathy caused by a disc herniation were evaluated through preliminary clinical assessment and electromyography (EMG) technique. Both conventional spin-echo sequences and 3D coronal FFE with selective water excitation (ProSet imaging) were acquired. Indentation, swelling and tilt angle of the nerve root were assessed by means of a 3D MR radiculography. 3D ProSet multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) were used for quantitative measurements of L5 and S1 nerve root widths. Widths of the symptomatic nerve root were compared with those of the contralateral nerve. Data were processed using Epi Info 3.3 software (CDC, Atlanta, GA, USA) and were compared through a paired t-Student test. We observed an abnormal tilt angle in 22 patients (57,2 percent, P less than 0.05). Morphologic alterations such as monolateral swelling or indentation of the involved roots were found in 36 patients (90 percent, P less than0.01) using 3D MR radiculography. In 10 patients, EMG revealed more nerve roots involved, while 3D FFE with ProSet technique shows a single root involved. In 2 patients, alterations were demonstrated only through EMG technique. We suggest that 3D MR radiculography can provide more information than other techniques about symptomatic disc herniation, supporting the detection of morphological changes of all nerve segments. 3D FFE with ProSet technique demonstrates high sensibility to exactly identify the level of the root involved and can provide an extremely useful tool to lead a surgical planning. PMID:24152846

  14. 3D ultrasound image guidance system used in RF uterine adenoma and uterine bleeding ablation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mingyue; Luo, Xiaoan; Cai, Chao; Zhou, Chengping; Fenster, Aaron

    2006-03-01

    Uterine adenoma and uterine bleeding are the two most prevalent diseases in Chinese women. Many women lose their fertility from these diseases. Currently, a minimally invasive ablation system using an RF button electrode is being used in Chinese hospitals to destroy tumor cells or stop bleeding. In this paper, we report on a 3D US guidance system developed to avoid accidents or death of the patient by inaccurate localization of the tumor position during treatment. A 3D US imaging system using a rotational scanning approach of an abdominal probe was built. In order to reduce the distortion produced when the rotational axis is not collinear with the central beam of the probe, a new 3D reconstruction algorithm is used. Then, a fast 3D needle segmentation algorithm is used to find the electrode. Finally, the tip of electrode is determined along the segmented 3D needle and the whole electrode is displayed. Experiments with a water phantom demonstrated the feasibility of our approach.

  15. Fusion of ultrasound B-mode and vibro-elastography images for automatic 3D segmentation of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, S Sara; Moradi, Mehdi; Morris, William J; Goldenberg, S Larry; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2012-11-01

    Prostate segmentation in B-mode images is a challenging task even when done manually by experts. In this paper we propose a 3D automatic prostate segmentation algorithm which makes use of information from both ultrasound B-mode and vibro-elastography data.We exploit the high contrast to noise ratio of vibro-elastography images of the prostate, in addition to the commonly used B-mode images, to implement a 2D Active Shape Model (ASM)-based segmentation algorithm on the midgland image. The prostate model is deformed by a combination of two measures: the gray level similarity and the continuity of the prostate edge in both image types. The automatically obtained mid-gland contour is then used to initialize a 3D segmentation algorithm which models the prostate as a tapered and warped ellipsoid. Vibro-elastography images are used in addition to ultrasound images to improve boundary detection.We report a Dice similarity coefficient of 0.87±0.07 and 0.87±0.08 comparing the 2D automatic contours with manual contours of two observers on 61 images. For 11 cases, a whole gland volume error of 10.2±2.2% and 13.5±4.1% and whole gland volume difference of -7.2±9.1% and -13.3±12.6% between 3D automatic and manual surfaces of two observers is obtained. This is the first validated work showing the fusion of B-mode and vibro-elastography data for automatic 3D segmentation of the prostate. PMID:22829391

  16. A Shell/3D Modeling Technique for the Analysis of Delaminated Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    A shell/3D modeling technique was developed for which a local solid finite element model is used only in the immediate vicinity of the delamination front. The goal was to combine the accuracy of the full three-dimensional solution with the computational efficiency of a shell finite element model. Multi-point constraints provided a kinematically compatible interface between the local 3D model and the global structural model which has been meshed with shell finite elements. Double Cantilever Beam, End Notched Flexure, and Single Leg Bending specimens were analyzed first using full 3D finite element models to obtain reference solutions. Mixed mode strain energy release rate distributions were computed using the virtual crack closure technique. The analyses were repeated using the shell/3D technique to study the feasibility for pure mode I, mode II and mixed mode I/II cases. Specimens with a unidirectional layup and with a multidirectional layup were simulated. For a local 3D model, extending to a minimum of about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front, the results were in good agreement with mixed mode strain energy release rates obtained from computations where the entire specimen had been modeled with solid elements. For large built-up composite structures the shell/3D modeling technique offers a great potential for reducing the model size, since only a relatively small section in the vicinity of the delamination front needs to be modeled with solid elements.

  17. Three dimensional level set based semiautomatic segmentation of atherosclerotic carotid artery wall volume using 3D ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Murad; AlMuhanna, Khalid; Zhao, Limin; Lal, Brajesh K.; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2014-03-01

    3D segmentation of carotid plaque from ultrasound (US) images is challenging due to image artifacts and poor boundary definition. Semiautomatic segmentation algorithms for calculating vessel wall volume (VWV) have been proposed for the common carotid artery (CCA) but they have not been applied on plaques in the internal carotid artery (ICA). In this work, we describe a 3D segmentation algorithm that is robust to shadowing and missing boundaries. Our algorithm uses distance regularized level set method with edge and region based energy to segment the adventitial wall boundary (AWB) and lumen-intima boundary (LIB) of plaques in the CCA, ICA and external carotid artery (ECA). The algorithm is initialized by manually placing points on the boundary of a subset of transverse slices with an interslice distance of 4mm. We propose a novel user defined stopping surface based energy to prevent leaking of evolving surface across poorly defined boundaries. Validation was performed against manual segmentation using 3D US volumes acquired from five asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis using a linear 4D probe. A pseudo gold-standard boundary was formed from manual segmentation by three observers. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), Hausdor distance (HD) and modified HD (MHD) were used to compare the algorithm results against the pseudo gold-standard on 1205 cross sectional slices of 5 3D US image sets. The algorithm showed good agreement with the pseudo gold standard boundary with mean DSC of 93.3% (AWB) and 89.82% (LIB); mean MHD of 0.34 mm (AWB) and 0.24 mm (LIB); mean HD of 1.27 mm (AWB) and 0.72 mm (LIB). The proposed 3D semiautomatic segmentation is the first step towards full characterization of 3D plaque progression and longitudinal monitoring.

  18. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses. PMID:26973405

  19. The alteration in placental volume and placental mean grey value in growth-restricted pregnancies assessed by 3D ultrasound (Growth Restriction & 3D Ultrasonography).

    PubMed

    Artunc Ulkumen, B; Pala, H G; Uyar, Y; Koyuncu, F M; Bulbul Baytur, Y

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the volumetric and echogenic alterations in placentas between the intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and normal pregnancies using three-dimensional ultrasound and virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL) software. This case-control prospective study consisted of 48 singleton pregnancies complicated by IUGR and 60 healthy singleton pregnancies matched for maternal age, gestational age and parity. Placental volume (PV) and placental volumetric mean grey values (MGV) were evaluated. PV (cm(3)) was analysed using the VOCAL imaging analysis program, and 3D histogram was used to calculate the volumetric MGV (%). PV was 278.50 ± 63.68 and 370.98 ± 97.82 cm(3) in IUGR and control groups, respectively (p = 0.004). MGV of the placenta was 38.24 ± 8.41 and 38.24 ± 8.41 in IUGR and control groups, respectively (p = 0.30). receiver operator curve (ROC) curve analysis revealed that area under curve was 0.731 for PV. Correlation analysis revealed that PV was significantly associated with estimated fetal weight (r = 0.319, p = 0.003), biparietal diameter (r = 0.346, p = 0.002), head circumference (r = 0.269, p = 0.019), abdominal circumference (r = 0.344, p = 0.002) and femur length (r = 0.328, p = 0.004). PV was inversely related to the umbilical artery pulsatility index (r = - 0.244, p = 0.017). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating volumetric MGV in IUGR placentas by comparing them with healthy pregnancies. Our study showed that PV diminishes significantly in IUGR pregnancies, whereas volumetric MGV does not alter significantly. PMID:25409488

  20. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  1. In vivo validation of a 3D ultrasound system for imaging the lateral ventricles of neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, J.; Fenster, A.; Chen, N.; Lee, D.; de Ribaupierre, S.

    2014-03-01

    Dilated lateral ventricles in neonates can be due to many different causes, such as brain loss, or congenital malformation; however, the main cause is hydrocephalus, which is the accumulation of fluid within the ventricular system. Hydrocephalus can raise intracranial pressure resulting in secondary brain damage, and up to 25% of patients with severely enlarged ventricles have epilepsy in later life. Ventricle enlargement is clinically monitored using 2D US through the fontanels. The sensitivity of 2D US to dilation is poor because it cannot provide accurate measurements of irregular volumes such as the ventricles, so most clinical evaluations are of a qualitative nature. We developed a 3D US system to image the cerebral ventricles of neonates within the confines of incubators that can be easily translated to more open environments. Ventricle volumes can be segmented from these images giving a quantitative volumetric measurement of ventricle enlargement without moving the patient into an imaging facility. In this paper, we report on in vivo validation studies: 1) comparing 3D US ventricle volumes before and after clinically necessary interventions removing CSF, and 2) comparing 3D US ventricle volumes to those from MRI. Post-intervention ventricle volumes were less than pre-intervention measurements for all patients and all interventions. We found high correlations (R = 0.97) between the difference in ventricle volume and the reported removed CSF with the slope not significantly different than 1 (p < 0.05). Comparisons between ventricle volumes from 3D US and MR images taken 4 (±3.8) days of each other did not show significant difference (p=0.44) between 3D US and MRI through paired t-test.

  2. Prostate boundary segmentation from ultrasound images using 2D active shape models: optimisation and extension to 3D.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Adam C; Fenster, Aaron; Downey, Dónal B; Ladak, Hanif M

    2006-12-01

    Boundary outlining, or segmentation, of the prostate is an important task in diagnosis and treatment planning for prostate cancer. This paper describes an algorithm based on two-dimensional (2D) active shape models (ASM) for semi-automatic segmentation of the prostate boundary from ultrasound images. Optimisation of the 2D ASM for prostatic ultrasound was done first by examining ASM construction and image search parameters. Extension of the algorithm to three-dimensional (3D) segmentation was then done using rotational-based slicing. Evaluation of the 3D segmentation algorithm used distance- and volume-based error metrics to compare algorithm generated boundary outlines to gold standard (manually generated) boundary outlines. Minimum description length landmark placement for ASM construction, and specific values for constraints and image search were found to be optimal. Evaluation of the algorithm versus gold standard boundaries found an average mean absolute distance of 1.09+/-0.49 mm, an average percent absolute volume difference of 3.28+/-3.16%, and a 5x speed increase versus manual segmentation. PMID:16930764

  3. The technique of ultrasound guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Romics, Imre

    2004-11-01

    This article discusses the preparations for ultrasound guided prostate biopsy, the conditions used and the process of performing a biopsy. The first step in preparing the patient is a cleansing enema before biopsy. Every author proposes the use of a preoperative antibiotic based prophylaxis. Differences may be found in the type, dosage and the duration of this preoperative application, which can last from 2 h to 2 days. For anaesthesia, lidocaine has been proposed, which may be used as a gel applied in the rectum or in the form of a prostate infiltrate. Quite a few colleagues administer a brief intravenous narcosis. A major debate goes on in respect of defining the number of biopsy samples needed. Hodge proposed sextant biopsy in 1989, for which we had false negative findings in 20% of all cases. Because of this, it has recently been suggested that eight or rather ten samples be taken. There are some who question even this. Twelve biopsy samples do offer an advantage compared to six, although in the case of eight this is not the case. We shall present an in depth discussion of the various opinions on the different numbers of biopsies samples required. For the sample site, the apex, the base and the middle part are proposed, and (completing the process) two additional samples can also be taken from the transition zone (TZ), since 20% of all prostate cancers originate from TZ. In case of a palpable nodule or any lesion made visible by TRUS, an additional, targeted, biopsy has to be performed. Certain new techniques like the 3-D Doppler, contrast, intermittent and others shall also be presented. The control of the full length of samples taken by a gun, as well as the proper conservation of the samples, are parts of pathological processing and of the technical tasks. A repeated biopsy is necessary in the case of PIN atypia, beyond which the author also discusses other indications for a repeated biopsy. We may expect the occurrence of direct postoperative complications

  4. Developing High-Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound Techniques to Characterize Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Karla Patricia E.

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for the repair or replacement of native tissues and organs. Further advancements in the fabrication of functional engineered tissues are partly dependent on developing new and improved technologies to monitor the properties of engineered tissues volumetrically, quantitatively, noninvasively, and nondestructively over time. Currently, engineered tissues are evaluated during fabrication using histology, biochemical assays, and direct mechanical tests. However, these techniques destroy tissue samples and, therefore, lack the capability for real-time, longitudinal monitoring. The research reported in this thesis developed nondestructive, noninvasive approaches to characterize the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of 3-D engineered tissues using high-frequency quantitative ultrasound and elastography technologies. A quantitative ultrasound technique, using a system-independent parameter known as the integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC), was employed to visualize and quantify structural properties of engineered tissues. Specifically, the IBC was demonstrated to estimate cell concentration and quantitatively detect differences in the microstructure of 3-D collagen hydrogels. Additionally, the feasibility of an ultrasound elastography technique called Single Tracking Location Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (STL-ARFI) imaging was demonstrated for estimating the shear moduli of 3-D engineered tissues. High-frequency ultrasound techniques can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, these high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable noninvasive, volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation.

  5. SU-E-J-135: An Investigation of Ultrasound Imaging for 3D Intra-Fraction Prostate Motion Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, T; Harris, E; Bamber, J; Evans, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the use of a mechanically swept 3D ultrasound (US) probe to estimate intra-fraction motion of the prostate during radiation therapy using an US phantom and simulated transperineal imaging. Methods: A 3D motion platform was used to translate an US speckle phantom while simulating transperineal US imaging. Motion patterns for five representative types of prostate motion, generated from patient data previously acquired with a Calypso system, were using to move the phantom in 3D. The phantom was also implanted with fiducial markers and subsequently tracked using the CyberKnife kV x-ray system for comparison. A normalised cross correlation block matching algorithm was used to track speckle patterns in 3D and 2D US data. Motion estimation results were compared with known phantom translations. Results: Transperineal 3D US could track superior-inferior (axial) and anterior-posterior (lateral) motion to better than 0.8 mm root-mean-square error (RMSE) at a volume rate of 1.7 Hz (comparable with kV x-ray tracking RMSE). Motion estimation accuracy was poorest along the US probe's swept axis (right-left; RL; RMSE < 4.2 mm) but simple regularisation methods could be used to improve RMSE (< 2 mm). 2D US was found to be feasible for slowly varying motion (RMSE < 0.5 mm). 3D US could also allow accurate radiation beam gating with displacement thresholds of 2 mm and 5 mm exhibiting a RMSE of less than 0.5 mm. Conclusion: 2D and 3D US speckle tracking is feasible for prostate motion estimation during radiation delivery. Since RL prostate motion is small in magnitude and frequency, 2D or a hybrid (2D/3D) US imaging approach which also accounts for potential prostate rotations could be used. Regularisation methods could be used to ensure the accuracy of tracking data, making US a feasible approach for gating or tracking in standard or hypo-fractionated prostate treatments.

  6. Real-time 3D curved needle segmentation using combined B-mode and power Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Greer, Joseph D; Adebar, Troy K; Hwang, Gloria L; Okamura, Allison M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a real-time segmentation method for curved needles in biological tissue based on analysis of B-mode and power Doppler images from a tracked 2D ultrasound transducer. Mechanical vibration induced by an external voice coil results in a Doppler response along the needle shaft, which is centered around the needle section in the ultrasound image. First, B-mode image analysis is performed within regions of interest indicated by the Doppler response to create a segmentation of the needle section in the ultrasound image. Next, each needle section is decomposed into a sequence of points and transformed into a global coordinate system using the tracked transducer pose. Finally, the 3D shape is reconstructed from these points. The results of this method differ from manual segmentation by 0.71 ± 0.55 mm in needle tip location and 0.38 ± 0.27 mm along the needle shaft. This method is also fast, taking 5-10 ms to run on a standard PC, and is particularly advantageous in robotic needle steering, which involves thin, curved needles with poor echogenicity. PMID:25485402

  7. Application of 3D Photo-reconstruction techniques in Geomorphology: Examples through different landforms and scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, Álvaro; Susanne, Schnabel; Conoscenti, Christian; Caraballo-Arias, Nathalie A.; Ferro, Vito; di Stefano, Constanza; Juan de Sanjosé, José; Berenguer-Sempere, Fernando; de Matías, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments made in tri-dimensional photo-reconstruction techniques (3D-PR), such as the use of Structure from Motion (SfM) and MultiView Stereo (MVS) techniques together, have allowed obtaining high resolution 3D point clouds. In order to achieve final point clouds with these techniques, only oblique images from consumer un-calibrated and non-metric cameras are needed. Here, these techniques are used in order to measure, monitor and quantify geomorphological features and processes. Three different applications through a range of scales and landforms are presented here. Firstly, five small gully headcuts located in a small catchment in SW Spain were monitored with the aim of estimating headcut retreat rates. During this field work, 3D models obtained by means of a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) were captured and used as benchmarks to analyze 3D-PR method accuracy. Results of this analysis showed centimeter-level accuracies with average distances between the 3D-PR model and the TLS model ranging from 0.009 to 0.025 m. Estimated soil loss ranged from -0.246 m3 to 0.114 m3 for a wet period (289 mm) of 54 days in 2013. Secondly, a calanchi type badland in Sicily (Italy) was photo-reconstructed and the quality of the 3D-PR model was analyzed using a Digital Elevation Model produced by classic digital photogrammetry with photos captured by an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). In this case, sub-meter calculated accuracies (0.30) showed that it is possible to describe badland morphology using 3D-PR models but it is not feasible to use these models to quantify annual rates of soil erosion in badlands (10 mm eroded per year). Finally, a high-resolution model of the Veleta rock glacier (in SE Spain) was elaborated with 3D-PR techniques and compared with a 3D model obtained by means of a TLS. Results indicated that 3D-PR method can be applied to the micro-scale study of glacier morphologies and processes with average distances to the TLS point cloud of 0.21 m.

  8. Research and implementation of visualization techniques for 3D explosion fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jianguo; Xu, Xiangzhao; Ma, Tianbao; Yu, Wen

    2015-12-01

    The visualization of scalar data in 3D explosion fields was devised to solve the problems of the complex physical and the huge data in numerical simulation of explosion mechanics problems. For enhancing the explosion effects and reducing the impacts of image analysis, the adjustment coefficient was added into original Phong illumination model. A variety of accelerated volume rendering algorithm and multithread technique were used to realize the fast rendering and real-time interactive control of 3D explosion fields. Cutaway view was implemented, so arbitrary section of 3D explosion fields can be seen conveniently. Slice can be extracted along three axes of 3D explosion fields, and the value at an arbitrary point on the slice can be gained. The experiment results show that the volume rendering acceleration algorithm can generate high quality images and can increase the speed of image generating, while achieve interactive control quickly.

  9. 3D Printed PEG-Based Hybrid Nanocomposites Obtained by Sol-Gel Technique.

    PubMed

    Chiappone, Annalisa; Fantino, Erika; Roppolo, Ignazio; Lorusso, Massimo; Manfredi, Diego; Fino, Paolo; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio; Calignano, Flaviana

    2016-03-01

    In this work, three-dimensional (3D) structured hybrid materials were fabricated combining 3D printing technology with in situ generation of inorganic nanoparticles by sol-gel technique. Those materials, consisting of silica nanodomains covalently interconnected with organic polymers, were 3D printed in complex multilayered architectures, incorporating liquid silica precursors into a photocurable oligomer in the presence of suitable photoinitiators and exposing them to a digital light system. A post sol-gel treatment in acidic vapors allowed the in situ generation of the inorganic phase in a dedicated step. This method allows to build hybrid structures operating with a full liquid formulation without meeting the drawbacks of incorporating inorganic powders into 3D printable formulations. The influence of the generated silica nanoparticle on the printed objects was deeply investigated at macro- and nanoscale; the resulting light hybrid structures show improved mechanical properties and, thus, have a huge potential for applications in a variety of advanced technologies. PMID:26871993

  10. Computer-generated 3D ultrasound images of the carotid artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, Robert H.; Lee, Paul L.; Lai, June Y.; Frieden, Howard J.; Blankenhorn, David H.

    1989-01-01

    A method is under development to measure carotid artery lesions from a computer-generated three-dimensional ultrasound image. For each image, the position of the transducer in six coordinates (x, y, z, azimuth, elevation, and roll) is recorded and used to position each B-mode picture element in its proper spatial position in a three-dimensional memory array. After all B-mode images have been assembled in the memory, the three-dimensional image is filtered and resampled to produce a new series of parallel-plane two-dimensional images from which arterial boundaries are determined using edge tracking methods.