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Sample records for 3h carbon 13c

  1. Abundance Anomaly of the 13C Isotopic Species of c-C3H2 in the Low-mass Star Formation Region L1527

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kento; Sakai, Nami; Tokudome, Tomoya; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Takano, Shuro; Lefloch, Bertrand; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Bachiller, Rafael; Caux, Emmanuel; Vastel, Charlotte; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-07-01

    The rotational spectral lines of c-C3H2 and two kinds of the 13C isotopic species, c-{}13{{CCCH}}2 ({C}2v symmetry) and c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2 (Cs symmetry), have been observed in the 1–3 mm band toward the low-mass star-forming region L1527. We have detected 7, 3, and 6 lines of c-C3H2, c-{}13{{CCCH}}2, and c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2, respectively, with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and 34, 6, and 13 lines, respectively, with the IRAM 30 m telescope, where seven, two, and two transitions, respectively, are observed with both telescopes. With these data, we have evaluated the column densities of the normal and 13C isotopic species. The [c-C3H2]/[c-{}13{{CCCH}}2] ratio is determined to be 310 ± 80, while the [c-C3H2]/[c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2] ratio is determined to be 61 ± 11. The [c-C3H2]/[c-{}13{{CCCH}}2] and [c-C3H2]/[c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2] ratios expected from the elemental 12C/13C ratio are 60–70 and 30–35, respectively, where the latter takes into account the statistical factor of 2 for the two equivalent carbon atoms in c-C3H2. Hence, this observation further confirms the dilution of the 13C species in carbon-chain molecules and their related molecules, which are thought to originate from the dilution of 13C+ in the gas-phase C+ due to the isotope exchange reaction: {}13{{{C}}}++{CO}\\to {}13{CO}+{{{C}}}+. Moreover, the abundances of the two 13C isotopic species are different from each other. The ratio of c-{}13{{CCCH}}2 species relative to c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2 is determined to be 0.20 ± 0.05. If 13C were randomly substituted for the three carbon atoms, the [c-{}13{{CCCH}}2]/[c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2] ratio would be 0.5. Hence, the observed ratio indicates that c-{{CC}}13{{CH}}2 exists more favorably. Possible origins of the different abundances are discussed. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope and the NRO 45 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain). NRO is a branch of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

  2. Anomalous 13C enrichment in modern marine organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Claypool, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Marine organic carbon is heavier isotopically (13C enriched) than most land-plant or terrestrial organic C1. Accordingly, ??13C values of organic C in modern marine sediments are routinely interpreted in terms of the relative proportions of marine and terrestrial sources of the preserved organic matter2,3. When independent geochemical techniques are used to evaluate the source of organic matter in Cretaceous or older rocks, those rocks containing mostly marine organic C are found typically to have lighter (more-negative) ??13C values than rocks containing mostly terrestrial organic C. Here we conclude that marine photosynthesis in mid-Cretaceous and earlier oceans generally resulted in a greater fractionation of C isotopes and produced organic C having lighter ??13C values. Modern marine photosynthesis may be occurring under unusual geological conditions (higher oceanic primary production rates, lower PCO2) that limit dissolved CO2 availability and minimize carbon isotope fractionation4. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  3. Xyloglucan undergoes interpolymeric transglycosylation during binding to the plant cell wall in vivo: evidence from 13C/3H dual labelling and isopycnic centrifugation in caesium trifluoroacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J E; Smith, R C; Fry, S C

    1997-01-01

    Xyloglucan from the walls of Rosa cells that had been cultured on [12C]- or [13C]-glucose formed bands in caesium trifluoroacetate with mean buoyant densities of 1.575 or 1.616 g/ml respectively. Incubation of a mixture of [13C,3H]xyloglucan and [12C,1H]xyloglucan in the presence of xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) activity caused the mean buoyant density of the radioactive material to decrease, indicating that interpolymeric transglycosylation could be detected in vitro. We used two 13C/3H-dual-labelling protocols to look for interpolymeric transglycosylation in vivo. In protocol A, [13C]glucose-grown Rosa cells were transferred into [12C]glucose medium 6 h after a approximately 2 h pulse of l-[1-3H]arabinose (which radiolabels the xylose residues of xyloglucan). The mean buoyant density of the wall-bound [3H]xyloglucan decreased during the following 7 days in culture. This indicates that, during or after the wall-binding of newly synthesized [12C,1H]xyloglucan, it became covalently attached to previously wall-bound [13C, 3H]xyloglucan. In protocol B, [12C]glycerol- or [12C]glucose-grown Rosa cells were transferred into [13C]glucose medium, 20 or 60 min before a approximately 2 h pulse of [3H]arabinose. The buoyant density of the earliest wall-bound [3H]xyloglucan showed that it had a 12C/13C ratio of approximately 1:1. This indicates that, during (or, implausibly, before) wall-binding, the newly synthesized [13C, 3H]xyloglucan became covalently attached to previously synthesized [12C]xyloglucan. During the following 7 days in culture, the mean buoyant density of the [3H]xyloglucan increased, showing that later-synthesized [13C,1H]xyloglucan can be covalently attached to previously wall-bound [12C,13C,3H]xyloglucan. The only known mechanism by which segments of xyloglucans could become covalently attached to each other in the cell wall is by interpolymeric transglycosylation catalysed by XET. We conclude that XET-catalysed interpolymeric transglycosylation

  4. The Nature of Carbonate and Organic δ13C Covariance Through Geological Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlert, A. M.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Significant evolutionary, climatic, and oceanographic events in Earth history are often accompanied by excursions in the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of marine carbonates and co-occurring sedimentary organic material. The observation of synchronous excursions in the δ13C values of marine carbonates and coeval organic matter is commonly thought to prove that the deposit has not been altered by diagenesis, and that the variations in the δ13C records are the result of a significant change in global carbon cycling. Furthermore, this model suggests that the covariance of carbonate and organic δ13C records is driven only by changes in the δ13C value of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the surface waters of the ocean. However, recent work suggests that there may be at least two alternate models for generating covariance between carbonate and organic δ13C values in the geologic record. One of the models invokes sea-level driven syndepositional mixing between isotopically distinct sources of carbonate and organic material to produce positive covariance between carbonate and organic δ13C values. The second model suggests that post-depositional alteration to the carbonate δ13C values during meteoric diagenesis, in concert with concurrent contributions of terrestrial organic material during subaerial exposure, can also produce co-occurring negative excursions with tightly covariant δ13C records. In contrast to earlier interpretations of covariant δ13C values, these models suggest that both syndepositional and post-depositional factors can significantly influence the relationship between carbonate and organic δ13C values in a variety of depositional environments. The implications for reconstructions of ancient global carbon cycle events will be explored within the context of these three models, and their relative importance throughout geologic time will be discussed.

  5. Sc3CH@C80: selective 13C enrichment of the central carbon atom†

    PubMed Central

    Junghans, Katrin; Rosenkranz, Marco; Popov, Alexey A.

    2016-01-01

    Sc3CH@C80 is synthesized and characterized by 1H, 13C, and 45Sc NMR. A large negative chemical shift of the proton, −11.73 ppm in the Ih and −8.79 ppm in the D5h C80 cage isomers, is found. 13C satellites in the 1H NMR spectrum enabled indirect determination of the 13C chemical shift for the central carbon at 173 ± 1 ppm. Intensity of the satellites allowed determination of the 13C content for the central carbon atom. This unique possibility is applied to analyze the cluster/cage 13C distribution in mechanistic studies employing either 13CH4 or 13C powder to enrich Sc3CH@C80 with 13C. PMID:27109443

  6. Sc3CH@C80: selective (13)C enrichment of the central carbon atom.

    PubMed

    Junghans, Katrin; Rosenkranz, Marco; Popov, Alexey A

    2016-05-01

    Sc3CH@C80 is synthesized and characterized by (1)H, (13)C, and (45)Sc NMR. A large negative chemical shift of the proton, -11.73 ppm in the Ih and -8.79 ppm in the D5h C80 cage isomers, is found. (13)C satellites in the (1)H NMR spectrum enabled indirect determination of the (13)C chemical shift for the central carbon at 173 ± 1 ppm. Intensity of the satellites allowed determination of the (13)C content for the central carbon atom. This unique possibility is applied to analyze the cluster/cage (13)C distribution in mechanistic studies employing either (13)CH4 or (13)C powder to enrich Sc3CH@C80 with (13)C. PMID:27109443

  7. CARBON-13 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE. 13C CHEMICAL SHIFTS AND 13C-199HG COUPLING CONSTANTS FOR SOME ORGANOMERCURY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The (13)C shieldings and (13)C-(199)Hg coupling constants of fourteen phenyl- and seven alkyl- and alkenyl-mercury compounds have been obtained. Substituent effects on the (13)C shieldings are similar to those in nonmercurated phenyl compounds, with a similar relationship between...

  8. A large metabolic carbon contribution to the δ 13C record in marine aragonitic bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, David P.; Lorrain, Anne; Meng, Li; Dehairs, Frank

    2007-06-01

    It is well known that the incorporation of isotopically light metabolic carbon (C M) significantly affects the stable carbon isotope (δ 13C) signal recorded in biogenic carbonates. This can obscure the record of δ 13C of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon13C DIC) potentially archived in the shell carbonate. To assess the C M contribution to Mercenaria mercenaria shells collected in North Carolina, USA, we sampled seawater δ 13C DIC, tissue, hemolymph and shell δ 13C. All shells showed an ontogenic decrease in shell δ 13C, with as much as a 4‰ decrease over the lifespan of the clam. There was no apparent ontogenic change in food source indicated by soft tissue δ 13C values, therefore a change in the respired δ 13C value cannot be the cause of this decrease. Hemolymph δ 13C, on the other hand, did exhibit a negative relationship with shell height indicating that respired CO 2 does influence the δ 13C value of internal fluids and that the amount of respired CO 2 is related to the size or age of the bivalve. The percent metabolic C incorporated into the shell (%C M) was significantly higher (up to 37%, with a range from 5% to 37%) than has been found in other bivalve shells, which usually contain less than 10%C M. Interestingly, the hemolymph did contain less than 10%C M, suggesting that complex fractionation might occur between hemolymph and calcifying fluids. Simple shell biometrics explained nearly 60% of the observed variability in %C M, however, this is not robust enough to predict %C M for fossil shells. Thus, the metabolic effect on shell δ 13C cannot easily be accounted for to allow reliable δ 13C DIC reconstructions. However, there does seem to be a common effect of size, as all sites had indistinguishable slopes between the %C M and shell height (+0.19% per mm of shell height).

  9. Preparation of 7-hydroxy-2-oxoindolin-3-ylacetic acid and its [13C2], [5-n-3H], and [5-n-3H]-7-O-glucosyl analogues for use in the study of indol-3-ylacetic acid catabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewer, P.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    An improved synthesis of 7-hydroxy-2-oxoindolin-3-ylacetic acid via the base-induced condensation reaction between oxalate esters and 7-benzyloxyindolin-2-one is described. 7-Benzyloxyindolin-2-one was prepared in four steps and 50% overall yield from 3-hydroxy-2-nitrotoluene. The yield of the title compound from 7-benzyloxyindolin-2-one was 56%. This route was used to prepare 7-hydroxy-2-oxoindolin-3-yl[13C2]acetic acid in 30% yield from [13C2]oxalic acid dihydrate. The method could not be extended to the preparation of the corresponding [14C2]-compound. However, an enzyme preparation from Zea mays roots catalysed the conversion of carrier-free [5-n-3H]indol-3-ylacetic acid with a specific activity of 16.7 Ci mmol-1 to a mixture of 7-hydroxy-2-oxo[5-n-3H]indolin-3-ylacetic acid and its [5-n-3H]-7-O-glucoside in ca. 3 and 40% radiochemical yield respectively. The glucoside was converted into the 7-hydroxy compound in 80% yield by means of beta-glucosidase.

  10. A Large Metabolic Carbon Ccontribution to the δ13C Record in Marine Aragonitic Bivalve Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillikin, D. P.; Lorrain, A.; Dehairs, F.

    2006-12-01

    The stable carbon isotopic signature archived in bivalve shells was originally thought to record the δ13C of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon13C-DIC). However, more recent studies have shown that the incorporation of isotopically light metabolic carbon (M) significantly affects the δ13C signal recorded in biogenic carbonates. To assess the M contribution to Mercenaria mercenaria shells collected in North Carolina, USA, we sampled seawater δ13C-DIC, tissue, hemolymph and shell δ13C. We found up to a 4‰ decrease through ontogeny in shell δ13C in a 23 year old individual. There was no correlation between shell height or age and tissue δ13C. Thus, the ontogenic decrease observed in the shell δ13C could not be attributed to changes in food sources as the animal ages leading to more negative metabolic CO2, since this would require a negative relationship between tissue δ13C and shell height. Hemolymph δ13C, on the other hand, did exhibit a negative relationship with height, but the δ13C values were more positive than expected, indicating that hemolymph may not be a good proxy of extrapallial fluid δ13C. Nevertheless, the hemolymph data indicate that respired CO2 does influence the δ13C of internal fluids and that the amount of respired CO2 is related to the age of the bivalve. The percent metabolic C incorporated into the shell (%M) was significantly higher (up to 37%) than has been found in other bivalve shells, which usually contain less than 10 %M. Attempts to use shell biometrics to predict %M could not explain more than ~60% of the observed variability. Moreover, there were large differences in the %M between different sites. Thus, the metabolic effect on shell δ13C cannot easily be accounted for to allow reliable δ13C-DIC reconstructions. However, there does seem to be a common effect of size, as all sites had indistinguishable slopes between the %M and shell height (+0.19% per mm of shell height).

  11. Natural abundance measurements of 13C indicate increased deep soil carbon mineralization after forest disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diochon, Amanda; Kellman, Lisa

    2008-07-01

    Northern forest soils represent globally important stores of carbon (C), yet there is no consensus about how they are altered by the widespread practice of harvesting that dominates many forested landscapes. Here we present the first study to systematically investigate the utility of δ 13C and C content depth profiles to infer temporal changes in belowground carbon cycling processes following disturbance in a pure C3 ecosystem. We document carbon concentration and δ 13C depth profile enrichment trends consistent with a kinetic fractionation arising from soil organic carbon (SOC) humification across a northern forest chronosequence (1, 15, 45, 80 and 125+ yrs). Reduced soil C storage that coincided with observed soil profile δ 13C-enrichment patterns which intensified following clearcut harvesting, pointed to losses of SOC in the deeper (>20 cm) mineral soil. This study suggests the δ 13C approach may assist in identifying mechanisms responsible for soil C storage changes in disturbed C3 forest ecosystems.

  12. Extreme (13)C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite.

    PubMed

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C13C as light as -69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to -125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane. PMID:25948095

  13. Extreme 13C depletion of carbonates formed during oxidation of biogenic methane in fractured granite

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Henrik; Åström, Mats E.; Heim, Christine; Broman, Curt; Åström, Jan; Whitehouse, Martin; Ivarsson, Magnus; Siljeström, Sandra; Sjövall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation of exceptionally 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate is a result of, and thus a tracer for, sulphate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation, particularly in marine sediments. Although these carbonates typically are less depleted in 13C than in the source methane, because of incorporation of C also from other sources, they are far more depleted in 13C13C as light as −69‰ V-PDB) than in carbonates formed where no methane is involved. Here we show that oxidation of biogenic methane in carbon-poor deep groundwater in fractured granitoid rocks has resulted in fracture-wall precipitation of the most extremely 13C-depleted carbonates ever reported, δ13C down to −125‰ V-PDB. A microbial consortium of sulphate reducers and methane oxidizers has been involved, as revealed by biomarker signatures in the carbonates and S-isotope compositions of co-genetic sulphide. Methane formed at shallow depths has been oxidized at several hundred metres depth at the transition to a deep-seated sulphate-rich saline water. This process is so far an unrecognized terrestrial sink of methane. PMID:25948095

  14. SPECTROSCOPIC CONSTANTS FOR {sup 13}C AND DEUTERIUM ISOTOPOLOGUES OF CYCLIC AND LINEAR C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J. E-mail: Timothy.J.Lee@nasa.gov

    2011-07-20

    Recently, we reported ab initio quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} molecular cation, referred to as c-C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} and l-C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}. These were computed using high levels of theory. Specifically the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), was used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit, and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation were included. In the present study, we use these QFFs to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants for the c-{sup 13}CC{sub 2}H{sub 3}{sup +}, c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}D{sup +}, c-{sup 13}CC{sub 2}H{sub 2}D{sup +} isotoplogues of c-C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}, and the H{sub 2}CCCD{sup +}, HDCCCH{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup 13}CCCH{sup +}, H{sub 2}C{sup 13}CCH{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CC{sup 13}CH{sup +} isotopologues of l-C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}. Improvements in ab intitio methods have now made it possible to identify small molecules in an astronomical observation without the aid of high-resolution experimental data. We also report dipole moment values and show that the above-mentioned cyclic isotopologues have values of 0.094, 0.225, and 0.312 D, respectively, while the l-C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} isotopologues have values that range between 0.325 and 0.811 D. Thus, it is hoped that the highly accurate spectroscopic constants and data provided herein for the {sup 13}C and deuterium isotopologues of the cyclic and linear forms of C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} will enable their identification in astronomical observations from the Herschel Space Observatory, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, the Atacama Large Millimeter Array, and in the future, the James Webb Space Telescope.

  15. sup 13 C and sup 18 O isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates: I. Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Biological carbonates frequently precipitate out of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C equilibrium with ambient waters. Two patterns of isotopic disequilibrium are particularly common. Kinetic disequilibria, so designated because they apparently result from kinetic isotope effects during CO{sub 2} hydration and hydroxylation, involve simultaneous depletions of {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C as large as 4{per thousand} and 10 to 15{per thousand}, respectively. Rapid skeletogenesis favors strong kinetic effects, and approximately linear correlations between skeletal {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C are common in carbonates showing mainly the kinetic pattern. Metabolic effects involve additional positive or negative modulation of skeletal {delta}{sup 13}C, reflecting changes in the {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic carbon, caused mainly by photosynthesis and respiration. Kinetic isotope disequilibria tend to be fairly consistent in rapidly growing parts of photosynthetic corals, and time dependent isotopic variations therefore reflect changes in environmental conditions. {delta}{sup 18}O variations from Galapagos corals yields meaningful clues regarding seawater temperature, while {delta}{sup 13}C variations reflect changes in photosynthesis, modulated by cloudiness.

  16. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique. PMID:16332107

  17. Stable Carbon Isotopes (δ 13C) in Coral Skeletons: Experimental Approach and Applications for Paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottoli, A. G.

    2004-12-01

    Scleractinian corals obtain fixed carbon via photosynthesis by their endosymbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) and via hetertrophy (injestion of zooplankton, δ 13C ≈ -17 to -22‰ ). Carbon dioxide (CO2) used for photosynthesis is obtained from seawater (δ 13C ≈ 0%) or from respired CO2 within the coral host. The δ 13C of the carbon used in the formation of the underlying coral skeleton is fractionated as a result of both of these metabolic processes. Here I have pooled evidence from several field and tank experiments on the effect of photosynthesis and heterotrophy of coral skeletal δ 13C. In the experiments, decreases in light levels due to shading or depth resulted in a significant decrease in skeletal δ 13C in all species studied (Pavona gigantea, Pavona clavus, Porites compressa). Decreases in photosynthesis in bleached corals also resulted in a decrease in skeletal δ 13C compared to non-bleached corals growing under the same conditions and at the same location. Skeletal δ 13C also decreased at higher than normal light levels most likely due to photoinhibition. Thus, decreases in photosynthesis due to reduced light levels, due to bleaching-induced decreases in chlorophyll a concentrations, or due to photodamage-induced decreases in functional cholorphyll a, results in significant δ 13C decreases. Comprehensive interpretation of all of the data showed that changes in photosynthesis itself can drive the changes in δ 13C. In field experiments, the addition of natural concentrations of zooplankton to the diet resulted in decreases in skeletal δ 13C. Such a decrease was more pronounced with depth and in P. gigantea compared to P. clavus. In situ feeding experiments have since confirmed these findings. However under tank conditions with unaturally high feeding rates, enhanced nitrogen supply in the diet can disrupt the coral-algal symbiosis, stimlate zooxanthellae growth and photosynthesis, and cause an incrase in skeletal δ 13C. It is proposed that under

  18. Magnetic susceptibility effects on 13C MAS NMR spectra of carbon materials and graphite.

    PubMed

    Freita, J C; Emmerich, F G; Cernicchiaro, G R; Sampaio, L C; Bonagamba, T J

    2001-01-01

    13C high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study carbon materials prepared through the thermal decomposition of four different organic precursors (rice hulls, endocarp of babassu coconut, peat, and PVC). For heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) above about 600 C, all materials presented 13C NMR spectra composed of a unique resonance line associated with carbon atoms in aromatic planes. With increasing HTT a continuous broadening of this resonance and a diamagnetic shift in its central frequency were verified for all samples. The evolution of the magnitude and anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of the heat-treated carbon samples with HTT explains well these findings. It is shown that these results are better understood when a comparison is made with the features of the 13C NMR spectrum of polycrystalline graphite, for which the magnetic susceptibility effect is also present and is much more pronounced. PMID:11529420

  19. On the use of phloem sap δ13C to estimate canopy carbon discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascher, Katherine; Máguas, Cristina; Werner, Christiane

    2010-05-01

    Although the carbon stable isotope composition (d13C) of bulk leaf material is a good integrative parameter of photosynthetic discrimination and can be used as a reliable ecological index of plant functioning; it is not a good tracer of short-term changes in photosynthetic discrimination. In contrast, d13C of phloem sap is potentially useful as an indicator of short-term changes in canopy photosynthetic discrimination. However, recent research indicates that d13C signatures may be substantially altered by metabolic processes downstream of initial leaf-level carbon fixation (e.g. post-photosynthetic fractionation). Accordingly, before phloem sap d13C can be used as a proxy for canopy level carbon discrimination an understanding of factors influencing the degree and magnitude of post-photosynthetic fractionation and how these vary between species is of paramount importance. In this study, we measured the d13C signature along the basipetal transport pathway in two co-occurring tree species in the field - an understory invasive exotic legume, Acacia longifolia, and a native pine, Pinus pinaster. We measured d13C of bulk leaf and leaf water soluble organic matter (WSOM), phloem sap sampled at two points along the plant axis and leaf and root dark respiration. In general, species differences in photosynthetic discrimination resulted in more enriched d13C values in the water-conserving P. pinaster relative to the water-spending A. longifolia. Post-photosynthetic fractionation led to differences in d13C of carbon pools along the plant axis with progressively more depleted d13C from the canopy to the trunk (~6.5 per mil depletion in A. longifolia and ~0.8per mil depletion in P. pinaster). Leaf and root respiration, d13C, were consistently enriched relative to putative substrates. We hypothesize that the pronounced enrichment of leaf respired CO2 relative to leaf WSOM may have left behind relatively depleted carbon to be loaded into the phloem resulting in d13C depletion

  20. 13C NMR spectroscopy of the insoluble carbon of carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Pizzarello, S.; Frye, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectra have been obtained of the insoluble carbon residues resulting from HF-digestion of three carbonaceous chondrites, Orgueil (C1), Murchison (CM2), and Allende (CV3). Spectra obtained using the cross polarization magic-angle spinning technique show two major features attributable respectively to carbon in aliphatic/olefinic structures. The spectrum obtained from the Allende sample was weak, presumably as a consequence of its low hydrogen content. Single pulse excitation spectra, which do not depend on 1H-13C polarization transfer for signal enhancement were also obtained. These spectra, which may be more representative of the total carbon in the meteorite samples, indicate a greater content of carbon in aromatic/olefinic structures. These results suggest that extensive polycyclic aromatic sheets are important structural features of the insoluble carbon of all three meteorites. The Orgueil and Murchison materials contain additional hydrogenated aromatic/olefinic and aliphatic groups.

  1. Global carbon sinks and their variability inferred from atmospheric O2 and delta13C.

    PubMed

    Battle, M; Bender, M L; Tans, P P; White, J W; Ellis, J T; Conway, T; Francey, R J

    2000-03-31

    Recent time-series measurements of atmospheric O2 show that the land biosphere and world oceans annually sequestered 1.4 +/- 0.8 and 2.0 +/- 0.6 gigatons of carbon, respectively, between mid-1991 and mid-1997. The rapid storage of carbon by the land biosphere from 1991 to 1997 contrasts with the 1980s, when the land biosphere was approximately neutral. Comparison with measurements of delta13CO2 implies an isotopic flux of 89 +/- 21 gigatons of carbon per mil per year, in agreement with model- and inventory-based estimates of this flux. Both the delta13C and the O2 data show significant interannual variability in carbon storage over the period of record. The general agreement of the independent estimates from O2 and delta13C is a robust signal of variable carbon uptake by both the land biosphere and the oceans. PMID:10741962

  2. Autotrophic carbon budget in coral tissue: a new 13C-based model of photosynthate translocation.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Pascale; Grover, Renaud; Maguer, Jean François; Legendre, Louis; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine

    2012-04-15

    Corals live in symbiosis with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinum. These dinoflagellates translocate a large part of the photosynthetically fixed carbon to the host, which in turn uses it for its own needs. Assessing the carbon budget in coral tissue is a central question in reef studies that still vexes ecophysiologists. The amount of carbon fixed by the symbiotic association can be determined by measuring the rate of photosynthesis, but the amount of carbon translocated by the symbionts to the host and the fate of this carbon are more difficult to assess. In the present study, we propose a novel approach to calculate the budget of autotrophic carbon in the tissue of scleractinian corals, based on a new model and measurements made with the stable isotope (13)C. Colonies of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata were incubated in H(13)CO (-)(3)-enriched seawater, after which the fate of (13)C was followed in the symbionts, the coral tissue and the released particulate organic carbon (i.e. mucus). Results obtained showed that after 15 min, ca. 60% of the carbon fixed was already translocated to the host, and after 48 h, this value reached 78%. However, ca. 48% of the photosynthetically fixed carbon was respired by the symbiotic association, and 28% was released as dissolved organic carbon. This is different from other coral species, where <1% of the total organic carbon released is from newly fixed carbon. Only 23% of the initially fixed carbon was retained in the symbionts and coral tissue after 48 h. Results show that our (13)C-based model could successfully trace the carbon flow from the symbionts to the host, and the photosynthetically acquired carbon lost from the symbiotic association. PMID:22442377

  3. Determination of the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon in water; RSIL lab code 1710

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singleton, Glenda L.; Revesz, Kinga; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 1710 is to present a method to determine the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of water. The DIC of water is precipitated using ammoniacal strontium chloride (SrCl2) solution to form strontium carbonate (SrCO3). The δ13C is analyzed by reacting SrCO3 with 100-percent phosphoric acid (H3PO4) to liberate carbon quantitatively as carbon dioxide (CO2), which is collected, purified by vacuum sublimation, and analyzed by dual inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (DI-IRMS). The DI-IRMS is a DuPont double-focusing mass spectrometer. One ion beam passes through a slit in a forward collector and is collected in the rear collector. The other measurable ion beams are collected in the front collector. By changing the ion-accelerating voltage under computer control, the instrument is capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 45 or 46 in the rear collector and m/z 44 and 46 or 44 and 45, respectively, in the front collector. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z 44 = CO2 = 12C16O16O, m/z 45 = CO2 = 13C16O16O primarily, and m/z 46 = CO2 = 12C16O18O primarily. The data acquisition and control software calculates δ13C values.

  4. Hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride thin films studied by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, W. J.; Malyarenko, D. I.; Kraft, O.; Hoatson, G. L.; Reilly, A. C.; Holloway, B. C.

    2002-10-01

    The chemical bonding of hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films was examined using solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. The films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests reveal a recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. This combination of low modulus and high strength means the material can be regarded as hard and elastic; the material gives when pressed on and recovers its shape when the load is released. The 13C NMR results conclusively demonstrate that hard and elastic a-CNx has an sp2 carbon bonded structure and that sp3 hybridized carbons are absent. Our results stand in contrast with earlier work that proposed that the interesting mechanical properties of hard and elastic a-CNx were due, in part, to sp3 bonded carbon.

  5. Diethers enriched in 13C suggest carbon-limitation at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. S.; Hayes, J. M.; Summons, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    Active and inactive carbonate vent structures from the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) contain up to 0.6% organic carbon including diverse lipids. Values of δ 13C for total organic carbon (TOC) range from -18.7‰ vs. VPDB at the active, high-temperature vent known as "The Beehive" (90° C), to -3.1‰ at Marker 7 (active, 70° C). Samples with relatively high levels of 13C also contained high amounts of isoprenoidal and nonisoprenoidal diethers. Samples more depleted in 13C lacked or contained low amounts of these diethers. The correlation between high 13C and abundant diethers is supported by compound-specific isotopic analyses. Archaeal and bacterial diethers are enriched in 13C relative to photosynthetically derived marine carbon. The biomarkers sn-2 hydroxyarchaeol, sn-3 hydroxyarchaeol, and dihydroxyarchaeol - considered diagnostic for methane-cycling archaea - had δ values ranging from -8.5 to +4.8‰ . Phylogenetic data confirms the presence at these vents of a single group of methanogens, related to the Methanosarcinales (Schrenk et al., 2004). Diethers with non-isoprenoidal alkyl chains are also present, are of presumed bacterial origin, and may indicated the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Values of δ for these compounds range from -7.3 to +1.0‰ . At the Beehive vent, diether lipids are absent and the TOC is depleted in 13C. Coexistence of isotopically similar hydroxyarchaeols and nonisoprenoidal glycerol diethers is typical of marine, cold-seep environments at which concentrations of H2 are low and methane is oxidized anaerobically. At the LCHF, however, concentrations of H2 in pore waters reach 15 mM (Proskurowski et al., 2003). This H2, produced by serpentinization reactions, drives production (rather than oxidation) of methane. Simultaneously, sulfate-reducing bacteria can flourish as carbon-fixing autotrophs. Under such conditions, carbon may be the limiting substrate, its nearly complete consumption accounting for the enrichment of

  6. Paleoclimate Reconstruction From the d13C Organic and d13C Carbonate Proxies in Triassic Paleosols and Sediments, Ischigualasto Basin Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. A.; Tabor, N. J.; Montañez, I. P.; Currie, B.; Shipman, T.

    2001-12-01

    Stable carbon isotopes of organic matter and paleosol carbonate from the Triassic Ischigualasto Formation, Argentina are used as a proxy of paleoatmospheric pCO2 and d13CO2. Carbon and Oxygen isotope values were determined for over 100 Triassic pedogenic carbonate nodules and associated organic matter. The d13C of carbonate ranges from -3.29 per mil to -10.56 per mil. The d13C of organic matter ranges from -21.07 per mil to -24.24 per mil. The Hydrogen and Oxygen indices and TOC values indicate that the best preserved organic matter samples yield the most negative d13C values. Reconstructed pCO2 levels were around 1000 ppm V in the early to mid- Triassic and increased to around 2000 ppm V later in the Triassic. This maximum is followed by a fall in pCO2 in the late Triassic. This previously undocumented rapid change in paleo-CO2 levels likely accompanied the evolution of mammal-like reptiles to true dinosaurs as well as rapid climate change.

  7. Quantifying the chemical composition of soil organic carbon with solid-state 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, J. A.; Sanderman, J.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) to biological decomposition and mineralisation to CO2 is defined at least partially by its chemical composition. Highly aromatic charcoal-like SOC components are more stable to biological decomposition than other forms of carbon including cellulose. Solid-state 13C NMR has gained wide acceptance as a method capable of defining SOC chemical composition and mathematical fitting processes have been developed to estimate biochemical composition. Obtaining accurate estimates depends on an ability to quantitatively detect all carbon present in a sample. Often little attention has been paid to defining the proportion of organic carbon present in a soil that is observable in solid-state 13C NMR analyses of soil samples. However, if such data is to be used to inform carbon cycling studies, it is critical that quantitative assessments of SOC observability be undertaken. For example, it is now well established that a significant discrimination exists against the detection of the low proton content polyaromatic structures typical of charcoal using cross polarisation 13C NMR analyses. Such discrimination does not exist where direct polarisation analyses are completed. In this study, the chemical composition of SOC as defined by cross polarisation and direct polarisation13C NMR analyses will be compared for Australian soils collected from under a diverse range of agricultural managements and climatic conditions. Results indicate that where significant charcoal C contents exist, it is highly under-represented in the acquired CP spectra. For some soils, a discrimination against alkyl carbon was also evident. The ability to derive correction factors to compensate for such discriminations will be assessed and presented.

  8. DFT study of zigzag (n, 0) single-walled carbon nanotubes: (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Teobald; Stachów, Michal; Stobiński, Leszek; Kaminský, Jakub

    2016-06-01

    (13)C NMR chemical shifts of selected finite-size models of pristine zigzag single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a diameter of ∼0.4-0.8nm and length up to 2.2nm were studied theoretically. Results for finite SWCNTs models containing 1, 4 and 10 adjacent bamboo-type units were compared with data obtained for infinite tubes in order to estimate the reliability of small finite models in predicting magnetic properties of real-size nanotubes and to assess their tube-length dependence. SWCNTs were fully optimized using unrestricted density functional theory (DFT-UB3LYP/6-31G*). Cyclacenes, as the shortest models of open-ended zigzag SWCNTs, with systematically varying diameter were calculated as well. GIAO NMR calculations on the SWCNT and cyclacene models were performed using the BHandH density functional combined with relatively small STO-3Gmag basis set, developed by Leszczyński and coworkers for accurate description of magnetic properties. Regular changes of carbon (13)C chemical shifts along the tube axis of real size (6, 0) and (9, 0) zigzag carbon nanotubes were shown. The (13)C NMR shifts according to increasing diameter calculated for zigzag (n, 0, n=5-10) cyclacenes followed the trends observed for zigzag (n, 0) SWCNTs. The results for 4-units long SWCNTs match reasonably well with the data obtained for infinite zigzag (n, 0) SWCNTs, especially to those with bigger diameter (n=8-15). The presence of rim hydrogens obviously affects theoretical (13)C chemical shieldings and shifts in cyclacenes and thus cyclacenes can provide only approximate estimation of (13)C NMR parameters of real-size SWCNTs. The NMR properties predicted for the longest 10-units long models of SWCNTs reliably correspond to results obtained for infinite nanotubes. They were thus able to accurately predict also recently reported experimental chemical shift of chiral (6, 5) SWCNT. PMID:27155813

  9. Characteristics of 14C and 13C of carbonate aerosols in dust storm events in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Jie, Dongmei; Shi, Meinan; Gao, Pan; Shen, Zhenxing; Uchida, Masao; Zhou, Liping; Liu, Kexin; Hu, Ke; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    In contrast with its decrease in western China deserts, the dust storm event in eastern China, Korea, and Japan shows an increase in frequency. Although the drylands in northeastern China have been recognized as an important dust source, the relative contributions of dust transport from the drylands and deserts are inconclusive, thus the quantification of dust storm sources in downwind area remains a challenge. We measured the 14C and 13C contents in carbonates of dust samples from six sites in China, which were collected for the duration of dust storm events in drylands, deserts, and urban areas. The δ13C of the dryland dust samples considerably varied in a range of - 9.7 to - 5.0‰, which partly overlapped the desert dust carbonate δ13C ranges. The 14C content of the dryland dust carbonates showed a narrow range of 60.9 ± 4.0 (as an average and 1 SD of five samples) percent modern carbon (pMC), indicating the enrichment of modern carbonate. Dust samples in desert regions contained relatively aged carbonates with the depleting 14C showing of 28.8 ± 3.3 pMC. After the long-range transport of the western China desert dust plume, the carbonates collected at the southern China remained the depletion of 14C (33.5 ± 5.3 pMC) as in the desert regions. On the other hand, the samples of dust storm events at the urban areas of eastern China showed an enrichment of 14C contents (46.2 ± 5.0 pMC, n = 7), which might be explained by the stronger contribution of modern-carbonate-rich dryland dust.

  10. Neoproterozoic diamictite-cap carbonate succession and δ13C chemostratigraphy from eastern Sonora, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsetti, Frank A.; Stewart, John H.; Hagadorn, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the occurrence of Neoproterozoic strata throughout the southwestern U.S. and Sonora, Mexico, glacial units overlain by enigmatic cap carbonates have not been well-documented south of Death Valley, California. Here, we describe in detail the first glaciogenic diamictite and cap carbonate succession from Mexico, found in the Cerro Las Bolas Group. The diamictite is exposed near Sahuaripa, Sonora, and is overlain by a 5 m thick very finely-laminated dolostone with soft sediment folds. Carbon isotopic chemostratigraphy of the finely-laminated dolostone reveals a negative δ13C anomaly (down to − 3.2‰ PDB) characteristic of cap carbonates worldwide. Carbon isotopic values rise to + 10‰ across ∼ 400 m of section in overlying carbonates of the Mina el Mezquite and Monteso Formations. The pattern recorded here is mostly characteristic of post-Sturtian (ca. ≤ 700 Ma), but pre-Marinoan (ca. ≥ 635 Ma) time. However, the Cerro Las Bolas Group shares ambiguity common to most Neoproterozoic successions: it lacks useful radiometric age constraints and biostratigraphically useful fossils, and its δ13C signature is oscillatory and therefore somewhat equivocal.

  11. Temperature-mediated changes in microbial carbon use efficiency and 13C discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Ballantyne, Ford, IV; Min, Kyungjin; Billings, Sharon A.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding how carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from ecosystems feeds back to climate warming depends in part on our ability to quantify the efficiency with which microorganisms convert organic carbon (C) into either biomass or CO2. Quantifying ecosystem-level respiratory CO2 losses often also requires assumptions about stable C isotope fractionations associated with the microbial transformation of organic substrates. However, the diversity of organic substrates' δ13C and the challenges of measuring microbial C use efficiency (CUE) in their natural environment fundamentally limit our ability to project ecosystem C budgets in a warming climate. Here, we quantify the effect of temperature on C fluxes during metabolic transformations of cellobiose, a common microbial substrate, by a cosmopolitan microorganism growing at a constant rate. Biomass C specific respiration rate increased by 250 % between 13 and 26.5 °C, decreasing CUE from 77 to 56 %. Biomass C specific respiration rate was positively correlated with an increase in respiratory 13C discrimination from 4.4 to 6.7 ‰ across the same temperature range. This first demonstration of a direct link between temperature, microbial CUE, and associated isotope fluxes provides a critical step towards understanding δ13C of respired CO2 at multiple scales, and towards a framework for predicting future ecosystem C fluxes.

  12. Temperature-mediated changes in microbial carbon use efficiency and 13C discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmeier, C. A.; Ballantyne, F., IV; Min, K.; Billings, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding how carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from soils feeds back to climate warming depends in part on our ability to quantify the efficiency with which microorganisms convert soil organic carbon (C) into either biomass or CO2. Quantifying ecosystem-level respiratory CO2 losses often also requires assumptions about stable C isotope fractionations associated with the microbial transformation of soil organic substrates. However, the diversity of organic substrates' δ13C and the challenges of measuring microbial C use efficiency (CUE) in soils fundamentally limit our ability to project soil, and thus ecosystem, C budgets in a warming climate. Here, we quantify the effect of temperature on C fluxes during metabolic transformations of cellobiose, a common microbial substrate, by a cosmopolitan soil microorganism growing at a constant rate. Specific respiration rate increased by 250 % between 13 and 26.5 °C, decreasing CUE from 77 to 56 %. Specific respiration rate was positively correlated with an increase in respiratory 13C discrimination from 4.4 to 6.7 ‰ across the same temperature range. This first demonstration of a direct link between temperature, microbial CUE and associated isotope fluxes provides a critical step towards understanding δ13C of respired CO2 at multiple scales, and towards a framework for predicting future soil C fluxes.

  13. Spectrally edited 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR spectra without diagonal ridge for characterizing 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Anderson, Jason M.; Shanks, Brent H.; Fang, Xiaowen; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Two robust combinations of spectral editing techniques with 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR have been developed for characterizing the aromatic components of 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials. One method (exchange with protonated and nonprotonated spectral editing, EXPANSE) selects cross peaks of protonated and nearby nonprotonated carbons, while the other technique, dipolar-dephased double-quantum/single-quantum (DQ/SQ) NMR, selects signals of bonded nonprotonated carbons. Both spectra are free of a diagonal ridge, which has many advantages: Cross peaks on the diagonal or of small intensity can be detected, and residual spinning sidebands or truncation artifacts associated with the diagonal ridge are avoided. In the DQ/SQ experiment, dipolar dephasing of the double-quantum coherence removes protonated-carbon signals; this approach also eliminates the need for high-power proton decoupling. The initial magnetization is generated with minimal fluctuation by combining direct polarization, cross polarization, and equilibration by 13C spin diffusion. The dipolar dephased DQ/SQ spectrum shows signals from all linkages between aromatic rings, including a distinctive peak from polycondensed aromatics. In EXPANSE NMR, signals of protonated carbons are selected in the first spectral dimension by short cross polarization combined with dipolar dephasing difference. This removes ambiguities of peak assignment to overlapping signals of nonprotonated and protonated aromatic carbons, e.g. near 125 ppm. Spin diffusion is enhanced by dipolar-assisted rotational resonance. Before detection, Csbnd H dipolar dephasing by gated decoupling is applied, which selects signals of nonprotonated carbons. Thus, only cross peaks due to magnetization originating from protonated C and ending on nearby nonprotonated C are retained. Combined with the chemical shifts deduced from the cross-peak position, this double spectral editing defines the bonding environment of aromatic, COO, and Cdbnd O carbons

  14. Large 13C enrichment in primary carbonates from Andean Altiplano lakes, northwest Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero-Garcés, Blas L.; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Ratto, Norma; Navas, Ana

    1999-08-01

    We report here extreme 13C enrichments up to +13‰ PDB in primary calcite and aragonite precipitates in saline, well oxygenated waters from high-altitude lakes in the southern Andean Altiplano, northwestern Argentina. Biological effects, as well as variations in carbon source inputs, and in the exchange rate with atmospheric CO 2, are commonly considered the main controls on the carbon isotope values of authigenic lacustrine carbonate. We present sedimentological and geochemical evidence that favors physical processes — evaporation effects and CO 2-degassing — as major controls on 13C enrichment. We propose that large enrichments may result from the non-equilibrium gas-transfer isotope fractionation during CO 2-degassing from thermal springs and evaporation effects in arid environments. The dilution effect by large quantities of 14C-free CO 2 hinders accurate 14C chronology of these lake records based on lacustrine organic matter and aquatic plants. Our results indicate that geothermal and volcanic CO 2 sources in lake basins located in volcanic settings, and physical fractionation may have a greater significance than commonly accepted to explain lacustrine carbon isotope records.

  15. Dynamic nuclear polarization of biocompatible (13)C-enriched carbonates for in vivo pH imaging.

    PubMed

    Korenchan, D E; Flavell, R R; Baligand, C; Sriram, R; Neumann, K; Sukumar, S; VanBrocklin, H; Vigneron, D B; Wilson, D M; Kurhanewicz, J

    2016-02-18

    A hyperpolarization technique using carbonate precursors of biocompatible molecules was found to yield high concentrations of hyperpolarized (13)C bicarbonate in solution. This approach enabled large signal gains for low-toxicity hyperpolarized (13)C pH imaging in a phantom and in vivo in a murine model of prostate cancer. PMID:26792559

  16. Silicate or Carbonate Weathering: Fingerprinting Sources of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Using δ13C in a Tropical River, Southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagat, H.; Ghosh, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rivers are an inherently vital resource for the development of any region and their importance is highlighted by the presence of many ancient human civilizations adjacent to river systems. δ13C - Si/HCO3 systematics has been applied to large south Indian rivers which drain the Deccan basaltic traps in order to quantify their relative contributions from silicate and carbonate weathering. This study investigates δ13C - Si/HCO3 systematics of the Cauvery River basin which flows through silicate lithology in the higher reaches and carbonate lithology with pedogenic and marine carbonates dominating the terrain in the lower reaches of the basin. The samples for the present study were collected at locations within the watershed during Pre-Monsoon and Monsoon Season 2014. The measurements of stable isotope ratios of δ13CDIC and were accomplished through a Thermo Scientific GasBench II interface connected to a MAT 253 IRMS. We captured a large spatial variation in δ13C and Si/HCO3 values during both seasons; Pre-Monsoon δ13C values ranges between -17.57‰ to -4.02‰ and during Monsoon it varies between -9.19‰ to +0.61‰. These results indicate a two end-member mixing component i.e. a silicate and a carbonate end member; governing the weathering interactions of the Cauvery River. Within the drainage basin, we identified silicate and carbonate dominating sources by using contributions of DIC and δ13C. Si/HCO3 values for Pre-Monsoon ranges between 0.028 - 0.67 and for Monsoon it varies between 0.073 - 0.80. Lighter δ13C composition was observed at sampling sites at higher altitude in contrast to sampling sites at flood plain which show relatively enriched δ13C which indicate mixing of soil derived CO2 with C4 plants. Result suggests dominance of carbonate weathering during the Monsoon Period, while silicate weathering is pronounced during Pre- Monsoon period.

  17. {sup 13}C-enrichment at carbons 8 and 2 of uric acid after {sup 13}C-labeled folate dose in man

    SciTech Connect

    Baggott, Joseph E.; Gorman, Gregory S.; Morgan, Sarah L.; Tamura, Tsunenobu . E-mail: tamurat@uab.edu

    2007-09-21

    To evaluate folate-dependent carbon incorporation into the purine ring, we measured {sup 13}C-enrichment independently at C{sub 2} and C{sub 8} of urinary uric acid (the final catabolite of purines) in a healthy male after an independent oral dose of [6RS]-5-[{sup 13}C]-formyltetrahydrofolate ([6RS]-5-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate) or 10-H{sup 13}CO-7,8-dihydrofolate (10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate). The C{sub 2} position was {sup 13}C-enriched more than C{sub 8} after [6RS]-5-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate, and C{sub 2} was exclusively enriched after 10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate. The enrichment of C{sub 2} was greater from [6RS]-5-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate than 10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate using equimolar bioactive doses. Our data suggest that formyl C of [6RS]-10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 4}folate was not equally utilized by glycinamide ribotide transformylase (enriches C{sub 8}) and aminoimidazolecarboxamide ribotide (AICAR) transformylase (enriches C{sub 2}), and the formyl C of 10-H{sup 13}CO-H{sub 2}folate was exclusively used by AICAR transformylase. 10-HCO-H{sub 2}folate may function in vivo as the predominant substrate for AICAR transformylase in humans.

  18. Follow the Carbon: Laboratory Studies of 13C-Labeled Early Earth Haze Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. K.; Day, D. A.; Mojzsis, S. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    While the Sun was still young and faint before the rise of molecular oxygen 2.4 Ga, early Earth might have been kept warm by an atmosphere containing the greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide in abundances greater than what is found on Earth today. It has been suggested that an atmosphere containing approximately 1000 ppmv methane and carbon dioxide could provided the needed greenhouse warming for liquid water to exist at the surface. Laboratory and modeling studies suggest that an atmosphere containing methane and carbon dioxide could lead to the formation of significant amounts of organic haze due to photochemical reactions initiated by Lyman-α (121.6 nm) excitation. Chemical mechanisms proposed to explain the chemistry rely on methane as the source of carbon in these hazes and treat carbon dioxide as a source of oxygen only. In the present work, we use isotopically labelled precursor gases to examine the source of carbon in photochemical haze formed in a CH4/CO2/N2 atmosphere. We generate haze analogs in the laboratory by far-UV irradiation of analog atmospheres containing permutations of 1,000 ppmv unlabeled and 13C-labeled methane and carbon. Products in the particle phase were analyzed by both unit mass resolution and high-resolution (m/Δm=5,000) aerosol mass spectrometry. Results indicate that carbon from carbon dioxide accounts for 20% (×5%) of the total carbon contained in the hazes. These results have implications for the geochemical interpretations of inclusions found in Archaean rocks on Earth, and for the astrobiological potential of other planetary atmospheres.

  19. Characterisation of black carbon-rich samples by (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Etelvino H; Hayes, Michael H B; Deazevedo, Eduardo R; Bonagamba, Tito J

    2006-09-01

    There are difficulties in quantifying and characterising the organic matter (OM) in soils that contain significant amounts of partially oxidised char or charcoal materials. The anthropogenic black carbon (BC), such as that found in the Terra Preta de Indio soils of the Amazon region, is a good example of the OM that is difficult to analyse in such soils. (13)C direct polarisation/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at high MAS frequency, (1)H-(13)C cross polarisation (CP)/MAS with total suppression of spinning sidebands (TOSS), and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filter nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been applied successfully for quantifying the different components of OM. However, because pyrogenic materials present strong local magnetic susceptibility heterogeneities, the use of CSA-filter and TOSS make the pulse sequences very sensitive to imperfections in the pi pulses. In this study, the DP/MAS pulse sequence was replaced by a CP with a radio frequency ramp--variable amplitude CP (VACP)--VACP/MAS pulse sequence, and composite pi pulses were used in the CSA-filter and TOSS pulse sequences. In that way, the component functionalities in a humic acid from a BC soil were successfully determined. The spectrometer time needed was greatly decreased by employing this VACP/MAS technique. This development provides an accurate method for characterising BC-rich samples from different origins. PMID:16688435

  20. Carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C) of pine honey and detection of HFCS adulteration.

    PubMed

    Çinar, Serap B; Ekşi, Aziz; Coşkun, İlknur

    2014-08-15

    Carbon isotope ratio ((13)C/(12)C=δ(13)C) of 100 pine honey samples collected from 9 different localities by Mugla region (Turkey) in years 2006, 2007 and 2008 were investigated. The δ(13)Cprotein value of honey samples ranged between -23.7 and -26.6‰, while the δ(13)Choney value varied between -22.7 and -27‰. For 90% of the samples, the difference in the C isotope ratio of protein and honey fraction (δ(13)Cpro-δ(13)Chon) was -1.0‰ and/or higher. Therefore, it can be said that the generally anticipated minimum value of C isotope difference (-1.0‰) for honey is also valid for pine honey. On the other hand, C4 sugar value (%), which was calculated from the δ(13)Cpro-δ(13)Chon difference, was found to be linearly correlated with the amount of adulterant (HFCS) in pine honey. These results indicate that C4 sugar value is a powerful criteria for detecting HFCS adulteration in pine honey. The δ(13)Choney and δ(13)Cprotein-δ(13)Choney values of the samples did not show any significant differences in terms of both year and locality (P>0.05), while the δ(13)Cprotein values showed significant differences due to year (P<0.05) but not due to locality (P>0.05). PMID:24679745

  1. Characterisation of black carbon-rich samples by 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Etelvino H.; Hayes, Michael H. B.; Deazevedo, Eduardo R.; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2006-09-01

    There are difficulties in quantifying and characterising the organic matter (OM) in soils that contain significant amounts of partially oxidised char or charcoal materials. The anthropogenic black carbon (BC), such as that found in the Terra Preta de Índio soils of the Amazon region, is a good example of the OM that is difficult to analyse in such soils. 13C direct polarisation/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at high MAS frequency, 1H-13C cross polarisation (CP)/MAS with total suppression of spinning sidebands (TOSS), and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filter nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been applied successfully for quantifying the different components of OM. However, because pyrogenic materials present strong local magnetic susceptibility heterogeneities, the use of CSA-filter and TOSS make the pulse sequences very sensitive to imperfections in the π pulses. In this study, the DP/MAS pulse sequence was replaced by a CP with a radio frequency ramp—variable amplitude CP (VACP)—VACP/MAS pulse sequence, and composite π pulses were used in the CSA-filter and TOSS pulse sequences. In that way, the component functionalities in a humic acid from a BC soil were successfully determined. The spectrometer time needed was greatly decreased by employing this VACP/MAS technique. This development provides an accurate method for characterising BC-rich samples from different origins.

  2. Belowground carbon allocation in a temperate beech forest: new insight into carbon residence time using whole tree 13C labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Ngao, J.; Plain, C.; Longdoz, B.; Granier, A.

    2011-12-01

    Belowground carbon allocation is an important component of forest carbon budget, affecting tree growth (competition between aboveground and belowground carbon sinks), acquisition of belowground resources (nutrients and water) that are often limiting forest ecosystems and soil carbon sequestration. Total belowground carbon flow can be estimated using a mass-balance approach as cumulative soil CO2 efflux minus the carbon input from aboveground litter plus the changes in the C stored in roots, in the forest floor, and in the soil, and further compared to gross annual production. While this approach is useful for understanding the whole ecosystem carbon budget, uncertainties remain about the contribution of the different belowground pools of carbon to ecosystem respiration and carbon sequestration. New insights into transfer rate and residence time of carbon in belowground compartments can be gained from in situ whole-crown 13C labelling experiments. We combined both approaches in a young temperate beech forest in north-eastern France where ecosystem carbon fluxes are recorded since a decade. Carbon allocated belowground represented less than 40% of gross primary production in this young beech forest. Autotrophic respiration assessed by comparing soil CO2 efflux measured on normal and on root exclusion plots, accounted for 60% of the total belowground carbon flow. This indicated a rather short mean residence time of carbon allocated belowground in the soil compartments. The recovery of 13C in soil CO2 efflux after pulse-labelling entire crowns of tree with 13CO2 at several occasions during the growing season was observed a few couple of hours after the labelling. That indicates a rapid transfer of 13C belowground with a maximum occurring within 2 to 4 days after labelling. Label was recovered at the same time in the respiration and in the biomass of both fine roots and soil microbes. Allocation of recently assimilated carbon to soil microbial respiration was greater in

  3. Direct uptake of organic carbon by grass roots and allocation in leaves and phytoliths: 13C labeling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, A.; Balesdent, J.; Cazevieille, P.; Chevassus-Rosset, C.; Signoret, P.; Mazur, J.-C.; Harutyunyan, A.; Doelsch, E.; Basile-Doelsch, I.; Miche, H.; Santos, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the rhizosphere, the uptake of low molecular weight carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) by plant roots has been well documented. While organic N uptake relatively to total uptake is important, organic C uptake is supposed to be low relatively to the plant's C budget. Recently, radiocarbon analyses demonstrated that a fraction of C from the soil was occluded in amorphous silica micrometric particles that precipitate in plant cells (phytoliths). Here, we investigated whether and in which extent organic C absorbed by grass roots, under the form of either intact amino acids (AAs) or microbial metabolites, can feed the organic C occluded in phytoliths. For this purpose we added 13C- and 15N-labeled AAs to the silicon-rich hydroponic solution of the grass Festuca arundinacea. The experiment was designed to prevent C leakage from the labeled nutritive solution to the chamber atmosphere. After 14 days of growth, the 13C and 15N enrichments (13C-excess and 15N-excess) in the roots, stems and leaves, and phytoliths, as well as the 13C-excess in AAs extracted from roots and stems and leaves, were quantified relatively to a control experiment in which no labelled AAs were added. The net uptake of 13C derived from the labeled AAs supplied to the nutritive solution (AA-13C) by Festuca arundinacea represented 4.5 % of the total AA-13C supply. AA-13C fixed in the plant represented only 0.13 % of total C. However, the experimental conditions may have underestimated the extent of the process under natural and field conditions. Previous studies showed that 15N and 13C can be absorbed by the roots in several organic and inorganic forms. In the present experiment, the fact that phenylalanine and methionine, that were supplied in high amount to the nutritive solution, were more 13C-enriched than other AAs in the roots and stems and leaves strongly suggested that part of AA-13C was absorbed and translocated in its original AA form. The concentration of AA-13C represented only 0.15 % of the

  4. Enhancing the Accuracy of Carbonate δ18O and δ13C Measurements by SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orland, I. J.; Kozdon, R.; Linzmeier, B.; Wycech, J.; Sliwinski, M.; Kitajima, K.; Kita, N.; Valley, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The precision and accuracy of carbonate δ18O & δ13C analysis by multicollector SIMS is well established if standards match samples in structure and major/minor element chemistry. However, low-T- and bio-carbonates used to construct paleoclimate archives can include complex internal structures and some samples analyzed at WiscSIMS (and other SIMS labs) have a consistent, sample-dependent offset between average SIMS δ18O measurements and bulk δ18O analyses by phosphoric-acid digestion. The offset is typically <1‰, but recent work has discovered samples where the offset is greater — up to 1.8‰ (average SIMS δ18O values < corresponding conventional measurements). Notably, δ13C offsets have not been observed even in samples with a δ18O offset. We conducted tests to characterize the δ18O offset in different low-T carbonate materials. Multiple potential causes were examined: perhaps the measured offset is real and conventional analyses include material that SIMS excludes (and vice versa); analytical errors and inter-lab (mis)calibration; depth-profiling effects; porosity; and the effects of variable minor element composition. One explanation implicates water and/or organic matter within carbonate that is ionized during SIMS analysis, but sometimes removed for bulk analysis. Two diagnostic tools help monitor such contaminants during SIMS analysis: 1) simultaneous measurement of [16O1H], and 2) secondary ion yield. Offsets of 0.3 to 1.8‰ in δ18O correlate to [16O1H] for 7 studies of Nautilus, foraminifera, pteropods and speleothems. Offsets were not observed in all foraminifera. For Nautilus, foraminifera, otoliths, and speleothems we also tested pre-treatment techniques (e.g. vacuum roasting, hydrogen peroxide), for which there is no agreed procedure in conventional bulk analyses. For SIMS analyses, pre-treatments had varied influence on the δ18O value, [16O1H], the concentration of "organic markers" like 12C14N and 31P, and mineralogy (of aragonite

  5. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs. PMID:27302905

  6. Carbon transfer from the host to Tuber melanosporum mycorrhizas and ascocarps followed using a 13C pulse-labeling technique.

    PubMed

    Le Tacon, François; Zeller, Bernd; Plain, Caroline; Hossann, Christian; Bréchet, Claude; Robin, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Truffles ascocarps need carbon to grow, but it is not known whether this carbon comes directly from the tree (heterotrophy) or from soil organic matter (saprotrophy). The objective of this work was to investigate the heterotrophic side of the ascocarp nutrition by assessing the allocation of carbon by the host to Tuber melanosporum mycorrhizas and ascocarps. In 2010, a single hazel tree selected for its high truffle (Tuber melanosporum) production and situated in the west part of the Vosges, France, was labeled with (13)CO2. The transfer of (13)C from the leaves to the fine roots and T. melanosporum mycorrhizas was very slow compared with the results found in the literature for herbaceous plants or other tree species. The fine roots primarily acted as a carbon conduit; they accumulated little (13)C and transferred it slowly to the mycorrhizas. The mycorrhizas first formed a carbon sink and accumulated (13)C prior to ascocarp development. Then, the mycorrhizas transferred (13)C to the ascocarps to provide constitutive carbon (1.7 mg of (13)C per day). The ascocarps accumulated host carbon until reaching complete maturity, 200 days after the first labeling and 150 days after the second labeling event. This role of the Tuber ascocarps as a carbon sink occurred several months after the end of carbon assimilation by the host and at low temperature. This finding suggests that carbon allocated to the ascocarps during winter was provided by reserve compounds stored in the wood and hydrolyzed during a period of frost. Almost all of the constitutive carbon allocated to the truffles (1% of the total carbon assimilated by the tree during the growing season) came from the host. PMID:23741356

  7. Carbon Transfer from the Host to Tuber melanosporum Mycorrhizas and Ascocarps Followed Using a 13C Pulse-Labeling Technique

    PubMed Central

    Le Tacon, François; Zeller, Bernd; Plain, Caroline; Hossann, Christian; Bréchet, Claude; Robin, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Truffles ascocarps need carbon to grow, but it is not known whether this carbon comes directly from the tree (heterotrophy) or from soil organic matter (saprotrophy). The objective of this work was to investigate the heterotrophic side of the ascocarp nutrition by assessing the allocation of carbon by the host to Tuber melanosporum mycorrhizas and ascocarps. In 2010, a single hazel tree selected for its high truffle (Tuber melanosporum) production and situated in the west part of the Vosges, France, was labeled with 13CO2. The transfer of 13C from the leaves to the fine roots and T. melanosporum mycorrhizas was very slow compared with the results found in the literature for herbaceous plants or other tree species. The fine roots primarily acted as a carbon conduit; they accumulated little 13C and transferred it slowly to the mycorrhizas. The mycorrhizas first formed a carbon sink and accumulated 13C prior to ascocarp development. Then, the mycorrhizas transferred 13C to the ascocarps to provide constitutive carbon (1.7 mg of 13C per day). The ascocarps accumulated host carbon until reaching complete maturity, 200 days after the first labeling and 150 days after the second labeling event. This role of the Tuber ascocarps as a carbon sink occurred several months after the end of carbon assimilation by the host and at low temperature. This finding suggests that carbon allocated to the ascocarps during winter was provided by reserve compounds stored in the wood and hydrolyzed during a period of frost. Almost all of the constitutive carbon allocated to the truffles (1% of the total carbon assimilated by the tree during the growing season) came from the host. PMID:23741356

  8. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockaday, W. C.; Masiello, C. A.; Randerson, J. T.; Smernik, R. J.; Baldock, J. A.; Chadwick, O. A.; Harden, J. W.

    2009-06-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known Cox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ±0.036 Cox units (±0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ± 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  9. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known C ox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ??0.036 Cox units (??0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ?? 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  10. {sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for carbonate ions in cement minerals and the use of {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR in studies of Portland cement including limestone additions

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Herfort, Duncan

    2013-10-15

    {sup 13}C isotropic chemical shifts and chemical shift anisotropy parameters have been determined for a number of inorganic carbonates relevant in cement chemistry from slow-speed {sup 13}C MAS or {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR spectra (9.4 T or 14.1 T) for {sup 13}C in natural abundance. The variation in the {sup 13}C chemical shift parameters is relatively small, raising some doubts that different carbonate species in Portland cement-based materials may not be sufficiently resolved in {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectra. However, it is shown that by combining {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR carbonate anions in anhydrous and hydrated phases can be distinguished, thereby providing valuable information about the reactivity of limestone in cement blends. This is illustrated for three cement pastes prepared from an ordinary Portland cement, including 0, 16, and 25 wt.% limestone, and following the hydration for up to one year. For these blends {sup 29}Si MAS NMR reveals that the limestone filler accelerates the hydration for alite and also results in a smaller fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated Al incorporated in the C-S-H phase. The latter result is more clearly observed in {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra of the cement–limestone blends and suggests that dissolved aluminate species in the cement–limestone blends readily react with carbonate ions from the limestone filler, forming calcium monocarboaluminate hydrate. -- Highlights: •{sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for inorganic carbonates from {sup 13}C MAS NMR. •Narrow {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift range (163–171 ppm) for inorganic carbonates. •Anhydrous and hydrated carbonate species by {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR. •Limestone accelerates the hydration for alite in Portland – limestone cements. •Limestone reduces the amount of aluminium incorporated in the C-S-H phase.

  11. Hydrogen bonding induced distortion of CO3 units and kinetic stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate: results from 2D (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Kaseman, Derrick C; Colas, Bruno; Jacob, Dorrit E; Clark, Simon M

    2016-07-27

    Systematic correlation in alkaline-earth carbonate compounds between the deviation of the CO3 units from the perfect D3h symmetry and their (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters is established. The (13)C NMR CSA parameters of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) are measured using two-dimensional (13)C phase adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) NMR spectroscopy and are analyzed on the basis of this correlation. The results indicate a distortion of the CO3 units in ACC in the form of an in-plane displacement of the C atom away from the centroid of the O3 triangle, resulting from hydrogen bonding with the surrounding H2O molecules, without significant out-of-plane displacement. Similar distortion for all C atoms in the structure of ACC suggests a uniform spatial disposition of H2O molecules around the CO3 units forming a hydrogen-bonded amorphous network. This amorphous network is stabilized against crystallization by steric frustration, while additives such as Mg presumably provide further stabilization by increasing the energy of dehydration. PMID:27276013

  12. Use of laser spectroscopy to measure the 13C/12C and 18O/16O compositions of carbonate minerals.

    PubMed

    Barker, Shaun L L; Dipple, Gregory M; Dong, Feng; Baer, Douglas S

    2011-03-15

    The stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of carbonate minerals are utilized throughout the earth and environmental sciences for various purposes. Here, we demonstrate the first application of a prototype instrument, based on off-axis integrated cavity output laser spectroscopy, to measure the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of CO(2) gas evolved from the acidification of carbonate minerals. The carbon and oxygen isotope ratios were recorded from absorption spectra of (12)C(16)O(16)O, (13)C(16)O(16)O, and (12)C(16)O(18)O in the near-infrared wavelength region. The instrument was calibrated using CaCO(3) minerals with known δ(13)C(VPDB) and δ(18)O(VSMOW) values, which had been previously calibrated by isotope ratio mass spectrometry relative to the international isotopic standards NBS 18 and NBS 19. Individual analyses are demonstrated to have internal precision (1 SE) of better than 0.15‰ for δ(13)C and 0.6‰ for δ(18)O. Analysis of four carbonate standards of known isotopic composition over 2 months, determined using the original instrumental calibration, indicates that analyses are accurate to better than 0.5‰ for both δ(13)C and δ(18)O without application of standard-sample-standard corrections. PMID:21341717

  13. Hydrothermal carbon from biomass: structural differences between hydrothermal and pyrolyzed carbons via 13C solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Falco, Camillo; Perez Caballero, Fernando; Babonneau, Florence; Gervais, Christel; Laurent, Guillaume; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; Baccile, Niki

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to better describe the structure of the hydrothermal carbon (HTC) process and put it in relationship with the more classical pyrolytic carbons. Indeed, despite the low energetic impact and the number of applications described so far for HTC, very little is known about the structure, reaction mechanism, and the way these materials relate to coals. Are HTC and calcination processes equivalent? Are the structures of the processed materials related to each other in any way? Which is the extent of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) inside HTC? In this work, the effect of hydrothermal treatment and pyrolysis are compared on glucose, a good model carbohydrate; a detailed single-quantum double-quantum (SQ-DQ) solid state (13)C NMR study of the HTC and calcined HTC is used to interpret the spectral region corresponding to the signal of furanic and arene groups. These data are compared to the spectroscopic signatures of calcined glucose, starch, and xylose. A semiquantitative analysis of the (13)C NMR spectra provides an estimation of the furanic-to-arene ratio which varies from 1:1 to 4:1 according to the processing conditions and carbohydrate employed. In addition, we formulate some hypothesis, validated by DFT (density functional theory) modeling associated with (13)C NMR chemical shifts calculations, about the possible furan-rich structural intermediates that occur in the coalification process leading to condensed polyaromatic structures. In combination with a broad parallel study on the HTC processing conditions effect on glucose, cellulose, and raw biomass (Falco, C.; Baccile, N.; Titirici, M.-M. Green Chem., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1GC15742F), we propose a broad reaction scheme and in which we show that, through HTC, it is possible to tune the furan-to-arene ratio composing the aromatic core of the produced HTC carbons, which is not possible if calcination is used alone, in the temperature range below 350 °C. PMID:22050004

  14. Contribution of rice straw carbon to CH4 emission from rice paddies using 13C-enriched rice straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Akira; Yoshida, Mariko; Kimura, Makoto

    1998-04-01

    It is generally recognized that the application of rice straw (RS) increases CH4 emission from rice paddies. To estimate the contribution of RS carbon to CH4 emission, a pot experiment was conducted using 13C-enriched RS. The percentage contributions of RS carbon to CH4 emission throughout the rice growth period were 10±1, 32±3, and 43±3% for the treatments with RS applied at the rates of 2, 4, and 6 g kg-1 soil, respectively. The increase in the rate of application of RS increased CH4 emission derived from both RS carbon and other carbon sources. The percentage contribution of RS carbon to CH4 emission was larger in the earlier period (maximum 96%) when the decomposition rate of RS was larger. After RS decomposition had slowed, CH4 emission derived from RS carbon decreased. However, the δ13C values of CH4 emitted from the pots with 13C-enriched RS applied at rates of 4 and 6 g kg-1 soil were significantly higher than those from the pots with natural RS until the harvesting stage. An increased atom-13C% of roots of rice plants growing in the pots with 6 g kg-1 of 13C-enriched RS at around the maximum tiller number stage and a decrease during the following 2 months suggested that rice plants assimilated RS carbon once and then released a portion of it. This supply of RS carbon from roots may be one of the sources of CH4 in the late period of rice growth.

  15. Biosynthesis of the antibiotic maduramicin. Origin of the carbon and oxygen atoms as well as the 13C NMR assignments.

    PubMed

    Tsou, H; Rajan, S; Fiala, R; Mowery, P C; Bullock, M W; Borders, D B; James, J C; Martin, J H; Morton, G O

    1984-12-01

    The biosynthesis of maduramicin alpha and beta in a culture of Actinomadura yumaensis has been studied using 13C, 14C and 18O labeled precursors. The alpha component of this recently discovered polyether antibiotic, containing forty-seven carbon atoms in a seven-ring system, is derived from eight acetate, seven propionate and four methionine molecules. The beta component which is missing one methoxy group incorporates three methionine methyl groups. The carbohydrate moiety was enriched by methionine, but not significantly by acetate or propionate. Studies of the incorporation of 13C labeled precursors permit the 13C NMR assignment of maduramicin. The origin of oxygen atoms of maduramicin has been examined by feeding [1-13C, 18O2]acetate and [1-13C, 18O2]propionate separately in the fermentation culture and the resulting doubly labeled maduramicin samples were analyzed by the isotopic shifts in the 13C NMR spectra. These results are consistent with the initial formation of a triene, which is converted to maduramicin by cyclization of the triepoxide. PMID:6526733

  16. Historical oceanographic events reflected in13C/12C ratio of total organic carbon in laminated Santa Barbara Basin Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Tegner, Mia J.

    1991-06-01

    An 1844-1987 time series of carbon stable isotope ratios from dated sedimentary total organic carbon (TOC) from the center of the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) is compared with historical climate and oceanographic records. Four isotopically distinct biogeochemical sources of TOC are important: phytoplankton-derived marine biomass, macroalgal biomass from kelp forests, terrigenous biomass (mainly flushed into the SBB via river discharge), and redeposited fossil organic carbon. The significance of the latter two sources is largely limited to a few unusual flood and oil spill events, whereas the combination of 13C-depleted phytoplankton and 13C-enriched macroalgal biomass appears to be responsible for most of the isotopic variance of the marine coastal biomass as recorded in sedimentary TOC. The isotopic response of marine organic carbon in sediments records strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the frequently associated severe storm and wave events in SBB varved sediments. The plausible major isotopic mechanisms are (1) increased physical liberation of 13C-enriched kelp carbon from locally abundant giant kelp (Macrocystis spp.) forests during times of physical and environmental stress, and (2) decreased productivity of 13C-depleted phytoplankton during ENSO events.

  17. Direct uptake of organically derived carbon by grass roots and allocation in leaves and phytoliths: 13C labeling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, Anne; Balesdent, Jérôme; Cazevieille, Patrick; Chevassus-Rosset, Claire; Signoret, Patrick; Mazur, Jean-Charles; Harutyunyan, Araks; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Miche, Hélène; Santos, Guaciara M.

    2016-03-01

    In the rhizosphere, the uptake of low-molecular-weight carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) by plant roots has been well documented. While organic N uptake relative to total uptake is important, organic C uptake is supposed to be low relative to the plant's C budget. Recently, radiocarbon analyses demonstrated that a fraction of C from the soil was occluded in amorphous silica micrometric particles that precipitate in plant cells (phytoliths). Here, we investigated whether and to what extent organically derived C absorbed by grass roots can feed the C occluded in phytoliths. For this purpose we added 13C- and 15N-labeled amino acids (AAs) to the silicon-rich hydroponic solution of the grass Festuca arundinacea. The experiment was designed to prevent C leakage from the labeled nutritive solution to the chamber atmosphere. After 14 days of growth, the 13C and 15N enrichments (13C excess and 15N excess) in the roots, stems and leaves as well as phytoliths were measured relative to a control experiment in which no labeled AAs were added. Additionally, the 13C excess was measured at the molecular level, in AAs extracted from roots and stems and leaves. The net uptake of labeled AA-derived 13C reached 4.5 % of the total AA 13C supply. The amount of AA-derived 13C fixed in the plant was minor but not nil (0.28 and 0.10 % of total C in roots and stems/leaves, respectively). Phenylalanine and methionine that were supplied in high amounts to the nutritive solution were more 13C-enriched than other AAs in the plant. This strongly suggested that part of AA-derived 13C was absorbed and translocated into the plant in its original AA form. In phytoliths, AA-derived 13C was detected. Its concentration was on the same order of magnitude as in bulk stems and leaves (0.15 % of the phytolith C). This finding strengthens the body of evidences showing that part of organic compounds occluded in phytoliths can be fed by C entering the plant through the roots. Although this experiment was done in

  18. In vivo 13 carbon metabolic imaging at 3T with hyperpolarized 13C-1-pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Kohler, S J; Yen, Y; Wolber, J; Chen, A P; Albers, M J; Bok, R; Zhang, V; Tropp, J; Nelson, S; Vigneron, D B; Kurhanewicz, J; Hurd, R E

    2007-07-01

    We present for the first time dynamic spectra and spectroscopic images acquired in normal rats at 3T following the injection of (13)C-1-pyruvate that was hyperpolarized by the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) method. Spectroscopic sampling was optimized for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and for spectral resolution of (13)C-1-pyruvate and its metabolic products (13)C-1-alanine, (13)C-1-lactate, and (13)C-bicarbonate. Dynamic spectra in rats were collected with a temporal resolution of 3 s from a 90-mm axial slab using a dual (1)H-(13)C quadrature birdcage coil to observe the combined effects of metabolism, flow, and T(1) relaxation. In separate experiments, spectroscopic imaging data were obtained during a 17-s acquisition of a 20-mm axial slice centered on the rat kidney region to provide information on the spatial distribution of the metabolites. Conversion of pyruvate to lactate, alanine, and bicarbonate occurred within a minute of injection. Alanine was observed primarily in skeletal muscle and liver, while pyruvate, lactate, and bicarbonate concentrations were relatively high in the vasculature and kidneys. In contrast to earlier work at 1.5 T, bicarbonate was routinely observed in skeletal muscle as well as the kidney and vasculature. PMID:17659629

  19. The influence of diet on the δ 13C of shell carbon in the pulmonate snail Helix aspersa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, Lowell D.

    2002-02-01

    The influence of diet and atmospheric CO 2 on the carbon isotope composition of shell aragonite and shell-bound organic carbon in the pulmonate snail Helix aspersa raised in the laboratory was investigated. Three separate groups of snails were raised on romaine lettuce (C3 plant, δ 13C=-25.8‰), corn (C4 plant, δ 13C=-10.5‰), and sour orange ( 12C-enriched C3 plant, δ 13C=-39.1‰). The isotopic composition of body tissues closely tracked the isotopic composition of the snail diet as demonstrated previously. However, the isotopic composition of the acid insoluble organic matrix extracted from the aragonite shells does not track diet in all groups. In snails that were fed corn the isotopic composition of the organic matrix was more negative than the body by as much as 5‰ whereas the matrix was approximately 1‰ heavier than the body tissues in snails fed a diet of C3 plant material. These results indicate that isotopic composition of the organic matrix carbon cannot be used as an isotopic substrate for paleodietary reconstructions without first determining the source of the carbon and any associated fractionations. The isotopic composition of the shell aragonite is offset from the body tissues by 12.3‰ in each of the culture groups. This offset was not influenced by the consumption of carbonate and is not attributable to the diffusion of atmospheric CO 2 into the hemolymph. The carbon isotopic composition of shell aragonite is best explained in terms of equilibrium fractionations associated with exchange between metabolic CO 2 and HCO 3 in the hemolymph and the fractionation associated with carbonate precipitation. These results differ from previous studies, based primarily on samples collected in the field, that have suggested atmospheric carbon dioxide contributes significantly to the shell δ 13C. The culture results indicate that the δ 13C of aragonite is a good recorder of the isotopic composition of the snail body tissue, and therefore a better

  20. Application of δ13c Values Recorded in Neoproterozoic Marine Dolomite As a Marker for Global Correlations: Significance of Major δ13c Variations for the Carbon Cycle Based on Studies of Modern Dolomite Precipitating Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, J. A.; Bontognali, T. R. R.; Bahniuk, A.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2014-12-01

    Since the early Paleozoic, the average bulk δ13C value of marine carbonates has remained relatively positive varying between 0 and +4‰ with distinctive positive excursions that are associated with global changes in the carbon cycle. Unlike the Phanerozoic δ13C data for marine limestones, a major δ13C excursion has been recorded in a globally deposited Neoproterozoic marine dolomite formation, known as the cap dolostone. This excursion with δ13C values ranging systematically between -3 and -5‰ represents a global chronstratigraphic marker used to correlate the end of the major Marinoan glaciation at 636 Ma1. Does this excursion signify a primary seawater value and how might it be interpreted as a primary carbon cycle signal, considering the widespread distribution of the cap dolostone? Studies of modern dolomite precipitating environments, such as supratidal sabkhas of Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. and Qatar and coastal hypersaline lagoons of Rio de Janiero State, Brazil, indicate that microbial activity or the biological products, thereof, influence or mediate mineral formation. The precipitating solutions are sourced from normal seawater, which has experienced variable stages of concentration through evaporative processes. Comparison of δ13C values of sabkha dolomite with that formed in the hypersaline lagoons reveals that the former are always rather positive (approx. +2 to +7 ‰), whereas the latter are always negative (approx. -5‰ to -11‰). During very early diagenesis, the original δ13C value of the initial precipitate is not necessarily retained, indicating that synsedimentary processes can alter the carbon signal prior to burial and later diagenesis. However, the potential for very early lithification of microbial dolomite promotes the preservation of original δ13C values, which, thus, can be useful for evaluation of the ancient carbon cycle. 1Halverson, G.P. et al., 2005. Toward a Neoproterozoic composite carbon-isotope record, GSA Bulletin, v. 117, p

  1. Preferential formation of 13C- 18O bonds in carbonate minerals, estimated using first-principles lattice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, Edwin A.; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Eiler, John M.

    2006-05-01

    Equilibrium constants for internal isotopic exchange reactions of the type: Ca12C18O16O2+Ca13C16O3↔Ca13C18O16O2+Ca12C16O3 for individual CO 32- groups in the carbonate minerals calcite (CaCO 3), aragonite (CaCO 3), dolomite (CaMg(CO 3) 2), magnesite (MgCO 3), witherite (BaCO 3), and nahcolite (NaHCO 3) are calculated using first-principles lattice dynamics. Calculations rely on density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) with norm-conserving planewave pseudopotentials to determine the vibrational frequencies of isotopically substituted crystals. Our results predict an ˜0.4‰ excess of 13C18O16O22- groups in all studied carbonate minerals at room-temperature equilibrium, relative to what would be expected in a stochastic mixture of carbonate isotopologues with the same bulk 13C/ 12C, 18O/ 16O, and 17O/ 16O ratios. The amount of excess 13C18O16O22- decreases with increasing temperature of equilibration, from 0.5‰ at 0 °C to <0.1‰ at 300 °C, suggesting that measurements of multiply substituted isotopologues of carbonate could be used to infer temperatures of ancient carbonate mineral precipitation and alteration events, even where the δ 18O of coexisting fluids is uncertain. The predicted temperature sensitivity of the equilibrium constant is ˜0.003‰/°C at 25 °C. Estimated equilibrium constants for the formation of 13C18O16O22- are remarkably uniform for the variety of minerals studied, suggesting that temperature calibrations will also be applicable to carbonate minerals not studied here without greatly compromising accuracy. A related equilibrium constant for the reaction: Ca12C18O16O2+Ca12C17O16O2↔Ca12C18O17O16O+Ca12C16O3 in calcite indicates formation of 0.1‰ excess 12C 18O 17O 16O 2- at 25 °C. In a conventional phosphoric acid reaction of carbonate to form CO 2 for mass-spectrometric analysis, molecules derived from 13C18O16O22- dominate (˜96%) the mass 47 signal, and 12C 18O 17O 16O 2- contributes most of the remainder (3%). This suggests

  2. Land use Effects on Storage, Stability and Structure of Organic Carbon in Soil Density Fractions Revealed by 13C Natural Abundance and CPMAS 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flessa, H.; Helfrich, M.; John, B.; Yamashita, T.; Ludwig, B.

    2004-12-01

    The type of land use and soil cultivation are important factors controlling organic carbon storage (SOC) in soils and they can also influence the relative importance, the structure, and the stability of different SOC pools. The objectives of our study were: i) to quantify the SOC stocks in different density fractions (mineral-associated soil organic matter > 2 g cm-3 (Mineral-SOM), free particulate organic matter < 1.6 g cm-3 (free POM), light occluded particulate organic matter < 1.6 g cm-3 (occluded POM<1.6) and dense occluded particulate organic matter 1.6 to 2.0 g cm-3 (occluded POM1.6-2.0)) of silty soils under different land use (spruce forest, grassland, maize, wheat), ii) to determine the structure of these SOC fractions by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy, and iii) to analyse the stability of these SOC fractions in the maize soil on the basis of the stable isotope composition of SOC. The SOC concentration in the A horizon increased in the order wheat (12.7 g kg-1) < maize (13.0 g kg-1) < grassland (24.5 g kg-1) < spruce (40.5 g kg-1). The major part (86-91%) of the SOC was associated with the heavy mineral fraction at the grassland, maize and wheat site. In the A horizon of the spruce soil, the particulate organic matter accounted for 52% of the total SOC content. The chemical structure of the soil organic matter (SOM) was influenced by litter quality, the intensity of litter decomposition and the related production and storage of microbially-derived substances. SOM of the acid forest soil was characterized by large amounts of POM with a high content of spruce litter-derived alkyl C. In the biologically more active grassland and maize soil, litter-derived POM was decomposed more rapidly and SOC stocks were dominated by mineral-associated SOM which contained greater proportions of aryl and carbonyl C. The cultivation of the grassland soil induced enhanced mineralization of POM and in particular of mineral-associated SOM. The faster SOC turnover was associated

  3. Direct analysis of δ13C and concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in environmental samples by TOC-IRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cerli, Chiara; Federherr, Eugen; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays an important role in carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Stable isotope analysis (delta 13C) of DOC could provide valuable insights in its origin, fluxes and environmental fate. Precise and routine analysis of delta 13C and DOC concentration are therefore highly desirable. A promising, new system has been developed for this purpose, linking a high-temperature combustion TOC analyzer trough an interface with a continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (Elementar group, Hanau, Germany). This TOC-IRMS system enables simultaneous stable isotope (bulk delta 13C) and concentration analysis of DOC, with high oxidation efficiency by high-temperature combustion for complex mixtures as natural DOC. To give delta 13C analysis by TOC-IRMS the necessary impulse for broad-scale application, we present a detailed evaluation of its analytical performance for realistic and challenging conditions inclusive low DOC concentrations and environmental samples. High precision (standard deviation, SD predominantly < 0.15 permil) and accuracy (R2 = 0.9997, i.e. comparison TOC-IRMS and conventional EA-IRMS) were achieved by TOC-IRMS for a broad diversity of DOC solutions. This precision is comparable or even slightly better than that typically reported for EA-IRMS systems, and improves previous techniques for δ13C analysis of DOC. Simultaneously, very good precision was obtained for DOC concentration measurements. Assessment of natural abundance and slightly 13C enriched DOC, a wide range of concentrations (0.2-150 mgC/L) and injection volumes (0.05-3 ml), demonstrated good analytical performance with negligible memory effects, no concentration/volume effects and a wide linearity. Low DOC concentrations (< 2 mgC/L), were correctly analyzed without any pre-concentration. Moreover, TOC-IRMS was successfully applied to analyze DOC from diverse terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments (SD < 0.23 permil). In summary, the TOC

  4. Bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated using 15N, 13C, and 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, W. J.; Hoatson, G. L.; Holloway, B. C.; Vold, R. L.; Reilly, A. C.

    2003-11-01

    The nitrogen bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films is examined with 15N, 13C, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Films were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests revealed an elastic recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. The NMR results show that nitrogen bonding in this material is consistent with sp2 hybridized nitrogen incorporated in an aromatic carbon environment. The data also indicate that the a-CNx prepared for this study has very low hydrogen content and is hydrophilic. Specifically, analysis of 15N and 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning and 1H NMR experiments suggests that water preferentially protonates nitrogen sites.

  5. Losses of soil carbon by converting tropical forest to plantations: erosion and decomposition estimated by δ(13) C.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Thomas; Damris, Muhammad; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-09-01

    Indonesia lost more tropical forest than all of Brazil in 2012, mainly driven by the rubber, oil palm, and timber industries. Nonetheless, the effects of converting forest to oil palm and rubber plantations on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks remain unclear. We analyzed SOC losses after lowland rainforest conversion to oil palm, intensive rubber, and extensive rubber plantations in Jambi Province on Sumatra Island. The focus was on two processes: (1) erosion and (2) decomposition of soil organic matter. Carbon contents in the Ah horizon under oil palm and rubber plantations were strongly reduced up to 70% and 62%, respectively. The decrease was lower under extensive rubber plantations (41%). On average, converting forest to plantations led to a loss of 10 Mg C ha(-1) after about 15 years of conversion. The C content in the subsoil was similar under the forest and the plantations. We therefore assumed that a shift to higher δ(13) C values in plantation subsoil corresponds to the losses from the upper soil layer by erosion. Erosion was estimated by comparing the δ(13) C profiles in the soils under forest and under plantations. The estimated erosion was the strongest in oil palm (35 ± 8 cm) and rubber (33 ± 10 cm) plantations. The (13) C enrichment of SOC used as a proxy of its turnover indicates a decrease of SOC decomposition rate in the Ah horizon under oil palm plantations after forest conversion. Nonetheless, based on the lack of C input from litter, we expect further losses of SOC in oil palm plantations, which are a less sustainable land use compared to rubber plantations. We conclude that δ(13) C depth profiles may be a powerful tool to disentangle soil erosion and SOC mineralization after the conversion of natural ecosystems conversion to intensive plantations when soils show gradual increase of δ(13) C values with depth. PMID:25707391

  6. Seasonal variations of dissolved inorganic carbon and δ13C of surface waters: application of a modified gas evolution technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atekwana, E. A.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.

    1998-03-01

    Seasonal concentrations and δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in a river-tributary system in Kalamazoo, southwest Michigan, USA, have been measured using a modified gas evolution technique. The technique makes use of evacuated glass septum tubes pre-loaded with phosphoric acid and a magnetic stir bar. Water samples are injected into these septum tubes in the field, which eliminates problems associated with CO 2 loss/gain during sample storage and transfer to the vacuum line during DIC extraction. Using this technique, a precision of 1% and 0.1‰ can be achieved for DIC concentrations and δ13C DIC measurements, respectively. As this technique provides reliable measurements of DIC concentrations and carbon isotope ratios, it was used to evaluate the processes that control DIC in the river-tributary system. Results of DIC concentration and δ13C DIC measurements of water samples from the river-tributary system show that the DIC pool is mostly dominated by groundwater. The DIC concentrations and δ13C DIC are within the ranges measured for the most isotopically evolved groundwater in this region. Seasonal variations superimposed on the baseline values are attributed to secondary processes such as CO 2 invasion from the atmosphere, enhanced recharge from lakes and biological activities of photosynthesis, respiration, and decay. With the onset of spring, there is a concurrent increase in the DIC concentration and δ13C DIC of these streams. A simultaneous increase in concentration and 13C enrichment of the riverine DIC pool is consistent with CO 2 invasion and recharge from lakes. During the summer, biological activity is the predominant control on shifts in the DIC pool. Although photosynthesis, respiration and decay occur during this time, decreases in the DIC concentration and increases in the 13C DIC indicates CO 2 removal from the pool by photosynthesis. In the late summer-early fall, photosynthesis declines and respiration and decay cause an increase in

  7. Coral skeletal carbon isotopes (δ13C and Δ14C) record the delivery of terrestrial carbon to the coastal waters of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, R.P.; Grottoli, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Tropical small mountainous rivers deliver a poorly quantified, but potentially significant, amount of carbon to the world's oceans. However, few historical records of land-ocean carbon transfer exist for any region on Earth. Corals have the potential to provide such records, because they draw on dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for calcification. In temperate systems, the stable- (δ13C) and radiocarbon (Δ14C) isotopes of coastal DIC are influenced by the δ13C and Δ14C of the DIC transported from adjacent rivers. A similar pattern should exist in tropical coastal DIC and hence coral skeletons. Here, δ13C and Δ14C measurements were made in a 56-year-old Montastraea faveolata coral growing ~1 km from the mouth of the Rio Fajardo in eastern Puerto Rico. Additionally, the δ13C and Δ14C values of the DIC of the Rio Fajardo and its adjacent coastal waters were measured during two wet and dry seasons. Three major findings were observed: (1) synchronous depletions of both δ13C and Δ14C in the coral skeleton are annually coherent with the timing of peak river discharge, (2) riverine DIC was always more depleted in δ13C and Δ14C than seawater DIC, and (3) the correlation of δ13C and Δ14C was the same in both coral skeleton and the DIC of the river and coastal waters. These results indicate that coral skeletal δ13C and Δ14C are recording the delivery of riverine DIC to the coastal ocean. Thus, coral records could be used to develop proxies of historical land-ocean carbon flux for many tropical regions. Such information could be invaluable for understanding the role of tropical land-ocean carbon flux in the context of land-use change and global climate change.

  8. Coral skeletal carbon isotopes (δ13C and Δ14C) record the delivery of terrestrial carbon to the coastal waters of Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, R.P.; Grottoli, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Tropical small mountainous rivers deliver a poorly quantified, but potentially significant, amount of carbon to the world's oceans. However, few historical records of land-ocean carbon transfer exist for any region on Earth. Corals have the potential to provide such records, because they draw on dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for calcification. In temperate systems, the stable- (??13C) and radiocarbon (??14C) isotopes of coastal DIC are influenced by the ??13C and ??14C of the DIC transported from adjacent rivers. A similar pattern should exist in tropical coastal DIC and hence coral skeletons. Here, ??13C and ??14C measurements were made in a 56-year-old Montastraea faveolata coral growing ~1 km from the mouth of the Rio Fajardo in eastern Puerto Rico. Additionally, the ??13C and ??14C values of the DIC of the Rio Fajardo and its adjacent coastal waters were measured during two wet and dry seasons. Three major findings were observed: (1) synchronous depletions of both ??13C and ??14C in the coral skeleton are annually coherent with the timing of peak river discharge, (2) riverine DIC was always more depleted in ??13C and ??14C than seawater DIC, and (3) the correlation of ??13C and ??14C was the same in both coral skeleton and the DIC of the river and coastal waters. These results indicate that coral skeletal ??13C and ??14C are recording the delivery of riverine DIC to the coastal ocean. Thus, coral records could be used to develop proxies of historical land-ocean carbon flux for many tropical regions. Such information could be invaluable for understanding the role of tropical land-ocean carbon flux in the context of land-use change and global climate change. ?? 2011 United States Geological Survey.

  9. Carbon Isotope Fractionation Between CO Gas and CO Ice with Implications for 12C/13C of the Interstellar Medium and the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. D.; Schauble, E. A.

    2011-03-01

    A model for carbon-isotope fractionation between CO ice and gas is presented. The model includes a self-consistent portrayal of the kinetics of partitioning of 12C and 13C between CO ice and gas. Ice-gas carbon exchange may be a primary control for 12C/13C.

  10. Effects of temperature and substrate stoichiometry on microbial specific respiration rate, carbon use efficiency, and 13C fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.; Lehmeier, C.; Sellers, M.; Chen, Y.; Ballantyne, F.; Billings, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial activity contributes up to 60% of soil respiration. However, uncertainty in microbial respiration with rising temperature has previously prevented better predictions of the amount and the source of carbon (C) respired from soil. Three key variables of microbial C economies are of particular interest for estimating microbially mediated C release with temperature: (1) specific respiration rate (SRR), which is microbial CO2 release per microbial biomass-C, (2) carbon use efficiency (CUE), which determines how much organic C consumed by microbes is transformed into biomass, and (3) changes in the δ13C of respired CO2 with temperature, which suggests the form of organic C mineralized and helps to partition soil respiration in plant- and microbe-derived CO2. However, it is difficult to obtain these variables in intact soils, due to confounding factors that influence the amount and δ13C of respired CO2. Here we present an experimental approach that allows us to grow an isolated microbial population on well-characterized organic substrates and directly measure SRR, CUE and δ13C of respired CO2. We explored the effect of temperature on those variables, and how it changes with C:N of the substrate provided. This is important given various substrates available for microbial decay, and the potential for changing microbial CUE with substrate C:N. This approach thus can help constrain potential microbial C loss with warming as soil organic substrates with varying C:N are decomposed. We hypothesized that (1) increased SRR and declined CUE with warming would be more evident at higher C:N, (2) apparent 13C fractionation between biomass and respired CO2 would decrease with temperature due to C limitation, and (3) this fractionation would be higher for high C:N. Pseudomonas fluorescens (a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium) was grown at 0.13 h-1 in a chemostat from 13 to 26.5°C. The concentration of cellobiose, the sole C source with constant δ13C, was adjusted to have

  11. Temporal δ13C records from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) reflect variation in foraging location and global carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossman, S. L.; Barros, N. B.; Ostrom, P. H.; Gandhi, H.; Wells, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    With four decades of data on a population of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) resident to Sarasota Bay (SB), The Sarasota Dolphin Research Program offers an unparalleled platform for ground-truthing stable isotope data and exploring bottlenose dolphin ecology in a natural setting. We explored carbon isotope value fidelity to habitat utilization by comparing δ13C data from whole teeth and muscle to the individual dolphin's proclivity towards foraging in seagrass beds based on observational data. We then examined variation in habitat use based on temporal isotope records. Whole tooth protein isotope values do not show a significant correlation with the observed percentage of foraging in seagrass habitat. In contrast, δ13C values from muscle showed a significant positive relationship with the observational data. Differences in the degree of tissue turn over may account for this distinction between tooth and muscle. Dolphin teeth consist of annually deposited layers that are inert once formed. Thus, the isotopic composition of protein in annuli reflect foraging at the time of deposition. In addition to incorporating variation associated with differences in foraging over the lifetime of the individual, whole tooth isotope values are confounded because a disproportionate amount of tooth protein derives from the first few years of life. Given the turnover time of muscle tissue, isotope values reflect diet over the past several months. From 1991 to 2008, muscle δ13C values showed a significant decline, -13.5‰ to -15.1‰.This time period encompasses a state wide net fishing ban (1995) however other factors such as a series of red tide harmful algal blooms, a decline in predators, increases in shallow water boat traffic and an increase in string ray abundance may also contribute to the temporal isotope trend. To examine changes in dolphin foraging habitat further back in time we analyzed the tip of crown of the tooth which records the isotopic signal from the

  12. Pathway analysis using (13) C-glycerol and other carbon tracers reveals a bipartite metabolism of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Häuslein, Ina; Manske, Christian; Goebel, Werner; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source for Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular pathogen, which can cause a life-threatening pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. Genome, transcriptome and proteome studies indicate that L. pneumophila also utilizes carbon substrates other than amino acids. We show here that glycerol promotes intracellular replication of L. pneumophila in amoeba or macrophages (but not extracellular growth) dependent on glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GlpD. An L. pneumophila mutant strain lacking glpD was outcompeted by wild-type bacteria upon co-infection of amoeba, indicating an important role of glycerol during infection. Isotopologue profiling studies using (13) C-labelled substrates were performed in a novel minimal defined medium, MDM, comprising essential amino acids, proline and phenylalanine. In MDM, L. pneumophila utilized (13) C-labelled glycerol or glucose predominantly for gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway, while the amino acid serine was used for energy generation via the citrate cycle. Similar results were obtained for L. pneumophila growing intracellularly in amoeba fed with (13) C-labelled glycerol, glucose or serine. Collectively, these results reveal a bipartite metabolism of L. pneumophila, where glycerol and carbohydrates like glucose are mainly fed into anabolic processes, while serine serves as major energy supply. PMID:26691313

  13. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance study of five- and six-coordinated carbon in nonclassical organometallic compounds: Dimeric trialkyl-, tricyclopropyl-, and triarylaluminums and some nido and closo carboranes*

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Liang, Gao; Henold, Kenneth L.; Haigh, Gary B.

    1977-01-01

    A 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of dimeric trimethyl-, triethyl-, tricyclopropyl-, and triarylaluminums is reported. The five-coordinated bridging carbons are found consistently more shielded than the terminal carbons, in accordance with the increased p-character of the former. The nature of bridging two-electron three-centered Al—C—Al bonds is discussed. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance shifts of several nido and closo carboranes containing five and six coordinated carbons and their 13C-1H spin-spin coupling constants were also obtained. The relationship between the carbon chemical shifts and coordination number of the carbon atom is discussed. There is approximately a 20- to 40-ppm shielding of the 13C chemical shifts of five- and six-coordinated carbons, compared with those of four valent carbons, with a simultaneous general increase of JC-H coupling constants. PMID:16592469

  14. Analysis of dissolved organic carbon concentration and 13C isotopic signature by TOC-IRMS - assessment of analytical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cerli, Chiara; Federherr, Eugen; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopes provide a powerful tool to assess carbon pools and their dynamics. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has been recognized to play an important role in ecosystem functioning and carbon cycling and has therefore gained increased research interest. However, direct measurement of 13C isotopic signature of carbon in the dissolved phase is technically challenging particularly using high temperature combustion. Until recently, mainly custom-made systems existed which were modified for coupling of TOC instruments with IRMS for simultaneous assessment of C content and isotopic signature. The variety of coupled systems showed differences in their analytical performances. For analysis of DOC high temperature combustion is recognized as best performing method, owing to its high efficiency of conversion to CO2 also for highly refractory components (e.g. humic, fulvic acids) present in DOC and soil extracts. Therefore, we tested high temperature combustion TOC coupled to IRMS (developed by Elementar Group) for bulk measurements of DOC concentration and 13C signature. The instruments are coupled via an Interface to exchange the carrier gas from O2 to He and to concentrate the derived CO2 for the isotope measurement. Analytical performance of the system was assessed for a variety of organic compounds characterized by different stability and complexity, including humic acid and DOM. We tested injection volumes between 0.2-3 ml, thereby enabling measurement of broad concentration ranges. With an injection volume of 0.5 ml (n=3, preceded by 1 discarded injection), DOC and 13C signatures for concentrations between 5-150 mg C/L were analyzed with high precision (standard deviation (SD) predominantly <0.1‰), good accuracy and linearity (overall SD <0.9‰). For the same settings, slightly higher variation in precision was observed among the lower concentration range and depending upon specific system conditions. Differences in 13C signatures of about 50‰ among

  15. Experimental validation of environmental controls on the δ13C of Arctica islandica (ocean quahog) shell carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirne, Erin C.; Wanamaker, Alan D.; Feindel, Scott C.

    2012-05-01

    The marine bivalve species, Arctica islandica, was reared under experimental conditions for 29 weeks in the Gulf of Maine in order to determine the relationship between the carbon isotope composition of shell carbonate (δ13CS) and ambient seawater dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC), as well as to approximate the metabolic contribution (CM) to shell material. Three experimental environments were compared: two flow-through tanks (one at ambient seawater conditions, one with a supplemental food source) and an in situ cage. Each environment contained 50 juveniles and 30 adults. Both juvenile (2-3 years) and adult (19-64 years) specimens displayed average percent CM of less than or equal to 10% when using three different proxies of respired carbon: digestive gland, adductor muscle and sediment. Hence, the primary control on δ13CS values is ambient DIC. The relationship between δ13CDIC and δ13CS for 114 individuals used in the study was: δ13C13C-1.0‰(±0.3‰) No ontogenetic effect on δ13CS was observed, and growth rates did not generally impact δ13CS values. Based on the results of this study, shell material derived from the long-lived ocean quahog (A. islandica) constitutes a viable proxy for paleo-DIC from the extratropical Atlantic Ocean.

  16. Using Atmospheric δ13C of CO2 observations to link the water and carbon cycles with climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alden, C. B.; Miller, J. B.; White, J. W.; Yadav, V.; Michalak, A. M.; Andrews, A. E.; Huang, L.

    2013-12-01

    The ratio of stable carbon isotopes, 13C:12C in atmospheric CO2 (expressed as δ13C) offers unique insights into atmosphere-land CO2 fluxes and the modulating effects of stomatal conductance on this exchange. Photosynthesis discriminates against 13CO2 during uptake. The magnitude of this fractionation is strongly dependent upon ambient CO2 concentrations and water availability, as well as on the mix of C3 and C4 vegetation types. C3 and C4 plants have very different discrimination because of carboxylation pathways, and C3 stomatal conductance varies with water availability because stomata close to reduce transpiration when plants are water stressed. Further, plant stomata respond to ambient CO2 concentrations in order to optimize leaf internal [CO2] while reducing transpirative water loss. Atmospheric δ13C therefore carries information about local and upwind drought conditions and the consequent likelihood of ground-to-atmosphere water transfer via transpiration, and the balance of latent and sensible heat fluxes, as well as about local and upwind distributions of C3 and C4 vegetation and variability therein. δ13C offers a unique lens through which to identify key thresholds and relationships between climate anomalies/change and the modulating climate impacts of plant biosphere response. By unraveling this relationship at local to continental scales, we stand to gain crucial understanding of the drivers of land CO2 uptake variability as well as knowledge of how to predict future climate impacts on the carbon cycle and vice versa. We use a two-step Bayesian inversion model to optimize 1x1 degree and 3-hourly (interpreted at regional and weekly to monthly scales) fields of δ13C of assimilated biomass over North America for the year 2010, using influence functions generated with FLEXPART, driven by National Centers for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System meteorology. Prior fluxes and fossil fuel, ocean and fire fluxes are from CarbonTracker 2011, and

  17. 13C-MFA delineates the photomixotrophic metabolism of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under light- and carbon-sufficient conditions.

    PubMed

    You, Le; Berla, Bert; He, Lian; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Tang, Yinjie J

    2014-05-01

    The central carbon metabolism of cyanobacteria is under debate. For over 50 years, the lack of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase has led to the belief that cyanobacteria have an incomplete TCA cycle. Recent in vitro enzymatic experiments suggest that this cycle may in fact be closed. The current study employed (13) C isotopomers to delineate pathways in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. By tracing the incorporation of supplemented glutamate into the downstream metabolites in the TCA cycle, we observed a direct in vivo transformation of α-ketoglutarate to succinate. Additionally, isotopic tracing of glyoxylate did not show a functional glyoxylate shunt and glyoxylate was used for glycine synthesis. The photomixotrophic carbon metabolism was then profiled with (13) C-MFA under light and carbon-sufficient conditions. We observed that: (i) the in vivo flux through the TCA cycle reactions (α-ketoglutarate → succinate) was minimal (<2%); (ii) the flux ratio of CO2 fixation was six times higher than that of glucose utilization; (iii) the relative flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway was low (<2%); (iv) high flux through malic enzyme served as a main route for pyruvate synthesis. Our results improve the understanding of the versatile metabolism in cyanobacteria and shed light on their application for photo-biorefineries. PMID:24659531

  18. sup 13 C and sup 18 O isotopic disequilibrium in biological carbonates: II. In vitro simulation of kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughey, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Biological carbonates are built largely from CO{sub 2}, which diffuses across the skeletogenic membrane and reacts to form HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Kinetic discrimination against the heavy isotopes {sup 18}O and {sup 13}C during CO{sub 2} hydration and hydroxylation apparently causes most of the isotopic disequilibrium observed in biological carbonates. These kinetic isotope effects are expressed when the extracytosolic calcifying solution is thin and alkaline, and HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} precipitates fairly rapidly as CaCO{sub 3}. In vitro simulation of the calcifying environment produced heavy isotope depletions qualitatively similar to, but somewhat more extreme than, those seen in biological carbonates. Isotopic equilibration during biological calcification occurs through CO{sub 2} exchange across the calcifying membrane and by admixture ambient waters (containing HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) into the calcifying fluids. Both mechanisms tend to produce linear correlations between skeletal {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O.

  19. Carbon partitioning into cell wall structural carbohydrates by following 13C label in Switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon isotope ratio analyses of stover tissue from both the lowland (Kanlow) and the upland (Summer) cultivars of switchgrass indicated that the value of Kanlow was less negative (-12.7 per mil.) than the upland variety Summer (-13.1). Preliminary observations on the carbon isotope ratio of cellulo...

  20. Exploring variations in microbial carbon sources and cycling in the deep terrestrial subsurface using PLFA and δ13C analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simkus, D.; Slater, G. F.; Wilkie, K. M.; Li, L.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Onstott, T. C.; Wommack, E.; Sakowski, E.

    2012-12-01

    In deep crystalline rock of the terrestrial subsurface, water-filled fracture networks represent potential microbial habitats. The geochemical environments within such fraction systems, and concurrently potential microbial carbon sources and metabolic activities, can vary widely. In systems where organic carbon is limited or highly recalcitrant, microbial ecosystems must rely on autotrophy of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) or metabolism of organic compounds produced abiotically via water-rock interaction. In either case, CH4 is a key potential species as it is produced autotrophically by CO2-reducing organisms, as well as abiotically by reactions analogous to the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Utilization of this methane by microbial communities requires the ability to oxidize it, either aerobically or anaerobically. In this study, the concentrations, distribution and δ13C compositions of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), as well as DIC and CH4 pools, were characterized in boreholes in mines in the Johannesburg area of South Africa. Water flow rates from these boreholes were in the liters per minute range and concurrent gas flow rates ranged from 3 to 800 mL/min. Water temperature, pH, Eh and salinity ranged from 27 to 55 °C, from 7.3 to 8.9, from -130 to 375 mV and from 0.2 to 110 ppt, respectively. CH4 concentrations ranged from 2 to 70 % of gas by volume and δ13C of methane ranged from -55 to -36 ‰. δ18O and δ2H analysis indicated that waters in the majority of boreholes were paleometeoric. One borehole was indicated to be off the global meteoric water line, consistent with large extents of water-rock interaction. PLFA concentrations and distributions varied between boreholes, indicating variations in the microbial communities, concurrent with variations in the environments being sampled. δ13C of PLFA also varied between boreholes; for instance, δ13C values of PLFA in the Beatrix mine 326 Bh2 ranged from -55 to -65 ‰ , whereas in Bh1, located circa 100 m

  1. Seasonal and interannual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torn, Margaret S.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Still, Christopher J.; Riley, William J.; Berry, Joe A.

    2011-04-01

    The δ13C value of terrestrial CO2 fluxes (δbio) provides important information for inverse models of CO2 sources and sinks as well as for studies of vegetation physiology, C3 and C4 vegetation fluxes, and ecosystem carbon residence times. From 2002-2009, we measured atmospheric CO2 concentration and δ13C-CO2 at four heights (2 to 60 m) in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) and computed δbio weekly. This region has a fine-scale mix of crops (primarily C3 winter wheat) and C4 pasture grasses. δbio had a large and consistent seasonal cycle of 6-8‰. Ensemble monthly mean δbio ranged from -25.8 ± 0.4‰ (±SE) in March to -20.1 ± 0.4‰ in July. Thus, C3 vegetation contributed about 80% of ecosystem fluxes in winter-spring and 50% in summer-fall. In contrast, prairie-soil δ13C values were about -15‰, indicating that historically the region was dominated by C4 vegetation and had more positive δbio values. Based on a land-surface model, isofluxes (δbio× NEE) in this region have large seasonal amplitude because δbio and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) covary. Interannual variability in isoflux was driven by variability in NEE. The large seasonal amplitude in δbio and isoflux imply that carbon inverse analyses require accurate estimates of land cover and temporally resolved 13CO2 and CO2 fluxes.

  2. Effect of Glutamine, Glutamic Acid and Nucleotides on the Turnover of Carbon13C) in Organs of Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Alessandro Borges; Berto, Dirlei Antonio; Saleh, Mayra Anton Dib; Telles, Filipe Garcia; Denadai, Juliana Célia; Sartori, Maria Márcia Pereira; Luiggi, Fabiana Golin; Santos, Luan Sousa; Ducatti, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and physiological alterations occur in the digestive system of weanling piglets, compromising the performance in subsequent phases. This experiment aimed at verifying the influence of glutamine, glutamate and nucleotides on the carbon turnover in the pancreas and liver of piglets weaned at 21 days of age. Four diets were evaluated: glutamine, glutamic acid or nucleotides-free diet (CD); containing 1% glutamine (GD); containing 1% glutamic acid (GAD) and containing 1% nucleotides (ND). One hundred and twenty-three piglets were utilized with three pigs slaughtered at day zero (weaning day) and three at each one of the experimental days (1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 13, 20, 27, and 49 post-weaning), in order to collect organ samples, which were analyzed for the δ13C isotopic composition and compared by means of time. No differences were found (p>0.05) among treatments for the turnover of the 13C in the pancreas (T50% = 13.91, 14.37, 11.07, and 9.34 days; T95% = 46.22, 47.73, 36.79, and 31.04 days for CD, GD, GAD, and ND, respectively). In the liver, the ND presented accelerated values of carbon turnover (T50% = 7.36 and T95% = 24.47 days) in relation to the values obtained for the GD (T50% = 10.15 and T95% = 33.74 days). However, the values obtained for the CD (T50% = 9.12 and T95% = 30.31 days) and GAD (T50% = 7.83 and T95% = 26.03 days) had no differences (p>0.05) among other diets. The technique of 13C isotopic dilution demonstrated trophic action of nucleotides in the liver. PMID:26954179

  3. Effect of Glutamine, Glutamic Acid and Nucleotides on the Turnover of Carbon (δ(13)C) in Organs of Weaned Piglets.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Alessandro Borges; Berto, Dirlei Antonio; Saleh, Mayra Anton Dib; Telles, Filipe Garcia; Denadai, Juliana Célia; Sartori, Maria Márcia Pereira; Luiggi, Fabiana Golin; Santos, Luan Sousa; Ducatti, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Morphological and physiological alterations occur in the digestive system of weanling piglets, compromising the performance in subsequent phases. This experiment aimed at verifying the influence of glutamine, glutamate and nucleotides on the carbon turnover in the pancreas and liver of piglets weaned at 21 days of age. Four diets were evaluated: glutamine, glutamic acid or nucleotides-free diet (CD); containing 1% glutamine (GD); containing 1% glutamic acid (GAD) and containing 1% nucleotides (ND). One hundred and twenty-three piglets were utilized with three pigs slaughtered at day zero (weaning day) and three at each one of the experimental days (1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 13, 20, 27, and 49 post-weaning), in order to collect organ samples, which were analyzed for the δ(13)C isotopic composition and compared by means of time. No differences were found (p>0.05) among treatments for the turnover of the (13)C in the pancreas (T50% = 13.91, 14.37, 11.07, and 9.34 days; T95% = 46.22, 47.73, 36.79, and 31.04 days for CD, GD, GAD, and ND, respectively). In the liver, the ND presented accelerated values of carbon turnover (T50% = 7.36 and T95% = 24.47 days) in relation to the values obtained for the GD (T50% = 10.15 and T95% = 33.74 days). However, the values obtained for the CD (T50% = 9.12 and T95% = 30.31 days) and GAD (T50% = 7.83 and T95% = 26.03 days) had no differences (p>0.05) among other diets. The technique of (13)C isotopic dilution demonstrated trophic action of nucleotides in the liver. PMID:26954179

  4. Modelling the 13C and 12C isotopes of inorganic and organic carbon in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Erik; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Humborg, Christoph; Gustafsson, Bo G.

    2015-08-01

    In this study, 12C and 13C contents of all carbon containing state variables (dissolved inorganic and organic carbon, detrital carbon, and the carbon content of autotrophs and heterotrophs) have for the first time been explicitly included in a coupled physical-biogeochemical Baltic Sea model. Different processes in the carbon cycling have distinct fractionation values, resulting in specific isotopic fingerprints. Thus, in addition to simulating concentrations of different tracers, our new model formulation improves the possibility to constrain the rates of processes such as CO2 assimilation, mineralization, and air-sea exchange. We demonstrate that phytoplankton production and respiration, and the related air-sea CO2 fluxes, are to a large degree controlling the isotopic composition of organic and inorganic carbon in the system. The isotopic composition is further, but to a lesser extent, influenced by river loads and deep water inflows as well as transformation of terrestrial organic carbon within the system. Changes in the isotopic composition over the 20th century have been dominated by two processes - the preferential release of 12C to the atmosphere in association with fossil fuel burning, and the eutrophication of the Baltic Sea related to increased nutrient loads under the second half of the century.

  5. Characterization of alkyl carbon in forest soils by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy and dipolar dephasing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kogel-Knabner, I.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Samples obtained from forest soils at different stages of decomposition were treated sequentially with chloroform/methanol (extraction of lipids), sulfuric acid (hydrolysis), and sodium chlorite (delignification) to enrich them in refractory alkyl carbon. As revealed by NMR spectroscopy, this treatment yielded residues with high contents of alkyl carbon. In the NMR spectra of residues obtained from litter samples, resonances for carbohydrates are also present, indicating that these carbohydrates are tightly bound to the alkyl carbon structures. During decomposition in the soils this resistant carbohydrate fraction is lost almost completely. In the litter samples the alkyl carbon shows a dipolar dephasing behavior indicative of two structural components, a rigid and a more mobile component. As depth and decomposition increase, only the rigid component is observed. This fact could be due to selective degradation of the mobile component or to changes in molecular mobility during decomposition, e.g., because of an increase in cross linking or contact with the mineral matter of the soil.

  6. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments. PMID:27074782

  7. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the biosynthesis by Microbacterium ammoniaphilum of L-glutamate selectively enriched with carbon-13

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.E.; Han, C.H.; Kollman, V.H.; London, R.E.; Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1982-02-10

    /sup 13/C NMR of isotopically enriched metabolites has been used to study the metabolism of Microbacterium ammoniaphilum, a bacterium which excretes large quantities of L-glutamic acid into the medium. Biosynthesis from 90% (1-/sup 13/C) glucose results in relatively high specificity of the label, with (2,4-/sup 13/C/sub 2/) glutamate as the major product. The predominant biosynthetic pathway for synthesis of glutamate from glucose was determined to be the Embden Meyerhof glycolytic pathway followed by P-enolpyruvate carboxylase and the first third of the Krebs cycle. Different metabolic pathways are associated with different correlations in the enrichment of the carbons, reflected in the spectrum as different /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C scalar multiplet intensities. Hence, intensity and /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C multiplet analysis allows quantitation of the pathways involved. Although blockage of the Krebs cycle at the ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase step is the basis for the accumulation of glutamate, significant Krebs cycle activity was found in glucose grown cells, and extensive Krebs cycle activity in cells metabolizing (1-/sup 13/C) acetate. In addition to the observation of the expected metabolites, the disaccharide ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-trehalose and ..cap alpha..,..beta..-glucosylamine were identified from the /sup 13/C NMR spectra.

  8. Soil carbon cycle 13C responses in the decade following bark beetle and girdling disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, G. E.; Chan, A. M.; Trahan, N. A.; Moore, D. J.; Bowling, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Recent bark beetle outbreaks in western North America have impacted millions of hectares of conifer forests leading to uncertainty about whether these forests will become new sources of atmospheric CO2. In large part, this depends on whether enhanced respiration from the decomposition of newly dead organic matter will outpace the recovery of ecosystem carbon uptake by the ecosystems. To understand how rapidly conifer forest carbon pools turn over following these disturbances, we examined changes in the isotopic composition of soil respiration (δ13Cresp) following beetle and girdling mortality in two subalpine forests in Colorado, U.S.A. At the beetle-impacted forest δ13Cresp declined by ~1‰ between 3 and 8 years post-disturbance, but recovered in years 9-10. In the girdled forest, deep (<10 cm depth) soil respiration from plots at <1 to 2 years post-girdling was depleted by ~1‰ relative to ungirdled plots, but then gradually increased until there was a significant spike in δ13Cresp at 8-9 years post-girdling. Based on our understanding of isotopic composition in carbon pools and fluxes at these forests, we attribute these changes to removal of recently assimilated C in rhizosphere respiration (1-2 years) followed by the decomposition of litterfall (needles and roots) 8-10 years post-disturbance. Relative to ungirdled plots, there was also a transient enrichment in surface δ13Cresp from plots at <1 to 2 years post-girdling (~0.5‰, not statistically significant) and significant declines in microbial carbon in surface soils in 2-4 year post-girdling plots. Again, based on current understanding, we interpret these to signify the rapid turnover of mycorrhizal and rhizosphere microbial biomass in the 2 years following girdling. A potential confounding factor in this study is that seasonal variation in δ13Cresp was similar in magnitude to changes with time since disturbance and was significantly related to variation in soil temperature and water content.

  9. A 13C labelling study on carbon fluxes in Arctic plankton communities under elevated CO2 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kluijver, A.; Soetaert, K.; Czerny, J.; Schulz, K. G.; Boxhammer, T.; Riebesell, U.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of CO2 on carbon fluxes in Arctic plankton communities was investigated during the 2010 EPOCA mesocosm study in Ny Ålesund, Svalbard. Nine mesocosms were set up with initial pCO2 levels ranging from 185 to 1420 μatm for 5 weeks. 13C labelled bicarbonate was added at the start of the experiment to follow the transfer of carbon from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into phytoplankton, bacteria, total particulate organic carbon (POC), zooplankton, and settling particles. Polar lipid derived fatty acids (PLFA) were used to trace carbon dynamics of phytoplankton and bacteria and allowed distinction of two groups of phytoplankton: phyto I (autotrophs) and phyto II (mixotrophs). Nutrients were added on day 13. A nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus model amended with 13C dynamics was constructed and fitted to the data to quantify uptake rates and carbon fluxes in the plankton community during the phase prior to nutrient addition (phase 1, days 0-12). During the first 12 days, a phytoplankton bloom developed that was characterized by high growth rates (0.87 days-1) for phyto I and lower growth rates (0.18 days-1) for phyto II. A large part of the carbon fixed by phytoplankton (~31%) was transferred to bacteria, while mesozooplankton grazed only ~6% of the production. After 6 days, the bloom collapsed and part of the organic matter subsequently settled into the sediment traps. The sedimentation losses of detritus in phase 1 were low (0.008 days-1) and overall export was only ~7% of production. Zooplankton grazing and detritus sinking losses prior to nutrient addition were sensitive to CO2: grazing decreased with increasing CO2, while sinking increased. Phytoplankton production increased again after nutrient addition on day 13. Although phyto II showed initially higher growth rates with increasing CO2 (days 14-22), the overall production of POC after nutrient addition (phase 2, days 14-29) decreased with increasing CO2. Significant sedimentation occurred

  10. Structural characterization of ion-vapor deposited hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings by solid state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jiao; Kato, Takahisa; Watanabe, Sadayuki; Hayashi, Hideo; Kawaguchi, Masahiro

    2014-01-07

    In the present study, unique structural heterogeneity was observed in ion-vapor deposited a-C:H coatings by performing {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CPMAS experiments on solid state nuclear magnetic resonance devices. Two distinct types of sp{sup 2} C clusters were discovered: one of them denoted as sp{sup 2} C′ in content of 3–12 at. % was non-protonated specifically localized in hydrogen-absent regions, while the other dominant one denoted as sp{sup 2} C″ was hydrogenated or at least proximate to proton spins. On basis of the notably analogous variation of sp{sup 2} C′ content and Raman parameters as function of substrate bias voltage in the whole range of 0.5 kV–3.5 kV, a model of nano-clustering configuration was proposed that the sp{sup 2} C′ clusters were embedded between sp{sup 2} C″ clusters and amorphous sp{sup 3} C matrix as trapped interfaces or boundaries where the sp{sup 2} carbon bonds were highly distorted. Continuous increase of bias voltage would promote the nano-clustering and re-ordering of dominant sp{sup 2} C″ clusters, thus results in a marked decrease of interspace and a change of the content of sp{sup 2} C′ clusters. Further investigation on the {sup 13}C magnetization recovery showed typical stretched-exponential approximation due to the prominent presence of paramagnetic centers, and the stretched power α varied within 0.6–0.9 from distinct types of sp{sup 2} C clusters. Differently, the magnetization recovery of {sup 1}H showed better bi-exponential approximation with long and short T{sub 1}(H) fluctuated within 40–60 ms and 0.1–0.3 ms approximately in content of 80% ± 5% and 20% ± 5%, respectively, varying with various bias voltages. Meanwhile, the interrupted {sup 13}C saturation recovery with an interval of short T{sub 1}(H) showed that most of quick-relaxing protons were localized in sp{sup 2} C″ clusters. Such a short T{sub 1}(H) was only possibly resulted from a relaxation mechanism

  11. Identification of /sup 13/C depleted mantle carbon in diamonds from the Roberts Victor Kimberlite, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Deines, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Roberts Victor Kimberlite is known for the abundance of eclogite xenoliths, some of which show an unusual depletion in /sup 18/O. The question whether the observed oxygen isotope variations can be related to carbon isotopic composition variations has been investigated. Peridotite-suite diamons (X = -5.4 per thousand vs. PDB, s = +/-0.9 per thousand, n = 65) and sulfide containing diamonds (X = -4.9, s = +/-0.9, n = 20) do not differ in their /sup 13/C content. For these samples, delta/sup 13/C is not related to diamond shape, color, minerals occluded, or the inclusion chemistry. Eclogite suite diamonds (11) can be subdivided into two groups, GI and GII, based on delta/sup 13/C : GI = (X = -15.4, s = +/-0.4, n = 8); GII = (X = -5.9, s = +/-0.4, n = 3). The composition of the gt and cpx inclusions of the two groups is distinct; e.g. cpx of GI is significantly depleted in SiO/sub 2/, MgO, and CaO, and significantly enriched in Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, FeO and MnO, compared to cpx of GII. Comparison of the chemical composition of the inclusions in E-type diamonds with those of eclogite xenoliths showing /sup 18/O depletion suggests that /sup 13/C and /sup 18/O depletion are not likely to be related. Evaluation of compositional trends of gt and cpx in eclogite xenoliths indicates that GI and GII are not related by a single fractionation event, but represent products from different reservoirs. Equilibration conditions deduced from coexisting gt and cpx demonstrate that GI diamonds come from larger depths than eclogite xenoliths and by inference GII diamonds. The high FeO and MnO content of a gt inclusion in cpx of an eclogite xenolith is used to argue for the existence of two separate events responsible for the formation of GI and GII diamonds.

  12. Accumulation and δ 13C Composition of Soil Carbon Across a Chronosequence of Dune Complexes at Mono Lake, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aanderud, Z. T.; Shuldman, M. I.; Richards, J. H.

    2004-12-01

    The amount of C sequestered and its permanence in some deserts could be higher than normally appreciated. Limited soil water availability and slow decomposition rates in desert soils may induce the long-term accumulation of soil organic C and coarse woody litter. We inventoried C in soils along a chronosequence of Sarcobatus vermiculatus shrub islands and interspaces at the Mono Basin Ecosystem Research Site, CA. Such shrub-island/interspace dune systems are widespread in basin habitats across the Great Basin Desert. We hypothesized that organic C stores would increase across the chronosequence (48, 84, ˜300, and 1800-3000 years since exposure by lake recession) and that δ 13C values of soil organic C (SOC) would become enriched over time due to isotopic fractionation associated with C mineralization of leaf and root litter. C stores quantified in 0-50 cm soils included: SOC, soil inorganic C (SIC; i.e. carbonates removed by 12 M HCl fumigation), and C in partially decomposed woody and fine litter. The youngest dune system contains at least 13.6 Mg C ha-1 and the oldest contains at least 37.9 Mg C ha-1. Our data suggest slow turnover rates of SOC (C:N ratios ˜10) and substantial accumulation of organic C (coarse litter, fine litter, and SOC) in shrub islands across the chronosequence (islands at the youngest site = 8.0 g kg-1 and islands at the oldest site = 24.0 g kg-1. Large pools of SOC and C in woody debris are potentially protected in this shrub-dominated desert, especially in shrub islands of "old-growth" dune systems. Most of the C in the soil is SIC (94% in youngest dunes to 83% at the oldest dunes). The decrease in SIC proportion as the dune systems age is correlated with a decrease in pH across the chronosequence (10.6 at the youngest site and 9.7 at the oldest site). As dunes age, total soil C isotopic composition shifts from positive δ 13C values (2.8 to 3.6 ‰ ), indicative inorganic processes, to slightly negative values (-1.2 to -3.7 ‰ ) as a

  13. Effect of Crop cultivation after Mediterranean maquis on soil carbon stock, δ13C spatial distribution and root turnover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Agata; Gristina, Luciano; Santoro, Antonino; La Mantia, Tommaso

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was investigate the effect of land use change on soil organic carbon (SOC) stock and distribution in a Mediterranean succession. A succession composed by natural vegetation, cactus pear crop and olive grove, was selected in Sicily. The land use change from mediterranena maquis (C3 plant) to cactus pear (C4 plant) lead to a SOC decrease of 65% after 28 years of cultivation, and a further decrease of 14% after 7 years since the land use from cactus pear to olive grove (C3 plant). Considering this exchange and decrease as well as the periods after the land use changes we calculated the mean residence time (MRT) of soil C of different age. The MRT of C under Mediterranean maquis was about 142 years, but was 10 years under cactus pear. Total SOC and δ13 C were measured along the soil profile (0-75cm) and in the intra-rows in order to evaluate the distribution of new and old carbon derived and the growth of roots. After measuring of weight of cactus pear root, an approach was developed to estimate the turnover of root biomass. Knowledge of root turnover and carbon input are important to evaluate the correlation between carbon input accumulation and SOC stock in order to study the ability of C sink of soils with different use and managements.

  14. Single-carbon catabolism in acetogens: analysis of carbon flow in Acetobacterium woodii and Butyribacterium methylotrophicum by fermentation and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance measurement.

    PubMed Central

    Kerby, R; Niemczura, W; Zeikus, J G

    1983-01-01

    The catabolism of methanol, formate, or carbon monoxide to acetate or butyrate or both was examined in two acetogenic bacteria. Butyribacterium methylotrophicum simultaneously transformed methanol and formate mainly to butyrate with concomitant H2 and CO2 production and consumption. In contrast, methanol plus CO was primarily converted to acetate, and only slight amounts of CO2 were produced. In vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of [13C]methanol transformation by B. methylotrophicum indicated that methanol was predominantly incorporated into the methyl of acetate. 13CO2 was produced and then consumed, and butyrate was formed from the condensation of two acetate precursors. The analysis of the position of acetate labeled by a given 13C single-carbon substrate when B. methylotrophicum or Acetobacterium woodii was grown in the presence of a second one-carbon substrate indicated two trends: when methanol was consumed, CO, CO2, or formate predominantly labeled the acetate carboxyl; when CO was consumed, CO2 and formate were principally funneled into the acetate methyl group, and CO remained a better carboxyl precursor. These data suggest a model of acetate synthesis via the combined operation of two readily reversible single-carbon pathways which are linked by CO2. PMID:6411684

  15. Single-carbon catabolism in acetogens: analysis of carbon flow in Acetobacterium woodii and Butyribacterium methylotrophicum by fermentation and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance measurement.

    PubMed

    Kerby, R; Niemczura, W; Zeikus, J G

    1983-09-01

    The catabolism of methanol, formate, or carbon monoxide to acetate or butyrate or both was examined in two acetogenic bacteria. Butyribacterium methylotrophicum simultaneously transformed methanol and formate mainly to butyrate with concomitant H2 and CO2 production and consumption. In contrast, methanol plus CO was primarily converted to acetate, and only slight amounts of CO2 were produced. In vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of [13C]methanol transformation by B. methylotrophicum indicated that methanol was predominantly incorporated into the methyl of acetate. 13CO2 was produced and then consumed, and butyrate was formed from the condensation of two acetate precursors. The analysis of the position of acetate labeled by a given 13C single-carbon substrate when B. methylotrophicum or Acetobacterium woodii was grown in the presence of a second one-carbon substrate indicated two trends: when methanol was consumed, CO, CO2, or formate predominantly labeled the acetate carboxyl; when CO was consumed, CO2 and formate were principally funneled into the acetate methyl group, and CO remained a better carboxyl precursor. These data suggest a model of acetate synthesis via the combined operation of two readily reversible single-carbon pathways which are linked by CO2. PMID:6411684

  16. Tracing source, mixing and uptaking processes of carbon in an epikarst spring-pond system in southeastern Guizhou of China by carbon isotopes (13C-14C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; Chen, B.; Liu, Z.; Li, H. C.; Yang, R.

    2015-12-01

    δ13C and Δ14C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and aquatic plants from a karst spring and two spring-fed ponds in Laqiao, Maolan County, Guizhou Province in January, July and October of 2013 were measured to understand the roles of aquatic photosynthesis through DIC uptake in karst surface waters. The mean Δ14C and δ13C values of DIC for the spring pool, midstream and downstream ponds are -60.6±26.3‰ and -13.53±1.97‰, -62.8±62.9‰ and -11.72±2.72‰, and -54.2±56.5‰ and -9.40±2.03‰, respectively. Both Δ14C and δ13C show seasonal variations, with lower Δ14C values but heavier δ13C values in dry season and vice versa in summer rainy season. This observation indicates that (1) the main carbon source of the spring DIC is from limestone bedrock dissolution and soil CO2 with higher contribution in summer due to higher productivity; and (2) 13C and 14C have different behaviors during DIC uptake by aquatic plants and during CO2 exchange between DIC and the atmospheric CO2. Biological uptake of CO2 will not affect the Δ14C of DIC, but lead to δ13CDIC enrichment. CO2 exchange between DIC and the atmospheric CO2 should elevate both the Δ14C and δ13C of DIC. In Laqiao spring-pond system, it seems that the effect of biological uptake on the Δ14C and δ13C of DIC is much stronger than that of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere. The mean Δ14C values of POC from the spring pool, midstream and downstream ponds are -308.1 ±64.3‰, -164.4±84.4‰ and -195.1±108.5‰, respectively, indicating mixture of aquatic algae and detrital particle (clay and dust). More aquatic algae were formed in the stream ponds especially in the summer. SEM results of the POC samples support this conclusion. Furthermore, the Δ14C values of the submerged aquatic plants range from -200.0‰ to -51.3 ‰ and were similar to those of the DIC, indicating that the aquatic plants used DIC for photosynthesis. The Δ14C value of an emergent plant

  17. In situ measurement of magnesium carbonate formation from CO2 using static high-pressure and -temperature 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Surface, J Andrew; Skemer, Philip; Hayes, Sophia E; Conradi, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    We explore a new in situ NMR spectroscopy method that possesses the ability to monitor the chemical evolution of supercritical CO(2) in relevant conditions for geological CO(2) sequestration. As a model, we use the fast reaction of the mineral brucite, Mg(OH)(2), with supercritical CO(2) (88 bar) in aqueous conditions at 80 °C. The in situ conversion of CO(2) into metastable and stable carbonates is observed throughout the reaction. After more than 58 h of reaction, the sample was depressurized and analyzed using in situ Raman spectroscopy, where the laser was focused on the undisturbed products through the glass reaction tube. Postreaction, ex situ analysis was performed on the extracted and dried products using Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and magic-angle spinning (1)H-decoupled (13)C NMR. These separate methods of analysis confirmed a spatial dependence of products, possibly caused by a gradient of reactant availability, pH, and/or a reaction mechanism that involves first forming hydroxy-hydrated (basic, hydrated) carbonates that convert to the end-product, anhydrous magnesite. This carbonation reaction illustrates the importance of static (unmixed) reaction systems at sequestration-like conditions. PMID:22676479

  18. Hydrocalcite (CaCO3 * H2O) and Nesquehonite (MgCO3 * 3H2O) in Carbonate Scales.

    PubMed

    Marschner, H

    1969-09-12

    Hydrocalcite (CaCO(3) * H(2)O) with exactly one molecule of hydrate water is the main component of carbonate scales deposited from cold water in contact with air. When the magnesium content of the water is high, the hydrocalcite occurs together with MgCO(3) * 3H(2)O (nesquehonite). From the conditions under which hydrocalcite is transformed into calcite and aragonite, it appears that in some cases aragonite in nature may be formed by way of an intermediary of CaCO(3) * H(2)O. PMID:17779803

  19. Bovine Serum Albumin-Catalyzed Deprotonation of [1-13C]-Glycolaldehyde: Protein Reactivity Toward Deprotonation of α–Hydroxy α–Carbonyl Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Go, Maybelle K.; Malabanan, M. Merced; Amyes, Tina L.; Richard, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) in D2O at 25 °C and pD 7.0 was found to catalyze the deuterium exchange reactions of [1-13C]-glycolaldehyde ([1-13C]-GA) to form [1-13C, 2-2H]-GA and [1-13C, 2,2-di-2H]-GA. The formation of [1-13C, 2-2H]-GA and [1-13C, 2,2-di-2H]-GA in a total yield of 51 ± 3% was observed at early reaction times, and at latter times [1-13C, 2-2H]-GA was observed to undergo BSA-catalyzed conversion to [1-13C, 2,2-di-2H]-GA. The overall second-order rate constant for these deuterium exchange reactions is (kE)P = 0.25 M−1 s−1. By comparison, values of (kE)P = 0.04 M−1 s−1 (Go, M. K., Amyes, T. L., and Richard, J. P. (2009), Biochemistry 48, 5769–5778) and 0.06 M−1 s−1 (Go, M. K., Koudelka, A., Amyes, T. L., and Richard, J. P. (2010), Biochemistry 49, 5377–5389) have been determined, respectively, for the wildtype- and K12G mutant TIM-catalyzed deuterium exchange reactions of [1-13C]-GA to form [1-13C, 2,2-di-2H]-GA. These data show that TIM and BSA exhibit a modest catalytic activity towards deprotonation of α-hydroxy α-carbonyl carbon. It is suggested that this activity is intrinsic to many globular proteins, and that it must be enhanced to demonstrate successful de novo design of protein catalysts of reactions through enamine intermediates. PMID:20687575

  20. Effects of Ontogeny on δ13C of Plant- and Soil-Respired CO2 and on Respiratory Carbon Fractionation in C3 Herbaceous Species.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Yann; Buchmann, Nina; Barnard, Romain L

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge gaps regarding potential ontogeny and plant species identity effects on carbon isotope fractionation might lead to misinterpretations of carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of respired CO2, a widely-used integrator of environmental conditions. In monospecific mesocosms grown under controlled conditions, the δ13C of C pools and fluxes and leaf ecophysiological parameters of seven herbaceous species belonging to three functional groups (crops, forage grasses and legumes) were investigated at three ontogenetic stages of their vegetative cycle (young foliage, maximum growth rate, early senescence). Ontogeny-related changes in δ13C of leaf- and soil-respired CO2 and 13C/12C fractionation in respiration (ΔR) were species-dependent and up to 7‰, a magnitude similar to that commonly measured in response to environmental factors. At plant and soil levels, changes in δ13C of respired CO2 and ΔR with ontogeny were related to changes in plant physiological status, likely through ontogeny-driven changes in the C sink to source strength ratio in the aboveground plant compartment. Our data further showed that lower ΔR values (i.e. respired CO2 relatively less depleted in 13C) were observed with decreasing net assimilation. Our findings highlight the importance of accounting for ontogenetic stage and plant community composition in ecological studies using stable carbon isotopes. PMID:27010947

  1. Effects of Ontogeny on δ13C of Plant- and Soil-Respired CO2 and on Respiratory Carbon Fractionation in C3 Herbaceous Species

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Yann; Buchmann, Nina; Barnard, Romain L.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge gaps regarding potential ontogeny and plant species identity effects on carbon isotope fractionation might lead to misinterpretations of carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of respired CO2, a widely-used integrator of environmental conditions. In monospecific mesocosms grown under controlled conditions, the δ13C of C pools and fluxes and leaf ecophysiological parameters of seven herbaceous species belonging to three functional groups (crops, forage grasses and legumes) were investigated at three ontogenetic stages of their vegetative cycle (young foliage, maximum growth rate, early senescence). Ontogeny-related changes in δ13C of leaf- and soil-respired CO2 and 13C/12C fractionation in respiration (ΔR) were species-dependent and up to 7‰, a magnitude similar to that commonly measured in response to environmental factors. At plant and soil levels, changes in δ13C of respired CO2 and ΔR with ontogeny were related to changes in plant physiological status, likely through ontogeny-driven changes in the C sink to source strength ratio in the aboveground plant compartment. Our data further showed that lower ΔR values (i.e. respired CO2 relatively less depleted in 13C) were observed with decreasing net assimilation. Our findings highlight the importance of accounting for ontogenetic stage and plant community composition in ecological studies using stable carbon isotopes. PMID:27010947

  2. Atmospheric CO2 level affects plants' carbon use efficiency: insights from a 13C labeling experiment on sunflower stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaoying; Schäufele, Rudi; Schnyder, Hans

    2015-04-01

    The increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration has been shown to stimulate plant photosynthesis and (to a lesser extent) growth, thereby acting as a possible sink for the additional atmospheric CO2. However, this effect is dependent on the efficiency with which plants convert atmospheric carbon into biomass carbon, since a considerable proportion of assimilated carbon is returned to the atmosphere via plant respiration. As a core parameter for carbon cycling, carbon use efficiency of plants (CUE, the ratio of net primary production to gross primary production) quantifies the proportion of assimilated carbon that is incorporated into plant biomass. CUE has rarely been assessed based on measurements of complete carbon balance, due to methodological difficulties in measuring respiration rate of plants in light. Moreover, foliar respiration is known to be inhibited in light, thus foliar respiration rate is generally lower in light than in dark. However, this phenomenon, termed as inhibition of respiration in light (IRL), has rarely been assessed at the stand-scale and been incorporated into the calculation of CUE. Therefore, how CUE responses to atmospheric CO2 levels is still not clear. We studied CUE of sunflower stands grown at sub-ambient CO2 level (200 μmol mol-1) and elevated CO2 level (1000 μmol mol-1) using mesocosm-scale gas exchange facilities which enabled continuous measurements of 13CO2/12CO2 exchange. Appling steady-state 13C labeling, fluxes of respiration and photosynthesis in light were separated, and tracer kinetic in respiration was analyzed. This study provides the first data on CUE at a mesocosm-level including respiration in light in different CO2 environments. We found that CUE of sunflower was lower at an elevated CO2 level than at a sub-ambient CO2 level; and the ignorance of IRL lead to erroneous estimations of CUE. Variation in CUE at atmospheric CO2 levels was attributed to several mechanisms. In this study, CO2 enrichment i) affected the

  3. Spatial variability in photosynthetic and heterotrophic activity drives localized δ13C org fluctuations and carbonate precipitation in hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Houghton, J; Fike, D; Druschel, G; Orphan, V; Hoehler, T M; Des Marais, D J

    2014-11-01

    Modern laminated photosynthetic microbial mats are ideal environments to study how microbial activity creates and modifies carbon and sulfur isotopic signatures prior to lithification. Laminated microbial mats from a hypersaline lagoon (Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico) maintained in a flume in a greenhouse at NASA Ames Research Center were sampled for δ(13) C of organic material and carbonate to assess the impact of carbon fixation (e.g., photosynthesis) and decomposition (e.g., bacterial respiration) on δ(13) C signatures. In the photic zone, the δ(13) C org signature records a complex relationship between the activities of cyanobacteria under variable conditions of CO2 limitation with a significant contribution from green sulfur bacteria using the reductive TCA cycle for carbon fixation. Carbonate is present in some layers of the mat, associated with high concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll e (characteristic of green sulfur bacteria) and exhibits δ(13) C signatures similar to DIC in the overlying water column (-2.0‰), with small but variable decreases consistent with localized heterotrophic activity from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Model results indicate respiration rates in the upper 12 mm of the mat alter in situ pH and HCO3- concentrations to create both phototrophic CO2 limitation and carbonate supersaturation, leading to local precipitation of carbonate minerals. The measured activity of SRB with depth suggests they variably contribute to decomposition in the mat dependent on organic substrate concentrations. Millimeter-scale variability in the δ(13) C org signature beneath the photic zone in the mat is a result of shifting dominance between cyanobacteria and green sulfur bacteria with the aggregate signature overprinted by heterotrophic reworking by SRB and methanogens. These observations highlight the impact of sedimentary microbial processes on δ(13) C org signatures; these processes need to be considered when attempting to relate

  4. Carbonate deposition and benthic δ 13C in the subarctic Pacific: implications for changes of the oceanic carbonate system during the past 750,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Rainer; Rushdi, Ahmed; Pisias, Nicklas G.; Bornhold, Brian D.; Blaise, Bertrand; Karlin, Robert

    1991-04-01

    Carbonate deposition at two core sites in the subarctic Pacific (48°N, 133°W; 2.9 km and 3.7 km water depth) follows the standard Pacific carbonate cycles, with glacial values being increased over interglacial values. Benthic δ 13C follows the global trend; that is, glacial values are more negative than interglacial values. Comparison with the benthic δ 13C record of North Atlantic DSDP Site 552 (56°N, 23°W; 2.3 km water depth) shows the North Pacific records to be nearly in phase with and continuously more negative relative to the North Atlantic record. This suggests that concentrations of ∑CO 2(org) were permanently higher in the North Pacific than in the North Atlantic during the past 750,000 years conceivably supporting the hypothesis that there was no deep-water forming in the late Pleistocene North Pacific. Whereas one would expect that the North Pacific deep waters were continuously more corrosive to carbonates than deep waters in the North Atlantic, carbonate deposition at the deep North Pacific core sites is enhanced during glacial periods, and occasionally higher than at shallow North Atlantic Site 552 even though Site 552 was probably above lysocline-depth during most of the late Pleistocene. This apparent paradox can be resolved only by invoking an increase in alkalinity in the glacial North Pacific which would have increased the degree of carbonate ion saturation and thereby improved the state of carbonate preservation.

  5. Complementary constraints from carbon (13C) and nitrogen (15N) isotopes on the glacial ocean's soft-tissue biological pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Somes, C. J.

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional, process-based model of the ocean's carbon and nitrogen cycles, including 13C and 15N isotopes, is used to explore effects of idealized changes in the soft-tissue biological pump. Results are presented from one preindustrial control run (piCtrl) and six simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with increasing values of the spatially constant maximum phytoplankton growth rate μmax, which accelerates biological nutrient utilization mimicking iron fertilization. The default LGM simulation, without increasing μmax and with a shallower and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and increased sea ice cover, leads to 280 Pg more respired organic carbon (Corg) storage in the deep ocean with respect to piCtrl. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the colder glacial thermocline increase, which reduces water column denitrification and, with delay, nitrogen fixation, thus increasing the ocean's fixed nitrogen inventory and decreasing δ15NNO3 almost everywhere. This simulation already fits sediment reconstructions of carbon and nitrogen isotopes relatively well, but it overestimates deep ocean δ13CDIC and underestimates δ15NNO3 at high latitudes. Increasing μmax enhances Corg and lowers deep ocean δ13CDIC, improving the agreement with sediment data. In the model's Antarctic and North Pacific Oceans modest increases in μmax result in higher δ15NNO3 due to enhanced local nutrient utilization, improving the agreement with reconstructions there. Models with moderately increased μmax fit both isotope data best, whereas large increases in nutrient utilization are inconsistent with nitrogen isotopes although they still fit the carbon isotopes reasonably well. The best fitting models reproduce major features of the glacial δ13CDIC, δ15N, and oxygen reconstructions while simulating increased Corg by 510-670 Pg compared with the preindustrial ocean. These results are consistent with the idea that the soft-tissue pump was more efficient

  6. Understanding carbon isotope behaviour during combustion processes: a pre-requisite to using d13C in the field of air pollution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrel, P.; Widory, D.

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of stable isotopes in the field of air pollution research, especially their success in clearly discriminating the different sources of pollution in urban environments, and in tracing their respective impacts for a given sampling location. Among them, carbon isotopes have been used to track the origin of both gases (i.e. CO2; Widory &Javoy, 2003) and particulate matter (i.e. PM2 .5 and PM10; Widory et al., 2004). But understanding the carbon isotope behaviour that leads to this discrimination during combustion processes is a pre-requisite to using them as tracers of pollution sources in the atmosphere. d13C in fuels has been extensively used as an indicator of the processes leading to the generation of their parent crude-oil. Here, we isotopically characterise fuels and combustibles sold in Paris (France), and characterise the isotopic relations existing with their combustion by-products, i.e. gases (CO2) and particles (bulk carbon). Results show that d13C in fuels is clearly related to their physical state, with natural gas being strongly depleted in 13C while coal yields the highest d13C, and liquid fuels display intermediate values. This relation is also valid for exhaust gases, though d13C values of combustion particles form a homogeneous range within which no clear distinction is observed. Combustion processes are accompanied by carbon-isotope fractionation resulting from the combustion being incomplete. Carbon-isotope fractionation is strictly negative ( 1.3‰) during the formation of combustion gases, but generally positive in particle formation even if values close to zero are observed. This study helps understanding the processes leading to the d13C discrimination observed in pollution sources' exhausts, and definitely validates the use of carbon isotopes as tracers of atmospheric pollution.

  7. Two diamictites, two cap carbonates, two δ13C excursions, two rifts: The Neoproterozoic Kingston Peak Formation, Death Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prave, A. R.

    1999-04-01

    Stratigraphic mapping of the Neoproterozoic glaciogenic Kingston Peak Formation (Death Valley, California) provides evidence for two temporally discrete extensional deformation episodes. These episodes are bracketed by the Sourdough Limestone and Noonday Dolomite, the facies characteristics and δ13C data (ranging between 2.15 and -2.56‰ and -1.88 and -4.86‰, respectively) of which make them equivalent to Sturtian and Varangian age cap carbonates, respectively. This constrains the two extensional episodes along the southwestern margin of Laurentia to ca. 700 Ma and ca. 600 Ma. These observations and data show that the field evidence for mid-Neoproterozoic breakup and the predictions from tectonic subsidence curves for a latest Neoproterozoic breakup are both correct. Thus, Neoproterozoic plate reconstructions must account for two discrete rift episodes separated by 100 m.y. or more. Confining rifting to within the Kingston Peak Formation thereby places the younger Proterozoic rocks of the southwestern Great Basin in the rift to drift tectonic phase.

  8. Fate of organic carbon in paddy soils - results of Alisol and Andosol incubation with 13C marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Pauline; Cerli, Chiara; Fiedler, Sabine; Woche, Susanne; Rahayu Utami, Sri; Jahn, Reinhold; Kalbitz, Karsten; Kaiser, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    For a better understanding of organic carbon (OC) decomposition in paddy soils an incubation experiment was performed. Two soil types with contrasting mineralogy (Alisol and Andosol) were exposed to 8 anoxic‒oxic cycles over 1 year. Soils received rice straw marked with 13C (228 ‰) at the beginning of each cycle. A second set of samples without straw addition was used as control. Headspaces of the incubation vessels were regularly analysed for CO2 and CH4. In soil solutions, redox potential, pH, dissolved organic C (DOC), and Fe2+ were measured after each anoxic and each oxic phase. Soils were fractionated by density at the end of the experiment and the different fractions were isotopically analysed. Samples of genuine paddy soils that developed from the test soils were used as reference. During anoxic cycles, soils receiving rice straw released large amounts of CO2 and CH4, indicating strong microbial activity. Consequently, Eh values dropped and pH as well as Fe2+ concentrations increased. Concentrations of DOC were relatively small, indicating either strong consumption and/or strong retention of dissolved organic compounds. During oxic cycles, concentrations of dissolved Fe dropped in both soils while DOC concentrations remained constant in the Alisol and decreased in the Andosol. Density fractionation revealed increased contents of mineral associated OC for the Andosol incubated with straw addition as compared to the parent soil. No changes were found for the Alisol. However, the mineral-associated OC fraction of both soil types contained 13C of the added straw. Hence, fresh organic matter is incorporated while part of the older organic matter has been released or mineralized. The increase in the Andosol might be due to effective binding of fresh OC to minerals and/or stronger retention/preservation of older OC. Both could be explained by the more reactive mineralogy of the Andosol than of the Alisol. XPS analyses of the soils are currently performed and

  9. Effects of Air Pollutants on the Composition of Stable Carbon Isotopes, δ13C, of Leaves and Wood, and on Leaf Injury 1

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Bjorn; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Thorstenson, Yvonne R.

    1988-01-01

    Air pollutants are known to cause visible leaf injury as well as impairment of photosynthetic CO2 fixation. Here we evaluate whether the effects on photosynthesis are large enough to cause changes in the relative composition of stable carbon isotopes, δ13C, of plant tissue samples, and, if so, how the changes relate to visual leaf injury. For that purpose, several woody and herbaceous plant species were exposed to SO2 + O3 and SO2 + O3 + NO2 for one month (8 hours per day, 5 days per week). At the end of the fumigations, the plants were evaluated for visual leaf lesions, and δ13C of leaf tissue was determined. Woody plants generally showed less visual leaf injury and smaller effects on δ13C of pollutant exposure than did herbaceous plants. If δ13C was affected by pollutants, it became, with few exceptions, less negative. The data from the fumigation experiments were consistent with δ13C analyses of whole wood of annual growth rings from two conifer tree species, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Pinus strobus. These trees had been exposed until 1977 to exhaust gases from a gas plant at Lacq, France. Wood of both conifer species formed in the polluted air of 1972 to 1976 had less negative δ13C values than had wood formed in the much cleaner air in 1982 to 1986. No similar, time-dependent differences in δ13C of wood were observed in trees which had been continuously growing in clean air. Our δ13C data from both relatively short-term artificial exposures and long-term natural exposure are consistent with greater stomatal limitation of photosynthesis in polluted air than in clean air. PMID:16666270

  10. Two episodes of 13C-depletion in organic carbon in the latest Permian: Evidence from the terrestrial sequences in northern Xinjiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changqun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Lujun; Shen, Shuzhong; Summons, Roger E.

    2008-06-01

    New analyses reveal two intervals of distinctly lower δ13C values in the terrestrial organic matter of Permian-Triassic sequences in northern Xinjiang, China. The younger negative δ13C org spike can be correlated to the conspicuous and sharp δ13C drops both in carbonate carbon and organic carbon near the Permian-Triassic event boundary (PTEB) in the marine section at Meishan. The geochemical correlation criteria are accompanied by a magnetic susceptibility pulse and higher abundances of distinctive, chain-like organic fossil remains of Reduviasporonites. The older negative δ13C org spike originates within a latest Permian regression. Significant changes in organic geochemical proxies are recorded in the equivalent interval of the marine section at Meishan. These include relatively higher concentrations of total organic carbon, isorenieratane, C 14-C 30 aryl isoprenoids and lower ratios of pristane/phytane that, together, indicate the onset of anoxic, euxinic and restricted environments within the photic zone. The massive and widespread oxidation of buried organic matter that induced these euxinic conditions in the ocean would also result in increased concentrations of 13C-depleted atmospheric CO 2. The latest Permian environmental stress marked by the older negative δ13C org episode can be correlated with the distinct changeover of ostracod assemblages and the occurrences of morphological abnormalities of pollen grains. These observations imply that biogeochemical disturbance was manifested on the land at the end of the Permian and that terrestrial organisms responded to it before the main extinction of the marine fauna.

  11. Balancing the (carbon) budget: Using linear inverse models to estimate carbon flows and mass-balance 13C:15N labelling experiments in low oxygen sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, William Ross; Van Oevelen, Dick; Witte, Ursula

    2013-04-01

    Over 1 million km2 of seafloor experience permanent low-oxygen conditions within oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). OMZs are predicted to grow as a consequence of climate change, potentially affecting oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The Arabian Sea OMZ impinges upon the western Indian continental margin at bathyal depths (150 - 1500m) producing a strong depth dependent oxygen gradient at the sea floor. The influence of the OMZ upon the short term processing of organic matter by sediment ecosystems was investigated using in situ stable isotope pulse chase experiments. These deployed doses of 13C:15N labeled organic matter onto the sediment surface at four stations from across the OMZ (water depth 540 - 1100 m; [O2] = 0.35 - 15 μM). In order to prevent experimentally anoxia, the mesocosms were not sealed. 13C and 15N labels were traced into sediment, bacteria, fauna and 13C into sediment porewater DIC and DOC. However, the DIC and DOC flux to the water column could not be measured, limiting our capacity to obtain mass-balance for C in each experimental mesocosm. Linear Inverse Modeling (LIM) provides a method to obtain a mass-balanced model of carbon flow that integrates stable-isotope tracer data with community biomass and biogeochemical flux data from a range of sources. Here we present an adaptation of the LIM methodology used to investigate how ecosystem structure influenced carbon flow across the Indian margin OMZ. We demonstrate how oxygen conditions affect food-web complexity, affecting the linkages between the bacteria, foraminifera and metazoan fauna, and their contributions to benthic respiration. The food-web models demonstrate how changes in ecosystem complexity are associated with oxygen availability across the OMZ and allow us to obtain a complete carbon budget for the stationa where stable-isotope labelling experiments were conducted.

  12. Processing of particulate organic carbon associated with secondary-treated pulp and paper mill effluent in intertidal sediments: a 13C pulse-chase experiment.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Joanne M; Ross, Donald J; Eyre, Bradley D

    2013-01-01

    To determine the benthic transformation pathways and fate of carbon associated with secondary-treated pulp and paper mill (PPM) effluent, (13)C-labeled activated sludge biomass (ASB) and phytoplankton (PHY) were added, separately, to estuarine intertidal sediments. Over 28 days, (13)C was traced into sediment organic carbon, fauna, seagrass, bacteria, and microphytobenthos and into fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from inundated sediments, and carbon dioxide (CO2(g)) from exposed sediments. There was greater removal of PHY carbon from sediments (~85% over 28 days) compared to ASB (~75%). Although there was similar (13)C loss from PHY and ASB plots via DIC (58% and 56%, respectively) and CO2(g) fluxes (<1%), DOC fluxes were more important for PHY (41%) than ASB (12%). Faster downward transport and loss suggest that fauna prefer PHY, due to its lability and/or toxins associated with ASB; this may account for different carbon pathways. Secondary-treated PPM effluent has lower oxygen demand than primary-treated effluent, but ASB accumulation may contribute to sediment anoxia, and respiration of ASB and PHY-derived DOC may make the water column more heterotrophic. This highlights the need to optimize secondary-treatment processes to control the quality and quantity of organic carbon associated with PPM effluent. PMID:24261917

  13. A Close Look at 13C CPMAS Linewidths in Solids for Rigid, Strongly Coupled Carbons under CW Proton Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderHart, D. L.; Campbell, G. C.

    1998-09-01

    Ambient-temperature13C linewidth (LW) and transverse relaxation (TC2) data are presented for the natural-abundance crystalline carbons of linear polyethylene (LPE) under CW proton decoupling conditions and magic angle spinning (MAS). This linewidth behavior typifies that seen for rigid methylene carbons whose attached protons are also strongly coupled to other protons. These data are presented for two LPE samples (unoriented, melt-crystallized and uniaxially oriented, extruded) as a function of several parameters including static field (1.4 T 13C-bonded protons. The difference in sensitivities of LW(ORPI) to νrfor the off-resonance and the on-resonance cases is traced back, respectively, to the

  14. Trends of /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios in pinyon tree rings of the American Southwest and the global carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, S.W.; Long, A.

    1986-01-01

    An accurate atmospheric /sup 13/C//sup 12/C chronology can provide important constraints to models of the global carbon cycle. Trees accumulate carbon from atmospheric CO/sub 2/ into growth rings and offer potential for /sup 13/C//sup 12/C reconstructions, but results have not been reproducible. This paper presents delta/sup 13/C curves from 5 sites, representing 20 pinyon (Pinus edulis) trees, where cores of 4 trees from each site have been pooled into a composite sample. Isotopic analysis of cellulose in 5-yr ring groups produces curves with a general trend of decreasing delta/sup 13/C after 1800, but with pronounced short-term fluctuations superimposed upon the trend. Evidence indicates the fluctuations are strongly related to moisture availability (drought). A mean curve of the 5 delta/sup 13/C chronologies from which the fossil-fuel component is subtracted suggests a substantial biospheric CO/sub 2/ contribution to the atmosphere since 1800.

  15. Carbon sequestration and estimated carbon credit values as measured using 13C labelling and analysis by means of an optical breath test analyser.

    PubMed

    Hood, R C; Khan, M; Haque, A; Khadir, M; Bonetto, J P; Syamsul, R; Mayr, L; Heiling, M

    2004-05-01

    Recent developments in optical systems (isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry) for breath testing have provided a robust, low-cost option for undertaking (13)C analysis. Although these systems were initially developed for breath testing for Helicobacter pylori, they have an enormous potential as a soil science research tool. The relatively low cost of the equipment, US$15,000-25,000, is within the research budgets of most institutes or universities. The simplicity of the mechanisms and optical nature mean that the equipment requires relatively low maintenance and minimal training. Thus methods were developed to prepare soil and plant materials for analysis using the breath test analyser. Results that compare conventional mass spectrometric methods with the breath test analyser will be presented. In combination with simple (13)C-plant-labeling techniques it is possible to devise methods for estimating carbon sequestration under different agronomic management practices within a short time frame. This enables assessment of the carbon credit value of a particular agronomic practice, which can in turn be used by policy makers for decision-making purposes. For global understanding of the effect of agricultural practices on the carbon cycle, data are required from a range of cropping systems and agro-ecological zones. The method and the approach described will enable collection of hard data within a reasonable time. PMID:14963630

  16. A Study of the Abundance and 13C/12C Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide to Advance the Scientific Understanding of Terrestrial Processes Regulating the Global Carbon Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen C. Piper

    2005-10-15

    The primary goal of our research program, consistent with the goals of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and funded by the terrestrial carbon processes (TCP) program of DOE, has been to improve understanding of changes in the distribution and cycling of carbon among the active land, ocean and atmosphere reservoirs, with particular emphasis on terrestrial ecosystems. Our approach is to systematically measure atmospheric CO2 to produce time series data essential to reveal temporal and spatial patterns. Additional measurements of the 13C/12C isotopic ratio of CO2 provide a basis for distinguishing organic and inorganic processes. To pursue the significance of these patterns further, our research also involved interpretations of the observations by models, measurements of inorganic carbon in sea water, and of CO2 in air near growing land plants.

  17. /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C spin-spin coupling in structural investigations. VII. Substitution effects and direct carbon-carbon constants of the triple bond in acetyline derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Krivdin, L.B.; Proidakov, A.G.; Bazhenov, B.N.; Zinchenko, S.V.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1989-01-10

    The effects of substitution on the direct /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C spin-spin coupling constants of the triple bond were studied in 100 derivatives of acetylene. It was established that these parameters exhibit increased sensitivity to the effect of substituents compared with other types of compounds. The main factor which determines their variation is the electronegativity of the substituting groups, and in individual cases the /pi/-electronic effects are appreciable. The effect of the substituents with an element of the silicon subgroup at the /alpha/ position simultaneously at the triple bond or substituent of the above-mentioned type and a halogen atom.

  18. Carbonic Anhydrase Activity Monitored In Vivo by Hyperpolarized 13C-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Demonstrates Its Importance for pH Regulation in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Ferdia A; Sladen, Helen; Kettunen, Mikko I; Serrao, Eva M; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Wright, Alan; Gill, Andrew B; McGuire, Sarah; Booth, Thomas C; Boren, Joan; McIntyre, Alan; Miller, Jodi L; Lee, Shen-Han; Honess, Davina; Day, Sam E; Hu, De-En; Howat, William J; Harris, Adrian L; Brindle, Kevin M

    2015-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase buffers tissue pH by catalyzing the rapid interconversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) and bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)). We assessed the functional activity of CAIX in two colorectal tumor models, expressing different levels of the enzyme, by measuring the rate of exchange of hyperpolarized (13)C label between bicarbonate (H(13)CO3(-)) and carbon dioxide ((13)CO2), following injection of hyperpolarized H(13)CO3(-), using (13)C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((13)C-MRS) magnetization transfer measurements. (31)P-MRS measurements of the chemical shift of the pH probe, 3-aminopropylphosphonate, and (13)C-MRS measurements of the H(13)CO3(-)/(13)CO2 peak intensity ratio showed that CAIX overexpression lowered extracellular pH in these tumors. However, the (13)C measurements overestimated pH due to incomplete equilibration of the hyperpolarized (13)C label between the H(13)CO3(-) and (13)CO2 pools. Paradoxically, tumors overexpressing CAIX showed lower enzyme activity using magnetization transfer measurements, which can be explained by the more acidic extracellular pH in these tumors and the decreased activity of the enzyme at low pH. This explanation was confirmed by administration of bicarbonate in the drinking water, which elevated tumor extracellular pH and restored enzyme activity to control levels. These results suggest that CAIX expression is increased in hypoxia to compensate for the decrease in its activity produced by a low extracellular pH and supports the hypothesis that a major function of CAIX is to lower the extracellular pH. PMID:26249175

  19. Geochemistry of dissolved inorganic carbon in a Coastal Plain aquifer. 2. Modeling carbon sources, sinks, and δ13C evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, Peter B.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    1991-01-01

    Stable isotope data for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), carbonate shell material and cements, and microbial CO2 were combined with organic and inorganic chemical data from aquifer and confining-bed pore waters to construct geochemical reaction models along a flowpath in the Black Creek aquifer of South Carolina. Carbon-isotope fractionation between DIC and precipitating cements was treated as a Rayleigh distillation process. Organic matter oxidation was coupled to microbial fermentation and sulfate reduction. All reaction models reproduced the observed chemical and isotopic compositions of final waters. However, model 1, in which all sources of carbon and electron-acceptors were assumed to be internal to the aquifer, was invalidated owing to the large ratio of fermentation CO2 to respiration CO2 predicted by the model (5–49) compared with measured ratios (two or less). In model 2, this ratio was reduced by assuming that confining beds adjacent to the aquifer act as sources of dissolved organic carbon and sulfate. This assumption was based on measured high concentrations of dissolved organic acids and sulfate in confining-bed pore waters (60–100 μM and 100–380 μM, respectively) relative to aquifer pore waters (from less than 30 μM and 2–80 μM, respectively). Sodium was chosen as the companion ion to organic-acid and sulfate transport from confining beds because it is the predominant cation in confining-bed pore waters. As a result, excessive amounts of Na-for-Ca ion exchange and calcite precipitation (three to four times more cement than observed in the aquifer) were required by model 2 to achieve mass and isotope balance of final water. For this reason, model 2 was invalidated. Agreement between model-predicted and measured amounts of carbonate cement and ratios of fermentation CO2 to respiration CO2 were obtained in a reaction model that assumed confining beds act as sources of DIC, as well as organic acids and sulfate. This assumption was

  20. Use of 13C labeling to assess carbon partitioning in transgenic and nontransgenic (parental) rice and their rhizosphere soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei Xiang; Liu, Wei; Lu, Hao Hao; Chen, Ying Xu; Medha, Devare; Janice, Thies

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthetic assimilation of CO2 is a primary source of carbon in soil and root exudates and can influence the community dynamics of rhizosphere organisms. Thus, if carbon partitioning is affected in transgenic crops, rhizosphere microbial communities may also be affected. In this study, the temporal effects of gene transformation on carbon partitioning in rice and rhizosphere microbial communities were investigated under greenhouse conditions using the 13C pulse-chase labeling method and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. The 13C contents in leaves of transgenic (Bt) and nontransgenic (Ck) rice were significantly different at the seedling, booting and heading stages. There were no detectable differences in 13C distribution in rice roots and rhizosphere microorganisms at any point during rice development. Although a significantly lower amount of Gram-positive bacterial PLFAs and a higher amount of Gram-negative bacterial PLFAs were observed in Bt rice rhizosphere as compared with Ck at all plant development stages, there were no significant differences in the amount of individual 13C-PLFA between Bt and Ck rhizospheres at any growing stage. These findings indicate that the insertion of cry1Ab and marker genes into rice had no persistent or adverse effect on the photosynthate distribution in rice or the microbial community composition in its rhizosphere. PMID:19049503

  1. Carbon flow and trophic structure of an Antarctic coastal benthic community as determined by δ 13C and δ 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, C. L.; Stark, J. S.; Johnstone, G. J.; Smith, S. D. A.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were used to determine the different carbon pathways and trophic assemblages amongst coastal benthic fauna of the Windmill Islands, East Antarctica. Macroalgae, pelagic POM, sediment POM and sea ice POM had well-separated δ 13C signatures, which ranged from -36.75‰ for the red alga Phyllophora antarctica, to -10.35‰ for sea ice POM. Consumers were also well separated by δ 13C, ranging from -21.42‰ for the holothurian Staurocucumis sp. up to -7.47‰ for the urchin Sterechinus neumayeri. Analysis of δ 13C and δ 15N revealed distinct groups for suspension feeders, grazer/herbivores and deposit feeders, whilst predators and predator/scavengers showed less grouping. Consumers spanned a δ 15N range of 8.71‰, equivalent to four trophic levels, although δ 15N ratios amongst consumers were continuous, rather than grouped into discrete trophic levels. The study has built a trophic model for the Windmill Islands and summarises three main carbon pathways utilised by the benthos: (1) pelagic POM; (2) macroalgae/epiphytic/benthic diatoms and (3) sediment POM/benthic diatoms. The movement of carbon within the coastal benthic community of the Windmill Islands is considered complex, and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were valuable tools in determining specific feeding guilds and in tracing carbon flow, particularly amongst lower-order consumers.

  2. Diurnal behavior of the carbon dioxide flux and change in the isotopic ratio δ13C in surface and near-bottom water in littoral of Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Mikhail V.; Domysheva, Valentina M.; Padalko, Natalia L.; Chernikov, Eugenii V.; Prazdnichnykh, Maxim I.; Tumakov, Alexander G.; Pestunov, Dmitrii A.

    2014-11-01

    Lake Baikal is one of the unique natural environments in Siberia which, to a large extent, affects the state of the nature in this region. The processes of gas exchange in the "water-atmosphere" system have been studied in Lake Baikal since 2002. The main purpose of the integrated investigations of exchange of carbon-containing gases in the water-atmosphere system in Lake Baikal is to study the contribution of physical, chemical, and biological components of the process and their interrelation with the intensity and rhythms of the fluxes. In 2013, the integrated measurements in the littoral area of Baikal were complemented with studies of the diurnal dynamics of isotopic ratio δ 13C in the surface and near-bottom water, which were not yet performed in Baikal before. In this work, we analyze first results of the joint analysis of RO2 fluxes in the "atmosphere - water surface" system and δ 13C, obtained in August 2013 in the littoral area of South Baikal. It is shown that d13C markedly increases in the surface waters at daylight time. In nighttime period, there takes place a reverse process, when δ 13C of the surface water approaches δ 13C, which is recorded for near-bottom water.

  3. Carbon cycle perturbations recorded by δ13C of bulk organic matter: the Carnian Pluvial Event in the Dolomites, northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preto, Nereo; Breda, Anna; Dal Corso, Jacopo; Rigo, Manuel; Roghi, Guido; Spötl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    A period of increased rainfall occurred in the Carnian (Late Triassic), known as Carnian Pluvial Event (CPE), which is evidenced by major lithological changes in continental and marine successions at tropical latitudes. Increased continental weathering and erosion led to the supply of large amounts of siliciclastics into the marginal basins of the Tethys. Seawater anoxia is also observed locally in semi-restricted basins. Simultaneously, microbial factories on high-relief carbonate platforms were replaced by metazoan factories, forming low-relief carbonate ramps and mixed low-gradient shelves. This environmental change has been shown to be closely associated with a negative carbon isotope excursion. A negative δ13C shift is recorded by bulk organic matter in the Milieres section (central Dolomites) and parallels a coeval excursion in carbon-isotope records of higher plant and marine algal biomarker, thus testifying a global change in the isotopic composition of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ocean. This isotopic excursion was identified in organic carbon records throughout the western Tethys, but so far could not be reproduced convincingly using carbon isotope records from carbonate. A long carbon isotope record was produced from bulk organic matter of the early to late Carnian Milieres - Dibona section in the Dolomites, northern Italy. Carbon isotope analyses of carbonate (limestone and dolomite) were also obtained. This new carbon isotope record illustrates the structure of this complex carbon cycle perturbation related to the CPE. But while sharp carbon isotope oscillations are evident in the bulk organic carbon record, there is no evidence of a similar pattern in carbonate record. It can be shown that the carbon isotope record of carbonates is influenced by fractionation and diagenetic processes that completely obliterated the original δ13C signal. We conclude that the Carnian carbonates of the Dolomites do not

  4. General last-step labeling of biomolecule-based substrates by [12C], [13C], and [11C] carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Cornilleau, Thomas; Audrain, Hélène; Guillemet, Aude; Hermange, Philippe; Fouquet, Eric

    2015-01-16

    Alkaloid-, steroid-, biotin-, carbohydrate-, nucleoside-, and peptide-based bioconjugates are easily labeled with CO by a last-step palladium-catalyzed carbonylation. The choice of the [(12)C], [(13)C], or [(11)C] isotope opens the way to a new class of potential tracers or ligands easily available for various applications. PMID:25562588

  5. THE GALACTIC R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS: THE C{sub 2} SWAN BANDS, THE CARBON PROBLEM, AND THE {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    Hema, B. P.; Pandey, Gajendra; Lambert, David L. E-mail: pandey@iiap.res.in

    2012-03-10

    Observed spectra of R Coronae Borealis (RCB) and hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) stars are analyzed by synthesizing the C{sub 2} Swan bands (1, 0), (0, 0), and (0, 1) using our detailed line list and the Uppsala model atmospheres. The (0, 1) and (0, 0) C{sub 2} bands are used to derive the {sup 12}C abundance, and the (1, 0) {sup 12}C{sup 13}C band to determine the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios. The carbon abundance derived from the C{sub 2} Swan bands is about the same for the adopted models constructed with different carbon abundances over the range 8.5 (C/He = 0.1%) to 10.5 (C/He = 10%). Carbon abundances derived from C I lines are about a factor of four lower than the carbon abundance of the adopted model atmosphere over the same C/He interval, as reported by Asplund et al., who dubbed the mismatch between adopted and derived C abundance as the 'carbon problem'. In principle, the carbon abundances obtained from C{sub 2} Swan bands and that assumed for the model atmosphere can be equated for a particular choice of C/He that varies from star to star. Then, the carbon problem for C{sub 2} bands is eliminated. However, such C/He ratios are in general less than those of the extreme helium stars, the seemingly natural relatives to the RCB and HdC stars. A more likely solution to the C{sub 2} carbon problem may lie in a modification of the model atmosphere's temperature structure. The derived carbon abundances and the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios are discussed in light of the double degenerate and the final flash scenarios.

  6. Effects of cadmium combined with ultraviolet-B radiation on growth, gas exchange, and stable carbon isotope value (δ13C) in soybean (Glycine max L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tuo; Qiang, Weiya; An, Lizhe; Wang, Xunling

    2003-06-01

    The changes in growth, gas exchange, and stable carbon isotope value (δ13C) in soybean seedlings (Glycine max L. Merr. cv. Longdou No.1) exposed to a 11.2 kJ m-2 day-1 biologically effective UV-B radiation (UV-BBE, 280-315 nm) and 50 mg CdCl2 kg-1 vermicular treatment, either alone or in combination were investigated under greenhouse conditions. Compared to the control, plant height and biomass, photosynthesis rates (Pn), water-use efficiency (WUE), and stomatal conductance (Gs) decreased significantly (P<0.05) exposed to cadmium (Cd) or UV-B radiation and combination. Leaf stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C values) decreased by Cd or UV-B radiation alone and in combination, δ13C were significantly correlated with changes in Pn, WUE and biomass. But Cd and UV-B in combination did not cause greater changes compared to Cd or UV-B radiation alone in many parameters. These results suggested that there was relatively little interaction of the two stresses. δ13C values may provide a reliable indication for growth, WUE, Pn or biomass of soybean seedlings when exposed to UV-B radiation and cadmium pollution.

  7. Carbon-proton scalar couplings in RNA. 3D heteronuclear and 2D isotope-edited NMR of a [sup 13]C-labeled extra-stable hairpin

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, J.V.; Landry, S.M.; Varani, G.; Tinoco, I. Jr. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-29

    Long range carbon-proton scalar couplings were measured for an RNA hairpin of 12 nucleotides using 3D and [sup 13]C-edited 2D NMR. The large one-bond carbon-proton scalar couplings ([sup 1]J[sub CH]) and small n-bond couplings ([sup 1]J[sub CH]) produce ECOSY type cross-peaks, thus facilitating the determination of the sign and magnitude of the smaller [sup 2]J[sub CH] or [sup 3]J[sub CH]. The UUCGRNA hairpin (5[prime]-rGGACUUCGGUCC-3[prime]), whose structure has been determined by our laboratory, was uniformly [sup 13]C-labeled at 30% isotopic enrichment. The observed [sup 1]J[sub CH] couplings were then correlated to the known structure. The signs of [sup 2]J[sub C4[prime]H5[prime

  8. Harding Iceland spar: a new delta 18O-delta 13C carbonate standard for hydrothermal minerals.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    An isotopically homogenous calcite, Iceland spar from the Iceberg claim, near the Harding pegmatite of N New Mexico, has delta 18O +11.78 + or - 0.07per mille (=+22.15per mille for CO2) and delta 13C -4.80 + or - 0.02per mille and has been prepared in quantities suitable for use as a working standard in MS.-R.A.H.

  9. In Situ 13C NMR at Elevated-Pressures and -Temperatures Investigating the Conversion of CO2 to Magnesium and Calcium Carbonate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surface, J. A.; Conradi, M. S.; Skemer, P. A.; Hayes, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We have constructed specialized NMR hardware to conduct in situ elevated-pressure, elevated-temperature 13C NMR studies of unmixed heterogeneous mixtures of solids, liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. Specifically, our aim is to monitor CO2 uptake in both ultramafic rocks and in more porous geological materials to understand the mechanisms of chemisorption as a function of temperature, pressure and pH. In this in situ NMR probe, we are able to simulate processes at geologically relevant fluid pressures and temperatures, monitoring the kinetics of CO2 conversion to carbonates. The in situ NMR experiments consist of heterogeneous mixtures of rock, salty brine solution, and moderate pressure CO2 gas at elevated temperatures. The purpose of studying these reactions is to determine efficacy of carbonate formation in various geological reservoirs. Via 13C NMR, we have spectroscopically characterized and quantified the conversion of CO2 to magnesium carbonate and calcium carbonate minerals. When CO2 reacts with the calcium or magnesium in a mineral or rock sample, the 13C chemical shift, linewidth, lineshape, and relaxation times change dramatically. This change can be monitored in situ and provide instantaneous and continuous characterization that maps the chemistry that is taking place. For example, on the pathway to MgCO3 formation, there are a number of phases of Mg(OH)x(H2O)y(CO3)z that are apparent via NMR spectroscopy. We will demonstrate that NMR can be used for quantitative characterization of multiple metastable mineral phases in pure forms and in mixtures. Results are confirmed via powder XRD and Raman spectroscopy of aquo- hydro- carbonato- magnesium species and calcium carbonate species. We also have monitored the 13C spectroscopy to analyze the phase of CO2 (liquid, supercritical, or gas) and its conversion into other forms, such as bicarbonate and carbonate species, providing a "window" into the in situ pH of the reacting system. Reference: 'In Situ

  10. A capillary absorption spectrometer for stable carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C) analysis in very small samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. F.; Sams, R. L.; Blake, T. A.; Newburn, M.; Moran, J.; Alexander, M. L.; Kreuzer, H.

    2012-02-01

    A capillary absorption spectrometer (CAS) suitable for IR laser isotope analysis of small CO2 samples is presented. The system employs a continuous-wave (cw) quantum cascade laser to study nearly adjacent rovibrational transitions of different isotopologues of CO2 near 2307 cm-1 (4.34 μm). This initial CAS system can achieve relative isotopic precision of about 10 ppm 13C, or ˜1‰ (per mil in delta notation relative to Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite) with 20-100 picomoles of entrained sample within the hollow waveguide for CO2 concentrations ˜400-750 ppm. Isotopic analyses of such gas fills in a 1-mm ID hollow waveguide of 0.8 m overall physical path length can be carried out down to ˜2 Torr. Overall 13C/12C ratios can be calibrated to ˜2‰ accuracy with diluted CO2 standards. A novel, low-cost method to reduce cw-fringing noise resulting from multipath distortions in the hollow waveguide is presented, which allows weak absorbance features to be studied at the few ppm level (peak-to-rms) after 1000 scans are co-added in ˜10 s. The CAS is meant to work directly with converted CO2 samples from a laser ablation-catalytic combustion micro-sampler to provide 13C/12C ratios of small biological isolates currently operating with spatial resolutions ˜50 μm.

  11. Synthesizing the Use of Carbon Isotope (14C and 13C) Approaches to Understand Rates and Pathways for Permafrost C Mobilization and Mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estop-Aragones, C.; Olefeldt, D.; Schuur, E.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the permafrost carbon (C) feedback it is important to synthesize our current knowledge, and knowledge gaps, of how permafrost thaw can cause in situ mineralization or downstream mobilization of aged soil organic carbon (SOC) and the rate of this release. This potential loss of old SOC may occur via gaseous flux of CO2 and CH4 exchanged between soil and the atmosphere and via waterborne flux as DOC, POC (and their subsequent decomposition and release to the atmosphere). Carbon isotope (14C and 13C) approaches have been used to estimate both rates and pathways for permafrost C mobilization and mineralization. Radiocarbon (14C) has been used to estimate the contribution of aged C to overall respiration or waterborne C export. We aim to contrast results from radiocarbon studies, in order to assess differences between ecosystems (contrasting wet and dry ecosystems), thaw histories (active layer deepening or thermokarst landforms), greenhouse gas considered (CO2 and CH4) and seasons. We propose to also contrast methodologies used for assessing the contribution of aged C to overall C balance, and include studies using 13C data. Biological fractionation of 13C during both uptake and decomposition has been taken advantage of both in order to aid the interpretation of 14C data and on its own to assess sources and mineralization pathways. For example, 13C data has been used to differentiate between CH4 production pathways, and the relative contribution of anaerobic CO2 production to overall respiration. Overall, carbon isotope research is proving highly valuable for our understanding of permafrost C dynamics following thaw, and there is a current need to synthesize the available literature.

  12. Effects of combustion emissions from the Eurasian continent in winter on seasonal δ 13C of elemental carbon in aerosols in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Hiroto; Haneishi, Yuya

    2012-01-01

    We investigated suspended particulate matter (SPM, particles with a 100% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm) and PM2.5 (particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm) concentrations in aerosols sampled in Akita Prefecture, Japan, from April 2008 to January 2010, and the carbon isotope ratios (δ 13C) of elemental carbon (EC) in both SPM and PM2.5 and in samples from possible sources. We also determined the ion contents of SPM and estimated the back trajectories of air masses arriving at Akita Prefecture during the study period. The SPM concentration was very low (annual average, 15.2 μg m -3), and it tended to be higher in spring and lower in winter. We attributed the higher SPM in spring to dust storms brought from the Asian continent. The average annual PM2.5 concentration was 8.6 μg m -3. δ 13C of source samples (gasoline and diesel vehicle exhaust, fireplace soot, open biomass burning emissions, street dust, soil, charcoal, and coal) ranged from -34.7‰ to -1.8‰. δ 13C values of soot from gasoline light-duty (-24.4 ± 0.7‰) and passenger vehicles (-24.1 ± 0.6‰) were very similar to that of soot from all diesel vehicles (-24.3 ± 0.3‰). δ 13C was enriched in SPM in winter compared with summer values, moreover, only a slight seasonal trend was detected in δ 13C in PM2.5. From these data and the source results, we hypothesized that the enrichment of δ 13C of SPM and PM2.5 in winter was a long-range effect of overseas combustion processes such as coal combustion. In addition, δ 13C of SPM was correlated with Cl - and Mg 2+ contents in SPM, suggesting the influence of sea salt. We verified this hypothesis by back trajectory analyses. The results indicated a continental influence effects on EC of SPM and PM2.5 in winter.

  13. Carbon Metabolism of Soil microorganisms at Low Temperatures: Position-Specific 13C Labeled Glucose Reveals the Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, C.; Bore, E. K.; Halicki, S.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Dippold, M.

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic pathway activities at low temperature are not well understood, despite the fact that the processes are relevant for many soils globally and seasonally. To analyze soil metabolism at low temperature, isotopomeres of position-specifically 13C labeled glucose were applied at three temperature levels; +5, -5 -20 oC. In additon, one sterilization treatment with sodium azide at +5 oC was also performed. Soils were incubated for 1, 3 and 10 days while soil samples at -20 oC were additionally sampled after 30 days. The 13C from individual molecule position in respired CO2 was quantifed. Incorporation of 13C in bulk soil, extractable microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) and cell membranes of different microbial communities classified by 13C phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) was carried out. Our 13CO2 data showed a dominance of C-1 respiration at +5 °C for treatments with and without sodium azide, but total respiration for sodium azide inhibited treatments increased by 14%. In contrast, at -5 and -20 oC metabolic behavior showed intermingling of preferential respiration of the glucose C-4 and C-1 positions. Therefore, at +5 °C, pentose phosphate pathway activity is a dominant metabolic pathway used by microorganisms to metabolize glucose. The respiration increase due to NaN3 inhibition was attributed to endoenzymes released from dead organisms that are stabilized at the soil matrix and have access to suitable substrate and co-factors to permit their funtions. Our PLFA analysis showed that incorporation of glucose 13C was higher in Gram negative bacteria than other microbial groups as they are most competitive for LMWOS. Only a limited amount of microbial groups maintained their glucose utilizing activity at -5 and -20 °C and they strongly shifted towards a metabolization of glucose via both glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways indicating both growth and cellular maintenance. This study revealed a remarkable microbial acitivity

  14. Predicting Effects of Cations (Mg, Ca, Na, and K) on 13C-18O Clumping in Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Species and Implications for Carbonate Geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, P. S.; Tripati, A.; Schauble, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    13C-18O bond abundance in carbonates is becoming more widely used as a geothermometer; this proxy is affected by various environmental factors. Here we report the influence of cations (Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, and K+) at high concentrations (~2 mol/liter) on the isotopologue composition of the DIC pool. Clumped isotope fractionation in CO32- groups of dissolved species and carbonate minerals is reported using the notation Δ63 corresponding mainly to the enrichment in per mil of Hx13C18O16O2x-2 (plus Hx12C18O17O 16Ox-2, Hx12C17O17O 17Ox-2, and Hx13C17O17O 16Ox-2) above the amount expected for a random distribution of isotopes among all CO32-, HCO3- and H2CO3 isotopologues. The Δ63 of a solution of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) depends upon the relative abundances of each DIC species (CO2(aq) or H2CO3, HCO3-, and CO32-) since each DIC species has a distinct equilibrium clumped isotope signature. These abundances depend primarily upon solution pH and secondarily upon temperature and salinity (fresh water vs. sea water vs. brine). Solvated DIC species with additional ions and the composite DIC solutions were modeled as a series of supermolecular clusters, each with a single DIC molecule, an added cation, and 21 to 32 surrounding H2O molecules. As in our previous work (Hill et al., 2014, GCA 125, 610-652), we developed electronic structure models at different levels of theory to ensure the best possible reliability at reasonable computational efficiency. Overall, the models predict that common aqueous cations will slightly increase the 13C-18O clumping signature of both individual DIC species and the total DIC pool at a given pH, salinity, and temperature. Predicted Δ63values are also dependent upon cation concentration. The perturbing effect of Mg2+ > Ca2+ > K+ > Na+. Dissolved cations increase the clumped crossover pH (pH at which the composite Δ63 of the DIC pool equals the Δ63 of calcite at equilibrium). Our models predict that a DIC solution of low to moderate p

  15. Use of 13C Labeled Carbon Tetrachloride to Demonstrate the Transformation to Carbon Dioxide under Anaerobic Conditions in a Continuous Flow Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprini, L.; Azizian, M.

    2012-12-01

    The demonstration of transformation of chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CAHs) in the subsurface is a challenge, especially when the products are carbon dioxide (CO2) and chloride ion. The groundwater contaminant carbon tetrachloride (CT) is of particular interest since a broad range of transformation products can be potentially formed under anaerobic conditions. The ability to demonstrate the transformation of CT to CO2 as a non toxic endproduct, is also of great interest. Results will be presented from a continuous flow column study where 13C labeled CT was used to demonstrate its transformation to CO2. The column was packed with a quartz sand and bioaugmented the Evanite Culture (EV) that is capable of transforming tetrachloroethene (PCE) to ethene. The column was continously fed a synthetic groundwater that was amended with PCE (0.10 mM) and either formate (1.5 mM) or lactate (1.1 mM), which ferments to produce hydrogen (H2) as the ultimate electron donor. Earlier CT transformation studies with the column, in the absence of sulfate reduction, and with formate added as a donor found CT (0.015 mM) was over 98% transformed with about 20% converted to chloroform (CF) (0.003 mM) and with a transient detection of chloromethane (CM). Methane and carbon disulfide, as potential products, were not detected. Neither CT nor CF inhibited the reductive dehalogenation of PCE to ethene. A series of transient studies conducted after these initial CT transformation tests, but in the absence of CT, showed formate remained an effective substrate for maintaining sulfate reduction and PCE transformation. Lactate, which was effectively fermented prior to CT addition, was not effectively fermented, with propionate accumulating as a fermentation product. When lactate was added, PCE was mainly transformed to cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and VC, and sulfate reduction did not occur. In order to restore effective lactate fermentation the column was then bioaugmented with an EV culture that

  16. A 100 Myr history of the carbon cycle based on the 400 kyr cycle in marine δ13C benthic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paillard, Didier; Donnadieu, Yannick

    2014-12-01

    Documenting the past coevolution of Earth temperatures and of the carbon cycle is of paramount importance for our understanding of climate dynamics. Atmospheric CO2 is well constrained over the last million years through direct measurements in air bubbles from Antarctic ice cores. For older times, many different and sometimes conflicting proxies have been suggested. Here we provide a new methodology to constrain the carbon cycle in the past, based on marine benthic δ13C records. Marine δ13C data are recording a persistent 400 kyr cycle, with an amplitude primarily linked to the total amount of carbon in the ocean, or dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). By extracting this amplitude from published records, we obtain a new strong constraint on the 100 Myr history of Earth's carbon cycle. The obtained Cenozoic evolution of DIC is in surprisingly in a good agreement with existing reconstructions of pCO2, suggesting that pCO2 is mostly driven by DIC changes over this period. In contrast, we find no strong decreasing trend in DIC between the Cretaceous and the Cenozoic, suggesting that Cretaceous atmospheric pCO2 levels were limited, and high temperatures at this time should be explained by other mechanisms. Alternatively, high Cretaceous atmospheric pCO2 could occur as a consequence of changes in oceanic chemistry but not carbon content.

  17. Variations of soil δ13C and δ15N across a precipitation gradient in a savanna ecosystem: Implications of climate change on the carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dintwe, K.; Gilhooly, W., III; Wang, L.; O'Donnell, F. C.; Bhattachan, A.; D'Odorico, P.; Okin, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Savannas are the third largest terrestrial carbon pool after only tropical and borealforests. They are highly productive ecosystems and contribute about 30% of the globalterrestrial net primary productivity and potentially contain 20% of the world's soilorganic carbon. Global circulation models have predicted that many savannas willbecome warmer and drier during the twenty-first century. The impacts of the projectedclimatic trend on the productivity and biogeochemical cycles of savannas are not fullyunderstood. Here, we assessed the abundance of stable carbon13C) and nitrogen (δ15N)isotopes in soil profiles at four sites along a 1000 km transect with a strong south-northprecipitation gradient in southern Africa. The south receives about 180 mm of rainfall peryear and dominated by grass species (C4) whereas the north receives 540 mm·yr-1 anddominated by woody plants (C3). Soil surface δ13C showed that woody vegetation contributedmore than 75% of soil carbon input in the wet sites whereas grasses contributed about65% of soil carbon input in the dry sites. The soil profile δ13C indicated that intermediatesites have shifted from grass dominated to woody-shrub-dominated statesduring recent past. The dry sites had relatively higher δ15N (~10‰) compared to the wetsites (~5‰) indicating significantly greater N2 fixation in the wetter sites or high rates ofNH3 volatilization in the drier sites. Our results suggest that as savannas become warmerand drier due to climate change, woody shrubs are likely to be the dominant form ofvegetation structure, a process that could alter biogeochemical processes and results insavannas becoming net carbon sink or source.

  18. A Capillary Absorption Spectrometer for Stable Carbon Isotope Ratio (13C/12C) Analysis in Very Small Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, James F.; Sams, Robert L.; Blake, Thomas A.; Newburn, Matthew K.; Moran, James J.; Alexander, M. L.; Kreuzer, Helen W.

    2012-02-06

    A capillary absorption spectrometer (CAS) suitable for IR laser isotope analysis of small CO{sub 2} samples is presented. The system employs a continuous-wave (cw) quantum cascade laser to study nearly adjacent rovibrational transitions of different isotopologues of CO{sub 2} near 2307 cm{sup -1} (4.34 {mu}m). This initial CAS system can achieve relative isotopic precision of about 10 ppm {sup 13}C, or {approx}1{per_thousand} (per mil in delta notation relative to Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite) with 20-100 picomoles of entrained sample within the hollow waveguide for CO{sub 2} concentrations {approx}400 to 750 ppm. Isotopic analyses of such gas fills in a 1-mm ID hollow waveguide of 0.8 m overall physical path length can be carried out down to {approx}2 Torr. Overall {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios can be calibrated to {approx}2{per_thousand} accuracy with diluted CO{sub 2} standards. A novel, low-cost method to reduce cw-fringing noise resulting from multipath distortions in the hollow waveguide is presented, which allows weak absorbance features to be studied at the few ppm level (peak-to-rms) after 1,000 scans are co-added in {approx}10 sec. The CAS is meant to work directly with converted CO{sub 2} samples from a Laser Ablation-Catalytic-Combustion (LA CC) micro-sampler to provide {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of small biological isolates with spatial resolutions {approx}50 {mu}m.

  19. Constraints on the Origin of Sedimentary Organic Carbon in the Beaufort Sea from Coupled Molecular 13C and 14C Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenzek, N.; Montlucon, D.; Yunker, M.; MacDonald, R.; Eglinton, T.

    2005-12-01

    The type and flux of organic carbon (OC) delivered from the continents to the sea can both influence, and be influenced by, climate change on regional and global scales. In order to develop a more complete view of OC delivery in the climatically sensitive Arctic region, we measured the stable carbon and radiocarbon isotopic signatures of individual lipid biomarkers and products of kerogen pyrolysis from the surficial sediments of several sites on the Mackenzie Shelf and adjacent slope of the Beaufort Sea. Even carbon numbered fatty acids exhibit a trend of increasing radiocarbon age with increasing chain length, from modern values for shorter homologues (nC18 or below) to several thousand years old for their longer counterparts (nC24 or greater). Such depleted Δ14C values for longer-chain fatty acids likely reflect supply of vascular plant OC that has been `pre-' on the continents for several millennia prior to delivery to the Beaufort Sea. Their concomitant stable carbon isotopic compositions support a C3 land plant source. The molecular distributions and corresponding δ13C and Δ14C signatures of solvent-extractable alkanes point to at least two sources: higher plant leaf waxes and a 14C-`dead' component likely derived from erosion of organic-rich sedimentary rocks exposed within the Mackenzie River drainage basin. The stable carbon and radiocarbon compositions of straight chain n-hydrocarbon pyrolysis products from the corresponding demineralized sediments suggest their vascular plant-derived precursor structures also spent several millennia in continental reservoirs before being delivered to the Beaufort Sea. On a bulk level, the trend in sedimentary organic carbon contents, C/N ratios, and δ13C values point to an overall decrease in the terrigenous input (mainly from the Mackenzie river) with distance offshore, whereas bulk Δ14C measurements exhibit no trend suggesting a somewhat constant pre-aged component. A dual molecular isotopic mass balance approach

  20. Stable Oxygen (δ 18O) and Carbon13C) Isotopes in the Skeleton of Bleached and Recovering Corals From Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, L. J.; Grottoli, A. G.

    2004-12-01

    Coral skeletal stable oxygen isotopes (δ 18O) reflect changes in seawater temperature and salinity, while stable carbon isotopes (δ 13C) reflect a combination of both metabolic (photosynthesis and feeding) and kinetic fractionation. Together, the two isotopic signatures may be used as a proxy for past bleaching events. During bleaching, increased seawater temperatures often contribute to a decline in zooxanthellae and/or chlorophyll concentrations, resulting in a decrease in photosynthesis. We experimentally investigated the effect of bleaching and subsequent recovery on the δ 13C and δ 18O values of coral skeleton. Fragments from two coral species (Montipora capitata and Porites compressa) from Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii were bleached in outdoor tanks by raising the seawater temperature to 30° C. Additional fragments from the same parent colonies were maintained at ambient seawater temperatures (27° C) in separate tanks as controls. After one month in the tanks, a subset of the fragments was frozen and all remaining fragments were placed back on the reef to recover. All coral fragments were analyzed for their skeletal δ 13C and δ 18O compositions at five time intervals: before, immediately after, 1.5, 4, and 8 months after bleaching. In addition, rates of photosynthesis, calcification, and heterotrophy were also measured. Immediately after bleaching, δ 18O decreased in bleached M. capitata relative to controls, reflecting their exposure to increased seawater temperatures. During recovery, δ 18O values in the treatment M. capitata were not different from the controls. In P. compressa, δ 18O did not significantly differ in bleached and control corals at any time during the experiment. Immediately after bleaching, δ 13C decreased in the bleached fragments of both species relative to controls reflecting decreased photosynthetic rates. However, during recovery δ 13C in both species was greater in bleached than control fragments despite photosynthesis remaining

  1. The carbon abundance and 12C/13C isotopic ratio in the atmosphere of Arcturus from 2.3 µm CO bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, Ya. V.

    2008-09-01

    We have modeled absorption lines of the 12CO and 13CO (Δ υ = 2) molecular bands at λλ 2.29 2.45 µm in the spectrum of Arcturus (K2III). A grid of model atmospheres and synthetic spectra were computed for the red giant using T eff = 4300, log g = 1.5, and the elemental abundances of Peterson et al. (1993), with the exception of the abundances of carbon, log N(C), and oxygen, log N(O) and the carbon isotopic ratio, 12C/13C, which were varied in our computations. The computed spectra were compared to the observed spectrum of Arcturus from the atlas of Hinkle et al. (1976). The best fit between the synthetic and observed spectra is achieved for log N(C) = -3.78, 12C/13C = 8 ± 0.5. We discuss the dependence of 12C/13C on log N(C) and log N(O) in the atmosphere of the red giant.

  2. [Carbon stable isotope composition (delta 13C) of lichen thalli in the forests in the vicinity of the Chernobyl atomic power station].

    PubMed

    Biazrov, L G; Gongal'skiĭ, K B; Pel'gunova, L A; Tiunov, A V

    2010-01-01

    The stable isotope abundance of carbon in the lichens Cladina mitis, Cladonia crispata Hypogymnia physodes, Parmelia sulcata has been investigated in a study relating these values with known levels of 106Ru, 134Cs, 137Cs and 144Ce defined activity in their thalli in the pine forests of region within a 30-km radius of the Chernobyl atomic power station and beyond it (37 km). All 63 samples of the lichens were obtained from 7 different sites. Small effects on delta 13C values in the lichens Cladina mitis, Hypogymnia physodes were found to be associated with distance from CNPP, activity level of radionuclides in them thalli whereas at Cladonia crispata is observed weighting of carbon with increase in values of 134Cs and 137Cs activity in thalli. Values of delta 13C the investigated lichen species more depends on habitat conditions rather than from levels of thalli radioactivity. In our study we didn't reveal the isotope specificity of any one species as it was not possible to establish a correlation between values of delta 13C and a particular species. PMID:20297687

  3. Terrestrial carbon cycle responses to drought and climate stress: New insights using atmospheric observations of CO2 and delta13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alden, Caroline B.

    Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) continue to rise well into the second decade of the new millennium, in spite of broad-scale human understanding of the impacts of fossil fuel emissions on the earth's climate. Natural sinks for CO2 that are relevant on human time scales---the world's oceans and land biosphere---appear to have kept pace with emissions. The continuously increasing strength of the land biosphere sink for CO2 is surpassing expectations given our understanding of the CO2 fertilization and warming effects on the balance between photosynthesis and respiration, especially in the face of ongoing forest degradation. The climate and carbon cycle links between the atmosphere and land biosphere are not well understood, especially at regional (100 km to 10,000 km) scales. The climate modulating effects of changing plant stomatal conductance in response to temperature and water availability is a key area of uncertainty. Further, the differential response to climate change of C3 and C4 plant functional types is not well known at regional scales. This work outlines the development of a novel application of atmospheric observations of delta13C of CO2 to investigate the links between climate and water and carbon cycling and the integrated responses of C3 and C4 ecosystems to climate variables. A two-step Bayesian batch inversion for 3-hourly, 1x1º CO2 fluxes (step one), and for 3-hourly 1x1º delta13C of recently assimilated carbon (step two) is created here for the first time, and is used to investigate links between regional climate indicators and changes in delta13C of the biosphere. Results show that predictable responses of regional-scale, integrated plant discrimination to temperature, precipitation and relative humidity anomalies can be recovered from atmospheric signals. Model development, synthetic data simulations to test sensitivity, and results for the year 2010 are presented here. This dissertation also includes two other applications

  4. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayler, Z. E.; Kaiser, M.; Gessler, A.; Ellerbrock, R. H.; Sommer, M.

    2011-03-01

    Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. We used the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM) fractions from soil to identify the likely binding mechanisms involved. We used OM fractions hypothesized to contain carbon stabilized through organo-mineral complexes: (1) OM separated chemically with sodium pyrophosphate (OM(PY)) and (2) OM stabilized in microstructures found in the chemical extraction residue (OM(ER)). Furthermore, because the OM fractions were separated from five different soils with paired forest and arable land use histories, we could address the impact of land use change on carbon binding and processing mechanisms within these soils. We used partial least squares regression to analyze patterns in the isotopic signature of OM with established proxies of different binding mechanisms. Parsing soil OM into different fractions is a systematic method of dissection, however, we are primarily interested in how OM is bound in soil as a whole, requiring a means of re-assembly. Thus, we implemented the recent zonal framework described by Kleber et al. (2007) to relate our findings to undisturbed soil. The δ15N signature of OM fractions served as a reliable indicator for microbial processed carbon in both arable and forest land use types. The δ13C signature of OM fractions in arable sites did not correlate well with proxies of soil mineral properties while a consistent pattern of enrichment was seen in the δ13C of OM fractions in the forest sites. We found a significant difference in δ13C of pooled OM fractions between the forest and arable land use type although it was relatively small (<1‰). We found different binding mechanisms predominate in each land use type. The isotopic signatures of OM fractions from arable soils were highly related to the clay and silt size particles amount while

  5. 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis Identifies an Unusual Route for Pyruvate Dissimilation in Mycobacteria which Requires Isocitrate Lyase and Carbon Dioxide Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Dany J. V.; Bonde, Bhushan; Hawkins, Nathaniel; Ward, Jane L.; Beale, Michael H.; Noack, Stephan; Nöh, Katharina; Kruger, Nicholas J.; Ratcliffe, R. George; McFadden, Johnjoe

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires the enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL) for growth and virulence in vivo. The demonstration that M. tuberculosis also requires ICL for survival during nutrient starvation and has a role during steady state growth in a glycerol limited chemostat indicates a function for this enzyme which extends beyond fat metabolism. As isocitrate lyase is a potential drug target elucidating the role of this enzyme is of importance; however, the role of isocitrate lyase has never been investigated at the level of in vivo fluxes. Here we show that deletion of one of the two icl genes impairs the replication of Mycobacterium bovis BCG at slow growth rate in a carbon limited chemostat. In order to further understand the role of isocitrate lyase in the central metabolism of mycobacteria the effect of growth rate on the in vivo fluxes was studied for the first time using 13C-metabolic flux analysis (MFA). Tracer experiments were performed with steady state chemostat cultures of BCG or M. tuberculosis supplied with 13C labeled glycerol or sodium bicarbonate. Through measurements of the 13C isotopomer labeling patterns in protein-derived amino acids and enzymatic activity assays we have identified the activity of a novel pathway for pyruvate dissimilation. We named this the GAS pathway because it utilizes the Glyoxylate shunt and Anapleurotic reactions for oxidation of pyruvate, and Succinyl CoA synthetase for the generation of succinyl CoA combined with a very low flux through the succinate – oxaloacetate segment of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We confirm that M. tuberculosis can fix carbon from CO2 into biomass. As the human host is abundant in CO2 this finding requires further investigation in vivo as CO2 fixation may provide a point of vulnerability that could be targeted with novel drugs. This study also provides a platform for further studies into the metabolism of M. tuberculosis using 13C-MFA. PMID:21814509

  6. The 'Nuts and Bolts' of 13C NMR Spectroscopy at Elevated-Pressures and -Temperatures for Monitoring In Situ CO2 Conversion to Metal Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. K.; Surface, J. A.; Skemer, P. A.; Conradi, M. S.; Hayes, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We will present details of newly-constructed specialized NMR designed to conduct in situ elevated-pressure, elevated-temperature 13C NMR studies on unmixed slurries of minerals in the presence of CO2 or other gases. This static probe is capable of achieving 300 bar, 300C conditions, and it is designed to spectroscopically examine 13C signals in mixtures of solids, liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. Ultimately, our aim is to monitor CO2 uptake in both ultramafic rocks and in more porous geological materials to understand the mechanisms of chemisorption as a function of temperature, pressure and pH. We will give details of the hardware setup, and we will show a variety of static in situ NMR, as well as ex situ 'magic-angle spinning' NMR to show the analyses that are possible of minerals in pure form and in mixtures. In addition, specific NMR pulse sequences, techniques, and modeling will be described in detail. In this in situ NMR probe, we are able to simulate processes at geologically relevant fluid pressures and temperatures, monitoring the kinetics of CO2 conversion to carbonates. The in situ NMR experiments consist of heterogeneous mixtures of rock, salty brine solution, and moderate pressure CO2 gas at elevated temperatures. The purpose of studying these reactions is to determine conditions that affect the efficacy of carbonate formation in various targeted geological reservoirs (i.e., peroditite, or others). Via 13C NMR, we have spectroscopically characterized and quantified the conversion of CO2 to magnesium carbonate and calcium carbonate minerals, including metastable intermediates (such as hydromagnesite, or dypingite in the case of magnesium carbonate species, or vaterite in the case of calcium carbonate species). Such species are distinguishable from a combination of the 13C isotropic chemical shift, the static 13C lineshape, and changes in spin-lattice (T1) relaxation times. We will demonstrate that NMR can be used for quantitative

  7. An automated growth enclosure for metabolic labeling of Arabidopsis thaliana with 13C-carbon dioxide - an in vivo labeling system for proteomics and metabolomics research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Labeling whole Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants to high enrichment with 13C for proteomics and metabolomics applications would facilitate experimental approaches not possible by conventional methods. Such a system would use the plant's native capacity for carbon fixation to ubiquitously incorporate 13C from 13CO2 gas. Because of the high cost of 13CO2 it is critical that the design conserve the labeled gas. Results A fully enclosed automated plant growth enclosure has been designed and assembled where the system simultaneously monitors humidity, temperature, pressure and 13CO2 concentration with continuous adjustment of humidity, pressure and 13CO2 levels controlled by a computer running LabView software. The enclosure is mounted on a movable cart for mobility among growth environments. Arabidopsis was grown in the enclosure for up to 8 weeks and obtained on average >95 atom% enrichment for small metabolites, such as amino acids and >91 atom% for large metabolites, including proteins and peptides. Conclusion The capability of this labeling system for isotope dilution experiments was demonstrated by evaluation of amino acid turnover using GC-MS as well as protein turnover using LC-MS/MS. Because this 'open source' Arabidopsis 13C-labeling growth environment was built using readily available materials and software, it can be adapted easily to accommodate many different experimental designs. PMID:21310072

  8. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen co-metabolism in yeast by ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry applying 13C- and 15N-labeled substrates simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Blank, Lars M; Desphande, Rahul R; Schmid, Andreas; Hayen, Heiko

    2012-06-01

    Alternative metabolic pathways inside a cell can be deduced using stable isotopically labeled substrates. One prerequisite is accurate measurement of the labeling pattern of targeted metabolites. Experiments are generally limited to the use of single-element isotopes, mainly (13)C. Here, we demonstrate the application of direct infusion nanospray, ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) for metabolic studies using differently labeled elemental isotopes simultaneously--i.e., (13)C and (15)N--in amino acids of a total protein hydrolysate. The optimized strategy for the analysis of metabolism by a hybrid linear ion trap-FTICR-MS comprises the collection of multiple adjacent selected ion monitoring scans. By limiting both the width of the mass range and the number of ions entering the ICR cell with automated gain control, sensitive measurements of isotopologue distribution were possible without compromising mass accuracy and isotope intensity mapping. The required mass-resolving power of more than 60,000 is only achievable on a routine basis by FTICR and Orbitrap mass spectrometers. Evaluation of the method was carried out by comparison of the experimental data to the natural isotope abundances of selected amino acids and by comparison to GC/MS results obtained from a labeling experiment with (13)C-labeled glucose. The developed method was used to shed light on the complexity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbon-nitrogen co-metabolism by administering both (13)C-labeled glucose and (15)N-labeled alanine. The results indicate that not only glutamate but also alanine acts as an amino donor during alanine and valine synthesis. Metabolic studies using FTICR-MS can exploit new possibilities by the use of multiple-labeled elemental isotopes. PMID:22543713

  9. Investigation of the degradation of 13C-labeled fungal biomass in soil - fate of carbon in a soil bioreactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Michael; Fester, Thomas; Miltner, Anja; Kaestner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Nutrient balances and degradation processes in boreal forests are mainly influenced by interactions of plant roots and ectomycorrhizal fungi. Plants benefit from nitrogen compounds provided by their symbiotic interaction partner. In return ectomycorrhiza are provided by large amounts of carbon from the plants which is used for the synthesis of hyphal networks in soil and for metabolic activity for nutrient uptake. Therefore, ectomycorrhizal fungi play a major role in ecosystems of boreal forests and are consequently an important sink for carbon by building large amount of mycelia. Recently, it has been shown that microbial biomass residues contribute significantly to soil organic matter formation. This suggests that also residues of ectomycorrhizal fungi may be an important source for soil organic matter formation in forest soils where these fungi are abundant. However, the fate of ectomycorrhizal biomass residues in soils is unknown. We therefore investigated the fate of ectomycorrhizal biomass in soil in a soil bioreactor system to quantify the contribution of this material to soil organic matter formation. As a model organism, we selected Laccaria bicolor, which was labelled by growing the fungus on 13C glucose. The stable isotope-labeled biomass was then homogenized and incubated in a podzol from a typical forest site in Central Germany. The fate of the labeled biomass was traced by analyzing the amount of 13C mineralized and the amount remaining in the soil. The fungal biomass carbon was mineralized rather rapidly during the first 50 days. Then the mineralization rate slowed down, but mineralization continued until the end of the experiment, when approximately 40% of the 13C was mineralized and 60% remained in soil. In addition, we analyzed biomolecules such as fatty acids to trace the incorporation of the L. bicolor-derived biomass carbon into other microorganisms and to identify potential primary consumers of fungal biomass. By these analyses, we found a

  10. Investigation of the degradation of 13C-labeled fungal biomass in soil - fate of carbon in a soil bioreactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Michael; Fester, Thomas; Miltner, Anja; Kästner, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Nutrient balances and degradation processes in boreal forests are mainly influenced by interactions of plant roots and ectomycorrhizal fungi. Plants benefit from nitrogen compounds provided by their symbiotic interaction partner. In return ectomycorrhiza are provided by large amounts of carbon from the plants which is used for the synthesis of hyphal networks in soil and for metabolic activity for nutrient uptake. Therefore ectomycorrhizal fungi play a major role in ecosystems of boreal forests and are consequently an important sink for carbon by building large amounts of mycelia. Recently, it has been shown that microbial biomass residues contribute significantly to soil organic matter formation. This suggests that also residues of ectomycorrhizal fungi may be an important source for soil organic matter formation in forest soils where these fungi are abundant. However, the fate of ectomycorrhizal biomass residues in soils is unknown. We therefore investigated the fate of ectomycorrhizal biomass in soil in a bioreactor system to quantify the contribution of this material to soil organic matter formation. As a model organism, we selected Laccaria bicolor, which was labelled by growing the fungus on 13C glucose. The stable isotope-labeled biomass was then homogenized and incubated in a podzol from a typical forest site in Central Germany. The fate of the labeled biomass was traced by analyzing the amount of 13C mineralized and the amount remaining in the soil. The fungal biomass carbon was mineralized rather rapidly during the first 25 days. Then the mineralization rate slowed down, but mineralization continued until the end of the experiment, when approximately 40% of the 13C was mineralized and 60% remained in soil. In addition, we analyzed biomolecules such as fatty acids to trace the incorporation of the L. bicolor-derived biomass carbon into other microorganisms and to identify potential primary consumers of fungal biomass. By these analyses, we found a

  11. Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Torn, M.S.; Biraud, S.; Still, C.J.; Riley, W.J.; Berry, J.A.

    2010-09-22

    The {delta}{sup 13}C signature of terrestrial carbon fluxes ({delta}{sub bio}) provides an important constraint for inverse models of CO{sub 2} sources and sinks, insight into vegetation physiology, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} vegetation productivity, and ecosystem carbon residence times. From 2002-2009, we measured atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and {delta}{sup 13}C-CO{sub 2} at four heights (2 to 60 m) in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) and computed {delta}{sub bio} weekly. This region has a fine-scale mix of crops (primarily C{sub 3} winter wheat) and C{sub 4} pasture grasses. {delta}{sub bio} had a large and consistent seasonal cycle of 6-8{per_thousand}. Ensemble monthly mean {delta}{sub bio} ranged from -25.8 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} ({+-}SE) in March to -20.1 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} in July. Thus, C{sub 3} vegetation contributed about 80% of ecosystem fluxes in winter-spring and 50% in summer-fall. In contrast, prairie-soil {delta}{sub 13}C values were about -15{per_thousand}, indicating that historically the region was dominated by C{sub 4} vegetation and had more positive {delta}{sub bio} values. Based on a land-surface model, isofluxes ({delta}{sub bio} x NEE) in this region have large seasonal amplitude because {delta}{sub bio} and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) covary. Interannual variability in isoflux was driven by variability in NEE. The large seasonal amplitude in {delta}{sub bio} and isoflux imply that carbon inverse analyses require accurate estimates of land cover and temporally resolved {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes.

  12. Biology and air-sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Gruber, N.; Mix, A. C.; Key, R. M.; Tagliabue, A.; Westberry, T. K.

    2013-05-01

    Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate the processes that control the distribution of δ13C in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation dominates the distribution of δ13CDIC of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) due to the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean. This process leads to low δ13CDIC values at dephs and in high latitude surface waters and high values in the upper ocean at low latitudes with maxima in the subtropics. Air-sea gas exchange provides an important secondary influence due to two effects. First, it acts to reduce the spatial gradients created by biology. Second, the associated temperature dependent fractionation tends to increase (decrease) δ13CDIC values of colder (warmer) water, which generates gradients that oppose those arising from biology. Our model results suggest that both effects are similarly important in influencing surface and interior δ13CDIC distributions. However, air-sea gas exchange is slow, so biological effect dominate spatial δ13CDIC gradients both in the interior and at the surface, in constrast to conclusions from some previous studies. Analysis of a new synthesis of δ13CDIC measurements from years 1990 to 2005 is used to quantify preformed (δ13Cpre) and remineralized (δ13Crem) contributions as well as the effects of biology (Δδ13Cbio) and air-sea gas exchange (δ13C*). The model reproduces major features of the observed large-scale distribution of δ13CDIC, δ13Cpre, δ13Crem, δ13C*, and Δδ13Cbio. Residual misfits are documented and analyzed. Simulated surface and subsurface δ13CDIC are influenced by details of the ecosystem model formulation. For example, inclusion of a simple parameterization of iron limitation of phytoplankton growth rates and temperature-dependent zooplankton grazing rates improves the agreement with δ13CDIC

  13. Losses of soil organic carbon by converting tropical forest to plantations: Assessment of erosion and decomposition by new δ13C approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, Thomas; Muhammad, Damris; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Indonesia lost more tropical forest than all of Brazil in 2012, mainly driven by the rubber, oil palm and timber industries. Nonetheless, the effects of converting forest to oil palm and rubber plantations on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks remain unclear. We analyzed SOC losses after lowland rainforest conversion to oil palm, intensive rubber and extensive rubber plantations in Jambi province on Sumatra Island. We developed and applied a new δ13C based approach to assess and separate two processes: 1) erosion and 2) decomposition. Carbon contents in the Ah horizon under oil palm and rubber plantations were strongly reduced: up to 70% and 62%, respectively. The decrease was lower under extensive rubber plantations (41%). The C content in the subsoil was similar in the forest and the plantations. We therefore assumed that a shift to higher δ13C values in the subsoil of the plantations corresponds to the losses of the upper soil layer by erosion. Erosion was estimated by comparing the δ13C profiles in the undisturbed soils under forest with the disturbed soils under plantations. The estimated erosion was the strongest in oil palm (35±8 cm) and rubber (33±10 cm) plantations. The 13C enrichment of SOC used as a proxy of its turnover indicates a decrease of SOC decomposition rate in the Ah horizon under oil palm plantations after forest conversion. SOC availability, measured by microbial respiration rate and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy, was lower under oil palm plantations. Despite similar trends in C losses and erosion in intensive plantations, our results indicate that microorganisms in oil palm plantations mineralized mainly the old C stabilized prior to conversion, whereas microorganisms under rubber plantations mineralized the fresh C from the litter, leaving the old C pool mainly untouched. Based on the lack of C input from litter, we expect further losses of SOC under oil palm plantations, which therefore are a less sustainable land

  14. Quantifying the metabolic contribution to δ13C of shell carbonate of Arctica islandica: an experimental calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirne, E. C.; Wanamaker, A. D.

    2010-12-01

    The stable isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon of seawater (δ13CDIC) can provide a powerful means to investigate atmospheric and oceanic carbon dynamics. Records of past δ13CDIC values of seawater, especially from the extratropical oceans, are needed to better understand how recent climate change and anthropogenic activity (namely fossil fuel emissions) have impacted the global carbon cycle. However, long-term reconstructions of marine δ13CDIC are limited (both spatially and temporally) by a lack of suitable proxy archives, which have undergone a rigorous calibration process. Marine mollusks represent a potential δ13CDIC archive given that the primary source of carbon to their shell material is ambient dissolved inorganic carbon. However, interpretation of this archive is confounded by the additional contribution of respired (or metabolic) carbon to the carbon isotope ratio of shell material (δ13Cshell). Although theoretical models predict that less than 10% of δ13Cshell of marine mollusks is attributable to metabolic carbon, several studies have reported significantly larger contributions of respired carbon (CM) to shell material depending upon the species in question, and in some cases, ontogenetic age. Therefore, species-specific calibrations must be conducted to establish metabolic contribution to δ13Cshell at different stages of ontogeny. The central objective of this study was to quantify the metabolic contribution to the shell carbonate of Arctica islandica L., juveniles and adults, to determine the viability of this species as a paleo-δ13CDIC archive. Results will be presented from an 8-month experimental calibration between δ13CDIC and δ13Cshell of the species Arctica islandica. Adults (25 to 55 years old) and juveniles (<3 years old) were collected and cultured in the Gulf of Maine, both in situ and in the laboratory environment. Relatively high growth rates in juveniles (>1mm/month) allowed for the measurement of three distinct

  15. Experimental link between the /sup 13/C NMR chemical shift of carbonyl carbons and the energy shifts observed in the n. -->. 3s optical transition of cyclic ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, T.J.; Baer, T.

    1988-09-14

    The n ..-->.. 3s transition energies of cold methylcyclopentanones and -cyclohexanones, as well as those of some branched-chain and bicyclic ketones, have been measured with 2 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The energy shifts of the n ..-->.. 3s transition origins are found to correlate in a linear fashion with reported /sup 13/C NMR chemical shifts of the carbonyl carbon atoms. Several possible explanations for the experimental connection to NMR are discussed including consideration of both the paramagnetic and diamagnetic shielding contributions to the total chemical shift. 31 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  16. Determination of methanogenic pathways through carbon isotope (δ13C) analysis for the two-stage anaerobic digestion of high-solids substrates.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Tito; Klang, Johanna; Niedermayr, Andrea; Berzio, Stephan; Immenhauser, Adrian; Klocke, Michael; Wichern, Marc; Lübken, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    This study used carbon isotope (δ(13)C)-based calculations to quantify the specific methanogenic pathways in a two-stage experimental biogas plant composed of three thermophilic leach bed reactors (51-56 °C) followed by a mesophilic (36.5 °C) anaerobic filter. Despite the continuous dominance of the acetoclastic Methanosaeta in the anaerobic filter, the methane (CH4) fraction derived from carbon dioxide reduction (CO2), fmc, varied significantly over the investigation period of 200 days. At organic loading rates (OLRs) below 6.0 gCOD L(-1) d(-1), the average fmc value was 33%, whereas at higher OLRs, with a maximum level of 17.0 gCOD L(-1) d(-1), the fmc values reached 47%. The experiments allowed for a clear differentiation of the isotope fractionation related to the formation and consumption of acetate in both stages of the plant. Our data indicate constant carbon isotope fractionation for acetate formation at different OLRs within the thermophilic leach bed reactors as well as a negligible contribution of homoacetogenesis. These results present the first quantification of methanogenic pathway (fmc values) dynamics for a continually operated mesophilic bioreactor and highlight the enormous potential of δ(13)C analysis for a more comprehensive understanding of the anaerobic degradation processes in CH4-producing biogas plants. PMID:25741999

  17. Sulfate-driven anaerobic oxidation of methane as the origin of extremely 13C-depleted calcite in the Doushantuo cap carbonates in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y.; Bao, H.; Jiang, G.; Kaufman, A. J.; Xiao, S.; Zhou, C.; Wang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The cap carbonate in Doushantuo Formation (ca. 635 Ma) has been extensively studied for Earth systems change following the Marinoan 'snowball Earth' glaciation. An important feature of this cap carbonate is the local occurrence of extremely negative δ13Ccarb values (down to -50‰) from dark-colored calcite cements. These calcites have been interpreted as carbonate cements precipitated from cold methane seeps or as hydrothermally induced diagenetic carbonates. To test these contrasting interpretations, we mechanically separated the calcite cements from host dolostones and analyzed stable isotope compositions of pyrite, carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS), and organic carbon in both components of the Doushantuo cap carbonate in the Yangtze Gorges area, South China. The data show that δ34Spyrtie of extremely 13C-depleted calcite (22.8-73.9‰) are up to 34‰ higher than those of the dolomite (14.7-39.9‰). Similarly, δ34SCAS of calcite (37.1-80.1‰) are up to 40‰ higher than those of the dolomite (24.5-41.5‰). The δ18OCAS of calcite (12.9-22.2‰; VSMOW) are also systematically higher than those of dolomite (13.3-16.8‰; VSMOW). In contrast, δ13Corg of calcite cements (-27.2 ‰ to -46.1‰) are lower than those of the dolostones (-26.5‰ to -31.7‰). In addition, there is a strong positive correlation between δ34SCAS and δ18OCAS and a negative correlation between δ13Corg and δ34Spyrtie of the calcite (Figure 1). The data demonstrated convincingly that the 13C-depleted calcites were formed in a environment facilitated by sulfate-driven anaeorobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The co-occurrence of unusually low δ13Corg and high δ34S values requires presence of active flow of both methane and sulfate, a condition not far away from conducive seawater sulfate supply. Figure 1: Cross plots of δ34SCAS vs. δ18OCAS and δ13Corg vs δ34Spyrtie in host dolomite and in the extremely 13C-depleted calcite cements.

  18. Synchronous negative carbon isotope shifts in marine and terrestrial biomarkers at the onset of the early Aptian oceanic anoxic event 1a: Evidence for the release of 13C-depleted carbon into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breugel, Yvonne; Schouten, Stefan; Tsikos, Harilaos; Erba, Elisabetta; Price, Gregory D.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2007-03-01

    A common feature of records of the early Aptian oceanic anoxic event (OAE) 1a is the sharp negative δ13C excursion displayed in both carbonate and organic matter at the onset of this event. A synchronous negative δ13C excursion has also been noted for terrestrial organic matter. This negative excursion has been attributed to either an injection of 13C-depleted light carbon into the atmosphere or, in case of marine sediments, recycling of 13C-depleted CO2. However, most studies were done on separate cores, and no information on the relative timing of the negative spikes in terrestrial versus marine records has been obtained. Here we examine early Aptian core sections from two geographically distal sites (Italy and the mid-Pacific) to elucidate the causes and relative timing of this negative "spike." At both sites, increased organic carbon (Corg) and decreased bulk carbonate contents characterize the interval recording OAE 1a (variously referred to as the "Selli event"). The organic material within the "Selli level" is immature and of autochthonous origin. Measured δ13C values of marine and terrestrial biomarkers largely covary with those of bulk organic carbon, with lowest values recorded at the base of the organic-rich section. By contrast, sediments enveloping the "Selli level" exhibit very low Corg contents, and their extractable Corg is predominantly of allochthonous origin. Hydrous pyrolysis techniques used to obtain an autochthonous, pre-Selli δ13C value for algal-derived pristane from corresponding sample material yielded a negative δ13C shift of up to 4‰. A negative δ13C shift of similar magnitude was also measured for the terrigenous n-alkanes. The results are collectively best explained by means of a massive, syndepositional, rapid input of 13C-depleted carbon into the atmosphere and surface oceans, likely delivered either via methane produced from the dissociation of sedimentary clathrates or perhaps by widespread thermal metamorphism of Corg

  19. Determination of the δ15N and δ13C of total nitrogen and carbon in solids; RSIL lab code 1832

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, Kinga; Qi, Haiping; Coplan, Tyler B.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 1832 is to determine the δ(15N/14N), abbreviated as δ15N, and the δ(13C/12C), abbreviated as δ13C, of total nitrogen and carbon in a solid sample. A Carlo Erba NC 2500 elemental analyzer (EA) is used to convert total nitrogen and carbon in a solid sample into N2 and CO2 gas. The EA is connected to a continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS), which determines the relative difference in stable nitrogen isotope-amount ratio (15N/14N) of the product N2 gas and the relative difference in stable carbon isotope-amount ratio (13C/12C) of the product CO2 gas. The combustion is quantitative; no isotopic fractionation is involved. Samples are placed in tin capsules and loaded into a Costech Zero Blank Autosampler on the EA. Under computer control, samples then are dropped into a heated reaction tube that contains an oxidant, where combustion takes place in a helium atmosphere containing an excess of oxygen gas. Combustion products are transported by a helium carrier through a reduction furnace to remove excess oxygen and to convert all nitrous oxides into N2 and through a drying tube to remove water. The gas-phase products, mainly CO2 and N2, are separated by a gas chromatograph. The gas is then introduced into the IRMS through a Finnigan MAT (now Thermo Scientific) ConFlo II interface. The Finnigan MAT ConFlo II interface is used for introducing not only sample into the IRMS but also N2 and CO2 reference gases and helium for sample dilution. The flash combustion is quantitative; no isotopic fractionation is involved. The IRMS is a Thermo Scientific Delta V CF-IRMS. It has a universal triple collector, two wide cups with a narrow cup in the middle; it is capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 28, 29, 30 or with a magnet current change 44, 45, 46, simultaneously. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z 28 = N2 = 14N/14N; m/z 29 = N2 = 14N/15N primarily; m/z 30 = NO = 14N/16O

  20. Chemical weathering and the role of sulfuric and nitric acids in carbonate weathering: Isotopes (13C, 15N, 34S, and 18O) and chemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cai; Ji, Hongbing

    2016-05-01

    Multiple isotopes (13C-DIC, 34S and 18O-SO42-, 15N and 18O-NO3-) and water chemistry were used to evaluate weathering rates and associated CO2 consumption by carbonic acid and strong acids (H2SO4 and HNO3) in a typical karst watershed (Wujiang River, Southwest China). The dual sulfate isotopes indicate that sulfate is mainly derived from sulfide oxidation in coal stratum and sulfide-containing minerals, and dual nitrate isotopes indicate that nitrate is mainly derived from soil N and nitrification. The correlation between isotopic compositions and water chemistry suggests that sulfuric and nitric acids, in addition to carbonic acid, are involved in carbonate weathering. The silicate and carbonate weathering rates are 7.2 t km-2 yr-1 and 76 t km-2 yr-1, respectively. In comparison with carbonate weathering rates (43 t km-2 yr-1) by carbonic acid alone, the subsequent increase in rates indicates significant enhancement of weathering when combined with sulfuric and nitric acids. Therefore, the role of sulfuric and nitric acids in the rock weathering should be considered in the global carbon cycle.

  1. Carbon transfer, partitioning and residence time in the plant-soil system: a comparison of two 13C-CO2 labelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Mirjam S.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Abiven, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    13C-CO2 labelling is a powerful tool to study the carbon (C) dynamics in plant-soil systems, whereby various approaches have been applied, differing in the duration of label exposure, the applied label strength and the sampling intervals. We made a direct comparison of the two main 13C-CO2 labelling techniques - pulse and continuous labelling - and evaluated if different approaches yield the same results regarding the C transfer time, C partitioning and the C residence time in different plant-soil compartments. We conducted a pulse labelling (exposure to 99 atom% 13C-CO2 for three hours, traced for eight days) and a continuous labelling (exposure to 10 atom% 13C-CO2, traced for 14 days) on identical plant-soil systems (Populus deltoides x nigra, Cambisol soil) and under controlled environmental conditions. The plant-soil systems were destructively harvested at five sampling dates, and the soil CO2 efflux was sampled throughout the experiments. The 13C distribution into leaves, petioles, stems, cuttings, roots, soil, microbial biomass and soil respiration was analysed and wee applied exponential (pulse labelling) and logistic (continuous labelling) functions to model the C dynamics. Our results confirm that pulse labelling is best suited to assess the minimum C transfer time, while continuous labelling can be applied to assess the C transfer through a compartment, including short-term storage pools. Both experiments yielded the same C partitioning patterns at the specific sampling days, however, the time of sampling was crucial. For example the results of belowground C partitioning were consistent only after eight days of labelling. The C mean residence times estimated by the rate constant of the exponential and logistic function were largely different for the two techniques, mostly due to the strong model assumptions (e.g. steady state). Pulse and continuous labelling techniques are both well suited to assess C cycling. With pulse labelling, the dynamics of fresh

  2. Soil Carbon and Microbial Dynamics during Long-term Incubation involving 13C and 14C Measurements.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grasslands in the conterminous United States include about 212 of which about ~48 million hectares (Mha) of pasture and 164 Mha of rangeland. Rates of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration can range from none to approaching 1 metric ton (mt) SOC/year. Climate and management influence potential i...

  3. Denisty fractionation and 13C reveal changes in soil carbon following woody encroachment in a desert ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Woody encroachment has dramatically changed land cover patterns in arid and semiarid systems (drylands) worldwide over the past 150 years. This change is known to influence bulk soil carbon (C) pools, but the implications for dynamics and stability of these pools are not well understood. Working in ...

  4. 13C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The many advantages of 13C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, 13C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional 13C-13C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semi-automated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE datasets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures. PMID:25932900

  5. Biology and air-sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Gruber, N.; Mix, A. C.; Key, R. M.; Tagliabue, A.; Westberry, T. K.

    2013-09-01

    Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate processes that control the distribution of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation and the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean leads to low δ13CDIC values at depths and in high latitude surface waters and high values in the upper ocean at low latitudes with maxima in the subtropics. Air-sea gas exchange has two effects. First, it acts to reduce the spatial gradients created by biology. Second, the associated temperature-dependent fractionation tends to increase (decrease) δ13CDIC values of colder (warmer) water, which generates gradients that oppose those arising from biology. Our model results suggest that both effects are similarly important in influencing surface and interior δ13CDIC distributions. However, since air-sea gas exchange is slow in the modern ocean, the biological effect dominates spatial δ13CDIC gradients both in the interior and at the surface, in contrast to conclusions from some previous studies. Calcium carbonate cycling, pH dependency of fractionation during air-sea gas exchange, and kinetic fractionation have minor effects on δ13CDIC. Accumulation of isotopically light carbon from anthropogenic fossil fuel burning has decreased the spatial variability of surface and deep δ13CDIC since the industrial revolution in our model simulations. Analysis of a new synthesis of δ13CDIC measurements from years 1990 to 2005 is used to quantify preformed and remineralized contributions as well as the effects of biology and air-sea gas exchange. The model reproduces major features of the observed large-scale distribution of δ13CDIC as well as the individual contributions and effects. Residual misfits are documented and analyzed. Simulated surface and subsurface δ13CDIC are influenced by

  6. Monodispersed Hollow SO3H-Functionalized Carbon/Silica as Efficient Solid Acid Catalyst for Esterification of Oleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Ding; Tan, Minghui; Jiang, Bo; Zheng, Jingtang; Tsubaki, Noritatsu; Wu, Mingbo

    2015-12-01

    SO3H-functionalized monodispersed hollow carbon/silica spheres (HS/C-SO3H) with primary mesopores were prepared with polystyrene as a template and p-toluenesulfonic acid (TsOH) as a carbon precursor and -SO3H source simultaneously. The physical and chemical properties of HS/C-SO3H were characterized by N2 adsorption, TEM, SEM, XPS, XRD, Raman spectrum, NH3-TPD, element analysis and acid-base titration techniques. As a solid acid catalyst, HS/C-SO3H shows excellent performance in the esterification of oleic acid with methanol, which is a crucial reaction in biodiesel production. The well-defined hollow architecture and enhanced active sites accessibility of HS/C-SO3H guarantee the highest catalytic performance compared with the catalysts prepared by activation of TsOH deposited on the ordered mesoporous silicas SBA-15 and MCM-41. At the optimized conditions, high conversion (96.9%) was achieved and no distinct activity drop was observed after 5 recycles. This synthesis strategy will provide a highly effective solid acid catalyst for green chemical processes. PMID:26588826

  7. Natural 13C abundance reveals trophic status of fungi and host-origin of carbon in mycorrhizal fungi in mixed forests

    PubMed Central

    Högberg, Peter; Plamboeck, Agneta H.; Taylor, Andrew F. S.; Fransson, Petra M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Fungi play crucial roles in the biogeochemistry of terrestrial ecosystems, most notably as saprophytes decomposing organic matter and as mycorrhizal fungi enhancing plant nutrient uptake. However, a recurrent problem in fungal ecology is to establish the trophic status of species in the field. Our interpretations and conclusions are too often based on extrapolations from laboratory microcosm experiments or on anecdotal field evidence. Here, we used natural variations in stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) as an approach to distinguish between fungal decomposers and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungal species in the rich sporocarp flora (our sample contains 135 species) of temperate forests. We also demonstrated that host-specific mycorrhizal fungi that receive C from overstorey or understorey tree species differ in their δ13C. The many promiscuous mycorrhizal fungi, associated with and connecting several tree hosts, were calculated to receive 57–100% of their C from overstorey trees. Thus, overstorey trees also support, partly or wholly, the nutrient-absorbing mycelia of their alleged competitors, the understorey trees. PMID:10411910

  8. Pan-Arctic concentrations of mercury and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in marine zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Pomerleau, Corinne; Stern, Gary A; Pućko, Monika; Foster, Karen L; Macdonald, Robie W; Fortier, Louis

    2016-05-01

    Zooplankton play a central role in marine food webs, dictating the quantity and quality of energy available to upper trophic levels. They act as "keystone" species in transfer of mercury (Hg) up through the marine food chain. Here, we present the first Pan-Arctic overview of total and monomethylmercury concentrations (THg and MMHg) and stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in selected zooplankton species by assembling data collected between 1998 and 2012 from six arctic regions (Laptev Sea, Chukchi Sea, southeastern Beaufort Sea, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Hudson Bay and northern Baffin Bay). MMHg concentrations in Calanus spp., Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp. were found to increase with higher δ(15)N and lower δ(13)C. The southern Beaufort Sea exhibited both the highest THg and MMHg concentrations. Biomagnification of MMHg between Calanus spp. and two of its known predators, Themisto spp. and Paraeuchaeta spp., was greatest in the southern Beaufort Sea. Our results show large geographical variations in Hg concentrations and isotopic signatures for individual species related to regional ecosystem features, such as varying water masses and freshwater inputs, and highlight the increased exposure to Hg in the marine food chain of the southern Beaufort Sea. PMID:26874765

  9. New guidelines for δ13C measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Brand, Willi A.; Gehre, Matthias; Groning, Manfred; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Toman, Blaza; Verkouteren, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Consistency of δ13C measurements can be improved 39−47% by anchoring the δ13C scale with two isotopic reference materials differing substantially in 13C/12C. It is recommended thatδ13C values of both organic and inorganic materials be measured and expressed relative to VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on a scale normalized by assigning consensus values of −46.6‰ to L-SVEC lithium carbonate and +1.95‰ to NBS 19 calcium carbonate. Uncertainties of other reference material values on this scale are improved by factors up to two or more, and the values of some have been notably shifted:  the δ13C of NBS 22 oil is −30.03%.

  10. Carbon dioxide partial pressure and 13C content of north temperate and boreal lakes at spring ice melt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striegl, R.G.; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Chanton, J.P.; Wickland, K.P.; Bugna, G.C.; Rantakari, M.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulates under lake ice in winter and degasses to the atmosphere after ice melt. This large springtime CO2 pulse is not typically considered in surface-atmosphere flux estimates, because most field studies have not sampled through ice during late winter. Measured CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) of lake surface water ranged from 8.6 to 4,290 Pa (85-4,230 ??atm) in 234 north temperate and boreal lakes prior to ice melt during 1998 and 1999. Only four lakes had surface pCO2 less than or equal to atmospheric pCO2, whereas 75% had pCO2 >5 times atmospheric. The ??13CDIC (DIC = ??CO2) of 142 of the lakes ranged from -26.28??? to +0.95.???. Lakes with the greatest pCO2 also had the lightest ??13CDIC, which indicates respiration as their primary CO2 source. Finnish lakes that received large amounts of dissolved organic carbon from surrounding peatlands had the greatest pCO2. Lakes set in noncarbonate till and bedrock in Minnesota and Wisconsin had the smallest pCO2 and the heaviest ??13CDIC, which indicates atmospheric and/or mineral sources of C for those lakes. Potential emissions for the period after ice melt were 2.36 ?? 1.44 mol CO2 m-2 for lakes with average pCO2 values and were as large as 13.7 ?? 8.4 mol CO2 m-2 for lakes with high pCO2 values.

  11. delta 15N and non-carbonate delta 13C values for two petroleum source rock reference materials and a marine sediment reference material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennen, Kristin O.; Johnson, Craig A.; Otter, Marshall L.; Silva, Steven R.; Wandless, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    Samples of United States Geological Survey (USGS) Certified Reference Materials USGS Devonian Ohio Shale (SDO-1), and USGS Eocene Green River Shale (SGR-1), and National Research Council Canada (NRCC) Certified Marine Sediment Reference Material (PACS-2), were sent for analysis to four separate analytical laboratories as blind controls for organic rich sedimentary rock samples being analyzed from the Red Dog mine area in Alaska. The samples were analyzed for stable isotopes of carbon (delta13Cncc) and nitrogen (delta15N), percent non-carbonate carbon (Wt % Cncc) and percent nitrogen (Wt % N). SDO-1, collected from the Huron Member of the Ohio Shale, near Morehead, Kentucky, and SGR-1, collected from the Mahogany zone of the Green River Formation are petroleum source rocks used as reference materials for chemical analyses of sedimentary rocks. PACS-2 is modern marine sediment collected from the Esquimalt, British Columbia harbor. The results presented in this study are, with the exceptions noted below, the first published for these reference materials. There are published information values for the elemental concentrations of 'organic' carbon (Wt % Corg measured range is 8.98 - 10.4) and nitrogen (Wt % Ntot 0.347 with SD 0.043) only for SDO-1. The suggested values presented here should be considered 'information values' as defined by the NRCC Institute for National Measurement Reference Materials and should be useful for the analysis of 13C, 15N, C and N in organic material in sedimentary rocks.

  12. Implications of the large carbon kinetic isotope effect in the reaction CH4 + Cl for the 13C/12C ratio of stratospheric CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, P.; Brühl, C.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Saueressig, G.; Crowley, J. N.; Grooß, J. U.; Fischer, H.; Crutzen, P. J.

    Recent investigations of the carbon kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of the reaction CH4 + Cl yielded KIECl = 1.066±0.002 at 297 K (increasing to 1.075±0.005 at 223 K) [Saueressig et al., 1995]. In order to assess the effect of the exceptionally large KIEcl on δ13C of stratospheric CH4 we applied a two-dimensional, time dependent chemical transport model. The model results demonstrate the strong influence of the CH4 + Cl reaction on δ13CH4 in particular in the middle and upper stratosphere, where this reaction contributes several tens of percent to the total CH4 sink. The Cl sink helps to explain the relatively large overall isotope fractionation of 1.010-1.012 observed in the lower stratosphere [Brenninkmeijer et al., 1995; Brenninkmeijer et al., 1996], even though the model results predict a smaller effect than observed.

  13. Carbon flux analysis by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to determine the effect of CO2 on anaerobic succinate production by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Radoš, Dušica; Turner, David L; Fonseca, Luís L; Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Blombach, Bastian; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2014-05-01

    Wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum produces a mixture of lactic, succinic, and acetic acids from glucose under oxygen deprivation. We investigated the effect of CO2 on the production of organic acids in a two-stage process: cells were grown aerobically in glucose, and subsequently, organic acid production by nongrowing cells was studied under anaerobic conditions. The presence of CO2 caused up to a 3-fold increase in the succinate yield (1 mol per mol of glucose) and about 2-fold increase in acetate, both at the expense of l-lactate production; moreover, dihydroxyacetone formation was abolished. The redistribution of carbon fluxes in response to CO2 was estimated by using (13)C-labeled glucose and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of the labeling patterns in end products. The flux analysis showed that 97% of succinate was produced via the reductive part of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, with the low activity of the oxidative branch being sufficient to provide the reducing equivalents needed for the redox balance. The flux via the pentose phosphate pathway was low (~5%) regardless of the presence or absence of CO2. Moreover, there was significant channeling of carbon to storage compounds (glycogen and trehalose) and concomitant catabolism of these reserves. The intracellular and extracellular pools of lactate and succinate were measured by in vivo NMR, and the stoichiometry (H(+):organic acid) of the respective exporters was calculated. This study shows that it is feasible to take advantage of natural cellular regulation mechanisms to obtain high yields of succinate with C. glutamicum without genetic manipulation. PMID:24610842

  14. Carbon Flux Analysis by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance To Determine the Effect of CO2 on Anaerobic Succinate Production by Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Radoš, Dušica; Turner, David L.; Fonseca, Luís L.; Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Blombach, Bastian; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.; Neves, Ana Rute

    2014-01-01

    Wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum produces a mixture of lactic, succinic, and acetic acids from glucose under oxygen deprivation. We investigated the effect of CO2 on the production of organic acids in a two-stage process: cells were grown aerobically in glucose, and subsequently, organic acid production by nongrowing cells was studied under anaerobic conditions. The presence of CO2 caused up to a 3-fold increase in the succinate yield (1 mol per mol of glucose) and about 2-fold increase in acetate, both at the expense of l-lactate production; moreover, dihydroxyacetone formation was abolished. The redistribution of carbon fluxes in response to CO2 was estimated by using 13C-labeled glucose and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of the labeling patterns in end products. The flux analysis showed that 97% of succinate was produced via the reductive part of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, with the low activity of the oxidative branch being sufficient to provide the reducing equivalents needed for the redox balance. The flux via the pentose phosphate pathway was low (∼5%) regardless of the presence or absence of CO2. Moreover, there was significant channeling of carbon to storage compounds (glycogen and trehalose) and concomitant catabolism of these reserves. The intracellular and extracellular pools of lactate and succinate were measured by in vivo NMR, and the stoichiometry (H+:organic acid) of the respective exporters was calculated. This study shows that it is feasible to take advantage of natural cellular regulation mechanisms to obtain high yields of succinate with C. glutamicum without genetic manipulation. PMID:24610842

  15. Deciphering the impact of diagenesis overprint on negative δ13C excursions using rock magnetism: Case study of Ediacaran carbonates, Yangjiaping section, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macouin, Mélina; Ader, Magali; Moreau, Marie-Gabrielle; Poitou, Charles; Yang, Zhenyu; Sun, Zhimming

    2012-10-01

    Rock magnetism is used here to investigate the genesis of one of the puzzling negative carbon isotopic excursions of the Neoproterozoic in the Yangtze platform (South China). A detailed characterization of the magnetic mineralogy, which includes low-temperature and high-field magnetometry and classical magnetic measurement (ARM, IRM, susceptibility), was therefore performed along upper Doushantuo and lower Dengying Formations outcropping in the Yangjiaping section. The derived magnetic parameters show variations that can be interpreted as variations in magnetic grains size and in oxide contents. They show that the magnetic content is significantly reduced in samples presenting negative δ13Ccalcite values. We interpret this as a result of magnetite dissolution and secondary carbonate precipitation during early diagenesis bacterial sulfate reduction. Combined with C and O isotopic data, paleomagnetic techniques thus show that the upper Doushantuo-lower Dengying negative excursion of the Yangjiaping section is largely due to diagenesis, although the preservation of a genuine δ13C excursion of lower magnitude from +7‰ down to 0‰, instead of down to -9‰ as usually considered, cannot be ruled out. A corrected δ13Ccarbonate chemostratigraphic curve is therefore proposed. The unambiguous identification of a strong diagenetic component for this excursion casts doubts on the primary nature of other potentially time equivalent negative excursions of the Yangtze platform and thus to its correlation to negative excursions in other cratons (i.e. Shuram excursion). More generally, this study illustrates the potential of magnetic mineralogy characterization, a low cost, time efficient and non-destructive technique, as screening tool for diagenetic overprints of δ13C and δ18O.

  16. Paleogeographic variations of pedogenic carbonate delta13C values from Koobi Fora, Kenya: implications for floral compositions of Plio-Pleistocene hominin environments.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Rhonda L; Lepre, Christopher J; Wright, James D; Feibel, Craig S

    2007-11-01

    Plio-Pleistocene East African grassland expansion and faunal macroevolution, including that of our own lineage, are attributed to global climate change. To further understand environmental factors of early hominin evolution, we reconstruct the paleogeographic distribution of vegetation (C(3)-C(4) pathways) by stable carbon isotope (delta(13)C) analysis of pedogenic carbonates from the Plio-Pleistocene Koobi Fora region, northeast Lake Turkana Basin, Kenya. We analyzed 202 nodules (530 measurements) from ten paleontological/archaeological collecting areas spanning environments over a 50-km(2) area. We compared results across subregions in evolving fluviolacustrine depositional environments in the Koobi Fora Formation from 2.0-1.5 Ma, a stratigraphic interval that temporally brackets grassland ascendancy in East Africa. Significant differences in delta(13)C values between subregions are explained by paleogeographic controls on floral composition and distribution. Our results indicate grassland expansion between 2.0 and 1.75 Ma, coincident with major shifts in basin-wide sedimentation and hydrology. Hypotheses may be correct in linking Plio-Pleistocene hominin evolution to environmental changes from global climate; however, based on our results, we interpret complexity from proximate forces that mitigated basin evolution. An approximately 2.5 Ma tectonic event in southern Ethiopia and northern Kenya exerted strong effects on paleography in the Turkana Basin from 2.0-1.5 Ma, contributing to the shift from a closed, lacustrine basin to one dominated by open, fluvial conditions. We propose basin transformation decreased residence time for Omo River water and expanded subaerial floodplain landscapes, ultimately leading to reduced proportions of wooded floras and the establishment of habitats suitable for grassland communities. PMID:17905411

  17. Climatic Control on Plant and Soil δ13C along an Altitudinal Transect of Lushan Mountain in Subtropical China: Characteristics and Interpretation of Soil Carbon Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Du, Baoming; Liu, Chunjiang; Kang, Hongzhang; Zhu, Penghua; Yin, Shan; Shen, Guangrong; Hou, Jingli; Ilvesniemi, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Decreasing temperature and increasing precipitation along altitude gradients are typical mountain climate in subtropical China. In such a climate regime, identifying the patterns of the C stable isotope composition (δ13C) in plants and soils and their relations to the context of climate change is essential. In this study, the patterns of δ13C variation were investigated for tree leaves, litters, and soils in the natural secondary forests at four altitudes (219, 405, 780, and 1268 m a.s.l.) in Lushan Mountain, central subtropical China. For the dominant trees, both leaf and leaf-litter δ13C decreased as altitude increased from low to high altitude, whereas surface soil δ13C increased. The lower leaf δ13C at high altitudes was associated with the high moisture-related discrimination, while the high soil δ13C is attributed to the low temperature-induced decay. At each altitude, soil δ13C became enriched with soil depth. Soil δ13C increased with soil C concentrations and altitude, but decreased with soil depth. A negative relationship was also found between O-alkyl C and δ13C in litter and soil, whereas a positive relationship was observed between aromatic C and δ13C. Lower temperature and higher moisture at high altitudes are the predominant control factors of δ13C variation in plants and soils. These results help understand C dynamics in the context of global warming. PMID:24466099

  18. Automated determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in aqueous samples: RSIL lab codes 1851 and 1852

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Révész, Kinga M.; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab codes 1851 and 1852 are to determine the total carbon mass and the ratio of the stable isotopes of carbon13C) for total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, lab code 1851) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC, lab code 1852) in aqueous samples. The analysis procedure is automated according to a method that utilizes a total carbon analyzer as a peripheral sample preparation device for analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas by a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The carbon analyzer produces CO2 and determines the carbon mass in parts per million (ppm) of DIC and DOC in each sample separately, and the CF-IRMS determines the carbon isotope ratio of the produced CO2. This configuration provides a fully automated analysis of total carbon mass and δ13C with no operator intervention, additional sample preparation, or other manual analysis. To determine the DIC, the carbon analyzer transfers a specified sample volume to a heated (70 °C) reaction vessel with a preprogrammed volume of 10% phosphoric acid (H3PO4), which allows the carbonate and bicarbonate species in the sample to dissociate to CO2. The CO2 from the reacted sample is subsequently purged with a flow of helium gas that sweeps the CO2 through an infrared CO2 detector and quantifies the CO2. The CO2 is then carried through a high-temperature (650 °C) scrubber reactor, a series of water traps, and ultimately to the inlet of the mass spectrometer. For the analysis of total dissolved organic carbon, the carbon analyzer performs a second step on the sample in the heated reaction vessel during which a preprogrammed volume of sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) is added, and the hydroxyl radicals oxidize the organics to CO2. Samples containing 2 ppm to 30,000 ppm of carbon are analyzed. The precision of the carbon isotope analysis is within 0.3 per mill for DIC, and within 0.5 per mill for DOC.

  19. The spatial variability of organic carbon concentrations, C/N ratios and δ13C in surface sediments of two high Arctic fjords (Spitsbergen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziorowska, Katarzyna; Kuliński, Karol; Pempkowiak, Janusz

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean, and especially its shelf, is considered to be an important region for the global carbon cycle. This is due to the high, but concentrated in a short time, primary production, specific thermohaline circulation and physicochemical conditions of sea water. It was estimated that the Arctic shelf seas are responsible for 7-11% of total carbon dioxide uptake by the oceans. Additionally, the Arctic Ocean is considered to be one of the youngest marine ecosystems in the world. This results in less trophic links in the food web and higher efficiency of organic matter burial in sediments than it is observed in the marine ecosystems of lower latitudes. The main aim of this study was to estimate the spatial variability of organic carbon (OC) concentrations, C/N ratios and δ13C in surface sediments from two high Arctic fiords: Hornsund and Adventfjorden. Hornsund is a southernmost fiord on the western coast of Spitsbergen. It is a medium size fiord with a complex coastline including numerous bays and fourteen tidewater glaciers entering directly the fjord. Adventfjorden belongs to the largest fjord system of the west Spitsbergen - Isfjorden. The innermost part of Adventfjorden is composed of a tidal flat formed at the mouth of two braided rivers (the Adventelva and the Longyearelva) feeded by meltwater from glaciers. Both fjords are under influence of different water masses. The whole Isfjorden is affected by warm and saline Atlantic water from the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC). In Hornsund the influence of WSC is less pronounced at the expense of strong pressure from cold and less saline waters of coastal Sørkapp Current coming from the northeastern Barents Sea. Surface sediments were sampled at four locations in each fiord along the fjords' axes starting from the tidal flat in Adventfjorden and the vicinity of Hornbree glacier in Hornsund. The OC concentrations in Hornsund were much lower (from 1.6% to 1.8%) than those in Adventfjorden (from 2.4% to 5

  20. /sup 13/C and /sup 61/Ni isotope substitutions confirm the presence of a nickel(III)-carbon species in acetogenic CO dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Ragsdale, S.W.; Ljungdahl, L.G.; DerVartanian, D.V.

    1983-09-15

    The nickel-containing CO dehydrogenase from Acetobacterium woodii and Clostridium thermoaceticum were studied by EPR spectroscopy in order to define the components involved in the EPR spectrum obtained by reaction of the enzymes with the substrate, CO. Using isotopic substitution techniques, these experiments unequivocally establish that a nickel-carbon species is involved in the g=2.08, 2.02 EPR signal. Comparing the /sup 61/Ni- and /sup 59/Ni-substituted enzymes, the g=2.08 component of the resonance was found to be mainly due to nickel with a smaller contribution by the carbon species. Reaction of the CO dehydrogenase with (/sup 13/C)CO versus (/sup 12/C)CO showed that a carbon species, formed from CO, was the major contributor to the g=2.02 EPR signal. In addition, the oxidized CO dehydrogenase was found to exhibit a Ni(III) EPR signal analogous to that of the hydrogenase from the methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. 19 references, 3 figures.

  1. 13C and 61Ni isotope substitutions confirm the presence of a nickel (III)-carbon species in acetogenic CO dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, S W; Ljungdahl, L G; DerVartanian, D V

    1983-09-15

    The nickel-containing CO dehydrogenases from Acetobacterium woodii and Clostridium thermoaceticum were studied by EPR spectroscopy in order to define the components involved in the EPR spectrum obtained by reaction of the enzymes with the substrate, CO. Using isotopic substitution techniques, these experiments unequivocally establish that a nickel-carbon species is involved in the g = 2.08, 2.02 EPR signal. Comparing the 61Ni- and 59Ni-substituted enzymes, the g = 2.08 component of the resonance was found to be mainly due to nickel with a smaller contribution by the carbon species. Reaction of the CO dehydrogenase with [13C]CO versus [12C]CO showed that a carbon species, formed from CO, was the major contributor to the g = 2.02 EPR signal. In addition, the oxidized CO dehydrogenase was found to exhibit a Ni (III) EPR signal analogous to that of the hydrogenases from the methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:6312988

  2. Application of a methane carbon isotope analyzer for the investigation of δ13C of methane emission measured by the automatic chamber method in an Arctic Tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastepanov, Mikhail; Christensen, Torben

    2014-05-01

    Methane emissions have been monitored by an automatic chamber method in Zackenberg valley, NE Greenland, since 2006 as a part of Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring (GEM) program. During most of the seasons the measurements were carried out from the time of snow melt (June-July) until freezing of the active layer (October-November). Several years of data, obtained by the same method, instrumentation and at exactly the same site, provided a unique opportunity for the analysis of interannual methane flux patterns and factors affecting their temporal variability. The start of the growing season emissions was found to be closely related to a date of snow melt at the site. Despite a large between year variability of this date (sometimes more than a month), methane emission started within a few days after, and was increasing for the next about 30 days. After this peak of emission, it slowly decreased and stayed more or less constant or slightly decreasing during the rest of the growing season (Mastepanov et al., Biogeosciences, 2013). During the soil freezing, a second peak of methane emission was found (Mastepanov et al., Nature, 2008); its amplitude varied a lot between the years, from almost undetectable to comparable with total growing season emissions. Analysis of the multiyear emission patterns (Mastepanov et al., Biogeosciences, 2013) led to hypotheses of different sources for the spring, summer and autumn methane emissions, and multiyear cycles of accumulation and release of these components to the atmosphere. For the further investigation of this it was decided to complement the monitoring system with a methane carbon isotope analyzer (Los Gatos Research, USA). The instrument was installed during 2013 field season and was successfully operating until the end of the measurement campaign (27 October). Detecting both 12C-CH4 and 13C-CH4 concentrations in real time (0.5 Hz) during automatic chamber closure (15 min), the instrument was providing data for determination of

  3. Confirmation of K-Momentum Dark Exciton Vibronic Sidebands Using 13C-Labeled, Highly Enriched (6,5) Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, J. L.; Holt, J. M.; Irurzun, V. M.; Reasco, D. E.; Rumbles, G.

    2012-03-14

    A detailed knowledge of the manifold of both bright and dark excitons in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is critical to understanding radiative and nonradiative recombination processes. Exciton-phonon coupling opens up additional absorption and emission channels, some of which may 'brighten' the sidebands of optically forbidden (dark) excitonic transitions in optical spectra. In this report, we compare {sup 12}C and {sup 13}C-labeled SWCNTs that are highly enriched in the (6,5) species to identify both absorptive and emissive vibronic transitions. We find two vibronic sidebands near the bright {sup 1}E{sub 11} singlet exciton, one absorptive sideband {approx}200 meV above, and one emissive sideband {approx}140 meV below, the bright singlet exciton. Both sidebands demonstrate a {approx}50 cm{sup -1} isotope-induced shift, which is commensurate with exciton-phonon coupling involving phonons of A'{sub 1} symmetry (D band, {omega} {approx} 1330 cm{sup -1}). Independent analysis of each sideband indicates that both sidebands arise from the same dark exciton level, which lies at an energy approximately 25 meV above the bright singlet exciton. Our observations support the recent prediction of, and mounting experimental evidence for, the dark K-momentum singlet exciton lying {approx}25 meV (for the (6,5) SWCNT) above the bright {Lambda}-momentum singlet. This study represents the first use of {sup 13}C-labeled SWCNTs highly enriched in a single nanotube species to unequivocally confirm these sidebands as vibronic sidebands of the dark K-momentum singlet exciton.

  4. More than a century of Grain for Green Program is expected to restore soil carbon stock on alpine grassland revealed by field (13)C pulse labeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Chen, Dongdong; Zhao, Liang; Yang, Xue; Xu, Shixiao; Zhao, Xinquan

    2016-04-15

    Anthropogenic changes in land use/cover have altered the vegetation, soil, and carbon (C) cycling on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) over the last ~50years. As a result, the Grain for Green Program (GfGP) has been widely implemented over the last 10years to mitigate the impacts of cultivation. To quantify the effects of the GfGP on C partitioning and turnover rates at the ecosystem scale, an in situ (13)C pulse labeling experiment was conducted on natural and GfGP grasslands in an agro-pastoral ecotone in the Lake Qinghai region on the QTP. We found that there were significant differences in the C stocks of all the considered pools in both the natural and GfGP grasslands, with higher CO2 uptake rates in the GfGP grassland than that in the natural grassland. Partitioning of photoassimilate (% of recovered (13)C) in C pools of both grasslands was similar 25days after labeling, except in the roots of the 0-15 and 5-15cm soil layer. Soil organic C (SOC) sequestration rate in the GfGP grassland was 11.59±1.89gCm(-2)yr(-1) significantly greater than that in the natural grassland. The results confirmed that the GfGP is an efficient approach for grassland restoration and C sequestration. However, it will take more than a century (119.19±20.26yr) to restore the SOC stock from the current cropland baseline level to the approximate level of natural grassland. We suggest that additional measures are needed in the selection of suitable plant species for vegetation restoration, and in reasonable grazing management. PMID:26803680

  5. Partitioning of carbon sources among functional pools to investigate short-term priming effects of biochar in soil: A (13)C study.

    PubMed

    Kerré, Bart; Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C; Smolders, Erik

    2016-03-15

    Biochar sequesters carbon (C) in soils because of its prolonged residence time, ranging from several years to millennia. In addition, biochar can promote indirect C-sequestration by increasing crop yield while, potentially, reducing C-mineralization. This laboratory study was set up to evaluate effects of biochar on C-mineralization with due attention to source appointment by using (13)C isotope signatures. An arable soil (S) (7.9g organic C, OCkg(-1)) was amended (single dose of 10gkg(-1) soil) with dried, grinded maize stover (leaves and stalks), either natural (R) or (13)C enriched (R*), and/or biochar (B/B*) prepared from the maize stover residues (450°C). Accordingly, seven different combinations were set up (S, SR, SB, SR*, SB*, SRB*, SR*B) to trace the source of C in CO2 (180days), dissolved organic-C (115days) and OC in soil aggregate fractions (90days). The application of biochar to soil reduced the mineralization of native soil organic C but the effect on maize stover-C mineralization was not consistent. Biochar application decreased the mineralization of the non-enriched maize stover after 90days, this being consistent with a significant reduction of dissolved organic C concentration from 45 to 18mgL(-1). However, no significant effect was observed for the enriched maize stover, presumably due to differences between the natural and enriched materials. The combined addition of biochar and enriched maize stover significantly increased (twofold) the presence of native soil organic C or maize derived C in the free microaggregate fraction relative to soil added only with stover. Although consistent effects among C sources and biochar materials remains elusive, our outcomes indicate that some biochar products can reduce mineralization and solubilization of other sources of C while promoting their physical protection in soil particles. PMID:26780129

  6. Carbon-rich Presolar Grains from Massive Stars: Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N Ratios and the Mystery of 15N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, M.; Zinner, E.; Hoppe, P.; Jordan, C. J.; Gibson, B. K.; Trappitsch, R.; Herwig, F.; Fryer, C.; Hirschi, R.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C and low-density (LD) graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the supernova shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the puzzle of the Ne-E(L) component in LD graphite grains. This scenario is attractive for the SiC grains of type AB with 14N/15N ratios lower than solar, and provides an alternative solution for SiC grains originally classified as nova grains. Finally, this process may contribute to the production of 14N and 15N in the Galaxy, helping to produce the 14N/15N ratio in the solar system.

  7. Controls on the δ 13C of dissolved inorganic carbon in marine pore waters: An integrated case study of isotope exchange during syndepositional recrystallization of biogenic carbonate sediments (South Florida Platform, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Lynn M.; Ku, Timothy C. W.; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Patterson, William P.; Bonnell, Linda

    2007-06-01

    The carbon isotope systematics of marine carbonates, organic matter and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) play a critical role in quantifying carbonate dissolution fluxes from modern deep-ocean sediments to paleoocean-atmospheric modeling. However, there is a growing body of evidence that C mass and isotope balances in marine pore waters appear incompatible, suggesting that some processes other than mass transport, carbonate dissolution, and organic matter decomposition have significantly increased the value of δ 13C (DIC). We present a comprehensive data set of pore water and sediment geochemistries in biogenic carbonates from well-characterized depositional environments of the South Florida platform. Pore water elemental and δ 13C (DIC) values are integrated with δ 13C values of carbon sources (seawater, organic and inorganic carbon), sediment mixing rates ( 210Pb profiles), microbial sulfate reduction rates (SRR) (radiotracer 35SO 42-), and incubation experiments spiked with low δ 13C (DIC) to estimate the rate and extent of C isotope exchange. Together, these data indicate that biogenic carbonates undergo extensive syndepositional recrystallization at rates comparable to net dissolution rates, permitting significant exchange between isotopically depleted organic C and isotopically enriched inorganic C pools. Significant amounts of net carbonate dissolution are common in the pore waters of these low-Fe sediments, as manifested by Ca 2+/Cl - ratios increased by up to 25% relative to overlying seawater. Despite rapid microbial SRR, degrees of pore water SO 42- reduction usually are maintained below 5% by H 2S oxidation, the main acid source for dissolution. These processes increase pore water DIC concentrations by more than 6 mM, over a 5-fold increase relative to overlying seawater values. Pore water δ 13C (DIC) values are usually greater than -5‰, and sometimes as high as +2‰, despite decomposition of organic matter with low δ 13C values (-9‰ to -15

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its δ13C in the Ganga (Hooghly) River estuary, India: Evidence of DIC generation via organic carbon degradation and carbonate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Saumik; Dalai, Tarun K.; Pattanaik, Jitendra K.; Rai, Santosh K.; Mazumdar, Aninda

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we present comprehensive data on dissolved Ca, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its carbon isotope composition (δ13CDIC) of (i) the Ganga (Hooghly) River estuary water sampled during six seasons of contrasting water discharge over 2 years (2012 and 2013), (ii) shallow groundwater from areas adjacent to the estuary and (iii) industrial effluent water and urban wastewater draining into the estuary. Mass balance calculations indicate that processes other than the conservative mixing of seawater and river water are needed to explain the measured DIC and δ13CDIC. Results of mixing calculations in conjunction with the estimated undersaturated levels of dissolved O2 suggest that biological respiration and organic carbon degradation dominate over biological production in the estuary. An important outcome of this study is that a significant amount of DIC and dissolved Ca is produced within the estuary at salinity ⩾10, particularly during the monsoon period. Based on consideration of mass balance and a strong positive correlation observed between the "excess" DIC and "excess" Ca, we contend that the dominant source of DIC generated within the estuary is carbonate dissolution that is inferred to be operating in conjunction with degradation of organic carbon. Calculations show that groundwater cannot account for the observed "excess" Ca in the high salinity zone. Estimated DIC contributions from anthropogenic activity are minor, and they constitute ca. 2-3% of the river water DIC concentrations. The estimated annual DIC flux from the estuary to the Bay of Bengal is ca. (3-4) × 1012 g, of which ca. 40-50% is generated within the estuary. The monsoon periods account for the majority (ca. 70%) of the annual DIC generation in the estuary. The annual DIC flux from the Hooghly estuary accounts for ca. 1% of the global river DIC flux to the oceans. This is disproportionately higher than the water contribution from the Hooghly River to the oceans, which

  9. Carbonation of C–S–H and C–A–S–H samples studied by {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2015-05-15

    Synthesized calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) samples with Ca/Si ratios of 0.66, 1.0, and 1.5 have been exposed to atmospheric CO{sub 2} at room temperature and high relative humidity and studied after one to 12 weeks. {sup 29}Si NMR reveals that the decomposition of C–S–H caused by carbonation involves two steps and that the decomposition rate decreases with increasing Ca/Si ratio. The first step is a gradual decalcification of the C–S–H where calcium is removed from the interlayer and defect sites in the silicate chains until Ca/Si = 0.67 is reached, ideally corresponding to infinite silicate chains. In the seconds step, calcium from the principal layers is consumed, resulting in the final decomposition of the C–S–H and the formation of an amorphous silica phase composed of Q{sup 3} and Q{sup 4} silicate tetrahedra. The amount of solid carbonates and of carbonate ions in a hydrous environment increases with increasing Ca/Si ratio for the C–S–H, as shown by {sup 13}C NMR. For C–A–S–H samples with Ca/Si = 1.0 and 1.5, {sup 27}Al NMR demonstrates that all aluminium sites associated with the C–S–H are consumed during the carbonation reactions and incorporated mainly as tetrahedral Al(–OSi){sub 4} units in the amorphous silica phase. A small amount of penta-coordinated Al sites has also been identified in the silica phase.

  10. Organic matter turnover in reservoirs of the Harz Mountains (Germany): evidence from 13C/12C changes in dissolved inorganic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Johannes A. C.; Nenning, Franziska; van Geldern, Robert; Mader, Michael; Friese, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    photosynthetic uptake of DIC could also be observed in surface waters. In addition, near-bottom waters in the reservoirs showed first signs of methane formation that were indicated by enrichment in 13C of the DIC.

  11. A study of the abundance and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of atmospheric carbon dioxide and oceanic carbon in relation to the global carbon cycle. Final technical report, February 15, 1990--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    Knowledge can be gained about the fluxes and storage of carbon in natural systems and their relation to climate by detecting temporal and spatial patterns in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. When patterns in its {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C isotopic ratio are included in the analysis, there is also a basis for distinguishing organic and inorganic processes. The authors systematically measured the concentration and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of atmospheric CO{sub 2} to produce time series data essential to reveal these temporal and spatial patterns. To pursue the significance of these patterns further, the result also involved measurements of inorganic carbon in sea water and of CO{sub 2} in air near growing land plants. The study was coordinated with a study of the same title concurrently funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The study called for continued atmospheric measurements at an array of ten stations from the Arctic Basin to the South Pole. Air was collected in flasks brought back to the laboratory for analysis, except at Mauna Loa. Observatory, Hawaii, where continuous measurements were also carried out.

  12. 13C FRACTIONATION DURING RELIC SOIL ORGANIC C MINERALIZATION ON CARBON BUDGETS AND HALF-LIVES CALCULATED USING THE STABLE ISOTOPE APPROACH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 13C natural abundance approach for determining soil organic C (SOC) stability and turnover has been used to determine SOC mineralization kinetics. These calculations often assume that 13C fractionation during relic SOC and non-harvested biomass mineralization is insignificant. The objective of t...

  13. Supramolecular self-organisation and conformational isomerism of a binuclear O,O'-dipropyl dithiophosphate gold(I) complex, [Au2{S2P(OC3H7)2}2]: Synthesis, (13)C and (31)P CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction study and thermal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Rodina, Tatyana A; Korneeva, Eugenia V; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Ivanov, Alexander V

    2015-10-01

    Crystalline one-dimensional polymeric catena-poly[bis(μ2-O,O'-dipropyldithiophosphato-S,S')digold(I)] (Au-Au) (1) was prepared and studied using (13)C and (31)P CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. To elucidate the structural function of Dtph ligands in crystalline gold(I) O,O'-dipropyl dithiophosphate, the chemical shift anisotropy parameters (δaniso and η) were calculated from spinning sideband manifolds in (31)P MAS NMR spectra. A novel structure of the gold(I) compound comprises two isomeric, non-centrosymmetric binuclear molecules of [Au2{S2P(OC3H7)2}2] (isomers 'A' and 'B'), whose four Dtph groups display structural inequivalence. In each isomeric binuclear molecule of 1, a pair of μ2-bridging dipropyl Dtph ligands almost symmetrically links two neighbouring gold atoms, forming an extensive eight-membered metallocycle [Au2S4P2], while the intramolecular aurophilic Au⋯Au bond additionally stabilises this central cyclic moiety. At the supramolecular level of complex 1, intermolecular aurophilic Au⋯Au bonds yield almost linear infinite polymeric chains (⋯'A'⋯'B'⋯'A'⋯'B'⋯)n. The thermal behaviour of this compound was studied by the simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) technique (a combination of TG and DSC) under an argon atmosphere. PMID:26004097

  14. Linkages Between Upwelling and Shell Characteristics of Mytilus californianus: Morphology and Stable Isotope (δ13C, δ18O) Signatures of a Carbonate Archive from the California Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosfelt, J. D.; Hill, T. M.; Russell, A. D.; Bean, J. R.; Sanford, E.; Gaylord, B.

    2014-12-01

    Many calcareous organisms are known to record the ambient environmental conditions in which they grow, and their calcium carbonate skeletons are often valuable archives of climate records. Mytilus californianus, a widely distributed species of intertidal mussel, experiences a spatial mosaic of oceanographic conditions as it grows within the California Current System. Periodic episodes of upwelling bring high-CO2 waters to the surface, during which California coastal waters are similar to projected conditions and act as a natural analogue to future ocean acidification. To examine the link between upwelling and shell characteristics of M. californianus, we analyzed the morphology and stable isotope (δ13C, δ18O) signatures of mussel specimens collected live from seven study sites within the California Current System. Morphometric analyses utilized a combination of elliptic Fourier analysis and shell thickness measurements to determine the influence of low pH waters on the growth morphology and ecological fitness of M. californianus. These geochemical and morphological analyses were compared with concurrent high-resolution environmental (T, S, pH, TA, DIC) records from these seven study sites from 2010-2013. With appropriate calibration, new archives from modern M. californianus shells could provide a valuable tool to enable environmental reconstructions within the California Current System. These archives could in turn be used to predict the future consequences of continuing ocean acidification, as well as reconstruct past (archeological) conditions.

  15. Organic Carbon Delivery to a High Arctic Watershed over the Late Holocene: Insights from Plant Biomarkers and Compound Specific δ13C and Δ14C Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, K. M.; Bianchi, T. S.; Eglinton, T. I.; Allison, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Colville River in Alaska is the largest river in North America which has a drainage basin that is exclusively underlain by permafrost, and as such provides a unique signal of historical changes in one of the world's most vulnerable areas to climate changes. Additionally, the Colville flows into Simpson's Lagoon, an area of the Alaskan Beaufort coast protected by a barrier island chain, lessening the impacts of Arctic storms and ice grounding on sediment mixing. Cores collected from the Colville river delta in August of 2010 were found to be composed of muddy, organic-rich, well-laminated sediments. The 2.5 to 3 meter length of each core spans about one to two thousand years of Holocene history, including the entire Anthropocene and much of the late Holocene. Two cores were sampled for this data set - one from close to the river mouth, and one from farther east in Simpson's Lagoon. Samples were taken every 2 cm for the entire length of both cores. In order to determine how the amount of terrestrial organic matter input changed over the Holocene, bulk analyses including percent organic carbon, percent nitrogen, and stable carbon isotopic analysis were performed, and biomarkers including lignin-phenols and fatty acids were measured. It was shown that lignin-phenol input is positively correlated with Alaskan North Slope temperature reconstructions. To determine whether the source of this increased terrestrial organic matter input was from fresh vegetation (for example, shrub encroachment onto tundra areas) or aged soil organic matter (potentially due to permafrost thawing and breakdown), selected samples were analyzed for compound-specific δ13C and Δ14C of fatty acids and lignin-phenols. These analyses show significant changes in carbon storage and in terrestrial carbon delivery to the Lagoon over time. These results represent the first fine-scale organic biomarker study in a high Arctic North American Lagoon, and have many implications for the future of carbon

  16. Priming of Soil Carbon Decomposition in Two Inner Mongolia Grassland Soils following Sheep Dung Addition: A Study Using 13C Natural Abundance Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiuzhi; Ambus, Per; Wang, Shiping; Wang, Yanfen; Wang, Chengjie

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of sheep dung on soil carbon (C) sequestration, a 152 days incubation experiment was conducted with soils from two different Inner Mongolian grasslands, i.e. a Leymus chinensis dominated grassland representing the climax community (2.1% organic matter content) and a heavily degraded Artemisia frigida dominated community (1.3% organic matter content). Dung was collected from sheep either fed on L. chinensis (C3 plant with δ13C = −26.8‰; dung δ13C = −26.2‰) or Cleistogenes squarrosa (C4 plant with δ13C = −14.6‰; dung δ13C = −15.7‰). Fresh C3 and C4 sheep dung was mixed with the two grassland soils and incubated under controlled conditions for analysis of 13C-CO2 emissions. Soil samples were taken at days 17, 43, 86, 127 and 152 after sheep dung addition to detect the δ13C signal in soil and dung components. Analysis revealed that 16.9% and 16.6% of the sheep dung C had decomposed, of which 3.5% and 2.8% was sequestrated in the soils of L. chinensis and A. frigida grasslands, respectively, while the remaining decomposed sheep dung was emitted as CO2. The cumulative amounts of C respired from dung treated soils during 152 days were 7–8 times higher than in the un-amended controls. In both grassland soils, ca. 60% of the evolved CO2 originated from the decomposing sheep dung and 40% from the native soil C. Priming effects of soil C decomposition were observed in both soils, i.e. 1.4 g and 1.6 g additional soil C kg−1 dry soil had been emitted as CO2 for the L. chinensis and A. frigida soils, respectively. Hence, the net C losses from L. chinensis and A. frigida soils were 0.6 g and 0.9 g C kg−1 soil, which was 2.6% and 7.0% of the total C in L. chinensis and A. frigida grasslands soils, respectively. Our results suggest that grazing of degraded Inner Mongolian pastures may cause a net soil C loss due to the positive priming effect, thereby accelerating soil deterioration. PMID:24236024

  17. Metal Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical CO2 and H2O Using Solid State 29Si, 13C NMR Spectroscop

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Sears, Jesse A.; Wang, Chong M.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2010-03-11

    Ex situ solid state NMR was used for the first time to study fundamental mineral carbonation processes and reaction extent relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) using a model silicate mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4)+supercriticalCO2 with and without H2O. Run conditions were 80 C and 96 atm. 29Si NMR clearly shows that in the absence of CO2, the role of H2O is to hydrolyze surface Mg-O-Si bonds to produce dissolved Mg2+, and mono- and oligomeric hydroxylated silica species. Surface hydrolysis products contain only Q0 (Si(OH)4) and Q1(Si(OH)3OSi) species. An equilibrium between Q0, Q1 and Mg2+ with a saturated concentration equivalent to less than 3.2% of the Mg2SiO4 conversion is obtained at a reaction time of up to 7 days. Using scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is observed within 7 days. Using both scCO2 and H2O, the surface reaction products for silica are mainly Q3 (SiOH(OSi)3) species accompanied by a lesser amount of Q2 (Si(OH)2(OSi)2) and Q4 (Si(OSi)4). However, no Q0 and Q1 were detected, indicating the carbonic acid formation/deprotonation and magnesite (MgCO3) precipitation reactions are faster than the forsterite hydrolysis process. Thus it can be concluded that the Mg2SiO4 hydrolysis process is the rate limiting step of the overall mineral carbonation process. 29Si NMR combined with XRD, TEM, SAED and EDX further reveal that the reaction is a surface reaction with the Mg2SiO4 crystallite in the core and with condensed Q2-Q4 species forming amorphous surface layers. 13C MAS NMR identified a possible reaction intermediate as (MgCO3)4-Mg(OH)2-5H2O. However, at long reaction times only crystallite magnesite MgCO3 products are observed.

  18. Analysing Groundwater Using the 13C Isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Sadek

    The stable isotope of the carbon atom (13C) give information about the type of the mineralisation of the groundwater existing during the water seepage and about the recharge conditions of the groundwater. The concentration of the CO2(aq.) dissolved during the infiltration of the water through the soil's layers has an effect on the mineralisation of this water. The type of the photosynthesis's cycle (C-3 or C-4 carbon cycle) can have a very important role to determine the conditions (closed or open system) of the mineralisation of groundwater. The isotope 13C of the dissolved CO2 in water give us a certain information about the origin and the area of pollution of water. The proportion of the biogenic carbon and its percentage in the mineralisation of groundwater is determined by using the isotope 13C.

  19. Organic compounds in the C 3H 6O 3 family: Microwave spectrum of cis-cis dimethyl carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovas, F. J.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Widicus Weaver, S. L.; McGuire, B. A.; Blake, G. A.

    2010-11-01

    Geometry optimization calculations on 13 members of the C 3H 6O 3 family of organic species have been carried out to determine their relative binding energies. Dimethyl carbonate [(CH 3) 2CO 3] is one of the lower energy species in this family, which includes the C 3-sugars 1,3-dihydroxyacetone and glyceraldehyde. The microwave spectrum of dimethyl carbonate has been measured over the frequency range 8.4-25.3 GHz with several pulsed-beam Fourier-transform microwave spectrometers and from 227 GHz to 350 GHz with direct absorption spectrometers. The spectrum of the lowest-energy cis-cis conformer of dimethyl carbonate has been assigned, and ab initio electronic structure calculations of the three possible conformers have been performed. Stark effect measurements were carried out on the cis-cis conformer to provide accurate determinations of the dipole moment components.

  20. Organic Compounds in the C3H6O3 Family: Microwave Spectrum of cis-cis Dimethyl Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, B. A.; Widicus Weaver, S. L.; Lovas, F. J.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Blake, G. A.

    2011-05-01

    A number of recent spectroscopic and observational efforts have focused on simple sugars and sugar alcohols because of their importance in prebiotic astro- chemistry. The simplest sugar-related species, glycolaldehyde, has been detected in Sgr B2(N), as have its C2H4O2 structural isomers acetic acid and methyl formate. Additional studies of the C3-sugars with empirical formula C3H6O3, glyceraldehyde and dihydroxyacetone, resulted in no clear interstellar detection. Structural isomerism is extensive in interstellar clouds, and there is a high level of correlation between the relative energies of isomers and their relative abundances, with the lowest energy isomers detected in greatest abundance. The detected members of the C2H4O2 family, however, defy this trend, having relative abundances of (acetic acid):(glycolaldehyde):(methyl formate) of about 2:1:52, despite acetic acid being the lowest energy isomer. These puzzling abundance ratios and the lack of detection of the C3H6O3 sugars gives rise to the question: "Which is the most likely isomer in the C3H6O3 family to be detectable in inter- stellar clouds?" In an attempt to answer this question, we carried out geometry optimization calculations to determine the relative binding energies of the 13 members of the C3H6O3 family. Of the four lowest- energy isomers, only lactic acid [CH3CH(OH)COOH] and dimethyl carbonate [(CH3)2CO3] are commercially available, and lactic acid has been previously investigated spectroscopically. We have therefore conducted a laboratory study of dimethyl carbonate, measuring its rotational spectrum from 8.4 - 25.3 GHz using a Fourier-Transform microwave spectrometer, and from 227 - 350 GHz using a direct absorption spectrometer. We report on the theoretical calculations performed on the C3H6O3 family of isomers, the experimental studies of cis-cis dimethyl carbonate, and the implica- tions of these results for interstellar chemistry. The details of this work are also reported in Lovas et

  1. Application of (13)C ramp CPMAS NMR with phase-adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) for the quantitative estimation of carbon functional groups in natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Ikeya, Kosuke; Watanabe, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The composition of carbon (C) functional groups in natural organic matter (NOM), such as dissolved organic matter, soil organic matter, and humic substances, is frequently estimated using solid-state (13)C NMR techniques. A problem associated with quantitative analysis using general cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CPMAS) spectra is the appearance of spinning side bands (SSBs) split from the original center peaks of sp (2) hybridized C species (i.e., aromatic and carbonyl C). Ramp CP/phase-adjusted side band suppressing (PASS) is a pulse sequence that integrates SSBs separately and quantitatively recovers them into their inherent center peaks. In the present study, the applicability of ramp CP/PASS to NOM analysis was compared with direct polarization (DPMAS), another quantitative method but one that requires a long operation time, and/or a ramp CP/total suppression side band (ramp CP/TOSS) technique, a popular but non-quantitative method for deleting SSBs. The test materials were six soil humic acid samples with various known degrees of aromaticity and two fulvic acids. There were no significant differences in the relative abundance of alkyl C, O-alkyl C, and aromatic C between the ramp CP/PASS and DPMAS methods, while the signal intensities corresponding to aromatic C in the ramp CP/TOSS spectra were consistently less than the values obtained in the ramp CP/PASS spectra. These results indicate that ramp CP/PASS can be used to accurately estimate the C composition of NOM samples. PMID:26522329

  2. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: Insights from solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shasha; Zhu, Yuanrong; Meng, Wei; He, Zhongqi; Feng, Weiying; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P

    2016-02-01

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions and degradation of WEOM derived from six aquatic macrophytes species of Tai Lake, China, were investigated by use of solid-state (13)C NMR and solution (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Carbohydrates were the predominant constituents of WEOM fractions, followed by carboxylic acid. Orthophosphate (ortho-P) was the dominant form of P (78.7% of total dissolved P) in the water extracts, followed by monoester P (mono-P) (20.6%) and little diester P (0.65%). The proportion of mono-P in total P species increased with the percentage of O-alkyl and O-C-O increasing in the WEOM, which is likely due to degradation and dissolution of biological membranes and RNA from aquatic plants. Whereas the proportion of mono-P decreased with alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O increasing, which may be owing to the insoluble compounds including C functional groups of alkyl-C, NCH/OCH3 and COO/N-C=O, such as aliphatic biopolymers, lignin and peptides. Based on the results of this study and information in the literature about water column and sediment, we propose that WEOM, dominated by polysaccharides, are the most labile and bioavailable component in debris of macrophytes. Additionally, these WEOMs would also be a potential source for bioavailable organic P (e.g., RNA, DNA and phytate) for lakes. PMID:26624522

  3. 13C/Palynological evidence of differential residence times of organic carbon prior to its sedimentation in East African Rift Lakes and peat bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Aucour, Anne-Marie; Bonnefille, Raymonde; Riollet, Guy; Vincens, Annie; Williamson, David

    Most terrestrial plants producing large amounts of organic matter in the East African Rift follow the Calvin (C3) photosynthetic pathway. Their end products have δ13C values of ca. -27 ± 2‰ (vs. PDB). On the contrary, most Cyperaceae (notably Cyperus papyrus and C. latifolius) are characterized by higher 13C contents ° 13C = -10.5 ± 1‰ ) in relation to their Hatch and Slack (C4) photosynthetic cycle. In consequence, δ13C values in total organic matter (TOM) from peat bog or lake cores essentially responded to the proportion of detritus from C4-Cyperaceae. Immediate evidence of the development or disappearance of Cyperaceae around lake margins or in peat bogs can be found in pollen assemblages. Lag times between pollen signals and correlative ° 13C shifts in TOM from cores are therefore indicative of the residence time of organic matter prior to its sedimentation. Delayed sedimentation of TOM will result in 14C anomalies which depend on several parameters, most of them being site specific as shown by examples from a peat bog in Burundi and from southern Lake Tanganyika. An independent assessment of the chronology by high resolution paleomagnetic correlations indicates a ca. 1.5 ka apparent 14C age of TOM in Lake Tanganyika at the Pleistocene-Holocene transition.

  4. Partitioning Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange Into net Assimilation and Respiration With Canopy-scale Isotopic Measurements: an Error Propagation Analysis With Both 13C and 18O Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peylin, P.; Ogee, J.; Cuntz, M.; Bariac, T.; Ciais, P.; Brunet, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Stable CO2 isotope measurements are increasingly used to partition the net CO2 exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere in terms of non-foliar respiration (FR) and gross photosynthesis (FA). However the accuracy of the partitioning strongly depends on the isotopic disequilibrium between these two gross fluxes and a rigorous estimation of the errors on FA and FR is needed. In this study we account and propagate uncertainties on all terms in the mass balance equations for total and "labeled" CO2 in order to get precise estimates of the errors on FA and FR. We applied our method to a maritime pine forest in the Southwest of France. Using the δ 13C-CO2 and CO2 measurements, we show that the resulting uncertainty associated to the gross fluxes can be as large as 4 æmol m-2 s-1. In addition, even if we could get more precise estimates of the isoflux and the isotopic signature of FA we show that this error would not be significantly reduced. This is because the isotopic disequilibrium between FA and FR is around 2-3‰ , i.e. the order of magnitude of the uncertainty on the isotopic signature of FR (δ R). With δ 18O-CO2 and CO2 measurements, the uncertainty associated to the gross fluxes lies also around 4 æmol m-2 s-1. On the other hand, it could be dramatically reduced if we were able to get more precise estimates of the CO18O isoflux and the associated discrimination during photosynthesis. This is because the isotopic disequilibrium between FA and FR is large, of the order of 10-15‰ , i.e. much larger than the uncertainty on δ R. The isotopic disequilibrium between FA and FR or the uncertainty on δ R vary among ecosystems and over the year. Our approach may help to choose the best strategy to study the carbon budget of a given ecosystem using stable isotopes.

  5. Glacial- interglacial temperature change based on 13C18O carbonate bond with in fish bone otoliths from Red Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Eiler, J.; Feeney, R.

    2006-12-01

    Determining the past record of temperature and salinity of ocean surface waters is essential for understanding past changes in climate, such as those which occur across glacial-interglacial transitions. As a useful proxy, the clumped isotope of CO2 in carbonate (13C18O16O or ?47) from inorganic precipitation experiment has been shown to reflect surface temperature with high degree of confidence (Ghosh et al., 2006). The last glacial cycle was characterized by climate fluctuations, but the extent of any associated changes in global sea level (or, equivalently, ice volume) remains elusive. High stands of sea level can be reconstructed from dated fossil and isotopic analyses of foraminifera and terapods, and these data are complemented by a compilation of global sea-level estimates based on deep-sea oxygen isotope ratios. Salinity derived from the records of oxygen isotopes ratios, however, contains uncertainties due to lack of information about the sea surface temperature change. Here we used combination of clumped isotopes technique and oxygen isotope measurement from fish otoliths (Myctophiformes; lanternfishes) extracted from two piston cores (Ku et al., 1969) (CH-154 and CH-153) to understand the temperature evolution and salinity variation of Red Sea water (300-800m) during the last 70 k.y. We analyzed well preserved unaltered otoliths from 7 different stratigraphic horizons from sediment core CH-154. Our preliminary observation suggests ~20 degree Celsius differences in sea water temperatures between glacial and interglacial time. We showed that the region has experienced fluctuation in climatic and tectonic processes during glacial interglacial time and the otoliths developed within the fishes captured the information about temperature change and salinity variation. Our results indicate a drop in temperature and restricted exchange of water with the open ocean during glaciations. The Red Sea environment was also highly saline even during the interglacial event

  6. Chemical structures of swine-manure chars produced under different carbonization conditions investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two types of swine manure chars, hydrothermally-produced hydrochar and slow-pyrolysis pyrochar, and their raw swine manure solid were characterized using advanced 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Compared with the parent raw swine manure, both hydrochars and pyrochar di...

  7. Intra-seasonal dynamics in metabolic processes of 13C/12C and 18O/16O in components of Scots pine twigs from southern Siberia interpreted with a conceptual framework based on the Carbon Metabolism Oscillatory Model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbon isotope data from conifer trees play an important role in research on the boreal forest carbon reservoir in the global carbon cycle. Carbon isotopes are routinely used to study interactions between the environment and tree growth. Moreover, carbon isotopes became an essential tool for the evaluation of carbon assimilation and transport from needles into reserve pools, as well as the allocation of stored assimilates within a tree. The successful application and interpretation of carbon isotopes rely on the coherence of isotopic fractionation modeling. This study employs a new Carbon Metabolism Oscillatory Model (CMOM) to interpret the experimental data sets on metabolic seasonal dynamics of 13C/12 C and 18O/16O ratios measured in twig components of Scots pine growing in southern Siberia (Russia). Results The dynamics of carbon isotopic variables were studied in components of Pinus sylvestris L. in light and in dark chambers during the vegetation period from 14 June to 28 July 2006. At the beginning of this period water-soluble organic matter, mostly labile sugars (including sucrose as the main component) and newly formed bulk needle material, displayed relatively “light” δ13C values (depletion in 13 C). Then, 13 C content increased again with noticeable “depletion” events in the middle of the growth period. A gradual 13 C accumulation took place in the second half of the vegetation period. Similar effects were observed both in the light and in the dark with some temporal shifts. Environmental factors did not influence the δ13C values. A gradual 12C-depletion effect was noticed in needles of the previous year. The δ13C values of sucrose and proteins from needle biomass altered independently from each other in the light chamber. A distinct negative correlation between δ13C and δ18O values was revealed for all studied variables. Conclusions The abrupt 13C depletion recorded by all tested trees for the period from June to July

  8. Combined δ11B, δ13C, and δ18O analyses of coccolithophore calcite constrains the response of coccolith vesicle carbonate chemistry to CO2-induced ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Wei; Tripati, Robert; Aciego, Sarah; Gilmore, Rosaleen; Ries, Justin

    2016-04-01

    Coccolithophorid algae play a central role in the biological carbon pump, oceanic carbon sequestration, and in marine food webs. It is therefore important to understand the potential impacts of CO2-induced ocean acidification on these organisms. Differences in the regulation of carbonate chemistry, pH, and carbon sources of the intracellular compartments where coccolith formation occurs may underlie the diverse calcification and growth responses to acidified seawater observed in prior experiments. Here we measured stable isotopes of boron (δ11B), carbon13C) and oxygen (δ18O) within coccolith calcite, and δ13C of algal tissue to constrain carbonate system parameters in two strains of Pleurochrysis carterae (P. carterae). The two strains were cultured under variable pCO2, with water temperature, salinity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and alkalinity monitored. Notably, PIC, POC, and PIC/POC ratio did not vary across treatments, indicating that P. carterae is able to calcify and photosynthesize at relatively constant rates irrespective of pCO2 treatment. The δ11B data indicate that mean pH at the site of coccolith formation did not vary significantly in response to elevated CO2. These results suggest that P. carterae regulates calcifying vesicle pH, even amidst changes in external seawater pH. Furthermore, δ13C and δ18O data suggest that P. carterae may utilize carbon from a single internal DIC pool for both calcification and photosynthesis, and that a greater proportion of dissolved CO2 relative to HCO3‑ enters the internal DIC pool under acidified conditions. These results suggest that P. carterae is able to calcifyand photosynthesize at relatively constant rates across pCO2 treatments by maintaining pH homeostasis at their site of calcification and utilizing a greater proportion of aqueous CO2.

  9. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen isoscapes of the California Coast: integrated δ15N and δ13C of suspended particulate organic matter inferred from tissues of the California Mussel (mytilus californianus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokhshoori, N. L.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Spatial maps of isotopic variability in a single species, or isoscapes, can characterize the natural variability in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) isotope ratios across ecosystems on broad spatial scales, trace the signature of a source across a given area, as well as constrain animal migration patterns (Graham et al. 2002). In this study, isoscapes of stable carbon (13C) and nitrogen (15N) isotopes were constructed using intertidal mussels for northeast Pacific coastal waters of California. In this region biogeochemical cycling is primarily controlled by upwelling intensity and large-scale transport of the California Current System (CCS). We hypothesize that sampling specific tissues of filter-feeding organisms can provide an integrated measure of variation in 15N and 13C of the suspended particulate organic matter (POM) pool vs. latitude within the CCS, as well indicate main sources of both organic C and N to littoral food webs. California mussels (mytilus californianus) were collected from 28 sites between Coos Bay, OR and La Jolla, CA in the winter of 2009-2010 and summer of 2011, and adductor tissue was analyzed for δ13C and δ15N. Mussel size classes were chosen to provide ~ 1 yr integrated signal. Spatial trends in δ15N from the winter sampling show a strong linear trend in increasing δ15N values with latitude north to south (δ15N values range from 7 % to 12%) consistent with slowly attenuating northward transport of 15N-depleted nitrate via California Undercurrent (Altabet et al. 1999). The δ13C values have no strong north to south correlation, but exhibit strong location-specific variability. The δ13C values range between -13 % and -18%. We propose the site-specific signature of δ13C indicates relative source of primary productin to POM at a given region (i.e. kelp, phytoplankton, zooplankton). Overall, these results suggest that isoscapes for filter-feeding organisms may offer a more accurate integrated picture of 15N and 13C values of POM than is

  10. Carbon13C) and Nitrogen (δ15N) Stable Isotope Signatures in Bat Fur Indicate Swarming Sites Have Catchment Areas for Bats from Different Summering Areas

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Jordi L.; Broders, Hugh G.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory patterns of bats are not well understood and traditional methods to study this, like capture-mark-recapture, may not provide enough detail unless there are many records. Stable isotope profiles of many animal species have been used to make inferences about migration. Each year Myotis lucifugus and M. septentrionalis migrate from summering roosts to swarming caves and mines in the fall, but the pattern of movement between them is not well understood. In this study, fur δ13C and δ15N values of 305 M. lucifugus and 200 M. septentrionalis were analyzed to make inferences about migration patterns between summering areas and swarming sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. We expected that there would be greater variability in δ13C and δ15N among individuals at swarming sites because it was believed that these sites are used by individuals originating from many summering areas. There was extensive overlap in the standard ellipse area, corrected for small sample sizes (SEAc), of bats at swarming sites and much less overlap in SEAc among groups sampled at summering areas. Meaningful inference could not be made on M. septentrionalis because their low variation in SEAc may have been the result of sampling only 3 summering areas. However, for M. lucifugus, swarming sites had larger SEAc than summering areas and predictive discriminant analysis assigned swarming bats to multiple summering areas, supporting the contention that swarming bats are mixed aggregations of bats from several summering areas. Together, these data support the contention that swarming sites have catchment areas for bats from multiple summering areas and it is likely that the catchment areas for swarming sites overlap. These data suggest that δ13C and δ15N profiling of bat fur offer some potential to make inferences about regional migration in bats. PMID:25923696

  11. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cardiac metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seeholzer, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the increasing use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques for following the metabolic fate of compounds specifically labeled with /sup 13/C. The goals of the present study are: (1) to develop reliable quantitative procedures for measuring the /sup 13/C enrichment of specific carbon sites in compounds enriched by the metabolism of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates in rat heart, and (2) to use these quantitative measurements of fractional /sup 13/C enrichment within the context of a mathematical flux model describing the carbon flow through the TCA cycle and ancillary pathways, as a means for obtaining unknown flux parameters. Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with various combinations of glucose, acetate, pyruvate, and propionate to achieve steady state flux conditions, followed by perfusion with the same substrates labeled with /sup 13/C in specific carbon sites. The hearts were frozen at different times after addition of /sup 13/C-labeled substrates and neutralized perchloric acid extracts were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The fractional /sup 13/C enrichment (F.E.) of individual carbon sites in different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for saturation and nuclear Overhauser effects. These F.E. measurements by /sup 13/C NMR were validated by the analysis of /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H scalar coupling patterns observed in /sup 1/H NMR spectra of the extracted metabolites. The results obtained from perfusion of hearts glucose plus either (2-/sup 13/C) acetate or (3-/sup 13/C) pyruvate are similar to those obtained by previous investigators using /sup 14/C-labeled substrates.

  12. A new laser spectrometer for measurements of the carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of methane in air and applications to ice core studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. E.; Brook, E.; Dong, F.; Gupta, M.

    2012-12-01

    Methane is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas contributing to global climate change, and yet its sources and sinks are still poorly understood. Isotopic ratios of methane released to the atmosphere depend on the isotopic composition of the source and fractionation by sink processes. Analysis of isotopic compositions can provide further understanding of methane source strength and location. Traditional measurements by mass spectrometry are laborious and not easily adaptable to new continuous gas extraction methodologies. Recent technological advances have reduced the amount of methane necessary for precise measurements of δ13C in methane by laser spectrometry to a practical sample size for ice core studies. We present a new laser-based analyzer for measurement of δ13C in methane that requires less than 6 μmol of CH4. Current precision is better than ±0.5‰ (1σ, 100 seconds) on dry air with [CH4]= 2ppm. The sensor is operable in either discrete or continuous sampling modes allowing for continuous measurement of gas sample exhausted from other analyzers. Detailed performance characteristics and tests will be discussed at the meeting.

  13. Non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux ratio analysis.

    PubMed

    Hörl, Manuel; Schnidder, Julian; Sauer, Uwe; Zamboni, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) has become a key method for metabolic engineering and systems biology. In the most common methodology, fluxes are calculated by global isotopomer balancing and iterative fitting to stationary (13)C-labeling data. This approach requires a closed carbon balance, long-lasting metabolic steady state, and the detection of (13)C-patterns in a large number of metabolites. These restrictions mostly reduced the application of (13)C-MFA to the central carbon metabolism of well-studied model organisms grown in minimal media with a single carbon source. Here we introduce non-stationary (13)C-metabolic flux ratio analysis as a novel method for (13)C-MFA to allow estimating local, relative fluxes from ultra-short (13)C-labeling experiments and without the need for global isotopomer balancing. The approach relies on the acquisition of non-stationary (13)C-labeling data exclusively for metabolites in the proximity of a node of converging fluxes and a local parameter estimation with a system of ordinary differential equations. We developed a generalized workflow that takes into account reaction types and the availability of mass spectrometric data on molecular ions or fragments for data processing, modeling, parameter and error estimation. We demonstrated the approach by analyzing three key nodes of converging fluxes in central metabolism of Bacillus subtilis. We obtained flux estimates that are in agreement with published results obtained from steady state experiments, but reduced the duration of the necessary (13)C-labeling experiment to less than a minute. These results show that our strategy enables to formally estimate relative pathway fluxes on extremely short time scale, neglecting cellular carbon balancing. Hence this approach paves the road to targeted (13)C-MFA in dynamic systems with multiple carbon sources and towards rich media. PMID:23860906

  14. Calculation of total meal d13C from individual food d13C.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variations in the isotopic signature of carbon in biological samples can be used to distinguish dietary patterns and monitor shifts in metabolism. But for these variations to have meaning, the isotopic signature of the diet must be known. We sought to determine if knowledge of the 13C isotopic abund...

  15. Stable isotope ratio (13C/12C) mass spectrometry to evaluate carbon sources and sinks: changes and trends during the decomposition of vegetal debris from eucalyptus clone plantations (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, I.; Cabaneiro, A.

    2014-02-01

    Vegetal debris is known to participate in key soil processes such as the formation of soil organic matter (OM), also being a potential source of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. However, its contribution to the isotopic composition of both the soil OM and the atmospheric carbon dioxide is not clear yet. Hence, the main objective of the present research is to understand the isotopic 13C changes and trends that take place during the successive biodegradative stages of decomposing soil organic inputs. By incubating bulk plant tissues for several months under laboratory controlled conditions, the kinetics of the CO2 releases and shifts in the 13C natural abundance of the solid residues were investigated using litter samples coming from forest plantations with a different clone (Anselmo: 1st clonal generation attained by morphological selection and Odiel: 2nd clonal generation genetically obtained) of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. developed over granitic or schistic bedrocks and located in northwestern Spain. Significant isotopic variations with time were observed, probably due to the isotopically heterogeneous composition of these complex substrates in conjunction with the initial selective consumption of more easily degradable 13C-differentiated compounds during the first stages of the biodegradation, while less available or recalcitrant litter components were decomposed at later stages of biodegradation, generating products that have their own specific isotopic signatures. These results, which significantly differ depending on the type of clone, suggest that caution must be exercised when interpreting carbon isotope studies (at natural abundance levels) since perturbations associated with the quality or chemical composition of the organic debris from different terrestrial ecosystems can have an important effect on the carbon stable isotope dynamics.

  16. Modification of Carrier Gas Stream to Improve 13C/12C Isotopic Accuracy in Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy-Based Measurements of Low-Concentration Dissolved Carbon Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conaway, C. H.; Morkner, P.; Thomas, B.; Saad, N.

    2013-12-01

    Determining isotopic composition of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon in natural waters is of critical importance to a broad set of scientific objectives. The routine analysis of these sample types can be expensive and in the past has been limited predominantly to laboratories capable of high-precision isotope ratio mass spectrometric analysis. More recently, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) has provided an alternative instrumental means for characterizing these samples. One challenge with these types of is that the CRDS can show a non-linear response in d13C at low carbon concentrations (<0.5 mM). Here we present a new approach using a modification of a total organic carbon-cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TOC-CRDS) continuous flow system by adding a background stream of carbon dioxide of known isotopic composition to the CRDS analytical train. The isotopic carbon values generated by the CRDS are then corrected using a two-component isotopic mixing model. This modification is useful in reducing bias towards lighter carbon isotopic values when measuring samples with low carbon concentration, such as natural waters with either dissolved organic or inorganic carbon concentrations of less than 0.5 mM, and does not introduce substantial bias for higher concentration samples.

  17. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  18. Belowground carbon sources and fine root turnover times using 13C tracer at the conclusion of a long-term FACE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, D. J.; Matamala, R.; Norby, R.; Iversen, C.; Gonzalez-Meler, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Estimates of carbon budgets require accurate approximations of fine root production and turnover. Current published estimates of root carbon turnover vary more than five-fold, with large differences between isotope-derived estimates, minirhizotron studies or other approaches. Variations in residence times between root structural and reserve C, root orders and new photosynthate to support root function have been shown independently, but have not been yet reconciled in a single study. Taking advantage of the conclusion of the long-term FACE experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we track the whole ecosystem isotope relaxation in fine root pools (<2mm). Carbon assimilated in 2010 and beyond is isotopically unique from carbon incorporated during fumigation (1998-2009). Our objectives were to quantify carbon turnover time in fine roots of Liquidambar styraciflua, and to identify carbon sources for new root growth and for energy metabolism. We sampled intact and in-growth root cores at regular (minimum time was monthly) intervals in 2010 and at several intervals in 2011. Additionally, fine roots and soils were incubated from three sampling periods each from 2010 and 2011 for measurement of the isotopic signature of respired CO2. Our results show a residence time of carbon in fine roots consistent with previous stable isotope reports for this species, with about 20% of structural C replaced after one full growing season. In contrast, all new root growth (evidenced from in-growth cores) was supported by new photosynthate, except for some storage carbon used very early in the growing season. Carbon used for energy metabolism in roots exclusively originated from new photosynthate during all measurement periods. Our results confirm heterogeneity of C pools in existing and new roots and the relatively long residence time of structural C in existing fine roots.

  19. Synthesis of a series of carbon-14 labeled tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-ones.

    PubMed

    Arjomandi, Omid Khalili; Saemian, Nader; McGeary, Ross P; Shirvani, Gholamhossein

    2013-12-01

    A series of tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-ones labeled with carbon-14 in the 2-position of pyrimidinone moiety were prepared as part of a 3-step sequence from benz[amidino-(14) C]amidine hydrochloride as a key synthetic intermediate. PMID:24339011

  20. Stable carbon ((12/13)C) and nitrogen ((14/15)N) isotopes as a tool for identifying the sources of cyanide in wastes and contaminated soils--a method development.

    PubMed

    Weihmann, Jenny; Mansfeldt, Tim; Schulte, Ulrike

    2007-01-23

    The occurrence of iron-cyanide complexes in the environment is of concern, since they are potentially hazardous. In order to determine the source of iron-cyanide complexes in contaminated soils and wastes, we developed a method based on the stable isotope ratios (13)C/(12)C and (15)N/(14)N of the complexed cyanide-ion (CN(-)). The method was tested on three pure chemicals and two industrials wastes: blast-furnace sludge (BFS) and gas-purifier waste (GPW). The iron-cyanide complexes were converted into the solid cupric ferrocyanide, Cu(2)[Fe(CN)(6)].7H(2)O, followed by combustion and determination of the isotope-ratios by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Cupric ferrocyanide was obtained from the materials by (i) an alkaline extraction with 1M NaOH and (ii) a distillate digestion. The [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) of the alkaline extraction was precipitated after adding Cu(2+). The CN(-) of the distillate digestion was at first complexed with Fe(2+) under inert conditions and then precipitated after adding Cu(2+). The delta(13)C-values obtained by the two methods differed slightly up to 1-3 per thousand for standards and BFS. The difference was larger for alkaline-extracted GPW (4-7 per thousand), since non-cyanide C was co-extracted and co-precipitated. Therefore the distillate digestion technique is recommended when determining the C isotope ratios in samples rich in organic carbon. Since the delta(13)C-values of BFS are in the range of -30 to -24 per thousand and of -17 to -5 per thousand for GPW, carbon seems to be a suitable tracer for identifying the source of cyanide in both wastes. However, the delta(15)N-values overlapped for BFS and GPW, making nitrogen unsuitable as a tracer. PMID:17386516

  1. Effect of organic carbon chemistry on sorption of atrazine and metsulfuron-methyl as determined by (13)C-NMR and IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban; Mandal, Abhishek; Manna, Suman; Singh, S B; Berns, Anne E; Singh, Neera

    2015-10-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) content is the major soil component affecting pesticide sorption. However, recent studies have highlighted the fact that it is not the total carbon content of the organic matter, but its chemical structure which have a profound effect on the pesticide's sorption. In the present study, sorption of atrazine and metsulfuron-methyl herbicides was studied in four SOM fractions viz. commercial humic acid, commercial lignin, as well as humic acid and humin extracted from a compost. Sorption data was fitted to the Freundlich adsorption equation. In general, the Freundlich slope (1/n) values for both the herbicides were <1. Except for atrazine sorption on commercial humic acid, metsulfuron-methyl was more sorbed. Desorption results suggested that atrazine was more desorbed than metsulfuron-methyl. Lignin, which showed least sorption of both the herbicides, showed minimum desorption. Sorption of atrazine was best positively correlated with the alkyl carbon (adjusted R (2) = 0.748) and carbonyl carbon (adjusted R (2) = 0.498) but, their effect was statistically nonsignificant (P = 0.05). Metsulfuron-methyl sorption showed best positive correlation with carbonyl carbon (adjusted R (2) = 0.960; P = 0.05) content. Sorption of both the herbicides showed negative correlation with O/N-alkyl carbon. Correlation of herbicide's sorption with alkyl and carbonyl carbon content of SOM fractions suggested their contribution towards herbicide sorption. But, sorption of metsulfuron-methyl, relatively more polar than atrazine, was mainly governed by the polar groups in SOM. IR spectra showed that H-bonds and charge-transfer bonds between SOM fraction and herbicides probably operated as mechanisms of adsorption. PMID:26353968

  2. FINAL REPORT: A Study of the Abundance and 13C/12C Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide to Advance the Scientific Understanding of Terrestrial Processes Regulating the GCC

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, R. F.; Piper, S. C.

    2008-12-23

    The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic composition. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. The program also included the development of methods for measuring radiocarbon content in the collected CO2 samples and carrying out radiocarbon measurements in collaboration with Tom Guilderson of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LLNL). The radiocarbon measurements can provide complementary information on carbon exchange rates with the land and oceans and emissions from fossil-fuel burning. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to establish estimates of the spatial and temporal variations in the net CO2 exchange with the atmosphere, the storage of carbon in the land and oceans, and variable isotopic discrimination of land plants.

  3. EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON LABILE AND STRUCTURAL CARBON IN DOUGLAS-FIR NEEDLES AS ESTIMATED BY DELTA 13C AND C AREA MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isotopic measurements may provide new insights into levels in leaves of labile and structural carbon (C) under climate change. In a 4-year climate change experiment using Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) seedlings and a 2x2 factorial design in enclosed chambers (n=3), atmosph...

  4. Characteristics and degradation of carbon and phosphorus from aquatic macrophytes in lakes: insights from solid-state 13C NMR and solution 31P NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) derived from macrophytes plays an important role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in lakes. However, reports of their composition and degradation in natural waters are scarce. Therefore, compositions...

  5. Assessing the potential of amino acid 13C patterns as a carbon source tracer in marine sediments: effects of algal growth conditions and sedimentary diagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T.; Bach, L. T.; Salvatteci, R.; Wang, Y. V.; Andersen, N.; Ventura, M.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2015-08-01

    Burial of organic carbon in marine sediments has a profound influence in marine biogeochemical cycles and provides a sink for greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. However, tracing organic carbon from primary production sources as well as its transformations in the sediment record remains challenging. Here we examine a novel but growing tool for tracing the biosynthetic origin of amino acid carbon skeletons, based on naturally occurring stable carbon isotope patterns in individual amino acids (δ13CAA). We focus on two important aspects for δ13CAA utility in sedimentary paleoarchives: first, the fidelity of source diagnostic of algal δ13CAA patterns across different oceanographic growth conditions, and second, the ability of δ13CAA patterns to record the degree of subsequent microbial amino acid synthesis after sedimentary burial. Using the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, we tested under controlled conditions how δ13CAA patterns respond to changing environmental conditions, including light, salinity, temperature, and pH. Our findings show that while differing oceanic growth conditions can change macromolecular cellular composition, δ13CAA isotopic patterns remain largely invariant. These results emphasize that δ13CAA patterns should accurately record biosynthetic sources across widely disparate oceanographic conditions. We also explored how δ13CAA patterns change as a function of age, total nitrogen and organic carbon content after burial, in a marine sediment core from a coastal upwelling area off Peru. Based on the four most informative amino acids for distinguishing between diatom and bacterial sources (i.e., isoleucine, lysine, leucine and tyrosine), bacterially derived amino acids ranged from 10 to 15 % in the sediment layers from the last 5000 years, and up to 35 % during the last glacial period. The greater bacterial contributions in older sediments indicate that bacterial activity and amino acid resynthesis progressed, approximately as a

  6. Assessing the potential of amino acid δ13C patterns as a carbon source tracer in marine sediments: effects of algal growth conditions and sedimentary diagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T.; Bach, L. T.; Salvatteci, R.; Wang, Y. V.; Andersen, N.; Ventura, M.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Burial of organic carbon in marine sediments has a profound influence in marine biogeochemical cycles, and provides a sink for greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. However, tracing organic carbon from primary production sources as well as its transformations in the sediment record remains challenging. Here we examine a novel but growing tool for tracing biosynthetic origin of amino acid carbon skeletons, based on natural occurring stable carbon isotope patterns in individual amino acids (δ13CAA). We focus on two important aspects for δ13CAA utility in sedimentary paleoarchives: first, the fidelity of source diagnostic of algal δ13CAA patterns across different oceanographic growth conditions; and second, the ability of δ13CAA patterns to record the degree of subsequent microbial amino acid synthesis after sedimentary burial. Using the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, we tested under controlled conditions how δ13CAA patterns respond to changing environmental conditions, including light, salinity, temperature, and pH. Our findings show that while differing oceanic growth conditions can change macromolecular cellular composition, δ13CAA isotopic patterns remain largely invariant. These results underscore that δ13CAA patterns should accurately record biosynthetic sources across widely disparate oceanographic conditions. We also explored how δ13CAA patterns change as a function of age, total nitrogen and organic carbon content after burial, in a marine sediment core from a coastal upwelling area off Peru. Based on the four most informative amino acids for distinguishing between diatom and bacterial sources (i.e. isoleucine, lysine, leucine and tyrosine), bacterial derived amino acids ranged from 10-15% in the sediment layers from the last 5000 years to 35% during the last glacial period. The larger bacterial fractions in older sediments indicate that bacterial activity and amino acid resynthesis progressed, approximately as a function of sediment age, to

  7. Two-phase diagenesis of Quaternary carbonates, Arabian Gulf: Insights from {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O data

    SciTech Connect

    Chafetz, H.S.; Rush, P.F.

    1995-04-03

    Diagenesis of the top 25 m of Quaternary sediment and rock samples from the shallow subsurface under the nearshore part of the Arabian Gulf is the primary subject of this study. During the last forty years, since this area was recognized as a site of extensive carbonate deposition, the origin, distribution, and dolomitization of modern sediments in the Arabian Gulf region have been intensively studied. However, few geoscientists have studied the Quaternary deposits below the top few meters of accumulation. As a complement to previous work, this study is primarily concerned with the diagenesis of aragonitic and high-magnesium calcitic sediments to sediments composing a low-magnesium calcitic facies. The samples studied, intercalated carbonate and siliciclastic sediments and rocks, were collected from a series of borings offshore of Al Jubayl, Saudi Arabia. The lowermost part of the section is predominantly Pleistocene dolomite. The middle part is composed of intercalated low-magnesium calcite and siliciclastics and is herein interpreted as Pleistocene.

  8. {sup 13}C and {sup 17}O NMR binding constant studies of uranyl carbonate complexes in near-neutral aqueous solution. Yucca Mountain Project Milestone Report 3351

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.; Newton, T.W.; Palmer, P.D.; Zwick, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    Valuable structural information, much of it unavailable by other methods, can be obtained about complexes in solution through NMR spectroscopy. From chemical shift and intensity measurements of complexed species, NMR can serve as a species-specific structural probe for molecules in solution and can be used to validate thermodynamic constants used in geochemical modeling. Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to study the speciation of uranium(VI) ions in aqueous carbonate solutions as a function of pH, ionic strength, carbonate concentration, uranium concentration, and temperature. Carbon-13 and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy were used to monitor the fractions, and hence thermodynamic binding constants of two different uranyl species U0{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} in aqueous solution. Synthetic buffer solutions were prepared under the ionic strength conditions used in the NMR studies in order to obtain an accurate measure of the hydrogen ion concentration, and a discussion of pH = {minus}log(a{sub H}{sup +}) versus p[H] = {minus}log[H+] is provided. It is shown that for quantitative studies, the quantity p[H] needs to be used. Fourteen uranium(VI) binding constants recommended by the OECD NEA literature review were corrected to the ionic strengths employed in the NMR study using specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the predicted species distributions were compared with the actual species observed by multinuclear NMR. Agreement between observed and predicted stability fields is excellent. This establishes the utility of multinuclear NMR as a species-specific tool for the study of the actinide carbonate complexation constants, and serves as a means for validating the recommendations provided by the OECD NEA.

  9. Palynological indications for elevated microbial primary productivity during the Early Toarcian Anoxic Event: Implications for organic-carbon accumulation and the interpretation of δ13C-trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houben, A. J. P.; Goldberg, T.; Janssen, N. M. M.; Nelskamp, S.; Verreussel, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE, ~182 Ma ago) represents an episode of organic-rich deposition that was accompanied by a substantial (up to 7‰) negative carbon-isotope excursion (CIE), suggesting a perturbation in the carbon cycle likely driven by the addition of "light" carbon to the ocean-atmosphere system. Paired δ13Corg-ratios and hydrogen-indices provide evidence for major changes in organic-matter sourcing which quantitatively affect CIE-magnitude. Underpinning the relationship between this carbon-cycle perturbation, ocean anoxia and primary productivity feedbacks thus remains a major challenge. We here present palynological- and organic-matter analysis data from outcrop sections in Yorkshire (UK) and three drill-cores from the Netherlands. In addition, elemental ratios and iron speciation data aid to constrain bottom-water oxygenation and euxinia. Stratigraphic calibrations were achieved with high-resolution δ13Corg-data. The iron-speciation and trace-element data indicate that persistent euxinic bottom-water conditions incept at the base of- and remarkably persist after the T-OAE. By employing extremely careful palynological preparation and UV-fluorescence microscopy, we assessed changes in phytoplankton communities and organic-matter types. At the base of the T-OAE a major increase in abundance of prasinophycean vegetative cysts indicates chemocline shoaling into the photic zone. During the T-OAE, all localities are characterized by organic-matter associations dominated by dense Structureless Organic Matter (SOM) that contain abundant characteristic sphaerical palynomorphs.These results confirm changes in organic-carbon sourcing, which exaggerate the magnitude of the CIE. The palynological and organic-matter data indicate that primary productivity did not collapse and that TOC-accumulations were not merely an effect of inhibited remineralization duirng anoxia. In contrast, we present a scenario in which cyanobacterial anoxygenic

  10. Tracing sources and deposition processes of organic carbon in river deltas: carbon isotopes (Δ14C and δ13C) coupled to density fractionation in the Rhône River delta (Gulf of Lion, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisnérat-Laborde, Nadine; Toussaint, Flora; Cathalot, Cécile; Rabouille, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    Despite its relatively modest surface area, coastal zones play a crucial role in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon because they receive large inputs of terrestrial organic matter (OM) by rivers, and appear as a large biogeochemical reactor. The terrestrial OM inputs can be buried or mineralized depending of physical and biological processes. Improved understanding of the fate of organic carbon and its distribution in River-dominated ocean margins is necessary to predict evolution of carbon in this system impacted by human disturbances and climate change. The Rhône River is the main source of freshwater and terrigenous particles including organic carbon to the Mediterranean Sea. Previous studies based on bulk 14C analysis of surface sediment of Rhône delta have shown an aging of the OM from the River mouth to the continental shelf. The distribution of OM is stable over several years (without flood) with a decreasing proportion of terrigenous OM with increasing distance of the river. Yet, the processes leading to this distribution are still being investigated: degradation, size or density sorting, petrogenic carbon accumulation… In order to better understand the origin and the distribution of matter, we measured radiocarbon and δ13C in the different fractions of sediments samples obtained by density fractionation. Surface sediment of 4 sites located on a transect offshore (A, K, C and E) was sampled in April 2007, in May 2011 and during one flood event, together with the suspended material discharged by the Rhône River. Sediment aliquot was separated in 4 fractions with sodium polytungstate using the same methods as Wakeham et al. (2009) (<1.6, 1.6-2, 2-2.5 and >2.5 g cm-3) in order to separate different types of OM. Radiocarbon measurements were obtained after physicochemical treatment by Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy at LMC14 and stable carbon isotopes measurements by EA-IRMS Mass Spectrometer (ThermoFiniganDelta+XP) at LSCE. First results indicate that the

  11. /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C spin-spin coupling constants in structural investigations. II. Conformational structure of vinyl ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Krivdin, L.B.; Shcherbakov, V.V.; Bzhezovskii, V.M.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1986-10-10

    The /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C spin-spin coupling constants between the carbon nuclei of the vinyl group were measured for a series of vinyl ethers. It was established that the unshared electron pairs of the oxygen atom can make a substantial stereospecific contribution to the direct /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C constants of the adjacent nuclei. The observed effect was used to establish the conformational structure of the compounds.

  12. A 13C-NMR study of azacryptand complexes.

    PubMed

    Wild, Aljoscha A C; Fennell, Kevin; Morgan, Grace G; Hewage, Chandralal M; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2014-09-28

    An azacryptand has been solubilised in aqueous media containing 50% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide. (13)C-NMR has been used to determine how the azacryptand is affected by zinc binding at pH 10. Using (13)C-NMR and (13)C-enriched bicarbonate we have been able to observe the formation of 4 different carbamate derivatives of the azacryptand at pH 10. The azacryptand was shown to solubilise zinc or cadmium at alkaline pHs. Two moles of zinc are bound per mole of azacryptand and this complex binds 1 mole of carbonate. By replacing the zinc with cadmium-113 we have shown that the (13)C-NMR signal of the (13)C-enriched carbon of the bound carbonate is split into two triplets at 2.2 °C. This shows that two cadmium complexes are formed and in each of these complexes the carbonate group is bound by two magnetically equivalent metal ions. It also demonstrates that these cadmium complexes are not in fast exchange. From temperature studies we show that in the zinc complexes both complexes are in fast exchange with each other but are in slow exchange with free bicarbonate. HOESY is used to determine the position of the carbonate carbon in the complex. The solution and crystal structures of the zinc-carbonate-azacryptand complexes are compared. PMID:25091182

  13. CeCaFDB: a curated database for the documentation, visualization and comparative analysis of central carbon metabolic flux distributions explored by 13C-fluxomics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Shen, Tie; Rui, Bin; Zhou, Wenwei; Zhou, Xiangfei; Shang, Chuanyu; Xin, Chenwei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Gang; Jiang, Jiansi; Li, Chao; Li, Ruiyuan; Han, Mengshu; You, Shanping; Yu, Guojun; Yi, Yin; Wen, Han; Liu, Zhijie; Xie, Xiaoyao

    2015-01-01

    The Central Carbon Metabolic Flux Database (CeCaFDB, available at http://www.cecafdb.org) is a manually curated, multipurpose and open-access database for the documentation, visualization and comparative analysis of the quantitative flux results of central carbon metabolism among microbes and animal cells. It encompasses records for more than 500 flux distributions among 36 organisms and includes information regarding the genotype, culture medium, growth conditions and other specific information gathered from hundreds of journal articles. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the CeCaFDB supports a common text search function among the data and interactive visualization of the curated flux distributions with compartmentation information based on the Cytoscape Web API, which facilitates data interpretation. The CeCaFDB offers four modules to calculate a similarity score or to perform an alignment between the flux distributions. One of the modules was built using an inter programming algorithm for flux distribution alignment that was specifically designed for this study. Based on these modules, the CeCaFDB also supports an extensive flux distribution comparison function among the curated data. The CeCaFDB is strenuously designed to address the broad demands of biochemists, metabolic engineers, systems biologists and members of the -omics community. PMID:25392417

  14. Applications of cavity ring-down spectroscopy to high precision isotope ratio measurement of 13C/12C in carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Ed H; Fidric, Bernard; Rella, Chris W; Koulikov, Sergei; Kharlamov, Boris; Tan, Sze; Kachanov, Alexander A; Richman, Bruce A; Crosson, Eric R; Paldus, Barbara A; Kalaskar, Shashi; Bowling, David R

    2006-03-01

    Recent measurements of carbon isotopes in carbon dioxide using near-infrared, diode-laser-based cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) are presented. The CRDS system achieved good precision, often better than 0.2 per thousand, for 4% CO2 concentrations, and also achieved 0.15-0.25 per thousand precision in a 78 min measurement time with cryotrap-based pre-concentration of ambient CO2 concentrations (360 ppmv). These results were obtained with a CRDS system possessing a data rate of 40 ring-downs per second and a loss measurement of 4.0 x 10(-11) cm(-1) Hz(-1/2). Subsequently, the measurement time has been reduced to under 10 min. This standard of performance would enable a variety of high concentration (3-10%) isotopic measurements, such as medical human breath analysis or animal breath experiments. The extension of this ring-down to the 2 microm region would enable isotopic analysis at ambient concentrations, which, combined with the small size, robust design, and potential for frequent measurements at a remote site, make CRDS technology attractive for remote atmospheric measurement applications. PMID:16500752

  15. Short-Term Effects of Tillage Practices on Soil Organic Carbon Turnover Assessed by δ13C Abundance in Particle-Size Fractions of Black Soils from Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Chen, Xuewen

    2014-01-01

    The combination of isotope trace technique and SOC fractionation allows a better understanding of SOC dynamics. A five-year tillage experiment consisting of no-tillage (NT) and mouldboard plough (MP) was used to study the changes in particle-size SOC fractions and corresponding δ13C natural abundance to assess SOC turnover in the 0–20 cm layer of black soils under tillage practices. Compared to the initial level, total SOC tended to be stratified but showed a slight increase in the entire plough layer under short-term NT. MP had no significant impacts on SOC at any depth. Because of significant increases in coarse particulate organic carbon (POC) and decreases in fine POC, total POC did not remarkably decrease under NT and MP. A distinct increase in silt plus clay OC occurred in NT plots, but not in MP plots. However, the δ13C abundances of both coarse and fine POC increased, while those of silt plus clay OC remained almost the same under NT. The C derived from C3 plants was mainly associated with fine particles and much less with coarse particles. These results suggested that short-term NT and MP preferentially enhanced the turnover of POC, which was considerably faster than that of silt plus clay OC. PMID:25162052

  16. State-of-the-Art Direct 13C and Indirect 1H-[13C] NMR Spectroscopy In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Robin A.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy in combination with 13C-labeled substrate infusion is a powerful technique to measure a large number of metabolic fluxes non-invasively in vivo. It has been used to quantify glycogen synthesis rates, establish quantitative relationships between energy metabolism and neurotransmission and evaluate the importance of different substrates. All measurements can, in principle, be performed through direct 13C NMR detection or via indirect 1H-[13C] NMR detection of the protons attached to 13C nuclei. The choice for detection scheme and pulse sequence depends on the magnetic field strength, whereas substrate selection depends on the metabolic pathways that are studied. 13C NMR spectroscopy remains a challenging technique that requires several non-standard hardware modifications, infusion of 13C-labeled substrates and sophisticated processing and metabolic modeling. Here the various aspects of direct 13C and indirect 1H-[13C] NMR are reviewed with the aim of providing a practical guide. PMID:21919099

  17. Accurate quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy: repeatability over time of site-specific 13C isotope ratio determination.

    PubMed

    Caytan, Elsa; Botosoa, Eliot P; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S

    2007-11-01

    The stability over time (repeatability) for the determination of site-specific 13C/12C ratios at natural abundance by quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy has been tested on three probes: enriched bilabeled [1,2-13C2]ethanol; ethanol at natural abundance; and vanillin at natural abundance. It is shown in all three cases that the standard deviation for a series of measurements taken every 2-3 months over periods between 9 and 13 months is equal to or smaller than the standard deviation calculated from 5-10 replicate measurements made on a single sample. The precision which can be achieved using the present analytical 13C NMR protocol is higher than the prerequisite value of 1-2 per thousand for the determination of site-specific 13C/12C ratios at natural abundance (13C-SNIF-NMR). Hence, this technique permits the discrimination of very small variations in 13C/12C ratios between carbon positions, as found in biogenic natural products. This observed stability over time in 13C NMR spectroscopy indicates that further improvements in precision will depend primarily on improved signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:17900175

  18. Distinct fungal and bacterial δ13C signatures can drive the increase in soil δ13C with depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Lukas; Laganièrea, Jérôme; Edwards, Kate A.; Billings, Sharon A.; Morrill, Penny L.; Van Biesen, Geert; Ziegler, Susan E.

    2015-04-01

    Soil microbial biomass is a key precursor of soil organic carbon (SOC), and the enrichment in 13C during SOC diagenesis has been purported to be driven by increasing proportions of microbially derived SOC. Yet, little is known about how the δ13C of soil microbial biomass - and by extension the δ13C of microbial inputs to SOC - vary in space, time, or with the composition of the microbial community. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) can be analyzed to measure the variation of the natural abundance δ13C values of both individual groups of microorganisms and the microbial community as a whole. Here, we show how variations of δ13CPLFA within the soil profile provides insight into C fluxes in undisturbed soils and demonstrate that distinct δ13C of fungal and bacterial biomass and their relative abundance can drive the increase of bulk δ13CSOC with depth. We studied the variation in natural abundance δ13C signatures of PLFA in podzolic soil profiles from mesic boreal forests in Atlantic Canada. Samples from the organic horizons (L,F,H) and the mineral (B; top 10 cm) horizons were analyzed for δ13C values of PLFA specific to fungi, G+ bacteria, or G- bacteria as proxies for the δ13C of the biomass of these groups, and for δ13C values of PLFA produced by a wide range of microorganisms (e.g. 16:0) as a proxy for the δ13C value of microbial biomass as a whole. Results were compared to fungi:bacteria ratios (F:B) and bulk δ13CSOC values. The δ13C values of group-specific PLFA were driven by differences among source organisms, with fungal PLFA consistently depleted (2.1 to 6.4‰) relative to and G+ and G- bacterial PLFA in the same sample. All group-specific PLFA, however, exhibited nearly constant δ13C values throughout the soil profile, apparently unaffected by the over 2.8‰ increase in δ13CSOC with depth from the L to B horizons. This indicates that bulk SOC poorly represents the substrates actually consumed by soil microorganisms in situ. Instead, our

  19. In search of the mechanisms behind soil carbon metabolism of a Douglas fir forest in complex terrain using naturally abundant 13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayler, Z. E.; Sulzman, E. W.; Barnard, H. R.; Kennedy, A.; Phillips, C.; Mix, A.; Bond, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Soil is well known for being highly variable, spatially and temporally, in moisture, texture, nutrients, carbon content and organisms. The magnitude of variation in soil characteristics represented in a study is, in part, determined by the choice in site location. Choosing sites that are topographically flat reduces variability due to environmental gradients, variability that is amplified in sites of complex terrain. We measured soil respiration, an integrative measure of ecosystem biological and physical processes, and its isotopic signature (δ13CR-s) to accomplish two goals: 1. Explore how gradients in temperature and moisture within a steeply sloped watershed affect the flux and isotopic signature of soil CO2 2. Deconvolve the isotopic signature of soil respiration into autotrophic and heterotrophic sources using a multi-source mixing model constrained by samples of soil organic matter and water soluble extracts of leaf foliage. Our site is located in a steep catchment within the central Cascades of Oregon (HJ Andrews LTER) where we made respiration measurements in plots established along side a sensor transect that continuously measures soil moisture and temperature; air relative humidity and temperature; and tree transpiration. There was a distinct difference in soil metabolism between the south and north aspects in the watershed. Temperature-corrected basal respiration of the south facing slope was 1 μmol m-2s-1 greater than the north facing slope. There was also a difference in isotopic signature between the two slopes that could be as great as 2 per mil depending on the period within the growing season. The strength of the correlation between environmental variables and soil carbon flux was non-uniform across the catchment. There was, however, a strong positive correlation between soil flux with recent transpiration rates (0 to 3 days prior) as well as with transpiration rates that occurred up to 9 days previously. This pattern was especially prevalent

  20. Accurate determinations of one-bond 13C-13C couplings in 13C-labeled carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azurmendi, Hugo F.; Freedberg, Darón I.

    2013-03-01

    Carbon plays a central role in the molecular architecture of carbohydrates, yet the availability of accurate methods for 1DCC determination has not been sufficiently explored, despite the importance that such data could play in structural studies of oligo- and polysaccharides. Existing methods require fitting intensity ratios of cross- to diagonal-peaks as a function of the constant-time (CT) in CT-COSY experiments, while other methods utilize measurement of peak separation. The former strategies suffer from complications due to peak overlap, primarily in regions close to the diagonal, while the latter strategies are negatively impacted by the common occurrence of strong coupling in sugars, which requires a reliable assessment of their influence in the context of RDC determination. We detail a 13C-13C CT-COSY method that combines a variation in the CT processed with diagonal filtering to yield 1JCC and RDCs. The strategy, which relies solely on cross-peak intensity modulation, is inspired in the cross-peak nulling method used for JHH determinations, but adapted and extended to applications where, like in sugars, large one-bond 13C-13C couplings coexist with relatively small long-range couplings. Because diagonal peaks are not utilized, overlap problems are greatly alleviated. Thus, one-bond couplings can be determined from different cross-peaks as either active or passive coupling. This results in increased accuracy when more than one determination is available, and in more opportunities to measure a specific coupling in the presence of severe overlap. In addition, we evaluate the influence of strong couplings on the determination of RDCs by computer simulations. We show that individual scalar couplings are notably affected by the presence of strong couplings but, at least for the simple cases studied, the obtained RDC values for use in structural calculations were not, because the errors introduced by strong couplings for the isotropic and oriented phases are very

  1. Paramagnetic 1H and 13C NMR studies on cobalt-substituted human carbonic anhydrase I carboxymethylated at active site histidine-200: molecular basis for the changes in catalytic properties induced by the modification.

    PubMed

    Khalifah, R G; Rogers, J I; Harmon, P; Morely, P J; Carroll, S B

    1984-07-01

    Using bromo[1-13C]acetate to modify N tau of His-200 of human carbonic anhydrase isozyme I leads to the introduction of a useful 13C NMR probe into the active site. To complement our previous diamagnetic NMR studies with this probe, we have now succeeded in directly observing the paramagnetically perturbed resonance of the carboxylate in the cobalt-substituted modified enzyme above pH 8. In the pH range 8-10, the resonance undergoes a pH-dependent slow-exchange process, with the more alkaline form having a much smaller pseudocontact shift and a narrower line width. Below pH 8, the resonance apparently undergoes a very large paramagnetic downfield shift that was estimated by extrapolation. An ionization of approximate pK of 6 appears to control this process. Paramagnetic spin-relaxation studies on the resonance under conditions where it was directly observed yielded distance measurements between the carboxylate carbon and the active site cobalt ion. In inhibitor complexes, this distance was in the range of 5-7 A. In the absence of inhibitors, the distance was approximately 3.0-3.2 A at pH 7.9, consistent with the coordination of the carboxylate to the metal. However, at pH 10, the distance was increased to 4.8 A. These distance determinations were aided by relaxation measurements of a paramagnetically shifted proton resonance at 60-65 ppm downfield assigned by others to a proton of a ligand histidine of metal and confirmed by us to be 5.2 +/- 0.1 A from the metal. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the observed changes in catalytic properties that accompany the carboxymethylation. PMID:6432037

  2. IRMS detection of testosterone manipulated with 13C labeled standards in human urine by removing the labeled 13C.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingzhu; Yang, Rui; Yang, Wenning; Liu, Xin; Xing, Yanyi; Xu, Youxuan

    2014-12-10

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is applied to confirm testosterone (T) abuse by determining the carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C value). However, (13)C labeled standards can be used to control the δ(13)C value and produce manipulated T which cannot be detected by the current method. A method was explored to remove the (13)C labeled atom at C-3 from the molecule of androsterone (Andro), the metabolite of T in urine, to produce the resultant (A-nor-5α-androstane-2,17-dione, ANAD). The difference in δ(13)C values between Andro and ANAD (Δδ(13)CAndro-ANAD, ‰) would change significantly in case manipulated T is abused. Twenty-one volunteers administered T manipulated with different (13)C labeled standards. The collected urine samples were analyzed with the established method, and the maximum value of Δδ(13)CAndro-ANAD post ingestion ranged from 3.0‰ to 8.8‰. Based on the population reference, the cut-off value of Δδ(13)CAndro-ANAD for positive result was suggested as 1.2‰. The developed method could be used to detect T manipulated with 3-(13)C labeled standards. PMID:25441891

  3. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  4. Field measurements of del13C in ecosystem respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Asperen, Hella; Sabbatini, Simone; Nicolini, Giacomo; Warneke, Thorsten; Papale, Dario; Notholt, Justus

    2014-05-01

    Stable carbon isotope del13C-measurements are extensively used to study ecological and biogeochemical processes in ecosystems. Above terrestrial ecosystems, atmospheric del13C can vary largely due to photosynthetic fractionation. Photosynthetic processes prefer the uptake of the lighter isotope 12C (in CO2), thereby enriching the atmosphere in 13C and depleting the ecosystem carbon. At night, when ecosystem respiratory fluxes are dominant, 13C-depleted CO2 is respired and thereby depletes the atmospheric del13C-content. Different ecosystems and different parts of one ecosystem (type of plant, leaves, and roots) fractionate and respire with a different del13C-ratio signature. By determining the del13C-signature of ecosystem respiration in temporal and spatial scale, an analysis can be made of the composition of respiratory sources of the ecosystem. A field study at a dry cropland after harvest (province of Viterbo, Lazio, Italy) was performed in the summer of 2013. A FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer) was set up to continuously measure CO2-, CH4-, N2O-, CO- and del13C-concentrations. The FTIR was connected to 2 different flux measurements systems: a Flux Gradient system (sampling every half hour at 1.3m and 4.2m) and 2 flux chambers (measured every hour), providing a continuous data set of the biosphere-atmosphere gas fluxes and of the gas concentrations at different heights. Keeling plot intercept values of respiratory CO2, measured by the Flux Gradient system at night, were determined to be between -25‰ and -20‰. Keeling plot intercept values of respiratory CO2, measured by the flux chamber system, varied between -24‰ and -29‰, and showed a clear diurnal pattern, suggesting different (dominant) respiratory processes between day and night.

  5. Constraints on the factors controlling 13C-18O bond abundances in biologically precipitated carbonates from measurements of marine calcifiers cultured at variable temperature, pH, and salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conchas, T. E.; Eagle, R.; Eiler, J. M.; Ries, J. B.; Freitas, P. S.; Hiebenthal, C.; Wanamaker, A. D.; Tripati, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    Marine mollusks and corals are widely used as archives of past climate change; oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O value) of their carbonate minerals is perhaps the most commonly used proxy to reconstruct paleoclimate from these marine calcifiers. However, oxygen isotope paleothermometry of mollusks and corals is complicated by non-equilibrium "vital effects" and variations in seawater pH changes, both of which influence the net fractionation of oxygen isotopes between carbonate and water. Carbonate "clumped isotope" thermometry is an emerging approach that potentially addresses these ambiguities. Here we report measurements of abundance of 13C-18O bonds (described by the measured parameter Δ47) in a variety of marine calcifiers cultured under controlled conditions. Previous studies on biologically precipitated samples such as foraminifera, coccoliths, and corals have shown that Δ47 values are related to calcification temperature with a relationship that is generally similar to inorganic carbonate. However, the influence of effects other than temperature has not been extensively studied and little work has been done to explore the potential for small non-equilibrium effects in cultured specimens that were grown under controlled conditions. In this study, we report δ18O and Δ47 measurements of mollusk specimens that were cultured at several temperatures ranging from 5 to 25°C, as well as different pH and salinity values. We also report data for other marine calcifiers including the temperate coral species Oculina arbuscula and the coralline red algae Neogoniolithon sp., that were cultured at a single temperature but variable pH.

  6. Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Dimethyl sulfoxide C2H6OS + C3H6O3 Dimethyl carbonate (VMSD1212, LB5136_V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes III' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Dimethyl sulfoxide C2H6OS + C3H6O3 Dimethyl carbonate (VMSD1212, LB5136_V)' providing data by calculation of molar excess volume from low-pressure density measurements at variable mole fraction and constant temperature.

  7. Heat of Mixing and Solution of Ethanol C2H6O + C3H6O3 Dimethyl carbonate (HMSD1121, LB4328_H)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes III' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'heat of Mixing and Solution of Ethanol C2H6O + C3H6O3 Dimethyl carbonate (HMSD1121, LB4328_H)' providing data from direct calorimetric measurement of molar excess enthalpy at variable mole fraction and constant pressure and temperature.

  8. Heat of Mixing and Solution of Dimethyl sulfoxide C2H6OS + C3H6O3 Dimethyl carbonate (HMSD1111, LB4314_H)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes III' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'heat of Mixing and Solution of Dimethyl sulfoxide C2H6OS + C3H6O3 Dimethyl carbonate (HMSD1111, LB4314_H)' providing data from direct low-pressure calorimetric measurement of molar excess enthalpy at variable mole fraction and constant temperature.

  9. Heat of Mixing and Solution of Methanol CH4O + C3H6O3 Dimethyl carbonate (HMSD1121, LB4327_H)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes III' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'heat of Mixing and Solution of Methanol CH4O + C3H6O3 Dimethyl carbonate (HMSD1121, LB4327_H)' providing data from direct calorimetric measurement of molar excess enthalpy at variable mole fraction and constant pressure and temperature.

  10. Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Dimethyl sulfoxide C2H6OS + C3H6O3 Dimethyl carbonate (VMSD1111, LB5133_V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes III' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'Volumetric Properties of the Mixture Dimethyl sulfoxide C2H6OS + C3H6O3 Dimethyl carbonate (VMSD1111, LB5133_V)' providing data from direct low-pressure measurement of mass density at variable mole fraction and constant temperature, in the single-phase region(s).