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Sample records for 3ma magmatic record

  1. Subduction of the South-Chile active spreading ridge: a 17 Ma to 3 Ma magmatic record in central Patagonia (western edge of Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, Emmanuelle; Arnaud, Nicolas; Guivel, Christèle; Lagabrielle, Yves; Scalabrino, Bruno; Espinoza, Felipe

    2010-05-01

    The Chile Triple Junction is a natural laboratory to study the interactions between magmatism and tectonics during the subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath a continent. The MLBA plateau (Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires) is one of the Neogene alkali basaltic plateaus located in the back-arc region of the Andean Cordillera at the latitude of the current Chile Triple Junction. The genesis of MLBA can be related with successive opening of slabs windows beneath Patagonia: within the subducting Nazca Plate itself and between the Nazca and Antarctic plates. Detailed 40Ar/39Ar dating and geochemical analysis of bimodal magmatism from the western flank of the MLBA show major changes in the back-arc magmatism which occurred between 14.5 Ma and 12.5 Ma with the transition from calc-alkaline lavas (Cerro Plomo) to alkaline lavas (MLBA) in relation with slab window opening. In a second step, at 4- 3 Ma, alkaline felsic intrusions were emplaced in the western flank of the MLBA coevally with the MLBA basalts with which they are genetically related. These late OIB-like alkaline to transitional basalts were generated by partial melting of the subslab asthenosphere of the subducting Nazca plate during the opening of the South Chile spreading ridge-related slab window. These basalts differentiated with small amounts of assimilation in shallow magma chambers emplaced along transtensional to extensional zones. The close association of bimodal magmatism with extensional tectonic features in the western MLBA is a strong support to the model of Patagonian collapse event proposed to have taken place between 5 and 3 Ma as a consequence of the presence of the asthenospheric window (SCR-1 segment of South Chile Ridge) below the MLBA area.

  2. Late Pliocene climate change 3.4-2.3 Ma: paleoceanographic record from the Yabuta Formation, Sea of Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Kitamura, A.; Ikeya, Noriyuki; Watanabe, M. E.; Kamiya, T.

    1994-01-01

    Late Pliocene paleoceanographic changes in the Sea of Japan between 3.4 and2.3 Ma were investigated through study of molluscs, diatoms, and ostracodes from the Yabuta Formation in Toyama Prefecture. The period 3.4-2.7 Ma was characterized by relatively high sea level and cool water benthic faunas. A progressive paleoceanographic shift towards colder oceanic conditions and lower sea level occurred beginning near 2.7 Ma, intenifying about 2.5 Ma, when important changes in ostracode and molluscan faunas occurred. Between 2.7 and 2.3 Ma, eight glacial events can be inferred based on drops in sea level of 50-60 m and increasing proportions of cold, shallow water ostracode species whose modern ecology and zoogeography indicate colder winter water temperatures (3-4??C). The glacial events between 2.5 and 2.3 Ma were the most intense. Preliminary interpretation of the faunal and oceanographic events of the Yabuta Formation suggests that they correspond to Northern Hemispheric cooling also known from North Atlantic deep-sea oxygen isotope, IRD, and planktic foraminiferal records, North Pacific diatom and radiolarian record, and the Chinese loess sequences. The eight glacial events may record a 41,000-yr obliquity cycle which characterized other late Pliocene climate proxy records. Inferred sea level drops near 2.5-2.3 Ma of about 50-60 m provide direct evidence from an ocean margin setting that supports deep sea oxygen isotopic evidence indicating major changes in global ice volume changes. ?? 1994.

  3. A ~1.3Ma paleoecological record from scientific drilling at Lake Malawi, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Andrew S.; Blome, Margaret; Ivory, Sarah; King, John; Cole, Julie; McGlue, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Long records of Quaternary ecological and climatic change are critical to understanding the range of potential responses of ecosystems to environmental forcing. Here we present an integrated lake and watershed paleoecological analysis from drill core records obtained by the Lake Malawi Drilling Project, documenting extraordinary fluctuations in climate, hydrology and ecosystem response for the southern tropics of Africa. High resolution lacustrine and terrestrial paleoecology and sedimentology data sets from these Early Pleistocene-Holocene drill cores provide the most complete record of this duration currently available from Africa. Time series analyses of these records demonstrate strong orbital forcing of regional hydroclimate that drives high-amplitude changes in Malawi ecosystems. Prior to ~600ka we also observe a secondary overprint of watershed processes involving river capture or diversion that may have a tectonic origin. We observe shifts between more arid conditions (shallow alkaline and well mixed lake, with discontinuous desert vegetation) and more humid environments (deep, stratified, freshwater lake with dense forest). These broadly synchronous changes in lake paleoecology, lake sedimentology, and watershed vegetation demonstrate the major role of climate in regulating this system. Transitions between these lake/watershed state extremes is often very abrupt, suggesting that the combined lake/watershed repeatedly passed through hydroclimate thresholds, with important implications for the evolution of the lake's endemic biodiversity and ecosystem. The tempo of lake/watershed state fluctuations changes at the Mid-Pleistocene Transition, altering from one of higher frequency/lower amplitude variability prior to 900ka to lower frequency/higher amplitude variability after that time.

  4. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A.; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-09-01

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80-40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70-43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52-51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma.

  5. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-01-01

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80-40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70-43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52-51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma. PMID:26395973

  6. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A.; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-01-01

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80–40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70–43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52–51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma. PMID:26395973

  7. Dating the India-Eurasia collision through arc magmatic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouilhol, Pierre; Jagoutz, Oliver; Hanchar, John M.; Dudas, Francis O.

    2013-03-01

    The Himalayan orogeny, a result of the collision of India and Eurasia, provides direct evidence of strain accommodation and large-scale rheological behavior of the continental lithosphere. Knowledge of the timing of the India-Eurasia collision is essential to understand the physical processes involved in collisional systems. Here we present a geochronological and multi-isotopic study on rocks from the upper crust of the Kohistan Paleo-Island Arc that formed in the equatorial part of the Neo-Tethys Ocean. In situ U-Pb geochronology and Hf isotopes in zircon, and whole-rock Nd and Sr isotopic data of plutonic rocks from the Kohistan-Ladakh Batholith, are used to construct a continuous record of the isotopic evolution of the source region of these granitoids that are related to both the subduction of the oceanic lithosphere and subsequent arc-continent collisions. We demonstrate that profound changes in the source region of these rocks correspond to collisional events. Our dataset constrains that the Kohistan-Ladakh Island Arc initially collided along the Indus suture zone with India at 50.2±1.5 Ma, an age generally attributed to the final India-Eurasia collision for the entire Himalayan belt. In the western Himalaya, the final collision between the assembled India/Arc and Eurasia however, occurred ∼10 Ma later at 40.4±1.3 Ma along the so-called Shyok suture zone. We present evidence indicating that a similar dual collision scenario can be extended to the east and conclude that a final India/Arc-Eurasia collision at ∼40 Ma integrates crucial aspects of the magmatic, tectonic, and sedimentary record of the whole Himalayan mountain belt.

  8. Pre-glacial and interglacial pollen records over the last 3 Ma from northwest Canada: Why do Holocene forests differ from those of previous interglaciations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweger, Charles; Froese, Duane; White, James M.; Westgate, John A.

    2011-08-01

    We synthesize pollen spectra from eleven dated stratigraphic sections from central and northern Yukon. Palaeomagnetic and tephra dating indicates the earliest assemblages, representing closed canopy Pinus and Picea forest, are middle-late Pliocene age. More open forest conditions, indicated by increased Poaceae and with evidence of permafrost, are dated at ca 3 Ma. While Pinus pollen is abundant at 3 Ma, it is reduced in records after 2.6 Ma, and subsequent Pleistocene interglacial forest records are repeatedly dominated by Picea, along with Alnus and small but significant amounts of Abies. Surface sample comparisons indicate that Abies was more widespread and abundant in past interglaciations than at present and that Middle-Pleistocene Picea- Abies forest grew in the northern Yukon Porcupine Basin, 500 km beyond modern Abies limits. In contrast, Pinus, which occurs today in southern and central Yukon, was not a significant component of these Pleistocene interglacial forests. Late-Holocene pollen assemblages with rare Abies and high Pinus are the most distinct in the past 2.6 Ma. Possible factors driving Holocene difference are paleoclimate, paludification, changes in megafaunal herbivory and an unusual fire regime. Anthropogenic burning is a factor unique to the Holocene, and if it is shown to be important in this case, it would challenge our notion of what constitutes boreal wilderness.

  9. The magmatic record in the Arghash region (northeast Iran) and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaminia, Zahra; Karimpour, Mohammad Hassan; Homam, Seyed Massoud; Finger, Fritz

    2013-09-01

    The area of Arghash in northeast Iran, prominent for its gold mineralization, was newly mapped on a scale of 1:20,000 with particular attention to the occurring generations of igneous rocks. In addition, geochronological and geochemical investigations were carried out. The oldest geological unit is a late Precambrian, hornblende-bearing diorite pluton with low-K composition and primitive isotope signatures. This diorite (U-Pb zircon age 554 ± 6 Ma) is most likely a remnant from a Peri-Gondwana island-arc or back-arc basin. About one-third of the map area is interpreted as an Upper Cretaceous magmatic arc consisting of a volcanic and a plutonic part. The plutonic part is represented by a suite of hornblende-bearing medium-K, I-type granitoids (minor diorite, mainly quartz-monzodiorite and granodiorite) dated at 92.8 ± 1.3 Ma (U-Pb zircon age). The volcanic part comprises medium-K andesite, dacite and tuffitic rocks and must be at least slightly older, because it is locally affected by contact metamorphism through the hornblende-granitoids. The Upper Cretaceous arc magmatism in the Arghash Massif is probably related to the northward subduction of the Sabzevar oceanic basin, which holds a back-arc position behind the main Neotethys subduction front. Small occurrences of pillow basalts and sediments (sandstone, conglomerate, limestone) tectonically intercalated in the older volcanic series may be relics of earlier Cretaceous or even pre-Cretaceous rocks. In the early Cenozoic, the Cretaceous magmatic arc was intruded by bodies of felsic, weakly peraluminous granite (U-Pb zircon age 55.4 ± 2.3 Ma). Another strong pulse of magmatism followed slightly later in the Eocene, producing large masses of andesitic to dacitic volcanic rocks. The geochemistry of this prominent Eocene volcanism is very distinct, with a high-K signature and trace element contents similar to shoshonitic series (high P, Zr, Cr, Sr and Ba). High Sr/Y ratios feature affinities to adakite magmas. The

  10. Implications of magmatic records for Neotethyan subduction beneath the Eurasian margin (Lhasa terrane, southern Tibet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jieqing; Aitchison, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Evidence for magmatism is widely developed in the Lhasa terrane of southern Tibet. Much of this is related to northward subduction of the Neotethyan Ocean prior the India-Eurasia collision. To better understand the tectono-magmatism, we systematically studied the published data for Middle Jurassic-Eocene igneous rocks in southern Tibet. Many of these rocks formed during two important intervals from ca. 110-80 Ma and ca. 65-40 Ma. On the basis of the reported rocks in this area, we considered the possibility that a Neotethyan mid-ocean ridge was subducted during the early peak episode (ca. 110-80 Ma). With this ridge subduction system, hot asthenosphere rose up through a slab window causing both oceanic slab and mantle wedge melting that resulted in peak volcanism during the Late Cretaceous. As young and hot crust at a mid-ocean ridge has a relatively low density, and thus potentially positive buoyancy, the subduction of a buoyant mid-ocean ridge may have led to a reduction in the angle of subduction. Evidence for termination of arc magmatism by the flat subducted oceanic slab is recorded by a magmatic gap ca. 80-65 Ma. Around ca. 65 Ma, the magmatic record appears again accompanied by a southward migration that represents resumption of an oceanic slab subduction at a normal subduction angle. Subsequently, magmatism lasts to ca. 36 Ma before the India-Eurasia collision and reached a peak of activity associated with a magmatic flare-up at 50 Ma. In this subduction system, some magmatic processes triggered formation of porphyry ore deposits and affected the temporal and spatial distribution of ores.

  11. Stratigraphic Record of Vertical Crustal Motions in the Past 2-3 Ma Along the Southern San Andreas Fault, Mecca Hills, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNabb, J. C.; Dorsey, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Sedimentary rocks exposed on the NE margin of Coachella Valley in the Mecca Hills, southern California, record vertical crustal motions along the San Andreas and associated strike-slip faults. A complex history of subsidence, transport, deposition, and uplift can be interpreted from mapping and measuring of sedimentary rocks, analysis of sedimentary lithofacies, and determination of transport directions from clast imbrications and cross-bedding. The 330 m-thick Mecca Fm rests non-conformably on Pre-Cambrian and Cretaceous crystalline rocks SW of the Painted Canyon Fault (PCF), and is not present NE of the PCF. The Mecca Fm is likely late Pliocene or early Pleistocene in age (Boley et al., 1994), and consists of red boulder conglomerate with imbricated clasts showing SSE to WSW paleoflow. It fines up into pebbly sandstone and is gradationally overlain by the lower member of the Palm Spring Formation (PSF). The PSF is likely younger than 2.0-2.6 Ma based on paleomagnetic studies (Boley et al., 1994) and older than the 0.74-Ma Thermal Canyon Ash high in the section (Rymer, 1989). The lower PSF is 340 m thick, with overall SE paleoflow and 3 lithofacies: (1) laterally extensive fluvial sandstone and siltstone; (2) plutonic-clast conglomerate; and (3) a thin lacustrine limestone unit that correlates across the PCF. The contact between the lower and upper members of the PSF changes from a conformable contact in a small area of the central Mecca Hills to an angular unconformity over a much larger area. The upper PSF is ~650 m thick (similar thickness across the PCF), displays overall transport to the SSE (with local exceptions), and has at least 7 lithofacies: (1) alluvial-fan pebbly sandstone and conglomerate; (2) fluvial sandstone and siltstone; (3) fluvial sandstone with conspicuous arkosic composition; (4) marginal-lacustrine bedded siltstone and sandstone; (5) eolian dune sandstone (6) lacustrine laminated siltstone and mudstone; and (7) local red conglomerate. The

  12. Records of magmatic change as preserved in zircon: examples from the Yellowstone Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Zircon crystals have been used as proxies for their host magmatic composition and as records of the evolution and differentiation of silicic magma systems through the use of integrated techniques such as cathodoluminescence imaging, LA-ICPMS trace element analysis, thermometry, and high-precision CA-IDTIMS U/Pb dating. This petrochronologic approach can aid in identifying crystal populations arising from discrete pulses of magmatism, reconstructing the growth histories of those populations, quantifying the chemical evolution of the host magma, and determining the timing and tempo of that chemical evolution. The Yellowstone Volcanic Field hosts both large and small volume silicic eruptions whose zircon records can provide insights to magmatic processes using a petrochronologic approach. Morphological and thermochemical trends preserved in zircon grains extracted from the three Yellowstone super-eruptions and a small volume precursory eruption indicate that magmatism in the volcanic field is punctuated, characterized by numerous pulses of melting, differentiation, and solidification occurring prior to eruption. U/Pb zircon dating constrains magma assembly to geologically short timescales, with populations of earlier solidified zircon incorporated into the nascent magma just prior to eruption. This requires punctuated intervals of high magmatic flux be superimposed on longer durations of a much lower background flux. Thus super-eruptions within the Yellowstone Volcanic Field result from rapid production and evolution of magma, and preceded by periods of smaller volume magma production that undergo similar differentiation processes over comparable timescales.

  13. Millennia of magmatism recorded in crustal xenoliths from Southwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Matthijs; Waight, Tod; Nielsen, Troels

    2016-04-01

    Eruption of CO2-rich ultramafic magma involves rapid ascent of mantle-derived magmas loaded with mantle xenoliths and xenocrysts (>30 vol%). The dynamics and duration of such eruptions are increasingly well constrained; the causes are nevertheless largely unclear. To address this issue, we performed a petrological and speedometric analysis of well-preserved crustal xenoliths from aillikite dikes at Sisimiut and Sarfartôq alkaline provinces, W Greenland. The xenoliths represent mafic granulites, scavenged from c. 25-36 km depth within the mid-to-lower crust. The rocks are infiltrated by various types of melt in grain boundaries, cracks and veins. Zirconium-in rutile thermometry and Fe-in-rutile speedometry indicate melt temperature of c. 1,015 °C and melt exposure time of a few hours for the host aillikite, implying an average ascent rate of c. 2 m/s. This is slower than average ascent rates of mantle cargo (4-40 m/s [1]), suggesting a slowing-down of transport at shallow levels. Local diffusive zoning in garnet indicates up to several millenia of melt-assisted mass transport. This demonstrates a two-stage magmatic process of rapid melt ascent preceded by a previously unrecognized long magmatic episode. Melt infiltration at Sismiut lasted 10 times longer than at Sarfartôq, and unlike at Sarfartôq was initially associated with carbonate- and sulfide-rich melt. This contrast reflects a fundamental difference in the devolatilization efficiency of parental carbonatite magma. The rapid development of the Sarfartôq system is ascribed to the local lithospheric mantle being highly depleted [2] and rich in the decarbonation reactant orthopyroxene [3]. A link is also proposed between this feature, and the occurrence of REE-carbonatite and diamond-bearing mantle cargo at that particular location. References [1] Sparks, R.S.J. et al., 2006. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 155, 8-48. [2] Bizzarro, M. and Stevenson, R.K., 2003. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 146, 223-240. [3] Russell

  14. Comparing magnetic and magmatic fabrics to constrain the magma flow record in La Gloria pluton, central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payacán, Italo; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Gelman, Sarah E.; Bachmann, Olivier; Parada, Miguel Ángel

    2014-12-01

    This contribution illustrates a case study of a pluton (La Gloria pluton; LGP) where magnetic and magmatic fabrics are locally decoupled. We compare the magmatic fabric with the available magnetic fabric data to explore their abilities and elucidate the magma flow record of LGP. Results indicate that magnetic (controlled by multi-domain magnetite) and magmatic fabrics are generally consistent throughout LGP. Foliations define an axisymmetric pattern that gradually changes from vertical near lateral margins to less steep in the pluton interior, whereas lineations are subhorizontal following the elongation direction of the pluton. However, samples at the pluton center show marked differences between both fabrics: magnetic fabrics indicate subhorizontal magnetic lineations and foliations, and magmatic fabrics indicate subvertical lineations and foliations. Both magnetic and magmatic fabrics are interpreted to record strain caused by magma flow during thermal convection and lateral magma propagation at the transition between low and high crystallinity stages. We suggest that fabrics acquisition and consistency were determined by shear conditions (pure/simple shear rates ratio) and the orientation of the magma flow direction with respect to a rigid boundary (critical crystalline region) of the pluton. Magmatic fabric differs at the center of the pluton because pure shear is dominant and ascendant flows are orthogonal to the horizontal rigid boundary. LGP represents a whole-scale partly molten magma reservoir, where both thermal convection and lateral propagation of the magma are recorded simultaneously. This study highlights the importance of characterizing both fabrics to properly interpret magma flow recorded in plutons.

  15. Magma flow recorded by magmatic and magnetic fabrics in a shallow granitic pluton: La Gloria Pluton, central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payacán, I. J.; Gutiérrez, F. J.; Gelman, S. E.; Bachmann, O.; Parada, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    To better understand the dynamics of a small, shallow, silicic magma reservoir, magmatic and magnetic (AMS) fabrics are compared in samples obtained from La Gloria Pluton (LGP), a 10 Ma granitic intrusion located in southern Andes. The magnetic fabric of LGP, mainly given by magnetite, is characterized by oblate shapes. Magnetic lineations have a NW trend with subhorizontal dip, following the main pluton elongation, while magnetic foliation planes have dips varying gradually from vertical at the walls to subhorizontal toward the center and the roof of the pluton. On the basis of numerical simulations, magnetic fabric was interpreted to represent the shear record induced by magmatic convection along solidification fronts as the reservoir reached its rheological locking point. Magmatic fabric (mineral orientation) was determined on 12 samples along the pluton. Three mutually orthogonal thin sections were produced for each sample, perpendicular to the AMS tensor axes. Size and orientation of individual crystals were obtained by image analysis. A 2-D tensor for two mineral groups (plagioclase and amphibole+biotitie) was defined in each mineral plane projecting the crystal lengths on the main crystal orientation (given by Bingham statistics). A 3-D magmatic fabric tensor was obtained. In order to compare the magmatic and magnetic fabrics, magmatic anisotropy parameters were defined similar to the AMS tensors. Magmatic fabric and anisotropy parameter values vary depending on the location inside the pluton: (1) Samples located at the borders exhibit vertical foliations and lineations with a NW trend, similar to the magnetic fabric tensors and higher anisotropy values for plagioclase than amphibole+biotite,; (2) samples located at the center of the LGP commonly present subvertical foliations/lineations, which differ from the magnetic fabric, and higher magmatic anisotropy degree values for amphibole+biotite than plagioclase. Based on numerical simulations of the fluid

  16. Iceland is not a magmatic analog for the Hadean: Evidence from the zircon record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, Tamara L.; Miller, Calvin F.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Padilla, Abraham J.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Economos, Rita C.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Jordan, Brennan T.

    2014-11-01

    Tangible evidence of Earth's earliest (Hadean; >4.0 Ga) crust, and the processes and materials that contributed to its formation, exists almost entirely in a record of detrital zircon from Jack Hills, Western Australia, and a few other locations. Iceland, with its thick, juvenile, basaltic crust and relatively abundant silicic rocks, is considered a potential modern analog for the Hadean magmatic environment where >4 Ga zircon formed. We present the first extensive dataset for Icelandic zircon, with trace element and oxygen isotope compositions from samples that span the island's history and full range of tectonic settings. This statistically robust zircon-based comparison between Iceland and the early Earth reveals distinctions in chemistry that suggest fundamental differences in magmatic environments. Whereas the δ18O signature of Hadean zircons generally exceed that of zircons equilibrated with mantle-derived magma (85%≥5.3‰; median 6‰), almost all Icelandic zircons are characterized by a “light” oxygen signature (98%≤5.3‰; median 3‰). Deviations from “juvenile” oxygen values indicate that many Hadean zircons and almost all Icelandic zircons grew from magmas with substantial contributions from materials that had interacted with surface waters. In the Hadean case, the interaction occurred at low temperatures, while in Iceland, it was a high-temperature interaction. Icelandic and Hadean zircons are also distinct in their Ti concentrations (Icelandic median concentration 12 ppm, Hadean median 5 ppm). Titanium in zircon correlates positively with temperature of crystallization, and this difference in median Ti concentration suggests a temperature difference of at least 50 °C. Other differences in trace elements compositions are consistent with the interpretation that Icelandic and Hadean zircons grew in magmas with very different origins and histories (e.g., the heavy rare earth element Yb is almost an order of magnitude higher in Icelandic

  17. How do olivines record magmatic events? Insights from major and trace element zoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Maisonneuve, C. Bouvet; Costa, F.; Huber, C.; Vonlanthen, P.; Bachmann, O.; Dungan, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Reconciling the diverse records of magmatic events preserved by multiple crystals and minerals in the same sample is often challenging. In the case of basaltic-andesites from Volcán Llaima (Chile), Mg zoning in olivine is always simpler than Ca zoning in plagioclase. A model that explains a number of chemical patterns is that Llaima magmas stall in the upper crust, where they undergo decompression crystallization and form crystal-mush bodies. Frequent magma inputs from deeper reservoirs provide the potential for remobilization and eruption. The records of multiple recharge events in Llaima plagioclase versus an apparent maximum of one such event in coexisting olivine are addressed by using trace element zoning in olivine phenocrysts. We have integrated elements that (1) respond to changes in magma composition due to recharge or mixing (Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, ±Ca), with (2) elements that are incorporated during rapid, disequilibrium crystal growth (P, Ti, Sc, V, Al). A more complex history is obtained when these elements are evaluated considering their partition coefficients, diffusivities, and crystal growth rates. The olivine archive can then be reconciled with the plagioclase archive of magma reservoir processes. Olivine (and plagioclase) phenocrysts may experience up to three or more recharge events between nucleation and eruption. Diffusion modeling of major and trace element zoning in two dimensions using a new lattice Boltzmann model suggests that recharge events occur on the order of months to a couple of years prior to eruption, whereas crystal residence times are more likely to be on the order of a few years to decades.

  18. Tectonic record, magmatic history and hydrothermal alteration in the Hercynian Guérande leucogranite, Armorican Massif, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballouard, C.; Boulvais, P.; Poujol, M.; Gapais, D.; Yamato, P.; Tartèse, R.; Cuney, M.

    2015-04-01

    309.7 ± 1.3 Ma ago and that a late magmatic activity synchronous with hydrothermal circulation occurred at ca. 303 Ma. These new structural, petrological and geochronological data presented for the Guérande leucogranite highlight the interplay between the emplacement in an extensional tectonic regime, magmatic differentiation and hydrothermal alteration, and provide a general background for the understanding of the processes controlling some mineralization in the western European Hercynian belt.

  19. Amphibole reaction rims as a record of pre-eruptive magmatic heating: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, S. H.; Larsen, J.; Coombs, M.; Dunn, A.; Hayden, L.

    2015-09-01

    Magmatic minerals record the pre-eruptive timescales of magma ascent and mixing in crustal reservoirs and conduits. Investigations of the mineral records of magmatic processes are fundamental to our understanding of what controls eruption style, as ascent rates and magma mixing processes are well known to control and/or trigger potentially hazardous explosive eruptions. Thus, amphibole reaction rims are often used to infer pre-eruptive magma dynamics, and in particular to estimate magma ascent rates. However, while several experimental studies have investigated amphibole destabilization during decompression, only two investigated thermal destabilization relevant to magma mixing processes. This study examines amphibole decomposition experimentally through isobaric heating of magnesio-hornblende phenocrysts within a natural high-silica andesite glass. The experiments first equilibrated for 24 h at 870 °C and 140 MPa at H2O-saturated conditions and ƒO2 ∼ Re-ReO prior to rapid heating to 880, 900, or 920 °C and hold times of 3-48 h. At 920 °C, rim thicknesses increased from 17 μm after 3 h, to 55 μm after 12 h, and became pseudomorphs after longer durations. At 900 °C, rim thicknesses increased from 7 μm after 3 h, to 80 μm after 24 h, to pseudomorphs after longer durations. At 880 °C, rim thicknesses increased from 7 μm after 3 h, to 18 μm after 36 h, to pseudomorphs after 48 h. Reaction rim microlites vary from 5-16 μm in size, with no systematic relationship between crystal size and the duration or magnitude of heating. Time-averaged rim microlite growth rates decrease steadily with increasing experimental duration (from 3.97 ×10-7 mms-1 to 3.1 to 3.5 ×10-8 mms-1). Time-averaged microlite nucleation rates also decrease with increasing experimental duration (from 1.2 ×103mm-3s-1 to 5.3 mm-3 s-1). There is no systematic relationship between time-averaged growth or nucleation rates and the magnitude of the heating step. Ortho- and clinopyroxene

  20. A temporal record of pre-eruptive magmatic volatile contents at Campi Flegrei: Insights from texturally-constrained apatite analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Michael J.; Isaia, Roberto; Humphreys, Madeleine C. S.; Smith, Victoria C.; Pyle, David M.

    2016-04-01

    Apatite is capable of incorporating all major magmatic volatile species (H2O, CO2, S, Cl and F) into its crystal structure. Analysis of apatite volatile contents can be related to parental magma compositions through the application of pressure and temperature-dependent exchange reactions (Piccoli and Candela, 1994). Once included within phenocrysts, apatite inclusions are isolated from the melt and preserve a temporal record of magmatic volatile contents in the build-up to eruption. In this work, we measured the volatile compositions of apatite inclusions, apatite microphenocrysts and pyroxene-hosted melt inclusions from the Astroni 1 eruption of Campi Flegrei, Italy (Stock et al. 2016). These data are coupled with magmatic differentiation models (Gualda et al., 2012), experimental volatile solubility data (Webster et al., 2014) and thermodynamic models of apatite compositional variations (Piccoli and Candela, 1994) to decipher pre-eruptive magmatic processes. We find that apatite halogen/OH ratios decreased through magmatic differentiation, while melt inclusion F and Cl concentrations increased. Melt inclusion H2O contents are constant at ~2.5 wt%. These data are best explained by volatile-undersaturated differentiation over most of the crystallisation history of the Astroni 1 melt, with melt inclusion H2O contents reset at shallow levels during ascent. Given the high diffusivity of volatiles in apatite (Brenan, 1993), the preservation of volatile-undersaturated melt compositions in microphenocrysts suggests that saturation was only achieved 10 - 103 days before eruption. We suggest that late-stage transition into a volatile-saturated state caused an increase in magma chamber overpressure, which ultimately triggered the Astroni 1 eruption. This has major implications for monitoring of Campi Flegrei and other similar volcanic systems. Piccoli and Candela, 1994. Am. J. of Sc., 294, 92-135. Stock et al., 2016, Nat. Geosci. Gualda et al., 2012. J. Pet., 53, 875

  1. Thermal and compositional evolution of the Mid-Miocene Searchlight magmatic system recorded by zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. M.; Miller, J. S.; Miller, C. F.; Wooden, J. L.; Colombini, L. L.

    2011-12-01

    The middle Miocene Searchlight pluton in southern Nevada, USA, located in the Colorado River Extensional Corridor, was constructed from ≈17 to ≈15.8 Ma and has an extensive spatially and temporally associated volcanic record. Regional extension has rotated a large crustal block ca. 90° to expose a 12-13 km section of crust including parts of the Searchlight pluton and its volcanic cover in the adjacent Highland Range. Initial studies viewed the Searchlight pluton as having a relatively simple monotonic solidification history from the top down and bottom up, but more recent geochronology of both the pluton and volcanic stratigraphy shows that the construction of the Searchlight magma system was piece-meal and much more complex. Periodic replenishment and evacuation of the magma chamber created a 2.5-3 km section of dominantly crystal-rich trachyandesites and trachydacites that was followed by later crystal-poor rhyolite lava flows and tuffs. We use zircon trace elements from dated samples of plutonic and volcanic rocks ranging from mafic (52 wt% SiO2) to high-silica (77 wt % SiO2) to examine the growth and dynamics of the Searchlight magma system. SHRIMP-RG U/Pb crystallization ages tend to have more than one age population, indicating the remobilization of crystals through the magma system. Zircon textures commonly show extensive resorption with new overgrowth and generally support the age information. Zircon REE patterns, Ti-in-zircon (Tzrn,Ti) model temperatures and elemental ratios show appreciable scatter among rock types, and typical trace element indices for magmatic evolution, such as Th/U, Yb/Gd, Eu/Eu* and U/Yb, show no strong correlation to rock type. Within individual samples modest correlation of trace elements with cores, interiors and rim (e.g. Th/U and Tzrn,Ti decrease and Hf increases in normally zoned, unresorbed zircons) is sometimes observed. Most Tzrn,Ti model temperatures show a range between 700 to 950 °C, and two distinct temperature

  2. Thermal and compositional evolution of the Mid-Miocene Searchlight magmatic system (Nevada, USA) as recorded in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Brent M.

    The middle Miocene Searchlight pluton (˜17-15.8 Ma) in southern Nevada, USA, located in the Colorado River Extensional Corridor, has an extensive spatially and temporally associated volcanic record. Regional extension has rotated a large crustal block ca. 90° to expose a 12-13 km section of crust that included parts of the Searchlight pluton and its volcanic cover in the adjacent Highland Range. Recent geochronology and geochemistry of the pluton and volcanic strata have shown that the construction of the Searchlight magma system was piecemeal. We examined the growth and dynamics of the Searchlight magma system using zircon trace elements from U/Pb age-dated plutonic and volcanic rocks. Zircon trace element indices for magmatic temperature and evolution, including Ti, Hf, Th, U, Th/U, Yb/Gd, and Eu/Eu*, showed a strong correlation to rock type and age. The Searchlight magmatic system has recorded a complex solidification history, a progression from a trachyandesitic to rhyolitic composition with time, and clear cogenetic links between some of the plutonic and volcanic rocks.

  3. Early Paleozoic magmatism and metallogeny in Northeast China: a record from the Tongshan porphyry Cu deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xinlu; Yao, Shuzhen; Ding, Zhenju; He, Mouchun

    2016-04-01

    The Tongshan Cu deposit is located in the northern segment of the Great Xing'an Range and represents one of the few early Paleozoic porphyry Cu deposits in northeastern China. The granitic rocks in the Tongshan Cu deposit include concealed granodiorite and exposed tonalite, which yield LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb ages of 478 ± 3 Ma and 214 ± 3 Ma, respectively. The granodiorite has relatively high SiO2 (60.5-63.5 wt%) and Sr (596-786 ppm) contents, low Yb (1.21-1.53 ppm) and Y (9.81-13.0 ppm) contents, and initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7038-0.7040), suggesting adakitic affinity. Combined with its positive ɛNd(t) values (3.5-5.4), low Mg# values (41-50), and low contents of Cr (18.6-29.0 ppm) and Ni (7.3-9.1 ppm), we propose an origin by partial melting of a juvenile mafic lower crust in a post-collisional setting after the amalgamation of the Erguna and Xing'an Blocks. The tonalite is characterized by high SiO2 (63.1-65.9 wt%) and Al2O3 (16.0-16.3 wt%) contents, low (87Sr/86Sr) i ratios (0.7041-0.7042), positive ɛNd(t) values (2.6-3.0), along with LILE and LREE enrichments and Nb-Ta-Ti depletions, suggesting an origin by partial melting of juvenile mafic lower crust, coupled with fractional crystallization, in a post-orogenic setting after the collision between the Xing'an and Songnen Blocks. The δD values of ore-forming fluids range from -100 to -93 ‰, and the δ18O values calculated from hydrothermal quartz are between -3 and 10 ‰. The δ34S values of sulfides vary from -2.6 to -1.1 ‰. Field observations, as well as the geochronological and H-O-S isotopic data, suggest that the Cu mineralization at Tongshan was genetically linked with the granodiorite.

  4. A 120 million years record of magmatism and crustal melting in the Kohistan Batholith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaltegger, U.; Frank, M.; Burg, J.-P.

    2003-04-01

    The Kohistan Arc Complex (KAC) in the Pakistani Himalaya is a volcanic arc terrane with a mantle-crust transition at its bottom and upper crustal volcano-sedimentary sequences above. The KAC features arc-type intrusives with oldest ages of c. 100 Ma, and a huge intrusion of gabbronorite at 85 Ma emplaced during a stage of intra-arc rifting (Schaltegger et al. 2002, Terra Nova 14, 461-468). The rift zone may have evolved into an intra-arc (or back-arc?) basin that persisted and remained marine until the Eocene (c. 50 Ma) i.e. after docking of the KAC against the Karakoram terrane in the north, which is reputed to be older than 75 Ma. The main part of the KAC is comprised of tonalites, diorites, granodiorites and granites that form the so-called Kohistan Batholith. U-Pb and Hf isotopic determinations of zircon from some of these plutons reveal the existence of a 154.0 +- 0.6 Ma old tonalite (compared to the Rb-Sr isochron age of 102 +- 12 Ma of Petterson &Windley, 1985) with an extremely high initial epsilon Hf value of +21. This rock intrudes volcanic units containing pillow basalts. It is thus tentatively interpreted as a tonalite produced by melting of oceanic lithosphere that has been melt-depleted during an ancient melting event. Other plutons are dated at 50 and 30 Ma. With an epsilon Hf around +10, they represent melting of an island-arc to MORB-type source. The 30 Ma-old leucogranite at the Indus confluence contains zircons with a 560 Ma inheritance, which is coupled to a lower epsilon Hf of +3-4, beside newly crystallized grains of 30 Ma with epsilon Hf=10. The Hf isotopes thus do not reveal any systematic change of the source composition with time, as it has been inferred from Sr and Nd isotopes. The Kohistan Batholith containing magmatic remnants of a pre-arc oceanic crust is thus demonstrated to be poly-episodic and composite. The magmatism, including 30 Ma old leucogranites, is derived from depleted mantle sources and does not contain detectable traces

  5. Cryptomare magmatism 4.35 Gyr ago recorded in lunar meteorite Kalahari 009.

    PubMed

    Terada, Kentaro; Anand, Mahesh; Sokol, Anna K; Bischoff, Addi; Sano, Yuji

    2007-12-01

    The origin and evolution of the Moon remain controversial, with one of the most important questions for lunar evolution being the timing and duration of basaltic (mare) magmatism. Here we report the result of ion microprobe U-Pb dating of phosphates in a lunar meteorite, Kalahari 009, which is classified as a very-low-Ti mare-basalt breccia. In situ analyses of five phosphate grains, associated with basaltic clasts, give an age of 4.35 +/- 0.15 billion years. These ancient phosphate ages are thought to represent the crystallization ages of parental basalt magma, making Kalahari 009 one of the oldest known mare basalts. We suggest that mare basalt volcanism on the Moon started as early as 4.35 Gyr ago, relatively soon after its formation and differentiation, and preceding the bulk of lunar volcanism which ensued after the late heavy bombardment around 3.8-3.9 Gyr (refs 7 and 8). Considering the extremely low abundances of incompatible elements such as thorium and the rare earth elements in Kalahari 009 (ref. 9) and recent remote-sensing observations illustrating that the cryptomaria tend to be of very-low-Ti basalt type, we conclude that Kalahari 009 is our first sample of a very-low-Ti cryptomare from the Moon. PMID:18064006

  6. Magmatic interactions as recorded in plagioclase phenocrysts of Chaos Crags, Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepley, F. J., III; Davidson, J.P.; Clynne, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    The silicic lava domes of Chaos Crags in Lassen Volcanic National Park contain a suite of variably quenched, hybrid basaltic andesite magmatic inclusions. The inclusions represent thorough mixing between rhyodacite and basalt recharge liquids accompanied by some mechanical disaggregation of the inclusions resulting in crystals mixing into the rhyodacite host preserved by quenching on dome emplacement. 87Sr/86Sr ratios (~0.7037-0.7038) of the inclusions are distinctly lower than those of the host rhyodacite (~0.704-0.7041), which are used to fingerprint the origin of mineral components and to monitor the mixing and mingling process. Chemical, isotopic, and textural characteristics indicate that the inclusions are hybrid magmas formed from the mixing and undercooling of recharge basaltic magma with rhyodacitic magma. All the host magma phenocrysts (biotite, plagioclase, hornblende and quartz crystals) also occur in the inclusions, where they are rimmed by reaction products. Compositional and strontium isotopic data from cores of unresorbed plagioclase crystals in the host rhyodacite, partially resorbed plagioclase crystals enclosed within basaltic andesite inclusions, and partially resorbed plagioclase crystals in the rhyodacitic host are all similar. Rim 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the partially resorbed plagioclase crystals in both inclusions and host are lower and close to those of the whole-rock hybrid basaltic andesite values. This observation indicates that some crystals originally crystallized in the silicic host, were partially resorbed and subsequently overgrown in the hybrid basaltic andesite magma, and then some of these partially resorbed plagioclase crystals were recycled back into the host rhyodacite. Textural evidence, in the form of sieve zones and major dissolution boundaries of the resorbed plagioclase crystals, indicates immersion of crystals into a hotter, more calcic magma. The occurrence of partially resorbed plagioclase together with plagioclase

  7. Quartz-tourmaline orbicules: Record of magmatic melt immiscibility in the Land's End granite, SW England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivenes, Kristian; Larsen, Rune; Müller, Axel; Sorensen, Bjorn; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Raanes, Morten

    2014-05-01

    Spherical quartz-tourmaline aggregations are a common sight throughout the Cornubian batholith in SW England. In the outer parts of the Land's End granite smaller rounded orbicules occur in a coarse-grained megacrystic biotite granite. The interior parts of the orbicules show poikilittic textures with fine-grained euhedral quartz chadacrysts enclosed by skeletal tourmaline oikocrysts, with outer zones showing typical replacement textures. Cathodoluminescence of quartz show at least two growth stages after the megacrystic stage. The quartz phenocrysts show an even, concentric zoning pattern, sometimes with a darker core indicating growth during stable physiochemical conditions. The orbicular quartz is strongly zoned with bright cores and darker rims, similar to the fine-grained quartz in the granite matrix. Ti content of quartz corresponds to the CL zoning, with 125 - 180 µg/g in the bright cores and 60 - 80 in the darker main stage orbicular quartz. Tourmaline in the orbicules is weakly zoned form dark to pale brown, but the zoning is more pronounced compared to tourmaline in the granite matrix. Chemically, both are well within the schorl field, and cannot be differentiated based on major elements. The B-isotope signature is also overlapping. Matrix tourmaline has higher Sc and V content, but lower Nb, Ta and Sn, and matrix and orbicule tourmaline can be distinguished using trace elements. The geometry and composition of the orbicules is difficult to explain by fractional crystallization alone, since the total FeO content of the granite is low, and Fe is bound primarily to magmatic phases such as ilmenite and biotite. A prolonged fractional crystallization sequence would have depleted the magma in respect to Fe, and Fe derived from breakdown of nearby biotite is not sufficient to stabilize orbicule tourmaline. Orbicular tourmaline is conspicuously different, both chemically and texturally, from the typical hydrothermal tourmaline in the area, and replacement by an

  8. Intra-sill magmatic evolution in the Cummings Complex, Abitibi greenstone belt: Tholeiitic to calc-alkaline magmatism recorded in an Archaean subvolcanic conduit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bédard, Jean H.; Leclerc, François; Harris, Lyal B.; Goulet, Normand

    2009-07-01

    The stratigraphy of the Abitibi greenstone belt in the Chibougamau area (southern Superior Province, Québec), is dominated by 2 cycles of mafic-felsic metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks constituting the Roy Group, which is riddled by metagabbroic sills (25%). The Doré Lake Complex (DLC, 2728 Ma) is emplaced into the lower Roy Group. The Cummings Complex sills (2717 Ma) were injected between the Bruneau member and Blondeau Formations of the 2nd Roy Group cycle. The sills of the Cummings Complex (Roberge, Ventures and Bourbeau Sills) contain metaperidotite, metapyroxenite, metagabbro and metagranophyric facies. The trace element contents of melts in equilibrium with these metacumulate rocks were calculated and are compared to Roy Group lavas to clarify the regional magmatic history. Many DLC model melts have fractionated trace element profiles, with LILE-LREE-enrichment, HREE-depletion, and negative Nb-Ta-anomalies suggesting that the DLC formed largely from calc-alkaline melts extracted from garnet-bearing residues. The DLC is coeval with, and shows geochemical resemblances to Waconichi Formation tuffs (the felsic cap of the 1st Roy Group cycle), suggesting it could represent the Waconichi's shallow magma chamber. Meta-anorthosite rafts from the para-autochtonous zone of the Grenville province yield model melts closely resembling those of the DLC and are correlated on this basis. Most Roy Group sills yield model melts with trace element patterns typical of Archaean tholeiites, suggesting they fed the regionally-dominant tholeiitic volcanic plain lavas of the Roy Group. Models for the Cummings Complex imply that it contained two types of magma. Model melts from the Roberge Sill have strongly fractionated calc-alkaline-like trace element patterns, while those of the Ventures and Bourbeau Sills are mostly flat, N-MORB-normalized tholeiitic-like patterns that cannot be derived from the Roberge Sill melts by fractional crystallization. The Roberge Sill must have a

  9. Late Paleozoic magmatic record of Middle Gobi area, South Mongolia and its implications for tectonic evolution: Evidences from zircon U-Pb dating and geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mingshuai; Miao, Laicheng; Baatar, Munkhtsengel; Zhang, Fochin; Anaad, Chimedtseren; Yang, Shunhu; Li, Xingbo

    2016-01-01

    Late Paleozoic subduction-accretion complexes occur widely in Middle Gobi area and provide a good opportunity for unraveling the Paleozoic tectonic evolution of South Mongolia. The magmatic rocks in the Tsavchir hudug district mainly consist of rhyolites and volcaniclastic rocks. The rhyolites show enrichment in LREE and LILE and negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies, indicating genesis in the subduction zone. A rhyolite sample from the Tsavchir hudug region yielded a SHRIMP 206Pb/238U zircon age of 315 ± 4 Ma (MSWD = 0.79, n = 15). The andesite overlying the Namdain hundy Early Paleozoic ophiolite shows adakite geochemical features, and the two andesite samples yielded SHRIMP 206Pb/238U zircon ages of 325 ± 3 Ma (MSWD = 1.6, n = 14) and 319 ± 4 Ma (MSWD = 0.56, n = 13), respectively, suggesting that the Carboniferous island arc formed on the basis of Early Paleozoic accretionary complex. The granodiorite sample that intrudes the Early Paleozoic accretion complex with adakite geochemical features yielded a SHRIMP 206Pb/238U zircon age of 333 ± 4 Ma (MSWD = 1.6, n = 16), representing the Late Paleozoic island arc intrusive. The SHRIMP U-Pb analyses for the tuff sandstones that occur associated with Early Paleozic oceanic inliers in Middle Gobi area suggest detrital zircons mainly stem from the Devonian-Carboniferous arc. The age data obtained from the ophiolite (528-509 Ma) and tuff sandstone indicate the accretion in Middle Gobi area lasted from Early Paleozoic to Late Paleozoic for at least ca. 200 Ma, suggesting the ocean of the accretionary complex was the major Paleo-Asain ocean basin. The subduction related magmatic belt in Middle Gobi area includes both Early Paleozoic and Late Paleozoic island arc activities, which is consistent with the accretion duration time obtained from accretionary complex and also attests the argument of major Paleo-Asain ocean basin.

  10. Do Zircon age Spectra Record Magmatic Cyclicity at Soufrière (Saint Lucia, Lesser Antilles)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, A. K.; Stockli, D. F.; Lindsay, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    The Soufrière Volcanic Center (Saint Lucia, Lesser Antilles) is a long-lived arc-volcanic system that evolved over the past 5 - 6 Ma. Its most recent volcanic activity between 20 and 40 ka was concentrated within the prominent Qualibou topographic depression and produced two voluminous pyroclastic deposits: Choiseul and the overlying Belfond. In addition, several dacitic lava domes exist within the Qualibou depression. Because evidence of earlier volcanic activity in long-lived magma systems is frequently obliterated by subsequent eruptive or volcano-tectonic events, high spatial resolution U-Th dating of zircon combined with (U-Th)/He dating is a powerful tool to identify magma crystallization episodes at depth and to link these to the eruptive record. U-Th model ages and disequilibrium corrected U-Pb ages for 56 individual zircons from Soufrière lavas (Morne Bonin, Belfond, Terre Blanche) and pumice (Choiseul, Belfond) were determined by secondary ionization mass spectrometry. The majority of results is on unpolished zircons where analysis pits integrate over the outermost ~10 μm of individual grains with a lateral spatial resolution of ~40 μm. Selected grains were subsequently analyzed by (U-Th)/He methods. Belfond and Terre Blanche (U-Th)/He zircon ages (~20 ka) agree with previous 14C charcoal ages, whereas Morne Bonin ages are much older (~250 ka). Overall, the U-Th zircon crystallization age spectrum reveals a remarkable range between ~20 and ~600 ka and displays multiple peaks, among which the most prominent are tentatively identified at ~40 ka, ~80 ka, ~130 ka, ~200 ka and ~500 ka. The distribution of rim ages indicates that most zircons lack overgrowth dating from just prior to the eruption, but the youngest ages for each sample overlap with the eruption ages. Soufrière zircons thus reveal magma intrusion, cooling, and crystallization cycles within the underlying plutonic system for which the volcanic stratigraphic record is sketchy.

  11. Late Cretaceous-Oligocene magmatic record in southern Mexico: The case for a temporal slab window along the evolving Caribbean-North America-Farallon triple boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Luca; Bergomi, Maria; Martini, Michelangelo; Tunesi, Annalisa; Orozco-Esquivel, Teresa; López-Martínez, Margarita

    2014-09-01

    Continental magmatism in southern Mexico is expected to record the eastward displacement of the Farallon-North America-Caribbean triple junction. However, a trench-transversal belt of magmatism in the central western Guerrero State does not fit into a regular pattern of arc migration and reorientation following the formation of the WSW trending Acapulco trench in the Cenozoic. We revised the magmatic pattern of southern Mexico using an updated database and new laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe, Ar-Ar ages, and geochemical and geologic data for the coastal part of the anomalous Guerrero belt. Our data reveal a persistent magmatic activity between ~75 and 35 Ma, with a changing character at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary (circa 56 Ma). Late Cretaceous-Paleocene granitoids have an adakitic signature imprinted by stable garnet in the source and show no plagioclase fractionation, indicative of wet and oxidized magmas. Eocene rocks consist of an almost bimodal suite of plutonic bodies covered by a succession of mafic lavas. Granitic plutons show plagioclase fractionation and flat middle rare earth element-heavy rare earth element; gabbros have a tholeiitic character, indicative of dryer and more reduced magmas. They appear later and were emplaced at shallow depth in an extensional sedimentary basin. We interpret the magmatic record of the Guerrero belt as the response to two concurrent processes: (1) a temporal window in the Farallon slab induced by the concurrent subduction along the two noncollinear trench segments of southern Mexico (WNW trending) and of the Chortís block (NNW trending) and (2) a scissor-like transtensional rifting associated to counterclockwise rotation and eastward motion of the Chortís block.

  12. Ca. 2.7 Ga ferropicritic magmatism: A record of Fe-rich heterogeneities during Neoarchean global mantle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milidragovic, Dejan; Francis, Don

    2016-07-01

    Although terrestrial picritic magmas with FeOTOT ⩾13 wt.% are rare in the geological record, they were relatively common ca. 2.7 Ga during the Neoarchean episode of enhanced global growth of continental crust. Recent evidence that ferropicritic underplating played an important role in the ca. 2.74-2.70 Ga reworking of the Ungava craton provides the impetus for a comparison of ca. 2.7 Ga ferropicrite occurrences in the global Neoarchean magmatic record. In addition to the Fe-rich plutons of the Ungava craton, volumetrically minor ferropicritic flows, pyroclastic deposits, and intrusive rocks form parts of the Neoarchean greenstone belt stratigraphy of the Abitibi, Wawa, Wabigoon and Vermillion domains of the southern and western Superior Province. Neoarchean ferropicritic rocks also occur on five other Archean cratons: West Churchill, Slave, Yilgarn, Kaapvaal, and Karelia; suggesting that ca. 2.7 Ga Fe-rich magmatism was globally widespread. Neoarchean ferropicrites form two distinct groups in terms of their trace element geochemistry. Alkaline ferropicrites have fractionated REE profiles and show no systematic HFSE anomalies, broadly resembling the trace element character of modern-day ocean island basalt (OIB) magmas. Magmas parental to ca. 2.7 Ga alkaline ferropicrites also had high Nb/YPM (>2), low Al2O3/TiO2 (<8) and Sc/Fe (⩽3 × 10-4) ratios, and were enriched in Ni relative to primary pyrolite mantle-derived melts. The high Ni contents of the alkaline ferropicrites coupled with the low Sc/Fe ratios are consistent with derivation from olivine-free garnet-pyroxenite sources. The second ferropicrite group is characterized by decisively non-alkaline primary trace element profiles that range from flat to LREE-depleted, resembling Archean tholeiitic basalts and komatiites. In contrast to the alkaline ferropicrites, the magmas parental to the subalkaline ferropicrites had flat HREE, lower Nb/YPM (<2), higher Al2O3/TiO2 (8-25) and Sc/Fe (⩾4 × 10-4) ratios, and

  13. Dissolved water distribution in vesicular magmatic glass records both decompressive bubble growth and quench resorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Llewellin, E.; Humphreys, M.; Nichols, A. R.; Burgisser, A.; Schipper, C.

    2013-12-01

    Water distribution in magma varies over the lifetime of an eruption due to a variety of processes, including decompressive degassing of the melt, cooling during the quench from melt to glass, and post-emplacement hydration under ambient conditions. Correct interpretation of water distributions in erupted pyroclasts can therefore offer crucial insights into the dynamics of eruption mechanisms and emplacement histories. Volcanic eruptions are driven by the nucleation and growth of bubbles in magma. Bubbles grow as volatile species in the melt, of which water is volumetrically the most important, diffuse down a concentration gradient towards and across the bubble wall. On cooling, the melt quenches to glass, preserving the spatial distribution of water concentration around the bubbles (now vesicles). We use Backscatter Scanning Electron Microscopy (BSEM), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR) to measure the spatial distribution of water around vesicles in experimentally-vesiculated samples. We find that, contrary to expectation, the total water concentration increases (by up to 2 wt.%) in the ~30 microns closest to the vesicle wall. Our samples record significant resorption of water back into the melt around bubbles during the quench process, a process which represents ';regassing' of the magma. We propose that the observed total water resorption profiles result from the increase in the equilibrium solubility of water as temperature decreases during the quench to glass, and that this resorption locally overprints the pre-existing concentration total water profile resulting from bubble growth during decompression. This resorption occurs over the very short timescales of rapid experimental quench (3-10 seconds) resulting in strongly disequilibrium water speciation. Water re-enters the melt as molecular water leading to enrichment in molecular water around vesicles, while the distribution of hydroxyl groups remains

  14. Zircon from Swift Creek stage eruptions records the assembly and evolution of an intrusive magmatic complex beneath Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, D. M.; Claiborne, L. L.; Miller, C. F.; Clynne, M. A.; Wooden, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    illustrate that the Mount St. Helens magmatic system has been constructed over a period of at least ~250 k.y. by repeated intrusion of new magma batches that stall and crystallize within the crust to produce a crystal storage zone beneath the volcano. Intra-grain fluctuations in zircon trace element composition record multi-stage histories of growth, fractionation, solidification, rejuvenation, and interaction with new magma batches within this active intrusive complex. Magmas that do not stall in the crust entrain and mix zircon grains from the storage zones(s) and carry them to eruption. Geochemical trends with time suggest that the deep-seated magmatic system of Mount St. Helens has been strongly influenced by input of hot, poorly evolved melt since ~60 ka. This focused investigation of a brief eruptive episode reveals the same history as zircon grains obtained from a broad sampling of eruptive units spanning the entire history of the volcano (e.g., Claiborne et al., m.s. in review), implying that a detailed view of the plumbing system of volcanic complexes may not require exhaustive sampling of all (or most) eruptive products.

  15. The Sedimentary Record of an Intraoceanic Magmatic Arc, from Inception through Maturation to Abandonment: IODP Expedition 351, Site U1438

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsaglia, K. M.; Barth, A. P.; Brandl, P. A.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Jiang, F.; Kanayama, K.; Kusano, Y.; Li, H.; McCarthy, A.; Meffre, S.; Savov, I. P.; Tepley, F. J., III; Yogodzinski, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 351 recovered an unprecedented ~1.4-km thick volcaniclastic sedimentary record documenting the initiation and subsequent evolution of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) intra-oceanic arc-basin system. The oldest sedimentary rocks in the 50 m above igneous basement may correspond to the time of subduction initiation to the east. They are lithologically complex, consisting of a mix of variably tuffaceous mudstone, sandstone and breccia-conglomerate with some basaltic andesite passing upsection into 50 m of reddish-brown, radiolarian-bearing hemipelagic mudstone with thin volcaniclastic siltstone to sandstone beds. Coarser volcaniclastic rocks (andesitic average whole rock composition) then dominate the overlying section from 1360 to 160 mbsf. Variably graded tuffaceous sandstone to conglomerate and breccia beds range from a few cm to 9 m in thickness and exhibit a wide range of bedding contact relationships and sedimentary structures, including partial to complete Bouma sequences. Gravel to silt-sized volcaniclastic sediment was likely delivered to the site by gravity flows ranging from low- to high-concentration turbidity currents to debris flows. The depositional setting was ~ 50 km from the main arc front (Palau-Kyushu Ridge, PKR), so these may represent very distal apron to fan deposits. The sharp decline in coarse volcanic sediment supply and switch to hemipelagic mud accumulation at ~160mbsf is coincident with the C. 25 Ma transformation of the KPR to a remnant arc by backarc spreading in the adjacent Shikoku Basin and the eastward migration of magmatic arc activity to the IBM.

  16. Recording the transition from flare-up to steady-state arc magmatism at the Purico-Chascon volcanic complex, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Dale H.; de Silva, Shanaka L.; Tepley, Frank; Schmitt, Axel K.; Loewen, Matthew W.

    2015-07-01

    The long-term evolution of continental magmatic arcs is episodic, where a few transient events of high magmatic flux or flare-ups punctuate the low-flux magmatism or "steady state" that makes up most of the arc history. How this duality manifests in terms of differences in crustal architecture, magma dynamics and chemistry, and the time scale over which transitions occur is poorly known. Herein we use multiscale geochemical and isotopic characteristics coupled with geothermobarometry at the Purico-Chascon Volcanic Complex (PCVC) in the Central Andes to identify a transition from flare-up to steady state arc magmatism over ∼800 kyr during which significant changes in upper crustal magmatic dynamics are recorded. The PCVC is one of the youngest volcanic centers related to a 10-1 Ma ignimbrite flare-up in the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex of the Central Andes. Activity at the PCVC initiated 0.98 ± 0.03 Ma with the eruption of a large 80-100 km3 crystal-rich dacite ignimbrite. High, restricted 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios between 0.7085 and 0.7090 in the bulk rock and plagioclase crystals from the Purico ignimbrite, combined with mineral chemistry and phase relationships indicate the dacite magma accumulated and evolved at relatively low temperatures around 800-850 °C in the upper crust at 4-8 km depth. Minor andesite pumice erupted late in the ignimbrite sequence records a second higher temperature (965 °C), higher pressure environment (17-20 km), but with similar restricted radiogenic bulk rock 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7089-0.7091 to the dacites. The compositional and isotopic characteristics of the Purico ignimbrite implicate an extensive zone of upper crustal mixing, assimilation, storage and homogenization (MASH) between ∼30 and 4 km beneath the PCVC ∼1 Ma. The final eruptions at the PCVC < 0.18 ± 0.02 Ma suggest a change in the magmatic architecture beneath the PCVC. These eruptions produced three small <6 km3 crystal-rich dacite lava domes with radiogenic bulk rock

  17. Constraining the magma flow record based on magmatic and magnetic data in La Gloria Pluton, central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, F. J.; Payacán, I.; Gelman, S. E.; Bachmann, O.; Creative Physical Petrology Team

    2013-05-01

    The magmatic origin of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is examined in comparison with magmatic anisotropy data in a small, shallow, silicic magma reservoir in the upper crust. La Gloria Pluton (LGP) is a 10 Ma granodiorite/quartz monzonite of about 250 km3 located in the southern Andes, central Chile. LGP represents a particularly simple case of a silicic intrusion that was assembled in only a few pulses and cooled over a short time interval. Hornblende, biotite and minor magnetite are ubiquitous mafic phases. The AMS tensor indicates that magnetic fabric has an oblate shape (i.e. magnetic foliation is higher than magnetic lineation). Lineations are weak (values up to 1.05), have a N-NW trend with a nearly horizontal dip and are interpreted to represent axisymmetric convection parallel to the main pluton elongation. Foliations are more pronounced (values up to 1.14), having NW trends and dips that vary gradually from vertical at the walls, to horizontal at the center and near the roof of the chamber. We selected 12 samples from AMS sites to obtain petrographic data (well-distributed throughout the pluton, containing samples from the walls, the center and the roof of LGP), and then, determine the magmatic fabric (anisotropy, lineation, foliation). We made 3 oriented thin sections per sample oriented with the AMS. Magmatic anisotropy data were obtained by measuring mineral length, width and orientation in photomicrographs of the three main planes of the AMS tensor, producing 3-D mineral data which were collected for plagioclase and amphibole + bitotite independently. For each site, a Bingham distribution with 95% of confidence is used to determine the mean mineral orientations and their angle difference with the AMS axes. Magmatic anisotropy tensor and rotations with respect to the AMS tensor are determined using both eigenvalues and minimization algorithms. Preliminary results indicate that crystals are coherently oriented in both mineral groups, and

  18. Paleomagnetic record of counterclockwise rotations due to dextral wrenching and collapse of magmatic arc in the northern Vosges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edel, J. B.; Schulmann, K.

    2003-04-01

    The Northern Vosges is the rare area where the earliest Carboniferous magnetizations have escaped middle-late Carboniferous overprints. The magmatic arc intruding shallow Armorican (Saxothuringian) crust is the key domain where the effects of subsequent tectonic evolution can be observed. Diorites, tonalites and granites of the northern Vosges magmatic arc, emplaced in the time-range of 340-330 Ma, show magnetic directions evolving from the margins to the central part of the pluton. The external earliest cooled parts of intrusion show mean magnetic direction of 269^o/-41^o. More internal and younger parts of pluton show progressive evolution of directions from 322^o/-37^o towards shallower 331^o/-18^o mean direction. This distribution is explained by counterclockwise rotation by 60-65^o of the whole massif, followed by a south-southeastward tilt by about 20^o around an axis parallel to the magmatic belt. The counterclockwise rotation results from the book-shelve rotation of blocks originally oriented parallel to the main Armorica NE-SW trending structural grain. This rotation is due to dextral shearing at the tip of large-scale NW-SE trending strike-slip fault (here the Pays de Bray fault and its southeasterly extension: the Lalaye-Lubine fault). The tilting results from normal movements along fault zones striking N60-70^o during collapse of magmatic arc. This is documented by modified pattern of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility parallel to vertical zone along which was exhumed the southern and deeper part of the magmatic arc. In addition, geological observations show that the vertical throw along this normal fault zone reached several kilometres. According to available K-Ar and Ar-Ar dates, the late motion likely occurred around 330 Ma.

  19. Middle Jurassic Topawa group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona: Volcanic and sedimentary record of deep basins within the Jurassic magmatic arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haxel, G.B.; Wright, J.E.; Riggs, N.R.; Tosdal, R.M.; May, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Among supracrustal sequences of the Jurassic magmatic arc of the southwestern Cordillera, the Middle Jurassic Topawa Group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona, is remarkable for its lithologic diversity and substantial stratigraphic thickness, ???8 km. The Topawa Group comprises four units (in order of decreasing age): (1) Ali Molina Formation-largely pyroclastic rhyolite with interlayered eolian and fluvial arenite, and overlying conglomerate and sandstone; (2) Pitoikam Formation-conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone overlain by interbedded silt- stone and sandstone; (3) Mulberry Wash Formation-rhyolite lava flows, flow breccias, and mass-flow breccias, with intercalated intraformational conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone, plus sparse within-plate alkali basalt and comendite in the upper part; and (4) Tinaja Spring Porphyry-intrusive rhyolite. The Mulberry Wash alkali basalt and comendite are genetically unrelated to the dominant calcalkaline rhyolite. U-Pb isotopic analyses of zircon from volcanic and intrusive rocks indicate the Topawa Group, despite its considerable thickness, represents only several million years of Middle Jurassic time, between approximately 170 and 165 Ma. Sedimentary rocks of the Topawa Group record mixing of detritus from a minimum of three sources: a dominant local source of porphyritic silicic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, identical or similar to those of the Topawa Group itself; Meso- proterozoic or Cambrian conglomerates in central or southeast Arizona, which contributed well-rounded, highly durable, polycyclic quartzite pebbles; and eolian sand fields, related to Middle Jurassic ergs that lay to the north of the magmatic arc and are now preserved on the Colorado Plateau. As the Topawa Group evidently represents only a relatively short interval of time, it does not record long-term evolution of the Jurassic magmatic arc, but rather represents a Middle Jurassic "stratigraphic snapshot" of the arc

  20. The thermal evolution of a episodic, convergent-margin, magmatic center: Evidence from the Tatoosh Magmatic Complex, Mount Rainier National Park, southern Washington Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.T. )

    1992-01-01

    Use of Mount Rainier as an IAVCEI Decade Volcano requires an assessment of long-term, magmatic activity cycles. Recent activity could represent either a waxing or waning step, relative to the main cone. The Tertiary record at Mount Rainier, represented by the Tatoosh complex, suggests evolution into larger and more energetic systems. This sequence included bimodal dikes and sills (Chinook Pass episode), through dacitic dome and pyroclastic eruptions (Sourdough Mountains episode), shallow monzonitic plutons, culminating in large granodiorite plutons (White River episode). Limited geochronology, geochemistry and field relations support this conceptual model. Simple thermal modeling of this hypothesis suggests that for the first two episodes, transport was insufficient to support a magma chamber. This is consistent with field relations. Repeated magmatism could have perturbed the geotherm, allowing a magma chamber during White River time. This suggests a potential 3 million-year-long, volcanic source for dacitic clasts of the Ellensburg Formation. Uplifts from such a thermal load would be consistent with independent estimates of Miocene deformation in the Washington Cascades. A 7 million year cycle for magmatism at Mount Rainier is consistent with the rock record and the cooling of a 0.5-km accumulation zone of melt at the mid crust. This suggests that any current activity at Mount Rainier could relate to the 0.7-Ma stratovolcano or the Lily Creek Formation (3 Ma). These results indicate the detailed petrologic and geochronological work in the Tatoosh complex necessary to Decade Volcano studies at Mount Rainier.

  1. Crustal migration of CO2-rich magmatic fluids recorded by tree-ring radiocarbon and seismicity at Mammoth Mountain, CA, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hilley, George E.; Shelly, David R.; King, John C.; McGeehin, John P.; Mangan, Margaret T.; Evans, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Unrest at Mammoth Mountain over the past several decades, manifest by seismicity, ground deformation, diffuse CO2 emissions, and elevated 3He/4He ratios in fumarolic gases has been driven by the release of CO2-rich fluids from basaltic intrusions in the middle to lower crust. Recent unrest included the occurrence of three lower-crustal (32–19 km depth) seismic swarms beneath Mammoth Mountain in 2006, 2008 and 2009 that were consistently followed by peaks in the occurrence rate of shallow (≤10 km depth) earthquakes. We measured 14C in the growth rings (1998–2012) of a tree growing in the largest (∼0.3 km2) area of diffuse CO2 emissions on Mammoth Mountain (the Horseshoe Lake tree kill; HLTK) and applied atmospheric CO2 concentration source area modeling to confirm that the tree was a reliable integrator of magmatic CO2 emissions over most of this area. The tree-ring 14C record implied that magmatic CO2 emissions from the HLTK were relatively stable from 1998 to 2009, nearly doubled from 2009 to 2011, and then declined by the 2012 growing season. The initial increase in CO2 emissions was detected during the growing season that immediately followed the largest (February 2010) peak in the occurrence rate of shallow earthquakes. Migration of CO2-rich magmatic fluids may have driven observed patterns of elevated deep, then shallow seismicity, while the relationship between pore fluid pressures within a shallow (upper 3 km of crust) fluid reservoir and permeability structure of the reservoir cap rock may have controlled the temporal pattern of surface CO2 emissions.

  2. Crustal migration of CO2-rich magmatic fluids recorded by tree-ring radiocarbon and seismicity at Mammoth Mountain, CA, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, J. L.; Hilley, G. E.; Shelly, D. R.; King, J. C.; McGeehin, J. P.; Mangan, M.; Evans, W. C.

    2014-03-01

    Unrest at Mammoth Mountain over the past several decades, manifest by seismicity, ground deformation, diffuse CO2 emissions, and elevated He3/He4 ratios in fumarolic gases has been driven by the release of CO2-rich fluids from basaltic intrusions in the middle to lower crust. Recent unrest included the occurrence of three lower-crustal (32-19 km depth) seismic swarms beneath Mammoth Mountain in 2006, 2008 and 2009 that were consistently followed by peaks in the occurrence rate of shallow (⩽10 km depth) earthquakes. We measured C14 in the growth rings (1998-2012) of a tree growing in the largest (∼0.3 km) area of diffuse CO2 emissions on Mammoth Mountain (the Horseshoe Lake tree kill; HLTK) and applied atmospheric CO2 concentration source area modeling to confirm that the tree was a reliable integrator of magmatic CO2 emissions over most of this area. The tree-ring C14 record implied that magmatic CO2 emissions from the HLTK were relatively stable from 1998 to 2009, nearly doubled from 2009 to 2011, and then declined by the 2012 growing season. The initial increase in CO2 emissions was detected during the growing season that immediately followed the largest (February 2010) peak in the occurrence rate of shallow earthquakes. Migration of CO2-rich magmatic fluids may have driven observed patterns of elevated deep, then shallow seismicity, while the relationship between pore fluid pressures within a shallow (upper 3 km of crust) fluid reservoir and permeability structure of the reservoir cap rock may have controlled the temporal pattern of surface CO2 emissions.

  3. Tibet and Beyond: Magmatic Records from CIA (Caucasus-Iran-Anatolia) and Southern Tibet with Implications for Asian Orogeny and Continental Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Sun-Lin

    2016-04-01

    This study, based on an ongoing joint research project "Tibet and Beyond", presents a synthesis of principal magmatic records from the CIA (Caucasus-Iran-Anatolia) and Tibet-Himalaya orogens resulting from the continental collisions of Arabia and India, respectively, with Eurasia. In both orogens, through this and other recent studies, the temporal and spatial variations in magmatism pre-, syn- and post-dating the collisions can now be much better defined, thus improving our understanding of collision zone magmatism that appears to have evolved with changes in the lithospheric structures over time and space by collisional processes. The two "collisional" Tethyan orogens were preceded by accretionary orogenic processes, which not only had produced a substantial amount of juvenile continental crust but also fulfill the "orogenic cycle" that evolved from an accretionary into a collisional system. Geochemical data reveal that in contrast to generating vast portions of juvenile crust in the early, accretionary stages of orogenic development, crustal recycling plays a more important role in the later, collisional stages. The latter, as exemplified in SE Turkey and southern Tibet, involves addition of older continental crust material back into the mantle, which subsequently melted and caused compositional transformation of the juvenile crust produced in the accretionary stages. Similar features are observed in young volcanic rocks from eastern Taiwan, the northern Luzon arc complex and part of the active subduction/accretion/collision system in Southeast Asia that may evolve one day to resemble the eastern Tethyan and central Asian orogenic belts by collision with the advancing Australian continent.

  4. From birth to death of arc magmatism: The igneous evolution of Komandorsky Islands recorded tectonic changes during 50 Ma of westernmost Aleutian history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfig, T. W.; Portnyagin, M.; Hoernle, K.; Hauff, F. F.; van den Bogaard, P.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Komandorsky Islands form the westernmost end of the Aleutian Island Arc. Four igneous complexes, spanning almost 50 Ma of magmatism, have previously been identified (Ivaschenko et al., 1984: Far East Scientific Centre, Vladivostok, 192 pp.). The petrogenesis of this protracted magmatic record and accurate absolute ages of events, however, remain poorly constrained. Our study investigates the relationship between magma composition and tectonic setting. The Komandorsky igneous basement formed in subduction zone setting. It hosts some of the oldest igneous rocks of the entire Aleutian Arc with the onset of magmatism occurring at 47 Ma. This early stage was characterized by classic fluid-dominated arc volcanism, which produced two coeval but likely genetically unrelated magmatic series of tholeiitic mafic and tholeiitic to calc-alkaline felsic rocks. To date, no boninites have been found and therefore arc initiation is different at the Aleutians than at Izu-Bonin-Marianas or the oldest rocks in the Aleutians have yet to be discovered. The prolonged production of the contrasting basalt-rhyolite association on Komandorsky Islands had lasted ~25 Ma and ceased around the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. Concurrently to this long-lasting activity, a gradual transition to a different mode of arc magmatism took place reflected by newly discovered Sr-enriched, HREE-depleted calc-alkaline basaltic andesitic lavas of mid-upper Eocene age spanning a time of at least ~7 Ma. This so-called Transition Series displays a moderate garnet signature marking the increased contribution of a slab-melt component to the magma sources of the Komandorsky Islands. Slab-melt contribution increased with decreasing age leading to strongly adakitic magmatism as early as ~33 Ma (Lower Oligocene), reflected by eruption of high-Sr (up to 2,500 ppm), highly HREE-depleted Adak-type magnesian basaltic andesites and andesites. These remarkable magmas became predominant during the Lower Miocene. They were

  5. Magmatic tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Aams, A.I.; McMurtry, G.M.; Shevenell, L.; Pettit, D.R.; Stimac, J.A.; Werner, C.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Detailed geochemical sampling of high-temperature fumaroles, background water, and fresh magmatic products from 14 active volcanoes reveal that they do not produce measurable amounts of tritium ({sup 3}H) of deep origin (<0.1 T.U. or <0.32 pCi/kg H{sub 2}O). On the other hand, all volcanoes produce mixtures of meteoric and magmatic fluids that contain measurable {sup 3}H from the meteoric end-member. The results show that cold fusion is probably not a significant deep earth process but the samples and data have wide application to a host of other volcanological topics.

  6. Bloc tectonic rotations recorded in the Neogene and Quaternary magmatic rocks from Northwestern Algeria: preliminary paleomagnetic results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Messaoud Derder, Mohamed; Robion, Philippe; Maouche, Said; Bayou, Boualem; Amenna, Mohamed; Henry, Bernard; Missenard, Yves; Ouabadi, Aziouz; Bestandji, Rafik; Ayache, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The seismic activity of the Western Mediterranean area is partly concentrated in northern Africa, particularly in northern Algeria, as it was shown by the strong earthquakes of Zemmouri 21 May 2003 Mw=6.9 and the El Asnam 10 October 1980 Ms= 7.3. This seismicity is due to the convergence between Africa and Eurasia plates since the Oligocene. This convergence involves a tectonic transpression with N-S to NNW-SSE shortening direction, which is expressed by active deformation along the plate boundary. Along the Tellian Atlas (Northern Algeria), active structures define NE-SW trending folds and NE-SW sinistral transpressive faults affecting the intermountain and coastal Neogene to Quaternary sedimentary basins (e.g. Cheliff and Mitidja Plioquaternary intramontaneous basins, …). The NE-SW reverse active faults are coupled with NW-SE to E-W trending strike-slip deep faults. The active deformation in northern Algeria can be explained by a kinematics model of blocks rotation: the transpressive tectonics with NNW-SSE direction of convergence defines NE-SW oriented blocks, which have been subjected to clockwise rotation. In north Algeria, paleomagnetic studies were carried out in the central area, on Neogene sedimentary and magmatic formations (Derder et al, 2009, 2011; 2013). They pointed out tectonic rotation of large blocks, in agreement with the kinematic model. Narrow zones represent important shear zone with strong rotation of smaller blocks (Derder et al., 2013). A new paleomagnetic study was conducted on the recent magmatic rocks outcropping in the Northwestern Algeria, in order to validate this model on a regional scale. The study is still in progress and the preliminary results show presence of systematic clockwise blocks rotation. These results confirm that the Africa-Europe convergence is partly accommodated in northern Africa by blocks rotations. They highlight that rotations are not homogeneous in north Algeria and thus the importance of future works in this

  7. Magmatic Enclaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past three decades, the term "magmatic enclave" has become widely accepted for small (typically <1 m) spheroidal bodies of igneous rock that are compositionally distinct from their coeval lava or intrusive hosts (e.g., Didier and Barbarin, 1991). Certain magmatic enclaves are crystal cumulates but most are globs of magma more mafic and hotter than their host. Understanding the origins and scientific utility of enclaves is aided by their common occurrence in both plutonic and volcanic rocks. Enclaves were noticed and described by geologists and petrographers for decades (e.g., Lacroix, 1890; Pabst, 1928; Williams, 1931) before it was demonstrated that many enclaves were introduced into their hosts while both were in a magmatic state: For example, in plutons by Wager and Bailey (1953), Walker and co-workers (1960's), Didier (1973), Wiebe (1980), and Vernon (1984), and in volcanic rocks by Wilcox (1944), Eichelberger (1980), and Bacon (1986). Spheroidal forms, crenulated or fine-grained margins, and crystal textures of enclaves are evidence of magmatic behavior. On entrapment, an enclave rapidly loses heat to its host and grows groundmass crystals whose size and morphology reflect the degree of enclave undercooling that is closely related to compositional contrast. At depth, some of the water dissolved in enclave magma may enter hydrous silicates but much can exsolve, including during partial crystallization. Vapor exsolution creates spherical vesicles and irregular gas pockets between crystals that give most volcanic enclaves porous textures. A vapor pressure gradient between an incompletely crystallized rigid enclave interior and host magma can drive residual melt into segregation vesicles and even out of the enclave by gas-driven filter pressing. Such enclaves have cores with cumulate-like compositions. Felsic droplets in mafic inclusions in plutonic rocks are interpreted as crystallized segregation vesicles. Enclaves are samples of magma that may not

  8. Origin and evolution of Pliocene Pleistocene granites from the Larderello geothermal field (Tuscan Magmatic Province, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dini, A.; Gianelli, G.; Puxeddu, M.; Ruggieri, G.

    2005-04-01

    Extensive, mainly acidic peraluminous magmatism affected the Tuscan Archipelago and the Tuscan mainland since late Miocene, building up the Tuscan Magmatic Province (TMP) as the Northern Apennine fold belt was progressively thinned, heated and intruded by mafic magmas. Between 3.8 and 1.3 Ma an intrusive complex was built on Larderello area (Tuscan mainland) by emplacement of multiple intrusions of isotopically and geochemically distinct granite magmas. Geochemical and isotopic investigations were carried out on granites cored during drilling exploration activity on the Larderello geothermal field. With respect to the other TMP granites the Larderello intrusives can be classified as two-mica granites due to the ubiquitous presence of small to moderate amounts of F-rich magmatic muscovite. They closely resemble the almost pure crustal TMP acidic rocks and do not show any of the typical petrographic features commonly observed in the TMP hybrid granites (enclaves, patchy zoning of plagioclase, amphibole clots). On the basis of major and trace elements, as well as REE patterns, two groups of granites were proposed: LAR-1 granites (3.8-2.3 Ma) originated by biotite-muscovite breakdown, and LAR-2 granites (2.3-1.3 Ma) generated by muscovite breakdown. At least three main crustal sources (at 14-23 km depth), characterized by distinct ɛNd( t) and 87Sr/ 86Sr values, were involved at different times, and the magmas produced were randomly emplaced at shallow levels (3-6 km depth) throughout the entire field. The partial melting of a biotite-muscovite-rich source with low ɛNd( t) value (about -10.5) produced the oldest intrusions (about 3.8-2.5 Ma). Afterwards (2.5-2.3 Ma), new magmas were generated by another biotite-rich source having a distinctly higher ɛNd( t) value (-7.9). Finally, a muscovite-rich source with high ɛNd( t) (about -8.9) gave origin to the younger group of granites (2.3-1.0 Ma). The significant Sr isotope disequilibrium recorded by granites belonging to

  9. The physical hydrology of magmatic-hydrothermal systems: High-resolution 18O records of magmatic-meteoric water interaction from the Yankee Lode tin deposit (Mole Granite, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Baumgartner, Lukas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits are important economic Cu, Au, Mo and Sn resources (Sillitoe, 2010, Kesler, 1994). The ore formation is a result of superimposed enrichment processes and metals can precipitate due to fluid-rock interaction and/or temperature drop caused by convection or mixing with meteoric fluid (Heinrich and Candela 2014). Microthermometry and LA-ICP MS trace element analyses of fluid inclusions of a well-characterized quartz sample from the Yankee Lode quartz-cassiterite vein deposit (Mole Granite, Australia) suggest that tin precipitation was driven by dilution of hot magmatic water by meteoric fluids (Audétat et al.1998). High resolution in situ oxygen isotope measurements of quartz have the potential to detect changing fluid sources during the evolution of a hydrothermal system. We analyzed the euhedral growth zones of this previously well-studied quartz sample. Growth temperatures are provided by Audétat et al. (1998) and Audétat (1999). Calculated δ 18O values of the quartz- and/or cassiterite-precipitating fluid show significant variability through the zoned crystal. The first and second quartz generations (Q1 and Q2) were precipitated from a fluid of magmatic isotopic composition with δ 18O values of ˜ 8 - 10 ‰. δ 18O values of Q3- and tourmaline-precipitating fluids show a transition from magmatic δ 18O values of ˜ 8 ‰ to ˜ -5 ‰. The outermost quartz-chlorite-muscovite zone was precipitated from a fluid with a significant meteoric water component reflected by very light δ 18O values of about -15 ‰ which is consistent with values found by previous studies (Sun and Eadington, 1987) using conventional O-isotope analysis of veins in the distal halo of the granite intrusion. Intense incursion of meteoric water during Q3 precipitation (light δ 18O values) agrees with the main ore formation event, though the first occurrence of cassiterite is linked to Q2 precipitating fluid with magmatic-like isotope signature. This

  10. The physical hydrology of magmatic-hydrothermal systems: High-resolution 18O records of magmatic-meteoric water interaction from the Yankee Lode tin deposit (Mole Granite, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Baumgartner, Lukas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits are important economic Cu, Au, Mo and Sn resources (Sillitoe, 2010, Kesler, 1994). The ore formation is a result of superimposed enrichment processes and metals can precipitate due to fluid-rock interaction and/or temperature drop caused by convection or mixing with meteoric fluid (Heinrich and Candela 2014). Microthermometry and LA-ICP MS trace element analyses of fluid inclusions of a well-characterized quartz sample from the Yankee Lode quartz-cassiterite vein deposit (Mole Granite, Australia) suggest that tin precipitation was driven by dilution of hot magmatic water by meteoric fluids (Audétat et al.1998). High resolution in situ oxygen isotope measurements of quartz have the potential to detect changing fluid sources during the evolution of a hydrothermal system. We analyzed the euhedral growth zones of this previously well-studied quartz sample. Growth temperatures are provided by Audétat et al. (1998) and Audétat (1999). Calculated δ 18O values of the quartz- and/or cassiterite-precipitating fluid show significant variability through the zoned crystal. The first and second quartz generations (Q1 and Q2) were precipitated from a fluid of magmatic isotopic composition with δ 18O values of ˜ 8 - 10 ‰. δ 18O values of Q3- and tourmaline-precipitating fluids show a transition from magmatic δ 18O values of ˜ 8 ‰ to ˜ -5 ‰. The outermost quartz-chlorite-muscovite zone was precipitated from a fluid with a significant meteoric water component reflected by very light δ 18O values of about -15 ‰ which is consistent with values found by previous studies (Sun and Eadington, 1987) using conventional O-isotope analysis of veins in the distal halo of the granite intrusion. Intense incursion of meteoric water during Q3 precipitation (light δ 18O values) agrees with the main ore formation event, though the first occurrence of cassiterite is linked to Q2 precipitating fluid with magmatic-like isotope signature. This

  11. Radiocarbon studies of plant leaves and rings from mammoth mountain, CA: A long-term record of magmatic CO2 release

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, A.C.; Hainsworth, L.J.; Sorey, M.L.; Evans, William C.; Southon, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of 14C in tree rings provides a measure of the flux of magmatic CO2 from Mammoth Mountain both before and after 1994 when copious diffuse emissions were first discovered and linked to tree kill. We analyzed the annual rings of trees with two main purposes: (1) to track changes in the magnitude of magmatic CO2 emission over time, and (2) to determine the onset of magmatic CO2 emission at numerous sites on Mammoth Mountain. The onset of CO2 emission at different areas of tree kill was determined to be in 1990, closely following the seismic events of 1989. At Horseshoe Lake (HSL), CO2 emission was found to have peaked in 1991 and to have subsequently declined by a factor of two through 1998. The tree-ring data also show that emissions of magmatic carbon from cold springs below the tree-kill areas occurred well before 1989. Trees located on the margins of the kill areas or otherwise away from zones of maximum gas discharge were found to be better integrators of magmatic CO2 emission than those located in the center of tree kills. Although quantitative extrapolations from our data to a flux history will require that a relationship be established between 14C depletion in tree rings and average annual magmatic CO2 flux, the pattern of 14C depletion in tree rings is likely to be the most reliable indicator of the long-term changes in the magnitude of CO2 release from Mammoth Mountain. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Timing of porphyry (Cu-Mo) and base metal (Zn-Pb-Ag-Cu) mineralisation in a magmatic-hydrothermal system—Morococha district, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchpole, Honza; Kouzmanov, Kalin; Bendezú, Aldo; Ovtcharova, Maria; Spikings, Richard; Stein, Holly; Fontboté, Lluís

    2015-12-01

    The Morococha district in central Peru is characterised by economically important Cordilleran polymetallic (Zn-Pb-Ag-Cu) vein and replacement bodies and the large Toromocho porphyry Cu-Mo deposit in its centre. U-Pb, Re-Os, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology data for various porphyry-related hydrothermal mineralisation styles record a 3.5-Ma multi-stage history of magmatic-hydrothermal activity in the district. In the late Miocene, three individual magmatic-hydrothermal centres were active: the Codiciada, Toromocho, and Ticlio centres, each separated in time and space. The Codiciada centre is the oldest magmatic-hydrothermal system in the district and consists of a composite porphyry stock associated with anhydrous skarn and quartz-molybdenite veins. The hydrothermal events are recorded by a titanite U-Pb age at 9.3 ± 0.2 Ma and a molybdenite Re-Os age at 9.26 ± 0.03 Ma. These ages are indistinguishable from zircon U-Pb ages for porphyry intrusions of the composite stock and indicate a time span of 0.2 Ma for magmatic-hydrothermal activity. The small Ticlio magmatic-hydrothermal centre in the west of the district has a maximum duration of 0.3 Ma, ranging from porphyry emplacement to porphyry mineralisation at 8.04 ± 0.14 Ma (40Ar/39Ar muscovite cooling age). The Toromocho magmatic-hydrothermal centre has a minimum of five recorded porphyry intrusions that span a total of 1.3 Ma and is responsible for the formation of the giant Toromocho Cu-Mo deposit. At least two hydrothermal pulses are identified. Post-dating a first pulse of molybdenite mineralisation, wide-spread hydrous skarn covers an area of over 6 km2 and is recorded by five 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages at 7.2-6.8 Ma. These ages mark the end of the slowly cooling and long-lived Toromocho magmatic-hydrothermal centre soon after last magmatic activity at 7.26 ± 0.02 Ma. District-wide (50 km2) Cordilleran base metal vein and replacement bodies post-date the youngest recorded porphyry mineralisation event at Toromocho

  13. Recrystallization and hydrothermal growth of high U-Th zircon in the Weondong deposit, Korea: Record of post-magmatic alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changyun; Song, Yungoo; Chung, Donghoon; Kang, Il-Mo; Khulganakhuu, Chuluunbaatar; Yi, Keewook

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigate zircons with high U and Th contents of 12,000-24,000 and 11,000-40,000 ppm, respectively, from leucocratic granite in the Weondong region of South Korea. Hydrothermally epitaxial growth textures are observed in addition to four distinct textures with different backscattered electron (BSE) intensities within single zircon crystals. We describe the internal textures of the zircon crystals and define the chemical characteristics of each textural domain. The zircon crystals show internally recrystallized and externally crystallized textures, supporting the concept of post-magmatic fluid control. After crystallization of the primary zircon by late magmatism, four types of secondary textures were developed. The type-I domain shows patchy forms within the primary domain due to the structural and chemical recrystallization of self-irradiated zircon by a fluid-dominated diffusion reaction process. The type-II domain is characterized by a pure zircon composition, mineral inclusions (mainly thorite), and micropores due to chemical recrystallization by a coupled dissolution-reprecipitation process during interaction with aqueous fluids. The type-III domain is the purest zircon, is interconnected with type-II, and formed by a second coupled dissolution-reprecipitation process. The type-IV domain is the hydrothermal recrystallization/overgrowth texture formed by the direct crystallization process from fluorine-enriched, zircon-saturated aqueous fluid. These results indicate that the zircon crystals were formed sequentially or intermittently through multi-genetic processes by post-magmatic fluids. Furthermore, we conclude that F-enriched post-magmatic fluid migrated large amounts of zirconium, resulting in the typical overgrowth texture of zircon.

  14. Consistent magmatic and magnetic anisotropy data in La Gloria Pluton, central Chile: Implications for the magma flow record in a shallow pluton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payacan, I.; Gutierrez, F. J.; Bachmann, O.; Parada, M.

    2012-12-01

    The magmatic origin of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is examined in comparison with magmatic anisotropy data in a small, shallow, silicic magma reservoir in the upper crust. La Gloria Pluton (LGP) is a 10 Ma granodiorite/quartz monzonite of about 250 km3 located in the southern Andes, central Chile. LGP represents a particularly simple case of a silicic intrusion which was assembled in a few pulses and cooled over a short time interval. Hornblende, biotite and minor magnetite are ubiquitous mafic phases. The AMS tensor indicates that magnetic fabric has an oblate shape (i.e. magnetic foliation is higher than magnetic lineation). Lineations are weak (values up to 1.05), have a N-NW trend with a nearly horizontal dip and represent axisymmetric convection parallel to the main pluton elongation. Foliations are more pronounced (values up to 1.14), having NW trends and dips that vary gradually from vertical at the walls, to horizontal at the center and near the roof of the chamber. We interpret this to represent shear localization near the magma locking point along solidification fronts. Magmatic anisotropy data were obtained by measuring mineral length, width and orientation in the three main planes of the AMS tensor. We define the planes Pmax, Pint, and Pmin as orthogonal to the maximum, intermediate, and minimum axes of the AMS tensor, respectively. Mineral data were collected for plagioclase and amphibole + bitotite independently. For each site, the Bingham distribution with 95% of confidence is used to determine the mean mineral orientation and their angle difference with the AMS axes. Preliminary results indicate that mean crystal orientations are well defined for Pmax and Pint for all analyzed minerals, but Pmin is only well constrained for amphibole + bitotite and poorly constrained for plagioclase. Angle differences generally decrease with magnetic anisotropy but are independent of the size and aspect ratio of the crystals. Mean values of

  15. Magmatic and hydrothermal controls on trace element output at active volcanoes as recorded by spherules of sulfur in acid crater lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, P. R.; van Bergen, M.; Martinez, M.; Martinez, M.; Sumarti, S.; Sumarti, S.; Valdes, J.; Malavassi, E.; Sriwana, T.

    2001-12-01

    Volcanic crater lakes are a major site of condensation for volatile elements and associated trace elements produced by magmatic activity. Spherules of solid native sulfur up to several mm in diameter with sulfide inclusions (mainly corroded FeS) are common in the dense acidic waters of magmatically active lakes. They were most likely produced as hot gas (e.g. H2S or SO2) was released at the bottom of the lake creating turbulence in pools of liquid sulfur. Analysis of the spherules presents a new opportunity to estimate the magmatic output of a poorly studied group of trace elements including Se, Te, As, Sb and Hg that often present a major environmental hazard in volcanic areas. Sulfur spherules and acid lake waters were sampled from three active subduction-related volcanoes with differing stages of activity and degassing rates. Poás in Costa Rica hosts a highly dynamic crater lake with respect to volume and chemical composition. In contrast, the crater lakes at Kawah Ijen, East Java and Kawah Putih, West Java were more stable during the last 10 years but show some seasonal variations. Major and trace elements were determined in situ using electron microprobe and laser ablation ICP-MS techniques. Spherules are highly enriched in trace elements including Se (400-4000 μ g/g), Te (500-800 μ g/g), Sb (1-18 μ g/g) and As (30-510 μ g/g). The internal chemical homogeneity of the spherules supports rapid formation. Changes in lake chemistry may account in part for large differences in trace element content between samples from each volcanic center. Lower As/S and Sb/S ratios at Poás correspond to higher temperatures that promote an enhanced release of HCl vapor from the lake surface. Recycling of hydrothermal acid brines into the lake may also have affected these trace element ratios. High Se/S and Te/S ratios cannot be explained by mixing between mantle and shallow sources and probably reflect additional sulfur loss due to degassing of the magmatic source.

  16. The last stages of the Avalonian-Cadomian arc in NW Iberian Massif: isotopic and igneous record for a long-lived peri-Gondwanan magmatic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andonaegui, Pilar; Arenas, Ricardo; Albert, Richard; Sánchez Martínez, Sonia; Díez Fernández, Rubén; Gerdes, Axel

    2016-06-01

    The upper allochthonous units of NW Iberian Massif contain an extensive Cambrian magmatism (c. 500 Ma), covering felsic to mafic compositions. The magmatic activity generated large massifs of granitoids and gabbros, with calc-alkaline and tholeiitic compositions respectively. Petrological and geochemical features of these massifs are characteristic of volcanic arc. The plutons intruded siliciclastic sedimentary series deposited in the periphery of the West Africa Craton. U-Pb/Hf isotopic compositions of detrital zircon in the siliciclastic host series, indicate continental arc activity between c. 750 Ma and c. 500 Ma. It was characterized by a large variety of isotopic sources, including from very old continental input, even Archean, to the addition of a significant amount of juvenile mafic material. These isotopic sources experienced an extensive mixing that explains the composition and isotopic features (εHft from - 50 until + 15) of the represented Cambrian plutons. The Cambrian igneous rocks of the upper units of NW Iberia are related to the latest activity of the Avalonian-Cadomian arc. From the Middle Cambrian arc activity in the periphery of Gondwana was replaced by pronounced extension associated with the development of continental rifting, which finally led to separation of the microcontinent Avalonia. Subsequent drifting of Avalonia to the North caused progressive opening one of the main Paleozoic ocean, the Rheic Ocean.

  17. Magmatic expressions of continental lithosphere removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huilin; Currie, Claire A.

    2015-10-01

    Gravitational lithosphere removal in continental interior has been inferred from various observations, including anomalous surface deflections and magmatism. We use numerical models and a simplified theoretical analysis to investigate how lithosphere removal can be recognized in the magmatic record. One style of removal is a Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability, where removal occurs through dripping. The associated magmatism depends on the lithosphere thermal structure. Four types of magmatism are predicted: (1) For relatively hot lithosphere (e.g., back arcs), the lithosphere can be conductively heated and melted during removal, while the asthenosphere upwells and undergoes decompression melting. If removal causes significant lithospheric thinning, the deep crust may be heated and melted. (2) For moderately warm lithosphere (e.g., average Phanerozoic lithosphere) in which the lithosphere root has a low density, only the lithosphere may melt. (3) If the lithosphere root has a high density in moderately warm lithosphere, only asthenosphere melt is predicted. (4) For cold lithosphere (e.g., cratons), no magmatism is induced. An alternate style of removal is delamination, where dense lithosphere peels along Moho. In most cases, the lithosphere sinks too rapidly to melt. However, asthenosphere can upwell to the base of the crust, resulting in asthenospheric and crustal melts. In delamination, magmatism migrates laterally with the detachment point; in contrast, magmatism in Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability has a symmetric shape and converges toward the drip center. The models may explain the diversity of magmatism observed in areas with inferred lithosphere removal, including the Puna Plateau and the southern Sierra Nevada.

  18. Low-Degree Partial Melting Experiments of CR and H Chondrite Compositions: Implications for Asteroidal Magmatism Recorded in GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 T

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; Jones, John H.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of differentiated meteorites have revealed a diversity of differentiation processes on their parental asteroids; these differentiation mechanisms range from whole-scale melting to partial melting without the core formation [e.g., 1]. Recently discovered paired achondrites GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 (hereafter referred to as GRA) represent unique asteroidal magmatic processes. These meteorites are characterized by high abundances of sodic plagioclase and alkali-rich whole-rock compositions, implying that they could originate from a low-degree partial melt from a volatile-rich oxidized asteroid [e.g., 2, 3, 4]. These conditions are consistent with the high abundances of highly siderophile elements, suggesting that their parent asteroid did not segregate a metallic core [2]. In this study, we test the hypothesis that low-degree partial melts of chondritic precursors under oxidizing conditions can explain the whole-rock and mineral chemistry of GRA based on melting experiments of synthesized CR- and H-chondrite compositions.

  19. Geochronology and geochemistry of rhyolites from Hormuz Island, southern Iran: A new record of Cadomian arc magmatism in the Hormuz Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, Narges Sadat; Amini, Sadraddin; Schmitt, Axel Karl; Hassanzadeh, Jamshid; Borg, Gregor; McKeegan, Kevin; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Hosein; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    Hormuz Island, a salt-gypsum dome in the Persian Gulf in southern Iran, is a complex halotectonic melange comprising evaporites, carbonates, volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks, as well as low-grade metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. Based on trace element (including rare earth elements REE) compositions of whole rocks and zircon, Hormuz rhyolites are inferred to have formed from subduction-related magmas generated in an active continental margin setting. Ion microprobe analyses of zircon crystals yielded concordant U-Pb ages with weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 558 ± 7 Ma (juvenile zircons in contrast to those from previous magmatic episodes or xenocrysts) along with younger and older discordant ages which likely represent Pb loss and the presence of xenocrystic domains, respectively. Trace element ratios and in particular REE patterns of juvenile zircon from Hormuz rhyolites indicate crystallization from continental crustal source rocks typical for subduction environments. The concordant 206Pb/238U zircon age agrees with ages obtained from most other structural zones of Iran which indicate regional consolidation of igneous basement during the Neoproterozoic to Early Cambrian. Furthermore, Hormuz rhyolite ages and compositions correlate with counterparts that co-evolved along the northern margin of Gondwana, and are now preserved along the southern coast of the Persian Gulf. Hormuz rhyolites erupted synchronously with the deposition of carbonates and evaporites, suggesting that volcanism occupied an extensional backarc or retroarc setting. Such depositional environments predominated in the northern Gondwana continental margin where convergent (Proto-Tethyan) and extensional (Najd) tectonic regimes coexisted.

  20. Punctuated anorogenic magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Robert F.; Sokolov, Maria; Magaji, Shehu S.

    2012-11-01

    The emplacement of anorogenic magmas, be they mantle-derived or crust-derived and silica-undersaturated or silica-oversaturated, marks a period of rifting or tectonic relaxation and apparent quiescence. In a given area, such magmatism commonly recurs episodically, and can yield even more strongly alkaline products than in the first cycle, in spite of the depletion that resulted from that episode of melting. Anorogenic magmatism is said to be punctuated where it recurs, in response to a triggering mechanism. The second cycle reflects an influx of heat and a fluid phase responsible for the fertilization of the depleted source-rock. In cases of an anorogenic stage after a major collision, the first cycle of magmatism, yielding an AMCG suite, arises by gravity-induced sinking of lithosphere and the diapiric rise of an asthenospheric mantle; renewed magmatism may involve localized and renewed detachment as late as 200 m.y. after the collision. Where the hiatus is much longer, as in Nigeria, we appeal to a propagating zipper-like zone of extension, possibly related to rotation of a crustal block. The economic ramifications of punctuated anorogenic magmatism are important; the second-generation magmas may well crystallize products that are mineralized in the high-field-strength elements and any other elements enriched in the source rocks. Such a model would account for the rich deposits of alluvial columbite, zircon and cassiterite associated with the Younger Granites of Nigeria.

  1. The Influence of Crystal Mush on Magmatism Under Arc Volcanoes Recorded in Zircon from the Lassen Volcanic Center, California and Mount Hood, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemetti, E. W.; Clynne, M. A.; Kent, A. J.; Bertolett, E. M.; Hernandez, L. D.; Coble, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many arc volcanoes are constructed by repeated tapping of complex subvolcanic magmatic plumbing containing new and inherited crystals and liquids that interact in the hours to millennia prior to an eruption. This process is often modulated by long-lived (10-100 k.y.) shallow (<5 km) silicic crystal mush. Constraining the development and growth of mush zones is therefore essential in predicting a volcano's future behavior. The Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC) in California and Mount Hood (MH) in Oregon are two of the most recently active Cascade volcanoes, with last major eruptions in 1915 and ~1780-81 respectively. We performed U-Th/U-Pb dating of LVC and MH zircon from lavas and tephras erupted between 0.1-825 ka. In the LVC, the Rockland Tephra (611 ka; Ar/Ar) contains zircon from 800-520 ka, spanning the age of the Rockland caldera complex (825-611 ka eruption ages). During the Lassen Domefield (315-0.1 ka eruption ages), zircon ages vary from secular equilibrium to 15 ka, overlapping with the Bumpass Sequence (315-190 ka eruption ages) and an eruptive hiatus (190-90 ka eruption ages). Nine of 116 Lassen Domefield zircon are in secular equilibrium (>350 ka). These data support a model of long-lived zircon-saturated silicic mushes existing under the LVC during the Rockland caldera complex stage and since the end of the Brokeoff Volcano stage (590-385 ka eruption ages). Preliminary zircon data from the Old Maid stage (~0.2 ka eruption age) at MH indicate two broad age groups. Younger zircon (<10 ka) suggest reactivation and/or expansion of mush following Polallie phase (20-12 ka eruption ages), Timberline (~1.5 ka eruption age), and Old Maid eruptions. Older zircon (>100 ka) are generally consistent with U-Th ages from plagioclase (~120 ka U-Th), indicating a long-lived zircon-saturated crystal mush tapped by Timberline and Old Maid lavas. At both of these volcanoes, silicic crystal mushes interact with intruding mafic magma, producing monotonous mixed andesite

  2. Mid-Pliocene (~3 Ma) relative sea level markers around the world: searching for eustasy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovere, Alessio; Raymo, Maureen; Hearty, Paul; MItrovica, Jerry; Austermann, Jacqueline; O'Leary, Michael; Sandstrom, Michael

    2014-05-01

    PLIOMAX (PLIOcene MAXimum sea level) is a five-year research project that aims to increase the accuracy of global sea level estimates for the mid-Pliocene warm period. To achieve its goals, PLIOMAX has organized several field expeditions to identify, measure and date relative sea level markers of mid-Pliocene age from around the globe, and built a network of collaborators expert in different geographic areas and disciplines. In this work we present field data obtained from South Africa, Australia, Italy, Argentina and the US East Coast. In these areas we sampled, measured and dated geological facies related to mid-Pliocene sea level. Most areas yield information on 3 Ma sea levels with an accuracy of few decimeters. In presenting our dataset, we will show how we address the following questions, including: how can we obtain accurate measurements in the field? What is the accuracy of the markers we measure in indicating past relative sea levels? To which point can we trust older literature data? We then show how the elevations of relative sea level markers obtained in the field must be corrected to obtain an estimate of eustatic sea level. These corrections use models of glacial isostatic adjustment and dynamic topography. We discuss uncertainties linked to these models as well as the main issues that are still separating us from obtaining a robust estimate of maximum eustatic sea level during the mid-Pliocene warm period.

  3. Configuration and Correlation of Fluvial Terrace Deposits In the Lower Rio Salado Valley: A Record of Magmatic Uplift and Active Normal Faulting in the Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sion, B. D.; Axen, G. J.; Phillips, F. M.; Harrison, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Rio Salado is a western tributary of the Rio Grande whose valley is flanked by six major terrace levels. The Rio crosses several active rift-related normal faults and the active, mid-crustal Socorro Magma Body (SMB; a sill at 19 km depth that is actively doming the land surface), providing an unusual opportunity to explore the effects of deep magma emplacement and active faulting on the terraces. Rio Salado terraces were mapped using a high-resolution DEM and digital color stereophotographs and were projected onto a valley-parallel vertical plane to construct longitudinal profiles. Three new soil pits were described to aid terrace correlation. A net incision rate of 0.41 ± 0.06 m/ka was inferred from the correlation of a major fill-cut terrace to the 122 ± 18 ka Airport surface ~25 km south of the Rio Salado. This incision rate is >1.5 times more rapid than estimated rates nearby or in other parts of New Mexico, but yields age estimates for other terraces that are consistent with soil development. Terrace gradients in the Rio Salado have increased through time, indicating either stream response to Rio Grande incision or footwall tilting from the Quaternary Loma Blanca fault (LBF). Two terraces in the LBF hanging wall are back-tilted relative to their footwall counterparts, suggesting a listric geometry for the LBF. However, two others (Qtf and Qtc) are east-tilted relative to their footwall counterparts. Both Qtf and Qtc merge eastward with the next youngest terrace in the flight, and Qtc is arched, consistent with an earlier episode of surface uplift above the SMB. Future work will involve (a) additional terrace mapping over the SMB, (b) cosmogenic 36Cl depth profile dating of the Rio Salado terraces to determine incision rates, allow regional terrace correlations, and constrain fault-slip slip rates and the record of SMB-related surface uplift, and (c) numerical modeling of SMB inflation constrained by uplift signals.

  4. Hydrogen isotope composition of magmatic water

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Isotopic tracing of H[sub 2]O degassing in both small and very large rhyolitic magmas in continental tectonic settings (USA and New Zealand), and isotopic studies of high-temperature fumaroles (USA, Japan, and elsewhere) indicate that the hydrogen isotope compositions of magmatic waters vary primarily with the composition of source material and tectonic setting. Water from felsic magmas in volcanic arc settings has a mean [delta]D value off [minus]25 [+-] 5 permil, whereas water from volcanic and plutonic magmas in continental settings has a slightly lower mean [delta]D of [minus]40 [+-] 10 permil. These differences reflect the variation in composition of source materials: hydrated oceanic crust and marine sediments for the arc volcanoes, and largely metamorphic crust for magmas in continental settings. The isotopic record in certain ore deposits associated with felsic magmas (e.g., W skarns, Sn-W veins) and geothermal systems records the influx at critical times of magmatic water with a [delta]D value of [minus]35 to [minus]45 permil. This is best documented where isotopic contrast between magmatic and meteoric waters is large. The [delta]D of MORB H[sub 2]O presumably lies between the mean [delta]D for MORB glass ([minus]75 permil), the [delta]D of H[sub 2]O in equilibrium with this glass ([delta]D ca. [minus]35; assuming closed-system degassing).

  5. Evolution of Northeast Atlantic magmatic continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Richard; Cornwell, David; Ramsden, Alice

    2014-05-01

    One of the major problems interpreting the evolution of magmatic continental margins such as those which dominate the Irish, UK and Norwegian margins of the NE Atlantic is that the structure which should record the pre-magmatic evolution of the rift and which potentially influences the character of the rifting process is partially or completely obscured by thick basalt lava flows and sills. A limited number of deep reflection seismic profiles acquired with tuned seismic sources have penetrated the basalts and provide an image of the pre-magmatic structure, otherwise the principle data are lower resolution wide-angle/refraction profiles and potential field models which have greater uncertainties associated with them. In order to sidestep the imaging contraints we have examined the Ethiopian ñ Afar rift system to try to understand the rifting process. This magmatic rift system provides, along its length, a series of ësnapshotsí into the possible tectonic evolution of a magmatic continental margin which are associated with different amounts of extension. The Main Ethiopian rift contains an embryonic magmatic passive margin dominated by faulting at the margins of the rift and en-echlon magmatic zones at the centre. Further north toward Afar the rift becomes infilled with extensive lava flows fed from fissure systems in the widening rift zone. Deep seismic profiles crossing the NE Atlantic margins reveal ocean dipping reflector sequences (ODRS) of basaltic lavas overlying extended crust and lower crustal sill complexes of intruded igneous rock, often referred to as underplate, which extend back beneath the continental margin. The ODRS show a variety of morphologies and settings but frequently occur in fault bounded rift structures along the margins. We suggest, by analogy to the observations that can be made in the Ethiopia Afar rift that these fault bounded basins largely form at the embryonic rift stage and are then partially or completely filled with lavas fed

  6. Venus magmatic and tectonic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.; Hansen, V. L.

    1993-01-01

    Two years beyond the initial mapping by the Magellan spacecraft, hypotheses for the magmatic and tectonic evolution of Venus have become refined and focused. We present our view of these processes, attempting to synthesize aspects of a model for the tectonic and magmatic behavior of the planet. The ideas presented should be taken collectively as an hypothesis subject to further testing. The quintessence of our model is that shear and buoyancy forces in the upper boundary layer of mantle convection give rise to a spatially and temporally complex pattern of strain in a one-plate Venusian lithosphere and modulate the timing and occurrence of magmatism on a global basis.

  7. Magmatism at different crustal levels in the ancient North Cascades magmatic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, E. K.; Bowring, S. A.; Miller, R. B.; Miller, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The mechanisms of magma ascent and emplacement inferred from study of intrusive complexes have long been the subject of intense debate. Current models favor incremental construction based on integration of field, geochemical, geochronologic, and modeling studies. Much of this work has been focused on a single crustal level. However, study of magmatism throughout the crust is critical for understanding how magma ascends through and intrudes surrounding crustal material. Here, we present new geochronologic and geochemical work from intrusive complexes emplaced at a range of crustal depths in the Cretaceous North Cascades magmatic arc. These complexes were intruded between 92 and 87 Ma at depths of at ≤5 -10 km, ~20 km, and ~25 km during this time. U-Pb CA-TIMS geochronology in zircon can resolve <0.1% differences in zircon dates and when combined with detailed field relationships allow new insights into how magmatic systems are assembled. We can demonstrate highly variable rates of intrusion at different crustal levels: the shallow-crustal (5-10 km) Black Peak intrusive complex was assembled semi-continuously over ~5 My, while the deep-crustal (25-30 km) Tenpeak intrusive complex was assembled in brief, high-flux events over ~2.6 My. Between these bodies is the Seven-Fingered Jack-Entiat intrusive complex, a highly elongate amalgamation of intrusions recording two episodes of magmatism between~92-88 Ma and ~80-77 Ma. Each of these complexes provides a window into crustal processes that occur at different depths. Our data suggest assembly of the Black Peak intrusive complex occurred via a series of small (0.5-2 km2) magmatic increments from ~92 Ma to ~87 Ma. Field relations and zircon trace element geochemistry indicate each of these increments were emplaced and crystallized as closed systems-we find no evidence for mixing between magmas in the complex. However, zircon inheritance becomes more common in younger intrusions, indicating assimilation of older plutonic

  8. Magmatism on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, Chloé; Thorey, Clément; Pinel, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Volcanism on the Moon is dominated by large fissure eruptions of mare basalt and seems to lack large, central vent, shield volcanoes as observed on all the other terrestrial planets. Large shield volcanoes are constructed over millions to several hundreds of millions of years. On the Moon, magmas might not have been buoyant enough to allow for a prolonged activity at the same place over such lengths of time. The lunar crust was indeed formed by flotation of light plagioclase minerals on top of the lunar magma ocean, resulting in a particularly light and relatively thick crust. This low-density crust acted as a barrier for the denser primary mantle melts. This is particularly evident in the fact that subsequent mare basalts erupted primarily within large impact basins where at least part of the crust was removed by the impact process. Thus, the ascent of lunar magmas might have been limited by their reduced buoyancy, leading to storage zone formation deep in the lunar crust. Further magma ascent to shallower depths might have required local or regional tensional stresses. Here, we first review evidences of shallow magmatic intrusions within the lunar crust of the Moon that consist in surface deformations presenting morphologies consistent with models of magma spreading at depth and deforming an overlying elastic layer. We then study the preferential zones of magma storage in the lunar crust as a function of the local and regional state of stress. Evidences of shallow intrusions are often contained within complex impact craters suggesting that the local depression caused by the impact exerted a strong control on magma ascent. The depression is felt over a depth equivalent to the crater radius. Because many of these craters have a radius less than 30km, the minimum crust thickness, this suggests that the magma was already stored in deeper intrusions before ascending at shallower depth. All the evidences for intrusions are also preferentially located in the internal

  9. Effect of aridification on carbon isotopic variation and ecologic evolution at 5.3 Ma in the Asian interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jimin; Lü, Tongyan; Gong, Yingzeng; Liu, Weiguo; Wang, Xu; Gong, Zhijun

    2013-10-01

    The Cenozoic era is marked by dramatic climatic and ecological changes. The timing of the emergence and the subsequent expansions of C4 grasses are prominent biological events on Earth. In China, thick Cenozoic deposits in the Tarim and Junggar Basins, which are located in the Asian interior, provide important geological archives for studying paleoenvironmental changes. Here we use carbon isotope compositions of organic matter to reconstruct the history of ecologic evolution during the late Cenozoic in the Tarim and Junggar Basins. The results show that there is a shift to slightly higher δ13C values at 5.3 Ma indicating a change in terrestrial ecosystems in the Asian interior driven by an increased regional aridity rather than decreasing atmospheric pCO2 levels. The weakened water vapor transportation related to the retreat of Paratethys Ocean and the enhanced rain shadow effect of mountain uplift during the latest Miocene mostly triggered this event.

  10. Magmatic history of Red Sea rifting: perspective from the central Saudi Arabian coastal plain.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    An early stage of magmatism related to Red Sea rifting is recorded by a Tertiary dyke complex and comagmatic volcanic rocks exposed on the central Saudi Arabian coastal plain. Field relations and new K/Ar dates indicate episodic magmatism from approx 30 m.y. to the present day and rift-related magmatism as early as 50 m.y. Localized volcanism and sheeted dyke injection ceased at approx 20 m.y. and were replaced by the intrusion of thick gabbro dykes, marking the onset of sea-floor spreading in the central Red Sea. Differences in the depths and dynamics of mantle-melt extraction and transport may account for the transition from mixed alkaline-subalkaline bimodal magmatism of the pre-20 m.y. rift basin to exclusively subalkaline (tholeiitic) magmatism of the Red Sea spreading axis and the alkali basalt volcanism inland.-L.C.H.

  11. Apatite as a Tool for Tracking Magmatic CO2 Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riker, J.; Humphreys, M.; Brooker, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    CO2 plays a fundamental role in the evolution of magmatic and volcanic systems, but its low solubility in silicate melts means that direct records of magmatic CO2 concentrations remain elusive. The phosphate mineral apatite is unique among igneous minerals in its capacity to accommodate all major magmatic volatiles (H2O, F, Cl, CO2 and S). Although interest in apatite as a tool for tracking magmatic volatile contents (namely H2O, F, and Cl) has increased in recent years, its potential as a record of magmatic CO2contents remains untapped. We present the results of high-temperature, high-pressure experiments investigating the partitioning behaviour of CO2 between apatite and basaltic melt. Experiments were run in piston cylinder apparatus at 1 GPa and 1250 °C, with a slow initial cooling ramp employed to facilitate crystal growth. Each charge contained the starting basaltic powder doped with Ca-phosphate and variable proportions of H2O, CO2, and F. Run products are glass-rich charges containing 15-25 vol% large, euhedral apatite crystals (± cpx and minor biotite). Experimental apatites and glasses have been characterised by BSE imaging, electron microprobe, and ion microprobe. Apatites range in composition from near-endmember fluorapatite (3.0 wt% F), to near-endmember hydroxyapatite (1.7 wt% H2O), to carbon-rich apatite containing up to 1.6 wt% CO2. Apatite compositions are stoichiometric if all anions (F-, OH-, and CO32—) lie in the channel site, suggesting an "A-type" substitution under these conditions (i.e. CO32— + [] = 2X—, where X is another channel anion and [] is a vacancy; e.g. Fleet et al. 2004). Importantly, CO2 partitions readily into apatite at all fluid compositions considered here. CO2 is also more compatible in apatite than water at our run conditions, with calculated H2O-CO2 exchange coefficients close to or greater than 1. Our results indicate that when channel ions are primarily occupied by H2O and CO2 (i.e. F- and Cl-poor magmatic systems

  12. Magmatic differentiation in a chaotic background: A comparison of multiphase simulations and magmatic chronometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.

    2015-12-01

    The location and timescales of silicic magma production has received much recent attention and these questions are at the forefront of understanding incubation times for eruptive episodes and ultimately, the production of continental crust. While idealizations of differentiation in simplified magma reservoir geometries have been useful to frame end-member behavior, most magmatic systems, and particular large magma reservoirs, are open systems with time varying geometries. Evidence of open systems and assembly of magmatic systems incrementally are present in a range of plutonic and volcanic rocks. To evaluate the timescales of silicic magma production, a 3D multiphase dynamics model was implemented that includes heat transfer, phase change and magma dynamics. The size of the magmatic systems under consideration are not prescribed, but rather grow or shrink in response to the flux of heat and intrusions. To compare simulations to a range of data, major element chemistry, phase assemblage, and tracking of representative crystals are made through time. A particular focus of this presentation is a comparison of dynamic processes to proxies used as chronometers. This includes recording the timescale of appearance of different phases that can be compared to timescales inferred from diffusion profiles and monitoring zircon saturation and dispersal. Both the differentiation timescale and timescales of the major growth of zircons are a relatively small fraction of the melt-present lifetime of magma reservoirs, and in particular, typically represent relatively smaller fractions for larger magmatic systems. Melt can exist at low melt fraction (<0.2) for timescales of 100s kyr for the largest systems, while spending only a small amount of time at high melt fraction. Nevertheless, these reservoirs can be assembled incrementally with magma fluxes in the ranges estimated for arcs. A mid-upper crust location is important to have phase assemblages with sufficient leverage to produce

  13. The pulse of large silicic magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, S. L.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2008-12-01

    Large silicic volcanic fields (LSVFs) are considered windows into the tops of upper crustal batholiths that are the foundations of the continental crust. The space-time-volume records of volcanism in LSVFs are therefore assumed to mirror the accumulation record of the associated upper crustal batholith. However, key questions about the link between the volcanic and plutonic realms remain to be addressed if this view is to be substantiated. Among these are: 1) What does the surface pattern of volcanism really tell us about the development of the plutonic system below? Do these eruptions represent evacuation from a distinct batch of magma that formed just prior to eruption or do they represent the periodic tapping of a long lived regional magma body? 2) What does the cyclicity of the large caldera systems and the regional concordance of eruptions tell us about the development of the magmatic systems beneath? Does the repose period represent the time scale of development of the next magma batch or does the erupted magma develop in a timescale much shorter than the repose period? 3) What does the self-organization of single batholithic scale magmatic systems, for instance the development of a zoned system, tell us about the dynamics and time scales over which these systems differentiate and evolve? We are addressing some of these questions in the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex of the Central Andes. Here, time scales of assembly and organization of batholith-scale silicic magma systems investigated using 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb in zircon connote: 1) Supereruptions in the APVC evacuated distinct magma batches that accumulated within a few hundred thousand years prior to eruption 2) The repose period of cyclic supervolcanic systems is considerably longer than the time scale to develop the next eruptible magma batch 3) Batholith scale-silicic magma chambers can develop significant zonations in time scales of a few hundred thousand years. Additionally, our data suggest quasi

  14. Diffuse degassing through magmatic arc crust (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. E.; Ingebritsen, S.

    2013-12-01

    The crust of magmatic arcs plays an important role in the volatile cycle at convergent margins. The fluxes of subduction- and arc-related volatiles such as H2O, C, Cl, S are poorly known. It is commonly believed that gases emitted from volcanoes account nearly quantitatively for the volatiles that cross the Moho beneath the volcanic front. This volcanic degassing may occur during eruption, emission from summit fumaroles and hot springs, or more 'diffuse' delivery to volcano flanks. However, several observations suggest that volatiles also transit arc crust by even more diffuse pathways, which could account for significant volatile loss on long time and length scales. Active metamorphism of arc crust produces crustal-scale permeability that is sufficient to transport a large volume of subducted volatiles (Ingebritsen and Manning, 2002, PNAS, 99, 9113). Arc magmas may reach volatile saturation deeper than the maximum depths recorded by melt inclusions (e.g., Blundy et al., 2010, EPSL, 290, 289), and exhumed sections of magmatic arc crust typically record voluminous plutons reflecting magma crystallization and volatile loss at depths well below the volcanic edifice. At shallower depths, topographically driven meteoric groundwater systems can absorb magmatic volatiles and transport them laterally by tens of km (e.g., James et al., 1999, Geology, 27, 823; Evans et al., 2002, JVGR, 114, 291). Hydrothermal ore deposits formed at subvolcanic depths sequester vast amounts of volatiles, especially sulfur, that are only returned to the surface on the time scale of exhumation and/or erosion. Water-rich metamorphic fluids throughout the crust can readily carry exsolved volcanic gases because the solubilities of volatile bearing minerals such as calcite, anhydrite, and fluorite are quite high at elevated pressure and temperature (e.g., Newton and Manning, 2002, Am Min, 87, 1401; 2005, J Pet, 46, 701; Tropper and Manning, 2007, Chem Geol, 242, 299). Taken together, these

  15. Neutron production in deuterium gas-puff z-pinch with outer plasma shell at current of 3 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cikhardt, J.; Klir, D.; Rezac, K.; Cikhardtova, B.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Sila, O.; Shishlov, A. V.; Cherdizov, R. K.; Frusov, F. I.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Labetsky, A. Yu.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Dudkin, G. N.; Garapatsky, A. A.; Padalko, V. N.; Varlachev, V. A.; Turek, K.; Krasa, J.

    2015-11-01

    Z-pinch experiments at the current of about 3 MA were carried out on the GIT-12 generator. The outer plasma shell of deuterium gas-puff was generated by the system of 48 plasma guns. This configuration exhibits a high efficiency of the production of DD fusion neutrons with the yield of above 1012 neutrons produced in a single shot with the duration of about 20 ns. The maximum energy of the neutrons produced in this pulse exceeded 30 MeV. The neutron radiation was measured using scintillation TOF detectors, CR-39 nuclear track detectors, bubble detectors BD-PND and BDS-10000 and by several types of nuclear activation detectors. These diagnostic tools were used to measure the anisotropy of neutron fluence and neutron energy spectra. It allows us to estimate the total number of DD neutrons, the contribution of other nuclear reactions, the amount of scattered neutrons, and other parameters of neutron production. This work was supported by the MSMT grants LH13283, LD14089.

  16. Zircon ages of metamorphic and magmatic rocks within peridotite-bearing mélanges: Crucial time constraints on early Carboniferous extensional tectonics in the Chinese Tianshan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Ping; Kröner, Alfred; Jahn, Bor-ming; Liu, Dunyi; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Yuruo; Ma, Huadong

    2013-07-01

    We dated and geochemically characterized peridotite-bearing mélanges in the Chinese South Tianshan and within the Main Tianshan Shear Zone. The Yushugou-Tonghuashan mélange in the Chinese South Tianshan exposes a tectonic juxtaposition of a diapirically emplaced metaperidotite (predominantly lherzolite) massif with a high-grade metamorphic terrane (ca. 10 km long; protolith age ≥ ca. 445-466 Ma). Metamorphic zircons of a mafic granulite (εNd(t) = 5.0) yielded a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 341 ± 8 Ma that we interpret as the time of granulite-facies metamorphism. The youngest zircon rims of an intermediate granulite (εNd(t) = - 4.3) have a mean age of 332 ± 13 Ma that records a retrogressive metamorphic event. These ages determine the timing (ca. 341-332 Ma) of mantle diapirism through continental crust. A dolerite dike (εNd(t) = 2.3) emplaced into metaperidote has a crystallization age of 335 ± 5 Ma, that, on the basis of geochemistry, we interpret as representing E-MORB-OIB magmatism that accompanied mantle diapirism. An undeformed pink granite (εNd(t) = - 3.6) intrudes the mélange matrix and has an emplacement age of 324 ± 5 Ma, thus providing an upper time limit for a tectonic movement that led to mélange formation. The older time limit of deformation (ca. 362-352 Ma) is constrained by the youngest ages of thermo-tectonically modified zircons in a mylonitized metagabbro and a foliated meta-andesite. Magmatic zircons in the meta-andesite (εNd(t) = - 3.3) and a dacite (εNd(t) = - 5.6) have eruption ages of 433 ± 4 Ma and 435 ± 3 Ma that date formation of the mélange matrix. A microgabbro dike (εNd(t) = 10.0) cutting metasediments (i.e. mélange matrix) has an emplacement age of 279 ± 3 Ma and contains abundant zircon xenocrysts ranging in age from Archean to late Paleozoic. Similarly, a dolerite dike, a meta-andesite, an intermediate granulite, and a metagabbro all contain inherited Precambrian to Paleozoic zircons. We accordingly conclude

  17. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA potentiates purvalanol-induced apoptosis in Bax deficient HCT 116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coker-Gurkan, Ajda; Arisan, Elif Damla; Obakan, Pinar; Guvenir, Esin; Unsal, Narcin Palavan

    2014-10-15

    The purine-derived analogs, roscovitine and purvalanol are selective synthetic inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) induced cell cycle arrest and lead to apoptotic cell death in various cancer cells. Although a number of studies investigated the molecular mechanism of each CDK inhibitor on apoptotic cell death mechanism with their therapeutic potential, their regulatory role on autophagy is not clarified yet. In this paper, our aim was to investigate molecular mechanism of CDK inhibitors on autophagy and apoptosis in wild type (wt) and Bax deficient HCT 116 cells. Exposure of HCT 116 wt and Bax(-/-) cells to roscovitine or purvalanol for 24h decreased cell viability in dose-dependent manner. However, Bax deficient HCT 116 cells were found more resistant against purvalanol treatment compared to wt cells. We also established that both CDK inhibitors induced apoptosis through activating mitochondria-mediated pathway in caspase-dependent manner regardless of Bax expression in HCT 116 colon cancer cells. Concomitantly, we determined that purvalanol was also effective on autophagy in HCT 116 colon cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA treatment enhanced the purvalanol induced apoptotic cell death in HCT 116 Bax(-/-) cells. Our results revealed that mechanistic action of each CDK inhibitor on cell death mechanism differs. While purvalanol treatment activated apoptosis and autophagy in HCT 116 cells, roscovitine was only effective on caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Another important difference between two CDK inhibitors, although roscovitine treatment overcame Bax-mediated drug resistance in HCT 116 cells, purvalanol did not exert same effect. PMID:25088259

  18. Magmatic evolution of the Austral Patagonian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, V. A.; Niemeyer, H.; Skarmeta, J.; Mun˜oz, J.

    1982-11-01

    New geological evidence and geochronological data obtained within the Patagonian Cordillera between Lat. 47° and 49°S, allow the redefinition of an Andean region with different and characteristic geological evolution compared to the adjacent segments. An acidic Middle Jurassic volcanism covered a "metamorphic basement" formed by low-grade metasediments and metabasites of Upper Paleozoic age. Dike swarms of basic alkaline rocks were emplaced since the Cretaceous in a marginal basin developed on the Jurassic sialic crust. The outcrop density of such bodies seems to indicate an attenuation of the sialic crust, towards the south, where oceanic crust of Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous age floored the marginal basin. The Cretaceous volcanic activity is well developed in the adjacent sectors, but almost absent in the studied segment. Several magmatic pulses lead to the final emplacement of the Patagonian batholith which yields its peak activity around 98 m.y. and presents typical geochemical variations. The Upper Cretaceous and Cenozoic magmatism are mainly exposed to the east of the cordillera and are represented by a series of alkali plateau basalts. Different pulses of activity have been recorded during Eocene, Upper Miocene, Pliocene and even during Quaternary times, associated with deep crustal fractures and probable upper-mantle origin, as evidenced by the low 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios and the ultramafic and mafic xenoliths of the lavas. Granitic stocks in the Andean domain are post-orogenic in relation to a compressive tectonic phase during Miocene times. The Upper Cenozoic calc-alkaline volcanism presents a gap in this segment of the Andean belt, probably related with the post-Miocene migration of the Chile rise.

  19. Similar and Contrasting Response of Rifting and Transtension in the Gulf of California and Walker Lane to Preceding Arc Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, C. D.; Faulds, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    magnitudes of total slip across different parts. Despite the progressive migration of the MTJ, arc magmatism ceased abruptly at the latitude of Lake Tahoe (39.2°) at about 3 Ma, and the southern end of the active Cascade arc jumped ~160 km northward to Lassen Peak (40.5°), where it remains. Geologic data indicate strike-slip faulting began between these two areas immediately following the end of arc magmatism. The southern Cascade arc is undergoing ~east-west extension, which was the case for the northern Walker Lane immediately before strike-slip faulting began. Further progression or steps in magmatism and strike-slip faulting will likely follow further northward migration of the MTJ.

  20. Magmatic Evolution 2. A New View of Post-Differentiation Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Neal, C. R.; Gaddis, L. R.; Jolliff, B. L.; Bell, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Numerous missions, new state-of-the-art sample measurements, new lunar samples (meteorites), and sophisticated modeling have provided a new perspective on lunar magmatism. We use these new observations to expand our understanding of lunar magmatism.

  1. Time scales of pulsatory magmatic construction and solidification in Miocene subvolcanic magma systems, Eldorado Mountains, Nevada (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. S.; Miller, C. F.; Cates, N. L.; Wooden, J. L.; Means, M. A.; Ericksen, S.

    2004-05-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution geochronology applied to volcanic rocks have illuminated residence times of magma in subvolcanic magma chambers, and thereby provided valuable constraints on the evolution of upper crustal magmatic systems. Subvolcanic plutons record an important complementary physical and temporal record of magma processing and solidification of shallowly emplaced magma bodies. Our detailed field, geochemical, and isotopic investigations of the Miocene Aztec Wash and Searchlight plutons (Eldorado Mountains, Nevada) have shown that both systems experienced mafic and felsic input, both solidified primarily by vertical accumulation of solidified products, and both were vented during their life spans. However, the final captured records are different in that Searchlight is dominated by relatively homogeneous felsic cumulates, whereas Aztec Wash records repeated input and mingling of mafic and felsic magmas. New in situ ion microprobe U/Pb dating (Stanford/USGS SHRIMP-RG) of zircon (partially corroborated by U/Pb TIMS), combined with our earlier and ongoing field and isotopic studies, now reveal clear differences in the magmatic life spans and lifecycles of the two systems. U/Pb ion probe ages of 123 zircon spots from 5 samples from Aztec Wash document 200 ky of construction. Three samples from the lower middle part of the pluton are all 15.8 Ma (1σ ) errors for individual samples ~0.15 Ma; MSWD's ~1.0), and a single sample at the top is 15.6±0.2 Ma (MSWD 0.3); a late dike is 15.5±0.1 Ma (MSWD 1.0). Ages from 136 spots from 6 samples from the Searchlight pluton record 2 million years of construction (all age errors are 1σ )). The oldest dated unit is a mafic pod from lower Searchlight pluton that yielded a 206Pb/238U age of 17.7±0.3 Ma (MSWD 0.6). A granite from a thick felsic sheet in the interior of Searchlight pluton, interpreted to be the last material to crystallize, yielded a 206Pb/238U age of 16.2±0.2 (MSWD 3.5), but has a distinct 15

  2. Uranium Series Accessory Crystal Dating of Magmatic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Axel K.

    2011-05-01

    Complex and protracted crystallization histories over geologic timescales are recorded in accessory minerals (e.g., zircon, allanite). Although magmatic crystallization was traditionally assumed to occur essentially instantaneously for the purposes of interpreting mineral geochronometers with low absolute time resolution for ancient samples, it emerged relatively recently that magmatic crystallization can occur over extended durations. This discovery arose from applying high-spatial-resolution accessory mineral dating techniques for uranium series isotopes to young volcanic and cognate plutonic rocks. The emerging pattern from these studies is that individual crystals and crystal populations record crystallization episodes lasting from <1,000 to many hundreds of thousands of years. Accessory mineral dating of volcanic rocks and cognate plutonic xenoliths opens new research avenues for crystal age fingerprinting that correlates pyroclastic deposits, lavas, and plutonic rocks by using characteristic age distributions. It also provides direct observations on magmatic accumulation and residence times, and the preeruptive configuration of subterraneous magma bodies and intrusive complexes with implications for the forecasting of volcanic eruptions. Awareness of potentially protracted crystallization in igneous rocks should guide the interpretation of accessory mineral ages.

  3. Late Miocene to Quaternary Transition in Magmatism and Tectonics, Sierra Nevada - Basin and Range Boundary, Northern California-Western Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytulak, J.; Cousens, B. L.; Henry, C. D.

    2001-12-01

    During the late Miocene and early Pliocene, the Ancestral Cascades Arc (ARC) in northern CA and western NV shut off as the Mendocino triple junction migrated northward. At the same time, Basin and Range extension migrated westward into the Sierra Nevada block, with major episodes at 12 and 3 Ma. These tectonic events are reflected in a complex transition in magmatic composition and style. We are using geochemical, isotopic, and 40Ar/39Ar data to evaluate magma petrogenesis, the timing of volcanism, and the relationship between volcanism and tectonism in this poorly understood region of Mio-Pliocene arc volcanism. The ARC erupted highly porphyritic, pyroxene- or hornblende-plagioclase andesites to dacites, termed the Kate Peak Formation, from numerous stratovolcano complexes over basement rocks of the Sierra Nevada Batholith. Our new and published dating indicate activity from \\sim16 to 4 Ma. Immediately west of Reno, sequences dominated by poorly-phyric, olivine- and pyroxene-basaltic andesite, commonly termed Lousetown Formation, began to erupt as early as 10 Ma and continued to \\sim1 Ma. Early episodes, at 10.3 and 4 Ma, were contemporaneous with continued arc magmatism. Further, post-arc mafic volcanism continued in the area north of Lake Tahoe between 2.9 and 1.2 Ma. Although the change from hydrous intermediate rocks to \\sim anhydrous mafic rocks suggests a fundamental change in magmatic sources and tectonic setting, the mafic rocks have normalized incompatible element patterns and radiogenic isotope compositions that include a strong subduction component that is virtually indistinguishable from that in ARC intermediate lavas. Thus mafic and intermediate magmas, including post-arc magmas, share a common, fluid-modified, mantle wedge source. Additionally, the timing of mafic magmatism coincides only imprecisely with extension. No mafic magmas erupted before the beginning of extension at any location, but the earliest activity followed extension by \\sim2Ma

  4. Timing of magmatism and migmatization in the 2.0-1.8 Ga accretionary Svecokarelian orogen, south-central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Åke; Stephens, Michael B.

    2016-07-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic (2.0-1.8 Ga) Svecokarelian orogen in central Sweden consists of a low-pressure, predominantly medium-grade metamorphic domain (central part of Bergslagen lithotectonic unit), enclosed to the north and south by low-pressure migmatite belts. Two periods of metamorphism (1.87-1.85 and 1.83-1.79 Ga) are known in the migmatite belts. In this study, new U-Th-Pb ion microprobe data on zircon and monazite from twelve samples of locally migmatized gneisses and felsic intrusive bodies determine both protolith and metamorphic ages in four sample areas north of Stockholm, inside or immediately adjacent to the medium-grade metamorphic domain. Two orthogneiss samples from the Rimbo area yield unusually old protolith ages of 1909 ± 4 and 1908 ± 4 Ma, while three orthogneisses from the Skutskär and Forsmark areas yield more typical protolith ages between 1901 ± 3 and 1888 ± 3 Ma. Migmatized paragneiss samples from this and two earlier studies contain a significant detrital component sourced from this 1.9 Ga magmatic suite. They are interpreted to be deposited contemporaneously with or shortly after this magmatism. Migmatization of the paragneiss at Rimbo was followed by intrusion of leucogranite at 1846 ± 3 Ma. Even in the other sample areas to the north (Hedesunda-Tierp, Skutskär and Forsmark), metamorphism including migmatization is constrained to the 1.87-1.85 Ga interval and penetrative ductile deformation is limited by earlier studies in the Forsmark area to 1.87-1.86 Ga. However, apart from a metamorphic monazite age of 1863 ± 1 Ma, precise ages were not possible to obtain due to the presence of only partially reset recrystallized domains in zircon, or highly discordant U-rich metamict and altered metamorphic rims. Migmatization was contemporaneous with magmatic activity at 1.87-1.84 Ga in the Bergslagen lithotectonic unit involving a mantle-derived component, and there is a spatial connection between migmatization and this magmatic phase in the

  5. Geology and age of mafic magmatism on Jeannette Island (De Long archipelago)—Implications for paleotectonic reconstructions for the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matushkin, N. Yu.; Metelkin, D. V.; Vernikovsky, V. A.; Travin, A. V.; Zhdanova, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the first data on the geology of a series of mafic dikes emplaced in the volcanogenic sedimentary sequence composing the structure of Jeannette Island. We show that the island hosts two generations of dikes consisting of fine-grained dolerites. Both magmatic stages were followed by fold deformations. The youngest and weakly deformed dikes are none the less chloritized and serpentinized. However, we were able to obtain the first ever precise geochronological 40Ar/39Ar data for them. According to this analysis, the emplacement age of the intrusive complex of Jeannette Island is close to the Ediacaran (553.6 ± 10.3 Ma). The ages of several superimposed tectonothermal events were determined: Middle Ordovician (463.3 ± 11.7 Ma), Late Silurian (425.3 ± 8.7 Ma), Late Devonian (360.7 ± 8.3 Ma) and Early Carboniferous (341.3 ± 6.8 Ma).

  6. Magmatic and tectonic modification of convergent margins: An example from southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farris, David W.

    strike variations in pluton chemistry, spacing and thermal characteristics can be explained by oblique-ridge subduction along a curved continental margin. Inland, arc magmatism exhibits a flare-up in activity that tracks eastward migration of magmatism in the forearc, but precedes it by 1-3 Ma.

  7. Autophagy in human skin squamous cell carcinoma: Inhibition by 3-MA enhances the effect of 5-FU-induced chemotherapy sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Li; Wang, Jianli

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular multi-step catabolic degradation process that involves the degradation and recycling of cellular proteins and cytoplasmic damaged organelles to maintain cellular homeostasis and reduction of metabolic stress. Numerous studies have indicated the importance of autophagy in cancer, but the role of autophagy in human skin squamous cell carcinoma (SSCC) development and response to therapy it is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of autophagy in SSCC and the relationship with chemotherapy sensitivity. The present study demonstrated that autophagy related gene the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) expression was low in SSCC. The negative correlation with Bcl2 and survivin, and the chemotherapy drug 5-FU increased the level of autophagy and the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA inhibited this effect in SSCC cells, time- and dose-dependently. When SSCC cells were treated first with 3-MA and then with 5-FU, the inhibition of proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis of SSCC cells was enhanced. Our results suggested the possibility of autophagy as a potential target in SSCC therapy and 3-MA and 5-FU combination treatment may be an effective SSCC therapy via autophagy modulating. PMID:26398820

  8. Paleoproterozoic postcollisional magmatic belt of the southern Siberian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salnikova, E. B.; Larin, A. M.; Kotov, A. B.; Levitsky, V. I.; Reznitsky, L. Z.; Kovach, V. P.; Yakovleva, S. Z.

    2003-04-01

    Paleoproterozoic time is characterized by large-scale collisional and postcollisional magmatic activity evidenced in the most of ancient cratons. This global event is related to the Arctic supercontinent assemblage (Rogers, 1996). The formation of postcollisional magmatic belt at 1.9-1.8 Ga within the south-west flanking of the Siberian craton is a remarkable example of these processes happened during overall lithospheric convergence. This belt is extends for about 3000 km from the southern Enisey ridge at the west to the central Aldan shield at the east. Within the central Aldan shield the latest collisional event occurred 1925+/-5 Ma (Kotov et al, 2003) and post-collisional subalkaline S- and I-type granites emplaced at 1916+/-10 Ma (Bibikova et al., 1989), 1901+/-1 Ma (Frost et al., 1998) and 1899+/-6 Ma (Kotov et al, 2003). However at the southern Olekma terrain (western Aldan shield) the syncollisional granites have formed at 1906+/-4 Ma and postcollisional Kodar granitoids were generated at 1876-1873 Ma (Larin et al., 2000). The is a tendency outlined in timing of postcollision processes to the west (in modern coordinates). Ages of postcollisional Kevakta granitoid plutons (1846+/-8 Ma) and volcanics of North-Baikal volcano-plutonic belt (1869+/-6 Ma 1856+/-3 Ma), Baikal folded area, support this tendency. Emplacement of the Primorsky complex postcollisional rapakivi-type granitoids (southern Baikal lake) occurred at 1859+/-16 Ma (Donskaya et al., 2002). New results of U-Pb single zircon and baddeleyite dating demonstrate that formation of late-synkinematic syenite, charnockite and pegmatitic veins (1856±12 Ma, 1853±20 Ma) and calciphyre (1868±2 Ma) within the eastern part of the Sharyzhalgay block (southern Baikal lake) occurred virtually within the same episode. Postcollisional intrusive charnockite of the Shumikha complex from the western Sharyzhalgay block dated at 1861±1 Ma (Donskaya et al., 2001) and 1871±17 Ma (Levitsky et al., 2002). Subalcaline

  9. Seismogenic frictional melting in the magmatic column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K.-U.; De Angelis, S.; Ferk, A.; Gaunt, H. E.; Dingwell, D. B.; Leonhardt, R.

    2013-10-01

    Lava dome eruptions subjected to high extrusion rates commonly evolve from endogenous to exogenous growth and limits to their structural stability hold catastrophic potential as explosive eruption triggers. In the conduit, strain localisation in magma, accompanied by seismogenic failure, marks the onset of brittle magma ascent dynamics. The rock record of exogenous dome structures preserves vestiges of cataclastic processes (Cashman et al., 2008; Kennedy and Russell, 2011) and of thermal anomalies (Kendrick et al., 2012), key to unravelling subsurface processes. Here, a combined structural, thermal and magnetic investigation of a shear band crosscutting a large block erupted in 2010 at Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) reveals evidence of faulting and frictional melting within the magmatic column. The mineralogy of this pseudotachylyte vein offers confirmation of complete recrystallisation with an isothermal remanent magnetisation signature that typifies local electric currents in faults. The pseudotachylyte presents an impermeable barrier, which is thought to have influenced the degassing pathway. Such melting events may be linked to the step-wise extrusion of magma accompanied by repetitive long-period (LP) drumbeat seismicity at SHV (Neuberg et al., 2006). Frictional melting of SHV andesite in a high velocity rotary shear apparatus highlights the small slip distances (< 15 cm) required to bring 800 °C magma to melting point at upper conduit stress conditions (10 MPa). We conclude that frictional melting is an inevitable consequence of seismogenic, conduit-dwelling magma fracture during dome building eruptions and that it may have an important influence on magma ascent dynamics.

  10. Seismogenic frictional melting in the magmatic column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K.-U.; De Angelis, S.; Ferk, A.; Gaunt, H. E.; Meredith, P. G.; Dingwell, D. B.; Leonhardt, R.

    2014-04-01

    Lava dome eruptions subjected to high extrusion rates commonly evolve from endogenous to exogenous growth and limits to their structural stability hold catastrophic potential as explosive eruption triggers. In the conduit, strain localisation in magma, accompanied by seismogenic failure, marks the onset of brittle magma ascent dynamics. The rock record of exogenous dome structures preserves vestiges of cataclastic processes and thermal anomalies, key to unravelling subsurface processes. Here, a combined structural, thermal and magnetic investigation of a shear band crosscutting a large block erupted in 2010 at Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) reveals evidence of faulting and frictional melting within the magmatic column. The mineralogy of this pseudotachylyte vein offers confirmation of complete recrystallisation, altering the structure, porosity and permeability of the material, and the magnetic signature typifies local electric currents in faults. Such melting events may be linked to the step-wise extrusion of magma accompanied by repetitive long-period (LP) drumbeat seismicity at SHV. Frictional melting of Soufrière Hills andesite in a high velocity rotary shear apparatus highlights the small slip distances (< 15 cm) thought to be required to bring 800 °C magma to melting point at upper conduit stress conditions (10 MPa). We conclude that frictional melting is a common consequence of seismogenic magma fracture during dome building eruptions and that it may govern the ascent of magma in the upper conduit.

  11. Magmatic epidote and its petrologic significance

    SciTech Connect

    Zen, A.; Hammarstrom, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    Epidote is a major magmatic mineral in tonalite and granodiorite in a belt coextensive with the Mesozoic accreted terranes between northern California and southeastern Alaska. Textural and chemical evidence indicates that epidote crystallized as a relatively late but magmatic mineral that formed through reaction with hornblende in the presence of a melt phase. The observed relations concur with experimental data on crystallization of epidote from synthetic granodiorite at 8 kbar total pressure. Plutonic rocks bearing magmatic epidote must have formed under moderately high pressures, corresponding to lower crustal depths, under fairly oxidizing conditions. 23 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  12. Mid-Tertiary magmatism of the Toquima caldera complex and vicinity, Nevada: development of explosive high-K, calc-alkaline magmas in the central Great Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boden, David R.

    1994-04-01

    granodioritic stock and a northeast-trending dike swarm at 37 34 Ma. The dikes are broadly bimodal assemblage of silicic andesite and rhyolite. Voluminous ash-flow-tuff magmatism commenced at 32.3 Ma and persisted for ˜9 m.y. without eruption of intermediate to mafic magmas (<62 wt% SiO2). As such, the TCC is probably a remnant of a more extensive complex of calderas whose identities are obscured by recurrent volcanism and by late Tertiary basin-range block faulting. The change from small-volume, broadly bimodal volcanism to voluminous outpourings of silicic magma is similar to that which occurred in east-central Nevada, where magmatism and rapid crustal extension overlapped in space and time. Although supracrustal extension at the time of formation of the TCC apears limited, the comparable magmatic histories and compositional characteristics of rocks erupted from east-central Nevada and the TCC suggest that fundamentally similar magmatic processes acted at depth and that extension may have been more pronounced in the lower and middle crust below the TCC and vicinity. Because strain is partitioned heterogeneously in the upper crust, the magmatic record, rather than surface structural features, may reflect better the actual state of crustal stress during volcanism. Mid-Tertiary magmatism in the TCC and vicinity probably began with intrusion of mantle-derived basalt into the lower crust, which led to crustal heating, local partial melting of crustal rocks, and intrusion of rhyolitic melts and contaminated basaltic differentiates (alkalirich andesite) into the upper crust. With time, intrusion to extrusion ratios increased as silicic melts retarded the rise of mafic magmas and mixing between mafic magmas and crustal partial melts occurred. The oxidized, water-rich, and low-temperature nature of these magmas reflects protracted crustal residence and interaction prior to eruption. The resulting hybridized and differentiated magmas ultimately erupted to form extensive deposits of

  13. Cryogenian alkaline magmatism in the Southern Granulite Terrane, India: Petrology, geochemistry, zircon U-Pb ages and Lu-Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosh, M.; Yang, Qiong-Yan; Ram Mohan, M.; Tsunogae, T.; Shaji, E.; Satyanarayanan, M.

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Granulite Terrane (SGT) in India preserves the records of the formation and recycling of continental crust from Mesoarchean through Paleoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic and Cambrian, involving multiple subduction-accretion-collision associated with major orogenic cycles. A chain of unmetamorphosed and undeformed alkaline magmatic intrusions occurs along the northern margin of the SGT aligned along paleo-suture zones. Here we investigate two representative plutons from this suite, the Angadimogar syenite (AM) and the Peralimala alkali granite (PM) through field, petrological, geochemical, zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf studies. Magma mixing and mingling textures and mineral assemblages typical of alkaline rocks are displayed by these plutons. The whole-rock major and trace element data characterize their alkaline nature. In trace element discrimination diagrams, the AM rocks straddle between the VAG (volcanic-arc granites) and WPG (within plate granites) fields with most of the samples confined to the VAG field, whereas the PM rocks are essentially confined to the WPG field. The diversity in some of the geochemical features between the two plutons is interpreted to be the reflection of source heterogeneities. Most zircon grains from the AM and PM plutons display oscillatory zoning typical of magmatic crystallization although some grains, particularly those from the PM pluton, show core-rim structures with dark patchy zoned cores surrounded by irregular thin rims resulting from fluid alteration. The weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of the magmatic zircons from three samples of the AM syenite are in the range of 781.8 ± 3.8 Ma to 798 ± 3.6 Ma and those from two samples of the PM alkali granite yield ages of 797.5 ± 3.7 Ma and 799 ± 6.2 Ma. A mafic magmatic enclave from the AM pluton shows weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 795 ± 3.3 Ma. The AM and PM plutons also carry rare xeneocrystic zircons which define upper intercept concordia ages of 3293 ± 13 Ma and 2530

  14. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. PMID:17796685

  15. Devonian-Ordovician Magmatism in Chiapas Massif, Southern Maya Block, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompa-Mera, V.; Schaaf, P.; Weber, B.; Solis-Pichardo, G.; Hernandez-Trevino, T.; Ortega-Gutierrez, F.

    2008-12-01

    body together with a Sm-Nd garnet age of 474+/-24 Ma and an U-Pb single grain zircon age of 482+/-3 Ma from a S type granite body. From a close by amphibolite unit we obtained an age of 456+/-14 Ma (U-Pb, single grain zircons). These ages represent a key tool for understanding the old assemblage between the crustal blocks at the Maya-Chortís boundary during Paleozoic times focusing the tectonic scenario, temporal rock relationships, metamorphic conditions and magma emplacement mechanisms.

  16. Magmatism and the Shallowing of the Chilean Flatslab in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The magmatic history of the flatslab region between the Central and Southern Andean volcanic zones reflects shallowing of the slab, lithospheric thinning, narrowing of the asthenospheric wedge, crustal thickening and forearc removal by subduction erosion. Newly revised contours on the northern margin of the modern flatslab (Mulcahy et al. 2014) show the flattest part extends from ~28° to 33°S and is bounded by Pleistocene volcanic activity. An eastward broadening of the magmatic arc began after 18 Ma as westward drift of South America accelerated, but the most distinctive retroarc magmatism occurred after near normal subduction of the southward drifting Juan Fernandez Ridge began at ~11 Ma and ended as magmatism ceased in the Pampean ranges, ~ 700 km east of the trench at ~4.7 Ma. Recent seismic work in the retroarc area indicate a ~60 km thick crust under the Precordillera fold-thrust belt with transitions at ~20 and ~40 km that are considered to be the top of crystalline basement and an eclogitic facies transition. Chemical constraints from ~15-7 Ma magmatic rocks suggest eclogization is related to crustal thickening over the shallowing slab in accord with field relations for major thrusting in the region by ~8-7 Ma. High Ba/Th ratios in <9 Ma volcanic rocks are interpreted to reflect phengite breakdown in the mantle wedge with the fluids facilitating eclogization of the lower crust. Evidence for mantle melt contributions in the magmas up until ~7 Ma comes from more primitive isotopic values in 1088-1251 Ma amphibolite and granulite facies xenoliths (eNd = 0 to -3; 87Sr/86Sr =704-0.710) than in Miocene volcanic rocks (eNd = 0-1.7; 0.70325-0.70345; zircon eHf ~ 0). From ~8 to 3 Ma, the active volcanic arc front near 28°S and 33°S was translated ~ 40-50 km eastward in a suspected response to forearc removal by subduction erosion. Given the position of the arc and distance to the trench, the same amount of forearc was likely removed in the intervening flatslab

  17. Crystals and Crystals: On the Mythology of Magmatic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B.

    2008-12-01

    The intimate records of the deep functioning of magmatic systems reside in the temporal and spatial records of magma flux, composition and crystal load. The records for a single system are piecemeal: Plutons show good spatial records, but poor temporal records. Volcanoes give through lava sequences good temporal records, but no spatial context. Because of this dichotomy, two, almost mutually exclusive, branches of magmatology have developed, whereas in Nature there is only a single process. The processes envisioned in these schools necessary to deliver the end rock record are distinct. It is our tools and historic perspectives that have steered the science, not the subject itself. Due to this approach an almost mythical conception of how magmas function has become commonplace. The circumvention of this dilemma rests in carefully evaluating the records on hand in the light of a broad understanding of the fundamental mechanics of how magma lives and dies. It is these basic principles that promise to unify plutonic and volcanic evidence to reveal the full nature of magmatism on all scales. The two most basic features of all magmatic processes are the universal presence of solidification fronts and the presence or absence of a crystal cargo. Almost without exception (e.g., shallow pressure quenching) all first generation crystals grow in marginal solidification fronts (SFs) bordering all magmas. The package of isotherms bounded by the liquidus and solidus define SFs, which propagate in response to the rate of cooling. All physical and chemical processes occurring within SFs compete with the advancement or retreat of solidification. SFs are governed by crystallinity regimes: Suspension Zone (<25 % xtals), Capture Front (~25 %), Mush Zone (25-55%), Rigidity Front (~55%; Critical Crystallinity), and Rigid Crust Zone (>55% xtals). Magmas are laced with nuclei that multiply and grow when overtaken. Crystal growth rates are bounded; tiny crystals reside at the front of SFs

  18. Magmatism in rifting and basin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thybo, H.

    2008-12-01

    Whether heating and magmatism cause rifting or rifting processes cause magmatic activity is highly debated. The stretching factor in rift zones can be estimated as the relation between the initial and the final crustal thickness provided that the magmatic addition to the crust is insignificant. Recent research demonstrates substantial magmatic intrusion into the crust in the form of sill like structures in the lowest crust in the presently active Kenya and Baikal rift zones and the DonBas palaeo-rift zone in Ukraine. This result may be surprising as the Kenya Rift is associated with large amounts of volcanic products, whereas the Baikal Rift shows very little volcanism. Identification of large amounts of magmatic intrusion into the crust has strong implications for estimation of stretching factor, which in the case of Baikal Rift Zone is around 1.7 but direct estimation gives a value of 1.3-1.4 if the magmatic addition is not taken into account. This may indicate that much more stretching has taken place on rift systems than hitherto believed. Wide sedimentary basins may form around aborted rifts due to loading of the lithosphere by sedimentary and volcanic in-fill of the rift. This type of subsidence will create wide basins without faulting. The Norwegian- Danish basin in the North Sea area also has subsided gradually during the Triassic without faulting, but only few rift structures have been identified below the Triassic sequences. We have identified several mafic intrusions in the form of large batholiths, typically more than 100 km long, 20-40 km wide and 20 km thick. The associated heating would have lifted the surface by about 2 km, which may have been eroded before cooling. The subsequent contraction due to solidification and cooling would create subsidence in a geometry similar to basins that developed by loading. These new aspects of magmatism will be discussed with regard to rifting and basin formation.

  19. The magmatic history of the Vetas-California mining district, Santander Massif, Eastern Cordillera, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla Figueroa, Luis C.; Bissig, Thomas; Valencia, Víctor; Hart, Craig J. R.

    2013-08-01

    The Vetas-California Mining District (VCMD), located in the central part of the Santander Massif (Colombian Eastern Cordillera), based on U-Pb dating of zircons, records the following principal tectono-magmatic events: (1) the Grenville Orogenic event and high grade metamorphism and migmatitization between ˜1240 and 957 Ma; (2) early Ordovician calc-alkalic magmatism, which was synchronous with the Caparonensis-Famatinian Orogeny (˜477 Ma); (3) middle to late Ordovician post-collisional calc-alkalic magmatism (˜466-436 Ma); (4) late Triassic to early Jurassic magmatism between ˜204 and 196 Ma, characterized by both S- and I-type calc-alkalic intrusions and; (5) a late Miocene shallowly emplaced intermediate calc-alkaline intrusions (10.9 ± 0.2 and 8.4 ± 0.2 Ma). The presence of even younger igneous rocks is possible, given the widespread magmatic-hydrothermal alteration affecting all rock units in the area. The igneous rocks from the late Triassic-early Jurassic magmatic episodes are the volumetrically most important igneous rocks in the study area and in the Colombian Eastern Cordillera. They can be divided into three groups based on their field relationships, whole rock geochemistry and geochronology. These are early leucogranites herein termed Alaskites-I (204-199 Ma), Intermediate rocks (199-198 Ma), and late leucogranites, herein referred to as Alaskites-II (198-196 Ma). This Mesozoic magmatism is reflecting subtle changes in the crustal stress in a setting above an oblique subduction of the Panthalassa plate beneath Pangea. The lower Cretaceous siliciclastic Tambor Formation has detrital zircons of the same age populations as the metamorphic and igneous rocks present in the study area, suggesting that the provenance is related to the erosion of these local rocks during the late Jurassic or early Cretaceous, implying a local supply of sediments to the local depositional basins.

  20. North Atlantic Current variability through marine isotope stage M2 (circa 3.3 Ma) during the mid-Pliocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Schepper, Stijn; Head, Martin J.; Groeneveld, Jeroen

    2009-12-01

    The mid-Pliocene was an episode of prolonged global warmth and strong North Atlantic thermohaline circulation, interrupted briefly at circa 3.30 Ma by a global cooling event corresponding to marine isotope stage (MIS) M2. Paleoceanographic changes in the eastern North Atlantic have been reconstructed between circa 3.35 and 3.24 Ma at Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 610 and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site 1308. Mg/Ca ratios and δ18O from Globigerina bulloides are used to reconstruct the temperature and relative salinity of surface waters, and dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are used to assess variability in the North Atlantic Current (NAC). Our sea surface temperature data indicate warm waters at both sites before and after MIS M2 but a cooling of ˜2-3°C during MIS M2. A dinoflagellate cyst assemblage overturn marked by a decline in Operculodinium centrocarpum reflects a southward shift or slowdown of the NAC between circa 3.330 and 3.283 Ma, reducing northward heat transport 23-35 ka before the global ice volume maximum of MIS M2. This will have established conditions that ultimately allowed the Greenland ice sheet to expand, leading to the global cooling event at MIS M2. Comparison with an ice-rafted debris record excludes fresh water input via icebergs in the northeast Atlantic as a cause of NAC decline. The mechanism causing the temporary disruption of the NAC may be related to a brief reopening of the Panamanian Gateway at about this time.

  1. Magmatic gas scrubbing: Implications for volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Gerlach, T.M.; Reed, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Despite the abundance of SO2(g) in magmatic gases, precursory increases in magmatic SO2(g) are not always observed prior to volcanic eruption, probably because many terrestrial volcanoes contain abundant groundwater or surface water that scrubs magmatic gases until a dry pathway to the atmosphere is established. To better understand scrubbing and its implications for volcano monitoring, we model thermochemically the reaction of magmatic gases with water. First, we inject a 915??C magmatic gas from Merapi volcano into 25??C air-saturated water (ASW) over a wide range of gas/water mass ratios from 0.0002 to 100 and at a total pressure of 0.1 MPa. Then we model closed-system cooling of the magmatic gas, magmatic gas-ASW mixing at 5.0 MPa, runs with varied temperature and composition of the ASW, a case with a wide range of magmatic-gas compositions, and a reaction of a magmatic gas-ASW mixture with rock. The modeling predicts gas and water compositions, and, in one case, alteration assemblages for a wide range of scrubbing conditions; these results can be compared directly with samples from degassing volcanoes. The modeling suggests that CO2(g) is the main species to monitor when scrubbing exists; another candidate is H2S(g), but it can be affected by reactions with aqueous ferrous iron. In contrast, scrubbing by water will prevent significant SO2(g) and most HCl(g) emissions until dry pathways are established, except for moderate HCl(g) degassing from pH 100 t/d (tons per day) of SO2(g) in addition to CO2(g) and H2S(g) should be taken as a criterion of magma intrusion. Finally, the modeling suggests that the interpretation of gas-ratio data requires a case-by-case evaluation since ratio changes can often be produced by several mechanisms; nevertheless, several gas ratios may provide useful indices for monitoring the drying out of gas pathways. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  2. Rb-Sr and oxygen isotopic study of alkalic rocks from the Trans-Pecos magmatic province, Texas: Implications for the petrogenesis and hydrothermal alteration of continental alkalic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.D.; Malek, D.J.; Dahl, D.A. )

    1988-10-01

    Rb-Sr and O isotopic data for mid-Tertiary alkalic rocks from the Trans-Pecos magmatic province of west Texas demonstrate that hydrothermal alteration and fluid/rock (cation exchange) interactions have affected the isotope geochemistry of these rocks. Strontium and O isotopic data for late-stage minerals in an alkali basalt (hawaiite) still record two episodes of fluid/rock interactions. These data suggest that later meteoric fluids introduced Sr with a Cretaceous marine {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio into minerals with significant cation exchange capacity. Dilute HCl leaching experiments demonstrate the removal of this labile or exchangeable Sr from the alkali basalt. Rb-Sr isotopic data for the leached alkali basalt and handpicked calcite record a crystallization age of 42 Ma, consistent with K-Ar data for an unaltered alkali basalt (hawaiite) dike from the same area (42.6 {plus minus} 1.3 Ma). Leaching experiments on one phonolite suggest the Sr isotopic variability in unleached phonolite and nepheline trachyte samples may be attributed to Sr in secondary calcite and zeolites, which have an upper Cretaceous marine {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio. Rb-Sr isotopic data for leached phonolite and sanidine separate yield an age of 36.5 {plus minus} 0.8 Ma, within analytical uncertainty of a K-Ar biotite age (36.0 {plus minus} 1.1 Ma) of another phonolite. These leaching experiments demonstrate that the Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of hydrothermally-altered continental alkalic rocks may be significantly improved, providing more reliable geochronologic and isotopic tracer information necessary in constructing precise models of mantle sources.

  3. Cretaceous oceanic anoxic event 2 triggered by a massive magmatic episode.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Steven C; Creaser, Robert A

    2008-07-17

    Oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) were episodes of widespread marine anoxia during which large amounts of organic carbon were buried on the ocean floor under oxygen-deficient bottom waters. OAE2, occurring at the Cenomanian/Turonian boundary (about 93.5 Myr ago), is the most widespread and best defined OAE of the mid-Cretaceous. Although the enhanced burial of organic matter can be explained either through increased primary productivity or enhanced preservation scenarios, the actual trigger mechanism, corresponding closely to the onset of these episodes of increased carbon sequestration, has not been clearly identified. It has been postulated that large-scale magmatic activity initially triggered OAE2 (refs 4, 5), but a direct proxy of magmatism preserved in the sedimentary record coinciding closely with the onset of OAE2 has not yet been found. Here we report seawater osmium isotope ratios in organic-rich sediments from two distant sites. We find that at both study sites the marine osmium isotope record changes abruptly just at or before the onset of OAE2. Using a simple two-component mixing equation, we calculate that over 97 per cent of the total osmium content in contemporaneous seawater at both sites is magmatic in origin, a approximately 30-50-fold increase relative to pre-OAE conditions. Furthermore, the magmatic osmium isotope signal appears slightly before the OAE2-as indicated by carbon isotope ratios-suggesting a time-lag of up to approximately 23 kyr between magmatism and the onset of significant organic carbon burial, which may reflect the reaction time of the global ocean system. Our marine osmium isotope data are indicative of a widespread magmatic pulse at the onset of OAE2, which may have triggered the subsequent deposition of large amounts of organic matter. PMID:18633415

  4. Magmatic epidote and its petrologic significance.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zen, E.-A.; Hammarstrom, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three epidote-bearing tonalitic plutons from the North American Cordillera were studied in detail. These three plutons have close petrographic and chemical similarities. Epidote is always euhedral against biotite but shows highly embayed, vermiform contacts with plagioclase and quartz. Rounded to highly embayed hornblendes are enclosed in epidote as well as in magmatic plagioclase. The pistacite content of epidote, atomic Fe3+/(Fe3+ + Al), is approx 23-27%. These and other textural relations, the lack of alteration of minerals, and the involvement of epidote in flow banding show that the epidote is magmatic, crystallized later through reaction with hornblende in the presence of a melt phase. The observed relations agree with experimental data on crystallization of epidote from synthetic granodiorite at 8 kbar total P. Plutonic rocks bearing magmatic epidote must have formed under moderately high P, corresponding with lower crustal depth, under fairly oxidizing conditions.-L.di H.

  5. Evidence of prolonged felsic magmatism within the Karoo large igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurhila, Matti; Romu, Ilona; Mänttäri, Irmeli; Andersen, Tom; Luttinen, Arto

    2015-04-01

    The Karoo large igneous province (LIP) extends from southern Africa to East Antarctica, and marks the onset of rifting of these two continents. The main stage of volcanic activity occurred ~182180 Ma ago, and was mostly mafic in composition. We report new thermal ionization (TIMS) and secondary ion (SIMS) mass spectrometric U-Pb ages on zircon from felsic lavas in Lebombo monocline, southern Mozambique and from granitoid intrusions in Vestfjella, Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. Utpostane granite in southern Vestfjella yields a TIMS age of 180.7±1.5 Ma, complying with the main stage of magmatism in the Karoo LIP. Three rhyolitic beds intercalating mafic volcanic layers of the Lebombo monocline give SIMS ages of 182±3 Ma, 178±3 Ma, and 172±2 Ma, respectively. The zircon in the oldest of these can be divided in two groups: (a) internally homogeneous, low U and Pb zircon and (b) oscillatorily zoned, relatively high U and Pb zircon. The ages of these groups are ~179 Ma and ~184 Ma, respectively, but they overlap within error limits, and thus a combined age for this sample is preferred. Finally, an alkali feldspar granite xenolith from a lamproite dike in Vestfjella has a SIMS age of 165±1 Ma. Lu-Hf isotopes were analyzed from zircons in the 172 Ma rhyolite sample. They show fairly homogeneous Hf isotope composition, with initial ɛHf values between +4 and +10. The corresponding crustal residence ages for the zircons vary between ~300 and ~500 Ma, implying source recycling. In light of the new data it is thus evident that, while most of the Karoo LIP may have emplaced within a short time frame, igneous activity continued for at least ~15 Ma.

  6. Igneous geology of the Carlin trend, Nevada: The importance of Eocene magmatism in gold mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressel, Michael Walter, Jr.

    Igneous rocks of five ages are present in the Carlin trend, Nevada, and include: (1) Paleozoic basalt of the Roberts Mountains allochthon, (2) the Jurassic (˜158 Ma) Goldstrike intrusive complex, which includes the Goldstrike diorite laccolith and abundant dikes and sills, (3) a Cretaceous (112 Ma) granite stock, (4) lavas and intrusions of the Emigrant Pass volcanic field and widespread epizonal plugs and dikes of Eocene (˜40-36 Ma) age that range from rhyolite through basalt, and (5) Miocene (15 Ma) rhyolite lava and tuff. Jurassic and Eocene igneous rocks are by far the most important volumetrically and are spatially associated with nearly all ore deposits of the Carlin trend. This study focuses on the field relations, isotopic dating, and geochemistry of Eocene dikes that intrude sedimentary rocks in many deposits of the Carlin trend, because they are the youngest pre-mineral rocks and have simpler alteration histories than other host rocks. In the Beast, Genesis, Deep Star, Betze-Post, Rodeo-Goldbug, Meikle-Griffin, and Dee-Storm deposits, Eocene dikes are altered, commonly mineralized, and locally constitute ore. Gold-bearing dikes and sedimentary rocks have similar ore mineralogy, including arsenian pyrite, marcasite, and arsenopyrite, with late barite and stibnite. At Beast, as much as half the ore is hosted in a 37.3 Ma rhyolite dike. Post-gold alunite is ˜18.6 Ma. At Meikle and Griffin, porphyritic dacite dikes yield concordant U/Pb zircon and 40Ar/39Ar biotite emplacement ages of ˜39.2 Ma, and illite from the same QSP-altered dacite, with as much 9 ppm Au, yields similar, although imprecise 40Ar/39Ar ages. Thus, gold mineralization at these deposits closely followed emplacement of Eocene dikes. Carlin-type gold deposits in northeastern Nevada have been variously interpreted as partly syngenetic with Paleozoic carbonate rocks, products of Mesozoic contraction and metamorphism with or without significant magmatism, and of Tertiary age and related or

  7. Crystallization ages of the A-type magmatism of the Graciosa Province (Southern Brazil): Constraints from zircon U-Pb (ID-TIMS) dating of coeval K-rich gabbro-dioritic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlach, Silvio R. F.; Siga, Oswaldo; Harara, Ossama M. M.; Gualda, Guilherme A. R.; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Vilalva, Frederico C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Zircon U-Pb (ID-TIMS) ages for gabbro-dioritic rocks and for a monzogranite from the Graciosa Province of A-type granites and syenites, southern Brazil, are presented. Two gabbro-dioritic samples gave concordant ages (580 ± 2, 583 ± 3 Ma), while less precise upper intercept ages were obtained for another one (584 ± 8 Ma) and the monzogranite (585 ± 12 Ma). The best results indicate crystallization ages of the basic-intermediate magmas around 580-583 Ma. Micro-structural evidences and structural relationships between the mafic-intermediate rocks and the much more abundant granites and syenites demonstrate that magmas mingled and partially mixed with one another during emplacement and crystallization. Therefore, the results are representative of the overall magmatism. The extensional A-type magmatism occurred ca. 10-30 Ma after (1) emplacement and crystallization of the high-K calc-alkaline syn- to late-collisional batholiths, (2) peak regional metamorphism, and (3) final amalgamation of the Luis Alves, Curitiba, and Paranaguá terrains. It is suggested that the whole magmatism occurred in a short time interval and there is no evidence of spatial or temporal migration of the magmatic foci. ID-TIMS zircon dating of coeval basic-intermediate rocks may yield better emplacement and crystallization ages than direct dating of granitic and syenitic rocks, which are more susceptible to inheritance and/or late- to post-magmatic disturbances.

  8. New Seismic and Magmatic Constraints on the Geometry and Timing of Shallowing of the Central Andean Chilean-Pampean Flatslab Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, S. M.; Mulcahy, P.; Chen, C.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2013-05-01

    The shape and evolution of the Central Andean Chilean-Pampean flatslab segment provide modern analogues in numerous studies of flatslab segments of subducting oceanic plates. A revised geometry for the Wadati-Benioff Zone of the Chilean-Pampean flatslab that incorporates 271 well-constrained mantle earthquakes recorded during the 2007-2009 southern Puna seismic experiment (25°-28°S; 70°-65°W) shows that the northern boundary of the flatslab shoals more abruptly southward giving a more symmetric form with a more northerly bend to the flatslab than seen in previous models. The prime evidence for a sharper bend to the north comes from the three distinctive earthquake hypocenter clusters at 110 to 160 km, which form the so-called Pipanaco earthquake nest under the region at 27.5° to 29°S and 68° to 66°W, and whose origins can be attributed to local bending stresses in the subducting plate. This northern bend also passes under the Incapillo Caldera arc volcanic complex near 28°S, which is the southernmost center in the Central Volcanic Zone with post-Pliocene activity until reaching the Tupungato in the Southern Volcanic Zone on the southern side of the flat-slab at 33°S. Support for this northern bend forming largely after near normal subduction of the Juan Fernandez ridge began on the Nazca plate in the middle of the shallowing flatslab at ~10 Ma comes from the ~9-3 Ma Pircas Negras glassy andesites and related lavas at 27° to 28°S, whose chemistry and locations have been suggested to reflect the bending. Further support for the flatslab principally forming at this time comes from the ~45-50 km eastward displacements of the volcanic arcs on both the northern and southern margins of the present flat-slab at ~ 9-3 Ma and the magmatic and deformational history recorded above the area of the flat-slab region. At the same time, the Albarracín region ignimbrites in the central Argentine Precordillera above the main part of the flatslab have recently confirmed

  9. The Upper Miocene magmatism of the Island of Elba (Central Italy): compositional characteristics, petrogenesis and implications for the origin of the Tuscany Magmatic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, Giampiero; Peccerillo, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    Late Miocene intrusive magmatism of the Island of Elba, Tuscany (central Italy), consists of stocks, laccoliths, sills, and dikes showing dominant monzogranite and granodiorite compositions, with minor leucogranitic dike-sill complexes, aplites and pegmatites. A few mafic rocks occur as dikes, and as microgranular enclaves hosted inside the main intrusions. The Elba magmatism belongs to the Tuscan Magmatic Province, an 8.5 to 0.3 Ma old association of mafic to felsic rocks, of mantle and crustal origin, cropping out in Tuscany and northern Latium. Major and trace element abundances of Elba rocks are extremely variable, testifying to complex origin and evolutionary history for magmas. 87Sr/86Sr (~ 0.708-0.723) and 143Nd/144Nd (~0.5121-0.5124) are close or within the field of upper continental crust, with mafic dikes showing the lowest Sr- and the highest Nd-isotope ratios. Petrological, geochemical and textural data of Elba igneous rocks are better explained by invoking a leading role for multiple mixing processes between crust-derived felsic magmas and mafic-intermediate melts of ultimate mantle origin, accompanied by fractional crystallisation. Proxies of crustal anatectic melts are represented by some highly radiogenic-Sr rocks from northern Monte Capanne pluton. Crustal magmas were formed by melting of sedimentary rocks, likely metagreywakes, at pressures exceeding 0.3 GPa. Mafic-intermediate magmas have calcalkaline to shoshonitic compositions and originated in an anomalous mantle, moderately contaminated by siliceous sediments. Selective enrichments in Sr, Ba and LREE are shown by some intermediate rocks (Orano dikes), revealing the occurrence of a distinct magma type at Elba. Similar compositions are also observed at Capraia island, San Vincenzo and Campiglia (southern Tuscany), suggesting a regional relevance for this magma type. Sr-Ba-LREE-rich rocks do not show obvious genetic relationships with other Tuscany magmas and may represent a distinct end

  10. The Upper Miocene magmatism of the Island of Elba (Central Italy): compositional characteristics, petrogenesis and implications for the origin of the Tuscany Magmatic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, Giampiero; Peccerillo, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Late Miocene intrusive magmatism of the Island of Elba, Tuscany (central Italy), consists of stocks, laccoliths, sills, and dikes showing dominant monzogranite and granodiorite compositions, with minor leucogranitic dike-sill complexes, aplites and pegmatites. A few mafic rocks occur as dikes, and as microgranular enclaves hosted inside the main intrusions. The Elba magmatism belongs to the Tuscan Magmatic Province, an 8.5 to 0.3 Ma old association of mafic to felsic rocks, of mantle and crustal origin, cropping out in Tuscany and northern Latium. Major and trace element abundances of Elba rocks are extremely variable, testifying to complex origin and evolutionary history for magmas. 87Sr/86Sr (~ 0.708-0.723) and 143Nd/144Nd (~0.5121-0.5124) are close or within the field of upper continental crust, with mafic dikes showing the lowest Sr- and the highest Nd-isotope ratios. Petrological, geochemical and textural data of Elba igneous rocks are better explained by invoking a leading role for multiple mixing processes between crust-derived felsic magmas and mafic-intermediate melts of ultimate mantle origin, accompanied by fractional crystallisation. Proxies of crustal anatectic melts are represented by some highly radiogenic-Sr rocks from northern Monte Capanne pluton. Crustal magmas were formed by melting of sedimentary rocks, likely metagreywakes, at pressures exceeding 0.3 GPa. Mafic-intermediate magmas have calcalkaline to shoshonitic compositions and originated in an anomalous mantle, moderately contaminated by siliceous sediments. Selective enrichments in Sr, Ba and LREE are shown by some intermediate rocks (Orano dikes), revealing the occurrence of a distinct magma type at Elba. Similar compositions are also observed at Capraia island, San Vincenzo and Campiglia (southern Tuscany), suggesting a regional relevance for this magma type. Sr-Ba-LREE-rich rocks do not show obvious genetic relationships with other Tuscany magmas and may represent a distinct end

  11. Simulating the Thermochemical Magmatic and Tectonic Evolution of Venus's Mantle and Lithosphere: Intrusive vs. Extrusive Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, Paul; Armann, Marina

    2013-04-01

    Here we extend the models of [1]. Numerical convection models of the thermochemical evolution of Venus are compared to present-day topography and geoid, recent resurfacing history and surface deformation. The models include melting, magmatism, decaying heat-producing elements, core cooling, realistic temperature-dependent viscosity and either stagnant lid or episodic lithospheric overturn. In [1] it was found that in stagnant lid convection the dominant mode of heat loss is magmatic heat pipe, which requires massive magmatism and produces very thick crust, inconsistent with observations. Partitioning of heat-producing elements into the crust helps but does not help enough. Episodic lid overturn interspersed by periods of quiescence effectively loses Venus's heat while giving lower rates of volcanism and a thinner crust. Calculations predict 5-8 overturn events over Venus's history, each lasting ~150 Myr, initiating in one place and then spreading globally. During quiescent periods convection keeps the lithosphere thin. Magmatism keeps the mantle temperature constant over Venus's history. Crustal recycling occurs by entrainment in stagnant lid convection, and by lid overturn in episodic mode. Venus-like amplitudes of topography and geoid can be produced in either stagnant or episodic modes, with a viscosity profile that is Earth-like but shifted to higher values. The basalt density inversion below the olivine-perovskite transition causes compositional stratification around 730 km; breakdown of this layering increases episodicity but far less than episodic lid overturn. The classical stagnant lid mode with interior temperature rheological temperature scale lower than TCMB is not reached because mantle temperature is controlled by magmatism while the core cools slowly from a superheated start. Core heat flow decreases with time, possibly shutting off the dynamo, particularly in episodic cases. Here we extend [1] by considering intrusive magmatism as an alternative to

  12. Remelting and Remobilization in a Magmatic Arc: the St Peter Suite, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symington, Neil; Weinberg, Roberto; Hasalová, Pavlina

    2014-05-01

    Thermo-mechanical models of magmatic arcs suggest that intermittent intrusion of magma batches should lead to remelting and remobilization of earlier intrusive rocks as a result of fluctuations in temperature and water content. However, examples of remelting and remobilization of earlier intrusive rocks, formed during arc-building, are surprisingly rare. We investigate the evolution of magmatic rocks of the Palaeoproterozoic St Peter Suite, in the Gawler Craton, South Australia. This suite records multiple intrusions, magma hybridization, and the remelting and remobilization of these intrusions to form migmatites and newly-formed leucocratic magmas. In this paper we detail first how multiple magma batches interact with one another as liquids and mushes during syn-magmatic deformation phases, and then detail the nature of migmatites resulting from anatexis of these same magmatic rocks and the resulting channel ways that allowed for magma remobilization. LA-ICP/MS U/Pb zircon dating yielded crystallization ages of 1647±12 Ma for an early diorite-to-granite suite, and 1604±12 Ma for a later magmatic suite of broadly similar composition. Both these suites underwent anatectic events. Titanite from late-formed leucosomes found within D2 shear zones in the older suite, yielded SHRIMP U/Pb age of 1605±7 Ma, within error of the age of the younger suite. We therefore infer that intrusion, crystallization and remelting/remobilization of this younger suite of rocks occurred within 10-15 M.yr. Thus, the St Peter Suite exposures record many of the key processes expected in arcs, including the prediction that early intrusive arc rocks remelt to form younger more fractionated magmas.

  13. Magmatic and metamorphic belts and plutonic-metamorphic complexes of southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Brew, D.A.; Himmelberg, G.R.; Ford, A.B.; Loney, R.A. . Branch of Alaskan Geology Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The Cordilleran orogen in southeastern Alaska includes 24 distinct magmatic belts, ranging in age from Cambrian to Holocene, that are defined by map relations, lithology, age, and chemical composition. The youngest magmatic features are Quaternary-age pre- and post-glacial volcanic rocks that occur in three major fields in the region, as well as in isolated locations. Cenozoic magmatic features consist of four major and three minor belts. The major Tkope-Portland Peninsula belt of Oligocene age includes both volcanic and plutonic rocks. The major calcalkalic Coast Mountains belt of early and middle Eocene age is the single largest magmatic feature of the region. Early Tertiary and latest Cretaceous magmatism is represented by the major calcalkalic great tonalite sill belt, a remarkable long and narrow feature along the west side of the Coast Mountains. Cretaceous and Jurassic intrusive rocks occur in five major belts and two minor belts in the region and Paleozoic intrusive rocks occur in four major and two minor belts. The three major plutonic-metamorphic complexes (PMC), from east to west, are: the Coast PMC in the Coast Mountains; the Glacier Bay-Chichag of plutonic complex (Chugach MC) in the northern outer islands. The Coast PMC records dynamothermal and regional contact metamorphic events related to regional plutonism within several juxtaposed terranes; its lengthy and complicated history is related to the Late Cretaceous collision of the Alexander and Wrangellia terranes and the Gravina overlap assemblage to the west against the Yukon prong and Stikine terrane to the east. The relatively simple Glacier Bay PC history is recorded as the roots of a Late Jurassic through late Early Cretaceous island arc that probably developed during the early stages of the above tectonic event. The complicated Chugach MC history developed during and after the Late Cretaceous collision of the Chugach terrane with the Wrangellia and Alexander terranes.

  14. Magmatic responses to Late Cretaceous through Oligocene tectonic evolution of the western Alaska Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, E.; Jones, J. V., III; Karl, S.; Ayuso, R. A.; Bradley, D. C.; Box, S. E.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    New geochemistry, U/Pb geochronology, and radiogenic isotopes, together with existing datasets, contribute to a refined model of the petrogenetic history of magmatism in the western Alaska Range. Plutons within the study area were emplaced into Kahiltna basin Mesozoic turbiditic strata. The Kahiltna sequence overlies Mesozoic Peninsular oceanic terrane rocks in the SE half of the basin and Proterozoic to Paleozoic Farewell continental terrane rocks to the NW. This study focuses on successive intrusion suites, most of which are thought to intrude Kahiltna or underlying Farewell terrane rocks, but include older, perhaps more deeply exhumed rocks emplaced in Peninsular terrane basement to the SE. The chemically diverse sequence records magmatism associated with major tectonic reorganization events on the southern Alaska circum-Pacific subduction margin. The oldest pluton suite (~100-80 Ma) is mostly intermediate to evolved calcalkaline granite and coincides with final closure of the Kahiltna basin and a regional transition to transpression-dominated tectonics. The post-closure magmatic pulse (~75-67 Ma) is compositionally varied, including primitive subalkaline melts, peraluminous high-K granites, and a subset of sodic, adakite-like granites. A Paleocene (~63-57 Ma) magmatic flare-up follows, dominated by extremely fractionated subalkaline melts. Rare, more primitive melts of this suite are metaluminous, from gabbro to syenite. This stage may represent relaxed melt productivity or shallowing of the slab dip, yielding more laterally diffuse melting. An early Eocene magmatic hiatus precedes middle Eocene circum-Pacific tectonic reorganization, regionally resulting in initiation of proto-Aleutian/Meshik arc magmatism, and locally in the 44-37 Ma emplacement of subalkaline intermediate to felsic plutons associated with andesite to rhyolite volcanic deposits. An Oligocene (~31-25 Ma) magmatic pulse involved emplacement of a compositionally variable suite ranging from

  15. Low-Sulfide PGE ores in paleoproterozoic Monchegorsk pluton and massifs of its southern framing, Kola Peninsula, Russia: Geological characteristic and isotopic geochronological evidence of polychronous ore-magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashchin, V. V.; Bayanova, T. B.; Mitrofanov, F. P.; Serov, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    New U-Pb and Sm-Nd isotopic geochronological data are reported for rocks of the Monchegorsk pluton and massifs of its southern framing, which contain low-sulfide PGE ores. U-Pb zircon ages have been determined for orthopyroxenite (2506 ± 3 Ma) and mineralized norite (2503 ± 8 Ma) from critical units of Monchepluton at the Nyud-II deposit, metaplagioclasite (2496 ± 4 Ma) from PGE-bearing reef at the Vurechuaivench deposit, and host metagabbronorite (2504.3 ± 2.2. Ma); the latter is the youngest in Monchepluton. In the southern framing of Monchepluton, the following new datings are now available: U-Pb zircon ages of mineralized metanorite from the lower marginal zone (2504 ± 1 Ma) and metagabbro from the upper zone (2478 ± 20 Ma) of the South Sopcha PGE deposit, as well as metanorite from the Lake Moroshkovoe massif (2463.1 ± 2.7 Ma). The Sm-Nd isochron (rock-forming minerals, sulfides, whole-rock samples) age of orthopyroxenite from the Nyud-II deposit (2497 ± 36 Ma) is close to results obtained using the U-Pb method. The age of harzburgite from PGE-bearing 330 horizon reef of the Sopcha massif related to Monchepluton is 2451 ± 64 Ma at initial ɛNd =-6.0. The latter value agrees with geological data indicating that this reef was formed due to the injection of an additional portion of high-temperature ultramafic magma, which experienced significant crustal contamination. The results of Sm-Nd isotopic geochronological study of ore-bearing metaplagioclasite from PGE reef of the Vurechuaivench deposit (2410 ± 58 Ma at ɛNd =-2.4) provide evidence for the appreciable effect of metamorphic and hydrothermal metasomatic alterations on PGE ore formation. The Sm-Nd age of mineralized norite from the Nyud-II deposit is 1940 ± 32 Ma at initial ɛNd =-7.8. This estimate reflects the influence of the Svecofennian metamorphism on the Monchepluton ore-magmatic system, which resulted in the rearrangement of the Sm-Nd system and its incomplete closure. Thus, the new

  16. Aspects of the magmatic geochemistry of bismuth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.; Gottfried, D.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1973-01-01

    Bismuth has been determined in 74 rocks from a differentiated tholeiitic dolerite, two calc-alkaline batholith suites and in 66 mineral separates from one of the batholiths. Average bismuth contents, weighted for rock type, of the Great Lake (Tasmania) dolerite, the Southern California batholith and the Idaho batholith are, 32, 50 and 70 ppb respectively. All three bodies demonstrate an enrichment of bismuth in residual magmas with magmatic differentiation. Bismuth is greatly enriched (relative to the host rock) in the calcium-rich accessory minerals, apatite and sphene, but other mineral analyses show that a Bi-Ca association is of little significance to the magmatic geochemistry of bismuth. Most of the bismuth, in the Southern California batholith at least, occurs in a trace mineral phase (possibly sulfides) present as inclusions in the rock-forming minerals. ?? 1973.

  17. The Magellan volcanic and magmatic feature catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Aubele, Jayne C.; Head, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    A catalog summarizing the location and characteristics of 1663 volcanic and magmatic centers identified in Magellan radar images of the surface of Venus is in final preparation to be submitted as a Geological Society of America Special Paper. The following is a brief summary preview of the contents and methods used in assembling the final data set, the organization of the catalog, and other notes of interest to potential users.

  18. East Asia: Seismotectonics, magmatism and mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Yu, Sheng; Ohtani, Eiji

    2011-02-01

    In this article, we review the significant recent results of geophysical studies and discuss their implications on seismotectonics, magmatism, and mantle dynamics in East Asia. High-resolution geophysical imaging revealed structural heterogeneities in the source areas of large crustal earthquakes, which may reflect magma and fluids that affected the rupture nucleation of large earthquakes. In subduction zone regions, the crustal fluids originate from the dehydration of the subducting slab. Magmatism in arc and back-arc areas is caused by the corner flow in the mantle wedge and dehydration of the subducting slab. The intraplate magmatism has different origins. The continental volcanoes in Northeast Asia (such as Changbai and Wudalianchi) seem to be caused by the corner flow in the big mantle wedge (BMW) above the stagnant slab in the mantle transition zone and the deep dehydration of the stagnant slab as well. The Tengchong volcano in Southwest China is possibly caused by a similar process in BMW above the subducting Burma microplate (or Indian plate). The Hainan volcano in southernmost China seems to be a hotspot fed by a lower-mantle plume associated with the Pacific and Philippine Sea slabs' deep subduction in the east and the Indian slab's deep subduction in the west down to the lower mantle. The occurrence of deep earthquakes under the Japan Sea and the East Asia margin may be related to a metastable olivine wedge in the subducting Pacific slab. The stagnant slab finally collapses down to the bottom of the mantle, which may trigger upwelling of hot mantle materials from the lower mantle to the shallow mantle beneath the subducting slabs and cause the slab-plume interactions. Some of these issues, such as the origin of intraplate magmatism, are still controversial, and so further detailed studies are needed from now.

  19. High energy axial ion beam generated by deuterium gas-puff Z-pinch at the current level of 3 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezac, K.; Klir, D.; Kubes, P.; Cikhardt, J.; Batobolotova, B.; Kravarik, J.; Orcikova, H.; Turek, K.; Shishlov, A.; Labetsky, A.; Kokshenev, V.; Ratakhin, N.; GIT-12 Team

    2014-10-01

    The contribution presents results from Z-pinch experiments with a plasma shell on deuterium gas-puff (with deuterium linear mass of about 100 μg/cm) carried out on the GIT-12 generator at IHCE in Tomsk at the current level slightly below 3 MA. The first purpose of experiments was to study the influence of different parameters on the production of neutrons. Neutron yield up to 5 ×1012 neutrons/shot was measured in the shot with LiF catcher. The second purpose was the examination of high-energy ions generated on the Z-pinch axis using RCF and CR-39. Very interesting results were provided by ion pinhole camera, where the influence of magnetic field on the ion beam could be studied. One of the conclusions is that the ions with energy below 10 MeV were significantly deflected by magnetic field. Work supported by MEYS CR research Programs No. ME090871, No. LG13029, by GACR Grant No. P205/12/0454, Grant CRA IAEA No. 17088 and RFBR Grant No. 13-08-00479-a.

  20. The Mount Kozak magmatic complex, Western Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunkaynak, Ş.; Yılmaz, Y.

    1998-10-01

    The Mount Kozak igneous complex is located close to the towns of Ayvalık, Bergama and Burhaniye in the Western Anatolia, Turkey. Magmatic activity occurred during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene, beginning with the emplacement of the Kozak pluton. Sheet intrusive rocks formed around it coevally. They are surrounded by the volcanic rocks, partly contemporaneously with the emplacement of the granitic rocks during the Early Miocene. The Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene magmatic rocks of the Kozak region are represented by a high-K, calc-alkaline suite of predominantly intermediate and acidic composition. Their geochemical characteristics suggest that the magmas are hybrid, and were formed from a similar source, representing mantle-derived magmas, contaminated by crustal materials. The cogenetic plutonic rocks, the hypabyssal rocks and the overlying volcanic associations are related to one another in space and time, and appear to have been connected to a shallow level granitic intrusion in a caldera collapse setting. The calc-alkaline magmatic activity waned during the Middle Miocene. When the volcanism was rejuvenated during the Late Miocene-Pliocene, alkaline basalt lavas were formed as fissure eruptions.

  1. The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.R. Jr.

    1988-05-01

    Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system.

  2. Modelling magmatic gas scrubbing in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Napoli, Rossella; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Valenza, Mariano; Bergsson, Baldur; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Pfeffer, Melissa Anne; Rakel Guðjónsdóttir, Sylvía

    2015-04-01

    In volcano-hosted hydrothermal systems, the chemistry of deeply rising magmatic gases is extensively modified by gas-water-rock interactions taking place within the hydrothermal reservoir, and/or at shallow groundwaters conditions. These reactions can scrub reactive, water-soluble species (S, halogens) from the magmatic gas phase, so that their quantitative assessment is central to understanding the chemistry of surface gas manifestations, and brings profound implications to the interpretation of volcanic-hydrothermal unrests. Here, we present the results of numerical simulations of magmatic gas scrubbing, in which the reaction path modelling approach (Helgeson, 1968) is used to reproduce hydrothermal gas-water-rock interactions at both shallow (temperature up to 109°C; low-T model runs) and deep reservoir (temperature range: 150-250 °C; high-T model runs) conditions. The model was built based upon the EQ3/6 software package (Wolery and Daveler, 1992), and consisted into a step by step addition of a high-temperature magmatic gas to an initial meteoric water, in the presence of a dissolving aquifer rock. The model outputted, at each step of gas addition, the chemical composition of a new aqueous solution formed after gas-water-rock interactions; which, upon reaching gas over-pressuring (PgasTOT > Psat(H2O) at run T), is degassed (by single-step degassing) to separate a scrubbed gas phase. As an application of the model results, the model compositions of the separated gases are finally compared with compositions of natural gas emissions from Hekla volcano (T< 100°C) and from Krisuvik geothermal system (T> 100°C), resulting into an excellent agreement. The compositions of the model solutions are also in fair agreement with compositions of natural thermal water samples. We conclude that our EQ3/6-based reaction path simulations offer a realistic representation of gas-water-rock interaction processes occurring underneath active magmatic-hydrothermal systems

  3. Magmatic systems of large continental igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, Evgenii

    2014-05-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) of the modern type are known from the middle Paleoproterozoic and have a great abundance in the Phanerozoic. The most researches considered their appearance with ascending of the mantle thermochemical superplumes which provided simultaneously eruption of the same type of lavas on the huge territories. Judging on presence among them different subprovinces, formation of concrete magmatic systems were linked with protuberances (secondary plumes) on the superplumes surfaces. We suggest that origin of such plumes was linked with local enrichment of upper part of the superplumes head beneath roofing by fluid components; it led to lowering of the plume material density and initiated ascending of the secondary plumes. As a result, their heads, where partial melting occurred, can reach the level of the upper crust as it follows from absence of lower-crustal rocks among xenoliths in basalts, although mantle xenoliths existed in them. Important feature of LIPs is presence of two major types of mafic lavas: (1) geochemical-enriched alkali Fe-Ti basalts and picrites, and (2) basalts of normal alkalinity (tholeiites) with different contents of TiO2. At that the first type of mafites are usually typical for lower parts of LIPs which initially developed as continental rifts, whereas the second type composed the upper part of the traps' cover. Magmatic systems of the LIPs are subdivided on three levels of different deep: (1) zones of magma generation, (2) areas of transitional magma chambers where large often layered intrusive bodies are formed, and (3) areas on surface where lava eruptions and subvolcanic intrusions occurred. All these levels are linked by feeder dykes. The least known element of the system is area of magma generation, and, especially, composition of melting substratum. Important information about it is contained in aforementioned mantle xenoliths in alkali basalts and basanites. They practically everywhere are represented by two

  4. Precise U-Pb Zircon Constraints on the Earliest Magmatic History of the Carolina Terrane.

    PubMed

    Wortman; Samson; Hibbard

    2000-05-01

    The early magmatic and tectonic history of the Carolina terrane and its possible affinities with other Neoproterozoic circum-Atlantic arc terranes have been poorly understood, in large part because of a lack of reliable geochronological data. Precise U-Pb zircon dates for the Virgilina sequence, the oldest exposed part, constrain the timing of the earliest known stage of magmatism in the terrane and of the Virgilina orogeny. A flow-banded rhyolite sampled from a metavolcanic sequence near Chapel Hill, North Carolina, yielded a U-Pb zircon date of 632.9 +2.6/-1.9 Ma. A granitic unit of the Chapel Hill pluton, which intrudes the metavolcanic sequence, yielded a nearly identical U-Pb zircon date of 633 +2/-1.5 Ma, interpreted as its crystallization age. A felsic gneiss and a dacitic tuff from the Hyco Formation yielded U-Pb zircon dates of 619.9 +4.5/-3 Ma and 615.7 +3.7/-1.9 Ma, respectively. Diorite and granite of the Flat River complex have indistinguishable U-Pb upper-intercept dates of 613.9 +1.6/-1.5 Ma and 613.4 +2.8/-2 Ma. The Osmond biotite-granite gneiss, which intruded the Hyco Formation before the Virgilina orogeny, crystallized at 612.4 +5.2/-1.7 Ma. Granite of the Roxboro pluton, an intrusion that postdated the Virgilina orogeny, yielded a U-Pb upper intercept date of 546.5 +3.0/-2.4 Ma, interpreted as the time of its crystallization. These new dates both provide the first reliable estimates of the age of the Virgilina sequence and document that the earliest known stage of magmatism in the Carolina terrane had begun by 633 +2/-1.5 Ma and continued at least until 612.4 +5.2/-1.7 Ma, an interval of approximately 25 m.yr. Timing of the Virgilina orogeny is bracketed between 612.4 +5.2/-1.7 Ma and 586+/-10 Ma (reported age of the upper Uwharrie Formation). The U-Pb systematics of all units studied in the Virgilina sequence are simple and lack any evidence of an older xenocrystic zircon component, which would indicate the presence of a continental

  5. Changes in magmatic oxidation state induced by degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brounce, M. N.; Stolper, E. M.; Eiler, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Temporal variations in the oxygen fugacity (fO2) of the mantle may have been transmitted to Earth's atmosphere and oceans by volcanic degassing. However, it is unclear how redox states of volatiles relate to their source magmas because degassing and assimilation can impact fO2 before or during eruption. To explore this, we present µ-XANES measurements of the oxidation states of Fe and S and laser fluorination measurements of 18O/16O ratios in submarine glasses from two settings where degassing is recorded: 1) submarine glasses from the Reykjanes Ridge as it shoals to Iceland, including subglacial glasses from the Reykjanes Peninsula; and 2) submarine glasses from Mauna Kea recovered by the Hawaii Shield Drilling Program (HSDP). Glasses from both settings are basalts with 5.5-9.9 wt% MgO and 350-1790 ppm S. Submarine Reykjanes glasses are sulfide saturated. Subglacial Reykjanes and HSDP glasses are not sulfide saturated, and S and H2O contents are consistent with S+H2O degassing. Submarine Reykjanes glasses have 18O/16O indistinguishable from MORB and become progressively 18O-depleted as MgO decreases. Subglacial glasses have lower 18O/16O than submarine glasses at a given MgO, but both sample types project to a common 18O/16O near 10 wt% MgO, suggesting that 18O-depletion in these lavas is generated by fractional crystallization and assimilation of an 18O-depleted crustal component. The oxidation state of Fe increases only slightly as 18O/16O decrease, suggesting that the assimilant is not oxidized enough to change magmatic fO2. Fe and S do not oxidize or reduce with decreasing S or H2O, suggesting that relatively reduced magmas at depth degassed S+H2O without changing magmatic fO2, and that the fO2 of these lavas reflect the fO2of their mantle source. The oxidation states of Fe and S in HSDP glasses are broadly correlated and samples with the highest S concentrations are the most oxidized. Both Fe and S reduce with decreasing S and H2O contents. This suggests

  6. ASTEROIDAL GRANITE-LIKE MAGMATISM 4.53 GYR AGO

    SciTech Connect

    Terada, Kentaro; Bischoff, Addi

    2009-07-10

    Constraining the timescales for the evolution of planetary bodies in our solar system is essential for a complete understanding of planet-forming processes. However, frequent collisions between planetesimals in the early solar system obscured and destroyed much of the primitive features of the old, first-generation planetary bodies. The presence of differentiated, achondritic clasts in brecciated chondrites and of chondritic fragments in achondritic breccias clearly witness multiple processes such as metamorphism, magmatism, fragmentation, mixing, and reaccretion. Here, we report the results of ion microprobe Pb-Pb dating of a granite-like fragment found in a meteorite, the LL3-6 ordinary chondrite regolith breccia Adzhi-Bogdo. Eight spot analyses of two phosphate grains and other co-genetic phases of the granitoid give a Pb-Pb isochron age of 4.48 {+-} 0.12 billion years (95% confidence) and a model age of 4.53 {+-} 0.03 billion years (1{sigma}), respectively. These ages represent the crystallization age of a parental granite-like magma that is significantly older than those of terrestrial (4.00-4.40 Gyr) and lunar granites (3.88-4.32 Gyr) indicating that the clast in Adzhi-Bogdo is the oldest known granitoid in the solar system. This is the first evidence that granite-like formation is not only a common process on Earth, but also occurred on primitive asteroids in the early solar system 4.53 Gyr ago. Thus, the discovery of granite magmatism recorded in a brecciated meteorite provides an innovative idea within the framework of scenarios for the formation and evolution of planetary bodies and possibly exoplanetary bodies.

  7. Magmatic Processes and Systems Deduced from Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J.; Bezard, R. C.; Morgan, D. J.; Ginibre, C.

    2014-12-01

    When crystals grow in liquids the composition of their outermost layer will reflect that of the host with which they are in equilibrium and will therefore record the liquid composition, pressure and temperature.. Following separation from their sources, magmas differentiate. This change in liquid composition is driven largely by crystallisation in response to cooling or decompression. Other open system processes such as mixing and contamination are common. These can lead to abrupt changes in trace element and isotopic composition, accompanied by petrographic features, such as dissolution surfaces or zones of melt inclusions. Where such careful mineral-scale studies have been performed, the prevalence of open system processes is clear. In many cases these are shown by core-rim isotopic variations. Crystal-scale compositional variations in the context of whole rock compositions and petrography have allowed us to show crustal assimilation even from regions of supposedly oceanic crust such as the Lesser Antilles. In tandem with tracking magma evolution, core-rim analyses of appropriate crystals have also provided diffusion profiles which reflect timescales of magmatic processes. A key point, long recognised by Bruce Marsh, is that in situ geochemical data should be considered in a petrographic context in order to gain the most (and most credible) insights on the workings of magma systems from hand specimen to whole volcano/pluton scales: The petrographic microscope is not dead yet Identification of magmatic processes from in situ scrutiny allows us to synthesise the architectures and inner workings of magma systems. The evidence for interaction among magmas in many systems is compelling and suggests that many exist as stacked dike-sill arrangements with wall-rock focussed crystal growth and mush zones. These are consistent with many of the systematics suggested some time ago by Bruce Marsh

  8. Permian-Triassic Magmatism Along the Southern Gondwana Margin: Correlating Proximal and Distal Volcanic Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, M. P.; Weislogel, A. L.; Fildani, A.

    2014-12-01

    Active margins are dominated by erosion, structural deformation, tectonic dissection, and igneous intrusions. These destructive processes lead to an incomplete record of past magmatism in active margins. Volcanic airfall tuffs that are transported and deposited in distal sedimentary basins may be more likely to be preserved in the rock record. Tuffs, however, may be affected by atmospheric fractionation during transport, postdepositional weathering, and diagenesis during burial, potentially altering ash texture, mineralogy, and geochemistry. We use outcrop observations, stratigraphic relationships, whole rock geochemistry, U-Pb zircon geochronology, and zircon rare-earth element geochemistry from Permian-Triassic strata of South Africa and South America to correlate distal volcanic ashes to proximal volcanic deposits and plutonic suites within southern Gondwana. U-Pb zircon signals of the tuffs are treated as "detrital"; the distinct zircon signals were then used to correlate distal airfall ashes to potential magmatic sources. This suggests that airfall fractionation of zircon populations is not a significant concern in tuff geochronology. Additionally, zircon inheritance may be a useful tool in matching far-traveled ashes with parental magmatic suites. Although previous studies have shown that the geochemistry of volcanic tuff deposits varies with distance from the volcanic vent, we employ whole rock and zircon REE compositions to differentiate distinct magmatic periods using distal ashes that were deposited >750 km from the volcanic source. The results of this study support a geochronologic interpretation that the Karoo strata of S. Africa are >10 Ma younger than previously thought based on biostratigraphy. Since the Karoo basin is heavily studied as a record of the end-Permian extinction and paleoclimate change, our results have major implication for this key time in Earth History.

  9. U-Pb SHRIMP-RG zircon ages and Nd signature of lower Paleozoic rifting-related magmatism in the Variscan basement of the Eastern Pyrenees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinez, F.J.; Iriondo, A.; Dietsch, C.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Peucat, J.J.; Cires, J.; Reche, J.; Capdevila, R.

    2011-01-01

    The ages of orthogneisses exposed in massifs of the Variscan chain can determine whether they are part of a pre-Neoproterozoic basement, a Neoproterozoic, Panafrican arc, or are, in fact, lower Paleozoic, and their isotopic compositions can be used to probe the nature of their source rocks, adding to the understanding of the types, distribution, and tectonic evolution of peri-Gondwanan crystalline basement. Using SHRIMP U-Pb zircon geochronology and Nd isotopic analysis, pre-Variscan metaigneous rocks from the N??ria massif in the Eastern Pyrenean axial zone and the Guilleries massif, 70km to the south, have been dated and their Nd signatures characterized. All dated orthogneisses from the N??ria massif have the same age within error, ~457Ma, including the Ribes granophyre, interpreted as a subvolcanic unit within Caradocian sediments contemporaneous with granitic magmas intruded into Cambro-Ordovician sediments at deeper levels. Orthogneisses in the Guilleries massif record essentially continuous magmatic activity during the Ordovician, beginning at the Cambro-Ordovician boundary (488??3Ma) and reaching a peak in the volume of magma in the early Late Ordovician (~460Ma). Metavolcanic rocks in the Guilleries massif were extruded at 452??4Ma and appear to have their intrusive equivalent in thin, deformed veins of granitic gneiss (451??7Ma) within metasedimentary rocks. In orthogneisses from both massifs, the cores of some zircons yield Neoproterozoic ages between ~520 and 900Ma. The age of deposition of a pre-Late Ordovician metapelite in the Guilleries massif is bracketed by the weighted average age of the youngest detrital zircon population, 582??11Ma, and the age of cross-cutting granitic veins, 451??7Ma. Older detrital zircons populations in this metapelite include Neoproterozoic (749-610Ma; n=10), Neo- to Mesoproterozoic (1.04-0.86Ga; n=7), Paleoproterozoic (2.02-1.59Ga; n=5), and Neoarchean (2.74-2.58Ga; n=3). Nd isotopic analyses of the N??ria and Guilleries

  10. U-Pb Geochronology: Taking or Creating the Pulse of Magmatic Systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoene, B.; Barboni, M.; Samperton, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    A combination of field, laboratory, and theoretical investigations has led to models for constructing upper crustal batholiths through pulsed emplacement of smaller magma batches. Whether melt accumulates or freezes at the emplacement level depends in part on the magma flux and the size of individual injections. Calibrating these variables in real systems has benefited greatly from the application of U-Pb zircon geochronology; however, as sampling density and number of analyses increases, it is commonly observed that zircon dates are continuous, not pulsed, on the pluton scale. Accurately interpreting such datasets to calibrate magmatic tempos thus requires an improved set of tools that link zircon crystallization histories to magmatic processes in dynamic systems. This contribution evaluates recent progress and challenges in using U-Pb geochronology to building models for magma transport and residence, as driven by the following questions: What are the timescales and sites of magmatic differentiation? What are the supersolidus temperature-time paths of magmas? What controls magma accumulation and eruptibility? Do zircon or other accessory minerals actually record these processes uniquely? To answer these questions, our recent work has emphasized integrating zircon geochronology and geochemistry with petrologic techniques, numerical modeling, and field mapping. Using this approach on arc systems from the pluton to batholith scale, we can now better characterize the pulsed nature of upper crustal magmatism and track the presence and crystallization history of melts. However, uncertainties persist in regard to our understanding of, e.g., zircon trace element partition coefficients, controls on magma zircon saturation, and how sampling bias at the handsample and regional scales affects our models of crustal magmatism. Addressing these unknowns will only further augment geochronology's role in reconstructing the formation, evolution and emplacement of magmas.

  11. Mantle dynamics and Cretaceous magmatism in east-central China: Insight from teleseismic tomograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guoming; Zhang, Guibin; Zhao, Dapeng; Lü, Qingtian; Li, Hongyi; Li, Xinfu

    2015-11-01

    Both the rich mineralization in the Lower Yangtze Block (LYB) and the post-collisional mafic rocks in the Dabie Orogen (DBO) are closely related to the Cretaceous magmatism in east-central China. Various geodynamic models have been proposed for explaining the mechanism of the Cretaceous magmatism, but these models are controversial and even contradictory with each other, especially on the mechanism of adakites. A unified geodynamic model is required for explaining the magmatism in east-central China, in particular, the spatial and temporal correlations of magmatic activity in the DBO and that in the LYB. For this purpose, we apply teleseismic tomography to study P-wave velocity structure down to 800 km depth beneath east-central China. A modified multiple-channel cross-correlation method is used to collect 28,805 high-quality P-wave arrival-time data from seismograms of distant earthquakes recorded by permanent seismic stations and our temporary stations in the study region. To remove the influence of crustal heterogeneity on the mantle tomography, we used the CRUST1.0 model to correct the teleseismic relative residuals. Our tomography revealed distinct high-velocity (high-V) anomalies beneath the DBO and two flanks of the LYB, and low-velocity (low-V) anomalies above the high-V zones. Combining our tomographic images with previous geological, geochemical and geophysical results, we infer that these high-V and low-V anomalies reflect the detached lithosphere and upwelling asthenospheric materials, respectively, which are associated with the Late Mesozoic dynamic process and the Cretaceous magmatism. We propose a double-slab subduction model that a ridge subduction yielded the adakitic rocks in the LYB during 150-135 Ma and the subsequent Pacific Plate subduction played a crucial role in not only the formation of igneous rocks in the LYB but also remelting of the subducted South China Block beneath the DBO during 135-101 Ma.

  12. Magmatic cycles pace tectonic and morphological expression of rifting (Afar depression, Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, S.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Dumont, S.; Grandin, R.; Williams, A.; Blard, P.-H.; Schimmelpfennig, I.; Vye-Brown, C.; France, L.; Ayalew, D.; Benedetti, L.; Yirgu, G.

    2016-07-01

    The existence of narrow axial volcanic zones of mid-oceanic ridges testifies of the underlying concentration of both melt distribution and tectonic strain. As a result of repeated diking and faulting, axial volcanic zones therefore represent a spectacular topographic expression of plate divergence. However, the submarine location of oceanic ridges makes it difficult to constrain the interplay between tectonic and magmatic processes in time and space. In this study, we use the Dabbahu-Manda Hararo (DMH) magmatic rift segment (Afar, Ethiopia) to provide quantitative constraints on the response of tectonic processes to variations in magma supply at divergent plate boundaries. The DMH magmatic rift segment is considered an analogue of an oceanic ridge, exhibiting a fault pattern, extension rate and topographic relief comparable to intermediate- to slow-spreading ridges. Here, we focus on the northern and central parts of DMH rift, where we present quantitative slip rates for the past 40 kyr for major and minor normal fault scarps in the vicinity of a recent (September 2005) dike intrusion. The data obtained show that the axial valley topography has been created by enhanced slip rates that occurred during periods of limited volcanism, suggestive of reduced magmatic activity, probably in association with changes in strain distribution in the crust. Our results indicate that the development of the axial valley topography has been regulated by the lifetimes of the magma reservoirs and their spatial distribution along the segment, and thus to the magmatic cycles of replenishment/differentiation (<100 kyr). Our findings are also consistent with magma-induced deformation in magma-rich rift segments. The record of two tectonic events of metric vertical amplitude on the fault that accommodated the most part of surface displacement during the 2005 dike intrusion suggests that the latter type of intrusion occurs roughly every 10 kyr in the northern part of the DMH segment.

  13. The Tertiary dike magmatism in the Southern Alps: geochronological data and geodynamic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergomi, Maria Aldina; Zanchetta, Stefano; Tunesi, Annalisa

    2015-03-01

    The relationships between tectonics and magmatic activity in the Alps are still debated. Despite an active subduction since the Late Cretaceous, no arc-related magmatism is recorded prior of the Middle Eocene. The emplacement of plutons along the Insubric Fault in a short time span (~34-28 Ma) has been generally interpreted in terms of the slab break-off model. The Tertiary magmatism, however, is also characterized by the occurrence of widespread calcalkaline dikes not necessarily intruded along the Insubric Fault. The geochemical features of dikes vary along the Alps belt and are interpreted in terms of mantle source heterogeneity and degree of crustal contamination. U-Pb zircon dating of studied dikes indicates intrusion ages in the 42- to 34-Ma time interval. These data provide evidence for a pre-Oligocene magmatic activity that was not solely limited to the Adamello batholith. Moreover, it appears that dikes rejuvenate from SE to NW, in an opposite direction with respect to the Alpine subduction polarity. Thus, a more complex geodynamic scenario than the slab break-off model must be envisaged. The absence of arc magmatism prior to the Middle Eocene can be explained by the low-angle subduction of the Tethyan slab that confined the mantle partial melting zone away from the orogenic wedge. The onset of the Apennines subduction at 55-50 Ma caused the Alpine slab to retreat. The partial melting zone progressively migrated beneath the orogenic wedge and finally reached the axial belt in the Late Eocene, when the Alpine collision was completed. Only at this stage, slab break-off occurred and promoted the intrusion of the Periadriatic plutons.

  14. Zircon U-Pb and Hf Isotopes Provide Insights into Triassic Magmatism in the Chinese Pamir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imrecke, D. B.; Robinson, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent research has improved understanding of Triassic magmatism and sedimentation in the Songpan-Ganzi/Hoh-Xil Terranes of Tibet and the implications for the closure of the Paleotethys ocean (Pullen et al., 2008; Ding et al,. 2013; Zhang et al., 2014). However, our knowledge of the age of magmatism in the laterally equivalent Karakul-Mazar Terrane in the Northern Pamir is limited. While previous investigations indicate Karakul-Mazar igneous bodies have generally documented crystallization ages 225-245 Ma, detrital zircon studies of Late Triassic/Early Jurassic strata within the Northern Pamir and the Tarim Basin record a significant quantity of <220 Ma zircons (Bershaw et al., 2011) sourced from the Pamir. 6 granite samples were analyzed for zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopes, representing plutons distributed across the Chinese Pamir, to determine the distribution of crystallization ages and chemical maturity of the magma source. Analyses yielded 204 Ma and 212-214 Ma zircon U-Pb crystallization ages. The dated samples yield ɛHf(t) values ranging from -6.7 to 9.6. Results show that a large volume of magmatic rocks in the Northern Pamir intruded in the Late Triassic prior to closure of the Paleotethys Ocean at ~200 Ma (Angiolini et al., 2013). Weakly positive and negative ɛHf(t) values indicate a primitive source for the dated magmatic bodies. Additionally, compliation of previously published data with these results suggests two pulses of magmatism, ~210 Ma and 230-245 Ma respectively. Finally, Triassic igneous bodies in the Pamir show similar crystallization ages and chemical signatures compared to plutons in the Songpan-Ganzi/Hoh-Xil Terranes to the east, suggesting lateral continuity of geodynamic processes across the terrane in the Mesozoic.

  15. Permian magmatic sequences of the Bilihe gold deposit in central Inner Mongolia, China: Petrogenesis and tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunhua; Nie, Fengjun

    2015-08-01

    The Bilihe gold deposit is located in the eastern section of the Ondor Sum-Yanji Suture at the southern margin of the Xing'an-Mongolian Orogenic Belt (XMOB) and the northern margin of the North China Craton (NCC), central Inner Mongolia. The magmatic rocks in the ore district are generally high-K calc-alkaline, enriched in LREE, Zr, and Hf, and depleted in HREE, Nb, Ta, and P. The magmatic evolution sequences are norite gabbro → granodiorite porphyry → granite or norite gabbro → andesite → dacite porphyry → granodiorite, which show a trend of decreasing TiO2, FeO, MgO, CaO, and P2O5 with increasing SiO2. In the Bilihe ore district, hydrothermal processes were coeval with granitic magmatism for a period of ~ 17 Myr (272-255 Ma). The ages of the granite, granodiorite porphyry, granodiorite, and dacite porphyry are 271.5-264.1 Ma, 269.8-255.8 Ma, 268.3 Ma, and 268.6-259.4 Ma, respectively. The magmatic rocks contain magmatic, hydrothermal, and magmatic-hydrothermal zircons. The magmatic zircons have δCe > 4, La < 3 ppm, and SmN/LaN > 2.5; the hydrothermal zircons have δCe < 4, La > 3 ppm, and SmN/LaN < 2.5. The Nb/Ta and Zr/Hf ratios of granodiorite are 12.7-14.99 and 40.2-46.56, respectively. The Zr/Hf ratios successively increase in the sequence of granite (27.4-29.02) → granodiorite porphyry (29.19-32.18) → dacite porphyry (33.54-38.5) → norite gabbro (36.75-38.37), and their Nb/Ta ratios are 9.09-12.38. Zircons in granodiorite yield ε Hf (t) values of - 0.29 to - 56 (n = 13) and 2.07-7.62 (n = 5), and they give a Hf two-stage model age (tDM2) of 807-4765 Ma. The ε Hf (t) values of the zircons in granite, granodiorite porphyry, and dacite porphyry are - 0.46 to 8.03, 3.17 to 10.32, and - 0.78 to 6.58, respectively, and their Hf tDM2 ages are 787-1324 Ma, 638-1091 Ma, and 868-1343 Ma, respectively. Dehydration partial melting of subducted oceanic crust resulted in the formation of dacite porphyry; partial melting of depleted mantle resulted in

  16. Magmatism in a Cambrian Laurentian Plate Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, M. C.

    2008-12-01

    Evidences of the Cambrian Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen extend over 1000km from about Dallas out to the Uncompahgre Plateau in SW Colorado. The signature of this originally extensional feature can be traced geophysically, and in some places at the present surface, petrologically and temporally, by the presence of mafic rock. It appears to have been the intracontinental third arm of a plume-generated? triple junction which helped to dismember the southern part of Laurentia on the final break-up of a Neoproterozoic supercontinent. Other parts of Laurentia rifted away and are now found in the Precordillera of Argentina. Rift magmatism appears to have been concentrated nearer the plate edge during the breakup. Perhaps as much as 40,000 km3 of mostly subaerial silicic volcanics and shallow-seated granites overlay and filled the top of the rift in the area of SW Oklahoma. The rift fill below the silicic rocks is large, layered mafic complexes and smaller, layered, hydrous gabbros, the whole set appearing as a shallow AMCG complex. Unusually, direct rift sediments are not obvious. Furthermore, silicic and mafic rocks have identical Nd signatures. Finally, about 20 Ma after rifting ceased and later into the Paleozoic during sea incursion, overlying sediments are thickened 4X compared to equivalent units 100's of kms to the rift sides. This rift appears distinct from most modern rifts. Conclusions are 1) This was a hot, narrow rift; 2) Basaltic magmatism , not sedimentation, filled the rift; 3) Magmatic intensity varied along the rift strike; 4) Silicic rocks were generated mostly directly from new mantle-derived basalt liquids through fractionation, not melting of older crustal rocks; 5) Laurentian lithosphere was weak allowing centering of the Early/Middle Paleozoic large "Oklahoma" basin (pre-Anadarko) over the rift.

  17. Tritium and stable isotopes of magmatic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, F.; McMurtry, G. M.

    2000-04-01

    To investigate the isotopic composition and age of water in volcanic gases and magmas, we analyzed samples from 11 active volcanoes ranging in composition from tholeiitic basalt to rhyolite: Mount St. Helens (USA), Kilauea (USA), Pacaya (Guatemala), Galeras (Colombia), Satsuma Iwo-Jima (Japan), Sierra Negra and Alcedo (Ecuador), Vulcano (Italy), Parı´cutin (Mexico), Kudryavy (Russia), and White Island (New Zealand). Tritium at relatively low levels (0.1-5 T.U.) is found in most emissions from high-temperature volcanic fumaroles sampled, even at discharge temperatures >700°C. Although magmatic fluids sampled from these emissions usually contain high CO 2, S total, HCl, HF, B, Br, 3He R/ RA, and low contents of air components, stable isotope and tritium relations of nearly all such fluids show mixing of magmatic volatiles with relatively young meteoric water (model ages≤75 y). Linear δD/ δ18O and 3H/ δ18O mixing trends of these two end-members are invariably detected at arc volcanoes. Tritium is also detected in fumarole condensates at hot spot basalt volcanoes, but collecting samples approaching the composition of end-member magmatic fluid is exceedingly difficult. In situ production of 3H, mostly from spontaneous fission of 238U in magmas is calculated to be <0.001 T.U., except for the most evolved compositions (high U, Th, and Li and low H 2O contents). These values are below the detection limit of 3H by conventional analytical techniques (about 0.01 T.U. at best). We found no conclusive evidence that natural fusion in the Earth produces anomalous amounts of detectable 3H (>0.05 T.U.).

  18. A General Model for Shallow Magmatic Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorey, C.; Michaut, C.

    2015-12-01

    Shallow magmatic intrusions make room for themselves by upward bending of the elastic overburden. Previous studies have shown that the bending of the overlying layer first controls the dynamics. Then, when the radius reaches a few times the flexural wavelength of the overburden, it transitions to a gravity current regime. This model predicts the appropriate geometry for both terrestrial laccoliths and large mafic sills. However, it underestimates the absolute dimensions of these magmatic intrusions; in particular, it requires abnormally high viscosity to reconcile both observations and predictions. To get some insights into the effective flow viscosity, we develop a model that account for the cooling of such elastic-plated gravity currents. We show that the coupling between the temperature field and the flow itself leads to the formation of a highly viscous region at the tip that slows down the spreading in both regimes. The intrusions are predicted to be thicker and their dimensions, especially in the bending regime, are now consistent with observations. By introducing the potentially complex structure of the overburden, we also show that the topography largely contributes to constrain the final intrusion morphology. For instance, in the case of an intrusion centered below a circular depression, the model predicts that the lithostatic increase at the crater rim prevents the magma from spreading laterally and enhances the thickening of the intrusion. This model has already proven successful in reproducing the deformations observed on potential intrusion centered below lunar impact craters. Caldera complexes often exhibit ground deformations that might be associated to the formation of shallow magmatic intrusions. InSAR imaging and GPS measurements now provide efficient tools to monitor these deformations. We conclude this study by examining the ability of the model to reproduce the deformation observed in several caldera complexes.

  19. Magmatic volatiles in explosive rhyolitic eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.; Westrich, H.R.

    1981-07-01

    Obsidian clasts in rhyolitic tephra deposits preserve preeruption magmatic volatile contents, providing a direct means for determining the volatile content of explosively erupted magmas. Small to moderate volume Plinian eruptions (10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -1/ km/sup 3/) appear to be driven by 0.5--1.0 wt.% volatiles, consisting dominantly of H/sub 2/O with minor CO/sub 2/. Analysis of obsidian from eruptive sequences consisting of tephra and flows indicates that this hydrous magma abruptly overlies magma with only 0.1--0.2 wt.% H/sub 2/O.

  20. Magmatic gas scrubbing: implications for volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symonds, R. B.; Gerlach, T. M.; Reed, M. H.

    2001-08-01

    Despite the abundance of SO 2(g) in magmatic gases, precursory increases in magmatic SO 2(g) are not always observed prior to volcanic eruption, probably because many terrestrial volcanoes contain abundant groundwater or surface water that scrubs magmatic gases until a dry pathway to the atmosphere is established. To better understand scrubbing and its implications for volcano monitoring, we model thermochemically the reaction of magmatic gases with water. First, we inject a 915°C magmatic gas from Merapi volcano into 25°C air-saturated water (ASW) over a wide range of gas/water mass ratios from 0.0002 to 100 and at a total pressure of 0.1 MPa. Then we model closed-system cooling of the magmatic gas, magmatic gas-ASW mixing at 5.0 MPa, runs with varied temperature and composition of the ASW, a case with a wide range of magmatic-gas compositions, and a reaction of a magmatic gas-ASW mixture with rock. The modeling predicts gas and water compositions, and, in one case, alteration assemblages for a wide range of scrubbing conditions; these results can be compared directly with samples from degassing volcanoes. The modeling suggests that CO 2(g) is the main species to monitor when scrubbing exists; another candidate is H 2S (g), but it can be affected by reactions with aqueous ferrous iron. In contrast, scrubbing by water will prevent significant SO 2(g) and most HCl (g) emissions until dry pathways are established, except for moderate HCl (g) degassing from pH<0.5 hydrothermal waters. Furthermore, it appears that scrubbing will prevent much, if any, SO 2(g) degassing from long-resident boiling hydrothermal systems. Several processes can also decrease or increase H 2(g) emissions during scrubbing making H 2(g) a poor choice to detect changes in magma degassing. We applied the model results to interpret field observations and emission rate data from four eruptions: (1) Crater Peak on Mount Spurr (1992) where, except for a short post-eruptive period, scrubbing appears

  1. Rhenium and Iridium Partitioning in Silicate and Magmatic Spinels: Implications for Planetary Magmatism and Mantles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.

    2001-01-01

    Highly siderophile elements Re, Ru and Ir partition strongly into spinel structures with large octahedral sites. New experimental results for both magmatic and silicate spinels will be presented with a few planetary implications. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Magmatism and Epithermal Gold-Silver Deposits of the Southern Ancestral Cascade Arc, Western Nevada and Eastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; du Bray, Edward A.; Henry, Christopher D., (compiler); Vikre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Many epithermal gold-silver deposits are temporally and spatially associated with late Oligocene to Pliocene magmatism of the southern ancestral Cascade arc in western Nevada and eastern California. These deposits, which include both quartz-adularia (low- and intermediate-sulfidation; Comstock Lode, Tonopah, Bodie) and quartz-alunite (high-sulfidation; Goldfield, Paradise Peak) types, were major producers of gold and silver. Ancestral Cascade arc magmatism preceded that of the modern High Cascades arc and reflects subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America. Ancestral arc magmatism began about 45 Ma, continued until about 3 Ma, and extended from near the Canada-United States border in Washington southward to about 250 km southeast of Reno, Nevada. The ancestral arc was split into northern and southern segments across an inferred tear in the subducting slab between Mount Shasta and Lassen Peak in northern California. The southern segment extends between 42°N in northern California and 37°N in western Nevada and was active from about 30 to 3 Ma. It is bounded on the east by the northeast edge of the Walker Lane. Ancestral arc volcanism represents an abrupt change in composition and style of magmatism relative to that in central Nevada. Large volume, caldera-forming, silicic ignimbrites associated with the 37 to 19 Ma ignimbrite flareup are dominant in central Nevada, whereas volcanic centers of the ancestral arc in western Nevada consist of andesitic stratovolcanoes and dacitic to rhyolitic lava domes that mostly formed between 25 and 4 Ma. Both ancestral arc and ignimbrite flareup magmatism resulted from rollback of the shallowly dipping slab that began about 45 Ma in northeast Nevada and migrated south-southwest with time. Most southern segment ancestral arc rocks have oxidized, high potassium, calc-alkaline compositions with silica contents ranging continuously from about 55 to 77 wt%. Most lavas are porphyritic and contain coarse plagioclase

  3. Claritas rise, Mars: Pre-Tharsis magmatism?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, J.M.; Anderson, R.C.; Williams, J.-P.; Ruiz, J.; McGuire, P.C.; Buczkowski, D.L.; Wang, R.; Scharenbroich, L.; Hare, T.M.; Connerney, J.E.P.; Baker, V.R.; Wheelock, S.J.; Ferris, J.C.; Miyamoto, H.

    2009-01-01

    Claritas rise is a prominent ancient (Noachian) center of tectonism identified through investigation of comprehensive paleotectonic information of the western hemisphere of Mars. This center is interpreted to be the result of magmatic-driven activity, including uplift and associated tectonism, as well as possible hydrothermal activity. Coupled with its ancient stratigraphy, high density of impact craters, and complex structure, a possible magnetic signature may indicate that it formed during an ancient period of Mars' evolution, such as when the dynamo was in operation. As Tharsis lacks magnetic signatures, Claritas rise may pre-date the development of Tharsis or mark incipient development, since some of the crustal materials underlying Tharsis and older parts of the magmatic complex, respectively, could have been highly resurfaced, destroying any remanent magnetism. Here, we detail the significant characteristics of the Claritas rise, and present a case for why it should be targeted by the Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and Mars Express spacecrafts, as well as be considered as a prime target for future tier-scalable robotic reconnaissance. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Magmatic heat and the El Nino cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, H.R.; Moore, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Large submarine lava flows with apparent volumes exceeding 10 km3 have recently been imaged on the deep ocean floor in various parts of the Pacific by means of GLORIA and SeaMarc side-looking sonar surveys. Such flows may produce thermal anomalies large enough to perturb the cyclic processes of the ocean and could be a factor in the genesis of El Nino phenomena. We find that known volume rates of mid-ocean magma production could generate repetitive thermal anomalies as large as 10% of the average El Nino sea surface anomaly at intervals of about 5 years (the mean interval of El Nino events between 1935 and 1984). Likewise, estimated rates of eruption, cooling of lava on the seafloor, and transfer of heat to the near-surface environment could reasonably produce a thermal anomaly comparable to that associated with El Nino. Larger magmatic events, associated with fluctuations in the total magmatic power and seismicity along the East Pacific Rise, are possible at longer intervals and may explain the extreme size of some El Nino events, such as that of 1982-1983. -Authors

  5. Caldera formation and varied eruption styles on North Pacific seamounts: the clastic lithofacies record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portner, Ryan A.; Clague, Dave A.; Paduan, Jennifer B.

    2014-08-01

    Detailed examination of volcaniclastic and sedimentary rocks collected from the Taney (30 Ma), President Jackson (4 Ma), Vance (3 Ma) and Alarcon (2 Ma) near-ridge seamount chains of the North Pacific reveals seven clastic lithofacies that record various modes of eruption, magma fragmentation, and particle dispersal. Lithofacies are distinguished by differences in lithology, bedding habit, compositional heterogeneity, and relationship to volcanic landforms. Breccia lithofacies were produced through mechanical fragmentation during caldera collapse (polymict) or effusive eruptions onto steep slopes (monomict). Rare globular lapilli mudstone lithofacies contain clasts with morphologies formed by magma-sediment mingling processes (peperite). Seamount summit pyroclastic deposits include proximal lapilli tuff with vesicular pyroclasts, and more distal limu o Pele tuff lithofacies. Much finer-grained hydrothermal mudstone/tuff lithofacies occurs around caldera rims and contains greenschist minerals, hydrothermal clays and basaltic ash that record subsurface phreatomagmatic fragmentation processes. Very fine-grained ash is transported to distal regions by oceanic currents and hydrothermal plumes, and is a component of the regional pelagic sediment budget. Pyroclastic lithofacies only occur on seamount summits suggesting formation during the latter stages of seamount evolution. As a seamount drifts away from an adjacent ridge axis and associated heat source, its magma supply is reduced allowing for magmatic gas buildup and mild explosive eruptions. During this stage, the diminished melt supply under the seamount is unable to fully compensate for extension along the ridge axis and vertical seamount growth. Lateral intrusion into spreading-related structures in this stage causes magma withdrawal and caldera formation. Formation of caldera ring faults also promotes seawater ingress into subseafloor hydrothermal cells, which interact with magma conduits causing phreatomagmatic

  6. Towards an integrated magmatic, structural and metamorphic model for the 1.1-0.9 Ga Sveconorwegian orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagstad, Trond; Roberts, Nick M. W.; Røhr, Torkil S.; Marker, Mogens K.

    2013-04-01

    Orogeny involves magmatic, metamorphic, deformational and erosional processes that are caused by or lead to crustal thickening and the development of high topography. In general, these processes operate along the margins of continental plates, either as a result of subduction of oceanic crust (accretionary) or collision between two or more continental plates (collisional). Many of these processes are common to accretionary and collisional orogeny, and do not uniquely discriminate between the two. With only a fragmented geological record, unravelling the style of orogenesis in ancient orogens may, therefore, be far from straightforward. Adding to the complexity, modern continental margins, e.g., the southern Asian margin, display significant variation in orogenic style along strike, rendering along-strike comparisons and correlations unreliable. The late Mesoproterozoic Sveconorwegian province in SW Baltica is traditionally interpreted as the eastward continuation of the Grenville province in Canada, resulting from collision with Amazonia and forming a central part in the assembly of the Rodinia supercontinent. We recently proposed that the Sveconorwegian segment of this orogen formed as a result of accretionary processes rather than collision. This hypothesis was based mainly on considerations of the Sveconorwegian magmatic evolution. Here, we show how the metamorphic/structural record supports (or at least may be integrated in) our model as well. The key elements in our accretionary model are: 1) formation of the Sirdal Magmatic Belt (SMB) between 1070 and 1020 Ma, most likely representing a continental arc batholith. Coeval deformation and high-grade metamorphism farther east in the orogen could represent deformation in the retroarc. 2) cessation of SMB magmatism at 1020 Ma followed by UHT conditions at 1010-1005 Ma, with temperatures in excess of 1000°C at 7.5 kbar. Subduction of a spreading ridge at ca. 1020 Ma would result in an end to arc magmatism and

  7. Magmatic CO2 emissions at Mammoth Mountain, California, tracked by 14C in tree core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B.; Mangan, M.; McGeehin, J. P.; King, J.; Lewicki, J. L.; Hilley, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Magmatic CO2 efflux to the atmosphere causes persistent depletion of 14C in the wood of trees that grow in areas of strong emissions. The record of 14C depletion in core from a surviving tree at the Horseshoe Lake tree-kill area, on the S flank of Mammoth Mountain volcano, has been updated to cover the time period 1984 to 2010. The amount of depletion was reasonably stable in annual growth rings for years 1995-2009 and indicates that the magmatic CO2 component in air at canopy height was 31±7 ppmv. Depletion increased sharply in the 2010 ring, yielding a magmatic CO2 concentration of 56 ppmv. This observation is consistent with accumulation chamber and eddy covariance measurements from the area, which indicate that magmatic CO2 effluxes and near-surface atmospheric concentrations increased during 2010. The agreement between tree-core and direct gas measurements suggests that the selected tree may be suitable for constraining the long-term record of CO2 emission strength at Horseshoe Lake, but the ability of a single tree to constrain total CO2 discharge from a broad region of diffuse emissions needs investigation. New concentration source-area modeling based on local atmospheric data measured by a 3-m tall eddy covariance tower suggests that the 13-m tall tree cored may provide a weighted integration of CO2 emission strength over an area at least as large as the Horseshoe Lake gas anomaly (0.3 km2). If the tree-core record accurately reflects total CO2 discharge, then emission strength in 2010 approached that in 1990, when anomalous gas efflux began in the aftermath of a 6-month seismic swarm linked to upflow of magmatic fluids. The apparent increase in emission strength in 2010 may correlate with a recent resurgence in seismicity beneath Mammoth Mountain and an increase in the 3He/4He ratio in fumarolic emissions near the summit, both of which began in 2009. If so, a correlative increase in 14C depletion is likely to exist in trees at other areas around the

  8. Petrological variability in recent magmatism at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Clague, D. A.; Gill, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Axial Seamount is known for its compositional homogeneity. We report on petrological variability in lavas from the summit caldera and rims of Axial Seamount during the last ~1.2ka and its implications for shallow crustal magma dynamics. AUVs have mapped the summit at ~1 m resolution, and ROVs have collected numerous lavas and volcaniclastic cores. Geospatial, superpositional, compositional, and age constraint data were used to outline flow units and construct geologic maps. Nearly 200 glasses from summit lavas were analyzed for major elements. A subset of ~20 samples were analyzed for selected trace elements, Pb-, U-, and Th- isotope ratios, and 226Ra and 210Pb. The results a) confirm a high degree compositional homogeneity, b) demonstrate a more restricted range in Pb-isotope ratios than previous data, c) indicate uniform compositional source component(s) genetically linked to that of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, and d) expand the dataset of distinctly-low 230Th/232Th lavas and subdivide them into geospatial groups. Hundreds of volcaniclastic grains collected from subsurface depths of up to several tens of cm analyzed for major elements extend the record of summit magmatism beyond what is exposed. Summit lava glasses are compositionally N-MORB. Summit volcaniclastics range to higher MgO (+1%); thus, magmatism likely included more mafic episodes than is recorded in the flows as yet sampled or that volcaniclastics preferentially sample higher temperature lavas. Negative correlation of CaO/Al2O3 with MgO in all glasses suggests fractionation from parental melt(s) of plag ± ol but not cpx. K2O/TiO2 ranges are typical for much of the JdFR. Summit lavas range from aphyric to ~35% plag phyric ± a few % ol. Plag-phyric summit lavas tend to have greater MgO (>7.5%), lower CaO/Al2O3 (<0.80), and lower K2O/TiO2 (<0.10) compared to aphyric lavas. For ~18 caldera flows with absolute or relative age control, plag-phyric lavas are older than aphyric lavas, the oldest of

  9. Evolution of Northeast Atlantic Magmatic Continental Margins from an Ethiopian-Afar Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, R. W.; Cornwell, D. G.; Ramsden, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    One of the major problems interpreting the evolution of magmatic continental margins is that the structure which should record the pre-magmatic evolution of the rift and which potentially influences the character of the rifting process is partially or completely obscured by thick basalt lava flows and sills. A limited number of deep reflection seismic profiles acquired with tuned seismic sources have penetrated the basalts and provide an image of the pre-magmatic structure, otherwise the principle data are lower resolution wide-angle/refraction profiles and potential field models which have greater uncertainties associated with them. In order to sidestep the imaging constraints we have examined the Ethiopian - Afar rift system to try to understand the rifting process. The Main Ethiopian rift contains an embryonic magmatic passive margin dominated by faulting at the margins of the rift and en-echelon magmatic zones at the centre. Further north toward Afar the rift becomes in-filled with extensive lava flows fed from fissure systems in the widening rift zone. This rift system provides, along its length, a series of 'snapshots' into the possible tectonic evolution of a magmatic continental margin. Deep seismic profiles crossing the NE Atlantic margins reveal ocean dipping reflector sequences (ODRS) overlying extended crust and lower crustal sill complexes of intruded igneous rock, which extend back beneath the continental margin. The ODRS frequently occur in fault bounded rift structures along the margins. We suggest, by analogy to the observations that can be made in the Ethiopia-Afar rift that these fault bounded basins largely form at the embryonic rift stage and are then partially or completely filled with lavas fed from fissures which are now observed as the ODRS. Also in the seismic profiles we identify volcanic constructs on the ODRS which we interpret as the equivalent of the present day fissure eruptions seen in Afar. The ocean ward dip on the ODRS is

  10. Permian basic magmatism, Upper Eocene and Lower Oligocene metamorphism in the Furgg zone (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liati, A.; Gebauer, D.; Froitzheim, N.

    2003-04-01

    The Furgg zone (Western Alps) separates the Monte Rosa nappe from the Bernhard and Zermatt nappes. It consists mainly of a schist-, leucocratic gneiss-, quartzite- and metacarbonate-matrix containing boudins of amphibolitised eclogites. Controversial views exist on the nature, origin and extent of the Furgg zone (cf. Dal Piaz, 2001). We dated by SHRIMP (GSC, Ottawa) magmatic and metamorphic zircon domains of a metabasite in the area of Stockknubel (north of the western part of the Monte Rosa nappe). This metabasite is a strongly retrogressed eclogite occurring in form of a boudin, ca. 1 m long, within leucocratic schists. Based on cathodoluminescence (CL)-imaging, zircons from this rock consist of large oscillatory zoned (magmatic) domains surrounded by metamorphic (recrystallisation) rims, bright in CL, with ghost oscillatory zoning. Bright CL-domains are irregularly dispersed also inside the magmatic domains, due to fluid circulation along fractures during metamorphism(s). Eight spot analyses on the magmatic domains yield a Permian weighted mean age at 269 ± 3 Ma (95% c.l.), corresponding to the crystallisation time of the gabbroic protolith of this metabasite. This age is in agreement with a ca. 272 Ma age reported for the crystallisation of an orthogneiss at Mattmark (farther east in the Furgg zone; Liati et al., 2001), as well as for Monte Rosa granites. The new Permian protolith age of the metabasic rock in Stockknubel, together with a 510 ± 5 Ma age reported for an eclogite boudin from the eastern part of the Furgg zone, is in agreement with the 'mélange hypothesis' for the origin of the Furgg zone (e.g. Froitzheim, 2001). 11 spot analyses on metamorphic domains indicate a strong influence of the Lepontine event at 31.5 ± 1.0 Ma (weighted mean of 8 analyses), accompanied by influx of high amounts of fluids. Of great interest are metamorphic rim analyses at ca. 38-39 Ma, together with a series of data scattering between this and the ca. 31.5 Ma age. The

  11. Miocene magmatism and tectonics within the Peri-Alboran orogen (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Azzouzi, M.; Bellon, H.; Coutelle, A.; Réhault, J.-P.

    2014-07-01

    volcanic edifice, major calc-alkaline to shoshonitic volcanoes were built between 9.0 ± 0.5 and 4.8 ± 0.5 Ma, in particular the large Gourougou volcanic complex. Near Oujda, volcanic activity of alkaline affinity leads to multiple emissions of basalts throughout Pliocene times until the beginning of Pleistocene, between 6.2 ± 0.3 and 1.5 ± 0.1 Ma. In the Alboran domain, an age of 19.7 ± 0.8 Ma is reported (this study) for the andesitic tuffites that form the emergent part of the Alboran Island. This age is comparable to that of the Algerian tuffites and cherts “silexites” and the Malaga ones in Spain. Younger activity, completely separated from the previous one, forms the low-K basaltic andesitic dikes from Alboran Island, dated between 9.1 ± 0.5 and 7.5 ± 0.3 Ma. Along the Alboran Ridge both low-K and high-K andesites to dacites were emitted in the estimated range of 10.7-8.7 Ma. Low-K and high-K andesites to dacites sampled at ODP sites 977 and 978 into the East Alboran Basin, are dated between 12.1 ± 0.2 and 9.3 ± 0.1 Ma.

  12. Crustal migration of magmatic CO2 tracked by tree-ring radiocarbon and seismicity at Mammoth Mountain, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, J. L.; Hilley, G. E.; Shelly, D. R.; King, J.; McGeehin, J. P.; Mangan, M.; Evans, W.

    2013-12-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a dacitic dome complex situated on the southwestern rim of Long Valley caldera, eastern California. Since 1989, unrest at Mammoth Mountain has been expressed by seismicity, ground deformation, diffuse CO2 emissions, and elevated 3He/4He ratios in fumarolic gases, all apparently driven by the release of CO2-rich aqueous fluids from basaltic intrusions in the middle to lower crust. Three lower-crustal (32-19 km depth) seismic swarms occurred beneath the mountain in 2006, 2008 and 2009 and were consistently followed several months later by peaks in the frequency of shallow (≤10 km depth) earthquakes. We measured the radiocarbon depletion relative to global background values in the annual rings (1998-2012) of a tree growing in the largest (~0.3 km2) area of diffuse CO2 emissions on Mammoth Mountain (the Horseshoe Lake tree kill; HLTK). We modeled the ground surface area, on average, that emitted the magmatic CO2 photosynthesized by the study tree (the magmatic CO2 source area) using measured atmospheric parameters. Results indicated that the tree integrated magmatic CO2 emissions over the majority of the HLTK area. The tree-ring radiocarbon record and magmatic CO2 source area modeling together implied that magmatic CO2 emissions from the HLTK were relatively stable from 1998 to 2009, nearly doubled from 2009 to 2011, and then declined by the 2012 growing season. The initial increase in CO2 emissions was detected during the growing season immediately after the largest (February 2010) peak in shallow earthquake frequency. Propagation of CO2-rich magmatic fluids may have driven observed patterns of elevated deep, then shallow seismicity, whereas the relationship between pore fluid pressures within a shallow (upper 3 km of crust) fluid reservoir and permeability structure of the reservoir cap rock may have controlled temporal variations in surface CO2 emissions.

  13. Paleoproterozoic magmatic and metamorphic events link Yangtze to northwest Laurentia in the Nuna supercontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Cawood, Peter A.; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Zhao, Jun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Zircons from granitic gneisses in North Vietnam have magmatic cores dated at 2.28-2.19 Ga, and constitute the first reported evidence of continental crust with these ages in the Yangtze Block of the South China Craton. Overgrowths on zircon rims indicate two periods of metamorphism at 1.97-1.95 Ga and ∼1.83 Ga. These events, along with a previously reported ∼2.36 Ga metamorphic overgrowth on ∼2.9 Ga crystallized zircons from the same region, suggest a sequence of events similar to that recorded for the northwestern region of Laurentia and possibly Siberia, which are associated with assembly of the Nuna supercontinent. These include the 2.4-2.3 Ga Arrowsmith Orogen and a range of events in the interval 2.32-1.80 Ga, including accretionary magmatism in northwestern Laurentia and Siberia (2.32-2.07 Ga), the Thelon orogeny (2.02-1.96 Ga) and the 1.85-1.80 Ga collision between the Superior and Hearne-Rae cratons during the Trans-Hudson Orogen in Laurentia, and the Akitkan Orogen in Siberia (2.03-1.86 Ga). Subsequent attempted breakup of Nuna may be represented by ca. 1.80 to 1.59 Ga consanguineous extension related sedimentation and magmatism in the southwestern Yangtze Block and northwestern Laurentia. These correlations favor location of the Yangtze Block adjacent to northwest Laurentia, and possibly Siberia, within the Nuna supercontinent.

  14. Migrating shoshonitic magmatism tracks Izu-Bonin-Mariana intra-oceanic arc rift propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Yuasa, M.; Tamura, Y.; Shukuno, H.; Stern, R. J.; Naka, J.; Joshima, M.; Taylor, R. N.

    2010-05-01

    The southernmost Izu-Bonin arc and northernmost Mariana arc are characterized by K-rich and shoshonitic lavas, referred to as the alkalic volcano province (AVP). These compositions are unusual for intra-oceanic arcs and the interpretation of the AVP is controversial. Rifting to form the Mariana Trough back-arc basin occurs just south of the AVP although back-arc seafloor spreading has not begun. Here we report the results of dredge sampling of the West Mariana Ridge (WMR) in the region of rift propagation; this recovered exclusively medium K to shoshonitic basalts that show clear arc-like geochemical signatures. Ar-Ar ages of WMR shoshonitics systematically young northward. Age of c. 6 Ma was obtained at 21.5°N, c. 3 Ma at 23-23.5°N, and zero-age shoshonites occur on Io-to Island (formerly Iwo Jima) at 24.8°N. Shoshonitic magmatism migrated northward at 4.3 cm/year, in advance of northward-propagating Mariana Trough rifting. This implies that AVP shoshonitic magmatism manifests processes and sources that are uniquely associated with earliest back-arc basin rifting. High-precision Pb isotopic analyses reveal that WMR lavas form a single trend between 2 components, one with lower 206Pb/ 204Pb and high Δ7/4 (arc-like), and another with high 206Pb/ 204Pb as well as low Δ 7/4 and 8/4 (HIMU-like). These components could correspond respectively to subducted pelagic sediment and subducted seamounts and volcaniclastics with HIMU isotopic signature. These slab-derived components alone, however, cannot fully explain chemical characteristics of WMR shoshonitic lavas. These lavas require a component with high Δ7/4 and high Ce/Pb, which is not likely to be either pelagic sediment or seamount volcanics. This component is only expressed when rifting begins, suggesting that it resides in enriched lithosphere or uppermost asthenosphere, which is easily melted due to decompression caused by rifting, when the lithosphere is first ruptured. This component might be linked to slow

  15. Using Zircon to Reconstruct the Magmatic History of Icelandic Rhyolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, T. L.; Miller, C. F.; Wooden, J. L.; Barth, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    We are investigating zircon in Icelandic rhyolite from major historical eruptions: Askja (1875 AD), Torfajokull (1477 AD), Hekla (1104 AD), and Oraefajokull (1362 AD). This focused study of Icelandic zircon (the first to combine trace element analysis and U-Th dating) adds critical compositional, geochronological and thermal insight into the history of silicic magmatism in Iceland. Icelandic zircons share a number of characteristics that distinguish them from continental arc and interior zircon. CL imaging reveals that they lack complex zoning (evidence for fluctuating conditions) which is common in continental settings. Zoning is weakly displayed except for dark (CL) cores in Oraefajokull and Torfajokull zircons. Elemental analyses reveal low U (<200 ppm except for dark cores), U/Th (<1) and Hf (<10,000 ppm) and high Ti (>10 ppm). Ti-in-zircon thermometry indicates that these zircons grew at temperatures of 800-900C (assuming a(TiO2) ~0.5-0.8). Precision of U-Th disequilibria ages is limited by generally low U and U/Th, but the data demonstrate that (1) the age-range is far less than is common in continental magmatic settings (typically hundreds of thousands to millions of years), but (2) most ages ages are demonstrably older than eruption. Torfajokull, Oraefajokull and Hekla zircon populations all span a range of ages from near-zero to approximately 40ky, with a majority of ages between 10 and 40 ky (extremely low-U Askja zircons yield no useful age information). These findings are corroborated by zircons from prehistoric eruptions of Torfajokull which record a similar history, with the majority of zircon ages predating eruptions by 10-40 ky. Though zircons from all of these volcanoes share many general characteristics, each zircon population is compositionally distinct. Notably, Ti concentrations (thus calculated temperatures) correlate with tectonic setting. Zircons from Askja, an on-rift volcano, grew at the highest estimated temperatures (average ~870C

  16. Thermal Effects in the Hydrothermal Regime of Magmatic-Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, P. A.

    2002-05-01

    Models of conductive and convective cooling of epizonal magma bodies commonly show temperatures in the country rock that are at or below 500 C. Indeed, simple conductive cooling models place the contact temperature below the midpoint of the intrusion and country rock temperatures, which for felsic magmas in cold country rock (cf. Furlong et al., 1991, Rev. in Min. v. 26), is approximately 500 C or lower. However, some vein systems record temperatures e.g. from fluid inclusions or phase equilibria that exceed 500 C. In some cases, as in some deep skarn deposits, high temperatures of ore deposition probably result from high country rock temperatures. Veins may also occur in the already cooled portions of an ore-generative pluton, which can be at any temperature below the solidus. In still other cases, high country rock temperatures may be heated by previous magmatic events (thermal ground preparation). However, high temperatures of mineral alteration or deposition may be produced in initially cold country rock by flux of high temperature magmatic volatile phase from the magma itself. This is a likely explanation when ore is associated with early stages of magmatism at shallow levels in the crust. The mass conservation equations of infiltration theory (cf. Ferry, 1991, Rev. in Min. v. 26), can be used to estimate time-integrated fluid fluxes, q, given changes in quartz solubility with temperature, geothermal and geobaric gradients in shallow magmatic environments, and order of magnitude vein quartz densities in porphyry copper deposits. The change in the silica content of the rock due to quartz veining is then given by: \\Delta cQZ =- \\int Jw dt \\times \

  17. Reconstruction of Late Cretaceous Magmatic Arcs in the Northern Andes: Single Versus Multiple Arc Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Leon, S.; Hincapie, S.; Mejia, D.; Patino, A. M.; Vanegas, J.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.; Jimenez, G.; Monsalve, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although magmatic rocks are major tracers of the geological evolution of convergent margins, pre-collisional events such as subduction erosion, collisional thrusting or late collisional strike slip segmentation may difficult the recognizing of multiple arc systems and therefore the existence of paleogeographic scenarios with multiple subduction systems. New field, U-Pb geochronology and whole rock geochemistry constraints from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera in the states of Antioquia and Caldas (Colombia) are used to understand the nature of the Late Cretaceous arc magmatism and evaluate the existence of single or multiple Pacific and Caribbean arc systems in the growth of the Northwestern Andes. The new results integrated with additional field and published information is used to suggest the existence of at least three different magmatic arcs. (1) An Eastern Continental arc built within a well defined Permian to Triassic continental crust that record a protracted 90-70 Ma magmatic evolution, (2) a 90-80 arc formed within attenuated continental crust and associated oceanic crust, (3) 90-88 Ma arc formed over a Late Cretaceous plateau crust. The eastern arcs were formed as part of double eastern vergent subduction system, where the most outboard arc represent a fringing arc formed over detached fragments of continental crust, whereas the easternmost continental arc growth by the closure an subduction of and older and broad Triassic to Early Jurassic back-arc ocean. Its closure also end up in ophiolite emplacement. The third allochtonous oceanic arc was formed over the Caribbean plateau crust and was accreted to the continental margin in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing paleomagnetic, deformational, gravimetric and basin analysis will be integrate to test this model and understand the complex Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes.

  18. Underthrusting of passive margin strata into deep crustal hot zones associated with Cretaceous arc magmatism in North America: links and timescales of magmatic vs. tectonic thickening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, E. J.; Lee, C.; Tollstrup, D. L.; Xie, L.; Wimpenny, J.; Yin, Q.

    2011-12-01

    crust at ~100 Ma, during the peak of Cretaceous arc magmatism. We envision underthrusting of N. American lithosphere beneath the active Sierran arc as the mechanism for transporting these sediments to high P, T conditions, but underthrusting cold continental lithosphere alone cannot explain the xenoliths' high final temperatures. An additional heat source, derived from deep crustal magmatic "hot zones", seems required. We are currently exploring diffusion modeling in garnet porphyroblasts as a way to estimate rates of thickening. Because the protoliths were initially garnet-free, growth of metamorphic garnet can potentially record the length of time it took the metaquartzites to achieve their high P, T conditions. We will also use Ti zonation in detrital zircons as an added constraint on timescales involved in thickening. So far, our results indicate firsthand that tectonic underthrusting of continental supracrustal rocks extends all the way into deep magmatic zones beneath arcs, implying that magmatic differentiation alone is not the only mechanism by which continental crust achieves its felsic composition.

  19. Spatial and temporal variation of OIB-like magmatism in the Western Pacific: Plume or non-plume related enriched magmatism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Taylor, R. N.; Ohara, Y.; Tani, K.; Yuasa, M.

    2012-12-01

    We present new 40Ar/39Ar ages as well as geochemical data for samples recovered from bathymetric highs in the West Philippine Basin (WPB) and Daito Ridge group in the Philippine Sea. This data defines the volcanic history of OIB-like magmatism in and around the WPB and enables a tectonic reconstruction of the early history of the Philippine Sea. The prominent bathymetric features in the WPB include broad highs (plateaus) of Benham Rise and Urdaneta Plateau which lie at equal distances from the extinct spreading centre of the WPB. The northern margin of the WPB is marked by Daito Ridge group, including Oki-Daito and Daito Ridges, and Amami Plateau as well as the recently-defined Oki-Daito Rise. New drilling and dredge sampling from these bathymetric features as well as from the WPB, recovered dominantly basaltic lavas with minor but significant quantites of more differentiated volcanic rocks. Basalts with OIB-like geochemical characteristics (an overall enrichment of incompatible elements and associated radiogenic isotopes) were found from these bathymetric highs and some locations on the Daito Ridge group. In addition, basalts from the WPB are found to have variable enrichment relative to N-MORB. The age range obtained from OIB-like basalts from Urdaneta Plateau (34.6 to 38.0Ma) agrees with that reported from the Benham Rise. Meanwhile, older ages of around 40-42 Ma were obtained from basalts from the Oki-Daito Rise, north of Urdaneta Plateau. These ages overlap with those we have determined from the Minami-Daito Basin (Hickey-Vargas, 1998). This implies that Urdaneta Plateau and Oki-Daito Rise represent age-progressive record of OIB-like magmatism in the West Philippine Basin, and the source for the OIB-like magmatism existed near the spreading center of the West Philippine Basin at 34-42 Ma. Significantly, the OIB-like magmatism is not restricted to the plateaus, but is also found on the WPB floor. This might indicate that besides the continuous supply of the

  20. Martian Magmatic-Driven Hydrothermal Sites: Potential Sources of Energy, Water, and Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Dohm, J. M.; Baker, V. R.; Ferris, J. C.; Hare, T. M.; Tanaka, K. L.; Klemaszewski, J. E.; Skinner, J. A.; Scott, D. H.

    2000-07-01

    Magmatic-driven processes and impact events dominate the geologic record of Mars. Such recorded geologic activity coupled with significant evidence of past and present-day water/ice, above and below the martian surface, indicate that hydrothermal environments certainly existed in the past and may exist today. The identification of such environments, especially long-lived magmatic-driven hydrothermal environments, provides NASA with significant target sites for future sample return missions, since they (1) could favor the development and sustenance of life, (2) may comprise a large variety of exotic mineral assemblages, and (3) could potentially contain water/ice reservoirs for future Mars-related human activities. If life developed on Mars, the fossil record would presumably be at its greatest concentration and diversity in environments where long-term energy sources and water coexisted such as at sites where long-lived, magmatic-driven hydrothermal activity occurred. These assertions are supported by terrestrial analogs. Small, single-celled creatures (prokaryotes) are vitally important in the evolution of the Earth; these prokaryotes are environmentally tough and tolerant of environmental extremes of pH, temperature, salinity, and anoxic conditions found around hydrothermal vents. In addition, there is a great ability for bacteria to survive long periods of geologic time in extreme conditions, including high temperature hydrogen sulfide and sulfur erupted from Mount St. Helens volcano. Our team of investigators is conducting a geological investigation using multiple mission-derived datasets (e.g., existing geologic map data, MOC imagery, MOLA, TES image data, geophysical data, etc.) to identify prime target sites of hydrothermal activity for future hydrological, mineralogical, and biological investigations. The identification of these sites will enhance the probability of success for future missions to Mars.

  1. Martian Magmatic-Driven Hydrothermal Sites: Potential Sources of Energy, Water, and Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Dohm, J. M.; Baker, V. R.; Ferris, J. C.; Hare, T. M.; Tanaka, K. L.; Klemaszewski, J. E.; Skinner, J. A.; Scott, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    Magmatic-driven processes and impact events dominate the geologic record of Mars. Such recorded geologic activity coupled with significant evidence of past and present-day water/ice, above and below the martian surface, indicate that hydrothermal environments certainly existed in the past and may exist today. The identification of such environments, especially long-lived magmatic-driven hydrothermal environments, provides NASA with significant target sites for future sample return missions, since they (1) could favor the development and sustenance of life, (2) may comprise a large variety of exotic mineral assemblages, and (3) could potentially contain water/ice reservoirs for future Mars-related human activities. If life developed on Mars, the fossil record would presumably be at its greatest concentration and diversity in environments where long-term energy sources and water coexisted such as at sites where long-lived, magmatic-driven hydrothermal activity occurred. These assertions are supported by terrestrial analogs. Small, single-celled creatures (prokaryotes) are vitally important in the evolution of the Earth; these prokaryotes are environmentally tough and tolerant of environmental extremes of pH, temperature, salinity, and anoxic conditions found around hydrothermal vents. In addition, there is a great ability for bacteria to survive long periods of geologic time in extreme conditions, including high temperature hydrogen sulfide and sulfur erupted from Mount St. Helens volcano. Our team of investigators is conducting a geological investigation using multiple mission-derived datasets (e.g., existing geologic map data, MOC imagery, MOLA, TES image data, geophysical data, etc.) to identify prime target sites of hydrothermal activity for future hydrological, mineralogical, and biological investigations. The identification of these sites will enhance the probability of success for future missions to Mars.

  2. Monitoring the State of the Magmatic Structures of Elbrus Volcano Based on Observation of Lithosphere Strains

    SciTech Connect

    Milyukov, Vadim; Myasnikov, Andrey; Mironov, Alexey

    2008-06-24

    An analysis of crustal strain recorded by the Baksan laser interferometer revealed a shallow magma chamber in the structure of Elbrus Volcano (The Northern Caucasus, Russia). The analysis is based on estimation of parameters of magmatic structures resonant modes excited by teleseismic signals. The resonance parameters we have found were interpreted in the framework of contemporary models of magma resonators. The depth and dimension of the magma chamber, as well as the properties of the magma fluid were estimated. It was suggested the changing the magma state due to rising the intrachamber pressure.

  3. Collision zone magmatism aids continental crustal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savov, Ivan; Meliksetian, Khachatur; Ralf, Halama; Gevorg, Navasardian; Chuck, Connor; Massimo, D'Antonio; Samuele, Agostini; Osamu, Ishizuka; Sergei, Karapetian; Arkadi, Karakhanian

    2014-05-01

    The continental crust has a broadly andesitic bulk composition and is predominantly generated at convergent margins. However, estimates of the bulk composition of oceanic arcs indicate a bulk composition closer to basalt than to andesite. Hence, reworking processes that transform basaltic island arc crust into andesitic continental crust are essential[1] and explaining growth of andesitic continental crust via accretion of arc crustal fragments remains problematic. Recent studies of magmatism in the Great Tibetan Plateau[2], as site of multiple and still active continent-continent collisions, have proposed that andesitic CC is generated via amalgamation of large volumes of collision-related felsic magmas generated by melting of hydrated oceanic crust with mantle geochemical signatures. We aim to test this hypothesis by evaluating geochemical data from the volcanically and tectonically active Lesser Caucasus region (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia and E. Turkey), as the only other region where active continent-continent collision takes place. We will benefit from the newly compiled volcano-tectonic database of collision-related volcanic and plutonic rocks of Armenia that is comparable in quality and detail to the one available on Tibet. Our dataset combines several detailed studies from the large Aragats shield volcano[3] and associated monogenetic volcanic fields (near the capital city of Yerevan), as well as > 500 Quaternary to Holocene volcanoes from Gegham, Vardenis and Syunik volcanic highlands (toward Armenia-Nagorno-Karabakh-Azerbaijan-Iran border). The Armenian collision-related magmatism is diverse in volume, composition, eruption style and volatile contents. Interestingly, the majority of exposed volcanics are andesitic in composition. Nearly all collision-related volcanic rocks, even the highly differentiated dacite and rhyolite ignimbrites, have elevated Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios varying only little (average ~ 0.7043 and ~ 0

  4. Volatile Exsolution Experiments: Sampling Exsolved Magmatic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattitch, B.; Blundy, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    In magmatic arcs the conditions of volatile exsolution exert a direct control on the composition of exsolved magmatic volatiles phases (MVPs), as well as on their parental magmas. The ability to accurately assess the exchange of major and trace elements between MVPs and magmas is key to understanding the evolution of arc magmas. The trace element signatures measured in arc volcanoes, fumaroles, and hydrothermal ore deposits are greatly influenced by the role of MVPs. In order to investigate the interplay and evolution of melts and MVPs we need experimental methods to simulate MVP exsolution that impose minimal external constraints on their equilibration. Previous experiments have focused on evaluating the exchange of elements between aqueous fluids and silicate melts under equilibrium conditions[1,2]. However, the large mass proportion of fluid to melt in these experiment designs is unrealistic. As a result, the idealized compositions of the aqueous fluids may exert a strong control on melt compositions for which they are out of equilibrium, especially at low melt fractions. In contrast, other experiments have focused on the melt during crystallization but must calculate MVP compositions by mass balance[3]. In order to investigate MVPs and magmas during this critical period of MVP exsolution, we present a new two-stage fluid-melt experimental design. Stage one experiments generate super-liquidus hydrous melts using Laguna del Maule rhyolites and dactites, as analogues for ascending arc magmas. Stage two experiments allow aliquots of stage one melt/glass to crystallize and exsolve MVPs. The design then uses pressure cycling to promote infiltration of in-situ fractured quartz[4] and traps the MVPs as synthetic fluid inclusions. We present results from trial stage 2 experiments, which produced synthetic fluid inclusions consistent with literature values of fluid-melt Cl partitioning[5] and of sufficient size for LA-ICPMS analysis. Trace element partitioning for Li, Na

  5. Magmatic intrusions in the lunar crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, C.; Thorey, C.

    2015-10-01

    The lunar highlands are very old, with ages covering a timespan between 4.5 to 4.2 Gyr, and probably formed by flotation of light plagioclase minerals on top of the lunar magma ocean. The lunar crust provides thus an invaluable evidence of the geological and magmatic processes occurring in the first times of the terrestrial planets history. According to the last estimates from the GRAIL mission, the lunar primary crust is particularly light and relatively thick [1] This low-density crust acted as a barrier for the dense primary mantle melts. This is particularly evident in the fact that subsequent mare basalts erupted primarily within large impact basin: at least part of the crust must have been removed for the magma to reach the surface. However, the trajectory of the magma from the mantle to the surface is unknown. Using a model of magma emplacement below an elastic overlying layer with a flexural wavelength Λ, we characterize the surface deformations induced by the presence of shallow magmatic intrusions. We demonstrate that, depending on its size, the intrusion can show two different shapes: a bell shape when its radius is smaller than 4 times Λ or a flat top with small bended edges if its radius is larger than 4 times Λ[2]. These characteristic shapes for the intrusion result in characteristic deformations at the surface that also depend on the topography of the layer overlying the intrusion [3].Using this model we provide evidence of the presence of intrusions within the crust of the Moon as surface deformations in the form of low-slope lunar domes and floor-fractured craters. All these geological features have morphologies consistent with models of magma spreading at depth and deforming an overlying elastic layer. Further more,at floor-fractured craters, the deformation is contained within the crater interior, suggesting that the overpressure at the origin of magma ascent and intrusion was less than the pressure due to the weight of the crust removed by

  6. Magmatic volatiles and the weathering of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. C.

    1993-01-01

    The sources for volatiles on Mars have been the subject of many hypotheses for exogenous influences including late accretion of volatile-enriched material, impact devolatilization to create massive early atmospheres, and even major bombardment by comets. However, the inventory of chemically active volatiles observable at the contemporary surface of Mars is consistent with domination by endogenous, subsequent planetary processes, viz., persistent magmatic outgassing. Volcanism on Mars has been widespread in both space and time. Notwithstanding important specific differences between the mantles of Earth and Mars, the geochemical similarities are such that the suite of gases emitted from Martian volcanic activity should include H2O, CO2, S-containing gases (e.g. H2S and/or SO2), and Cl-containing gases (e.g., Cl2 and/or HCl). H2O and CO2 exist in the atmosphere of Mars. Both are also present as surface condensates. However, spectroscopic observations of the Martian atmosphere clearly show that the S- and Cl-containing gases are severely depleted, with upper limits of less than or equal to 10(exp -7) the abundance of CO2. Likewise, there is no evidence of polar condensates of compounds of these elements as there is for CO2 and H2O. Within the soil, on the other hand, there has been direct measurement of incorporated H2O and abundant compounds containing S and Cl. Barring some as yet implausible geochemical sequestering process, the S/Cl ratio of about 6:1 in Martian soils implies a limit of 5% on the contribution of matter of solarlike composition (e.g., carbonaceous chondrite or cometary material) to these volatiles. Hence, exogenous sources are minor or not yet observed. From analysis of elemental trends in Martian soils, it has been recently shown that a simple two-component model can satisfy the Viking in situ measurements. Component A includes Si and most or all the Al, Ca, Ti, and Fe. Component B, taken as 16 +/- 3% by weight of the total, contains S and most or

  7. Radiocarbon in hydrologic systems containing dissolved magmatic carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, T.P.; Davisson, M.L.

    1996-09-06

    In regions of active volcanism, the presence of magmatic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in regional hydrologic systems provides a radiocarbon-depleted tracer for delineating ground-water transport and mixing processes and provides a means of assessing regional magmatic carbon fluxes. Variations in the stable carbon isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 13}C) and carbon-14 values of springs and surface waters from the southern Cascade Range show consistent patterns of carbon isotopic mixing between magmatic, biogenic, and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reservoirs. Radiocarbon measurements of waters from the Lassen region in northern California were used to construct a ground-water carbon-14 contour map, revealing principal subsurface flow paths and a broad region of diffuse magmatic CO{sub 2} flux. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Does magmatism influence low-angle normal faulting?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Thompson, George A.

    1993-01-01

    Synextensional magmatism has long been recognized as a ubiquitous characteristic of highly extended terranes in the western Cordillera of the United States. Intrusive magmatism can have severe effects on the local stress field of the rocks intruded. Because a lower angle fault undergoes increased normal stress from the weight of the upper plate, it becomes more difficult for such a fault to slide. However, if the principal stress orientations are rotated away from vertical and horizontal, then a low-angle fault plane becomes more favored. We suggest that igneous midcrustal inflation occurring at rates faster than regional extension causes increased horizontal stresses in the crust that alter and rotate the principal stresses. Isostatic forces and continued magmatism can work together to create the antiformal or domed detachment surface commonly observed in the metamorphic core complexes of the western Cordillera. Thermal softening caused by magmatism may allow a more mobile mid-crustal isostatic response to normal faulting.

  9. Prolonged post-rift magmatism on highly extended crust of divergent continental margins (Baiyun Sag, South China Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fang; Alves, Tiago M.; Wu, Shiguo; Li, Wei; Huuse, Mads; Mi, Lijun; Sun, Qiliang; Ma, Benjun

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic, borehole and geochemical data reveal a prolonged phase of post-rift magmatism on highly extended crust of the Baiyun Sag, South China Sea. Two volcanic complexes are identified and described in the context of continental rifting and diachronous continental breakup of the South China Sea. Biostratigraphic data from exploration wells BY7-1 and BY2, complemented by K-Ar datings from core samples, confirm that magmatic activity in the Baiyun Sag occurred in two main stages: (1) a first episode at the base of the Miocene (23.8 Ma); and (2) a second episode occurring at the end of the Early Miocene (17.6 Ma). The relative location of volcanic complexes in the Baiyun Sag, and their stratigraphic position, reveals prolonged magmatism inboard of the ocean-continent transition zone during continental breakup. We suggest that magmatism in the Baiyun Sag reflects progressive continental breakup in the South China Sea, with the last volcanic episode marking the end of a breakup sequence representing the early post-rift tectonic events associated with the continental breakup process. Seismic and borehole data from this breakup sequence records diachronous magma emplacement and complex changes in depositional environments during continental breakup.

  10. Fluid-magmatic systems and volcanic centers in Northern Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobisevich, Alexey L.; Masurenkov, Yuri P.; Pouzich, Irina N.; Laverova, Ninel I.

    2014-05-01

    The fluid-magmatic activity within modern and Holocene volcanic centers of The Greater Caucasus is considered. Results of complimentary geological and geophysical studies carried out in the Elbrus volcanic area and the Pyatigorsk volcanic center are presented. The deep magmatic source and the peripheral magmatic chamber of the Elbrus volcano are outlined via comparative analysis of geological and experimental geophysical data (microgravity studies, magneto-telluric sounding, temperature variations measured in carbonaceous mineral waters). It has been determined that the peripheral magmatic chamber and the deep magmatic source are located at depths of 0-7 and 20-30 km below sea level, respectively, and the geothermal gradient beneath the volcano is 100°C/km. In this study, analysis of processes of modern heat outflux produced by carbonaceous springs in the Elbrus volcanic center is carried out with respect to updated information about spatial configuration of deep fluid-magmatic structures. It has been shown, that observed degradation and the rate of melting for the glaciers on the volcano's eastern slope are related both to climatic variations and endogenic heat flux. In the area of Caucasus Mineral Waters (Pyatigorsk volcanic center) the annular zonality of structural, petro-geochemical, geothermal, and hydrochemical features has been found. The likelihood of existence of peripheral magmatic source at depth of 9 - 15 km is suggested. The relation between hydro-chemical properties of Caucasus Mineral Waters and structural as well as petrologic and geochemical features of the fluid-magmatic system of the Pyatigorsk volcanic center is determined and discussed.

  11. Cenozoic extension and magmatism in Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, S. J.; Spencer, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Basin and Range Province of Arizona was the site of two episodes of Cenozoic extension that can be distinguished on the basis of timing, direction and style of extension, and associated magmatism. The first episode of extension occurred during Oligocene to mid-Miocene time and resulted in the formation of low-angle detachment faults, ductile shear zones (metamorphic core complexes), and regional domains of tilted fault blocks. Evidence for extreme middle Tertiary crustal extension in a NE to SW to SW to ENE to WSW direction has been recognized in various parts of the Basin and Range of Arizona, especially in the Lake Mead area and along the belf of metamorphic core complexes that crosses southern Arizona from Parker to Tucson. New geologic mapping and scrutiny of published geologic maps indicates that significant middle Tertiary extension is more widely distributed than previously thought. The state can be subdivided into regional tilt-block domains in which middle Tertiary rocks dip consistently in one direction. The dip direction in any tilt-block domain is generally toward the breakaway of a low-angle detachment fault that underlies the tilt-block domain; we interpret this an indicating that normal faults in the upper plate of a detechment fault are generally synthetic, rather than antithetic, with respect to the detachment fault.

  12. Platinum metals in magmatic sulfide ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naldrett, A.J.; Duke, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  13. Hydrous reactive flow and magmatic channelisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Richard; Manning, Craig; Spiegelman, Marc; Kelemen, Peter

    2010-05-01

    It is broadly accepted that the dominant mechanism of melt production in subduction zones is hydrous flux melting. This type of melting occurs when hydrous fluids, released by metamorphic reactions in the subducting slab, metasomatize the mantle wedge. As hydrous fluid rises off the subducting slab it encounters higher temperatures within the mantle. The volatile elements in the hydrous fluid (principally water) depress the solidus of the mantle and cause melting. This can be thought of as a reactive flow process whereby a chemically reactive liquid migrates through a soluble matrix, up a solubility gradient---with increasing temperature, the hydrous fluid becomes increasingly undersaturated in silicate rock components. The fluid is therefore corrosive and hydrous melting is understood as a dissolution process. Under these conditions, the flow can be affected by the Reactive Infiltration Instability, which leads to channelization. In this talk I introduce a themochemical/fluid dynamical model to investigate this scenario and show that for plausible conditions in the mantle wedge, channelized magmatic transport is expected.

  14. Nominally hydrous magmatism on the Moon

    PubMed Central

    McCubbin, Francis M.; Steele, Andrew; Hauri, Erik H.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Yamashita, Shigeru; Hemley, Russell J.

    2010-01-01

    For the past 40 years, the Moon has been described as nearly devoid of indigenous water; however, evidence for water both on the lunar surface and within the lunar interior have recently emerged, calling into question this long-standing lunar dogma. In the present study, hydroxyl (as well as fluoride and chloride) was analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry in apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH)] from three different lunar samples in order to obtain quantitative constraints on the abundance of water in the lunar interior. This work confirms that hundreds to thousands of ppm water (of the structural form hydroxyl) is present in apatite from the Moon. Moreover, two of the studied samples likely had water preserved from magmatic processes, which would qualify the water as being indigenous to the Moon. The presence of hydroxyl in apatite from a number of different types of lunar rocks indicates that water may be ubiquitous within the lunar interior, potentially as early as the time of lunar formation. The water contents analyzed for the lunar apatite indicate minimum water contents of their lunar source region to range from 64 ppb to 5 ppm H2O. This lower limit range of water contents is at least two orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported value for the bulk Moon, and the actual source region water contents could be significantly higher. PMID:20547878

  15. Nominally hydrous magmatism on the Moon.

    PubMed

    McCubbin, Francis M; Steele, Andrew; Hauri, Erik H; Nekvasil, Hanna; Yamashita, Shigeru; Hemley, Russell J

    2010-06-22

    For the past 40 years, the Moon has been described as nearly devoid of indigenous water; however, evidence for water both on the lunar surface and within the lunar interior have recently emerged, calling into question this long-standing lunar dogma. In the present study, hydroxyl (as well as fluoride and chloride) was analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry in apatite [Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)(F,Cl,OH)] from three different lunar samples in order to obtain quantitative constraints on the abundance of water in the lunar interior. This work confirms that hundreds to thousands of ppm water (of the structural form hydroxyl) is present in apatite from the Moon. Moreover, two of the studied samples likely had water preserved from magmatic processes, which would qualify the water as being indigenous to the Moon. The presence of hydroxyl in apatite from a number of different types of lunar rocks indicates that water may be ubiquitous within the lunar interior, potentially as early as the time of lunar formation. The water contents analyzed for the lunar apatite indicate minimum water contents of their lunar source region to range from 64 ppb to 5 ppm H(2)O. This lower limit range of water contents is at least two orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported value for the bulk Moon, and the actual source region water contents could be significantly higher. PMID:20547878

  16. Numerical simulation of magmatic hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Geiger, S.; Hurwitz, S.; Driesner, T.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of magmatic hydrothermal systems entails coupled and nonlinear multiphase flow, heat and solute transport, and deformation in highly heterogeneous media. Thus, quantitative analysis of these systems depends mainly on numerical solution of coupled partial differential equations and complementary equations of state (EOS). The past 2 decades have seen steady growth of computational power and the development of numerical models that have eliminated or minimized the need for various simplifying assumptions. Considerable heuristic insight has been gained from process-oriented numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts employing relatively complete EOS and accurate transport calculations have revealed dynamic behavior that was damped by linearized, less accurate models, including fluid property control of hydrothermal plume temperatures and three-dimensional geometries. Other recent modeling results have further elucidated the controlling role of permeability structure and revealed the potential for significant hydrothermally driven deformation. Key areas for future reSearch include incorporation of accurate EOS for the complete H2O-NaCl-CO2 system, more realistic treatment of material heterogeneity in space and time, realistic description of large-scale relative permeability behavior, and intercode benchmarking comparisons. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Devonian magmatism in Brooks Range, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Dillion, J.T.; Tilton, G.R.

    1985-04-01

    Devonian bimodel metaplutonic and metavolcanic rocks lie in parallel, west-trending belts in the southern Brooks Range. Overlapping distribution of the plutonic and volcanic rocks occurs in volcanic centers found south of the Doonerak window in the Wiseman, Chandalar, and Colleen quadrangles, and near the Beaver Creek pluton in the Survey Pass quadrangle. The Devonian age is interpreted from isotopic analyses of U and Pb of over 55 zircon fractions from these felsic metaigneous units. Considering concordia plots and Pb-Pb ages from over 40 discordant zircon fractions and fossil ages derived from marbles intercalated in the volcanic sequences, the authors see an age range of 360-410 Ma. The age range is attributed to variation in crystallization ages, as well as the U-Pb systematics of the Brooks Range zircons. Their overlapping age and distribution provides evidence for cogenesis of the Devonian plutonic and volcanic rocks, and also for their correlation with Devonian magmatic rocks of the North American Cordilleran. Lower intercepts on U-Pb concordia diagrams for these zircons range from 105 to 150 Ma, bracketing the end of lead loss resulting from metamorphism. The age of this metamorphic event corresponds to the Late Jurassic and earliest Cretaceous emplacement of the Angayucham terrane. U-Pb concordia plots of 15 zircon fractions from five samples of the Ernie Lake granitic gneiss bodies are explained as latest Proterozoic intrusion of granitic magma with entrained 2-Ga-old zircons, which subsequently lost lead during Mesozoic metamorphism.

  18. U-Pb zircon and geochemical evidence for bimodal mid-Paleozoic magmatism and syngenetic base-metal mineralization in the Yukon-Tanana terrane, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; Wooden, J.L.; Hopkins, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    New SHRIMP (sensitive, high-resolution ion microprobe) U-Pb zircon ages and trace element geochemical data for mafic and felsic metaigneous rocks of the pericratonic Yukon-Tanana terrane in east-central Alaska help define the tectonic setting of mid-Paleozoic magmatism and syngenetic hydrothermal Zn-Pb-Ag mineralization along the ancient Pacific margin of North America. We compare data from similar greenschist-facies sequences of bimodal volcanic and subvolcanic rocks associated with carbonaceous and siliciclastic marine sedimentary rocks, in the Wood River area of the Alaska Range and the Salcha River area of the Yukon-Tanana Upland, and from amphibolite-facies augen gneiss and mafic gneiss (amphibolite) in the Goodpaster River area of the upland. Allowing for analytical uncertainties, igneous crystallization age ranges of 376-353 Ma, 378-346 Ma, and 374-358 Ma are indicated by 13 new SHRIMP U-Pb dates for the Wood River, Salcha River, and Goodpaster River areas, respectively. Bimodal magmatism is indicated by Late Devonian crystallization ages for both augen gneiss (371 ?? 3 and 362 ?? 4 Ma) and associated orthoamphibolite (369 ?? 3 Ma) in the upland and by stratigraphic interleaving of mafic and felsic rocks in the Alaska Range. Metabasites in all three study areas have elevated HFSE (high field strength element) and REE (rare earth element) contents indicative of generation in a within-plate (extensional) tectonic setting. Within-plate trace element signatures also are indicated for peralkaline metarhyolites that host the largest volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits of the Bonnifield district in the Wood River area and for metarhyolite tuff interlayered with the carbonaceous Nasina assemblage, which hosts sedimentary exhalative sulfide occurrences in the Salcha River area. Most of the other felsic metaigneous samples from the Alaska Range and the Yukon-Tanana Upland have geochemical signatures that are similar to those of both average upper continental crust

  19. Eocene to Pleistocene magmatic evolution of the Delarof Islands, Aleutian Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaen, Allen J.; Jicha, Brian R.; Kay, Suzanne M.; Singer, Brad S.; Tibbetts, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    The Delarof Islands in the Aleutian Arc near 179º W record ˜37 million years of discontinuous arc magmatism along a SW-NE cross-arc transect from near the trench to the active volcanic front. Geochemical and geochronologic data from the pre-Pleistocene volcanic record in this region are limited and the 40Ar/39Ar, isotopic, and trace element data presented here are the first from units older than the Pleistocene-Holocene volcanoes (Tanaga, Gareloi). Twenty-two new 40Ar/39Ar ages establish a temporal framework for geochemical data and reveal that magmatism in the Delarof region was coincident with two arc-wide magmatic flare ups in the late Eocene/early Oligocene and latest Miocene/Pliocene. Mafic lavas and plutons in the southern Delarofs give 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages ranging from 36.8 ± 0.2 to 26.9 ± 0.6 Ma on Amatignak Island and 37.0 ± 0.2 to 29.3 ± 1.0 Ma on Ulak Island. To the north 25 km, 40Ar/39Ar ages from the central Delarof Islands, Kavalga, Ogliuga, and Skagul are late Miocene (6.28 ± 0.04 Ma) to Pliocene (4.77 ± 0.18 Ma) with younger ages to the northeast. A significant transition in arc chemistry occurs in the Pleistocene where lavas from active volcanoes Gareloi and Tanaga exhibit higher sediment and hydrous fluid signatures (Th/La, Cs/Ta, La/Sm, LILE abundances) and lower 143Nd/144Nd than older Delarof Island units closer to the trench. Similar findings from Eocene-Miocene lavas from Amchitka to Adak suggest that a previously minor sediment melt component became more pronounced in the Quaternary.

  20. Neoarchean arc magmatism followed by high-temperature, high-pressure metamorphism in the Nilgiri Block, southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Vinod O.; Sajeev, K.; Hokada, T.; Horie, K.; Itaya, T.

    2015-11-01

    The Nilgiri Block, southern India is an exhumed lower crust formed through arc magmatic processes in the Neoarchean. The main lithologies in this terrane include charnockites, gneisses, volcanic tuff, metasediments, banded iron formation and mafic-ultramafic bodies. Mafic-ultramafic rocks are present towards the northern and central part of the Nilgiri Block. We examine the evolution of these mafic granulites/metagabbros by phase diagram modeling and U-Pb sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) dating. They consist of a garnet-clinopyroxene-plagioclase-hornblende-ilmenite ± orthopyroxene ± rutile assemblage. Garnet and clinopyroxene form major constituents with labradorite and orthopyroxene as the main mineral inclusions. Labradorite, identified using Raman analysis, shows typical peaks at 508 cm- 1, 479 cm- 1, 287 cm- 1 and 177 cm- 1. It is stable along with orthopyroxene towards the low-pressure high-temperature region of the granulite facies (M1 stage). Subsequently, orthopyroxene reacted with plagioclase to form the peak garnet + clinopyroxene + rutile assemblage (M2 stage). The final stage is represented by amphibolite facies-hornblende and plagioclase-rim around the garnet-clinopyroxene assemblage (M3 stage). Phase diagram modeling shows that these mafic granulites followed an anticlockwise P-T-t path during their evolution. The initial high-temperature metamorphism (M1 stage) was at 850-900 °C and ~ 9 kbar followed by high-pressure granulite facies metamorphism (M2 stage) at 850-900 °C and 14-15 kbar. U-Pb isotope studies of zircons using SHRIMP revealed late Neoarchean to early paleoproterozoic ages of crystallization and metamorphism respectively. The age data shows that these mafic granulites have undergone arc magmatism at ca. 2539.2 ± 3 Ma and high-temperature, high-pressure metamorphism at ca. 2458.9 ± 8.6 Ma. Thus our results suggests a late Neoarchean arc magmatism followed by early paleoproterozoic high-temperature, high

  1. Fluid Dynamic Experiments on Mush Column Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan-Brown, R. E.; Marsh, B. D.

    2001-05-01

    A vertically extensive stack of sills interconnected by pipe-like conduits extending from the mantle through the lithosphere and capped by a volcanic center is a magmatic mush column. At any instant at various locations it contains fractionated and primitive melts as pools of nearly crystal-free magma, pools of crystal-rich magma, thick beds of cumulates, open conduits, and conduits congested by cognate and wall debris. All boundaries of the system are sheathed by solidification fronts. With the wide range of local, characteristic length scales there is a commensurate range of solidification time scales. This creates a complicated series of resistances to magma flow and provides a variety of distinct local physical environments for the chemical modification of magma. The system is driven by over-pressure from the addition of new melt from below. The over-pressure propagates upward by moving magma which flushes conduits, disrupts cumulate beds, and pools or purges sills. A critical aspect of this process is the entrainment, transport, and deposition of crystals throughout the system. Picritic lavas charges with entrained (tramp) olivine of a wide compositional range erupted at many systems (e.g. Jan Mayen, Kilauea, Reunion, etc.) are the final expression of this process. That the size and abundance of these crystals is correlated with eruptive flux (Murata & Richter, AJS, 1966) suggests an important indicator of the overall dynamics of the mush column. A mush column of this basic nature is observed is observed in the McMurdo Dry Valleys region of Antarctica and is inferred beneath Hawaii and the ocean ridges. We have attempted to model this process by studying the entrainment, transport, and deposition of particles in a vertical stack of sills (Plexiglas tanks) connected by resistive conduits (check valves), over-pressured from the base, and open at the top. The system is about two meters in height with water and oil as fluids and particles with Reynolds numbers

  2. Magmatic degassing at Erta 'Ale volcano, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, G. M.; Oppenheimer, C.; Tsanev, V. I.; Yirgu, G.

    2008-12-01

    Here we report measurements of the chemical composition and flux of gas emitted from the central lava lake at Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia) made on 15 October 2005. We determined an average SO 2 flux of ˜ 0.69 ± 0.17 kg s - 1 using zenith sky ultraviolet spectroscopy of the plume, and molar proportions of magmatic H 2O, CO 2, SO 2, CO, HCl and HF gases to be 93.58, 3.66, 2.47, 0.06, 0.19 and 0.04%, respectively, by open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry. Together, these data imply fluxes of 7.3, 0.7, 0.008, 0.03 and 0.004 kg s - 1 for H 2O, CO 2, CO, HCl and HF, respectively. These are the first FTIR spectroscopic observations at Erta 'Ale, and are also some of the very few gas measurements made at the volcano since the early 1970s (Gerlach, T.M., 1980b. Investigation of volcanic gas analyses and magma outgassing from Erta 'Ale lava lake, Afar, Ethiopia. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 7(3-4): 415-441). We identify significant increases in the proportion of H 2O in the plume with respect to both CO 2 and SO 2 across this 30-year interval, which we attribute to the depletion of volatiles in magma that sourced effusive eruptions during the early 1970s and/or to fractional magma degassing between the two active pit craters located in the summit caldera.

  3. Along-rift Variations in Deformation and Magmatism in the Ethiopian and Afar Rift Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keir, D.; Bastow, I. D.; Corti, G.; Mazzarini, F.; Rooney, T. O.

    2015-12-01

    The geological record at rifts and margins worldwide often reveals along-strike variations in volumes of extruded and intruded igneous rocks. These variations may be the result of asthenospheric heterogeneity, variations in rate, and timing of extension; alternatively, preexisting plate architecture and/or the evolving kinematics of extension during breakup may exert first-order control on magmatism. The Ethiopian and Afar Rift systems provide an excellent opportunity to address this since it exposes, along strike, several sectors of asynchronous rift development from continental rifting in the south to incipient oceanic spreading in the north. Here we perform studies of distribution and style of volcanism and faulting along strike in the MER and Afar. We also incorporate synthesis of geophysical, geochemical, and petrological constraints on magma generation and emplacement in order to discriminate between tectonic and mantle geodynamic controls on the geological record of a newly forming magmatic rift. Along-rift changes in extension by magma intrusion and plate stretching, and the three-dimensional focusing of melt where the rift dramatically narrows each influence igneous intrusion, volcanism and subsidence history. In addition, rift obliquity plays an important role in localizing intrusion into the crust beneath en echelon volcanic segments. Along-strike variations in volumes and types of igneous rocks found at rifted margins thus likely carry information about the development of strain during rifting, as well as the physical state of the convecting mantle at the time of breakup.

  4. Imaging the magmatic system of Newberry Volcano using Joint active source and teleseismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Benjamin A.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Bezada, Maximiliano J.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we combine active and passive source P wave seismic data to tomographically image the magmatic system beneath Newberry Volcano, located east of the Cascade arc. By using both travel times from local active sources and delay times from teleseismic earthquakes recorded on closely spaced seismometers (300-800 m), we significantly improve recovery of upper crustal velocity structure (<10 km depth). The tomographic model reveals a low-velocity feature between 3 and 5 km depth that lies beneath the caldera, consistent with a magma body. In contrast to earlier tomographic studies, where elevated temperatures were sufficient to explain the recovered low velocities, the larger amplitude low-velocity anomalies in our joint tomography model require low degrees of partial melt (˜10%), and a minimum melt volume of ˜2.5 km3. Furthermore, synthetic tests suggest that even greater magnitude low-velocity anomalies, and by inference larger volumes of magma (up to 8 km3), are needed to explain the observed waveform variability. The lateral extent and shape of the inferred magma body indicates that the extensional tectonic regime at Newberry influences the emplacement of magmatic intrusions. Our study shows that jointly inverting active source and passive source seismic data improves tomographic imaging of the shallow crustal seismic structure of volcanic systems and that active source experiments would benefit from longer deployment times to also record teleseismic sources.

  5. Three stages in the Late Paleozoic to Triassic magmatism of southwestern Gondwana, and the relationships with the volcanogenic events in coeval basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ana María; Llambías, Eduardo J.; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Castro, Carlos E.

    2015-11-01

    The intermediate to acid Choiyoi Magmatic Province is the most conspicuous feature along the Late Paleozic continental margin of southwestern Gondwana, and is generally regarded as the possible source for the widespread ash fall deposits interlayered with sedimentary sequences in the adjacent Gondwana basins. The Choiyoi magmatism is geologically constrained between the early Permian San Rafael orogenic phase and the Triassic extensional Huarpica phase in the region of Argentine Frontal Cordillera, Precordillera and San Rafael Block. In order to better assess the Choiyoi magmatism in Argentine Frontal Cordillera, we obtained 6 new LA-ICPMS U-Pb ages between 278.8 ± 3.4 Ma and 252.5 ± 1.9 Ma from plutonic rocks of the Colangüil Batholith and an associated volcanic rock. The global analysis of age data compiled from Chilean and Argentine Late Paleozoic to Triassic outcrops allows us to identify three stages of magmatism: (1) pre-Choiyoi orogenic magmatism, (2) Choiyoi magmatism (286-247 Ma), and (3) post-Choiyoi magmatism related to extensional tectonics. In the Choiyoi stage is there an eastward shift and expansion of the magmatism to the southeast, covering an extensive region that defines the Choiyoi magmatic province. On the basis of comparison with the ages from volcanogenic levels identified in the coeval Gondwana basins, we propose: (a) The pre-Choiyoi volcanism from the Paganzo basin (320-296 Ma) probably has a local source in addition to the Frontal Cordillera region. (b) The pre-Choiyoi and Choiyoi events identified in the Paraná basin (304-275 Ma) are likely to have their source in the Chilean Precordillera. (c) The early stage of the Choiyoi magmatism found in the Sauce Grande basin (284-281 Ma) may have come from the adjacent Las Matras to Chadileuvú blocks. (d) The pre-Choiyoi and Choiyoi events in the Karoo basins (302-253 Ma) include the longest Choiyoi interval, and as a whole bear the best resemblance to the age records along the Chilean and

  6. The southern margin of the Caribbean Plate in Venezuela: tectono-magmatic setting of the ophiolitic units and kinematic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunta, Giuseppe; Beccaluva, Luigi; Coltorti, Massimo; Siena, Franca; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2002-07-01

    The southern Caribbean Plate margin in Venezuela consists of a W-E elongated deformed belt, composed of several tectonic units dismembered along the northern part of the South America continental Plate since the Late Cretaceous. The present review, based on petrology and tectono-magmatic significance of each unit, makes it possible to define the main geotectonic elements and to reconstruct the paleogeographic domains from Late Jurassic to Tertiary: (a) Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) proto-Caribbean oceanic basin (Loma de Hierro Unit); (b) oceanic plateau (Dutch and Venezuelan Islands basement); (c) rifted continental margin (Cordillera de La Costa and Caucagua-El Tinaco Units) with Within Plate Tholeiitic (WPTh) magmatism; (d) an intra-oceanic subduction zone represented by Island Arc Tholeiitic (IAT) magmatism (Villa de Cura and Dos Hermanas Units) of Early Cretaceous age; (e) an Early Cretaceous ocean-continent subduction trench filled by melange (Franja Costera); (f) a new intra-oceanic subduction zone, represented by the tonalitic arc magmatism of Late Cretaceous age (Dutch and Venezuelan Islands). Regional tectonic constraints and coherent kinematic reconstruction suggest an original "near-Mid America" location of the Jurassic-Cretaceous "proto-Caribbean" oceanic realm. From Early to Late Cretaceous one sub-continental subduction with melanges (Franja Costera Unit) and two main stages of intra-oceanic arc magmatism are recorded in the so-called "eo-Caribbean" phases. The first consists of generally metamorphosed and deformed volcano-plutonic sequences with IAT affinity (Villa de Cura and Dos Hermanas Units), probably in relation to a southeastward-dipping subduction. The second is mainly represented by generally unmetamorphosed tonalitic intrusives cutting the oceanic plateau in the Dutch and Venezuelan Islands, and related to the new intra-oceanic subduction with reverse lithospheric sinking. The latter probably marked the onset of the Aves/Lesser Antilles arc

  7. Arabian Shield magmatic cycles and their relationship with Gondwana assembly: Insights from zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, F. A.; Foden, J. D.; Collins, A. S.; Payne, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Arabian Shield preserves a protracted magmatic record of amalgamated juvenile terranes that host a diverse range of early Neoproterozoic to Cambrian granitoids intruding volcanosedimentary basin assemblages that have corollaries in other parts of the East African Orogen. New zircon U-Pb geochronology of 19 granitoids intruding eight Arabian Shield terranes, define four discrete magmatic events: island arc (∼845 Ma), syncollisional (∼710 Ma), post-tectonic (∼620 Ma) and anorogenic (∼525 Ma). Zircon Lu-Hf isotopic analyses indicate that all studied granitoids are juvenile with typical εHf values of >+5 to +10 and Stenian-Tonian (∼1100-900 Ma) model ages, regardless of their precise intrusive ages or spatial relationship. Subtle changes in isotopic signatures between ∼850 and 600 Ma, suggest the result from changes in granite source materials brought about by; basaltic underplating, limited crustal interaction with Palaeoproterozoic basement and a change to lithospheric delamination/subduction roll-back processes driving juvenile ANS crustal growth. The cycle of granite intrusion reflects accretionary cycles initiated during Mozambique Ocean closure and during Gondwana amalgamation and final assembly. Post-tectonic magmatism is divided into a ∼636-600 Ma phase and post 600 Ma event that reflects first subduction and then within-plate related processes. The identification of magmatism at ∼525 Ma is now the youngest granitoid identified so far in the Saudi Arabian Shield and may change the identified age of the regional, basal Palaeozoic unconformity. This late magmatism may be generated by the Najd Fault reactivation correlating with the Malagasy/Kunnga Orogeny that marked the final stages of Gondwana assembly.

  8. Magmatic Differentiation Exposed on a Crustal Scale: A Field Example from Sierra Valle Fértil, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, T. J.; Bergantz, G. W.; Bachmann, O.

    2010-12-01

    Two endmember models of magmatic arc assembly have been proposed: (1) a model where an upper-crust silicic magma body is fed by a lower-crust mafic source area with the mid-crust largely uninvolved, serving as a transport zone, and (2), a model of progressive and spatially continuous construction of arc basement that requires a few million years of thermal maturation before voluminous silicic magmas accumulate in the upper crust. One way to assess the generality of these two models is to look at crustal cross-sections. A particularly well-exposed example of such a cross-section is within the Ordovician Famatinian magmatic arc, a 1500 km long suite of magmatic units ranging from deep mafic to shallower intermediate plutonic bodies and silicic eruptive products. The deepest complete section of the arc is exposed in the Sierras Valle Fértil-La Huerta (SVF) with magmatic crystallization pressures ranging from greater than 8 kb to 4 kb. The SVF displays continuous outcrop that preserves the geological record of the magmatic role of igneous input, thermal prograde processes, and assimilation during arc crust assembly, thereby allowing us to construct a time-composition-volume evolution of the SVF arc section. Field observations—such as large, multiply intruded gabbro bodies interspersed with metapelitic septa, the absence of regional vertical structures, a sharp horizontal contact between mafic and felsic units, minor pelite assimilation, and no remelting of precursory mafic forerunners (amphibolites)—constrain possible processes of magmatic differentiation and preserve complex features indicative of emplacement during a common thermal prograde event. CA-ID-TIMS U-Pb geochronology from gabbroic, dioritic, and granodioritic rocks in the SVF yields crystallization ages from 471.47 Ma to 467.14 Ma. This 4.33 Myr time frame for the initial construction and evolution of arc crust is consistent with examples from continental and oceanic arcs that indicate an active

  9. K-T magmatism of western Rajasthan, India: Manifestation of Reunion plume activity or extensional lithospheric tectonics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, K.

    2004-12-01

    A number of alkaline plutons have been recorded at the K-T (Cretaceous-Tertiary) boundary in western Rajasthan, India. Significant magmatism occurred at Mundwara, Barmer, Sarnu-Dandali and Tavider. The evolution of the Cambay-Sanchor-Barmer rift during the K-T period resulted in these alkaline complexes at the rift margins. Sedimentary basins are developed in the Barmer and Jaiselmer regions. The magmatism of Mundwara and Sarnu-Dandali is dated at 68.50 Ma and considered as an early pulse of Deccan volcanism. Several workers correlated K-T sedimentary basin evolution, magmatism and other tectonic features of western Rajasthan with the Reunion plume-interaction in the northwestern Indian shield. Alkaline igneous complexes along the rift from the southern part are reported from Phenai Mata, Amba Dongar and Seychelles. The Seychelles was part of the northwestern Indian shield prior to Deccan volcanism. The Mundwara igneous complex represents three distinct circular plutonic bodies - Toa, Mer and Mushala, which are situated in the periphery of an area three kilometers in radius. Besides these, there are numerous concentric and radial dykes of lamprophyre, carbonatite, dolerite and amphibolite. All these three bodies represent different phases of intrusion and are not similar to each other. The alkaline rocks of Sarnu-Dandali occur as dykes and isolated plugs in the desert sand. Carbonatite dykes are also reported from southeast of Barmer. The Tavider outcrop is devoid of any plutonic rock and consists of rhyolite, andesite and basalt. These rocks occur along the Precambrian Malani magmatic lineaments. The development of the Cambay-Sanchor-Barmer rift caused reactivation of Precambrian fractures and resulted in magmatism at the basin margin. The Gondwanaland fragmentation during the Mesozoic era caused extensional tectonics in the northwestern Indian shield. This led to the development of rift basins in Gujarat and western Rajasthan. Deccan volcanism, separation of the

  10. The timing of kimberlite magmatism in North America: implications for global kimberlite genesis and diamond exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaman, L. M.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.; Creaser, R. A.

    2003-12-01

    -prolific periods of magmatism in the Eocene (50-53 Ma), Jurassic (150-190) and Triassic (˜235 Ma). Several discrete episodes of pre-Mesozoic kimberlite magmatism variably occur in North America, southern Africa and Yakutia at 590-615, 520-540, 435-450, 400-410 and 345-360 Ma. One of the surprises in the timing of kimberlite magmatism worldwide is the common absence of activity between about 250 and 360 Ma; this period is even longer in southern Africa. This >110 my period of quiescence in kimberlite magmatism is likely linked to relative crustal and mantle stability during the lifetime of the supercontinent Gondwanaland. Economic diamond deposits in kimberlite occur throughout the Phanerozoic from the Cambrian (Venetia, South Africa; Snap Lake and Kennady Lake, Canada) to the Tertiary (Mwadui, Tanzania; Ekati and Diavik in Lac de Gras, Canada). There are clearly some discrete periods when economic kimberlite-hosted diamond deposits formed globally. In contrast, the Devonian event, which is such an important source of diamonds in Yakutia, is notably absent in the kimberlite record from both southern Africa and North America.

  11. Apatite: A New Tool For Understanding The Temporal Variability Of Magmatic Volatile Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M. J.; Humphreys, M.; Smith, V.; Pyle, D. M.; Isaia, R.

    2015-12-01

    The apatite crystal structure is capable of incorporating H2O, F and Cl, as well as trace CO2 and sulphur. These can be related to parental magma compositions through application of a series of pressure and temperature-dependent exchange reactions (Piccoli and Candela, 1994), permitting apatite crystals to preserve a record of all major volatile species in the melt. Furthermore, due to the general incompatibility of P in other rock-forming minerals, apatite is ubiquitous in igneous systems and often begins crystallising early, such that apatite inclusions within phenocrysts record melt volatile contents throughout magmatic differentiation. In this work, we compare the compositions of apatite inclusions and microphenocrysts with pyroxene-hosted melt inclusions from the Astroni 1 eruption of Campi Flegrei, Italy. These data are coupled with magmatic differentiation models (Gualda et al., 2012), experimental volatile solubility data (Webster et al., 2014) and thermodynamic models of apatite compositional variations (Piccoli and Candela, 1994) to determine a time-series of magmatic volatile evolution in the build-up to eruption. We find that apatite halogen/OH ratios decreased through magmatic differentiation, while melt inclusion F and Cl concentrations increased. Melt inclusion H2O contents are constant at ~2.5 wt%. These data are best explained by volatile-undersaturated differentiation over most of the crystallisation history of the Astroni 1 melt, with melt inclusion H2O contents reset during ascent, due to rapid H diffusion through the phenocryst hosts (Woods et al., 2000). Given the rapid diffusivity of volatiles in apatite (Brenan, 1993), preservation of undersaturated compositions in microphenocrysts suggests that saturation was only achieved a few days to months before eruption and that it may have been the transition into a volatile-saturated state that ultimately triggered eruption. Piccoli and Candela, 1994. Am. J. of Sc., 294, 92-135. Gualda et al., 2012

  12. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251-245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  13. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  14. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-05-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen.

  15. Factors controlling structural style and magmatism in passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2015-04-01

    Comparing volcanic and non-volcanic passive margins, the distinct variability in geometry and subsidence history implies that the thermo-mechanical conditions vary at the time of rifting. Volcanic rifted margins (such as in the North Atlantic) show large magmatic activity and shallow water condition at the rift-drift transition, implying high geothermal gradients. For non-volcanic rifted margins where the initial thermal condition is potentially colder, it may develop in two end-member styles (Type I and Type II). Type-I margin with limited magmatism can be observed at Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins where the continental crustal thins across a narrow region and large tracts of continental mantle lithosphere are exposed at the seafloor. Type-II margin as observed in the ultra-wide central South Atlantic margins, in contrast, has normal magmatic activity and has a strongly thinned continental crust that span very wide regions (>250 km) below which the continental mantle lithosphere was removed. Here we perform thermo-mechanical finite element numerical experiments to investigate factors that are potentially important for the formation of volcanic and non-volcanic passive margins. Forward numerical models are used to predict the structural styles and characteristic magmatism associated with each of these end members. A number of parameters including different rheological stratifications and thermal gradients are tested and factors that control the degree of magmatism and structural style during rifting are focused.

  16. The response of two-phase hydrothermal systems to changing magmatic heat input at mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaewoon; Lowell, Robert P.

    2015-11-01

    We develop numerical simulations of two-phase flow in a NaCl-H2O fluid subject to time varying basal heat flux boundary conditions in order to understand the response of hydrothermal vent temperature and salinity to changing magmatic heat input. The results show that periodic changes in basal heat input on a time scale of several years will not be detected in a continuous time series record of temperature measurements. Fluctuations in vent salinity may be recorded, however. For models with monotonic decay of the magmatic heat flux, a decline in vent temperature may not be observed for several years; however, once single phase conditions are established at the base of the system, a pulse of brine-derived fluid is expected to appear at the surface, followed by a gradual decline of salinity to the seawater value. The pulse of brine salinity is expected to occur before an observed decline in vent temperature. Observed rapid changes in vent temperature and salinity associated with either eruptive or non-eruptive magmatic events are not likely a result of changes in basal heat flux.

  17. Paleomagnetic stratigraphy and geochronology of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) from the Middle Atlas and Western Meseta, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownlee, S. J.; Renne, P. R.; Marzoli, A.; Callegaro, S.; Cuppone, T.; Mahmoudi, A.; Youbi, N.; Bertrand, H.

    2008-12-01

    The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) is one of the largest igneous provinces (LIPs) on earth, and was emplaced as part of the pre-rift stage of the Central Atlantic Ocean at ~200 Ma. Like other LIPs, CAMP coincided closely with a mass extinction event. In order to further test the temporal correlation between the CAMP and the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) boundary, four new sections of CAMP lavas in central and northern Morocco, each 110-140m thick with 14-16 flows, were sampled for paleomagnetic stratigraphy and geochronology. Preliminary paleomagnetic data are consistent with previous results (Knight et al. 2004) and record dominantly if not exclusively normal polarity, and also appear to record distinct pulses of magmatism with at least 4 directional groupings with discrete declinations and inclinations. 40Ar/39Ar analyses of plagioclase from 2 sections near Maaziz and Agourai yield plateau ages that are mutually indistinguishable and consistent with previous results. Collectively, these new paleomagnetic and geochronologic data provide further evidence of the brevity and synchrony of CAMP magmatism at the T-J boundary throughout Morocco.

  18. Chemical mass transfer in magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiorso, Mark S.

    1987-07-01

    Lasaga's (1982) Master Equation for crystal growth is solved for multicomponent systems in situations which allow for coupled diffusion of melt species. The structure of the solution is explored in some detail for the case of a constant diffusion coefficient matrix. Incorporating these results, the growth of plagioclase is modeled in undercooled tholeiitic melts by approximating interface growth rates with (1) a reduced growth rate function and with (2) calculated solid-liquid solution properties obtained from the silicate liquid solution model of Ghiorso et al. (1983; appendix of Ghiorso 1985). For this purpose algorithms are provided for estimating the liquidus temperature or the chemical affinity of a multicomponent solid solution precipitating from a complex melt of specified bulk composition. Compositional trends in initial solids produced by successive degrees of undercooling are opposite to those predicted in the binary system NaAlSi3O8-CaAl2Si2O8. Calculations suggest that the solid phase and interface melt compositions rapidly approach a “steady state” for a given degree of undercooling. Consequently, the overall isothermal growth rate of plagioclase forming from tholeiitic melts appears to be entirely diffusion controlled. In magmatic systems the multicomponent growth equations allow for the formation of oscillatory zoned crystals as a consequence of the “couplingr” between interface reaction kinetics and melt diffusion. The magnitude of this effect is largely dependent upon the asymmetry of the diffusion coefficient matrix. Methods are described to facilitate the calibration of diffusion matrices from experimental data on multicomponent penetration curves. Experimental results (Lesher and Walker 1986) on steady state Soret concentration profiles resulting from thermal diffusion in MORB and andesitic liquids are analyzed using the theory of multicomponent linear irreversible thermodynamics. Under conditions where the entropy production is

  19. Complex magmatic plumbing despite simple evolution trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrin, J. S.; van Bergen, M. J.; Mason, P. R. D.

    2003-04-01

    Complex subsurface plumbing networks can obscure details of magma evolution processes in volcanic systems. Processes that affect magma chemistry, such as crystal settling/accumulation, backmixing, parallel evolution, and multiple parent compositions, can be difficult to detect and quantify, even using a combination of traditional approaches such as bulk-chemical, mineral-chemical and textural analysis. We illustrate this for Werung volcano, an active low-K volcano on the island of Lomblen at the front of the eastern Sunda Arc. Whole-rock data from Werung samples suggest that magmas follow a single differentiation trend between 49.0 and 60.1 wt.% SiO2. However, EPMA analysis of >450 (500-2000 mm) olivine phenocrysts, separated from a single basaltic andesite sample containing <1% olivine phenocrysts, reveals a tri-modal compositional distribution, with modal averages of forsterite content occurring at Fo71, Fo74, and Fo78 while magma represented by the bulk rock would be in equilibrium with Fo72. This distribution of olivine composition is indicative of non-equilibrium processes occurring within the magmatic system. By applying a LA-ICP-MS technique that allows rapid analysis of incompatible trace elements in unhomogenized olivine-hosted melt inclusions trapped within selected olivine grains, we have been able to shed light on these underlying processes. An inverse correlation is seen between concentrations of incompatible trace elements (REE, Zr, Sr, Ba) in melt inclusions and forsterite content of their host olivines. This, combined with little difference in ratios of incompatible elements between inclusions suggests that all magmas in this system are derived from the same parent magma. Backmixing of magmas in different stages of evolution is suggested as a mechanism for generating the observed disequilibrium in olivine. Thus, at least some of the magmas that erupted from Werung volcano represent a mixture of magmas, which evolved along separate but parallel

  20. Magmatic water in the martian meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallis, L. J.; Taylor, G. J.; Nagashima, K.; Huss, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    Mars does not recycle crustal materials via plate tectonics. For this reason the magmatic water reservoir of the martian mantle has not been affected by surface processes, and the deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio of this water should represent the original primordial martian value. Following this logic, hydrous primary igneous minerals on the martian surface should also carry this primordial D/H ratio, assuming no assimilation of martian atmospheric water during crystallization and no major hydrogen fractionation during melt degassing. Hydrous primary igneous minerals, such as apatite and amphibole, are present in martian meteorites here on Earth. Providing these minerals have not been affected by terrestrial weathering, martian atmospheric water, or shock processes after crystallization, they should contain a good approximation of the primordial martian D/H ratio. As Nakhla was seen to fall in the Egyptian desert in 1911, terrestrial contamination is minimized in this meteorite. The nakhlites are also among the least shocked of the martian meteorites. Therefore, apatite within Nakhla could contain primordial martian hydrogen isotope ratios. We produced in-situ measurements of the D/H ratios in Nakhla apatite grains, using a Cameca ims 1280 ion-microprobe. Our measurements produced D/H values in Nakhla apatite similar to terrestrial values, despite strong evidence that our samples were not significantly contaminated by terrestrial hydrogen. These results suggest that water trapped in the martian mantle has a similar D/H to that of the Earth. Therefore, the water of these two planets may have originated from the same source material. The D/H ratios of the carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, and the Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2, are similar to the D/H of the two planets, making both these primitive inner solar system materials strong candidates for the source of the terrestrial planets water. These results support recent dynamical models of the formation of the

  1. Atmospheric PCO₂ perturbations associated with the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Morgan F; Wright, James D; Kent, Dennis V

    2011-03-18

    The effects of a large igneous province on the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (PCO₂) are mostly unknown. In this study, we estimate PCO₂ from stable isotopic values of pedogenic carbonates interbedded with volcanics of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) in the Newark Basin, eastern North America. We find pre-CAMP PCO₂ values of ~2000 parts per million (ppm), increasing to ~4400 ppm immediately after the first volcanic unit, followed by a steady decrease toward pre-eruptive levels over the subsequent 300 thousand years, a pattern that is repeated after the second and third flow units. We interpret each PCO₂ increase as a direct response to magmatic activity (primary outgassing or contact metamorphism). The systematic decreases in PCO₂ after each magmatic episode probably reflect consumption of atmospheric CO₂ by weathering of silicates, stimulated by fresh CAMP volcanics. PMID:21330490

  2. Tectonic, magmatic, and metallogenic evolution of the Late Cretaceous arc in the Carpathian-Balkan orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallhofer, Daniela; Quadt, Albrecht von; Peytcheva, Irena; Schmid, Stefan M.; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2015-09-01

    The Apuseni-Banat-Timok-Srednogorie Late Cretaceous magmatic arc in the Carpathian-Balkan orogen formed on the European margin during closure of the Neotethys Ocean. It was subsequently deformed into a complex orocline by continental collisions. The Cu-Au mineralized arc consists of geologically distinct segments: the Apuseni, Banat, Timok, Panagyurishte, and Eastern Srednogorie segments. New U-Pb zircon ages and geochemical whole rock data for the Banat and Apuseni segments are combined with previously published data to reconstruct the original arc geometry and better constrain its tectonic evolution. Trace element and isotopic signatures of the arc magmas indicate a subduction-enriched source in all segments and variable contamination by continental crust. The magmatic arc was active for 25 Myr (~92-67 Ma). Across-arc age trends of progressively younger ages toward the inferred paleo-trench indicate gradual steepening of the subducting slab away from the upper plate European margin. This leads to asthenospheric corner flow in the overriding plate, which is recorded by decreasing 87Sr/86Sr (0.70577 to 0.70373) and increasing 143Nd/144Nd (0.51234 to 0.51264) ratios over time in some segments. The close spatial relationship between arc magmatism, large-scale shear zones, and related strike-slip sedimentary basins in the Timok and Pangyurishte segments indicates mild transtension in these central segments of the restored arc. In contrast, the Eastern Srednogorie segment underwent strong orthogonal intraarc extension. Segmental distribution of tectonic stress may account for the concentration of rich porphyry Cu deposits in the transtensional segments, where lower crustal magma storage and fractionation favored the evolution of volatile-rich magmas.

  3. Seismic Anisotropy Reveals a Large Magmatic Sill Complex below the Toba Caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaxybulatov, K.; Shapiro, N.; Koulakov, I.; Mordret, A.; Landes, M.; Sens-Schoenfelder, C.

    2014-12-01

    An understanding of the formation of large magmatic reservoirs is a key issue for the evaluation of possible strong volcanic eruptions in the future. Many geological observations of exposed past volcanic systems and geodynamic models have indicated that large magmatic reservoirs can build up over long periods of time, with small increments that promote vertical dykes and horizontally oriented sill intrusions. The typical size of such intrusions beneath presently active volcanoes is too small to be imaged with most geophysical methods. Here we show that large layered intrusion complexes at depth can be detected by measurements of the seismic anisotropy caused by the fine-scale layering. We have used data obtained from 42 stations between May and October 2008 on the Toba caldera complex (north Sumatra, Indonesia) to construct a 3D seismic model of the crust with using ambient noise tomography method. Approximately ~500 Rayleigh and Love waves were extracted from cross correlations of continuous records. Their group velocities were measured at periods between 5 and 19 s and, after a 2D regionalization, inverted into local 1D shear velocity profiles (VSH from Love and VSV from Rayleigh waves) using a Monte-Carlo method based on the Neighborhood Algorithm. All 1D profiles were combined into a final 3D model that shows a strong radial anisotropy below the Toba caldera at depths greater than 7 km. A plausible explanation of these observations is the presence of a large magmatic sill complex in the crust below 7 km in depth. Our data support the concept of the long-term incremental building up of magma bodies that leads to the largest volcanic eruptions.

  4. Mantle refertilization and magmatism in old orogenic regions: The role of late-orogenic pyroxenites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Lydéric; Chazot, Gilles; Kornprobst, Jacques; Dallai, Luigi; Vannucci, Riccardo; Grégoire, Michel; Bertrand, Hervé; Boivin, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Pyroxenites and garnet pyroxenites are mantle heterogeneities characterized by a lower solidus temperature than the enclosing peridotites; it follows that they are preferentially involved during magma genesis. Constraining their origin, composition, and the interactions they underwent during their subsequent evolution is therefore essential to discuss the sources of magmatism in a given area. Pyroxenites could represent either recycling of crustal rocks in mantle domains or mantle originated rocks (formed either by olivine consuming melt-rock reactions or by crystal fractionation). Petrological and geochemical (major and trace elements, Sr-Nd and O isotopes) features of xenoliths from various occurrences (French Massif-Central, Jordan, Morocco and Cameroon) show that these samples represent cumulates crystallized during melt percolation at mantle conditions. They formed in mantle domains at pressures of 1-2 GPa during post-collisional magmatism (possibly Hercynian for the French Massif-Central, and Panafrican for Morocco, Jordan and Cameroon). The thermal re-equilibration of lithospheric domains, typical of the late orogenic exhumation stages, is also recorded by the samples. Most of the samples display a metasomatic overprint that may be either inherited or likely linked to the recent volcanic activity that occurred in the investigated regions. The crystallization of pyroxenites during late orogenic events has implications for the subsequent evolution of the mantle domains. The presence of large amounts of mantle pyroxenites in old orogenic regions indeed imparts peculiar physical and chemical characteristics to these domains. Among others, the global solidus temperature of the whole lithospheric domain will be lowered; in turn, this implies that old orogenic regions are refertilized zones where magmatic activity would be enhanced.

  5. Fluid-magmatic systems and volcanic centers in Northern Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobisevich, Alexey L.; Masurenkov, Yuri P.; Pouzich, Irina N.; Laverova, Ninel I.

    2013-04-01

    The central segment of Alpine mobile folded system and the Greater Caucasus is considered with respect to fluid-magmatic activity within modern and Holocene volcanic centers. A volcanic center is a combination of volcanoes, intrusions, and hydrothermal features supported by endogenous flow of matter and energy localised in space and steady in time; responsible for magma generation and characterized by structural representation in the form of circular dome and caldera associations. Results of complimentary geological and geophysical studies carried out in the Elbrus volcanic area and the Pyatogorsk volcanic center are presented. The deep magmatic source and the peripheral magmatic chamber of the Elbrus volcano are outlined via comparative analysis of geological and experimental geophysical data (microgravity studies, magneto-telluric profiling, temperature of carbonaceous mineral waters). It has been determined that the peripheral magmatic chamber and the deep magmatic source of the volcano are located at depths of 0-7 and 20-30 km below sea level, respectively, and the geothermal gradient beneath the volcano is 100°C/km. In this study, analysis of processes of modern heat outflux produced by carbonaceous springs in the Elbrus volcanic center is carried out with respect to updated information about spatial configuration of deep fluid-magmatic structures of the Elbrus volcano. It has been shown, that degradation of the Elbrus glaciers throughout the historical time is related both to climatic variations and endogenic heat. The stable fast rate of melting for the glaciers on the volcano's eastern slope is of theoretical and practical interest as factors of eruption prognosis. The system approach to studying volcanism implies that events that seem to be outside the studied process should not be ignored. This concerns glaciers located in the vicinity of volcanoes. The crustal rocks contacting with the volcanism products exchange matter and energy between each other

  6. Mesoarchean Gabbroanorthosite Magmatism of the Kola Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, N.; Mokrushin, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Kola peninsula is the region marked with development of anorthosite magmatism in the NE Baltic Shield. The Archaean gabbroanorthosites intrusions - Tsaginsky, Achinsky and Medvezhe-Schucheozersky - have the age of 2.7-2.6 Ga (Bayanova, 2004). The Patchemvarek and Severny gabbroanorthosites intrusions are located in the junction zone of the Kolmozero-Voronja greenstone belt and the Murmansk domain. Age data for sedimentaryvolcanogenic rocks of the Kolmozero-Voronja belt and Murmansk domain granitoids are 2.8-2.7 Ga. The gabbroanorthosites intrusions have more calcic composition (70-85% An) of normative plagioclase, and low contents of TiO2, FeO, and Fe2O3. In terms of chemical composition, the gabbroanorthosites of the studied massifs are close to the rocks of the Fiskenesset Complex (Greenland) and to the anorthosites of the Vermillion Lake Complex (Canada). U-Pb zircon dating established Mesoarchean ages of 29257 and 29358 Ma for the gabbroanorthosites of the Patchemvarek and Severny massifs, respectively. It was shown that the gabbroanorthosites of the studied massifs have fairly low REE contents (Cen = 2.2-4.2, Ybn = 1.6-2.6) and distinct positive Eu anomaly. Comagmatic ultrabasic differentiates have practically unfractionated REE pattern, low total REE contents (Cen = 1.2, Ybn = 1.1, La/Ybn = 1.32), and no Eu anomaly. The studied samples of the Archean gabbroanorthosites are characterized by positive "Nd= + 2.68 for the gabbroanorthosites of the Severny Massif and from + 2.77 to + 1.66 for the Patchemvarek Massif. The rocks of the Severny and Patchemvarek massifs has 87Sr/86Sri = 0.702048 and 87Sr/86Sri = 0.70258_8, respectively. The oldest U-Pb zircon ages for the gabbroanorthosites of the Patchemvarek and Severny massifs marking the Mesoarchean stage in the evolution of region. The differences in the initial 143Nd/144Nd ratios between the Neoarchean and the Mesoarchean gabbroanorthosites suggest the existence of two mantle sources. One of them produced

  7. Quaternary Magmatism in the Cascades - Geologic Perspectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, Wes

    2007-01-01

    Foreward The Cascade magmatic arc is a belt of Quaternary volcanoes that extends 1,250 km from Lassen Peak in northern California to Meager Mountain in Canada, above the subduction zone where the Juan de Fuca Plate plunges beneath the North American Plate. This Professional Paper presents a synthesis of the entire volcanic arc, addressing all 2,300 known Quaternary volcanoes, not just the 30 or so visually prominent peaks that comprise the volcanic skyline. Study of Cascade volcanoes goes back to the geological explorers of the late 19th century and the seminal investigations of Howel Williams in the 1920s and 1930s. However, major progress and application of modern scientific methods and instrumentation began only in the 1970s with the advent of systematic geological, geophysical, and geochemical studies of the entire arc. Initial stimulus from the USGS Geothermal Research Program was enhanced by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Together, these two USGS Programs have provided more than three decades of stable funding, staffing, and analytical support. This Professional Paper summarizes the resultant USGS data sets and integrates them with the parallel contributions of other investigators. The product is based upon an all-encompassing and definitive geological database, including chemical and isotopic analyses to characterize the rocks and geochronology to provide the critical time constraints. Until now, this massive amount of data has not been summarized, and a systematic and uniform interpretation firmly grounded in geological fact has been lacking. Herein lies the primary utility of this Cascade volume. It not only will be the mandatory starting point for new workers, but also will provide essential geological context to broaden the perspectives of current investigators of specific Cascade volcanoes. Wes Hildreth's insightful understanding of volcanic processes and his uncompromising scientific integrity make him

  8. Proterozoic granitic magmatism in the Fennoscandian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapala, I.; Lahtinen, R.; Rämö, O. T.

    2003-04-01

    Archean border indicate a major Archean source component (Huhma, 1986). The western margin of the Svecofennian domain is marked by the Transcandinavian Igneous Belt consisting of various 1.8--1.5 Ga granites. A-type rapakivi granites and associated diabase dikes of southern Finland, Russian Karelia, Baltic countries, and central Sweden can be divided into four age groups, from east to west: 1.56--1.53 Ga, 1.67--1.62 Ga, 1.59--1.54 Ga, 1.53--1.47 Ga. Bimodal magmatism, extensional setting and thinning of the lower crust below rapakivi granites can be explained by the mafic underplate model (Haapala and Rämö, 1992).

  9. Patterns in Long-Lived Continental Magmatism; Crustal Modulation of Mantle-Derived Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunder, A. R.; de Silva, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    Patterns in volumetric eruption rate of continental intermediate to silicic magmatic systems have implications for how heat is delivered and processed in the crust, and reveal the evolution of crustal scale magmatic systems. Drawing on the Neogene volcanic rocks of the Altiplano Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC) and the Aucanquilcha Volcanic Cluster (AVC) of the Central Andes, we compare their histories to other long-lived crustal magmatic complexes. Erupted volumes of such systems vary from a few tens of km3 to tens of thousands of km3 of magma with associated plutonic volumes several times that. Despite differences in volume, these complexes share a general family resemblance. They have lifespans of about 10 million years. Where resolution allows, the record of activity may reveal distinct pulses, lasting a few hundred thousand to ~1 to 2 m.y., demonstrating the composite nature of the magmatic systems. These complexes bear isotopic and compositional evidence of crustal and mantle involvement in the origin of the magmas and mineralogic evidence for subsequent equilibration at shallow crustal levels. Many, but not all, have abundant ignimbrites. Most strikingly they all have a three stage evolutionary history that is scale independent. An early waxing stage characterized by low volume, low flux volcanism that is compositionally diverse and may be dispersed; a climactic stage of dramatically higher flux, that is compositionally more focused and may be spatially more focused; and a final waning stage of small eruptions. We interpret these patterns to be the result of long-lived thermal pulses delivered from the mantle in the form of basaltic magma. A fundamental question is to what extent does the surface pattern reflect the mantle input. We suggest that the thermal signal is modulated by interaction and thermal incubation in the crust that leads to development of a large crustal magma reservoir that in turn modulates the composition of erupted magma. The interplay

  10. Subaqueous basaltic magmatic explosions trigger phreatomagmatism: A case study from Askja, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graettinger, Alison H.; Skilling, Ian; McGarvie, Dave; Höskuldsson, Ármann

    2013-08-01

    Sequences of basaltic pillow lavas that transition upward with systematic gradation from pillow fragment breccias to fluidal bomb-bearing breccias to bomb-bearing lapilli tuffs are common at Askja volcano, Iceland. Based on the detailed textural investigation of three of these sequences, we argue that they record temporally continuous transitions from effusive to explosive products that were erupted from, and deposited at or near a single subaqueous vent. The recognition of such sequences is important as they provide evidence for controls on the onset of explosive activity in subaqueous environments. Such investigations are complicated by the interplay of magmatic gas expansion, and phreatomagmatic and mechanical granulation fragmentation mechanisms in the subaqueous eruptive environment. All of the sequences studied at Askja have textural, componentry and sedimentological characteristics suggestive of a close genetic and spatial relationship between the pillow lavas and all of the overlying glassy clastic deposits. The identification of magma fragmentation signatures in pyroclasts was accomplished through detailed textural studies of pyroclasts within the full range of grain sizes of a given deposit i.e. bomb/blocks, lapilli and fine ash. These textural characteristics were compared and evaluated as discriminators of fragmentation in pyroclastic deposits. The presence of angular vitric clasts within the breccia and lapilli tuff displaying fragile glassy projections indicates little or no post-depositional textural modification. A shift in vesicle and clast textures between the pillow lavas and the large concentration of fluidal bombs in the breccia indicates that the phreatomagmatic explosions were initially triggered by magmatic vesiculation. The initial magmatic gas expansion may have been triggered by depressurization caused by the drainage of the ice-confined lake surrounding Askja. The fuel coolant interactions (FCIs) of the more efficient phreatomagmatic

  11. Longevity of Crystal Cargo vs. Transience of Melts in Magmatic Plumbing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, J.; Kronz, A.; Worner, G.; Schmitt, A. K.; Economos, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Magmatic plumbing systems, particularly in continental arcs, have long been recognized as sites of open system processes. Disequilibrium textures or zoning in phenocrysts result if crystallization is coeval with assimilation or mixing. Radiometric dating measures a crystal's age, but not necessarily the amount of time spent at magmatic temperatures, or its residence time in the melt in which it is erupted [1]. Indeed, the relative amount of time spent by melts vs. crystals in any particular crustal reservoir may be very different. At Parinacota Volcano (central Andes), eruptions transitioned from tapping of a stagnant, silicic, crystal-rich mush to a more dynamic, mafic, crystal-poor magma over ca. 30 k.y., when recharge increased and mafic magmas transited the crust much faster [2]. Bulk lava chemistry and isotopic composition during initial stages of this transition (47-28 ka) indicate that the magmatic system was compartmentalized: one part evolved to more silicic compositions consistent with fractional crystallization, whereas the other became slightly more mafic by recharge. Despite heterogeneity of host melts erupted during this change in magmatic regime, the crystal cargoes in these magmas are homogenous in terms of mineral phases present, their major and trace element chemistry, age, and recorded P-T conditions and thus are likely to be derived from the same long-lived crystal-rich reservoir. In contrast to the minerals, the bulk composition of lavas varied on timescales of hundreds to thousands of years - evidence that melts reside in the system relatively briefly. In contrast, U-Th dating indicates the crystal cargo is much older (up to 350 k.y.), especially in the case of zircon. Reconciling these two lines of evidence suggests that: (1) the same cohort of crystals remains in the magma reservoir for periods of time much longer than it takes to build a volcano, (2) the presence of any given melt is ephemeral, and (3) the capacity of melts to transport

  12. Tonian granitic magmatism of the Borborema Province, NE Brazil: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, Ignez P.; de Fatima L. de Brito, Maria; de A. Lages, Geysson; da Silva Filho, Adejardo F.; Santos, Lucilene; Brasilino, Roberta G.

    2016-07-01

    Tonian granitoids, today augen-gneisses and migmatites, showing crystallization ages ranging from 870 Ma to 1000 Ma occur in the Borborema Province, NE Brazil. The majority of them have ages within the 925-970 Ma interval. Few intrusions with ages of ∼1.0 Ga and <900 Ma occur in the Transversal and South subprovinces. The Tonian granitoids constitute the most expressive magmatic rocks of the Cariris Velhos event. The studied granitoids (herein CVG -Cariris Velhos granitoids) intrude slightly older bimodal (but mostly felsic) volcanic successions and metasedimentary sequences in the Transversal and South subprovinces. Tonian granitoids are unknown in the North subprovince. The CVG comprise mainly coarse-grained augen-gneisses of granite to granodiorite composition. Fe-rich biotite (annite) is the main mafic mineral phase, constituting up to 15% of the modal composition. Garnet, muscovite and tourmaline occur as accessory phases in many plutons. The CVG augen-gneisses have high SiO2 (>71%) and alkali contents, they vary from slightly peraluminous to slightly metaluminous, and from slightly magnesian to typical ferrroan rocks. In the migmatized orthogneisses the SiO2 contents are usually <70%. Trace element variations in the CVG are extensive, reflecting the migmatization recorded in some plutons and/or distinct sources. They are Ca-, Sr- and Nb-poor, showing variable Ba (100-1260 ppm), Rb (164-400 ppm) and Zr (144-408 ppm) contents, and high abundances of Y (>40 ppm). The chondrite normalized REE patterns are characterized by strong to moderate negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.23-0.70). In general, the spidergram patterns show deep troughs at Ti, P, Ba and Sr and less pronounced Nb-Ta troughs. These patterns are similar to those reported for anorogenic granites evolved from mixtures of magmas from both crustal and mantle sources. The CVG exhibit TDM model ages ranging from 1.9 to 1.1Ga, with slightly negative to slightly positive ƐNd(t) values, suggesting the

  13. The development of extension and magmatism during continent-ocean transition: evidence from Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastow, Ian; Keir, Derek; Booth, Adam; Corti, Giacomo; Magee, Craig; Jackson, Christopher; Wilkinson, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The geological record at rifts and margins worldwide often reveals along-strike variations in volumes of extruded and intruded igneous rocks. These variations may be the result of asthenospheric heterogeneity, variations in rate and timing of extension. Preexisting plate architecture and/or the evolving kinematics of extension during breakup may also influence magmatism strongly. The Ethiopian and Afar Rift systems provide an excellent opportunity to address these issues since they expose, along strike, several sectors of ongoing, asynchronous rift development from embryonic continental rifting in the south to incipient oceanic spreading in the north. A consensus has now emerged from a variety of disciplines in Ethiopia that a considerable proportion of extension in Ethiopia is accommodated by focused dyke intrusion in narrow axial zones, without marked crustal (and plate?) thinning. These "magmatic segments" may mark the final breakup boundary and location of an incipient oceanic spreading centre. However, observations of markedly thinned crust and a pulse in Quaternary-Recent basaltic volcanism within the Danakil Depression have recently been cited as evidence that an abrupt, late stage of localised plate stretching may instead mark the final stages of continent-ocean transition (Bastow & Keir, 2011). We explore this hypothesis using recently-acquired seismic reflection data and accompanying borehole geological constraints from Danakil. Thick sequences of evaporites have been deposited in an asymmetric basin, whose subsidence has been controlled primarily by a major, east dipping normal fault. Surprisingly, no significant magmatism is observed in the upper ~1000m. Age constraints on a potash-bearing sequence presently being mined in the basin point towards rapid basin infill in the last several tens-to-hundreds of thousands of years. Basin formation cannot be easily attributed to the effects of magmata intrusion. Instead, an abrupt, localised, late-stage, plate

  14. Analysis of the Magmatic - Hydrothermal volcanic field of Tacora Volcano, northern Chile, using passive seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavez Orrego, Claudia; Comte, Diana; Gutierrez, Francisco; Gaytan, Diego

    2016-04-01

    The results of a passive seismic tomography developed in the Tacora Volcano, northern Chile, are presented. In this area, the main thermal manifestations are fumarolic fields mainly distributed in the western flank of the volcano. Around the volcanic area were installed 17 short period seismic stations, between August and December, 2014. Using the P and S wave arrival times of the seismicity record, a 3D velocity model was determined through a passive seismic tomography. For a better visualization of low and high velocity anomalies, the Leapfrog Viewer Software has been used. The areas of high Vp /Vs values, located directly under the volcanic chain, are interpreted as fluid-saturated areas, corresponding to the recharge zone of the hydrothermal system. Meanwhile, low Vp /Vs values represent the location of a magmatic reservoir and circulation networks of magmatic-hydrothermal fluids. The final model it was contrasted with available geochemical information showing a match between the low Vp/Vs areas (magma reservoirs / hydrothermal fluids), fumarolic fields and surface hydrothermal alteration. Finally, we present a cluster analysis using the percentage variation of %dVp, with which we have found a method for the identification of clay level areas related with the intermediate values of Vp/Vs (1.70 - 1.75) and the degassification zones.

  15. The volcaniclastic series from the Luang Prabang Basin, Laos: A witness of a triassic magmatic arc?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossignol, Camille; Bourquin, Sylvie; Poujol, Marc; Hallot, Erwan; Dabard, Marie-Pierre; Nalpas, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    The paleogeographic evolution of South East Asia (SEA) during the early Mesozoic is still poorly understood and a number of models have recently been put forward to account for the geodynamic evolution of SEA. The Luang Prabang Basin (north Laos), located in the core of a "paleogeographic jigsaw" in SEA, recorded a long lasting volcanism that spanned for ∼ 35 my from the earliest Triassic up to Late Triassic as evidenced by combined stratigraphic and geochronological (U-Pb/zircon) analyses performed on both volcanic and volcaniclastic series. The volcanic rocks are arc tholeiites and calk-alkaline andesites to dacites. The volcaniclastic rocks contain, in part, volcaniclasts produced contemporaneously with sedimentation. Both the volcanic and volcaniclastic series display geochemical features characteristic of a subduction related volcanism. Therefore, the Luang Prabang Basin documents a magmatic arc in a good agreement with the recent recognition of neighboring ophiolitic rocks in the Luang Prabang area. Following a passive margin setting that prevailed from the late Carboniferous to the late Permian, an active margin then initiated along the western margin of the Indochina Block. This active magmatic arc developed as the result of an east-dipping subduction below the Indochina Block during most of the Triassic, at least from ca. 250 to 215 Ma. Subsequently, this oceanic subduction episode must have been followed by a continental collision of the Indochina Block with the eastern Simao Block, at a period that remains to be defined.

  16. A new method fingerprinting magmatic processes using combined U/Pb ID-TIMS geochronology and accessory mineral geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoene, B.; Schaltegger, U.; Latkoczy, C.; Günther, D.

    2009-12-01

    Zircon is commonly used as a recorder of magmatic processes because of its utility in geochronology and ability to retain primary growth information at prolonged magmatic conditions. Recent applications of U-Pb ID-TIMS geochronology have shown that precision on dates of single zircons are often far smaller than the time-scales of magmatic systems. The result is that dates on such grains record various processes occurring over an interval of time during the production, mobilisation, and emplacement of magmas. Combining age information with geochemical data from the same zircons has proved a useful tool, but thus far has been restricted to low-precision in situ dating techniques. Furthermore, these techniques have been unable to combine age data with trace element geochemistry on the same volume of zircon. We have developed a new technique that combines high-precision ID-TIMS dating with geochemical characterization on the exact same material. U and Pb are commonly separated from the other chemical constituents by ion exchange chemistry during sample preparation. We retain this fraction and analyse it using solution nebulization ICP-SFMS with matrix-matched external liquid calibration. We measured elements such as Zr, Hf, Y, Sc, and the REE, which are present in solution at between 10 and >105 ppt; Hf isotopes are subsequently measured on the same solution. Data obtained using this approach allow us to distinguish between models for melt generation, transport, and assembly of the ca. 40 Ma composite mafic to felsic Re di Castello pluton, Adamello batholith, northern Italy. Coupled with age uncertainties on single zircons as low as 10,000 years, zircon geochemistry preserves a rich record of fractional crystallization, crustal assimilation and magma mixing over timescales of <20,000 to >400,000 years. These data can also be used to distinguish between auto-, xeno-, and antecrystic zircon. Combined with field observation and U-Pb sphene thermochronology, we show that

  17. Tectonic Significance of Cretaceous to Tertiary Magmatic and Structural Evolution of the Northern Portion of the Xolapa Complex, Tierra Colorada-Acapulco Area, Southern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres de Leon, R.; Perez, R.; Solari, L.; Hernandez, G.; Sole, J.; Solis, G.; Hernandez, T.

    2007-05-01

    This work presents combined structural and geochronological data from Tierra Colorada to Acapulco area that show evidence of five deformational events and four episodes of arc related magmatism during Mesozoic and Cenozoic times. The oldest sequence correspond to metasedimentary units (paragneisses and marbles) metamorphosed in amphibolite facies that are affected by a penetrative foliation and mineral lineation (D1). This sequence is intruded by a first magmatic pulse (M1) that is represented by ~165 Ma metagranitoids that are affected by metamorphism and migmatization (D2). The second magmatic pulse (M2) corresponds to the intrusion of the El Pozuelo granite (129 +/- 0.5 Ma: concordant U-Pb zircon analysis), which postdates high grade metamorphism and migmatization. The next magmatic episode (M3) is represented by the peraluminous, deformed El Salitre granite (55.3 +/- 3.3 Ma: mineral-whole rock Rb-Sr isochron), and the protomylonitic Las Pi\\hbaras I-type granite (54.2 +/- 5.8 Ma: lower intercept U-Pb zircon). Las Pi\\hbaras granite is characterized by D3 ductile sheared fabric with normal, top-to-the NNW sense of shear, deformed at 45 - 50 Ma (Rb-Sr and K-Ar ages). D3 also affects the El Pozuelo granite and the lower Cretaceous metavolcanic rocks of the Chapolapa Formation. The 34 Ma undeformed granites (M4) corresponds to the last intrusive pulse in the area, post-dating D4 SSW-verging thrusting of the Cretaceous Morelos Formation over sheared granites and metavolcanic rocks. The last deformational event (D5) corresponds to brittle lateral features that affects all the units. These four pulses of subduction related magmatism in the Tierra Colorada-Acapulco area indicate a regular, northeastward subduction at the Mesoamerican trench since Jurassic time, alternated with contractile and/or extensional deformational events. The gap in magmatic activity at about 90-100 Ma roughly coincides with deposition of platformal limestones of the Morelos Formation during the

  18. Age and geochemistry of host rocks of the Cobre Panama porphyry Cu-Au deposit, central Panama: Implications for the Paleogene evolution of the Panamanian magmatic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Michael J.; Hollings, Peter; Thompson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Jay M.; Burge, Colin

    2016-04-01

    magmas suggest that evolved calc-alkaline arc magmatism may extend to the late Eocene, at least ~ 10 million years earlier than previously estimated. The crystallisation ages for intrusive rocks associated with mineralisation at Cobre Panama imply that the deposit formed in the early Oligocene, between a period of late Cretaceous to Eocene magmatism (ca. 66-42 Ma; Chagres-Bayano arc) and Cordilleran arc magmatism (22-7 Ma). Similarities in the timing of intrusive suite emplacement and the fingerprinting of magmatic fractionation processes between the Cobre Panama porphyry deposit and the Cerro Colorado porphyry deposit in western Panama (ca. 5.3 Ma) suggest that these features provide favourable geodynamic and geochemical prerequisites for the formation of porphyry deposits along the Panamanian magmatic arc during the Cenozoic.

  19. Late Miocene (Proto-Gulf) Extension and Magmatism on the Sonoran Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, P.; MacMillan, I.; Roldan-Quintana, J.

    2003-12-01

    Constraints on the magnitude and character of late Miocene (Proto-Gulf) deformation on the Sonoran margin of the Gulf of California extensional province are key to understanding how and when Baja California was captured by the Pacific plate and how strain was partitioned during the early stages of this transtensional rift system. Our new geologic mapping in southwestern Sonora and 40Ar/39Ar dating of pre-, syn-, and post-tectonic volcanic units indicate that late Miocene deformation and volcanic activity were largely restricted to a NW-trending, 100-120 km wide belt adjacent to the coast. Inboard of this belt, NW-SE extension is mainly older (>15 Ma) and occurred in an intra-arc or back-arc setting. Proto-Gulf deformation within the coastal belt was profoundly transtensional, with NW-striking, dextral strike slip faults operating in concert with N-S and NNE-striking normal and oblique slip faults to produce an inferred NW or NNW tectonic transport direction. The total amount of late Miocene NW directed dextral shear within the coastal belt is still poorly constrained, but may exceed 100 km. The locus of deformation and volcanic activity migrated westward or northwestward within the Sonoran coastal belt. in the eastern portion (Sierra Libre and Sierra El Bacatete) major volcanic activity commenced at ˜13.0 Ma and peaked at 12.0 Ma, and major faulting and tilting is bracketed between 12.0 and 10.6 Ma. Further west in the Sierra El Aguaje/San Carlos region, major volcanic activity commenced at 11.5 Ma and peaked at 10.5 Ma, and most faulting and tilting is bracketed between 10.7 and 9.3 Ma. On the coastal mountains northwest of San Carlos, rift related faulting and tilting continued after 8.5 Ma. Voluminous late Miocene (13-8 Ma) volcanic rocks within the Sonoran coastal belt were erupted from numerous centers (e.g. Sierra Libre, Guaymas, Sierra El Aguaje). These thick volcanic sections are compositionally diverse (basalt to rhyolite, with abundant dacite and

  20. Temporal, geomagnetic and related attributes of kimberlite magmatism at Ekati, Northwest Territories, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, Grant; Grütter, Herman; Carlson, Jon

    2004-09-01

    This paper outlines the development of a multi-disciplinary strategy to focus exploration for economic kimberlites on the Ekati property. High-resolution aeromagnetic data provide an over-arching spatial and magnetostratigraphic framework for exploration and kimberlite discovery at Ekati, and hence also for this investigation. The temporal, geomagnetic, spatial and related attributes of kimberlites with variable diamond content have been constrained by judiciously augmenting the information gathered during routine exploration with detailed, laboratory-based or field-based investigations. The natural remanent magnetisation of 36 Ekati kimberlites has been correlated with their age as determined by isotopic dating techniques, and placed in the context of a well-constrained geomagnetic polarity timescale. Kimberlite magmatism occurred over the period 75 to 45 Ma, in at least five temporally discrete intrusive episodes. Based on current evidence, the older kimberlites (75 to 59 Ma) have low diamond contents and are distributed throughout the property. Younger kimberlites (56 to 45 Ma) have moderate to high diamond contents and occur in three distinct intrusive corridors with NNE to NE orientations. Economic kimberlite pipes erupted at 55.4±0.4 Ma along the A154-Lynx intrusive corridor, which is 7 km wide and oriented at 015°, and at 53.2±0.3 Ma along the Panda intrusive corridor, which is 1 km wide and oriented at 038°. The intrusion ages straddle a paleopole reversal at Chron C24n, consistent with the observation that the older economic kimberlites present as aeromagnetic "low" anomalies while the younger economic pipes are characterised as aeromagnetic "highs". The aeromagnetic responses for these kimberlites are generally muted because they contain volcaniclastic rock types with low magnetic susceptibility. Kimberlites throughout the Ekati property carry a primary natural magnetic remanence (NRM) vector in Ti-bearing groundmass magnetite, and it dominates over

  1. Subaqueous basaltic magmatic explosions trigger phreatomagmatism: a case study from Askja, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graettinger, A. H.; Skilling, I.; McGarvie, D. W.; Hoskuldsson, A.

    2012-12-01

    The mechanisms that control the transition from effusive to explosive behavior in basaltic subaqueous eruptions are poorly understood. One approach to understanding this transition and the onset of phreatomagmatic explosions is to perform detailed textural studies of the vitriclastic deposits produced at the initiation of explosive fragmentation. Three sequences at Askja volcano, Iceland record an effusive to explosive transition in vitriclastic deposits formed in an ice-confined setting. The sequences display a clear systematic gradation from pillow lavas through pillow-fragment breccia to fluidally shaped bomb-bearing breccia to vitric lapilli tuff. All three sequences have textural, component and sedimentary characteristics indicating a close genetic relationship between the pillow lavas and the overlying clastic deposits. Many vitric clasts have fragile glassy projections, indicating little or no post-depositional textural modification. Sedimentary structures indicative of lateral transport are absent. The deposits display an upward decrease in the size and abundance of fluidal bombs, and an increase in the presence of fine ash. Textural parameters in three size ranges (fine ash, lapilli, blocks) were measure throughout the sequences, including vesicle and microlith density, vesicle dimensions, vesicle number density, vesicle morphology, sideromelane to tachylite proportions, clast size and clast shape. Evidence of initial magmatic fragmentation is preserved as a higher percentage of ductilely fragmented fluidal bombs and lapilli in the earliest deposits. Evidence of later phreatomagmatic fragmentation is recorded in the gradational increase up section of brittly fragmented very fine blocky ash particles. Brittle fragmentation also resulted from mechanical processes such as cooling contraction and impacts. These secondary mechanisms overprints particle textures, but would not produce the volumes of very fine ash without significant sorting and transport. The

  2. Tomographically-imaged subducted slabs and magmatic history of Caribbean and Pacific subduction beneath Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Olaya, R.; Mann, P.; Vargas, C. A.; Koulakov, I.

    2013-12-01

    We define the length and geometry of eastward and southeastward-subducting slabs beneath northwestern South America in Colombia using ~100,000 earthquake events recorded by the Colombian National Seismic Network from 1993 to 2012. Methods include: hypocenter relocation, compilation of focal mechanisms, and P and S wave tomographic calculations performed using LOTOS and Seisan. The margins of Colombia include four distinct subduction zones based on slab dip: 1) in northern Colombia, 12-16-km-thick oceanic crust subducts at a modern GPS rate of 20 mm/yr in a direction of 110 degrees at a shallow angle of 8 degrees; as a result of its low dip, Pliocene-Pleistocene volcanic rocks are present 400 km from the frontal thrust; magmatic arc migration to the east records 800 km of subduction since 58 Ma ago (Paleocene) with shallow subduction of the Caribbean oceanic plateau starting ~24-33 Ma (Miocene); at depths of 90-150 km, the slab exhibits a negative velocity anomaly we associate with pervasive fracturing; 2) in the central Colombia-Panama area, we define an area of 30-km-thick crust of the Panama arc colliding/subducting at a modern 30/mm in a direction of 95 degrees; the length of this slab shows subduction/collision initiated after 20 Ma (Middle Miocene); we call this feature the Panama indenter since it has produced a V-shaped indentation of the Colombian margin and responsible for widespread crustal deformation and topographic uplift in Colombia; an incipient subduction area is forming near the Panama border with intermediate earthquakes at an eastward dip of 70 degrees to depths of ~150 km; this zone is not visible on tomographic images; 3) a 250-km-wide zone of Miocene oceanic crust of the Nazca plate flanking the Panama indenter subducts at a rate of 25 mm/yr in a direction of 55 degrees and at a normal dip of 40 degrees; the length of this slab suggests subduction began at ~5 Ma; 4) the Caldas tear defines a major dip change to the south where a 35 degrees

  3. Magmatic-hydrothermal evolution and devolatilization beneath Merapi volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Olivier; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.; Stix, John

    2013-07-01

    At Merapi volcano, Indonesia, explosive eruptions lasting several months result from injections of reduced mafic magmas and are interspersed by periods of lava dome growth and collapse, quiescent degassing, assimilation of wall rock and fractional crystallization lasting a few years. Silicate melt inclusions and volcanic gases were analyzed to study processes of magmatic volatile exsolution and volcanic degassing during periods of quiescent degassing at Merapi. Volcanic gases were sampled at Merapi in 1994 during a phase of quiescent degassing and in 2006 at the end of a dome-growth and collapse explosive eruption. Silicate melt inclusions were collected and analyzed from lavas and scorias for their major element and volatile components. Solubility relationships between H2O and CO2 in melt inclusions demonstrate that melt was being trapped beneath Merapi to depths reaching 19 km. Host amphibole geobarometry indicates crystallization pressures reaching up to 26 km. Hence there is evidence of deep pooling and crystallization of magma beneath Merapi at appreciable depths. Using a mass balance model of magmatic volatile exsolution, we demonstrate that the magma degassing from 19 km to the surface approaches closed-system behavior. Compared to the bulk magmatic volatiles analyzed in melt inclusions, volcanic gases had similar amounts of CO2, were enriched in H2O and S and depleted in Cl and F. We thus propose that the magmatic volatile phase was initially exsolved from the magma as a supercritical fluid and that it subsequently exsolved into a H2O-Cl-F-rich brine and CO2-S-rich vapor. According to the H2O-NaCl model, brine-vapor exsolution occurred at ~ 5 km in depth for a 5 wt.% NaCl, 900 °C to 1000 °C fluid, although the presence of H2S, SO2 and CO2 may cause the supercritical fluid to unmix at greater depths. Magma at shallower depths exsolved a brine and a vapor directly from the melt. The volcanic gases at Merapi thus represent the vapor fraction of a magmatic

  4. Magmatism & lithospheric destruction along the Colorado Plateau margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendersky, C.; Plank, T.; Forsyth, D. W.; Hauri, E. H.; Lee, C.; Holtzman, B. K.

    2012-12-01

    The process of cratonic lithosphere deformation remains mysterious. The Colorado Plateau (CP), including its underlying lithosphere, has persisted for over a 1Ga, while in parts of the adjacent Basin and Range (B&R) Cenozoic extension has thinned the lithosphere by half. Today, extensional processes are focused in the transition zone between these two regions, which is defined by a region of volcanism and active faulting. We combine seismic tomography models from EarthScope data with melt thermobarometry from mafic scoria erupted in three volcanic fields since 100ka to investigate lithospheric deformation in this actively rifting area. Our sample locations lie along the western and southwestern margin of the CP and record different evolutionary stages in the process of lithosphere destruction via melt infiltration. For each volcanic area studied we use seismic profiles of shear wave velocities (Vs) with pressures and temperatures of mantle-melt equilibrium calculated using the Si and Mg thermobarometer (Lee et al 2009). The thermobarometric results depend highly on the water and Fe3+ content of the melts, which were constrained separately for each volcanic field. Magmatic water contents have been determined by ion-microprobe measurements of olivine hosted melt inclusions. Fe/ΣFe+3 ratios were estimated for each volcanic field via LA-ICP-MS analysis of V in olivine and whole rock compositions (Canil 2002). In the northernmost volcanic field, Black Rock (BRVF), Utah, melts are hot (consistent with mantle potential temperature (Tp) >1400°C), dry (≤1 wt% H2O), and have equilibrated at shallow depths (<70 km), within the seismic lid. Shear velocities in this lid, however, are anomalously slow (4.1 km/s), and the mantle beneath (Vs ~ 3.9 km/s), is the slowest in the B&R, coincident with the highest and most focused extension rates (Wasatch Fault Zone). Together, these observations support high mantle temperatures, inefficient melt extraction, and a weak lithosphere

  5. Magmatic expression of lithospheric thinning across continental rifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. N.; Gibson, S. A.

    1994-05-01

    Studies of magmatism associated with continental rifting have traditionally focused only on volcanism within the downfaulted axial zone and along its immediate flanks. Teleseismic travel-time delay studies during the last decade have confirmed the results of earlier gravity surveys of rifted areas, showing that thinning at the base of the continental lithosphere occurs throughout a zone up to about 10 times wider than the physiographic expression of the rift. It is, therefore, logical to consider rifting-related magmatism on the same scale. Potential sources of mafic magmas in rift zones are the thinned subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), the convecting mantle beneath the continental plate and mixtures of the two. Detailed elemental and radiogenic isotope geochemical studies show that, during the initial extension of continental rifts, the associated mafic magmatism tends to be: (1) relatively sodic and from predominantly convecting mantle sources at the rift axis; (2) relatively potassic and from predominantly lithospheric mantle sources at the margins of the thinned-plate zone. This underlying geochemical pattern is obscured in many instances by such processes as crustal contamination and magma mixing within open-system reservoirs. The mafic ultrapotassic component that provides a distinctive input to SCLM-source magmas appears to be largely fusible at temperatures well below the dry solidus of SCLM; so that, in some cases, prolonged magmatism at a site causes removal of most or all of the potassic lithosphere-source melt (as mafic ultrapotassic magmas or as a contribution to mixed-source melts) without destruction of that lithosphere segment as a geophysically defined unit. Such a zone of refractory lithosphere permits subsequent, recognisable, convecting mantle source melts to penetrate it and reach the surface. These principles are illustrated by discussion of the Neogene-Quaternary magmatism of the Rio Grande, East African, Rhine and Baikal rifts, in

  6. Petrogenesis of Sveconorwegian magmatism in southwest Norway; constraints from zircon U-Pb-Hf-O and whole-rock geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Nick M. W.; Slagstad, Trond; Parrish, Randall R.; Norry, Michael J.; Marker, Mogens; Horstwood, Matthew S. A.; Røhr, Torkil

    2013-04-01

    The Sveconorwegian orogen is traditionally interpreted as a Himalayan-scale continental collision, and the eastward continuation of the Grenville Province of Laurentia; however, it has recently been proposed that it represents an accretionary orogen without full-scale continental collision (Slagstad et al., in press). We suggest that magmatism is one of the key constraints to differentiate between different types of orogens; thus, detailed investigation of the timing and petrogenesis of the magmatic record is a requirement for better understanding of the Sveconorwegian orogen as a whole. Here, we present new U-Pb geochronology, zircon Hf-O isotope, and whole-rock geochemical data to constrain the petrogenesis of the early -Sveconorwegian Sirdal Magmatic Belt (SMB). The SMB is a batholithic-scale complex of intrusions that intrudes into most of the Rogaland-Hardangervidda Block in southwest Norway. Current age constraints put emplacement between ~1050 to 1020 Ma. New ages from the Suldal region indicate that the onset of SMB magmatism can be put back to 1070 Ma, which is some 30-50 Myrs prior to high-grade metamorphism. Average initial ɛHf signatures range from ~0 to 4; these overlap with later post-Sveconorwegian granites and with early-/pre-Sveconorwegian ferroan (A-type) granites. Average δ18O signatures range from ~5.7 to 8.7, except for one anomalous granite at ~11.6. The Hf-O signatures are compatible with a mixed mantle-crustal source. Crustal sources may include ~1500 Ma Telemarkian or ~1200 Ma juvenile crust. Hf-O bulk-mixing modelling using a 1500 Ma crustal source indicates >50 % mantle input. Although much further mapping and geochronological work is required, granitic magmatism appears to have persisted throughout much of the ~1100 to 900 Ma period that spans the Sveconorwegian orogen. This magmatism is consistently ferroan (i.e. dry); however, the SMB marks a clear transition to magnesian (i.e. wet) magmatism, with a return to ferroan magmatism at

  7. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, G.R. )

    1996-01-01

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at [approximately]1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  8. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ?) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at {approximately}1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  9. Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous magmatism in the Lhasa terrane and its tectonic implications: Evidences from detrital zircons in the Nyingchi Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Harris, Nigel; Xu, Wang-Chun; Pan, Fa-Bin

    2016-02-01

    The Late Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the Lhasa terrane remains poorly understood due to the paucity of the Late Paleozoic magmatic rocks exposed at the surface. Detrital zircons in the sedimentary rocks can provide a record of magmatic rocks that have been eroded. Here we report detrital zircon U-Pb ages, trace-element and Hf isotopic data of metasedimentary rocks from the Nyingchi Complex in the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. Detrital zircons from the metasedimentary rocks yield major age populations of 330-364 Ma, 490-800 Ma, 1000-1200 Ma, and 1500-1800 Ma. The weighted mean ages of the youngest three detrital zircons indicate Carboniferous (~ 330 Ma) depositional age for their sedimentary protoliths. Provenance analysis indicates that the sedimentary detritus was sourced from the Lhasa terrane itself. The presence of abundant 330-364 Ma detrital zircons indicates that the Lhasa terrane was characterized by Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous magmatism. The trace-element compositions of the 330-364 Ma detrital zircons indicate that their magmatic host rocks mainly include mafic rocks and granitoids, and minor carbonatite. Some mafic host rocks probably formed in rift-related tectonic setting, and the others formed in arc-related tectonic settings. The granitic host rocks were S-type granites. The 330-391 Ma zircons have negative εHf(t) values (- 19.3 to - 2.5), suggesting that their magmatic host rocks resulted from partial melting of the enriched mantle or ancient crustal materials. Combined with previous studies, we propose that the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous magmatic rocks in the Lhasa terrane probably formed in an arc-back-arc system which resulted from the southward subduction of the Paleo-Tethys oceanic crust. The back-arc basin developed as the Sumdo Paleo-Tethys ocean, which began to shrink as oceanic crust subducted northwards underneath the North Lhasa terrane during the Late Carboniferous-Permian and finally closed during the Triassic.

  10. Triassic granitoids in the eastern Songpan Ganzi Fold Belt, SW China: Magmatic response to geodynamics of the deep lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chao; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Sun, Min; Zhao, Yongjiu; Wilde, Simon; Long, Xiaoping; Yan, Danping

    2010-02-01

    The Songpan Ganzi Fold Belt (SGFB), SW China, was developed from a passive continental margin into an orogenic belt with the consumption of the Paleo-Tethys. During the evolution of the SGFB, numerous Late Triassic granitic plutons formed and exhibited a progressive development from adakite/I-type granite, high Ba-Sr granite, A-type granite and monzonite. Representative Late Triassic plutons were studied to unravel the bewildering evolution of the eastern SGFB. The Menggu Pluton (224 ± 3 Ma) consists of granites with high alkali (K 2O+Na 2O = 7.85-10.4 wt.%) and adakitic characteristics (Sr/Y = 19-38). The ɛNd T values (- 2.77 to - 5.03), initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (0.7050-0.7063) and low Nb/Ta ratios (8-10) are indicative of an origin by partial melting of amphibolitic lower crust. Rocks from the Niuxingou Pluton (215 ± 3 Ma) are richer in K than Na (K 2O/Na 2O = 1.1-1.5) and contain high Sr (1006-1662 ppm) and Ba (1277-2009 ppm), typical of shoshonite and high Ba-Sr granite. They have less enriched ɛNd T values (+ 0.08 to - 2.04) and less radiogenic 87Sr/ 86Sr i ratios (0.7047-0.7048), and formed from a mixed melt derived from upwelling asthenosphere and the overlying metasomatised lithospheric mantle. The Taiyanghe Pluton (205 ± 3 Ma) consists of monzonites, with high Al 2O 3 (> 20 wt.%), but low MgO (0.94-1.39 wt.%). The rocks are richer in Na than K (K 2O/Na 2O < 0.7), contain high large ion lithophile element (LILE) (681-834 ppm Sr and 2142-9453 ppm Ba) and display strongly fractionated REE patterns ((La/Yb) N = 35-63). These features, together with their enriched Nd-Sr isotopic compositions (ɛNd T = - 4.78 to - 6.50; 87Sr/ 86Sr i = 0.7074-0.7090), suggest that the monzonite probably formed from low degrees of partial melting of metasomatised lithospheric mantle. Although a continuous compressional regime during the Mid- and Late Triassic has been invoked for the SGFB, the generation of crustally derived adakitic and shoshonitic plutons reflect

  11. Detrital Zircon Record and Continental Growth: Differentiating Crustal Generation versus Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawood, Peter; Hawkesworth, Chris; Dhuime, Bruno; Kemp, Tony; Prave, Tony

    2010-05-01

    The detrital (and magmatic) zircon record is being increasingly used to understand the rate, duration and process of formation of continental crust. Compilations of zircons have identified peaks of ages of crystallisation and crust formation. Taken at face value these peaks suggest that continental crust formation is episodic with significant pulses of juvenile magmatism and crustal growth in the late Archean and Paleoproterozoic (2.7 Ga and 1.9 Ga), and with only subdued addition in the Phanerozoic. Punctuated crustal growth remains difficult to explain by global changes in plate tectonic regimes, and so it is typically attributed to mantle plume activity. However, the andesitic composition of continental crust and evidence that plate tectonics has been active since at least 3.0 Ga suggests magmatic arcs should be the major site of continental growth. Alternatively, we argue that peaks reflect variations in preservation potential in relation to tectonic setting and that peaks correspond with phases of supercontinent assembly: collisional belts have high preservation potential whereas magmatic arcs, which are sites for significant crustal generation, have a low preservation potential. The detrital zircon record can also be used to unravel tectonic setting. The key features of zircons sampled in different tectonic settings are (i) the time between crystallisation and incorporation into the sedimentary record, and (ii) the age distributions. The detrital record from magmatic arcs yields zircons with crystallisation ages close to that of the host sediment, and little range in ages. Other settings yield large differences between the ages of crystallisation and that of sedimentation, reflecting the history of the pre-existing crust, and the extent to which there was magmatism close to the time of sedimentation. The most marked example is for divergent margins that may be associated with little magmatism that crystallises zircon, and simply record peaks of older ages

  12. The 780 Gunbarrel Magmatic Event: U-Pb Documentation of Widespread Mafic Magmatism Along the Neoproterozoic Western of Laurentia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlan, S. S.; Heaman, L.; Lecheminant, A. N.; Premo, W. R.

    2003-12-01

    Precise U-Pb baddeleyite dating of mafic igneous rocks provide evidence for a widespread and synchronous magmatic event that extended for >2400 km along the western margin of the Neoproterozoic Laurentian craton. The gabbros dated in this study include three mafic sheets that intrude crystalline basement rocks of the Northwest Territories (the Gunbarrel, Calder and Faber Lake gabbros), a mafic sill exposed in the Mackenzie Mountains (Concajou Canyon sill), a mafic dike in the Muskwa Ranges of British Columbia (Muncho Lake diabase), and three northwest-trending mafic dikes in the Tobacco Root (group B dikes) and Beartooth Mountains (Christmas Lake dike) of Montana and Wyoming. U-Pb baddeleyite analyses for eight intrusions from seven localities yield 207Pb/206Pb ages that range from 775 to 782 Ma, with most analyses less than 2% discordant. The 207Pb/206Pb dates from the eight mafic dikes and sheets are statistically indistinguishable and we have combined sixteen individual baddeleyite analyses to yield a composite U-Pb Concordia age of 780.3 +/- 1.4 Ma (95% confidence level). We term this 780 Ma event the Gunbarrel magmatic event based on exposures of the Gunbarrel gabbro found along Gunbarrel Inlet, Great Bear Lake, Northwest Territories. Other mafic rocks that may be part of the gunbarrel event include some of the voluminous mafic sills that intrude the Belt/Purcell Supergroups in the U.S. and Canada and the northwest-trending dike at Mount Moran in the Teton Mountains of Wyoming. Overall, this is the geographically largest mafic event yet identified along the Neoprotoerozoic western margin of Laurentia. The origin of the mafic magmatism of the Gunbarrel event is not clear, but it may be related to mantle plume activity or the upwelling of asthenosphere leading to crustal extension accompanying initial breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia and development of the proto-Pacific Ocean. The mafic magmatism of the Gunbarrel magmatic event at 780 Ma predates the

  13. Implications of estimated magmatic additions and recycling losses at the subduction zones of accretionary (non-collisional) and collisional (suturing) orogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, D. W.; Von Huene, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arc magmatism at subduction zones (SZs) most voluminously supplies juvenile igneous material to build rafts of continental and intra-oceanic or island arc (CIA) crust. Return or recycling of accumulated CIA material to the mantle is also most vigorous at SZs. Recycling is effected by the processes of sediment subduction, subduction erosion, and detachment and sinking of deeply underthrust sectors of CIA crust. Long-term (>10-20 Ma) rates of additions and losses can be estimated from observational data gathered where oceanic crust underruns modern, long-running (Cenozoic to mid-Mesozoic) ocean-margin subduction zones (OMSZs, e.g. Aleutian and South America SZs). Long-term rates can also be observationally assessed at Mesozoic and older crust-suturing subduction zone (CSSZs) where thick bodies of CIA crust collided in tectonic contact (e.g. Wopmay and Appalachian orogens, India and SE Asia). At modern OMSZs arc magmatic additions at intra-oceanic arcs and at continental margins are globally estimated at c. 1.5 AU and c. 1.0 AU, respectively (1 AU, or Armstrong Unit,= 1 km3 a-1 of solid material). During collisional suturing at fossil CSSZs, global arc magmatic addition is estimated at 0.2 AU. This assessment presumes that in the past the global length of crustal collision zones averaged c. 6000 km, which is one-half that under way since the early Tertiary. The average long-term rate of arc magmatic additions extracted from modern OMSZs and older CSSZs is thus evaluated at 2.7 AU. Crustal recycling at Mesozoic and younger OMSZs is assessed at c. 60 km3 Ma-1 km-1 (c. 60% by subduction erosion). The corresponding global recycling rate is c. 2.5 AU. At CSSZs of Mesozoic, Palaeozoic and Proterozoic age, the combined upper and lower plate losses of CIA crust via subduction erosion, sediment subduction, and lower plate crustal detachment and sinking are assessed far less securely at c. 115 km3 Ma-1 km-1. At a global length of 6000 km, recycling at CSSZs is accordingly c. 0

  14. Late Triassic alkaline complex in Sulu UHP terrane: Implications for post-collisional magmatism along the continental subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Song, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    In order to insight into crust-mantle interaction triggered by partial melting of the subudcted continental crust during its exhumation, we carried out a combined study on Shidao alkaline complex in the Sulu ultrahigh pressure (UHP) terrane. The alkaline complex is composed of shoshonitic to ultrapotassic gabbro, pyroxene syenite, amphibole syenite, quartz syenite, and granite. Field researches suggest that the mafic rocks are earlier than the felsic ones in sequence. LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb dating on them gives Late Triassic ages of 214 ± 2 to 200 ± 3 Ma from mafic to felsic rocks. These ages are a bit younger than Late Triassic ages for partial melting of the Sulu UHP terrane during exhumation, indicating syn-exhumation magmatism during continental collision. The alkaline rocks have wide ranges of SiO2 (49.7 - 76.7 wt.%), MgO (8.25 - 0.03 wt.%),total Fe2O3 (9.23 - 0.47 wt.%), CaO (8.39 - 0.39 wt.%), Ni (126.0 - 0.07 ppm), and Cr (182.0 - 0.45 ppm) contents. Other major oxides are regularly changed with SiO2. The alkaline rocks have characteristics of arc-like patterns in the trace element distribution, e.g., enrichment of LREE and LILE (Rb, Ba, Th and U), depletion of HFSE (Nb, Ta, P and Ti), and positive Pb anomalies. From the mafic to felsic rocks, (La/Yb)N ratios and contents of the total REE, Sr and Ba are decreased but Rb contents are increased. The alkaline rocks also display features of A2-type granitoids, suggesting a post-collisional magmatism. They have high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70575 and 0.70927) and negative ɛNd(t) values (-18.6 to -15.0) for whole-rock. The homogeneous initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios and ɛNd(t) values of the alkaline rocks are almost unchanged with SiO2 and MgO contents, suggesting a fractional crystallization (FC) process from a same parental magma. Our studies suggest a series of crust-mantle interaction processes along the continental subduction interface as follows: (1) melts from partial melting of the subducted continental

  15. Intra-arc transpression in the lower crust and its relationship to magmatism in a Mesozoic magmatic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotte, Stephen B.; Klepeis, Keith A.; Clarke, Geoffrey L.; Gehrels, George; Hollis, Julie A.

    2005-10-01

    Structural observations and U-Pb geochronology from Fiordland, New Zealand support a model of partitioned transpression within the lower crust of an early Mesozoic magmatic arc called the Median Batholith. We use this lower crustal section to test whether transpression was an efficient mechanism for transporting magma through the deep lithosphere. A continentward migration of magmatic activity occurred within the margin of Gondwana after ˜140 Ma followed by a period of concentrated magmatism in a vertical, 12-15 km wide lower crustal shear zone after ˜119 Ma. The shear zone, named the Indecision Creek Shear Zone, contains variably oriented dioritic intrusions and displays systematic variations in the three-dimensional orientation of ductile structures. From the margins to the center of the shear zone the pitch of stretching lineations on foliation surfaces changes from 10-35° to 55-82° with increasing finite strain. This increase in pitch is accompanied by a steepening and counter-clockwise rotation of foliation planes. These and other structural patterns indicate that arc-parallel sinistral oblique-slip and strike-slip displacements occurred at the shear zone margins and that deformation in its center was dominated by horizontal arc-normal shortening and near vertical extrusion. This style of partitioned transpression reflects the effects of rheological contrasts created by a heterogeneous pattern of magmatism within the arc. Field relationships and U-Pb dates on zircon suggest that the shear zone formed along the boundary between outboard (older) and inboard (younger) parts of the batholith and facilitated the transfer of small volumes of magma vertically through the lower crust until at least ˜111 Ma, when convergence and arc magmatism waned.

  16. Chemical evolution of a magmatic system: The Paintbrush Tuff, SW Nevada volcanic field

    SciTech Connect

    Flood, T.P.; Vogel, T.A.; Schuraytz, B.C.

    1987-09-01

    The chemical and thermal evolution of a single magmatic system is recorded in a series of four ash-flow sheets, the Paintbrush Tuff, that were erupted from the same caldera within a span of 600,000 years. The chemistry of individual glassy pumices, collected from the tops and bottoms of the ash-flow sheets, are used to quantitatively evaluate possible fractionation mechanisms, such as magma mixing and fractional crystallization. The glassy pumices are used because they most nearly approximate the magma in the chamber. All of the chemical variation within the Paintbrush Tuff can be accounted for by fractional crystallization or magma mixing operating alone and/or in conjunction. No other fractionation processes need by invoked. Also, volume estimates based on quantitative modeling reveal that the size of the ash-flow sheets do not reflect the size of their associated reservoirs.

  17. Fe and Si isotope variations at Cedar Butte volcano; insight into magmatic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambardi, Thomas; Lundstrom, Craig C.; Li, Xiaoxiao; McCurry, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This study presents the stable isotopic variations of both Si and Fe recorded in a single well-characterized magmatic suite from Cedar Butte volcano (ID, USA), as well as a sill with progressive compositional change within Finland granophyre (Duluth Complex, MN, USA). Both isotopic systems show a significant enrichment in heavy isotopes in the more differentiated materials, in agreement with previous studies. In addition, the Finland granophyre sill shows a strong dependence between the isotopic composition and the sampling depth, suggesting the isotopic compositions follow a temperature gradient in which the cold part systematically enriches in heavy isotopes. From these results it appears that at Cedar Butte, neither crystal fractionation, nor crustal contamination, nor late stage fluid exsolution can likely explain the isotopic variations we observe for both Fe and Si. We rather attribute these isotopic fractionations to a thermal migration process involving a top-down sill injection during which the isotopic distribution mostly follows a vertical temperature gradient.

  18. Cretaceous Arctic magmatism: Slab vs. plume? Or slab and plume?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, E. S.; Miller, E. L.; Andronikov, A. V.; Brumley, K.; Mayer, L. A.; Mukasa, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic models for the Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent landmasses propose that rifting in the Amerasia Basin (AB) began in Jura-Cretaceous time, accompanied by the development of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). During the same timespan, deformation and slab-related magmatism, followed by intra-arc rifting, took place along the Pacific side of what was to become the Arctic Ocean. A compilation and comparison of the ages, characteristics and space-time variation of circum-Arctic magmatism allows for a better understanding of the role of Pacific margin versus Arctic-Atlantic plate tectonics and the role of plume-related magmatism in the origin of the Arctic Ocean. In Jura-Cretaceous time, an arc built upon older terranes overthrust the Arctic continental margins of North America and Eurasia, shedding debris into foreland basins in the Brooks Range, Alaska, across Chukotka, Russia, to the Lena Delta and New Siberian Islands region of the Russian Arctic. These syn-tectonic sediments have some common sources (e.g., ~250-300 Ma magmatic rocks) as determined by U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology. They are as young as Valanginian-Berriasian (~136 Ma, Gradstein et al., 2004) and place a lower limit on the age of formation of the AB. Subsequent intrusions of granitoid plutons, inferred to be ultimately slab-retreat related, form a belt along the far eastern Russian Arctic continental margin onto Seward Peninsula and have yielded a continuous succession of zircon U-Pb ages from ~137-95 Ma (n=28) and a younger suite ~91-82 Ma (n=16). All plutons dated were intruded in an extensional tectonic setting based on their relations to wall-rock deformation. Regional distribution of ages shows a southward migration of the locus of magmatism during Cretaceous time. Basaltic lavas as old as 130 Ma and as young as 80 Ma (40Ar/39Ar)) erupted across the Canadian Arctic Islands, Svalbard and Franz Josef Land and are associated with

  19. Geology, alteration, and magmatic-hydrothermal history of The Geysers felsite -- potential applications for exploration and development

    SciTech Connect

    Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L. )

    1993-01-01

    The [open quotes]felsite[close quotes] is a shallow, young, granitic intrusive body centrally located within and beneath. The Geysers steam field. The field and the felsite are coaxial, and hydrothermal alteration effected by hot-water dominated geothermal systems antedating the modern steam reservoir shows systematic vertical zonation with respect to the pluton. The research summarized in this communication was undertaken both to clarify the role of the pluton in reservoir evolution, and to characterize critical felsite-specific controls on the fields's deep porosity and permeability. The felsite comprises at least three major intrusive phases. Two are high-silica granites probably older than 1.3 Ma. The third is granodiorite (1 Ma), temporally and chemically equivalent to overlying extrusive dacites of the Clear Lake volcanic field. All three intrusive phases are too old to be heat sources for the modern steam field, but probably were the heat engines for the prior liquid-dominant systems. Younger, deeper magmatic heat sources are strongly implied for the current vapor-dominated regime. Porosity in the felsite is provided by: (1) Extensively mineralized fractures and breccias, probably of both tectonic and high-temperature hydrothermal origin; and (2) miarolitic cavities in the upper levels of the pluton. The latter could be analogous to calcite-dissolution cavities in overlying metagraywacke -- they could serve as storage sites for the fields's liquid water reserves. Porosity in these fractures, breccias, and vugs in partially occluded by hydrothermal vein minerals deposited in prior hotwater-dominated systems --tourmaline, ferroaxinite, quartz, potassium feldspar, epidote, actinolite, prehnite, and many others. Such secondary mineralization conceptually could serve as an excellent exploration guide to potentially productive portions of the felsite beyond the field's present boundaries.

  20. Role of random thermal perturbations in the magmatic segmentation of mid-oceanic ridges: Insights from numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Shamik; Baruah, Amiya; Dutta, Urmi; Mandal, Nibir

    2014-12-01

    Using a random thermal perturbation (RTP) model this study investigates the process of magmatic segmentation along mid-oceanic ridge (MOR) axes as a function of the upwelling dynamics, controlled by coupled solidification-melting processes. The RTP model suggests that the variation in along-axis velocity (VL) fields constitutes the underlying mechanism of segmentation in natural MORs, showing temperature variations within a steady-state range, irrespective of large initial thermal perturbations imposed at the model base. The VL patterns are initially transient, characterized by multi-order segments, but attain a stable configuration with dominantly large segments (average size ~ 100 km) within a time scale of 2.3 Ma. Buoyant-melt driven thermal convection explains this transient segmentation. Small scale convection cells are found to be progressively consumed by larger cells, resulting in a stable convection structure over a similar time scale. Slow- and fast-spreading ridges (SSR and FSR) undergo upwelling with contrasting melt flow patterns. SSRs involve melt feeding into the ridge axis by horizontal flows from segment centers, trailing into large-scale conduits at an early stage. With time, vertical upwelling occurs throughout the segment. In the case of FSRs, both melt supply avenues prevail throughout their development. We also evaluate the variation of the across-axis flow velocity (VT) to investigate the mode of geometric evolution of MORs. Time series VT maps suggest that a ridge structure develops through localization of discrete axes (VT = 0) with offsets varying up to 15 km, which coalesce with one another to form a single axis. The matured ridge, however, retains higher-order offsets (up to 9 km).

  1. The Plutón Diorítico Moat: Mildly alkaline monzonitic magmatism in the Fuegian Andes of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Guillot, M.; Escayola, M.; Acevedo, R.; Pimentel, M.; Seraphim, G.; Proenza, J.; Schalamuk, I.

    2009-12-01

    The Plutón Diorítico Moat (Moat Dioritic Pluton, PDM) is the largest of several isolated Cretaceous plutons exposed in the Fuegian Andes of Argentina. It is made of a large variety of rock types ranging from ultramafic bodies (pyroxenites and hornblendites) to syenites. The petrological diversity is thought to have been originated by fractional crystallization of a mantle-derived magma combined with minor assimilation of continental crust (AFC). Its geochemical characteristics indicate a mildly-alkaline monzonitic affinity, contrasting with the typical calc-alkaline plutons of the Southern Patagonian Batholith (PB) to the south, in the Chilean archipelago. The PDM original magma is arc-related and its crystallization, as indicated by the Rb-Sr mineral isochron age of 115 ± 3 Ma, is coeval with some plutons of the PB. Therefore a similar tectonic regime is assumed for the emplacement of these plutonic bodies, both south and north of the Beagle channel. Differences in magma sources and degree of partial melting are inferred to account for the contrasting lithological and geochemical characteristics of the PB and PDM. The data suggest that the original magmas of the PDM were generated at greater depths in the mantle, by a smaller degree of partial melting, compared with the PB. The Barros Arana basalts, exposed to the north in Chile, forming a back-arc volcanic complex, display the same mildly-alkaline shoshonitic affinity, and are considered in this study as the volcanic equivalents of the PDM. All the plutons in the Argentinean Fuegian Andes display similar lithological and geochemical characteristics and are, therefore, grouped in this work under the name of Magmatismo Potásico Fueguino ( Fuegian Potassic Magmatism).

  2. The Capilla del Monte pluton, Sierras de Córdoba, Argentina: the easternmost Early Carboniferous magmatism in the pre-Andean SW Gondwana margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlquist, Juan A.; Pankhurst, Robert J.; Rapela, Carlos W.; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Alasino, Pablo H.; Saavedra, Julio; Baldo, Edgardo G.; Murra, Juan A.; da Costa Campos Neto, Mario

    2015-10-01

    New geochronological, geochemical, and isotopic data are reported for the Capilla del Monte two-mica granite pluton in the northeastern Sierras de Córdoba. An Early Carboniferous age is established by a U-Pb zircon concordia (336 ± 3 Ma) and a Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron (337 ± 2 Ma). Zircon saturation geothermometry indicates relatively high temperatures (735-800 °C). The granites have high average SiO2 (74.2 %), Na2O + K2O (7.8 %), and high field-strength elements, high K2O/Na2O (1.7) and FeO/MgO ratios (5.1), with low CaO content (0.71 %). REE patterns with marked negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* 0.14-0.56) indicate crystal fractionation, dominantly of plagioclase and K-feldspar, from a peraluminous magma enriched in F. Isotope data (87Sr/86Srinitial = 0.7086, ɛ Nd336 = -5.5 to -4.4 with T DM = 1.5 Ga, zircon ɛ Hf336 +0.8 to -6.1; mean T DM = 1.5 Ga) suggest a Mesoproterozoic continental source, albeit with some younger or more juvenile material indicated by the Hf data. The pluton is the easternmost member of a Carboniferous A-type magmatic suite which shows an increase in juvenile input toward the west in this part of the pre-Andean margin. The petrological and geochemical data strongly suggest a similar intraplate geodynamic setting to that of the nearby but much larger, Late Devonian, Achala batholith, although Hf isotope signatures of zircon suggest a more uniformly crustal origin for the latter. Further studies are required to understand whether these bodies represent two independent magmatic episodes or more continuous activity.

  3. Cambro-Ordovician magmatism in the Araçuaí Belt (SE Brazil): Snapshots from a post-collisional event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Campos, Cristina P.; de Medeiros, Silvia R.; Mendes, Julio C.; Pedrosa-Soares, Antonio C.; Dussin, Ivo; Ludka, Isabel P.; Dantas, Elton L.

    2016-07-01

    The focus of the present work is the rebound of the magmatism at the late stages of orogenic collapse in the Araçuaí Belt, in Brazil. At the end of the orogen bimodal inversely zoned plutons were emplaced along a tectonic corridor following the Atlantic coast of Brazil. This event culminates around 500 Ma. We review geology, petrography, geochemistry and geochronology of these plutonic structures in the region of Espírito Santo. New geochemical modeling of trace element data together with new whole rock Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic data depict a gradual process of mantle contamination during different stages of the orogen. In the post-orogenic stage contamination reaches extreme values. Basic rocks reach εNd(0.5Ga) values below -10. Gabbros to peridotites are more enriched in Ba, Zr, LREE and Sr than the surrounding metasediments. Four new U-Pb data sets from determinations in zircon and monazite crystals, (central northern part of the belt) confirm peak magma production around 500 ± 15 Ma, ranging up to 525 ± 3 Ma in one of the structures. Based on the pictured data, we discuss the significance of this magmatism and present a possible model: a process of gradational delamination of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle and adjacent deep continental crust through underplating. As a consequence, an already enriched mantle was dramatically further contaminated. At the end of this event the intrusion of alkaline melts, with less negative εNd (-5) and further enrichment in incompatible elements, point towards a new input of deeper juvenile mantle magma. Our data suggest the possible onset of a hotspot due to the destabilization of the asthenospheric mantle after orogenic collapse.

  4. The Capilla del Monte pluton, Sierras de Córdoba, Argentina: the easternmost Early Carboniferous magmatism in the pre-Andean SW Gondwana margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlquist, Juan A.; Pankhurst, Robert J.; Rapela, Carlos W.; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Alasino, Pablo H.; Saavedra, Julio; Baldo, Edgardo G.; Murra, Juan A.; da Costa Campos Neto, Mario

    2016-07-01

    New geochronological, geochemical, and isotopic data are reported for the Capilla del Monte two-mica granite pluton in the northeastern Sierras de Córdoba. An Early Carboniferous age is established by a U-Pb zircon concordia (336 ± 3 Ma) and a Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron (337 ± 2 Ma). Zircon saturation geothermometry indicates relatively high temperatures (735-800 °C). The granites have high average SiO2 (74.2 %), Na2O + K2O (7.8 %), and high field-strength elements, high K2O/Na2O (1.7) and FeO/MgO ratios (5.1), with low CaO content (0.71 %). REE patterns with marked negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* 0.14-0.56) indicate crystal fractionation, dominantly of plagioclase and K-feldspar, from a peraluminous magma enriched in F. Isotope data (87Sr/86Srinitial = 0.7086, ɛ Nd336 = -5.5 to -4.4 with T DM = 1.5 Ga, zircon ɛ Hf336 +0.8 to -6.1; mean T DM = 1.5 Ga) suggest a Mesoproterozoic continental source, albeit with some younger or more juvenile material indicated by the Hf data. The pluton is the easternmost member of a Carboniferous A-type magmatic suite which shows an increase in juvenile input toward the west in this part of the pre-Andean margin. The petrological and geochemical data strongly suggest a similar intraplate geodynamic setting to that of the nearby but much larger, Late Devonian, Achala batholith, although Hf isotope signatures of zircon suggest a more uniformly crustal origin for the latter. Further studies are required to understand whether these bodies represent two independent magmatic episodes or more continuous activity.

  5. Seismic properties of magmatic processes at laboratory scale: Effects of crystallization and bubble nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripoli, Barbara; Cordonnier, Benoit; Ulmer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Seismic tomography of potentially hazardous volcanoes is a prime tool to assess the dimensions of magmatic reservoirs and possible magmatic ascent. Magma rheology and volcanic eruptive style are to a first order controlled by processes occurring in the conduit or in the chamber, such as crystallization and bubble exsolution. Seismic velocities are strongly affected by these processes (Carrichi et al, 2009) but the only few constrained measurements don't allow yet to establish a link between seismic tomography and the textural state of the volcanic system. Elastic parameters of vapor-saturated, partially molten systems are thus providing fundamental information for the identification of such reservoirs under active and seemingly dormant volcanoes. We investigated a chemically simplified melt analogous to andesite and trachyte, in the system CaO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-CO2 (Picard et al, 2011), which undergoes plagioclase crystallization and bubble exsolution. Using a Paterson-type internally-heated gas pressure apparatus, we measured the ultrasonic velocities at a constant pressure of 250 MPa and at a frequency of 0.1 MHz. Samples have been first heated at 850 °C for 30 minutes. Subsequently, the temperature has been decreased to 650 °C at a rate of 0.5 or 0.1 °C/min and velocities were recorded every 45 minutes. In order to characterize the microstructure evolution, series of cold-seal experiments at identical pressure conditions but with rapid-quenching at each of the recorded temperatures have been undertaken. We will present new experimental results that clarify the dependence of the seismic velocities on the evolution of microstructures (bubble and crystal-size distribution) as well as the evolution of composition (melt and crystals). REFERENCES Caricchi, L., Burlini, L., and Ulmer, P. (2009) Propagation of P and S-waves in magmas with different crystal contents: insights into the crystallinity of magmatic reservoirs. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal

  6. A case of Alzheimer's disease in magmatic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Rodriguez, F.; Bouvet de Maisonneuve, C.

    2012-12-01

    The reequilibration of chemical zoning in crystals from volcanic rocks is increasingly used to determine the duration of the processes involved in their origin, residence and transport. There now exist a good number of determinations of diffusion coefficients in olivine (Fe-Mg, Mn, Ca, Ni, Cr), plagioclase (CaAl-NaSi, Mg, Sr, Ba, REE), pyroxenes (Fe-Mg, Mn, Ca, REE) and quartz (Ti), but most studies have used a single element or component in a single mineral group. Although this is a good approach, it can only access a limited range of time scales, typically the short-term memory of the crystal. In other words, for process durations that are longer than the combination of the diffusivity and diffusion distance (and for a constant boundary), the long-term memory of the crystal might have been lost. This could explain why most time determinations of magmatic processes from volcanic rocks give times of about < 100 years, and why these are shorter than the thousands of years obtained from U-Th series disequilibrium isotopes. We have done a series of numerical calculations and natural observation to determine the time windows that can be accessed with different elements and minerals, and how they may affect the time scales and interpretations of processes that the crystals might be recording. We have looked at two end-members representative of mafic and silicic magmas by changing the temperature and mineral compositions. 3 dimensional calculations of diffusion reequilibration at the center of a 1 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm crystal and using a constant boundary as first case. We find that for mafic magma and olivine, 90 % of equilibration of Fe-Mg, Mn, and Ni occurs in a few decades, but gradients in Ca and Cr persist for a few thousand years. These results can for example explain the large ranges of Ca and Cr contents at a given Fe/Mg of olivine, and why apparently contradictory times can be obtained from elements with different diffusivities in the same crystal. At the same time

  7. A model for northern Vermont's Acadian magmatism with insight from Italy's Tuscan magmatic province

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, D.S. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    S-type Devonian acidic intrusives in northern Vermont occur scattered throughout the turbiditic flysch sequence and pervasive horizon of mafic Standing Pond Volcanics of the Connecticut Valley--Gaspe Trough (CVGT). These granitoids formed in a successor basin that opened over the stalled Taconic subduction zone located between the Bronson Hill--Boundary Mountain Volcanic arc (east) and the ophiolite-bearing accretionary complex of the Green Mountains (west). Contact aureoles surrounding the granitoids are superimposed over low-pressure facies series metamorphic isograds that have concentric pattern correlated with the centers of intrusion. Italy's Tuscan Magmatic Province, also dominated by S-type acidic intrusives, developed between 7 and 2 Ma in a successor basin over an extinct subduction zone. In that case, the basin and its plutons developed when the Corsica-Sardinia plate pulled back to form the Tyrrhenian Sea after having collided with Italy to form the Apennine range approximately 10 m.y. earlier. In this model for northern Vermont, a volcanic arc and accretionary complex developed during Ordovician subduction, perhaps with continuing trench--arc separation due to shallow subduction. When the leading edge of continental North America entered the subduction zone, the process stalled and the subducted Iapetus slab continued to lose heat and increase density, promoting its separation from the overlying plate. Upwelling under the former forearc region rifted the crust to form the CVGT. The mantle-derived mafic melts rose, transferring heat to metamorphose and partially melt the basin fill. The Standing Pond Volcanics represent this melt that reached the surface at one stage and flooded the basin. Northern Vermont's granitoids rose, penetrating the domed strata above their source region, as extensional tectonism was replaced by Acadian compression.

  8. Magmatic versus sedimentary volcanism: similarities of two different geological phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, Adriano

    2015-04-01

    Sedimentary volcanoes (or more commonly called mud volcanoes) are geological phenomena that are present in sedimentary basins of passive and active margins. At these localities gas and water related to hydrocarbon diagenetic and catagenetic production generate overpressure facilitating the rise of mobile and ductily deformable materials that breach through the denser overlying rocks. The results are surface powerful manifestations of mud eruptions that strikingly resemble to those of magmatic volcanoes. Magmatic and sedimentary volcanoes share many other similarities. Initially both systems are essentially gas driven and the subsurface plumbing systems are characterized by intrusions and a complex system of fractures and conduits that bifurcate from a central feeder channel that manifest in the surface as numerous satellite seeps and vents. In both cases are inferred secondary shallower chambers where reactions take place. Comparable structural morphologies (e.g. conical, elongated, pie-shaped, multicrater, swap-like, caldera collapse, subsiding flanks, plateau-like) and/or alteration of the original shape are in both cases related to e.g. density and viscosity of the erupted solids, to the gas content, to the frequency of the eruptions, and to the action of meteoric factors (e.g. strong erosion by rain, wind, temperature changes etc. etc.). Like for magmatic volcanoes, the periodicity of the eruptive activity is related to the time required to charge the system and create new overpressure, as well as how the structure seals during periods of dormancy. Earthquakes are documented to be a powerful trigger capable to activate faults (often hosting magmatic and sedimentary volcanoes) and/or facilitating the breaching of the upper layers, and allowing the rise of deeper charged fluids. Finally, both systems significantly contribute as active source for CH4 (sedimentary) and CO2 (magmatic) resulting of great importance for global budget estimates of sensitive gasses. The

  9. Geochemical evolution of magmatism in Archean granite-greenstone terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, A. V.; Larionova, Yu. O.

    2006-05-01

    Evolution of Archean magmatism is one of the key problems concerning the early formation stages of the Earth crust and biosphere, because that evolution exactly controlled variable concentrations of chemical elements in the World Ocean, which are important for metabolism. Geochemical evolution of magmatism between 3.5 and 2.7 Ga is considered based on database characterizing volcanic and intrusive rock complexes of granite-greenstone terrains (GGT) studied most comprehensively in the Karelian (2.9-2.7 Ga) and Kaapvaal (3.5-2.9 Ga) cratons and in the Pilbara block (3.5-2.9 Ga). Trends of magmatic geochemical evolution in the mentioned GGTs were similar in general. At the early stage of their development, tholeiitic magmas were considerably enriched in chalcophile and siderophile elements Fe2O3, MgO, Cr, Ni, Co, V, Cu, and Zn. At the next stage, calc-alkaline volcanics of greenstone belts and syntectonic TTG granitoids were enriched in lithophile elements Rb, Cs, Ba, Th, U, Pb, Nb, La, Sr, Be and others. Elevated concentrations of both the “crustal” and “mantle-derived” elements represented a distinctive feature of predominantly intrusive rocks of granitoid composition, which were characteristic of the terminal stage of continental crust formation in the GGTs, because older silicic rocks and lithospheric mantle were jointly involved into processes of magma generation. On the other hand, the GGTs different in age reveal specific trends in geochemical evolution of rock associations close in composition and geological position. First, the geochemical cycle of GGT evolution was of a longer duration in the Paleoarchean than in the Meso-and Neoarchean. Second, the Paleoarche an tholeiitic associations had higher concentrations of LREE and HFSE (Zr, Ti, Th, Nb, Ta, Hf) than their Meso-and Neoarchean counterparts. Third, the Y and Yb concentrations in Paleoarchean calc-alkaline rock associations are systematically higher than in Neoarchean rocks of the same type

  10. Age and origin of earliest adakitic-like magmatism in Panama: Implications for the tectonic evolution of the Panamanian magmatic arc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whattam, Scott A.; Montes, Camilo; McFadden, Rory R.; Cardona, Agustin; Ramirez, Diego; Valencia, Victor

    2012-06-01

    40-20 Ma marks a fundamental interval in the evolution of the 70-0 Ma Panamanian magmatic arc system. During this period, there is no evidence of Panamanian magmatic arc activity to the east of the Panama Canal Basin while to the west and in localized regions to the east of the Panama Canal Basin a phase of intrusive-only activity is recorded. Fundamentally, geochemical and geochronological evidence presented herein indicate that this intrusive activity was predominantly 'adakitic-like' and becomes younger from west to east along an approximately W-E striking lineament. Granodiorites of the Petaquilla batholith, western Panama yield LAM-ICP-MS 206Pb/238U zircon ages of 29.0 + 0.7, - 0.6 Ma, 28.5 + 0.7, - 0.5 Ma, 28.3 + 0.5, - 0.4 Ma and 26.2 + 0.5, - 0.9 Ma. To the east of the Panama Canal Basin zircons from a hypabyssal diorite of the mainly intermediate Majé subvolcanic suite, cedes a mean 206Pb/238U age of 18.9 + 0.4 Ma. Relative to other 70-5 Ma Panamanian magmatic arc lavas and intrusives, Majé and Petaquilla intrusives yield adakitic-like major and trace element abundances (e.g., > 15 wt.% Al2O3, generally > 3.5 wt.% Na2O, > 400 ppm Sr, < 1.9 ppm Yb, < 18 ppm Y, Sr/Y that ranges to > 120) and strongly fractionated HREE patterns. These 30-26 Ma (Petaquilla) and 19 Ma (Majé) suites are also compositionally similar to a subvolcanic suite of rare, circa 25 Ma adakitic-like, andesitic intrusives which occur within the Panama Canal Basin midway between Petaquilla and Majé and at the same approximate latitude as Petaquilla and Majé. Collectively, the geochemical and geochronological data for the adakitic-like intrusives arc consistent with formation via partial melting of lowermost, mafic crust above a sub-horizontal slab tear that propagated from the west (Petaquilla) to the east (Majé) between 30 and 19 Ma. Our new tectonic model postulates that collision between the Panamanian magmatic arc system and an 'indentor' (e.g., a tract of thickened buoyant