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Sample records for 3t mri scanner

  1. Acute vertigo in an anesthesia provider during exposure to a 3T MRI scanner

    PubMed Central

    Gorlin, Andrew; Hoxworth, Joseph M; Pavlicek, William; Thunberg, Christopher A; Seamans, David

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo induced by exposure to the magnetic field of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner is a well-known phenomenon within the radiology community but is not widely appreciated by other clinical specialists. Here, we describe a case of an anesthetist experiencing acute vertigo while providing sedation to a patient undergoing a 3 Tesla MRI scan. After discussing previous reports, and the evidence surrounding MRI-induced vertigo, we review potential etiologies that include the effects of both static and time-varying magnetic fields on the vestibular apparatus. We conclude our review by discussing the occupational standards that exist for MRI exposure and methods to minimize the risks of MRI-induced vertigo for clinicians working in the MRI environment. PMID:25792858

  2. Ag/AgCl electrodes in the EEG/fMRI method in 3T MRI scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akay, Cengiz; Kepceoğlu, Abdullah

    2013-10-01

    This study focuses on the comparison of two different types of EEG electrodes (the first B10-S-150 Ag/AgCl sintered ring electrode with 1, 5 mm touch proof safety socket and 150 cm heavy-duty lead wire and the second, B12-LS-100 Ag/AgCl sintered FE-electrode with 100 cm light-duty lead wire and 1, 5 mm touch proof safety socket with 5 kΩ resistor near sensor) used in the EEG/fMRI method in 3T MRI scanner. We compared these electrodes by their specific absorption rate (SAR) simulation values and the temperature change calculated by PRF method. The experimental setup of the study is described as follows: a phantom is prepared and the electrodes are placed on it. Then, a simulation for SAR values is realized. The temperature change is calculated by MR thermometer. As a result of this study, Ag/AgCl pin electrode is better to be use in EEG/fMRI; because the measured temperature change is expected to be low.

  3. Corticospinal Tract Tracing in the Marmoset with a Clinical Whole-Body 3T Scanner Using Manganese-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Plas, Benjamin; Bolan, Faye; Boulanouar, Kader; Renaud, Luc; Darmana, Robert; Vaysse, Laurence; Vieu, Christophe; Loubinoux, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been described as a powerful tool to depict the architecture of neuronal circuits. In this study we investigated the potential use of in vivo MRI detection of manganese for tracing neuronal projections from the primary motor cortex (M1) in healthy marmosets (Callithrix Jacchus). We determined the optimal dose of manganese chloride (MnCl2) among 800, 400, 40 and 8nmol that led to manganese-induced hyperintensity furthest from the injection site, as specific to the corticospinal tract as possible, and that would not induce motor deficit. A commonly available 3T human clinical MRI scanner and human knee coil were used to follow hyperintensity in the corticospinal tract 24h after injection. A statistical parametric map of seven marmosets injected with the chosen dose, 8 nmol, showed the corticospinal tract and M1 connectivity with the basal ganglia, substantia nigra and thalamus. Safety was determined for the lowest dose that did not induce dexterity and grip strength deficit, and no behavioral effects could be seen in marmosets who received multiple injections of manganese one month apart. In conclusion, our study shows for the first time in marmosets, a reliable and reproducible way to perform longitudinal ME-MRI experiments to observe the integrity of the marmoset corticospinal tract on a clinical 3T MRI scanner. PMID:26398500

  4. Computational dosimetry of induced electric fields during realistic movements in the vicinity of a 3 T MRI scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Kännälä, Sami; Jokela, Kari

    2013-04-01

    Medical staff working near magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are exposed both to the static magnetic field itself and also to electric currents that are induced in the body when the body moves in the magnetic field. However, there are currently limited data available on the induced electric field for realistic movements. This study computationally investigates the movement induced electric fields for realistic movements in the magnetic field of a 3 T MRI scanner. The path of movement near the MRI scanner is based on magnetic field measurements using a coil sensor attached to a human volunteer. Utilizing realistic models for both the motion of the head and the magnetic field of the MRI scanner, the induced fields are computationally determined using the finite-element method for five high-resolution numerical anatomical models. The results show that the time-derivative of the magnetic flux density (dB/dt) is approximately linearly proportional to the induced electric field in the head, independent of the position of the head with respect to the magnet. This supports the use of dB/dt measurements for occupational exposure assessment. For the path of movement considered herein, the spatial maximum of the induced electric field is close to the basic restriction for the peripheral nervous system and exceeds the basic restriction for the central nervous system in the international guidelines. The 99th percentile electric field is a considerably less restrictive metric for the exposure than the spatial maximum electric field; the former is typically 60-70% lower than the latter. However, the 99th percentile electric field may exceed the basic restriction for dB/dt values that can be encountered during tasks commonly performed by MRI workers. It is also shown that the movement-induced eddy currents may reach magnitudes that could electrically stimulate the vestibular system, which could play a significant role in the generation of vertigo-like sensations reported

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging in evaluation of posterior fossa tumors in children on a 3T MRI scanner

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Zarina Abdul; Saini, Jitender; Ranjan, Manish; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Sabharwal, Paramveer; Naidu, Purushotham R

    2015-01-01

    Context: Primary intracranial tumors in children are commonly located in the posterior fossa. Conventional MRI offers limited information regarding the histopathological type of tumor which is essential for better patient management. Aims: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of advanced MR imaging techniques like diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in distinguishing the various histopathological types of posterior fossa tumors in children. Settings and Design: DTI was performed on a 3T MRI scanner in 34 untreated children found to have posterior fossa lesions. Materials and Methods: Using third party software, various DTI parameters [apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity, planar index, spherical index, and linear index] were calculated for the lesion. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were subjected to statistical analysis [analysis of variance (ANOVA)] using SPSS 15.0 software. Results: We observed significant correlation (P < 0.01) between ADC mean and maximum, followed by radial diffusivity (RD) with the histopathological types of the lesions. Rest of the DTI parameters did not show any significant correlation in our study. Conclusions: The results of our study support the hypothesis that most cellular tumors and those with greater nuclear area like medulloblastoma would have the lowest ADC values, as compared to less cellular tumors like pilocytic astrocytoma. PMID:26752824

  6. A fast multiparameter MRI approach for acute stroke assessment on a 3T clinical scanner: preliminary results in a non-human primate model with transient ischemic occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Frank; Li, Chun-Xia; Yan, Yumei; Nair, Govind; Nagaoka, Tsukasa; Tanaka, Yoji; Zola, Stuart; Howell, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Many MRI parameters have been explored and demonstrated the capability or potential to evaluate acute stroke injury, providing anatomical, microstructural, functional, or neurochemical information for diagnostic purposes and therapeutic development. However, the application of multiparameter MRI approach is hindered in clinic due to the very limited time window after stroke insult. Parallel imaging technique can accelerate MRI data acquisition dramatically and has been incorporated in modern clinical scanners and increasingly applied for various diagnostic purposes. In the present study, a fast multiparameter MRI approach including structural T1-weighted imaging (T1W), T2-weighted imaging (T2W), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), T2-mapping, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and magnetization transfer (MT) imaging, was implemented and optimized for assessing acute stroke injury on a 3T clinical scanner. A macaque model of transient ischemic stroke induced by a minimal interventional approach was utilized for evaluating the multiparameter MRI approach. The preliminary results indicate the surgical procedure successfully induced ischemic occlusion in the cortex and/or subcortex in adult macaque monkeys (n=4). Application of parallel imaging technique substantially reduced the scanning duration of most MRI data acquisitions, allowing for fast and repeated evaluation of acute stroke injury. Hence, the use of the multiparameter MRI approach with up to five quantitative measures can provide significant advantages in preclinical or clinical studies of stroke disease. PMID:24834423

  7. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Di; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B1) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on average

  8. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B{sub 1}) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on

  9. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  10. Can ultrashort-TE (UTE) MRI sequences on a 3-T clinical scanner detect signal directly from collagen protons: freeze-dry and D2 O exchange studies of cortical bone and Achilles tendon specimens.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya-Jun; Chang, Eric Y; Bydder, Graeme M; Du, Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Ultrashort-TE (UTE) sequences can obtain signal directly from short-T2 , collagen-rich tissues. It is generally accepted that bound and free water can be detected with UTE techniques, but the ability to detect protons directly on the collagen molecule remains controversial. In this study, we investigated the potential of UTE sequences on a 3-T clinical scanner to detect collagen protons via freeze-drying and D2 O-H2 O exchange studies. Experiments were performed on bovine cortical bone and human Achilles tendon specimens, which were either subject to freeze-drying for over 66 h or D2 O-H2 O exchange for 6 days. Specimens were imaged using two- and three-dimensional UTE with Cones trajectory techniques with a minimum TE of 8 μs at 3 T. UTE images before treatment showed high signal from all specimens with bi-component T2 * behavior. Bovine cortical bone showed a shorter T2 * component of 0.36 ms and a longer T2 * component of 2.30 ms with fractions of 78.2% and 21.8% by volume, respectively. Achilles tendon showed a shorter T2 * component of 1.22 ms and a longer T2 * component of 15.1 ms with fractions of 81.1% and 18.9% by volume, respectively. Imaging after freeze-drying or D2 O-H2 O exchange resulted in either the absence or near-absence of signal. These results indicate that bound and free water are the sole sources of UTE signal in bovine cortical bone and human Achilles tendon samples on a clinical 3-T scanner. Protons on the native collagen molecule are not directly visible when imaged using UTE sequences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27148693

  11. In-bore setup and software for 3T MRI-guided transperineal prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Junichi; Tuncali, Kemal; Iordachita, Iulian; Song, Sang-Eun; Fedorov, Andriy; Oguro, Sota; Lasso, Andras; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2012-09-01

    MRI-guided prostate biopsy in conventional closed-bore scanners requires transferring the patient outside the bore during needle insertion due to the constrained in-bore space, causing a safety hazard and limiting image feedback. To address this issue, we present our custom-made in-bore setup and software to support MRI-guided transperineal prostate biopsy in a wide-bore 3 T MRI scanner. The setup consists of a specially designed tabletop and a needle-guiding template with a Z-frame that gives a physician access to the perineum of the patient at the imaging position and allows the physician to perform MRI-guided transperineal biopsy without moving the patient out of the scanner. The software and Z-frame allow registration of the template, target planning and biopsy guidance. Initially, we performed phantom experiments to assess the accuracy of template registration and needle placement in a controlled environment. Subsequently, we embarked on our clinical trial (N = 10). The phantom experiments showed that the translational errors of the template registration along the right-left (RP) and anterior-posterior (AP) axes were 1.1 ± 0.8 and 1.4 ± 1.1 mm, respectively, while the rotational errors around the RL, AP and superior-inferior axes were (0.8 ± 1.0)°, (1.7 ± 1.6)° and (0.0 ± 0.0)°, respectively. The 2D root-mean-square (RMS) needle-placement error was 3 mm. The clinical biopsy procedures were safely carried out in all ten clinical cases with a needle-placement error of 5.4 mm (2D RMS). In conclusion, transperineal prostate biopsy in a wide-bore 3T scanner is feasible using our custom-made tabletop setup and software, which supports manual needle placement without moving the patient out of the magnet.

  12. Philips 3T Intera Magnetic Resonance Imaging System and Upgrade of existing MRI equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Evanochko, William T

    2004-05-14

    The objective of this proposal was twofold. First, upgrade existing MRI equipment, specifically a research 4.1T whole-body system. Second, purchase a clinical, state-of-the-art 3T MRI system tailored specifically to cardiovascular and neurological applications. This project was within the guidelines of ''Medical Applications and Measurement Science''. The goals were: [1] to develop beneficial applications of magnetic resonance imaging; [2] discover new applications of MR strategies for medical research; and [2] apply them for clinical diagnosis. Much of this proposal searched for breakthroughs in this noninvasive and nondestructive imaging technology. Finally, this proposal's activities focused on research in the basic science of chemistry, biochemistry, physics, and engineering as applied to bioengineering. The centerpiece of this grant was our 4.1T ultra-high field whole-body nuclear magnetic resonance system and the newly acquired state-of-the-art, heart and head dedicated 3T clinical MRI system. We have successfully upgraded the equipment for the 4.1T system so that it is now state-of-the-art with new gradient and radio frequency amplifiers. We also purchase a unique In Vivo EKG monitoring unit that will permit tracking clinical quality EKG signals while the patient is in a high field MR scanner. Important upgrades of a peripheral vascular coil and a state-of-the-art clinical workstation for processing complex heart images were implemented. The most recent acquisition was the purchase of a state-of-the-art Philips 3T Intera clinical MRI system. This system is unique in that the magnet is only 5 1/2 feet long compare to over 12 feet long magnet of our 4.1T MRI system. The 3T MRI system is fully functional and its use and applications are already greatly benefiting the UAB with 200-300 micron resolution brain images and diagnostic quality MR angiography of coronary arteries in less than 5 minutes.

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging of isolated perfused pig hearts in a 3T clinical MR scanner

    PubMed Central

    Chiribiri, Amedeo; Ishida, Masaki; Morton, Geraint; Paul, Matthias; Hussain, Shazia T.; Bigalke, Boris; Perera, Divaka; Schaeffter, Tobias; Nagel, Eike

    2012-01-01

    Purpose An isolated perfused pig heart model has recently been proposed for the development of novel methods in standard clinical magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. The original set-up required the electrical system to be within the safe part of the MR-room, which introduced significant background noise. The purpose of the current work was to refine the system to overcome this limitation so that all electrical parts are completely outside the scanner room. Methods Four pig hearts were explanted under terminal anaesthesia from large white cross landrace pigs. All hearts underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) scanning in the MR part of a novel combined 3T MR and x-ray fluoroscopy (XMR) suite. CMR scanning included real-time k-t SENSE functional imaging, k-t SENSE accelerated perfusion imaging and late gadolinium enhancement imaging. Interference with image quality was assessed by spurious echo imaging and compared to noise levels acquired while operating the electrical parts within the scanner room. Results Imaging was performed successfully in all hearts. The system proved suitable for isolated heart perfusion in a novel 3T XMR suite. No significant additional noise was introduced into the scanner room by our set-up. Conclusions We have substantially improved a previous version of an isolated perfused pig heart model and made it applicable for MR imaging in a state of the art clinical 3T XMR imaging suite. The use of this system should aid novel CMR sequence development and translation into clinical practice. PMID:24265875

  14. Quest for an open MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Bertora, Franco; Borceto, Alice; Viale, Andrea; Sandini, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    A study of the motor cortex during the programming, execution and mental representation of voluntary movement is of great relevance; its evaluation in conditions close to reality is necessary, given the close integration of the visuomotor, sensory feedback and proprioceptive systems, as of yet, a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scanner allowing a human subject to maintain erect stance, observe the surroundings and conserve limb freedom is still a dream. The need for high field suggests a solenoid magnet geometry that forces an unnatural posture that affects the results, particularly when the motor cortex is investigated. In contrast in a motor functional study, the scanner should allow the subject to sit or stand, with unobstructed sight and unimpeded movement. Two approaches are presented here to solve this problem. In the first approach, an increased field intensity in an open magnet is obtained lining the "back wall" of the cavity with a sheet of current: this boosts the field intensity at the cost of the introduction of a gradient, which has to be canceled by the introduction of an opposite gradient; The second approach is an adaptation of the "double doughnut" architecture, in which the cavity widens at the center to provide additional room for the subject. The detailed design of this kind of structure has proven the feasibility of the solution. PMID:25227008

  15. Normal findings on brain FLAIR MRI scans at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Neema, Mohit; Guss, Zachary D.; Stankiewicz, James M.; Arora, Ashish; Healy, Brian C.; Bakshi, Rohit

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging of the brain has become a routine tool for assessing lesions in patients with suspected neurologic disorders. There is growing interest in 3T brain FLAIR MR imaging but little normative data are available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency and topography of cerebral hyperintensities seen with FLAIR MR imaging of the brain at 3T in a normal population and compare those findings to 1.5T. MATERIALS AND METHODS Whole-brain 2D FLAIR MR imaging was performed in 22 healthy controls (mean age, 44 ± 8 years; range, 30–53 years) at 3T. Fifteen of these subjects also underwent 2D FLAIR at 1.5T, with similar optimized parameters and voxel size. Cerebral hyperintense areas, including discrete foci, anterior and posterior periventricular capping, diffuse parenchymal hyperintensity, septal hyperintensity, corticospinal tract hyperintensity, and CSF flow artifacts were assessed. The Spearman rank test assessed the correlation between discrete hyperintense foci and age. The Wilcoxon signed rank test compared foci detectability at 3T versus 1.5T. RESULTS FLAIR at 3T commonly showed hyperintensities such as discrete foci (mean, 10.68 per subject; at least 1 present in 68% of subjects), anterior and posterior periventricular capping, diffuse posterior white matter hyperintensity, septal hyperintensity, corticospinal tract hyperintensity, and ventricular CSF flow artifacts. FLAIR at 3T showed a higher hyperintense foci volume (170 ± 243 versus 93 ± 152 mm3, P < .01) and number (9.4 ± 13 versus 5.5 ± 9.2, P < .01) than at 1.5T. No significant differences (P = .68) in the length/diameter of individual discrete hyperintense foci were seen between 3T and 1.5T. Discrete foci volume (r = 0.72 at 3T, r = 0.70 at 1.5T) and number (r = 0.74 at 3T; r = 0.69 at 1.5T) correlated with age to a similar degree on both platforms. All discrete foci were confined to the noncallosal supratentorial

  16. Image quality and signal distribution in 1.5-T and 3-T MRI in mild traumatic brain injury patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Maija E.; Dastidar, Prasun; Ryymin, Pertti; Ylinen, Aarne; Öhman, Juha; Soimakallio, Seppo; Eskola, Hannu

    2009-02-01

    Clear standards are lacking in the imaging modalities of the deficit in mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) patients. The purpose of this study is to compare the image quality by signal distribution between 1.5 Tesla and 3 Tesla MRI in turbo spin echo (TSE) and gradient echo (GRE) images in normal hospital settings and to find preferences for which field to use in MTBI patients. We studied 40 MTBI patients with TSE and GRE; 20 patients were imaged at 1.5 T and 20 at 3 T. The imaging parameters were optimized separately for the two scanners. Histograms of the signal distribution in 22 ROIs were fitted to a 1-peak Gaussian model and the resulting peak positions were scaled in respect to the peak positions of genu of the corpus callosum and the caudate nuclei. Correlation of the contrast of the ROIs in reference to genu of the corpus callosum between both the two scanners and the two imaging sequences was good. Image contrast was similar at both in the TSE images; in the GRE images contrast improved from 1.5 T to 3 T. However, based on peak positions and widths, a slight drawback in the separability between the ROIs was observed when 1.5 T MRI was replaced by 3 T. No clear improvement in tissue contrast or separability of 3 T was found compared to 1.5 T. Imaging of MTBI with 3 T should therefore be based on other advantages of high-field imaging, such as improved SNR and spatial resolution.

  17. A 64-channel 3T array coil for accelerated brain MRI

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Blau, James N.; Biber, Stephan; Hoecht, Philipp; Tountcheva, Veneta; Setsompop, Kawin; Triantafyllou, Christina; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2012-01-01

    A 64-channel brain array coil was developed and compared to a 32-channel array constructed with the same coil former geometry in order to precisely isolate the benefit of the two-fold increase in array coil elements. The constructed coils were developed for a standard clinical 3T MRI scanner and used a contoured head-shape curved former around the occipital pole and tapered in at the neck to both improve sensitivity and patient comfort. Additionally, the design is a compact, split-former design intended for robust daily use. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and noise amplification (G-factor) for parallel imaging were quantitatively evaluated in human imaging and compared to a size and shape-matched 32-channel array coil. For unaccelerated imaging, the 64-channel array provided similar SNR in the brain center to the 32-channel array and 1.3-fold more SNR in the brain cortex. Reduced noise amplification during highly parallel imaging of the 64-channel array provided the ability to accelerate at approximately one unit higher at a given noise amplification compared to the sized-matched 32-channel array. For example, with a 4-fold acceleration rate, the central brain and cortical SNR of the 64-channel array was 1.2 and 1.4-fold higher, respectively, compared to the 32-channel array. The characteristics of the coil are demonstrated in accelerated brain imaging. PMID:22851312

  18. Speech Perception in MRI Scanner Noise by Persons with Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Eric W.; Moser, Dana C.; Morrow-Odom, K. Leigh; Hall, Deborah A.; Fridriksson, Julius

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To examine reductions in performance on auditory tasks by aphasic and neurologically intact individuals as a result of concomitant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner noise. Method: Four tasks together forming a continuum of linguistic complexity were developed. They included complex-tone pitch discrimination, same-different…

  19. Germany gets largest ever MRI scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Ned

    2008-07-01

    A 57-tonne cylindrical magnet has arrived at the Jülich Research Centre in Germany, where physicists are putting together the world's largest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. When the machine comes online next year, medical researchers will use it to examine the brain in unprecedented detail, in the hope of gaining new insights into neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

  20. 3-T MRI safety assessments of magnetic dental attachments and castable magnetic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, K; Abe, Y; Ishii, T; Ishigami, T; Ohtani, K; Nagai, E; Ohyama, T; Umekawa, Y; Nakabayashi, S

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the safety of different magnetic dental attachments during 3-T MRI according to the American Society for Testing and Materials F2182-09 and F2052-06e1 standard testing methods and to develop a method to determine MRI compatibility by measuring magnetically induced torque. Methods: The temperature elevations, magnetically induced forces and torques of a ferromagnetic stainless steel keeper, a coping comprising a keeper and a cast magnetic alloy coping were measured on MRI systems. Results: The coping comprising a keeper demonstrated the maximum temperature increase (1.42 °C) for the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate and was calculated as 2.1 W kg−1 with the saline phantom. All deflection angles exceeded 45°. The cast magnetic alloy coping had the greatest deflection force (0.33 N) during 3-T MRI and torque (1.015 mN m) during 0.3-T MRI. Conclusions: The tested devices showed minimal radiofrequency (RF)-induced heating in a 3-T MR environment, but the cast magnetic alloy coping showed a magnetically induced deflection force and torque approximately eight times that of the keepers. For safety, magnetic dental attachments should be inspected before and after MRI and large prostheses containing cast magnetic alloy should be removed. Although magnetic dental attachments may pose no great risk of RF-induced heating or magnetically induced torque during 3-T MRI, their magnetically induced deflection forces tended to exceed acceptable limits. Therefore, the inspection of such devices before and after MRI is important for patient safety. PMID:25785821

  1. fMRI Scanner Noise Interaction with Affective Neural Processes

    PubMed Central

    Skouras, Stavros; Gray, Marcus; Critchley, Hugo; Koelsch, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was the investigation of interaction effects between functional MRI scanner noise and affective neural processes. Stimuli comprised of psychoacoustically balanced musical pieces, expressing three different emotions (fear, neutral, joy). Participants (N=34, 19 female) were split into two groups, one subjected to continuous scanning and another subjected to sparse temporal scanning that features decreased scanner noise. Tests for interaction effects between scanning group (sparse/quieter vs continuous/noisier) and emotion (fear, neutral, joy) were performed. Results revealed interactions between the affective expression of stimuli and scanning group localized in bilateral auditory cortex, insula and visual cortex (calcarine sulcus). Post-hoc comparisons revealed that during sparse scanning, but not during continuous scanning, BOLD signals were significantly stronger for joy than for fear, as well as stronger for fear than for neutral in bilateral auditory cortex. During continuous scanning, but not during sparse scanning, BOLD signals were significantly stronger for joy than for neutral in the left auditory cortex and for joy than for fear in the calcarine sulcus. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to show a statistical interaction effect between scanner noise and affective processes and extends evidence suggesting scanner noise to be an important factor in functional MRI research that can affect and distort affective brain processes. PMID:24260420

  2. A comparison of distributional considerations with statistical analysis of resting state fMRI at 3T and 7T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue; Holmes, Martha J.; Newton, Allen T.; Morgan, Victoria L.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-high field 7T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers potentially unprecedented spatial resolution of functional activity within the human brain through increased signal and contrast to noise ratios over traditional 1.5T and 3T MRI scanners. However, the effects physiological and imaging artifacts are also greatly increased. Traditional statistical parametric mapping theories based on distributional properties representative of data acquired at lower fields may be inadequate for new 7T data. Herein, we investigate the model fitting residuals based on two 7T and one 3T protocols. We find that model residuals are substantively more non-Gaussian at 7T relative to 3T. Imaging slices that passed through regions with peak inhomogeneity problems (e.g., mid-brain acquisitions for the 7T hippocampus) exhibited visually higher degrees of distortion along with spatially correlated and extreme values of kurtosis (a measure of non- Gaussianity). The impacts of artifacts have been previously addressed for 3T data by estimating the covariance matrix of the regression errors. We further extend the robust estimation approach for autoregressive models and evaluate the qualitative impacts of this technique relative to traditional inference. Clear differences in statistical significance are shown between inferences based on classical versus robust assumptions, which suggest that inferences based on Gaussian assumptions are subject to practical (as well as theoretical) concerns regarding their power and validity. Hence, modern statistical approaches, such as the robust autoregressive model posed herein, are appropriate and suitable for inference with ultra-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. MR images of mouse brain using clinical 3T MR scanner and 4CH-Mouse coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soo Mee; Park, Eun Mi; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Lee, Junghyun; Han, Bo Mi; Lee, Jeong Kyong; Lee, Su Bin

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Although small-bore high-field magnets are useful for research in small rodent models,this technology, however, has not been easily accessible to most researchers. This current study, thus,tried to evaluate the usability of 4CH-Mouse coil (Philips Healthcare, Best, the Netherlands) forpreclinical investigations in clinical 3T MR scan environment. We evaluated the effects of ischemicpreconditioning (IP) in the mouse stroke model with clinical 3T MR scanner and 4CH-Mouse coil. Materials and Methods: Experiments were performed on male C57BL/6 mice that either received the IP or sham operation (control). Three different MR sequences including diffusion weighted images (DWI), T2-weighted images (T2WI), and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) were performed on the mouse brains following 24, 72 hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and analyzed for infarct lesions. Results: The images showed that the IP-treated mouse brains had significantly smaller infarct volumes compared to the control group. Of the MR sequences employed, the T2WI showed the highest level of correlations with postmortem infarct volume measurements. Conclusions: The clinical 3T MR scanner turned out to have a solid potential as a practical tool for imaging small animal brains. MR sequences including DWI, T2WI, FLAIR were obtained with acceptable resolution and in a reasonable time constraint in evaluating a mouse stroke model brain.

  4. Absolute Temperature Monitoring Using RF Radiometry in the MRI Scanner.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem M; Sotiriadis, Paul P; Bottomley, Paul A; Atalar, Ergin

    2006-11-01

    Temperature detection using microwave radiometry has proven value for noninvasively measuring the absolute temperature of tissues inside the body. However, current clinical radiometers operate in the gigahertz range, which limits their depth of penetration. We have designed and built a noninvasive radiometer which operates at radio frequencies (64 MHz) with ∼100-kHz bandwidth, using an external RF loop coil as a thermal detector. The core of the radiometer is an accurate impedance measurement and automatic matching circuit of 0.05 Ω accuracy to compensate for any load variations. The radiometer permits temperature measurements with accuracy of ±0.1°K, over a tested physiological range of 28° C-40° C in saline phantoms whose electric properties match those of tissue. Because 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners also operate at 64 MHz, we demonstrate the feasibility of integrating our radiometer with an MRI scanner to monitor RF power deposition and temperature dosimetry, obtaining coarse, spatially resolved, absolute thermal maps in the physiological range. We conclude that RF radiometry offers promise as a direct, noninvasive method of monitoring tissue heating during MRI studies and thereby providing an independent means of verifying patient-safe operation. Other potential applications include titration of hyper- and hypo-therapies. PMID:18026562

  5. SU-E-J-209: Geometric Distortion at 3T in a Commercial 4D MRI-Compatible Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Fatemi-Ardekani, A; Wronski, M; Kim, A; Stanisz, G; Sarfehnia, A; Keller, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There are very few commercial 4D phantoms that are marketed as MRI compatible. We are evaluating one such commercial phantom, made to be used with an MRI-Linear accelerator. The focus of this work is to characterize the geometric distortions produced in this phantom at 3T using 3 clinical MR pulse sequences. Methods: The CIRS MRI-Linac Dynamic Phantom (CIRSTM) under investigation in this study consists of a softwaredriven moving tumour volume within a thorax phantom body and enables dose accumulation by placing a dosimeter within the tumour volume. Our initial investigation is to evaluate the phantom in static mode prior to examining its 4D capability. The water-filled thorax phantom was scanned using a wide-bore Philips 3T Achieva MRI scanner employing a Thoracic xl coil and clinical 2D T1W FFE, 2D T1W TSE and 3D T1W TFE pulse sequences. Each of the MR image sets was rigidly fused with a reference CT image of the phantom employing a rigid registration with 6 degrees of freedom. Geometric distortions between the MR and CT image sets were measured in 3 dimensions at selected points along the periphery of the distortion grid embedded within the phantom body (11.5, 7.5 and 3 cm laterally, ant/post and sup/inf of magnetic isocenter respectively). Results: The maximal measured geometric distortions between the MR and reference CT points of interest were 0.9, 1.8 and 1.3 mm in the lateral, anteriorposterior and cranio-caudal directions, respectively. For all 3 spatial dimensions, the maximal distortions occurred for the FFE pulse sequence. Maximal distortions for the 2D FFE, 2D TSE and 3D TFE sequences were 1, 0.7 and 1.8 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Our initial static investigation of this phantom shows minimal geometric distortions at 3T along the periphery of the embedded grid. CIRS has provided us with a phantom at no charge for evaluation at 3 Tesla.

  6. A novel RF resonator for human-body MRI at 3 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Hyeok-Woo; Cho, Young-Ki; Yoo, Hyoungsuk

    2014-03-01

    A square-slot-loaded (SSL) radio-frequency (RF) resonator using a microstrip transmission line (MTL) is designed for human-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 T MRI. The SSL RF resonator shows improved RF magnetic fields resulting in more homogenous fields near the center of the phantom than traditional RF resonators using MTL. A multichannel body coil using the SSL RF resonators is also simulated and provides improved parallel excitation performance. In addition, RF shimming for homogenization can be effectively controlled by adjusting the inputs to the eight resonators. Numerical results are obtained by using a spherical phantom and a realistic human-body model at 3 T to calculate the B {1/+} fields.

  7. Fusion in diffusion MRI for improved fibre orientation estimation: An application to the 3T and 7T data of the Human Connectome Project.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Hernández-Fernández, Moisés; Vu, An T; Andersson, Jesper L; Moeller, Steen; Yacoub, Essa; Lenglet, Christophe; Ugurbil, Kamil; Behrens, Timothy E J; Jbabdi, Saad

    2016-07-01

    Determining the acquisition parameters in diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is governed by a series of trade-offs. Images of lower resolution have less spatial specificity but higher signal to noise ratio (SNR). At the same time higher angular contrast, important for resolving complex fibre patterns, also yields lower SNR. Considering these trade-offs, the Human Connectome Project (HCP) acquires high quality dMRI data for the same subjects at different field strengths (3T and 7T), which are publically released. Due to differences in the signal behavior and in the underlying scanner hardware, the HCP 3T and 7T data have complementary features in k- and q-space. The 3T dMRI has higher angular contrast and resolution, while the 7T dMRI has higher spatial resolution. Given the availability of these datasets, we explore the idea of fusing them together with the aim of combining their benefits. We extend a previously proposed data-fusion framework and apply it to integrate both datasets from the same subject into a single joint analysis. We use a generative model for performing parametric spherical deconvolution and estimate fibre orientations by simultaneously using data acquired under different protocols. We illustrate unique features from each dataset and how they are retained after fusion. We further show that this allows us to complement benefits and improve brain connectivity analysis compared to analyzing each of the datasets individually. PMID:27071694

  8. The effect of 3 T MRI on microleakage of amalgam restorations

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, S; Misirlioğlu, M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of 3 T magnetic field on microleakage of amalgam restorations containing three different types of silver (Ag). Methods: 60 extracted teeth were restored with three different types of amalgam filling materials. Restored teeth were sectioned mesiodistally and divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental groups were exposed to a magnetic field of 3 T for 20 min. All samples were plunged into 2% basic fuchsin solution and examined under a digital microscope by three different observers with regard to microleakage. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences in microleakage between the groups exposed to MRI and controls, whereas differences in microleakage between amalgam types were insignificant. Conclusions: The primary risk of MRI systems arises from the effects of its strong magnetic field on objects containing ferromagnetic materials. An MRI of 1.5 T is known to be safe for amalgam restorations. However, our research indicates that MRI is not completely devoid of any effects on amalgam restorations. PMID:23674614

  9. Visual evoked potential (VEP) measured by simultaneous 64-channel EEG and 3T fMRI.

    PubMed

    Bonmassar, G; Anami, K; Ives, J; Belliveau, J W

    1999-06-23

    We present the first simultaneous measurements of evoked potentials (EPs) and fMRI hemodynamic responses to visual stimulation. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded both inside and outside the static 3T magnetic field, and during fMRI examination. We designed, constructed, and tested a non-magnetic 64-channel EEG recording cap. By using a large number of EEG channels it is possible to design a spatial filter capable of removing the artifact noise present when recording EEG/EPs within a strong magnetic field. We show that the designed spatial filter is capable of recovering the ballistocardiogram-contaminated original EEG signal. Isopotential plots of the electrode array recordings at the peak of the VEP response (approximately 100ms) correspond well with simultaneous fMRI observed activated areas of primary and secondary visual cortices. PMID:10501528

  10. Intensity non-uniformity correction using N3 on 3-T scanners with multichannel phased array coils.

    PubMed

    Boyes, Richard G; Gunter, Jeff L; Frost, Chris; Janke, Andrew L; Yeatman, Thomas; Hill, Derek L G; Bernstein, Matt A; Thompson, Paul M; Weiner, Michael W; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene E; Killiany, Ronald J; DeCarli, Charles; Jack, Clifford R; Fox, Nick C

    2008-02-15

    Measures of structural brain change based on longitudinal MR imaging are increasingly important but can be degraded by intensity non-uniformity. This non-uniformity can be more pronounced at higher field strengths, or when using multichannel receiver coils. We assessed the ability of the non-parametric non-uniform intensity normalization (N3) technique to correct non-uniformity in 72 volumetric brain MR scans from the preparatory phase of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Normal elderly subjects (n=18) were scanned on different 3-T scanners with a multichannel phased array receiver coil at baseline, using magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo (MP-RAGE) and spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) pulse sequences, and again 2 weeks later. When applying N3, we used five brain masks of varying accuracy and four spline smoothing distances (d=50, 100, 150 and 200 mm) to ascertain which combination of parameters optimally reduces the non-uniformity. We used the normalized white matter intensity variance (standard deviation/mean) to ascertain quantitatively the correction for a single scan; we used the variance of the normalized difference image to assess quantitatively the consistency of the correction over time from registered scan pairs. Our results showed statistically significant (p<0.01) improvement in uniformity for individual scans and reduction in the normalized difference image variance when using masks that identified distinct brain tissue classes, and when using smaller spline smoothing distances (e.g., 50-100 mm) for both MP-RAGE and SPGR pulse sequences. These optimized settings may assist future large-scale studies where 3-T scanners and phased array receiver coils are used, such as ADNI, so that intensity non-uniformity does not influence the power of MR imaging to detect disease progression and the factors that influence it. PMID:18063391

  11. Intensity non-uniformity correction using N3 on 3-T scanners with multichannel phased array coils

    PubMed Central

    Boyes, Richard G.; Gunter, Jeff L.; Frost, Chris; Janke, Andrew L.; Yeatman, Thomas; Hill, Derek L.G.; Bernstein, Matt A.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael W.; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene E.; Killiany, Ronald J.; DeCarli, Charles; Jack, Clifford R.; Fox, Nick C.

    2008-01-01

    Measures of structural brain change based on longitudinal MR imaging are increasingly important but can be degraded by intensity non-uniformity. This non-uniformity can be more pronounced at higher field strengths, or when using multichannel receiver coils. We assessed the ability of the non-parametric non-uniform intensity normalization (N3) technique to correct non-uniformity in 72 volumetric brain MR scans from the preparatory phase of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Normal elderly subjects (n = 18) were scanned on different 3-T scanners with a multichannel phased array receiver coil at baseline, using magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo (MP-RAGE) and spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) pulse sequences, and again 2 weeks later. When applying N3, we used five brain masks of varying accuracy and four spline smoothing distances (d = 50, 100, 150 and 200 mm) to ascertain which combination of parameters optimally reduces the non-uniformity. We used the normalized white matter intensity variance (standard deviation/mean) to ascertain quantitatively the correction for a single scan; we used the variance of the normalized difference image to assess quantitatively the consistency of the correction over time from registered scan pairs. Our results showed statistically significant (p < 0.01) improvement in uniformity for individual scans and reduction in the normalized difference image variance when using masks that identified distinct brain tissue classes, and when using smaller spline smoothing distances (e.g., 50-100 mm) for both MP-RAGE and SPGR pulse sequences. These optimized settings may assist future large-scale studies where 3-T scanners and phased array receiver coils are used, such as ADNI, so that intensity non-uniformity does not influence the power of MR imaging to detect disease progression and the factors that influence it. PMID:18063391

  12. [Evaluation of Artificial Hip Joint with Radiofrequency Heating Issues during MRI Examination: A Comparison between 1.5 T and 3 T].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masaru; Ideta, Takahiro; Kudo, Sadahiro; Nakazawa, Masami

    2016-06-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), when radiofrequency (RF) is irradiated to a subject with metallic implant, it can generate heat by RF irradiation. Recently 3 T MRI scanner has spread widely and imaging for any regions of whole body has been conducted. However specific absorption rate (SAR) of 3 T MRI becomes approximately four times as much as the 1.5 T, which can significantly affect the heat generation of metallic implants. So, we evaluated RF heating of artificial hip joints in different shapes and materials in 1.5 T and 3 T MRI. Three types of artificial hip joints made of stainless alloy, titanium alloy and cobalt chrome alloy were embedded in the human body-equivalent phantom respectively and their temperature change were measured for twenty minutes by 1.5 T and 3 T MRI. The maximum temperature rise was observed at the bottom head in all of three types of artificial hip joints, the rise being 12°C for stainless alloy, 11.9°C for titanium alloy and 6.1°C for cobalt chrome alloy in 1.5 T. The temperature rise depended on SAR and the increase of SAR had a good linear relationship with the temperature rise. It was found from the result that the RF heating of metallic implants can take place in various kinds of material and the increase of SAR has a good linear relationship with the temperature rise. This experience shows that reduction of SAR can decrease temperature of metallic implants. PMID:27320151

  13. Eight-channel transmit/receive body MRI coil at 3T.

    PubMed

    Vernickel, P; Röschmann, P; Findeklee, C; Lüdeke, K-M; Leussler, Ch; Overweg, J; Katscher, U; Grässlin, I; Schünemann, K

    2007-08-01

    Multichannel transmit magnetic resonance imaging (MR) systems have the potential to compensate for signal-intensity variations occurring at higher field strengths due to wave propagation effects in tissue. Methods such as RF shimming and local excitation in combination with parallel transmission can be applied to compensate for these effects. Moreover, parallel transmission can be applied to ease the excitation of arbitrarily shaped magnetization patterns. The implementation of these methods adds new requirements in terms of MRI hardware. This article describes the design of a decoupled eight-element transmit/receive body coil for 3T. The setup of the coil is explained, starting with standard single-channel resonators. Special focus is placed on the decoupling of the elements to obtain independent RF resonators. After a brief discussion of the underlying theory, the properties and limitations of the coil are outlined. Finally, the functionality and capabilities of the coil are demonstrated using RF measurements as well as MRI sequences. PMID:17654592

  14. Improved T1 mapping by motion correction and template based B1 correction in 3T MRI brain studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Yao, Jianhua; Lee, Christabel; Pang, Yuxi; Baker, Eva; Butman, John; Thomasson, David

    2009-02-01

    Accurate estimation of relaxation time T1 from MRI images is increasingly important for some clinical applications. Low noise, high resolution, fast and accurate T1 maps from MRI images of the brain can be performed using a dual flip angle method. However, accuracy is limited by the scanners ability to deliver the prescribed flip angle due to the B1 inhomogeneity, particularly at high field strengths (e.g. 3T). One of the most accurate methods to correct that inhomogeneity is to acquire a subject-specific B1 map. However, since B1 map acquisition takes up precious scanning time and most retrospective studies do not have B1 map, it would be desirable to perform that correction from a template. For this work a dual repetition time method was used for B1 map acquisition in five normal subjects. Inaccuracies due to misregistration of acquired T1-weighted images were corrected by rigid registration, and the effects of misalignment were compared to those of B1 inhomogeneity. T1-intensity histograms were produced and three-Gaussian curves were fitted for every fully-, partially- and non-corrected histogram in order to estimate and compare the white and gray matter peaks. In addition, in order to reduce the scanning time we designed a template based correction strategy. Images from different subjects were aligned using a twelve-parameter affine registration, and B1 maps were aligned according to that transformation. Recomputed T1 maps showed a significant improvement with respect to non-corrected ones. These results are very promising and have the potential for clinical application.

  15. Amygdala volume in depressed patients with bipolar disorder assessed using high resolution 3T MRI: the impact of medication.

    PubMed

    Savitz, Jonathan; Nugent, Allison C; Bogers, Wendy; Liu, Alice; Sills, Rebecca; Luckenbaugh, David A; Bain, Earle E; Price, Joseph L; Zarate, Carlos; Manji, Husseini K; Cannon, Dara M; Marrett, Sean; Charney, Dennis S; Drevets, Wayne C

    2010-02-15

    MRI-based reports of both abnormally increased and decreased amygdala volume in bipolar disorder (BD) have surfaced in the literature. Two major methodological weaknesses characterizing extant studies are treatment with medication and inaccurate segmentation of the amygdala due to limitations in spatial and tissue contrast resolution. Here, we acquired high-resolution images (voxel size=0.55 x 0.55 x 0.60 mm) using a GE 3T MRI scanner, and a pulse sequence optimized for tissue contrast resolution. The amygdala was manually segmented by one rater blind to diagnosis, using coronal images. Eighteen unmedicated (mean medication-free period 11+/-10 months) BD subjects were age and gender matched with 18 healthy controls, and 17 medicated (lithium or divalproex) subjects were matched to 17 different controls. The unmedicated BD patients displayed smaller left and right amygdala volumes than their matched control group (p<0.01). Conversely, the BD subjects undergoing medication treatment showed a trend towards greater amygdala volumes than their matched HC sample (p=0.051). Right and left amygdala volumes were larger (p<0.05) or trended larger, respectively, in the medicated BD sample compared with the unmedicated BD sample. The two control groups did not differ from each other in either left or right amygdala volume. BD patients treated with lithium have displayed increased gray matter volume of the cortex and hippocampus relative to untreated BD subjects in previous studies. Here we extend these results to the amygdala. We raise the possibility that neuroplastic changes in the amygdala associated with BD are moderated by some mood stabilizing medications. PMID:19931399

  16. Ex-PRESS glaucoma filter: an MRI compatible metallic orbital foreign body imaged at 1.5 and 3 T

    PubMed Central

    Mabray, M.C.; Uzelac, A.; Talbott, J.F.; Lin, S.C.; Gean, A.D.

    2015-01-01

    AIM To report on the MRI compatibility of the Ex-PRESS glaucoma filtration device, a tiny metallic implant placed into the anterior chamber of the eye that is much smaller than traditional glaucoma shunts, and to educate the radiology community regarding its appearance. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seven patients with Ex-PRESS glaucoma filtration devices were identified that had undergone MRI at San Francisco General Hospital/University of California San Francisco Medical Center by searching and cross-referencing the radiology reporting system and the electronic medical record. MRI images were reviewed for artefact interfering with interpretation. Ophthalmology examinations were reviewed for evidence of complications. RESULTS Eighteen individual MRI examinations were performed during 12 unique MRI events on these 7 patients. 13/18 individual MRI examinations and 7/12 MRI events were performed at 3 T with the others performed at 1.5 T. Mean time from Ex-PRESS implantation to MRI was 17.5 months. Mean time from MRI to first ophthalmology examination was 1.1 months and from MRI to latest ophthalmology examination was 6.6 months. Susceptibility artefact did not interfere with image interpretation and no complications related to MRI were encountered. CONCLUSION The Ex-PRESS glaucoma filtration device appears to be safe for MRI at 1.5 and 3 T and does not produce significant susceptibility artefact to affect diagnostic interpretation adversely. PMID:25735675

  17. Time Efficient 3D Radial UTE Sampling with Fully Automatic Delay Compensation on a Clinical 3T MR Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Reichenbach, Jürgen R.

    2016-01-01

    This work’s aim was to minimize the acquisition time of a radial 3D ultra-short echo-time (UTE) sequence and to provide fully automated, gradient delay compensated, and therefore artifact free, reconstruction. The radial 3D UTE sequence (echo time 60 μs) was implemented as single echo acquisition with center-out readouts and improved time efficient spoiling on a clinical 3T scanner without hardware modifications. To assess the sequence parameter dependent gradient delays each acquisition contained a quick calibration scan and utilized the phase of the readouts to detect the actual k-space center. This calibration scan does not require any user interaction. To evaluate the robustness of this automatic delay estimation phantom experiments were performed and 19 in vivo imaging data of the head, tibial cortical bone, feet and lung were acquired from 6 volunteers. As clinical application of this fast 3D UTE acquisition single breath-hold lung imaging is demonstrated. The proposed sequence allowed very short repetition times (TR~1ms), thus reducing total acquisition time. The proposed, fully automated k-phase based gradient delay calibration resulted in accurate delay estimations (difference to manually determined optimal delay −0.13 ± 0.45 μs) and allowed unsupervised reconstruction of high quality images for both phantom and in vivo data. The employed fast spoiling scheme efficiently suppressed artifacts caused by incorrectly refocused echoes. The sequence proved to be quite insensitive to motion, flow and susceptibility artifacts and provides oversampling protection against aliasing foldovers in all directions. Due to the short TR, acquisition times are attractive for a wide range of clinical applications. For short T2* mapping this sequence provides free choice of the second TE, usually within less scan time as a comparable dual echo UTE sequence. PMID:26975051

  18. Time Efficient 3D Radial UTE Sampling with Fully Automatic Delay Compensation on a Clinical 3T MR Scanner.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Krämer, Martin; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2016-01-01

    This work's aim was to minimize the acquisition time of a radial 3D ultra-short echo-time (UTE) sequence and to provide fully automated, gradient delay compensated, and therefore artifact free, reconstruction. The radial 3D UTE sequence (echo time 60 μs) was implemented as single echo acquisition with center-out readouts and improved time efficient spoiling on a clinical 3T scanner without hardware modifications. To assess the sequence parameter dependent gradient delays each acquisition contained a quick calibration scan and utilized the phase of the readouts to detect the actual k-space center. This calibration scan does not require any user interaction. To evaluate the robustness of this automatic delay estimation phantom experiments were performed and 19 in vivo imaging data of the head, tibial cortical bone, feet and lung were acquired from 6 volunteers. As clinical application of this fast 3D UTE acquisition single breath-hold lung imaging is demonstrated. The proposed sequence allowed very short repetition times (TR~1ms), thus reducing total acquisition time. The proposed, fully automated k-phase based gradient delay calibration resulted in accurate delay estimations (difference to manually determined optimal delay -0.13 ± 0.45 μs) and allowed unsupervised reconstruction of high quality images for both phantom and in vivo data. The employed fast spoiling scheme efficiently suppressed artifacts caused by incorrectly refocused echoes. The sequence proved to be quite insensitive to motion, flow and susceptibility artifacts and provides oversampling protection against aliasing foldovers in all directions. Due to the short TR, acquisition times are attractive for a wide range of clinical applications. For short T2* mapping this sequence provides free choice of the second TE, usually within less scan time as a comparable dual echo UTE sequence. PMID:26975051

  19. Superior Cervical Sympathetic Ganglion: Normal Imaging Appearance on 3T-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joo Yeon; Song, Joon Seon; Song, Min Jeong; Hwang, Seung-Jun; Yoon, Ra Gyoung; Jang, Seung Won; Park, Ji Eun; Heo, Young Jin; Choi, Young Jun; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify superior cervical sympathetic ganglion (SCSG) and describe their characteristic MR appearance using 3T-MRI. Materials and Methods In this prospective study, we recruited 53 consecutive patients without history of head and neck irradiation. Using anatomic location based on literature review, both sides of the neck were evaluated to identify SCSGs in consensus. SCSGs were divided into definite (medial to internal carotid artery [ICA] and lateral to longus capitis muscle [LCM]) and probable SCSGs based on relative location to ICA and LCM. Two readers evaluated signal characteristics including intraganglionic hypointensity of all SCSGs and relative location of probable SCSGs. Interrater and intrarater agreements were quantified using unweighted kappa. Results Ninety-one neck sites in 53 patients were evaluated after exclusion of 15 neck sites with pathology. Definite SCSGs were identified at 66 (73%) sites, and probable SCSGs were found in 25 (27%). Probable SCSGs were located anterior to LCM in 16 (18%), lateral to ICA in 6 (7%), and posterior to ICA in 3 (3%). Intraganglionic hypointensity was identified in 82 (90%) on contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images. There was no statistical difference in the relative location between definite and probable SCSGs of the right and left sides with intragnalionic hypointensity on difference pulse sequences. Interrater and intrarater agreements on the location and intraganglionic hypointensity were excellent (κ-value, 0.749–1.000). Conclusion 3T-MRI identified definite SCSGs at 73% of neck sites and varied location of the remaining SCSGs. Intraganglionic hypointensity was a characteristic feature of SCSGs. PMID:27587954

  20. [Experimental evaluation of the occupational exposure to static magnetic fields on a 3 T magnetic resonance scanner].

    PubMed

    Moro, Luca; Alabiso, Francesco; Parisoli, Francesco; Frigerio, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The recent postponement until 31 October 2013 of the deadline for transposition of the EU Directive 2004/40/EC, concerning the minimum health requirementsfor the exposure of workers to the risks arising from electromagnetic fields between 0 and 300 GHz, keeps on suspending the Italian law which was aimed to implement the EU regulations on the occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields, including those generated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) units. Waiting for the revision of the exposure limits proposed by the EU Directive taking into account results from new studies and evolution of knowledge, the time-weighted values of static magnetic field proposed by the Italian Ministry of Health (D.M 02/08/91) still survive as limits for worker's exposure. The comparison between the proposed thresholds and the time required to position patients allows to calculate how long the MRI staff can stay at different values of static magnetic field, i.e. the maximum workload of each worker. In order to evaluate more accurately how many time the members of MRI staff are near the magnet bore and the real value of worker's exposure to the static magnetic field during the handling of patients, a teslameter Metrolab THM1176-PDA was used. Personal exposure measurements on the radiologists and the radiographers who worked on a 3 T GE Healthcare Discovery 750 MR were carried out during the positioning of self-sufficient and collaborative patients. The sensor was worn at the chest level on the side that was nearest to the magnet bore. Results show wide variations occurring between individual working procedures concerning the handling of patients, especially during the initial position phase. The mean values of the time spent by radiographers inside the magnet room (B > 0.5 mT) to place the patient and to take him outside at the end of the exam were respectively 220 and 127 seconds. The mean value of the time spent by radiologists was 162 seconds when they had to insert a peripheral

  1. MRBrainS Challenge: Online Evaluation Framework for Brain Image Segmentation in 3T MRI Scans

    PubMed Central

    Mendrik, Adriënne M.; Vincken, Koen L.; Kuijf, Hugo J.; Breeuwer, Marcel; Bouvy, Willem H.; de Bresser, Jeroen; Alansary, Amir; de Bruijne, Marleen; Carass, Aaron; El-Baz, Ayman; Jog, Amod; Katyal, Ranveer; Khan, Ali R.; van der Lijn, Fedde; Mahmood, Qaiser; Mukherjee, Ryan; van Opbroek, Annegreet; Paneri, Sahil; Pereira, Sérgio; Rajchl, Martin; Sarikaya, Duygu; Smedby, Örjan; Silva, Carlos A.; Vrooman, Henri A.; Vyas, Saurabh; Wang, Chunliang; Zhao, Liang; Biessels, Geert Jan; Viergever, Max A.

    2015-01-01

    Many methods have been proposed for tissue segmentation in brain MRI scans. The multitude of methods proposed complicates the choice of one method above others. We have therefore established the MRBrainS online evaluation framework for evaluating (semi)automatic algorithms that segment gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on 3T brain MRI scans of elderly subjects (65–80 y). Participants apply their algorithms to the provided data, after which their results are evaluated and ranked. Full manual segmentations of GM, WM, and CSF are available for all scans and used as the reference standard. Five datasets are provided for training and fifteen for testing. The evaluated methods are ranked based on their overall performance to segment GM, WM, and CSF and evaluated using three evaluation metrics (Dice, H95, and AVD) and the results are published on the MRBrainS13 website. We present the results of eleven segmentation algorithms that participated in the MRBrainS13 challenge workshop at MICCAI, where the framework was launched, and three commonly used freeware packages: FreeSurfer, FSL, and SPM. The MRBrainS evaluation framework provides an objective and direct comparison of all evaluated algorithms and can aid in selecting the best performing method for the segmentation goal at hand. PMID:26759553

  2. High resolution polymer gel dosimetry for small beam irradiation using a 7T micro-MRI scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Olsen, John; Best, Ryan; Bennett, Marcus; McGowin, Inna; Dorand, Jennifer; Link, Kerry; Bourland, J. Daniel

    2010-11-01

    The use of small field radiation beams has greatly increased with advanced radiation therapy techniques such as IMRT, rotational IMRT, and stereotactic body radiotherapy. In this work small field 3D dose distributions have been measured with high spatial resolution using polymer gels and 7T micro-MR imaging. A MAGIC (Methacrylic and Ascorbic acid in Gelatin Initiated by Copper) polymer gel [1] phantom was used to capture the 3D dose distributions for two small field (5 × 5 mm2 and 10 × 10 mm2) for a 6MV x-ray beam. High resolution 3D T2 maps were obtained with 7T micro-MRI (0.156mm × 0.156mm × 1mm, MSME pulse sequence). For comparison T2 maps, the gel phantom was scanned in a 3T MRI clinical scanner (0.254mm × 0.254mm × 2mm, FSE pulse sequence). Normalized 3D dose maps were calculated in Matlab. Results show that 7T micro-MRI 3D gel dosimetry measurements are much more stable, less noisy, and have higher spatial resolution than those obtained using a 3T clinical scanner for the same amount of scan time. In general, 3D gel dosimetry results also agree with simultaneously-obtained radiochromic film dosimetry. This study indicates that the MAGIC polymer gel with 7T micro-MRI for 3D dose readout could potentially be used for small radiation beams, including measurements for micro-beams (field size ~ 100um).

  3. Feasibility of 3-D MRI of Proximal Femur Microarchitecture at 3 T using 26 Receive Elements without and with Parallel Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Gregory; Deniz, Cem; Honig, Stephen; Rajapakse, Chamith S.; Egol, Kenneth; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Brown, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose High-resolution imaging of deeper anatomy such as the hip is challenging due to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), necessitating long scan times. Multi-element coils can increase SNR and reduce scan time through parallel imaging (PI). We assessed the feasibility of using a 26-element receive coil setup to perform 3 T MRI of proximal femur microarchitecture without and with PI. Materials and Methods This study had institutional review board approval. We scanned thirteen subjects on a 3 T scanner using 26 receive-elements and a 3-D FLASH sequence without and with PI (acceleration factors (AF) 2, 3, 4). We assessed SNR, depiction of individual trabeculae, PI performance (1/g-factor), and image quality with PI (1=non-visualization to 5=excellent). Results SNR maps demonstrate higher SNR for the 26-element setup compared to a 12-element setup for hip MRI. Without PI, individual proximal femur trabeculae were well-depicted, including microarchitectural deterioration in osteoporotic subjects. With PI, 1/g values for the 26-element/12-element receive-setup were 0.71/0.45, 0.56/0.25, and 0.44/0.08 at AF2, AF3, and AF4, respectively. Image quality was: AF1, excellent (4.8±0.4); AF2, good (4.2±1.0); AF3, average (3.3±1.0); AF4, non-visualization (1.4±0.9). Conclusion A 26-element receive-setup permits 3 T MRI of proximal femur microarchitecture with good image quality up to PI AF2. PMID:24711013

  4. Impact of fMRI Scanner Noise on Affective State and Attentional Performance

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Shawna N.; Shear, Paula K.; Norris, Matthew; Smith, Matthew; Osterhage, Jeff; Strakowski, Stephen M.; Cerullo, Michael; Fleck, David E.; Lee, Jing-Huei; Eliassen, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Previous research has shown that performance on cognitive tasks administered in the scanner can be altered by the scanner environment. There are no previous studies that have investigated the impact of scanner noise using a well-validated measure of affective change. The goal of this study was to determine whether performance on an affective attentional task or emotional response to the task would change in the presence of distracting acoustic noise, such as that encountered in an MRI environment. Method Thirty-four young adults with no self-reported history of neurologic disorder or mental illness completed three blocks of the affective Posner task outside of the scanner. The task was meant to induce frustration through monetary contingencies and rigged feedback. Participants completed a self-assessment manikin at the end of each block to rate their mood, arousal level, and sense of dominance. During the task, half of the participants heard noise (recorded from a 4T MRI system), and half heard no noise. Results The affective Posner task led to significant reductions in mood and increases in arousal in healthy participants. The presence of scanner noise did not impact task performance; however, individuals in the noise group did report significantly poorer mood throughout the task. Conclusions The results of the present study suggest that the acoustic qualities of MRI enhance frustration effects on an affective attentional task and that scanner noise may influence mood during similar fMRI tasks. PMID:26059389

  5. Normal-appearing brain tissue analysis in radiologically isolated syndrome using 3 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, María Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-07-01

    To date, it remains largely unknown whether there is in radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS) brain damage beyond visible T2 white matter lesions. We used single- voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging (3 T MRI) to analyze normal-appearing brain tissue regions in 18 RIS patients and 18 matched healthy controls. T2-hyperintense lesion volumes and structural brain volumes were also measured. The absolute metabolite concentrations and ratios of total N-acetylaspartate+N-acetylaspartyl glutamate (NAA), choline-containing compounds, myoinositol, and glutamine-glutamate complex to creatine were calculated. Spectral analysis was performed by LCModel. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Compared with healthy controls, RIS patients did not show any significant differences in either the absolute concentration of NAA or NAA/Cr ratio in mid-parietal gray matter. A trend toward lower NAA concentrations (-3.35%) was observed among RIS patients with high risk for conversion to multiple sclerosis. No differences in the other metabolites or their ratios were observed. RIS patients showed lower fractional anisotropy only in clusters overlapping lesional areas, namely in the cingulate gyrus bilaterally and the frontal lobe subgyral bilaterally (P < 0.001). Normalized brain and cortical volumes were significantly lower in RIS patients than in controls (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively). Our results suggest that in RIS, global brain and cortical atrophy are not primarily driven by significant occult microstructural normal appearing brain damage. Longitudinal MRI studies are needed to better understand the pathological processes underlying this novel entity. PMID:27399108

  6. Using High Spatial Resolution to Improve BOLD fMRI Detection at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Claise, Béatrice; Jean, Betty

    2015-01-01

    For different functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, the acquisition of T2*-weighted scans at a high spatial resolution may be advantageous in terms of time-course signal-to-noise ratio and of BOLD sensitivity when the regions are prone to susceptibility artifacts. In this study, we explore this solution by examining how spatial resolution influences activations elicited when appetizing food pictures are viewed. Twenty subjects were imaged at 3 T with two different voxel volumes, 3.4 μl and 27 μl. Despite the diminution of brain coverage, we found that high-resolution acquisition led to a better detection of activations. Though known to suffer to different degrees from susceptibility artifacts, the activations detected by high spatial resolution were notably consistent with those reported in published activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses, corresponding to taste-responsive regions. Furthermore, these regions were found activated bilaterally, in contrast with previous findings. Both the reduction of partial volume effect, which improves BOLD contrast, and the mitigation of susceptibility artifact, which boosts the signal to noise ratio in certain regions, explained the better detection noted with high resolution. The present study provides further evidences that high spatial resolution is a valuable solution for human BOLD fMRI, especially for studying food-related stimuli. PMID:26550990

  7. Automatic tuned MRI RF coil for multinuclear imaging of small animals at 3T.

    PubMed

    Muftuler, L Tugan; Gulsen, Gultekin; Sezen, Kumsal D; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2002-03-01

    We have developed an MRI RF coil whose tuning can be adjusted automatically between 120 and 128 MHz for sequential spectroscopic imaging of hydrogen and fluorine nuclei at field strength 3 T. Variable capacitance (varactor) diodes were placed on each rung of an eight-leg low-pass birdcage coil to change the tuning frequency of the coil. The diode junction capacitance can be controlled by the amount of applied reverse bias voltage. Impedance matching was also done automatically by another pair of varactor diodes to obtain the maximum SNR at each frequency. The same bias voltage was applied to the tuning varactors on all rungs to avoid perturbations in the coil. A network analyzer was used to monitor matching and tuning of the coil. A Pentium PC controlled the analyzer through the GPIB bus. A code written in LABVIEW was used to communicate with the network analyzer and adjust the bias voltages of the varactors via D/A converters. Serially programmed D/A converter devices were used to apply the bias voltages to the varactors. Isolation amplifiers were used together with RF choke inductors to provide isolation between the RF coil and the DC bias lines. We acquired proton and fluorine images sequentially from a multicompartment phantom using the designed coil. Good matching and tuning were obtained at both resonance frequencies. The tuning and matching of the coil were changed from one resonance frequency to the other within 60 s. PMID:11945031

  8. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Eric S.; Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  9. A modified electrode cap for EEG recordings in MRI scanners.

    PubMed

    Baumann, S B; Noll, D C

    1999-12-01

    A stretchable electrode cap containing 64 electrodes was modified to make it compatible for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Metallic components were individually tested for magnetic susceptibility, and those that perturbed a free-swinging magnet or moved in a strong magnetic field were replaced with non-ferromagnetic components. Studies with a phantom indicate that placement of the cables carrying signals from the cap to the amplifiers can significantly affect MR image quality. Anatomical and functional images obtained with the modified electrode cap show modest signal loss, but not enough to substantially interfere with the low-noise images required for fMRI. The cap enables faster application of large arrays of electrodes in conjunction with MRI studies, and thus makes combined EEG/fMRI studies more practical, especially those with EEG source localization as one of the goals. PMID:10616125

  10. MR Scanner Systems Should Be Adequately Characterized in Diffusion-MRI of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Giannelli, Marco; Sghedoni, Roberto; Iacconi, Chiara; Iori, Mauro; Traino, Antonio Claudio; Guerrisi, Maria; Mascalchi, Mario; Toschi, Nicola; Diciotti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Breast imaging represents a relatively recent and promising field of application of quantitative diffusion-MRI techniques. In view of the importance of guaranteeing and assessing its reliability in clinical as well as research settings, the aim of this study was to specifically characterize how the main MR scanner system-related factors affect quantitative measurements in diffusion-MRI of the breast. In particular, phantom acquisitions were performed on three 1.5 T MR scanner systems by different manufacturers, all equipped with a dedicated multi-channel breast coil as well as acquisition sequences for diffusion-MRI of the breast. We assessed the accuracy, inter-scan and inter-scanner reproducibility of the mean apparent diffusion coefficient measured along the main orthogonal directions () as well as of diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI)-derived mean diffusivity (MD) measurements. Additionally, we estimated spatial non-uniformity of (NU) and MD (NUMD) maps. We showed that the signal-to-noise ratio as well as overall calibration of high strength diffusion gradients system in typical acquisition sequences for diffusion-MRI of the breast varied across MR scanner systems, introducing systematic bias in the measurements of diffusion indices. While and MD values were not appreciably different from each other, they substantially varied across MR scanner systems. The mean of the accuracies of measured and MD was in the range [−2.3%,11.9%], and the mean of the coefficients of variation for and MD measurements across MR scanner systems was 6.8%. The coefficient of variation for repeated measurements of both and MD was < 1%, while NU and NUMD values were <4%. Our results highlight that MR scanner system-related factors can substantially affect quantitative diffusion-MRI of the breast. Therefore, a specific quality control program for assessing and monitoring the performance of MR scanner systems for diffusion-MRI of the breast is

  11. Spurious correlations in simultaneous EEG-fMRI driven by in-scanner movement.

    PubMed

    Fellner, M-C; Volberg, G; Mullinger, K J; Goldhacker, M; Wimber, M; Greenlee, M W; Hanslmayr, S

    2016-06-01

    Simultaneous EEG-fMRI provides an increasingly attractive research tool to investigate cognitive processes with high temporal and spatial resolution. However, artifacts in EEG data introduced by the MR scanner still remain a major obstacle. This study, employing commonly used artifact correction steps, shows that head motion, one overlooked major source of artifacts in EEG-fMRI data, can cause plausible EEG effects and EEG-BOLD correlations. Specifically, low-frequency EEG (<20Hz) is strongly correlated with in-scanner movement. Accordingly, minor head motion (<0.2mm) induces spurious effects in a twofold manner: Small differences in task-correlated motion elicit spurious low-frequency effects, and, as motion concurrently influences fMRI data, EEG-BOLD correlations closely match motion-fMRI correlations. We demonstrate these effects in a memory encoding experiment showing that obtained theta power (~3-7Hz) effects and channel-level theta-BOLD correlations reflect motion in the scanner. These findings highlight an important caveat that needs to be addressed by future EEG-fMRI studies. PMID:27012498

  12. Workflow assessment of 3T MRI-guided transperineal targeted prostate biopsy using a robotic needle guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sang-Eun; Tuncali, Kemal; Tokuda, Junichi; Fedorov, Andriy; Penzkofer, Tobias; Fennessy, Fiona; Tempany, Clare; Yoshimitsu, Kitaro; Magill, John; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided transperineal targeted prostate biopsy has become a valuable instrument for detection of prostate cancer in patients with continuing suspicion for aggressive cancer after transrectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) guided biopsy. The MRI-guided procedures are performed using mechanical targeting devices or templates, which suffer from limitations of spatial sampling resolution and/or manual in-bore adjustments. To overcome these limitations, we developed and clinically deployed an MRI-compatible piezoceramic-motor actuated needle guidance device, Smart Template, which allows automated needle guidance with high targeting resolution for use in a wide closed-bore 3-Tesla MRI scanner. One of the main limitations of the MRI-guided procedure is the lengthy procedure time compared to conventional TRUS-guided procedures. In order to optimize the procedure, we assessed workflow of 30 MRI-guided biopsy procedures using the Smart Template with focus on procedure time. An average of 3.4 (range: 2~6) targets were preprocedurally selected per procedure and 2.2 ± 0.8 biopsies were performed for each target with an average insertion attempt of 1.9 ± 0.7 per biopsy. The average technical preparation time was 14 ± 7 min and the in-MRI patient preparation time was 42 ± 7 min. After 21 ± 7 min of initial imaging, 64 ± 12 min of biopsy was performed yielding an average of 10 ± 2 min per tissue sample. The total procedure time occupying the MRI suite was 138 ± 16 min. No noticeable tendency in the length of any time segment was observed over the 30 clinical cases.

  13. Automated post-hoc noise cancellation tool for audio recordings acquired in an MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Cusack, Rhodri; Cumming, Nick; Bor, Daniel; Norris, Dennis; Lyzenga, Johannes

    2005-04-01

    There are several types of experiment in which it is useful to have subjects speak overtly in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, including those studying the articulatory apparatus and the neural basis of speech production, and fMRI experiments in which speech is used as a response modality. Although it is relatively easy to record sound from the bore, it can be difficult to hear the speech over the very loud acoustic noise from the scanner. This is particularly a problem during echo-planar imaging, which is usually used for fMRI. We present a post-hoc sound cancellation algorithm, and describe a Windows-based tool that implements it. The tool is fast and operates with minimal user intervention. We evaluate cancellation performance in terms of the improvement in signal-to-noise ratio, and investigate the effect of the recording medium. A substantial improvement in audibility was obtained. PMID:15678480

  14. Small PET scanner based on MRI-compatible light sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, J.; Balkay, L.; Berenyi, E.

    2015-03-01

    Improving the quality of life of elderly people requires diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for diseases of the central nervous system, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and epilepsy which have a rapidly growing impact on society. Minimallyinvasive imaging technologies such as PET and MRI allow for monitoring and tracking these illnesses, starting from their preliminary manifestations.

  15. Adaptation of a haptic robot in a 3T fMRI.

    PubMed

    Snider, Joseph; Plank, Markus; May, Larry; Liu, Thomas T; Poizner, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides excellent functional brain imaging via the BOLD signal with advantages including non-ionizing radiation, millimeter spatial accuracy of anatomical and functional data, and nearly real-time analyses. Haptic robots provide precise measurement and control of position and force of a cursor in a reasonably confined space. Here we combine these two technologies to allow precision experiments involving motor control with haptic/tactile environment interaction such as reaching or grasping. The basic idea is to attach an 8 foot end effecter supported in the center to the robot allowing the subject to use the robot, but shielding it and keeping it out of the most extreme part of the magnetic field from the fMRI machine (Figure 1). The Phantom Premium 3.0, 6DoF, high-force robot (SensAble Technologies, Inc.) is an excellent choice for providing force-feedback in virtual reality experiments, but it is inherently non-MR safe, introduces significant noise to the sensitive fMRI equipment, and its electric motors may be affected by the fMRI's strongly varying magnetic field. We have constructed a table and shielding system that allows the robot to be safely introduced into the fMRI environment and limits both the degradation of the fMRI signal by the electrically noisy motors and the degradation of the electric motor performance by the strongly varying magnetic field of the fMRI. With the shield, the signal to noise ratio (SNR: mean signal/noise standard deviation) of the fMRI goes from a baseline of ~380 to ~330, and ~250 without the shielding. The remaining noise appears to be uncorrelated and does not add artifacts to the fMRI of a test sphere (Figure 2). The long, stiff handle allows placement of the robot out of range of the most strongly varying parts of the magnetic field so there is no significant effect of the fMRI on the robot. The effect of the handle on the robot's kinematics is minimal since it is lightweight (~2

  16. Long-Term Left Ventricular Remodelling in Rat Model of Nonreperfused Myocardial Infarction: Sequential MR Imaging Using a 3T Clinical Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Muhammad G.; Sharp, Sarah-Kate; Alhamud, Alkathafi; Spottiswoode, Bruce S.; van der Kouwe, Andre J. W.; Davies, Neil H.; Franz, Thomas; Meintjes, Ernesta M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate whether 3T clinical MRI with a small-animal coil and gradient-echo (GE) sequence could be used to characterize long-term left ventricular remodelling (LVR) following nonreperfused myocardial infarction (MI) using semi-automatic segmentation software (SASS) in a rat model. Materials and Methods. 5 healthy rats were used to validate left ventricular mass (LVM) measured by MRI with postmortem values. 5 sham and 7 infarcted rats were scanned at 2 and 4 weeks after surgery to allow for functional and structural analysis of the heart. Measurements included ejection fraction (EF), end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and LVM. Changes in different regions of the heart were quantified using wall thickness analyses. Results. LVM validation in healthy rats demonstrated high correlation between MR and postmortem values. Functional assessment at 4 weeks after MI revealed considerable reduction in EF, increases in ESV, EDV, and LVM, and contractile dysfunction in infarcted and noninfarcted regions. Conclusion. Clinical 3T MRI with a small animal coil and GE sequence generated images in a rat heart with adequate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for successful semiautomatic segmentation to accurately and rapidly evaluate long-term LVR after MI. PMID:23118511

  17. New Clinically Feasible 3T MRI Protocol to Discriminate Internal Brain Stem Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Hoch, M J; Chung, S; Ben-Eliezer, N; Bruno, M T; Fatterpekar, G M; Shepherd, T M

    2016-06-01

    Two new 3T MR imaging contrast methods, track density imaging and echo modulation curve T2 mapping, were combined with simultaneous multisection acquisition to reveal exquisite anatomic detail at 7 canonical levels of the brain stem. Compared with conventional MR imaging contrasts, many individual brain stem tracts and nuclear groups were directly visualized for the first time at 3T. This new approach is clinically practical and feasible (total scan time = 20 minutes), allowing better brain stem anatomic localization and characterization. PMID:26869471

  18. Oxygenation in cervical cancer and normal uterine cervix assessed using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) MRI at 3T.

    PubMed

    Hallac, Rami R; Ding, Yao; Yuan, Qing; McColl, Roderick W; Lea, Jayanthi; Sims, Robert D; Weatherall, Paul T; Mason, Ralph P

    2012-12-01

    Hypoxia is reported to be a biomarker for poor prognosis in cervical cancer. However, a practical noninvasive method is needed for the routine clinical evaluation of tumor hypoxia. This study examined the potential use of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast MRI as a noninvasive technique to assess tumor vascular oxygenation at 3T. Following Institutional Review Board-approved informed consent and in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, successful results were achieved in nine patients with locally advanced cervical cancer [International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIA to IVA] and three normal volunteers. In the first four patients, dynamic T₂*-weighted MRI was performed in the transaxial plane using a multi-shot echo planar imaging sequence whilst patients breathed room air followed by oxygen (15 dm³/min). Later, a multi-echo gradient echo examination was added to provide quantitative R₂* measurements. The baseline T₂*-weighted signal intensity was quite stable, but increased to various extents in tumors on initiation of oxygen breathing. The signal in normal uterus increased significantly, whereas that in the iliacus muscle did not change. R₂* responded significantly in healthy uterus, cervix and eight cervical tumors. This preliminary study demonstrates that BOLD MRI of cervical cancer at 3T is feasible. However, more patients must be evaluated and followed clinically before any prognostic value can be determined. PMID:22619091

  19. Development of a PET Scanner for Simultaneously Imaging Small Animals with MRI and PET

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Christopher J; Goertzen, Andrew L; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Bishop, Daryl; Stortz, Greg; Kozlowski, Piotr; Retière, Fabrice; Zhang, Xuezhu; Sossi, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT) in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay) and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution. PMID:25120157

  20. Development of a PET scanner for simultaneously imaging small animals with MRI and PET.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christopher J; Goertzen, Andrew L; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Bishop, Daryl; Stortz, Greg; Kozlowski, Piotr; Retière, Fabrice; Zhang, Xuezhu; Sossi, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT) in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay) and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution. PMID:25120157

  1. Inter-site and inter-scanner diffusion MRI data harmonization.

    PubMed

    Mirzaalian, H; Ning, L; Savadjiev, P; Pasternak, O; Bouix, S; Michailovich, O; Grant, G; Marx, C E; Morey, R A; Flashman, L A; George, M S; McAllister, T W; Andaluz, N; Shutter, L; Coimbra, R; Zafonte, R D; Coleman, M J; Kubicki, M; Westin, C F; Stein, M B; Shenton, M E; Rathi, Y

    2016-07-15

    We propose a novel method to harmonize diffusion MRI data acquired from multiple sites and scanners, which is imperative for joint analysis of the data to significantly increase sample size and statistical power of neuroimaging studies. Our method incorporates the following main novelties: i) we take into account the scanner-dependent spatial variability of the diffusion signal in different parts of the brain; ii) our method is independent of compartmental modeling of diffusion (e.g., tensor, and intra/extra cellular compartments) and the acquired signal itself is corrected for scanner related differences; and iii) inter-subject variability as measured by the coefficient of variation is maintained at each site. We represent the signal in a basis of spherical harmonics and compute several rotation invariant spherical harmonic features to estimate a region and tissue specific linear mapping between the signal from different sites (and scanners). We validate our method on diffusion data acquired from seven different sites (including two GE, three Philips, and two Siemens scanners) on a group of age-matched healthy subjects. Since the extracted rotation invariant spherical harmonic features depend on the accuracy of the brain parcellation provided by Freesurfer, we propose a feature based refinement of the original parcellation such that it better characterizes the anatomy and provides robust linear mappings to harmonize the dMRI data. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method by statistically comparing diffusion measures such as fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity and generalized fractional anisotropy across multiple sites before and after data harmonization. We also show results using tract-based spatial statistics before and after harmonization for independent validation of the proposed methodology. Our experimental results demonstrate that, for nearly identical acquisition protocol across sites, scanner-specific differences can be accurately removed using the

  2. Subtle in-scanner motion biases automated measurement of brain anatomy from in vivo MRI.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Bloch, Aaron; Clasen, Liv; Stockman, Michael; Ronan, Lisa; Lalonde, Francois; Giedd, Jay; Raznahan, Armin

    2016-07-01

    While the potential for small amounts of motion in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans to bias the results of functional neuroimaging studies is well appreciated, the impact of in-scanner motion on morphological analysis of structural MRI is relatively under-studied. Even among "good quality" structural scans, there may be systematic effects of motion on measures of brain morphometry. In the present study, the subjects' tendency to move during fMRI scans, acquired in the same scanning sessions as their structural scans, yielded a reliable, continuous estimate of in-scanner motion. Using this approach within a sample of 127 children, adolescents, and young adults, significant relationships were found between this measure and estimates of cortical gray matter volume and mean curvature, as well as trend-level relationships with cortical thickness. Specifically, cortical volume and thickness decreased with greater motion, and mean curvature increased. These effects of subtle motion were anatomically heterogeneous, were present across different automated imaging pipelines, showed convergent validity with effects of frank motion assessed in a separate sample of 274 scans, and could be demonstrated in both pediatric and adult populations. Thus, using different motion assays in two large non-overlapping sets of structural MRI scans, convergent evidence showed that in-scanner motion-even at levels which do not manifest in visible motion artifact-can lead to systematic and regionally specific biases in anatomical estimation. These findings have special relevance to structural neuroimaging in developmental and clinical datasets, and inform ongoing efforts to optimize neuroanatomical analysis of existing and future structural MRI datasets in non-sedated humans. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2385-2397, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27004471

  3. 3T diffusion-weighted MRI of the thyroid gland with reduced distortion: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Nagala, S; Priest, A N; McLean, M A; Jani, P; Graves, M J

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Single-shot diffusion-weighted (DW) echo planar imaging (EPI), which is commonly used for imaging the thyroid, is characterised by severe blurring and distortion. The objectives of this work were: 1, to show that a reduced-field of view (r-FOV) DW EPI technique can improve image quality; and 2, to investigate the effect of different reconstruction strategies on the resulting apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs). Methods: We implemented a single-shot, r-FOV DW EPI technique with a two-dimensional radiofrequency excitation pulse for DW imaging of the thyroid at 3T. Images were reconstructed using root sum of squares (SOS) and an optimal-B1 reconstruction (OBR). Phantom and in vivo experiments were performed to compare r-FOV and conventional full-FOV DW EPI with root SOS and OBR. Results: r-FOV with OBR substantially improved image quality at 3T. In phantoms, r-FOV gave more accurate ADCs than full-FOV. In vivo r-FOV always gave lower ADC values with respect to the full-FOV technique irrespective of the reconstruction used and whether only two or multiple b-values were used to compute the ADCs. Conclusion: r-FOV DW EPI can reduce image blurring and distortion at the expense of a low signal-to-noise ratio. OBR is a promising reconstruction technique for accurate ADC measurements in lower signal-to-noise ratio regimes, although further studies are needed to characterise its performance. Advances in knowledge: DW imaging of the thyroid at 3T could potentially benefit from r-FOV acquisition strategies, such as the r-FOV DW EPI technique proposed in this paper. PMID:23770539

  4. Interventional and intraoperative MRI at low field scanner--a review.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Roberto T; Ojala, Risto; Kariniemi, Juho; Perälä, Jukka; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Tervonen, Osmo

    2005-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a cutting edge imaging modality in detecting diseases and pathologic tissue. The superior soft tissue contrast in MRI allows better definition of the pathology. MRI is increasingly used for guiding, monitoring and controlling percutaneous procedures and surgery. The rapid development of interventional techniques in radiology has led to integration of imaging with computers, new therapy devices and operating room like conditions. This has projected as faster and more accurate imaging and hence more demanding procedures have been applied to the repertoire of the interventional radiologist. In combining features of various other imaging modalities and adding some more into them, interventional MRI (IMRI) has potential to take further the interventional radiology techniques, minimally invasive therapies and surgery. The term "Interventional MRI" consists in short all those procedures, which are performed under MRI guidance. These procedures can be either percutaneous or open surgical of nature. One of the limiting factors in implementing MRI as guidance modality for interventional procedures has been the fact, that most widely used magnet design, a cylindrical magnet, is not ideal for guiding procedures as it does not allow direct access to the patient. Open, low field scanners usually operating around 0.2 T, offer this feature. Clumsy hardware, bad patient access, slow image update frequency and strong magnetic fields have been other limiting factors for interventional MRI. However, the advantages of MRI as an imaging modality have been so obvious that considerable development has taken place in the 20-year history of MRI. The image quality has become better, ever faster software, new innovative sequences, better MRI hardware and increased computing power have accelerated imaging speed and image quality to a totally new level. Perhaps the most important feature in the recent development has been the introduction of open

  5. An implanted 8-channel array coil for high-resolution macaque MRI at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, T.; Keil, B.; Farivar, R.; McNab, J.A.; Polimeni, J. R.; Gerits, A.; Arsenault, J.T.; Wald, L. L.; Vanduffel, W.

    2012-01-01

    An 8-channel receive coil array was constructed and implanted adjacent to the skull in a male rhesus monkey in order to improve the sensitivity of (functional) brain imaging. The permanent implant was part of an acrylic headpost assembly and only the coil element loop wires were implanted. The tuning, matching, and preamplifier circuitry was connected via a removable external assembly. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and noise amplification for parallel imaging were compared to a single-, 4-, and 8-channel external receive-only coil routinely used for macaque fMRI. In vivo measurements showed significantly improved SNR within the brain for the implanted versus the external coils. Within a region-of-interest covering the cerebral cortex, we observed a 5.4-, 3.6-fold, and 3.4-fold increase in SNR compared to the external single-, 4-, and 8-channel coil, respectively. In the center of the brain, the implanted array maintained a 2.4×, 2.5×, and 2.1× higher SNR, respectively compared to the external coils. The array performance was evaluated for anatomical, diffusion tensor and functional brain imaging. This study suggests that a stable implanted phased-array coil can be used in macaque MRI to substantially increase the spatial resolution for anatomical, diffusion tensor, and functional imaging. PMID:22609793

  6. 3-T MRI detects inflammatory stenosis of the vertebral artery in giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Geiger, J; Uhl, M; Peter, H H; Langer, M; Bley, T A

    2008-05-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a granulomatous vasculitis. Early diagnosis is important for the initiation of corticosteroid treatment because the arteritis can result in blindness. In most of the cases, the superficial cranial arteries are affected. However, extracranial involvement of various arteries is known. Here, we report a case of histologically proven GCA with an inflammatory stenosis of the right vertebral artery. For complete evaluation of the extension of the disease, an optimized protocol of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T in combination with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography was performed. This non-invasive method facilitates the differentiation of inflamed and healthy segments of small cranial arteries, may help to find appropriate sites for biopsy, and allows the assessment of affected extracranial vessels. In this patient case, even the cause of vertebral stenosis--inflammatory versus arteriosclerotic--could be elucidated. PMID:18172573

  7. The Interconnection of MRI Scanner and MR-Compatible Robotic Device: Synergistic Graphical User Interface to Form a Mechatronic System.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Alpay; Tsekos, Nikolaos

    2008-06-01

    MRI scanner and magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible robotic devices are mechatronic systems. Without an interconnecting component, these two devices cannot be operated synergetically for medical interventions. In this paper, the design and properties of a graphical user interface (GUI) that accomplishes the task is presented. The GUI interconnects the two devices to obtain a larger mechatronic system by providing command and control of the robotic device based on the visual information obtained from the MRI scanner. Ideally, the GUI should also control imaging parameters of the MRI scanner. Its main goal is to facilitate image-guided interventions by acting as the synergistic component between the physician, the robotic device, the scanner, and the patient. PMID:21544216

  8. Physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception: An fMRI study at 3T.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Laura H; Sprenger, Christian; May, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The brainstem is a major site of processing and modulation of nociceptive input and plays a key role in the pathophysiology of various headache disorders. However, human imaging studies on brainstem function following trigeminal nociceptive stimulation are scarce as brainstem specific imaging approaches have to address multiple challenges such as magnetic field inhomogeneities and an enhanced level of physiological noise. In this study we used a viable protocol for brainstem fMRI of standardized trigeminal nociceptive stimulation to achieve detailed insight into physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception. We conducted a study of 21 healthy participants using a nociceptive ammonia stimulation of the left nasal mucosa with an optimized MR acquisition protocol for high resolution brainstem echoplanar imaging in combination with two different noise correction techniques. Significant BOLD responses to noxious ammonia stimulation were observed in areas typically involved in trigeminal nociceptive processing such as the spinal trigeminal nuclei (sTN), thalamus, secondary somatosensory cortex, insular cortex and cerebellum as well as in a pain modulating network including the periaqueductal gray area, hypothalamus (HT), locus coeruleus and cuneiform nucleus (CNF). Activations of the left CNF were positively correlated with pain intensity ratings. Employing psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis we found enhanced functional connectivity of the sTN with the contralateral sTN and HT following trigeminal nociception. We also observed enhanced functional connectivity of the CNF with the RVM during painful stimulation thus implying an important role of these two brainstem regions in central pain processing. The chosen approach to study trigeminal nociception with high-resolution fMRI offers new insight into human pain processing and might thus lead to a better understanding of headache pathophysiology. PMID:26388554

  9. Increased Visibility of Deep Medullary Veins in Leukoaraiosis: A 3-T MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shenqiang; Wan, Jinping; Zhang, Xuting; Tong, Lusha; Zhao, Song; Sun, Jianzhong; Lin, Yuehan; Shen, Chunhong; Lou, Min

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous collagenosis has been implicated in leading to white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) via venous ischemia. We sought to determine whether cerebral venous dilation or ischemia correlate with the severity of WMHs by quantitative in vivo imaging techniques. This was an investigator-initiated prospective single-center study. We reviewed clinical, laboratory data from 158 consecutive WMHs patients and 50 controls, and measured the number of voxels of deep medullary veins (DMVs) on susceptibility-weighted image and assessed the WMH volume (as a marker of the severity of WMHs) on a 3-T magnetic resonance system. We then performed the logistic-regression analysis and partial Pearson’s correlation analysis to examine the association between the venous voxel count and WMH volume. The number of voxels of DMVs was significantly higher in WMHs than in controls. Increased number of voxels of DMVs was independently associated with both WMH volume of the whole brain and coregistered regional WMH volume after adjusting for age and number of lacunes. Our study indicates that cerebral deep venous insufficiency or ischemia play a role in the pathogenesis of WMHs, which may provide prognostic information on patients with WMHs and may have implications for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25071553

  10. 2D Imaging in a Lightweight Portable MRI Scanner without Gradient Coils

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Clarissa Zimmerman; Stockmann, Jason P.; Armstrong, Brandon D.; Sarracanie, Mathieu; Lev, Michael H.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose As the premiere modality for brain imaging, MRI could find wider applicability if lightweight, portable systems were available for siting in unconventional locations such as Intensive Care Units, physician offices, surgical suites, ambulances, emergency rooms, sports facilities, or rural healthcare sites. Methods We construct and validate a truly portable (<100kg) and silent proof-of-concept MRI scanner which replaces conventional gradient encoding with a rotating lightweight cryogen-free, low-field magnet. When rotated about the object, the inhomogeneous field pattern is used as a rotating Spatial Encoding Magnetic field (rSEM) to create generalized projections which encode the iteratively reconstructed 2D image. Multiple receive channels are used to disambiguate the non-bijective encoding field. Results The system is validated with experimental images of 2D test phantoms. Similar to other non-linear field encoding schemes, the spatial resolution is position dependent with blurring in the center, but is shown to be likely sufficient for many medical applications. Conclusion The presented MRI scanner demonstrates the potential for portability by simultaneously relaxing the magnet homogeneity criteria and eliminating the gradient coil. This new architecture and encoding scheme shows convincing proof of concept images that are expected to be further improved with refinement of the calibration and methodology. PMID:24668520

  11. Structural brain alterations in primary open angle glaucoma: a 3T MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jieqiong; Li, Ting; Sabel, Bernhard A.; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wen, Hongwei; Li, Jianhong; Xie, Xiaobin; Yang, Diya; Chen, Weiwei; Wang, Ningli; Xian, Junfang; He, Huiguang

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is not only an eye disease but is also associated with degeneration of brain structures. We now investigated the pattern of visual and non-visual brain structural changes in 25 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients and 25 age-gender-matched normal controls using T1-weighted imaging. MRI images were subjected to volume-based analysis (VBA) and surface-based analysis (SBA) in the whole brain as well as ROI-based analysis of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), visual cortex (V1/2), amygdala and hippocampus. While VBA showed no significant differences in the gray matter volumes of patients, SBA revealed significantly reduced cortical thickness in the right frontal pole and ROI-based analysis volume shrinkage in LGN bilaterally, right V1 and left amygdala. Structural abnormalities were correlated with clinical parameters in a subset of the patients revealing that the left LGN volume was negatively correlated with bilateral cup-to-disk ratio (CDR), the right LGN volume was positively correlated with the mean deviation of the right visual hemifield, and the right V1 cortical thickness was negatively correlated with the right CDR in glaucoma. These results demonstrate that POAG affects both vision-related structures and non-visual cortical regions. Moreover, alterations of the brain visual structures reflect the clinical severity of glaucoma. PMID:26743811

  12. A 20-Channel Receive-Only Mouse Array Coil for a 3T Clinical MRI System

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Wiggins, Graham C.; Triantafyllou, Christina; Wald, Lawrence L.; Meise, Florian M.; Schreiber, Laura M.; Klose, Klaus J.; Heverhagen, Johannes T.

    2010-01-01

    A 20-channel phased-array coil for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of mice has been designed, constructed and validated with bench measurements and high resolution accelerated imaging. The technical challenges of designing a small, high density array have been overcome using individual small-diameter coil elements arranged on a cylinder in a hexagonal overlapping design with adjacent low impedance preamplifiers to further decouple the array elements. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and noise amplification in accelerated imaging were simulated and quantitatively evaluated in phantoms and in vivo mouse images. Comparison between the 20-channel mouse array and a length-matched quadrature driven small animal birdcage coil showed an SNR increase at the periphery and in the center of the phantom of 3-fold and 1.3-fold, respectively. Comparison to a shorter but SNR-optimized birdcage coil (aspect ratio 1:1 and only half mouse coverage) showed an SNR gain of 2-fold at the edge of the phantom and similar SNR in the center. G-factor measurements indicate that the coil is well suited to acquire highly accelerated images. PMID:21433066

  13. In vivo electric conductivity of cervical cancer patients based on B_{1}^{+} maps at 3T MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balidemaj, E.; de Boer, P.; van Lier, A. L. H. M. W.; Remis, R. F.; Stalpers, L. J. A.; Westerveld, G. H.; Nederveen, A. J.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Crezee, J.

    2016-02-01

    The in vivo electric conductivity (σ) values of tissue are essential for accurate electromagnetic simulations and specific absorption rate (SAR) assessment for applications such as thermal dose computations in hyperthermia. Currently used σ-values are mostly based on ex vivo measurements. In this study the conductivity of human muscle, bladder content and cervical tumors is acquired non-invasively in vivo using MRI. The conductivity of 20 cervical cancer patients was measured with the MR-based electric properties tomography method on a standard 3T MRI system. The average in vivo σ-value of muscle is 14% higher than currently used in human simulation models. The σ-value of bladder content is an order of magnitude higher than the value for bladder wall tissue that is used for the complete bladder in many models. Our findings are confirmed by various in vivo animal studies from the literature. In cervical tumors, the observed average conductivity was 13% higher than the literature value reported for cervical tissue. Considerable deviations were found for the electrical conductivity observed in this study and the commonly used values for SAR assessment, emphasizing the importance of acquiring in vivo conductivity for more accurate SAR assessment in various applications.

  14. Voxel-based morphometry at ultra-high fields. a comparison of 7T and 3T MRI data.

    PubMed

    Seiger, Rene; Hahn, Andreas; Hummer, Allan; Kranz, Georg S; Ganger, Sebastian; Küblböck, Martin; Kraus, Christoph; Sladky, Ronald; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-06-01

    Recent technological progress enables MRI recordings at ultra-high fields of 7 T and above leading to brain images of higher resolution and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Despite these benefits, imaging at 7 T exhibits distinct challenges due to B1 field inhomogeneities, causing decreased image quality and problems in data analysis. Although several strategies have been proposed, a systematic investigation of bias-corrected 7 T data for voxel-based morphometry (VBM) is still missing and it is an ongoing matter of debate if VBM at 7 T can be carried out properly. Here, an optimized VBM study was conducted, evaluating the impact of field strength (3T vs. 7 T) and pulse sequence (MPRAGE vs. MP2RAGE) on gray matter volume (GMV) estimates. More specifically, twenty-two participants were measured under the conditions 3T MPRAGE, 7 T MPRAGE and 7 T MP2RAGE. Due to the fact that 7 T MPRAGE data exhibited strong intensity inhomogeneities, an alternative preprocessing pipeline was proposed and applied for that data. VBM analysis revealed higher GMV estimates for 7 T predominantly in superior cortical areas, caudate nucleus, cingulate cortex and the hippocampus. On the other hand, 3T yielded higher estimates especially in inferior cortical areas of the brain, cerebellum, thalamus and putamen compared to 7 T. Besides minor exceptions, these results were observed for 7 T MPRAGE as well for the 7 T MP2RAGE measurements. Results gained in the inferior parts of the brain should be taken with caution, as native GM segmentations displayed misclassifications in these regions for both 7 T sequences. This was supported by the test-retest measurements showing highest variability in these inferior regions of the brain for 7 T and also for the advanced MP2RAGE sequence. Hence, our data support the use of 7 T MRI for VBM analysis in cortical areas, but direct comparison between field strengths and sequences requires careful assessment. Similarly, analysis of the inferior cortical regions

  15. Steering of aggregating magnetic microparticles using propulsion gradients coils in an MRI Scanner.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Martel, Sylvain

    2010-05-01

    Upgraded gradient coils can effectively enhance the MRI steering of magnetic microparticles in a branching channel. Applications of this method include MRI targeting of magnetic embolization agents for oncologic therapy. A magnetic suspension of Fe(3)O(4) magnetic particles was injected inside a y-shaped microfluidic channel. Magnetic gradients of 0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mT/m were applied to the magnetic particles perpendicularly to the flow by a custom-built gradient coil inside a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Measurement of the steering ratio was performed both by video analyses and quantification of the mass of the particles collected at each outlet of the microfluidic channel, using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Magnetic particles steering ratios of 0.99 and 0.75 were reached with 400 mT/m gradient amplitude and measured by video analyses and atomic absorption spectroscopy, respectively. Experimental data shows that the steering ratio increases with higher magnetic gradients. Moreover, theory suggests that larger particles (or aggregates), higher magnetizations, and lower flows can also be used to improve the steering ratio. The technological limitation of the approach is that an MRI gradient amplitude increase to a few hundred milliteslas per meter is needed. A simple analytical method based on magnetophoretic velocity predictions and geometric considerations is proposed for steering ratio calculation. PMID:20432304

  16. MRI osteitis predicts cartilage damage at the wrist in RA: a three-year prospective 3T MRI study examining cartilage damage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cartilage damage impacts on patient disability in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aims of this magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study were to investigate cartilage damage over three years and determine predictive factors. Methods A total of 38 RA patients and 22 controls were enrolled at t = 0 (2009). After 3 years, clinical and MRI data were available in 28 patients and 15 controls. 3T MRI scans were scored for cartilage damage, bone erosion, synovitis and osteitis. A model was developed to predict cartilage damage from baseline parameters. Results Inter-reader reliability for the Auckland MRI cartilage score (AMRICS) was high for status scores; intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), 0.90 (0.81 to 0.95) and moderate for change scores (ICC 0.58 (0.24 to 0.77)). AMRICS scores correlated with the Outcome MEasures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials (OMERACT) MRI joint space narrowing (jsn) and X-Ray (XR) jsn scores (r =0.96, P < 0.0001 and 0.80, P < 0.0001, respectively). AMRICS change scores were greater for RA patients than controls (P = 0.06 and P = 0.04 for the two readers). Using linear regression, baseline MRI cartilage, synovitis and osteitis scores predicted the three-year AMRICS (R2 = 0.67, 0.37 and 0.39, respectively). A multiple linear regression model predicted the three-year AMRICS (R2 = 0.78). Baseline radial osteitis predicted increased cartilage scores at the radiolunate and radioscaphoid joints, P = 0.0001 and 0.0012, respectively and synovitis at radioulnar, radiocarpal and intercarpal-carpometacarpal joints also influenced three-year cartilage scores (P-values of 0.001, 0.04 and 0.01, respectively). Conclusions MRI cartilage damage progression is preceded by osteitis and synovitis but is most influenced by pre-existing cartilage damage suggesting primacy of the cartilage damage pathway in certain patients. PMID:24476340

  17. Feasibility study using MRI and two optical CT scanners for readout of polymer gel and PresageTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, H.; Skyt, P. S.; Ceberg, S.; Doran, S.; Muren, L. P.; Balling, P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Bäck, S. Å. J.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the conventional combination of three-dimensional dosimeter (nPAG gel) and readout method (MRI) with other combinations of three-dimensional dosimeters (nPAG gel/PresageTM) and readout methods (optical CT scanners). In the first experiment, the dose readout of a gel irradiated with a four field-box technique was performed with both an Octopus IQ scanner and MRI. It was seen that the MRI readout agreed slightly better to the TPS. In another experiment, a gel and a PresageTM sample were irradiated with a VMAT field and read out using MRI and a fast laser scanner, respectively. A comparison between the TPS and the volumes revealed that the MRI/gel readout had closer resemblance to the TPS than the optical CT/PresageTM readout. There are clearly potential in the evaluated optical CT scanners, but more time has to be invested in the particular scanning scenario than was possible in this study.

  18. Analysis of the role of lead resistivity in specific absorption rate for deep brain stimulator leads at 3T MRI.

    PubMed

    Angelone, Leonardo M; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on patients with implanted deep brain stimulators (DBSs) can be hazardous because of the antenna-effect of leads exposed to the incident radio-frequency field. This study evaluated electromagnetic field and specific absorption rate (SAR) changes as a function of lead resistivity on an anatomically precise head model in a 3T system. The anatomical accuracy of our head model allowed for detailed modeling of the path of DBS leads between epidermis and the outer table. Our electromagnetic finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis showed significant changes of 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR for the range of lead resistivity modeled, including highly conductive leads up to highly resistive leads. Antenna performance and whole-head SAR were sensitive to the presence of the DBS leads only within 10%, while changes of over one order of magnitude were observed for the peak 10 g averaged SAR, suggesting that local SAR values should be considered in DBS guidelines. With rho(lead) = rho(copper) , and the MRI coil driven to produce a whole-head SAR without leads of 3.2 W/kg, the 1 g averaged SAR was 1080 W/kg and the 10 g averaged SAR 120 W/kg at the tip of the DBS lead. Conversely, in the control case without leads, the 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR were 0.5 W/kg and 0.6 W/kg, respectively, in the same location. The SAR at the tip of lead was similar with electrically homogeneous and electrically heterogeneous models. Our results show that computational models can support the development of novel lead technology, properly balancing the requirements of SAR deposition at the tip of the lead and power dissipation of the system battery. PMID:20335090

  19. The registration of signals from the nuclei other than protons at 0.5 T MRI scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, N.; Volkov, D.; Gulyaev, M.; Pavlova, O.; Pirogov, Yu

    2016-02-01

    The practical aspects of the adaptation of the medical MRI scanner for multinuclear applications are considered. Examples of high resolution NMR spectra for nuclei 19F, 31P, 23Na, 11B, 13C, 2H, and also NQR spectrum for 35Cl are given. Possibilities of MRI for nuclei 19F, 31P, 23Na, 11B are shown. Experiments on registration of signals 19F from the fluorocarbons injected in laboratory animals are described.

  20. Clinical utility and economic viability of a 3T MRI in an anti-cancer centre: The experience of the centre Oscar Lambret.

    PubMed

    Taïeb, S; Devise, V; Pouliquen, G; Rocourt, N; Faivre-Pierret, M; Brongniart, S; Peugny, P; Ceugnart, L

    2012-07-01

    This paper will try and describe the installation of a 3T MRI in an anti-cancer centre. Functional sequences become indispensable in the assessment of targeted treatments. It is only possible to carry out these treatments on a routine basis in acceptable examination times with 3T. The technical constraints are overcome with third generation MRI and the improvement of the spatial resolution in examination times reduced by 30 to 50% increases patient comfort. Nevertheless, the financial constraints represent a major handicap. It is not possible to obtain an economic balance with rates based on the cost and depreciation of 1.5T imagers that are half the price. PMID:22726637

  1. Comparison of Standard 1.5 T vs. 3 T Optimized Protocols in Patients Treated with Glatiramer Acetate. A Serial MRI Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Zivadinov, Robert; Hojnacki, David; Hussein, Sara; Bergsland, Niels; Carl, Ellen; Durfee, Jacqueline; Dwyer, Michael G.; Kennedy, Cheryl; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the effect of glatiramer acetate (GA, 20 mg) on lesion activity using the 1.5 T standard MRI protocol (single dose gadolinium [Gd] and 5-min delay) or optimized 3 T protocol (triple dose of Gd, 20-min delay and application of an off-resonance saturated magnetization transfer pulse). A 15-month, phase IV, open-label, single-blinded, prospective, observational study included 12 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who underwent serial MRI scans (Days −45, −20, 0; the minus ign indicates the number of days before GA treatment; and on Days 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 270 and 360 during GA treatment) on 1.5 T and 3 T protocols. Cumulative number and volume of Gd enhancing (Gd-E) and T2 lesions were calculated. At Days −45 and 0, there were higher number (p < 0.01) and volume (p < 0.05) of Gd-E lesions on 3 T optimized compared to 1.5 T standard protocol. However, at 180 and 360 days of the study, no significant differences in total and cumulative number of new Gd-E and T 2 lesions were found between the two protocols. Compared to pre-treatment period, at Days 180 and 360 a significantly greater decrease in the cumulative number of Gd-E lesions (p = 0.03 and 0.021, respectively) was found using the 3 T vs. the 1.5 T protocol (p = NS for both time points). This MRI mechanistic study suggests that GA may exert a greater effect on decreasing lesion activity as measured on 3 T optimized compared to 1.5 T standard protocol. PMID:22754322

  2. Comparison of standard 1.5 T vs. 3 T optimized protocols in patients treated with glatiramer acetate. A serial MRI pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert; Hojnacki, David; Hussein, Sara; Bergsland, Niels; Carl, Ellen; Durfee, Jacqueline; Dwyer, Michael G; Kennedy, Cheryl; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the effect of glatiramer acetate (GA, 20 mg) on lesion activity using the 1.5 T standard MRI protocol (single dose gadolinium [Gd] and 5-min delay) or optimized 3 T protocol (triple dose of Gd, 20-min delay and application of an off-resonance saturated magnetization transfer pulse). A 15-month, phase IV, open-label, single-blinded, prospective, observational study included 12 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who underwent serial MRI scans (Days -45, -20, 0; the minus ign indicates the number of days before GA treatment; and on Days 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 270 and 360 during GA treatment) on 1.5 T and 3 T protocols. Cumulative number and volume of Gd enhancing (Gd-E) and T2 lesions were calculated. At Days -45 and 0, there were higher number (p < 0.01) and volume (p < 0.05) of Gd-E lesions on 3 T optimized compared to 1.5 T standard protocol. However, at 180 and 360 days of the study, no significant differences in total and cumulative number of new Gd-E and T 2 lesions were found between the two protocols. Compared to pre-treatment period, at Days 180 and 360 a significantly greater decrease in the cumulative number of Gd-E lesions (p = 0.03 and 0.021, respectively) was found using the 3 T vs. the 1.5 T protocol (p = NS for both time points). This MRI mechanistic study suggests that GA may exert a greater effect on decreasing lesion activity as measured on 3 T optimized compared to 1.5 T standard protocol. PMID:22754322

  3. Changes in Prostate Shape and Volume and Their Implications for Radiotherapy After Introduction of Endorectal Balloon as Determined by MRI at 3T

    SciTech Connect

    Heijmink, Stijn W.T.P.J. Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Lin, Emile N.J.T. van; Visser, Andries G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M.; Witjes, J. Alfred; Barentsz, Jelle O.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the changes in prostate shape and volume after the introduction of an endorectal coil (ERC) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3T. Methods and materials: A total of 44 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent separate MRI examinations at 3T with a body array coil and subsequently with an ERC inflated with 50 mL of fluid. Prospectively, two experienced readers independently evaluated all data sets in random order. The maximal anteroposterior, right-to-left, and craniocaudal prostate diameters, as well as the total prostate and peripheral zone and central gland volumes were measured before and after ERC introduction. The changes in prostate shape and volume were analyzed using Wilcoxon's test for paired samples. Results: The introduction of the ERC significantly changed the prostate shape in all three directions, with mean changes in the anteroposterior, right-to-left, and craniocaudal diameters of 15.7% (5.5 mm), 7.7% (3.5 mm), and 6.3% (2.2 mm), respectively. The mean total prostate, peripheral zone, and central gland volume decreased significantly after ERC introduction by 17.9% (8.3 cm{sup 3}), 21.6% (4.8 cm{sup 3}), and 14.2% (3.4 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Conclusion: ERC introduction as observed by 3T MRI changed the prostate shape and volume significantly. The mean anteroposterior diameter was reduced by nearly one-sixth of its original diameter, and the mean total prostate volume was decreased by approximately 18%. This could cause difficulties and should be considered when using ERC-based MRI for MRI-computed tomography fusion and radiotherapy planning.

  4. Human brain diffusion tensor imaging at submillimeter isotropic resolution on a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Sundman, Mark; Petit, Laurent; Guhaniyogi, Shayan; Chu, Mei-Lan; Petty, Christopher; Song, Allen W.; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2015-01-01

    The advantages of high-resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been demonstrated in a recent post-mortem human brain study (Miller et al., NeuroImage 2011;57(1):167–181), showing that white matter fiber tracts can be much more accurately detected in data at submillimeter isotropic resolution. To our knowledge, in vivo human brain DTI at submillimeter isotropic resolution has not been routinely achieved yet because of the difficulty in simultaneously achieving high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in DTI scans. Here we report a 3D multi-slab interleaved EPI acquisition integrated with multiplexed sensitivity encoded (MUSE) reconstruction, to achieve high-quality, high-SNR and submillimeter isotropic resolution (0.85 × 0.85 × 0.85 mm3) in vivo human brain DTI on a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. In agreement with the previously reported post-mortem human brain DTI study, our in vivo data show that the structural connectivity networks of human brains can be mapped more accurately and completely with high-resolution DTI as compared with conventional DTI (e.g., 2 × 2 × 2 mm3). PMID:26072250

  5. Reliability of Three-Dimensional Pseudo-Continuous Arterial Spin Labeling MR Imaging for Measuring Visual Cortex Perfusion on Two 3T Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Diandian; Wu, Bing; Shi, Kaining; Ma, Lin; Cai, Youquan; Lou, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the human primary visual cortex is correlated with the loss of visual function in neuro-ophthalmological diseases. Advanced three-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (3D pCASL), as a non-invasive method to access the CBF, can be a novel measurement to detect the visual cortex. The objective of the study was to assess the intra- and inter-scanner reliability of 3D pCASL of the visual cortex in healthy adults and suggest the selection of different post-labeling delay times (PLDs). For this reason, 3D pCASL was conducted in two 3.0T MR three times with twelve healthy volunteers at an interval of 10–15 days. The 1st and 3rd tests were performed on scanner-1, and the 2nd test was performed on scanner-2. The value of the CBF was abstracted from the visual cortex with two PLDs. The intra- and inter-scanner reliability and reproducibility were evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. By estimating the mean value of the CBF in the visual cortex, the intra-scanner results demonstrated the higher reliability (ICC for PLD = 1.5 second presented at 0.743 compared with 0.829 for PLD = 2.5 seconds), and the Bland-Altman plots showed the reproducibility at a longer PLD. We conclude that the calibrated 3D pCASL approach provides a highly reproducible measurement of the CBF of the visual cortex that can serve as a useful quantitative probe for research conducted at multiple centers and for the long-term observation of the clinical effects of neuro-opthalmological diseases. PMID:24278137

  6. Design of a loop resonator with a split-ring-resonator (SRR) for a human-body coil in 3 T MRI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Hyeok Woo; Cho, Young Ki; Kim, Byung Mun; Back, Hyun Man; Yoo, Hyoungsuk

    2016-04-01

    A new radio-frequency (RF) resonator for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) imaging at clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems is proposed in this paper. An approach based on the effects of the properties of metamaterials in split-ring resonators (SRRs) is used to design a new loop resonator with a SRR for NMR imaging. This loop resonator with a SRR is designed for NMR imaging at 3 T MRI systems. The 3D electromagnetic simulation was used to optimize the design of the proposed RF resonator and analyze it's performance at 3 T MRI systems. The proposed RF resonator provides strong penetrating magnetic fields at the center of the human phantom model, approximately 10%, as compared to the traditional loop-type RF resonator used for NMR imaging at clinical MRI systems. We also designed an 8-channel body coil for human-body NMR imaging by using the proposed loop resonator with a SRR. This body coil also produces more homogeneous and highly penetrating magnetic fields into the human phantom model.

  7. Significance of Additional Non-Mass Enhancement in Patients with Breast Cancer on Preoperative 3T Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yun Hee; Cho, Kyu Ran; Park, Eun Kyung; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Cho, Sung Bum; Bae, Jeoung Won

    2016-01-01

    Background In preoperative assessment of breast cancer, MRI has been shown to identify more additional breast lesions than are detectable using conventional imaging techniques. The characterization of additional lesions is more important than detection for optimal surgical treatment. Additional breast lesions can be included in focus, mass, and non-mass enhancement (NME) on MRI. According to the fifth edition of the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS®), which includes several changes in the NME descriptors, few studies to date have evaluated NME in preoperative assessment of breast cancer. Objectives We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of BI-RADS descriptors in predicting malignancy for additional NME lesions detected on preoperative 3T dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Patients and Methods Between January 2008 and December 2012, 88 patients were enrolled in our study, all with NME lesions other than the index cancer on preoperative 3T DCE-MRI and all with accompanying histopathologic examination. The MRI findings were analyzed according to the BI-RADS MRI lexicon. We evaluated the size, distribution, internal enhancement pattern, and location of NME lesions relative to the index cancer (i.e., same quadrant, different quadrant, or contralateral breast). Results On histopathologic analysis of the 88 NME lesions, 73 (83%) were malignant and 15 (17%) were benign. Lesion size did not differ significantly between malignant and benign lesions (P = 0.410). Malignancy was more frequent in linear (P = 0.005) and segmental (P = 0.011) distributions, and benignancy was more frequent in focal (P = 0.004) and regional (P < 0.001) NME lesions. The highest positive predictive value (PPV) for malignancy occurred in segmental (96.8%), linear (95.1%), clustered ring (100%), and clumped (92.0%) enhancement. Asymmetry demonstrated a high positive predictive value of 85.9%. The frequency of malignancy was higher

  8. Development and preliminary evaluation of an ultrasonic motor actuated needle guide for 3T MRI-guided transperineal prostate interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sang-Eun; Tokuda, Junichi; Tuncali, Kemal; Tempany, Clare; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Image guided prostate interventions have been accelerated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and robotic technologies in the past few years. However, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided procedure still remains as vast majority in clinical practice due to engineering and clinical complexity of the MRI-guided robotic interventions. Subsequently, great advantages and increasing availability of MRI have not been utilized at its maximum capacity in clinic. To benefit patients from the advantages of MRI, we developed an MRI-compatible motorized needle guide device "Smart Template" that resembles a conventional prostate template to perform MRI-guided prostate interventions with minimal changes in the clinical procedure. The requirements and specifications of the Smart Template were identified from our latest MRI-guided intervention system that has been clinically used in manual mode for prostate biopsy. Smart Template consists of vertical and horizontal crossbars that are driven by two ultrasonic motors via timing-belt and mitergear transmissions. Navigation software that controls the crossbar position to provide needle insertion positions was also developed. The software can be operated independently or interactively with an open-source navigation software, 3D Slicer, that has been developed for prostate intervention. As preliminary evaluation, MRI distortion and SNR test were conducted. Significant MRI distortion was found close to the threaded brass alloy components of the template. However, the affected volume was limited outside the clinical region of interest. SNR values over routine MRI scan sequences for prostate biopsy indicated insignificant image degradation during the presence of the robotic system and actuation of the ultrasonic motors.

  9. Quantitative planar and volumetric cardiac measurements using 64 MDCT and 3T MRI versus standard 2D and M-mode echocardiography: Does anesthetic protocol matter?

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Randi; Johnson, Rebecca A; Stepien, Rebecca L; Rio, Alejandro Munoz Del; Saunders, Jimmy H; François, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional imaging of the heart utilizing computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be superior for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and systolic function in humans compared to echocardiography. The purpose of this prospective study was to test the effects of two different anesthetic protocols on cardiac measurements in 10 healthy beagle dogs using 64-multidetector row computed tomographic angiography (64-MDCTA), 3T magnetic resonance (MRI) and standard awake echocardiography. Both anesthetic protocols used propofol for induction and isoflourane for anesthetic maintenance. In addition, protocol A used midazolam/fentanyl and protocol B used dexmedetomedine as premedication and constant rate infusion during the procedure. Significant elevations in systolic and mean blood pressure were present when using protocol B. There was overall good agreement between the variables of cardiac size and systolic function generated from the MDCTA and MRI exams and no significant difference was found when comparing the variables acquired using either anesthetic protocol within each modality. Systolic function variables generated using 64-MDCTA and 3T MRI were only able to predict the left ventricular end diastolic volume as measured during awake echocardiogram when using protocol B and 64-MDCTA. For all other systolic function variables, prediction of awake echocardiographic results was not possible (P = 1). Planar variables acquired using MDCTA or MRI did not allow prediction of the corresponding measurements generated using echocardiography in the awake patients (P=1). Future studies are needed to validate this approach in a more varied population and clinically affected dogs. PMID:26082285

  10. QUANTITATIVE PLANAR AND VOLUMETRIC CARDIAC MEASUREMENTS USING 64 MDCT AND 3T MRI VS. STANDARD 2D AND M-MODE ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY: DOES ANESTHETIC PROTOCOL MATTER?

    PubMed

    Drees, Randi; Johnson, Rebecca A; Stepien, Rebecca L; Munoz Del Rio, Alejandro; Saunders, Jimmy H; François, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sectional imaging of the heart utilizing computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be superior for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and systolic function in humans compared to echocardiography. The purpose of this prospective study was to test the effects of two different anesthetic protocols on cardiac measurements in 10 healthy beagle dogs using 64-multidetector row computed tomographic angiography (64-MDCTA), 3T magnetic resonance (MRI) and standard awake echocardiography. Both anesthetic protocols used propofol for induction and isoflourane for anesthetic maintenance. In addition, protocol A used midazolam/fentanyl and protocol B used dexmedetomedine as premedication and constant rate infusion during the procedure. Significant elevations in systolic and mean blood pressure were present when using protocol B. There was overall good agreement between the variables of cardiac size and systolic function generated from the MDCTA and MRI exams and no significant difference was found when comparing the variables acquired using either anesthetic protocol within each modality. Systolic function variables generated using 64-MDCTA and 3T MRI were only able to predict the left ventricular end diastolic volume as measured during awake echocardiogram when using protocol B and 64-MDCTA. For all other systolic function variables, prediction of awake echocardiographic results was not possible (P = 1). Planar variables acquired using MDCTA or MRI did not allow prediction of the corresponding measurements generated using echocardiography in the awake patients (P = 1). Future studies are needed to validate this approach in a more varied population and clinically affected dogs. PMID:26082285

  11. T2-Weighted Liver MRI Using the MultiVane Technique at 3T: Comparison with Conventional T2-Weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyung A; Kim, EunJu; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Choi, Dongil; Lee, Won Jae; Jung, Sin-Ho; Baek, Sun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the value of applying MultiVane to liver T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) compared with conventional T2WIs with emphasis on detection of focal liver lesions. Materials and Methods Seventy-eight patients (43 men and 35 women) with 86 hepatic lesions and 20 pancreatico-biliary diseases underwent MRI including T2WIs acquired using breath-hold (BH), respiratory-triggered (RT), and MultiVane technique at 3T. Two reviewers evaluated each T2WI with respect to artefacts, organ sharpness, and conspicuity of intrahepatic vessels, hilar duct, and main lesion using five-point scales, and made pairwise comparisons between T2WI sequences for these categories. Diagnostic accuracy (Az) and sensitivity for hepatic lesion detection were evaluated using alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results MultiVane T2WI was significantly better than BH-T2WI or RT-T2WI for organ sharpness and conspicuity of intrahepatic vessels and main lesion in both separate reviews and pairwise comparisons (p < 0.001). With regard to motion artefacts, MultiVane T2WI or BH-T2WI was better than RT-T2WI (p < 0.001). Conspicuity of hilar duct was better with BH-T2WI than with MultiVane T2WI (p = 0.030) or RT-T2WI (p < 0.001). For detection of 86 hepatic lesions, sensitivity (mean, 97.7%) of MultiVane T2WI was significantly higher than that of BH-T2WI (mean, 89.5%) (p = 0.008) or RT-T2WI (mean, 84.9%) (p = 0.001). Conclusion Applying the MultiVane technique to T2WI of the liver is a promising approach to improving image quality that results in increased detection of focal liver lesions compared with conventional T2WI. PMID:26357498

  12. Quantitative PET imaging with the 3T MR-BrainPET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, C.; Scheins, J.; Lohmann, P.; Tellmann, L.; Byars, L.; Michel, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Brenner, D.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N. J.

    2013-02-01

    The new hybrid imaging technology of MR-PET allows for simultaneous acquisition of versatile MRI contrasts and the quantitative metabolic imaging with PET. In order to achieve the quantification of PET images with minimal residual error the application of several corrections is crucial. In this work we present our results on quantification with the 3T MR BrainPET scanner.

  13. Development of 1.45-mm resolution four-layer DOI-PET detector for simultaneous measurement in 3T MRI.

    PubMed

    Nishikido, Fumihiko; Tachibana, Atsushi; Obata, Takayuki; Inadama, Naoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Suga, Mikio; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2015-01-01

    Recently, various types of PET-MRI systems have been developed by a number of research groups. However, almost all of the PET detectors used in these PET-MRI systems have no depth-of-interaction (DOI) capability. The DOI detector can reduce the parallax error and lead to improvement of the performance. We are developing a new PET-MRI system which consists of four-layer DOI detectors positioned close to the measured object to achieve high spatial resolution and high scanner sensitivity. As a first step, we are investigating influences the PET detector and the MRI system have on each other using a prototype four-layer DOI-PET detector. This prototype detector consists of a lutetium yttrium orthosilicate crystal block and a 4 × 4 multi-pixel photon counter array. The size of each crystal element is 1.45 mm × 1.45 mm × 4.5 mm, and the crystals are arranged in 6 × 6 elements × 4 layers with reflectors. The detector and some electric components are packaged in an aluminum shielding box. Experiments were carried out with 3.0 T MRI (GE, Signa HDx) and a birdcage-type RF coil. We demonstrated that the DOI-PET detector was normally operated in simultaneous measurements with no influence of the MRI measurement. A slight influence of the PET detector on the static magnetic field of the MRI was observed near the PET detector. The signal-to-noise ratio was decreased by presence of the PET detector due to environmental noise entering the MRI room through the cables, even though the PET detector was not powered up. On the other hand, no influence of electric noise from the PET detector in the simultaneous measurement on the MRI images was observed, even though the PET detector was positioned near the RF coil. PMID:25348721

  14. Visceral pain perception in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy volunteers is affected by the MRI scanner environment

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Reuben K; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Li, Xinhua; Cao, Yang; Ho, Khek Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background The MRI scanner environment induces marked psychological effects, but specific effects on pain perception and processing are unknown and relevant to all brain imaging studies. Objectives and methods We performed visceral and somatic quantitative sensory and pain testing and studied endogenous pain modulation by heterotopic stimulation outside and inside the functional MRI scanner in 11 healthy controls and 13 patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Results Rectal pain intensity (VAS 0–100) during identical distension pressures increased from 39 (95% confidence interval: 35–42) outside the scanner to 53 (43–63) inside the scanner in irritable bowel syndrome, and from 42 (31–52) to 49 (39–58), respectively, in controls (ANOVA for scanner effect: p = 0.006, group effect: p = 0.92). The difference in rectal pain outside versus inside correlated significantly with stress (r = −0.76, p = 0.006), anxiety (r = −0.68, p = 0.02) and depression scores (r = −0.67, p = 0.02) in controls, but not in irritable bowel syndrome patients, who a priori had significantly higher stress and anxiety scores. ANOVA analysis showed trends for effect of the scanner environment and subject group on endogenous pain modulation (p = 0.09 and p = 0.1, respectively), but not on somatic pain (p > 0.3). Conclusion The scanner environment significantly increased visceral, but not somatic, pain perception in irritable bowel syndrome patients and healthy controls in a protocol specifically aimed at investigating visceral pain. Psychological factors, including anxiety and stress, are the likely underlying causes, whereas classic endogenous pain modulation pathways activated by heterotopic stimulation play a lesser role. These results are highly relevant to a wide range of imaging applications and need to be taken into account in future pain research. Further controlled studies are indicated to clarify these findings. PMID:26966533

  15. Force and torque effects of a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner on cardiac pacemakers and ICDs.

    PubMed

    Luechinger, R; Duru, F; Scheidegger, M B; Boesiger, P; Candinas, R

    2001-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely accepted tool for the diagnosis of a variety of disease states. However, the presence of an implanted pacemaker is considered to be a strict contraindication to MRI in a vast majority of centers due to safety concerns. In phantom studies, the authors investigated the force and torque effects of the static magnetic field of MRI on pacemakers and ICDs. Thirty-one pacemakers (15 dual chamber and 16 single chamber units) from eight manufacturers and 13 ICDs from four manufacturers were exposed to the static magnetic field of a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner. Magnetic force and acceleration measurements were obtained quantitatively, and torque measurements were made qualitatively. For pacemakers, the measured magnetic force was in the range of 0.05-3.60 N. Pacemakers released after 1995 had low magnetic force values as compared to the older devices. For these devices, the measured acceleration was even lower than the gravity of the earth (< 9.81 N/kg). Likewise, the torque levels were significantly reduced in newer generation pacemakers (< or = 2 from a scale of 6). ICD devices, except for one recent model, showed higher force (1.03-5.85 N), acceleration 9.5-34.2 N/kg), and torque (5-6 out of 6) levels. In conclusion, modern pacemakers present no safety risk with respect to magnetic force and torque induced by the static magnetic field of a 1.5-Tesla MRI scanner. However, ICD devices, despite considerable reduction in size and weight, may still pose problems due to strong magnetic force and torque. PMID:11270700

  16. Signal-to-noise ratio increase in carotid atheroma MRI: a comparison of 1.5 and 3 T

    PubMed Central

    Young, V E; Patterson, A J; Tunnicliffe, E M; Sadat, U; Graves, M J; Tang, T Y; Priest, A N; Kirkpatrick, P J; Gillard, J H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study reports quantitative comparisons of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 1.5 and 3 T from images of carotid atheroma obtained using a multicontrast, cardiac-gated, blood-suppressed fast spin echo protocol. Methods 18 subjects, with carotid atherosclerosis (>30% stenosis) confirmed on ultrasound, were imaged on both 1.5 and 3 T systems using phased-array coils with matched hardware specifications. T1 weighted (T1W), T2 weighted (T2W) and proton density-weighted (PDW) images were acquired with identical scan times. Multiple slices were prescribed to encompass both the carotid bifurcation and the plaque. Image quality was quantified using the SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). A phantom experiment was also performed to validate the SNR method and confirm the size of the improvement in SNR. Comparisons of the SNR values from the vessel wall with muscle and plaque/lumen CNR measurements were performed at a patient level. To account for the multiple comparisons a Bonferroni correction was applied. Results One subject was excluded from the protocol owing to image quality and protocol failure. The mean improvement in SNR in plaque was 1.9, 2.1 and 2.1 in T1W, T2W and PDW images, respectively. All plaque SNR improvements were statistically significant at the p<0.05 level. The phantom experiment reported an improvement in SNR of 2.4 for PDW images. Conclusions Significant gains in SNR can be obtained for carotid atheroma imaging at 3 T compared with 1.5 T. There was also a trend towards increased CNR. However, this was not significant after the application of the Bonferroni correction. PMID:22294703

  17. Evoked Potentials and Memory/Cognition Tests Validate Brain Atrophy as Measured by 3T MRI (NeuroQuant) in Cognitively Impaired Patients.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Eric R; Blum, Kenneth; Hussman, Karl L; Han, David; Dushaj, Kristina; Li, Mona; Marin, Gabriela; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Smayda, Richard; Gold, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, this is the largest study evaluating relationships between 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and P300 and memory/cognitive tests in the literature. The 3T MRI using NeuroQuant has an increased resolution 15 times that of 1.5T MRI. Utilizing NeuroQuant 3T MRI as a diagnostic tool in primary care, subjects (N=169; 19-90 years) displayed increased areas of anatomical atrophy: 34.62% hippocampal atrophy (N=54), 57.14% central atrophy (N=88), and 44.52% temporal atrophy (N=69). A majority of these patients exhibited overlap in measured areas of atrophy and were cognitively impaired. These results positively correlated with decreased P300 values and WMS-III (WMS-III) scores differentially across various brain loci. Delayed latency (p=0.0740) was marginally associated with temporal atrophy; reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in frontal lobes correlated with aging, delayed P300 latency, and decreased visual and working memory (p=0.0115). Aging and delayed P300 latency correlated with lower FA. The correlation between working memory and reduced FA in frontal lobes is marginally significant (p=0.0787). In the centrum semiovale (CS), reduced FA correlated with visual memory (p=0.0622). Lower demyelination correlated with higher P300 amplitude (p=0.0002). Compared to males, females have higher demyelination (p=0.0064). Along these lines, the higher the P300 amplitude, the lower the bilateral atrophy (p=0.0165). Hippocampal atrophy correlated with increased auditory memory and gender, especially in males (p=0.0087). In considering temporal lobe atrophy correlations: delayed P300 latency and high temporal atrophy (p=0.0740); high auditory memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0417); and high working memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0166). Central atrophy correlated with aging and immediate memory (p=0.0294): the higher the immediate memory, the lower the central atrophy. Generally, the validation of brain atrophy by P300 and WMS-III could lead to cost

  18. Evoked Potentials and Memory/Cognition Tests Validate Brain Atrophy as Measured by 3T MRI (NeuroQuant) in Cognitively Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Braverman, Eric R.; Blum, Kenneth; Hussman, Karl L.; Han, David; Dushaj, Kristina; Li, Mona; Marin, Gabriela; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D.; Smayda, Richard; Gold, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, this is the largest study evaluating relationships between 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and P300 and memory/cognitive tests in the literature. The 3T MRI using NeuroQuant has an increased resolution 15 times that of 1.5T MRI. Utilizing NeuroQuant 3T MRI as a diagnostic tool in primary care, subjects (N=169; 19–90 years) displayed increased areas of anatomical atrophy: 34.62% hippocampal atrophy (N=54), 57.14% central atrophy (N=88), and 44.52% temporal atrophy (N=69). A majority of these patients exhibited overlap in measured areas of atrophy and were cognitively impaired. These results positively correlated with decreased P300 values and WMS-III (WMS-III) scores differentially across various brain loci. Delayed latency (p=0.0740) was marginally associated with temporal atrophy; reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in frontal lobes correlated with aging, delayed P300 latency, and decreased visual and working memory (p=0.0115). Aging and delayed P300 latency correlated with lower FA. The correlation between working memory and reduced FA in frontal lobes is marginally significant (p=0.0787). In the centrum semiovale (CS), reduced FA correlated with visual memory (p=0.0622). Lower demyelination correlated with higher P300 amplitude (p=0.0002). Compared to males, females have higher demyelination (p=0.0064). Along these lines, the higher the P300 amplitude, the lower the bilateral atrophy (p=0.0165). Hippocampal atrophy correlated with increased auditory memory and gender, especially in males (p=0.0087). In considering temporal lobe atrophy correlations: delayed P300 latency and high temporal atrophy (p=0.0740); high auditory memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0417); and high working memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0166). Central atrophy correlated with aging and immediate memory (p=0.0294): the higher the immediate memory, the lower the central atrophy. Generally, the validation of brain atrophy by P300 and WMS-III could lead to cost

  19. Whole body sodium MRI at 3T using an asymmetric birdcage resonator and short echo time sequence: first images of a male volunteer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Corteville, Dominique M.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Rennings, Andreas; Konstandin, Simon; Nagel, Armin M.; Stark, Helmut; Schad, Lothar R.

    2012-07-01

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (23Na MRI) is a non-invasive technique which allows spatial resolution of the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the human body. TSC measurements could potentially serve to monitor early treatment success of chemotherapy on patients who suffer from whole body metastases. Yet, the acquisition of whole body sodium (23Na) images has been hampered so far by the lack of large resonators and the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved with existing resonator systems. In this study, a 23Na resonator was constructed for whole body 23Na MRI at 3T comprising of a 16-leg, asymmetrical birdcage structure with 34 cm height, 47.5 cm width and 50 cm length. The resonator was driven in quadrature mode and could be used either as a transceiver resonator or, since active decoupling was included, as a transmit-only resonator in conjunction with a receive-only (RO) surface resonator. The relative B1-field profile was simulated and measured on phantoms, and 3D whole body 23Na MRI data of a healthy male volunteer were acquired in five segments with a nominal isotropic resolution of (6 × 6 × 6) mm3 and a 10 min acquisition time per scan. The measured SNR values in the 23Na-MR images varied from 9 ± 2 in calf muscle, 15 ± 2 in brain tissue, 23 ± 2 in the prostate and up to 42 ± 5 in the vertebral discs. Arms, legs, knees and hands could also be resolved with applied resonator and short time-to-echo (TE) (0.5 ms) radial sequence. Up to fivefold SNR improvement was achieved through combining the birdcage with local RO surface coil. In conclusion, 23Na MRI of the entire human body provides sub-cm spatial resolution, which allows resolution of all major human body parts with a scan time of less than 60 min.

  20. Wavelet based characterization of ex vivo vertebral trabecular bone structure with 3T MRI compared to microCT

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, R; Carballido-Gamio, J; Burghardt, A; Haase, S; Sedat, J W; Moss, W C; Majumdar, S

    2005-04-11

    Trabecular bone structure and bone density contribute to the strength of bone and are important in the study of osteoporosis. Wavelets are a powerful tool to characterize and quantify texture in an image. In this study the thickness of trabecular bone was analyzed in 8 cylindrical cores of the vertebral spine. Images were obtained from 3 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and micro-computed tomography ({micro}CT). Results from the wavelet based analysis of trabecular bone were compared with standard two-dimensional structural parameters (analogous to bone histomorphometry) obtained using mean intercept length (MR images) and direct 3D distance transformation methods ({micro}CT images). Additionally, the bone volume fraction was determined from MR images. We conclude that the wavelet based analyses delivers comparable results to the established MR histomorphometric measurements. The average deviation in trabecular thickness was less than one pixel size between the wavelet and the standard approach for both MR and {micro}CT analysis. Since the wavelet based method is less sensitive to image noise, we see an advantage of wavelet analysis of trabecular bone for MR imaging when going to higher resolution.

  1. An investigation of the value of spin-echo-based fMRI using a Stroop color-word matching task and EPI at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Norris, David G; Zysset, Stefan; Mildner, Toralf; Wiggins, Christopher J

    2002-03-01

    This study examines the value of spin-echo-based fMRI for cognitive studies at the main magnetic field strength of 3 T using a spin-echo EPI (SE-EPI) sequence and a Stroop color-word matching task. SE-EPI has the potential advantage over conventional gradient-echo EPI (GE-EPI) that signal losses caused by dephasing through the slice are not present, and hence although image distortion will be the same as for an equivalent GE-EPI sequence, signal voids will be eliminated. The functional contrast in SE-EPI will be lower than for GE-EPI, as static dephasing effects do not contribute. As an auxiliary experiment interleaved diffusion-weighted and non-diffusion-weighted SE-EPI was performed in the visual cortex to further elucidate the mechanims of functional contrast. In the Stroop experiment activation was detected in all areas previously found using GE-EPI. Additional frontopolar and ventral frontomedian activations were also found, which could not be detected using GE-EPI. The experiments from visual cortex indicated that at 3 T the BOLD signal change has contributions from the extravascular space and larger blood vessels in roughly equal amounts. In comparison with GE-EPI the absence of static dephasing effects would seem to result in a superior intrinsic spatial resolution. In conclusion the sensitivity of SE-EPI at 3 T is sufficient to make it the method of choice for fMR studies that require a high degree of spatial localization or where the requirement is to detect activation in regions affected by strong susceptibility gradients. PMID:11848715

  2. A low-cost and versatile system for projecting wide-field visual stimuli within fMRI scanners.

    PubMed

    Greco, V; Frijia, F; Mikellidou, K; Montanaro, D; Farini, A; D'Uva, M; Poggi, P; Pucci, M; Sordini, A; Morrone, M C; Burr, D C

    2016-06-01

    We have constructed and tested a custom-made magnetic-imaging-compatible visual projection system designed to project on a very wide visual field (~80°). A standard projector was modified with a coupling lens, projecting images into the termination of an image fiber. The other termination of the fiber was placed in the 3-T scanner room with a projection lens, which projected the images relayed by the fiber onto a screen over the head coil, viewed by a participant wearing magnifying goggles. To validate the system, wide-field stimuli were presented in order to identify retinotopic visual areas. The results showed that this low-cost and versatile optical system may be a valuable tool to map visual areas in the brain that process peripheral receptive fields. PMID:26092392

  3. Abdominal adipose tissue quantification on water-suppressed and non-water-suppressed MRI at 3T using semi-automated FCM clustering algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valaparla, Sunil K.; Peng, Qi; Gao, Feng; Clarke, Geoffrey D.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate measurements of human body fat distribution are desirable because excessive body fat is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we hypothesized that the performance of water suppressed (WS) MRI is superior to non-water suppressed (NWS) MRI for volumetric assessment of abdominal subcutaneous (SAT), intramuscular (IMAT), visceral (VAT), and total (TAT) adipose tissues. We acquired T1-weighted images on a 3T MRI system (TIM Trio, Siemens), which was analyzed using semi-automated segmentation software that employs a fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering algorithm. Sixteen contiguous axial slices, centered at the L4-L5 level of the abdomen, were acquired in eight T2DM subjects with water suppression (WS) and without (NWS). Histograms from WS images show improved separation of non-fatty tissue pixels from fatty tissue pixels, compared to NWS images. Paired t-tests of WS versus NWS showed a statistically significant lower volume of lipid in the WS images for VAT (145.3 cc less, p=0.006) and IMAT (305 cc less, p<0.001), but not SAT (14.1 cc more, NS). WS measurements of TAT also resulted in lower fat volumes (436.1 cc less, p=0.002). There is strong correlation between WS and NWS quantification methods for SAT measurements (r=0.999), but poorer correlation for VAT studies (r=0.845). These results suggest that NWS pulse sequences may overestimate adipose tissue volumes and that WS pulse sequences are more desirable due to the higher contrast generated between fatty and non-fatty tissues.

  4. Tonotopic gradients in human primary auditory cortex: concurring evidence from high-resolution 7 T and 3 T fMRI.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Sandra; Saenz, Melissa; Clarke, Stephanie; van der Zwaag, Wietske

    2015-01-01

    The tonotopic representations within the primary auditory cortex (PAC) have been successfully mapped with ultra-high field fMRI. Here, we compared the reliability of this tonotopic mapping paradigm at 7 T with 1.5 mm spatial resolution with maps acquired at 3 T with the same stimulation paradigm, but with spatial resolutions of 1.8 and 2.4 mm. For all subjects, the mirror-symmetric gradients within PAC were highly similar at 7 T and 3 T and across renderings at different spatial resolutions; albeit with lower percent signal changes at 3 T. In contrast, the frequency maps outside PAC tended to suffer from a reduced BOLD contrast-to-noise ratio at 3 T for a 1.8 mm voxel size, while robust at 2.4 mm and at 1.5 mm at 7 T. Overall, our results showed the robustness of the phase-encoding paradigm used here to map tonotopic representations across scanners. PMID:25098273

  5. New shielding configurations for a simultaneous PET/MRI scanner at 7T.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo J; Wu, Yibao; Cherry, Simon R; Walton, Jeffrey H

    2014-02-01

    Understanding sources of electromagnetic interference are important in designing any electronic system. This is especially true when combining positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a multimodality system as coupling between the subsystems can degrade the performance of either modality. For this reason, eliminating radio frequency (RF) interference and gradient-induced eddy currents have been major challenges in building simultaneous hybrid PET/MRI systems. MRI requires negligible RF interference at the Larmor resonance frequency, while RF interference at almost any frequency may corrupt PET data. Moreover, any scheme that minimizes these interactions would, ideally, not compromise the performance of either subsystem. This paper lays out a plan to resolve these problems. A carbon fiber composite material is found to be a good RF shield at the Larmor frequency (300MHz in this work) while introducing negligible gradient eddy currents. This carbon fiber composite also provides excellent structural support for the PET detector components. Low frequency electromagnetic radiation (81kHz here) from the switching power supplies of the gradient amplifiers was also found to interfere with the PET detector. Placing the PET detector module between two carbon fiber tubes and grounding the inner carbon fiber tube to the PET detector module ground reduced this interference. Further reductions were achieved by adding thin copper (Cu) foil on the outer carbon fiber case and electrically grounding the PET detector module so that all 3 components had a common ground, i.e. with the PET detector in an electrostatic cage. Finally, gradient switching typical in MRI sequences can result in count losses in the particular PET detector design studied. Moreover, the magnitude of this effect depends on the location of the detector within the magnet bore and which MRI gradient is being switched. These findings have a bearing on future designs of PET/MRI

  6. New shielding configurations for a simultaneous PET/MRI scanner at 7T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bo J.; Wu, Yibao; Cherry, Simon R.; Walton, Jeffrey H.

    2014-02-01

    Understanding sources of electromagnetic interference are important in designing any electronic system. This is especially true when combining positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a multimodality system as coupling between the subsystems can degrade the performance of either modality. For this reason, eliminating radio frequency (RF) interference and gradient-induced eddy currents have been major challenges in building simultaneous hybrid PET/MRI systems. MRI requires negligible RF interference at the Larmor resonance frequency, while RF interference at almost any frequency may corrupt PET data. Moreover, any scheme that minimizes these interactions would, ideally, not compromise the performance of either subsystem. This paper lays out a plan to resolve these problems. A carbon fiber composite material is found to be a good RF shield at the Larmor frequency (300 MHz in this work) while introducing negligible gradient eddy currents. This carbon fiber composite also provides excellent structural support for the PET detector components. Low frequency electromagnetic radiation (81 kHz here) from the switching power supplies of the gradient amplifiers was also found to interfere with the PET detector. Placing the PET detector module between two carbon fiber tubes and grounding the inner carbon fiber tube to the PET detector module ground reduced this interference. Further reductions were achieved by adding thin copper (Cu) foil on the outer carbon fiber case and electrically grounding the PET detector module so that all 3 components had a common ground, i.e. with the PET detector in an electrostatic cage. Finally, gradient switching typical in MRI sequences can result in count losses in the particular PET detector design studied. Moreover, the magnitude of this effect depends on the location of the detector within the magnet bore and which MRI gradient is being switched. These findings have a bearing on future designs of PET/MRI

  7. Burns from ECG leads in an MRI scanner: Case series and discussion of mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rehim, S.; Bagirathan, S.; Al-Benna, S.; O’Boyle, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Iatrogenic burns are rare and preventable. The authors present two cases of burns from ECG leads, sustained during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Common features included a long duration spinal MR scan (120 and 60 minutes) and high patient body mass index (BMI >30). Both patients were discharged within 24 hours of admission, but required a period of outpatient burn care. The causation of these injuries remains unclear but there are several possible mechanisms including: electromagnetic induction heating, antenna effects and closed-loop current induction. The authors provide a description of the injuries, discuss possible mechanisms that may lead to burn injury in the MRI environment and suggest ways to reduce the risks of such injuries. PMID:26336370

  8. Assessment of cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns using the time-spatial labeling inversion pulse technique with 3T MRI: early clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kayoko; Ono, Yuko; Yoneyama, Hiroko; Nishina, Yu; Aihara, Yasuo; Okada, Yoshikazu; Sakai, Shuji

    2014-06-01

    CSF imaging using the time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (time-SLIP) technique at 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to assess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. The study population comprised 15 healthy volunteers and five patients with MR findings showing expansive dilation of the third and lateral ventricles suggesting aqueductal stenosis (AS). Signal intensity changes were evaluated in the tag-labeled CSF, untagged brain parenchyma, and untagged CSF of healthy volunteers by changing of black-blood time-inversion pulse (BBTI). CSF flow from the aqueduct to the third ventricle, the aqueduct to the fourth ventricle, and the foramen of Monro to the lateral ventricle was clearly rendered in all healthy volunteers with suitable BBTI. The travel distance of CSF flow as demonstrated by the time-SLIP technique was compared with the distance between the aqueduct and the fourth ventricle. The distance between the foramen of Monro and the lateral ventricle was used to calculate the CSF flow/distance ratio (CD ratio). The CD ratio at each level was significantly reduced in patients suspected to have AS compared to healthy volunteers. CSF flow was not identified at the aqueductal level in most of the patients. Two patients underwent time-SLIP assessments before and after endoscopic third ventriculostomies (ETVs). CSF flow at the ETV site was confirmed in each patient. With the time-SLIP technique, CSF imaging is sensitive enough to detect kinetic changes in CSF flow due to AS and ETV. PMID:24976193

  9. Development of a MPPC-based prototype gantry for future MRI-PET scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurei, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kato, T.; Fujita, T.; Ohshima, T.; Taya, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a high spatial resolution, compact Positron Emission Tomography (PET) module designed for small animals and intended for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. This module consists of large-area, 4 × 4 ch MPPC arrays (S11830-3344MF; Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.) optically coupled with Ce-doped (Lu,Y)2(SiO4)O (Ce:LYSO) scintillators fabricated into 16 × 16 matrices of 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 pixels. We set the temperature sensor (LM73CIMK-0; National Semiconductor Corp.) at the rear of the MPPC acceptance surface, and apply optimum voltage to maintain the gain. The eight MPPC-based PET modules and coincidence circuits were assembled into a gantry arranged in a ring 90 mm in diameter to form the MPPC-based PET system. We have developed two types PET gantry: one made of non-magnetic metal and the other made of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) resins. The PET gantry was positioned around the RF coil of the 4.7 T MRI system. We took an image of a point }22Na source under fast spin echo (FSE) and gradient echo (GE), in order to measure the interference between the MPPC-based PET and MRI. The spatial resolution of PET imaging in a transaxial plane of about 1 mm (FWHM) was achieved in all cases. Operating with PET made of ABS has no effect on MR images, while operating with PET made of non-magnetic metal has a significant detrimental effect on MR images. This paper describes our quantitative evaluations of PET images and MR images, and presents a more advanced version of the gantry for future MRI/DOI-PET systems.

  10. Magnetosomes, biogenic magnetic nanomaterials for brain molecular imaging with 17.2 T MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Mériaux, Sébastien; Boucher, Marianne; Marty, Benjamin; Lalatonne, Yoann; Prévéral, Sandra; Motte, Laurence; Lefèvre, Christopher T; Geffroy, Françoise; Lethimonnier, Franck; Péan, Michel; Garcia, Daniel; Adryanczyk-Perrier, Géraldine; Pignol, David; Ginet, Nicolas

    2015-05-01

    The fast development of sensitive molecular diagnostic tools is currently paving the way for a personalized medicine. A new class of ultrasensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T₂-contrast agents based on magnetosomes, magnetite nanocrystals biomineralized by magnetotactic bacteria, is proposed here. The contrast agents can be injected into the blood circulation and detected in the picomolar range. Purified magnetosomes are water-dispersible and stable within physiological conditions and exhibit at 17.2 T a transverse relaxivity r₂ four times higher than commercial ferumoxide. The subsequent gain in sensitivity by T₂(*) -weighted imaging at 17.2 T of the mouse brain vasculature is evidenced in vivo after tail vein injection of magnetosomes representing a low dose of iron (20 μmoliron kg(-1)), whereas no such phenomenon with the same dose of ferumoxide is observed. Preclinical studies of human pathologies in animal models will benefit from the combination of high magnetic field MRI with sensitive, low dose, easy-to-produce biocompatible contrast agents derived from bacterial magnetosomes. PMID:25676134

  11. Added value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared to mammography, ultrasound and 3-T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Seymer, A; Keinrath, P; Holzmannhofer, J; Pirich, C; Hergan, K; Meissnitzer, M W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively analyse the diagnostic value of semi-quantitative breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) in the work-up of suspicious breast lesions compared with that of mammography (MG), breast ultrasound and MRI of the breast. Methods: Within a 15-month period, 67 patients with 92 breast lesions rated as Category IV or V according to the breast imaging reporting and data system detected with MG and/or ultrasound were included into the study. After the injection of 740–1110 MBq of Technetium-99m (99mTc) SestaMIBI intravenously, scintigrams were obtained in two projections comparable to MG. The BSGI was analysed visually and semi-quantitatively by calculating a relative uptake factor (X). With the exception of two patients with cardiac pacemakers, all patients underwent 3-T breast MRI. Biopsy results were obtained as the reference standard in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values, accuracy and area under the curve were calculated for each modality. Results: Among the 92 lesions, 67 (72.8%) were malignant. 60 of the 67 cancers of any size were detected by BSGI with an overall sensitivity of 90%, only exceeded by ultrasound with a sensitivity of 99%. The sensitivity of BSGI for lesions <1 cm declined significantly to 60%. Overall specificity of ultrasound was only 20%. Specificity, accuracy and positive-predictive value were the highest for BSGI (56%, 80% and 85%, respectively). X was significantly higher for malignant lesions (mean, 4.27) and differed significantly between ductal types (mean, 4.53) and the other histopathological entities (mean, 3.12). Conclusion: Semi-quantitative BSGI with calculation of the relative uptake factor (X) can help to characterize breast lesions. BSGI negativity may obviate the need for biopsy of breast lesions >1 cm with low or intermediate prevalence for malignancy. Advances in knowledge: Compared with morphological imaging modalities, specificity, positive

  12. Subjects with Higher Physical Activity Levels Have More Severe Focal Knee lesions diagnosed with 3T MRI: Analysis of a Non Symptomatic Cohort of the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Stehling, Christoph; Lane, Nancy E.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Lynch, John; McCulloch, Charles E.; Link, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the prevalence of focal knee abnormalities using 3 Tesla (T) MR studies in relation to physical activity levels in asymptomatic, middle-aged subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Material and Methods We analyzed baseline data from 236 45–55 years old individuals (136 women, 100 men) without knee pain (based on WOMAC scores) and a BMI of 19–27 kg/m2. Physical activity levels were determined in all subjects using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE). MRI at 3T was performed using coronal intermediate-weighted (IW) 2D fast spin-echo (FSE), sagittal 3D dual-echo in steady state (DESS) and 2D IW fat-suppressed (fs) FSE sequences of the right knee. All images were analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists identifying and grading cartilage, meniscal, ligamentous and other knee abnormalities using the WORMS MRI OA scoring method. Statistical significances between subjects with different activity levels were determined using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square tests and a multivariate regression model adjusted for gender, age, BMI, KL-Score and OA risk factors. Results Meniscal lesions were found in 47% of the 236 subjects, cartilage lesions in 74.6%, bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) in 40.3% and ligament lesions in 17%. Stratification of subjects by physical activity resulted in an increasing incidence of cartilage, meniscus and ligament abnormalities, BMEP and joint effusion according to activity levels (PASE). The severity grade of cartilage lesions was also associated with PASE levels and presence of other knee abnormalities was also significantly associated with cartilage defects. Conclusion Asymptomatic middle-aged individuals from the OAI incidence cohort had a high prevalence of knee abnormalities; more physically active individuals had significantly more and more severe knee abnormalities independently of gender, age, BMI, KL-Score and OA risk factors. This data therefore also suggests that subjects

  13. MRI scanner variability studies using a semi-automated analysis system.

    PubMed

    Hyde, R J; Ellis, J H; Gardner, E A; Zhang, Y; Carson, P L

    1994-01-01

    Due to the unique design of the Parallel Rod Test Object (PRoTO) and the associated semi-automated analysis program, it was necessary to test it extensively for precision and accuracy, and preliminarily for utility, before its distribution for wider use in MRI system quality control (QC). The test object and analysis program measured the desired quantities reproducibly and they accurately measured predicted changes from intentionally adjusted imaging system parameters, yielding sensitivity of the various test measures to deviation in the system operating parameters. From a single scan of the most recent revision of the test object, multiple quantitative quality control measures were obtained throughout the scanning volume on two MR imaging systems over periods of six and twelve months, respectively. From these and earlier trials, an initial indication was obtained of which performance measures are worth monitoring for QC. This experience suggests that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and distortion (including display scale) should be monitored but not necessarily the resolution. The latter was only found to alter at the same time or later than other parameters such as SNR had changed. Slice thickness was found to vary on some units and this measure was also used in normalizing the SNR by voxel volume. SNR, distortion, and resolution measurements using field-echo sequences were less stable than those using spin-echo sequences. Use of this QC program to test a wide variety of image quality measures allowed timely assessment of the long-term variability of the units tested. Long-term variability may become among the most important measures for comparison of system performance and maintenance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7997096

  14. A job interview in the MRI scanner: How does indirectness affect addressees and overhearers?

    PubMed

    Bašnáková, Jana; van Berkum, Jos; Weber, Kirsten; Hagoort, Peter

    2015-09-01

    In using language, people not only exchange information, but also navigate their social world - for example, they can express themselves indirectly to avoid losing face. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated the neural correlates of interpreting face-saving indirect replies, in a situation where participants only overheard the replies as part of a conversation between two other people, as well as in a situation where the participants were directly addressed themselves. We created a fictional job interview context where indirect replies serve as a natural communicative strategy to attenuate one's shortcomings, and asked fMRI participants to either pose scripted questions and receive answers from three putative job candidates (addressee condition) or to listen to someone else interview the same candidates (overhearer condition). In both cases, the need to evaluate the candidate ensured that participants had an active interest in comprehending the replies. Relative to direct replies, face-saving indirect replies increased activation in medial prefrontal cortex, bilateral temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), bilateral inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral middle temporal gyrus, in active overhearers and active addressees alike, with similar effect size, and comparable to findings obtained in an earlier passive listening study (Bašnáková et al., 2014). In contrast, indirectness effects in bilateral anterior insula and pregenual ACC, two regions implicated in emotional salience and empathy, were reliably stronger in addressees than in active overhearers. Our findings indicate that understanding face-saving indirect language requires additional cognitive perspective-taking and other discourse-relevant cognitive processing, to a comparable extent in active overhearers and addressees. Furthermore, they indicate that face-saving indirect language draws upon affective systems more in addressees than in overhearers, presumably because the addressee

  15. Measurement of the weighted peak level for occupational exposure to gradient magnetic fields for 1.5 and 3 Tesla MRI body scanners.

    PubMed

    Bonutti, F; Tecchio, M; Maieron, M; Trevisan, D; Negro, C; Calligaris, F

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to give a contribution to the construction of a comprehensive knowledge of the exposure levels to gradient magnetic fields (GMF) in terms of the weighed peak (WP), especially for 3 Tesla scanners for which there are still few works available in the literature. A new generation probe for the measurement of electromagnetic fields in the range of 1 Hz-400 kHz was used to assess the occupational exposure levels to the GMF for 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI body scanners, using the method of the WP according to the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) approach. The probe was placed at a height of 1.1 m, close to the MRI scanners, where operators could stay during some medical procedures with particular issues. The measurements were performed for a set of typical acquisition sequences for body (liver) and head exams. The measured values of WP were in compliance with ICNIRP 2010 reference levels for occupational exposures. PMID:25987585

  16. Role of 3T multiparametric-MRI with BOLD hypoxia imaging for diagnosis and post therapy response evaluation of postoperative recurrent cervical cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Abhishek; Engineer, Reena; Chopra, Supriya; Mahanshetty, Umesh; Juvekar, S.L.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Desekar, Naresh; Thakur, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the diagnostic value of multiparametric-MRI (MPMRI) with hypoxia imaging as a functional marker for characterizing and detecting vaginal vault/local recurrence following primary surgery for cervical cancer. Methods With institutional review board approval and written informed consent 30 women (median age: 45 years) from October 2009 to March 2010 with previous operated carcinoma cervix and suspected clinical vaginal vault/local recurrence were examined with 3.0T-MRI. MRI imaging included conventional and MPMRI sequences [dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE), diffusion weighted (DW), 1H-MR spectroscopy (1HMRS), blood oxygen level dependent hypoxia imaging (BOLD)]. Two radiologists, blinded to pathologic findings, independently assessed the pretherapy MRI findings and then correlated it with histopathology findings. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and their confidence intervals were calculated. The pre and post therapy conventional and MPMRI parameters were analyzed and correlated with response to therapy. Results Of the 30 patients, there were 24 recurrent tumors and 6 benign lesions. The accuracy of diagnosing recurrent vault lesions was highest at combined MPMRI and conventional MRI (100%) than at conventional-MRI (70%) or MPMRI (96.7%) alone. Significant correlation was seen between percentage tumor regression and pre-treatment parameters such as negative enhancement integral (NEI) (p = 0.02), the maximum slope (p = 0.04), mADC value (p = 0.001) and amount of hypoxic fraction on the pretherapy MRI (p = 0.01). Conclusion Conventional-MR with MPMRI significantly increases the diagnostic accuracy for suspected vaginal vault/local recurrence. Post therapy serial MPMRI with hypoxia imaging follow-up objectively documents the response. MPMRI and BOLD hypoxia imaging provide information regarding tumor biology at the molecular, subcellular, cellular and tissue levels and this information may be used

  17. Significant Artifact Reduction at 1.5T and 3T MRI by the Use of a Cochlear Implant with Removable Magnet: An Experimental Human Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Franca; Wimmer, Wilhelm; Leidolt, Lars; Vischer, Mattheus; Weder, Stefan; Wiest, Roland; Mantokoudis, Georgios; Caversaccio, Marco D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cochlear implants (CIs) are standard treatment for postlingually deafened individuals and prelingually deafened children. This human cadaver study evaluated diagnostic usefulness, image quality and artifacts in 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance (MR) brain scans after CI with a removable magnet. Methods Three criteria (diagnostic usefulness, image quality, artifacts) were assessed at 1.5T and 3T in five cadaver heads with CI. The brain magnetic resonance scans were performed with and without the magnet in situ. The criteria were analyzed by two blinded neuroradiologists, with focus on image distortion and limitation of the diagnostic value of the acquired MR images. Results MR images with the magnet in situ were all compromised by artifacts caused by the CI. After removal of the magnet, MR scans showed an unequivocal artifact reduction with significant improvement of the image quality and diagnostic usefulness, both at 1.5T and 3T. Visibility of the brain stem, cerebellopontine angle, and parieto-occipital lobe ipsilateral to the CI increased significantly after magnet removal. Conclusions The results indicate the possible advantages for 1.5T and 3T MR scanning of the brain in CI carriers with removable magnets. Our findings support use of CIs with removable magnets, especially in patients with chronic intracranial pathologies. PMID:26200775

  18. Quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis of prostate cancer DCE-MRI at 3T: comparison of two arterial input functions on cancer detection with digitized whole mount histopathological validation.

    PubMed

    Fennessy, Fiona M; Fedorov, Andriy; Penzkofer, Tobias; Kim, Kyung Won; Hirsch, Michelle S; Vangel, Mark G; Masry, Paul; Flood, Trevor A; Chang, Ming-Ching; Tempany, Clare M; Mulkern, Robert V; Gupta, Sandeep N

    2015-09-01

    Accurate pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in prostate cancer (PCa) requires knowledge of the concentration time course of the contrast agent in the feeding vasculature, the so-called arterial input function (AIF). The purpose of this study was to compare AIF choice in differentiating peripheral zone PCa from non-neoplastic prostatic tissue (NNPT), using PK analysis of high temporal resolution prostate DCE-MRI data and whole-mount pathology (WMP) validation. This prospective study was performed in 30 patients who underwent multiparametric endorectal prostate MRI at 3.0T and WMP validation. PCa foci were annotated on WMP slides and MR images using 3D Slicer. Foci ≥0.5cm(3) were contoured as tumor regions of interest (TROIs) on subtraction DCE (early-arterial - pre-contrast) images. PK analyses of TROI and NNPT data were performed using automatic AIF (aAIF) and model AIF (mAIF) methods. A paired t-test compared mean and 90th percentile (p90) PK parameters obtained with the two AIF approaches. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis determined diagnostic accuracy (DA) of PK parameters. Logistic regression determined correlation between PK parameters and histopathology. Mean TROI and NNPT PK parameters were higher using aAIF vs. mAIF (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in DA between AIF methods: highest for p90 volume transfer constant (K(trans)) (aAIF differences in the area under the ROC curve (Az) = 0.827; mAIF Az=0.93). Tumor cell density correlated with aAIF K(trans) (p=0.03). Our results indicate that DCE-MRI using both AIF methods is excellent in discriminating PCa from NNPT. If quantitative DCE-MRI is to be used as a biomarker in PCa, the same AIF method should be used consistently throughout the study. PMID:25683515

  19. The 'swallow tail' appearance of the healthy nigrosome - a new accurate test of Parkinson's disease: a case-control and retrospective cross-sectional MRI study at 3T.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefan T; Afzal, Mohammed; Morgan, Paul S; Bajaj, Nin; Gowland, Penny A; Auer, Dorothee P

    2014-01-01

    There is no well-established in vivo marker of nigral degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). An ideal imaging marker would directly mirror the loss of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurones, which is most prominent in sub-regions called nigrosomes. High-resolution, iron-sensitive, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7T allows direct nigrosome-1 visualisation in healthy people but not in PD. Here, we investigated the feasibility of nigrosome-1 detection using 3T - susceptibility-weighted (SWI) MRI and the diagnostic accuracy that can be achieved for diagnosing PD in a clinical population. 114 high-resolution 3T - SWI-scans were reviewed consisting of a prospective case-control study in 19 subjects (10 PD, 9 controls) and a retrospective cross-sectional study in 95 consecutive patients undergoing routine clinical SWI-scans (>50 years, 9 PD, 81 non-PD, 5 non-diagnostic studies excluded). Two raters independently classified subjects into PD and non-PD according to absence or presence of nigrosome-1, followed by consensus reading. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed against clinical diagnosis as gold standard. Absolute inter- and intra-rater agreement was ≥94% (kappa≥0.82, p<0.001). In the prospective study 8/9 control and 8/10 PD; and in the retrospective study 77/81 non-PD and all 9 PD subjects were correctly classified. Diagnostic accuracy of the retrospective cohort was: sensitivity 100%, specificity 95%, NPV 1, PPV 0.69 and accuracy 96% which dropped to 91% when including non-diagnostic scans ('intent to diagnose'). The healthy nigrosome-1 can be readily depicted on high-resolution 3T - SWI giving rise to a 'swallow tail' appearance of the dorsolateral substantia nigra, and this feature is lost in PD. Visual radiological assessment yielded a high diagnostic accuracy for PD vs. an unselected clinical control population. Assessing the substantia nigra on SWI for the typical 'swallow tail' appearance has potential to become a new and easy applicable 3T MRI

  20. The Use of the Lumbosacral Enlargement as an Intrinsic Imaging Biomarker: Feasibility of Grey Matter and White Matter Cross-Sectional Area Measurements Using MRI at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Yiannakas, Marios C.; Kakar, Puneet; Hoy, Luke R.; Miller, David H.; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Histopathological studies have demonstrated the involvement of spinal cord grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) in several diseases and recent research has suggested the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a promising tool for in vivo assessment of the upper spinal cord. However, many neurological conditions would benefit from quantitative assessment of tissue integrity at different levels and relatively little work has been done, mainly due to technical challenges associated with imaging the lower spinal cord. In this study, the value of the lumbosacral enlargement (LSE) as an intrinsic imaging biomarker was determined by exploring the feasibility of obtaining within it reliable GM and WM cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements by means of a commercially available MRI system at 3 tesla (T). 10 healthy volunteers (mean age 27.5 years, 6 female) gave written informed consent and high resolution images of the LSE were acquired and analysed using an optimised MRI acquisition and analysis protocol. GM and WM mean CSA measurements were obtained from a 15 mm section at the level of the LSE and the reproducibility of the measurements was determined by means of scan-rescan, intra- and inter-observer assessments. Mean (±SD) LSE cross-sectional area (LSE-CSA) was 62.3 (±4.1) mm2 and mean (±SD) LSE grey matter cross-sectional area (LSE-GM-CSA) was 19.8 (±3.3) mm2. The mean scan-rescan, intra- and inter-observer % coefficient of variation (COV) for measuring the LSE-CSA were 2%, 2% and 2.5%, respectively and for measuring the LSE-GM-CSA were 7.8%, 8% and 8.6%, respectively. This study has shown that the LSE can be used reliably as an intrinsic imaging biomarker. The method presented here can be potentially extended to study the LSE in the diseased state and could provide a solid foundation for subsequent multi-parametric MRI investigations. PMID:25170763

  1. A multichannel, real-time MRI RF power monitor for independent SAR determination

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate measurements of the RF power delivered during clinical MRI are essential for safety and regulatory compliance, avoiding inappropriate restrictions on clinical MRI sequences, and for testing the MRI safety of peripheral and interventional devices at known RF exposure levels. The goal is to make independent RF power measurements to test the accuracy of scanner-reported specific absorption rate (SAR) over the extraordinary range of operating conditions routinely encountered in MRI. Methods: A six channel, high dynamic range, real-time power profiling system was designed and built for monitoring power delivery during MRI up to 440 MHz. The system was calibrated and used in two 3 T scanners to measure power applied to human subjects during MRI scans. The results were compared with the scanner-reported SAR. Results: The new power measurement system has highly linear performance over a 90 dB dynamic range and a wide range of MRI duty cycles. It has about 0.1 dB insertion loss that does not interfere with scanner operation. The measurements of whole-body SAR in volunteers showed that scanner-reported SAR was significantly overestimated by up to about 2.2 fold. Conclusions: The new power monitor system can accurately and independently measure RF power deposition over the wide range of conditions routinely encountered during MRI. Scanner-reported SAR values are not appropriate for setting exposure limits during device or pulse sequence testing. PMID:22559603

  2. A multichannel, real-time MRI RF power monitor for independent SAR determination

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Qian Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate measurements of the RF power delivered during clinical MRI are essential for safety and regulatory compliance, avoiding inappropriate restrictions on clinical MRI sequences, and for testing the MRI safety of peripheral and interventional devices at known RF exposure levels. The goal is to make independent RF power measurements to test the accuracy of scanner-reported specific absorption rate (SAR) over the extraordinary range of operating conditions routinely encountered in MRI. Methods: A six channel, high dynamic range, real-time power profiling system was designed and built for monitoring power delivery during MRI up to 440 MHz. The system was calibrated and used in two 3 T scanners to measure power applied to human subjects during MRI scans. The results were compared with the scanner-reported SAR. Results: The new power measurement system has highly linear performance over a 90 dB dynamic range and a wide range of MRI duty cycles. It has about 0.1 dB insertion loss that does not interfere with scanner operation. The measurements of whole-body SAR in volunteers showed that scanner-reported SAR was significantly overestimated by up to about 2.2 fold. Conclusions: The new power monitor system can accurately and independently measure RF power deposition over the wide range of conditions routinely encountered during MRI. Scanner-reported SAR values are not appropriate for setting exposure limits during device or pulse sequence testing.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of a monolithic detector module for integrated PET/MRI scanner with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Gonzalez, A. J.; Bettiol, M.; Fabbri, A.; Cinti, M. N.; Preziosi, E.; Borrazzo, C.; Conde, P.; Pellegrini, R.; Di Castro, E.; Majewski, S.

    2015-06-01

    The proposal of Mindview European Project concerns with the development of a very high resolution and high efficiency brain dedicated PET scanner simultaneously working with a Magnetic Resonance scanner, that expects to visualize neurotransmitter pathways and their disruptions in the quest to better diagnose schizophrenia. On behalf of this project, we propose a low cost PET module for the first prototype, based on monolithic crystals, suitable to be integrated with a head Radio Frequency (RF) coil. The aim of the suggested module is to achieve high performances in terms of efficiency, planar spatial resolution (expected about 1 mm) and discrimination of gamma Depth Of Interaction (DOI) in order to reduce the parallax error. Our preliminary results are very promising: a DOI resolution of about 3 mm, a spatial resolution ranging from about 1 to 1.5 mm and a good position linearity.

  4. FUNCTIONAL AND ANATOMICAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CONTINENT AND INCONTINENT MEN POST RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY ON URODYNAMICS AND 3T MRI: A PILOT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Anne P.; Suskind, Anne M.; Neer, Charlene; Hussain, Hero; Montgomery, Jeffrey; Latini, Jerilyn M.; DeLancey, John O

    2014-01-01

    Aims There are competing hypotheses about the etiology of post prostatectomy incontinence (PPI).The purpose of this study was to determine the anatomical and functional differences between men with and without PPI. Methods Case control study of continent and incontinent men after radical prostatectomy who underwent functional and anatomic studies with urodynamics and 3.0 Tesla MRI. All men were at least 12 months post prostatectomy and none had a history of pelvic radiation or any prior surgery for incontinence. Results Baseline demographics, surgical approach and pathology were similar between incontinent (cases) (n=14) and continent (controls) (n=12) men. Among the cases, the average 24 hour pad weight was 400.0 ±176.9 grams with a mean of 2.4 ±0.7 pads per day. Urethral pressure profiles at rest did not significantly differ between groups; however with a Kegel maneuver the rise in urethral pressure was 2.6 fold higher in controls. On MRI, the urethral length was 31–35% shorter and the bladder neck was 28.9 degrees more funneled in cases. There were no differences in levator ani muscle size between groups. There was distortion of the sphincter area in 85.7% of cases and in 16.7% of controls (p=0.001). Conclusions Men with PPI were not able to increase urethral pressure with a Kegel maneuver despite similar resting urethral pressure profiles. Additionally, incontinent men had shorter urethras and were more likely to have distortion of the sphincter area. All suggesting that the sphincter in men with PPI is both diminutive and poorly functional. PMID:24752967

  5. An Approach for Preoperative Planning and Performance of MR-guided Interventions Demonstrated With a Manual Manipulator in a 1.5T MRI Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seimenis, Ioannis; Tsekos, Nikolaos V.; Keroglou, Christoforos; Eracleous, Eleni; Pitris, Constantinos; Christoforou, Eftychios G.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to develop and test a general methodology for the planning and performance of robot-assisted, MR-guided interventions. This methodology also includes the employment of software tools with appropriately tailored routines to effectively exploit the capabilities of MRI and address the relevant spatial limitations. Methods: The described methodology consists of: (1) patient-customized feasibility study that focuses on the geometric limitations imposed by the gantry, the robotic hardware, and interventional tools, as well as the patient; (2) stereotactic preoperative planning for initial positioning of the manipulator and alignment of its end-effector with a selected target; and (3) real-time, intraoperative tool tracking and monitoring of the actual intervention execution. Testing was performed inside a standard 1.5T MRI scanner in which the MR-compatible manipulator is deployed to provide the required access. Results: A volunteer imaging study demonstrates the application of the feasibility stage. A phantom study on needle targeting is also presented, demonstrating the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed preoperative and intraoperative stages of the methodology. For this purpose, a manually actuated, MR-compatible robotic manipulation system was used to accurately acquire a prescribed target through alternative approaching paths. Conclusions: The methodology presented and experimentally examined allows the effective performance of MR-guided interventions. It is suitable for, but not restricted to, needle-targeting applications assisted by a robotic manipulation system, which can be deployed inside a cylindrical scanner to provide the required access to the patient facilitating real-time guidance and monitoring.

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging for anatomical localization of cranial nerves and cranial nerve nuclei in pontine lesions: initial experiences with 3T-MRI.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Nils H; Ahmadli, Uzeyir; Woernle, Christoph M; Alzarhani, Yahea A; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Kollias, Spyros S

    2014-11-01

    With continuous refinement of neurosurgical techniques and higher resolution in neuroimaging, the management of pontine lesions is constantly improving. Among pontine structures with vital functions that are at risk of being damaged by surgical manipulation, cranial nerves (CN) and cranial nerve nuclei (CNN) such as CN V, VI, and VII are critical. Pre-operative localization of the intrapontine course of CN and CNN should be beneficial for surgical outcomes. Our objective was to accurately localize CN and CNN in patients with intra-axial lesions in the pons using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and estimate its input in surgical planning for avoiding unintended loss of their function during surgery. DTI of the pons obtained pre-operatively on a 3Tesla MR scanner was analyzed prospectively for the accurate localization of CN and CNN V, VI and VII in seven patients with intra-axial lesions in the pons. Anatomical sections in the pons were used to estimate abnormalities on color-coded fractional anisotropy maps. Imaging abnormalities were correlated with CN symptoms before and after surgery. The course of CN and the area of CNN were identified using DTI pre- and post-operatively. Clinical associations between post-operative improvements and the corresponding CN area of the pons were demonstrated. Our results suggest that pre- and post-operative DTI allows identification of key anatomical structures in the pons and enables estimation of their involvement by pathology. It may predict clinical outcome and help us to better understand the involvement of the intrinsic anatomy by pathological processes. PMID:24998855

  7. Amygdala reactivity to masked negative faces is associated with automatic judgmental bias in major depression: a 3 T fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Dannlowski, Udo; Ohrmann, Patricia; Bauer, Jochen; Kugel, Harald; Arolt, Volker; Heindel, Walter; Kersting, Anette; Baune, Bernhard T.; Suslow, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Objective In a previous study, we demonstrated that amygdala reactivity to masked negative facial emotions predicts negative judgmental bias in healthy subjects. In the present study, we extended the paradigm to a sample of 35 inpatients suffering from depression to investigate the effect of amygdala reactivity on automatic negative judgmental bias and clinical characteristics in depression. Methods Amygdala activity was recorded in response to masked displays of angry, sad and happy facial expressions by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T. In a subsequent experiment, the patients performed an affective priming task that characterizes automatic emotion processing by investigating the biasing effect of subliminally presented emotional faces on evaluative ratings to subsequently presented neutral stimuli. Results Significant associations between (right) amygdala reactivity and automatic negative judgmental bias were replicated in our patient sample (r = –0.59, p < 0.001). Further, negatively biased evaluative processing was associated with severity and longer course of illness (r = –0.57, p = 0.001). Conclusion Amygdala hyperactivity is a neural substrate of negatively biased automatic emotion processing that could be a determinant for a more severe disease course. PMID:18043766

  8. Optimisation of T₂*-weighted MRI for the detection of small veins in multiple sclerosis at 3 T and 7 T.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Jennifer Elizabeth; Simpson, Ashley; Mistry, Niraj; Evangelou, Nikos; Morris, Peter Gordon

    2013-05-01

    T₂*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 7 T has recently been shown to allow differentiation between white-matter multiple sclerosis lesions and asymptomatic white-matter lesions, by the presence or absence of a detectable central blood vessel. The aim of the present work is to improve the technique by increasing the sensitivity to veins at both 3 T and 7 T, and to assess the benefit of ultra-high-field imaging. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements and simulations are used to compare the sensitivity of magnitude T₂*-weighted and susceptibility-weighted images for the detection of small veins (<1 pixel in diameter), both with and without the use of gadolinium. The simulations are used to predict the optimal scanning parameters in order to increase the sensitivity to these veins at both field strengths, and to reduce the inherent dependence on vessel orientation. The sensitivities of the sequences at both field strengths are compared, theoretically and experimentally, in order to quantify the benefit of imaging at ultra-high-field. Subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS) are scanned at both field strengths, using the optimised sequence parameters, as well as those used in previously published work, and the optimisation is shown to improve the detection of veins within lesions. PMID:22138119

  9. Semi-Quantitative vs. Volumetric Determination of Endolymphatic Space in Menière’s Disease Using Endolymphatic Hydrops 3T-HR-MRI after Intravenous Gadolinium Injection

    PubMed Central

    Homann, Georg; Vieth, Volker; Weiss, Daniel; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Heindel, Walter; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Böckenfeld, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging enhances the clinical diagnosis of Menière's disease. This is accomplished by in vivo detection of endolymphatic hydrops, which are graded using different semi-quantitative grading systems. We evaluated an established, semi-quantitative endolymphatic hydrops score and with a quantitative method for volumetric assessment of the endolymphatic size. 11 patients with Menière's disease and 2 healthy subjects underwent high resolution endolymphatic hydrops 3 Tesla MRI with highly T2 weighted FLAIR and T2DRIVE sequences. The degree of endolymphatic hydrops was rated semi-quantitatively and compared to the results of 3D-volumetry. Moreover, the grade of endolymphatic hydrops was correlated with pure tone audiometry. Semi-quantitative grading and volumetric evaluation of the endolymphatic hydrops are in accordance (r = 0.92) and the grade of endolymphatic hydrops correlates with pure tone audiometry. Patients with a sickness duration of ≥ 30 months showed a significant higher total labyrinth fluid volume (p = 0.03). Fast, semi-quantitative evaluation of endolymphatic hydrops is highly reliable compared to quantitative/volumetric assessment. Endolymphatic space is significantly higher in patients with longer sickness duration. PMID:25768940

  10. Derivation of high-resolution MRI atlases of the human cerebellum at 3T and segmentation using multiple automatically generated templates.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Tae M; Pipitone, Jon; Baer, Lawrence H; Winterburn, Julie L; Shah, Yashvi; Chavez, Sofia; Schira, Mark M; Lobaugh, Nancy J; Lerch, Jason P; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Chakravarty, M Mallar

    2014-07-15

    The cerebellum has classically been linked to motor learning and coordination. However, there is renewed interest in the role of the cerebellum in non-motor functions such as cognition and in the context of different neuropsychiatric disorders. The contribution of neuroimaging studies to advancing understanding of cerebellar structure and function has been limited, partly due to the cerebellum being understudied as a result of contrast and resolution limitations of standard structural magnetic resonance images (MRI). These limitations inhibit proper visualization of the highly compact and detailed cerebellar foliations. In addition, there is a lack of robust algorithms that automatically and reliably identify the cerebellum and its subregions, further complicating the design of large-scale studies of the cerebellum. As such, automated segmentation of the cerebellar lobules would allow detailed population studies of the cerebellum and its subregions. In this manuscript, we describe a novel set of high-resolution in vivo atlases of the cerebellum developed by pairing MR imaging with a carefully validated manual segmentation protocol. Using these cerebellar atlases as inputs, we validate a novel automated segmentation algorithm that takes advantage of the neuroanatomical variability that exists in a given population under study in order to automatically identify the cerebellum, and its lobules. Our automatic segmentation results demonstrate good accuracy in the identification of all lobules (mean Kappa [κ]=0.731; range 0.40-0.89), and the entire cerebellum (mean κ=0.925; range 0.90-0.94) when compared to "gold-standard" manual segmentations. These results compare favorably in comparison to other publically available methods for automatic segmentation of the cerebellum. The completed cerebellar atlases are available freely online (http://imaging-genetics.camh.ca/cerebellum) and can be customized to the unique neuroanatomy of different subjects using the proposed

  11. The impact of simulated MRI scanner background noise on visual attention processes as measured by the EEG.

    PubMed

    Kobald, S Oliver; Getzmann, Stephan; Beste, Christian; Wascher, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Environmental noise is known to affect personal well-being as well as cognitive processes. Besides daily life, environmental noise can also occur in experimental research settings, e.g. when being in a magnetic resonance scanner. Scanner background noise (SBN) might pose serious confounds for experimental findings, even when non-auditory settings are examined. In the current experiment we tested if SBN alters bottom-up and top-down related processes of selective visual attention mechanisms. Participants completed two blocks of a visual change detection task, one block in silence and one block under SBN exposure. SBN was found to decrease accuracy in measures of visual attention. This effect was modulated by the temporal occurrence of SBN. When SBN was encountered in the first block, it prevented a significant improvement of accuracy in the second block. When SBN appeared in the second block, it significantly decreased accuracy. Neurophysiological findings showed a strong frontal positivity shift only when SBN was present in the first block, suggesting an inhibitory process to counteract the interfering SBN. Common correlates of both top-down and bottom-up processes of selective visual attention were not specifically affected by SBN exposure. Further research appears necessary to entirely rule out confounds of SBN in assessing visual attention. PMID:27324456

  12. The impact of simulated MRI scanner background noise on visual attention processes as measured by the EEG

    PubMed Central

    Kobald, S. Oliver; Getzmann, Stephan; Beste, Christian; Wascher, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Environmental noise is known to affect personal well-being as well as cognitive processes. Besides daily life, environmental noise can also occur in experimental research settings, e.g. when being in a magnetic resonance scanner. Scanner background noise (SBN) might pose serious confounds for experimental findings, even when non-auditory settings are examined. In the current experiment we tested if SBN alters bottom-up and top-down related processes of selective visual attention mechanisms. Participants completed two blocks of a visual change detection task, one block in silence and one block under SBN exposure. SBN was found to decrease accuracy in measures of visual attention. This effect was modulated by the temporal occurrence of SBN. When SBN was encountered in the first block, it prevented a significant improvement of accuracy in the second block. When SBN appeared in the second block, it significantly decreased accuracy. Neurophysiological findings showed a strong frontal positivity shift only when SBN was present in the first block, suggesting an inhibitory process to counteract the interfering SBN. Common correlates of both top-down and bottom-up processes of selective visual attention were not specifically affected by SBN exposure. Further research appears necessary to entirely rule out confounds of SBN in assessing visual attention. PMID:27324456

  13. 3-T Breast Diffusion-Weighted MRI by Echo-Planar Imaging with Spectral Spatial Excitation or with Additional Spectral Inversion Recovery: An In Vivo Comparison of Image Quality

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Megan C.; Dogan, Basak E.; Adrada, Beatriz E.; Plaxco, Jeri Sue; Wei, Wei; Son, Jong Bum; Hazle, John D.; Ma, Jingfei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare conventional DWI with spectral spatial excitation (cDWI) and an enhanced DWI with additional adiabatic spectral inversion recovery (eDWI) for 3T breast MRI. Methods Twenty-four patients were enrolled in the study with both cDWI and eDWI. Three breast radiologists scored cDWI and eDWI images of each patient for fat-suppression quality, geometric distortion, visibility of normal structure and biopsy-proven lesions, and overall image quality. SNR, CNR and ADC for evaluable tissues were measured. Statistical tests were performed for qualitative and quantitative comparisons. Results eDWI yielded significantly higher CNR and SNR on a lesion and higher glandular CNR and SNR, and muscle SNR on a patient basis. eDWI also yielded significantly higher qualitative scores in all categories. No significant difference was found in ADC values. Conclusion eDWI provided superior image quality and higher CNR and SNR on a lesion basis. eDWI can replace cDWI for 3T breast DWI. PMID:25695868

  14. Mechanisms and prevention of thermal injury from gamma radiosurgery headframes during 3T MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Marcus C; Wiant, David B; Gersh, Jacob A; Dolesh, Wendy; Ding, X; Best, Ryan C M; Bourland, J D

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regularly used for stereotactic imaging of Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery patients for GK treatment planning. MRI-induced thermal injuries have occurred and been reported for GK patients with attached metallic headframes. Depending on the specific MR imaging and headframe conditions, a skin injury from MRI-induced heating can potentially occur where the four headframe screws contact the skin surface of the patient's head. Higher MR field strength has a greater heating potential. Two primary heating mechanisms, electromagnetic induction and the antenna effect, are possible. In this study, MRI-induced heating from a 3T clinical MRI scanner was investigated for stereotactic headframes used in gamma radiosurgery and neurosurgery. Using melons as head phantoms, optical thermometers were used to characterize the temperature profile at various points of the melon headframe composite as a function of two 3T MR pulse sequence protocols. Different combinations of GK radiosurgery headframe post and screw designs were tested to determine best and worst combinations for MRI-induced heating. Temperature increases were measured for all pulse sequences tested, indicating that the potential exists for MRI-induced skin heating and burns at the headframe attachment site. This heating originates with electromagnetic induction caused by the RF fields inducing current in a loop formed by the headframe, mounting screws, and the region of the patient's head located between any of the two screws. This induced current is then resistively dissipated, with the regions of highest resistance, located at the headframe screw-patient head interface, experiencing the most heating. Significant heating can be prevented by replacing the metallic threads holding the screw with electrically insulated nuts, which is the heating prevention and patient safety recommendation of the GK manufacturer. Our results confirm that the manufacturer's recommendation to use

  15. In vitro imaging of single living human umbilical vein endothelial cells with a clinical 3.0-T MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; van den Bos, E J; Wielopolski, P A; de Jong-Popijus, M; Bernsen, M R; Duncker, D J; Krestin, G P

    2005-09-01

    Iron oxide-labelled, single, living human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were imaged over time in vitro using a clinical 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy system. Labelling efficiency, toxicity, cell viability, proliferation and differentiation were assessed using flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting and a phenanthroline assay. MR images were compared with normal light and fluorescence microscopy. Efficient uptake of iron oxide into HUVECs was shown, although with higher label uptake dose-dependent cytotoxic effects were observed, affecting cell viability. For MR imaging, a T2* weighted three-dimensional protocol was used with in-plane resolution of 39 x 48 microm2 and 100-microm slices with a scan time of 13 min. MRI could detect living cells in standard culture dishes at single-cell resolution, although label loss was observed that corresponded with the intracellular iron measurements. MR microscopy using iron oxide labels is a promising tool for studying HUVEC migration and cell biology in vitro and in vivo, but possible toxic effects of label uptake and loss of label over time should be taken into account. PMID:16096808

  16. Skin and proximity effects in the conductors of split gradient coils for a hybrid Linac-MRI scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fangfang; Lopez, Hector Sanchez; Freschi, Fabio; Smith, Elliot; Li, Yu; Fuentes, Miguel; Liu, Feng; Repetto, Maurizio; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), rapidly changing gradient fields are applied to encode the magnetic resonance signal with spatial position; however eddy currents are induced in the surrounding conducting structures depending on the geometry of the conductor and the excitation waveform. These alternating fields change the spatial profile of the current density within the coil track with the applied frequencies of the input waveform and by their proximity to other conductors. In this paper, the impact of the conductor width and the excited frequency over the parameters that characterise the performance of split transverse and longitudinal gradient coils are studied. Thirty x-gradient coils were designed using a “free-surface” coil design method and the track width was varied from 1 mm to 30 mm with an increment value of 1 mm; a frequency sweep analysis in the range of 100 Hz to 10 kHz was performed using the multi-layer integral method (MIM) and parameters such as power loss produced by the coil and generated in the cryostat, inductance, coil efficiency (field strength/operating current), magnetic field profile produced by the coil and the eddy currents were studied. An experimental validation of the theoretical model was performed on an example coil. Coils with filamentary conductor segments were also studied to compare the simulated parameters with those produced by coils with a finite track. There was found to be a significant difference between the parameters calculated using filamentary coils and those obtained when the coil is simulated using finite size tracks. A wider track width produces coil with superior efficiency and low resistance; however, due to the skin effect, the power loss increases faster in wider tracks than in those generated in coils with narrow tracks. It was demonstrated that rapidly changing current paths must be avoided in order to mitigate the power loss and the spatial asymmetry in the current density profile. The decision of

  17. Scanner Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaworski, Joy; Murphy, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they incorporated environmental awareness into their art curriculum. Here, they describe a digital photography project in which their students used flatbed scanners as cameras. Their students composed their objects directly on the scanner. The lesson enabled students to realize that artists have voices…

  18. 3T MR imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    DeLano, Mark C; Fisher, Charles

    2006-02-01

    The advent of very high field clinical scanners that operate at 3T is taking structural and functional imaging to new levels and is reinvigorating clinical spectroscopy, fMR imaging, and noncontrast-enhanced methods of MRA. Most of the challenges that are related to 3T imaging have been addressed to facilitate routine clinical imaging. An awareness of the complexities that underlie the solutions to these challenges is important to the continued improvements to the 3T platform so that its maximal potential can be reached. The development of the multichannel-head coils and the improvement in the design of body coils, concurrently with the development of multichannel capabilities that enable parallel imaging, have benefited all field platforms. Perhaps the added value of parallel imaging has been greatest at 3T where the additional signal can be exploited. The definition of very high field is a moving target, and may be well on its way to 7.0 T, although in terms of the current clinical state of the art, 3T is our current reference. PMID:16530636

  19. fMRI-Compatible Electromagnetic Haptic Interface.

    PubMed

    Riener, R; Villgrattner, T; Kleiser, R; Nef, T; Kollias, S

    2005-01-01

    A new haptic interface device is suggested, which can be used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. The basic component of this 1 DOF haptic device are two coils that produce a Lorentz force induced by the large static magnetic field of the MR scanner. A MR-compatible optical angular encoder and a optical force sensor enable the implementation of different control architectures for haptic interactions. The challenge was to provide a large torque, and not to affect image quality by the currents applied in the device. The haptic device was tested in a 3T MR scanner. With a current of up to 1A and a distance of 1m to the focal point of the MR-scanner it was possible to generate torques of up to 4 Nm. Within these boundaries image quality was not affected. PMID:17281892

  20. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  1. Simultaneous hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate MRI and 18F-FDG-PET in cancer (hyperPET): feasibility of a new imaging concept using a clinical PET/MRI scanner

    PubMed Central

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E; Henriksen, Sarah T; Johannesen, Helle H; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan; Vignaud, Alexandre; Hansen, Anders E; Børresen, Betina; Klausen, Thomas L; Wittekind, Anne-Mette N; Gillings, Nic; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Clemmensen, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of a new imaging concept - combined hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and 18F-FDG-PET imaging. This procedure was performed in a clinical PET/MRI scanner with a canine cancer patient. We have named this concept hyper PET. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate results in an increase of 13C-lactate, 13C-alanine and 13C-CO2 (13C-HCO3) resonance peaks relative to the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. Accordingly, with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and use of 13C-pyruvate it is now possible to directly study the Warburg Effect through the rate of conversion of 13C-pyruvate to 13C-lactate. In this study, we combined it with 18F-FDG-PET that studies uptake of glucose in the cells. A canine cancer patient with a histology verified local recurrence of a liposarcoma on the right forepaw was imaged using a combined PET/MR clinical scanner. PET was performed as a single-bed, 10 min acquisition, 107 min post injection of 310 MBq 18F-FDG. 13C-chemical shift imaging (CSI) was performed just after FDG-PET and 30 s post injection of 23 mL hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate. Peak heights of 13C-pyruvate and 13C-lactate were quantified using a general linear model. Anatomic 1H-MRI included axial and coronal T1 vibe, coronal T2-tse and axial T1-tse with fat saturation following gadolinium injection. In the tumor we found clearly increased 13C-lactate production, which also corresponded to high 18F-FDG uptake on PET. This is in agreement with the fact that glycolysis and production of lactate are increased in tumor cells compared to normal cells. Yet, most interestingly, also in the muscle of the forepaw of the dog high 18F-FDG uptake was observed. This was due to activity in these muscles prior to anesthesia, which was not accompanied by a similarly high 13C-lactate production. Accordingly, this clearly demonstrates how the Warburg Effect directly

  2. Evaluation of 2D multiband EPI imaging for high-resolution, whole-brain, task-based fMRI studies at 3T: Sensitivity and slice leakage artifacts.

    PubMed

    Todd, Nick; Moeller, Steen; Auerbach, Edward J; Yacoub, Essa; Flandin, Guillaume; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that require high-resolution whole-brain coverage have long scan times that are primarily driven by the large number of thin slices acquired. Two-dimensional multiband echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences accelerate the data acquisition along the slice direction and therefore represent an attractive approach to such studies by improving the temporal resolution without sacrificing spatial resolution. In this work, a 2D multiband EPI sequence was optimized for 1.5mm isotropic whole-brain acquisitions at 3T with 10 healthy volunteers imaged while performing simultaneous visual and motor tasks. The performance of the sequence was evaluated in terms of BOLD sensitivity and false-positive activation at multiband (MB) factors of 1, 2, 4, and 6, combined with in-plane GRAPPA acceleration of 2× (GRAPPA 2), and the two reconstruction approaches of Slice-GRAPPA and Split Slice-GRAPPA. Sensitivity results demonstrate significant gains in temporal signal-to-noise ratio (tSNR) and t-score statistics for MB 2, 4, and 6 compared to MB 1. The MB factor for optimal sensitivity varied depending on anatomical location and reconstruction method. When using Slice-GRAPPA reconstruction, evidence of false-positive activation due to signal leakage between simultaneously excited slices was seen in one instance, 35 instances, and 70 instances over the ten volunteers for the respective accelerations of MB 2×GRAPPA 2, MB 4×GRAPPA 2, and MB 6×GRAPPA 2. The use of Split Slice-GRAPPA reconstruction suppressed the prevalence of false positives significantly, to 1 instance, 5 instances, and 5 instances for the same respective acceleration factors. Imaging protocols using an acceleration factor of MB 2×GRAPPA 2 can be confidently used for high-resolution whole-brain imaging to improve BOLD sensitivity with very low probability for false-positive activation due to slice leakage. Imaging protocols using higher acceleration factors (MB 3 or MB 4

  3. Multi-Parametric Neuroimaging Reproducibility: A 3T Resource Study

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Bennett A.; Huang, Alan J.; Gifford, Aliya; Vikram, Deepti S.; Lim, Issel Anne L.; Farrell, Jonathan A.D.; Bogovic, John A.; Hua, Jun; Chen, Min; Jarso, Samson; Smith, Seth A.; Joel, Suresh; Mori, Susumu; Pekar, James J.; Barker, Peter B.; Prince, Jerry L.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Modern MRI image processing methods have yielded quantitative, morphometric, functional, and structural assessments of the human brain. These analyses typically exploit carefully optimized protocols for specific imaging targets. Algorithm investigators have several excellent public data resources to use to test, develop, and optimize their methods. Recently, there has been an increasing focus on combining MRI protocols in multi-parametric studies. Notably, these have included innovative approaches for fusing connectivity inferences with functional and/or anatomical characterizations. Yet, validation of the reproducibility of these interesting and novel methods has been severely hampered by the limited availability of appropriate multi-parametric data. We present an imaging protocol optimized to include state-of-the-art assessment of brain function, structure, micro-architecture, and quantitative parameters within a clinically feasible 60 minute protocol on a 3T MRI scanner. We present scan-rescan reproducibility of these imaging contrasts based on 21 healthy volunteers (11 M/10 F, 22–61 y/o). The cortical gray matter, cortical white matter, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid, thalamus, putamen, caudate, cerebellar gray matter, cerebellar white matter, and brainstem were identified with mean volume-wise reproducibility of 3.5%. We tabulate the mean intensity, variability and reproducibility of each contrast in a region of interest approach, which is essential for prospective study planning and retrospective power analysis considerations. Anatomy was highly consistent on structural acquisition (~1–5% variability), while variation on diffusion and several other quantitative scans was higher (~<10%). Some sequences are particularly variable in specific structures (ASL exhibited variation of 28% in the cerebral white matter) or in thin structures (quantitative T2 varied by up to 73% in the caudate) due, in large part, to variability in automated ROI placement. The

  4. Cylindrical Scanner

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-04-29

    The CS system is designed to provide a very fast imaging system in order to search for weapons on persons in an airport environment. The Cylindrical Scanner moves a vertical transceiver array rapidly around a person standing stationary. The software can be segmented in to three specific tasks. The first task is data acquisition and scanner control. At the operator's request, this task commands the scanner to move and the radar transceiver array to sendmore » data to the computer system in a known and well-ordered manner. The array is moved over the complete aperture in 10 to 12 seconds. At the completion of the array movement the second software task automatically reconstructs the high-resolution image from the radar data utilizing the integrated DSP boards. The third task displays the resulting images, as they become available, to the computer screen for user review and analysis.« less

  5. Cylindrical Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Thomas E.

    1999-04-29

    The CS system is designed to provide a very fast imaging system in order to search for weapons on persons in an airport environment. The Cylindrical Scanner moves a vertical transceiver array rapidly around a person standing stationary. The software can be segmented in to three specific tasks. The first task is data acquisition and scanner control. At the operator's request, this task commands the scanner to move and the radar transceiver array to send data to the computer system in a known and well-ordered manner. The array is moved over the complete aperture in 10 to 12 seconds. At the completion of the array movement the second software task automatically reconstructs the high-resolution image from the radar data utilizing the integrated DSP boards. The third task displays the resulting images, as they become available, to the computer screen for user review and analysis.

  6. Monitoring fractional anisotropy in developing rabbit brain using MR diffusion tensor imaging at 3T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jao, Jo-Chi; Yang, Yu-Ting; Hsiao, Chia-Chi; Chen, Po-Chou

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factional anisotropy (FA) in various regions of developing rabbit brain using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR DTI) at 3 T. A whole-body clinical MR imaging (MRI) scanner with a 15-channel high resolution knee coil was used. An echo-planar-imaging (EPI)-DTI pulse sequence was performed. Five 5 week-old New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits underwent MRI once per week for 24 weeks. After scanning, FA maps were obtained. ROIs (regions of interests) in the frontal lobe, parietal & temporal lobe, and occipital lobe were measured. FA changes with time were evaluated with a linear regression analysis. The results show that the FA values in all lobes of the brain increased linearly with age. The ranking of FA values was FA(frontal lobe) < FA(parietal & temporal lobe) > FA(occipital lobe). There was significant difference (p < 0.05) among these lobes. FA values are associated with the nerve development and brain functions. The FA change rate could be a biomarker to monitor the brain development. Understanding the FA values of various lobes during development could provide helpful information to diagnosis the abnormal syndrome earlier and have a better treatment and prognosis. This study established a brain MR-DTI protocol for rabbits to investigate the brain anatomy during development using clinical MRI. This technique can be further applied to the pre-clinical diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and follow-up of brain lesions.

  7. Towards Truly Quiet MRI: animal MRI magnetic field gradients as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, William; El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem

    2013-03-01

    Clinical MRI acoustic noise, often substantially exceeding 100 dB, causes patient anxiety and discomfort and interferes with functional MRI (fMRI) and interventional MRI. MRI acoustic noise reduction is a long-standing and difficult technical challenge. The noise is basically caused by large Lorentz forces on gradient windings--surrounding the patient bore--situated in strong magnetic fields (1.5 T, 3 T or higher). Pulsed currents of 300 A or more are switched through the gradient windings in sub-milliseconds. Experimenting with hardware noise reduction on clinical scanners is difficult and expensive because of the large scale and weight of clinical scanner components (gradient windings ~ 1000 kg) that require special handling equipment in large engineering test facilities. Our approach is to produce a Truly Quiet (<70 dB) small-scale animal imager. Results serve as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction measures that can be implemented in clinical scanners. We have so far decreased noise in an animal scale imager from 108 dB to 71 dB, a 37 dB reduction. Our noise reduction measures include: a gradient container that can be evacuated; inflatable antivibration mounts to prevent transmission of vibrations from gradient winding to gradient container; vibration damping of wires going from gradient to the outside world via the gradient container; and a copper passive shield to prevent the generation of eddy currents in the metal cryostat inner bore, which in turn can vibrate and produce noise.

  8. Detection of Lactate with a Hadamard Slice Selected, Selective Multiple Quantum Coherence, Chemical Shift Imaging Sequence (HDMD-SelMQC-CSI) on a clinical MRI scanner: Application to Tumors and Muscle Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, Eric A.; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Pickup, Stephen; Kim, Sungheon; Goldstein, Steven C.; Floyd, Thomas F.; Poptani, Harish; Delikatny, E. James; Reddy, Ravinder; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2010-01-01

    Lactate is an important metabolite in normal and malignant tissues detectable by NMR spectroscopy; however, it has been difficult to clinically detect the lactate methyl resonance because it is obscured by lipid resonances. The selective homonuclear multiple quantum coherence transfer (SelMQC) technique offers a method for distinguishing lipid and lactate resonances. We implemented a 3D SelMQC version with Hadamard slice selection and 2D phase encoding (HDMD-SelMQC-CSI) on a conventional clinical MR scanner. Hadamard slice selection is explained and demonstrated in vivo. This is followed by 1cm3 resolution lactate imaging with detection to 5 mM concentration in 20 minutes on a 3T clinical scanner. An analysis of quantum selection gradient duration and amplitude effects on lactate and lipid signal is presented. To demonstrate clinical feasibility, a 5 minute lactate scan of a patient with a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the superficial thigh is reported. The elevated lactate signal coincides with the T2-weighted image of this tumor. As a test of SelMQC sensitivity, a thigh tourniquet was applied to a normal volunteer and an increase in lactate was detected immediately after tourniquet flow constriction. In conclusion, the HDMD-SelMQC-CSI sequence is demonstrated on a phantom and in two lipid-rich, clinically relevant, in vivo conditions. PMID:19785016

  9. Optimized magnetic resonance diffusion protocol for ex-vivo whole human brain imaging with a clinical scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, Benoit; Afacan, Onur; Stamm, Aymeric; Singh, Jolene; Warfield, Simon K.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) provides a novel insight into the brain to facilitate our understanding of the brain connectivity and microstructure. While in-vivo DW-MRI enables imaging of living patients and longitudinal studies of brain changes, post-mortem ex-vivo DW-MRI has numerous advantages. Ex-vivo imaging benefits from greater resolution and sensitivity due to the lack of imaging time constraints; the use of tighter fitting coils; and the lack of movement artifacts. This allows characterization of normal and abnormal tissues with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity, facilitating our ability to investigate anatomical structures that are inaccessible in-vivo. This also offers the opportunity to develop today novel imaging biomarkers that will, with tomorrow's MR technology, enable improved in-vivo assessment of the risk of disease in an individual. Post-mortem studies, however, generally rely on the fixation of specimen to inhibit tissue decay which starts as soon as tissue is deprived from its blood supply. Unfortunately, fixation of tissues substantially alters tissue diffusivity profiles. In addition, ex-vivo DW-MRI requires particular care when packaging the specimen because the presence of microscopic air bubbles gives rise to geometric and intensity image distortion. In this work, we considered the specific requirements of post-mortem imaging and designed an optimized protocol for ex-vivo whole brain DW-MRI using a human clinical 3T scanner. Human clinical 3T scanners are available to a large number of researchers and, unlike most animal scanners, have a bore diameter large enough to image a whole human brain. Our optimized protocol will facilitate widespread ex-vivo investigations of large specimen.

  10. Multi-centre reproducibility of diffusion MRI parameters for clinical sequences in the brain.

    PubMed

    Grech-Sollars, Matthew; Hales, Patrick W; Miyazaki, Keiko; Raschke, Felix; Rodriguez, Daniel; Wilson, Martin; Gill, Simrandip K; Banks, Tina; Saunders, Dawn E; Clayden, Jonathan D; Gwilliam, Matt N; Barrick, Thomas R; Morgan, Paul S; Davies, Nigel P; Rossiter, James; Auer, Dorothee P; Grundy, Richard; Leach, Martin O; Howe, Franklyn A; Peet, Andrew C; Clark, Chris A

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the reproducibility of diffusion imaging, and in particular the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) parameters and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters, across multiple centres using clinically available protocols with limited harmonization between sequences. An ice-water phantom and nine healthy volunteers were scanned across fives centres on eight scanners (four Siemens 1.5T, four Philips 3T). The mean ADC, IVIM parameters (diffusion coefficient D and perfusion fraction f) and DTI parameters (mean diffusivity MD and fractional anisotropy FA), were measured in grey matter, white matter and specific brain sub-regions. A mixed effect model was used to measure the intra- and inter-scanner coefficient of variation (CV) for each of the five parameters. ADC, D, MD and FA had a good intra- and inter-scanner reproducibility in both grey and white matter, with a CV ranging between 1% and 7.4%; mean 2.6%. Other brain regions also showed high levels of reproducibility except for small structures such as the choroid plexus. The IVIM parameter f had a higher intra-scanner CV of 8.4% and inter-scanner CV of 24.8%. No major difference in the inter-scanner CV for ADC, D, MD and FA was observed when analysing the 1.5T and 3T scanners separately. ADC, D, MD and FA all showed good intra-scanner reproducibility, with the inter-scanner reproducibility being comparable or faring slightly worse, suggesting that using data from multiple scanners does not have an adverse effect compared with using data from the same scanner. The IVIM parameter f had a poorer inter-scanner CV when scanners of different field strengths were combined, and the parameter was also affected by the scan acquisition resolution. This study shows that the majority of diffusion MRI derived parameters are robust across 1.5T and 3T scanners and suitable for use in multi-centre clinical studies and trials. PMID:25802212

  11. Multi-centre reproducibility of diffusion MRI parameters for clinical sequences in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Grech-Sollars, Matthew; Hales, Patrick W; Miyazaki, Keiko; Raschke, Felix; Rodriguez, Daniel; Wilson, Martin; Gill, Simrandip K; Banks, Tina; Saunders, Dawn E; Clayden, Jonathan D; Gwilliam, Matt N; Barrick, Thomas R; Morgan, Paul S; Davies, Nigel P; Rossiter, James; Auer, Dorothee P; Grundy, Richard; Leach, Martin O; Howe, Franklyn A; Peet, Andrew C; Clark, Chris A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the reproducibility of diffusion imaging, and in particular the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) parameters and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters, across multiple centres using clinically available protocols with limited harmonization between sequences. An ice–water phantom and nine healthy volunteers were scanned across fives centres on eight scanners (four Siemens 1.5T, four Philips 3T). The mean ADC, IVIM parameters (diffusion coefficient D and perfusion fraction f) and DTI parameters (mean diffusivity MD and fractional anisotropy FA), were measured in grey matter, white matter and specific brain sub-regions. A mixed effect model was used to measure the intra- and inter-scanner coefficient of variation (CV) for each of the five parameters. ADC, D, MD and FA had a good intra- and inter-scanner reproducibility in both grey and white matter, with a CV ranging between 1% and 7.4%; mean 2.6%. Other brain regions also showed high levels of reproducibility except for small structures such as the choroid plexus. The IVIM parameter f had a higher intra-scanner CV of 8.4% and inter-scanner CV of 24.8%. No major difference in the inter-scanner CV for ADC, D, MD and FA was observed when analysing the 1.5T and 3T scanners separately. ADC, D, MD and FA all showed good intra-scanner reproducibility, with the inter-scanner reproducibility being comparable or faring slightly worse, suggesting that using data from multiple scanners does not have an adverse effect compared with using data from the same scanner. The IVIM parameter f had a poorer inter-scanner CV when scanners of different field strengths were combined, and the parameter was also affected by the scan acquisition resolution. This study shows that the majority of diffusion MRI derived parameters are robust across 1.5T and 3T scanners and suitable for use in multi-centre clinical studies and trials. © 2015 The Authors NMR in

  12. A direct modulated optical link for MRI RF receive coil interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing; Wei, Juan; Shen, G. X.

    2007-11-01

    Optical glass fiber is a promising alternative to traditional coaxial cables for MRI RF receive coil interconnection to avoid any crosstalk and electromagnetic interference between multiple channels. A direct modulated optical link is proposed for MRI coil interconnection in this paper. The link performances of power gain, frequency response and dynamic range are measured. Phantom and in vivo human head images have been demonstrated by the connection of this direct modulated optical link to a head coil on a 0.3 T MRI scanner for the first time. Comparable image qualities to coaxial cable link verify the feasibility of using the optical link for imaging with minor modification on the existing scanners. This optical link could also be easily extended for multi-channel array interconnections at high field of 1.5 T.

  13. Optical scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkel, Mitchell W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An optical scanner for imaging lines in an object plane onto a linear array in a focal plane either continuously or discretely is described. The scanner consists of a set of four mutually perpendicularly oriented plane corner mirrors which provide a reflecting path that describes a parallelogram. In addition, there is a plane parallel scanning mirror with a front and back reflecting surface located midway between the first and fourth corner mirrors. It is oriented so that in the mid-scan position it is parallel to the first corner mirror, and therefore perpendicular to the fourth corner mirror. As the scan mirror rotates, rays incident from a plurality of lines in the object plane are selectively directed through the optical system arriving at a common intersection on the back surface of the scanning mirror where the rays are colinearly directed toward a lens and then imaged onto the linear array in the focal plane. A set of compensating mirrors may be introduced just before the imaging lens to compensate for a small and generally negligible path difference delta sub l between the axial and marginal rays.

  14. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Parameters as Biomarkers in Assessing Head and Neck Lesions After Chemoradiotherapy Using a Wide-Bore 3 Tesla Scanner.

    PubMed

    Lerant, Gergely; Sarkozy, Peter; Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polony, Gabor; Tamas, Laszlo; Toth, Erika; Boer, Andras; Javor, Laszlo; Godeny, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Pilot studies have shown promising results in characterizing head and neck tumors (HNT) using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), differentiating between malignant and benign lesions and evaluating changes in response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Our aim was to find DCE-MRI parameters, biomarkers in evaluating the post-CRT status. Two hundred and five patients with head and neck lesions were examined with DCE-MRI sequences. The time intensity curves (TIC) were extracted and processed to acquire time-to-peak (TTP), relative maximum enhancement (RME), relative wash-out (RWO), and two new parameters attack and decay. These parameters were analyzed using univariate tests in SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 17, SPSS Inc. Chicago, USA) to identify parameters that could be used to infer tumor malignancy and post-CRT changes. Multiple parameters of curve characteristics were significantly different between malignant tumors after CRT (MACRT) and changes caused by CRT. The best-performing biomarkers were the attack and the decay. We also found multiple significant (p < 0.05) parameters for both the benign and malignant status as well as pre- and post-CRT status. Our large cohort of data supports the increasing role of DCE-MRI in HNT differentiation, particularly for the assessment of post-CRT status along with accurate morphological imaging. PMID:25920367

  15. Multichannel Compressive Sensing MRI Using Noiselet Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding. PMID:25965548

  16. Directly detected 55Mn MRI: Application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized 13C MRI development

    PubMed Central

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D.; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 (55Mn) MRI using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized 13C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the 55Mn and 13C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective “13C” MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, 55Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical 13C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large 13C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d= 8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7M) was scanned rapidly by 55Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for 13C, using a balanced SSFP acquisition. The requisite penetration of RF magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for 55Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image SNR of ~60 at 0.5cm3 spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP 13C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  17. Minimum Field Strength Simulator for Proton Density Weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiyi; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate a framework for simulating low-field proton-density weighted MRI acquisitions based on high-field acquisitions, which could be used to predict the minimum B0 field strength requirements for MRI techniques. This framework would be particularly useful in the evaluation of de-noising and constrained reconstruction techniques. Materials and Methods Given MRI raw data, lower field MRI acquisitions can be simulated based on the signal and noise scaling with field strength. Certain assumptions are imposed for the simulation and their validity is discussed. A validation experiment was performed using a standard resolution phantom imaged at 0.35 T, 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T. This framework was then applied to two sample proton-density weighted MRI applications that demonstrated estimation of minimum field strength requirements: real-time upper airway imaging and liver proton-density fat fraction measurement. Results The phantom experiment showed good agreement between simulated and measured images. The SNR difference between simulated and measured was ≤ 8% for the 1.5T, 3T, and 7T cases which utilized scanners with the same geometry and from the same vendor. The measured SNR at 0.35T was 1.8- to 2.5-fold less than predicted likely due to unaccounted differences in the RF receive chain. The predicted minimum field strength requirements for the two sample applications were 0.2 T and 0.3 T, respectively. Conclusions Under certain assumptions, low-field MRI acquisitions can be simulated from high-field MRI data. This enables prediction of the minimum field strength requirements for a broad range of MRI techniques. PMID:27136334

  18. Comparisons between the 35 mm Quadrature Surface Resonator at 300 K and the 40 mm High-Temperature Superconducting Surface Resonator at 77 K in a 3T MRI Imager

    PubMed Central

    Song, Manli; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Chen, Ji; Lin, In-Tsang

    2015-01-01

    This study attempts to compare the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the 40 mm High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) surface resonator at 77 K and the 35 mm commercial quadrature (QD) surface resonator at 300 K in a 3 Tesla (T) MRI imager. To aquire images for the comparison, we implemented a phantom experiment using the 40 mm diameter Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (Bi-2223) HTS surface resonator, the 35 mm commercial QD surface resonator and the 40 mm professionally-made copper surface resonator. The HTS surface resonator at 77 K provided a 1.43-fold SNR gain over the QD surface resonator at 300 K and provided a 3.84-fold SNR gain over the professionally-made copper surface resonator at 300 K on phantom images. The results agree with the predictions, and the difference between the predicted SNR gains and measured SNR gains is 1%. Although the geometry of the HTS surface resonator is different from the QD surface resonator, its SNR is still higher. The results demonstrate that a higher image quality can be obtained with the HTS surface resonator at 77 K. With the HTS surface resonator, the SNR can be improved, suggesting that the HTS surface resonator is a potentially helpful diagnostic tool for MRI imaging in various applications. PMID:25812124

  19. High-Resolution 3-T Endorectal Prostate MRI: A Multireader Study of Radiologist Preference and Perceived Interpretive Quality of 2D and 3D T2-Weighted Fast Spin-Echo MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Noworolski, Susan M.; Harisinghani, Mukesh; Jhaveri, Kartik S.; Raman, Steve S.; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Wang, Zhen J.; Zagoria, Ronald J.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to compare the perceived quality of 3-T axial T2-weighted high-resolution 2D and high-resolution 3D fast spin-echo (FSE) endorectal MR images of the prostate. MATERIALS AND METHODS Six radiologists independently reviewed paired 3-T axial T2-weighted high-resolution 2D and 3D FSE endorectal MR images of the prostates of 85 men in two sessions. In the first session (n = 85), each reader selected his or her preferred images; in the second session (n = 28), they determined their confidence in tumor identification and compared the depiction of the prostatic anatomy, tumor conspicuity, and subjective intrinsic image quality of images. A meta-analysis using a random-effects model, logistic regression, and the paired Wilcoxon rank-sum test were used for statistical analyses. RESULTS Three readers preferred the 2D acquisition (67–89%), and the other three preferred the 3D images (70–80%). The option for one of the techniques was not associated with any of the predictor variables. The 2D FSE images were significantly sharper than 3D FSE (p < 0.001) and significantly more likely to exhibit other (nonmotion) artifacts (p = 0.002). No other statistically significant differences were found. CONCLUSION Our results suggest that there are strong individual preferences for the 2D or 3D FSE MR images, but there was a wide variability among radiologists. There were differences in image quality (image sharpness and presence of artifacts not related to motion) but not in the sequences’ ability to delineate the glandular anatomy and depict a cancerous tumor. PMID:26491891

  20. Automatic Brachytherapy Seed Placement Under MRI Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Muntener, Michael; Mazilu, Dumitru; Schär, Michael; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a robotic method of performing low dose rate prostate brachytherapy under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The design and operation of a fully automated MR compatible seed injector is presented. This is used with the MrBot robot for transperineal percutaneous prostate access. A new image-registration marker and algorithms are also presented. The system is integrated and tested with a 3T MRI scanner. Tests compare three different registration methods, assess the precision of performing automated seed deployment, and use the seeds to assess the accuracy of needle targeting under image guidance. Under the ideal conditions of the in vitro experiments, results show outstanding image-guided needle and seed placement accuracy. PMID:17694871

  1. Objective Bayesian fMRI analysis—a pilot study in different clinical environments

    PubMed Central

    Magerkurth, Joerg; Mancini, Laura; Penny, William; Flandin, Guillaume; Ashburner, John; Micallef, Caroline; De Vita, Enrico; Daga, Pankaj; White, Mark J.; Buckley, Craig; Yamamoto, Adam K.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Yousry, Tarek; Thornton, John S.; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) used for neurosurgical planning delineates functionally eloquent brain areas by time-series analysis of task-induced BOLD signal changes. Commonly used frequentist statistics protect against false positive results based on a p-value threshold. In surgical planning, false negative results are equally if not more harmful, potentially masking true brain activity leading to erroneous resection of eloquent regions. Bayesian statistics provides an alternative framework, categorizing areas as activated, deactivated, non-activated or with low statistical confidence. This approach has not yet found wide clinical application partly due to the lack of a method to objectively define an effect size threshold. We implemented a Bayesian analysis framework for neurosurgical planning fMRI. It entails an automated effect-size threshold selection method for posterior probability maps accounting for inter-individual BOLD response differences, which was calibrated based on the frequentist results maps thresholded by two clinical experts. We compared Bayesian and frequentist analysis of passive-motor fMRI data from 10 healthy volunteers measured on a pre-operative 3T and an intra-operative 1.5T MRI scanner. As a clinical case study, we tested passive motor task activation in a brain tumor patient at 3T under clinical conditions. With our novel effect size threshold method, the Bayesian analysis revealed regions of all four categories in the 3T data. Activated region foci and extent were consistent with the frequentist analysis results. In the lower signal-to-noise ratio 1.5T intra-operative scanner data, Bayesian analysis provided improved brain-activation detection sensitivity compared with the frequentist analysis, albeit the spatial extents of the activations were smaller than at 3T. Bayesian analysis of fMRI data using operator-independent effect size threshold selection may improve the sensitivity and certainty of information available to guide neurosurgery

  2. Objective Bayesian fMRI analysis-a pilot study in different clinical environments.

    PubMed

    Magerkurth, Joerg; Mancini, Laura; Penny, William; Flandin, Guillaume; Ashburner, John; Micallef, Caroline; De Vita, Enrico; Daga, Pankaj; White, Mark J; Buckley, Craig; Yamamoto, Adam K; Ourselin, Sebastien; Yousry, Tarek; Thornton, John S; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) used for neurosurgical planning delineates functionally eloquent brain areas by time-series analysis of task-induced BOLD signal changes. Commonly used frequentist statistics protect against false positive results based on a p-value threshold. In surgical planning, false negative results are equally if not more harmful, potentially masking true brain activity leading to erroneous resection of eloquent regions. Bayesian statistics provides an alternative framework, categorizing areas as activated, deactivated, non-activated or with low statistical confidence. This approach has not yet found wide clinical application partly due to the lack of a method to objectively define an effect size threshold. We implemented a Bayesian analysis framework for neurosurgical planning fMRI. It entails an automated effect-size threshold selection method for posterior probability maps accounting for inter-individual BOLD response differences, which was calibrated based on the frequentist results maps thresholded by two clinical experts. We compared Bayesian and frequentist analysis of passive-motor fMRI data from 10 healthy volunteers measured on a pre-operative 3T and an intra-operative 1.5T MRI scanner. As a clinical case study, we tested passive motor task activation in a brain tumor patient at 3T under clinical conditions. With our novel effect size threshold method, the Bayesian analysis revealed regions of all four categories in the 3T data. Activated region foci and extent were consistent with the frequentist analysis results. In the lower signal-to-noise ratio 1.5T intra-operative scanner data, Bayesian analysis provided improved brain-activation detection sensitivity compared with the frequentist analysis, albeit the spatial extents of the activations were smaller than at 3T. Bayesian analysis of fMRI data using operator-independent effect size threshold selection may improve the sensitivity and certainty of information available to guide neurosurgery

  3. MR-Guided Freehand Biopsy of Liver Lesions With Fast Continuous Imaging Using a 1.0-T Open MRI Scanner: Experience in 50 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fischbach, Frank; Bunke, Juergen; Thormann, Markus; Gaffke, Gunnar; Jungnickel, Kerstin; Smink, Jouke; Ricke, Jens

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess a new open system with a field-strength of 1.0 T for the feasibility of liver biopsy using the freehand technique with fast continuous imaging. Fifty patients with focal liver lesions measuring 5 to 30 mm in diameter were included in the study. Guidance and monitoring was performed using a 1.0-T open magnetic resonance (MR) scanner (Panorama HFO; Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands). With fast continuous imaging using a T1-weighted (T1W) gradient echo (GRE) sequence after administration of gadolinium (Gd)-EOB-DTPA, the needle was placed into the lesion. An interface for interactive dynamic viewing in two perpendicular planes prevented needle deviations T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) fat-suppressed sequence was added to rule out postinterventional hematoma or biloma. All lesions were visible on the interventional images. Biopsy was technically successful, and solid specimens were obtained in all cases. Forty-six patients showed a histopathologic pattern other than native liver tissue, thus confirming correct position of the needle. Time between determination of the lesion and performance of the control scan was on average 18 min. No major complications were recorded. MR guidance with the new 1-T open system must be considered an attractive alternative for liver punction. An interface for dynamic imaging of needle guidance and T1W-GRE imaging with administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA for contrast enhancement allows the pinpoint puncture of liver lesions.

  4. Real-time motion- and B0-correction for LASER-localized spiral-accelerated 3D-MRSI of the brain at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Bogner, Wolfgang; Hess, Aaron T; Gagoski, Borjan; Tisdall, M. Dylan; van der Kouwe, Andre J.W.; Trattnig, Siegfried; Rosen, Bruce; Andronesi, Ovidiu C

    2013-01-01

    The full potential of magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is often limited by localization artifacts, motion-related artifacts, scanner instabilities, and long measurement times. Localized adiabatic selective refocusing (LASER) provides accurate B1-insensitive spatial excitation even at high magnetic fields. Spiral encoding accelerates MRSI acquisition, and thus, enables 3D-coverage without compromising spatial resolution. Real-time position-and shim/frequency-tracking using MR navigators correct motion- and scanner instability-related artifacts. Each of these three advanced MRI techniques provides superior MRSI data compared to commonly used methods. In this work, we integrated in a single pulse sequence these three promising approaches. Real-time correction of motion, shim, and frequency-drifts using volumetric dual-contrast echo planar imaging-based navigators were implemented in an MRSI sequence that uses low-power gradient modulated short-echo time LASER localization and time efficient spiral readouts, in order to provide fast and robust 3D-MRSI in the human brain at 3T. The proposed sequence was demonstrated to be insensitive to motion- and scanner drift-related degradations of MRSI data in both phantoms and volunteers. Motion and scanner drift artifacts were eliminated and excellent spectral quality was recovered in the presence of strong movement. Our results confirm the expected benefits of combining a spiral 3D-LASER-MRSI sequence with real-time correction. The new sequence provides accurate, fast, and robust 3D metabolic imaging of the human brain at 3T. This will further facilitate the use of 3D-MRSI for neuroscience and clinical applications. PMID:24201013

  5. Susceptibility-weighted MR Imaging of Radiation Therapy-induced Cerebral Microbleeds in Patients with Glioma: A Comparison Between 3T and 7T

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Wei; Hess, Christopher P.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Lupo, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral microbleeds have been observed in normal-appearing brain tissue of patients with glioma years after receiving radiation therapy. The contrast of these paramagnetic lesions varies with field strength due to differences in the effects of susceptibility. The purpose of this study was to compare 3T and 7T MRI as platforms for detecting cerebral microbleeds in patients treated with radiotherapy using SWI. Methods SWI was performed with both 3T and 7T MR scanners on 10 patients with glioma who had received prior radiotherapy. Imaging sequences were optimized to obtain data within a clinically acceptable scan time. Both T2*-weighted magnitude images and SWI data were reconstructed, minimum-intensity projection was implemented, and microbleeds were manually identified. The number of microbleeds was counted and compared among datasets. Results Significantly more microbleeds were identified on SWI than magnitude images at both 7T (p=0.002) and 3T (p=0.023). 7T SWI detected significantly more microbleeds than 3T SWI for 7 out of 10 patients who had tumors located remote from deep brain regions (p=0.016), but when the additional 3 patients with more inferior tumors were included, the difference was not significant. Conclusion SWI is more sensitive for detecting microbleeds than magnitude images at both 3T and 7T. For areas without heightened susceptibility artifacts, 7T SWI is more sensitive to detecting radiation therapy-induced microbleeds than 3T SWI. Tumor location should be considered in conjunction with field strength when selecting the most appropriate strategy for imaging microbleeds. PMID:24281386

  6. In vivo conductivity imaging of canine male pelvis using a 3T MREIT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Jeong, W. C.; Kim, Y. T.; Minhas, A. S.; Lee, T. H.; Lim, C. Y.; Park, H. M.; Seo, J. K.; Woo, E. J.

    2010-04-01

    The prostate is an imaging area of growing concern related with aging. Prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are the most common diseases and significant cause of death for elderly men. Hence, the conductivity imaging of the male pelvis is a challenging task with a clinical significance. In this study, we performed in vivo MREIT imaging experiments of the canine male pelvis using a 3T MRI scanner. Adopting carbon-hydrogel electrodes and a multi-echo pulse sequence, we could inject as much as 10 mA current in a form of 51 ms pulse into the pelvis. Collecting magnetic flux density data inside the pelvis subject to multiple injection currents, we reconstructed cross-sectional conductivity images using a MREIT software package CoReHA. Scaled conductivity images of the prostate show a clear contrast between the central and peripheral zones which are related with prostate diseases including cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. In our future work, we will focus on prostate cancer model animal experiments.

  7. What is Scanner and NonScanner?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... (ERBE ADM). The scanner is designed for regional to large scale analysis, and due to the smaller footprint, the scanner product is able ... The large footprint (1000 km) is designed only for large scale analysis, thus products provide only all-sky data. Because the nonscanner ...

  8. An MR-conditional high-torque pneumatic stepper motor for MRI-guided and robot-assisted intervention.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Kwok, Ka-Wai; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging allows for visualizing detailed pathological and morphological changes of soft tissue. MR-conditional actuations have been widely investigated for development of image-guided and robot-assisted surgical devices under the Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This paper presents a simple design of MR-conditional stepper motor which can provide precise and high-torque actuation without adversely affecting the MR image quality. This stepper motor consists of two MR-conditional pneumatic cylinders and the corresponding supporting structures. Alternating the pressurized air can drive the motor to rotate each step in 3.6° with the motor coupled to a planetary gearbox. Experimental studies were conducted to validate its dynamics performance. Maximum 800 mN m output torque is achieved. The motor accuracy independently varied by two factors: motor operating speed and step size, was also investigated. The motor was tested within a 3T Siemens MRI scanner (MAGNETOM Skyra, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) and a 3T GE MRI scanner (GE SignaHDx, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA). The image artifact and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were evaluated for study of its MRI compliancy. The results show that the presented pneumatic stepper motor generated 2.35% SNR reduction in MR images. No observable artifact was presented besides the motor body itself. The proposed motor test also demonstrates a standard to evaluate the pneumatic motor capability for later incorporation with motorized devices used under MRI. PMID:24957635

  9. Clinical 3T MR imaging: mastering the challenges.

    PubMed

    Tanenbaum, Lawrence N

    2006-02-01

    3T MRI is ready to meet the needs of clinical practice. SAR limitations are minimized by technical advances and surface coils are available for all core applications. With appropriate adjustments to scanning protocols, one can master the challenges of scanning at 3T; studies of the brain, spine, chest, abdomen, pelvis, vasculature, and extremities can be consistently higher in quality than are those obtained at 1.5T. The superior studies that are obtainable at 3T have great appeal to clinicians who are sophisticated about MR technology in areas, such as neurology, orthopedics, vascular surgery, and oncology,and encourage a shift in referrals toward practices that invest in higher field technology. The greater sensitivity to magnetic susceptibility offers unique benefits in functional neuroimaging, and available software/hardware packages enhance clinical setting feasibility, which adds a source of new referrals. The greater overall signal of 3T can be manipulated to make scanning more comfortable and with less motion artifact because scan times could be half as long. Spectacular anatomic delineation that is provided by high-definition scanning at true 1024 resolution can improve preoperative assessment and may improve sensitivity to smaller lesions. 3T provides practices with an advantage that is sought increasingly by high field strength purchasers in a competitive market. Only cost considerations stand in the way of the eventual domination of 3T systems in the high field strength market. PMID:16530631

  10. Malformations of cortical development: 3T magnetic resonance imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Battal, Bilal; Ince, Selami; Akgun, Veysel; Kocaoglu, Murat; Ozcan, Emrah; Tasar, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Malformation of cortical development (MCD) is a term representing an inhomogeneous group of central nervous system abnormalities, referring particularly to embriyological aspect as a consequence of any of the three developmental stages, i.e., cell proliferation, cell migration and cortical organization. These include cotical dysgenesis, microcephaly, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, lissencephaly, hemimegalencephaly, heterotopia and focal cortical dysplasia. Since magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice that best identifies the structural anomalies of the brain cortex, we aimed to provide a mini review of MCD by using 3T magnetic resonance scanner images. PMID:26516429

  11. MRI Evaluation and Safety in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tocchio, Shannon; Kline-Fath, Beth; Kanal, Emanuel; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of the developing brain has dramatically increased over the last decade. Faster acquisitions and the development of advanced MRI sequences such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), perfusion imaging, functional MR imaging (fMRI), and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), as well as the use of higher magnetic field strengths has made MRI an invaluable tool for detailed evaluation of the developing brain. This article will provide an overview of the use and challenges associated with 1.5T and 3T static magnetic fields for evaluation of the developing brain. This review will also summarize the advantages, clinical challenges and safety concerns specifically related to MRI in the fetus and newborn, including the implications of increased magnetic field strength, logistics related to transporting and monitoring of neonates during scanning, sedation considerations and a discussion of current technologies such as MRI-conditional neonatal incubators and dedicated small-foot print neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) scanners. PMID:25743582

  12. Standardized quantitative measurements of wrist cartilage in healthy humans using 3T magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zink, Jean-Vincent; Souteyrand, Philippe; Guis, Sandrine; Chagnaud, Christophe; Fur, Yann Le; Militianu, Daniela; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Guye, Maxime; Bernard, Monique; Bendahan, David

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To quantify the wrist cartilage cross-sectional area in humans from a 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dataset and to assess the corresponding reproducibility. METHODS: The study was conducted in 14 healthy volunteers (6 females and 8 males) between 30 and 58 years old and devoid of articular pain. Subjects were asked to lie down in the supine position with the right hand positioned above the pelvic region on top of a home-built rigid platform attached to the scanner bed. The wrist was wrapped with a flexible surface coil. MRI investigations were performed at 3T (Verio-Siemens) using volume interpolated breath hold examination (VIBE) and dual echo steady state (DESS) MRI sequences. Cartilage cross sectional area (CSA) was measured on a slice of interest selected from a 3D dataset of the entire carpus and metacarpal-phalangeal areas on the basis of anatomical criteria using conventional image processing radiology software. Cartilage cross-sectional areas between opposite bones in the carpal region were manually selected and quantified using a thresholding method. RESULTS: Cartilage CSA measurements performed on a selected predefined slice were 292.4 ± 39 mm2 using the VIBE sequence and slightly lower, 270.4 ± 50.6 mm2, with the DESS sequence. The inter (14.1%) and intra (2.4%) subject variability was similar for both MRI methods. The coefficients of variation computed for the repeated measurements were also comparable for the VIBE (2.4%) and the DESS (4.8%) sequences. The carpus length averaged over the group was 37.5 ± 2.8 mm with a 7.45% between-subjects coefficient of variation. Of note, wrist cartilage CSA measured with either the VIBE or the DESS sequences was linearly related to the carpal bone length. The variability between subjects was significantly reduced to 8.4% when the CSA was normalized with respect to the carpal bone length. CONCLUSION: The ratio between wrist cartilage CSA and carpal bone length is a highly reproducible standardized

  13. Orbital and Intracranial Effects of Microgravity: 3T MRI Findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, L. A.; Sargsyan, A.; Hasan, K. M.; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Goals and Objectives of this presentation are: 1. To briefly describe a newly discovered clinical entity related to space flight. 2. To describe normal anatomy and pathologic changes of the optic nerve, posterior globe, optic nerve sheath and pituitary gland related to exposure to microgravity. 3. To correlate imaging findings with known signs of intracranial hypertension.

  14. Sodium MRI: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-05-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges, limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  15. Sodium MRI: Methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-01-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges and limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  16. Engineering for safety assurance in MRI: analytical, numerical and experimental dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Valentina

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered a safe technology since it does not use ionizing radiation with high energy to detach electrons from atoms or molecules. However, as in any healthcare intervention, even in an MRI diagnostic procedure there are intrinsic hazards that must be understood and taken into consideration. Moreover, given the increasing number of clinical MRI examinations and the widespread availability of MR scanners with high static magnetic fields (>3T), the consideration of possible risks and health effects associated with MRI procedures is gaining in importance and the term "dosimetry" has begun to be used also for non ionizing techniques as MRI. Engineering techniques are increasingly used in MRI to explain the interactions between electromagnetic fields and the human body, analyze aspects relative to signal and image generation, and assure patient and staff safety and comfort. In this review some engineering methods to quantify the interactions between MR fields and biological tissues will be reviewed and cataloged to aid the readers in finding resources for their own applications in MRI safety assurance. This paper should not be intended as another review of the biological effects of MRI but, for the reader's convenience, the possible hazards for each kind of MR magnetic field, will be briefly described. PMID:25660641

  17. Directly detected (55)Mn MRI: application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized (13)C MRI development.

    PubMed

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-12-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 ((55)Mn) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized (13)C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the (55)Mn and (13)C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective "(13)C" MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, (55)Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical (13)C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large (13)C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d=8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7 M) was scanned rapidly by (55)Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for (13)C, using a balanced steady state free precession acquisition. The requisite penetration of radiofrequency magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for (55)Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image signal-to-noise ratio of ~60 at 0.5 cm(3) spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP (13)C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  18. Final Report: A CdZnTe detector for MRI-compatible SPECT Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Ling-Jian

    2012-12-27

    The key objective of this project is to develop the enabling technology for future MRI-compatible nuclear (e.g. SPECT) imaging system, and to demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous MR and SPECT imaging studies of the same object. During the past three years, we have developed (a) a MRI-compatible ultrahigh resolution gamma ray detector and associated readout electronics, (b) a theoretical approach for modeling the effect of strong magnetic field on SPECT image quality, and (c) a maximum-likelihood (ML) based reconstruction routine with correction for the MR-induced distortion. With this support, we have also constructed a four-head MR-compatible SPECT system and tested the system inside a 3-T clinical MR-scanner located on UI campus. The experimental results obtained with this system have clearly demonstrated that sub-500um spatial resolution can be achieved with a SPECT system operated inside a 3-T MRI scanner. During the past three years, we have accomplished most of the major objectives outlined in the original proposal. These research efforts have laid out a solid foundation the development of future MR-compatible SPECT systems for both pre-clinical and clinical imaging applications.

  19. The Influence of Head Motion on Intrinsic Functional Connectivity MRI

    PubMed Central

    Van Dijk, Koene R.A.; Sabuncu, Mert R.; Buckner, Randy L.

    2011-01-01

    Functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) has been widely applied to explore group and individual differences. A confounding factor is head motion. Children move more than adults, older adults more than younger adults, and patients more than controls. Head motion varies considerably among individuals within the same population. Here we explored the influence of head motion on fcMRI estimates. Mean head displacement, maximum head displacement, the number of micro movements (> 0.1 mm), and head rotation were estimated in 1000 healthy, young adult subjects each scanned for two resting-state runs on matched 3T scanners. The majority of fcMRI variation across subjects was not linked to estimated head motion. However, head motion had significant, systematic effects on fcMRI network measures. Head motion was associated with decreased functional coupling in the default and frontoparietal control networks – two networks characterized by coupling among distributed regions of association cortex. Other network measures increased with motion including estimates of local functional coupling and coupling between left and right motor regions – a region pair sometimes used as a control in studies to establish specificity. Comparisons between groups of individuals with subtly different levels of head motion yielded difference maps that could be mistaken for neuronal effects in other contexts. These effects are important to consider when interpreting variation between groups and across individuals. PMID:21810475

  20. MRI-Compatible Pneumatic Robot for Transperineal Prostate Needle Placement

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Gregory S.; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; DiMaio, Simon P.; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high-quality 3-D visualization of prostate and surrounding tissue, thus granting potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. However, the benefits cannot be readily harnessed for interventional procedures due to difficulties that surround the use of high-field (1.5T or greater) MRI. The inability to use conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intraprostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. MRI compatibility of the robot has been evaluated under 3T MRI using standard prostate imaging sequences and average SNR loss is limited to 5%. Needle alignment accuracy of the robot under servo pneumatic control is better than 0.94 mm rms per axis. The complete system workflow has been evaluated in phantom studies with accurate visualization and targeting of five out of five 1 cm targets. The paper explains the robot mechanism and controller design, the system integration, and presents results of preliminary evaluation of the system. PMID:21057608

  1. MRI-Compatible Pneumatic Robot for Transperineal Prostate Needle Placement.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Gregory S; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; Dimaio, Simon P; Tempany, Clare M; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2008-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high-quality 3-D visualization of prostate and surrounding tissue, thus granting potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. However, the benefits cannot be readily harnessed for interventional procedures due to difficulties that surround the use of high-field (1.5T or greater) MRI. The inability to use conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intraprostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. MRI compatibility of the robot has been evaluated under 3T MRI using standard prostate imaging sequences and average SNR loss is limited to 5%. Needle alignment accuracy of the robot under servo pneumatic control is better than 0.94 mm rms per axis. The complete system workflow has been evaluated in phantom studies with accurate visualization and targeting of five out of five 1 cm targets. The paper explains the robot mechanism and controller design, the system integration, and presents results of preliminary evaluation of the system. PMID:21057608

  2. Scanner matching optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupers, Michiel; Klingbeil, Patrick; Tschischgale, Joerg; Buhl, Stefan; Hempel, Fritjof

    2009-03-01

    Cost of ownership of scanners for the manufacturing of front end layers is becoming increasingly expensive. The ability to quickly switch the production of a layer to another scanner in case it is down is important. This paper presents a method to match the scanner grids in the most optimal manner so that use of front end scanners in effect becomes interchangeable. A breakdown of the various components of overlay is given and we discuss methods to optimize the matching strategy in the fab. A concern here is how to separate the scanner and process induced effects. We look at the relative contributions of intrafield and interfield errors caused by the scanner and the process. Experimental results of a method to control the scanner grid are presented and discussed. We compare the overlay results before and after optimizing the scanner grids and show that the matching penalty is reduced by 20%. We conclude with some thoughts on the need to correct the remaining matching errors.

  3. In vivo CEST Imaging of Creatine (CrCEST) in Skeletal Muscle at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Feliks; Haris, Mohammad; Debrosse, Catherine; Singh, Anup; Nanga, Ravi P.; Cai, Kejia; Hariharan, Hari; Reddy, Ravinder

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) based technique to measure free creatine (Cr), a key component of muscle energy metabolism, distribution in skeletal muscle with high spatial resolution before and after exercise at 3T. Methods CrCEST saturation parameters were empirically optimized for 3T. CEST, T2, magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) acquisitions of the lower leg were performed before and after mild plantar flexion exercise on a 3T whole-body MR scanner on 6 healthy volunteers. Results The feasibility of imaging Cr changes in skeletal muscle following plantar flexion exercise using CrCEST was demonstrated at 3T. This technique exhibited good spatial resolution and was able to differentiate differences in muscle utilization among subjects. CrCEST results were compared with 31P MRS results showing good agreement in the Cr and PCr recovery kinetics. A relationship of 0.45 % CrCESTasym/mM Cr was observed across all subjects. Conclusion Demonstrated the CrCEST technique could be applied at 3T to measure dynamic changes in creatine in in vivo muscle. The widespread availability and clinical applicability of 3T scanners has the potential to clinically advance this method. PMID:24925857

  4. Scalable multichannel MRI data acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Bodurka, Jerzy; Ledden, Patrick J; van Gelderen, Peter; Chu, Renxin; de Zwart, Jacco A; Morris, Doug; Duyn, Jeff H

    2004-01-01

    A scalable multichannel digital MRI receiver system was designed to achieve high bandwidth echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisitions for applications such as BOLD-fMRI. The modular system design allows for easy extension to an arbitrary number of channels. A 16-channel receiver was developed and integrated with a General Electric (GE) Signa 3T VH/3 clinical scanner. Receiver performance was evaluated on phantoms and human volunteers using a custom-built 16-element receive-only brain surface coil array. At an output bandwidth of 1 MHz, a 100% acquisition duty cycle was achieved. Overall system noise figure and dynamic range were better than 0.85 dB and 84 dB, respectively. During repetitive EPI scanning on phantoms, the relative temporal standard deviation of the image intensity time-course was below 0.2%. As compared to the product birdcage head coil, 16-channel reception with the custom array yielded a nearly 6-fold SNR gain in the cerebral cortex and a 1.8-fold SNR gain in the center of the brain. The excellent system stability combined with the increased sensitivity and SENSE capabilities of 16-channel coils are expected to significantly benefit and enhance fMRI applications. PMID:14705057

  5. Tunable Resonant Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagu, Jean I.

    1987-01-01

    The most attractive features of resonant scanners are high reliability and eternal life as well as extremely low wobble and jitter. Power consumption is also low, electronic drive is simple, and the device is capable of handling large beams. All of these features are delivered at a low cost in a small package. The resonant scanner's use in numerous high precision applications, however, has been limited because of the difficulty in controlling its phase and resonant frequency. This paper introduces the concept of tunable/controllable resonant scanners, discusses their features, and offers a number of tuning techniques. It describes two angular scanner designs and presents data on tunable range and life tests. It also reviews applications for these new tunable resonant scanners that preserve the desirable features of earlier models while removing the old problems with synchronization or time base flexibility. The three major types of raster scanning applications where the tunable resonant scanner may be of benefit are: 1. In systems with multiple time bases such as multiple scanner networks or with scanners keyed to a common clock (the line frequency or data source) or a machine with multiple resonant scanners. A typical application is image and text transmission, also a printer with a large data base where a buffer is uneconomical. 2. In systems sharing data processing or laser equipment for reasons of cost or capacity, typically multiple work station manufacturing processes or graphic processes. 3. In systems with extremely precise time bases where the frequency stability of conventional scanners cannot be relied upon.

  6. Investigation of Holographic Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Lian Qin

    Holographic scanners are capable of challenging both the speed and resolution of polygon scanners. This work investigates, in detail, the design and operation of a holographic scanner with an aspherical reflector. The characteristics of this holographic scanner are presented through theoretical analyses and computer simulation. The calculated data and the experimental results show that this system has excellent scan line straightness and scan linearity. The influence of the eccentricity and wobble of the hologram on the quality of the scan lines can be minimized by proper choice of system parameters. This unique system can readily perform 1-D, 2 -D, 3-D and selective scans. These features make suitable applications for robot vision, part inspection, high speed printing, and input/output devices for computers. If the hologram is operating in the reflective mode, there are no transmissive components in this scanner. It can be used with acoustic waves and electromagnetic waves with longer wavelengths, such as infrared, microwaves, millimeter waves. Since it is difficult to find a suitable recording material for these waves, a technique for making computer -generated holograms has also been developed here. The practical considerations for making quality holograms are summarized. An improved coating process for photoresist and a novel anti-reflection setup for the hologram plate are developed. The detailed experimental processes are included. The planar grating scanner for one dimensional, two-dimensional and cross-scanning patterns is analyzed and demonstrated. A comparison is made with two other two-dimensional scanners.

  7. Dynamic diffusion tensor measurements in muscle tissue using Single Line Multiple Echo Diffusion Tensor Acquisition Technique at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Baete, Steven H.; Cho, Gene; Sigmund, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    When diffusion biomarkers display transient changes, i.e. in muscle following exercise, traditional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) methods lack temporal resolution to resolve the dynamics. This paper presents an MRI method for dynamic diffusion tensor acquisitions on a clinical 3T scanner. This method, SL-MEDITATE (Single Line Multiple Echo Diffusion Tensor Acquisition Technique) achieves a high temporal resolution (4s) (1) by rapid diffusion encoding through the acquisition of multiple echoes with unique diffusion sensitization and (2) by limiting the readout to a single line volume. The method is demonstrated in a rotating anisotropic phantom, in a flow phantom with adjustable flow speed, and in in vivo skeletal calf muscle of healthy volunteers following a plantar flexion exercise. The rotating and flow-varying phantom experiments show that SL-MEDITATE correctly identifies the rotation of the first diffusion eigenvector and the changes in diffusion tensor parameter magnitudes, respectively. Immediately following exercise, the in vivo mean diffusivity (MD) time-courses show, before the well-known increase, an initial decrease which is not typically observed in traditional DTI. In conclusion, SL-MEDITATE can be used to capture transient changes in tissue anisotropy in a single line. Future progress might allow for dynamic DTI when combined with appropriate k-space trajectories and compressed sensing reconstruction. PMID:25900166

  8. A 3T Sodium and Proton Composite Array Breast Coil

    PubMed Central

    Kaggie, Joshua D.; Hadley, J. Rock; Badal, James; Campbell, John R.; Park, Daniel J.; Parker, Dennis L.; Morrell, Glen; Newbould, Rexford D.; Wood, Ali F.; Bangerter, Neal K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to determine whether a sodium phased array would improve sodium breast MRI at 3T. The secondary objective was to create acceptable proton images with the sodium phased array in place. Methods A novel composite array for combined proton/sodium 3T breast MRI is compared to a coil with a single proton and sodium channel. The composite array consists of a 7-channel sodium receive array, a larger sodium transmit coil, and a 4-channel proton transceive array. The new composite array design utilizes smaller sodium receive loops than typically used in sodium imaging, uses novel decoupling methods between the receive loops and transmit loops, and uses a novel multi-channel proton transceive coil. The proton transceive coil reduces coupling between proton and sodium elements by intersecting the constituent loops to reduce their mutual inductance. The coil used for comparison consists of a concentric sodium and proton loop with passive decoupling traps. Results The composite array coil demonstrates a 2–5x improvement in SNR for sodium imaging and similar SNR for proton imaging when compared to a simple single-loop dual resonant design. Conclusion The improved SNR of the composite array gives breast sodium images of unprecedented quality in reasonable scan times. PMID:24105740

  9. Novel magnetomechanical MR compatible vibrational device for producing kinesthetic illusion during fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Sarah J.; Borreggine, Kristin; Heilman, Jeremiah; Griswold, Mark; Walter, Benjamin L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Functional MRI (fMRI) can provide insights into the functioning of the sensorimotor system, which is of particular interest in studying people with movement disorders or chronic pain conditions. This creates a demand for manipulanda that can fit and operate within the environment of a MRI scanner. Here, the authors present a magnetomechanical device that delivers a vibrotactile sensation to the skin with a force of approximately 9 N. Methods: MRI compatibility of the device was tested in a 3 T scanner using a phantom to simulate the head. Preliminary investigation into the effectiveness of the device at producing cortical and subcortical activity was also conducted with a group of seven healthy subjects. The vibration was applied to the right extensor carpi ulnaris tendon to induce a kinesthetic illusion of flexion and extension of the wrist. Results: The MRI compatibility tests showed the device did not produce image artifacts and the generated electromagnetic field did not disrupt the static magnetic field of the scanner or its operation. The subject group results showed activity in the contralateral putamen, premotor cortex, and dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex. Ipsilaterally, there was increased activity in the superior and inferior parietal lobules. Areas that activated bilaterally included the thalamus, anterior cingulate, secondary somatosensory areas (S2), temporal lobes, and visual association areas. Conclusions: This device offers an effective tool with precise control over the vibratory stimulus, delivering higher forces than some other types of devices (e.g., piezoelectric actuators). It can be useful for investigating sensory systems and sensorimotor integration. PMID:24320459

  10. Forensics for flatbed scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloe, Thomas; Franz, Elke; Winkler, Antje

    2007-02-01

    Within this article, we investigate possibilities for identifying the origin of images acquired with flatbed scanners. A current method for the identification of digital cameras takes advantage of image sensor noise, strictly speaking, the spatial noise. Since flatbed scanners and digital cameras use similar technologies, the utilization of image sensor noise for identifying the origin of scanned images seems to be possible. As characterization of flatbed scanner noise, we considered array reference patterns and sensor line reference patterns. However, there are particularities of flatbed scanners which we expect to influence the identification. This was confirmed by extensive tests: Identification was possible to a certain degree, but less reliable than digital camera identification. In additional tests, we simulated the influence of flatfielding and down scaling as examples for such particularities of flatbed scanners on digital camera identification. One can conclude from the results achieved so far that identifying flatbed scanners is possible. However, since the analyzed methods are not able to determine the image origin in all cases, further investigations are necessary.

  11. Initial tests of a prototype MRI-compatible PET imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Kross, Brain; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randy

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI, will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group (a collaboration of West Virginia University and Jefferson Lab) is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode with an active FOV of 5×5×4 cm 3. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements (2.5×2.5×15 mm 3) coupled through a long fiber optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel PSPMT. The fiber optic light guide is made of a glued assembly of 2 mm diameter acrylic fibers with a total length of 2.5 m. The use of a light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of the 3 T General Electric MRI scanner used in the tests. Photon attenuation in the light guides resulted in an energy resolution of ˜60% FWHM, interaction of the magnetic field with PSPMT further reduced energy resolution to ˜85% FWHM. Despite this effect, excellent multi-plane PET and MRI images of a simple disk phantom were acquired simultaneously. Future work includes improved light guides, optimized magnetic shielding for the PSPMTs, construction of specialized coils to permit high-resolution MRI imaging, and use of the system to perform simultaneous PET and MRI or MR-spectroscopy .

  12. 3-T MR-guided brachytherapy for gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Tina; Egger, Jan; Damato, Antonio; Schmidt, Ehud J; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2012-11-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Standard treatment for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancer cases includes external-beam radiation followed by brachytherapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is beneficial in diagnostic evaluation, in mapping the tumor location to tailor radiation dose and in monitoring the tumor response to treatment. Initial studies of MR guidance in gynecologic brachytherapy demonstrate the ability to optimize tumor coverage and reduce radiation dose to normal tissues, resulting in improved outcomes for patients. In this article, we describe a methodology to aid applicator placement and treatment planning for 3 Tesla (3-T) MR-guided brachytherapy that was developed specifically for gynecologic cancers. This methodology has been used in 18 cases from September 2011 to May 2012 in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating (AMIGO) suite at Brigham and Women's Hospital. AMIGO comprises state-of-the-art tools for MR imaging, image analysis and treatment planning. An MR sequence using three-dimensional (3D)-balanced steady-state free precession in a 3-T MR scanner was identified as the best sequence for catheter identification with ballooning artifact at the tip. 3D treatment planning was performed using MR images. Items in development include software designed to support virtual needle trajectory planning that uses probabilistic bias correction, graph-based segmentation and image registration algorithms. The results demonstrate that 3-T MR image guidance has a role in gynecologic brachytherapy. These novel developments have the potential to improve targeted treatment to the tumor while sparing the normal tissues. PMID:22898699

  13. MRI Catheterization in Cardiopulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Toby; Ratnayaka, Kanishka

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognostication in patients with complex cardiopulmonary disease can be a clinical challenge. A new procedure, MRI catheterization, involves invasive right-sided heart catheterization performed inside the MRI scanner using MRI instead of traditional radiographic fluoroscopic guidance. MRI catheterization combines simultaneous invasive hemodynamic and MRI functional assessment in a single radiation-free procedure. By combining both modalities, the many individual limitations of invasive catheterization and noninvasive imaging can be overcome, and additional clinical questions can be addressed. Today, MRI catheterization is a clinical reality in specialist centers in the United States and Europe. Advances in medical device design for the MRI environment will enable not only diagnostic but also interventional MRI procedures to be performed within the next few years. PMID:24394821

  14. Pneumatically Operated MRI-Compatible Needle Placement Robot for Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Gregory S.; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; Mewes, Philip W.; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. The strong magnetic field prevents the use of conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intra-prostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. The robot performs needle insertion under real-time 3T MR image guidance; workspace requirements, MR compatibility, and workflow have been evaluated on phantoms. The paper explains the robot mechanism and controller design and presents results of preliminary evaluation of the system. PMID:21686038

  15. Liquid-explosives scanners stand trial in airports

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Jermey N. A.

    2010-07-15

    Air passengers may once more be allowed to pack beverages, lotions, and hair spray in their carry-on luggage, if imaging technologies to detect liquid explosives can prove their worth. Several competing systems, including multi-energy x-ray systems and a low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, are undergoing field tests at some airports worldwide.

  16. Portable biochip scanner device

    DOEpatents

    Perov, Alexander; Sharonov, Alexei; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2002-01-01

    A portable biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips (biochips) is provided. The portable biochip scanner device employs a laser for emitting an excitation beam. An optical fiber delivers the laser beam to a portable biochip scanner. A lens collimates the laser beam, the collimated laser beam is deflected by a dichroic mirror and focused by an objective lens onto a biochip. The fluorescence light from the biochip is collected and collimated by the objective lens. The fluorescence light is delivered to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) via an emission filter and a focusing lens. The focusing lens focuses the fluorescence light into a pinhole. A signal output of the PMT is processed and displayed.

  17. Biochip scanner device

    DOEpatents

    Perov, Alexander; Belgovskiy, Alexander I.; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2001-01-01

    A biochip scanner device used to detect and acquire fluorescence signal data from biological microchips or biochips and method of use are provided. The biochip scanner device includes a laser for emitting a laser beam. A modulator, such as an optical chopper modulates the laser beam. A scanning head receives the modulated laser beam and a scanning mechanics coupled to the scanning head moves the scanning head relative to the biochip. An optical fiber delivers the modulated laser beam to the scanning head. The scanning head collects the fluorescence light from the biochip, launches it into the same optical fiber, which delivers the fluorescence into a photodetector, such as a photodiode. The biochip scanner device is used in a row scanning method to scan selected rows of the biochip with the laser beam size matching the size of the immobilization site.

  18. Automatic EEG-assisted retrospective motion correction for fMRI (aE-REMCOR).

    PubMed

    Wong, Chung-Ki; Zotev, Vadim; Misaki, Masaya; Phillips, Raquel; Luo, Qingfei; Bodurka, Jerzy

    2016-04-01

    Head motions during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) impair fMRI data quality and introduce systematic artifacts that can affect interpretation of fMRI results. Electroencephalography (EEG) recordings performed simultaneously with fMRI provide high-temporal-resolution information about ongoing brain activity as well as head movements. Recently, an EEG-assisted retrospective motion correction (E-REMCOR) method was introduced. E-REMCOR utilizes EEG motion artifacts to correct the effects of head movements in simultaneously acquired fMRI data on a slice-by-slice basis. While E-REMCOR is an efficient motion correction approach, it involves an independent component analysis (ICA) of the EEG data and identification of motion-related ICs. Here we report an automated implementation of E-REMCOR, referred to as aE-REMCOR, which we developed to facilitate the application of E-REMCOR in large-scale EEG-fMRI studies. The aE-REMCOR algorithm, implemented in MATLAB, enables an automated preprocessing of the EEG data, an ICA decomposition, and, importantly, an automatic identification of motion-related ICs. aE-REMCOR has been used to perform retrospective motion correction for 305 fMRI datasets from 16 subjects, who participated in EEG-fMRI experiments conducted on a 3T MRI scanner. Performance of aE-REMCOR has been evaluated based on improvement in temporal signal-to-noise ratio (TSNR) of the fMRI data, as well as correction efficiency defined in terms of spike reduction in fMRI motion parameters. The results show that aE-REMCOR is capable of substantially reducing head motion artifacts in fMRI data. In particular, when there are significant rapid head movements during the scan, a large TSNR improvement and high correction efficiency can be achieved. Depending on a subject's motion, an average TSNR improvement over the brain upon the application of aE-REMCOR can be as high as 27%, with top ten percent of the TSNR improvement values exceeding 55%. The average

  19. The Safety of Using Body-Transmit MRI in Patients with Implanted Deep Brain Stimulation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Joshua; Papadaki, Anastasia; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Thornton, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with movement disorders. Patients receiving chronic DBS provide a unique opportunity to explore the underlying mechanisms of DBS using functional MRI. It has been shown that the main safety concern with MRI in these patients is heating at the electrode tips – which can be minimised with strict adherence to a supervised acquisition protocol using a head-transmit/receive coil at 1.5T. MRI using the body-transmit coil with a multi-channel receive head coil has a number of potential advantages including an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Study outline We compared the safety of cranial MRI in an in vitro model of bilateral DBS using both head-transmit and body-transmit coils. We performed fibre-optic thermometry at a Medtronic ActivaPC device and Medtronic 3389 electrodes during turbo-spin echo (TSE) MRI using both coil arrangements at 1.5T and 3T, in addition to gradient-echo echo-planar fMRI exposure at 1.5T. Finally, we investigated the effect of transmit-coil choice on DBS stimulus delivery during MRI. Results Temperature increases were consistently largest at the electrode tips. Changing from head- to body-transmit coil significantly increased the electrode temperature elevation during TSE scans with scanner-reported head SAR 0.2W/kg from 0.45°C to 0.79°C (p<0.001) at 1.5T, and from 1.25°C to 1.44°C (p<0.001) at 3T. The position of the phantom relative to the body coil significantly impacted on electrode heating at 1.5T; however, the greatest heating observed in any position tested remained <1°C at this field strength. Conclusions We conclude that (1) with our specific hardware and SAR-limited protocol, body-transmit cranial MRI at 1.5T does not produce heating exceeding international guidelines, even in cases of poorly positioned patients, (2) cranial MRI at 3T can readily produce heating exceeding international guidelines, (3) patients with ActivaPC Medtronic systems are safe

  20. MRI-powered Actuators for Robotic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Vartholomeos, Panagiotis; Qin, Lei; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel actuation technology for robotically assisted MRI-guided interventional procedures. Compact and wireless, the actuators are both powered and controlled by the MRI scanner. The design concept and performance limits are described and derived analytically. Simulation and experiments in a clinical MR scanner are used to validate the analysis and to demonstrate the capability of the approach for needle biopsies. The concepts of actuator locking mechanisms and multi-axis control are also introduced. PMID:22287082

  1. Helmholtz-pair transmit coil with integrated receive array for high-resolution MRI of trabecular bone in the distal tibia at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Alexander C.; Lemdiasov, Rostislav; Connick, Thomas J.; Bhagat, Yusuf A.; Magland, Jeremy F.; Song, Hee Kwon; Toddes, Steven P.; Ludwig, Reinhold; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2011-01-01

    A Helmholtz-pair local transmit RF coil with an integrated four-element receive array RF coil and foot immobilization platform was designed and constructed for imaging the distal tibia in a whole-body 7 T MRI scanner. Simulations and measurements of the B1 field distribution of the transmit coil are described, along with SAR considerations for operation at 7 T. Results of imaging the trabecular bone of three volunteers at 1.5 T, 3 T and 7 T are presented, using identical 1.5 T and 3 T versions of the 7 T four-element receive array. The spatially registered images reveal improved visibility for individual trabeculae and show average gains in SNR of 2.8x and 4.9x for imaging at 7 T compared to 3 T and 1.5 T, respectively. The results thus display an approximately linear dependence of SNR with field strength and enable the practical utility of 7 T scanners for micro-MRI of trabecular bone. PMID:21402488

  2. 3DQRS: A method to obtain reliable QRS complex detection within high field MRI using 12-lead ECG traces

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, T. Stan; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Zhang, Shelley Hualei; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a technique that accurately detects the QRS complex in 1.5T, 3T and 7T MRI scanners.” Theory and Methods During early systole, blood is rapidly ejected into the aortic arch, traveling perpendicular to the MRI’s main field, which produces a strong voltage (VMHD) that eclipses the QRS complex. Greater complexity arises in arrhythmia patients, since VMHD can vary between sinus-rhythm and arrhythmic beats. The 3DQRS method uses a kernel consisting of 6 ECG precordial leads, compiled from a 12-lead ECG performed outside the magnet. The kernel is cross-correlated with signals acquired inside the MRI in order to identify the QRS complex in real time. The 3DQRS method was evaluated against a Vectorcardiogram-based (VCG) approach in 2 Premature Ventricular Contraction (PVC) and 2 Atrial Fibrillation (AF) patients, a healthy exercising athlete and 8 healthy volunteers, within 1.5T and 3T MRIs, using a prototype MRI-conditional 12 lead ECG system. 2 volunteers were recorded at 7T using a Holter recorder. Results For QRS complex detection, 3DQRS subject-averaged sensitivity levels, relative to VCG were: 1.5T (100% vs. 96.7%), 3T (98.9% vs. 92.2%), 7T (96.2% vs. 77.7%). Conclusions The 3DQRS method was shown to be more effective in cardiac gating than a conventional VCG-based method. PMID:24453116

  3. Hybrid Dispersion Laser Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Goda, K.; Mahjoubfar, A.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2012-01-01

    Laser scanning technology is one of the most integral parts of today's scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and biomedicine. In many applications, high-speed scanning capability is essential for scanning a large area in a short time and multi-dimensional sensing of moving objects and dynamical processes with fine temporal resolution. Unfortunately, conventional laser scanners are often too slow, resulting in limited precision and utility. Here we present a new type of laser scanner that offers ∼1,000 times higher scan rates than conventional state-of-the-art scanners. This method employs spatial dispersion of temporally stretched broadband optical pulses onto the target, enabling inertia-free laser scans at unprecedented scan rates of nearly 100 MHz at 800 nm. To show our scanner's broad utility, we use it to demonstrate unique and previously difficult-to-achieve capabilities in imaging, surface vibrometry, and flow cytometry at a record 2D raster scan rate of more than 100 kHz with 27,000 resolvable points. PMID:22685627

  4. Optical fuel pin scanner

    DOEpatents

    Kirchner, Tommy L.; Powers, Hurshal G.

    1983-01-01

    An optical scanner for indicia arranged in a focal plane at a cylindrical outside surface by use of an optical system including a rotatable dove prism. The dove prism transmits a rotating image of an encircled cylindrical surface area to a stationary photodiode array.

  5. Freestanding Complex Optical Scanners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisbie, David A.

    A complex freestanding optical mark recognition (OMR) scanner is one which is not on-line to an external processor; it has intelligence stemming from an internal processor located within the unit or system. The advantages and disadvantages of a complex OMR can best be assessed after identifying the scanning needs and constraints of the potential…

  6. What Scanner products are available?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... There are single satellite and combined-satellite scanner products. The best source for these data is to order the ERBE scanner CD which gives all the S4G monthly mean 2.5 degree gridded data from ...

  7. Design and Application of a New Automated Fluidic Visceral Stimulation Device for Human fMRI Studies of Interoception

    PubMed Central

    Gassert, Roger; Wanek, Johann; Michels, Lars; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kollias, Spyros S.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping the brain centers that mediate the sensory-perceptual processing of visceral afferent signals arising from the body (i.e., interoception) is useful both for characterizing normal brain activity and for understanding clinical disorders related to abnormal processing of visceral sensation. Here, we report a novel closed-system, electrohydrostatically driven master–slave device that was designed and constructed for delivering controlled fluidic stimulations of visceral organs and inner cavities of the human body within the confines of a 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The design concept and performance of the device in the MRI environment are described. In addition, the device was applied during a functional MRI (fMRI) investigation of visceral stimulation related to detrusor distention in two representative subjects to verify its feasibility in humans. System evaluation tests demonstrate that the device is MR-compatible with negligible impact on imaging quality [static signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss <2.5% and temporal SNR loss <3.5%], and has an accuracy of 99.68% for flow rate and 99.27% for volume delivery. A precise synchronization of the stimulus delivery with fMRI slice acquisition was achieved by programming the proposed device to detect the 5 V transistor–transistor logic (TTL) trigger signals generated by the MRI scanner. The fMRI data analysis using the general linear model analysis with the standard hemodynamic response function showed increased activations in the network of brain regions that included the insula, anterior and mid-cingulate and lateral prefrontal cortices, and thalamus in response to increased distension pressure on viscera. The translation from manually operated devices to an MR-compatible and MR-synchronized device under automatic control represents a useful innovation for clinical neuroimaging studies of human interoception. PMID:27551646

  8. Design and Application of a New Automated Fluidic Visceral Stimulation Device for Human fMRI Studies of Interoception.

    PubMed

    Jarrahi, Behnaz; Gassert, Roger; Wanek, Johann; Michels, Lars; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kollias, Spyros S

    2016-01-01

    Mapping the brain centers that mediate the sensory-perceptual processing of visceral afferent signals arising from the body (i.e., interoception) is useful both for characterizing normal brain activity and for understanding clinical disorders related to abnormal processing of visceral sensation. Here, we report a novel closed-system, electrohydrostatically driven master-slave device that was designed and constructed for delivering controlled fluidic stimulations of visceral organs and inner cavities of the human body within the confines of a 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The design concept and performance of the device in the MRI environment are described. In addition, the device was applied during a functional MRI (fMRI) investigation of visceral stimulation related to detrusor distention in two representative subjects to verify its feasibility in humans. System evaluation tests demonstrate that the device is MR-compatible with negligible impact on imaging quality [static signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss <2.5% and temporal SNR loss <3.5%], and has an accuracy of 99.68% for flow rate and 99.27% for volume delivery. A precise synchronization of the stimulus delivery with fMRI slice acquisition was achieved by programming the proposed device to detect the 5 V transistor-transistor logic (TTL) trigger signals generated by the MRI scanner. The fMRI data analysis using the general linear model analysis with the standard hemodynamic response function showed increased activations in the network of brain regions that included the insula, anterior and mid-cingulate and lateral prefrontal cortices, and thalamus in response to increased distension pressure on viscera. The translation from manually operated devices to an MR-compatible and MR-synchronized device under automatic control represents a useful innovation for clinical neuroimaging studies of human interoception. PMID:27551646

  9. Advances in Clinical PET/MRI Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Hans; Lerche, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the first whole-body PET/MRI scanners installed for clinical use were the sequential Philips PET/MRI with PMT-based, TOF-capable technology and the integrated simultaneous Siemens PET/MRI. Avalanche photodiodes as non-magneto-sensitive readout electronics allowed PET integrated within the MRI. The experiences with these scanners showed that improvements of software aspects, such as attenuation correction, were necessary and that efficient protocols combining optimally PET and MRI must be still developed. In 2014, General Electric issued an integrated PET/MRI with SiPM-based PET detectors, allowing TOF-PET. Looking at the MRI components of current PET/MR imaging systems, primary improvements come from sequences and new coils. PMID:26952724

  10. Hybrid 18F-FDG PET-MRI of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis: initial results.

    PubMed

    Miese, Falk; Scherer, Axel; Ostendorf, Benedikt; Heinzel, Alexander; Lanzman, Rotem S; Kröpil, Patric; Blondin, Dirk; Hautzel, Hubertus; Wittsack, Hans-Jörg; Schneider, Matthias; Antoch, Gerald; Herzog, Hans; Shah, N Jon

    2011-09-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (18F-FDG PET) is highly sensitive to inflammatory changes within the synovial tissue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the highest spatial resolution for soft tissue can be achieved with MRI. Here, we report on the first true hybrid PET-MRI examination of the hand in early RA exploiting the advantages of both modalities. PET-MRI was performed with a prototype of an APD-based magneto-insensitive BrainPET detector (Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) operated within a standard 3T MR scanner (MAGNETOM Trio, Siemens). PET images were normalized, random, attenuation and scatter-corrected, iteratively reconstructed and calibrated to yield standardized uptake values (SUV) of 18F-FDG uptake. T1-weighted TSE in coronal as well as sagittal orientation prior to and following Gadolinium administration were acquired. Increased 18F-FDG uptake was present in synovitis and tenovaginitis as identified on contrast-enhanced MRI. The tracer distribution was surrounding the metacarpophalangeal joints II and III. Maximum SUV of 3.1 was noted. In RA, true hybrid 18F-FDG PET-MRI of the hand is technically feasible and bears the potential to directly visualize inflammation. PMID:21590292

  11. MARGA: multispectral adaptive region growing algorithm for brain extraction on axial MRI.

    PubMed

    Roura, Eloy; Oliver, Arnau; Cabezas, Mariano; Vilanova, Joan C; Rovira, Alex; Ramió-Torrentà, Lluís; Lladó, Xavier

    2014-02-01

    Brain extraction, also known as skull stripping, is one of the most important preprocessing steps for many automatic brain image analysis. In this paper we present a new approach called Multispectral Adaptive Region Growing Algorithm (MARGA) to perform the skull stripping process. MARGA is based on a region growing (RG) algorithm which uses the complementary information provided by conventional magnetic resonance images (MRI) such as T1-weighted and T2-weighted to perform the brain segmentation. MARGA can be seen as an extension of the skull stripping method proposed by Park and Lee (2009) [1], enabling their use in both axial views and low quality images. Following the same idea, we first obtain seed regions that are then spread using a 2D RG algorithm which behaves differently in specific zones of the brain. This adaptation allows to deal with the fact that middle MRI slices have better image contrast between the brain and non-brain regions than superior and inferior brain slices where the contrast is smaller. MARGA is validated using three different databases: 10 simulated brains from the BrainWeb database; 2 data sets from the National Alliance for Medical Image Computing (NAMIC) database, the first one consisting in 10 normal brains and 10 brains of schizophrenic patients acquired with a 3T GE scanner, and the second one consisting in 5 brains from lupus patients acquired with a 3T Siemens scanner; and 10 brains of multiple sclerosis patients acquired with a 1.5T scanner. We have qualitatively and quantitatively compared MARGA with the well-known Brain Extraction Tool (BET), Brain Surface Extractor (BSE) and Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) approaches. The obtained results demonstrate the validity of MARGA, outperforming the results of those standard techniques. PMID:24380649

  12. Tracking cells implanted into cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ito-Fujishiro, Yasuyo; Koie, Hiroshi; Shibata, Hiroaki; Okabayashi, Sachi; Katakai, Yuko; Ohno, Chieko; Kanayama, Kiichi; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Ageyama, Naohide

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative therapy with stem cell transplantation is used to treat various diseases such as coronary syndrome and Buerger’s disease. For instance, stem-cell transplantation into the infarcted myocardium is an innovative and promising strategy for treating heart failure due to ischemic heart disease. Basic studies using small animals have shown that transplanted cells improve blood flow in the infarcted region. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can noninvasively identify and track transplanted cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO). Although clinical regenerative therapies have been clinically applied to patients, the fate of implanted cells remains unknown. In addition, follow-up studies have shown that some adverse events can occur after recovery. Therefore, the present study evaluated the ability of MRI using a 3T scanner to track implanted peripheral blood mononuclear cells labeled with SPIO on days 0 and 7 after intramuscular (i.m.) and intravenous (i.v.) injection into a cynomolgus monkey. Labeled cells were visualized at the liver and triceps surae muscle on MR images using T1- and T2-weighted sequences and histologically localized by Prussian blue staining. The transplanted cells were tracked without abnormal clinical manifestations throughout this study. Hence, MRI of cynomolgus monkey transplanted SPIO-labeled cells is a safe and efficient method of tracking labeled cells that could help to determine the mechanisms involved in regenerative therapy. PMID:27062993

  13. Tracking cells implanted into cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) using MRI.

    PubMed

    Ito-Fujishiro, Yasuyo; Koie, Hiroshi; Shibata, Hiroaki; Okabayashi, Sachi; Katakai, Yuko; Ohno, Chieko; Kanayama, Kiichi; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Ageyama, Naohide

    2016-07-29

    Regenerative therapy with stem cell transplantation is used to treat various diseases such as coronary syndrome and Buerger's disease. For instance, stem-cell transplantation into the infarcted myocardium is an innovative and promising strategy for treating heart failure due to ischemic heart disease. Basic studies using small animals have shown that transplanted cells improve blood flow in the infarcted region. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can noninvasively identify and track transplanted cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO). Although clinical regenerative therapies have been clinically applied to patients, the fate of implanted cells remains unknown. In addition, follow-up studies have shown that some adverse events can occur after recovery. Therefore, the present study evaluated the ability of MRI using a 3T scanner to track implanted peripheral blood mononuclear cells labeled with SPIO on days 0 and 7 after intramuscular (i.m.) and intravenous (i.v.) injection into a cynomolgus monkey. Labeled cells were visualized at the liver and triceps surae muscle on MR images using T1- and T2-weighted sequences and histologically localized by Prussian blue staining. The transplanted cells were tracked without abnormal clinical manifestations throughout this study. Hence, MRI of cynomolgus monkey transplanted SPIO-labeled cells is a safe and efficient method of tracking labeled cells that could help to determine the mechanisms involved in regenerative therapy. PMID:27062993

  14. Temperature dependence of relaxation times and temperature mapping in ultra-low-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesanen, Panu T.; Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Dabek, Juhani; Parkkonen, Lauri T.; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.

    2013-10-01

    Ultra-low-field MRI is an emerging technology that allows MRI and NMR measurements in microtesla-range fields. In this work, the possibilities of relaxation-based temperature measurements with ultra-low-field MRI were investigated by measuring T1 and T2 relaxation times of agarose gel at 50 μT-52 mT and at temperatures 5-45 °C. Measurements with a 3 T scanner were made for comparison. The Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound relaxation theory was combined with a two-state model to explain the field-strength and temperature dependence of the data. The results show that the temperature dependencies of agarose gel T1 and T2 in the microtesla range differ drastically from those at 3 T; the effect of temperature on T1 is reversed at approximately 5 mT. The obtained results were used to reconstruct temperature maps from ultra-low-field scans. These time-dependent temperature maps measured from an agarose gel phantom at 50 μT reproduced the temperature gradient with good contrast.

  15. LIGA Scanner Control Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-02-01

    The LIGA Scanner Software is a graphical user interface package that facilitates controlling the scanning operation of x-rays from a synchrotron and sample manipulation for making LIGA parts. The process requires scanning of the LIGA mask and the PMMA resist through a stationary x-ray beam to provide an evenly distributed x-ray exposure over the wafer. This software package has been written specifically to interface with Aerotech motor controllers.

  16. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... tell your health care provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves ...

  17. High throughput optical scanner

    DOEpatents

    Basiji, David A.; van den Engh, Gerrit J.

    2001-01-01

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  18. Turbulent Kinetic Energy Measurement Using Phase Contrast MRI for Estimating the Post-Stenotic Pressure Drop: In Vitro Validation and Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Huh, Hyung Kyu; Lee, Sang Joon; Koo, Hyun Jung; Kang, Joon-Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Dae-Hee; Kim, Young-Hak

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the measurement of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been introduced as an alternative index for quantifying energy loss through the cardiac valve, experimental verification and clinical application of this parameter are still required. Objectives The goal of this study is to verify MRI measurements of TKE by using a phantom stenosis with particle image velocimetry (PIV) as the reference standard. In addition, the feasibility of measuring TKE with MRI is explored. Methods MRI measurements of TKE through a phantom stenosis was performed by using clinical 3T MRI scanner. The MRI measurements were verified experimentally by using PIV as the reference standard. In vivo application of MRI-driven TKE was explored in seven patients with aortic valve disease and one healthy volunteer. Transvalvular gradients measured by MRI and echocardiography were compared. Results MRI and PIV measurements of TKE are consistent for turbulent flow (0.666 < R2 < 0.738) with a mean difference of −11.13 J/m3 (SD = 4.34 J/m3). Results of MRI and PIV measurements differ by 2.76 ± 0.82 cm/s (velocity) and −11.13 ± 4.34 J/m3 (TKE) for turbulent flow (Re > 400). The turbulence pressure drop correlates strongly with total TKE (R2 = 0.986). However, in vivo measurements of TKE are not consistent with the transvalvular pressure gradient estimated by echocardiography. Conclusions These results suggest that TKE measurement via MRI may provide a potential benefit as an energy-loss index to characterize blood flow through the aortic valve. However, further clinical studies are necessary to reach definitive conclusions regarding this technique. PMID:26978529

  19. 51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner building 105 from upper catwalk level showing emanating waveguides from upper switch (upper one-fourth of photograph) and emanating waveguides from lower radar scanner switch in vertical runs. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  20. An optically powered CMOS tracking system for 3 T magnetic resonance environment.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, Baykal; Tumer, Murat; Cindemir, Umut; Camli, Berk; Dundar, Gunhan; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Yalcinkaya, Arda D

    2015-02-01

    In this work, a fully optical Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) based catheter tracking system designed for 3 T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) environment is presented. The system aims to solve the Radio Frequency (RF) induced heating problem present in conventional wired catheter tracking systems used in MRI. It is based on an integrated circuit, consisting of a receiver and an optical power supply unit. The optical power supply unit includes a single on-chip photodiode and a DC-DC converter that boosts the low photodiode voltage output to voltages greater than 1.5 V. Through an optically driven switch, the accumulated charge on an a storage capacitor is transferred to the rest of the system. This operation is novel in the way that it is fully optical and the switch control is done through modulation of the applied light. An on-chip local oscillator signal for the receiver is avoided by application of an RF signal that is generated by the MRI machine at the receiving period. The signals received by a micro-coil antenna are processed by the on-chip direct conversion receiver. The processed signal is then transferred, also optically, to the outside world for tracking purposes. The frequency encoding method is used for MRI tracking. Operation with various levels of external optical power does not generate noticeble temperature increase in the system. The overall system is successfully tested in a 3 T MRI machine to demonstrate its full operation. PMID:24893369

  1. Integrated display scanner

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-12-21

    A display scanner includes an optical panel having a plurality of stacked optical waveguides. The waveguides define an inlet face at one end and a screen at an opposite end, with each waveguide having a core laminated between cladding. A projector projects a scan beam of light into the panel inlet face for transmission from the screen as a scan line to scan a barcode. A light sensor at the inlet face detects a return beam reflected from the barcode into the screen. A decoder decodes the return beam detected by the sensor for reading the barcode. In an exemplary embodiment, the optical panel also displays a visual image thereon.

  2. Novel artefact removal algorithms for co-registered EEG/fMRI based on selective averaging and subtraction.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Jan C; van Houdt, Petra J; Gonçalves, Sónia I; van Wegen, Erwin; Ossenblok, Pauly P W

    2013-01-01

    Co-registered EEG and functional MRI (EEG/fMRI) is a potential clinical tool for planning invasive EEG in patients with epilepsy. In addition, the analysis of EEG/fMRI data provides a fundamental insight into the precise physiological meaning of both fMRI and EEG data. Routine application of EEG/fMRI for localization of epileptic sources is hampered by large artefacts in the EEG, caused by switching of scanner gradients and heartbeat effects. Residuals of the ballistocardiogram (BCG) artefacts are similarly shaped as epileptic spikes, and may therefore cause false identification of spikes. In this study, new ideas and methods are presented to remove gradient artefacts and to reduce BCG artefacts of different shapes that mutually overlap in time. Gradient artefacts can be removed efficiently by subtracting an average artefact template when the EEG sampling frequency and EEG low-pass filtering are sufficient in relation to MR gradient switching (Gonçalves et al., 2007). When this is not the case, the gradient artefacts repeat themselves at time intervals that depend on the remainder between the fMRI repetition time and the closest multiple of the EEG acquisition time. These repetitions are deterministic, but difficult to predict due to the limited precision by which these timings are known. Therefore, we propose to estimate gradient artefact repetitions using a clustering algorithm, combined with selective averaging. Clustering of the gradient artefacts yields cleaner EEG for data recorded during scanning of a 3T scanner when using a sampling frequency of 2048 Hz. It even gives clean EEG when the EEG is sampled with only 256 Hz. Current BCG artefacts-reduction algorithms based on average template subtraction have the intrinsic limitation that they fail to deal properly with artefacts that overlap in time. To eliminate this constraint, the precise timings of artefact overlaps were modelled and represented in a sparse matrix. Next, the artefacts were disentangled with

  3. The Holy Grail in diagnostic neuroradiology: 3T or 3D?

    PubMed Central

    Pouwels, Petra J. W.; Wattjes, Mike P.

    2010-01-01

    Many technical developments keep occurring in the field of MRI that could benefit image acquisition in the field of diagnostic neuroradiology. While there is much focus on the potential advantages of 3T and higher field strengths, it is often unclear whether these are cosmetic only, or convey clinically relevant diagnostic value. The increased signal-to-noise at 3T is certainly beneficial in different ways particularly for the acquisition of isotropic 3D sequences like FLAIR. Single-slab 3D sequences can now be obtained with multiple contrasts in clinically attainable data acquisition times and could revolutionize MRI to evolve into a fundamentally multi-planar technique, rather similar to what has happened with the introduction of multi-detector row CT. PMID:21181406

  4. On the validity of 3D polymer gel dosimetry: III. MRI-related error sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; De Deene, Yves

    2013-01-01

    In MRI (PAGAT) polymer gel dosimetry, there exists some controversy on the validity of 3D dose verifications of clinical treatments. The relative contribution of important sources of uncertainty in MR scanning to the overall accuracy and precision of 3D MRI polymer gel dosimetry is quantified in this study. The performance in terms of signal-to-noise and imaging artefacts was evaluated on three different MR scanners (two 1.5 T and a 3 T scanner). These include: (1) B0-field inhomogeneity, (2) B1-field inhomogeneity, (3) dielectric effects (losses and standing waves) and (4) temperature inhomogeneity during scanning. B0-field inhomogeneities that amount to maximum 5 ppm result in dose deviations of up to 4.3% and deformations of up to 5 pixels. Compensation methods are proposed. B1-field inhomogeneities were found to induce R2 variations in large anthropomorphic phantoms both at 1.5 and 3 T. At 1.5 T these effects are mainly caused by the coil geometry resulting in dose deviations of up to 25%. After the correction of the R2 maps using a heuristic flip angle-R2 relation, these dose deviations are reduced to 2.4%. At 3 T, the dielectric properties of the gel phantoms are shown to strongly influence B1-field homogeneity, hence R2 homogeneity, especially of large anthropomorphic phantoms. The low electrical conductivity of polymer gel dosimeters induces standing wave patterns resulting in dose deviations up to 50%. Increasing the conductivity of the gel by adding NaCl reduces the dose deviation to 25% after which the post-processing is successful in reducing the remaining inhomogeneities caused by the coil geometry to within 2.4%. The measurements are supported by computational modelling of the B1-field. Finally, temperature fluctuations of 1 °C frequently encountered in clinical MRI scanners result in dose deviations up to 15%. It is illustrated that with adequate temperature stabilization, the dose uncertainty is reduced to within 2.58%. Both authors contributed

  5. On the validity of 3D polymer gel dosimetry: III. MRI-related error sources.

    PubMed

    Vandecasteele, Jan; De Deene, Yves

    2013-01-01

    In MRI (PAGAT) polymer gel dosimetry, there exists some controversy on the validity of 3D dose verifications of clinical treatments. The relative contribution of important sources of uncertainty in MR scanning to the overall accuracy and precision of 3D MRI polymer gel dosimetry is quantified in this study. The performance in terms of signal-to-noise and imaging artefacts was evaluated on three different MR scanners (two 1.5 T and a 3 T scanner). These include: (1) B₀-field inhomogeneity, (2) B₁-field inhomogeneity, (3) dielectric effects (losses and standing waves) and (4) temperature inhomogeneity during scanning. B₀-field inhomogeneities that amount to maximum 5 ppm result in dose deviations of up to 4.3% and deformations of up to 5 pixels. Compensation methods are proposed. B₁-field inhomogeneities were found to induce R₂ variations in large anthropomorphic phantoms both at 1.5 and 3 T. At 1.5 T these effects are mainly caused by the coil geometry resulting in dose deviations of up to 25%. After the correction of the R₂ maps using a heuristic flip angle-R₂ relation, these dose deviations are reduced to 2.4%. At 3 T, the dielectric properties of the gel phantoms are shown to strongly influence B₁-field homogeneity, hence R₂ homogeneity, especially of large anthropomorphic phantoms. The low electrical conductivity of polymer gel dosimeters induces standing wave patterns resulting in dose deviations up to 50%. Increasing the conductivity of the gel by adding NaCl reduces the dose deviation to 25% after which the post-processing is successful in reducing the remaining inhomogeneities caused by the coil geometry to within 2.4%. The measurements are supported by computational modelling of the B₁-field. Finally, temperature fluctuations of 1 °C frequently encountered in clinical MRI scanners result in dose deviations up to 15%. It is illustrated that with adequate temperature stabilization, the dose uncertainty is reduced to within 2.58%. PMID

  6. Multi-session complex averaging for high resolution high SNR 3T MR visualization of ex vivo hippocampus and insula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Aymeric; Singh, Jolene M.; Scherrer, Benoit; Afacan, Onur; Warfield, Simon K.

    2015-03-01

    The hippocampus and the insula are responsible for episodic memory formation and retrieval. Hence, visualization of the cytoarchitecture of such structures is of primary importance to understand the underpinnings of conscious experience. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) offers an opportunity to non-invasively image these crucial structures. However, current clinical MR imaging operates at the millimeter scale while these anatomical landmarks are organized into sub-millimeter structures. For instance, the hippocampus contains several layers, including the CA3-dentate network responsible for encoding events and experiences. To investigate whether memory loss is a result of injury or degradation of CA3/dentate, spatial resolution must exceed one hundred micron, isotropic, voxel size. Going from one millimeter voxels to one hundred micron voxels results in a 1000× signal loss, making the measured signal close to or even way below the precision of the receiving coils. Consequently, the signal magnitude that forms the structural images will be biased and noisy, which results in inaccurate contrast and less than optimal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this paper, we propose a strategy to perform high spatial resolution MR imaging of the hippocampus and insula with 3T scanners that enables accurate contrast (no systematic bias) and arbitrarily high SNR. This requires the collection of additional repeated measurements of the same image and a proper averaging of the k-space data in the complex domain. This comes at the cost of additional scan time, but long single-session scan times are not practical for obvious reasons. Hence, we also develop an approach to combine k-space data from multiple sessions, which enables the total scan time to be split into arbitrarily short sessions, where the patient is allowed to move and rest in-between. For validation, we hereby illustrate our multi-session complex averaging strategy by providing high spatial resolution 3T MR visualization

  7. MRI driven magnetic microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Kósa, Gábor; Jakab, Péter; Székely, Gábor; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Capsule endoscopy is a promising technique for diagnosing diseases in the digestive system. Here we design and characterize a miniature swimming mechanism that uses the magnetic fields of the MRI for both propulsion and wireless powering of the capsule. Our method uses both the static and the radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields inherently available in MRI to generate a propulsive force. Our study focuses on the evaluation of the propulsive force for different swimming tails and experimental estimation of the parameters that influence its magnitude. We have found that an approximately 20 mm long, 5 mm wide swimming tail is capable of producing 0.21 mN propulsive force in water when driven by a 20 Hz signal providing 0.85 mW power and the tail located within the homogeneous field of a 3 T MRI scanner. We also analyze the parallel operation of the swimming mechanism and the scanner imaging. We characterize the size of artifacts caused by the propulsion system. We show that while the magnetic micro swimmer is propelling the capsule endoscope, the operator can locate the capsule on the image of an interventional scene without being obscured by significant artifacts. Although this swimming method does not scale down favorably, the high magnetic field of the MRI allows self propulsion speed on the order of several millimeter per second and can propel an endoscopic capsule in the stomach. PMID:22037673

  8. Development and Preliminary Evaluation of a Motorized Needle Guide Template for MRI-guided Targeted Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang-Eun; Tokuda, Junichi; Tuncali, Kemal; Tempany, Clare; Zhang, Elizabeth; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    To overcome the problems of limited needle insertion accuracy and human error in the use of a conventional needle guide template in MRI-guided prostate intervention, we developed a motorized MRI-compatible needle guide template that resembles a TRUS-guided prostate template. The motorized template allows automated, gapless needle guidance in a 3T MRI scanner with minimal changes in the current clinical procedure. To evaluate the impact of the motorized template on MRI, signal-to-noise ratio and distortion were measured under various system configurations. A maximum of 44% signal-to-noise ratio decrease was found when the ultrasonic motors were running, and a maximum of 0.4% image distortion was observed due to the presence of the motorized template. To measure needle insertion accuracy, we performed four sets of five random target needle insertions mimicking four biopsy procedures, which resulted in an average in-plane targeting error of 0.94 mm with a standard deviation of 0.34 mm. The evaluation studies indicated that the presence and operation of the motorized template in the MRI bore creates insignificant image degradation, and provides submillimeter targeting accuracy. The automated needle guide that is directly controlled by navigation software eliminates human error so that the safety of the procedure can be improved. PMID:23335658

  9. A Fabry-Perot Interferometry Based MRI-Compatible Miniature Uniaxial Force Sensor for Percutaneous Needle Placement

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Weijian; Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Furlong, Cosme; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Robot-assisted surgical procedures, taking advantage of the high soft tissue contrast and real-time imaging of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are developing rapidly. However, it is crucial to maintain tactile force feedback in MRI-guided needle-based procedures. This paper presents a Fabry-Perot interference (FPI) based system of an MRI-compatible fiber optic sensor which has been integrated into a piezoelectrically actuated robot for prostate cancer biopsy and brachytherapy in 3T MRI scanner. The opto-electronic sensing system design was minimized to fit inside an MRI-compatible robot controller enclosure. A flexure mechanism was designed that integrates the FPI sensor fiber for measuring needle insertion force, and finite element analysis was performed for optimizing the correct force-deformation relationship. The compact, low-cost FPI sensing system was integrated into the robot and calibration was conducted. The root mean square (RMS) error of the calibration among the range of 0–10 Newton was 0.318 Newton comparing to the theoretical model which has been proven sufficient for robot control and teleoperation. PMID:25126153

  10. A Fabry-Perot Interferometry Based MRI-Compatible Miniature Uniaxial Force Sensor for Percutaneous Needle Placement.

    PubMed

    Shang, Weijian; Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Furlong, Cosme; Fischer, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    Robot-assisted surgical procedures, taking advantage of the high soft tissue contrast and real-time imaging of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are developing rapidly. However, it is crucial to maintain tactile force feedback in MRI-guided needle-based procedures. This paper presents a Fabry-Perot interference (FPI) based system of an MRI-compatible fiber optic sensor which has been integrated into a piezoelectrically actuated robot for prostate cancer biopsy and brachytherapy in 3T MRI scanner. The opto-electronic sensing system design was minimized to fit inside an MRI-compatible robot controller enclosure. A flexure mechanism was designed that integrates the FPI sensor fiber for measuring needle insertion force, and finite element analysis was performed for optimizing the correct force-deformation relationship. The compact, low-cost FPI sensing system was integrated into the robot and calibration was conducted. The root mean square (RMS) error of the calibration among the range of 0-10 Newton was 0.318 Newton comparing to the theoretical model which has been proven sufficient for robot control and teleoperation. PMID:25126153

  11. A MR-conditional High-torque Pneumatic Stepper Motor for MRI-guided and Robot-assisted Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue; Kwok, Ka-Wai; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging allows for visualizing detailed pathological and morphological changes of soft tissue. This increasingly attracts attention on MRI-guided intervention; hence, MR-conditional actuations have been widely investigated for development of image-guided and robot-assisted surgical devices under the MRI. This paper presents a simple design of MR-conditional stepper motor which can provide precise and high-torque actuation without adversely affecting the MR image quality. This stepper motor consists of two MR-conditional pneumatic cylinders and the corresponding supporting structures. Alternating the pressurized air can drive the motor to rotate each step in 3.6° with the motor coupled to a planetary gearbox. Experimental studies were conducted to validate its dynamics performance. Maximum 800mNm output torque can be achieved. The motor accuracy independently varied by two factors: motor operating speed and step size, was also investigated. The motor was tested within a Siemens 3T MRI scanner. The image artifact and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were evaluated in order to study its MRI compliancy. The results show that the presented pneumatic stepper motor generated 2.35% SNR reduction in MR images and no observable artifact was presented besides the motor body itself. The proposed motor test also demonstrates a standard to evaluate the motor capability for later incorporation with motorized devices used in robot-assisted surgery under MRI. PMID:24957635

  12. Highest Resolution In Vivo Human Brain MRI Using Prospective Motion Correction

    PubMed Central

    Stucht, Daniel; Danishad, K. Appu; Schulze, Peter; Godenschweger, Frank; Zaitsev, Maxim; Speck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    High field MRI systems, such as 7 Tesla (T) scanners, can deliver higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) than lower field scanners and thus allow for the acquisition of data with higher spatial resolution, which is often demanded by users in the fields of clinical and neuroscientific imaging. However, high resolution scans may require long acquisition times, which in turn increase the discomfort for the subject and the risk of subject motion. Even with a cooperative and trained subject, involuntary motion due to heartbeat, swallowing, respiration and changes in muscle tone can cause image artifacts that reduce the effective resolution. In addition, scanning with higher resolution leads to increased sensitivity to even very small movements. Prospective motion correction (PMC) at 3T and 7T has proven to increase image quality in case of subject motion. Although the application of prospective motion correction is becoming more popular, previous articles focused on proof of concept studies and technical descriptions, whereas this paper briefly describes the technical aspects of the optical tracking system, marker fixation and cross calibration and focuses on the application of PMC to very high resolution imaging without intentional motion. In this study we acquired in vivo MR images at 7T using prospective motion correction during long acquisitions. As a result, we present images among the highest, if not the highest resolution of in vivo human brain MRI ever acquired. PMID:26226146

  13. Highest Resolution In Vivo Human Brain MRI Using Prospective Motion Correction.

    PubMed

    Stucht, Daniel; Danishad, K Appu; Schulze, Peter; Godenschweger, Frank; Zaitsev, Maxim; Speck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    High field MRI systems, such as 7 Tesla (T) scanners, can deliver higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) than lower field scanners and thus allow for the acquisition of data with higher spatial resolution, which is often demanded by users in the fields of clinical and neuroscientific imaging. However, high resolution scans may require long acquisition times, which in turn increase the discomfort for the subject and the risk of subject motion. Even with a cooperative and trained subject, involuntary motion due to heartbeat, swallowing, respiration and changes in muscle tone can cause image artifacts that reduce the effective resolution. In addition, scanning with higher resolution leads to increased sensitivity to even very small movements. Prospective motion correction (PMC) at 3T and 7T has proven to increase image quality in case of subject motion. Although the application of prospective motion correction is becoming more popular, previous articles focused on proof of concept studies and technical descriptions, whereas this paper briefly describes the technical aspects of the optical tracking system, marker fixation and cross calibration and focuses on the application of PMC to very high resolution imaging without intentional motion. In this study we acquired in vivo MR images at 7T using prospective motion correction during long acquisitions. As a result, we present images among the highest, if not the highest resolution of in vivo human brain MRI ever acquired. PMID:26226146

  14. Multispectral scanner optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, R. C.; Koch, N. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An optical system for use in a multispectral scanner of the type used in video imaging devices is disclosed. Electromagnetic radiation reflected by a rotating scan mirror is focused by a concave primary telescope mirror and collimated by a second concave mirror. The collimated beam is split by a dichroic filter which transmits radiant energy in the infrared spectrum and reflects visible and near infrared energy. The long wavelength beam is filtered and focused on an infrared detector positioned in a cryogenic environment. The short wavelength beam is dispersed by a pair of prisms, then projected on an array of detectors also mounted in a cryogenic environment and oriented at an angle relative to the optical path of the dispersed short wavelength beam.

  15. Optical Scanner for Linear Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkel, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Optical scanner instantaneously reads contiguous lines forming scene or target in object plane. Reading active or passive and scans, continuous or discrete. Scans essentially linear with scan angle and symmetric about axial ray. Nominal focal error, resulting from curvature of scan, well within Rayleigh limit. Scanner specifically designed to be fully compatible with general requirements of linear arrays.

  16. Dual-source parallel radiofrequency excitation ACR phantom magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T: Assessment of the effect of image quality on high-contrast spatial resolution, percent signal ghosting, and low-contrast object detectability in comparison with conventional single-source transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung-Bae; Park, Yong-Sung; Choe, Bo-Young

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess dual-source parallel radiofrequency (RF) excitation American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3T compared with conventional single-source RF transmission and compared with the standard ACR MRI phantom test. We used a 3T MR scanner equipped with dual-source parallel RF excitation and an 8-channel head phased array coil. We employed T1- and T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) pulse sequences for an assessment of the impact of image quality on high-contrast spatial resolution, percent signal ghosting and low-contrast object detectability following the ACR MRI quality control (QC) manual. With geometric accuracy and identical slice locations, dual RFs using dual-source parallel RF excitation MR showed an advantage over single RF using dual-source parallel RF excitation MR and conventional MR in terms of high-contrast spatial resolution (p < 0.010), percent signal ghosting (p < 0.010), and low-contrast object detectability (p < 0.010). The quality of the image from the dual-source parallel RF excitation MR equipment was superior to that of the image from conventional MR equipment for the ACR phantom. We need to pursue dual-source parallel RF excitation MR studies involving various clinical cases.

  17. Deltoid Ligament and Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Injury in Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation at 3T and Comparison with Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Ka-Young; Lee, Seok Hoon; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Jeong, Min-Sun; Kim, Dae-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of deltoid ligament and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI). Materials and Methods Fifty patients (mean age, 35 years) who had undergone preoperative 3T MRI and surgical treatment for CLAI were enrolled. The prevalence of deltoid ligament and syndesmosis injury were assessed. The complexity of lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) injury was correlated with prevalence of deltoid or syndesmosis injuries. The diagnostic accuracy of ankle ligament imaging at 3T MRI was analyzed using arthroscopy as a reference standard. Results On MRI, deltoid ligament injury was identified in 18 (36%) patients as follows: superficial ligament alone, 9 (50%); deep ligament alone 2 (11%); and both ligaments 7 (39%). Syndesmosis abnormality was found in 21 (42%) patients as follows: anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) alone, 19 (90%); and AITFL and interosseous ligament, 2 (10%). There was no correlation between LCLC injury complexity and the prevalence of an accompanying deltoid or syndesmosis injury on both MRI and arthroscopic findings. MRI sensitivity and specificity for detection of deltoid ligament injury were 84% and 93.5%, and those for detection of syndesmosis injury were 91% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion Deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injuries were common in patients undergoing surgery for CLAI, regardless of the LCLC injury complexity. 3T MRI is helpful for the detection of all types of ankle ligament injury. Therefore, careful interpretation of pre-operative MRI is essential. PMID:26356649

  18. Space-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2004-05-01

    A low-loss two-dimensional optical beam scanner that is capable of delivering large (e.g., > 10 degrees) angular scans along the elevation as well as the azimuthal direction is presented. The proposed scanner is based on a space-switched parallel-serial architecture that employs a coarse-scanner module and a fine-scanner module that produce an ultrahigh scan space-fill factor, e.g., 900 x 900 distinguishable beams in a 10 degrees (elevation) x 10 degrees (azimuth) scan space. The experimentally demonstrated one-dimensional version of the proposed scanner has a supercontinuous scan, 100 distinguishable beam spots in a 2.29 degrees total scan range, and 1.5-dB optical insertion loss. PMID:15130010

  19. MR-compatibility assessment of the first preclinical PET-MRI insert equipped with digital silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, J.; Weissler, B.; Dueppenbecker, P. M.; Gebhardt, P.; Goldschmidt, B.; Schug, D.; Kiessling, F.; Schulz, V.

    2015-03-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) with its high sensitivity in combination with MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) providing anatomic information with good soft-tissue contrast is considered to be a promising hybrid imaging modality. However, the integration of a PET detector into an MRI system is a challenging task since the MRI system is a sensitive device for external disturbances and provides a harsh environment for electronic devices. Consequently, the PET detector has to be transparent for the MRI system and insensitive to electromagnetic disturbances. Due to the variety of MRI protocols imposing a wide range of requirements regarding the MR-compatibility, an extensive study is mandatory to reliably assess worst-case interference phenomena between the PET detector and the MRI scanner. We have built the first preclinical PET insert, designed for a clinical 3 T MRI, using digital silicon photomultipliers (digital SiPM, type DPC 3200-22, Philips Digital Photon Counting). Since no thorough interference investigation with this new digital sensor has been reported so far, we present in this work such a comprehensive MR-compatibility study. Acceptable distortion of the B0 field homogeneity (volume RMS = 0.08 ppm, peak-to-peak value = 0.71 ppm) has been found for the PET detector installed. The signal-to-noise ratio degradation stays between 2-15% for activities up to 21 MBq. Ghosting artifacts were only found for demanding EPI (echo planar imaging) sequences with read-out gradients in Z direction caused by additional eddy currents originated from the PET detector. On the PET side, interference mainly between the gradient system and the PET detector occurred: extreme gradient tests were executed using synthetic sequences with triangular pulse shape and maximum slew rate. Under this condition, a relative degradation of the energy (⩽10%) and timing (⩽15%) resolution was noticed. However, barely measurable performance deterioration occurred when morphological MRI

  20. MR-compatibility assessment of the first preclinical PET-MRI insert equipped with digital silicon photomultipliers.

    PubMed

    Wehner, J; Weissler, B; Dueppenbecker, P M; Gebhardt, P; Goldschmidt, B; Schug, D; Kiessling, F; Schulz, V

    2015-03-21

    PET (positron emission tomography) with its high sensitivity in combination with MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) providing anatomic information with good soft-tissue contrast is considered to be a promising hybrid imaging modality. However, the integration of a PET detector into an MRI system is a challenging task since the MRI system is a sensitive device for external disturbances and provides a harsh environment for electronic devices. Consequently, the PET detector has to be transparent for the MRI system and insensitive to electromagnetic disturbances. Due to the variety of MRI protocols imposing a wide range of requirements regarding the MR-compatibility, an extensive study is mandatory to reliably assess worst-case interference phenomena between the PET detector and the MRI scanner. We have built the first preclinical PET insert, designed for a clinical 3 T MRI, using digital silicon photomultipliers (digital SiPM, type DPC 3200-22, Philips Digital Photon Counting). Since no thorough interference investigation with this new digital sensor has been reported so far, we present in this work such a comprehensive MR-compatibility study. Acceptable distortion of the B0 field homogeneity (volume RMS = 0.08 ppm, peak-to-peak value = 0.71 ppm) has been found for the PET detector installed. The signal-to-noise ratio degradation stays between 2-15% for activities up to 21 MBq. Ghosting artifacts were only found for demanding EPI (echo planar imaging) sequences with read-out gradients in Z direction caused by additional eddy currents originated from the PET detector. On the PET side, interference mainly between the gradient system and the PET detector occurred: extreme gradient tests were executed using synthetic sequences with triangular pulse shape and maximum slew rate. Under this condition, a relative degradation of the energy (⩽10%) and timing (⩽15%) resolution was noticed. However, barely measurable performance deterioration occurred when morphological MRI

  1. Scaphotrapezial ligament: normal arthro-CT and arthro-MRI appearance with anatomical and clinical correlation.

    PubMed

    Holveck, A; Wolfram-Gabel, R; Dosch, J C; Sanda, R; Antunes, A B F; Decock, S; Zorn, P; Foessel, L; Bierry, G; Clavert, P; Dietemann, J L; Kahn, J L

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to demonstrate and describe the MR and arthro-CT anatomic appearance of the scaphotrapezial ligament and illustrate some of the pathologies involving this structure. This ligament consists of two slips that originate from the radiopalmar aspect of the scaphoid tuberosity and extend distally, forming a V shape. The ulnar fibers, which are just radial to the flexor carpi radialis sheath, inserted along the trapezial ridge. The radial fibers were found to be thinner and inserted at the radial aspect of the trapezium. Twelve fresh cadaver wrists were dissected, with close attention paid to the scaphotrapezio-trapezoidal (STT) joint. An osseoligamentous specimen was dissected with removal of all musculotendinous structures around the STT joint and was performed with high-resolution acquisition in a 128-MDCT scanner. Samples of the wrist area were collected from two fetal specimens. A retrospective study of 55 patients with wrist pain that were submitted to arthrography, arthro-CT, and arthro-MRI imaging was performed (10 patients on a 3-T superconducting magnet and 45 patients on a 1.5-T system). Another ten patients had high-resolution images on a 3-T superconducting magnet without arthrographic injection. MR arthrography and arthro-CT improved visualization and provided detailed information about the anatomy of the scaphotrapezial ligament. Knowledge of the appearance of this normal ligament on MRI allows accurate diagnosis of lesions and will aid when surgery is indicated or may have a role in avoiding unnecessary immobilization. PMID:21455837

  2. Multiple single-point imaging (mSPI) as a tool for capturing and characterizing MR signals and repetitive signal disturbances with high temporal resolution: the MRI scanner as a high-speed camera.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Chris J G; van Gorp, Jetse S; Verwoerd, Jan L; Westra, Albert H; Bouwman, Job G; Zijlstra, Frank; Seevinck, Peter R

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we aim to lay down and demonstrate the use of multiple single-point imaging (mSPI) as a tool for capturing and characterizing steady-state MR signals and repetitive disturbances thereof with high temporal resolution. To achieve this goal, various 2D mSPI sequences were derived from the nearest standard 3D imaging sequences by (i) replacing the excitation of a 3D slab by the excitation of a 2D slice orthogonal to the read axis, (ii) setting the readout gradient to zero, and (iii) leaving out the inverse Fourier transform in the read direction. The thus created mSPI sequences, albeit slow with regard to the spatial encoding part, were shown to result into a series of densely spaced 2D single-point images in the time domain enabling monitoring of the evolution of the magnetization with a high temporal resolution and without interference from any encoding gradients. The high-speed capabilities of mSPI were demonstrated by capturing and characterizing the free induction decays and spin echoes of substances with long T2s (>30 ms) and long and short T2*s (4 - >30 ms) and by monitoring the perturbation of the transverse magnetization by, respectively, a titanium cylinder, representing a static disturbance; a pulsed magnetic field gradient, representing a stimulus inherent to a conventional MRI experiment; and a pulsed electric current, representing an external stimulus. The results of the study indicate the potential of mSPI for assessing the evolution of the magnetization and, when properly synchronized with the acquisition, repeatable disturbances thereof with a temporal resolution that is ultimately limited by the bandwidth of the receiver, but in practice governed by the SNR of the experiment and the magnitude of the disturbance. Potential applications of mSPI can be envisaged in research areas that are concerned with MR signal behavior, MR system performance and MR evaluation of magnetically evoked responses. PMID:23759651

  3. Side scanner for supermarkets: a new scanner design standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Charles K.; Cheng, J. K.

    1996-09-01

    High speed UPC bar code has become a standard mode of data capture for supermarkets in the US, Europe, and Japan. The influence of the ergonomics community on the design of the scanner is evident. During the past decade the ergonomic issues of cashier in check-outs has led to occupational hand-wrist cumulative trauma disorders, in most cases causing carpal tunnel syndrome, a permanent hand injury. In this paper, the design of a side scanner to resolve the issues is discussed. The complex optical module and the sensor for aforesaid side scanner is described. The ergonomic advantages offer the old counter mounted vertical scanner has been experimentally proved by the industrial funded study at an independent university.

  4. The potential of 3T high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis, staging, and follow-up of retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Marcus C; de Graaf, Pim; Brisse, Hervé J; Galluzzi, Paolo; Göricke, Sophia L; Moll, Annette C; Munier, Francis L; Popovic, Maja Beck; Moulin, Alexandre P; Binaghi, Stefano; Castelijns, Jonas A; Maeder, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the value of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing, staging, and follow-up of retinoblastoma during eye-saving treatment. We have included informative retinoblastoma cases scanned on a 3T MRI system from a retrospective retinoblastoma cohort from 2009 through 2013. We show that high-resolution MRI has the potential to detect small intraocular seeds, hemorrhage, and metastatic risk factors not visible with fundoscopy (e.g., optic nerve invasion and choroidal invasion), and treatment response. Unfortunately, however, the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution MRI is not perfect, especially for subtle intraocular seeds or minimal postlaminar optic nerve invasion. The most important application of MRI is the detection of metastatic risk factors, as these cannot be found by fundoscopy and ultrasound. PMID:25891031

  5. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  6. Focal Cortical Lesion Detection in Multiple Sclerosis: 3T DIR versus 7T FLASH-T2*

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, A. Scott; Kinkel, R. Philip; Tinelli, Emanuele; Benner, Thomas; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Mainero, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the inter-rater agreement of cortical lesion detection using 7T FLASH-T2* and 3T DIR sequences. Materials and Methods Twenty-six patients with multiple sclerosis were scanned on a human 7T (Sidemen’s) and 3T MRI (TIM Trio, Sidemen’s) to acquire 3T DIR/MEMPR and 7T FLASH-T2* sequences. Four independent reviewers scored and categorized cortical lesions in the bilateral pre-central gyri (motor strips) as leukocortical, intracortical, or subpial. Inter-rater agreement was assessed according to lesion category using the kappa statistic. The sensitivity of recent MAGNIMS consensus guidelines for cortical lesion detection using 3T DIR was assessed with 7T FLASH-T2* as the reference gold standard. Results Inter-rater agreement at 7T was excellent compared to 3T (k=0.97 vs. 0.12). FLASH-T2* at 7T detected subpial lesions while 3T DIR did not. The predicted sensitivity of 3T DIR sequence for cortical lesions in vivo is modest (range of 13.6 to 18.3%). Conclusion 7T FLASH-T2* detects more cortical—particularly subpial—lesions compared to 3T DIR. In the absence of DIR/post-mortem data, 7T FLASH-T2* is a suitable gold-standard instrument and should be incorporated into future consensus guidelines. PMID:22045554

  7. Technical Note: Building a combined cyclotron and MRI facility: Implications for interference

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Mark B. M.; Kuijer, Joost P. A.; Ridder, Jan Willem de; Perk, Lars R.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: With the introduction of hybrid PET/MRI systems, it has become more likely that the cyclotron and MRI systems will be located close to each other. This study considered the interference between a cyclotron and a superconducting MRI system. Methods: Interactions between cyclotrons and MRIs are theoretically considered. The main interference is expected to be the perturbation of the magnetic field in the MRI due to switching on or off the magnetic field of the cyclotron. MR imaging is distorted by a dynamic spatial gradient of an external inplane magnetic field larger than 0.5-0.04 {mu}T/m, depending on the specific MR application. From the design of a cyclotron, it is expected that the magnetic fringe field at large distances behaves as a magnetic dipolar field. This allows estimation of the full dipolar field and its spatial gradients from a single measurement. Around an 18 MeV cyclotron (Cyclone, IBA), magnetic field measurements were performed on 5 locations and compared with calculations based upon a dipolar field model. Results: At the measurement locations the estimated and measured values of the magnetic field component and its spatial gradients of the inplane component were compared, and found to agree within a factor 1.1 for the magnetic field and within a factor of 1.5 for the spatial gradients of the field. In the specific case of the 18 MeV cyclotron with a vertical magnetic field and a 3T superconducting whole body MR system, a minimum distance of 20 m has to be considered to prevent interference. Conclusions: This study showed that a dipole model is sufficiently accurate to predict the interference of a cyclotron on a MRI scanner, for site planning purposes. The cyclotron and a whole body MRI system considered in this study need to be placed more than 20 m apart, or magnetic shielding should be utilized.

  8. Whole-body MRI for the staging and follow-up of patients with metastasis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gerwin P; Reiser, Maximilian F; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2009-06-01

    The advent of whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) has introduced tumor imaging with a systemic approach compared to established sequential, multi-modal diagnostic algorithms. Hardware innovations, such as the introduction of multi-receiver channel whole-body scanners at 1.5 T and recently 3T, combined with acquisition acceleration techniques, have made high resolution WB-MRI clinically feasible. Now, a dedicated assessment of individual organs with various soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution and contrast media dynamics can be combined with whole-body anatomic coverage in a multi-planar imaging approach. More flexible protocols, e.g. including T1-weighted TSE- and STIR-imaging, dedicated lung imaging or dynamic contrast-enhanced studies of the abdomen can be performed within less than 45 min. For initial tumor staging PET-CT as a competing whole-body modality in oncologic imaging has proved more accurate for the definition of T-stage and lymph node assessment, using the additional metabolic information of PET for the assessment of tumor viability and therapy response. However, new applications, such as MR-whole-body diffusion imaging, may significantly increase sensitivity in near future. WB-MRI has shown advantages for the detection of distant metastatic disease, especially from tumors frequently spreading to the liver or brain and it is especially useful as a radiation-free alternative for the surveillance of tumor patients with multiple follow-up exams. Furthermore, it has been introduced as a whole-body bone marrow screening application. Within this context WB-MRI is highly accurate for the detection of skeletal metastases and staging of hematologic diseases, such as multiple myeloma or lymphoma. This article summarizes recent developments and applications of WB-MRI and highlights its performance within the scope of systemic oncologic staging and surveillance. PMID:19457631

  9. MSS D Multispectral Scanner System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauletta, A. M.; Johnson, R. L.; Brinkman, K. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The development and acceptance testing of the 4-band Multispectral Scanners to be flown on LANDSAT D and LANDSAT D Earth resources satellites are summarized. Emphasis is placed on the acceptance test phase of the program. Test history and acceptance test algorithms are discussed. Trend data of all the key performance parameters are included and discussed separately for each of the two multispectral scanner instruments. Anomalies encountered and their resolutions are included.

  10. Michigan experimental multispectral scanner system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasell, P. G., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A functional description of a multispectral airborne scanner system that provides spectral bands along a single optical line of sight is reported. The airborne scanner consists of an optical telescope for scanning plane perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the aircraft and radiation detectors for converting radiation to electrical signals. The system makes a linear transformation of input radiation to voltage recorded on analog magnetic tape.