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Sample records for 4-benzyl-6-phenyl pyridazine ligand

  1. Pyridazine based scorpionate ligand in a copper boratrane compound.

    PubMed

    Nuss, Gernot; Saischek, Gerald; Harum, Bastian N; Volpe, Manuel; Belaj, Ferdinand; Mösch-Zanetti, Nadia C

    2011-12-19

    Reaction of potassium tris(mercapto-tert-butylpyridazinyl)borate K[Tn(tBu)] with copper(II) chloride in dichloromethane at room temperature led to the diamagnetic copper boratrane compound [Cu{B(Pn(tBu))(3)}Cl] (Pn = pyridazine-3-thionyl) (1) under activation of the B-H bond and formation of a Cu-B dative bond. In contrast to this, stirring of the same ligand with copper(I) chloride in tetrahydrofuran (THF) gave the dimeric compound [Cu{Tn(tBu)}](2) (2) where one copper atom is coordinated by two sulfur atoms and one hydrogen atom of one ligand and one sulfur of the other ligand. Hereby, no activation of the B-H bond occurred but a 3-center-2-electron B-H···Cu bond is formed. The reaction of copper(II) chloride with K[Tn(tBu)] in water gave the same product 2, but a formal reduction of the metal center from Cu(II) to Cu(I) occurred. When adding tricyclohexyl phosphine to the reaction mixture of K[Tn(R)] (R = tBu, Me) and copper(I) chloride in MeOH, the distorted tetrahedral Cu complexes [Cu{Tn(R)}(PCy(3))] (R = tBu 3, Me 4) were formed. Compound 4 is exhibiting an "inverted" κ(3)-H,S,S, coordination mode. The copper boratrane 1 was further investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations for a better understanding of the M→B interaction involving the d(8) electron configuration of Cu. PMID:22092010

  2. New Pyrazolo[1',5':1,6]pyrimido[4,5-d]pyridazin-4(3H)-ones Fluoroderivatives as Human A1 Adenosine Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Alessia; Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Vergelli, Claudia; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Martini, Claudia; Giacomelli, Chiara

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of a new series of pyrazolo[1',5':1,6]pyrimido[4,5-d]pyridazin-4(3H)-ones as human A1 adenosine receptor ligands. The tricyclic scaffold was modified at position 6 and 9 by introducing small alkyl chains and substituted phenyls. The most interesting compounds showed Ki for A1 in the submicromolar range (0.105-0.244 µM) and the most interesting term (compound 4c) combined an appreciable affinity for A1 (Ki = 0.132 µM) with a good selectivity toward A2A (43% inhibition at 10 µM) and A3 (46% inhibition at 10 µM). PMID:24061322

  3. Bicyclic [b]-heteroannelated pyridazine derivatives. Part 5. Synthesis of some triazolo[4,3-b]pyridazine and pyridazino[6,1-c]triazine derivatives as potential benzodiazepine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Lange, J; Wejroch, K; Karolak-Wojciechowska, J; Plenkiewicz, J; Gniewosz, M; Tondys, H; Ruzikowski, P; Rump, S

    1996-01-01

    4-Substituted-tetrahydropyridazine-3,6-dione 3-hydrazones [I] reacted with strong carboxylic acids and some acyl chlorides to give the N-acylation products and/or triazolo[4,3-b]pyridazine derivatives. Derivatives of this bicyclic structure were obtained also in reactions of I with triethyl orthoformate and orthoacetate. In the reaction with phosgene, triazolo[4,3-b]pyridazine-3,6-dione, and with oxalyl chloride pyridazino[6,1-c]triazine-3,4,7-trione derivatives were obtained. PMID:9415218

  4. Cobalt(II) complexes with bis(N-imidazolyl/benzimidazolyl) pyridazine: Structures, photoluminescent and photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Ping; Fan, Jian-Zhong; Wang, Duo-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Six new CoII complexes [Co(L1)4(OH)2] (1), {[Co(L1)(H2O)4]·2ClO4}∞ (2), {[Co(L1)(H2O)4]·SiF6}∞ (3), {[Co(L1)3]·2ClO4}∞ (4), [Co(L2)Cl2]∞ (5) and {[Co(L2)2]·SiF6}∞ (6) [L1=3,6-bis(N-imidazolyl) pyridazine, L2=3,6-bis (N-benzimidazolyl) pyridazine] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Complex 1 has a mononuclear structure, while complexes 2 and 3 have 1-D chain structures. Considering the CoII centers were linked by the L1 ligands, the 3-D framework of complex 4 can be rationalized to be a {4^12.6^3} 6-c topological net with the stoichiometry uninodal net. 5 reveals a coordination 1-D zigzag chain structure consisting of a neutral chain [Co(L2)Cl2]n with the CoII centers. Complex 6 has a rhombohedral grid with a (4, 4) topology. The TGA property, fluorescent property and photocatalytic activity of complexes 1-6 have been investigated and discussed.

  5. trans-Diaqua­(pyridazine-3-carboxyl­ato-κ2 N 2,O)lithium

    PubMed Central

    Starosta, Wojciech; Leciejewicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the title complex, [Li(C5H3N2O2)(H2O)2], is built of monomeric mol­ecules. In each, an Li+ ion is N,O-chelated by the pyridazine-3-carboxyl­ate ligand and two water O atoms. The coordination geometry of the metal ion is distorted tetra­hedral. The monomers are linked by a system of hydrogen bonds in which water mol­ecules act as donors and carboxyl­ate O atoms act as acceptors. O—H⋯N hydrogen bonding is also present. PMID:21522867

  6. Further Studies on 2-Arylacetamide Pyridazin-3(2H)-ones: Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of 4,6-Disubstituted Analogues as Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Dahlgren, Claes; Graziano, Alessia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Zerbinati, Serena; Vergelli, Claudia; Quinn, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) play an essential role in the regulation of endogenous inflammation and immunity. In the present studies, a large series of pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives bearing an arylacetamide chain at position 2 was synthesized and tested for FPR agonist activity. The pyridazin-3(2H)-one ring was confirmed to be an appropriate scaffold to support FPR agonist activity, and its modification at the 4 and 6 positions led to the identification of additional active agonists, which induced intracellular Ca2+ flux in HL-60 cells transfected with either FPR1, FPR2, or FPR3. Seven formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1)-specific and several mixed FPR1/FPR2 dual agonists were identified with low micromolar EC50 values. Furthermore, these agonists also activated human neutrophils, inducing intracellular Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis. Finally, molecular docking studies indicated that the most potent pyridazin-3(2H)-ones overlapped in their best docking poses with fMLF and WKYMVM peptides in the FPR1 and FPR2 ligand binding sites, respectively. Thus, pyridazinone-based compounds represent potential lead compounds for further development of selective and/or potent FPR agonists. PMID:23685570

  7. Degenerate four wave mixing of pyridazine from a slit nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongzhi; Kong, Wei

    1998-09-01

    Using a pulsed supersonic slit nozzle, the nonfluorescing π*←n transition of pyridazine was investigated. The degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) spectra showed numerous vibrational bands over a 1200 cm-1 region. Most of these bands were parallel transitions with a strong Q branch and weaker but observable P and R branches. Based on our previous model [H. Li and W. Kong, J. Chem. Phys. 107, 3774 (1997)], these transitions were simulated with success. The polarization dependence of the rotational branching ratios suggested that primary contributions to the DFWM signal were from large spaced gratings formed by ground state molecules. The lack of contributions from excited state gratings and small spaced gratings was attributed to the fast internal conversion process on the S1 surface of pyridazine (0.3-3 ns), the wash-out time due to movements of the sample in a molecular beam, and the duration time of the excitation laser (7 ns). Two vibrational bands showed unexpected enhancement in the P or R branch, but for each band, one adjustment factor was sufficient to reproduce the spectra recorded under all different polarization combinations. Perturbations were observable from the rotationally resolved spectra, however in most cases, rotational progressions did not seem to be affected by the perturbation in terms of both line positions and intensities. A more detailed analysis of the supersonically cooled spectra, together with data from a room temperature gas cell and ab initio calculations, will be necessary to completely interpret the spectroscopy of pyridazine. This paper demonstrates that with the increased sensitivity achievable through a slit nozzle, DFWM is an effective technique for detailed spectroscopic studies, particularly for nonfluorescing species.

  8. Pyridazine N-Oxides as Precursors of Metallocarbenes: Rhodium-Catalyzed Transannulation with Pyrroles.

    PubMed

    Kanchupalli, Vinaykumar; Joseph, Desna; Katukojvala, Sreenivas

    2015-12-01

    Pyridazine N-oxides are used for the first time as precursors of metallocarbenes. These nitrogen-rich heterocycles led to the discovery of a novel acceptor and donor-acceptor enalcarbenoids. The synthetic utility of these metallocarbenes was demonstrated in the rhodium-catalyzed denitrogenative transannulation of pyridazine N-oxides with pyrroles to the valuable alkyl, 7-aryl, and 7-styryl indoles. The transannulation strategy was applied to the synthesis of a potent anticancer agent. PMID:26588048

  9. Discovery of novel potent imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine PDE10a inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meegalla, Sanath K; Huang, Hui; Illig, Carl R; Parks, Daniel J; Chen, Jinsheng; Lee, Yu-Kai; Wilson, Kenneth J; Patel, Sharmila K; Cheung, Wing S; Lu, Tianbao; Kirchner, Thomas; Askari, Hossein B; Geisler, John; Patch, Raymond J; Gibbs, Alan C; Rady, Brian; Connelly, Margery; Player, Mark R

    2016-09-01

    Design and optimization of a novel series of imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine PDE10a inhibitors are described. Compound 31 displays excellent pharmacokinetic properties and was also evaluated as an insulin secretagogue in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27491708

  10. Insights from Theory and Experiment on the Photochromic spiro-Dihydropyrrolo-Pyridazine/Betaine System.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Amendra; Shrestha, Tej B; Liu, Yao; Malalasekera, Aruni P; Yu, Jing; McLaurin, Emily J; Turro, Claudia; Bossmann, Stefan H; Aikens, Christine M

    2016-02-18

    We elucidated the photochromic spiro-4a,5-dihydropyrrolo[1,2-b]pyridazine/betaine (DPP/betaine) system by comparing state-of-the-art density functional theory calculations with nanosecond/millisecond UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, as well as steady-state absorption and cyclization kinetics. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are employed to examine the transformations occurring after photoexcitation. This study shows that the photochromic spiro-4a,5-dihydropyrrolo[1,2-b]pyridazine and spiro-1,8a-dihydroindolizine (DHI) systems react according to similar pathways. However, notable differences exist. Although photoexcitation of the spiro-DPP system also leads to cis-betaines, which then isomerize to trans-betaines, we found two distinct classes of cis isomers (cis-betaine rotamer-1 and cis-betaine rotamer-2), which do not exist in spiro-1,8a-dihydroindolizine. Similar to our previous study on the spiro-DHI/betaine system, a complicated potential-energy landscape between cis and trans isomers exists in the spiro-DPP system, consisting of a network of transition states and intermediates. Because the spiro-DPP/betaine is even more complicated than the spiro-DHI/betaine system, (substituted) photochromic systems featuring a 4a,5-dihydropyrrolo[1,2-b]pyridazine functional unit will require thorough in silico design to function properly as logical gates or in devices for information storage. PMID:26812493

  11. Three- and four-coordinate gold(I) complexes of 3,6-bis(diphenylphosphino)pyridazine: monomers, polymers, and a metallocryptand cage.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Vincent J; Malwitz, Mark A; Horner, Stephen J; Vasquez, John

    2003-03-24

    The slightly yellow polymeric complexes [Au(2)Cl(2)(P(2)pz)(3)](n), 1 x 6CHCl(3), (P(2)pz is 3,6-bis(diphenylphosphino)pyridazine) and [[Au(2)(P(2)pz)(3)](PF(6))(2)](n), 2, are prepared by the stoichiometric reaction of AuCl(tht) (tht is tetrahydrothiophene) and P(2)pz in either dichloromethane or dichloromethane/methanol, respectively. Addition of 2 equiv of AuCl(tht) to a dichloromethane solution of 1 equiv of P(2)pz generates the simple (AuCl)(2)(P(2)pz) compound, 3. Compound 3 contains nearly linear P-Au-Cl units with intermolecular Au.Au separations of 3.570 A. Au(2)I(2)(P(2)pz)(3), 4, is prepared by reacting excess NaI with 2 in a dichloromethane/methanol mixture. Characterization of 1, 2, and 4 by X-ray crystallography confirms the 2:3 gold/ligand ratio of all three complexes. The coordination polymer 1 maintains a high degree of solvation in the solid-state with three chloroform adducts hydrogen-bonded to the chloride ligand on each gold atom. These chloroform molecules are sandwiched between the two-dimensional polymeric sheets of 1. The crystal structure of 4 reveals an empty, iodide-capped metallocryptand cage with the tetrahedrally distorted gold atoms and the nitrogen atoms on the pyridazine rings directed away from the center of the cavity. No metal ion encapsulation was observed for complex 4. Complex 2 forms one-dimensional arrays of [Au(2)(P(2)pz)(2)](2+) metallomacrocycles connected to each other by a third P(2)pz ligand. The electronic absorption spectra (CH(2)Cl(2)) of 1-4 show broad, nearly featureless absorption bands that tail into the visible with pi-pi bands at 296 nm and discernible shoulders at 314 nm for 2 and 334 nm for 3. Excitation into the low energy band of 2 produces only a modest emission in solution at 540 nm (lambda(ex) 468 nm) and 493 nm (lambda(ex) 403 nm). Under identical conditions, the P(2)pz ligand also emits at 540 and 493 nm. PMID:12639153

  12. Using ovality to predict nonmutagenic, orally efficacious pyridazine amides as cell specific spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Matthew C; Bhagirath, Niala; Chiao, Eric; Goldstein, David M; Hermann, Johannes C; Hsu, Pei-Yuan; Kirchner, Stephan; Kennedy-Smith, Joshua J; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Lukacs, Christine; Menke, John; Niu, Linghao; Padilla, Fernando; Peng, Ying; Polonchuk, Liudmila; Railkar, Aruna; Slade, Michelle; Soth, Michael; Xu, Daigen; Yadava, Preeti; Yee, Calvin; Zhou, Mingyan; Liao, Cheng

    2014-03-27

    Inhibition of spleen tyrosine kinase has attracted much attention as a mechanism for the treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematous. We report the structure-guided optimization of pyridazine amide spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early representatives of this scaffold were highly potent and selective but mutagenic in an Ames assay. An approach that led to the successful identification of nonmutagenic examples, as well as further optimization to compounds with reduced cardiovascular liabilities is described. Select pharmacokinetic and in vivo efficacy data are presented. PMID:24520947

  13. Light-Enhanced Fluorescence of Multi-Level Cavitands Possessing Pyridazine Upper rim.

    PubMed

    Janosi, Tibor Zoltan; Makkai, Geza; Kegl, Timea; Matyus, Peter; Kollar, Laszlo; Erostyak, Janos

    2016-03-01

    Completely different fluorescence behaviour of cavitands based on a same calix[4]resorcinarene compound was observed. While the fluorescence intensity of the parent compound, tetramethyl-cavitand (1) slowly faded as a result of UV-light exposure, the emission of the three-level cavitand with pyridazine moieties at the upper rim (5a) was enhanced by the excitation in the UV-region. The structure of fluorescence emission (characterized by excitation-emission matrices) and the absorption of 5a remained unaltered. The analysis of fluorescence decay curves reveals the presence of two separated components assigned to two individual emitting species. The measured significant increase of the average lifetime and quantum yield is the consequence of the UV-light induced transition between the different states of 5a. These observations can be explained by the structural difference between 5a and 1. As a counterpart of the naked cavitand (1) with methyl substituents at the upper rim only, 5a has three additional moieties benzene, triazole and pyridazine levels. Computational studies proved the existence of two conformational isomers of 5a. Upon ultraviolet light excitation a "dark" to "light" conformational transition occurs between the two isomers. This hypothesis was confirmed by anisotropy decay measurements. PMID:26715516

  14. A Pyridazine-Bridged Sandwiched Cluster Incorporating Planar Hexanuclear Cobalt Ring and Bivacant Phosphotungstate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling-Yu; Zeng, Su-Yuan; Jagličić, Zvonko; Hu, Qi-Dong; Wang, Shi-Xuan; Wang, Zhi; Sun, Di

    2016-09-01

    A planar hexanuclear cobalt ring was clamped by two bivacant α1-[PW10O37](9-) with the assistance of the pyridazine bridges to form a novel sandwiched Co(II)-polyoxometalate cluster compound, [Na(H2O)6][Co3(OH) (pydz)4(H2O)7][Co6(PW10O37)2(pydz)4(H2O)6]·43H2O (1; pydz = pyridazine).This cluster was identified by X-ray single-crystal diffraction, elemental analysis, Fourier transform IR and UV-visible spectroscopies, and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Structural analysis reveals that 1 comprises a hexahydrated sodium, a trinuclear [Co3(OH) (pydz)4(H2O)7](5+) cationic cluster, and an anionic [Co6(PW10O37)2(pydz)4(H2O)6](6-) sandwiched cluster, thus giving an intrinsical intercluster compound. The isolation of such cluster was dependent on the in situ transformation of trivacant [α-P2W15O56](12-) to α1-[PW10O37](9-) under the hydrothermal condition. The CV shows reversible multielectron waves from the redox of W(VI) in 1. Cluster 1 exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of nitrite. Magnetism studies indicated a weak anti-ferromagnetic exchange interaction between Co(II) ions within 1. PMID:27548500

  15. Discovery of pyrrolo[1,2-b]pyridazine-3-carboxamides as Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Duan, James J-W; Lu, Zhonghui; Jiang, Bin; Yang, Bingwei V; Doweyko, Lidia M; Nirschl, David S; Haque, Lauren E; Lin, Shuqun; Brown, Gregory; Hynes, John; Tokarski, John S; Sack, John S; Khan, Javed; Lippy, Jonathan S; Zhang, Rosemary F; Pitt, Sidney; Shen, Guoxiang; Pitts, William J; Carter, Percy H; Barrish, Joel C; Nadler, Steven G; Salter-Cid, Luisa M; McKinnon, Murray; Fura, Aberra; Schieven, Gary L; Wrobleski, Stephen T

    2014-12-15

    A new class of Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors was discovered using a rationally designed pyrrolo[1,2-b]pyridazine-3-carboxamide scaffold. Preliminary studies identified (R)-(2,2-dimethylcyclopentyl)amine as a preferred C4 substituent on the pyrrolopyridazine core (3b). Incorporation of amino group to 3-position of the cyclopentane ring resulted in a series of JAK3 inhibitors (4g-4j) that potently inhibited IFNγ production in an IL2-induced whole blood assay and displayed high functional selectivity for JAK3-JAK1 pathway relative to JAK2. Further modifications led to the discovery of an orally bioavailable (2-fluoro-2-methylcyclopentyl)amino analogue 5g which is a nanomolar inhibitor of both JAK3 and TYK2, functionally selective for the JAK3-JAK1 pathway versus JAK2, and active in a human whole blood assay. PMID:25453808

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines as selective cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Kirk L.; Reno, Michael J.; Alberti, Jennifer B.; Price, Daniel J.; Kane-Carson, Laurie S.; Knick, Victoria B.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Hassell, Anne M.; Veal, James M.; Davis, Stephen T.; Griffin, Robert J.; Peel, Michael R.

    2010-10-01

    A novel series of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines have been synthesized and identified as cyclin dependant kinase inhibitors potentially useful for the treatment of solid tumors. Modification of the hinge-binding amine or the C(2)- and C(6)-substitutions on the pyrazolopyridazine core provided potent inhibitors of CDK4 and demonstrated enzyme selectivity against VEGFR-2 and GSK3{beta}.

  17. The structure-AChE inhibitory activity relationships study in a series of pyridazine analogues.

    PubMed

    Saracoglu, M; Kandemirli, F

    2009-07-01

    The structure-activity relationships (SAR) are investigated by means of the Electronic-Topological Method (ETM) followed by the Neural Networks application (ETM-NN) for a class of anti-cholinesterase inhibitors (AChE, 53 molecules) being pyridazine derivatives. AChE activities of the series were measured in IC(50) units, and relative to the activity levels, the series was partitioned into classes of active and inactive compounds. Based on pharmacophores and antipharmacophores calculated by the ETM-software as sub-matrices containing important spatial and electronic characteristics, a system for the activity prognostication is developed. Input data for the ETM were taken as the results of conformational and quantum-mechanics calculations. To predict the activity, we used one of the most well known neural networks, namely, the feed-forward neural networks (FFNNs) trained with the back propagation algorithm. The supervised learning was performed using a variant of FFNN known as the Associative Neural Networks (ASNN). The result of the testing revealed that the high ETM's ability of predicting both activity and inactivity of potential AChE inhibitors. Analysis of HOMOs for the compounds containing Ph1 and APh1 has shown that atoms with the highest values of the atomic orbital coefficients are mainly those atoms that enter into the pharmacophores. Thus, the set of pharmacophores and antipharmacophores found as the result of this study forms a basis for a system of the anti-cholinesterase activity prediction. PMID:19689389

  18. Isomeric signatures in the fragmentation of pyridazine and pyrimidine induced by fast ion impact

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Wania Luna, Hugo; Montenegro, Eduardo C.

    2015-07-28

    We present fast proton impact induced fragmentations of pyrimidine and pyridazine as an experimental resource to investigate isomeric signatures. Major isomeric imprints are identified for few fragment ions and differences of more than an order of magnitude for the cross sections of fragments of the same mass were measured. The observation of the molecular structure of these isomers gives no apparent indication for the reasons for such substantial differences. It is verified that the simple displacement of the position of one nitrogen atom strongly inhibits or favors the production of some ionic fragment species. The dependency of the fragmentation cross sections on the proton impact energy, investigated by means of time of flight mass spectroscopy and of a model calculation based in first order perturbation theory, allows us to disentangle the complex collision dynamics of the ionic fragments. The proton-induced fragmentation discriminates rather directly the association between a molecular orbital ionization and the fragment-ions creation and abundance, as well as how the redistribution of the energy imparted to the molecules takes place, triggering not only single but also double vacancy and leads to specific fragmentation pathways.

  19. Synthesis and Antiproliferative Effects of 5,6-Disubstituted Pyridazin-3(2H)-ones Designed as Conformationally Constrained Combretastatin A-4 Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Elagawany, Mohamed; Schmitt, Martine; Ghiaty, Adel; El-Etrawy, A. Sh.; Ibrahim, Mohamed A.; Bihel, Frédéric; Sbardelotto, Aline Borba; Pessoa, Cláudia; Nguyen, Tam Luong; Hamel, Ernest; Bourguignon, Jean Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Novel 5,6-disubstituted pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives were designed and synthesized as combretastatin A-4 analogues. Our objective was to overcome the spontaneous cis to trans isomerization of the compound. We therefore replaced the cis-double bond with a pyridazine ring. The antiproliferative activity of the novel analogues was evaluated against four human cancer cell lines (HL-60, MDA-MB-435, SF-295 and HCT-8). We found that the analogues had little activity either against selected cell lines or against purified tubulin. Molecular modeling studies may account for their inactivity. PMID:23574386

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of new pyrazolone-pyridazine conjugates as anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Nadia Abdalla; Ahmed, Eman Mohamed; Mohamed, Khaled Omar; Nissan, Yassin Mohammed; Zaitone, Sawsan Abo-Bakr

    2014-04-01

    A new series of pyrazolone-pyridazine conjugates 3 and 4a-l were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic means and elemental analyses. All compounds were tested in vivo for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties against diclofenac, as reference compound. The synthesized compounds were also evaluated for their ability to inhibit the production of certain inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 in serum samples. The ulcerogenic potential of the synthesized compounds was also determined. IC50 values for inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes were investigated in vitro for the most active candidates. Molecular docking was performed on the active site of COX-2 to predict their mode of binding to the amino acids. Among the synthesized derivatives, compounds 4c and 4e showed good analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities with lower ulcer index than the reference drug. PMID:24631365

  1. Rotational spectroscopy of pyridazine and its isotopologs from 235-360 GHz: equilibrium structure and vibrational satellites.

    PubMed

    Esselman, Brian J; Amberger, Brent K; Shutter, Joshua D; Daane, Mitchell A; Stanton, John F; Woods, R Claude; McMahon, Robert J

    2013-12-14

    The rotational spectrum of pyridazine (o-C4H4N2), the ortho disubstituted nitrogen analog of benzene, has been measured and analyzed in the gas phase. For the ground vibrational state of the normal isotopolog, over 2000 individual rotational transitions have been identified between 238 and 360 GHz and have been fit to 13 parameters of a 6th-order centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. All transitions in this frequency region can now be predicted from this model to near experimental accuracy, i.e., well enough for the purpose of any future radio-astronomical search for this species. Three isotopologs, [3-(13)C]-C4H4N2, [4-(13)C]-C4H4N2, and [1-(15)N]-C4H4N2, have been detected in natural abundance, and several hundred lines have been measured for each of these species and fit to 6th-order Hamiltonians. Ten additional isotopologs were synthesized with enhanced deuterium substitution and analyzed to allow for a complete structure determination. The equilibrium structure (Re) of pyridazine was obtained by correcting the experimental rotational constants for the effects of vibration-rotation coupling using interaction constants predicted from CCSD(T) calculations with an ANO0 basis set and further correcting for the effect of electron mass. The final Re structural parameters are determined with excellent accuracy, as evidenced by their ability to predict 28 independent moments of inertia (Ia and Ib for 14 isotopologs) very well from 9 structural parameters. The rotational spectra of the six lowest-energy fundamental vibrational satellites of the main isotopolog have been detected. The rotational spectra of the five lowest-energy vibrational satellites have been assigned and fit to yield accurate rotational and distortion constants, while the fit and assignment for the sixth is less complete. The resultant vibration-rotation interaction (α) constants are found to be in excellent agreement with ones predicted from coupled-cluster calculations, which proved to be the key

  2. Rotational spectroscopy of pyridazine and its isotopologs from 235–360 GHz: Equilibrium structure and vibrational satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Esselman, Brian J.; Amberger, Brent K.; Shutter, Joshua D.; Daane, Mitchell A.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.; Stanton, John F.

    2013-12-14

    The rotational spectrum of pyridazine (o-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}), the ortho disubstituted nitrogen analog of benzene, has been measured and analyzed in the gas phase. For the ground vibrational state of the normal isotopolog, over 2000 individual rotational transitions have been identified between 238 and 360 GHz and have been fit to 13 parameters of a 6th-order centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. All transitions in this frequency region can now be predicted from this model to near experimental accuracy, i.e., well enough for the purpose of any future radio-astronomical search for this species. Three isotopologs, [3-{sup 13}C]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, [4-{sup 13}C]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, and [1-{sup 15}N]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, have been detected in natural abundance, and several hundred lines have been measured for each of these species and fit to 6th-order Hamiltonians. Ten additional isotopologs were synthesized with enhanced deuterium substitution and analyzed to allow for a complete structure determination. The equilibrium structure (R{sub e}) of pyridazine was obtained by correcting the experimental rotational constants for the effects of vibration-rotation coupling using interaction constants predicted from CCSD(T) calculations with an ANO0 basis set and further correcting for the effect of electron mass. The final R{sub e} structural parameters are determined with excellent accuracy, as evidenced by their ability to predict 28 independent moments of inertia (I{sub a} and I{sub b} for 14 isotopologs) very well from 9 structural parameters. The rotational spectra of the six lowest-energy fundamental vibrational satellites of the main isotopolog have been detected. The rotational spectra of the five lowest-energy vibrational satellites have been assigned and fit to yield accurate rotational and distortion constants, while the fit and assignment for the sixth is less complete. The resultant vibration-rotation interaction (α) constants are found to

  3. 4-(3,7-Dimethyl-4-oxo-4,5-dihydro­isoxazolo[4,5-d]pyridazin-5-yl)benzene­sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Asiri, Abdullah M.; Faidallah, Hassan M.; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O.; Obaid, Abdullah.Y.; Ng, Seik Weng

    2011-01-01

    The nine-membered fused-ring system of the title pyridazine derivative, C13H12N4O4S, is approximately planar (r.m.s. deviation 0.027 Å), and the benzene ring of the phenyl­sulfamide substituent is aligned at 43.5 (1)° to the fused-ring system. The amine group of the sulfonamide substituent forms an N—H⋯O hydrogen bond to the ketonic O atom of two neigboring mol­ecules to generate a chain running along the c axis. PMID:22059027

  4. Synthesis of new pyridazino[4,5-b]indol-4-ones and pyridazin-3(2H)-one analogs as DYRK1A inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bruel, Amélie; Bénéteau, Romain; Chabanne, Mylène; Lozach, Olivier; Le Guevel, Rémy; Ravache, Myriam; Bénédetti, Hélène; Meijer, Laurent; Logé, Cédric; Robert, Jean-Michel

    2014-11-01

    New pyridazino[4,5-b]indol-4-ones and pyridazin-3(2H)-one analogs were synthesized and their inhibitory activities against DYRK1A, CDK5/p25, GSK3α/β and p110-α isoform of PI3K evaluated using harmine as reference. Both furan-2-yl 10 and pyridin-4-yl 19 from the two different series, exhibited submicromolar IC50 against DYRK1A with no activities against the three other kinases. In addition, compound 10 exhibited antiproliferative activities in the Huh-7, Caco2 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. PMID:25248682

  5. Second hyperpolarizability of the calcium-doped lithium salt of pyridazine Li-H3C4N2 ⋯ Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Suélio; Castro, Marcos A.; Leão, Salviano A.; Fonseca, Tertius L.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we report results of coupled cluster calculations for the second hyperpolarizability of the calcium-doped lithium salt of pyridazine (Li-H3C4N2 ⋯ Ca) molecule. In the static limit an unusual value of 4.34 ×106 au was obtained at the CCSD level of calculation. Results obtained for the dc-Kerr effect through SCF, CCS and CCSD methods show that γ (- ω; ω, 0, 0) is strongly dependent of the electron correlation treatment. Dynamic results obtained at the CCSD level are also reported for the IDRI, dc-SHG and THG nonlinear optical processes.

  6. Lipophilic and hydrophilic esters of 4-acetyl-2-(2-hydroxyethyl)-5,6-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-2H-pyridazin-3-one as antihypertensive agents.

    PubMed

    Fogt, S W; Scozzie, J A; Heilman, R D; Powers, L J

    1980-12-01

    In an attempt to enhance the antihypertensive activity of 4-acetyl-2-(2-hydroxyethyl)-5,6-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-2H-pyridazin-3-one, 1, a series of lipophilic and hydrophilic esters was synthesized. These derivatives possessed increased lipid and aqueous solubility, respectively. The esters, in general, cause a larger blood-pressure drop than 1 when tested at high doses in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model. At lower doses the antihypertensive activity is the same as with 1. PMID:7452699

  7. Synthesis of a new class of Pyridazin-3-one and 2-amino-5-arylazopyridine derivatives and their utility in the synthesis of fused azines.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hamada Mohamed; Behbehani, Haider

    2014-01-01

    A general route for the synthesis of a novel class of pyridazin-3-one derivatives 3 by the reaction in acetic anhydride between 3-oxo-2-arylhydrazonopropanals 1 and some active methylene compounds like p-nitrophenylacetic acid and cyanoacetic acid was established. Under these conditions the pyridazin-3-one derivatives 3 were formed as the sole isolable products in excellent yield. The 6-acetyl-3-oxopyridazine derivative 3l was reacted with DMF-DMA to afford the corresponding enaminone derivative 4, which reacts with a variety of aminoazoles to afford the corresponding azolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine derivatives 5-7. Also, in order to explore the viability and generality of a recently uncovered reaction between 3-oxo-2-arylhydrazonopropanals and active methylene compounds, a variety of 2-amino-6-aryl-5-arylazo-3-aroylpyridines 16-19 were prepared by reacting 3-oxo-2-arylhydrazonopropanals with miscellaneous active methylene compounds like 3-oxo-3-phenylpropionitrile, hetaroylacetonitriles and cyanoacetamides. These 2-aminopyridine derivatives undergo smooth reactions with cyanoacetic acid that led to the formation in high yield of a new class of 1,8-naphthyridine derivatives 24. The structures of all new substances prepared in this investigation were determined by the different analytical spectroscopic methods, in addition to the X-ray crystallographic analysis. PMID:24566327

  8. Structure-Based Design of Novel Pyrimido[4,5-c]pyridazine Derivatives as Dihydropteroate Synthase Inhibitors with Increased Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ying; Hammoudeh, Dalia; Yun, Mi-Kyung; Qi, Jianjun; White, Stephen W.; Lee, Richard E.

    2012-05-29

    Dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) is the validated drug target for sulfonamide antimicrobial therapy. However, due to widespread drug resistance and poor tolerance, the use of sulfonamide antibiotics is now limited. The pterin binding pocket in DHPS is highly conserved and is distinct from the sulfonamide binding site. It therefore represents an attractive alternative target for the design of novel antibacterial agents. We previously carried out the structural characterization of a known pyridazine inhibitor in the Bacillus anthracis DHPS pterin site and identified a number of unfavorable interactions that appear to compromise binding. With this structural information, a series of 4,5-dioxo-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimido[4,5-c]pyridazines were designed to improve binding affinity. Most importantly, the N-methyl ring substitution was removed to improve binding within the pterin pocket, and the length of the side chain carboxylic acid was optimized to fully engage the pyrophosphate binding site. These inhibitors were synthesized and evaluated by an enzyme activity assay, X-ray crystallography, isothermal calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the binding interactions from structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic perspectives. This study clearly demonstrates that compounds lacking the N-methyl substitution exhibit increased inhibition of DHPS, but the beneficial effects of optimizing the side chain length are less apparent.

  9. Supramolecular self-assembled polynuclear complexes from tritopic, tetratopic, and pentatopic ligands: structural, magnetic and surface studies.

    PubMed

    Dey, Subrata K; Abedin, Tareque S M; Dawe, Louise N; Tandon, Santokh S; Collins, Julie L; Thompson, Laurence K; Postnikov, Andrei V; Alam, Mohammad S; Müller, Paul

    2007-09-17

    Polymetallic, highly organized molecular architectures can be created by "bottom-up" self-assembly methods using ligands with appropriately programmed coordination information. Ligands based on 2,6-picolyldihydrazone (tritopic and pentatopic) and 3,6-pyridazinedihydrazone (tetratopic) cores, with tridentate coordination pockets, are highly specific and lead to the efficient self-assembly of square [3 x 3] Mn9, [4 x 4] Mn16, and [5 x 5] Mn25 nanoscale grids. Subtle changes in the tritopic ligand composition to include bulky end groups can lead to a rectangular 3 x [1 x 3] Mn9 grid, while changing the central pyridazine to a more sterically demanding pyrazole leads to simple dinuclear copper complexes, despite the potential for binding four metal ions. The creation of all bidentate sites in a tetratopic pyridazine ligand leads to a dramatically different spiral Mn4 strand. Single-crystal X-ray structural data show metallic connectivity through both mu-O and mu-NN bridges, which leads to dominant intramolecular antiferromagnetic spin exchange in all cases. Surface depositions of the Mn9, Mn16, and Mn25 square grid molecules on graphite (HOPG) have been examined using STM/CITS imagery (scanning tunneling microscopy/current imaging tunneling spectroscopy), where tunneling through the metal d-orbital-based HOMO levels reveals the metal ion positions. CITS imagery of the grids clearly shows the presence of 9, 16, and 25 manganese ions in the expected square grid arrangements, highlighting the importance and power of this technique in establishing the molecular nature of the surface adsorbed species. Nanoscale, electronically functional, polymetallic assemblies of this sort, created by such a bottom-up synthetic approach, constitute important components for advanced molecule-based materials. PMID:17696336

  10. Predicting Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity through Ligand-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Ferino, Giulio; Quezada, Elias; Santana, Lourdes; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of bio- and cheminformatics associated with the development of specialized software and increasing computer power has produced a great interest in theoretical in silico methods applied in drug rational design. These techniques apply the concept that “similar molecules have similar biological properties” that has been exploited in Medicinal Chemistry for years to design new molecules with desirable pharmacological profiles. Ligand-based methods are not dependent on receptor structural data and take into account two and three-dimensional molecular properties to assess similarity of new compounds in regards to the set of molecules with the biological property under study. Depending on the complexity of the calculation, there are different types of ligand-based methods, such as QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) with 2D and 3D descriptors, CoMFA (Comparative Molecular Field Analysis) or pharmacophoric approaches. This work provides a description of a series of ligand-based models applied in the prediction of the inhibitory activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes. The controlled regulation of the enzymes’ function through the use of MAO inhibitors is used as a treatment in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, such as depression, anxiety, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. For this reason, multiple scaffolds, such as substituted coumarins, indolylmethylamine or pyridazine derivatives were synthesized and assayed toward MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition. Our intention is to focus on the description of ligand-based models to provide new insights in the relationship between the MAO inhibitory activity and the molecular structure of the different inhibitors, and further study enzyme selectivity and possible mechanisms of action. PMID:23231398

  11. Design and synthesis of potent and selective pyridazin-4(1H)-one-based PDE10A inhibitors interacting with Tyr683 in the PDE10A selectivity pocket.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Masato; Hitaka, Takenori; Hasui, Tomoaki; Fushimi, Makoto; Kunitomo, Jun; Kokubo, Hironori; Oki, Hideyuki; Nakashima, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Takahiko

    2016-08-15

    Utilizing structure-based drug design techniques, we designed and synthesized phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitors based on pyridazin-4(1H)-one. These compounds can interact with Tyr683 in the PDE10A selectivity pocket. Pyridazin-4(1H)-one derivative 1 was linked with a benzimidazole group through an alkyl spacer to interact with the OH of Tyr683 and fill the PDE10A selectivity pocket. After optimizing the linker length, we identified 1-(cyclopropylmethyl)-5-[3-(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)propoxy]-3-(1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridazin-4(1H)-one (16f) as having highly potent PDE10A inhibitory activity (IC50=0.76nM) and perfect selectivity against other PDEs (>13,000-fold, IC50=>10,000nM). The crystal structure of 16f bound to PDE10A revealed that the benzimidazole moiety was located deep within the PDE10A selectivity pocket and interacted with Tyr683. Additionally, a bidentate interaction existed between the 5-alkoxypyridazin-4(1H)-one moiety and the conserved Gln716 present in all PDEs. PMID:27301679

  12. Discovery of imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine derivatives: selective and orally available Mps1 (TTK) kinase inhibitors exhibiting remarkable antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Ken-Ichi; Ide, Nobuyuki; Daigo, Yataro; Itoh, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takahiko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nozu, Kohei; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Tadano, Genta; Tagashira, Sachie; Higashino, Kenichi; Okano, Yousuke; Sato, Yuji; Inoue, Makiko; Iguchi, Motofumi; Kanazawa, Takayuki; Ishioka, Yukichi; Dohi, Keiji; Kido, Yasuto; Sakamoto, Shingo; Ando, Shigeru; Maeda, Masahiro; Higaki, Masayo; Baba, Yoshiyasu; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2015-02-26

    Monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) is an attractive oncology target due to its high expression level in cancer cells as well as the correlation of its expression levels with histological grades of cancers. An imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazine 10a was identified during an HTS campaign. Although 10a exhibited good biochemical activity, its moderate cellular as well as antiproliferative activities needed to be improved. The cocrystal structure of an analogue of 10a guided our lead optimization to introduce substituents at the 6-position of the scaffold, giving the 6-aryl substituted 21b which had improved cellular activity but no oral bioavailability in rat. Property-based optimization at the 6-position and a scaffold change led to the discovery of the imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine-based 27f, an extremely potent (cellular Mps1 IC50 = 0.70 nM, A549 IC50 = 6.0 nM), selective Mps1 inhibitor over 192 kinases, which could be orally administered and was active in vivo. This 27f demonstrated remarkable antiproliferative activity in the nanomolar range against various tissue cancer cell lines. PMID:25625617

  13. Bis(μ-pyridazine-3-carboxyl­ato-κ2 O:O′)bis­[aqua­dioxido(pyridazine-3-carboxyl­ato-κ2 N 2,O)uranium(VI)] dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Leciejewicz, Janusz; Starosta, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the binuclear title complex, [U2(C5H3N2O2)4O4(H2O)2]·2H2O, is composed of centrosymmetric dimers in which each UO2 2+ ion is coordinated by two ligand mol­ecules. One donates its N,O-bonding group and the other donates both carboxyl­ate O atoms. Each of the latter bridges adjacent uranyl ions. The coordination environment of the metal center is a distorted penta­gonal bipyramid. The dimers are inter­connected by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between coordinated and uncoordinated water mol­ecules and carboxyl­ate O atoms. An intra­molecular O—H⋯N inter­action is also present. PMID:21581557

  14. Environmentally-Safe Conditions for a Palladium-Catalyzed Direct C3-Arylation with High Turn Over Frequency of Imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazines Using Aryl Bromides and Chlorides.

    PubMed

    Chikhi, Sabah; Djebbar, Safia; Soulé, Jean-François; Doucet, Henri

    2016-09-01

    Pd(OAc)2 was found to catalyze very efficiently the direct arylation of imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine at C3-position under a very low catalyst loading and phosphine-free conditions. The reaction can be performed in very high TOFs and TONs employing as little as 0.1-0.05 mol % catalyst using a wide range of aryl bromides. In addition, some electron-deficient aryl chlorides were also found to be suitable substrates. Moreover, 31 examples of the cross couplings were reported using green, safe, and renewable solvents, such as pentan-1-ol, diethylcarbonate or cyclopentyl methyl ether, without loss of efficiency. PMID:27380613

  15. Crystal structure of 4-(4-chloro­phen­yl)-6-(morpholin-4-yl)pyridazin-3(2H)-one

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Abdullah; Akkurt, Mehmet; Şüküroğlu, Murat; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    In the title compound, C14H14ClN3O2, the morpholine ring adopts a chair conformation, with the exocyclic N—C bond in an equatorial orientation. The 1,6-di­hydro­pyridazine ring is essentially planar, with a maximum deviation of 0.014 (1) Å, and forms a dihedral angle of 40.16 (7)° with the plane of the benzene ring. In the crystal, pairs of centrosymmetrically related mol­ecules are linked into dimers via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming R 2 2(8) ring motifs. The dimers are connected via C—H⋯O and C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network. Aromatic π–π stacking inter­actions [centroid–centroid distance = 3.6665 (9) Å] are also observed. Semi-empirical mol­ecular orbital calculations were carried out using the AM1 method. The calculated dihedral angles between the pyridizine and benzene rings and between the pyridizine and morpholine (all atoms) rings are 34.49 and 76.96°, respectively·The corresponding values obtained from the X-ray structure determination are 40.16 (7) and 12.97 (9)°, respectively. The morpholine ring of the title compound in the calculated gas-phase seems to have a quite different orientation compared to that indicated by the X-ray structure determination. PMID:26396762

  16. Development of small molecule non-peptide formyl peptide receptor (FPR) ligands and molecular modeling of their recognition.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, I A; Khlebnikov, A I; Giovannoni, M P; Kirpotina, L N; Cilibrizzi, A; Quinn, M T

    2014-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on a variety of cell types. These receptors play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory reactions and sensing cellular damage. They have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, cataract formation, and atherogenesis. Thus, FPR ligands, both agonists and antagonists, may represent novel therapeutics for modulating host defense and innate immunity. A variety of molecules have been identified as receptor subtype-selective and mixed FPR agonists with potential therapeutic value during last decade. This review describes our efforts along with recent advances in the identification, optimization, biological evaluation, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of small molecule non-peptide FPR agonists and antagonists, including chiral molecules. Questions regarding the interaction at the molecular level of benzimidazoles, pyrazolones, pyridazin-3(2H)-ones, N-phenylureas and other derivatives with FPR1 and FPR2 are discussed. Application of computational models for virtual screening and design of FPR ligands is also considered. PMID:24350845

  17. Metal-ligand cooperation.

    PubMed

    Khusnutdinova, Julia R; Milstein, David

    2015-10-12

    Metal-ligand cooperation (MLC) has become an important concept in catalysis by transition metal complexes both in synthetic and biological systems. MLC implies that both the metal and the ligand are directly involved in bond activation processes, by contrast to "classical" transition metal catalysis where the ligand (e.g. phosphine) acts as a spectator, while all key transformations occur at the metal center. In this Review, we will discuss examples of MLC in which 1) both the metal and the ligand are chemically modified during bond activation and 2) bond activation results in immediate changes in the 1st coordination sphere involving the cooperating ligand, even if the reactive center at the ligand is not directly bound to the metal (e.g. via tautomerization). The role of MLC in enabling effective catalysis as well as in catalyst deactivation reactions will be discussed. PMID:26436516

  18. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used in the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams. Organic ligands with metal ion specificity are critical components in the development of solvent extraction and ion exchange processes that are highly selective for targeted radionuclides. The traditional approach to the development of such ligands involves lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing, which in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, results in wasted research effort. The author`s approach breaks down and simplifies this costly process with the aid of computer-based molecular modeling techniques. Commercial software for organic molecular modeling is being configured to examine the interactions between organic ligands and metal ions, yielding an inexpensive, commercially or readily available computational tool that can be used to predict the structures and energies of ligand-metal complexes. Users will be able to correlate the large body of existing experimental data on structure, solution binding affinity, and metal ion selectivity to develop structural design criteria. These criteria will provide a basis for selecting ligands that can be implemented in separations technologies through collaboration with other DOE national laboratories and private industry. The initial focus will be to select ether-based ligands that can be applied to the recovery and concentration of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions including cesium, strontium, and radium.

  19. Vasorelaxant and antiplatelet activity of 4,7-dimethyl-1,2,5-oxadiazolo[3,4-d]pyridazine 1,5,6-trioxide: role of soluble guanylate cyclase, nitric oxide and thiols

    PubMed Central

    Kots, Alexander Ya; Grafov, Mikhail A; Khropov, Yuri V; Betin, Vasily L; Belushkina, Natalya N; Busygina, Olga G; Yazykova, Marina Yu; Ovchinnikov, Igor V; Kulikov, Alexander S; Makhova, Nina N; Medvedeva, Natalya A; Bulargina, Tamara V; Severina, Irina S

    2000-01-01

    Certain heterocyclic N-oxides are vasodilators and inhibitors of platelet aggregation. The pharmacological activity of the furoxan derivative condensed with pyridazine di-N-oxide 4,7-dimethyl-1,2,5-oxadiazolo[3,4-d]pyridazine 1,5,6-trioxide (FPTO) and the corresponding furazan (FPDO) was studied. FPTO reacted with thiols generating nitrite (NO), S-nitrosoglutathione and hydroxylamine (nitroxyl) and converted oxyHb to metHb. FPDO did not generate detectable amounts of NO-like species but reacted with thiols and oxyHb. FPTO and FPDO haem-dependently stimulated the activity of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and this stimulation was inhibited by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) and by 0.1 mM dithiothreitol. FPTO relaxed noradrenaline-precontracted aortic rings and its concentration-response curve was biphasic (pIC50=9.03±0.13 and 5.85±0.06). FPDO was significantly less potent vasodilator (pIC50=5.19±0.14). The vasorelaxant activity of FPTO and FPDO was inhibited by ODQ. oxyHb significantly inhibited only FPTO-dependent relaxation. FPTO and FPDO were equipotent inhibitors of ADP-induced platelet aggregation (IC50=0.63±0.15 and 0.49±0.05 μM, respectively). The antiplatelet activity of FPTO (but not FPDO) was partially suppressed by oxyHb. The antiaggregatory effects of FPTO and FPDO were only partially blocked by sGC inhibitors. FPTO and FPDO (10–20 μM) significantly increased cyclic GMP levels in aortic rings and platelets and this increase was blocked by ODQ. Thus, FPTO can generate NO and, like FPDO, reacts with thiols and haem. The vasorelaxant activity of FPTO and FPDO is sGC-dependent and a predominant role is played by NO at FPTO concentrations below 1 μM. On the contrary, inhibition of platelet aggregation is only partially related to sGC activation. PMID:10725265

  20. Vasorelaxant and antiplatelet activity of 4,7-dimethyl-1,2, 5-oxadiazolo[3,4-d]pyridazine 1,5,6-trioxide: role of soluble guanylate cyclase, nitric oxide and thiols.

    PubMed

    Kots, A Y; Grafov, M A; Khropov, Y V; Betin, V L; Belushkina, N N; Busygina, O G; Yazykova, M Y; Ovchinnikov, I V; Kulikov, A S; Makhova, N N; Medvedeva, N A; Bulargina, T V; Severina, I S

    2000-03-01

    1. Certain heterocyclic N-oxides are vasodilators and inhibitors of platelet aggregation. The pharmacological activity of the furoxan derivative condensed with pyridazine di-N-oxide 4,7-dimethyl-1,2, 5-oxadiazolo[3,4-d]pyridazine 1,5,6-trioxide (FPTO) and the corresponding furazan (FPDO) was studied. 2. FPTO reacted with thiols generating nitrite (NO), S-nitrosoglutathione and hydroxylamine (nitroxyl) and converted oxyHb to metHb. FPDO did not generate detectable amounts of NO-like species but reacted with thiols and oxyHb. 3. FPTO and FPDO haem-dependently stimulated the activity of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and this stimulation was inhibited by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) and by 0.1 mM dithiothreitol. 4. FPTO relaxed noradrenaline-precontracted aortic rings and its concentration-response curve was biphasic (pIC(50)=9. 03+/-0.13 and 5.85+/-0.06). FPDO was significantly less potent vasodilator (pIC(50)=5.19+/-0.14). The vasorelaxant activity of FPTO and FPDO was inhibited by ODQ. oxyHb significantly inhibited only FPTO-dependent relaxation. 5. FPTO and FPDO were equipotent inhibitors of ADP-induced platelet aggregation (IC(50)=0.63+/-0.15 and 0.49+/-0. 05 microM, respectively). The antiplatelet activity of FPTO (but not FPDO) was partially suppressed by oxyHb. The antiaggregatory effects of FPTO and FPDO were only partially blocked by sGC inhibitors. 6. FPTO and FPDO (10 - 20 microM) significantly increased cyclic GMP levels in aortic rings and platelets and this increase was blocked by ODQ. 7. Thus, FPTO can generate NO and, like FPDO, reacts with thiols and haem. The vasorelaxant activity of FPTO and FPDO is sGC-dependent and a predominant role is played by NO at FPTO concentrations below 1 microM. On the contrary, inhibition of platelet aggregation is only partially related to sGC activation. PMID:10725265

  1. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used tin applications for the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams.

  2. Kinase domain inhibition of leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) using a [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-b]pyridazine scaffold.

    PubMed

    Galatsis, Paul; Henderson, Jaclyn L; Kormos, Bethany L; Han, Seungil; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Wager, Travis T; Verhoest, Patrick R; Noell, G Stephen; Chen, Yi; Needle, Elie; Berger, Zdenek; Steyn, Stefanus J; Houle, Christopher; Hirst, Warren D

    2014-09-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been genetically linked to Parkinson's disease (PD). The most common mutant, G2019S, increases kinase activity, thus LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are potentially useful in the treatment of PD. We herein disclose the structure, potential ligand-protein binding interactions, and pharmacological profiling of potent and highly selective kinase inhibitors based on a triazolopyridazine chemical scaffold. PMID:25113930

  3. A TRLFS study on the complexation of novel BTP type ligands with Cm(III).

    PubMed

    Beele, Björn B; Rüdiger, Elias; Schwörer, Felicitas; Müllich, Udo; Geist, Andreas; Panak, Petra J

    2013-09-14

    Two BTP-type N-donor ligands with different numbers of aromatic nitrogen atoms (2,6-bis(4-ethyl-pyridazin-1-yl)pyridine, Et-BDP and 2,6-bis(4-(n)propyl-2,3,5,6-tetrazine-1-yl)pyridine, (n)Pr-Tetrazine) have been synthesized and characterized by NMR and MS techniques. The complexation with Cm(III) in 2-propanol-water (1 : 1, vol.) is studied for both ligands using time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and the complexation properties are compared to (n)Pr-BTP. With increasing the ligand concentration three different species, the 1 : 1-, 1 : 2- and 1 : 3-complex, were found. Log β3 values of 7.6 for the formation of Cm(Et-BDP)3 and 9.2 for the formation of Cm((n)Pr-Tetrazine)3 are determined. The complexation with (n)Pr-Tetrazine shows slow kinetics. Thermodynamic data of the complexation reactions are determined in a temperature range of 25 °C-60 °C. The complexation with Et-BDP is exothermic (ΔH = -16.3 ± 1.2 kJ mol(-1)) and exergonic (ΔG = -43.8 ± 2.6 kJ mol(-1)) whereas the complexation with (n)Pr-Tetrazine is endothermic (ΔH = 43.9 ± 3.1 kJ mol(-1)) and exergonic (ΔG = -51.7 ± 2.2 kJ mol(-1)). In the case of the latter the complexation is driven by a highly positive reaction entropy change (ΔS = 320.6 ± 15.4 J mol(-1) K(-1)). In comparison to (n)Pr-BTP, less negative ΔG values were found for the complexation of Cm(III) with both ligands. PMID:23552476

  4. Synthesis and Evaluation of New 4-Chloro-2-(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)-5-(aliphatic/cyclic saturated amino)pyridazin-3(2H)-one Derivatives as Anticancer, Antiangiogenic, and Antioxidant Agents.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Vinod T; Sawant, Ajay S; Sawant, Sanjay S; Pisal, Parshuram M; Gacche, Rajesh N; Kamble, Sonali S; Kamble, Vilas A

    2015-05-01

    Pyridazinones are widely recognized as versatile scaffolds with a wide spectrum of biological activities. In the present work, a series of new 4-chloro-2-(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)-5-(aliphatic/cyclic saturated amino)pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives 4a-i were synthesized and characterized by spectral techniques. The inhibitory effects of the synthesized compounds 4a-i on the viability of three human cancer cell lines, HEP3BPN 11 (liver), MDA 453 (breast), and HL 60 (leukemia), were assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Among the compounds 4a-i screened, 4g and 4i exhibited inhibitory activity very close to the standard methotrexate; therefore, these lead compounds were further tested for their potential to inhibit the proangiogenic cytokines involved in tumor progression. Compound 4g was found to be a potent antiangiogenic agent against TNFα, VEGF, FGFb, and TGFβ, whereas 4i showed potent antiangiogenic activity against TNFα, VEGF, FGFb, and leptin. All the compounds 4a-i were screened for their antioxidant activities using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazine (DPPH), OH, and superoxide anion radicals. Compound 4f showed better OH radical scavenging activity than the standard ascorbic acid. PMID:25846009

  5. Pharmacological profile of novel acid pump antagonist 7-(4-fluorobenzyloxy)-2,3-dimethyl-1-{[(1S,2S)-2-methyl cyclopropyl]methyl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyridazine (CS-526).

    PubMed

    Ito, Keiichi; Kinoshita, Kazuya; Tomizawa, Atsuyuki; Inaba, Fumi; Morikawa-Inomata, Yuka; Makino, Mitsuko; Tabata, Keiichi; Shibakawa, Nobuhiko

    2007-10-01

    The pharmacological profiles of the novel acid pump antagonist 7-(4-fluorobenzyloxy)-2,3-dimethyl-1-{[(1S,2S)-2-methylcyclopropyl]methyl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyridazine (CS-526) were investigated in terms of hog gastric H+,K+-ATPase activity, gastric acid secretion, and acute gastroesophageal lesions in comparison with other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). CS-526 inhibited H+,K+-ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 61 nM. The inhibitory effect of CS-526 on H+,K+-ATPase activity was more potent than that of any of the other PPIs examined. The inhibitory mechanism of CS-526 on H+,K+-ATPase was a competitive antagonism to the K+ binding site of H+,K+-ATPase, and it was also a reversible inhibition. In pylorus-ligated rats, intraduodenal or oral administration of CS-526 inhibited gastric acid secretion in a dose-dependent manner, and the ID50 values were 2.8 or 0.7 mg/kg, respectively. In Heidenhain pouch dogs, intrapouch administration of CS-526 inhibited histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion in a dose- and retention time-dependent manner. In a reflux esophagitis model, intraduodenal and oral administration of CS-526 prevented esophageal lesions with ID50 values of 5.4 and 1.9 mg/kg, respectively. Lansoprazole prevented esophagitis only by intraduodenal administration (ID50 = 2.2 mg/kg). Furthermore, CS-526 inhibited acute gastric mucosal lesions. These data demonstrate that the novel acid pump antagonist CS-526 has potent antisecretory and antiulcer effects. These findings indicate that CS-526 would have a curative effect on gastroesophageal reflux disease via its potent antisecretory and antiulcer actions. PMID:17630360

  6. LigandRNA: computational predictor of RNA–ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Anna; Milanowska, Kaja; Łach, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules have recently become attractive as potential drug targets due to the increased awareness of their importance in key biological processes. The increase of the number of experimentally determined RNA 3D structures enabled structure-based searches for small molecules that can specifically bind to defined sites in RNA molecules, thereby blocking or otherwise modulating their function. However, as of yet, computational methods for structure-based docking of small molecule ligands to RNA molecules are not as well established as analogous methods for protein-ligand docking. This motivated us to create LigandRNA, a scoring function for the prediction of RNA–small molecule interactions. Our method employs a grid-based algorithm and a knowledge-based potential derived from ligand-binding sites in the experimentally solved RNA–ligand complexes. As an input, LigandRNA takes an RNA receptor file and a file with ligand poses. As an output, it returns a ranking of the poses according to their score. The predictive power of LigandRNA favorably compares to five other publicly available methods. We found that the combination of LigandRNA and Dock6 into a “meta-predictor” leads to further improvement in the identification of near-native ligand poses. The LigandRNA program is available free of charge as a web server at http://ligandrna.genesilico.pl. PMID:24145824

  7. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B.

    2008-12-23

    A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

  8. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR.

  9. Galanin Receptors and Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Webling, Kristin E. B.; Runesson, Johan; Bartfai, Tamas; Langel, Ülo

    2012-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin was first discovered 30 years ago. Today, the galanin family consists of galanin, galanin-like peptide (GALP), galanin-message associated peptide (GMAP), and alarin and this family has been shown to be involved in a wide variety of biological and pathological functions. The effect is mediated through three GPCR subtypes, GalR1-3. The limited number of specific ligands to the galanin receptor subtypes has hindered the understanding of the individual effects of each receptor subtype. This review aims to summarize the current data of the importance of the galanin receptor subtypes and receptor subtype specific agonists and antagonists and their involvement in different biological and pathological functions. PMID:23233848

  10. Bifunctional DTPA-type ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Gansow, O.A.; Brechbiel, M.W.

    1990-03-26

    The subject matter of the invention relates to bifunctional cyclohexyl DTPA ligands and methods of using these compounds. Specifically, such ligands are useful for radiolabeling proteins with radioactive metals, and can consequently be utilized with respect to radioimmunoimaging and/or radioimmunotherapy.

  11. Al(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodupe, M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to optimize the structure and determine the binding energies of Al(+) to a series of ligands. For Al(+)-CN, the bonding was found to have a large covalent component. For the remaining ligands, the bonding is shown to be electrostatic in origin. The results obtained for Al(+) are compared with those previously reported for Mg(+).

  12. The maximal affinity of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, I. D.; Chen, K.; Sharp, K. A.; Kollman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    We explore the question of what are the best ligands for macromolecular targets. A survey of experimental data on a large number of the strongest-binding ligands indicates that the free energy of binding increases with the number of nonhydrogen atoms with an initial slope of ≈−1.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) per atom. For ligands that contain more than 15 nonhydrogen atoms, the free energy of binding increases very little with relative molecular mass. This nonlinearity is largely ascribed to nonthermodynamic factors. An analysis of the dominant interactions suggests that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic effects provide a reasonable basis for understanding binding affinities across the entire set of ligands. Interesting outliers that bind unusually strongly on a per atom basis include metal ions, covalently attached ligands, and a few well known complexes such as biotin–avidin. PMID:10468550

  13. Predicting target-ligand interactions using protein ligand-binding site and ligand substructures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Cell proliferation, differentiation, Gene expression, metabolism, immunization and signal transduction require the participation of ligands and targets. It is a great challenge to identify rules governing molecular recognition between chemical topological substructures of ligands and the binding sites of the targets. Methods We suppose that the ligand-target interactions are determined by ligand substructures as well as the physical-chemical properties of the binding sites. Therefore, we propose a fragment interaction model (FIM) to describe the interactions between ligands and targets, with the purpose of facilitating the chemical interpretation of ligand-target binding. First we extract target-ligand complexes from sc-PDB database, based on which, we get the target binding sites and the ligands. Then we represent each binding site as a fragment vector based on a target fragment dictionary that is composed of 199 clusters (denoted as fragements in this work) obtained by clustering 4200 trimers according to their physical-chemical properties. And then, we represent each ligand as a substructure vector based on a dictionary containing 747 substructures. Finally, we build the FIM by generating the interaction matrix M (representing the fragment interaction network), and the FIM can later be used for predicting unknown ligand-target interactions as well as providing the binding details of the interactions. Results The five-fold cross validation results show that the proposed model can get higher AUC score (92%) than three prevalence algorithms CS-PD (80%), BLM-NII (85%) and RF (85%), demonstrating the remarkable predictive ability of FIM. We also show that the ligand binding sites (local information) overweight the sequence similarities (global information) in ligand-target binding, and introducing too much global information would be harmful to the predictive ability. Moreover, The derived fragment interaction network can provide the chemical insights on

  14. Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm (LISA)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    A central problem in de novo drug design is determining the binding affinity of a ligand with a receptor. A new scoring algorithm is presented that estimates the binding affinity of a protein-ligand complex given a three-dimensional structure. The method, LISA (Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm), uses an empirical scoring function to describe the binding free energy. Interaction terms have been designed to account for van der Waals (VDW) contacts, hydrogen bonding, desolvation effects and metal chelation to model the dissociation equilibrium constants using a linear model. Atom types have been introduced to differentiate the parameters for VDW, H-bonding interactions and metal chelation between different atom pairs. A training set of 492 protein-ligand complexes was selected for the fitting process. Different test sets have been examined to evaluate its ability to predict experimentally measured binding affinities. By comparing with other well known scoring functions, the results show that LISA has advantages over many existing scoring functions in simulating protein-ligand binding affinity, especially metalloprotein-ligand binding affinity. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was also used in order to demonstrate that the energy terms in LISA are well designed and do not require extra cross terms. PMID:21561101

  15. What are Nuclear Receptor Ligands?

    PubMed Central

    Sladek, Frances M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a family of highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcription in response to small lipophilic compounds. They play a role in every aspect of development, physiology and disease in humans. They are also ubiquitous in and unique to the animal kingdom suggesting that they may have played an important role in their evolution. In contrast to the classical endocrine receptors that originally defined the family, recent studies suggest that the first NRs might have been sensors of their environment, binding ligands that were external to the host organism. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad perspective on NR ligands and address the issue of exactly what constitutes a NR ligand from historical, biological and evolutionary perspectives. This discussion will lay the foundation for subsequent reviews in this issue as well as pose new questions for future investigation. PMID:20615454

  16. Why mercury prefers soft ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Riccardi, Demian M; Guo, Hao-Bo; Gu, Baohua; Parks, Jerry M; Summers, Anne; Miller, S; Liang, Liyuan; Smith, Jeremy C

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a major global pollutant arising from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Defining the factors that determine the relative affinities of different ligands for the mercuric ion, Hg2+, is critical to understanding its speciation, transformation, and bioaccumulation in the environment. Here, we use quantum chemistry to dissect the relative binding free energies for a series of inorganic anion complexes of Hg2+. Comparison of Hg2+ ligand interactions in the gaseous and aqueous phases shows that differences in interactions with a few, local water molecules led to a clear periodic trend within the chalcogenide and halide groups and resulted in the well-known experimentally observed preference of Hg2+ for soft ligands such as thiols. Our approach establishes a basis for understanding Hg speciation in the biosphere.

  17. Fluorescent Ligands for Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Jayasekara, P Suresh; Squarcialupi, Lucia; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Federico, Stephanie; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Interest is increasing in developing fluorescent ligands for characterization of adenosine receptors (ARs), which hold a promise of usefulness in the drug discovery process. The size of a strategically labeled AR ligand can be greatly increased after the attachment of a fluorophore. The choice of dye moiety (e.g. Alexa Fluor 488), attachment point and linker length can alter the selectivity and potency of the parent molecule. Fluorescent derivatives of adenosine agonists and antagonists (e.g. XAC and other heterocyclic antagonist scaffolds) have been synthesized and characterized pharmacologically. Some are useful AR probes for flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and scanning confocal microscopy. Thus, the approach of fluorescent labeled GPCR ligands, including those for ARs, is a growing dynamic research field. PMID:23200243

  18. Molecular Recognition and Ligand Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Riccardo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-04-01

    We review recent developments in our understanding of molecular recognition and ligand association, focusing on two major viewpoints: (a) studies that highlight new physical insight into the molecular recognition process and the driving forces determining thermodynamic signatures of binding and (b) recent methodological advances in applications to protein-ligand binding. In particular, we highlight the challenges posed by compensating enthalpic and entropic terms, competing solute and solvent contributions, and the relevance of complex configurational ensembles comprising multiple protein, ligand, and solvent intermediate states. As more complete physics is taken into account, computational approaches increase their ability to complement experimental measurements, by providing a microscopic, dynamic view of ensemble-averaged experimental observables. Physics-based approaches are increasingly expanding their power in pharmacology applications.

  19. Multifunctional Ligands in Transition Metal Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated ligands are now being designed that do far more than just fulfil their traditional spectator roles by binding to the metal and providing a sterically-defined binding pocket for the substrate in homogeneous transition metal catalysis. This Focus review emphasizes selected cases in which ligands carry additional functional groups that change the properties of the ligand as a result of an external stimulus or undergo catalytically-relevant ligand-based reactivity. These include proton responsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more protons, ligands having a hydrogen bonding function, electroresponsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more electrons, and photoresponsive ligands capable of undergoing a useful change of properties upon irradiation. Molecular recognition ligands and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) are briefly discussed.

  20. Polypharmacology of dopamine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Butini, S; Nikolic, K; Kassel, S; Brückmann, H; Filipic, S; Agbaba, D; Gemma, S; Brogi, S; Brindisi, M; Campiani, G; Stark, H

    2016-07-01

    Most neurological diseases have a multifactorial nature and the number of molecular mechanisms discovered as underpinning these diseases is continuously evolving. The old concept of developing selective agents for a single target does not fit with the medical need of most neurological diseases. The development of designed multiple ligands holds great promises and appears as the next step in drug development for the treatment of these multifactorial diseases. Dopamine and its five receptor subtypes are intimately involved in numerous neurological disorders. Dopamine receptor ligands display a high degree of cross interactions with many other targets including G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes and ion channels. For brain disorders like Parkinsońs disease, schizophrenia and depression the dopaminergic system, being intertwined with many other signaling systems, plays a key role in pathogenesis and therapy. The concept of designed multiple ligands and polypharmacology, which perfectly meets the therapeutic needs for these brain disorders, is herein discussed as a general ligand-based concept while focusing on dopaminergic agents and receptor subtypes in particular. PMID:27234980

  1. Efficient pseudo-enantiomeric carbohydrate olefin ligands.

    PubMed

    Grugel, Holger; Albrecht, Fabian; Minuth, Tobias; Boysen, Mike M K

    2012-07-20

    Highly efficient pseudo-enantiomeric olefin ligands were designed from D-glucose and D-galactose. These ligands yield consistently excellent levels of enantioselectivity in Rh(I)-catalyzed 1,4-additions of aryl- and alkenylboronic acids to achiral enones and high diastereoselectivity with chiral substrates. Contrary to established olefin ligands, they are obtained enantiomerically pure via short syntheses without racemic resolution steps, making them a valuable addition to the arsenal of chiral ligands with olefinic donor sites. PMID:22780685

  2. Glyconanomaterials: Synthesis, Characterization, and Ligand Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Glyconanomaterials, nanomaterials carrying surface-tethered carbohydrate ligands, have emerged and demonstrated increasing potential in biomedical imaging, therapeutics, and diagnostics. These materials combine the unique properties of nanometer-scale objects with the ability to present multiple copies of carbohydrate ligands, greatly enhancing the weak affinity of individual ligands to their binding partners. Critical to the performance of glyconanomaterials is the proper display of carbohydrate ligands, taking into consideration of the coupling chemistry, the type and length of the spacer linkage, and the ligand density. This article provides an overview of the coupling chemistry for attaching carbohydrate ligands to nanomaterials, and discusses the need for thorough characterization of glyconanomaterials, especially quantitative analyses of the ligand density and binding affinities. Using glyconanoparticles synthesized by a versatile photocoupling chemistry, methods for determining the ligand density by colorimetry and the binding affinity with lectins by a fluorescence competition assay are determined. The results show that the multivalent presentation of carbohydrate ligands significantly enhances the binding affinity by several orders of magnitude in comparison to the free ligands in solution. The effect is sizeable even at low surface ligand density. The type and length of the spacer linkage also affect the binding affinity, with the longer linkage promoting the association of bound ligands with the corresponding lectins. PMID:20301131

  3. Combining quantum mechanical ligand conformation analysis and protein modeling to elucidate GPCR-ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Schultes, Sabine; Engelhardt, Harald; Roumen, Luc; Zuiderveld, Obbe P; Haaksma, Eric E J; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob; de Graaf, Chris

    2013-01-01

    SAR beyond protein-ligand interactions: By combining structure-affinity relationships, protein-ligand modeling studies, and quantum mechanical calculations, we show that ligand conformational energies and basicity play critical roles in ligand binding to the histamine H4 receptor, a GPCR that plays a key role in inflammation. PMID:23161844

  4. Ligand chain length conveys thermochromism.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Mainak; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Chandrakumar, K R S; Sasmal, Anup Kumar; Pal, Anjali; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-08-14

    Thermochromic properties of a series of non-ionic copper compounds have been reported. Herein, we demonstrate that Cu(II) ion with straight-chain primary amine (A) and alpha-linolenic (fatty acid, AL) co-jointly exhibit thermochromic properties. In the current case, we determined that thermochromism becomes ligand chain length-dependent and at least one of the ligands (A or AL) must be long chain. Thermochromism is attributed to a balanced competition between the fatty acids and amines for the copper(II) centre. The structure-property relationship of the non-ionic copper compounds Cu(AL)2(A)2 has been substantiated by various physical measurements along with detailed theoretical studies based on time-dependent density functional theory. It is presumed from our results that the compound would be a useful material for temperature-sensor applications. PMID:24943491

  5. Mg(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry

    1991-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to optimize the structures and determine the binding energies of Mg(+) to a series of ligands. Mg(+) bonds electrostatically with benzene, acetone, H2, CO, and NH3 and a self-consistent-field treatment gives a good description of the bonding. The bonding in MgCN(+) and MgCH3(+) is largely covalent and a correlated treatment is required.

  6. Unusual ligand coordination for cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, J.C.; Kavallieratos, K.; Sachleben, R.A.

    2000-04-03

    When complexed by tetrabenzo-24-crown-8, the cesium ion can accommodate unprecedented ligation. The structures of the complexes are presented. These structures are the first reported examples of linear {eta}{sup 2}-acetonitrile coordination to any metal ion and the first structures illustrating {eta}{sup 2}-acetonitrile and dichloromethane ligation to an alkali metal ion. Possible steric and electronic origins of these unusual metal-ligand interactions are discussed.

  7. Presentation of Ligands on Hydroxylapatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Barbara C. F.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1997-01-01

    Conjugates of biotin with the decamer of glutamic acid (glu(sub 10)) and the trimer of D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (I) have been synthesized, and it has been shown that they mediate the binding of avidin to hydroxylapatite. In a similar way a conjugate of methotrexate with glu(sub 10) mediates the binding of dihydrofolate reductase to the mineral. The presentation of ligands on the hydroxylapatite component of bone may find applications in clinical medicine.

  8. Absolute Ligand Discrimination by Dimeric Signaling Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Sepehr; Nayak, Chitra R; Feld, Jordan J; Zilman, Anton G

    2016-09-01

    Many signaling pathways act through shared components, where different ligand molecules bind the same receptors or activate overlapping sets of response regulators downstream. Nevertheless, different ligands acting through cross-wired pathways often lead to different outcomes in terms of the target cell behavior and function. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed, it still largely remains unclear how cells can reliably discriminate different molecular ligands under such circumstances. Here we show that signaling via ligand-induced receptor dimerization-a very common motif in cellular signaling-naturally incorporates a mechanism for the discrimination of ligands acting through the same receptor. PMID:27602720

  9. Bifunctional crosslinking ligands for transthyretin

    PubMed Central

    Mangione, P. Patrizia; Deroo, Stéphanie; Ellmerich, Stephan; Bellotti, Vittorio; Kolstoe, Simon; Wood, Stephen P.; Robinson, Carol V.; Smith, Martin D.; Tennent, Glenys A.; Broadbridge, Robert J.; Council, Claire E.; Thurston, Joanne R.; Steadman, Victoria A.; Vong, Antonio K.; Swain, Christopher J.; Pepys, Mark B.; Taylor, Graham W.

    2015-01-01

    Wild-type and variant forms of transthyretin (TTR), a normal plasma protein, are amyloidogenic and can be deposited in the tissues as amyloid fibrils causing acquired and hereditary systemic TTR amyloidosis, a debilitating and usually fatal disease. Reduction in the abundance of amyloid fibril precursor proteins arrests amyloid deposition and halts disease progression in all forms of amyloidosis including TTR type. Our previous demonstration that circulating serum amyloid P component (SAP) is efficiently depleted by administration of a specific small molecule ligand compound, that non-covalently crosslinks pairs of SAP molecules, suggested that TTR may be also amenable to this approach. We first confirmed that chemically crosslinked human TTR is rapidly cleared from the circulation in mice. In order to crosslink pairs of TTR molecules, promote their accelerated clearance and thus therapeutically deplete plasma TTR, we prepared a range of bivalent specific ligands for the thyroxine binding sites of TTR. Non-covalently bound human TTR–ligand complexes were formed that were stable in vitro and in vivo, but they were not cleared from the plasma of mice in vivo more rapidly than native uncomplexed TTR. Therapeutic depletion of circulating TTR will require additional mechanisms. PMID:26400472

  10. Tumor Targeting via Integrin Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Rechenmacher, Florian; Sobahi, Tariq Rashad Ali; Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Kessler, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Selective and targeted delivery of drugs to tumors is a major challenge for an effective cancer therapy and also to overcome the side-effects associated with current treatments. Overexpression of various receptors on tumor cells is a characteristic structural and biochemical aspect of tumors and distinguishes them from physiologically normal cells. This abnormal feature is therefore suitable for selectively directing anticancer molecules to tumors by using ligands that can preferentially recognize such receptors. Several subtypes of integrin receptors that are crucial for cell adhesion, cell signaling, cell viability, and motility have been shown to have an upregulated expression on cancer cells. Thus, ligands that recognize specific integrin subtypes represent excellent candidates to be conjugated to drugs or drug carrier systems and be targeted to tumors. In this regard, integrins recognizing the RGD cell adhesive sequence have been extensively targeted for tumor-specific drug delivery. Here we review key recent examples on the presentation of RGD-based integrin ligands by means of distinct drug-delivery systems, and discuss the prospects of such therapies to specifically target tumor cells. PMID:24010121

  11. Ligand identification using electron-density mapcorrelations

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn,Judith D.

    2006-12-01

    A procedure for the identification of ligands bound incrystal structuresof macromolecules is described. Two characteristics ofthe density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identificationprocedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of aset of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to thedensity. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the densitywith the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. Thefingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the testligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using aZ-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean andstandard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatchedligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probabilityof observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. Theprocedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligandsin the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57 percent of allligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these twocharacteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identificationswere made for representative (F-o-F-c) exp(i phi(c)) difference densityfrom entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48 percent of the 200 cases,the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. Thisapproach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in newmacromolecular structures as well as in the identification of whichligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  12. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  13. Canonical and non-canonical Notch ligands

    PubMed Central

    D’SOUZA, BRENDAN; MELOTY-KAPELLA, LAURENCE; WEINMASTER, GERRY

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling induced by canonical Notch ligands is critical for normal embryonic development and tissue homeostasis through the regulation of a variety of cell fate decisions and cellular processes. Activation of Notch signaling is normally tightly controlled by direct interactions with ligand-expressing cells and dysregulated Notch signaling is associated with developmental abnormalities and cancer. While canonical Notch ligands are responsible for the majority of Notch signaling, a diverse group of structurally unrelated non-canonical ligands has also been identified that activate Notch and likely contribute to the pleiotropic effects of Notch signaling. Soluble forms of both canonical and non-canonical ligands have been isolated, some of which block Notch signaling and could serve as natural inhibitors of this pathway. Ligand activity can also be indirectly regulated by other signaling pathways at the level of ligand expression, serving to spatio-temporally compartmentalize Notch signaling activity and integrate Notch signaling into a molecular network that orchestrates developmental events. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms underlying the dual role of Notch ligands as activators and inhibitors of Notch signaling. Additionally, evidence that Notch ligands function independent of Notch are presented. We also discuss how ligand post-translational modification, endocytosis, proteolysis and spatio-temporal expression regulate their signaling activity. PMID:20816393

  14. Conformational readout of RNA by small ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kligun, Efrat; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules have highly versatile structures that can fold into myriad conformations, providing many potential pockets for binding small molecules. The increasing number of available RNA structures, in complex with proteins, small ligands and in free form, enables the design of new therapeutically useful RNA-binding ligands. Here we studied RNA ligand complexes from 10 RNA groups extracted from the protein data bank (PDB), including adaptive and non-adaptive complexes. We analyzed the chemical, physical, structural and conformational properties of binding pockets around the ligand. Comparing the properties of ligand-binding pockets to the properties of computed pockets extracted from all available RNA structures and RNA-protein interfaces, revealed that ligand-binding pockets, mainly the adaptive pockets, are characterized by unique properties, specifically enriched in rare conformations of the nucleobase and the sugar pucker. Further, we demonstrate that nucleotides possessing the rare conformations are preferentially involved in direct interactions with the ligand. Overall, based on our comprehensive analysis of RNA-ligand complexes, we suggest that the unique conformations adopted by RNA nucleotides play an important role in RNA recognition by small ligands. We term the recognition of a binding site by a ligand via the unique RNA conformations “RNA conformational readout.” We propose that “conformational readout” is a general way by which RNA binding pockets are recognized and selected from an ensemble of different RNA states. PMID:23618839

  15. Ligand placement based on prior structures: the guided ligand-replacement method

    SciTech Connect

    Klei, Herbert E.; Moriarty, Nigel W. Echols, Nathaniel; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Baldwin, Eric T.; Pokross, Matt; Posy, Shana; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), has been developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein-ligand complexes are available. The process of iterative structure-based drug design involves the X-ray crystal structure determination of upwards of 100 ligands with the same general scaffold (i.e. chemotype) complexed with very similar, if not identical, protein targets. In conjunction with insights from computational models and assays, this collection of crystal structures is analyzed to improve potency, to achieve better selectivity and to reduce liabilities such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology. Current methods for modeling ligands into electron-density maps typically do not utilize information on how similar ligands bound in related structures. Even if the electron density is of sufficient quality and resolution to allow de novo placement, the process can take considerable time as the size, complexity and torsional degrees of freedom of the ligands increase. A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), was developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein–ligand complexes are available. At the heart of GLR is an algorithm based on graph theory that associates atoms in the target ligand with analogous atoms in the reference ligand. Based on this correspondence, a set of coordinates is generated for the target ligand. GLR is especially useful in two situations: (i) modeling a series of large, flexible, complicated or macrocyclic ligands in successive structures and (ii) modeling ligands as part of a refinement pipeline that can automatically select a reference structure. Even in those cases for which no reference structure is available, if there are multiple copies of the bound ligand per asymmetric unit GLR offers an efficient way to complete the model after the first ligand has been placed. In all of these applications, GLR

  16. A universal rule for organic ligand exchange.

    PubMed

    You, Hongjun; Wang, Wenjin; Yang, Shengchun

    2014-11-12

    Most synthetic routes to high-quality nanocrystals with tunable morphologies predominantly employ long hydro-carbon molecules as ligands, which are detrimental for electronic and catalytic applications. Here, a rule is found that the adsorption energy of an organic ligand is related to its carbon-chain length. Using the density functional theory method, the adsorption energies of some commonly used ligand molecules with different carbon-chain lengths are calculated, including carboxylate, hydroxyl, and amine molecules adsorbed on metal or metal oxide crystal surface. The results indicate that the adsorption energy of the ligand molecule with a long carbon chain is weaker than that of a smaller molecule with same functional group. This rule provides a theoretical support for a new kind of ligand exchange method in which large organic ligand molecules can be exchanged by small molecules with same functional group to improve the catalytic properties. PMID:25335915

  17. Ligand-targeted liposomes for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sapra, Puja; Tyagi, Pradeep; Allen, Theresa M

    2005-10-01

    Selective targeting of ligand-targeted liposomes containing anticancer drugs or therapeutic genes to cell surface receptors expressed on cancer cells is a recognized strategy for improving the therapeutic effectiveness of conventional chemotherapeutics or gene therapeutics. Some recent advances in the field of ligand-targeted liposomes for the treatment of cancer are summarized including: selection criteria for the receptors to be targeted, choice of targeting ligands and choice of encapsulated therapeutics. Targeting of liposomes to solid tumors, versus angiogenic endothelial cells versus vascular targets is discussed. Ligand-targeted liposomes have shown considerable promise in preclinical xenograft models and are poised for clinical development. PMID:16305440

  18. Allosterism at muscarinic receptors: ligands and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, N J M; Lazareno, S

    2005-06-01

    The evaluation of allosteric ligands at muscarinic receptors is discussed in terms of the ability of the experimental data to be interpreted by the allosteric ternary complex model. The compilation of useful SAR information of allosteric ligands is not simple, especially for muscarinic receptors, where there are multiple allosteric sites and complex interactions. PMID:15974931

  19. Autocrine signal transmission with extracellular ligand degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratov, C B; Posta, F; Shvartsman, S Y

    2009-03-01

    Traveling waves of cell signaling in epithelial layers orchestrate a number of important processes in developing and adult tissues. These waves can be mediated by positive feedback autocrine loops, a mode of cell signaling where binding of a diffusible extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor can lead to further ligand release. We formulate and analyze a biophysical model that accounts for ligand-induced ligand release, extracellular ligand diffusion and ligand-receptor interaction. We focus on the case when the main mode for ligand degradation is extracellular and analyze the problem with the sharp threshold positive feedback nonlinearity. We derive expressions that link the speed of propagation and other characteristics of traveling waves to the parameters of the biophysical processes, such as diffusion rates, receptor expression level, etc. Analyzing the derived expressions we found that traveling waves in such systems can exhibit a number of unusual properties, e.g. non-monotonic dependence of the speed of propagation on ligand diffusivity. Our results for the fully developed traveling fronts can be used to analyze wave initiation from localized perturbations, a scenario that frequently arises in the in vitro models of epithelial wound healing, and guide future modeling studies of cell communication in epithelial layers.

  20. Protein-ligand-based pharmacophores: generation and utility assessment in computational ligand profiling.

    PubMed

    Meslamani, Jamel; Li, Jiabo; Sutter, Jon; Stevens, Adrian; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Rognan, Didier

    2012-04-23

    Ligand profiling is an emerging computational method for predicting the most likely targets of a bioactive compound and therefore anticipating adverse reactions, side effects and drug repurposing. A few encouraging successes have already been reported using ligand 2-D similarity searches and protein-ligand docking. The current study describes the use of receptor-ligand-derived pharmacophore searches as a tool to link ligands to putative targets. A database of 68,056 pharmacophores was first derived from 8,166 high-resolution protein-ligand complexes. In order to limit the number of queries, a maximum of 10 pharmacophores was generated for each complex according to their predicted selectivity. Pharmacophore search was compared to ligand-centric (2-D and 3-D similarity searches) and docking methods in profiling a set of 157 diverse ligands against a panel of 2,556 unique targets of known X-ray structure. As expected, ligand-based methods outperformed, in most of the cases, structure-based approaches in ranking the true targets among the top 1% scoring entries. However, we could identify ligands for which only a single method was successful. Receptor-ligand-based pharmacophore search is notably a fast and reliable alternative to docking when few ligand information is available for some targets. Overall, the present study suggests that a workflow using the best profiling method according to the protein-ligand context is the best strategy to follow. We notably present concrete guidelines for selecting the optimal computational method according to simple ligand and binding site properties. PMID:22480372

  1. Improving protein-ligand docking with flexible interfacial water molecules using SWRosettaLigand.

    PubMed

    Li, Linqing; Xu, Weiwei; Lü, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Computational protein-ligand docking is of great importance in drug discovery and design. Conformational changes greatly affect the results of protein-ligand docking, especially when water molecules take part in mediating protein ligand interactions or when large conformational changes are observed in the receptor backbone interface. We have developed an improved protocol, SWRosettaLigand, based on the RosettaLigand protocol. This approach incorporates the flexibility of interfacial water molecules and modeling of the interface of the receptor into the original RosettaLigand. In a coarse sampling step, SWRosettaLigand pre-optimizes the initial position of the water molecules, docks the ligand to the receptor with explicit water molecules, and minimizes the predicted structure with water molecules. The receptor backbone interface is treated as a loop and perturbed and refined by kinematic closure, or cyclic coordinate descent algorithm, with the presence of the ligand. In two cross-docking test sets, it was identified that for 8 out of 14, and 16 out of 22, test instances, the top-ranked structures by SWRosettaLigand achieved better accuracy than other protocols. PMID:26515196

  2. Ultrafast dynamics of ligands within heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Vos, Marten H

    2008-01-01

    Physiological bond formation and bond breaking events between proteins and ligands and their immediate consequences are difficult to synchronize and study in general. However, diatomic ligands can be photodissociated from heme, and thus in heme proteins ligand release and rebinding dynamics and trajectories have been studied on timescales of the internal vibrations of the protein that drive many biochemical reactions, and longer. The rapidly expanding number of characterized heme proteins involved in a large variety of functions allows comparative dynamics-structure-function studies. In this review, an overview is given of recent progress in this field, and in particular on initial sensing processes in signaling proteins, and on ligand and electron transfer dynamics in oxidases and cytochromes. PMID:17996720

  3. The Retinoid X Receptors and Their Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Marcia I.; Xia, Zebin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the current status of studies on the structural and molecular biology of the retinoid X receptor subtypes α, β, and γ (RXRs, NR2B1–3), their nuclear and cytoplasmic functions, post-transcriptional processing, and recently reported ligands. Points of interest are the different changes in the ligand-binding pocket induced by variously shaped agonists, the communication of the ligand–bound pocket with the coactivator binding surface and the heterodimerization interface, and recently identified ligands that are natural products, those that function as environmental toxins or drugs that had been originally designed to interact with other targets, as well as those that were deliberately designed as RXR-selective transcriptional agonists, synergists, or antagonists. Of these synthetic ligands, the general trend in design appears to be away from fully aromatic rigid structures to those containing partial elements of the flexible tetraene side chain of 9-cis-retinoic acid. PMID:22020178

  4. Bioisosteric matrices for ligands of serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Warszycki, Dawid; Mordalski, Stefan; Staroń, Jakub; Bojarski, Andrzej J

    2015-04-01

    The concept of bioisosteric replacement matrices is applied to explore the chemical space of serotonin receptor ligands, aiming to determine the most efficient ways of manipulating the affinity for all 5-HT receptor subtypes. Analysis of a collection of over 1 million bioisosteres of compounds with measured activity towards serotonin receptors revealed that an average of 31 % of the ligands for each target are mutual bioisosteres. In addition, the collected dataset allowed the development of bioisosteric matrices-qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the biological effects of each predefined type of bioisosteric substitution, providing favored paths of modifying the compounds. The concept exemplified here for serotonin receptor ligands can likely be more broadly applied to other target classes, thus representing a useful guide for medicinal chemists designing novel ligands. PMID:25772514

  5. Ligand engineering of nanoparticle solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voros, Marton

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (NP) are promising materials to build cheap and efficient solar cells. One of the key challenges in their utilization for solar energy conversion is the control of NP surfaces and ligand-NP interfaces. Recent experiments have shown that by carefully choosing the ligands terminating the NPs, one can tailor electronic and optical absorption properties of NP assemblies, along with their transport properties. By using density functional theory based methods, we investigated how the opto-electronic properties of lead chalcogenide NPs may be tuned by using diverse organic and inorganic ligands. We interpreted experiments, and we showed that an essential prerequisite to avoid detrimental trap states is to ensure charge balance at the ligand-NP interface, possibly with the help of hydrogen treatment Work supported by the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  6. Glutamate receptor ligands as anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka-Wójcik, E; Kłodzinska, A; Pilc, A

    2001-08-01

    The glutamatergic system has received considerable attention over recent years as a potential target for anxiolytic drugs. In spite of the pronounced anxiolytic-like effects of competitive and non-competitive antagonists of NMDA receptors in animal models of anxiety, these substances can not be regarded as potential anxiolytic drugs, mainly due to their side-effect profiles (eg, ataxia, myorelaxation, impairment of learning and memory processes and psychotomimetic effects). Antagonists and partial agonists of the glycine, receptor inhibit function of the NMDA receptor complex and evoke in animals an anxiolytic-like response. Although data concerning anti-anxiety-like effects of glycine, receptor antagonists are not very promising, studies are underway to develop new, brain-penetrating agents devoid of side effects. Further developments are necessary to more fully elucidate the possible involvement of AMPA/kainate receptors in anxiety. The recent discovery of metabotropic glutamate receptors, which modulate the function of the glutamatergic system, offers new hope for discovery of a new generation of anxiolytics. MPEP, a highly selective, brain penetrable, noncompetitive mGlu5 receptor antagonist, evokes anxiolytic-like effects in several animal models of anxiety, remaining remarkably free of side effects. LY-354740, a selective brain-penetrable group II mGlu receptor agonist, evokes marked anxiolytic-like effects in animal models of anxiety. LY-354740 causes mild sedation in mice, does not disturb motor coordination and has no potential to cause dependence. Therefore mGlu receptor ligands may become the anxiolytics of the future, free from the side effects characteristic of benzodiazepines. PMID:11892923

  7. PLIC: protein-ligand interaction clusters.

    PubMed

    Anand, Praveen; Nagarajan, Deepesh; Mukherjee, Sumanta; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2014-01-01

    Most of the biological processes are governed through specific protein-ligand interactions. Discerning different components that contribute toward a favorable protein- ligand interaction could contribute significantly toward better understanding protein function, rationalizing drug design and obtaining design principles for protein engineering. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) currently hosts the structure of ∼68 000 protein-ligand complexes. Although several databases exist that classify proteins according to sequence and structure, a mere handful of them annotate and classify protein-ligand interactions and provide information on different attributes of molecular recognition. In this study, an exhaustive comparison of all the biologically relevant ligand-binding sites (84 846 sites) has been conducted using PocketMatch: a rapid, parallel, in-house algorithm. PocketMatch quantifies the similarity between binding sites based on structural descriptors and residue attributes. A similarity network was constructed using binding sites whose PocketMatch scores exceeded a high similarity threshold (0.80). The binding site similarity network was clustered into discrete sets of similar sites using the Markov clustering (MCL) algorithm. Furthermore, various computational tools have been used to study different attributes of interactions within the individual clusters. The attributes can be roughly divided into (i) binding site characteristics including pocket shape, nature of residues and interaction profiles with different kinds of atomic probes, (ii) atomic contacts consisting of various types of polar, hydrophobic and aromatic contacts along with binding site water molecules that could play crucial roles in protein-ligand interactions and (iii) binding energetics involved in interactions derived from scoring functions developed for docking. For each ligand-binding site in each protein in the PDB, site similarity information, clusters they belong to and description of

  8. Fully Flexible Docking of Medium Sized Ligand Libraries with RosettaLigand

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, Samuel; Khar, Karen; Meiler, Jens

    2015-01-01

    RosettaLigand has been successfully used to predict binding poses in protein-small molecule complexes. However, the RosettaLigand docking protocol is comparatively slow in identifying an initial starting pose for the small molecule (ligand) making it unfeasible for use in virtual High Throughput Screening (vHTS). To overcome this limitation, we developed a new sampling approach for placing the ligand in the protein binding site during the initial ‘low-resolution’ docking step. It combines the translational and rotational adjustments to the ligand pose in a single transformation step. The new algorithm is both more accurate and more time-efficient. The docking success rate is improved by 10–15% in a benchmark set of 43 protein/ligand complexes, reducing the number of models that typically need to be generated from 1000 to 150. The average time to generate a model is reduced from 50 seconds to 10 seconds. As a result we observe an effective 30-fold speed increase, making RosettaLigand appropriate for docking medium sized ligand libraries. We demonstrate that this improved initial placement of the ligand is critical for successful prediction of an accurate binding position in the ‘high-resolution’ full atom refinement step. PMID:26207742

  9. Time, the Forgotten Dimension of Ligand Binding Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corzo, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding is generally explained in terms of the equilibrium constant K[subscript d] for the protein-ligand complex dissociation. However, both theoretical considerations and experimental data point to the life span of the protein-ligand complex as an important, but generally overlooked, aspect of ligand binding by macromolecules. Short-lived…

  10. Synthesis and characterization of mixed ligand chiral nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Guven, Zekiye P; Ustbas, Burcin; Harkness, Kellen M; Coskun, Hikmet; Joshi, Chakra P; Besong, Tabot M D; Stellacci, Francesco; Bakr, Osman M; Akbulut, Ozge

    2016-07-28

    Chiral mixed ligand silver nanoclusters were synthesized in the presence of a chiral and an achiral ligand. While the chiral ligand led mostly to the formation of nanoparticles, the presence of the achiral ligand drastically increased the yield of nanoclusters with enhanced chiral properties. PMID:27362744

  11. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M.

    2015-09-01

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand-receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  12. A General Ligand Design for Gold Catalysis allowing Ligand-Directed Anti Nucleophilic Attack of Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanzhao; Wang, Zhixun; Li, Yuxue; Wu, Gongde; Cao, Zheng; Zhang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Most homogenous gold catalyses demand ≥0.5 mol % catalyst loading. Due to the high cost of gold, these reactions are unlikely to be applicable in medium or large scale applications. Here we disclose a novel ligand design based on the privileged biphenyl-2-phosphine framework that offers a potentially general approach to dramatically lowering catalyst loading. In this design, an amide group at the 3’ position of the ligand framework directs and promotes nucleophilic attack at the ligand gold complex-activated alkyne, which is unprecedented in homogeneous gold catalysis considering the spatial challenge of using ligand to reach antiapproaching nucleophile in a linear P-Au-alkyne centroid structure. With such a ligand, the gold(I) complex becomes highly efficient in catalyzing acid addition to alkynes, with a turnover number up to 99,000. Density functional theory calculations support the role of the amide moiety in directing the attack of carboxylic acid via hydrogen bonding. PMID:24704803

  13. Controlling Gold Nanoclusters by Diphospine Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qianfan; Bonaccorso, Timary A.; Williard, Paul G.; Wang, Lai S.

    2014-01-08

    We report the synthesis and structure determination of a new Au22 nanocluster coordinated by six bidentate diphosphine ligands: 1,8-bis(diphenylphosphino) octane (L8 for short). Single crystal x-ray crystallography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry show that the cluster assembly is neutral and can be formulated as Au22(L8)6. The Au22 core consists of two Au11 units clipped together by four L8 ligands, while the additional two ligands coordinate to each Au11 unit in a bidentate fashion. Eight gold atoms at the interface of the two Au11 units are not coordinated by any ligands. Four short gold-gold distances (2.64?2.65 Å) are observed at the interface of the two Au11 clusters as a result of the clamping force of the four clipping ligands and strong electronic interactions. The eight uncoordinated surface gold atoms in the Au22(L8)6 nanocluster are unprecedented in atom-precise gold nanoparticles and can be considered as potential in-situ active sites for catalysis.

  14. Ligand-responsive RNA mechanical switches.

    PubMed

    Boerneke, Mark A; Hermann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-responsive RNA mechanical switches represent a new class of simple switching modules that adopt well-defined ligand-free and bound conformational states, distinguishing them from metabolite-sensing riboswitches. Initially discovered in the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of hepatitis C virus (HCV), these RNA switch motifs were found in the genome of diverse other viruses. Although large variations are seen in sequence and local secondary structure of the switches, their function in viral translation initiation that requires selective ligand recognition is conserved. We recently determined the crystal structure of an RNA switch from Seneca Valley virus (SVV) which is able to functionally replace the switch of HCV. The switches from both viruses recognize identical cognate ligands despite their sequence dissimilarity. Here, we describe the discovery of 7 new switches in addition to the previously established 5 examples. We highlight structural and functional features unique to this class of ligand-responsive RNA mechanical switches and discuss implications for therapeutic development and the construction of RNA nanostructures. PMID:26158858

  15. A screening cascade to identify ERβ ligands

    PubMed Central

    Filgueira, Carly S.; Benod, Cindy; Lou, Xiaohua; Gunamalai, Prem S.; Villagomez, Rosa A.; Strom, Anders; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Berkenstam, Anders L.; Webb, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of effective high throughput screening cascades to identify nuclear receptor (NR) ligands that will trigger defined, therapeutically useful sets of NR activities is of considerable importance. Repositioning of existing approved drugs with known side effect profiles can provide advantages because de novo drug design suffers from high developmental failure rates and undesirable side effects which have dramatically increased costs. Ligands that target estrogen receptor β (ERβ) could be useful in a variety of diseases ranging from cancer to neurological to cardiovascular disorders. In this context, it is important to minimize cross-reactivity with ERα, which has been shown to trigger increased rates of several types of cancer. Because of high sequence similarities between the ligand binding domains of ERα and ERβ, preferentially targeting one subtype can prove challenging. Here, we describe a sequential ligand screening approach comprised of complementary in-house assays to identify small molecules that are selective for ERβ. Methods include differential scanning fluorimetry, fluorescence polarization and a GAL4 transactivation assay. We used this strategy to screen several commercially-available chemical libraries, identifying thirty ERβ binders that were examined for their selectivity for ERβ versus ERα, and tested the effects of selected ligands in a prostate cancer cell proliferation assay. We suggest that this approach could be used to rapidly identify candidates for drug repurposing. PMID:25422593

  16. Dockomatic - automated ligand creation and docking

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The application of computational modeling to rationally design drugs and characterize macro biomolecular receptors has proven increasingly useful due to the accessibility of computing clusters and clouds. AutoDock is a well-known and powerful software program used to model ligand to receptor binding interactions. In its current version, AutoDock requires significant amounts of user time to setup and run jobs, and collect results. This paper presents DockoMatic, a user friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) application that eases and automates the creation and management of AutoDock jobs for high throughput screening of ligand to receptor interactions. Results DockoMatic allows the user to invoke and manage AutoDock jobs on a single computer or cluster, including jobs for evaluating secondary ligand interactions. It also automates the process of collecting, summarizing, and viewing results. In addition, DockoMatic automates creation of peptide ligand .pdb files from strings of single-letter amino acid abbreviations. Conclusions DockoMatic significantly reduces the complexity of managing multiple AutoDock jobs by facilitating ligand and AutoDock job creation and management. PMID:21059259

  17. Determining ligand specificity of Ly49 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Kerry J; Kane, Kevin P

    2010-01-01

    Ly49 receptors in rodents, like KIR in humans, play an integral role in the regulation of NK cell activity. Some inhibitory Ly49 are known to interact with specific MHC I alleles to maintain tolerance to self tissues, and NK activation is triggered upon the loss of inhibitory signals due to pathological downregulation of self MHC I. Although a virally encoded ligand has been identified that can trigger NK cytotoxicity through an activating Ly49, some activating Ly49 also recognize MHC I and the role of most activating receptors in NK effector function remains poorly defined. As many Ly49 remain orphan receptors, we describe methods to unambiguously discern receptor-ligand pairs. Additionally, we describe a method for the mutagenesis of Ly49 and MHC ligands that can be used to define the motifs conferring receptor specificity for their ligands. Further elucidation of Ly49 ligands is required to continue to define the role of Ly49 in regulating NK cell effector function and may give vital clues to the role of KIR in human health and disease. PMID:20033649

  18. Chelating ligands for nanocrystals' surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Querner, Claudia; Reiss, Peter; Bleuse, Joël; Pron, Adam

    2004-09-22

    A new family of ligands for the surface functionalization of CdSe nanocrystals is proposed, namely alkyl or aryl derivatives of carbodithioic acids (R-C(S)SH). The main advantages of these new ligands are as follows: they nearly quantitatively exchange the initial surface ligands (TOPO) in very mild conditions; they significantly improve the resistance of nanocrystals against photooxidation because of their ability of strong chelate-type binding to metal atoms; their relatively simple preparation via Grignard intermediates facilitates the development of new bifunctional ligands containing, in addition to the anchoring carbodithioate group, a second function, which enables the grafting of molecules or macromolecules of interest on the nanocrystal surface. To give an example of this approach, we report, for the first time, the grafting of an electroactive oligomer from the polyaniline family-aniline tetramer-on CdSe nanocrystals after their functionalization with 4-formyldithiobenzoic acid. The grafting proceeds via a condensation reaction between the aldehyde group of the ligand and the terminal primary amine group of the tetramer. The resulting organic/inorganic hybrid exhibits complete extinction of the fluorescence of its constituents, indicating efficient charge or energy transfer between the organic and the inorganic semiconductors. PMID:15366904

  19. Ligand identification using electron-density map correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn, Judith D.

    2007-01-01

    An automated ligand-fitting procedure is applied to (F{sub o} − F{sub c})exp(iϕ{sub c}) difference density for 200 commonly found ligands from macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank to identify ligands from density maps. A procedure for the identification of ligands bound in crystal structures of macromolecules is described. Two characteristics of the density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identification procedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of a set of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to the density. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the density with the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. The fingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the test ligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using a Z-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean and standard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatched ligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probability of observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. The procedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligands in the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57% of all ligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these two characteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identifications were made for representative (F{sub o} − F{sub c})exp(iϕ{sub c}) difference density from entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48% of the 200 cases, the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. This approach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in new macromolecular structures as well as in the identification of which ligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  20. Characteristic molecular vibrations of adenosine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Chee, Hyun Keun; Yang, Jin-San; Joung, Je-Gun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Oh, S June

    2015-02-13

    Although the regulation of membrane receptor activation is known to be crucial for molecular signal transduction, the molecular mechanism underlying receptor activation is not fully elucidated. Here we study the physicochemical nature of membrane receptor behavior by investigating the characteristic molecular vibrations of receptor ligands using computational chemistry and informatics methods. By using information gain, t-tests, and support vector machines, we have identified highly informative features of adenosine receptor (AdoR) ligand and corresponding functional amino acid residues such as Asn (6.55) of AdoR that has informative significance and is indispensable for ligand recognition of AdoRs. These findings may provide new perspectives and insights into the fundamental mechanism of class A G protein-coupled receptor activation. PMID:25622891

  1. Lanthanide clusters with azide capping ligands.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian F; Emge, Thomas J; Brennan, John G

    2013-05-20

    Weakly binding azide ligands have been used as surface caps in the synthesis of lanthanide oxo and selenido clusters. Addition of NaN3 and Na2O to in situ prepared solutions of Ln(SePh)3 in pyridine results in the formation of (py)18Sm6Na2O2(N3)16 or (py)10Ln6O2(N3)12(SePh)2 (Ln = Ho, Er), with the Sm and Er compounds characterized by low temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction. Attempts to prepare chalcogenido derivatives by ligand-based redox reactions using elemental Se were successful in the preparation of (py)10Er6O2(SeSe)2(N3)10, a diselenido cluster having crystallographic disorder due to some site sharing of both SeSe and N3 ligands. These compounds all detonate when heated. PMID:23639142

  2. The first scorpionate ligand based on diazaphosphole.

    PubMed

    Mlateček, Martin; Dostál, Libor; Růžičková, Zdeňka; Honzíček, Jan; Holubová, Jana; Erben, Milan

    2015-12-14

    The reaction of PhBCl2 with 1H-1,2,4-λ(3)-diazaphosphole in the presence of NEt3 gives a new scorpionate ligand, phenyl-tris(1,2,4-diazaphospholyl)borate (PhTdap). The coordination behaviour of this ligand toward transition and non-transition metals has been comprehensively studied. In the thallium(I) complex, Tl(PhTdap), κ(2)-N,N bonding supported with intramolecular η(3)-phenyl coordination has been observed in the solid state. Tl(PhTdap) also shows unusual intermolecular π-interactions between five-membered diazaphosphole rings and the thallium atom giving infinite molecular chains in the crystal. In the square planar complex [Pd(C,N-C6H4CH2NMe2)(PhTdap)], κ(2)-bonded scorpionate has been detected in both solution and in the solid state. For other studied compounds with the central metal ion Ti(IV), Mo(II), Mn(I), Fe(II), Ru(II), Co(II), Co(III), Ni(II) and Cd(II), the κ(3)-N,N,N coordination pattern was observed. Electronic properties of PhTdap and its ligand-field strength were elucidated from UV-Vis spectra of transition-metal species. The CH/P replacement on going from tris(pyrazolyl)borate to the ligand PhTdap causes a slight increase in electronic density rendered to the central metal atom. The following order of ligand-field strength has been established: HB(3,5-Me2pz)3 < PhB(pz)3 < HB(1,2,4-triazolyl) < HB(pz)3 < PhB(1,2,4-triazolyl) < PhTdap. The crystal structures of ten metal complexes bearing the new ligand are reported. The possibility of PhTdap coordination through the phosphorus atom is also briefly discussed. PMID:26537349

  3. Multifunctional Ligands in Transition Metal Catalysis (invited 'Focus' article),

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated ligands are now being designed that do far more than just fulfil their traditional spectator roles by binding to the metal and providing a sterically-defined binding pocket for the substrate in homogeneous transition metal catalysis. This Focus review emphasizes selected cases in which ligands carry additional functional groups that change the properties of the ligand as a result of an external stimulus or undergo catalytically-relevant ligand-based reactivity. These include proton responsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more protons, ligands having a hydrogen bonding function, electroresponsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more electrons, and photoresponsive ligands capable of undergoing a useful change of properties upon irradiation. Molecular recognition ligands and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) are briefly discussed.

  4. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where "nonspecific" interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  5. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where “nonspecific” interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  6. Determination of Ligand Pathways in Globins

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Mallory D.; Blouin, George C.; Soman, Jayashree; Singleton, Eileen W.; Dewilde, Sylvia; Moens, Luc; Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; Olson, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Although molecular dynamics simulations suggest multiple interior pathways for O2 entry into and exit from globins, most experiments indicate well defined single pathways. In 2001, we highlighted the effects of large-to-small amino acid replacements on rates for ligand entry and exit onto the three-dimensional structure of sperm whale myoglobin. The resultant map argued strongly for ligand movement through a short channel from the heme iron to solvent that is gated by the distal histidine (His-64(E7)) near the solvent edge of the porphyrin ring. In this work, we have applied the same mutagenesis mapping strategy to the neuronal mini-hemoglobin from Cerebratulus lacteus (CerHb), which has a large internal tunnel from the heme iron to the C-terminal ends of the E and H helices, a direction that is 180° opposite to the E7 channel. Detailed comparisons of the new CerHb map with expanded results for Mb show unambiguously that the dominant (>90%) ligand pathway in CerHb is through the internal tunnel, and the major (>75%) ligand pathway in Mb is through the E7 gate. These results demonstrate that: 1) mutagenesis mapping can identify internal pathways when they exist; 2) molecular dynamics simulations need to be refined to address discrepancies with experimental observations; and 3) alternative pathways have evolved in globins to meet specific physiological demands. PMID:22859299

  7. MOESSBAUER EFFECT IN HEMOGLOBIN WITH DIFFERENT LIGANDS.

    PubMed

    GONSER, U; GRANT, R W; KREGZDE, J

    1964-02-14

    Recoil-free nuclear gamma-ray resonance adsorption was observed in the iron-57 of blood. The spectral parameters are dependent on the ligand bound to the iron atoms in hemoglobin. The results are interpreted in terms of isomeric shifts and quad rupole splittings. PMID:14081237

  8. Identification of ligands for bacterial sensor proteins.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Matilde; Morel, Bertrand; Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Martín-Mora, David; López-Farfán, Diana; Reyes-Darias, José Antonio; Matilla, Miguel A; Ortega, Álvaro; Krell, Tino

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria have evolved a variety of different signal transduction mechanisms. However, the cognate signal molecule for the very large amount of corresponding sensor proteins is unknown and their functional annotation represents a major bottleneck in the field of signal transduction. The knowledge of the signal molecule is an essential prerequisite to understand the signalling mechanisms. Recently, the identification of signal molecules by the high-throughput protein screening of commercially available ligand collections using differential scanning fluorimetry has shown promise to resolve this bottleneck. Based on the analysis of a significant number of different ligand binding domains (LBDs) in our laboratory, we identified two issues that need to be taken into account in the experimental design. Since a number of LBDs require the dimeric state for ligand recognition, it has to be assured that the protein analysed is indeed in the dimeric form. A number of other examples demonstrate that purified LBDs can contain bound ligand which prevents further binding. In such cases, the apo-form can be generated by denaturation and subsequent refolding. We are convinced that this approach will accelerate the functional annotation of sensor proteins which will help to understand regulatory circuits in bacteria. PMID:26511375

  9. Micropatterned Surfaces with Controlled Ligand Tethering

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Timothy A.; Stanley, Brandon T.; García, Andrés J.

    2008-01-01

    Microcontact printing (μ-CP) is a facile, cost-effective, and versatile soft-lithography technique to create 2-dimensional patterns of domains with distinct functionalities that provides a robust platform to generate micropatterned biotechnological arrays and cell culture substrates. Current μ-CP approaches rely on non-specific immobilization of biological ligands, either by direct printing or adsorption from solution, onto micropatterned domains surrounded by a non-fouling background. This technique is limited by insufficient control over ligand density. We present a modified μ-CP protocol involving stamping mixed ratios of carboxyl- and tri(ethylene glycol)-terminated alkanethiols that provides for precise covalent tethering of single or multiple ligands to prescribed micropatterns via standard peptide chemistry. Processing parameters were optimized to identify conditions that control relevant endpoint pattern characteristics. This technique provides a facile method to generate micropatterned arrays with tailorable and controlled presentation of biological ligands for biotechnological applications and analyses of cell-material interactions. PMID:18570314

  10. Nanoparticle ligand presentation for targeting solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Duskey, Jason T; Rice, Kevin G

    2014-10-01

    Among the many scientific advances to come from the study of nanoscience, the development of ligand-targeted nanoparticles to eliminate solid tumors is predicted to have a major impact on human health. There are many reports describing novel designs and testing of targeted nanoparticles to treat cancer. While the principles of the technology are well demonstrated in controlled lab experiments, there are still many hurdles to overcome for the science to mature into truly efficacious targeted nanoparticles that join the arsenal of agents currently used to treat cancer in humans. One of these hurdles is overcoming unwanted biodistribution to the liver while maximizing delivery to the tumor. This almost certainly requires advances in both nanoparticle stealth technology and targeting. Currently, it continues to be a challenge to control the loading of ligands onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) to achieve maximal targeting. Nanoparticle cellular uptake and subcellular targeting of genes and siRNA also remain a challenge. This review examines the types of ligands that have been most often used to target nanoparticles to solid tumors. As the science matures over the coming decade, careful control over ligand presentation on nanoparticles of precise size, shape, and charge will likely play a major role in achieving success. PMID:24927668

  11. Ligand configurational entropy and protein binding.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-en A; Chen, Wei; Gilson, Michael K

    2007-01-30

    The restriction of a small molecule's motion on binding to a protein causes a loss of configurational entropy, and thus a penalty in binding affinity. Some energy models used in computer-aided ligand design neglect this entropic penalty, whereas others account for it based on an expected drop in the number of accessible rotamers upon binding. However, the validity of the physical assumptions underlying the various approaches is largely unexamined. The present study addresses this issue by using Mining Minima calculations to analyze the association of amprenavir with HIV protease. The computed loss in ligand configurational entropy is large, contributing approximately 25 kcal/mol (4.184 kJ/kcal) to DeltaG degrees. Most of this loss results from narrower energy wells in the bound state, rather than a drop in the number of accessible rotamers. Coupling among rotation/translation and internal degrees of freedom complicates the decomposition of the entropy change into additive terms. The results highlight the potential to gain affinity by designing conformationally restricted ligands and have implications for the formulation of energy models for ligand scoring. PMID:17242351

  12. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  13. Ligand configurational entropy and protein binding

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-en A.; Chen, Wei; Gilson, Michael K.

    2007-01-01

    The restriction of a small molecule's motion on binding to a protein causes a loss of configurational entropy, and thus a penalty in binding affinity. Some energy models used in computer-aided ligand design neglect this entropic penalty, whereas others account for it based on an expected drop in the number of accessible rotamers upon binding. However, the validity of the physical assumptions underlying the various approaches is largely unexamined. The present study addresses this issue by using Mining Minima calculations to analyze the association of amprenavir with HIV protease. The computed loss in ligand configurational entropy is large, contributing ∼25 kcal/mol (4.184 kJ/kcal) to ΔG°. Most of this loss results from narrower energy wells in the bound state, rather than a drop in the number of accessible rotamers. Coupling among rotation/translation and internal degrees of freedom complicates the decomposition of the entropy change into additive terms. The results highlight the potential to gain affinity by designing conformationally restricted ligands and have implications for the formulation of energy models for ligand scoring. PMID:17242351

  14. Ammonia formation by metal-ligand cooperative hydrogenolysis of a nitrido ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askevold, Bjorn; Nieto, Jorge Torres; Tussupbayev, Samat; Diefenbach, Martin; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Holthausen, Max C.; Schneider, Sven

    2011-07-01

    Bioinspired hydrogenation of N2 to ammonia at ambient conditions by stepwise nitrogen protonation/reduction with metal complexes in solution has experienced remarkable progress. In contrast, the highly desirable direct hydrogenation with H2 remains difficult. In analogy to the heterogeneously catalysed Haber-Bosch process, such a reaction is conceivable via metal-centred N2 splitting and unprecedented hydrogenolysis of the nitrido ligands to ammonia. We report the synthesis of a ruthenium(IV) nitrido complex. The high nucleophilicity of the nitrido ligand is demonstrated by unusual N-C coupling with π-acidic CO. Furthermore, the terminal nitrido ligand undergoes facile hydrogenolysis with H2 at ambient conditions to produce ammonia in high yield. Kinetic and quantum chemical examinations of this reaction suggest cooperative behaviour of a phosphorus-nitrogen-phosphorus pincer ligand in rate-determining heterolytic hydrogen splitting.

  15. Ammonia formation by metal-ligand cooperative hydrogenolysis of a nitrido ligand.

    PubMed

    Askevold, Bjorn; Nieto, Jorge Torres; Tussupbayev, Samat; Diefenbach, Martin; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Holthausen, Max C; Schneider, Sven

    2011-07-01

    Bioinspired hydrogenation of N(2) to ammonia at ambient conditions by stepwise nitrogen protonation/reduction with metal complexes in solution has experienced remarkable progress. In contrast, the highly desirable direct hydrogenation with H(2) remains difficult. In analogy to the heterogeneously catalysed Haber-Bosch process, such a reaction is conceivable via metal-centred N(2) splitting and unprecedented hydrogenolysis of the nitrido ligands to ammonia. We report the synthesis of a ruthenium(IV) nitrido complex. The high nucleophilicity of the nitrido ligand is demonstrated by unusual N-C coupling with π-acidic CO. Furthermore, the terminal nitrido ligand undergoes facile hydrogenolysis with H(2) at ambient conditions to produce ammonia in high yield. Kinetic and quantum chemical examinations of this reaction suggest cooperative behaviour of a phosphorus-nitrogen-phosphorus pincer ligand in rate-determining heterolytic hydrogen splitting. PMID:21697873

  16. All-inorganic Germanium nanocrystal films by cationic ligand exchange

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Beard, Matthew C.; Neale, Nathan R.

    2016-01-21

    In this study, we introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport inmore » germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications.« less

  17. All-Inorganic Germanium Nanocrystal Films by Cationic Ligand Exchange.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Lance M; Nichols, Asa W; Chernomordik, Boris D; Anderson, Nicholas C; Beard, Matthew C; Neale, Nathan R

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for group IV nanocrystal surface chemistry based on room temperature surface activation that enables ionic ligand exchange. Germanium nanocrystals synthesized in a gas-phase plasma reactor are functionalized with labile, cationic alkylammonium ligands rather than with traditional covalently bound groups. We employ Fourier transform infrared and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to demonstrate the alkylammonium ligands are freely exchanged on the germanium nanocrystal surface with a variety of cationic ligands, including short inorganic ligands such as ammonium and alkali metal cations. This ionic ligand exchange chemistry is used to demonstrate enhanced transport in germanium nanocrystal films following ligand exchange as well as the first photovoltaic device based on an all-inorganic germanium nanocrystal absorber layer cast from solution. This new ligand chemistry should accelerate progress in utilizing germanium and other group IV nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications. PMID:26796765

  18. Quantum.Ligand.Dock: protein-ligand docking with quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system.

    PubMed

    Kantardjiev, Alexander A

    2012-07-01

    Quantum.Ligand.Dock (protein-ligand docking with graphic processing unit (GPU) quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system) is an original modern method for in silico prediction of protein-ligand interactions via high-performance docking code. The main flavour of our approach is a combination of fast search with a special account for overlooked physical interactions. On the one hand, we take care of self-consistency and proton equilibria mutual effects of docking partners. On the other hand, Quantum.Ligand.Dock is the the only docking server offering such a subtle supplement to protein docking algorithms as quantum entanglement contributions. The motivation for development and proposition of the method to the community hinges upon two arguments-the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement contribution in molecular interaction and the realistic possibility to implement it by the availability of supercomputing power. The implementation of sophisticated quantum methods is made possible by parallelization at several bottlenecks on a GPU supercomputer. The high-performance implementation will be of use for large-scale virtual screening projects, structural bioinformatics, systems biology and fundamental research in understanding protein-ligand recognition. The design of the interface is focused on feasibility and ease of use. Protein and ligand molecule structures are supposed to be submitted as atomic coordinate files in PDB format. A customization section is offered for addition of user-specified charges, extra ionogenic groups with intrinsic pK(a) values or fixed ions. Final predicted complexes are ranked according to obtained scores and provided in PDB format as well as interactive visualization in a molecular viewer. Quantum.Ligand.Dock server can be accessed at http://87.116.85.141/LigandDock.html. PMID:22669908

  19. Affinity thermoprecipitatin: Contribution of the efficiency of ligand-protein interaction and access of the ligand.

    PubMed

    Galaev, I Y; Mattiasson, B

    1993-05-01

    Conjugates to two thermoprecipitating polymers, poly(N-vinyl caprolactam) and poly(N-isopropylacrylmide), with soybean trypsin inhibitor, Cibacron Blue 3GA, Cu-iminodiacetic acid, and p-aminobenzamidine were synthesized. The interaction of these conjugates with trypsin and lactate dehydrogenase was studied. Coupling of the ligand to a polymer resulted in a 100-1000-fold decrease in enzyme-affinity. Rough theoretical estimates revealed that a successful affinity precipitation required that the binding of a target protein and a ligand coupled to a polymer have binding constants on the order of 10(-7)-10(-8) M. Such strong affinity of low molecular weight ligands that can provide binding constants of 10(-9)-10(-11) M or alternatively multipoint attachment of the target protein molecule. The ligand in the ligand-polymer conjugate is still accessible to the protein after thermoprecipitation, and the latter can bind with the particle of the dispersion of thermoprecipitated ligand-polymer precipitate may result in stripping of enzyme molecules from the surface of the particles. PMID:18601296

  20. Role of ligand-ligand vs. core-core interactions in gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Milowska, Karolina Z; Stolarczyk, Jacek K

    2016-05-14

    The controlled assembly of ligand-coated gold nanoclusters (NCs) into larger structures paves the way for new applications ranging from electronics to nanomedicine. Here, we demonstrate through rigorous density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing novel functionals accounting for van der Waals forces that the ligand-ligand interactions determine whether stable assemblies can be formed. The study of NCs with different core sizes, symmetry forms, ligand lengths, mutual crystal orientations, and in the presence of a solvent suggests that core-to-core van der Waals interactions play a lesser role in the assembly. The dominant interactions originate from combination of steric effects, augmented by ligand bundling on NC facets, and related to them changes in electronic properties induced by neighbouring NCs. We also show that, in contrast to standard colloidal theory approach, DFT correctly reproduces the surprising experimental trends in the strength of the inter-particle interaction observed when varying the length of the ligands. The results underpin the importance of understanding NC interactions in designing gold NCs for a specific function. PMID:27097887

  1. Amino Acids in Nine Ligand-Prefer Ramachandran Regions

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Lincong; Chen, Xiaoyang; Zou, Shuxue; Wang, Guishen; Xu, Shutan

    2015-01-01

    Several secondary structures, such as π-helix and left-handed helix, have been frequently identified at protein ligand-binding sites. A secondary structure is considered to be constrained to a specific region of dihedral angles. However, a comprehensive analysis of the correlation between main chain dihedral angles and ligand-binding sites has not been performed. We undertook an extensive analysis of the relationship between dihedral angles in proteins and their distance to ligand-binding sites, frequency of occurrence, molecular potential energy, amino acid composition, van der Waals contacts, and hydrogen bonds with ligands. The results showed that the values of dihedral angles have a strong preference for ligand-binding sites at certain regions in the Ramachandran plot. We discovered that amino acids preceding the ligand-prefer ϕ/ψ box residues are exposed more to solvents, whereas amino acids following ligand-prefer ϕ/ψ box residues form more hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts with ligands. Our method exhibited a similar performance compared with the program Ligsite-csc for both ligand-bound structures and ligand-free structures when just one ligand-binding site was predicted. These results should be useful for the prediction of protein ligand-binding sites and for analysing the relationship between structure and function. PMID:26491686

  2. Protein Ligand Complex Guided Approach for Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Pandit, Deepak; Vyas, Renu

    2015-01-01

    The target ligand association data is a rich source of information which is not exploited enough for drug design efforts in virtual screening. A java based open-source toolkit for Protein Ligand Network Extraction (J-ProLiNE) focused on protein-ligand complex analysis with several features integrated in a distributed computing network has been developed. Sequence alignment and similarity search components have been automated to yield local, global alignment scores along with similarity and distance scores. 10000 proteins with co-crystallized ligands from pdb and MOAD databases were extracted and analyzed for revealing relationships between targets, ligands and scaffolds. Through this analysis, we could generate a protein ligand network to identify the promiscuous and selective scaffolds for multiple classes of proteins targets. Using J-ProLiNE we created a 507 x 507 matrix of protein targets and native ligands belonging to six enzyme classes and analyzed the results to elucidate the protein-protein, protein-ligand and ligand-ligand interactions. In yet another application of the J-ProLiNE software, we were able to process kinase related information stored in US patents to construct disease-gene-ligand-scaffold networks. It is hoped that the studies presented here will enable target ligand knowledge based virtual screening for inhibitor design. PMID:26138572

  3. Targeting mitochondrial energy metabolism with TSPO ligands.

    PubMed

    Gut, Philipp

    2015-08-01

    The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) resides on the outer mitochondrial membrane where it is believed to participate in cholesterol transport and steroid hormone synthesis. Although it is almost ubiquitously expressed, what TSPO does in non-steroidogenic tissues is largely unexplored. Recent studies report changes in glucose homoeostasis and cellular energy production when TSPO function is modulated by selective ligands or by genetic loss-of-function. This review summarizes findings that connect TSPO function with the regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. The juxtaposition of TSPO at the cytosolic/mitochondrial interface and the existence of endogenous ligands that are regulated by metabolism suggest that TSPO functions to adapt mitochondrial to cellular metabolism. From a pharmacological perspective the specific up-regulation of TSPO in neuro-inflammatory and injury-induced conditions make TSPO an interesting, druggable target of mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26551690

  4. Receptor-ligand interactions: Advanced biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Guryanov, Ivan; Fiorucci, Stefano; Tennikova, Tatiana

    2016-11-01

    Receptor-ligand interactions (RLIs) are at the base of all biological events occurring in living cells. The understanding of interactions between complementary macromolecules in biological systems represents a high-priority research area in bionanotechnology to design the artificial systems mimicking natural processes. This review summarizes and analyzes RLIs in some cutting-edge biomedical fields, in particular, for the preparation of novel stationary phases to separate complex biological mixtures in medical diagnostics, for the design of ultrasensitive biosensors for identification of biomarkers of various diseases at early stages, as well as in the development of innovative biomaterials and approaches for regenerative medicine. All these biotechnological fields are closely related, because their success depends on a proper choice, combination and spatial disposition of the single components of ligand-receptor pairs on the surface of appropriately designed support. PMID:27524092

  5. [Opioid receptors and their selective ligands].

    PubMed

    Piestrzeniewicz, Mariola Katarzyna; Fichna, Jakub; Michna, Jakub; Janecka, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Opioid receptors (micro, delta, and kappa) belong to a large family of G protein-coupled receptors and play an important physiological role. Stimulation of these receptors triggers analgesic effects and affects the function of gastrointestinal tract. The discovery of opioid peptides, which are endogenous ligands of opioid receptors, including delta-selective enkephalins, kappa-selective dynorphins, and micro-selective endomorphins, initiated their structure-activity relationship studies. For the last 30 years, hundreds of analogs of opioid peptides have been synthesized in an effort to obtain the compounds more active, selective, and resistant to biodegradation than the endogenous ligands. Different unnatural amino acids, as well as cyclisation procedures, leading to conformationaly restricted analogs, were employed. All these modifications resulted in obtaining very selective agonists and antagonists with high affinity at micro-, dlta-, and kappa-opioid receptors, which are extremely useful tools in further studies on the pharmacology of opioid receptors in a mammalian organism. PMID:17201067

  6. Enhanced ligand sampling for relative protein-ligand binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Kaus, Joseph W; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-05-21

    Free energy calculations are used to study how strongly potential drug molecules interact with their target receptors. The accuracy of these calculations depends on the accuracy of the molecular dynamics (MD) force field as well as proper sampling of the major conformations of each molecule. However, proper sampling of ligand conformations can be difficult when there are large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. An example of this is for ligands with an asymmetrically substituted phenyl ring, where the presence of protein loops hinders the proper sampling of the different ring conformations. These ring conformations become more difficult to sample when the size of the functional groups attached to the ring increases. The Adaptive Integration Method (AIM) has been developed, which adaptively changes the alchemical coupling parameter λ during the MD simulation so that conformations sampled at one λ can aid sampling at the other λ values. The Accelerated Adaptive Integration Method (AcclAIM) builds on AIM by lowering potential barriers for specific degrees of freedom at intermediate λ values. However, these methods may not work when there are very large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. In this work, we describe a modification to AIM that improves sampling of the different ring conformations, even when there is a very large barrier between them. This method combines AIM with conformational Monte Carlo sampling, giving improved convergence of ring populations and the resulting free energy. This method, called AIM/MC, is applied to study the relative binding free energy for a pair of ligands that bind to thrombin and a different pair of ligands that bind to aspartyl protease β-APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). These protein-ligand binding free energy calculations illustrate the improvements in conformational sampling and the convergence of the free energy compared to both AIM and AcclAIM. PMID:25906170

  7. Enhanced Ligand Sampling for Relative Protein–Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations are used to study how strongly potential drug molecules interact with their target receptors. The accuracy of these calculations depends on the accuracy of the molecular dynamics (MD) force field as well as proper sampling of the major conformations of each molecule. However, proper sampling of ligand conformations can be difficult when there are large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. An example of this is for ligands with an asymmetrically substituted phenyl ring, where the presence of protein loops hinders the proper sampling of the different ring conformations. These ring conformations become more difficult to sample when the size of the functional groups attached to the ring increases. The Adaptive Integration Method (AIM) has been developed, which adaptively changes the alchemical coupling parameter λ during the MD simulation so that conformations sampled at one λ can aid sampling at the other λ values. The Accelerated Adaptive Integration Method (AcclAIM) builds on AIM by lowering potential barriers for specific degrees of freedom at intermediate λ values. However, these methods may not work when there are very large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. In this work, we describe a modification to AIM that improves sampling of the different ring conformations, even when there is a very large barrier between them. This method combines AIM with conformational Monte Carlo sampling, giving improved convergence of ring populations and the resulting free energy. This method, called AIM/MC, is applied to study the relative binding free energy for a pair of ligands that bind to thrombin and a different pair of ligands that bind to aspartyl protease β-APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). These protein–ligand binding free energy calculations illustrate the improvements in conformational sampling and the convergence of the free energy compared to both AIM and AcclAIM. PMID:25906170

  8. Container molecules based on imine type ligands.

    PubMed

    Schulze, A Carina; Oppel, Iris M

    2012-01-01

    This chapter will give a short overview about container molecules, their synthesis and possible applications. The main focus is on those which are based on imine type ligands. These containers can be used for example for guest exchange, gas separation, as chemical sensors or for the stabilisation of white phosphorus under water. The described cages have wide openings or tightly closed ones. For one cage the reversible opening and closing is also described. PMID:22076078

  9. Inhaled innate immune ligands to prevent pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Scott E; Tuvim, Michael J; Fox, Cory J; Sachdev, Nidhi; Gibiansky, Leonid; Dickey, Burton F

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial surfaces throughout the body continuously sample and respond to environmental stimuli. The accessibility of lung epithelium to inhaled therapies makes it possible to stimulate local antimicrobial defences with aerosolized innate immune ligands. This strategy has been shown to be effective in preclinical models, as delivery of innate immune ligands to the lungs of laboratory animals results in protection from subsequent challenge with microbial pathogens. Survival of the animal host in this setting correlates directly with killing of pathogens within the lungs, indicating the induction of a resistance mechanism. Resistance appears to be mediated primarily by activated epithelial cells rather than recruited leucocytes. Resistance reaches a peak within hours and persists for several days. Innate immune ligands can interact synergistically under some circumstances, and synergistic combinations of innate ligands delivered by aerosol are capable of inducing a high level of broad host resistance to bacteria, fungi and viruses. The induction of innate antimicrobial resistance within the lungs could have clinical applications in the prevention of lower respiratory tract infection in subjects transiently at high risk. These include cancer patients undergoing myeloablative chemotherapy, intubated patients being mechanically ventilated, vulnerable individuals during seasonal influenza epidemics, asthmatic subjects experiencing a respiratory viral infection, and healthy subjects exposed to virulent pathogens from a bioterror attack or emergent pandemic. In summary, stimulation of the lung epithelium to induce localized resistance to infection is a novel strategy whose clinical utility will be assessed in the near future. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Respiratory Pharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-1 PMID:21250981

  10. Diamine Ligands in Copper-Catalyzed Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Surry, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The utility of copper-mediated cross-coupling reactions has been significantly increased by the development of mild reaction conditions and the ability to employ catalytic amounts of copper. The use of diamine-based ligands has been important in these advances and in this review we discuss these systems, including the choice of reaction conditions and applications in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, natural products and designed materials. PMID:22384310

  11. Targeting Selectins and Their Ligands in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Natoni, Alessandro; Macauley, Matthew S.; O’Dwyer, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is a hallmark of cancer cells with increased evidence pointing to a role in tumor progression. In particular, aberrant sialylation of glycoproteins and glycolipids has been linked to increased immune cell evasion, drug evasion, drug resistance, tumor invasiveness, and vascular dissemination, leading to metastases. Hypersialylation of cancer cells is largely the result of overexpression of sialyltransferases (STs). Differentially, humans express twenty different STs in a tissue-specific manner, each of which catalyzes the attachment of sialic acids via different glycosidic linkages (α2-3, α2-6, or α2-8) to the underlying glycan chain. One important mechanism whereby overexpression of STs contributes to an enhanced metastatic phenotype is via the generation of selectin ligands. Selectin ligand function requires the expression of sialyl-Lewis X and its structural isomer sialyl-Lewis A, which are synthesized by the combined action of alpha α1-3-fucosyltransferases, α2-3-sialyltransferases, β1-4-galactosyltranferases, and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminyltransferases. The α2-3-sialyltransferases ST3Gal4 and ST3Gal6 are critical to the generation of functional E- and P-selectin ligands and overexpression of these STs have been linked to increased risk of metastatic disease in solid tumors and poor outcome in multiple myeloma. Thus, targeting selectins and their ligands as well as the enzymes involved in their generation, in particular STs, could be beneficial to many cancer patients. Potential strategies include ST inhibition and the use of selectin antagonists, such as glycomimetic drugs and antibodies. Here, we review ongoing efforts to optimize the potency and selectivity of ST inhibitors, including the potential for targeted delivery approaches, as well as evaluate the potential utility of selectin inhibitors, which are now in early clinical development. PMID:27148485

  12. Targeting Selectins and Their Ligands in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Natoni, Alessandro; Macauley, Matthew S; O'Dwyer, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is a hallmark of cancer cells with increased evidence pointing to a role in tumor progression. In particular, aberrant sialylation of glycoproteins and glycolipids has been linked to increased immune cell evasion, drug evasion, drug resistance, tumor invasiveness, and vascular dissemination, leading to metastases. Hypersialylation of cancer cells is largely the result of overexpression of sialyltransferases (STs). Differentially, humans express twenty different STs in a tissue-specific manner, each of which catalyzes the attachment of sialic acids via different glycosidic linkages (α2-3, α2-6, or α2-8) to the underlying glycan chain. One important mechanism whereby overexpression of STs contributes to an enhanced metastatic phenotype is via the generation of selectin ligands. Selectin ligand function requires the expression of sialyl-Lewis X and its structural isomer sialyl-Lewis A, which are synthesized by the combined action of alpha α1-3-fucosyltransferases, α2-3-sialyltransferases, β1-4-galactosyltranferases, and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminyltransferases. The α2-3-sialyltransferases ST3Gal4 and ST3Gal6 are critical to the generation of functional E- and P-selectin ligands and overexpression of these STs have been linked to increased risk of metastatic disease in solid tumors and poor outcome in multiple myeloma. Thus, targeting selectins and their ligands as well as the enzymes involved in their generation, in particular STs, could be beneficial to many cancer patients. Potential strategies include ST inhibition and the use of selectin antagonists, such as glycomimetic drugs and antibodies. Here, we review ongoing efforts to optimize the potency and selectivity of ST inhibitors, including the potential for targeted delivery approaches, as well as evaluate the potential utility of selectin inhibitors, which are now in early clinical development. PMID:27148485

  13. Selective oxoanion separation using a tripodal ligand

    DOEpatents

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A.; Rajbanshi, Arbin

    2016-02-16

    The present invention relates to urea-functionalized crystalline capsules self-assembled by sodium or potassium cation coordination and by hydrogen-bonding water bridges to selectively encapsulate tetrahedral divalent oxoanions from highly competitive aqueous alkaline solutions and methods using this system for selective anion separations from industrial solutions. The method involves competitive crystallizations using a tripodal tris(urea) functionalized ligand and, in particular, provides a viable approach to sulfate separation from nuclear wastes.

  14. galectin-3 ligand — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Galectin-3 is an endogenous lectin that binds glycan epitopes of cell membrane and some extracellular glycoproteins such as integrins and laminin. Galectin-3 is involved in several biological activities including regulation of cellular cycle, modulation of adhesion and tumor progression and metastasis. Serum galectin-3 ligands have been shown to modulate the immune reaction against tumors and viruses and their level increases in sera of several neoplastic diseases.

  15. Ligand binding and hexacoordination in synechocystis hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Hvitved, A N; Trent, J T; Premer, S A; Hargrove, M S

    2001-09-14

    A large and phylogenetically diverse group of organisms contain truncated hemoglobins, including the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis (Pesce, A., Couture, M., Dewilde, S., Guertin, M., Yamauchi, K., Ascenzi, P., Moens, L., and Bolognesi, M. (2000) EMBO J. 19, 2424-2434). Synechocystis hemoglobin is also hexacoordinate, with a heme pocket histidine that reversibly coordinates the ligand binding site. Hexacoordinate hemoglobins are ubiquitous in plants and are now being identified in a diverse array of organisms including humans (Arredondo-Peter, R., Hargrove, M. S., Moran, J. F., Sarath, G., and Klucas, R. V. (1998) Plant Physiol. 118, 1121-1125; Trent, J. T., III, Watts, R. A., and Hargrove, M. S. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 30106-30110). Rate constants for association and dissociation of the hexacoordinating amino acid side chain in Synechocystis hemoglobin have been measured along with bimolecular rate constants for association of oxygen and carbon monoxide following laser flash photolysis. These values were compared with ligand binding initiated by rapid mixing. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine the roles of several heme pocket amino acids in facilitating hexacoordination and stabilizing bound oxygen. It is demonstrated that Synechocystis hemoglobin contains a very reactive binding site and that ligand migration through the protein is rapid. Rate constants for hexacoordination by His(46) are also large and facilitated by other heme pocket amino acids including Gln(43). PMID:11438545

  16. Assessment of automatic ligand building in ARP/wARP

    SciTech Connect

    Evrard, Guillaume X. Langer, Gerrit G.; Lamzin, Victor S.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of the ligand-building module of the ARP/wARP software suite is assessed through a large-scale test on known protein–ligand complexes. The results provide a detailed benchmark and guidelines for future improvements. The efficiency of the ligand-building module of ARP/wARP version 6.1 has been assessed through extensive tests on a large variety of protein–ligand complexes from the PDB, as available from the Uppsala Electron Density Server. Ligand building in ARP/wARP involves two main steps: automatic identification of the location of the ligand and the actual construction of its atomic model. The first step is most successful for large ligands. The second step, ligand construction, is more powerful with X-ray data at high resolution and ligands of small to medium size. Both steps are successful for ligands with low to moderate atomic displacement parameters. The results highlight the strengths and weaknesses of both the method of ligand building and the large-scale validation procedure and help to identify means of further improvement.

  17. A Annealing Algorithm for Designing Ligands from Receptor Structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Peter J.

    DEenspace NOVO, a simulated annealing method for designing ligands is described. At a given temperature, ligand fragments are randomly selected and randomly placed within the given receptor cavity, often replacing existing ligand fragments. For each new ligand fragment combination, bonded, nonbonded, polarization and solvation energies of the new ligand-receptor system are compared to the previous system. Acceptance or rejection of the new system is decided using the Boltzmann distribution. Thus, energetically unfavorable fragment switches are sometimes accepted, sacrificing immediate energy gains in the interest of finding the system with the globally minimum energy. By lowering the temperature, the rate of unfavorable switches decreases and energetically favorable combinations become difficult to change. The process is halted when the frequency of switches becomes too small. As a test of the method, DEenspace NOVO predicted the positions of important ligand fragments for neuraminidase that are in accord with the natural ligand, sialic acid.

  18. Redox-Active-Ligand-Mediated Formation of an Acyclic Trinuclear Ruthenium Complex with Bridging Nitrido Ligands.

    PubMed

    Bagh, Bidraha; Broere, Daniël L J; Siegler, Maxime A; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2016-07-11

    Coordination of a redox-active pyridine aminophenol ligand to Ru(II) followed by aerobic oxidation generates two diamagnetic Ru(III) species [1 a (cis) and 1 b (trans)] with ligand-centered radicals. The reaction of 1 a/1 b with excess NaN3 under inert atmosphere resulted in the formation of a rare bis(nitrido)-bridged trinuclear ruthenium complex with two nonlinear asymmetrical Ru-N-Ru fragments. The spontaneous reduction of the ligand centered radical in the parent 1 a/1 b supports the oxidation of a nitride (N(3-) ) to half an equivalent of N2 . The trinuclear omplex is reactive toward TEMPO-H, tin hydrides, thiols, and dihydrogen. PMID:27321547

  19. Defining the property space for chromatographic ligands from a homologous series of mixed-mode ligands.

    PubMed

    Woo, James A; Chen, Hong; Snyder, Mark A; Chai, Yiming; Frost, Russell G; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-08-14

    A homologous ligand library based on the commercially-available Nuvia cPrime ligand was generated to systematically explore various features of a multimodal cation-exchange ligand and to identify structural variants that had significantly altered chromatographic selectivity. Substitution of the polar amide bond with more hydrophobic chemistries was found to enhance retention while remaining hydrophobically-selective for aromatic residues. In contrast, increasing the solvent exposure of the aromatic ring was observed to strengthen the ligand affinity for both types of hydrophobic residues. An optimal linker length between the charged and hydrophobic moieties was also observed to enhance retention, balancing the steric accessibility of the hydrophobic moiety with its ability to interact independently of the charged group. The weak pKa of the carboxylate charge group was found to have a notable impact on protein retention on Nuvia cPrime at lower pH, increasing hydrophobic interactions with the protein. Substituting the charged group with a sulfonic acid allowed this strong MM ligand to retain its electrostatic-dominant character in this lower pH range. pH gradient experiments were also carried out to further elucidate this pH dependent behavior. A single QSAR model was generated using this accumulated experimental data to predict protein retention across a range of multimodal and ion exchange systems. This model could correctly predict the retention of proteins on resins that were not included in the original model and could prove quite powerful as an in silico approach toward designing more effective and differentiated multimodal ligands. PMID:26162668

  20. Quantification of ligand bias for clinically relevant β2-adrenergic receptor ligands: implications for drug taxonomy.

    PubMed

    van der Westhuizen, Emma T; Breton, Billy; Christopoulos, Arthur; Bouvier, Michel

    2014-03-01

    The concepts of functional selectivity and ligand bias are becoming increasingly appreciated in modern drug discovery programs, necessitating more informed approaches to compound classification and, ultimately, therapeutic candidate selection. Using the β2-adrenergic receptor as a model, we present a proof of concept study that assessed the bias of 19 β-adrenergic ligands, including many clinically used compounds, across four pathways [cAMP production, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation, calcium mobilization, and receptor endocytosis] in the same cell background (human embryonic kidney 293S cells). Efficacy-based clustering placed the ligands into five distinct groups with respect to signaling signatures. In some cases, apparent functional selectivity originated from off-target effects on other endogenously expressed adrenergic receptors, highlighting the importance of thoroughly assessing selectivity of the responses before concluding receptor-specific ligand-biased signaling. Eliminating the nonselective compounds did not change the clustering of the 10 remaining compounds. Some ligands exhibited large differences in potency for the different pathways, suggesting that the nature of the receptor-effector complexes influences the relative affinity of the compounds for specific receptor conformations. Calculation of relative effectiveness (within pathway) and bias factors (between pathways) for each of the compounds, using an operational model of agonism, revealed a global signaling signature for all of the compounds relative to isoproterenol. Most compounds were biased toward ERK1/2 activation over the other pathways, consistent with the notion that many proximal effectors converge on this pathway. Overall, we demonstrate a higher level of ligand texture than previously anticipated, opening perspectives for the establishment of pluridimensional correlations between signaling profiles, drug classification, therapeutic efficacy, and

  1. Synthesis and Photophysical Studies of Iridium Complexes Having Different Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Hyeon Hee; Park, Gui Youn; Ha, Yunkyoung; Kim, Young Sik

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis and photophysical study of efficient phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes having two different (C∧N) ligands are reported. In order to improve the luminescence efficiency by avoiding triplet-triplet (T-T) annihilation, the iridium complexes, Ir(ppy)2(piq) and Ir(ppy)2(piq-F), are designed and prepared where ppy, piq and piq-F represent 2-phenylpyridine, 1-(phenyl)isoquinoline and 2-(4'-fluorophenyl)isoquinoline, respectively. Two ppy ligands and a piq derivative act as a source of energy supply and a piq derivative acts as a chromophore. Since Ir(ppy)3, Ir(piq)3 and Ir(piq-F)3 can be placed in the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state, they absorb light effectively. When Ir(ppy)2(piq-F) is placed in excited state, the excitation energy is neither quenched nor deactivated but quickly intramolecular transferred from two ppy ligands to one luminescent piq-F ligand. This can occure because the triplet energy level of ppy is higher than that of piq-F and light is emitted from piq-F ligand in the end. Thus, Ir(ppy)2(piq-F) shows strong photoluminescence originated from piq-F ligand because piq-F ligand is known to have a shorter lifetime than that of ppy ligand. To analyze luminescent mechanism, we calculated these complexes having two different ligand sets theoretically by using computational method.

  2. Including Ligand Induced Protein Flexibility into Protein Tunnel Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Laura J.; Lill, Markus A.

    2014-01-01

    In proteins with buried active sites, understanding how ligands migrate through the tunnels that connect the exterior of the protein to the active site can shed light on substrate specificity and enzyme function. A growing body of evidence highlights the importance of protein flexibility in the binding site upon ligand binding; however, the influence of protein flexibility throughout the body of the protein during ligand entry and egress is much less characterized. We have developed a novel tunnel prediction and evaluation method named IterTunnel, which includes the influence of ligand-induced protein flexibility, guarantees ligand egress, and provides detailed free energy information as the ligand proceeds along the egress route. IterTunnel combines geometric tunnel prediction with steered MD in an iterative process to identify tunnels that open as a result of ligand migration and calculates the potential of mean force (PMF) of ligand egress through a given tunnel. Applying this new method to cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6), we demonstrate the influence of protein flexibility on the shape and accessibility of tunnels. More importantly, we demonstrate that the ligand itself, while traversing through a tunnel, can reshape tunnels due to its interaction with the protein. This process results in the exposure of new tunnels and the closure of pre-existing tunnels as the ligand migrates from the active site. PMID:25043499

  3. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them. PMID:27327045

  4. (Ligand intermediates in metal-catalyzed reactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report consists of sections on sigma bond complexes of alkenes, a new carbon-hydrogen bond activation reaction of alkene complexes, carbon-hydrogen bond migrations in alkylidene complexes, carbon- hydrogen bond migrations in alkyne complexes, synthesis, structure and reactivity of C{sub x} complexes, synthesis and reactivity of alcohol and ether complexes, new catalysts for the epimerization of secondary alcohols; carbon-hydrogen bond activation in alkoxide complexes, pi/sigma equilibria in metal/O=CXX' complexes, and other hydrocarbon ligands; miscellaneous.(WET)

  5. Transmutable nanoparticles with reconfigurable surface ligands.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngeun; Macfarlane, Robert J; Jones, Matthew R; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-02-01

    Unlike conventional inorganic materials, biological systems are exquisitely adapted to respond to their surroundings. Proteins and other biological molecules can process a complex set of chemical binding events as informational inputs and respond accordingly via a change in structure and function. We applied this principle to the design and synthesis of inorganic materials by preparing nanoparticles with reconfigurable surface ligands, where interparticle bonding can be programmed in response to specific chemical cues in a dynamic manner. As a result, a nascent set of "transmutable nanoparticles" can be driven to crystallize along multiple thermodynamic trajectories, resulting in rational control over the phase and time evolution of nanoparticle-based matter. PMID:26912697

  6. Helix-helix interfaces and ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Kurochkina, Natalya; Choekyi, Tsering

    2011-08-21

    Helix-helix parallel interfaces can be characterized by certain combinations of amino acids, which repeatedly occur at core positions a and d (leucine zipper nomenclature) in homologous and nonhomologous proteins and influence interhelical angles. Applied for the prediction of interhelical angles in glutathione S-transferase, intracellular chloride channel and annexin molecules from various sources, correct results were achieved in 58 out of 62 proteins. Interhelical angles are found to correlate with the conformation of the glutathione S-transferase ligands glutathione, s-hexylglutathione, glutathione sulfonic acid, and glutathione-s-dinitrobenzene. PMID:21620863

  7. Transmutable nanoparticles with reconfigurable surface ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngeun; Macfarlane, Robert J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2016-02-01

    Unlike conventional inorganic materials, biological systems are exquisitely adapted to respond to their surroundings. Proteins and other biological molecules can process a complex set of chemical binding events as informational inputs and respond accordingly via a change in structure and function. We applied this principle to the design and synthesis of inorganic materials by preparing nanoparticles with reconfigurable surface ligands, where interparticle bonding can be programmed in response to specific chemical cues in a dynamic manner. As a result, a nascent set of “transmutable nanoparticles” can be driven to crystallize along multiple thermodynamic trajectories, resulting in rational control over the phase and time evolution of nanoparticle-based matter.

  8. New ligands for the asymmetric dihydroxylation

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, H.; King, S.B.; Richardson, P.

    1995-12-31

    The asymmetric dibydroxylation of olefins in the presence of cinchona alkaloid derivatives (the AD reaction) has proven to be a reliable method in organic syntheses. For most olefins, the enantioselectivities using the {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} phathalazine ligands are excellent; however, facial selectivity is still moderate for some olefins. 2,3-Diphenyl pyrazinopyridazine (DPP) and anthraquinone (AQN) as spacers for the {open_quotes}pseudo enantiomeric{close_quotes} alkaloids dihydroquinidine (DHQD) or dihydroquinine (DHQ) give superior enantioselectivities for almost all olefins.

  9. Weak Ligand-Field Effect from Ancillary Ligands on Enhancing Single-Ion Magnet Performance.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yin-Shan; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Wang, Bing-Wu; Gao, Song

    2016-08-26

    A series of bis-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-supported Dy complexes containing different ancillary ligands were synthesized and characterized. Magnetic studies showed that 1 Dy [Cp*2 DyCl(THF)], 1 Dy' [Cp*2 DyCl2 K(THF)]n , 2 Dy [Cp*2 DyBr(THF)], 3 Dy [Cp*2 DyI(THF)] and 4 Dy [Cp*2 DyTp] (Tp=hydrotris(1-pyrazolyl)borate) were single-ion magnets (SIMs). The 1D dysprosium chain 1 Dy' exhibited a hysteresis at up to 5 K. Furthermore, 3 Dy featured the highest energy barrier (419 cm(-1) ) among the complexes. The effects of ancillary ligands on single-ion magnetic properties were studied by experimental, ab initio calculations and electrostatic analysis methods in detail. These results demonstrated that the QTM rate was strongly dependent on the ancillary ligands and that a weak equatorial ligand field could be beneficial for constructing Dy-SIMs. PMID:27417884

  10. Is cyanide really a strong-field ligand?

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mikio

    2009-01-01

    Iron man or weakling? Ligand-field strengths are conveniently expressed by the empirical spectrochemical series. Although cyanide has been deeply entrenched as a strong-field ligand, a couple of recent examples cast doubt toward the position of this ligand, namely the high-spin (S = 2) states of [Cr(II)(CN)(5)](3-) and [Fe(II)(tpp)(CN)](-). tpp = meso-tetraphenylporphinate. PMID:19222066

  11. Quasielastic neutron scattering study of POSS ligand dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jalarvo, Niina H; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Crawford, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Polyoligosilsesquioxanes are molecules having cage-like structures composed of silicon and oxygen. These molecules can have a wide variety of functional ligands attached to them. Depending on the nature of the ligand, interesting properties and applications are found. In this work we present results from quasielastic neutron scattering measurements of four different POSS molecules that illustrate the presence of strong coupling between the ligand dynamics and the POSS crystal structures.

  12. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  13. Continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands (CMAIL)

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Huang, Chao-Yang; Hu, Chih-Yung; Wu, Yen-Yu; Wu, Chung-Hsiun; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Chihchen

    2016-01-01

    Finding an interactive ligand-receptor pair is crucial to many applications, including the development of monoclonal antibodies. Biopanning, a commonly used technique for affinity screening, involves a series of washing steps and is lengthy and tedious. Here we present an approach termed continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands, or CMAIL, for the screening and sorting of antigen-binding single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFv) displayed on bacteriophages (phages). Phages carrying native negative charges on their coat proteins were electrophoresed through a hydrogel matrix functionalized with target antigens under two alternating orthogonal electric fields. During the weak horizontal electric field phase, phages were differentially swept laterally depending on their affinity for the antigen, and all phages were electrophoresed down to be collected during the strong vertical electric field phase. Phages of different affinity were spatially separated, allowing the continuous operation. More than 105 CFU (colony forming unit) antigen-interacting phages were isolated with ~100% specificity from a phage library containing 3 × 109 individual members within 40 minutes of sorting using CMAIL. CMAIL is rapid, sensitive, specific, and does not employ washing, elution or magnetic beads. In conclusion, we have developed an efficient and cost-effective method for isolating and sorting affinity reagents involving phage display. PMID:27578501

  14. Continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands (CMAIL).

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Huang, Chao-Yang; Hu, Chih-Yung; Wu, Yen-Yu; Wu, Chung-Hsiun; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Chihchen

    2016-01-01

    Finding an interactive ligand-receptor pair is crucial to many applications, including the development of monoclonal antibodies. Biopanning, a commonly used technique for affinity screening, involves a series of washing steps and is lengthy and tedious. Here we present an approach termed continuous microfluidic assortment of interactive ligands, or CMAIL, for the screening and sorting of antigen-binding single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFv) displayed on bacteriophages (phages). Phages carrying native negative charges on their coat proteins were electrophoresed through a hydrogel matrix functionalized with target antigens under two alternating orthogonal electric fields. During the weak horizontal electric field phase, phages were differentially swept laterally depending on their affinity for the antigen, and all phages were electrophoresed down to be collected during the strong vertical electric field phase. Phages of different affinity were spatially separated, allowing the continuous operation. More than 10(5) CFU (colony forming unit) antigen-interacting phages were isolated with ~100% specificity from a phage library containing 3 × 10(9) individual members within 40 minutes of sorting using CMAIL. CMAIL is rapid, sensitive, specific, and does not employ washing, elution or magnetic beads. In conclusion, we have developed an efficient and cost-effective method for isolating and sorting affinity reagents involving phage display. PMID:27578501

  15. The first nitro-substituted heteroscorpionate ligand.

    PubMed

    Pellei, Maura; Benetollo, Franco; Lobbia, Giancarlo Gioia; Alidori, Simone; Santini, Carlo

    2005-02-21

    The new dihydridobis(3-nitro-1,2,4-triazolyl)borate ligand, [H2B(tzNO2)2]-, has been synthesized in dimethylacetamide solution, using 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazole and KBH4 through careful temperature control, and characterized as its potassium salt. The zinc(II) and cadmium(II) complexes, {M[H2B(tzNO2)2]Cl(H2O)2}, have been prepared by metathesis of [H2B(tzNO2)2]K with ZnCl2 and CdCl2, respectively. The complexes likely contain a metal core in which the ligand is coordinated to the metal ions in the K2-N,N' or K4-N,N',O,O' fashion. A single-crystal structural characterization is reported for the potassium dihydrobis(3-nitro-1,2,4-triazolyl)borate. The potassium salt is polymeric and shows several K...N and K...O interactions. PMID:15859260

  16. Biased ligands: pathway validation for novel GPCR therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rominger, David H; Cowan, Conrad L; Gowen-MacDonald, William; Violin, Jonathan D

    2014-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), in recent years, have been shown to signal via multiple distinct pathways. Furthermore, biased ligands for some receptors can differentially stimulate or inhibit these pathways versus unbiased endogenous ligands or drugs. Biased ligands can be used to gain a deeper understanding of the molecular targets and cellular responses associated with a GPCR, and may be developed into therapeutics with improved efficacy, safety and/or tolerability. Here we review examples and approaches to pathway validation that establish the relevance and therapeutic potential of distinct pathways that can be selectively activated or blocked by biased ligands. PMID:24834870

  17. Superior serum half life of albumin tagged TNF ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Nicole; Schneider, Britta; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Wajant, Harald

    2010-06-11

    Due to their immune stimulating and apoptosis inducing properties, ligands of the TNF family attract increasing interest as therapeutic proteins. A general limitation of in vivo applications of recombinant soluble TNF ligands is their notoriously rapid clearance from circulation. To improve the serum half life of the TNF family members TNF, TWEAK and TRAIL, we genetically fused soluble variants of these molecules to human serum albumin (HSA). The serum albumin-TNF ligand fusion proteins were found to be of similar bioactivity as the corresponding HSA-less counterparts. Upon intravenous injection (i.v.), serum half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins, as determined by ELISA, was around 15 h as compared to approximately 1 h for all of the recombinant control TNF ligands without HSA domain. Moreover, serum samples collected 6 or 24 h after i.v. injection still contained high TNF ligand bioactivity, demonstrating that there is only limited degradation/inactivation of circulating HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins in vivo. In a xenotransplantation model, significantly less of the HSA-TRAIL fusion protein compared to the respective control TRAIL protein was required to achieve inhibition of tumor growth indicating that the increased half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins translates into better therapeutic action in vivo. In conclusion, our data suggest that genetic fusion to serum albumin is a powerful and generally applicable mean to improve bioavailability and in vivo activity of TNF ligands.

  18. Ligand Release Pathways Obtained with WExplore: Residence Times and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Alex; Lotz, Samuel D

    2016-06-23

    The binding of ligands with their molecular receptors is of tremendous importance in biology. Although much emphasis has been placed on characterizing binding sites and bound poses that determine the binding thermodynamics, the pathway by which a ligand binds importantly determines the binding kinetics. The computational study of entire unbiased ligand binding and release pathways is still an emerging field, made possible only recently by advances in computational hardware and sampling methodologies. We have developed one such method (WExplore) that is based on a weighted ensemble of trajectories, which we apply to ligand release for the first time, using a set of three previously characterized interactions between low-affinity ligands and the protein FKBP-12 (FK-506 binding protein). WExplore is found to be more efficient that conventional sampling, even for the nanosecond-scale unbinding events observed here. From a nonequilibrium ensemble of unbinding trajectories, we obtain ligand residence times and release pathways without using biasing forces or a Markovian assumption of transitions between regions. We introduce a set of analysis tools for unbinding transition pathways, including using von Mises-Fisher distributions to model clouds of ligand exit points, which provide a quantitative proxy for ligand surface diffusion. Differences between the transition pathway ensembles of the three ligands are identified and discussed. PMID:27231969

  19. Riboswitch structure: an internal residue mimicking the purine ligand

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Bouchard, Patricia; Bonneau, Eric; Dagenais, Pierre; Lemay, Jean-François; Lafontaine, Daniel A.; Legault, Pascale

    2010-01-01

    The adenine and guanine riboswitches regulate gene expression in response to their purine ligand. X-ray structures of the aptamer moiety of these riboswitches are characterized by a compact fold in which the ligand forms a Watson–Crick base pair with residue 65. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a strict restriction at position 39 of the aptamer that prevents the G39–C65 and A39–U65 combinations, and mutational studies indicate that aptamers with these sequence combinations are impaired for ligand binding. In order to investigate the rationale for sequence conservation at residue 39, structural characterization of the U65C mutant from Bacillus subtilis pbuE adenine riboswitch aptamer was undertaken. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography studies demonstrate that the U65C mutant adopts a compact ligand-free structure, in which G39 occupies the ligand-binding site of purine riboswitch aptamers. These studies present a remarkable example of a mutant RNA aptamer that adopts a native-like fold by means of ligand mimicking and explain why this mutant is impaired for ligand binding. Furthermore, this work provides a specific insight into how the natural sequence has evolved through selection of nucleotide identities that contribute to formation of the ligand-bound state, but ensures that the ligand-free state remains in an active conformation. PMID:20022916

  20. Assisted assignment of ligands corresponding to unknown electron density.

    SciTech Connect

    Binkowski, T. A.; Cuff, M.; Nocek, B.; Chang, C.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division

    2010-01-03

    A semi-automated computational procedure to assist in the identification of bound ligands from unknown electron density has been developed. The atomic surface surrounding the density blob is compared to a library of three-dimensional ligand binding surfaces extracted from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Ligands corresponding to surfaces which share physicochemical texture and geometric shape similarities are considered for assignment. The method is benchmarked against a set of well represented ligands from the PDB, in which we show that we can identify the correct ligand based on the corresponding binding surface. Finally, we apply the method during model building and refinement stages from structural genomics targets in which unknown density blobs were discovered. A semi-automated computational method is described which aims to assist crystallographers with assigning the identity of a ligand corresponding to unknown electron density. Using shape and physicochemical similarity assessments between the protein surface surrounding the density and a database of known ligand binding surfaces, a plausible list of candidate ligands are identified for consideration. The method is validated against highly observed ligands from the Protein Data Bank and results are shown from its use in a high-throughput structural genomics pipeline.

  1. Riboswitch Structure: an Internal Residue Mimicking the Purine Ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Delfosse, V.; Bouchard, P; Bonneau, E; Dagenais, P; Lemay, J; Lafontaine, D; Legault, P

    2009-01-01

    The adenine and guanine riboswitches regulate gene expression in response to their purine ligand. X-ray structures of the aptamer moiety of these riboswitches are characterized by a compact fold in which the ligand forms a Watson-Crick base pair with residue 65. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a strict restriction at position 39 of the aptamer that prevents the G39-C65 and A39-U65 combinations, and mutational studies indicate that aptamers with these sequence combinations are impaired for ligand binding. In order to investigate the rationale for sequence conservation at residue 39, structural characterization of the U65C mutant from Bacillus subtilis pbuE adenine riboswitch aptamer was undertaken. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography studies demonstrate that the U65C mutant adopts a compact ligand-free structure, in which G39 occupies the ligand-binding site of purine riboswitch aptamers. These studies present a remarkable example of a mutant RNA aptamer that adopts a native-like fold by means of ligand mimicking and explain why this mutant is impaired for ligand binding. Furthermore, this work provides a specific insight into how the natural sequence has evolved through selection of nucleotide identities that contribute to formation of the ligand-bound state, but ensures that the ligand-free state remains in an active conformation.

  2. Melanoma cell galectin-1 ligands functionally correlate with malignant potential*

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Erika M.; Geddes-Sweeney, Jenna E.; Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Walley, Kempland C.; Barthel, Steven R.; Opperman, Matthew J.; Liang, Jennifer; Lin, Jennifer Y.; Schatton, Tobias; Laga, Alvaro C.; Mihm, Martin C.; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Widlund, Hans R.; Murphy, George F.; Dimitroff, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1)-binding to Gal-1 ligands on immune and endothelial cells can influence melanoma development through dampening anti-tumor immune responses and promoting angiogenesis. However, whether Gal-1 ligands are functionally expressed on melanoma cells to help control intrinsic malignant features remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed expression, identity and function of Gal-1 ligands in melanoma progression. Immunofluorescent analysis of benign and malignant human melanocytic neoplasms revealed that Gal-1 ligands were abundant in severely-dysplastic nevi as well as in primary and metastatic melanomas. Biochemical assessments indicated that melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) was a major Gal-1 ligand on melanoma cells that was largely dependent on its N-glycans. Other melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand activity conferred by O-glycans was negatively regulated by α2,6 sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc2. In Gal-1-deficient mice, MCAM-silenced (MCAMKD) or ST6GalNAc2-overexpressing (ST6O/E) melanoma cells exhibited slower growth rates, underscoring a key role for melanoma cell Gal-1 ligands and host Gal-1 in melanoma growth. Further analysis of MCAMKD or ST6O/E melanoma cells in cell migration assays indicated that Gal-1 ligand-dependent melanoma cell migration was severely inhibited. These findings provide a refined perspective on Gal-1 – melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand interactions as contributors to melanoma malignancy. PMID:25756799

  3. Ultrafast heme-ligand recombination in truncated hemoglobin HbO from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A ligand cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasaitis, Audrius; Ouellet, Hugues; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Martin, Jean-Louis; Friedman, Joel M.; Guertin, Michel; Vos, Marten H.

    2012-03-01

    Truncated hemoglobin HbO from Mycobacterium tuberculosis displays very slow exchange of diatomic ligands with its environment. Using femtosecond spectroscopy, we show that upon photoexcitation, ligands rebind with unusual speed and efficiency. Only ˜1% O2 can escape from the heme pocket and less than 1% NO. Most remarkably, CO rebinding occurs for 95%, predominantly in 1.2 ns. The general CO rebinding properties are unexpectedly robust against changes in the interactions with close by aromatic residues Trp88 (G8) and Tyr36 (CD1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the CO complex suggest that interactions of the ligand with structural water molecules as well as its rotational freedom play a role in the high reactivity of the ligand and the heme. The slow exchange of ligands between heme and environment may result from a combination of hindered ligand access to the heme pocket by the network of distal aromatic residues, and low escape probability from the pocket.

  4. Characterizing mixed phosphonic acid ligand capping on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots using ligand exchange and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Davidowski, Stephen K; Lisowski, Carmen E; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2016-03-01

    The ligand capping of phosphonic acid functionalized CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) was investigated with a combination of solution and solid-state (31) P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Two phosphonic acid ligands were used in the synthesis of the QDs, tetradecylphosphonic acid and ethylphosphonic acid. Both alkyl phosphonic acids showed broad liquid and solid-state (31) P NMR resonances for the bound ligands, indicative of heterogeneous binding to the QD surface. In order to quantify the two ligand populations on the surface, ligand exchange facilitated by phenylphosphonic acid resulted in the displacement of the ethylphosphonic acid and tetradecylphosphonic acid and allowed for quantification of the free ligands using (31) P liquid-state NMR. After washing away the free ligand, two broad resonances were observed in the liquids' (31) P NMR corresponding to the alkyl and aromatic phosphonic acids. The washed samples were analyzed via solid-state (31) P NMR, which confirmed the ligand populations on the surface following the ligand exchange process. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26639792

  5. Calculating the mean time to capture for tethered ligands and its effect on the chemical equilibrium of bound ligand pairs.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lu; Decker, Caitlin G; Maynard, Heather D; Levine, Alex J

    2016-09-01

    We present here the calculation of the mean time to capture of a tethered ligand to the receptor. This calculation is then used to determine the shift in the partitioning between (1) free, (2) singly bound, and (3) doubly bound ligands in chemical equilibrium as a function of the length of the tether. These calculations are used in the research article Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Dimer with Superagonist in vitro Activity Improves Granulation Tissue Formation During Wound Healing (Decker et al., in press [1]) to explain quantitatively how changes in polymeric linker length in the ligand dimers modifies the efficacy of these molecules relative to that of free ligands. PMID:27408925

  6. Ligand "Brackets" for Ga-Ga Bond.

    PubMed

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Yang, Xiao-Juan; Chudakova, Valentina A; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy; Baranov, Evgeny V

    2016-09-01

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1) (dpp-Bian = 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene) toward acenaphthenequinone (AcQ), sulfur dioxide, and azobenzene was investigated. The reaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:1 molar ratio proceeds via two-electron reduction of AcQ to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)Ga(dpp-Bian) (2), in which diolate [AcQ](2-) acts as "bracket" for the Ga-Ga bond. The interaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:2 molar ratio proceeds with an oxidation of the both dpp-Bian ligands as well as of the Ga-Ga bond to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (3). At 330 K in toluene complex 2 decomposes to give compounds 3 and 1. The reaction of complex 2 with atmospheric oxygen results in oxidation of a Ga-Ga bond and affords (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)(μ2-O)Ga(dpp-Bian) (4). The reaction of digallane 1 with SO2 produces, depending on the ratio (1:2 or 1:4), dithionites (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)Ga(dpp-Bian) (5) and (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (6). In compound 5 the Ga-Ga bond is preserved and supported by dithionite dianionic bracket. In compound 6 the gallium centers are bridged by two dithionite ligands. Both 5 and 6 consist of dpp-Bian radical anionic ligands. Four-electron reduction of azobenzene with 1 mol equiv of digallane 1 leads to complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-NPh)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). Paramagnetic compounds 2-7 were characterized by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and their molecular structures were established by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Magnetic behavior of compounds 2, 5, and 6 was investigated by superconducting quantum interference device technique in the range of 2-295 K. PMID:27548713

  7. Pathways of ligand clearance in acetylcholinesterase by multiple copy sampling.

    PubMed

    Van Belle, D; De Maria, L; Iurcu, G; Wodak, S J

    2000-05-12

    The clearance of seven different ligands from the deeply buried active-site of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase is investigated by combining multiple copy sampling molecular dynamics simulations, with the analysis of protein-ligand interactions, protein motion and the electrostatic potential sampled by the ligand copies along their journey outwards. The considered ligands are the cations ammonium, methylammonium, and tetramethylammonium, the hydrophobic methane and neopentane, and the anionic product acetate and its neutral form, acetic acid. We find that the pathways explored by the different ligands vary with ligand size and chemical properties. Very small ligands, such as ammonium and methane, exit through several routes. One involves the main exit through the mouth of the enzyme gorge, another is through the so-called back door near Trp84, and a third uses a side door at a direction of approximately 45 degrees to the main exit. The larger polar ligands, methylammonium and acetic acid, leave through the main exit, but the bulkiest, tetramethylammonium and neopentane, as well as the smaller acetate ion, remain trapped in the enzyme gorge during the time of the simulations. The pattern of protein-ligand contacts during the diffusion process is highly non-random and differs for different ligands. A majority is made with aromatic side-chains, but classical H-bonds are also formed. In the case of acetate, but not acetic acid, the anionic and neutral form, respectively, of one of the reaction products, specific electrostatic interactions with protein groups, seem to slow ligand motion and interfere with protein flexibility; protonation of the acetate ion is therefore suggested to facilitate clearance. The Poisson-Boltzmann formalism is used to compute the electrostatic potential of the thermally fluctuating acetylcholinesterase protein at positions actually visited by the diffusing ligand copies. Ligands of different charge and size are shown to sample

  8. Tetraspecific ligand for tumor-targeted delivery of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongwook; Friedman, Adam D; Liu, Rihe

    2014-07-01

    The polygenetic nature of most cancers emphasizes the necessity of cancer therapies that target multiple essential signaling pathways. However, there is a significant paucity of targeting ligands with multi-specificities for targeted delivery of biomaterials. To address this unmet need, we generated a tetraspecific targeting ligand that recognizes four different cancer biomarkers, including VEGFR2, αvβ3 integrin, EGFR, and HER2 receptors, which have been implicated in numerous malignant tumors. The tetraspecific targeting ligand was constructed by sequentially connecting four targeting ligand subunits via flexible linkers, yielding a fusion protein that can be highly expressed in Escherichia coli and readily purified to near homogeneity. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), Bio-Layer Interferometry (BLI) studies and extensive cellular binding analyses indicated that all the targeting ligand subunits in the tetraspecific fusion protein recognized their target receptors proximately to the corresponding monospecific ligands. The resulting tetraspecific targeting ligand was applied for the delivery of nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for targeted hyperthermic killing of various cancer cell lines with biomarkers of interest expressed. We demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand can be facilely introduced on the surface of AuNPs and efficient target-dependent killing of cancer cells can be achieved only when the AuNPs are conjugated with the tetraspecific ligand. Significantly, the tetraspecific ligand simultaneously interacts with more than one receptors, such as EGFR and HER2 receptors, when they are expressed on the surface of the same cell, as demonstrated by in vitro binding assays and cell binding analyses. Our results demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand, through multivalency and synergistic binding, can be readily used to generate various 'smart' biomaterials with greatly broadened tumor targeting range for simultaneous targeting of multiple

  9. Tetraspecific Ligand for Tumor-Targeted Delivery of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongwook; Friedman, Adam D.; Liu, Rihe

    2014-01-01

    The polygenetic nature of most cancers emphasizes the necessity of cancer therapies that target multiple essential signaling pathways. However, there is a significant paucity of targeting ligands with multi-specificities for targeted delivery of biomaterials. To address this unmet need, we generated a tetraspecific targeting ligand that recognizes four different cancer biomarkers, including VEGFR2, αvβ3 integrin, EGFR, and HER2 receptors, which have been implicated in numerous malignant tumors. The tetraspecific targeting ligand was constructed by sequentially connecting four targeting ligand subunits via flexible linkers, yielding a fusion protein that can be highly expressed in E. coli and readily purified to near homogeneity. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), Bio-Layer Interferometry (BLI) studies and extensive cellular binding analyses indicated that all the targeting ligand subunits in the tetraspecific fusion protein recognized their target receptors proximately to the corresponding monospecific ligands. The resulting tetraspecific targeting ligand was applied for the delivery of nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for targeted hyperthermic killing of various cancer cell lines with biomarkers of interest expressed. We demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand can be facilely introduced on the surface of AuNPs and efficient target-dependent killing of cancer cells can be achieved only when the AuNPs are conjugated with the tetraspecific ligand. Significantly, the tetraspecific ligand simultaneously interacts with more than one receptors, such as EGFR and HER2 receptors, when they are expressed on the surface of the same cell, as demonstrated by in vitro binding assays and cell binding analyses. Our results demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand, through multivalency and synergistic binding, can be readily used to generate various ‘smart’ biomaterials with greatly broadened tumor targeting range for simultaneous targeting of multiple

  10. Rational design of class I MHC ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognan, D.; Scapozza, L.; Folkers, G.; Daser, Angelika

    1995-04-01

    From the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of a class I MHC protein, several non natural peptides were designed in order to either optimize the interactions of one secondary anchor amino acid with its HLA binding pocket or to substitute the non interacting part with spacer residues. All peptides were synthesized and tested for binding to the class I MHC protein in an in vitro reconstitution assay. As predicted, the non natural peptides present an enhanced binding to the HLA-B27 molecule with respect to their natural parent peptides. This study constitutes the first step towards the rational design of non peptidic MHC ligands that should be very promising tools for the selective immunotherapy of autoimmune diseases.

  11. Ligand-directed trafficking of receptor stimulus.

    PubMed

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2014-12-01

    GPCRs are seven transmembrane-spanning receptors that convey specific extracellular stimuli to intracellular signalling. They represent the largest family of cell surface proteins that are therapeutically targeted. According to the traditional two-state model of receptor theory, GPCRs were considered as operating in equilibrium between two functional conformations, an active (R*) and inactive (R) state. Thus, it was assumed that a GPCR can exist either in an "off" or "on" conformation causing either no activation or equal activation of all its signalling pathways. Over the past several years it has become evident that this model is too simple and that GPCR signalling is far more complex. Different studies have presented a multistate model of receptor activation in which ligand-specific receptor conformations are able to differentiate between distinct signalling partners. Recent data show that beside G proteins numerous other proteins, such as β-arrestins and kinases, may interact with GPCRs and activate intracellular signalling pathways. GPCR activation may therefore involve receptor desensitization, coupling to multiple G proteins, Gα or Gβγ signalling, and pathway activation that is independent of G proteins. This latter effect leads to agonist "functional selectivity" (also called ligand-directed receptor trafficking, stimulus trafficking, biased agonism, biased signalling), and agonist intervention with functional selectivity may improve the therapy. Many commercially available drugs with beneficial efficacy also show various undesirable side effects. Further studies of biased signalling might facilitate our understanding of the side effects of current drugs and take us to new avenues to efficiently design pathway-specific medications. PMID:25443729

  12. Do organic ligands affect calcite dissolution rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Golubev, Sergey V.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Bénézeth, Pascale

    2011-04-01

    Steady state Iceland-spar calcite dissolution rates were measured at 25 °C in aqueous solutions containing 0.1 M NaCl and up to 0.05 M dissolved bicarbonate at pH from 7.9 to 9.1 in the presence of 13 distinct dissolved organic ligands in mixed-flow reactors. The organic ligands considered in this study include those most likely to be present in either (1) aquifers at the conditions pertinent to CO 2 sequestration or (2) soil/early diagenetic environments: acetate, phthalate, citrate, EDTA 4-, succinate, D-glucosaminate, L-glutamate, D-gluconate, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, fumarate, malonate, and gallate. Results show that the presence of <0.05 mol/kg of these organic anions changes calcite dissolution rates by less than a factor of 2.5 with the exception of citrate and EDTA 4-. The presence of 0.05 mol/kg citrate and EDTA 4- increases calcite dissolution rates by as much as a factor of 35 and 500, respectively, compared to rates in organic anion-free solutions. Further calcite dissolution experiments were performed in the presence of organic polymers similar to bacterial exudates, cell exopolysaccharides, and analogs of microbial cell envelopes: alginate, lichen extract, humic acid, pectin, and gum xanthan. In no case did the presence of <100 ppm of these organics change calcite dissolution rates by more than a factor of 2.5. Results obtained in this study suggest that the presence of aqueous organic anions negligibly affects calcite forward dissolution rates in most natural environments. Some effect on calcite reactivity may be observed, however, by the presence of organic anions if they change substantially the chemical affinity of the fluid with respect to calcite.

  13. Synthesis of 3-alkyl naphthalenes as novel estrogen receptor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jing; Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Britton, Jonathan E.; Katamreddy, Subba R.; Navas III, Frank; Miller, Aaron B.; Williams, Shawn P.; Gray, David W.; Orband-Miller, Lisa A.; Shearin, Jean; Heyer, Dennis

    2009-06-24

    A series of estrogen receptor ligands based on a 3-alkyl naphthalene scaffold was synthesized using an intramolecular enolate-alkyne cycloaromatization as the key step. Several of these compounds bearing a C6-OH group were shown to be high affinity ligands. All compounds had similar ER{alpha} and ER{beta} binding affinity ranging from micromolar to low nanomolar.

  14. Proteome-wide covalent ligand discovery in native biological systems.

    PubMed

    Backus, Keriann M; Correia, Bruno E; Lum, Kenneth M; Forli, Stefano; Horning, Benjamin D; González-Páez, Gonzalo E; Chatterjee, Sandip; Lanning, Bryan R; Teijaro, John R; Olson, Arthur J; Wolan, Dennis W; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-06-23

    Small molecules are powerful tools for investigating protein function and can serve as leads for new therapeutics. Most human proteins, however, lack small-molecule ligands, and entire protein classes are considered 'undruggable'. Fragment-based ligand discovery can identify small-molecule probes for proteins that have proven difficult to target using high-throughput screening of complex compound libraries. Although reversibly binding ligands are commonly pursued, covalent fragments provide an alternative route to small-molecule probes, including those that can access regions of proteins that are difficult to target through binding affinity alone. Here we report a quantitative analysis of cysteine-reactive small-molecule fragments screened against thousands of proteins in human proteomes and cells. Covalent ligands were identified for >700 cysteines found in both druggable proteins and proteins deficient in chemical probes, including transcription factors, adaptor/scaffolding proteins, and uncharacterized proteins. Among the atypical ligand-protein interactions discovered were compounds that react preferentially with pro- (inactive) caspases. We used these ligands to distinguish extrinsic apoptosis pathways in human cell lines versus primary human T cells, showing that the former is largely mediated by caspase-8 while the latter depends on both caspase-8 and -10. Fragment-based covalent ligand discovery provides a greatly expanded portrait of the ligandable proteome and furnishes compounds that can illuminate protein functions in native biological systems. PMID:27309814

  15. How to Compute Labile Metal-Ligand Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Levie, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The different methods used for computing labile metal-ligand complexes, which are suitable for an iterative computer solution, are illustrated. The ligand function has allowed students to relegate otherwise tedious iterations to a computer, while retaining complete control over what is calculated.

  16. Multifunctional ligand for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical

    DOEpatents

    Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Singh, P.R.

    1996-05-14

    A compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical are revealed. The ligand comprises either a phosphorous or germanium core and at least two hydrazine groups forming a ligand for bonding to a metal extending from the phosphorous or germanium core.

  17. Technetium radiodiagnostic fatty acids derived from bisamide bisthiol ligands

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Lister-James, John; Davison, Alan

    1988-05-24

    A bisamide-bisthiol ligand containing fatty acid substituted thiol useful for producing Tc-labelled radiodiagnostic imaging agents is described. The ligand forms a complex with the radionuclide .sup.99m Tc suitable for administration as a radiopharmaceutical to obtain images of the heart for diagnosis of myocardial disfunction.

  18. Designing Ligand-Enhanced Optical Absorption of Thiolated Gold Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sementa, Luca; Barcaro, Giovanni; Dass, Amala; Stener, Mauro; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2015-05-07

    The optical spectra of thiolated Au25(SR)18/Au23(SR)16 clusters with different R residues are investigated via TDDFT simulations. Significant enhancements in the optical region and effective electron delocalization are simultaneously achieved by tuning the ligands' steric hindrance and electronic conjugating features, producing a resonance phenomenon between the Au–S core motif and the ligand fragments.

  19. Improved ligand geometries in crystallographic refinement using AFITT in PHENIX.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Pawel A; Moriarty, Nigel W; Kelley, Brian P; Case, David A; York, Darrin M; Adams, Paul D; Warren, Gregory L

    2016-09-01

    Modern crystal structure refinement programs rely on geometry restraints to overcome the challenge of a low data-to-parameter ratio. While the classical Engh and Huber restraints work well for standard amino-acid residues, the chemical complexity of small-molecule ligands presents a particular challenge. Most current approaches either limit ligand restraints to those that can be readily described in the Crystallographic Information File (CIF) format, thus sacrificing chemical flexibility and energetic accuracy, or they employ protocols that substantially lengthen the refinement time, potentially hindering rapid automated refinement workflows. PHENIX-AFITT refinement uses a full molecular-mechanics force field for user-selected small-molecule ligands during refinement, eliminating the potentially difficult problem of finding or generating high-quality geometry restraints. It is fully integrated with a standard refinement protocol and requires practically no additional steps from the user, making it ideal for high-throughput workflows. PHENIX-AFITT refinements also handle multiple ligands in a single model, alternate conformations and covalently bound ligands. Here, the results of combining AFITT and the PHENIX software suite on a data set of 189 protein-ligand PDB structures are presented. Refinements using PHENIX-AFITT significantly reduce ligand conformational energy and lead to improved geometries without detriment to the fit to the experimental data. For the data presented, PHENIX-AFITT refinements result in more chemically accurate models for small-molecule ligands. PMID:27599738

  20. Polymerization catalysts containing electron-withdrawing amide ligands

    DOEpatents

    Watkin, John G.; Click, Damon R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention describes methods of making a series of amine-containing organic compounds which are used as ligands for group 3-10 and lanthanide metal compounds. The ligands have electron-withdrawing groups bonded to them. The metal compounds, when combined with a cocatalyst, are catalysts for the polymerization of olefins.

  1. DE NOVO DESIGN OF LIGANDS FOR METAL SEPARATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This application focuses on the development of appropriate computation tools and parameters for the de novo design of selective metal ligands. We have developed a successful suite of tools for computer-aided design of ligands for receptors of known three-dimensional structure (st...

  2. A three-coordinate iron-silylene complex stabilized by ligand-ligand dispersion forces.

    PubMed

    Hänninen, Mikko M; Pal, Kuntal; Day, Benjamin M; Pugh, Thomas; Layfield, Richard A

    2016-07-28

    The structural and bonding properties of a three-coordinate N-heterocyclic silyene (NHSi) complex of the iron(ii) amide [Fe{N(SiMe3)2}2] are reported. Computational studies reveal that dispersion forces between the amido SiMe3 substituents and the isopropyl substituents on the NHSi ligand significantly enhance the stability of the complex, along with Fe-to-Si π-backbonding. PMID:27362948

  3. Enhancement of surface ligand display on PLGA nanoparticles with amphiphilic ligand conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jason; Mattessich, Thomas; Jay, Steven M.; Agawu, Atu; Saltzman, W. Mark; Fahmy, Tarek M.

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles are widely recognized as efficacious drug delivery vehicles, yet the rational engineering of nanoparticle surfaces in order to improve biodistribution, reduce clearance, and/or improve targeting remains a significant challenge. We have previously demonstrated that an amphiphilic conjugate of avidin and palmitic acid can be used to modify poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particle surfaces to display functional avidin groups, allowing for the facile attachment of biotinylated ligands for targeting or steric stabilization. Here, we hypothesized that the incorporation, density, and stability of surface-presented avidin could be modulated through varying the lipophilicity of its fatty acid conjugate partner. We tested this hypothesis by generating a set of novel conjugates incorporating avidin and common fatty acids. We found that conjugation to linoleic acid resulted in a ∼60% increase in the incorporation of avidin on the nanoparticle surface compared to avidin–palmitic acid, which exhibited the highest avidin incorporation in previous studies. Further, the linoleic acid–avidin conjugate yielded nanoparticles with enhanced ability to bind biotinylated ligands compared to the previous method; nanoparticles modified with avidin–linoleic acid bound ∼170% more biotin–HRP than those made with avidin–palmitic acid and ∼1300% more than particles made without conjugated avidin. Most critically, increased ligand density on anti-CD4-targeted nanoparticles formulated with the linoleic acid–avidin conjugate resulted in a 5% increase in binding of CD4+ T cells. Thus we conclude that the novel avidin–linoleic acid conjugate facilitates enhanced ligand density on PLGA nanoparticles, resulting in functional enhancement of cellular targeting. PMID:21723893

  4. Detection and Identification of Ligands for Mammalian RPTP Extracellular Domains.

    PubMed

    Stoker, Andrew William

    2016-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) form a group of over 20 enzymes in vertebrates, each with unique ectodomains subject to potential extracellular interactions with ligands. It has recently become clear that a remarkably diverse range of ligands exist, including homophilic binders, adhesion molecules, neurotrophin receptors, and proteoglycans. Individual RPTPs can bind several ligands, and vice versa, suggesting that complex cell signaling networks exist. The identification of RPTP ligands and where they are located in tissues remains a challenge for a large number of these enzymes. Here we describe some powerful methods that have proved successful for several research groups, leading to our improved understanding of RPTP-ligand interactions and functional regulation. PMID:27514811

  5. Development of chiral sulfoxide ligands for asymmetric catalysis.

    PubMed

    Trost, Barry M; Rao, Meera

    2015-04-20

    Nitrogen-, phosphorus-, and oxygen-based ligands with chiral backbones have been the historic workhorses of asymmetric transition-metal-catalyzed reactions. On the contrary, sulfoxides containing chirality at the sulfur atom have mainly been used as chiral auxiliaries for diastereoselective reactions. Despite several distinct advantages over traditional ligand scaffolds, such as the proximity of the chiral information to the metal center and the ability to switch between S and O coordination, these compounds have only recently emerged as a versatile class of chiral ligands. In this Review, we detail the history of the development of chiral sulfoxide ligands for asymmetric catalysis. We also provide brief descriptions of metal-sulfoxide bonding and strategies for the synthesis of enantiopure sulfoxides. Finally, insights into the future development of this underutilized ligand class are discussed. PMID:25801825

  6. Polypharmacology: in silico methods of ligand design and development.

    PubMed

    McKie, Samuel A

    2016-04-01

    How to design a ligand to bind multiple targets, rather than to a single target, is the focus of this review. Rational polypharmacology draws on knowledge that is both broad ranging and hierarchical. Computer-aided multitarget ligand design methods are described according to their nested knowledge level. Ligand-only and then receptor-ligand strategies are first described; followed by the metabolic network viewpoint. Subsequently strategies that view infectious diseases as multigenomic targets are discussed, and finally the disease level interpretation of medicinal therapy is considered. As yet there is no consensus on how best to proceed in designing a multitarget ligand. The current methodologies are bought together in an attempt to give a practical overview of how polypharmacology design might be best initiated. PMID:27105127

  7. Automated identification of crystallographic ligands using sparse-density representations

    SciTech Connect

    Carolan, C. G.; Lamzin, V. S.

    2014-07-01

    A novel procedure for identifying ligands in macromolecular crystallographic electron-density maps is introduced. Density clusters in such maps can be rapidly attributed to one of 82 different ligands in an automated manner. A novel procedure for the automatic identification of ligands in macromolecular crystallographic electron-density maps is introduced. It is based on the sparse parameterization of density clusters and the matching of the pseudo-atomic grids thus created to conformationally variant ligands using mathematical descriptors of molecular shape, size and topology. In large-scale tests on experimental data derived from the Protein Data Bank, the procedure could quickly identify the deposited ligand within the top-ranked compounds from a database of candidates. This indicates the suitability of the method for the identification of binding entities in fragment-based drug screening and in model completion in macromolecular structure determination.

  8. In vivo screening of ligand-dependent hammerhead ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Saragliadis, Athanasios; Klauser, Benedikt; Hartig, Jörg S

    2012-01-01

    The development of artificial switches of gene expression is of high importance for future applications in biotechnology and synthetic biology. We have developed a powerful RNA-based system which allows for the ligand-dependent and reprogrammable control of gene expression in Escherichia coli. Our system makes use of the hammerhead ribozyme (HHR) which acts as molecular scaffold for the sequestration of the ribosome binding site (RBS), mimicking expression platforms in naturally occurring riboswitches. Aptamer domains can be attached to the ribozyme as exchangeable ligand-sensing modules. Addition of ligands to the bacterial growth medium changes the activity of the ligand-dependent self-cleaving ribozyme which in turn switches gene expression. In this chapter, we describe the in vivo screening procedure allowing for reprogramming the ligand-specificity of our system. PMID:22315086

  9. Dynamic control of chirality in phosphine ligands for enantioselective catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Depeng; Neubauer, Thomas M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2015-01-01

    Chirality plays a fundamental role in biology and chemistry and the precise control of chirality in a catalytic conversion is a key to modern synthesis most prominently seen in the production of pharmaceuticals. In enantioselective metal-based catalysis, access to each product enantiomer is commonly achieved through ligand design with chiral bisphosphines being widely applied as privileged ligands. Switchable phosphine ligands, in which chirality is modulated through an external trigger signal, might offer attractive possibilities to change enantioselectivity in a catalytic process in a non-invasive manner avoiding renewed ligand synthesis. Here we demonstrate that a photoswitchable chiral bisphosphine based on a unidirectional light-driven molecular motor, can be used to invert the stereoselectivity of a palladium-catalysed asymmetric transformation. It is shown that light-induced changes in geometry and helicity of the switchable ligand enable excellent selectivity towards the racemic or individual enantiomers of the product in a Pd-catalysed desymmetrization reaction. PMID:25806856

  10. Metrical oxidation states of 2-amidophenoxide and catecholate ligands: structural signatures of metal-ligand π bonding in potentially noninnocent ligands.

    PubMed

    Brown, Seth N

    2012-02-01

    Catecholates and 2-amidophenoxides are prototypical "noninnocent" ligands which can form metal complexes where the ligands are best described as being in the monoanionic (imino)semiquinone or neutral (imino)quinone oxidation state instead of their closed-shell dianionic form. Through a comprehensive analysis of structural data available for compounds with these ligands in unambiguous oxidation states (109 amidophenolates, 259 catecholates), the well-known structural changes in the ligands with oxidation state can be quantified. Using these correlations, an empirical "metrical oxidation state" (MOS) which gives a continuous measure of the apparent oxidation state of the ligand can be determined based on least-squares fitting of its C-C, C-O, and C-N bond lengths to this single parameter (a simple procedure for doing so is provided via a spreadsheet in the Supporting Information). High-valent d(0) metal complexes, particularly those of vanadium(V) and molybdenum(VI), have ligands with unexpectedly positive, and generally nonintegral, MOS values. The structural effects in these complexes are attributed not to electron transfer, but rather to amidophenoxide- or catecholate-to-metal π bonding, an interpretation supported by the systematic variation of the MOS values as a function of the degree of competition with the other π-donating groups in the structures. PMID:22260321

  11. Developing Ligands for Palladium(II)-Catalyzed C–H Functionalization: Intimate Dialogue between Ligand and Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Keary M.; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Homogeneous transition metal–catalyzed reactions are indispensable to all facets of modern chemical synthesis. It is thus difficult to imagine that for much of the early 20th century, the reactivity and selectivity of all known homogeneous metal catalysts paled in comparison to their heterogeneous and biological counterparts. In the intervening decades, advances in ligand design bridged this divide, such that today some of the most demanding bond-forming events are mediated by ligand-supported homogeneous metal species. While ligand design has propelled many areas of homogeneous catalysis, in the field of Pd(II)-catalyzed C–H functionalization, suitable ligand scaffolds are lacking, which has hampered the development of broadly practical transformations based on C–H functionalization logic. In this review, we offer an account of our research employing three ligand scaffolds, mono-N-protected amino acids, 2,6-disubstituted pyridines, and 2,2′-bipyridines, to address challenges posed by several synthetically versatile substrate classes. Drawing on this work, we discuss principles of ligand design, such as the need to match a ligand to a particular substrate class, and how ligand traits such as tunability and modularity can be advantageous in reaction discovery. PMID:23565982

  12. Ligand-size and ligand-chain hydrophilicity effects on the relaxometric properties of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegafaw, Tirusew; Xu, Wenlong; Lee, Sang Hyup; Chae, Kwon Seok; Cha, Hyunsil; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Gang Ho

    2016-06-01

    The relaxometric properties of ultrasmall Gd2O3 nanoparticles coated with various ligands were investigated. These ligands include small diacids with hydrophobic chains, namely, succinic acid (Mw = 118.09 amu), glutaric acid (Mw = 132.12 amu), and terephthalic acid (Mw = 166.13 amu), and large polyethylenimines (PEIs) with hydrophilic chains, namely, PEI-1300 ( M ¯ n = 1300 ) and PEI-10000 ( M ¯ n = 10000 ). Ligand-size and ligand-chain hydrophilicity effects were observed. The longitudinal (r1) and transverse (r2) water proton relaxivities generally decreased with increasing ligand-size (the ligand-size effect). The ligand-size effect was weaker for PEI because its hydrophilic chains allow water molecules to access the nanoparticle (the ligand-chain hydrophilicity effect). This result was explained on the basis of the magnetic dipole interaction between the dipoles of the nanoparticle and water proton. In addition, all samples were found to be non-toxic in cellular cytotoxicity tests.

  13. Gas adsorption and gas mixture separations using mixed-ligand MOF material

    DOEpatents

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Mulfort, Karen L.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Bae, Youn-Sang

    2011-01-04

    A method of separating a mixture of carbon dioxiode and hydrocarbon gas using a mixed-ligand, metal-organic framework (MOF) material having metal ions coordinated to carboxylate ligands and pyridyl ligands.

  14. Metal-ligand cooperation in H2 activation with iron complexes bearing hemilabile bis(diphenylphosphino)amine ligands.

    PubMed

    Frank, Nicolas; Hanau, Katharina; Langer, Robert

    2014-10-20

    The octahedral transition-metal complex [(dppa)Fe(Ph2P-N-PPh2)2] (1) [dppa = bis(diphenylphosphino)amine] with homofunctional bidentate ligands is described. The ligand exhibits hemilability due to its small bite angle and the steric repulsion of the coordinated donor groups. As the {Ph2P-N-PPh2}(-) ligand can act as an internal base, heterolytic cleavage of dihydrogen by complex 1 leads to the formation of the hydride complex [(dppa)(Ph2P-N-PPh2)Fe(H)(κ(1)-Ph2P-NH-PPh2)2] (2), representing an example of cooperative bond activation with a homofunctional hemilabile ligand. This study demonstrates that hemilability of homofunctionalized ligands can be affected by careful adjustment of geometric parameters. PMID:25290535

  15. Development and validation of a novel protein-ligand fingerprint to mine chemogenomic space: application to G protein-coupled receptors and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Weill, Nathanael; Rognan, Didier

    2009-04-01

    The present study introduces a novel low-dimensionality fingerprint encoding both ligand and target properties which is suitable to mine protein-ligand chemogenomic space. Whereas ligand properties have been represented by standard descriptors, protein cavities are encoded by a fixed length bit string describing pharmacophoric properties of a definite number of binding site residues. In order to simplify the cavity fingerprint, the concept was applied here to a unique family of targets (G protein-coupled receptors) with a homogeneous cavity description. Particular attention was given to set up data sets of really diverse protein-ligand pairs covering as exhaustively as possible both ligand and target spaces. Several machine learning classification algorithms were trained on two sets of roughly 200000 receptor-ligand fingerprints with a different definition of inactive decoys. Cross-validated models show excellent precision (>0.9) in distinguishing true from false pairs with a particular preference for support vector machine classifiers. When applied to two external test sets of GPCR ligands, the most predictive models were not those performing the best in the previous cross-validation. The ability to recover true GPCR ligands (ligand prediction mode) or true GPCRs (receptor prediction mode) depends on multiple parameters: the molecular complexity of the ligands, the chemical space from which ligand decoys are selected to generate false protein-ligand pairs, and the target space under consideration. In most cases, predicting ligands is easier than predicting receptors. Although receptor profiling is possible, it probably requires a more detailed description of the ligand-binding site. Noteworthy, protein-ligand fingerprints outperform the corresponding ligand fingerprints in mining the GPCR-ligand space. Since they can be applied to a much larger number of receptors than ligand-based fingerprints, protein-ligand fingerprints represent a novel and promising way to

  16. Electronic spectra and photophysics of platinum(II) complexes with alpha-diimine ligands - Solid-state effects. I - Monomers and ligand pi dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miskowski, Vincent M.; Houlding, Virginia H.

    1989-01-01

    Two types of emission behavior for Pt(II) complexes containing alpha-diimine ligands have been observed in dilute solution. If the complex also has weak field ligands such as chloride, ligand field (d-d) excited states become the lowest energy excited states. If only strong field ligands are present, a diimine 3(pi-pi/asterisk/) state becomes the lowest. In none of the cases studied did metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state lie lowest.

  17. Receptor Specific Ligands for Spect Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. F.

    2003-02-25

    In the past funding period we have concentrated in developing new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs. Basic chemistry of ligand synthesis, radiochemistry of Re and 99mTc complex formation, separation of stereoisomers and in vitro stability were investigated. We have prepared a number of new MIBG derivatives containing chelating moiety N2S2 and additional groups to increase lipophilicity. Unfortunately none of the new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs showed promise as an imaging agent for myocardial neuronal function. Radioactive-iodine-labeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is currently being used as an in vivo imaging agent to evaluate neuroendocrine tumors as well as the myocardial sympathetic nervous system in patients with myocardial infarct and cardiomyopathy. It is generally accepted that MIBG is an analog of norepinephrine and its uptake in the heart corresponds to the distribution of norepinephrine and the density of sympathetic neurons. A series of MIBG derivatives containing suitable chelating functional groups N2S2 for the formation of [Tcv0]+3N2S2 complex was successfully synthesized and the 99mTc-labeled complexes were prepared and tested in rats. One of the compounds, [99mTc]M2, tested showed significant, albeit lower, heart uptakes post iv injection in rats (0.18% dose/organ at 4 hours) as compared to [l25l]MIBG (1.4% dose/organ at 4 hours). The heart uptake of the 99mTc-labeled complex, [99mTc]M2, appears to be specific and can be reduced by coinjection with nonradioactive MIBG or by pretreatment with desipramine. a selective norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. Further evaluation of the in vitro uptake of [99mTc]M2 in cultured neuroblastoma cells displayed consistently lower, but measurable uptake (app. 10% of that for [125l]MlBG). These preliminary results suggested that the mechanisms of heart uptake of [99mTc]M2 may be related to those for [125l]MIBG uptake. To improve the heart uptake of the MIBG derivatives we have developed chemistry related to the

  18. Identification of Soft Matter Binding Peptide Ligands Using Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Günay, Kemal Arda; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-10-21

    Phage display is a powerful tool for the selection of highly affine, short peptide ligands. While originally primarily used for the identification of ligands to proteins, the scope of this technique has significantly expanded over the past two decades. Phage display nowadays is also increasingly applied to identify ligands that selectively bind with high affinity to a broad range of other substrates including natural and biological polymers as well as a variety of low-molecular-weight organic molecules. Such peptides are of interest for various reasons. The ability to selectively and with high affinity bind to the substrate of interest allows the conjugation or immobilization of, e.g., nanoparticles or biomolecules, or generally, facilitates interactions at materials interfaces. On the other hand, presentation of peptide ligands that selectively bind to low-molecular-weight organic materials is of interest for the development of sensor surfaces. The aim of this article is to highlight the opportunities provided by phage display for the identification of peptide ligands that bind to synthetic or natural polymer substrates or to small organic molecules. The article will first provide an overview of the different peptide ligands that have been identified by phage display that bind to these "soft matter" targets. The second part of the article will discuss the different characterization techniques that allow the determination of the affinity of the identified ligands to the respective substrates. PMID:26275106

  19. Exchange Kinetics of a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jeff; Stone, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Conformational fluctuations of proteins are thought to be important for determining the functional roles in biological activity. In some cases, the rates of these conformational changes may be directly correlated to, for example, the rates of catalysis or ligand binding. We are studying the role of conformational fluctuations in the binding of small volatile hydrophobic pheromones by the mouse major urinary proteins (MUPs). Communication among mice occurs, in part, with the MUP-1 protein. This urinary protein binds pheromones as a way to increase the longevity of the pheromone in an extracellular environment. Of interest is that the crystal structure of MUP-1 with a pheromone ligand shows the ligand to be completely occluded from the solvent with no obvious pathway to enter or exit. This suggests that conformational exchange of the protein may be required for ligand binding and release to occur. We hypothesize that the rate of conformational exchange may be a limiting factor determining the rate of ligand association and dissociation. By careful measurement of the on- and off-rates of ligand binding and the rates of conformational changes of the protein, a more defined picture of the interplay between protein structure and function can be obtained. To this end, heteronuclear saturation transfer, ^15N-exchange and ^15N dynamics experiments have been employed to probe the kinetics of ligand binding to MUP-1.

  20. Influence of Ancillary Ligands in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Pashaei, Babak; Shahroosvand, Hashem; Graetzel, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-08-24

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have motivated many researchers to develop various sensitizers with tailored properties involving anchoring and ancillary ligands. Ancillary ligands carry favorable light-harvesting abilities and are therefore crucial in determining the overall power conversion efficiencies. The use of ancillary ligands having aliphatic chains and/or π-extended aromatic units decreases charge recombination and permits the collection of a large fraction of sunlight. This review aims to provide insight into the relationship between ancillary ligand structure and DSSC properties, which can further guide the function-oriented design and synthesis of different sensitizers for DSSCs. This review outlines how the new and rapidly expanding class of chelating ancillary ligands bearing 2,2'-bipyridyl, 1,10-phenanthroline, carbene, dipyridylamine, pyridyl-benzimidazole, pyridyl-azolate, and other aromatic ligands provides a conduit for potentially enhancing the performance and stability of DSSCs. Finally, these classes of Ru polypyridyl complexes have gained increasing interest for feasible large-scale commercialization of DSSCs due to their more favorable light-harvesting abilities and long-term thermal and chemical stabilities compared with other conventional sensitizers. Therefore, the main idea is to inspire readers to explore new avenues in the design of new sensitizers for DSSCs based on different ancillary ligands. PMID:27479482

  1. Characterization of methacrylate chromatographic monoliths bearing affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Černigoj, Urh; Vidic, Urška; Nemec, Blaž; Gašperšič, Jernej; Vidič, Jana; Lendero Krajnc, Nika; Štrancar, Aleš; Podgornik, Aleš

    2016-09-16

    We investigated effect of immobilization procedure and monolith structure on chromatographic performance of methacrylate monoliths bearing affinity ligands. Monoliths of different pore size and various affinity ligands were prepared and characterized using physical and chromatographic methods. When testing protein A monoliths with different protein A ligand densities, a significant nonlinear effect of ligand density on dynamic binding capacity (DBC) for IgG was obtained and accurately described by Langmuir isotherm curve enabling estimation of protein A utilization as a function of ligand density. Maximal IgG binding capacity was found to be at least 12mg/mL exceeding theoretical monolayer adsorption value of 7.8mg/mL assuming hexagonal packing and IgG hydrodynamic diameter of 11nm. Observed discrepancy was explained by shrinkage of IgG during adsorption on protein A experimentally determined through calculated adsorbed IgG layer thickness of 5.4nm from pressure drop data. For monoliths with different pore size maximal immobilized densities of protein A as well as IgG dynamic capacity linearly correlates with monolith surface area indicating constant ligand utilization. Finally, IgGs toward different plasma proteins were immobilized via the hydrazide coupling chemistry to provide oriented immobilization. DBC was found to be flow independent and was increasing with the size of bound protein. Despite DBC was lower than IgG capacity to immobilized protein A, ligand utilization was higher. PMID:27554023

  2. VEGFR-2 conformational switch in response to ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    VEGFR-2 is the primary regulator of angiogenesis, the development of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones. VEGFR-2 has been hypothesized to be monomeric in the absence of bound ligand, and to undergo dimerization and activation only upon ligand binding. Using quantitative FRET and biochemical analysis, we show that VEGFR-2 forms dimers also in the absence of ligand when expressed at physiological levels, and that these dimers are phosphorylated. Ligand binding leads to a change in the TM domain conformation, resulting in increased kinase domain phosphorylation. Inter-receptor contacts within the extracellular and TM domains are critical for the establishment of the unliganded dimer structure, and for the transition to the ligand-bound active conformation. We further show that the pathogenic C482R VEGFR-2 mutant, linked to infantile hemangioma, promotes ligand-independent signaling by mimicking the structure of the ligand-bound wild-type VEGFR-2 dimer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13876.001 PMID:27052508

  3. Serum concentrations of Flt-3 ligand in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kayo; Nakatsuka, Noriko; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Makino, Takamitsu; Kajihara, Ikko; Makino, Katsunari; Honda, Noritoshi; Inoue, Kuniko; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2015-10-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt-3) is a cytokine receptor expressed on the surface of bone-marrow progenitor of hematopoietic cells. Flt-3 ligands are produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and found in various human body fluids. Flt-3 signal is involved in the regulation of vessel formation as well as B cell differentiation, suggesting that Flt-3 signal contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular abnormalities and immune dysregulation in rheumatic diseases. The aim of the present study is to examine serum Flt-3 ligand levels in patients with various rheumatic diseases, and to evaluate the possibility that serum Flt-3 ligand levels can be a useful disease marker. Sera were obtained from 20 dermatomyositis (DM) patients, 36 systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, 10 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, 10 scleroderma spectrum disorder (SSD) patients, 4 mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) patients, and 12 normal subjects. Flt-3 ligand levels were determined with ELISA. Serum Flt-3 ligand levels were significantly elevated in patients with DM, SSc, SSD and MCTD compared to those in normal subjects. DM patients with elevated Flt-3 ligand levels were accompanied with significantly increased CRP levels and increased frequency of heliotrope rash than those with normal levels. In addition, SSc patients with elevated Flt-3 ligand levels showed significantly reduced frequency of nailfold bleeding. Serum Flt-3 ligand levels can be a marker of cutaneous manifestation in DM and a marker of microangiopathy in SSc. Clarifying the role of Flt-3 ligand in rheumatic diseases may lead to further understanding of these diseases and new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26559027

  4. ZINC 15 – Ligand Discovery for Everyone

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many questions about the biological activity and availability of small molecules remain inaccessible to investigators who could most benefit from their answers. To narrow the gap between chemoinformatics and biology, we have developed a suite of ligand annotation, purchasability, target, and biology association tools, incorporated into ZINC and meant for investigators who are not computer specialists. The new version contains over 120 million purchasable “drug-like” compounds – effectively all organic molecules that are for sale – a quarter of which are available for immediate delivery. ZINC connects purchasable compounds to high-value ones such as metabolites, drugs, natural products, and annotated compounds from the literature. Compounds may be accessed by the genes for which they are annotated as well as the major and minor target classes to which those genes belong. It offers new analysis tools that are easy for nonspecialists yet with few limitations for experts. ZINC retains its original 3D roots – all molecules are available in biologically relevant, ready-to-dock formats. ZINC is freely available at http://zinc15.docking.org. PMID:26479676

  5. The Death Ligand TRAIL in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lorz, Corina; Benito-Martín, Alberto; Boucherot, Anissa; Ucero, Alvaro C.; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Henger, Anna; Armelloni, Silvia; Santamaría, Beatriz; Berthier, Celine C.; Kretzler, Matthias; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death contributes to diabetic nephropathy (DN), but its role is not well understood. The tubulointerstitium from DN biopsy specimens was microdissected, and expression profiles of genes related to apoptosis were analyzed. A total of 112 (25%) of 455 cell death–related genes were found to be significantly differentially regulated. Among those that showed the greatest changes in regulation were two death receptors, OPG (the gene encoding osteoprotegerin) and Fas, and the death ligand TRAIL. Glomerular and proximal tubular TRAIL expression, assessed by immunohistochemistry, was higher in DN kidneys than controls and was associated with clinical and histologic severity of disease. In vitro, proinflammatory cytokines but not glucose alone regulated TRAIL expression in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2. TRAIL induced tubular cell apoptosis in a dosage-dependant manner, an effect that was more marked in the presence of high levels of glucose and proinflammatory cytokines. TRAIL also activated NF-κB, and inhibition of NF-κB sensitized cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. It is proposed that TRAIL-induced cell death could play an important role in the progression of human DN. PMID:18287563

  6. Screening Ligands by X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Davies, Douglas R

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is an invaluable technique in structure-based drug discovery, including fragment-based drug discovery, because it is the only technique that can provide a complete three dimensional readout of the interaction between the small molecule and its macromolecular target. X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques can be employed as the sole method for conducting a screen of a fragment library, or it can be employed as the final technique in a screening campaign to confirm putative "hit" compounds identified by a variety of biochemical and/or biophysical screening techniques. Both approaches require an efficient technique to prepare dozens to hundreds of crystals for data collection, and a reproducible way to deliver ligands to the crystal. Here, a general method for screening cocktails of fragments is described. In cases where X-ray crystallography is employed as a method to verify putative hits, the cocktails of fragments described below would simply be replaced with single fragment solutions. PMID:24590727

  7. Ligand Affinities Estimated by Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Söderhjelm, Pär; Kongsted, Jacob; Ryde, Ulf

    2010-05-11

    We present quantum chemical estimates of ligand-binding affinities performed, for the first time, at a level of theory for which there is a hope that dispersion and polarization effects are properly accounted for (MP2/cc-pVTZ) and at the same time effects of solvation, entropy, and sampling are included. We have studied the binding of seven biotin analogues to the avidin tetramer. The calculations have been performed by the recently developed PMISP approach (polarizable multipole interactions with supermolecular pairs), which treats electrostatic interactions by multipoles up to quadrupoles, induction by anisotropic polarizabilities, and nonclassical interactions (dispersion, exchange repulsion, etc.) by explicit quantum chemical calculations, using a fragmentation approach, except for long-range interactions that are treated by standard molecular-mechanics Lennard-Jones terms. In order to include effects of sampling, 10 snapshots from a molecular dynamics simulation are studied for each biotin analogue. Solvation energies are estimated by the polarized continuum model (PCM), coupled to the multipole-polarizability model. Entropy effects are estimated from vibrational frequencies, calculated at the molecular mechanics level. We encounter several problems, not previously discussed, illustrating that we are first to apply such a method. For example, the PCM model is, in the present implementation, questionable for large molecules, owing to the use of a surface definition that gives numerous small cavities in a protein. PMID:26615702

  8. Ligand migration in nonsymbiotic hemoglobin AHb1 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Grandi, Elena; Bruno, Stefano; Faggiano, Serena; Spyrakis, Francesca; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Cacciatori, Elena; Dominici, Paola; Viappiani, Cristiano

    2007-11-01

    AHb1 is a hexacoordinated type 1 nonsymbiotic hemoglobin recently discovered in Arabidopsis thaliana. To gain insight into the ligand migration inside the protein, we studied the CO rebinding kinetics of AHb1 encapsulated in silica gels, in the presence of glycerol. The CO rebinding kinetics after nanosecond laser flash photolysis exhibits complex ligand migration patterns, consistent with the existence of discrete docking sites in which ligands can temporarily be stored before rebinding to the heme at different times. This finding may be of relevance to the physiological NO dioxygenase activity of this protein, which requires sequential binding of two substrates, NO and O2, to the heme. PMID:17924689

  9. Plasmon resonance enhanced mechanical detection of ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-01-05

    Small molecule binding to the active site of enzymes typically modifies the mechanical stiffness of the enzyme. We exploit this effect, in a setup which combines nano-mechanics and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) enhanced optics, for the label free detection of ligand binding to an enzyme. The large dynamic range of the signal allows to easily obtain binding curves for small ligands, in contrast to traditional SPR methods which rely on small changes in index of refraction. Enzyme mechanics, assessed by nano-rheology, thus emerges as an alternative to electronic and spin resonances, assessed by traditional spectroscopies, for detecting ligand binding.

  10. Control and recognition of anionic ligands in myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Cutruzzolà, F; Allocatelli, C T; Ascenzi, P; Bolognesi, M; Sligar, S G; Brunori, M

    1991-05-01

    Equilibrium and kinetic experiments on site-directed mutants of a synthetic sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) gene have been performed. Results on the reactivity on both ferric and ferrous wild type and mutants Mb's are presented. Analysis of ligand binding to His (E7) Val and His (E7) Val-Thr (E10) Arg mutants compared to wild-type sperm whale, horse and Aplysia limacina Mb's, shows that the introduction of an arginyl residue at the topological position E10 greatly enhances the stability of the various Mg:heme ligand adducts. Alternative mechanisms of ligand stabilization may therefore be operative in Mb's lacking the distal histidine. PMID:2037047

  11. Highly Active Multidentate Ligand-Based Alkyne Metathesis Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Du, Ya; Yang, Haishen; Zhu, Chengpu; Ortiz, Michael; Okochi, Kenji D; Shoemaker, Richard; Jin, Yinghua; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Alkyne metathesis catalysts composed of molybdenum(VI) propylidyne and multidentate tris(2-hydroxylbenzyl)methane ligands have been developed, which exhibit excellent stability (remains active in solution for months at room temperature), high activity, and broad functional-group tolerance. The homodimerization and cyclooligomerization of monopropynyl or dipropynyl substrates, including challenging heterocycle substrates (e.g., pyridine), proceed efficiently at 40-55 °C in a closed system. The ligand structure and catalytic activity relationship has been investigated, which shows that the ortho groups of the multidentate phenol ligands are critical to the stability and activity of such a catalyst system. PMID:27113640

  12. LIGAND-INDUCED CHANGES IN T BOX ANTITERMINATOR RNA STABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, S.; Acquaah-Harrison, G.; Jack, K.D.; Bergmeier, S.C.; Hines, J.V.

    2012-01-01

    The T box antiterminator RNA element is an important component of the T box riboswitch that controls the transcription of vital genes in many Gram-positive bacteria. A series of 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles was screened in a fluorescence-monitored thermal denaturation assay to identify ligands that altered the stability of antiterminator model RNA. Several ligands were identified that significantly increased or decreased the melting temperature (Tm) of the RNA. The results indicate that this series of triazole ligands can alter the stability of antiterminator model RNA in a structure-dependent manner. PMID:22117759

  13. Polyethylene glycol-based homologated ligands for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors☆

    PubMed Central

    Scates, Bradley A.; Lashbrook, Bethany L.; Chastain, Benjamin C.; Tominaga, Kaoru; Elliott, Brandon T.; Theising, Nicholas J.; Baker, Thomas A.; Fitch, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    A homologous series of polyethylene glycol (PEG) monomethyl ethers were conjugated with three ligand series for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Conjugates of acetylaminocholine, the cyclic analog 1-acetyl-4,4-dimethylpiperazinium, and pyridyl ether A-84543 were prepared. Each series was found to retain significant affinity at nicotinic receptors in rat cerebral cortex with tethers of up to six PEG units. Such compounds are hydrophilic ligands which may serve as models for fluorescent/affinity probes and multivalent ligands for nAChR. PMID:19006672

  14. Oxidative Stress Promotes Ligand-independent and Enhanced Ligand-dependent Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Ozsoy, Hatice Z.; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Wieder, Eric D.; Pedersen, Steen; Mann, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFR1, p55) and 2 (TNFR2, p75) are characterized by several cysteine-rich modules in the extracellular domain, raising the possibility that redox-induced modifications of these cysteine residues might alter TNFR function. To test this possibility, we examined fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in 293T cells transfected with CFP- and YFP-tagged TNFRs exposed to the thiol oxidant diamide. Treatment with high concentrations of diamide (1 mm) resulted in an increase in the FRET signal that was sensitive to inhibition with the reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting that oxidative stress resulted in TNFR self-association. Treatment of cells with low concentrations of diamide (1 μm) that was not sufficient to provoke TNFR self-association resulted in increased TNF-induced FRET signals relative to the untreated cells, suggesting that oxidative stress enhanced ligand-dependent TNFR signaling. Similar findings were obtained when the TNFR1- and TNFR2-transfected cells were pretreated with a cell-impermeable oxidase, DsbA, that catalyzes disulfide bond formation between thiol groups on cysteine residues. The changes in TNFR self-association were functionally significant, because pretreating the HeLa cells and 293T cells resulted in increased TNF-induced NF-κB activation and TNF-induced expression of IκB and syndecan-4 mRNA levels. Although pretreatment with DsbA did not result in an increase in TNF binding to TNFRs, it resulted in increased TNF-induced activation of NF-κB, consistent with an allosteric modification of the TNFRs. Taken together, these results suggest that oxidative stress promotes TNFR receptor self-interaction and ligand-independent and enhanced ligand-dependent TNF signaling. PMID:18544535

  15. Effect of size and conformation of the ligand on asialoglycoprotein receptor-mediated ligand internalization and degradation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Chang, T.M.

    1987-05-01

    The rates of internalization and degradation of /sup 125/-I-labeled desialylated cyanogen bromide fragment I of orosomucoid (AS-CNBr-I) and its reduced and carboxymethylated derivative (AS-RC-CNBr-I) were compared with those of /sup 125/I-labeled asialoorosomucoid (ASOR) in rat hepatocytes. At 30 nM the rates of internalization and degradation of /sup 125/I-AS-CNBr-I were greater than those of /sup 125/I-ASOR. /sup 125/I-AS-RC-CNBr-I also had a lower rate of internalization and degradation. In contrast to /sup 125/I-ASOR, when degradation was inhibited by 5 ..mu..M colchicine there was a significant intracellular accumulation of the smaller ligands. At 4/sup 0/C the hepatocytes were found to bind the fragmented ligands more than /sup 125/I-ASOR. Incubation of the cells with bound ligand at 37/sup 0/ indicated that diacytosis of /sup 125/I-ASOR was greater than the smaller ligands. Colchincine markedly enhanced diacytosis of /sup 125/I-ASOR. On the other hand, there were marked accumulation of the smaller ligands by colchicine. These results suggest that the rates of internalization, degradation and diacytosis of the ligand are affected by the size and conformation of the ligand through different rates of receptor binding and intracellular transport.

  16. Study on effects of molecular crowding on G-quadruplex-ligand binding and ligand-mediated telomerase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-11-01

    The telomere G-quadruplex-binding and telomerase-inhibiting capacity of two cationic (TMPyP4 and PIPER) and two anionic (phthalocyanine and Hemin) G-quadruplex-ligands were examined under conditions of molecular crowding (MC). Osmotic experiments showed that binding of the anionic ligands, which bind to G-quadruplex DNA via π-π stacking interactions, caused some water molecules to be released from the G-quadruplex/ligand complex; in contrast, a substantial number of water molecules were taken up upon electrostatic binding of the cationic ligands to G-quadruplex DNA. These behaviors of water molecules maintained or reduced the binding affinity of the anionic and the cationic ligands, respectively, under MC conditions. Consequently, the anionic ligands (phthalocyanine and Hemin) robustly inhibited telomerase activity even with MC; in contrast, the inhibition of telomerase caused by cationic TMPyP4 was drastically reduced by MC. These results allow us to conclude that the binding of G-quadruplex-ligands to G-quadruplex via non-electrostatic interactions is preferable for telomerase inhibition under physiological conditions. PMID:23562626

  17. HybridDock: A Hybrid Protein-Ligand Docking Protocol Integrating Protein- and Ligand-Based Approaches.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-You; Li, Min; Wang, Jianxin; Pan, Yi

    2016-06-27

    Structure-based molecular docking and ligand-based similarity search are two commonly used computational methods in computer-aided drug design. Structure-based docking tries to utilize the structural information on a drug target like protein, and ligand-based screening takes advantage of the information on known ligands for a target. Given their different advantages, it would be desirable to use both protein- and ligand-based approaches in drug discovery when information for both the protein and known ligands is available. Here, we have presented a general hybrid docking protocol, referred to as HybridDock, to utilize both the protein structures and known ligands by combining the molecular docking program MDock and the ligand-based similarity search method SHAFTS, and evaluated our hybrid docking protocol on the CSAR 2013 and 2014 exercises. The results showed that overall our hybrid docking protocol significantly improved the performance in both binding affinity and binding mode predictions, compared to the sole MDock program. The efficacy of the hybrid docking protocol was further confirmed using the combination of DOCK and SHAFTS, suggesting an alternative docking approach for modern drug design/discovery. PMID:26317502

  18. Investigation of the enantioselectivity of tetramethylammonium L-hydroxyproline ionic liquid as a novel chiral ligand in ligand-exchange CE and ligand-exchange MEKC.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruijuan; Du, Yingxiang; Chen, Jiaquan; Zhang, Qi; Du, Shuaijing; Feng, Zijie

    2015-01-01

    Chiral ionic liquids (ILs) have drawn more and more attention in separation science; however, only a few papers focused on the application of chiral ILs as chiral ligands in LE-CE. In this article, a novel amino acid ionic liquid (AAIL), tetramethylammonium L-hydroxyproline ([TMA][L-OH-Pro]), was first applied as a chiral ligand to evaluate its enantioselectivity towards several aromatic amino acids in ligand-exchange capillary electrophoresis (LE-CE) and ligand-exchange micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (LE-MEKC). In the LE-CE system, excellent separations were achieved for tryptophan (Rs = 3.03) and 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) (Rs = 4.35). Several parameters affecting the enantioseparation were systematically investigated, including AAIL concentration, type and concentration of central metal ion, buffer pH, as well as applied voltage. The optimum separation was obtained with 60 mM AAIL containing 30 mM Cu (II) at pH 4.5. Additionally, an LE-MEKC system was established to further study the enantioselectivity of [TMA][L-OH-Pro] towards selected analytes. As observed, the separations of the enantiomers of tryptophan, phenylalanine, and histidine were all improved compared to the LE-CE system. The results indicated that the application of AAILs as chiral ligands is a promising method in chiral separation science. PMID:25399872

  19. Ligand-based reactivity of a platinum bisdithiolene: double diene addition yields a new C2-chiral chelate ligand.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Mitchell J; Harrison, Daniel J; Lough, Alan J; Fekl, Ulrich

    2009-10-01

    The reaction of Pt(tfd)(2) [tfd = S(2)C(2)(CF(3))(2)] with excess 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene initially yields the expected 1:1 adduct, in which the diene has added across two sulfur atoms on separate tfd ligands. However, within 1 day at 50 degrees C, this kinetic product quantitatively converts into a thermodynamic product where two dienes have added to one tfd ligand via unprecedented addition across the dithiolene CS bonds. The new reaction is highly selective for the C(2)-symmetric diastereomer. A new chiral bisthioether chelate ligand has formed in the product, which has been characterized crystallographically. PMID:19634863

  20. Regulation of the extracellular ligand binding activity of integrins.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, C; Clark, K; Burrows, L; Schofield, N R; Humphries, M J

    1998-07-01

    Integrins are a large heterodimeric family of cell surface adhesion receptors that bind extracellular matrix and cell surface ligands. The extracellular ligand binding activity of integrins is a dynamic and highly regulated event involving the induction of conformational changes within the integrin structure. The adhesive properties of integrins can be controlled by altering the activation state of the integrin, either through conformational change or receptor clustering, using mechanisms that are regulated by intracellular proteins. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about integrin structure and the ligand binding sites present within the receptor. In addition, the mechanisms by which the ligand binding event is regulated through conformational change will be addressed, and the potential role of intracellular cytoplasmic proteins will be discussed. PMID:9637803

  1. Investigation of protein-ligand interactions by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sinz, Andrea

    2007-04-01

    The rate of drug discovery is greatly dependent on the development and improvement of rapid and reliable analytical methods that allow screening for protein-ligand interactions. The solution-based methods for investigating protein-ligand interactions by mass spectrometry (MS), which are discussed in this paper, are hydrogen/deuterium exchange of protein backbone amide hydrogens, and photoaffinity labeling. Moreover, MS analysis of intact noncovalent protein-ligand complexes is described. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) with its ultra-high resolution and excellent mass accuracy is also considered herein as it is gaining increasing popularity for a mass spectrometric investigation of protein-ligand interactions. PMID:17299828

  2. An Endogenous Mammalian Retinoid X Receptor Ligand, At Last!

    PubMed

    de Lera, Ángel R; Krezel, Wojciech; Rühl, Ralph

    2016-05-19

    9-cis-Retinoic acid was identified and claimed to be the endogenous ligand of the retinoid X receptors (RXRs) in 1992. Since then, the endogenous presence of this compound has never been rigorously confirmed. Instead, concerns have been raised by other groups that have reported that 9-cis-retinoic acid is undetectable or that its presence occurs at very low levels. Furthermore, these low levels could not satisfactorily explain the physiological activation of RXR. Alternative ligands, among them various lipids, have also been identified, but also did not fulfill criteria for rigorous endogenous relevance, and their consideration as bona fide endogenous mammalian RXR ligand has likewise been questioned. Recently, novel studies claim that the saturated analogue 9-cis-13,14-dihydroretinoic acid functions as an endogenous physiologically relevant mammalian RXR ligand. PMID:27151148

  3. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  4. CD40 ligand immunotherapy in cancer: an efficient approach.

    PubMed

    Kuwashima, N; Kageyama, S; Eto, Y; Urashima, M

    2001-01-01

    Cancer cells do not elicit a clinically sufficient anti-tumor immune response that results in tumor rejection. Recently, many investigators have been trying to enhance anti-tumor immunity and encouraging results have been reported. This review will discuss current anti-cancer immunotherapy; interleukin-2 therapy, tumor vaccine secreting Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, dendritic cells fused with tumor cells, and CD40 ligand immunotherapy. Moreover, we introduce our two kinds of CD40 ligand immuno-genetherapy; (1) oral CD40 ligand gene therapy against lymphoma using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (published in BLOOD 2000), (2) cancer vaccine transfected with CD40 ligand ex vivo for neuroblastoma (unpublished). Both approaches resulted in a high degree of protection against the tumor progression and they are simple and safe in the murine system. PMID:11911421

  5. A new fullerene complexation ligand: N-pyridylfulleropyrrolidine.

    PubMed

    Tat, Fatma T; Zhou, Zhiguo; MacMahon, Shaun; Song, Fayi; Rheingold, Arnold L; Echegoyen, Luis; Schuster, David I; Wilson, Stephen R

    2004-07-01

    The subject of this paper is a new fullerene building block design with the potential for defined geometry and good electronic communication. The synthesis and characterization of a new pyridinofullerene ligand capable of forming axially symmetric complexes with metalloporphyrins is reported. X-ray structural and molecular modeling studies, (1)H NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy, electrochemistry studies, and fluorescence quenching data support the formation of a strong complex between the new ligand and the metal center of ZnTPP. On the basis of computational studies, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of this ligand is significantly different from a model compound with insulating carbons between the pyridine and the fullerene. The N-pyridinium fulleropyrrolidine salts of the new ligand and model compound were also prepared and their spectral and electrochemical properties are reported. PMID:15230581

  6. Fluorescent ligand for human progesterone receptor imaging in live cells.

    PubMed

    Weinstain, Roy; Kanter, Joan; Friedman, Beth; Ellies, Lesley G; Baker, Michael E; Tsien, Roger Y

    2013-05-15

    We employed molecular modeling to design and then synthesize fluorescent ligands for the human progesterone receptor. Boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) or tetramethylrhodamine were conjugated to the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 (Mifepristone) through an extended hydrophilic linker. The fluorescent ligands demonstrated comparable bioactivity to the parent antagonist in live cells and triggered nuclear translocation of the receptor in a specific manner. The BODIPY labeled ligand was applied to investigate the dependency of progesterone receptor nuclear translocation on partner proteins and to show that functional heat shock protein 90 but not immunophilin FKBP52 activity is essential. A tissue distribution study indicated that the fluorescent ligand preferentially accumulates in tissues that express high levels of the receptor in vivo. The design and properties of the BODIPY-labeled RU486 make it a potential candidate for in vivo imaging of PR by positron emission tomography through incorporation of (18)F into the BODIPY core. PMID:23600997

  7. A Correlation between Protein Function and Ligand Binding Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge, Matthew D.; Bokemper, Michael; Copeland, Jennifer C.; Stark, Jaime L.; Powers, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We report that proteins with the same function bind the same set of small molecules from a standardized chemical library. This observation led to a quantifiable and rapidly adaptable method for protein functional analysis using experimentally-derived ligand binding profiles. Ligand binding is measured using a high-throughput NMR ligand affinity screen with a structurally diverse chemical library. The method was demonstrated using a set of 19 proteins with a range of functions. A statistically significant similarity in ligand binding profiles was only observed between the two functionally identical albumins and between the five functionally similar amylases. This new approach is independent of sequence, structure or evolutionary information, and therefore, extends our ability to analyze and functionally annotate novel genes. PMID:21366353

  8. Pharmacophore-based discovery of ligands for drug transporters

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng; Ekins, Sean; Bahadduri, Praveen; Swaan, Peter W.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to identify ligands for drug transporters is an important step in drug discovery and development. It can both improve accurate profiling of lead pharmacokinetic properties and assist in the discovery of new chemical entities targeting transporters. In silico approaches, especially pharmacophore-based database screening methods have great potential in improving the throughput of current transporter ligand identification assays, leading to a higher hit rate by focusing in vitro testing to the most promising hits. In this review, the potential of different in silico methods in transporter ligand identification studies are compared and summarized with an emphasis on pharmacophore modeling. Various implementations of pharmacophore model generation, database compilation and flexible screening algorithms are also introduced. Recent successful utilization of database searching with pharmacophores to identify novel ligands for the pharmaceutically significant transporters hPepT1, P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and DAT are reviewed and challenges encountered with current approaches are discussed. PMID:17097188

  9. Unique advantages of organometallic supporting ligands for uranium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Diaconescu, Paula L.; Garcia, Evan

    2014-05-31

    The objective of our research project was to study the reactivity of uranium complexes supported by ferrocene-based ligands. In addition, this research provides training of graduate students as the next generation of actinide scientists.

  10. Paramagnetic Ligand Tagging To Identify Protein Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient biomolecular interactions are the cornerstones of the cellular machinery. The identification of the binding sites for low affinity molecular encounters is essential for the development of high affinity pharmaceuticals from weakly binding leads but is hindered by the lack of robust methodologies for characterization of weakly binding complexes. We introduce a paramagnetic ligand tagging approach that enables localization of low affinity protein–ligand binding clefts by detection and analysis of intermolecular protein NMR pseudocontact shifts, which are invoked by the covalent attachment of a paramagnetic lanthanoid chelating tag to the ligand of interest. The methodology is corroborated by identification of the low millimolar volatile anesthetic interaction site of the calcium sensor protein calmodulin. It presents an efficient route to binding site localization for low affinity complexes and is applicable to rapid screening of protein–ligand systems with varying binding affinity. PMID:26289584

  11. Novel method for reducing plasma cholesterol: a ligand replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anantharamaiah, GM; Goldberg, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Despite wide use of statins, significant cardiovascular disease risk persists. High-density lipoprotein based therapy has not yielded any positive results in combating this disease. Newer methods to rapidly decrease plasma cholesterol are much needed. While apolipoprotein B is a ligand for low-density lipoprotein receptor, which clears low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in a highly regulated pathway, apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a ligand for clearing other apolipoprotein B containing atherogenic lipoproteins via an alternate receptor pathway, especially the heparin sulfate proteoglycans on the liver cell surface. We describe here a novel method that replaces apoE as a ligand to clear all of the atherogenic lipoproteins via the heparin sulfate proteoglycans pathway. This ligand replacement apoE mimetic peptide therapy, having been designated as an orphan drug by the US FDA, is in clinical trials. PMID:25937835

  12. Chemistry and pharmacology of GABAB receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents new clinical applications of the prototypic GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen for the treatment of addiction by drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, cocaine, nicotine, morphine, and heroin, a novel baclofen prodrug Arbaclofen placarbil, the GABA(B) receptor agonist AZD3355 (Lesogabaran) currently in Phase 2 clinical trials for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and four positive allosteric modulators of GABA(B) receptors (CGP7930, GS39783, NVP-BHF177, and BHFF), which have less propensity for the development of tolerance due to receptor desensitization than classical GABA(B) receptor agonists. All four compounds showed anxiolytic affects. In the presence of positive allosteric modulators the "classical" GABA(B) receptor antagonists CGP35348 and 2-hydroxy-saclofen showed properties of partial GABA(B) receptor agonists. Seven micromolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists, phaclofen; 2-hydroxy-saclofen; CGP's 35348, 36742, 46381, 51176; and SCH50911, are discussed. CGP36742 (SGS742) showed statistically significant improvements of working memory and attention in a Phase 2 clinical trial in mild, but not in moderate Alzheimer patients. Eight nanomolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists are presented (CGP's 52432, 54626, 55845, 56433, 56999, 61334, 62349, and 63360) that were used by pharmacologists for numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. CGP's 36742, 51176, 55845, and 56433 showed antidepressant effects. Several compounds are also available as radioligands, such as [(3)H]CGP27492, [(3)H]CGP54626, [(3)H]CGP5699, and [(3)H]CGP62349. Three novel fluorescent and three GABA(B) receptor antagonists with very high specific radioactivity (>2,000 Ci/mmol) are presented. [(125)I]CGP64213 and the photoaffinity ligand [(125)I]CGP71872 allowed the identification of GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) receptors in the expression cloning work. PMID:20655477

  13. Follitropin receptors contain cryptic ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lin, Win; Bernard, Michael P; Cao, Donghui; Myers, Rebecca V; Kerrigan, John E; Moyle, William R

    2007-01-01

    Human choriogonadotropin (hCG) and follitropin (hFSH) have been shown to contact different regions of the extracellular domains of G-protein coupled lutropin (LHR) and follitropin (FSHR) receptors. We report here that hCG and hFSH analogs interact with different regions of an FSHR/LHR chimera having only two unique LHR residues and that binds both hormones with high affinity. hCG and hFSH analogs dock with this receptor chimera in a manner similar to that in which they bind LHR and FSHR, respectively. This shows that although the FSHR does not normally bind hCG, it contains a cryptic lutropin binding site that has the potential to recognize hCG in a manner similar to the LHR. The presence of this cryptic site may explain why equine lutropins bind many mammalian FSHR and why mutations in the transmembrane domain distant from the extracellular domain enable the FSHR to bind hCG. The leucine-rich repeat domain (LRD) of the FSHR also appears to contain a cryptic FSH binding site that is obscured by other parts of the extracellular domain. This will explain why contacts seen in crystals of hFSH complexed with an LRD fragment of the human FSHR are hard to reconcile with the abilities of FSH analogs to interact with membrane G-protein coupled FSHR. We speculate that cryptic lutropin binding sites in the FSHR, which are also likely to be present in thyrotropin receptors (TSHR), permit the physiological regulation of ligand binding specificity. Cryptic FSH binding sites in the LRD may enable alternate spliced forms of the FSHR to interact with FSH. PMID:17059863

  14. An Aggregation Advisor for Ligand Discovery.

    PubMed

    Irwin, John J; Duan, Da; Torosyan, Hayarpi; Doak, Allison K; Ziebart, Kristin T; Sterling, Teague; Tumanian, Gurgen; Shoichet, Brian K

    2015-09-10

    Colloidal aggregation of organic molecules is the dominant mechanism for artifactual inhibition of proteins, and controls against it are widely deployed. Notwithstanding an increasingly detailed understanding of this phenomenon, a method to reliably predict aggregation has remained elusive. Correspondingly, active molecules that act via aggregation continue to be found in early discovery campaigns and remain common in the literature. Over the past decade, over 12 thousand aggregating organic molecules have been identified, potentially enabling a precedent-based approach to match known aggregators with new molecules that may be expected to aggregate and lead to artifacts. We investigate an approach that uses lipophilicity, affinity, and similarity to known aggregators to advise on the likelihood that a candidate compound is an aggregator. In prospective experimental testing, five of seven new molecules with Tanimoto coefficients (Tc's) between 0.95 and 0.99 to known aggregators aggregated at relevant concentrations. Ten of 19 with Tc's between 0.94 and 0.90 and three of seven with Tc's between 0.89 and 0.85 also aggregated. Another three of the predicted compounds aggregated at higher concentrations. This method finds that 61 827 or 5.1% of the ligands acting in the 0.1 to 10 μM range in the medicinal chemistry literature are at least 85% similar to a known aggregator with these physical properties and may aggregate at relevant concentrations. Intriguingly, only 0.73% of all drug-like commercially available compounds resemble the known aggregators, suggesting that colloidal aggregators are enriched in the literature. As a percentage of the literature, aggregator-like compounds have increased 9-fold since 1995, partly reflecting the advent of high-throughput and virtual screens against molecular targets. Emerging from this study is an aggregator advisor database and tool ( http://advisor.bkslab.org ), free to the community, that may help distinguish between

  15. The Foundations of Protein-Ligand Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebe, Gerhard

    For the specific design of a drug we must first answer the question: How does a drug achieve its activity? An active ingredient must, in order to develop its action, bind to a particular target molecule in the body. Usually this is a protein, but also nucleic acids in the form of RNA and DNA can be target structures for active agents. The most important condition for binding is at first that the active agent exhibits the correct size and shape in order to optimally fit into a cavity exposed to the surface of the protein, the "bindingpocket". It is further necessary for the surface properties of the ligand and protein to be mutually compatible to form specific interactions. In 1894 Emil Fischer compared the exact fit of a substrate for the catalytic centre of an enzyme with the picture of a "lock-and-key". Paul Ehrlich coined in 1913 "Corpora non agunt nisi fixata", literally "bodies do not work when they are not bound". He wanted to imply that active agents that are meant to kill bacteria or parasites must be "fixed" by them, i.e. linked to their structures. Both concepts form the starting point for any rational concept in the development of active pharmaceutical ingredients. In many respects they still apply today. A drug must, after being administered, reach its target and interact with a biological macromolecule. Specific agents have a large affinity and sufficient selectivity to bind to the macromolecule's active site. This is the only way they can develop the desired biological activity without side-effects.

  16. Reaction chemistry and ligand exchange at cadmium selenide nanocrystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Jonathan; Park, Jungwon; Trudeau, Paul-Emile; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-02

    Chemical modification of nanocrystal surfaces is fundamentally important to their assembly, their implementation in biology and medicine, and greatly impacts their electrical and optical properties. However, it remains a major challenge owing to a lack of analytical tools to directly determine nanoparticle surface structure. Early nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (1) and tri-n-octylphosphine (2), suggested these coordinating solvents are datively bound to the particle surface. However, assigning the broad NMR resonances of surface-bound ligands is complicated by significant concentrations of phosphorus-containing impurities in commercial sources of 1, and XPS provides only limited information about the nature of the phosphorus containing molecules in the sample. More recent reports have shown the surface ligands of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in technical grade 1, and in the presence of alkylphosphonic acids, include phosphonic and phosphinic acids. These studies do not, however, distinguish whether these ligands are bound datively, as neutral, L-type ligands, or by X-type interaction of an anionic phosphonate/phosphinate moiety with a surface Cd{sup 2+} ion. Answering this question would help clarify why ligand exchange with such particles does not proceed generally as expected based on a L-type ligand model. By using reagents with reactive silicon-chalcogen and silicon-chlorine bonds to cleave the ligands from the nanocrystal surface, we show that our CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystal surfaces are likely terminated by X-type binding of alkylphosphonate ligands to a layer of Cd{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} ions, rather than by dative interactions. Further, we provide spectroscopic evidence that 1 and 2 are not coordinated to our purified nanocrystals.

  17. Persistent Binding of Ligands to the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bohonowych, Jessica E.; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates many of the biological and toxic effects of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and other structurally diverse ligands. While HAHs are several orders of magnitude more potent in producing AhR-dependent biochemical effects than PAHs or other AhR agonists, only the HAHs have been observed to produce AhR-dependent toxicity in vivo. Here we have characterized the dissociation of a prototypical HAH ligand ([3H] 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin [TCDD]) and PAH-like ligand ([3H] β-naphthoflavone [βNF]) from the guinea pig, hamster, mouse, and rat hepatic cytosolic AhR in order to elucidate the relationship between the apparent ligand-binding affinities and the divergent potency of these chemicals. Both compounds dissociated very slowly from the AhR with the amount of specific binding remaining at 96 h ranging from 53% to 70% for [3H]TCDD and 26% to 85% for [3H] βNF, depending upon the species examined. The rate of ligand dissociation was unaffected by protein concentration or incubation temperature. Preincubation of cytosol with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran, carbaryl, or primaquine, prior to the addition of [3H]TCDD, shifted the apparent IC50 of these compounds as competitive AhR ligands by ∼10- to 50-fold. Our results support the need for reassessment of previous AhR ligand-binding affinity calculations and competitive binding analysis since these measurements are not carried out at equilibrium binding conditions. Our studies suggest that AhR binding affinity/occupancy has little effect on the observed differences in the persistence of gene expression by HAHs and PAHs. PMID:17431010

  18. Drawing Mononuclear Octahedral Coordination Compounds Containing Tridentate Chelating Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamadou, Aminou; Ple, Karen; Haudrechy, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Complexes with tridentate ligands of the type [M(A-B-C)2], where A [not equal to] B [not equal to] C and with an imposed bonding sequence A-B-C, require special attention to draw all possible stereoisomers. Depending on the nature of the central donor atom B of the tridentate ligand, an easy drawing method is presented that shows seven chiral…

  19. Self-assembled molecular films incorporating a ligand

    DOEpatents

    Bednarski, Mark D.; Wilson, Troy E.; Mastandra, Mark S.

    1996-01-01

    Functionalized monomers are presented which can be used in the fabrication of molecular films for controlling adhesion, detection of receptor-ligand binding and enzymatic reactions; new coatings for lithography; and for semiconductor materials. The monomers are a combination of a ligand, a linker, optionally including a polymerizable group, and a surface attachment group. The processes and an apparatus for making films from these monomers, as well as methods of using the films are also provided.

  20. Application of BRET to monitor ligand binding to GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Leigh A; Johnstone, Elizabeth K M; Wheal, Amanda J; Goulding, Joëlle; Robers, Matthew B; Machleidt, Thomas; Wood, Keith V

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is a well-established method for investigating protein-protein interactions. Here we present a novel BRET approach to monitor ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) on the surface of living cells made possible by the use of fluorescent ligands in combination with a novel bioluminescent protein (NanoLuc) that can be readily expressed on the N-terminus of GPCRs. PMID:26030448

  1. Application of BRET to monitor ligand binding to GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Stoddart, Leigh A; Johnstone, Elizabeth K M; Wheal, Amanda J; Goulding, Joëlle; Robers, Matthew B; Machleidt, Thomas; Wood, Keith V; Hill, Stephen J; Pfleger, Kevin D G

    2015-07-01

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is a well-established method for investigating protein-protein interactions. Here we present a BRET approach to monitor ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) on the surface of living cells made possible by the use of fluorescent ligands in combination with a bioluminescent protein (NanoLuc) that can be readily expressed on the N terminus of GPCRs. PMID:26030448

  2. Fluorescent and Lanthanide Labeling for Ligand Screens, Assays, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Jatinder S.; De Silva, Channa R.; Yoo, Byunghee; Lynch, Ronald M.; Pagel, Mark D.; Vagner, Josef; Hruby, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent (or luminescent) and metal contrast agents in high-throughput screens, in vitro assays, and molecular imaging procedures has rapidly expanded in recent years. Here we describe the development and utility of high-affinity ligands for cancer theranostics and other in vitro screening studies. In this context, we also illustrate the syntheses and use of heteromultivalent ligands as targeted imaging agents. PMID:21318902

  3. Self-assembled molecular films incorporating a ligand

    DOEpatents

    Bednarski, M.D.; Wilson, T.E.; Mastandra, M.S.

    1996-04-23

    Functionalized monomers are presented which can be used in the fabrication of molecular films for controlling adhesion, detection of receptor-ligand binding and enzymatic reactions; new coatings for lithography; and for semiconductor materials. The monomers are a combination of a ligand, a linker, optionally including a polymerizable group, and a surface attachment group. The processes and an apparatus for making films from these monomers, as well as methods of using the films are also provided. 7 figs.

  4. Tetrapyrroles as Endogenous TSPO Ligands in Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes: Comparisons with Synthetic Ligands.

    PubMed

    Veenman, Leo; Vainshtein, Alex; Yasin, Nasra; Azrad, Maya; Gavish, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is highly 0conserved in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Since its discovery in 1977, numerous studies established the TSPO's importance for life essential functions. For these studies, synthetic TSPO ligands typically are applied. Tetrapyrroles present endogenous ligands for the TSPO. Tetrapyrroles are also evolutionarily conserved and regulate multiple functions. TSPO and tetrapyrroles regulate each other. In animals TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions range from effects on embryonic development to metabolism, programmed cell death, response to stress, injury and disease, and even to life span extension. In animals TSPOs are primarily located in mitochondria. In plants TSPOs are also present in plastids, the nuclear fraction, the endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi stacks. This may contribute to translocation of tetrapyrrole intermediates across organelles' membranes. As in animals, plant TSPO binds heme and protoporphyrin IX. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions in plants appear to relate to development as well as stress conditions, including salt tolerance, abscisic acid-induced stress, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, and finally cell death regulation. In bacteria, TSPO is important for switching from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, including the regulation of photosynthesis. As in mitochondria, in bacteria TSPO is located in the outer membrane. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions may be part of the establishment of the bacterial-eukaryote relationships, i.e., mitochondrial-eukaryote and plastid-plant endosymbiotic relationships. PMID:27271616

  5. Tetrapyrroles as Endogenous TSPO Ligands in Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes: Comparisons with Synthetic Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Veenman, Leo; Vainshtein, Alex; Yasin, Nasra; Azrad, Maya; Gavish, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is highly 0conserved in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Since its discovery in 1977, numerous studies established the TSPO’s importance for life essential functions. For these studies, synthetic TSPO ligands typically are applied. Tetrapyrroles present endogenous ligands for the TSPO. Tetrapyrroles are also evolutionarily conserved and regulate multiple functions. TSPO and tetrapyrroles regulate each other. In animals TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions range from effects on embryonic development to metabolism, programmed cell death, response to stress, injury and disease, and even to life span extension. In animals TSPOs are primarily located in mitochondria. In plants TSPOs are also present in plastids, the nuclear fraction, the endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi stacks. This may contribute to translocation of tetrapyrrole intermediates across organelles’ membranes. As in animals, plant TSPO binds heme and protoporphyrin IX. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions in plants appear to relate to development as well as stress conditions, including salt tolerance, abscisic acid-induced stress, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, and finally cell death regulation. In bacteria, TSPO is important for switching from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, including the regulation of photosynthesis. As in mitochondria, in bacteria TSPO is located in the outer membrane. TSPO-tetrapyrrole interactions may be part of the establishment of the bacterial-eukaryote relationships, i.e., mitochondrial-eukaryote and plastid-plant endosymbiotic relationships. PMID:27271616

  6. Phage Selection of Chemically Stabilized α-Helical Peptide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Diderich, Philippe; Bertoldo, Davide; Dessen, Pierre; Khan, Maola M; Pizzitola, Irene; Held, Werner; Huelsken, Joerg; Heinis, Christian

    2016-05-20

    Short α-helical peptides stabilized by linkages between constituent amino acids offer an attractive format for ligand development. In recent years, a range of excellent ligands based on stabilized α-helices were generated by rational design using α-helical peptides of natural proteins as templates. Herein, we developed a method to engineer chemically stabilized α-helical ligands in a combinatorial fashion. In brief, peptides containing cysteines in position i and i + 4 are genetically encoded by phage display, the cysteines are modified with chemical bridges to impose α-helical conformations, and binders are isolated by affinity selection. We applied the strategy to affinity mature an α-helical peptide binding β-catenin. We succeeded in developing ligands with Kd's as low as 5.2 nM, having >200-fold improved affinity. The strategy is generally applicable for affinity maturation of any α-helical peptide. Compared to hydrocarbon stapled peptides, the herein evolved thioether-bridged peptide ligands can be synthesized more easily, as no unnatural amino acids are required and the cyclization reaction is more efficient and yields no stereoisomers. A further advantage of the thioether-bridged peptide ligands is that they can be expressed recombinantly as fusion proteins. PMID:26929989

  7. Extracellular interactions and ligand degradation shape the nodal morphogen gradient

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Wang, Xi; Wohland, Thorsten; Sampath, Karuna

    2016-01-01

    The correct distribution and activity of secreted signaling proteins called morphogens is required for many developmental processes. Nodal morphogens play critical roles in embryonic axis formation in many organisms. Models proposed to generate the Nodal gradient include diffusivity, ligand processing, and a temporal activation window. But how the Nodal morphogen gradient forms in vivo remains unclear. Here, we have measured in vivo for the first time, the binding affinity of Nodal ligands to their major cell surface receptor, Acvr2b, and to the Nodal inhibitor, Lefty, by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy. We examined the diffusion coefficient of Nodal ligands and Lefty inhibitors in live zebrafish embryos by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We also investigated the contribution of ligand degradation to the Nodal gradient. We show that ligand clearance via degradation shapes the Nodal gradient and correlates with its signaling range. By computational simulations of gradient formation, we demonstrate that diffusivity, extra-cellular interactions, and selective ligand destruction collectively shape the Nodal morphogen gradient. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13879.001 PMID:27101364

  8. Agonists and Antagonists of TGF-β Family Ligands.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chenbei

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family ligands and the realization that their bioactivities need to be tightly controlled temporally and spatially led to intensive research that has identified a multitude of extracellular modulators of TGF-β family ligands, uncovered their functions in developmental and pathophysiological processes, defined the mechanisms of their activities, and explored potential modulator-based therapeutic applications in treating human diseases. These studies revealed a diverse repertoire of extracellular and membrane-associated molecules that are capable of modulating TGF-β family signals via control of ligand availability, processing, ligand-receptor interaction, and receptor activation. These molecules include not only soluble ligand-binding proteins that were conventionally considered as agonists and antagonists of TGF-β family of growth factors, but also extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and proteoglycans that can serve as "sink" and control storage and release of both the TGF-β family ligands and their regulators. This extensive network of soluble and ECM modulators helps to ensure dynamic and cell-specific control of TGF-β family signals. This article reviews our knowledge of extracellular modulation of TGF-β growth factors by diverse proteins and their molecular mechanisms to regulate TGF-β family signaling. PMID:27413100

  9. Lyar Is a New Ligand for Retinal Pigment Epithelial Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feiye; Ding, Ying; Caberoy, Nora B; Alvarado, Gabriela; Liu, Robert; Shen, Chen; Yu, Jisu; Zhou, Yixiong; Salero, Enrique; LeBlanc, Michelle E; Wang, Weiwen; Li, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Phagocytosis is critical to tissue homeostasis, as highlighted by phagocytosis defect of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells with debris accumulation, photoreceptor degeneration and blindness. Phagocytosis ligands are the key to delineating molecular mechanisms and functional roles of phagocytes, but are traditionally identified in individual cases with technical challenges. We recently developed open reading frame phage display (OPD) for phagocytosis-based functional cloning (PFC) to identify unknown ligands. One of the identified ligands was Ly-1 antibody reactive clone (Lyar) with functions poorly defined. Herein, we characterized Lyar as a new ligand to stimulate RPE phagocytosis. In contrast to its reported nucleolar expression, immunohistochemistry showed that Lyar was highly expressed in photoreceptor outer segments (POSs) of the retina. Cytoplasmic Lyar was released from apoptotic cells, and selectively bound to shed POSs and apoptotic cells, but not healthy cells. POS vesicles engulfed through Lyar-dependent pathway were targeted to phagosomes and colocalized with phagosome marker Rab7. These results suggest that Lyar is a genuine RPE phagocytosis ligand, which in turn supports the validity of OPD/PFC as the only available approach for unbiased identification of phagocytosis ligands with broad applicability to various phagocytes. PMID:25735755

  10. Porphyrin-based design of bioinspired multitarget quadruplex ligands.

    PubMed

    Laguerre, Aurélien; Desbois, Nicolas; Stefan, Loic; Richard, Philippe; Gros, Claude P; Monchaud, David

    2014-09-01

    Secondary nucleic acid structures, such as DNA and RNA quadruplexes, are potential targets for cancer therapies. Ligands that interact with these targets could thus find application as anticancer agents. Synthetic G-quartets have recently found numerous applications, including use as bioinspired G-quadruplex ligands. Herein, the design, synthesis and preliminary biophysical evaluation of a new prototype multitarget G-quadruplex ligand, (PNA)PorphySQ, are reported, where peptidic nucleic acid guanine ((PNA)G) was incorporated in the porphyrin-templated synthetic G-quartet (PorphySQ). Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-melting experiments, PorphySQ was shown to possess enhanced quadruplex-interacting properties thanks to the presence of four positively charged (PNA)G residues that improve its electrostatic interactions with the binding site of both DNA and RNA quadruplexes (i.e., their negatively charged and accessible G-quartets), thereby making (PNA)PorphySQ an interesting prototype of a multitarget ligand. Both the chemical stability and water solubility of (PNA)PorphySQ are improved over the non-PNA derivative (PorphySQ), which are desirable properties for drug development, and while improvements remain to be made, this ligand is a promising lead for the further development of multitarget G-quadruplex ligands. PMID:24678052

  11. Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners, a DIP subset

    DOE Data Explorer

    Graeber, Thomas G.; Eisenberg, David

    The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information (see the DIP User's Guide). DLRP is a web supplement for: Thomas G. Graeber and David Eisenberg. Bioinformatic identification of potential autocrine signaling loops in cancers from gene expression profiles. Nature Genetics, 29(3):295-300 (November 2001). [Quoted from the DLRP homepage at http://dip.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/dip/DLRP.cgi] Also available from this page is the DLRP chemokine subset.

  12. Ligand and interfacial dynamics in a homodimeric hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prashant Kumar; Meuwly, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The structural dynamics of dimeric hemoglobin (HbI) from Scapharca inaequivalvis in different ligand-binding states is studied from atomistic simulations on the μs time scale. The intermediates are between the fully ligand-bound (R) and ligand-free (T) states. Tertiary structural changes, such as rotation of the side chain of Phe97, breaking of the Lys96–heme salt bridge, and the Fe–Fe separation, are characterized and the water dynamics along the R-T transition is analyzed. All these properties for the intermediates are bracketed by those determined experimentally for the fully ligand-bound and ligand-free proteins, respectively. The dynamics of the two monomers is asymmetric on the 100 ns timescale. Several spontaneous rotations of the Phe97 side chain are observed which suggest a typical time scale of 50–100 ns for this process. Ligand migration pathways include regions between the B/G and C/G helices and, if observed, take place in the 100 ns time scale. PMID:26958581

  13. Discovery of GPCR ligands for probing signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Brogi, Simone; Tafi, Andrea; Désaubry, Laurent; Nebigil, Canan G.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven integral transmembrane proteins that are the primary targets of almost 30% of approved drugs and continue to represent a major focus of pharmaceutical research. All of GPCR targeted medicines were discovered by classical medicinal chemistry approaches. After the first GPCR crystal structures were determined, the docking screens using these structures lead to discovery of more novel and potent ligands. There are over 360 pharmaceutically relevant GPCRs in the human genome and to date about only 30 of structures have been determined. For these reasons, computational techniques such as homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have proven their usefulness to explore the structure and function of GPCRs. Furthermore, structure-based drug design and in silico screening (High Throughput Docking) are still the most common computational procedures in GPCRs drug discovery. Moreover, ligand-based methods such as three-dimensional quantitative structure–selectivity relationships, are the ideal molecular modeling approaches to rationalize the activity of tested GPCR ligands and identify novel GPCR ligands. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances for the computational approaches to effectively guide selectivity and affinity of ligands. We also describe novel approaches in medicinal chemistry, such as the development of biased agonists, allosteric modulators, and bivalent ligands for class A GPCRs. Furthermore, we highlight some knockout mice models in discovering biased signaling selectivity. PMID:25506327

  14. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  15. Riboswitch structure in the ligand-free state.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Joseph A; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    Molecular investigations of riboswitches bound to small-molecule effectors have produced a wealth of information on how these molecules achieve high affinity and specificity for a target ligand. X-ray crystal structures have been determined for the ligand-free state for representatives of the preQ₁-I, S-adenosylmethionine I, lysine, and glycine aptamer classes. These structures in conjunction with complimentary techniques, such as in-line probing, NMR spectroscopy, Förster resonance energy transfer, small-angle scattering, and computational simulations, have demonstrated that riboswitches adopt multiple conformations in the absence of ligand. Despite a number of investigations that support ligand-dependent folding, mounting evidence suggests that free-state riboswitches interact with their effectors in the sub-populations of largely prefolded states as embodied by the principle of conformational selection, which has been documented extensively for protein-mediated ligand interactions. Fundamental riboswitch investigations of the bound and free states have advanced our understanding of RNA folding, ligand recognition, and how these factors culminate in communication between an aptamer and its expression platform. An understanding of these topics is essential to comprehend riboswitch gene regulation at the molecular level, which has already provided a basis to understand the mechanism of action of natural antimicrobials. PMID:21957061

  16. Ligand exchange in quaternary alloyed nanocrystals--a spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Gabka, Grzegorz; Bujak, Piotr; Giedyk, Kamila; Kotwica, Kamil; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Malinowska, Karolina; Lisowski, Wojciech; Sobczak, Janusz W; Pron, Adam

    2014-11-14

    Exchange of initial, predominantly stearate ligands for pyridine in the first step and butylamine (BA) or 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) in the second one was studied for alloyed quaternary Cu-In-Zn-S nanocrystals. The NMR results enabled us to demonstrate, for the first time, direct binding of the pyridine labile ligand to the nanocrystal surface as evidenced by paramagnetic shifts of the three signals attributed to its protons to 7.58, 7.95 and 8.75 ppm. XPS investigations indicated, in turn, a significant change in the composition of the nanocrystal surface upon the exchange of initial ligands for pyridine, which being enriched in indium in the 'as prepared' form became enriched in zinc after pyridine binding. This finding indicated that the first step of ligand exchange had to involve the removal of the surface layer enriched in indium with simultaneous exposure of a new, zinc-enriched layer. In the second ligand exchange step (replacement of pyridine with BA or MUA) the changes in the nanocrystal surface compositions were much less significant. The presence of zinc in the nanocrystal surface layer turned out necessary for effective binding of pyridine as shown by a comparative study of ligand exchange in Cu-In-Zn-S, Ag-In-Zn-S and CuInS2, carried out by complementary XPS and NMR investigations. PMID:25252174

  17. Narrow escape for a stochastically gated Brownian ligand.

    PubMed

    Reingruber, Jürgen; Holcman, David

    2010-02-17

    Molecular activation in cellular microdomains is usually characterized by a forward binding rate, which is the reciprocal of the arrival time of a ligand to a key target. Upon chemical interactions or conformational changes, a Brownian ligand may randomly switch between different states, and when target activation is possible in a specific state only, switching can significantly alter the activation process. The main goal of this paper is to study the mean time for a switching ligand to activate a small substrate, modelled as the time to exit a microdomain through a small absorbing window on the surface. We present the equations for the mean sojourn times the ligand spends in each state, and study the escape process with switching between two states in dimension one and three. When the ligand can exit in only one of the two states, we find that switching always decreases its sojourn time in the state where it can exit. Moreover, the fastest exit is obtained when the ligand diffuses most of the time in the state with the maximal diffusion coefficient, although this may imply that it spends most of the time 'hidden' in the state where it cannot exit. We discuss the physical mechanisms responsible for this apparent paradox. In dimension three we confirm our results with Brownian simulations. Finally, we suggest possible applications in cellular biology. PMID:21389363

  18. Ligand-Dependent Conformational Dynamics of Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Reddish, Michael J.; Vaughn, Morgan B.; Fu, Rong; Dyer, R. Brian

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are known to change among several conformational states during turnover. The role of such dynamic structural changes in catalysis is not fully understood. The influence of dynamics in catalysis can be inferred, but not proven, by comparison of equilibrium structures of protein variants and protein–ligand complexes. A more direct way to establish connections between protein dynamics and the catalytic cycle is to probe the kinetics of specific protein motions in comparison to progress along the reaction coordinate. We have examined the enzyme model system dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Escherichia coli with tryptophan fluorescence-probed temperature-jump spectroscopy. We aimed to observe the kinetics of the ligand binding and ligand-induced conformational changes of three DHFR complexes to establish the relationship among these catalytic steps. Surprisingly, in all three complexes, the observed kinetics do not match a simple sequential two-step process. Through analysis of the relationship between ligand concentration and observed rate, we conclude that the observed kinetics correspond to the ligand binding step of the reaction and a noncoupled enzyme conformational change. The kinetics of the conformational change vary with the ligand's identity and presence but do not appear to be directly related to progress along the reaction coordinate. These results emphasize the need for kinetic studies of DHFR with highly specific spectroscopic probes to determine which dynamic events are coupled to the catalytic cycle and which are not. PMID:26901612

  19. Rule of five in 2015 and beyond: Target and ligand structural limitations, ligand chemistry structure and drug discovery project decisions.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Christopher A

    2016-06-01

    The rule of five (Ro5), based on physicochemical profiles of phase II drugs, is consistent with structural limitations in protein targets and the drug target ligands. Three of four parameters in Ro5 are fundamental to the structure of both target and drug binding sites. The chemical structure of the drug ligand depends on the ligand chemistry and design philosophy. Two extremes of chemical structure and design philosophy exist; ligands constructed in the medicinal chemistry synthesis laboratory without input from natural selection and natural product (NP) metabolites biosynthesized based on evolutionary selection. Exceptions to Ro5 are found mostly among NPs. Chemistry chameleon-like behavior of some NPs due to intra-molecular hydrogen bonding as exemplified by cyclosporine A is a strong contributor to NP Ro5 outliers. The fragment derived, drug Navitoclax is an example of the extensive expertise, resources, time and key decisions required for the rare discovery of a non-NP Ro5 outlier. PMID:27154268

  20. Ligands turning around in the midst of protein conformers: the origin of ligand-protein mating. A NMR view.

    PubMed

    Pertinhez, T A; Spisni, A

    2011-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is a puzzling process. Many theories have been devised since the pioneering key-and-lock hypothesis based on the idea that both the protein and the ligand have a rigid single conformation. Indeed, molecular motion is the essence of the universe. Consequently, not only proteins are characterized by an extraordinary conformational freedom, but ligands too can fluctuate in a rather vast conformational space. In this scenario, the quest to understand how do they match is fascinating. Recognizing that the inherent dynamics of molecules is the key factor controlling the success of the binding and, subsequently, their chemical/biological function, here we present a view of this process from the NMR stand point. A description of the most relevant NMR parameters that can provide insights, at atomic level, on the mechanisms of protein-ligand binding is provided in the final section. PMID:20939791

  1. A Ferrocene-Based Catecholamide Ligand: the Consequences of Ligand Swivel for Directed Supramolecular Self-Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Mugridge, Jeffrey; Fiedler, Dorothea; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-02-04

    A ferrocene-based biscatecholamide ligand was prepared and investigated for the formation of metal-ligand supramolecular assemblies with different metals. Reaction with Ge(IV) resulted in the formation of a variety of Ge{sub n}L{sub m} coordination complexes, including [Ge{sub 2}L{sub 3}]{sup 4-} and [Ge{sub 2}L{sub 2}({mu}-OMe){sub 2}]{sup 2-}. The ligand's ability to swivel about the ferrocenyl linker and adopt different conformations accounts for formation of many different Ge{sub n}L{sub m} species. This study demonstrates why conformational ligand rigidity is essential in the rational design and directed self-assembly of supramolecular complexes.

  2. electronic Ligand Builder and Optimisation Workbench (eLBOW): A tool for ligand coordinate and restraint generation

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, Nigel; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf; Adams, Paul

    2009-07-01

    The electronic Ligand Builder and Optimisation Workbench (eLBOW) is a program module of the PHENIX suite of computational crystallographic software. It's designed to be a flexible procedure using simple and fast quantum chemical techniques to provide chemically accurate information for novel and known ligands alike. A variety of input formats and options allow for the attainment of a number of diverse goals including geometry optimisation and generation of restraints.

  3. Multipurpose ligand, DAKLI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (. kappa. opioid) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.; Naidu, A.; Newman, S.R. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe a synthetic ligand, DALKI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as {sup 125}I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin ({kappa} opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites.

  4. electronic Ligand Builder and Optimization Workbench (eLBOW): a tool for ligand coordinate and restraint generation

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Adams, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    The electronic Ligand Builder and Optimization Workbench (eLBOW) is a program module of the PHENIX suite of computational crystallographic software. It is designed to be a flexible procedure that uses simple and fast quantum-chemical techniques to provide chemically accurate information for novel and known ligands alike. A variety of input formats and options allow the attainment of a number of diverse goals including geometry optimization and generation of restraints. PMID:19770504

  5. Quantitative analysis of protein-ligand interactions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ayako; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yanaka, Saeko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Protein-ligand interactions have been commonly studied through static structures of the protein-ligand complex. Recently, however, there has been increasing interest in investigating the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions both for fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for drug development. NMR is a versatile and powerful tool, especially because it provides site-specific quantitative information. NMR has widely been used to determine the dissociation constant (KD), in particular, for relatively weak interactions. The simplest NMR method is a chemical-shift titration experiment, in which the chemical-shift changes of a protein in response to ligand titration are measured. There are other quantitative NMR methods, but they mostly apply only to interactions in the fast-exchange regime. These methods derive the dissociation constant from population-averaged NMR quantities of the free and bound states of a protein or ligand. In contrast, the recent advent of new relaxation-based experiments, including R2 relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange, has enabled us to obtain kinetic information on protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate- and slow-exchange regimes. Based on R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange, methods that can determine the association rate, kon, dissociation rate, koff, and KD have been developed. In these approaches, R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange curves are measured for multiple samples with different protein and/or ligand concentration ratios, and the relaxation data are fitted to theoretical kinetic models. It is critical to choose an appropriate kinetic model, such as the two- or three-state exchange model, to derive the correct kinetic information. The R2 dispersion and ZZ-exchange methods are suitable for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions with a micromolar or sub-micromolar dissociation constant but not for very weak interactions, which are typical in very fast exchange. This contrasts with the NMR methods that are used

  6. DFT Study of Acceptorless Alcohol Dehydrogenation Mediated by Ruthenium Pincer Complexes: Ligand Tautomerization Governing Metal Ligand Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Cheng; Zhang, Zhihan; Zhao, Cunyuan; Ke, Zhuofeng

    2016-07-01

    Metal ligand cooperation (MLC) catalysis is a popular strategy to design highly efficient transition metal catalysts. In this presented theoretical study, we describe the key governing factor in the MLC mechanism, with the Szymczak's NNN-Ru and the Milstein's PNN-Ru complexes as two representative catalysts. Both the outer-sphere and inner-sphere mechanisms were investigated and compared. Our calculated result indicates that the PNN-Ru pincer catalyst will be restored to aromatic state during the catalytic cycle, which can be considered as the driving force to promote the MLC process. On the contrary, for the NNN-Ru catalyst, the MLC mechanism leads to an unfavored tautomerization in the pincer ligand, which explains the failure of the MLC mechanism in this system. Therefore, the strength of the driving force provided by the pincer ligand actually represents a prerequisite factor for MLC. Spectator ligands such as CO, PPh3, and hydride are important to ensure the catalyst follow a certain mechanism as well. We also evaluate the driving force of various bifunctional ligands by computational methods. Some proposed pincer ligands may have the potential to be the new pincer catalysts candidates. The presented study is expected to offer new insights for MLC catalysis and provide useful guideline for future catalyst design. PMID:27322755

  7. Influence of variations in the chromophoric ligand on the properties of metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.R.; Westmoreland, T.D.; Caspar, J.V.; Barqawi, K.R.; Meyer, T.J.

    1988-09-07

    The effects of variations in the chromophoric ligand on the properties of the metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited states in the series (Os(PP)/sub 3/)/sup 2+/, ((PP)/sub 2/Os(py)/sub 2/)/sup 2+/, and ((PP)/sub 2/Os(LL))/sup 2+/ (PP = 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, or a substituted derivative; py = pyridine; LL = das, dppm, dppb, dppene) have been investigated. From a series of electrochemical and photophysical measurements it has been determined that (1) substituent variations in the chromophoric ligands have a relatively minor effect on the d/pi/(Os) levels as evidenced by variations in E/sub 1/2/ values for the ground-state Os(III/II) couples, (2) linear correlations exist between metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) absorption or emission band energies and the difference in metal-based oxidation and ligand-based reduction potentials, E/sub 1/2/(Os/sup III/II/) - E/sub 1/2/(PP/sup 0//minus//), and (3) a linear relationship between 1n k/sub nr/ and the emission energy, E/sub em/, exists, consistent with the energy gap law. It appears that for nonradiative decay both the pattern of acceptor vibrations and the vibrationally induced electronic coupling term remain relatively constant as the chromophoric ligand is varied. 26 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Steric and Electronic Factors Associated with the Photoinduced Ligand Exchange of Bidentate Ligands Coordinated to Ru(II).

    PubMed

    Albani, Bryan A; Whittemore, Tyler; Durr, Christopher B; Turro, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to create a molecule that can absorb low energy visible or near-infrared light for photochemotherapy (PCT), the new complexes [Ru(biq)2 (dpb)](PF6 )2 (1, biq = 2,2'-biquinoline, dpb = 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)benzoquinoxaline) and [(biq)2 Ru(dpb)Re(CO)3 Cl](PF6 )2 (2) were synthesized and characterized. Complexes 1 and 2 were compared to [Ru(bpy)2 (dpb)](PF6 )2 (3, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(biq)2 (phen)](PF6 )2 (4, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline). Distortions around the metal and biq ligands were used to explain the exchange of one biq ligand in 4 upon irradiation. Complex 1, however, undergoes photoinduced dissociation of the dpb ligand rather than biq under analogous experimental conditions. Complex 3 is not photoactive, providing evidence that the biq ligands are crucial for ligand photodissociation in 1. The crystal structures of 1 and 4 are compared to explain the difference in photochemistry between the complexes. Complex 2 absorbs lower energy light than 1, but is photochemically inert although its crystal structure displays significant distortions. These results indicate that both the excited state electronic structure and steric bulk play key roles in bidentate photoinduced ligand dissociation. The present work also shows that it is possible to stabilize sterically hindered Ru(II) complexes by the addition of another metal, a property that may be useful for other applications. PMID:25403564

  9. Non-peptide ligand binding to the formyl peptide receptor FPR2--A comparison to peptide ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Stepniewski, Tomasz M; Filipek, Slawomir

    2015-07-15

    Ligands of the FPR2 receptor initiate many signaling pathways including activation of phospholipase C, protein kinase C, the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway. The possible actions include also calcium flux, superoxide generation, as well as migration and proliferation of monocytes. FPR2 activation may induce a pro- and anti-inflammatory effect depending on the ligand type. It is also found that this receptor is involved in tumor growth. Most of currently known FPR2 ligands are agonists since they were designed based on N-formyl peptides, which are natural agonists of formyl receptors. Since the non-peptide drugs are indispensable for effective treatment strategies, we performed a docking study of such ligands employing a generated dual template homology model of the FPR2 receptor. The study revealed different binding modes of particular classes of these drugs. Based on the obtained docking poses we proposed a detailed location of three hydrophobic pockets in orthosteric binding site of FPR2. Our model emphasizes the importance of aromatic stacking, especially with regard to residues His102(3.29) and Phe257(6.51), for binding of FPR2 ligands. We also identified other residues important for non-peptide ligand binding in the binding site of FPR2. PMID:25882522

  10. Ligand-to-Ligand Charge Transfer within Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Manganese Coordination Polymers with Tetrathiafulvalene-Bicarboxylate and Bipyridine Ligands.

    PubMed

    Huo, Peng; Chen, Ting; Hou, Jin-Le; Yu, Lei; Zhu, Qin-Yu; Dai, Jie

    2016-07-01

    A systematic study on ligand-to-ligand charge-transfer (LLCT) properties of three closely related metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is presented. These compounds are formulated as [MnL(4,4'-bpy)(H2O)]n·nCH3CN (1), [MnL(bpe)0.5(DMF)]n·2nH2O (2), and [MnL(bpa)(H2O)]n·2nH2O (3) (L = dimethylthio-tetrathiafulvalene-bicarboxylate, 4,4'-bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine, bpe = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene, bpa = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane). The X-ray single-crystal diffractions show that complexes 1-3 are all two-dimensional (2-D) coordination polymers with different frameworks in crystal lattices. Charge-transfer (CT) interactions within these MOFs are visually apparent in colors and vary according to the conjugated states of the bipyridine ligands (4,4'-bpy, bpe, and bpa). Theoretical calculations show that the charge transfer occurs from ligand L to bipyridine. The intensity of the LLCT is in the order of 2 > 1 > 3 investigated by theoretical calculations and ESR, which indicates that the intensity of CT is related to the bipyridyl conjugated state. Photocurrent responses of these compounds are consequently studied, and the results are in agreement with the intensity of charge transfer and linearly related to the LLCT energy. PMID:27285178

  11. Evaluating ligands for use in polymer ligand film (PLF) for plutonium and uranium extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rim, Jung H.; Peterson, Dominic S.; Armenta, Claudine E.; Gonzales, Edward R.; Ünlü, Kenan

    2015-05-08

    We describe a new analyte extraction technique using Polymer Ligand Film (PLF). PLFs were synthesized to perform direct sorption of analytes onto its surface for direct counting using alpha spectroscopy. The main focus of the new technique is to shorten and simplify the procedure for chemically isolating radionuclides for determination through a radiometric technique. 4'(5')-di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (HEH[EHP]) were examined for plutonium extraction. Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) were examined for plutonium and uranium extraction. DtBuCH18C6 and HEH[EHP] were not effective in plutonium extraction. HDEHP PLFs were effective for plutonium but not for uranium.

  12. Evaluating ligands for use in polymer ligand film (PLF) for plutonium and uranium extraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rim, Jung H.; Peterson, Dominic S.; Armenta, Claudine E.; Gonzales, Edward R.; Ünlü, Kenan

    2015-05-08

    We describe a new analyte extraction technique using Polymer Ligand Film (PLF). PLFs were synthesized to perform direct sorption of analytes onto its surface for direct counting using alpha spectroscopy. The main focus of the new technique is to shorten and simplify the procedure for chemically isolating radionuclides for determination through a radiometric technique. 4'(5')-di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (HEH[EHP]) were examined for plutonium extraction. Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) were examined for plutonium and uranium extraction. DtBuCH18C6 and HEH[EHP] were not effective in plutonium extraction. HDEHP PLFs were effective for plutonium but not for uranium.

  13. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Negami, Tatsuki; Shimizu, Kentaro; Terada, Tohru

    2014-09-30

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations with the MARTINI force field were performed to reproduce the protein-ligand binding processes. We chose two protein-ligand systems, the levansucrase-sugar (glucose or sucrose), and LinB-1,2-dichloroethane systems, as target systems that differ in terms of the size and shape of the ligand-binding pocket and the physicochemical properties of the pocket and the ligand. Spatial distributions of the Coarse-grained (CG) ligand molecules revealed potential ligand-binding sites on the protein surfaces other than the real ligand-binding sites. The ligands bound most strongly to the real ligand-binding sites. The binding and unbinding rate constants obtained from the CGMD simulation of the levansucrase-sucrose system were approximately 10 times greater than the experimental values; this is mainly due to faster diffusion of the CG ligand in the CG water model. We could obtain dissociation constants close to the experimental values for both systems. Analysis of the ligand fluxes demonstrated that the CG ligand molecules entered the ligand-binding pockets through specific pathways. The ligands tended to move through grooves on the protein surface. Thus, the CGMD simulations produced reasonable results for the two different systems overall and are useful for studying the protein-ligand binding processes. PMID:25043724

  14. Ligand Migration and Binding in Myoglobin Mutant L29W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Waschipky, Robert; Nienhaus, Karin; Minkow, Oleksandr; Ostermann, Andreas; Parak, Fritz G.

    2001-09-01

    Myoglobin, a small globular heme protein that binds gaseous ligands such as O2, CO, and NO reversibly at the heme iron, has for many years been a paradigm for studying the effects of structure and dynamics on protein reactions. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements after photodissociation of the ligand reveal a complex ligand binding reaction with multiple kinetic intermediates, resulting from protein relaxation and movements of the ligand within the protein. To observe structural changes induced by ligand dissociation, we have investigated carbonmonoxy myoglobin (MbCO) mutant L29W using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy in combination with x-ray crystallography. The presence of two distinct infrared stretch bands of the bound CO, AI at 1945 cm-1 and AII at 1955 cm-1, implies that L29W MbCO assumes two different conformations at neutral pH. Low-temperature flash photolysis experiments with monitoring of the absorption changes in the individual CO lines reveal markedly different rebinding properties. While recombination in AII is conceptually simple and well described by a two-state transition involving a distribution of enthalpy barriers, recombination in AI is more complicated: Besides a fast kinetic component, a second, slower kinetic component appears; its population grows with increasing temperature. X-ray crystallography of crystals illuminated below 180 K to photodissociate the CO reveals that the slow component arises from ligands that have migrated from their initial docking site to a remote site within the distal heme pocket. This process occurs in an essentially immobilized, frozen protein. Subsequently, ligands rebind by thermal activation over a barrier that is much higher than the barrier for recombination from the initial docking site. Upon photodissociation above 180 K, ligands escape from the distal pocket, aided by protein fluctuations that transiently open exit channels. The x-ray structure shows a large proportion of ligands in a cavity on

  15. Niobium tetrahalide complexes with neutral diphosphine ligands.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Sophie L; Chang, Yao-Pang; Hector, Andrew L; Jura, Marek; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; Stenning, Gavin

    2016-05-10

    The reactions of NbCl4 with diphosphine ligands o-C6H4(PMe2)2, Me2PCH2CH2PMe2 or Et2PCH2CH2PEt2 in a 1 : 2 molar ratio in MeCN solution produced eight-coordinate [NbCl4(diphosphine)2]. [NbBr4(diphosphine)2] (diphosphine = o-C6H4(PMe2)2 or Me2PCH2CH2PMe2) were made similarly from NbBr4. X-ray crystal structures show that [NbCl4{o-C6H4(PMe2)2}2] has a dodecahedral geometry, but the complexes with dimethylene-backboned diphosphines are distorted square antiprisms. The Nb-P distances and

  16. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Kanev, Georgi K.; van Linden, Oscar P.J.; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  17. NKG2D ligands mediate immunosurveillance of senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Moshayev, Zhana; Vadai, Ezra; Wensveen, Felix; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golani, Ofra; Polic, Bojan; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Induction of cellular senescence commonly coincides with an immunogenic phenotype that promotes self-elimination by components of the immune system, thereby facilitating tumor suppression and limiting excess fibrosis during wound repair. The mechanisms by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance are not completely understood. Here we show that ligands of an activating Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor (NKG2D), MICA and ULBP2 are consistently up-regulated following induction of replicative senescence, oncogene-induced senescence and DNA damage - induced senescence. MICA and ULBP2 proteins are necessary for efficient NK-mediated cytotoxicity towards senescent fibroblasts. The mechanisms regulating the initial expression of NKG2D ligands in senescent cells are dependent on a DNA damage response, whilst continuous expression of these ligands is regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. In liver fibrosis, the accumulation of senescent activated stellate cells is increased in mice lacking NKG2D receptor leading to increased fibrosis. Overall, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms regulating the expression of immune ligands in senescent cells and reveal the importance of NKG2D receptor-ligand interaction in protecting against liver fibrosis. PMID:26878797

  18. Ligand migration and binding in nonsymbiotic hemoglobins of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nienhaus, Karin; Dominici, Paola; Astegno, Alessandra; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Viappiani, Cristiano; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2010-09-01

    We have studied carbon monoxide (CO) migration and binding in the nonsymbiotic hemoglobins AHb1 and AHb2 of Arabidopsis thaliana using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy combined with temperature derivative spectroscopy (TDS) at cryogenic temperatures. Both proteins have similar amino acid sequences but display pronounced differences in ligand binding properties, at both physiological and cryogenic temperatures. Near neutral pH, the distal HisE7 side chain is close to the heme-bound ligand in the majority of AHb1-CO molecules, as indicated by a low CO stretching frequency at 1921 cm(-1). In this fraction, two CO docking sites can be populated, the primary site B and the secondary site C. When the pH is lowered, a high-frequency stretching band at approximately 1964 cm(-1) grows at the expense of the low-frequency band, indicating that HisE7 protonates and, concomitantly, moves away from the bound ligand. Geminate rebinding barriers are markedly different for the two conformations, and docking site C is not accessible in the low-pH conformation. Rebinding of NO ligands was observed only from site B of AHb1, regardless of conformation. In AHb2, the HisE7 side chain is removed from the bound ligand; rebinding barriers are low, and CO molecules can populate only primary docking site B. These results are interpreted in terms of differences in the active site structures and physiological functions. PMID:20666470

  19. PLIP: fully automated protein-ligand interaction profiler.

    PubMed

    Salentin, Sebastian; Schreiber, Sven; Haupt, V Joachim; Adasme, Melissa F; Schroeder, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The characterization of interactions in protein-ligand complexes is essential for research in structural bioinformatics, drug discovery and biology. However, comprehensive tools are not freely available to the research community. Here, we present the protein-ligand interaction profiler (PLIP), a novel web service for fully automated detection and visualization of relevant non-covalent protein-ligand contacts in 3D structures, freely available at projects.biotec.tu-dresden.de/plip-web. The input is either a Protein Data Bank structure, a protein or ligand name, or a custom protein-ligand complex (e.g. from docking). In contrast to other tools, the rule-based PLIP algorithm does not require any structure preparation. It returns a list of detected interactions on single atom level, covering seven interaction types (hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic contacts, pi-stacking, pi-cation interactions, salt bridges, water bridges and halogen bonds). PLIP stands out by offering publication-ready images, PyMOL session files to generate custom images and parsable result files to facilitate successive data processing. The full python source code is available for download on the website. PLIP's command-line mode allows for high-throughput interaction profiling. PMID:25873628

  20. Scoring functions for prediction of protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jui-Chih; Lin, Jung-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    The scoring functions for protein-ligand interactions plays central roles in computational drug design, virtual screening of chemical libraries for new lead identification, and prediction of possible binding targets of small chemical molecules. An ideal scoring function for protein-ligand interactions is expected to be able to recognize the native binding pose of a ligand on the protein surface among decoy poses, and to accurately predict the binding affinity (or binding free energy) so that the active molecules can be discriminated from the non-active ones. Due to the empirical nature of most, if not all, scoring functions for protein-ligand interactions, the general applicability of empirical scoring functions, especially to domains far outside training sets, is a major concern. In this review article, we will explore the foundations of different classes of scoring functions, their possible limitations, and their suitable application domains. We also provide assessments of several scoring functions on weakly-interacting protein-ligand complexes, which will be useful information in computational fragment-based drug design or virtual screening. PMID:23016847

  1. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, Albert J; Kanev, Georgi K; van Linden, Oscar P J; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  2. Structural basis for EGFR ligand sequestration by Argos

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Daryl E.; Stayrook, Steven E.; Shi, Fumin; Narayan, Kartik; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2008-06-26

    Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or ErbB/HER family and their activating ligands are essential regulators of diverse developmental processes. Inappropriate activation of these receptors is a key feature of many human cancers, and its reversal is an important clinical goal. A natural secreted antagonist of EGFR signalling, called Argos, was identified in Drosophila. We showed previously that Argos functions by directly binding (and sequestering) growth factor ligands that activate EGFR5. Here we describe the 1.6-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Argos bound to an EGFR ligand. Contrary to expectations, Argos contains no EGF-like domain. Instead, a trio of closely related domains (resembling a three-finger toxin fold) form a clamp-like structure around the bound EGF ligand. Although structurally unrelated to the receptor, Argos mimics EGFR by using a bipartite binding surface to entrap EGF. The individual Argos domains share unexpected structural similarities with the extracellular ligand-binding regions of transforming growth factor-{beta} family receptors. The three-domain clamp of Argos also resembles the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor, which uses a similar mechanism to engulf the EGF-like module of uPA. Our results indicate that undiscovered mammalian counterparts of Argos may exist among other poorly characterized structural homologues. In addition, the structures presented here define requirements for the design of artificial EGF-sequestering proteins that would be valuable anti-cancer therapeutics.

  3. Cloud Computing for Protein-Ligand Binding Site Comparison

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  4. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  5. Analysis of protein-ligand interactions by fluorescence polarization

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ana M.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2011-01-01

    Quantification of the associations between biomolecules is required both to predict and understand the interactions that underpin all biological activity. Fluorescence polarization (FP) provides a non-disruptive means of measuring the association of a fluorescent ligand with a larger molecule. We describe an FP assay in which binding of fluorescein-labelled inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) to N-terminal fragments of IP3 receptors can be characterised at different temperatures and in competition with other ligands. The assay allows the standard Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) changes of ligand binding to be determined. The method is applicable to any purified ligand-binding site for which an appropriate fluorescent ligand is available. FP can be used to measure low-affinity interactions in real-time without use of radioactive materials, it is non-destructive, and with appropriate care it can resolve ΔH° and ΔS°. The first part of the protocol, protein preparation, may take several weeks, while the FP measurements, once they have been optimised, would normally take 1-6 h. PMID:21372817

  6. Probing heterotrimeric G protein activation: applications to biased ligands

    PubMed Central

    Denis, Colette; Saulière, Aude; Galandrin, Ségolène; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Galés, Céline

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) drive numerous signaling pathways involved in the regulation of a broad range of physiologic processes. Today, they represent the largest target for modern drugs development with potential application in all clinical fields. Recently, the concept of “ligand-directed trafficking” has led to a conceptual revolution in pharmacological theory, thus opening new avenues for drug discovery. Accordingly, GPCRs do not function as simple on-off switch but rather as filters capable of selecting activation of specific signals and thus generating textured responses to ligands, a phenomenon often referred to as ligand-biased signaling. Also, one challenging task today remains optimization of pharmacological assays with increased sensitivity so to better appreciate the inherent texture of ligand responses. However, considering that a single receptor has pleiotropic signalling properties and that each signal can crosstalk at different levels, biased activity remains thus difficult to evaluate. One strategy to overcome these limitations would be examining the initial steps following receptor activation. Even if some G protein-independent functions have been recently described, heterotrimeric G protein activation remains a general hallmark for all GPCRs families and the first cellular event subsequent to agonist binding to the receptor. Herein, we review the different methodologies classically used or recently developed to monitor G protein activation and discuss them in the context of G protein biased -ligands. PMID:22229559

  7. A single ligand is sufficient to activate EGFR dimers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Cleveland, Thomas E.; Bouyain, Samuel; Byrne, Patrick O.; Longo, Patti A.; Leahy, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Crystal structures of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with bound ligand revealed symmetric, doubly ligated receptor dimers thought to represent physiologically active states. Such complexes fail to rationalize negative cooperativity of epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding to EGFR and the behavior of the ligandless EGFR homolog ErbB2/HER2, however. We report cell-based assays that provide evidence for active, singly ligated dimers of human EGFR and its homolog, ErbB4/HER4. We also report crystal structures of the ErbB4/HER4 extracellular region complexed with its ligand Neuregulin-1β that resolve two types of ErbB dimer when compared to EGFR:Ligand complexes. One type resembles the recently reported asymmetric dimer of Drosophila EGFR with a single high-affinity ligand bound and provides a model for singly ligated human ErbB dimers. These results unify models of vertebrate and invertebrate EGFR/ErbB signaling, imply that the tethered conformation of unliganded ErbBs evolved to prevent crosstalk among ErbBs, and establish a molecular basis for both negative cooperativity of ligand binding to vertebrate ErbBs and the absence of active ErbB2/HER2 homodimers in normal conditions. PMID:22699492

  8. Structure-guided development of heterodimer-selective GPCR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Harald; Schellhorn, Tamara; Gienger, Marie; Schaab, Carolin; Kaindl, Jonas; Leeb, Laurin; Clark, Timothy; Möller, Dorothee; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structures of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand complexes allow a rational design of novel molecular probes and drugs. Here we report the structure-guided design, chemical synthesis and biological investigations of bivalent ligands for dopamine D2 receptor/neurotensin NTS1 receptor (D2R/NTS1R) heterodimers. The compounds of types 1–3 consist of three different D2R pharmacophores bound to an affinity-generating lipophilic appendage, a polyethylene glycol-based linker and the NTS1R agonist NT(8-13). The bivalent ligands show binding affinity in the picomolar range for cells coexpressing both GPCRs and unprecedented selectivity (up to three orders of magnitude), compared with cells that only express D2Rs. A functional switch is observed for the bivalent ligands 3b,c inhibiting cAMP formation in cells singly expressing D2Rs but stimulating cAMP accumulation in D2R/NTS1R-coexpressing cells. Moreover, the newly synthesized bivalent ligands show a strong, predominantly NTS1R-mediated β-arrestin-2 recruitment at the D2R/NTS1R-coexpressing cells. PMID:27457610

  9. Insights into Protein–Ligand Interactions: Mechanisms, Models, and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xing; Li, Yi; Xia, Yuan-Ling; Ai, Shi-Meng; Liang, Jing; Sang, Peng; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Shu-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition, which is the process of biological macromolecules interacting with each other or various small molecules with a high specificity and affinity to form a specific complex, constitutes the basis of all processes in living organisms. Proteins, an important class of biological macromolecules, realize their functions through binding to themselves or other molecules. A detailed understanding of the protein–ligand interactions is therefore central to understanding biology at the molecular level. Moreover, knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for the protein-ligand recognition and binding will also facilitate the discovery, design, and development of drugs. In the present review, first, the physicochemical mechanisms underlying protein–ligand binding, including the binding kinetics, thermodynamic concepts and relationships, and binding driving forces, are introduced and rationalized. Next, three currently existing protein-ligand binding models—the “lock-and-key”, “induced fit”, and “conformational selection”—are described and their underlying thermodynamic mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the methods available for investigating protein–ligand binding affinity, including experimental and theoretical/computational approaches, are introduced, and their advantages, disadvantages, and challenges are discussed. PMID:26821017

  10. Comparing ligand interactions with multiple receptors via serial docking.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Miguel X; Kairys, Visvaldas; Gilson, Michael K

    2004-01-01

    Standard uses of ligand-receptor docking typically focus on the association of candidate ligands with a single targeted receptor, but actual applications increasingly require comparisons across multiple receptors. This study demonstrates that comparative docking to multiple receptors can help to select homology models for virtual compound screening and to discover ligands that bind to one set of receptors but not to another, potentially similar, set. A serial docking algorithm is furthermore described that reduces the computational costs of such calculations by testing compounds against a series of receptor structures and discarding a compound as soon as it fails to satisfy specified bind/no bind criteria for each receptor. The algorithm also realizes substantial efficiencies by taking advantage of the fact that a ligand typically binds in similar conformations to similar receptors. Thus, once detailed docking has been used to fit a ligand into the first of a series of similar receptors, much less extensive calculations can be used for the remaining structures. PMID:15554665

  11. Rapid flexible docking using a stochastic rotamer library of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Feng; Yin, Shuangye; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2010-01-01

    Existing flexible docking approaches model the ligand and receptor flexibility either separately or in a loosely-coupled manner, which captures the conformational changes inefficiently. Here, we propose a flexible docking approach, MedusaDock, which models both ligand and receptor flexibility simultaneously with sets of discrete rotamers. We develop an algorithm to build the ligand rotamer library “on-the-fly” during docking simulations. MedusaDock benchmarks demonstrate a rapid sampling efficiency and high prediction accuracy in both self-docking (to the co-crystallized state) and cross-docking (to a state co-crystallized with a different ligand), the latter of which mimics the virtual-screening procedure in computational drug discovery. We also perform a virtual-screening test of four flexible kinase targets including cyclin-dependent kinase 2, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, HIV reverse transcriptase, and HIV protease. We find significant improvements of virtual-screening enrichments when compared to rigid-receptor methods. The predictive power of MedusaDock in cross-docking and preliminary virtual-screening benchmarks highlights the importance to model both ligand and receptor flexibility simultaneously in computational docking. PMID:20712341

  12. PLIP: fully automated protein–ligand interaction profiler

    PubMed Central

    Salentin, Sebastian; Schreiber, Sven; Haupt, V. Joachim; Adasme, Melissa F.; Schroeder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of interactions in protein–ligand complexes is essential for research in structural bioinformatics, drug discovery and biology. However, comprehensive tools are not freely available to the research community. Here, we present the protein–ligand interaction profiler (PLIP), a novel web service for fully automated detection and visualization of relevant non-covalent protein–ligand contacts in 3D structures, freely available at projects.biotec.tu-dresden.de/plip-web. The input is either a Protein Data Bank structure, a protein or ligand name, or a custom protein–ligand complex (e.g. from docking). In contrast to other tools, the rule-based PLIP algorithm does not require any structure preparation. It returns a list of detected interactions on single atom level, covering seven interaction types (hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic contacts, pi-stacking, pi-cation interactions, salt bridges, water bridges and halogen bonds). PLIP stands out by offering publication-ready images, PyMOL session files to generate custom images and parsable result files to facilitate successive data processing. The full python source code is available for download on the website. PLIP's command-line mode allows for high-throughput interaction profiling. PMID:25873628

  13. Probing heterotrimeric G protein activation: applications to biased ligands.

    PubMed

    Denis, Colette; Saulière, Aude; Galandrin, Segolene; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Galés, Céline

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) drive numerous signaling pathways involved in the regulation of a broad range of physiologic processes. Today, they represent the largest target for modern drugs development with potential application in all clinical fields. Recently, the concept of "ligand-directed trafficking" has led to a conceptual revolution in pharmacological theory, thus opening new avenues for drug discovery. Accordingly, GPCRs do not function as simple on-off switch but rather as filters capable of selecting the activation of specific signals and thus generating texture responses to ligands, a phenomenon often referred to as ligand-biased signaling. Also, one challenging task today remains optimization of pharmacological assays with increased sensitivity so to better appreciate the inherent texture of ligands. However, considering that a single receptor has pleiotropic signaling properties and that each signal can crosstalk at different levels, biased activity remains thus difficult to evaluate. One strategy to overcome these limitations would be examining the initial steps following receptor activation. Even, if some G protein independent functions have been recently described, heterotrimeric G protein activation remains a general hallmark for all GPCRs families and the first cellular event subsequent to agonist binding to the receptor. Herein, we review the different methodologies classically used or recently developed to monitor G protein activation and discussed them in the context of G protein biased-ligands. PMID:22229559

  14. NKG2D ligands mediate immunosurveillance of senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Sagiv, Adi; Burton, Dominick G A; Moshayev, Zhana; Vadai, Ezra; Wensveen, Felix; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golani, Ofra; Polic, Bojan; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2016-02-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Induction of cellular senescence commonly coincides with an immunogenic phenotype that promotes self-elimination by components of the immune system, thereby facilitating tumor suppression and limiting excess fibrosis during wound repair. The mechanisms by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance are not completely understood. Here we show that ligands of an activating Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor (NKG2D), MICA and ULBP2 are consistently up-regulated following induction of replicative senescence, oncogene-induced senescence and DNA damage - induced senescence. MICA and ULBP2 proteins are necessary for efficient NK-mediated cytotoxicity towards senescent fibroblasts. The mechanisms regulating the initial expression of NKG2D ligands in senescent cells are dependent on a DNA damage response, whilst continuous expression of these ligands is regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. In liver fibrosis, the accumulation of senescent activated stellate cells is increased in mice lacking NKG2D receptor leading to increased fibrosis. Overall, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms regulating the expression of immune ligands in senescent cells and reveal the importance of NKG2D receptor-ligand interaction in protecting against liver fibrosis. PMID:26878797

  15. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-06-16

    We believe that the high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is the result of the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with amore » nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Additionally, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.« less

  16. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-06-16

    We believe that the high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is the result of the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with a nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Additionally, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.

  17. Ligand screening by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, V V

    2005-04-26

    NMR based methods to screen for high-affinity ligands have become an indispensable tool for designing rationalized drugs, as these offer a combination of good experimental design of the screening process and data interpretation methods, which together provide unprecedented information on the complex nature of protein-ligand interactions. These methods rely on measuring direct changes in the spectral parameters, that are often simpler than the complex experimental procedures used to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The goal of this review article is to provide the basic details of NMR based ligand-screening methods, with particular focus on the saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment. In addition, we provide an overview of other NMR experimental methods and a practical guide on how to go about designing and implementing them.

  18. Docking Screens for Novel Ligands Conferring New Biology.

    PubMed

    Irwin, John J; Shoichet, Brian K

    2016-05-12

    It is now plausible to dock libraries of 10 million molecules against targets over several days or weeks. When the molecules screened are commercially available, they may be rapidly tested to find new leads. Although docking retains important liabilities (it cannot calculate affinities accurately nor even reliably rank order high-scoring molecules), it can often can distinguish likely from unlikely ligands, often with hit rates above 10%. Here we summarize the improvements in libraries, target quality, and methods that have supported these advances, and the open access resources that make docking accessible. Recent docking screens for new ligands are sketched, as are the binding, crystallographic, and in vivo assays that support them. Like any technique, controls are crucial, and key experimental ones are reviewed. With such controls, docking campaigns can find ligands with new chemotypes, often revealing the new biology that may be docking's greatest impact over the next few years. PMID:26913380

  19. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands in cancer: friend and foe.

    PubMed

    Murray, Iain A; Patterson, Andrew D; Perdew, Gary H

    2014-12-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is best known for mediating the toxicity and tumour-promoting properties of the carcinogen 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, commonly referred to as ‘dioxin’. AHR influences the major stages of tumorigenesis — initiation, promotion, progression and metastasis — and physiologically relevant AHR ligands are often formed during disease states or during heightened innate and adaptive immune responses. Interestingly, ligand specificity and affinity vary between rodents and humans. Studies of aggressive tumours and tumour cell lines show increased levels of AHR and constitutive localization of this receptor in the nucleus. This suggests that the AHR is chronically activated in tumours, thus facilitating tumour progression. This Review discusses the role of AHR in tumorigenesis and the potential for therapeutic modulation of its activity in tumours. PMID:25568920

  20. Memetic algorithms for ligand expulsion from protein cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydzewski, J.; Nowak, W.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand diffusion through a protein interior is a fundamental process governing biological signaling and enzymatic catalysis. A complex topology of channels in proteins leads often to difficulties in modeling ligand escape pathways by classical molecular dynamics simulations. In this paper, two novel memetic methods for searching the exit paths and cavity space exploration are proposed: Memory Enhanced Random Acceleration (MERA) Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Immune Algorithm (IA). In MERA, a pheromone concept is introduced to optimize an expulsion force. In IA, hybrid learning protocols are exploited to predict ligand exit paths. They are tested on three protein channels with increasing complexity: M2 muscarinic G-protein-coupled receptor, enzyme nitrile hydratase, and heme-protein cytochrome P450cam. In these cases, the memetic methods outperform simulated annealing and random acceleration molecular dynamics. The proposed algorithms are general and appropriate in all problems where an accelerated transport of an object through a network of channels is studied.

  1. Identification of nucleolin as a new L-selectin ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Harms, G; Kraft, R; Grelle, G; Volz, B; Dernedde, J; Tauber, R

    2001-01-01

    Apart from leucocyte-endothelial interactions, the adhesion molecule L-selectin mediates the homotypic adhesion of leucocytes during recruitment at sites of acute inflammation, as well as intercellular adhesion of haematopoietic progenitor cells during haematopoiesis. There is evidence that, in addition to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, other as-yet-unidentified proteins function as L-selectin ligands on human leucocytes and haematopoietic progenitor cells. In the present study, we show: (i) by affinity chromatography on L-selectin-agarose; (ii) by protein identification using MS; and (iii) by covalent cell-surface labelling with sulphosuccinimidyl-2-(biotinamido)ethyl-1,3-dithiopropionate that the multifunctional nuclear protein nucleolin is partly exposed on the cell surface, and is a ligand of L-selectin in human leucocytes and haematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:11736641

  2. Ligands for the Nuclear Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Sascha

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors, which represent a primary class of drug targets. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a key player in various biological processes. PPARγ is widely known as the target protein of the thiazolidinediones for treating type 2 diabetes. Moreover, PPARγ ligands can induce anti-inflammatory and potentially additional beneficial effects. Recent mechanistic insights of PPARγ modulation give hope the next generation of efficient PPARγ-based drugs with fewer side effects can be developed. Furthermore, chemical approaches that make use of synergistic action of combinatorial ligands are promising alternatives for providing tailored medicine. Lessons learned from fine-tuning the action of PPARγ can provide avenues for efficient molecular intervention via many other nuclear receptors to combat common diseases. PMID:26435213

  3. A Rapid Method for Refolding Cell Surface Receptors and Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lu; Wu, Ling; Li, Feng; Burnham, Robert S.; Pizarro, Juan C.; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Production of membrane-associated cell surface receptors and their ligands is often a cumbersome, expensive, and time-consuming process that limits detailed structural and functional characterization of this important class of proteins. Here we report a rapid method for refolding inclusion-body-based, recombinant cell surface receptors and ligands in one day, a speed equivalent to that of soluble protein production. This method efficiently couples modular on-column immobilized metal ion affinity purification and solid-phase protein refolding. We demonstrated the general utility of this method for producing multiple functionally active immunoreceptors, ligands, and viral decoys, including challenging cell surface proteins that cannot be produced using typical dialysis- or dilution-based refolding approaches. PMID:27215173

  4. Chiroptical activity in colloidal quantum dots coated with achiral ligands.

    PubMed

    Melnikau, Dzmitry; Savateeva, Diana; Gaponik, Nikolai; Govorov, Alexander O; Rakovich, Yury P

    2016-01-25

    We studied the chiroptical properties of colloidal solution of CdSe and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with a cubic lattice structure which were initially prepared without use of any chiral molecules and coated with achiral ligands. We demonstrate circular dichroism (CD) activity around first and second excitonic transition of these CdSe based nanocrystals. We consider that this chiroptical activity is caused by imbalance in racemic mixtures of QDs between the left and right handed nanoparticles, which appears as a result of the formation of various defects or incorporation of impurities into crystallographic structure during their synthesis. We demonstrate that optical activity of colloidal solution of CdSe QDs with achiral ligands weakly depends on the QDs size and number of ZnS monolayers, but does not depend on the nature of achiral ligands or polarity of the solution. PMID:26832599

  5. Memetic algorithms for ligand expulsion from protein cavities.

    PubMed

    Rydzewski, J; Nowak, W

    2015-09-28

    Ligand diffusion through a protein interior is a fundamental process governing biological signaling and enzymatic catalysis. A complex topology of channels in proteins leads often to difficulties in modeling ligand escape pathways by classical molecular dynamics simulations. In this paper, two novel memetic methods for searching the exit paths and cavity space exploration are proposed: Memory Enhanced Random Acceleration (MERA) Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Immune Algorithm (IA). In MERA, a pheromone concept is introduced to optimize an expulsion force. In IA, hybrid learning protocols are exploited to predict ligand exit paths. They are tested on three protein channels with increasing complexity: M2 muscarinic G-protein-coupled receptor, enzyme nitrile hydratase, and heme-protein cytochrome P450cam. In these cases, the memetic methods outperform simulated annealing and random acceleration molecular dynamics. The proposed algorithms are general and appropriate in all problems where an accelerated transport of an object through a network of channels is studied. PMID:26428990

  6. Ligand-gated Diffusion Across the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    B Lepore; M Indic; H Pham; E Hearn; D Patel; B van den Berg

    2011-12-31

    Ligand-gated channels, in which a substrate transport pathway is formed as a result of the binding of a small-molecule chemical messenger, constitute a diverse class of membrane proteins with important functions in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Despite their widespread nature, no ligand-gated channels have yet been found within the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria. Here we show, using in vivo transport assays, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and X-ray crystallography, that high-affinity (submicromolar) substrate binding to the OM long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL from Escherichia coli causes conformational changes in the N terminus that open up a channel for substrate diffusion. The OM long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL from E. coli is a unique paradigm for OM diffusion-driven transport, in which ligand gating within a {beta}-barrel membrane protein is a prerequisite for channel formation.

  7. Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Allosteric Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Topographically distinct, druggable, allosteric sites may be present on all G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As such, targeting these sites with synthetic small molecules offers an attractive approach to develop receptor-subtype selective chemical leads for the development of novel therapies. A crucial part of drug development is to understand the acute and chronic effects of such allosteric modulators at their corresponding GPCR target. Key regulatory processes including cell-surface delivery, endocytosis, recycling, and down-regulation tightly control the number of receptors at the surface of the cell. As many GPCR therapeutics will be administered chronically, understanding how such ligands modulate these regulatory pathways forms an essential part of the characterization of novel GPCR ligands. This is true for both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of GPCR regulatory processes with a particular focus on the effects and implications of allosteric targeting of GPCRs. PMID:23398684

  8. Heterobifunctional PEG Ligands for Bioconjugation Reactions on Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bloemen, Maarten; Van Stappen, Thomas; Willot, Pieter; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Koeckelberghs, Guy; Geukens, Nick; Gils, Ann; Verbiest, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Ever since iron oxide nanoparticles have been recognized as promising scaffolds for biomedical applications, their surface functionalization has become even more important. We report the synthesis of a novel polyethylene glycol-based ligand that combines multiple advantageous properties for these applications. The ligand is covalently bound to the surface via a siloxane group, while its polyethylene glycol backbone significantly improves the colloidal stability of the particle in complex environments. End-capping the molecule with a carboxylic acid introduces a variety of coupling chemistry possibilities. In this study an antibody targeting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 was coupled to the surface and its presence and binding activity was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance experiments. The results indicate that the ligand has high potential towards biomedical applications where colloidal stability and advanced functionality is crucial. PMID:25275378

  9. RIBOSE MODIFIED NUCLEOSIDES AND NUCLEOTIDES AS LIGANDS FOR PURINE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, R. G.; Nandanan, E.; Kim, H. S.; Moro, S.; Kim, Y. C.; Lee, K.; Barak, D.; Marquez, V. E.; Ji, X. D.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling of receptors for adenosine and nucleotide (P2) receptors with docked ligand, based on mutagenesis, was carried out. Adenosine 3′,5′-bisphosphate derivatives act as selective P2Y1 antagonists/partial agonists. The ribose moiety was replaced with carbocyclics, smaller and larger rings, conformationally constrained rings, and acyclics, producing compounds that retained receptor affinity. Conformational constraints were built into the ribose rings of nucleoside and nucleotide ligands using the methanocarba approach, i.e. fused cyclopropane and cyclopentane rings in place of ribose, suggesting a preference for the Northern (N) conformation among ligands for P2Y1 and A1 and A3ARs. PMID:11563046

  10. New formamidine ligands and their mixed ligand palladium(II) oxalate complexes: Synthesis, characterization, DFT calculations and in vitro cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Ahmed A.; Alajrawy, Othman I.; Attabi, Fawzy A.; Shaaban, Mohamed R.; Linert, W.

    2016-01-01

    A series of new ternary palladium(II) complexes of the type [Pd(L1-4)ox]·xH2O where L = formamidine ligands and ox = oxalate, were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility, UV-Vis, infrared (IR) and mass spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The spectroscopic data indicated that the formamidine ligands act as bidentate N2 donors and the oxalate as O2 ligand. The complexes (1-4) are diamagnetic and the optimization of their structures indicated that the geometry is distorted square planer with O-Pd-O and N-Pd-N bond angles ranged 82.70-83.87° and 88.21-95.02°; respectively which is acceptable for the heteroleptic complexes. The dipole moment of the complexes (13.97-18.77 Debye) indicating that the complexes are more polarized than the ligands (1.93-4.96 Debye). The complexes are thermally stable as shown from their relatively higher overall activation energies (441-688 kJ mol-1). The ligands and the complexes are proved to have good cytotoxicity with IC50 (μM) in the range of (0.011-0.168) against MCF-7, (0.012-0.150) against HCT-116, (0.042-0.094) against PC-3 and (0.006-0.222) against HepG-2 cell lines, which open the field for further application as antitumor compounds.

  11. A tandem regression-outlier analysis of a ligand cellular system for key structural modifications around ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A tandem technique of hard equipment is often used for the chemical analysis of a single cell to first isolate and then detect the wanted identities. The first part is the separation of wanted chemicals from the bulk of a cell; the second part is the actual detection of the important identities. To identify the key structural modifications around ligand binding, the present study aims to develop a counterpart of tandem technique for cheminformatics. A statistical regression and its outliers act as a computational technique for separation. Results A PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) agonist cellular system was subjected to such an investigation. Results show that this tandem regression-outlier analysis, or the prioritization of the context equations tagged with features of the outliers, is an effective regression technique of cheminformatics to detect key structural modifications, as well as their tendency of impact to ligand binding. Conclusions The key structural modifications around ligand binding are effectively extracted or characterized out of cellular reactions. This is because molecular binding is the paramount factor in such ligand cellular system and key structural modifications around ligand binding are expected to create outliers. Therefore, such outliers can be captured by this tandem regression-outlier analysis. PMID:23627990

  12. Protein-ligand and membrane-ligand interactions in pharmacology: the case of the translocator protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Hatty, Claire R; Banati, Richard B

    2015-10-01

    The targets of many small molecule drugs are membrane proteins, and traditionally the focus of pharmacology is on the interaction between such receptors and their small molecule drug ligands. However, the lipid membranes of cells and organelles are increasingly appreciated as diverse and dynamic structures that also specifically interact with small molecule drugs and peptides, causing profound changes in the properties of these membranes, and modulating the function of the membrane and the proteins within it. Drug-membrane interactions are likely to have a role in both the therapeutic and toxic activity of a variety of compounds, and their role in the overall pharmacological effect of a drug needs to be understood more clearly. This is the case for the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) and its ligands, where functions that were established based on pharmacological studies are being called into question. Re-examining the putative functions of the TSPO and the effects of its ligands reveals a need to consider in more detail the interplay between protein-ligand and membrane-ligand interactions, and the modulatory relationship between TSPO and the lipid membrane. PMID:26238176

  13. Improved Estimation of Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy by Using the Ligand-Entropy and Mobility of Water Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    We previously developed the direct interaction approximation (DIA) method to estimate the protein-ligand binding free energy (ΔG). The DIA method estimates the ΔG value based on the direct van der Waals and electrostatic interaction energies between the protein and the ligand. In the current study, the effect of the entropy of the ligand was introduced with protein dynamic properties by molecular dynamics simulations, and the interaction between each residue of the protein and the ligand was also weighted considering the hydration of each residue. The molecular dynamics simulation of the apo target protein gave the hydration effect of each residue, under the assumption that the residues, which strongly bind the water molecules, are important in the protein-ligand binding. These two effects improved the reliability of the DIA method. In fact, the parameters used in the DIA became independent of the target protein. The averaged error of ΔG estimation was 1.3 kcal/mol and the correlation coefficient between the experimental ΔG value and the calculated ΔG value was 0.75. PMID:24276169

  14. Secondary ligand-directed assembly of Co(II) coordination polymers based on a pyridine carboxylate ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ke-Li; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Cai, Yi-Ni; Xu, Xiao-Wei; Feng, Yun-Long

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the influence of hydrogen bonds and secondary ligands on the structures and properties of the resulting frameworks, five new Co(II) compounds have been synthesized by the reactions of Co(II) salts and 3,5-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethoxy)benzoic acid (HL) with four rationally selected dicarboxylic acid ligands. Without secondary ligand, we got one compound [CoL2(H2O)2]n·2nH2O (1), which possesses a 1D chain structure. In the presence of ancillary ligands, namely, 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylic acid (H2adbc), terephthalic acid (H2tpa), thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H2tdc) and 1,4-benzenedithioacetic acid (H2bdtc), four 3D structures [Co2L2(adbc)]n·nH2O (2), [Co2L2(tpa)]n (3), [Co2L2(tdc)]n (4), [Co2L2(bdtc)(H2O)]n (5) were obtained, respectively. It can be observed from the architectures of 1-5 that hydrogen bonds and secondary ligands both have great effects on the spatial connective fashions, resulting in the formation of various dimensional compounds. The XRPD, TGA data of title polymers and the magnetic properties for 2 and 5 have also been investigated.

  15. Conformational diversity of flexible ligand in metal-organic frameworks controlled by size-matching mixed ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Xiu-Ni; Qin, Lan; Yan, Xiao-Zhi; Yu, Lei; Xie, Yi-Xin; Han, Lei

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal reactions of N-auxiliary flexible exo-bidentate ligand 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane (bpp) and carboxylates ligands naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (2,6-H2ndc) or 4,4‧-(hydroxymethylene)dibenzoic acid (H2hmdb), in the presence of cadmium(II) salts have given rise to two novel metal-organic frameworks based on flexible ligands (FL-MOFs), namely, [Cd2(2,6-ndc)2(bpp)(DMF)]·2DMF (1) and [Cd3(hmdb)3(bpp)]·2DMF·2EtOH (2) (DMF=N,N-Dimethylformamide). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that compound 1 exhibits a three-dimensional self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster second building unit. Compound 2 displays an infinite three-dimensional 'Lucky Clover' shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster and V-shaped organic linkers. The flexible bpp ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which are successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process.

  16. Complexation of trivalent americium and lanthanides with terdentate 'N' donor ligands: the role of rigidity in the ligand structure.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Gadly, Trilochan; Pathak, Priyanath; Ghosh, Sunil K; Mohapatra, Manoj; Ghanty, Tapan K; Mohapatra, Prasanta K

    2014-08-28

    A systematic study on the Ln(3+) complexation behaviour with two terdentate 'N' donor ligands of varying structural rigidity, viz. 5,6-dimethyl-(1,2,4)-triazinylbipyridine (Me2TBipy) and 5,6-dimethyl-(1,2,4)-triazinylphenanthroline (Me2TPhen), is performed in the present work by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (ESI-MS) studies. These studies indicate the formation of a 1 : 1 complex of La(3+), 1 : 2 complexes of Eu(3+) and Er(3+) with both the ligands. Density functional theoretical (DFT) study is carried out to determine the solution phase structure of the Eu(3+) complex considering the species (from UV-Vis spectrophotometry) and C2v site symmetry around the Eu(3+) ion (from TRFS study). Me2TPhen is found to be a stronger complexing ligand as compared to Me2TBipy irrespective of the Ln(3+) ions. The solid state crystal structure of the La(3+) complex of Me2TPhen is determined using the single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD) technique. The complexation of the trivalent Am(3+) ion is also studied with both these ligands using UV-Vis spectrophotometric titrations which show the formation of 1 : 2 complexes with higher complexation constant values as compared to all the Ln(3+) ions studied, indicating the selectivity of these ligands for the trivalent actinides over the lanthanides. PMID:25001925

  17. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial studies on some mixed ligand thorium complexes with N- and O-donor ligands.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sunil S; Thakur, Ganesh A; Shaikh, Manzoor M

    2011-01-01

    Mixed ligand Th(IV) complexes of the type [M(Q)(L)(NO3)2] x 2H2O have been synthesized using 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) as a primary ligand and N- and/or O- donor amino acids (HL) such as L-threonine, L-tryptophan and L-isoleucine as secondary ligands. The metal complexes have been characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, electrical conductance, room temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements, spectral and thermal studies. The electrical conductance studies of the complexes in DMF in 10(-3). M concentration indicate their non-electrolytic nature. Room temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed diamagnetic nature of the complexes. Electronic absorption spectra of the complexes show intra-ligand and charge transfer transitions, respectively. Bonding of the metal ion through N- and O-donor atoms of the ligands revealed by IR studies and the chemical environment of the protons is also confirmed by NMR studies. The thermal analysis data of the complexes indicate the presence of crystalline water molecules. The tube dilution method has been used to study the antibacterial activity of the complexes against the pathogenic bacteria S. aureus, C. diphtheriae, S. typhi and E. coli. PMID:22125953

  18. Cellular trafficking of quantum dot-ligand bioconjugates and their induction of changes in normal routing of unconjugated ligands.

    PubMed

    Tekle, Christina; Deurs, Bo van; Sandvig, Kirsten; Iversen, Tore-Geir

    2008-07-01

    Can quantum dots (Qdots) act as relevant intracellular probes to investigate routing of ligands in live cells? The intracellular trafficking of Qdots that were coupled to the plant toxin ricin, Shiga toxin, or the ligand transferrin (Tf) was studied by confocal fluorescence microscopy. The Tf:Qdots were internalized by clathrin-dependent endocytosis as fast as Tf, but their recycling was blocked. Unlike Shiga toxin, the Shiga:Qdot bioconjugate was not routed to the Golgi apparatus. The internalized ricin:Qdot bioconjugates localized to the same endosomes as ricin itself but could not be visualized in the Golgi apparatus. Importantly, we find that the endosomal accumulation of ricin:Qdots affects endosome-to-Golgi transport of both ricin and Shiga toxin: Transport of ricin was reduced whereas transport of Shiga toxin was increased. In conclusion, the data reveal that, although coupling of Qdots to a ligand does not necessarily change the endocytic pathway normally used by the ligands studied, it appears that the ligand-coupled Qdot nanoparticles can be arrested within endosomes and somehow perturb the normal endosomal sorting in cells. Thus, the results demonstrate that Qdots may have severe consequences on cell physiology. PMID:18570482

  19. Solvent fluctuations in hydrophobic cavity–ligand binding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Setny, Piotr; Baron, Riccardo; Michael Kekenes-Huskey, Peter; McCammon, J. Andrew; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Water plays a crucial part in virtually all protein–ligand binding processes in and out of equilibrium. Here, we investigate the role of water in the binding kinetics of a ligand to a prototypical hydrophobic pocket by explicit-water molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and implicit diffusional approaches. The concave pocket in the unbound state exhibits wet/dry hydration oscillations whose magnitude and time scale are significantly amplified by the approaching ligand. In turn, the ligand’s stochastic motion intimately couples to the slow hydration fluctuations, leading to a sixfold-enhanced friction in the vicinity of the pocket entrance. The increased friction considerably decelerates association in the otherwise barrierless system, indicating the importance of molecular-scale hydrodynamic effects in cavity–ligand binding arising due to capillary fluctuations. We derive and analyze the diffusivity profile and show that the mean first passage time distribution from the MD simulation can be accurately reproduced by a standard Brownian dynamics simulation if the appropriate position-dependent friction profile is included. However, long-time decays in the water–ligand (random) force autocorrelation demonstrate violation of the Markovian assumption, challenging standard diffusive approaches for rate prediction. Remarkably, the static friction profile derived from the force correlations strongly resembles the profile derived on the Markovian assumption apart from a simple shift in space, which can be rationalized by a time–space retardation in the ligand’s downhill dynamics toward the pocket. The observed spatiotemporal hydrodynamic coupling may be of biological importance providing the time needed for conformational receptor–ligand adjustments, typical of the induced-fit paradigm. PMID:23297241

  20. Dithiocarbamates as capping ligands for water-soluble quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjie; Schnoes, Allison M; Clapp, Aaron R

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the suitability of dithiocarbamate (DTC) species as capping ligands for colloidal CdSe-ZnS quantum dots (QDs). DTC ligands are generated by reacting carbon disulfide (CS(2)) with primary or secondary amines on appropriate precursor molecules. A biphasic exchange procedure efficiently replaces the existing hydrophobic capping ligands on the QD surface with the newly formed DTCs. The reaction conversion is conveniently monitored by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Due to their inherent water solubility and variety of side chain functional groups, we used several amino acids as precursors in this reaction/exchange procedure. The performance of DTC-ligands, as evaluated by the preservation of luminescence and colloidal stability, varied widely among amino precursors. For the best DTC-ligand and QD combinations, the quantum yield of the water-soluble QDs rivaled that of the original hydrophobic-capped QDs dispersed in organic solvents. The mean density of DTC-ligands per nanocrystal was estimated through a mass balance calculation which suggested nearly complete coverage of the available nanocrystal surface. The accessibility of the QD surface was evaluated by self-assembly of His-tagged dye-labeled proteins and peptides using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. DTC-capped QDs were also exposed to cell cultures to evaluate their stability and potential use for biological applications. In general, DTC-capped CdSe-ZnS QDs have many advantages over other water-soluble QD formulations and provide a flexible chemistry for controlling the QD surface functionalization. Despite previous literature reports of DTC-stabilized nanocrystals, this study is the first formal investigation of a biphasic exchange method for generating biocompatible core-shell QDs. PMID:21053924

  1. Protein-ligand docking with multiple flexible side chains.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Sanner, Michel F

    2008-09-01

    In this work, we validate and analyze the results of previously published cross docking experiments and classify failed dockings based on the conformational changes observed in the receptors. We show that a majority of failed experiments (i.e. 25 out of 33, involving four different receptors: cAPK, CDK2, Ricin and HIVp) are due to conformational changes in side chains near the active site. For these cases, we identify the side chains to be made flexible during docking calculation by superimposing receptors and analyzing steric overlap between various ligands and receptor side chains. We demonstrate that allowing these side chains to assume rotameric conformations enables the successful cross docking of 19 complexes (ligand all atom RMSD < 2.0 A) using our docking software FLIPDock. The number of side receptor side chains interacting with a ligand can vary according to the ligand's size and shape. Hence, when starting from a complex with a particular ligand one might have to extend the region of potential interacting side chains beyond the ones interacting with the known ligand. We discuss distance-based methods for selecting additional side chains in the neighborhood of the known active site. We show that while using the molecular surface to grow the neighborhood is more efficient than Euclidian-distance selection, the number of side chains selected by these methods often remains too large and additional methods for reducing their count are needed. Despite these difficulties, using geometric constraints obtained from the network of bonded and non-bonded interactions to rank residues and allowing the top ranked side chains to be flexible during docking makes 22 out of 25 complexes successful. PMID:18034309

  2. Bifunctional Ligands Allow Deliberate Extrinsic Reprogramming of the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Højfeldt, Jonas W.; Cruz-Rodríguez, Osvaldo; Imaeda, Yasuhiro; Van Dyke, Aaron R.; Carolan, James P.; Mapp, Anna K.

    2014-01-01

    Therapies based on conventional nuclear receptor ligands are extremely powerful, yet their broad and long-term use is often hindered by undesired side effects that are often part of the receptor's biological function. Selective control of nuclear receptors such as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) using conventional ligands has proven particularly challenging. Because they act solely in an allosteric manner, conventional ligands are constrained to act via cofactors that can intrinsically partner with the receptor. Furthermore, effective means to rationally encode a bias for specific coregulators are generally lacking. Using the (GR) as a framework, we demonstrate here a versatile approach, based on bifunctional ligands, that extends the regulatory repertoire of GR in a deliberate and controlled manner. By linking the macrolide FK506 to a conventional agonist (dexamethasone) or antagonist (RU-486), we demonstrate that it is possible to bridge the intact receptor to either positively or negatively acting coregulatory proteins bearing an FK506 binding protein domain. Using this strategy, we show that extrinsic recruitment of a strong activation function can enhance the efficacy of the full agonist dexamethasone and reverse the antagonist character of RU-486 at an endogenous locus. Notably, the extrinsic recruitment of histone deacetylase-1 reduces the ability of GR to activate transcription from a canonical GR response element while preserving ligand-mediated repression of nuclear factor-κB. By providing novel ways for the receptor to engage specific coregulators, this unique ligand design approach has the potential to yield both novel tools for GR study and more selective therapeutics. PMID:24422633

  3. Nanocrystal Inks without Ligands: Stable Colloids of Bare Germanium Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Zachary C.; Kortshagen, Uwe R.

    2011-05-11

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals typically have ligands attached to their surfaces that afford solubility in common solvents but hinder charge transport in nanocrystal films. Here, an alternative route is explored in which bare germanium nanocrystals are solubilized by select solvents to form stable colloids without the use of ligands. A survey of candidate solvents shows that germanium nanocrystals are completely solubilized by benzonitrile, likely because of electrostatic stabilization. Films cast from these dispersions are uniform, dense, and smooth, making them suitable for device applications without postdeposition treatment.

  4. Mesoporous organosilica nanotubes containing a chelating ligand in their walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Goto, Yasutomo; Maegawa, Yoshifumi; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Inagaki, Shinji

    2014-11-01

    We report the synthesis of organosilica nanotubes containing 2,2'-bipyridine chelating ligands within their walls, employing a single-micelle-templating method. These nanotubes have an average pore diameter of 7.8 nm and lengths of several hundred nanometers. UV-vis absorption spectra and scanning transmission electron microscopy observations of immobilized nanotubes with an iridium complex on the bipyridine ligands showed that the 2,2'-bipyridine groups were homogeneously distributed in the benzene-silica walls. The iridium complex, thus, immobilized on the nanotubes exhibited efficient catalytic activity for water oxidation using Ce4+, due to the ready access of reactants to the active sites in the nanotubes.

  5. Two ligands for a GPCR, proton vs lysolipid.

    PubMed

    Im, Dong-Soon

    2005-12-01

    Recently, two different chemicals have been matched as ligands with the same G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Double-pairing of OGR1 family GPCRs with proton and lysolipid raises several questions. First, whether both are the real ligands for the GPCRs. Second, whether modulation of a GPCR by two chemicals could be possible. Third, one of the chemicals is proton. Proton-sensing not only is a new action mode of GPCR activation, but also it could be generalized in other GPCRs. In this review, I would like to summarize the issue and discuss questions with pharmacological criteria. PMID:16297340

  6. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    E Butler; J Wang; Y Xiong; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for how the glycine riboswitch cooperatively regulates gene expression.

  7. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  8. Bonding in titanocenyl complexes containing O,O‧-cyclic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradie, Jeanet

    Density functional theory calculations show that the formal 16-electron count of d0 [Cp2TiIV(O,O‧-BID)]0/1 complexes containing a O,O‧-chelated bidentate ligand O,O‧-BID of different ring size, is increased via Ti←O π bonding when both the O donor atoms carry a formal negative charge. The Ti←O π bonding occurs by symmetry lowering of the complex by either symmetrical (Cs) or unsymmetrical (C2) folding of the O,O‧-BID ligand round the O···O axis. An NBO analysis confirms the Ti←O π charge transfer via back-bonding.

  9. Ultrafast electron trapping in ligand-exchanged quantum dot assemblies.

    PubMed

    Turk, Michael E; Vora, Patrick M; Fafarman, Aaron T; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R; Kikkawa, James M

    2015-02-24

    We use time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence and absorption to characterize the low-temperature optical properties of CdSe quantum dot solids after exchanging native aliphatic ligands for thiocyanate and subsequent thermal annealing. In contrast to trends established at room temperature, our data show that at low temperature the band-edge absorptive bleach is dominated by 1S3/2h hole occupation in the quantum dot interior. We find that our ligand treatments, which bring enhanced interparticle coupling, lead to faster surface state electron trapping, a greater proportion of surface-related photoluminescence, and decreased band-edge photoluminescence lifetimes. PMID:25635923

  10. Calculation of Mg(+)-ligand relative binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The calculated relative binding energies of 16 organic molecules to Mg(+) are compared with experimental results where available. The geometries of the ligands and the Mg(+)-ligand complexes arc optimized at the self-consistent field level using a 6-31G* basis set. The Mg(+) binding energies are evaluated using second-order perturbation theory and basis sets of triple-sigma quality augmented with two sets of polarization functions. This level of theory is calibrated against higher levels of theory for selected systems. The computed binding energies are accurate to about 2 kcal/mol.

  11. Coordination chemistry of poly(thioether)borate ligands.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Charles G

    2010-08-01

    This review traces the development and application of the tris(thioether)borate ligands, tripodal ligands with highly polarizable thioether donors. Areas of emphasis include the basic coordination chemistry of the mid-to-late first row transition metals (Fe, Ni, Co, Cu), and the role of the thioether substituent in directing complex formation, the modeling of zinc thiolate protein active sites, high-spin organo-iron and organo-cobalt chemistry, the preparation of monovalent complexes of Fe, Co and Ni, and dioxygen and sulfur activation by monovalent nickel complexes. PMID:20607091

  12. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Ligand Interactions: Structural Cross Talk between Ligands and the Extracellular Domain

    PubMed Central

    West, Graham M.; Willard, Francis S.; Sloop, Kyle W.; Showalter, Aaron D.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in pancreatic β-cells potentiates insulin production and is a current therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Like other class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the GLP-1R contains an N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. N-terminal truncations on the peptide agonist generate antagonists capable of binding to the extracellular domain, but not capable of activating full length receptor. The main objective of this study was to use Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) to identify how the amide hydrogen bonding network of peptide ligands and the extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R) were altered by binding interactions and to then use this platform to validate direct binding events for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. The HDX studies presented here for two glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) peptide ligands indicates that the antagonist exendin-4[9-39] is significantly destabilized in the presence of nonionic detergents as compared to the agonist exendin-4. Furthermore, HDX can detect stabilization of exendin-4 and exendin-4[9-39] hydrogen bonding networks at the N-terminal helix [Val19 to Lys27] upon binding to the N-terminal extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R). In addition we show hydrogen bonding network stabilization on nGLP-1R in response to ligand binding, and validate direct binding events with the extracellular domain of the receptor for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. PMID:25180755

  13. Predicting Electrophoretic Mobility of Protein-Ligand Complexes for Ligands from DNA-Encoded Libraries of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiayin; Krylova, Svetlana M; Cherney, Leonid T; Hale, Robert L; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Chiu, Cynthia H; Shaginian, Alex; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-05-17

    Selection of target-binding ligands from DNA-encoded libraries of small molecules (DELSMs) is a rapidly developing approach in drug-lead discovery. Methods of kinetic capillary electrophoresis (KCE) may facilitate highly efficient homogeneous selection of ligands from DELSMs. However, KCE methods require accurate prediction of electrophoretic mobilities of protein-ligand complexes. Such prediction, in turn, requires a theory that would be applicable to DNA tags of different structures used in different DELSMs. Here we present such a theory. It utilizes a model of a globular protein connected, through a single point (small molecule), to a linear DNA tag containing a combination of alternating double-stranded and single-stranded DNA (dsDNA and ssDNA) regions of varying lengths. The theory links the unknown electrophoretic mobility of protein-DNA complex with experimentally determined electrophoretic mobilities of the protein and DNA. Mobility prediction was initially tested by using a protein interacting with 18 ligands of various combinations of dsDNA and ssDNA regions, which mimicked different DELSMs. For all studied ligands, deviation of the predicted mobility from the experimentally determined value was within 11%. Finally, the prediction was tested for two proteins and two ligands with a DNA tag identical to those of DELSM manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. Deviation between the predicted and experimentally determined mobilities did not exceed 5%. These results confirm the accuracy and robustness of our model, which makes KCE methods one step closer to their practical use in selection of drug leads, and diagnostic probes from DELSMs. PMID:27119259

  14. Mixed ligand complexes of bis(phenylimine) Schiff base ligands incorporating pyridinium moiety. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Wahab, Zeinab H. Abd

    2005-04-01

    The synthesis and structural characterization of mixed ligand complexes derived from 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehydebis( o-hydroxyphenylimine), 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehydebis( p-hydroxyphenylimine) (1 ry ligands) and 2-aminopyridne (2 ry ligand) are reported. The ligands and their transition metal complexes were characterized on the bases of their elemental analyses, IR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analysis (TGA). The mixed ligand complexes are formed in the 1:1:1 (M:L 1 or L 2:L') ratio as found from the elemental analyses and found to have the formulae [MX 2(L 1 or L 2)(L')]· nH 2O where M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II), L 1 = 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehydebis( p-hydroxyphenylimine), L 2 = 2,6-pyridine dicarboxaldehydebis( o-hydroxyphenylimine), L' = 2-aminopyridine, X = Cl - in case of Cu(II) complex and Br - in case of Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes and y = 0-3. The molar conductance data reveal that the chelates are non-electrolytes. IR spectra show that the Schiff bases are coordinated to the metal ions in a terdentate manner with NNN donor sites of the pyridine- N and two azomethine- N. While 2-aminopyridine coordinated to the metal ions via its pyridine- N. Magnetic and solid reflectance spectra are used to infer the coordinating capacity of the ligand and the geometrical structure of these complexes are found to be octahedral. The thermal behaviour of these chelates shows that the hydrated water molecules and the anions are removed in a successive two steps followed immediately by decomposition of the ligands (L 1, L 2 and L') in the subsequent steps. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, E*, Δ H*, Δ S* and Δ G* are calculated from the TG curves and discussed. The ligands and their metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities and the findings have been reported, explained and compared with some known antibiotics.

  15. Tunable Phosphoramidite Ligands for Asymmetric Hydrovinylation: Ligands par excellence for Generation of All-Carbon Quaternary Centers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig R; Lim, Hwan Jung; Zhang, Aibin; Rajanbabu, T V

    2009-01-01

    1-Alkylstyrenes undergo efficient hydrovinylation (addition of ethylene) in the presence of a Ni-catalyst prepared from [(allyl)NiBr](2), Na(+) [BAr(4)](-) (Ar = 3,5-bis-trifluromethylphenyl), and a phosphoramidite ligand giving products in excellent yields and enantioselectivities. In many cases phosphoramidites derived from achiral 2,2'-biphenol are almost as good as ligands derived from the more expensive enantiopure 2,2'-binaphthols. The hydrovinylation products, which carry two versatile latent functionalities, an aryl and a vinyl group, are potentially useful for the synthesis of several important natural products containing benzylic all-carbon quaternary centers. PMID:19763244

  16. Secondary ligand-directed assembly of Co(II) coordination polymers based on a pyridine carboxylate ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Ke-Li; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Cai, Yi-Ni; Xu, Xiao-Wei; Feng, Yun-Long

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the influence of hydrogen bonds and secondary ligands on the structures and properties of the resulting frameworks, five new Co(II) compounds have been synthesized by the reactions of Co(II) salts and 3,5-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethoxy)benzoic acid (HL) with four rationally selected dicarboxylic acid ligands. Without secondary ligand, we got one compound [CoL{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}·2nH{sub 2}O (1), which possesses a 1D chain structure. In the presence of ancillary ligands, namely, 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}adbc), terephthalic acid (H{sub 2}tpa), thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) and 1,4-benzenedithioacetic acid (H{sub 2}bdtc), four 3D structures [Co{sub 2}L{sub 2}(adbc)]{sub n}·nH{sub 2}O (2), [Co{sub 2}L{sub 2}(tpa)]{sub n} (3), [Co{sub 2}L{sub 2}(tdc)]{sub n} (4), [Co{sub 2}L{sub 2}(bdtc)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (5) were obtained, respectively. It can be observed from the architectures of 1–5 that hydrogen bonds and secondary ligands both have great effects on the spatial connective fashions, resulting in the formation of various dimensional compounds. The XRPD, TGA data of title polymers and the magnetic properties for 2 and 5 have also been investigated. - Graphical abstract: The structural differences show that the ancillary ligands have great effects on the spatial connective fashions, resulting in the formation of various dimensional compounds. - Highlights: • Five new Co(II) coordination polymers have been synthesized by solvothermal reactions based on 3,5-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethoxy)benzoic acid (HL). • The long-flexible ligand (HL) is a good candidate to produce interpenetrating architectures. • The secondary dicarboxylic acid ligands play important roles in the spatial connective fashions and the formation of various dimensional compounds. • The magnetism studies show that both 2 and 5 exhibit antiferromagnetic interactions.

  17. Tunable Phosphoramidite Ligands for Asymmetric Hydrovinylation: Ligands par excellence for Generation of All-Carbon Quaternary Centers

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Craig R.; Lim, Hwan Jung; Zhang, Aibin; RajanBabu, T. V.

    2009-01-01

    1-Alkylstyrenes undergo efficient hydrovinylation (addition of ethylene) in the presence of a Ni-catalyst prepared from [(allyl)NiBr]2, Na+ [BAr4]− (Ar = 3,5-bis-trifluromethylphenyl), and a phosphoramidite ligand giving products in excellent yields and enantioselectivities. In many cases phosphoramidites derived from achiral 2,2′-biphenol are almost as good as ligands derived from the more expensive enantiopure 2,2′-binaphthols. The hydrovinylation products, which carry two versatile latent functionalities, an aryl and a vinyl group, are potentially useful for the synthesis of several important natural products containing benzylic all-carbon quaternary centers. PMID:19763244

  18. Mixed ligand complexes of bis(phenylimine) Schiff base ligands incorporating pyridinium moiety Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Gehad G; Abd El-Wahab, Zeinab H

    2005-04-01

    The synthesis and structural characterization of mixed ligand complexes derived from 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehydebis(o-hydroxyphenylimine), 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehydebis(p-hydroxyphenylimine) (1(ry) ligands) and 2-aminopyridne (2(ry) ligand) are reported. The ligands and their transition metal complexes were characterized on the bases of their elemental analyses, IR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analysis (TGA). The mixed ligand complexes are formed in the 1:1:1 (M:L(1) or L(2):L') ratio as found from the elemental analyses and found to have the formulae [MX(2)(L(1) or L(2))(L')].nH(2)O where M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II), L(1) = 2,6-pyridinedicarboxaldehydebis(p-hydroxyphenylimine), L(2) = 2,6-pyridine dicarboxaldehydebis(o-hydroxyphenylimine), L' = 2-aminopyridine, X = Cl(-) in case of Cu(II) complex and Br(-) in case of Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes and y = 0-3. The molar conductance data reveal that the chelates are non-electrolytes. IR spectra show that the Schiff bases are coordinated to the metal ions in a terdentate manner with NNN donor sites of the pyridine-N and two azomethine-N. While 2-aminopyridine coordinated to the metal ions via its pyridine-N. Magnetic and solid reflectance spectra are used to infer the coordinating capacity of the ligand and the geometrical structure of these complexes are found to be octahedral. The thermal behaviour of these chelates shows that the hydrated water molecules and the anions are removed in a successive two steps followed immediately by decomposition of the ligands (L(1), L(2) and L') in the subsequent steps. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, E*, DeltaH*, DeltaS* and DeltaG* are calculated from the TG curves and discussed. The ligands and their metal chelates have been screened for their antimicrobial activities and the findings have been reported, explained and compared with some known antibiotics. PMID:15741103

  19. Local Innate Responses to TLR Ligands in the Chicken Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Barjesteh, Neda; Alkie, Tamiru Negash; Hodgins, Douglas C.; Nagy, Éva; Sharif, Shayan

    2016-01-01

    The chicken upper respiratory tract is the portal of entry for respiratory pathogens, such as avian influenza virus (AIV). The presence of microorganisms is sensed by pathogen recognition receptors (such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs)) of the innate immune defenses. Innate responses are essential for subsequent induction of potent adaptive immune responses, but little information is available about innate antiviral responses of the chicken trachea. We hypothesized that TLR ligands induce innate antiviral responses in the chicken trachea. Tracheal organ cultures (TOC) were used to investigate localized innate responses to TLR ligands. Expression of candidate genes, which play a role in antiviral responses, was quantified. To confirm the antiviral responses of stimulated TOC, chicken macrophages were treated with supernatants from stimulated TOC, prior to infection with AIV. The results demonstrated that TLR ligands induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, type I interferons and interferon stimulated genes in the chicken trachea. In conclusion, TLR ligands induce functional antiviral responses in the chicken trachea, which may act against some pathogens, such as AIV. PMID:27455308

  20. Multifunctional ligand for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical

    DOEpatents

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Ketring, Alan R.; Singh, Prahlad R.

    1996-01-01

    A compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical comprises either a phosphorous or germanium core and at least two hydrazine groups forming a ligand for bonding to a metal extending from the phosphorous or germanium core.

  1. (Hydro)peroxide ligands on colloidal cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Damatov, Delina; Mayer, James M

    2016-08-11

    Anhydrous H2O2 reacts with organic colloidal solutions of ceria nanoparticles to form a stable surface peroxo/hydroperoxo species with the release of oleate capping ligands into solution. A new optical spectroscopic signature was identified for cerium-peroxo/hydroperoxo species in solution and correlated with solid-state IR spectroscopy and chemical reactivity. PMID:27468991

  2. NAIP inflammasomes give the NOD to bacterial ligands.

    PubMed

    Maltez, Vivien I; Miao, Edward A

    2014-11-01

    NLRs are innate immune sensors that monitor the sanctity of the cytosolic compartment. In a recent paper in Molecular Cell, Tenthorey et al. reveal a novel ligand-sensing interface within regions of the oligomerization domain of the NAIPs, rather than within the leucine-rich repeats, as was anticipated. PMID:25443492

  3. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  4. Titanium complex formation of organic ligands in titania gels.

    PubMed

    Nishikiori, Hiromasa; Todoroki, Kenta; Setiawan, Rudi Agus; Teshima, Katsuya; Fujii, Tsuneo; Satozono, Hiroshi

    2015-01-27

    Thin films of organic ligand-dispersing titania gels were prepared from titanium alkoxide sols containing ligand molecules by steam treatment without heating. The formation of the ligand-titanium complex and the photoinduced electron transfer process in the systems were investigated by photoelectrochemical measurements. The complex was formed between the 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) and titanium species, such as the titanium ion, on the titania nanoparticle surface through the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the quinolate. A photocurrent was observed in the electrodes containing the complex due to the electron injection from the LUMO of the complex into the titania conduction band. A bidentate ligand, 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN), formed the complex on the titania surface through dehydration between its two hydroxyl groups of DHN and two TiOH groups of the titania. The electron injection from the HOMO of DHN to the titania conduction band was observed during light irradiation. This direct electron injection was more effective than the two-step electron injection. PMID:25535798

  5. REACTIVITY PROFILE OF CONFORMATIONALLY-FLEXIBLE RETINOID RECEPTOR LIGANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoids and associated derivatives represent a class of endogenousr hormones that bind to and activate different families of retinoic acid receptors (RARs, RXRs), and control many aspects of normal vertebrate development. Identification of potential RAR and RXRs ligands is of i...

  6. The imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain modulation

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Nurcan; Nemutlu, Dilara; Arslan, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Pain is an unpleasant experience and effects daily routine negatively. Although there are various drugs, many of them are not entirely successful in relieving pain, since pain modulation is a complex process involving numerous mediators and receptors. Therefore, it is a rational approach to identify the factors involved in the complex process and develop new agents that act on these pain producing mechanisms. In this respect, the involvement of the imidazoline receptors in pain modulation has drawn attention in recent years. In this review, it is aimed to focus on the imidazoline receptors and their ligands which contribute to the pain modulation. It is demonstrated that imidazoline-2 (I2) receptors are steady new drug targets for analgesics. Even if the mechanism of I2 receptor is not well known in the modulation of pain, it is known that it plays a role in tonic and chronic pain but not in acute phasic pain. Moreover, the I2 receptor ligands increase the analgesic effects of opioids in both acute and chronic pain and prevent the development of opioid tolerance. So, they are valuable for the chronic pain treatment and also therapeutic coadjuvants in the management of chronic pain with opiate drugs due to the attenuation of opioid tolerance and addiction. Thus, the use of the ligands which bind to the imidazoline receptors is an effective strategy for relieving pain. This educational forum exhibits the role of imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain process by utilizing experimental studies. PMID:26600633

  7. A Guided Inquiry Activity for Teaching Ligand Field Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian J.; Graham, Kate J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe a guided inquiry activity for teaching ligand field theory. Previous research suggests the guided inquiry approach is highly effective for student learning. This activity familiarizes students with the key concepts of molecular orbital theory applied to coordination complexes. Students will learn to identify factors that…

  8. Synthesis of supported metal nanoparticle catalysts using ligand assisted methods.

    PubMed

    Costa, Natalia J S; Rossi, Liane M

    2012-09-28

    The synthesis and characterization methods of metal nanoparticles (NPs) have advanced greatly in the last few decades, allowing an increasing understanding of structure-property-performance relationships. However, the role played by the ligands used as stabilizers for metal NPs synthesis or for NPs immobilization on solid supports has been underestimated. Here, we highlight some recent progress in the preparation of supported metal NPs with the assistance of ligands in solution or grafted on solid supports, a modified deposition-reduction method, with special attention to the effects on NPs size, metal-support interactions and, more importantly, catalytic activities. After presenting the general strategies in metal NP synthesis assisted by ligands grafted on solid supports, we highlight some recent progress in the deposition of pre-formed colloidal NPs on functionalized solids. Another important aspect that will be reviewed is related to the separation and recovery of NPs. Finally, we will outline our personal understanding and perspectives on the use of supported metal NPs prepared through ligand-assisted methods. PMID:22915064

  9. Solvent-induced desorption of alkanethiol ligands from Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Wei; Cheng, Hao; Yao, Tao; Yang, Lina; Bao, Jie; Huang, Ting; Sun, Zhihu; Jiang, Yong; Wei, Shiqiang

    2016-06-21

    Removing surfactants from a colloidal metal nanoparticle surface is necessary for their realistic applications, and how they could be stripped is a subject of active investigation. Here, we report a solvent-induced desorption of dodecanethiol ligands from the gold nanoparticle surface, and traced this desorption process using a combination of in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and Raman spectroscopic techniques. In situ analysis results reveal that the solvent exchange of ethanol with tetrahydrofuran (THF) can effectively remove dodecanethiol ligands while keeping the particle morphology unchanged. Upon increasing the THF/ethanol ratio from 0 : 1 to 5 : 1, the surface coverage of thiol on the Au surface is reduced from 0.47 to 0.07, suggesting the depletion of ligands first from the nanoparticle facet sites, then from the edge sites, while the ligands at the corner sites are intact. This work enriches our knowledge on surfactant removal and may pave the way towards preparing surface-clean nanoparticles for practical applications. PMID:27241025

  10. Theoretical investigations of silver clusters and silver-ligand systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinek, J.; Salian, U.; Srinivas, S.

    1999-05-19

    Studies directed at understanding structural and electronic properties of silver clusters have been and remain the subject of an active theoretical [1-22] and experimental [23- 38] effort. One of the reasons is the (still) important role these systems play in the photographic process. Investigations of interactions of silver clusters with different atoms and molecules are motivated primarily by a possible utility of these clusters in catalytic processes. The important role of silver in the selective oxidation of ethylene into ethylene oxide, the feedstock for polyester production, is well-known [39]. Possible variations in chemical reactivity with the cluster size and understanding of the mechanisms of interactions with different ligands may lead to new and more efficient applications. Investigations of cluster-ligand systems also contribute a great deal to a better understanding of gas-surface interactions. Accordingly, theoretical studies of silver clusters and cluster-ligand systems [40-44] fall into two categories--those that use clusters as models for silver surfaces [40], and those that target clusters and cluster-ligand interactions as subjects in their own right [41-44]. The common goal of all these studies is to elucidate the nature of the interatomic interactions and bonding at the microscopic level and thereby arrive at a fundamental understanding and description of the various structural and electronic properties.

  11. The biologically active conformations of ligand CCK B receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Pavel E.; Kuznetsova, Nina B.; Schulgin, Sergey V.; Rogacheva, Svetlana M.; Sinyakov, Valeriy V.; Kovtun, Viktor A.

    2006-07-01

    We analyzed literature data about structures of ligands of CCK B receptor. The structure of the binding site (fragments of the third extracellular loop and the seventh transmembrane helix of CCK B receptor) was determined recently by experiments. We were finding presumable biologically active conformations (BAC) of the ligands by two methods. One of them is based on the fact that the most stable conformations of the biologically active peptide on the phase interface "water-lipophilic medium" are often similar to the BAC. Another method is based on the formation of the stable ligand-receptor complex during the modeling procedure. We used Monte-Carlo method with the fixed geometry of the receptor and the optimized geometry of tetrapeptide cholecystokinin (CCK-4). It has been shown, that the first method should be used to find BAC of antagonists of CCK B receptor. The strategy of the formation of the stable ligand-receptor complex during the modeling procedure can be used for the designing of peptide agonists of CCK B receptor.

  12. Local Innate Responses to TLR Ligands in the Chicken Trachea.

    PubMed

    Barjesteh, Neda; Alkie, Tamiru Negash; Hodgins, Douglas C; Nagy, Éva; Sharif, Shayan

    2016-01-01

    The chicken upper respiratory tract is the portal of entry for respiratory pathogens, such as avian influenza virus (AIV). The presence of microorganisms is sensed by pathogen recognition receptors (such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs)) of the innate immune defenses. Innate responses are essential for subsequent induction of potent adaptive immune responses, but little information is available about innate antiviral responses of the chicken trachea. We hypothesized that TLR ligands induce innate antiviral responses in the chicken trachea. Tracheal organ cultures (TOC) were used to investigate localized innate responses to TLR ligands. Expression of candidate genes, which play a role in antiviral responses, was quantified. To confirm the antiviral responses of stimulated TOC, chicken macrophages were treated with supernatants from stimulated TOC, prior to infection with AIV. The results demonstrated that TLR ligands induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, type I interferons and interferon stimulated genes in the chicken trachea. In conclusion, TLR ligands induce functional antiviral responses in the chicken trachea, which may act against some pathogens, such as AIV. PMID:27455308

  13. Tunable P-Chiral Bisdihydrobenzooxaphosphole Ligands for Enantioselective Hydroformylation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Renchang; Zheng, Xin; Qu, Bo; Sader, C Avery; Fandrick, Keith R; Senanayake, Chris H; Zhang, Xumu

    2016-07-15

    Air-stable and tunable chiral bisdihydrobenzooxaphosphole ligands (BIBOPs) were employed in rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydroformylation of various terminal olefins with excellent conversions (>99%), moderate-to-excellent enantioselectivities (up to 95:5 er), and branched to linear ratios (b:l) of up to 400. PMID:27333435

  14. Nonsteroidal Androgen Receptor Ligands: Versatile Syntheses and Biological Data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report herein a stereoselective and straightforward methodology for the synthesis of new androgen receptor ligands with (anti)-agonistic activities. Oxygen–nitrogen replacement in bicalutamide-like structures paves the way to the disclosure of a new class of analogues, including cyclized/nitrogen-substituted derivatives, with promising antiandrogen (or anabolic) activity. PMID:24900495

  15. Molecules with polymerizable ligands as precursors to porous doped materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert-Pfalzgraf, L.G.; Pajot, N.; Papiernik, R.; Parraud, S.

    1996-12-31

    Titanium and aluminum alkoxide derivatives with polymerizable ligands such as 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethylacetoacetate (HAAEMA), oleic acid and geraniol (HOGE) have been obtained. The various compounds have been characterized by FT-IR and NMR {sup 1}H. Copolymerization with styrene and divinylbenzene affords porous doped organic materials which have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), elemental analysis, density measurements.

  16. Ligand Pose and Orientational Sampling in Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Ryan G.; Carchia, Michael; Sterling, Teague; Irwin, John J.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular docking remains an important tool for structure-based screening to find new ligands and chemical probes. As docking ambitions grow to include new scoring function terms, and to address ever more targets, the reliability and extendability of the orientation sampling, and the throughput of the method, become pressing. Here we explore sampling techniques that eliminate stochastic behavior in DOCK3.6, allowing us to optimize the method for regularly variable sampling of orientations. This also enabled a focused effort to optimize the code for efficiency, with a three-fold increase in the speed of the program. This, in turn, facilitated extensive testing of the method on the 102 targets, 22,805 ligands and 1,411,214 decoys of the Directory of Useful Decoys - Enhanced (DUD-E) benchmarking set, at multiple levels of sampling. Encouragingly, we observe that as sampling increases from 50 to 500 to 2000 to 5000 to 20000 molecular orientations in the binding site (and so from about 1×1010 to 4×1010 to 1×1011 to 2×1011 to 5×1011 mean atoms scored per target, since multiple conformations are sampled per orientation), the enrichment of ligands over decoys monotonically increases for most DUD-E targets. Meanwhile, including internal electrostatics in the evaluation ligand conformational energies, and restricting aromatic hydroxyls to low energy rotamers, further improved enrichment values. Several of the strategies used here to improve the efficiency of the code are broadly applicable in the field. PMID:24098414

  17. Ligand-Controlled Regiodivergent Copper-Catalyzed Alkylboration of Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei; Gong, Tian-Jun; Lu, Xi; Xu, Meng-Yu; Yu, Chu-Guo; Xu, Zheng-Yang; Yu, Hai-Zhu; Xiao, Bin; Fu, Yao

    2015-10-26

    A novel copper-catalyzed regiodivergent alkylboration of alkenes with bis(pinacolato)diboron and alkyl halides has been developed. The regioselectivity of the alkylboration was controlled by subtle differences in the ligand structure. The reaction thus enables the practical, regiodivergent synthesis of two different alkyl boronic esters with complex structures from a single alkene. PMID:26338141

  18. RXR function requires binding to an endogenous terpenoid ligand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The issue of whether the nuclear receptor RXR must bind to an endogenous, nanomolar affinity ligand in order to perform its natural function is still unsettled (1). On the basis of our previous studies establishing that the Drosophilamelanogaster ortholog of the retinoid X receptor ("ultraspiracle,"...

  19. Ligand Induced Spin Crossover in Penta-Coordinated Ferric Dithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, P.; Iyer, R. M.

    1981-09-01

    On addition of lewis bases to Fe(dtc)2X, ligand exchange takes place through a SN2 mechanism, with a parallel spin crossover in the ferric ion. The two species (S = 3/2 and S = 5/2) formed are in dynamic chemical equilibrium, and a slow decomposition is then initiated.

  20. Adsorption kinetic process of thiol ligands on gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Yang, Lina; Jiang, Yong; Huang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zhihu; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Tiandou; Pan, Zhiyun; Pan, Guoqiang; Yao, Tao; Bian, Qing; Wei, Shiqiang

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the kinetic mechanism during ligand adsorption on gold nanocrystals is important for designing and fine-tuning their properties and implications. Here, we report a kinetic study on the adsorption process of dodecanethiol ligands on Au nanocrystals of 3.3 nm by an in situ time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure technique. A two-step process of dodecanethiol adsorption on Au NC surfaces is proposed based on the obtained ligand coverage, which shows a quick increase from 0 to 0.40 within the first 20 min, followed by a much slower increase to the limiting value of 0.94. In-depth analysis suggests that the first stage involves the quick adsorption of dodecanethiol to the corner and edge sites of Au NCs surfaces, leading to remarkable surface Au-Au bond length relaxation (from 2.79 to 2.81 Å) and pronounced gold-to-ligand charge transfer. The second step that corresponds to the much slower adsorption process to the surface facets could be described by the Langmuir kinetics equation with an adsorption rate constant of 0.0132 min(-1) and an initial coverage of 0.41, in good agreement with the initially preferable adsorption of thiols to the most favorable sites. PMID:24122096

  1. Small Molecule Ligands for Bulged RNA Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, S. Todd; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    A class of wedge-shaped small molecules has been designed, synthesized, and shown to bind bulged RNA secondary structures. These minimally cationic ligands exhibit good affinity and selectivity for certain RNA bulges as demonstrated in a fluorescent intercalator displacement assay. PMID:19678613

  2. Supramolecular coordination and antimicrobial activities of constructed mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sonbati, A. Z.; Diab, M. A.; El-Bindary, A. A.; Abou-Dobara, M. I.; Seyam, H. A.

    2013-03-01

    A novel series of copper(II) and palladium(II) with 4-derivatives benzaldehyde pyrazolone (Ln) were synthesized. The mixed ligand complexes were prepared by using 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) as second ligand. The structure of these complexes was identified and confirm by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, UV-Vis, IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy and magnetic moment measurements as well as thermal analysis. The ligand behaves as a neutral bidentate ligand through ON donor sites. ESR spectra show the simultaneous presence of a planar trans and a nearly planar cis isomers in the 1:2 ratio for all N,O complexes [Cu(Ln)2]Cl2ṡ2H2O. Schiff bases (Ln) were tested against bacterial species; namely two Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and two Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and fungal species (Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporium, Penicillium italicum and Alternaria alternata). The tested compounds have antibacterial activity against S. aureus, B. cereus and K. pneumoniae.

  3. Proton-dependent zinc release from intracellular ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kiedrowski, Lech

    2014-01-01

    In cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons when intracellular pH drops from 6.6 to 6.1, yet unclear intracellular stores release micromolar amounts of Zn2+ into the cytosol. Mitochondria, acidic organelles, and/or intracellular ligands could release this Zn2+. Although exposure to the protonophore FCCP precludes re-loading of the mitochondria and acidic organelles with Zn2+, FCCP failed to compromise the ability of the intracellular stores to repeatedly release Zn2+. Therefore, Zn2+-releasing stores were not mitochondria or acidic organelles but rather intracellular Zn2+ ligands. To test which ligands might be involved, the rate of acid-induced Zn2+ release from complexes with cysteine, glutathione, histidine, aspartate, glutamate, glycine, and carnosine was investigated; [Zn2+] was monitored in vitro using the ratiometric Zn2+-sensitive fluorescent probe FuraZin-1. Carnosine failed to chelate Zn2+ but did chelate Cu2+; the remaining ligands chelated Zn2+ and upon acidification were releasing it into the medium. However, when pH was decreasing from 6.6 to 6.1, only zinc-cysteine complexes rapidly accelerated the rate of Zn2+ release. The zinc-cysteine complexes also released Zn2+ when a histidine-modifying agent, diethylpyrocarbonate, was applied at pH 7.2. Since the cytosolic zinc-cysteine complexes can contain micromolar amounts of Zn2+, these complexes may represent the stores responsible for an acid-induced intracellular Zn2+ release. PMID:24606401

  4. Trapping of palindromic ligands within native transthyretin prevents amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Kolstoe, Simon E.; Mangione, Palma P.; Bellotti, Vittorio; Taylor, Graham W.; Tennent, Glenys A.; Deroo, Stéphanie; Morrison, Angus J.; Cobb, Alexander J. A.; Coyne, Anthony; McCammon, Margaret G.; Warner, Timothy D.; Mitchell, Jane; Gill, Raj; Smith, Martin D.; Ley, Steven V.; Robinson, Carol V.; Wood, Stephen P.; Pepys, Mark B.

    2010-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is a fatal disease for which new therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. We have designed two palindromic ligands, 2,2'-(4,4'-(heptane-1,7-diylbis(oxy))bis(3,5-dichloro-4,1-phenylene)) bis(azanediyl)dibenzoic acid (mds84) and 2,2'-(4,4'-(undecane-1,11-diylbis(oxy))bis(3,5-dichloro-4,1-phenylene)) bis(azanediyl)dibenzoic acid (4ajm15), that are rapidly bound by native wild-type TTR in whole serum and even more avidly by amyloidogenic TTR variants. One to one stoichiometry, demonstrable in solution and by MS, was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis showing simultaneous occupation of both T4 binding sites in each tetrameric TTR molecule by the pair of ligand head groups. Ligand binding by native TTR was irreversible under physiological conditions, and it stabilized the tetrameric assembly and inhibited amyloidogenic aggregation more potently than other known ligands. These superstabilizers are orally bioavailable and exhibit low inhibitory activity against cyclooxygenase (COX). They offer a promising platform for development of drugs to treat and prevent TTR amyloidosis. PMID:21059958

  5. Diversity of Potassium Channel Ligands: Focus on Scorpion Toxins.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenkov, A I; Grishin, E V; Vassilevski, A A

    2015-12-01

    Potassium (K+) channels are a widespread superfamily of integral membrane proteins that mediate selective transport of K+ ions through the cell membrane. They have been found in all living organisms from bacteria to higher multicellular animals, including humans. Not surprisingly, K+ channels bind ligands of different nature, such as metal ions, low molecular mass compounds, venom-derived peptides, and antibodies. Functionally these substances can be K+ channel pore blockers or modulators. Representatives of the first group occlude the channel pore, like a cork in a bottle, while the second group of ligands alters the operation of channels without physically blocking the ion current. A rich source of K+ channel ligands is venom of different animals: snakes, sea anemones, cone snails, bees, spiders, and scorpions. More than a half of the known K+ channel ligands of polypeptide nature are scorpion toxins (KTx), all of which are pore blockers. These compounds have become an indispensable molecular tool for the study of K+ channel structure and function. A recent special interest is the possibility of toxin application as drugs to treat diseases involving K+ channels or related to their dysfunction (channelopathies). PMID:26878580

  6. Dynamics of methionine ligand rebinding in cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Małolepsza, Edyta; Straub, John E

    2012-06-14

    Geminate recombination of the methionine ligand to the heme iron in ferrous cytochrome c protein following photodissociation displays rich kinetics. It is of particular interest to develop an understanding of fast and slow rebinding time scales, observed in experimental studies, in terms of features of the underlying complex energy landscape. The classical empirical force field in the heme pocket has been extended by incorporating ab initio potential energy surface calculations representing the ground singlet state and quintet state associated with methionine bond breaking and rebinding. An algorithm based on the Landau-Zener nonadiabatic transition theory has been employed to model the electronic surface hopping between two spin states during the process of ligand dissociation and recombination. Multiple conformational substates of the dissociated methionine ligand are found to participate in the reaction dynamics. Varying time scales for interconversion between substates lead to a mechanism elucidating the fast and slow rebinding time scales. The reaction system may be understood in terms of a two-dimensional reaction coordinate distinctly separated from the coupled bath of surrounding protein and solvent degrees of freedom. Insights into the reaction dynamics provided by this study lead to suggestions for future experiments to further probe the role of dynamic heterogeneity in the kinetics of ligand-protein binding. PMID:22432601

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Metal Complexes with Schiff Base Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Shane M.; Sheedy, Timothy M.; New, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    In order for undergraduate laboratory experiments to reflect modern research practice, it is essential that they include a range of elements, and that synthetic tasks are accompanied by characterization and analysis. This intermediate general chemistry laboratory exercise runs over 2 weeks, and involves the preparation of a Schiff base ligand and…

  8. Proteus and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Polydorides, Savvas; Michael, Eleni; Mignon, David; Druart, Karen; Archontis, Georgios; Simonson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the organization and use of Proteus, a multitool computational suite for the optimization of protein and ligand conformations and sequences, and the calculation of pK α shifts and relative binding affinities. The software offers the use of several molecular mechanics force fields and solvent models, including two generalized Born variants, and a large range of scoring functions, which can combine protein stability, ligand affinity, and ligand specificity terms, for positive and negative design. We present in detail the steps for structure preparation, system setup, construction of the interaction energy matrix, protein sequence and structure optimizations, pK α calculations, and ligand titration calculations. We discuss illustrative examples, including the chemical/structural optimization of a complex between the MHC class II protein HLA-DQ8 and the vinculin epitope, and the chemical optimization of the compstatin analog Ac-Val4Trp/His9Ala, which regulates the function of protein C3 of the complement system. PMID:27094287

  9. Spin-dependent mechanism for diatomic ligand binding to heme

    PubMed Central

    Franzen, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    The nature of diatomic ligand recombination in heme proteins is elucidated by using a Landau–Zener model for the electronic coupling in the recombination rate constant. The model is developed by means of explicit potential energy surfaces calculated by using density functional theory (DFT). The interaction of all possible spin states of the three common diatomic ligands, CO, NO, and O2, and high-spin heme iron is compared. The electronic coupling, rebinding barrier, and Landau–Zener force terms can be obtained and used to demonstrate significant differences among the ligands. In particular the intermediate spin states of NO (S = 3/2) and O2 (S = 1) are shown to be bound states. Rapid recombination occurs from these bound states in agreement with experimental data. The slower phases of O2 recombination can be explained by the presence of two higher spin states, S = 2 and S = 3, which have a small and relatively large barrier to ligand recombination, respectively. By contrast, the intermediate spin state for CO is not a bound state, and the only recombination pathway for CO involves direct recombination from the S = 2 state. This process is significantly slower according to the Landau–Zener model. Quantitative estimates of the parameters used in the rate constants provide a complete description that explains rebinding rates that range from femtoseconds to milliseconds at ambient temperature. PMID:12477933

  10. Analyzing Ligand Depletion in a Saturation Equilibrium Binding Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claro, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    I present a proposal for a laboratory practice to generate and analyze data from a saturation equilibrium binding experiment addressed to advanced undergraduate students. [[superscript 3]H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate is a nonselective muscarinic ligand with very high affinity and very low nonspecific binding to brain membranes, which contain a high…

  11. Ultrafast Electron Trapping in Ligand-Exchanged Quantum Dot Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikkawa, J. M.; Turk, M. E.; Vora, P. M.; Fafarman, A. T.; Diroll, B. T.; Murray, C. B.; Kagan, C. R.

    2015-03-01

    We use time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence and absorption to characterize the low-temperature (10 K) optical properties of CdSe quantum dot (QD) solids with different ligand and annealing preparation. Close-packed CdSe quantum dot solids are prepared with native aliphatic ligands and with thiocyanate with and without thermal annealing. Using sub-picosecond, broadband time-resolved photoluminescence and absorption, we find that ligand exchange increases the rate of carrier surface trapping. We further determine that holes within the QD core, rather than electrons, can bleach the band-edge transition in these samples at low temperature, a finding that comes as a surprise given what is known about the surface treatment in these QDs. We find that our ligand treatments lead to faster electron trapping to the quantum dot surface, a greater proportion of surface photoluminescence, and an increased rate of nonradiative decay due to enhanced interparticle coupling upon exchange and annealing. All aspects of this work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under Award No. DE-SC0002158.

  12. Modeling of metal interaction geometries for protein-ligand docking.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, Birte; Reulecke, Ingo; Kämper, Andreas; Rarey, Matthias

    2008-05-15

    The accurate modeling of metal coordination geometries plays an important role for structure-based drug design applied to metalloenzymes. For the development of a new metal interaction model, we perform a statistical analysis of metal interaction geometries that are relevant to protein-ligand complexes. A total of 43,061 metal sites of the Protein Data Bank (PDB), containing amongst others magnesium, calcium, zinc, iron, manganese, copper, cadmium, cobalt, and nickel, were evaluated according to their metal coordination geometry. Based on statistical analysis, we derived a model for the automatic calculation and definition of metal interaction geometries for the purpose of molecular docking analyses. It includes the identification of the metal-coordinating ligands, the calculation of the coordination geometry and the superposition of ideal polyhedra to identify the optimal positions for free coordination sites. The new interaction model was integrated in the docking software FlexX and evaluated on a data set of 103 metalloprotein-ligand complexes, which were extracted from the PDB. In a first step, the quality of the automatic calculation of the metal coordination geometry was analyzed. In 74% of the cases, the correct prediction of the coordination geometry could be determined on the basis of the protein structure alone. Secondly, the new metal interaction model was tested in terms of predicting protein-ligand complexes. In the majority of test cases, the new interaction model resulted in an improved docking accuracy of the top ranking placements. PMID:18041759

  13. Sequestering ability of polycarboxylic ligands towards dioxouranium(VI).

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Foti, Claudia; Sammartano, Silvio

    2008-05-15

    In this paper we report a comparison on the sequestering ability of some polycarboxylic ligands towards dioxouranium(VI) (UO(2)(2+), uranyl). Ligands taken into account are mono- (acetate), di- (oxalate, malonate, succinate and azelate), tri- (1,2,3-propanetricarboxylate) and hexa-carboxylate (1,2,3,4,5,6-benzenehexacarboxylate). The sequestering ability of polycarboxylic ligands towards UO(2)(2+) was quantified by a new approach expressed by means of a sigmoid Boltzman type equation and of a empirical parameters (pL(50)) which defines the amount of ligand necessary to sequester 50% of the total UO(2)(2+) concentration. A fairly linear correlation was obtained between pL(50) or log K(110) (log K(110) refers to the equilibrium: UO(2)(2+)+L(z-)=UO(2)L((2-z)); L=generic ligand) and the polyanion charges. In order to complete the picture, a tetra-carboxylate ligand (1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylate) was studied in NaCl aqueous solutions at 0ligand protonation constants and of the complex formation constants of UO(2)(2+)-polycarboxylate systems was modelled by the SIT (specific ion interaction theory) approach and by the Pitzer equations. PMID:18585146

  14. Magnesium incorporation in calcite in the presence of organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Baldermann, Andre; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The formation of authigenic Mg-calcites in marine early diagenetic environments is commonly driven by a bio-induced process, the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), which provides inorganic carbon required for the precipitation of such authigenic carbonates. In such settings the availability of major and/or trace divalent metal cations (Me2+) incorporated in calcite and their aqueous speciation are controlled by the presence of aqueous organic molecules that are produced either as (by-)products of biological activity (i.e. exopolymeric substances) or during degradation of allochthonous organic matter in the sediments. Despite the fact that the presence of aqueous organic ligands strongly affects the growth rates and the mineralogy of precipitating CaCO3 polymorphs, till now no study addresses the role of Me2+-ligand aqueous complexes on the extent of Mg and/or other trace element content of Mg-calcites. In order to shed light on this process, relevant to authigenic calcite formation in organic-rich marine sediments and continental soils, we precipitated calcite in the presence of aqueous Mg and a variety of low molecular weight carboxylic- and aminoacids. Our experimental data indicate that the presence of organic ligands augments significantly the saturation state of calcite in the parent fluid during its precipitation. Moreover, they suggest that the higher the ligand concentration, the higher the obtained distribution coefficient of Mg in calcite. The latter is directly proportional to the ratio of Mg2+/Ca2+ aqueous ions for all ligands used. Hydrogeochemical modelling of the aqueous fluids indicate that the observed correlation can be explained by the stronger complexation of Ca2+ with organic ligands compared to Mg2+, which results in higher availability of Mg2+ vs. Ca2+ aqueous ions. Overall the obtained results suggest that the higher the organic ligand aqueous concentration the higher the Mg content of calcite forming from this fluid. These findings are

  15. Electron Transfer Reactions in Colloidal Quantum Dot-Ligand Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris-Cohen, Adam Joshua

    This thesis describes a quantitative analysis of the chemical composition of colloidal II-VI quantum dot (QD)-ligand complexes and transient absorption experiments analyzing the rates of electron transfer reactions in these complexes functionalized with redox active ligands. Chemical analysis reveals that phosphonate impurities in the surfactants used to synthesize CdSe QDs are the dominant ligands on the surface of the QDs, and these phosphonate impurities cause size-dependent Cd-enrichment of the QD surface. A study of the adsorption equilibrium of solution-phase CdS quantum dots and acid-derivatized viologen ligands (V2+) reveals that the structure of the surfaces of the QDs depends on the concentration of the QDs. A new model based on the Langmuir isotherm that treats both the number of adsorbed ligands per QD and the number of available binding sites per QD as binomially-distributed quantities is described. Transient absorption spectroscopy of solution-phase mixtures of colloidal CdS QDs and V2+ indicates electron transfer occurs from the conduction band of the QD to the LUMO of V2+. The rate constant for photoinduced electron transfer (PET) is independent of the number of methylene groups in the alkyl chain on the acid-derivatized viologen. The insensitivity of the electron transfer rate constant to the length of the functional groups on the viologen suggests a van der Waals (vdW) pathway for PET, where the electron bypasses the alkylcarboxylate and tunnels through the orbitals of the QD and of the bipyridinium core. The rate of PET from colloidal CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to oxo-centered triruthenium clusters (Ru 3O) depends on the structure of the chemical headgroup by which the Ru3O clusters adsorb to the QDs. Complexes comprising QDs and Ru 3O clusters adsorbed through a pyridine-4-carboxylic acid ligand have a PET rate constant of (4.9 ± 0.9)×109 s -1 whereas complexes comprising QDs and Ru3O clusters adsorbed through a 4-mercaptopyridine ligand have an

  16. Nanomaterials can Dynamically Steer Cell Responses to Biological Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ram I.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2011-01-01

    Traditional tissue regeneration approaches to activate cell behaviours on biomaterials rely on the use of extracellular matrix based or soluble growth factor cues. In this article, we highlight a novel approach to dynamically steer cellular phenomena such as cell motility based on nanoscale substratum features of biological ligands. Albumin derived nanocarriers (ANCs) of variable nanoscale size features were functionalized with fibronectin III9–10 matrix ligand and effects on primary human keratinocyte activation were investigated. The display of fibronectin fragment from ANCs significantly enhanced cell migration compared to free ligands at equivalent concentrations. Notably, cell migration was influenced by the size of underlying ANCs even for variably sized ANCs presenting comparable levels of fibronectin fragment. For equivalent ligand concentrations, cell migration on the smaller-sized ANCs (30 nm and 50 nm) was significantly more enhanced compared to that on larger-sized ANCs (75 nm and 100 nm). In contrast, the enhancement of cell migration on nanocarriers was abolished by the use of immobilized biofunctionalized ANCs, indicating that “dynamic” nanocarrier internalization events underlie the role of nanocarrier geometry on the differential regulation of cell migration kinetics. Uptake studies using fluorescent ANCs indicated that larger-sized ANCs showed delayed endocytic kinetics and hence could present barriers for internalization during the cell adhesion and motility processes. Motile cells exhibited diminished migration upon exposure to clathrin-inhibitors, but not caveolin-inhibitors, suggesting the role of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in facilitating cell migratory responsiveness to the nanocarriers. Overall, a monotonic relationship was found between the degree of nanocarrier cytointernalization rate and cell migration rate, suggesting the possibility of designing biointerfacial features for dynamic control of cell migration. Thus, the major

  17. The interplay of catechol ligands with nanoparticulate iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Alexander K L; Hutton, Georgina A; Masters, Anthony F; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The unique properties exhibited by nanoscale materials, coupled with the multitude of chemical surface derivatisation possibilities, enable the rational design of multifunctional nanoscopic devices. Such functional devices offer exciting new opportunities in medical research and much effort is currently invested in the area of "nanomedicine", including: multimodal imaging diagnostic tools, platforms for drug delivery and vectorisation, polyvalent, multicomponent vaccines, and composite devices for "theranostics". Here we will review the surface derivatisation of nanoparticulate oxides of iron and iron@iron-oxide core-shells. They are attractive candidates for MRI-active therapeutic platforms, being potentially less toxic than lanthanide-based materials, and amenable to functionalisation with ligands. However successful grafting of groups onto the surface of iron-based nanoparticles, thus adding functionality whilst preserving their inherent properties, is one of the most difficult challenges for creating truly useful nanodevices from them. Functionalised catechol-derived ligands have enjoyed success as agents for the masking of superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles, often so as to render them biocompatible with medium to long-term colloidal stability in the complex chemical environments of biological milieux. In this perspective, the opportunities and limitations of functionalising the surfaces of iron-oxide nanoparticles, using coatings containing a catechol-derived anchor, are analysed and discussed, including recent advances using dopamine-terminated stabilising ligands. If light-driven ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) processes, and pH-dependent ligand desorption, leading to nanoparticle degradation under physiologically relevant conditions can be suppressed, colloidal stability of samples can be maintained and toxicity ascribed to degradation products avoided. Modulation of the redox behaviour of iron catecholate systems through the introduction of an

  18. Benchmarking the Predictive Power of Ligand Efficiency Indices in QSAR.

    PubMed

    Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro

    2016-08-22

    Compound physicochemical properties favoring in vitro potency are not always correlated to desirable pharmacokinetic profiles. Therefore, using potency (i.e., IC50) as the main criterion to prioritize candidate drugs at early stage drug discovery campaigns has been questioned. Yet, the vast majority of the virtual screening models reported in the medicinal chemistry literature predict the biological activity of compounds by regressing in vitro potency on topological or physicochemical descriptors. Two studies published in this journal showed that higher predictive power on external molecules can be achieved by using ligand efficiency indices as the dependent variable instead of a metric of potency (IC50) or binding affinity (Ki). The present study aims at filling the shortage of a thorough assessment of the predictive power of ligand efficiency indices in QSAR. To this aim, the predictive power of 11 ligand efficiency indices has been benchmarked across four algorithms (Gradient Boosting Machines, Partial Least Squares, Random Forest, and Support Vector Machines), two descriptor types (Morgan fingerprints, and physicochemical descriptors), and 29 data sets collected from the literature and ChEMBL database. Ligand efficiency metrics led to the highest predictive power on external molecules irrespective of the descriptor type or algorithm used, with an R(2)test difference of ∼0.3 units and a this difference ∼0.4 units when modeling small data sets and a normalized RMSE decrease of >0.1 units in some cases. Polarity indices, such as SEI and NSEI, led to higher predictive power than metrics based on molecular size, i.e., BEI, NBEI, and LE. LELP, which comprises a polarity factor (cLogP) and a size parameter (LE) constantly led to the most predictive models, suggesting that these two properties convey a complementary predictive signal. Overall, this study suggests that using ligand efficiency indices as the dependent variable might be an efficient strategy to model

  19. Structural evidence for asymmetric ligand binding to transthyretin.

    PubMed

    Cianci, Michele; Folli, Claudia; Zonta, Francesco; Florio, Paola; Berni, Rodolfo; Zanotti, Giuseppe

    2015-08-01

    Human transthyretin (TTR) represents a notable example of an amyloidogenic protein, and several compounds that are able to stabilize its native state have been proposed as effective drugs in the therapy of TTR amyloidosis. The two thyroxine (T4) binding sites present in the TTR tetramer display negative binding cooperativity. Here, structures of TTR in complex with three natural polyphenols (pterostilbene, quercetin and apigenin) have been determined, in which this asymmetry manifests itself as the presence of a main binding site with clear ligand occupancy and related electron density and a second minor site with a much lower ligand occupancy. The results of an analysis of the structural differences between the two binding sites are consistent with such a binding asymmetry. The different ability of TTR ligands to saturate the two T4 binding sites of the tetrameric protein can be ascribed to the different affinity of ligands for the weaker binding site. In comparison, the high-affinity ligand tafamidis, co-crystallized under the same experimental conditions, was able to fully saturate the two T4 binding sites. This asymmetry is characterized by the presence of small but significant differences in the conformation of the cavity of the two binding sites. Molecular-dynamics simulations suggest the presence of even larger differences in solution. Competition binding assays carried out in solution revealed the presence of a preferential binding site in TTR for the polyphenols pterostilbene and quercetin that was different from the preferential binding site for T4. The TTR binding asymmetry could possibly be exploited for the therapy of TTR amyloidosis by using a cocktail of two drugs, each of which exhibits preferential binding for a distinct binding site, thus favouring saturation of the tetrameric protein and consequently its stabilization. PMID:26249340

  20. A new method of synthesizing biopolymeric affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G S; Guzman, R; Porath, J O

    1997-08-01

    (1) A new concept for producing soluble polymeric affinity ligands is proposed and exemplified. By solid-phase synthesis, an insoluble hydrophilic polymer is converted into an affinity gel. The gel is hydrolytically degraded to water-soluble affinity polymeric ligands which are recovered and purified. (2) A water-soluble biopolymeric metal-affinity carrier based on an iminodiacetic acid (IDA) derivative of dextran has been synthesized through the modification of Sephadex G-200 by IDA, followed by hydrolysis with dextranase and size-exclusion-chromatographic purification of the high-molecular-mass fragments. (3) The molecular size of the soluble products as a function of hydrolysis time with dextranase from Penicillium sp. was determined. The range of molecular size of the biopolymeric chelating ligand varies from around 200 Da to greater than 580 kDa. (4) The influence of three metal ions chelated with the Sephadex derivative on the hydrolysis rate and the molecular-size distribution of end products was studied. Eu3+ was found to improve the rate of solubilization. Ni2+ and Cu2+ decreased the hydrolysis rate, as compared with that of the metal-free IDA-Sephadex. (5) The method introduced here has the potential of being developed and applied as a general technology for synthesis of soluble multifunctional affinity ligands. Such ligands should be useful for liquid-phase extraction as well as for the synthesis of adsorbents with localized multiple binding sites. Other possible fields of applications are to be found in medicine, where they could be used for slow drug delivery or detoxification, and in analytical chemistry, where they could be used in various assays. PMID:9261997

  1. Targeted delivery to bone and mineral deposits using bisphosphonate ligands.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2016-04-01

    The high concentration of mineral present in bone and pathological calcifications is unique compared with all other tissues and thus provides opportunity for targeted delivery of pharmaceutical drugs, including radiosensitizers and imaging probes. Targeted delivery enables accumulation of a high local dose of a therapeutic or imaging contrast agent to diseased bone or pathological calcifications. Bisphosphonates (BPs) are the most widely utilized bone-targeting ligand due to exhibiting high binding affinity to hydroxyapatite mineral. BPs can be conjugated to an agent that would otherwise have little or no affinity for the sites of interest. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge and practice for the use of BPs as ligands for targeted delivery to bone and mineral deposits. The clinical history of BPs is briefly summarized to emphasize the success of these molecules as therapeutics for metabolic bone diseases. Mechanisms of binding and the relative binding affinity of various BPs to bone mineral are introduced, including common methods for measuring binding affinity in vitro and in vivo. Current research is highlighted for the use of BP ligands for targeted delivery of BP conjugates in various applications, including (1) therapeutic drug delivery for metabolic bone diseases, bone cancer, other bone diseases, and engineered drug delivery platforms; (2) imaging probes for scintigraphy, fluorescence, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography; and (3) radiotherapy. Last, and perhaps most importantly, key structure-function relationships are considered for the design of drugs with BP ligands, including the tether length between the BP and drug, the size of the drug, the number of BP ligands per drug, cleavable tethers between the BP and drug, and conjugation schemes. PMID:26482186

  2. Solution structure of ligands involved in purine salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Karnawat, Vishakha; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2015-12-01

    Analogues of intermediates involved in the purine salvage pathway can be exploited as potential drug molecules against enzymes of protozoan parasites. To develop such analogues we need knowledge of the solution structures, predominant tautomer at physiological pH and protonation-state of the corresponding natural ligand. In this regard, we have employed ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) in combination with density functional theory (DFT) to study the solution structures of two relatively unexplored intermediates, 6-phosphoryl IMP (6-pIMP) and succinyl adenosine-5'-monophosphate (sAMP), of purine salvage pathway. These molecules are intermediates in a two step enzymatic process that converts inosine-5'-monpophosphate (IMP) to adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP). Experimental data on the molecular structure of these ligands is lacking. We report UVRR spectra of these two ligands, obtained at an excitation wavelength of 260 nm. Using isotope induced shifts and DFT calculations we assigned observed spectra to computed normal modes. We find that sAMP exists as neutral species at physiological pH and the predominant tautomer in solution bears proton at N10 position of purine ring. Though transient in solution, 6-pIMP is captured in the enzyme-bound form. This work provides the structural information of these ligands in solution state at physiological pH. We further compare these structures with the structures of AMP and IMP. Despite the presence of similar purine rings in AMP and sAMP, their UVRR spectra are found to be very different. Similarly, though the purine ring in 6-pIMP resembles that of IMP, UVRR spectra of the two molecules are distinct. These differences in the vibrational spectra provide direct information on the effects of exocyclic groups on the skeletal structures of these molecules. Our results identify key bands in the vibrational spectra of these ligands which may serve as markers of hydrogen bonding interactions upon binding to the active

  3. Ligand pathways in myoglobin: a review of Trp cavity mutations.

    PubMed

    Olson, J S; Soman, J; Phillips, G N

    2007-01-01

    The pathways for ligand entry and exit in myoglobin have now been well established by a wide variety of experimental results, including pico- to nano- to microsecond transient absorbance measurements and time-resolved X-ray crystallographic measurements. Trp insertions have been used to block, one at a time, the three major cavities occupied by photodissociated ligands. In this work, we review the effects of the L29(B10)W mutation, which places a large indole ring in the initial 'docking site' for photodissociated ligands. Then, the effects of blocking the Xe4 site with I28W, V68W, and I107W mutations and the Xe1 cavity with L89W, L104W, and F138W mutations are described. The structures of four of these mutants are shown for the first time (Trp28, Trp68, Trp107, and Trp 138 sperm whale metMb). All available results support a 'side path' mechanism in which ligands move into and out of myoglobin by outward rotation of the HisE7 side chain, but after entry can migrate into internal cavities, including the distal Xe4 and proximal Xe1 binding sites. The distal cavities act like the pocket of a baseball glove, catching the ligand and holding it long enough for the histidine gate to close and facilitate internal coordination with the heme iron atom. The physiological role of the proximal Xe1 site is less clear because changes in the size of this cavity have minimal effects on overall O(2) binding parameters. PMID:17701550

  4. Impact of As-Synthesized Ligands and Low-Oxygen Conditions on Silver Nanoparticle Surface Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Kathryn A; Smith, Ashley M; Marbella, Lauren E; Millstone, Jill E

    2016-04-26

    Here, we compare the ligand exchange behaviors of silver nanoparticles synthesized in the presence of two different surface capping agents: poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (MW = 10 or 40 kDa) or trisodium citrate, and under either ambient or low-oxygen conditions. In all cases, we find that the polymer capping agent exhibits features of a weakly bound ligand, producing better ligand exchange efficiencies with an incoming thiolated ligand compared to citrate. The polymer capping agent also generates nanoparticles that are more susceptible to reactions with oxygen during both synthesis and ligand exchange. The influence of the original ligand on the outcome of ligand exchange reactions with an incoming thiolated ligand highlights important aspects of silver nanoparticle surface chemistry, crucial for applications ranging from photocatalysis to antimicrobials. PMID:27077550

  5. Thermodynamic study of the complexation between Nd(3+) and functionalized diacetamide ligands in solution.

    PubMed

    Dau, Phuong V; Zhang, Zhicheng; Dau, Phuong D; Gibson, John K; Rao, Linfeng

    2016-07-26

    A series of amine functionalized ligands, including 2,2'-(benzylazanediyl)bis(N,N'-dimethylacetamide) (BnABDMA), 2,2'-azanediylbis(N,N'-dimethylacetamide) (ABDMA), and 2,2'-(methylazanediyl)bis(N,N'-dimethylacetamide) (MABDMA), are synthesized for the thermodynamic study of their complexation with Nd(3+) ions. Their complexation in solution is investigated using potentiometry, spectrophotometry, calorimetry, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The results suggest that these ligands act as tridentate ligands. Furthermore, direct comparison between ABDMA and an analogous ether-functionalized ligand, 2,2'-oxybis(N,N'-dimethylacetamide) (TMDGA), showed that the amine functionalized ligand forms thermodynamically stronger complexes with Nd(3+) ions than the ether-functionalized ligand. In addition, the amine functionalized ligand can allow the fine-tuning of the binding strength with metal ions via substitution on the central amine N atom with different functional groups, which is not possible for ether functionalized ligands such as TMDGA. PMID:27222301

  6. Reactivity of halide and pseudohalide ligands in transition-metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kukushkin, Yu.N.; Kukushkin, V.Yu.

    1985-10-01

    The experimental material on the reactions of coordinated halide ligands, as well as cyanide, azido, thiocyanato, and cyanato ligands, in transition-metal complexes has been generalized in this review.

  7. LISE: a server using ligand-interacting and site-enriched protein triangles for prediction of ligand-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Liu, Chuan-Kun; Hsiao, Fang-Chih; Yao, Adam; Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2013-07-01

    LISE is a web server for a novel method for predicting small molecule binding sites on proteins. It differs from a number of servers currently available for such predictions in two aspects. First, rather than relying on knowledge of similar protein structures, identification of surface cavities or estimation of binding energy, LISE computes a score by counting geometric motifs extracted from sub-structures of interaction networks connecting protein and ligand atoms. These network motifs take into account spatial and physicochemical properties of ligand-interacting protein surface atoms. Second, LISE has now been more thoroughly tested, as, in addition to the evaluation we previously reported using two commonly used small benchmark test sets and targets of two community-based experiments on ligand-binding site predictions, we now report an evaluation using a large non-redundant data set containing >2000 protein-ligand complexes. This unprecedented test, the largest ever reported to our knowledge, demonstrates LISE's overall accuracy and robustness. Furthermore, we have identified some hard to predict protein classes and provided an estimate of the performance that can be expected from a state-of-the-art binding site prediction server, such as LISE, on a proteome scale. The server is freely available at http://lise.ibms.sinica.edu.tw. PMID:23609546

  8. Effect of complexing ligands on the adsorption of Cu(II) onto the silica gel surface. 1: Adsorption of ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.; Jung, K.H.; Park, K.K.; Park, K.K.

    1995-04-01

    The adsorption of several ligands on silica gel was investigated in aqueous solutions. The ligands used were 2,2{prime},6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine, pyridine, 3,4-lutidine, 2-aminomethyl pyridine, 2-pyridine methanol, picolinic acid, salicylic acid, and 5-sulfosalicylic acid. The adsorption behaviors of these ligands were interpreted by means of three adsorption modes: ion exchange, hydrogen bonding, and hydrophobic interaction. For 2,2{prime},6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine, pyridine, and 3,4-lutidine, the adsorption maxima appeared near their respective pK{sub a} values and were found to be due mainly to ion exchange, whereas the adsorption of these ligands at low pH was strongly attributed to hydrophobic interaction. The adsorption of 2-aminomethyl pyridine increased with increasing pH over the entire pH range investigated and was due mainly to ion exchange. Picolinic acid was adsorbed mainly by hydrogen bonding either via pyridine N atoms at low pH or via carboxylic O atoms at high pH. 2-Pyridine methanol was adsorbed by hydrophobic interaction at low pH and by hydrogen bonding at high pH. The adsorptions of salicylic and 5-sulfosalicylic acid were very small over the entire pH ranges investigated. For the adsorption mechanism, the Stern model was used to fit adsorption data.

  9. A 3-fold-symmetric ligand based on 2-hydroxypyridine: regulation of ligand binding by hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Moore, Cameron M; Quist, David A; Kampf, Jeff W; Szymczak, Nathaniel K

    2014-04-01

    A tripodal ligand based on 2-hydroxypyridine is presented. Cu-Cl adducts of H3thpa with Cu(I) and Cu(II) provide complexes featuring highly directed, intramolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. An upper limit for the hydrogen-bonding free energy to Cu(I)-Cl was estimated at ∼18 kcal/mol. PMID:24654846

  10. Electron-transfer catalysis of ligand substitution in triiron clusters. The role of the bridging ligand in anion radical intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Ohst, H.H.; Kochi, J.K.

    1986-05-28

    The polynuclear cluster Fe/sub 3/(CO)/sub 9/(..mu../sub 3/-PPh)/sub 2/ (I) undergoes rapid ligand substitution by electron-transfer catalysis (ETC) under conditions in which the thermal process is nonexistent. X-ray crystallography and /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy establish the stepwise substitution of the CO ligands by trimethyl phosphite to take place selectively at three separate iron centers. The high selectivity to the mono-substitution product II is achieved by tuning the reduction potential specifically to generate catalytic amounts of the anion radical Fe/sub 3/(CO)/sub 9/(PPh)/sub 2//sup -/ (I/sup -/) in either acetonitrile or tetrahydrofuran. Transient ESR spectroscopy of I/sup -/ and three related paramagnetic intermediates establish the sequential transformation of anion radicals as they evolve in the ETC mechanism. The rate-limiting rearrangement of I/sup -/ by the slippage of a phosphinidene cap from ..mu../sub 3/ ..-->.. ..mu../sub 2/ coordination underscores the key role of the bridging ligand in the substitution process. The importance of this critical transformation related to the formation of a 17-electron, coordinatively unsaturated iron center in the otherwise intact cluster. As such, it emphasizes the key role that the bridging ligand can play in cluster activation.

  11. Distinguishing of tumor cell-targeting peptide ligands through a color-encoding microarray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zihua; Wang, Weizhi; Geng, Lingling; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2015-12-21

    A silicon-based microarray system was constructed to discover the affinity peptides and to distinguish the specific peptides from a high throughput library. Using a color-encoding strategy, in situ peptide distinguishing between HER1 ligands and HER2 ligands was achieved. Novel affinity peptide sequences H1P (HER1 ligand) and H2P (HER2 ligand) were determined with nmol affinity. PMID:26530232

  12. O-fucosylation of the notch ligand mDLL1 by POFUT1 is dispensable for ligand function.

    PubMed

    Müller, Julia; Rana, Nadia A; Serth, Katrin; Kakuda, Shinako; Haltiwanger, Robert S; Gossler, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Fucosylation of Epidermal Growth Factor-like (EGF) repeats by protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (POFUT1 in vertebrates, OFUT1 in Drosophila) is pivotal for NOTCH function. In Drosophila OFUT1 also acts as chaperone for Notch independent from its enzymatic activity. NOTCH ligands are also substrates for POFUT1, but in Drosophila OFUT1 is not essential for ligand function. In vertebrates the significance of POFUT1 for ligand function and subcellular localization is unclear. Here, we analyze the importance of O-fucosylation and POFUT1 for the mouse NOTCH ligand Delta-like 1 (DLL1). We show by mass spectral glycoproteomic analyses that DLL1 is O-fucosylated at the consensus motif C²XXXX(S/T)C³ (where C² and C³ are the second and third conserved cysteines within the EGF repeats) found in EGF repeats 3, 4, 7 and 8. A putative site with only three amino acids between the second cysteine and the hydroxy amino acid within EGF repeat 2 is not modified. DLL1 proteins with mutated O-fucosylation sites reach the cell surface and accumulate intracellularly. Likewise, in presomitic mesoderm cells of POFUT1 deficient embryos DLL1 is present on the cell surface, and in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking POFUT1 the same relative amount of overexpressed wild type DLL1 reaches the cell surface as in wild type embryonic fibroblasts. DLL1 expressed in POFUT1 mutant cells can activate NOTCH, indicating that POFUT1 is not required for DLL1 function as a Notch ligand. PMID:24533113

  13. Label-free integrative pharmacology on-target of opioid ligands at the opioid receptor family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In vitro pharmacology of ligands is typically assessed using a variety of molecular assays based on predetermined molecular events in living cells. Many ligands including opioid ligands pose the ability to bind more than one receptor, and can also provide distinct operational bias to activate a specific receptor. Generating an integrative overview of the binding and functional selectivity of ligands for a receptor family is a critical but difficult step in drug discovery and development. Here we applied a newly developed label-free integrative pharmacology on-target (iPOT) approach to systematically survey the selectivity of a library of fifty-five opioid ligands against the opioid receptor family. All ligands were interrogated using dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays in both recombinant and native cell lines that express specific opioid receptor(s). The cells were modified with a set of probe molecules to manifest the binding and functional selectivity of ligands. DMR profiles were collected and translated to numerical coordinates that was subject to similarity analysis. A specific set of opioid ligands were then selected for quantitative pharmacology determination. Results Results showed that among fifty-five opioid ligands examined most ligands displayed agonist activity in at least one opioid receptor expressing cell line under different conditions. Further, many ligands exhibited pathway biased agonism. Conclusion We demonstrate that the iPOT effectively sorts the ligands into distinct clusters based on their binding and functional selectivity at the opioid receptor family. PMID:23497702

  14. New biphenol-based, fine-tunable monodentate phosphoramidite ligands for catalytic asymmetric transformations

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Zihao; Vassar, Victor C.; Choi, Hojae; Ojima, Iwao

    2004-01-01

    Monodentate phosphoramidite ligands have been developed based on enantiopure 6,6′-dimethylbiphenols with axial chirality. These chiral ligands are easy to prepare and flexible for modifications. The fine-tuning capability of these ligands plays a significant role in achieving high enantioselectivity in the asymmetric hydroformylation of allyl cyanide and the conjugate addition of diethylzinc to cycloalkenones. PMID:15020764

  15. Conformational Transitions upon Ligand Binding: Holo-Structure Prediction from Apo Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Seeliger, Daniel; de Groot, Bert L.

    2010-01-01

    Biological function of proteins is frequently associated with the formation of complexes with small-molecule ligands. Experimental structure determination of such complexes at atomic resolution, however, can be time-consuming and costly. Computational methods for structure prediction of protein/ligand complexes, particularly docking, are as yet restricted by their limited consideration of receptor flexibility, rendering them not applicable for predicting protein/ligand complexes if large conformational changes of the receptor upon ligand binding are involved. Accurate receptor models in the ligand-bound state (holo structures), however, are a prerequisite for successful structure-based drug design. Hence, if only an unbound (apo) structure is available distinct from the ligand-bound conformation, structure-based drug design is severely limited. We present a method to predict the structure of protein/ligand complexes based solely on the apo structure, the ligand and the radius of gyration of the holo structure. The method is applied to ten cases in which proteins undergo structural rearrangements of up to 7.1 Å backbone RMSD upon ligand binding. In all cases, receptor models within 1.6 Å backbone RMSD to the target were predicted and close-to-native ligand binding poses were obtained for 8 of 10 cases in the top-ranked complex models. A protocol is presented that is expected to enable structure modeling of protein/ligand complexes and structure-based drug design for cases where crystal structures of ligand-bound conformations are not available. PMID:20066034

  16. Understanding ligand effects in gold clusters using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Grant E; Laskin, Julia

    2016-06-21

    This review summarizes recent research on the influence of phosphine ligands on the size, stability, and reactivity of gold clusters synthesized in solution. Sub-nanometer clusters exhibit size- and composition-dependent properties that are unique from those of larger nanoparticles. The highly tunable properties of clusters and their high surface-to-volume ratio make them promising candidates for a variety of technological applications. However, because "each-atom-counts" toward defining cluster properties it is critically important to develop robust synthesis methods to efficiently prepare clusters of predetermined size. For decades phosphines have been known to direct the size-selected synthesis of gold clusters. Despite the preparation of numerous species it is still not understood how different functional groups at phosphine centers affect the size and properties of gold clusters. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) it is possible to characterize the effect of ligand substitution on the distribution of clusters formed in solution at defined reaction conditions. In addition, ligand exchange reactions on preformed clusters may be monitored using ESI-MS. Collision induced dissociation (CID) may also be employed to obtain qualitative insight into the fragmentation of mixed ligand clusters and the relative binding energies of differently substituted phosphines. Quantitative ligand binding energies and cluster stability may be determined employing surface induced dissociation (SID) in a custom-built Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS). Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) based modeling of the SID data allows dissociation energies and entropy values to be extracted. The charge reduction and reactivity of atomically precise gold clusters, including partially ligated species generated in the gas-phase by in source CID, on well-defined surfaces may be explored using ion soft landing (SL) in a custom

  17. Copper(I) cyanide networks: synthesis, luminescence behavior and thermal analysis. Part 1. Diimine ligands.

    PubMed

    Tronic, Tristan A; deKrafft, Kathryn E; Lim, Mi Jung; Ley, Amanda N; Pike, Robert D

    2007-10-15

    Metal-organic networks of CuCN with diimines (L) = pyrazine (Pyz), 2-aminopyrazine (PyzNH(2)), quinoxaline (Qox), phenazine (Phz), 4,4'-bipyridyl (Bpy), pyrimidine (Pym), 2-aminopyrimidine (PymNH(2)), 2,4-diaminopyrimidine (Pym(NH(2))(2)), 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine (Pym(NH(2))(3)), quinazoline (Qnz), pyridazine (Pdz), and phthalazine (Ptz) were studied. Open reflux reactions produced complexes (CuCN)(2)(L) for L = Qox, Phz, Bpy, PymNH(2), Pym(NH(2))(2), Qnz, and Pdz and (CuCN)(3)(L) complexes for L = Pyz, PyzNH(2), Qox, Bpy, Pym(NH(2))(3), and Pdz. Also produced were (CuCN)(3)(Pyz)(2), (CuCN)(PyzNH(2)), (CuCN)7(Pym)(2), (CuCN)(5)(Qnz)(2) and (CuCN)(5)(Ptz)(2). X-ray structures are presented for (CuCN)(2)(Pdz), (CuCN)(2)(PymNH(2)), and (CuCN)(7)(Pym)(2). Hydrothermal reactions yielded additional X-ray structures of (CuCN)(2)(PyzNH(2)), (CuCN)(3)(Pym(NH(2))(2)), (CuCN)(4)(Qnz), a second (CuCN)(2)(Pdz) phase, (CuCN)(5)(Pdz)2, (CuCN)(2)(Ptz), and (CuCN)(7)(Ptz)2. Structural trends, including cuprophilic interactions and cyano-bridged Cu(2)(CN)(2) dimer formation, are discussed. Particularly short Cu...Cu interactions are noted for the novel 4- and 5-coordinate Cu(2)(CN)(2) dimers. Thermal analyses show that most of the complexes decompose with loss of L around 160-180 degrees C. Luminescence behavior is relatively weak in the products. PMID:17850140

  18. Affinity of An(VI) for N4-Tetradentate Donor Ligands: Complexation of the Actinyl(VI) Ions with N4-Tetradentate Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, Mark; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2012-05-01

    In this report the affinity of four N4-tetradentate ligands that incorporate the 2- methylpyridyl functionality with hexavalent actinides (AnO2+2 ) has been investigated in methanol solution. The ligands studied include N,N*-bis(2-methylpyridyl)diaminoethane (BPMDAE), N,N-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (BPMDAP), N,N*-bis(2-pyridylmethyl) piperazine (BPMPIP), and trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC). Conditional stability constants describing the strength of the interaction were determined by UV-visible spectrophotometry. The log10K101 values for both U(VI) and Pu(VI) are comparable and show the same trend of stability with ligand structure. Dinuclear complexes are also indicated as being important. The log10K201 values for Pu(VI) complexation with the N4-ligands are identical for the four ligands (within experimental error), indicating that the structure of the ligand backbone has little effect on the stability of the (PuO2)2L2+ complex. The exception to this trend is the behavior of N,N*- bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine (BPMPIP) with Pu(VI). This ligand displays a tendency to reduce Pu(VI) within the experimental time frame of 45 minutes. BPMPIP is the only ligand tested that contains tertiary amines in the ligand backbone. The decomposition of BPMPIP by Pu(VI) suggests a susceptibility of tertiary amines to oxidative degradation.

  19. A Structural Switch between Agonist and Antagonist Bound Conformations for a Ligand-Optimized Model of the Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Arden; Phillips, Jessica L.; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Perdew, Gary H.; Kolluri, Siva K.; Bisson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the expression of a diverse group of genes. Exogenous AHR ligands include the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which is a potent agonist, and the synthetic AHR antagonist N-2-(1H-indol-3yl)ethyl)-9-isopropyl-2-(5-methylpyridin-3-yl)-9H-purin-6-amine (GNF351). As no experimentally determined structure of the ligand binding domain exists, homology models have been utilized for virtual ligand screening (VLS) to search for novel ligands. Here, we have developed an “agonist-optimized” homology model of the human AHR ligand binding domain, and this model aided in the discovery of two human AHR agonists by VLS. In addition, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of an agonist TCDD-bound and antagonist GNF351-bound version of this model in order to gain insights into the mechanics of the AHR ligand-binding pocket. These simulations identified residues 307–329 as a flexible segment of the AHR ligand pocket that adopts discrete conformations upon agonist or antagonist binding. This flexible segment of the AHR may act as a structural switch that determines the agonist or antagonist activity of a given AHR ligand. PMID:25329374

  20. Anisotropic energy flow and allosteric ligand binding in albumin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guifeng; Magana, Donny; Dyer, R. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric interactions in proteins generally involve propagation of local structural changes through the protein to a remote site. Anisotropic energy transport is thought to couple the remote sites, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. Here, we report the relationship between energy flow through the structure of bovine serum albumin and allosteric interactions between remote ligand binding sites of the protein. Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy is used to probe the flow of energy through the protein backbone following excitation of a heater dye, a metalloporphyrin or malachite green, bound to different binding sites in the protein. We observe ballistic and anisotropic energy flow through the protein structure following input of thermal energy into the flexible ligand binding sites, without local heating of the rigid helix bundles that connect these sites. This efficient energy transport mechanism enables the allosteric propagation of binding energy through the connecting helix structures. PMID:24445265

  1. Ligand regulation of a constitutively dimeric EGF receptor.

    PubMed

    Freed, Daniel M; Alvarado, Diego; Lemmon, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization has traditionally been viewed as the key event in transmembrane signalling by epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans EGFR orthologue LET-23 is constitutively dimeric, yet responds to its ligand LIN-3 without changing oligomerization state. SAXS and mutational analyses further reveal that the preformed dimer of the LET-23 extracellular region is mediated by its domain II dimerization arm and resembles other EGFR extracellular dimers seen in structural studies. Binding of LIN-3 induces only minor structural rearrangements in the LET-23 dimer to promote signalling. Our results therefore argue that EGFR can be regulated by allosteric changes within an existing receptor dimer--resembling signalling by insulin receptor family members, which share similar extracellular domain compositions but form covalent dimers. PMID:26060020

  2. Biophysics of selectin-ligand interactions in inflammation and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu-Lun Cheung, Luthur; Raman, Phrabha S.; Balzer, Eric M.; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2011-02-01

    Selectins (l-, e- and p-selectin) are calcium-dependent transmembrane glycoproteins that are expressed on the surface of circulating leukocytes, activated platelets, and inflamed endothelial cells. Selectins bind predominantly to sialofucosylated glycoproteins and glycolipids (e-selectin only) present on the surface of apposing cells, and mediate transient adhesive interactions pertinent to inflammation and cancer metastasis. The rapid turnover of selectin-ligand bonds, due to their fast on- and off-rates along with their remarkably high tensile strengths, enables them to mediate cell tethering and rolling in shear flow. This paper presents the current body of knowledge regarding the role of selectins in inflammation and cancer metastasis, and discusses experimental methodologies and mathematical models used to resolve the biophysics of selectin-mediated cell adhesion. Understanding the biochemistry and biomechanics of selectin-ligand interactions pertinent to inflammatory disorders and cancer metastasis may provide insights for developing promising therapies and/or diagnostic tools to combat these disorders.

  3. Scintillation Proximity Radioimmunoassay Utilizing 125I-Labeled Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udenfriend, Sidney; Diekmann Gerber, Louise; Brink, Larry; Spector, Sydney

    1985-12-01

    A unique type of radioimmunoassay is described that does not require centrifugation or separation. Microbeads containing a fluorophor are covalently linked to antibody. When an 125I-labeled antigen is added it binds to the beads and, by its proximity, the emitted short-range electrons of the 125I excite the fluorophor in the beads. The light emitted can be measured in a standard scintillation counter. Addition of unlabeled antigen from tissue extracts displaces the labeled ligand and diminishes the fluorescent signal. Application of scintillation proximity immunoassay to tissue enkephalins, serum thyroxin, and urinary morphine is described. Applications of the principle to study the kinetics of interaction between receptors and ligands are discussed.

  4. Ligand regulation of a constitutively dimeric EGF receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Daniel M.; Alvarado, Diego; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2015-06-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization has traditionally been viewed as the key event in transmembrane signalling by epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans EGFR orthologue LET-23 is constitutively dimeric, yet responds to its ligand LIN-3 without changing oligomerization state. SAXS and mutational analyses further reveal that the preformed dimer of the LET-23 extracellular region is mediated by its domain II dimerization arm and resembles other EGFR extracellular dimers seen in structural studies. Binding of LIN-3 induces only minor structural rearrangements in the LET-23 dimer to promote signalling. Our results therefore argue that EGFR can be regulated by allosteric changes within an existing receptor dimer--resembling signalling by insulin receptor family members, which share similar extracellular domain compositions but form covalent dimers.

  5. Finding gas migration pathways in proteins using implicit ligand sampling.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jordi; Olsen, Kenneth W; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Implicit ligand sampling is a practical, efficient, and accurate method for finding the gas migration pathways for small hydrophobic gas molecules, such as oxygen, inside proteins. The method infers the gas migration pathways by calculating the potential of mean force for the gas molecule everywhere inside the protein by means of a molecular dynamics simulation of the protein in the absence of the gas molecule. Pathways can be constructed by connecting the areas of the protein that are favorable to the presence of gas. This method has the advantage of providing a comprehensive overview of all possible gas migration pathways and barriers in a given protein from a single simulation run. Implicit ligand sampling has been applied to a large number of hemoproteins. The example of the truncated hemoglobin from Paramecium caudatum is given to illustrate the method. PMID:18433641

  6. Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) for bioconjugation and surface ligand immobilization.

    PubMed

    Zelikin, Alexander N; Such, Georgina K; Postma, Almar; Caruso, Frank

    2007-09-01

    Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), a nonionic and nontoxic polymer with antifouling properties, has been synthesized via RAFT polymerization to obtain thiol-terminated PVP. We demonstrate that when the polymer is adsorbed onto the surface of colloidal silica particles, the terminal thiol groups of PVP remain accessible for chemical modification and lend themselves to the immobilization of ligands. We show that ligand attachment onto the surface via conjugation to PVP is reversible, as the polymer can be desorbed from the surface for conjugate and surface recovery. We present the conjugation of a model peptide and an oligonucleotide to PVP via the polymer terminal thiol and demonstrate that conjugates remain functional in molecular recognition assay. The developed technique offers a novel method to functionalize low-fouling surfaces for a variety of biomedical applications and presents opportunities to use PVP as a macromolecular drug carrier. PMID:17715962

  7. gp130 receptor ligands as potential therapeutic targets for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Febbraio, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Obesity and its related cluster of pathophysiologic conditions including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are recognized as growing threats to world health. It is now estimated that 10% of the world’s population is overweight or obese. As a result, new therapeutic options for the treatment of obesity are clearly warranted. Recent research has focused on the role that gp130 receptor ligands may play as potential therapeutic targets in obesity. One cytokine in particular, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), acts both centrally and peripherally and mimics the biologic actions of the appetite control hormone leptin, but unlike leptin, CNTF appears to be effective in obesity and as such may have therapeutic potential. In addition, CNTF suppresses inflammatory signaling cascades associated with lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle. This review examines the potential role of gp130 receptor ligands as part of a therapeutic strategy to treat obesity. PMID:17404609

  8. Inside job: ligand-receptor pharmacology beneath the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Babcock, Joseph J; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    Most drugs acting on the cell surface receptors are membrane permeable and thus able to engage their target proteins in different subcellular compartments. However, these drugs' effects on cell surface receptors have historically been studied on the plasma membrane alone. Increasing evidence suggests that small molecules may also modulate their targeted receptors through membrane trafficking or organelle-localized signaling inside the cell. These additional modes of interaction have been reported for functionally diverse ligands of GPCRs, ion channels, and transporters. Such intracellular drug-target engagements affect cell surface expression. Concurrent intracellular and cell surface signaling may also increase the complexity and therapeutic opportunities of small molecule modulation. Here we discuss examples of ligand-receptor interactions that are present in both intra- and extracellular sites, and the potential therapeutic opportunities presented by this phenomenon. PMID:23685953

  9. Structural Dynamics of the Cereblon Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Marcus D.; Boichenko, Iuliia; Coles, Murray; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Cereblon, a primary target of thalidomide and its derivatives, has been characterized structurally from both bacteria and animals. Especially well studied is the thalidomide binding domain, CULT, which shows an invariable structure across different organisms and in complex with different ligands. Here, based on a series of crystal structures of a bacterial representative, we reveal the conformational flexibility and structural dynamics of this domain. In particular, we follow the unfolding of large fractions of the domain upon release of thalidomide in the crystalline state. Our results imply that a third of the domain, including the thalidomide binding pocket, only folds upon ligand binding. We further characterize the structural effect of the C-terminal truncation resulting from the mental-retardation linked R419X nonsense mutation in vitro and offer a mechanistic hypothesis for its irresponsiveness to thalidomide. At 1.2Å resolution, our data provide a view of thalidomide binding at atomic resolution. PMID:26024445

  10. Silver, Gold, Palladium Nanoparticles: Ligand Design, Synthesis and Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad

    Metal nanoparticles, especially gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), have been extensively studied due to their interesting optical properties and potential applications in emerging technologies like drug delivery, cancer therapy, catalysis, chemical and bio-sensing and microelectronics devices. Alkyl thiol ligands in the form of self assembled monolayers are often used to stabilize and functionalize the gold nanoparticles while other types of ligands have been rarely employed and the properties of AuNPs protected by different types of ligands have not been studied comprehensively and comparatively. This dissertation reports the first comparative studies on the thermal and chemical stability of AuNPs protected by alkyl thiolates, alkyl selenolates, dialkyl dithiophosphinates, and dialkyl dithiophosphates (Chapters 2 and 3). AuNPs protected by dialkyl dithiophosphinates and dialkyl dithiophosphates are unprecedented. All AuNPs were prepared from amine protected precursor AuNPs by ligand exchange to ensure similar size, size distribution, and chemical composition. They were extensively characterized by solution 1H-NMR and UV-VIS spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. For the first time, thermal stability was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) that provided more accurate decomposition temperatures and enthalpies, whereas chemical stability was tested as the availability of the gold surface towards etching with cyanide in different solvents. Surprisingly, alkyl selenolate protected AuNPs are thermally less stable than alkyl thiolate protected AuNPs despite their proposed stronger binding to the gold surface and a much more crystalline monolayer, which suggests that different decomposition mechanisms apply to alkyl thiolate and alkyl selenolate protected AuNPs. Dialkyl dithiophosphinates and dialkyl dithiophosphates protected AuNPs are thermally

  11. Allosteric regulation of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Taly, Antoine; Hénin, Jérôme; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Cecchini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) play a central role in intercellular communications in the nervous system by converting the binding of a chemical messenger—a neurotransmitter—into an ion flux through the postsynaptic membrane. They are oligomeric assemblies that provide prototypical examples of allosterically regulated integral membrane proteins. Here, we present an overview of the most recent advances on the signal transduction mechanism based on the X-ray structures of both prokaryotic and invertebrate eukaryotic pLGICs and on atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulations. The present results suggest that ion gating involves a large structural reorganization of the molecule mediated by two distinct quaternary transitions, a global twisting and the blooming of the extracellular domain, which can be modulated by ligand binding at the topographically distinct orthosteric and allosteric sites. The emerging model of gating is consistent with a wealth of functional studies and will boost the development of novel pharmacological strategies. PMID:25478624

  12. Scintillation proximity radioimmunoassay utilizing 125I-labeled ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Udenfriend, S.; Gerber, L.D.; Brink, L.; Spector, S.

    1985-12-01

    A unique type of radioimmunoassay is described that does not require centrifugation or separation. Microbeads containing a fluorophor are covalently linked to antibody. When an /sup 125/I-labeled antigen is added it binds to the beads and, by its proximity, the emitted short-range electrons of the /sup 125/I excite the fluorophor in the beads. The light emitted can be measured in a standard scintillation counter. Addition of unlabeled antigen from tissue extracts displaces the labeled ligand and diminishes the fluorescent signal. Application of scintillation proximity immunoassay to tissue enkephalins, serum thyroxin, and urinary morphine is described. Applications of the principle to study the kinetics of interaction between receptors and ligands are discussed.

  13. Hypocretin ligand deficiency in narcolepsy: recent basic and clinical insights.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Cayde; Okuro, Masashi; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Nishino, Seiji

    2010-05-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Both sporadic and familial forms exist in humans. Recently, the major pathophysiology of human narcolepsy was indicated, based on discovery, through animal study, of narcolepsy genes involved in the pathology of hypocretin/orexin ligand and its receptor. Hypocretin ligand deficiency is found in most patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy. This deficiency likely is the result of postnatal cell death of hypocretin neurons, and involvement of autoimmune mechanisms is suggested. Hypocretin deficiency also is found in symptomatic narcolepsy and excessive daytime sleepiness with neurologic conditions, including immune-mediated neurologic disorders. These findings have significant clinical relevance and promote understanding of hypocretin cell death mechanisms. Already, discoveries in humans have led to a new diagnostic test for narcolepsy. Currently, hypocretin replacement therapy has emerged as a promising therapeutic option, and experiments using gene therapy and cell transplantation are in progress. PMID:20425033

  14. Immunotoxins, ligand-toxin conjugates and molecular targeting.

    PubMed

    Soria, M

    1989-01-01

    Biotechnology provides tools for therapeutic exploitation following advances in the elucidation of protein-to-cell and cell-to-cell interactions. Molecular targeting of bacterial and plant toxins to the desired district of action can be achieved through effector molecules like monoclonal antibodies or protein ligands. Biochemical conjugation of these effectors to SO-6, a single-chain Ribosome Inactivating Protein from Saponaria officinalis, yielded powerful cytotoxic agents that are attractive candidates for therapeutic evaluation. Cloning of the gene for this plant toxin has been achieved. Technologies for expression of protein ligands, such as apolipoproteins or several growth factors, are available in recombinant microorganisms, providing adequate partners for the assembly of targeted chimaeras. Domain engineering of structural and functional regions in effector proteins is now possible and will be carried out with the available technologies to improve existing therapy. PMID:2698471

  15. Anisotropic energy flow and allosteric ligand binding in albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guifeng; Magana, Donny; Dyer, R. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric interactions in proteins generally involve propagation of local structural changes through the protein to a remote site. Anisotropic energy transport is thought to couple the remote sites, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. Here, we report the relationship between energy flow through the structure of bovine serum albumin and allosteric interactions between remote ligand binding sites of the protein. Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy is used to probe the flow of energy through the protein backbone following excitation of a heater dye, a metalloporphyrin or malachite green, bound to different binding sites in the protein. We observe ballistic and anisotropic energy flow through the protein structure following input of thermal energy into the flexible ligand binding sites, without local heating of the rigid helix bundles that connect these sites. This efficient energy transport mechanism enables the allosteric propagation of binding energy through the connecting helix structures.

  16. Programmed death-1 & its ligands: promising targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shrimali, Rajeev K; Janik, John E; Abu-Eid, Rasha; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2015-01-01

    Novel strategies for cancer treatment involving blockade of immune inhibitors have shown significant progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor immune evasion. The preclinical findings and clinical responses associated with programmed death-1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand pathway blockade seem promising, making these targets highly sought for cancer immunotherapy. In fact, the anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, were recently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of unresectable and metastatic melanoma resistant to anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 antibody (ipilimumab) and BRAF inhibitor. Here, we discuss strategies of combining PD-1/PD-ligand interaction inhibitors with other immune checkpoint modulators and standard-of-care therapy to break immune tolerance and induce a potent antitumor activity, which is currently a research area of key scientific pursuit. PMID:26250412

  17. Mesoporous organosilica nanotubes containing a chelating ligand in their walls

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiao; Goto, Yasutomo; Maegawa, Yoshifumi; Inagaki, Shinji

    2014-11-01

    We report the synthesis of organosilica nanotubes containing 2,2′-bipyridine chelating ligands within their walls, employing a single-micelle-templating method. These nanotubes have an average pore diameter of 7.8 nm and lengths of several hundred nanometers. UV-vis absorption spectra and scanning transmission electron microscopy observations of immobilized nanotubes with an iridium complex on the bipyridine ligands showed that the 2,2′-bipyridine groups were homogeneously distributed in the benzene-silica walls. The iridium complex, thus, immobilized on the nanotubes exhibited efficient catalytic activity for water oxidation using Ce{sup 4+}, due to the ready access of reactants to the active sites in the nanotubes.

  18. Studies of Iron(III) Porphyrinates Containing Silylthiolate Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Meininger, Daniel J.; Caranto, Jonathan D.; Arman, Hadi D.

    2014-01-01

    The chemistry of several iron(III) porphyrinates containing silylthiolate ligands is described. The complexes are prepared by protonolysis reactions of silanethiols with the iron(III) precursors, [Fe(OMe)(TPP)] and [Fe(OH)(H2O)(TMP)] (TPP = dianion of meso-tetraphenylporphine; TMP = dianion of meso-tetramesitylporphine). Each of the compounds has been fully characterized in solution and the solid state. The stability of the silylthiolate complexes versus other iron(III) porphyrinate complexes containing sulfur-based ligands allows for an examination of their reactivity with several biologically relevant small molecules including H2S, NO, and 1-methylimidazole. Electrochemically, the silylthiolate complexes display a quasi-reversible one-electron oxidation event at potentials higher than that observed for an analogous arylthiolate complex. The behavior of these complexes versus other sulfur-ligated iron(III) porphyrinates is discussed. PMID:24138018

  19. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future. PMID:26032605

  20. Action of RORs and Their Ligands in (Patho)physiology

    PubMed Central

    Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    The retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptors (RORs) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily whose activity has been implicated in a number of physiological and pathological processes. The RORs, specifically RORα and RORγ, are considered master regulators of TH17 cells, a recently described subset of CD4+ T helper cells that have been demonstrated to have a pathological role in autoimmune disease. As with most members of the NR superfamily, RORs are ligand regulated, suggesting that their activity can be modulated by synthetic ligands. Recent advances in the field have established that selective inhibition of the RORs is a viable therapeutic approach for not only the treatment of autoimmune disorders, but ROR-mediated metabolic disorders as well. PMID:22789990

  1. Multidentate terephthalamidate and hydroxypyridonate ligands: towards new orally active chelators.

    PubMed

    Abergel, Rebecca J; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2011-01-01

    The limitations of current therapies for the treatment of iron overload or radioisotope contamination have stimulated efforts to develop new orally bioavailable iron and actinide chelators. Siderophore-inspired tetradentate, hexadentate and octadentate terephthalamidate and hydroxypyridonate ligands were evaluated in vivo as selective and efficacious iron or actinide chelating agents, with several metal loading and ligand assessment procedures, using (59)Fe, (238)Pu, and (241)Am as radioactive tracers. The compounds presented in this study were compared to commercially available therapeutic sequestering agents [deferoxamine (DFO) for iron and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DPTA) for actinides] and are unrivaled in terms of affinity, selectivity and decorporation efficacy, which attests to the fact that high metal affinity may overcome the low bioavailability properties commonly associated to multidenticity. PMID:21599440

  2. MULTIDENTATE TEREPHTHALAMIDATE AND HYDROXYPYRIDONATE LIGANDS: TOWARDS NEW ORALLY ACTIVE CHELATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Abergel, Rebecca J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2011-07-13

    The limitations of current therapies for the treatment of iron overload or radioisotope contamination have stimulated efforts to develop new orally bioavailable iron and actinide chelators. Siderophore-inspired tetradentate, hexadentate and octadentate terephthalamidate and hydroxypyridonate ligands were evaluated in vivo as selective and efficacious iron or actinide chelating agents, with several metal loading and ligand assessment procedures, using {sup 59}Fe, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 241}Am as radioactive tracers. The compounds presented in this study were compared to commercially available therapeutic sequestering agents [deferoxamine (DFO) for iron and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DPTA) for actinides] and are unrivaled in terms of affinity, selectivity and decorporation efficacy, which attests to the fact that high metal affinity may overcome the low bioavailability properties commonly associated to multidenticity.

  3. Recent developments in the synthesis of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Breining, Scott R

    2004-01-01

    The extraordinary pharmacology of nicotine and epibatidine have indicated the potential for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands to serve as a new therapeutic class for a host of CNS disorders. Many such ligands are natural products, or analogs thereof, which represent a significant challenge to the synthetic chemist. Synthesis of such molecules often serves as a showcase to demonstrate the potential of newly developed methodology. This synthetic challenge coupled with the promise of pharmacological activity in compounds possessing the nicotinic pharmacophore has stimulated a great deal of synthetic activity over the last five years. The present report provides an overview of novel synthetic methodology occurring during this period directed toward the synthesis of compounds with presumed affinity for the neuronal nAChR. Syntheses chosen for review here represent the major efforts toward molecules such as epibatidine analogs, anatoxin-a, nicotine and related alkaloids, conformationally constrained nicotine derivatives, cytisine and methyllycaconitine (MLA). PMID:14965298

  4. Photomechanical actuation of ligand geometry in enantioselective catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kean, Zachary S; Akbulatov, Sergey; Tian, Yancong; Widenhoefer, Ross A; Boulatov, Roman; Craig, Stephen L

    2014-12-22

    A catalyst that couples a photoswitch to the biaryl backbone of a chiral bis(phosphine) ligand, thus allowing photochemical manipulation of ligand geometry without perturbing the electronic structure is reported. The changes in catalyst activity and selectivity upon switching can be attributed to intramolecular mechanical forces, thus laying the foundation for a new class of catalysts whose selectivity can be varied smoothly and in situ over a useful range by controlling molecular stress experienced by the catalyst during turnover. Forces on the order of 100 pN are generated, thus leading to measurable changes in the enantioselectivities of asymmetric Heck arylations and Trost allylic alkylations. The differential coupling between applied force and competing stereochemical pathways is quantified and found to be more efficient for the Heck arylations. PMID:25359436

  5. Ligand-assisted elution chromatography for separation of lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Ling, Lei; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda

    2015-04-10

    Lanthanides (Ln's) are the major components of rare earth elements, which are critical components of many high-value products. The ions of adjacent Ln's have the same valence and very similar ionic radii. They cannot be separated using conventional adsorption or ion exchange processes. Current production of high-purity Ln's is based on multiple sequential and parallel solvent extraction processes, which require large amounts of toxic solvents and result in serious negative impact on the environment. In this study, a ligand-assisted elution chromatography process for the separation of Ln's was developed for the first time for titania, which is a robust and inexpensive inorganic sorbent. A selective ligand for Ln's, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), was found to adsorb on the sorbent. The adsorbed EDTA became strong adsorption sites for the Ln's. Desorption of Ln's was driven by reversible reactions of Ln's with EDTA in the mobile phase. The overall sorbent selectivity for the reaction and adsorption process was approximately equal to the ratio of the sorbent selectivity to the ligand selectivity. The separation mechanisms were tested and verified using rate model simulations and experimental data for the separation of praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), and samarium (Sm). Simulations based on the model were used to design efficient linear gradient elution and stepwise elution processes. The purity and yield of all three Ln's were found to be above 95% in the designed processes. Stepwise elution can be implemented in a continuous process for increasing sorbent productivity and reducing costs for large-scale separation. Ligand assisted elution processes are much simpler and more environmentally friendly than the conventional solvent extraction processes. PMID:25746756

  6. Predicting protein-ligand and protein-peptide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolazzi, Paola; Guerra, Concettina; Liuzzi, Giampaolo

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with the identification of binding sites and concentrates on interactions involving small interfaces. In particular we focus our attention on two major interface types, namely protein-ligand and protein-peptide interfaces. As concerns protein-ligand binding site prediction, we classify the most interesting methods and approaches into four main categories: (a) shape-based methods, (b) alignment-based methods, (c) graph-theoretic approaches and (d) machine learning methods. Class (a) encompasses those methods which employ, in some way, geometric information about the protein surface. Methods falling into class (b) address the prediction problem as an alignment problem, i.e. finding protein-ligand atom pairs that occupy spatially equivalent positions. Graph theoretic approaches, class (c), are mainly based on the definition of a particular graph, known as the protein contact graph, and then apply some sophisticated methods from graph theory to discover subgraphs or score similarities for uncovering functional sites. The last class (d) contains those methods that are based on the learn-from-examples paradigm and that are able to take advantage of the large amount of data available on known protein-ligand pairs. As for protein-peptide interfaces, due to the often disordered nature of the regions involved in binding, shape similarity is no longer a determining factor. Then, in geometry-based methods, geometry is accounted for by providing the relative position of the atoms surrounding the peptide residues in known structures. Finally, also for protein-peptide interfaces, we present a classification of some successful machine learning methods. Indeed, they can be categorized in the way adopted to construct the learning examples. In particular, we envisage three main methods: distance functions, structure and potentials and structure alignment.

  7. Ligand Mobility Modulates Immunological Synapse Formation and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Jung; Hsieh, Wan-Ting; Waldman, Abraham; Clarke, Fiona; Huseby, Eric S.; Burkhardt, Janis K.; Baumgart, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) engagement induces clustering and recruitment to the plasma membrane of many signaling molecules, including the protein tyrosine kinase zeta-chain associated protein of 70 kDa (ZAP70) and the adaptor SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP76). This molecular rearrangement results in formation of the immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic protein array that modulates T cell activation. The current study investigates the effects of apparent long-range ligand mobility on T cell signaling activity and IS formation. We formed stimulatory lipid bilayers on glass surfaces from binary lipid mixtures with varied composition, and characterized these surfaces with respect to diffusion coefficient and fluid connectivity. Stimulatory ligands coupled to these surfaces with similar density and orientation showed differences in their ability to activate T cells. On less mobile membranes, central supramolecular activation cluster (cSMAC) formation was delayed and the overall accumulation of CD3ζ at the IS was reduced. Analysis of signaling microcluster (MC) dynamics showed that ZAP70 MCs exhibited faster track velocity and longer trajectories as a function of increased ligand mobility, whereas movement of SLP76 MCs was relatively insensitive to this parameter. Actin retrograde flow was observed on all surfaces, but cell spreading and subsequent cytoskeletal contraction were more pronounced on mobile membranes. Finally, increased tyrosine phosphorylation and persistent elevation of intracellular Ca2+ were observed in cells stimulated on fluid membranes. These results point to ligand mobility as an important parameter in modulating T cell responses. PMID:22384241

  8. Zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal initiators supported by olefin ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, Guillermo C.; Chen, Yaofeng

    2011-10-25

    A zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal complex containing the simple and relatively small 3-(arylimino)-but-1-en-2-olato ligand that catalyzes the formation of polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene. A novel feature of this catalyst is that the active species is stabilized by a chelated olefin adduct. The present invention also provides methods of polymerizing olefin monomers using zwitterionic catalysts, particularly polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene.

  9. Biaryl Phosphine Ligands in Palladium-Catalyzed Amination

    PubMed Central

    Surry, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed amination of aryl halides has undergone rapid development in the last 12 years. This has been largely driven by implementation of new classes of ligands. Biaryl phosphines have proven to provide especially active catalysts in this context. This review discusses the applications that these catalysts have found in C-N cross-coupling in heterocycle synthesis, pharmaceuticals, materials science and natural product synthesis. PMID:18663711

  10. NKG2D receptor and its ligands in host defense

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Lewis L.

    2015-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ T cells, and subsets of CD4+ T cells, iNKT cells, and γδ T cells. In humans NKG2D transmits signals by its association with the DAP10 adapter subunit and in mice alternatively spliced isoforms transmit signals either using DAP10 or DAP12 adapter subunits. Although NKG2D is encoded by a highly conserved gene (KLRK1) with limited polymorphism, the receptor recognizes an extensive repertoire of ligands, encoded by at least 8 genes in humans (MICA, MICB, RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H, RAET1I, RAET1L, and RAET1N), some with extensive allelic polymorphism. Expression of the NKG2D ligands is tightly regulated at the level of transcription, translation, and post-translation. In general healthy adult tissues do not express NKG2D glycoproteins on the cell surface, but these ligands can be induced by hyper-proliferation and transformation, as well as when cells are infected by pathogens. Thus, the NKG2D pathway serves a mechanism for the immune system to detect and eliminate cells that have undergone “stress”. Viruses and tumor cells have devised numerous strategies to evade detection by the NKG2D surveillance system and diversification of the NKG2D ligand genes likely has been driven by selective pressures imposed by pathogens. NKG2D provides an attractive target for therapeutics in the treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26041808

  11. Ultrafast infrared studies of complex ligand rearrangements in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Christine K.

    2003-05-31

    The complete description of a chemical reaction in solution depends upon an understanding of the reactive molecule as well as its interactions with the surrounding solvent molecules. Using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy it is possible to observe both the solute-solvent interactions and the rearrangement steps which determine the overall course of a chemical reaction. The topics addressed in these studies focus on reaction mechanisms which require the rearrangement of complex ligands and the spectroscopic techniques necessary for the determination of these mechanisms. Ligand rearrangement is studied by considering two different reaction mechanisms for which the rearrangement of a complex ligand constitutes the most important step of the reaction. The first system concerns the rearrangement of a cyclopentadienyl ring as the response of an organometallic complex to a loss of electron density. This mechanism, commonly referred to as ''ring slip'', is frequently cited to explain reaction mechanisms. However, the ring slipped intermediate is too short-lived to be observed using conventional methods. Using a combination of ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations it has been shown that the intermediate exists, but does not form an eighteen-electron intermediate as suggested by traditional molecular orbital models. The second example examines the initial steps of alkyne polymerization. Group 6 (Cr, Mo, W) pentacarbonyl species are generated photolytically and used to catalyze the polymerization of unsaturated hydrocarbons through a series of coordination and rearrangement steps. Observing this reaction on the femto- to millisecond timescale indicates that the initial coordination of an alkyne solvent molecule to the metal center results in a stable intermediate that does not rearrange to form the polymer precursor. This suggests that polymerization requires the dissociation of additional carbonyl ligands before rearrangement can occur. Overall

  12. Structural and Functional Profiling of Environmental Ligands for Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Grimaldi, Marina; Cavaillès, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background: Individuals are exposed daily to environmental pollutants that may act as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), causing a range of developmental, reproductive, metabolic, or neoplastic diseases. With their mostly hydrophobic pocket that serves as a docking site for endogenous and exogenous ligands, nuclear receptors (NRs) can be primary targets of small molecule environmental contaminants. However, most of these compounds are chemically unrelated to natural hormones, so their binding modes and associated hormonal activities are hardly predictable. Objectives: We conducted a correlative analysis of structural and functional data to gain insight into the mechanisms by which 12 members of representative families of pollutants bind to and activate the estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ. Methods: We used a battery of biochemical, structural, biophysical, and cell-based approaches to characterize the interaction between ERs and their environmental ligands. Results: Our study revealed that the chemically diverse compounds bound to ERs via varied sets of protein–ligand interactions, reflecting their differential activities, binding affinities, and specificities. We observed xenoestrogens binding to both ERs—with affinities ranging from subnanomolar to micromolar values—and acting in a subtype-dependent fashion as full agonists or partial agonists/antagonists by using different combinations of the activation functions 1 and 2 of ERα and ERβ. Conclusions: The precise characterization of the interactions between major environmental pollutants and two of their primary biological targets provides rational guidelines for the design of safer chemicals, and will increase the accuracy and usefulness of structure-based computational methods, allowing for activity prediction of chemicals in risk assessment. Citation: Delfosse V, Grimaldi M, Cavaillès V, Balaguer P, Bourguet W. 2014. Structural and functional profiling of environmental ligands for estrogen

  13. Flexible Docking of Proteins and "Drug-like" Ligands.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hai-Xu; Ye, Yu-Zhen; Ding, Da-Fu

    1998-01-01

    By using "tabu search" algorithm and Gehlhaar potential function, a new approach is presented for flexible docking of protein and its "drug-like" ligand has been developed. Computational test for this method with a set of 100 complexes has been performed, which indicated that the deviation of 89% of the predicted complex conformation was less than 0.25 nm. Compared with GOLD, a program of genetic algorithm, our method has high accuracy, low limit and short computation time. PMID:12168000

  14. Bioconjugation Methods for Coupling Targeting Ligands with Fluorescent Dyes.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiaoxi

    2016-01-01

    Targeted molecular imaging probes are essential tools for visualization of specific molecular processes in cells and living systems. Among these, targeted fluorescent probes are widely used due to the high sensitivity and resolution of fluorescence imaging. The conventional strategy for developing targeted fluorescent probes is to couple targeting ligands with fluorescent dyes by covalent bond via bioconjugation. Here, we describe several commonly used bioconjugation methods, from traditional amide and thiol coupling, to metal-catalyzed coupling reaction and catalyst free cycloaddition. PMID:27283413

  15. Cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling in the mouse uterus.

    PubMed Central

    Das, S K; Paria, B C; Chakraborty, I; Dey, S K

    1995-01-01

    Using RNA (Northern) blot hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR, we demonstrate that the brain-type cannabinoid receptor (CB1-R) mRNA, but not the spleen-type cannabinoid receptor (CB2-R) mRNA, is expressed in the mouse uterus and that this organ has the capacity to synthesize the putative endogenous cannabinoid ligand, anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide). The psychoactive cannabinoid component of marijuana--delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)--or anandamide, but not the inactive and nonpsychoactive cannabidiol (CBD), inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP formation in the mouse uterus, which was prevented by pertussis toxin pretreatment. These results suggest that uterine CB1-R is coupled to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and is biologically active. Autoradiographic studies identified ligand binding sites ([3H]anandamide) in the uterine epithelium and stromal cells, suggesting that these cells are perhaps the targets for cannabinoid action. Scatchard analysis of the binding of [3H]WIN 55212-2, another cannabinoid receptor ligand, showed a single class of high-affinity binding sites in the endometrium with an apparent Kd of 2.4 nM and Bmax of 5.4 x 10(9) molecules per mg of protein. The gene encoding lactoferrin is an estrogen-responsive gene in the mouse uterus that was rapidly and transiently up-regulated by THC, but not by CBD, in ovariectomized mice in the absence of ovarian steroids. This effect, unlike that of 17 beta-estradiol (E2), was not influenced by a pure antiestrogen, ICI 182780, suggesting that the THC-induced uterine lactoferrin gene expression does not involve estrogen receptors. We propose that the uterus is a new target for cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7753807

  16. Ligand-dependent Bohr effect of Chrionomus hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Steffens, G; Buse, G; Wollmer, A

    1977-01-01

    The O2 and CO Bohr effects of monomeric and dimeric hemoglobins of the insect Chironomus thummi thummi were determined as proton releases upon ligation. For the O2 Bohr effect of the monomeric hemoglobin III a maximum value of 0.20 H+/heme was obtained at pH 7.5. Upon ligation with CO, however, only 0.04 H+/heme were released at the same pH. In agreement with this finding isoelectric focusing experiments revealed different isoelectric points for O2-liganded and CO-liganded states of hemoglobin III. Analogous results were obtained in the cases of the monomeric hemoglobin IV and the dimeric hemoglobins of Chironomus thummi thummi; here O2 Bohr effects of 0.43 and 0.86 H+/heme were observed. For the corresponding CO Bohr effects values of 0.08 and 0.31 H+/heme were obtained respectively. On the basis of the available structural data the reduced CO Bohr effect in hemoglobin III is discussed as arising from a steric hindrance of the CO ligand by the side chain of isoleucine-E11, obstructing the movement of the heme-iron upon reaction with carbon monoxide. It should, however, be noted that ligands, according to their different electron donor and acceptor properties, may generally induce different conformational changes and thus different Bohr effects, in those hemoglobins in which distinct tertiary and/or quaternary constraints have not evolved. The general utilization of CO instead of O2 as allosteric effector is ruled out by the results reported here. PMID:12977

  17. Protein flexibility and ligand recognition: challenges for molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Spyrakis, Francesca; BidonChanal, Axel; Barril, Xavier; Luque, F Javier

    2011-01-01

    The intrinsic dynamics of macromolecules is an essential property to relate the structure of biomolecular systems with their function in the cell. In the field of ligand-receptor recognition, numerous evidences have revealed the limitations of the lock-and-key theory, and the need to elaborate models that take into account the inherent plasticity of biomolecules, such as the induced-fit model or the existence of an ensemble of pre-equilibrated conformations. Depending on the nature of the target system, ligand binding can be associated with small local adjustments in side chains or even the backbone to large-scale motions of structural fragments, domains or even subunits. Reproducing the inherent flexibility of biomolecules has thus become one of the most challenging issues in molecular modeling and simulation studies, as it has direct implications in our understanding of the structure-function relationships, but even in areas such as virtual screening and structure-based drug discovery. Given the intrinsic limitation of conventional simulation tools, only events occurring in short time scales can be reproduced at a high accuracy level through all-atom techniques such as Molecular Dynamics simulations. However, larger structural rearrangements demand the use of enhanced sampling methods relying on modified descriptions of the biomolecular system or the potential surface. This review illustrates the crucial role that structural plasticity plays in mediating ligand recognition through representative examples. In addition, it discusses some of the most powerful computational tools developed to characterize the conformational flexibility in ligand-receptor complexes. PMID:20939788

  18. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials. PMID:19630739

  19. Pharmacology and therapeutic potential of sigma(1) receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Cobos, E J; Entrena, J M; Nieto, F R; Cendán, C M; Del Pozo, E

    2008-12-01

    Sigma (sigma) receptors, initially described as a subtype of opioid receptors, are now considered unique receptors. Pharmacological studies have distinguished two types of sigma receptors, termed sigma(1) and sigma(2). Of these two subtypes, the sigma(1) receptor has been cloned in humans and rodents, and its amino acid sequence shows no homology with other mammalian proteins. Several psychoactive drugs show high to moderate affinity for sigma(1) receptors, including the antipsychotic haloperidol, the antidepressant drugs fluvoxamine and sertraline, and the psychostimulants cocaine and methamphetamine; in addition, the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin allosterically modulates sigma(1) receptors. Certain neurosteroids are known to interact with sigma(1) receptors, and have been proposed to be their endogenous ligands. These receptors are located in the plasma membrane and in subcellular membranes, particularly in the endoplasmic reticulum, where they play a modulatory role in intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Sigma(1) receptors also play a modulatory role in the activity of some ion channels and in several neurotransmitter systems, mainly in glutamatergic neurotransmission. In accordance with their widespread modulatory role, sigma(1) receptor ligands have been proposed to be useful in several therapeutic fields such as amnesic and cognitive deficits, depression and anxiety, schizophrenia, analgesia, and against some effects of drugs of abuse (such as cocaine and methamphetamine). In this review we provide an overview of the present knowledge of sigma(1) receptors, focussing on sigma(1) ligand neuropharmacology and the role of sigma(1) receptors in behavioral animal studies, which have contributed greatly to the potential therapeutic applications of sigma(1) ligands. PMID:19587856

  20. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. ); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. ); Rouvinen, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  1. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Burton, D R

    1988-07-22

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used. PMID:2840465

  2. Ligand Functionalization in Metal-Organic Frameworks for Enhanced Carbon Dioxide Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Peng, Junjie; Li, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Ligand functionalization in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been studied extensively and has been demonstrated to enhance gas adsorption and induce interesting gas adsorption phenomena. This account summarizes our recent study of three series of MOFs by ligand functionalization, as well as their carbon dioxide adsorption properties. While ligand functionalization does not change the overall structure of the frameworks, it can influence their gas adsorption behavior. In the first two series, we show how ligand functionalization influences the CO2 affinity and adsorption capacity of MOFs. We also show a special case in which subtle changes in ligand functionality alter the CO2 adsorption profile. PMID:27071491

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermogravimetric and antimicrobial studies of mixed ligands complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Walaa H.; Mahmoud, Nessma F.; Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Sonbati, Adel Z.; El-Bindary, Ashraf A.

    2015-09-01

    An interesting series of mixed ligand complexes have been synthesized by the reaction of metal chloride with guaifenesin (GFS) in the presence of 2-aminoacetic acid (HGly) (1:1:1 molar ratio). The elemental analysis, magnetic moments, molar conductance, spectral (UV-Vis, IR, 1H NMR and ESR) and thermal studies were used to characterize the isolated complexes. The molecular structure of GFS is optimized theoretically and the quantum chemical parameters are calculated. The IR showed that the ligand (GFS) acts as monobasic tridentate through the hydroxyl, phenoxy etheric and methoxy oxygen atoms and co-ligand (HGly) as monobasic bidentate through the deprotonated carboxylate oxygen atom and nitrogen atom of amino group. The molar conductivities showed that all the complexes are non-electrolytes except Cr(III) complex is electrolyte. Electronic and magnetic data proposed the octahedral structure for all complexes under investigation. ESR spectrum for Cu(II) revealed data which confirm the proposed structure. Antibacterial screening of the compounds were carried out in vitro on gram positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative (Escherichia coli and Neisseria gonorrhoeae) bacteria and for in vitro antifungal activity against Candida albicans organism. However, some complexes showed more chemotherapeutic efficiency than the parent GFS drug. The complexes were also screened for their in vitro anticancer activity against the breast cell line (MFC7) and the results obtained showed that they exhibit a considerable anticancer activity.

  4. Mechanistic insight into ligand binding to G-quadruplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Novellino, Ettore; Cavalli, Andrea; Parrinello, Michele; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Specific guanine-rich regions in human genome can form higher-order DNA structures called G-quadruplexes, which regulate many relevant biological processes. For instance, the formation of G-quadruplex at telomeres can alter cellular functions, inducing apoptosis. Thus, developing small molecules that are able to bind and stabilize the telomeric G-quadruplexes represents an attractive strategy for antitumor therapy. An example is 3-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-7-hydroxy-8-((4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl)methyl)-2H-chromen-2-one (compound 1), recently identified as potent ligand of the G-quadruplex [d(TGGGGT)]4 with promising in vitro antitumor activity. The experimental observations are suggestive of a complex binding mechanism that, despite efforts, has defied full characterization. Here, we provide through metadynamics simulations a comprehensive understanding of the binding mechanism of 1 to the G-quadruplex [d(TGGGGT)]4. In our calculations, the ligand explores all the available binding sites on the DNA structure and the free-energy landscape of the whole binding process is computed. We have thus disclosed a peculiar hopping binding mechanism whereas 1 is able to bind both to the groove and to the 3’ end of the G-quadruplex. Our results fully explain the available experimental data, rendering our approach of great value for further ligand/DNA studies. PMID:24753420

  5. Selective Chromium(VI) Ligands Identified Using Combinatorial Peptoid Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Abigail S.; Zhou, Effie Y.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a world-wide water contaminant that is currently without cost-effective and efficient remediation strategies. This is in part due to a lack of ligands that can bind it amid an excess of innocuous ions in aqueous solution. We present herein the design and application of a peptoid-based library of ligand candidates for toxic metal ions. A selective screening process was used to identify members of the library that can bind to Cr(VI) species at neutral pH and in the presence of a large excess of spectator ions. Eleven sequences were identified, and their affinities were compared using titrations monitored with UV-Vis spectroscopy. To identify the interactions involved in coordination and specificity, we evaluated the effects of sequence substitutions and backbone variation in the highest affinity structure. Additional characterization of the complex formed between this sequence and Cr(VI) was performed using NMR spectroscopy. To evaluate the ability of the developed sequences to remediate contaminated solutions, the structures were synthesized on a solid-phase resin and incubated with environmental water samples that contained simulated levels of chromium contamination. The synthetic structures demonstrated the ability to reduce the amount of toxic chromium to levels within the range of the EPA contamination guidelines. In addition to providing some of the first selective ligands for Cr(VI), these studies highlight the promise of peptoid sequences as easily-prepared components of environmental remediation materials. PMID:24195610

  6. Ligand Binding to Chlorite Dismutase from Magnetospirillum sp.

    PubMed

    De Schutter, Amy; Correia, Hugo D; Freire, Diana M; Rivas, María G; Rizzi, Alberto; Santos-Silva, Teresa; González, Pablo J; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2015-10-29

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) catalyzes the reduction of chlorite to chloride and dioxygen. Here, the ligand binding to Cld of Magnetospirillum sp. (MaCld) is investigated with X-ray crystallography and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). EPR reveals a large heterogeneity in the structure of wild-type MaCld, showing a variety of low- and high-spin ferric heme forms. Addition of an axial ligand, such as azide or imidazole, removes this heterogeneity almost entirely. This is in line with the two high resolution crystal structures of MaCld obtained in the presence of azide and thiocyanate that show the coordination of the ligands to the heme iron. The crystal structure of the MaCld-azide complex reveals a single well-defined orientation of the azide molecule in the heme pocket. EPR shows, however, a pH-dependent heme structure, probably due to acid-base transitions of the surrounding amino-acid residues stabilizing azide. For the azide and imidazole complex of MaCld, the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole interactions with the close-by (14)N and (1)H nuclei are determined using pulsed EPR. These values are compared to the corresponding data for the low-spin forms observed in the ferric wild-type MaCld and to existing EPR data on azide and imidazole complexes of other heme proteins. PMID:26287794

  7. Evolution of ligand specificity in vertebrate corticosteroid receptors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Corticosteroid receptors include mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptors. Teleost fishes have a single MR and duplicate GRs that show variable sensitivities to mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids. How these receptors compare functionally to tetrapod MR and GR, and the evolutionary significance of maintaining two GRs, remains unclear. Results We used up to seven steroids (including aldosterone, cortisol and 11-deoxycorticosterone [DOC]) to compare the ligand specificity of the ligand binding domains of corticosteroid receptors between a mammal (Mus musculus) and the midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus), a teleost model for steroid regulation of neural and behavioral plasticity. Variation in mineralocorticoid sensitivity was considered in a broader phylogenetic context by examining the aldosterone sensitivity of MR and GRs from the distantly related daffodil cichlid (Neolamprologus pulcher), another teleost model for neurobehavioral plasticity. Both teleost species had a single MR and duplicate GRs. All MRs were sensitive to DOC, consistent with the hypothesis that DOC was the initial ligand of the ancestral MR. Variation in GR steroid-specificity corresponds to nine identified amino acid residue substitutions rather than phylogenetic relationships based on receptor sequences. Conclusion The mineralocorticoid sensitivity of duplicate GRs in teleosts is highly labile in the context of their evolutionary phylogeny, a property that likely led to neo-functionalization and maintenance of two GRs. PMID:21232159

  8. Ligand-hole localization in oxides with unusual valence Fe

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Tin; Saito, Takashi; Hayashi, Naoaki; Takano, Mikio; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Unusual high-valence states of iron are stabilized in a few oxides. A-site-ordered perovskite-structure oxides contain such iron cations and exhibit distinct electronic behaviors at low temperatures, e.g. charge disproportionation (4Fe4+ → 2Fe3+ + 2Fe5+) in CaCu3Fe4O12 and intersite charge transfer (3Cu2+ + 4Fe3.75+ → 3Cu3+ + 4Fe3+) in LaCu3Fe4O12. Here we report the synthesis of solid solutions of CaCu3Fe4O12 and LaCu3Fe4O12 and explain how the instabilities of their unusual valence states of iron are relieved. Although these behaviors look completely different from each other in simple ionic models, they can both be explained by the localization of ligand holes, which are produced by the strong hybridization of iron d and oxygen p orbitals in oxides. The localization behavior in the charge disproportionation of CaCu3Fe4O12 is regarded as charge ordering of the ligand holes, and that in the intersite charge transfer of LaCu3Fe4O12 is regarded as a Mott transition of the ligand holes. PMID:22690318

  9. Copper isotope fractionation during equilibration with natural and synthetic ligands.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Brooke M; Kirby, Jason K; Degryse, Fien; Scheiderich, Kathleen; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2014-01-01

    As copper (Cu) stable isotopes emerge as a tool for tracing Cu biogeochemical cycling, an understanding of how Cu isotopes fractionate during complexation with soluble organic ligands in natural waters and soil solutions is required. A Donnan dialysis technique was employed to assess the isotopic fractionation of Cu during complexation with the soluble synthetic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and desferrioxamine B (DFOB), as well as with Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). The results indicated enrichment of the heavy isotope ((65)Cu) in the complexes, with Δ(65)Cu complex-free values ranging from +0.14 to +0.84‰. A strong linear correlation was found between the logarithms of the stability constants of the Cu complexes and the magnitudes of isotopic fractionation. These results show that complexation of Cu by organic ligands can affect the isotopic signature of the free Cu ion. This free Cu is considered the most bioavailable species, and hence, our results highlight the importance of understanding fractionation processes in the uptake medium when using Cu isotopes to study the uptake mechanisms of organisms. These data contribute a vital piece to the emerging picture of Cu isotope cycling in the natural environment, as organic complexation plays a key role in the Cu cycle. PMID:24992660

  10. Recent advances in the synthesis of endocannabinoid related ligands.

    PubMed

    Razdan, R K; Mahadevan, A

    2002-12-31

    The chemical strategies used for the synthesis of various ligands related to the endocannabinoid system namely anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-Ara-Gl), CB1/(vanilloid receptors) VR1, anandamide membrane transporter (AMT) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are described in this review. In general, the chemical synthesis of analogs with changes in the head group of AEA was quite straightforward involving the conversion of an acid to an amide or an ester. Analogs which had modifications in the end pentyl chain were more difficult to synthesize and required multistep synthetic sequences to prepare the target compounds. A facile total synthesis of 2-Ara-Gl was reported and an HPLC procedure for its identification and quantification was developed, but because of the instability of 2-Ara-Gl another synthesis was developed so that it can be stored as the more stable phenylboronate ester. Similarly the chemical synthesis of various ligands in the remaining areas of CB1/VR1, AMT and FAAH are described. A summary of the present state of knowledge about the SAR in each area is presented to help in the design and synthesis of novel ligands for the future. PMID:12505687

  11. Biphasic binding kinetics between FepA and its ligands.

    PubMed

    Payne, M A; Igo, J D; Cao, Z; Foster, S B; Newton, S M; Klebba, P E

    1997-08-29

    The Escherichia coli FepA protein is an energy- and TonB-dependent, ligand-binding porin that functions as a receptor for the siderophore ferric enterobactin and colicins B and D. We characterized the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters associated with the initial, energy-independent steps in ligand binding to FepA. In vivo experiments produced Kd values of 24, 185, and 560 nM for ferric enterobactin, colicin B, and colicin D, respectively. The siderophore and colicin B bound to FepA with a 1:1 stoichiometry, but colicin D bound to a maximum level that was 3-fold lower. Preincubation with ferric enterobactin prevented colicin B binding, and preincubation with colicin B prevented ferric enterobactin binding. Colicin B release from FepA was unexpectedly slow in vivo, about 10-fold slower than ferric enterobactin release. This slow dissociation of the colicin B.FepA complex facilitated the affinity purification of FepA and FepA mutants with colicin B-Sepharose. Analysis of a fluorescent FepA derivative showed that ferric enterobactin and colicin B adsorbed with biphasic kinetics, suggesting that both ligands bind in at least two distinct steps, an initial rapid stage and a subsequent slower step, that presumably establishes a transport-competent complex. PMID:9268330

  12. Using inositol as a biocompatible ligand for efficient transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Bellis, Susan L; Fan, Yiwen; Wu, Yunkun

    2015-01-01

    Transgene transfection techniques using cationic polymers such as polyethylenimines (PEIs) and PEI derivatives as gene vectors have shown efficacy, although they also have shortcomings. PEIs have decent DNA-binding capability and good cell internalization performance, but they cannot deliver gene payloads very efficiently to cell nuclei. In this study, three hyperbranched polyglycerol-polyethylenimine (PG6-PEI) polymers conjugated with myo-inositol (INO) molecules were developed. The three resulting PG6-PEI-INO polymers have an increased number of INO ligands per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 1 had only 14 carboxymethyl INO (CMINO) units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 2 had approximately 130 CMINO units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 3 had as high as 415 CMINO units approximately. Mixing PG6-PEI-INO polymers with DNA produced compact nanocomposites. We then performed localization studies using fluorescent microscopy. As the number of conjugated inositol ligands increased in PG6-PEI-INO polymers, there was a corresponding increase in accumulation of the polymers within 293T cell nuclei. Transfection performed with spherical 293T cells yielded 82% of EGFP-positive cells when using PG6-PEI-INO 3 as the vehicle. Studies further revealed that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) can inhibit the transgene efficiency of PG6-PEI-INO polymers, as compared with PEI and PG6-PEI that were not conjugated with inositol. Our work unveiled the possibility of using inositol as an effective ligand for transgene expression. PMID:25926732

  13. Using inositol as a biocompatible ligand for efficient transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Bellis, Susan L; Fan, Yiwen; Wu, Yunkun

    2015-01-01

    Transgene transfection techniques using cationic polymers such as polyethylenimines (PEIs) and PEI derivatives as gene vectors have shown efficacy, although they also have shortcomings. PEIs have decent DNA-binding capability and good cell internalization performance, but they cannot deliver gene payloads very efficiently to cell nuclei. In this study, three hyperbranched polyglycerol-polyethylenimine (PG6-PEI) polymers conjugated with myo-inositol (INO) molecules were developed. The three resulting PG6-PEI-INO polymers have an increased number of INO ligands per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 1 had only 14 carboxymethyl INO (CMINO) units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 2 had approximately 130 CMINO units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 3 had as high as 415 CMINO units approximately. Mixing PG6-PEI-INO polymers with DNA produced compact nanocomposites. We then performed localization studies using fluorescent microscopy. As the number of conjugated inositol ligands increased in PG6-PEI-INO polymers, there was a corresponding increase in accumulation of the polymers within 293T cell nuclei. Transfection performed with spherical 293T cells yielded 82% of EGFP-positive cells when using PG6-PEI-INO 3 as the vehicle. Studies further revealed that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) can inhibit the transgene efficiency of PG6-PEI-INO polymers, as compared with PEI and PG6-PEI that were not conjugated with inositol. Our work unveiled the possibility of using inositol as an effective ligand for transgene expression. PMID:25926732

  14. Stability and structure of activated macrocyles. Ligand with biological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Motekaitis, R.J.; Martell, A.E.

    1996-06-19

    Single p-toluic acid pendant groups were attached to 1,4,7,10,13-pentaazacyclopentadecane (15aneN5) and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane (cyclam) to prepare bifunctional reagents for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies with {sup 64, 67}Cu. The ligands are 1,4,7,10,13-pentaazacyclopentadecane-1-({alpha}-1,4-toluic acid) (PCBA) and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1-({alpha}-1,4-toluic acid) (CPTA). For the parent macrocycles and their pendant arm derivatives, the 1:1 Cu{sup 2+} complexes dissociate only below pH 2. At pH 0.0 and 25 {degrees}C the CPTA-Cu complex has a half-life toward complete dissociation of 24 days. A new approach was developed for the estimation of the Cu{sup 2+} stability constant for the kinetically robust CPTA. All other formation constants were determined at 25.0 {degrees}C with batch spectrophotometric techniques. Potentiometric titrations were used to determine the protonation constants of the macrocyclic ligands as well as of the metal chelates. The protonation constants, stability constants, and pM`s are discussed in terms of both molecular mechanics calculations and the ligands` potential applicability as copper(II) radiopharmaceuticals.

  15. Supramolecular and structural modification on conformational by mixed ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sonbati, A. Z.; Diab, M. A.; El-Bindary, A. A.; Abd El-Kader, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    A novel series of platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes have been synthesized by template condensation of 4-methoxybenzaldehyde, benzaldehyde, 4-chlorobenzaldehyde and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde, with appropriate 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP) in the presence of K2PtCl4/PdCl2 to form complexes of the type [M(Ln)Cl2](where M = Pt(II) or Pd(II)). The corresponding Schiff base complexes mixed ligand were prepared by condensation of [M(Ln)Cl2] with ethanolamine (LH). The complexes have been characterized with the help of elemental analysis, IR, 1H and 13C NMR, electronic spectra, conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibilities and thermal analysis. On the basis of these studies, it is clear that ligands coordinated to metal atom in a mononuclear (NO) in (1-6), Schiff base complexes (NN*) in (7-9) and monobasic tridentate Schiff base complexes (NN*O) in (10-12). Thus, suitable square planar geometry for tetradentated state has been suggested for the metal complexes. Various ligand and nephelouxetic parameter have been calculated for the complexes. The thermal decomposition for complexes was studied.

  16. Sequence variation in ligand binding sites in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Magliery, Thomas J; Regan, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    Background The recent explosion in the availability of complete genome sequences has led to the cataloging of tens of thousands of new proteins and putative proteins. Many of these proteins can be structurally or functionally categorized from sequence conservation alone. In contrast, little attention has been given to the meaning of poorly-conserved sites in families of proteins, which are typically assumed to be of little structural or functional importance. Results Recently, using statistical free energy analysis of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, we observed that positions in contact with peptide ligands are more variable than surface positions in general. Here we show that statistical analysis of TPRs, ankyrin repeats, Cys2His2 zinc fingers and PDZ domains accurately identifies specificity-determining positions by their sequence variation. Sequence variation is measured as deviation from a neutral reference state, and we present probabilistic and information theory formalisms that improve upon recently suggested methods such as statistical free energies and sequence entropies. Conclusion Sequence variation has been used to identify functionally-important residues in four selected protein families. With TPRs and ankyrin repeats, protein families that bind highly diverse ligands, the effect is so pronounced that sequence "hypervariation" alone can be used to predict ligand binding sites. PMID:16194281

  17. A Synthetic Bivalent Ligand of CXCR4 Inhibits HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Duggineni, Srinivas; Espitia, Stephen; Richman, Douglas D.; An, Jing; Huang, Ziwei

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are cell membrane protein receptors that transduce signals across the cell membrane and are important targets for therapeutic interventions. As members of the GPCR superfamily, chemokine receptors such as CXCR4 play critical roles in normal physiology as well as the pathology of many human diseases including cancer, inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Here we report the discovery and study of a novel peptide ligand of CXCR4 using D-amino acids and bivalent ligand approach. This peptide, DV1-K-(DV3), shows very high affinity for CXCR4 with an IC50 of 4 nM in anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 12G5 competitive assay, which is more potent than full length natural ligand SDF-1α, even though the peptide is less than half of the number of residues of SDF-1α. This peptide can block the calcium influx stimulated by SDF-1α and inhibit cancer cell migration in vitro via CXCR4, thus functioning as a CXCR4 antagonist. Furthermore, DV1-K-(DV3) peptide displayed anti-HIV activity by inhibiting HIV-1 infection mediated by CXCR4. With its high receptor affinity and stability from D-amino acids, this peptide may be a new probe of CXCR4 functions in physiology and pathology and promising lead for therapeutic development. PMID:23688427

  18. Electrophilic Metal Alkyl Chemistry in New Ligand Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Richard F.

    2013-06-30

    The goals of this project were to design new electrophilic metal alkyl complexes and to exploit these systems in fundamental studies of olefin polymerization and other important and new catalytic reactions. A key target reaction is insertion copolymerization of olefins and polar CH2=CHX vinyl monomers such as vinyl halides and vinyl ethers. During the period covered by this report we (i) investigated the properties of ortho-alkoxy-arylphosphine ligands in Ni-based olefin polymerization catalysts, (ii) studied the synthesis of double-end-capped polyethylene using group 4 metal catalysts that contain tris-pyrazolylborate ligands, (iii) explored the ethylene insertion reactivity of group 4 metal tris-pyrazolyl-borate complexes, (iv) showed that (α-diimine)PdMe{sup +} species undergo multiple insertion of silyl vinyl ethers, (v) synthesized and explored the reactivity of base-free Ni benzyl complexes that contain ortho-phosphino-arene sulfonate ligands, (vi) established the mechanism of the reaction of vinyl chloride with (α-diimine)PdMe{sup +} catalysts, (vii) explored the role of cationic polymerization and insertion chemistry in the reactions of vinyl ethers with (α-diimine)PdMe{sup +} species, (viii) discovered a new class of self-assembled tetranuclear Pd catalysts that produce high molecular weight linear polyethylene and copolymerize ethylene and vinyl fluoride, and (ix) developed model systems that enabled investigation of cis-trans isomerization of {phosphine-sulfonate}Pd(II) complexes.

  19. Discovery of selective RIO2 kinase small molecule ligand.

    PubMed

    Varin, Thibault; Godfrey, Alexander G; Masquelin, Thierry; Nicolaou, Christos A; Evans, David A; Vieth, Michal

    2015-10-01

    We report the discovery and initial optimization of diphenpyramide and several of its analogs as hRIO2 kinase ligands. One of these analogs is the most selective hRIO2 ligand reported to date. Diphenpyramide is a Cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 inhibitor that was used as an anti-inflammatory agent. The RIO2 kinase affinity of diphenpyramide was discovered by serendipity while profiling of 13 marketed drugs on a large 456 kinase assay panel. The inhibition values also suggested a relative selectivity of diphenpyramide for RIO2 against the other kinases in the panel. Subsequently three available and eight newly synthesized analogs were assayed, one of which showed a 10 fold increased hRIO2 binding affinity. Additionally, this compound shows significantly better selectivity over assayed kinases, when compared to currently known RIO2 inhibitors. As RIO2 is involved in the biosynthesis of the ribosome and cell cycle regulation, our selective ligand may be useful for the delineation of the biological role of this kinase. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. PMID:25891899

  20. Structural and Functional Diversity of Estrogen Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptors, comprised of ERα and ERβ isoforms in mammals, act as ligand-modulated transcription factors and orchestrate a plethora of cellular functions from sexual development and reproduction to metabolic homeostasis. Herein, I revisit the structural basis of the binding of ERα to DNA and estradiol in light of the recent discoveries and emerging trends in the field of nuclear receptors. A particular emphasis of this review is on the chemical and structural diversity of an ever-increasing repertoire of physiological, environmental and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors that ultimately modulate their interactions with cognate DNA located within the promoters of estrogen-responsive genes. In particular, modulation of estrogen receptors by small molecule ligands represents an important therapeutic goal toward the treatment of a wide variety of human pathologies including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and obesity. Collectively, this article provides an overview of a wide array of small organic and inorganic molecules that can fine-tune the physiological function of estrogen receptors, thereby bearing a direct impact on human health and disease. PMID:25866274

  1. Anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand of vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Amrita B.; Han, Andrew W.; Mehta, Angad P.; Mok, Kenny C.; Osadchiy, Vadim; Begley, Tadhg P.; Taga, Michiko E.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is required by humans and other organisms for diverse metabolic processes, although only a subset of prokaryotes is capable of synthesizing B12 and other cobamide cofactors. The complete aerobic and anaerobic pathways for the de novo biosynthesis of B12 are known, with the exception of the steps leading to the anaerobic biosynthesis of the lower ligand, 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). Here, we report the identification and characterization of the complete pathway for anaerobic DMB biosynthesis. This pathway, identified in the obligate anaerobic bacterium Eubacterium limosum, is composed of five previously uncharacterized genes, bzaABCDE, that together direct DMB production when expressed in anaerobically cultured Escherichia coli. Expression of different combinations of the bza genes revealed that 5-hydroxybenzimidazole, 5-methoxybenzimidazole, and 5-methoxy-6-methylbenzimidazole, all of which are lower ligands of cobamides produced by other organisms, are intermediates in the pathway. The bza gene content of several bacterial and archaeal genomes is consistent with experimentally determined structures of the benzimidazoles produced by these organisms, indicating that these genes can be used to predict cobamide structure. The identification of the bza genes thus represents the last remaining unknown component of the biosynthetic pathway for not only B12 itself, but also for three other cobamide lower ligands whose biosynthesis was previously unknown. Given the importance of cobamides in environmental, industrial, and human-associated microbial metabolism, the ability to predict cobamide structure may lead to an improved ability to understand and manipulate microbial metabolism. PMID:26246619

  2. Rationalizing Tight Ligand Binding through Cooperative Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Small modifications of the molecular structure of a ligand sometimes cause strong gains in binding affinity to a protein target, rendering a weakly active chemical series suddenly attractive for further optimization. Our goal in this study is to better rationalize and predict the occurrence of such interaction hot-spots in receptor binding sites. To this end, we introduce two new concepts into the computational description of molecular recognition. First, we take a broader view of noncovalent interactions and describe protein–ligand binding with a comprehensive set of favorable and unfavorable contact types, including for example halogen bonding and orthogonal multipolar interactions. Second, we go beyond the commonly used pairwise additive treatment of atomic interactions and use a small world network approach to describe how interactions are modulated by their environment. This approach allows us to capture local cooperativity effects and considerably improves the performance of a newly derived empirical scoring function, ScorpionScore. More importantly, however, we demonstrate how an intuitive visualization of key intermolecular interactions, interaction networks, and binding hot-spots supports the identification and rationalization of tight ligand binding. PMID:22087588

  3. Ligand Exchange Governs the Crystal Structures in Binary Nanocrystal Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingjing; Schaeffer, Nicolas; Pileni, Marie-Paule

    2015-11-25

    The surface chemistry in colloidal nanocrystals on the final crystalline structure of binary superlattices produced by self-assembly of two sets of nanocrystals is hereby demonstrated. By mixing nanocrystals having two different sizes and the same coating agent, oleylamine (OAM), the binary nanocrystal superlattices that are produced, such as NaCl, AlB2, NaZn13, and MgZn2, are well in agreement with the crystalline structures predicted by the hard-sphere model, their formation being purely driven by entropic forces. By opposition, when large and small nanocrystals are coated with two different ligands [OAM and dodecanethiol (DDT), respectively] while keeping all other experimental conditions unchanged, the final binary structures markedly change and various structures with lower packing densities, such as Cu3Au, CaB6, and quasicrystals, are observed. This effect of the nanocrystals' coating agents could also be extended to other binary systems, such as Ag-Au and CoFe2O4-Ag supracrystalline binary lattices. In order to understand this effect, a mechanism based on ligand exchange process is proposed. Ligand exchange mechanism is believed to affect the thermodynamics in the formation of binary systems composed of two sets of nanocrystals with different sizes and bearing two different coating agents. Hence, the formation of binary superlattices with lower packing densities may be favored kinetically because the required energetic penalty is smaller than that of a denser structure. PMID:26549642

  4. Synthesis and characterisation of a mesocyclic tripodal triamine ligand.

    PubMed

    Ure, Andrew D; Lázaro, Isabel Abánades; Cotter, Michelle; McDonald, Aidan R

    2016-01-14

    Meso- and macrocyclic polydentate amine ligands have been widely explored in oxidation catalysis and for the stabilization of unstable metal-superoxide, -peroxide, and -oxo intermediates. Herein we report on the design and synthesis of a novel mesocyclic, tripodal, triamine ligand that we believe will be an excellent addition to this field. We explored a number of synthetic procedures towards the mesocyclic asymmetric tetraalkylated ligand 1. We expect that 1 will bind metals in a facially capping manner, yielding complexes that display pseudo-tetrahedral geometry, potentially providing access to unprecedented late transition metal-oxo complexes (metal = Co, Ni, Cu). We describe the preparation of a library of mesocyclic polyamine synthons (8, 16, 17, 18, 19) that are precursors in the synthesis of 1. These synthons will be used to tailor the electronic properties of metal complexes of 1 and derivatives thereof. The X-ray crystal structures of 19 and mono- and di-protonated forms of 1b show that the triamine crystalises in a boat–chair conformation which is undesirable for metal coordination. However, solution (1)H NMR studies show that in solution both 19 and the tetraalkylated derivative 1b are remarkably flexible. 1b reacted with [CuI(NCCH3)4](OTf) yielding a 1:1 copper(I) complex [CuI(NCCH3)(1b)](+). PMID:26488232

  5. Reprogramming eukaryotic translation with ligand-responsive synthetic RNA switches.

    PubMed

    Anzalone, Andrew V; Lin, Annie J; Zairis, Sakellarios; Rabadan, Raul; Cornish, Virginia W

    2016-05-01

    Protein synthesis in eukaryotes is regulated by diverse reprogramming mechanisms that expand the coding capacity of individual genes. Here, we exploit one such mechanism, termed -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF), to engineer ligand-responsive RNA switches that regulate protein expression. First, efficient -1 PRF stimulatory RNA elements were discovered by in vitro selection; then, ligand-responsive switches were constructed by coupling -1 PRF stimulatory elements to RNA aptamers using rational design and directed evolution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that -1 PRF switches tightly control the relative stoichiometry of two distinct protein outputs from a single mRNA, exhibiting consistent ligand response across whole populations of cells. Furthermore, -1 PRF switches were applied to build single-mRNA logic gates and an apoptosis module in yeast. Together, these results showcase the potential for harnessing translation-reprogramming mechanisms for synthetic biology, and they establish -1 PRF switches as powerful RNA tools for controlling protein synthesis in eukaryotes. PMID:26999002

  6. Student-Directed Explorations To Learn about Ligands in an Inorganic Chemistry Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cass, Marion E.

    2004-08-01

    In an inorganic chemistry course, it is hard to find the time to teach the large number of diverse ligands that impact the chemistry of metal-ligand complexes. Over the past several years, I have used a weekly assignment to have students bring examples of ligands to class. I call this exercise the "ligand-of-the-week" assignment. Each week, we select a type of ligand, such as ligands that bind through nitrogen, ligands that bind through oxygen, chelating ligands, ligands that impose tetrahedral geometry, and so forth. Each student searches the literature to find an example that is unique relative to the choice made by any other student in the class. In a rotation cycle of three to four students per week, students present their examples. Using this exercise, I find that we cover a large number of topics (electron counting, nomenclature, modes of bonding, bridging ligands, metal ion selectivity, electronically "non-innocent" ligands, etc.) in a relatively spontaneous, student-directed, need-to-know 15 minutes of class time per week.

  7. Polycatenar Ligand Control of the Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Colloidal Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Diroll, Benjamin T; Jishkariani, Davit; Cargnello, Matteo; Murray, Christopher B; Donnio, Bertrand

    2016-08-24

    Hydrophobic colloidal nanocrystals are typically synthesized and manipulated with commercially available ligands, and surface functionalization is therefore typically limited to a small number of molecules. Here, we report the use of polycatenar ligands derived from polyalkylbenzoates for the direct synthesis of metallic, chalcogenide, pnictide, and oxide nanocrystals. Polycatenar molecules, branched structures bearing diverging chains in which the terminal substitution pattern, functionality, and binding group can be independently modified, offer a modular platform for the development of ligands with targeted properties. Not only are these ligands used for the direct synthesis of monodisperse nanocrystals, but nanocrystals coated with polycatenar ligands self-assemble into softer bcc superlattices that deviate from conventional harder close-packed structures (fcc or hcp) formed by the same nanocrystals coated with commercial ligands. Self-assembly experiments demonstrate that the molecular structure of polycatenar ligands encodes interparticle spacings and attractions, engineering self-assembly, which is tunable from hard sphere to soft sphere behavior. PMID:27472457

  8. EXAFS Studies of Some Copper(II) Mixed-Ligand Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, S. K.; Katare, R. K.; Shrivastava, B. D.

    2007-02-02

    X-ray K-absorption spectroscopic studies have been carried out on copper (II) mixed-ligand complexes with glutamic acid and aspartic acid as the primary ligands, where as water, pyridine, imidazole and benz-imidazole have been used as secondary ligands. Chemical shifts obtained from the X-ray absorption data have indicated that the glutamic acid complexes are more ionic as compared to their corresponding aspartic acid complexes having similar secondary ligands. Further, we have estimated the average metal-ligand bond distances from the from structure data. For the different complexes studied under the present investigation, the studies reveal that the bonding parameter {alpha}1 decreases with the increase in the percentage covalency of the metal-ligand bond. Thus, the bonding parameter {alpha}1 may be used for the estimation of percentage covalency of the metal-ligand bond in other similar complexes.

  9. Sulfur copolymer for the direct synthesis of ligand-free CdS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Martin, Trevor R; Mazzio, Katherine A; Hillhouse, Hugh W; Luscombe, Christine K

    2015-06-30

    Organic coordinating ligands are ubiquitously used to solubilize, stabilize and functionalize colloidal nanoparticles. Aliphatic organic ligands are typically used to control size during the nanoparticle growth period and are used as a high boiling point solvent for solution-based synthesis procedures. However, these aliphatic ligands are typically not well suited for the end use of the nanoparticles, so additional ligand exchange or ligand stripping procedures must be implemented after the nanoparticle synthesis. Herein we present a ligand-free CdS nanoparticle synthesis procedure using a unique sulfur copolymer. The sulfur copolymer is derived from elemental sulfur, which is a cheap and abundant material. This copolymer is used as a sulfur source and high boiling point solvent, which produces stabilized metal-sulfide nanoparticles that are suspended within a sulfur copolymer matrix. The copolymer can then be removed, thereby yielding ligand-free metal-sulfide nanoparticles. PMID:26077505

  10. DNA-Based Nanostructures: Changes of Mechanical Properties of DNA upon Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, Yury; Grokhovsky, Sergey; Gursky, Georgy; Nechipurenko, Dmitry; Polozov, Robert

    The formation of DNA-based nanostructures involves the binding of different kinds of ligands to DNA as well as the interaction of DNA molecules with each other. Complex formation between ligand and DNA can alter physicochemical properties of the DNA molecule. In the present work, the accessibility of DNA-ligand complexes to cleavage by DNase I are considered, and the exact algorithms for analysis of diagrams of DNase I footprinting for ligand-DNA complexes are obtained. Changes of mechanical properties of the DNA upon ligand binding are also demonstrated by the cleavage patterns generated upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes. Propagation of the mechanical perturbations along DNA in the presence of bound ligands is considered in terms of a string model with a heterogeneity corresponding to the position of a bound ligand on DNA. This model can reproduce qualitatively the cleavage patterns obtained upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes.

  11. Design and Formation of a Large, Tetrahedral, Metal-ligand Cluster Using 1,1'-Binaphthyl Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Biros, Shannon M.; Yeh, Robert M.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-03-13

    Many chemists have been fascinated with the development of discrete supramolecular structures that encapsulate guest molecules. These structures can be assembled through covalent or hydrogen bonds, electrostatic or metal-ligand interactions. These host structures have provided valuable insight into the forces involved in small molecule recognition. Our work has focused on the design and study of metal-ligand clusters of varying sizes. The naphthalene [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} cluster 1, shown in Figure 1, has demonstrated diastereoselective guest binding and chiral induction properties as well as the ability to catalyze reactions carried out inside the cavity in an enzyme-like manner. However, the size of the cavity (ca. 300-500 {angstrom}{sup 3}) has often limited the scope of substrates for these transformations.

  12. Conducting dimerized cobalt complexes with tetrathiafulvalene dithiolate ligands.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Emiko; Hosoya, Kazumasa; Kobayashi, Akiko; Tanaka, Hisashi; Tokumoto, Madoka; Okano, Yoshinori; Fujiwara, Hideki; Kobayashi, Hayao; Fujishiro, Yuichi; Nishibori, Eiji; Takata, Masaki; Sakata, Makoto

    2008-02-01

    To obtain novel single-component molecular metals, we attempted to synthesize several cobalt complexes coordinated by TTF (tetrathiafulvalene)-type dithiolate ligands. We succeeded in the syntheses and structure determinations of ((n)Bu(4)N)(2)[Co(chdt)(2)](2) (1), ((n)Bu(4)N)(2)[Co(dmdt)(2)](2) (2), [Co(dmdt)(2)](2) (3), and [Co(dt)(2)](2) (4) (chdt = cyclohexeno-TTF-dithiolate, dmdt = dimethyl-TTF-dithiolate, and dt = TTF-dithiolate). Structure analyses of complexes 1-4 revealed that two monomeric [Co(ligand)2]- or [Co(ligand)(2)](0) units are connected by two Co-S bonds resulting in dimeric [Co(ligand)(2)](2)(2-) or [Co(ligand)(2)](2) molecules. Complex 1 has a cation-anion-intermingled structure and exhibited Curie-Weiss magnetic behavior with a large Curie constant (C = 2.02 K x emu x mol(-1)) and weak antiferromagnetic interactions (theta = -8.3 K). Complex 2 also has a cation-anion-intermingled structure. However, the dimeric molecules are completely isolated by cations. Complexes 3 and 4 are single-component molecular crystals. The molecules of complex 3 form two-dimensional molecular stacking layers and exhibit a room-temperature conductivity of sigmart = 1.2 x 10(-2) S.cm(-1) and an activation energy of E(a) = 85 meV. The magnetic behavior is almost consistent with Curie-Weiss law, where the Curie constant and Weiss temperature are 8.7 x 10(-2) K x emu x mol(-1) and -0.85 K, respectively. Complex 4 has a rare chair form of the dimeric structure. The electrical conductivity was fairly large (sigmart = 19 S.cm(-1)), and its temperature dependence was very small (sigma(0.55K)/sigma(rt) = ca. 1:10), although the measurements were performed on the compressed pellet sample. Complex 4 showed an almost constant paramagnetic susceptibility (chi(300) (K) = 3.5 x 10(-4) emu x mol(-1)) from 300 to 50 K. The band structure calculation of complex 4 suggested the metallic nature of the system. Complex 4 is a novel single-component molecular conductor with a dimeric

  13. Dissolved Mn Speciation and Ligand Characteristics in a Coastal Waterway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, V.; Jensen, L.; Luther, G. W., III

    2014-12-01

    Soluble manganese speciation (Mn(II) and Mn(III); 0.2 μm filtered) was measured along a salinity gradient in the Broadkill River, a coastal waterway bordered by wetlands and salt marshes in Delaware. We modified an established method of porphyrin (T-4(CP)P) addition, by incorporating a heating step and coupling a 100-cm cell to a UV/Vis detector, to achieve a 4.0 nM sample DL. Surface waters were collected from June to August, 2014 and total dissolved Mn (0.23 - 1.92 μM) first increased then decreased along the salinity gradient (31 ppt to freshwater). However, Mn speciation was highly variable; Mn(III) made up 0-49 % of the total dissolved Mn, where the highest Mn(III) values occurred at sites with high salt-marsh runoff. Mn(III) was not recoverable without the addition of a strong reducing agent, indicating that little or no weak ligand was present, and that a strong ligand was responsible for complexing Mn(III). An assessment of potential strong ligand character was made by precipitating humic matter, by acidifying subsamples to pH<1.5, then 100 μM Mn(III)-pyrophosphate was added to acidified supernatant samples and non-acidified samples. In non-acidified samples, the Mn(III)-pyrophosphate peak at 484 nm rapidly disappeared and was replaced by a broad peak at 400 nm and the resulting sample had a yellow color. Upon the addition of 500 μM desferrioxamine-B (DFOB) to the same sample, a peak at 310 nm appeared, indicating the formation of Mn(III)-DFOB. In acidified samples, the Mn(III)-pyrophosphate peak did not change. Humic matter, therefore, may be acting as an Mn(III) binding ligand, outcompeting pyrophosphate for Mn(III), however this natural ligand is outcompeted by a large excess of DFOB. The humic matter and increased Mn likely come from the salt marsh runoff during tidal exchange, and we observed that as salinity increased, the amount of humic binding decreased. These results present the first Mn speciation measurements along a salinity gradient in

  14. Proton-dependent zinc release from intracellular ligands.

    PubMed

    Kiedrowski, Lech

    2014-07-01

    In cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons when intracellular pH drops from 6.6 to 6.1, yet unclear intracellular stores release micromolar amounts of Zn(2+) into the cytosol. Mitochondria, acidic organelles, and/or intracellular ligands could release this Zn(2+) . Although exposure to the protonophore FCCP precludes reloading of the mitochondria and acidic organelles with Zn(2+) , FCCP failed to compromise the ability of the intracellular stores to repeatedly release Zn(2+) . Therefore, Zn(2+) -releasing stores were not mitochondria or acidic organelles but rather intracellular Zn(2+) ligands. To test which ligands might be involved, the rate of acid-induced Zn(2+) release from complexes with cysteine, glutathione, histidine, aspartate, glutamate, glycine, and carnosine was investigated; [Zn(2+) ] was monitored in vitro using the ratiometric Zn(2+) -sensitive fluorescent probe FuraZin-1. Carnosine failed to chelate Zn(2+) but did chelate Cu(2+) ; the remaining ligands chelated Zn(2+) and upon acidification were releasing it into the medium. However, when pH was decreasing from 6.6 to 6.1, only zinc-cysteine complexes rapidly accelerated the rate of Zn(2+) release. The zinc-cysteine complexes also released Zn(2+) when a histidine-modifying agent, diethylpyrocarbonate, was applied at pH 7.2. Since the cytosolic zinc-cysteine complexes can contain micromolar amounts of Zn(2+) , these complexes may represent the stores responsible for an acid-induced intracellular Zn(2+) release. This study aimed at identifying intracellular stores which release Zn(2+) when pHi drops from 6.6 to 6.1. It was found that these stores are not mitochondria or acidic organelles, but rather intracellular Zn(2+) ligands. When the pH was decreasing from 6.6 to 6.1, only zinc-cysteine complexes showed a rapid acceleration in the rate of Zn(2+) release. Therefore, the stores responsible for an acid-induced intracellular Zn(2+) release in neurons may be the cytosolic zinc-cysteine complexes

  15. The Movable Type Method Applied to Protein-Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zheng; Ucisik, Melek N; Merz, Kenneth M

    2013-12-10

    Accurately computing the free energy for biological processes like protein folding or protein-ligand association remains a challenging problem. Both describing the complex intermolecular forces involved and sampling the requisite configuration space make understanding these processes innately difficult. Herein, we address the sampling problem using a novel methodology we term "movable type". Conceptually it can be understood by analogy with the evolution of printing and, hence, the name movable type. For example, a common approach to the study of protein-ligand complexation involves taking a database of intact drug-like molecules and exhaustively docking them into a binding pocket. This is reminiscent of early woodblock printing where each page had to be laboriously created prior to printing a book. However, printing evolved to an approach where a database of symbols (letters, numerals, etc.) was created and then assembled using a movable type system, which allowed for the creation of all possible combinations of symbols on a given page, thereby, revolutionizing the dissemination of knowledge. Our movable type (MT) method involves the identification of all atom pairs seen in protein-ligand complexes and then creating two databases: one with their associated pairwise distant dependent energies and another associated with the probability of how these pairs can combine in terms of bonds, angles, dihedrals and non-bonded interactions. Combining these two databases coupled with the principles of statistical mechanics allows us to accurately estimate binding free energies as well as the pose of a ligand in a receptor. This method, by its mathematical construction, samples all of configuration space of a selected region (the protein active site here) in one shot without resorting to brute force sampling schemes involving Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms or molecular dynamics simulations making the methodology extremely efficient. Importantly, this method explores the free

  16. The Movable Type Method Applied to Protein-Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Ucisik, Melek N.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Accurately computing the free energy for biological processes like protein folding or protein-ligand association remains a challenging problem. Both describing the complex intermolecular forces involved and sampling the requisite configuration space make understanding these processes innately difficult. Herein, we address the sampling problem using a novel methodology we term “movable type”. Conceptually it can be understood by analogy with the evolution of printing and, hence, the name movable type. For example, a common approach to the study of protein-ligand complexation involves taking a database of intact drug-like molecules and exhaustively docking them into a binding pocket. This is reminiscent of early woodblock printing where each page had to be laboriously created prior to printing a book. However, printing evolved to an approach where a database of symbols (letters, numerals, etc.) was created and then assembled using a movable type system, which allowed for the creation of all possible combinations of symbols on a given page, thereby, revolutionizing the dissemination of knowledge. Our movable type (MT) method involves the identification of all atom pairs seen in protein-ligand complexes and then creating two databases: one with their associated pairwise distant dependent energies and another associated with the probability of how these pairs can combine in terms of bonds, angles, dihedrals and non-bonded interactions. Combining these two databases coupled with the principles of statistical mechanics allows us to accurately estimate binding free energies as well as the pose of a ligand in a receptor. This method, by its mathematical construction, samples all of configuration space of a selected region (the protein active site here) in one shot without resorting to brute force sampling schemes involving Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms or molecular dynamics simulations making the methodology extremely efficient. Importantly, this method explores the

  17. Conversion of a monodentate amidinate-germylene ligand into chelating imine-germanate ligands (on mononuclear manganese complexes).

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Javier A; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Pérez-Carreño, Enrique; Polo, Diego

    2014-08-18

    The unprecedented transformation of a terminal two-electron-donor amidinate-germylene ligand into a chelating three-electron-donor κ(2)-N,Ge-imine-germanate ligand has been achieved by treating the manganese amidinate-germylene complex [MnBr{Ge((i)Pr2bzam)(t)Bu}(CO)4] (1; (i)Pr2bzam = N,N'-bis(isopropyl)benzamidinate) with LiMe or Ag[BF4]. In these reactions, which afford [Mn{κ(2)Ge,N-GeMe((i)Pr2bzam)(t)Bu}(CO)4] (2) and [Mn{κ(2)Ge,N-GeF((i)Pr2bzam)(t)Bu}(CO)4] (3), respectively, the anionic nucleophile, Me(-) or F(-), ends on the Ge atom while an arm of the amidinate fragment migrates from the Ge atom to the Mn atom. In contrast, the reaction of 1 with AgOTf (OTf = triflate) leads to [Mn(OTf){Ge((i)Pr2bzam)(t)Bu}(CO)4] (4), which maintains intact the amidinate-germylene ligand. Complex 4 is very moisture-sensitive, leading to [Mn2{μ-κ(4)Ge2,O2-Ge2(t)Bu2(OH)2O}(CO)8] (5) and [(i)Pr2bzamH2]OTf (6) in wet solvents. In 5, a novel digermanate(II) ligand, [(t)Bu(OH)GeOGe(OH)(t)Bu](2-), doubly bridges two Mn(CO)4 units. The structures of 1-6 have been characterized by spectroscopic (IR, NMR) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. PMID:25084394

  18. Cationic Gold Clusters Ligated with Differently Substituted Phosphines: Effect of Substitution on Ligand Reactivity and Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Olivares, Astrid M.; Hill, David E.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the number of methyl (Me) and cyclohexyl (Cy) functional groups in monodentate phosphine ligands on the solution-phase synthesis of ligated sub-nanometer gold clusters and their gas-phase fragmentation pathways. Small mixed ligand cationic gold clusters were synthesized using ligand exchange reactions between pre-formed triphenylphosphine ligated (PPh3) gold clusters and monodentate Me- and Cy-substituted ligands in solution and characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. Under the same experimental conditions, larger gold-PPh3 clusters undergo efficient exchange of unsubstituted PPh3 ligands for singly Me- and Cy-substituted PPh2Me and PPh2Cy ligands. The efficiency of ligand exchange decreases with an increasing number of Me or Cy groups in the substituted phosphine ligands. CID experiments performed for a series of ligand-exchanged gold clusters indicate that loss of a neutral Me-substituted ligand is preferred over loss of a neutral PPh¬3 ligand while the opposite trend is observed for Cy-substituted ligands. The branching ratio of the competing ligand loss channels is strongly correlated with the electron donating ability of the phosphorous lone pair as determined by the relative proton affinity of the ligand. The results indicate that the relative ligand binding energies increase in the order PMe3 < PPhMe2 < PPh2Me < PPh3< PPh2Cy < PPhCy2< PCy3. Furthermore, the difference in relative ligand binding energies increases with the number of substituted PPh3-mMem or PPh3-mCym ligands (L) exchanged onto each cluster. This study provides the first experimental determination of the relative binding energies of ligated gold clusters containing differently substituted monophosphine ligands, which are important to controlling their synthesis and reactivity in solution. The results also indicate that ligand substitution is an important

  19. Analysis of ligand-protein exchange by Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs (CoLD-CoP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David A.; Chantova, Mihaela; Chaudhry, Saadia

    2015-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool in describing protein structures and protein activity for pharmaceutical and biochemical development. This study describes a method to determine weak binding ligands in biological systems by using hierarchic diffusion coefficient clustering of multidimensional data obtained with a 400 MHz Bruker NMR. Comparison of DOSY spectrums of ligands of the chemical library in the presence and absence of target proteins show translational diffusion rates for small molecules upon interaction with macromolecules. For weak binders such as compounds found in fragment libraries, changes in diffusion rates upon macromolecular binding are on the order of the precision of DOSY diffusion measurements, and identifying such subtle shifts in diffusion requires careful statistical analysis. The "CoLD-CoP" (Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs) method presented here uses SAHN clustering to identify protein-binders in a chemical library or even a not fully characterized metabolite mixture. We will show how DOSY NMR and the "CoLD-CoP" method complement each other in identifying the most suitable candidates for lysozyme and wheat germ acid phosphatase.

  20. Demonstration of ligand decoration, and ligand-induced perturbation, of G-quadruplexes in a plasmid using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mela, Ioanna; Kranaster, Ramon; Henderson, Robert M; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Edwardson, J Michael

    2012-01-17

    G-Quadruplexes are nucleic acid secondary structures consisting of a planar arrangement of four guanine residues. Potential G-quadruplex-forming sequences are widely distributed throughout the genome. Significantly, they are present in telomeres and are enriched in gene promoters and first introns, raising the possibility that perturbation of G-quadruplex stability might have therapeutic potential, for example in the treatment of cancer. Ligands that interact selectively with G-quadruplexes include both proteins and small molecules, although the interactions between ligands and their G-quadruplex targets have been monitored using indirect methods. In addition, the G-quadruplex targets have often been short DNA fragments. Here, we have used atomic force microscopy imaging to examine directly at the single-molecule level the interaction of ligands with G-quadruplexes generated during transcription of a plasmid containing a G-rich insert. We show that the structures produced during transcription are decorated specifically by the single-chain antibody HF1 and by the nuclear protein PARP-1, both of which are known to recognize G-quadruplexes. Our results provide clear structural evidence of G-quadruplex formation in a transcription-dependent case and demonstrate directly how small-molecule stabilizers and destabilizers can manipulate these structures in a biochemically functional system. PMID:22225525

  1. Elucidating ligand binding and channel gating mechanisms in pentameric ligand-gated ion channels by atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Comitani, Federico; Melis, Claudio; Molteni, Carla

    2015-04-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are important biomolecules that mediate fast synaptic transmission. Their malfunctions are linked to serious neuronal disorders and they are major pharmaceutical targets; in invertebrates, they are involved in insecticide resistance. The complexity of pLGICs and the limited crystallographic information available prevent a detailed understanding of how they function. State-of-the-art computational techniques are therefore crucial to build an accurate picture at the atomic level of the mechanisms which drive the activation of pLGICs, complementing the available experimental data. We have used a series of simulation methods, including homology modelling, ligand-protein docking, density functional theory, molecular dynamics and metadynamics, a powerful scheme for accelerating rare events, with the guidance of mutagenesis electrophysiology experiments, to explore ligand-binding mechanisms, the effects of mutations and the potential role of a proline molecular switch for the gating of the ion channels. Results for the insect RDL receptor, the GABAC receptor, the 5-HT3 receptor and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor will be reviewed. PMID:25849909

  2. Virtual fragment screening: discovery of histamine H3 receptor ligands using ligand-based and protein-based molecular fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Sirci, Francesco; Istyastono, Enade P; Vischer, Henry F; Kooistra, Albert J; Nijmeijer, Saskia; Kuijer, Martien; Wijtmans, Maikel; Mannhold, Raimund; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2012-12-21

    Virtual fragment screening (VFS) is a promising new method that uses computer models to identify small, fragment-like biologically active molecules as useful starting points for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). Training sets of true active and inactive fragment-like molecules to construct and validate target customized VFS methods are however lacking. We have for the first time explored the possibilities and challenges of VFS using molecular fingerprints derived from a unique set of fragment affinity data for the histamine H(3) receptor (H(3)R), a pharmaceutically relevant G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Optimized FLAP (Fingerprints of Ligands and Proteins) models containing essential molecular interaction fields that discriminate known H(3)R binders from inactive molecules were successfully used for the identification of new H(3)R ligands. Prospective virtual screening of 156,090 molecules yielded a high hit rate of 62% (18 of the 29 tested) experimentally confirmed novel fragment-like H(3)R ligands that offer new potential starting points for the design of H(3)R targeting drugs. The first construction and application of customized FLAP models for the discovery of fragment-like biologically active molecules demonstrates that VFS is an efficient way to explore protein-fragment interaction space in silico. PMID:23140085

  3. Conformational dynamics and thermodynamics of protein-ligand binding studied by NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Akke, Mikael

    2012-04-01

    Protein conformational dynamics can be critical for ligand binding in two ways that relate to kinetics and thermodynamics respectively. First, conformational transitions between different substates can control access to the binding site (kinetics). Secondly, differences between free and ligand-bound states in their conformational fluctuations contribute to the entropy of ligand binding (thermodynamics). In the present paper, I focus on the second topic, summarizing our recent results on the role of conformational entropy in ligand binding to Gal3C (the carbohydrate-recognition domain of galectin-3). NMR relaxation experiments provide a unique probe of conformational entropy by characterizing bond-vector fluctuations at atomic resolution. By monitoring differences between the free and ligand-bound states in their backbone and side chain order parameters, we have estimated the contributions from conformational entropy to the free energy of binding. Overall, the conformational entropy of Gal3C increases upon ligand binding, thereby contributing favourably to the binding affinity. Comparisons with the results from isothermal titration calorimetry indicate that the conformational entropy is comparable in magnitude to the enthalpy of binding. Furthermore, there are significant differences in the dynamic response to binding of different ligands, despite the fact that the protein structure is virtually identical in the different protein-ligand complexes. Thus both affinity and specificity of ligand binding to Gal3C appear to depend in part on subtle differences in the conformational fluctuations that reflect the complex interplay between structure, dynamics and ligand interactions. PMID:22435823

  4. Ligand preference and orientation in b- and c-type heme-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fufezan, Christian; Zhang, Jun; Gunner, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    Hemes are often incorporated into designed proteins. The importance of the heme ligand type and its orientation is still a matter of debate. Here, heme ligands and ligand orientation were investigated using a nonredundant (87 structures) and a redundant (1503 structures) set of structures to compare and contrast design features of natural b- and c-type heme-binding proteins. Histidine is the most common ligand. Marked differences in ligation motifs between b- and c-type hemes are higher occurrence of His-Met in c-type heme binding motifs (16.4% vs. 1.4%) and higher occurrence of exchangeable, small molecules in b-type heme binding motifs (67.6% vs. 9.9%). Histidine ligands that are part of the c-type CXXCH heme-binding motif show a distinct asymmetric distribution of orientation. They tend to point between either the heme propionates or between the NA and NB heme nitrogens. Molecular mechanics calculations show that this asymmetry is due to the bonded constraints of the covalent attachment between the heme and the protein. In contrast, the orientations of b-type hemes histidine ligands are found evenly distributed with no preference. Observed histidine heme ligand orientations show no dominating influence of electrostatic interactions between the heme propionates and the ligands. Furthermore, ligands in bis-His hemes are found more frequently perpendicular rather than parallel to each other. These correlations support energetic constraints on ligands that can be used in designing proteins. PMID:18491383

  5. Copper binding ligands: production by marine plankton and characterization by ESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orians, K.; Ross, A.; Lawrence, M.; Ikonomou, M.

    2003-04-01

    Organic complexation affects the bioavailability and distribution of copper in the surface ocean. The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was cultured in the lab and subjected to near-toxic Cu concentrations. Strong Cu-binding ligands were produced under these conditions, as found for other species of Synechococcus. The copper-binding ligand produced had a log K'cond. (log conditional stability constant) of 12.2, similar to the natural ligands found in the surface ocean. The amount of ligand produced was proportional to the amount of copper present. Isolation and concentration of these compounds for characterization by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) provides information about the structure of the organic ligands and their metal-ion complexes. Using model ligands, we'll show that ligands can be characterized by ESI-MS and that the location of the copper binding site can be determined in complex molecules. We'll also present results of copper-complexing ligands extracted from the coastal waters of British Columbia. Ligand concentrations are higher at low salinity and in surface waters, indicating that these ligands are produced in surface waters and/or delivered to the region via the Fraser River. Analysis of the extracts with highest UV absorbance identified two Cu2+ ligands of molecular weight 259 and 264. The mass and isotopic distributions are consistent with dipeptides and tripeptides containing two metal-binding amino groups. This result is consistent with the findings of other studies attempting to characterize Cu2+ ligands in seawater. The structure of the identified ligand is similar to that of rhodotorulic acid (a microbial siderophore), glutathione, and phytochelatins, indicating that small peptides and related compounds can act as strong, specific metal chelators in natural waters

  6. Metal nanoparticles functionalized with metal-ligand covalent bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xiongwu

    Metal-organic contact has been recognized to play important roles in regulation of optical and electronic properties of nanoparticles. In this thesis, significant efforts have been devoted into synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles with various metal-ligand interfacial linkages and investigation of their electronic and optical properties. Ruthenium nanoparticles were prepared by the self-assembly of functional group onto bare Ru colloid surface. As to Ru-alkyne nanoparticles, the formation of a Ru-vinylidene (Ru=C=CH--R) interfacial bonding linkage was confirmed by the specific reactivity of the nanoparticles with imine derivatives and olefin at the metal-ligand interface, as manifested in NMR, photoluminescence, and electrochemical measurements. Interestingly, it was found the electronic coupling coefficient (beta)for strongly depend upon such metal-ligand interfacial bonding. Next, such metal-ligand interfacial bonding was extended to ruthenium-nitrene pi bonds on ruthenium colloids, which were investigated by XPS. The nanoparticles exhibited a 1:1 atomic ratio of nitrogen to sulfur, consistent with that of sulfonyl nitrene fragments. In addition, the nanoparticle-bound nitrene moieties behaved analogously to azo derivatives, as manifested in UV-vis and fluorescence measurements. Further testimony of the formation of Ru=N interfacial linkages was highlighted in the unique reactivity of the nanoparticles with alkenes by imido transfer. Extensive conjugation between metal-ligand interfacial bond results in remarkable intraparticle charge delocalization on Ru-alkynide nanoparticles, which was manipulated by simple chemical reduction or oxidation. Charging of extra electrons into the nanoparticle cores led to an electron-rich metal core and hence red-shift of the triple bond stretching mode, lower binding energy of sp hybridized C 1s and dimmed fluorescence of nanoparticles. Instead, chemical oxidation resulted in the opposite impacts on these properties. By taking

  7. Screening and Optimization of Ligand Conjugates for Lysosomal Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Meerovich, Igor; Koshkaryev, Alexander; Thekkedath, Ritesh; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The use of lysosome-targeted liposomes may significantly improve the delivery of therapeutic enzymes and chaperones into lysosomes for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders. The aim of this research was to synthesize new potentially lysosomotropic ligands on a base of Neutral Red and rhodamine B and to study their ability to enhance specific lysosomal delivery of surface-modified liposomes loaded with a model compound, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD). The delivery of these liposomes and their content to lysosomes in HeLa cells was investigated by confocal immunofluorescent microscopy, subcellular fractionation and flow cytometry. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that liposomes modified with derivatives of rhodamine B provide good rate of co-localization well the specific lysosomal markers. The comparison of fluorescence of FD in lysosomes isolated by subcellular fractionation also showed that the efficiency of lysosomal delivery of liposomal load by liposomes modified with some of synthesized ligands was significantly higher compared with plain liposomes. These results were additionally confirmed by the flow cytometry of the intact cells treated with liposomes loaded with with 5-dodecanoylaminofluorescein di-β-D-galactopyranoside, a specific substrate for the intralysosomal β-galactosidase, using a number of cell lines, including macrophages with induced phenotype of lysosomal enzyme deficiency; two of the synthesized ligands – rhodamine B DSPE-PEG2k-amide and 6-(3-(DSPE-PEG2k)-thioureido) rhodamine B – demonstrated enhanced lysosomal delivery, in some cases, higher than that for commercially available rhodamine B octadecyl ester, with the best results (the enhancement of the lysosomal delivery up to 75% greater in comparison to plain liposomes) shown for the cells with induced lysosomal enzyme deficiency phenotype. Use of liposomes modified with rhodamine B derivatives may be advantageous for the development of drug delivery systems for the

  8. Langerhans' cell expression of the selectin ligand, sialyl Lewis x.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, E L; Barker, J N; Allen, M H; Chu, A C; Groves, R W; MacDonald, D M

    1994-01-01

    Cellular adhesion molecules play a central role in leucocyte migration through peripheral blood and tissues. A crucial stage in these events in selectin-mediated adhesion involving E-selectin expressed on activated endothelium interacting with a range of carbohydrate ligands expressed by specific subpopulations of leucocytes. As such mechanisms may be relevant to bone marrow-derived dendritic epidermal Langerhans' cell (LC) migration, expression of these carbohydrate ligands was assessed immunocytochemically in whole skin biopsies and in epidermal cell suspensions obtained from adult humans. Double-labelling experiments revealed that sialyl Lewis x, recognized by the monoclonal antibody CSLEX1, was expressed on epidermal LC (n = 9). Furthermore, expression was enhanced at 24 hr following epicutaneous application of antigen and in the inflammatory disorder psoriasis (n = 10). E-selectin was concomitantly strongly expressed on dermal endothelium in psoriasis and allergic contact dermatitis. Intradermal injection of the T-cell-derived cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) led to increased LC expression of sialyl Lewis x. In epidermal cell suspensions, in contrast to keratinocytes, CD1a+ cells expressed sialyl Lewis x, intensity of which was enhanced after 4 days in culture. CSLEX1 staining could be abolished and CD15 (non-sialated Lewis x) expression induced by saponification and treatment with neuraminidase. Expression of other selectin ligands was also examined. While the cutaneous lymphocyte antigen defined by the monoclonal antibody HECA-452 reacted with a small minority of LC, sialyl Lewis a and sulphatide were not expressed under any experimental conditions. These studies indicate that E-selectin-sialyl Lewis x interactions are potentially important in LC migration, both into and out of skin. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7512530

  9. TLR Ligands Induce Antiviral Responses in Chicken Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Barjesteh, Neda; Behboudi, Shahriar; Brisbin, Jennifer T.; Villanueva, Alexander Ian; Nagy, Éva; Sharif, Shayan

    2014-01-01

    Chicken macrophages express several receptors for recognition of pathogens, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs bind to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) derived from bacterial or viral pathogens leading to the activation of macrophages. Macrophages play a critical role in immunity against viruses, including influenza viruses. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that treatment of chicken macrophages with TLR ligands reduces avian influenza replication. Furthermore, we sought to study the expression of some of the key mediators involved in the TLR-mediated antiviral responses of macrophages. Chicken macrophages were treated with the TLR2, 3, 4, 7 and 21 ligands, Pam3CSK4, poly(I:C), LPS, R848 and CpG ODN, respectively, at different doses and time points pre- and post-H4N6 avian influenza virus (AIV) infection. The results revealed that pre-treatment of macrophages with Pam3CSK4, LPS and CpG ODN reduced the replication of AIV in chicken macrophages. In addition, the relative expression of genes involved in inflammatory and antiviral responses were quantified at 3, 8 and 18 hours post-treatment with the TLR2, 4 and 21 ligands. Pam3CSK4, LPS and CpG ODN increased the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, interferon (IFN)-γ, IFN-β and interferon regulatory factor (IFR) 7. The expression of these genes correlated with the reduction of viral replication in macrophages. These results shed light on the process of immunity to AIV in chickens. PMID:25165812

  10. Ambidentate thiocyanate and cyanate ligands in dinitrosyl iron complexes.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chung-Hung; Brothers, Scott M; Reibenspies, Joseph H; Hall, Michael B; Popescu, Codrina V; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y

    2013-02-18

    To explore the effect of delocalization in the Fe(NO)(2) unit on possible linkage isomerism of ambidentate ECN(-) ligands, E = S and O, anionic DNICs, dinitrosyl iron complexes, (SCN)(2)Fe(NO)(2)(-) (1) and (OCN)(2)Fe(NO)(2)(-) (2) were synthesized by the reaction of in situ-generated [Fe(CO)(2)(NO)(2)](+) and PPN(+)ECN(-). Other {Fe(NO)(2)}(9) (Enemark-Feltham notation) complexes, (N(3))(2)Fe(NO)(2)(-) and (PhS)(2)Fe(NO)(2)(-), were prepared for comparison. The X-ray diffraction analysis of 1 and 2 yielded the typical tetrahedral structures of DNICs with two slightly bent Fe-N-O oriented toward each other, and linear FeNCE units. The ν(NO) IR values shift to lower values for 1 > 2 > (N(3))(2)Fe(NO)(2)(-) > (PhS)(2)Fe(NO)(2)(-), reflecting the increasing donor ability of the ancillary ligands and consistent with the redox potentials of the complexes, and the small trends in Mössbauer isomer shifts. Computational studies corroborate that the {Fe(NO)(2)}(9) motif prefers N-bound rather than E-bound isomers. The calculated energy differences between the linkage isomers of 1 (Fe-NCS preferred over Fe-SCN by about 6 kcal/mol) are smaller than those of 2 (Fe-NCO preferred over Fe-OCN by about 16 kcal/mol), a difference that is justified by the frontier molecular orbitals of the ligands themselves. PMID:23373599

  11. Immunostimulation by OX40 Ligand Transgenic Ewing Sarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Dajana; Staege, Martin S.; Kühnöl, Caspar D.; Föll, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) transgenic Ewing sarcoma cells can induce tumor specific T and NK cell responses and reduce tumor growth in vivo and in vitro. Nevertheless, the efficiency of this stimulation is not high enough to inhibit tumor growth completely. In addition to recognition of the cognate antigen, optimal T-cell stimulation requires signals from so-called co-stimulatory molecules. Several members of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily have been identified as co-stimulatory molecules that can augment antitumor immune responses. OX40 (CD134) and OX40 ligand (OX40L = CD252; also known as tumor necrosis factor ligand family member 4) is one example of such receptor/ligand pair with co-stimulatory function. In the present investigation, we generated OX40L transgenic Ewing sarcoma cells and tested their immunostimulatory activity in vitro. OX40L transgenic Ewing sarcoma cells showed preserved expression of Ewing sarcoma-associated (anti)gens including lipase member I, cyclin D1 (CCND1), cytochrome P450 family member 26B1 (CYP26B1), and the Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1-friend leukemia virus integration 1 (EWSR1-FLI1) oncogene. OX40L-expressing tumor cells showed a trend for enhanced immune stimulation against Ewing sarcoma cells in combination with IL-2 and stimulation of CD137. Our data suggest that inclusion of the OX40/OX40L pathway of co-stimulation might improve immunotherapy strategies for the treatment of Ewing sarcoma. PMID:26579494

  12. Natural compounds in the synthesis of chiral organophosphorous ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikov, Alexander G.; Khlebnikova, Tatiana B.; Tolstikova, Olga V.; Tolstikov, Genrikh A.

    2003-09-01

    Methods for the synthesis of chiral organophosphorus compounds based on natural optically active compounds (hydroxy acids, amino acids and their derivatives, mono- and disaccharides, mono- and diterpenoids, steroids) are discussed. Particular attention is given to the synthesis of bisphosphines and bisphosphinites. These compounds serve as ligands for transition metal complexes, which catalyse asymmetric hydrogenation. Data on the enantioselectivity of hydrogenation of unsaturated precursors of amino acids and unsaturated prochiral acids as well as on information on the enantioselectivity of hydrosilylation of ketones are surveyed.

  13. Metal speciation dynamics in monodisperse soft colloidal ligand suspensions.

    PubMed

    Duval, Jérôme F L; Pinheiro, José P; van Leeuwen, Herman P

    2008-08-01

    A comprehensive theory is presented for the dynamics of metal speciation in monodisperse suspensions of soft spherical particles characterized by a hard core and an ion-permeable shell layer where ligands L are localized. The heterogeneity in the binding site distribution leads to complex formation/dissociation rate constants (denoted as k a (*) and k d (*), respectively) that may substantially differ from their homogeneous solution counterparts (k a and k d). The peculiarities of metal speciation dynamics in soft colloidal ligand dispersions result from the coupling between diffusive transport of free-metal ions M within and around the soft surface layer and the kinetics of ML complex formation/dissociation within the shell component of the particle. The relationship between k a,d (*) and k a,d is derived from the numerical evaluation of the spatial, time-dependent distributions of free and bound metal. For that purpose, the corresponding diffusion equations corrected by the appropriate chemical source term are solved in spherical geometry using a Kuwabara-cell-type representation where the intercellular distance is determined by the volume fraction of soft particles. The numerical study is supported by analytical approaches valid in the short time domain. For dilute dispersions of soft ligand particles, it is shown that the balance between free-metal diffusion within and outside of the shell and the kinetic conversion of M into ML within the particular soft surface layer rapidly establishes a quasi-steady-state regime. For sufficiently long time, chemical equilibrium between the free and bound metal is reached within the reactive particle layer, which corresponds to the true steady-state regime for the system investigated. The analysis reported covers the limiting cases of rigid particles where binding sites are located at the very surface of the particle core (e.g., functionalized latex colloids) and polymeric particles that are devoid of a hard core (e

  14. Improved Evolutionary Hybrids for Flexible Ligand Docking in Autodock

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, R.K.; Hart, W.E.; Morris, G.M.; Rosin, C.

    1999-01-27

    In this paper we evaluate the design of the hybrid evolutionary algorithms (EAs) that are currently used to perform flexible ligand binding in the Autodock docking software. Hybrid EAs incorporate specialized operators that exploit domain-specific features to accelerate an EA's search. We consider hybrid EAs that use an integrated local search operator to reline individuals within each iteration of the search. We evaluate several factors that impact the efficacy of a hybrid EA, and we propose new hybrid EAs that provide more robust convergence to low-energy docking configurations than the methods currently available in Autodock.

  15. The Search for Covalently Ligandable Proteins in Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Badshah, Syed Lal; Mabkhot, Yahia Nasser

    2016-01-01

    This commentary highlights the recent article published in Nature, June 2016, titled: "Proteome-wide covalent ligand discovery in native biological systems". They screened the whole proteome of different human cell lines and cell lysates. Around 700 druggable cysteines in the whole proteome were found to bind the electrophilic fragments in both active and inactive states of the proteins. Their experiment and computational docking results agreed with one another. The usefulness of this study in terms of bringing a change in medicinal chemistry is highlighted here. PMID:27598117

  16. Trypsin-Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculation with AMOEBA

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yue; Jiao, Dian; Schnieders, Michael J.; Ren, Pengyu

    2010-01-01

    The binding free energies of several benzamidine-like inhibitors to trypsin were examined using a polarizable potential. All the computed binding free energies are in good agreement with the experimental data. From free energy decomposition, electrostatic interaction was found to be the driving force for the binding. Structural analysis shows that the ligands form hydrogen bonds with residues and water molecules nearby in a competitive fashion. The dependence of binding free energy on molecular dipole moment and polarizability was also studied. While the binding free energy is independent on the dipole moment, it shows a negative correlation with the polarizability. PMID:19965178

  17. Discovery Of Peptoid Ligands For Anti-Aquaporin 4 Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Raveendra, Bindu; Hao, Wu; Baccala, Roberto; Reddy, M. Muralidhar; Schilke, Jessica; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N.; Kodadek, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Summary Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system. In most NMO patients, autoantibodies to the water channel protein Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) are present at high levels and are thought to drive pathology by mediating complement-dependent destruction of astrocytes. Here we apply recently developed chemical library screening technology to identify a synthetic peptoid that binds anti-AQP4 antibodies in the serum of NMO patients. This finding validates, in a well-defined human disease, that synthetic, unnatural ligands for the antigen-binding site of a disease-linked antibody can be isolated by high-throughput screening. PMID:23521793

  18. Ligand-directed profiling of organelles with internalizing phage libraries

    PubMed Central

    Dobroff, Andrey S.; Rangel, Roberto; Guzman-Roja, Liliana; Salmeron, Carolina C.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a resourceful tool to, in an unbiased manner, discover and characterize functional protein-protein interactions, to create vaccines, and to engineer peptides, antibodies, and other proteins as targeted diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents. Recently, our group has developed a new class of internalizing phage (iPhage) for ligand-directed targeting of organelles and/or to identify molecular pathways within live cells. This unique technology is suitable for applications ranging from fundamental cell biology to drug development. Here we describe the method for generating and screening the iPhage display system, and explain how to select and validate candidate internalizing homing peptide. PMID:25640897

  19. Overview of Stabilizing Ligands for Biocompatible Quantum Dot Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanjie; Clapp, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Luminescent colloidal quantum dots (QDs) possess numerous advantages as fluorophores in biological applications. However, a principal challenge is how to retain the desirable optical properties of quantum dots in aqueous media while maintaining biocompatibility. Because QD photophysical properties are directly related to surface states, it is critical to control the surface chemistry that renders QDs biocompatible while maintaining electronic passivation. For more than a decade, investigators have used diverse strategies for altering the QD surface. This review summarizes the most successful approaches for preparing biocompatible QDs using various chemical ligands. PMID:22247651

  20. From Toxins Targeting Ligand Gated Ion Channels to Therapeutic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nasiripourdori, Adak; Taly, Valérie; Grutter, Thomas; Taly, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC) play a central role in inter-cellular communication. This key function has two consequences: (i) these receptor channels are major targets for drug discovery because of their potential involvement in numerous human brain diseases; (ii) they are often found to be the target of plant and animal toxins. Together this makes toxin/receptor interactions important to drug discovery projects. Therefore, toxins acting on LGIC are presented and their current/potential therapeutic uses highlighted. PMID:22069709