Science.gov

Sample records for 4-dimensional intravital microscopy

  1. Intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Milberg, Oleg; Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Sramkova, Monika; Wigand, Tim; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Weigert, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an extremely powerful tool that enables imaging several biological processes in live animals. Recently, the ability to image subcellular structures in several organs combined with the development of sophisticated genetic tools has made possible extending this approach to investigate several aspects of cell biology. Here we provide a general overview of intravital microscopy with the goal of highlighting its potential and challenges. Specifically, this review is geared toward researchers that are new to intravital microscopy and focuses on practical aspects of carrying out imaging in live animals. Here we share the know-how that comes from first-hand experience, including topics such as choosing the right imaging platform and modality, surgery and stabilization techniques, anesthesia and temperature control. Moreover, we highlight some of the approaches that facilitate subcellular imaging in live animals by providing numerous examples of imaging selected organelles and the actin cytoskeleton in multiple organs. PMID:22992750

  2. High-Resolution Intravital Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Volker; Pollok, Karolin; Rinnenthal, Jan-Leo; Oehme, Laura; Günther, Robert; Spiecker, Heinrich; Radbruch, Helena; Gerhard, Jenny; Sporbert, Anje; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Hauser, Anja E.; Niesner, Raluca

    2012-01-01

    Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy - the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning) while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs) of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and developmental biology

  3. Regulated exocytosis: novel insights from intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Porat-Shliom, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis is a fundamental process that every secretory cell uses to deliver molecules to the cell surface and the extracellular space by virtue of membranous carriers. This process has been extensively studied using various approaches such as biochemistry, electro-physiology, and electron microscopy. However, recent developments in time-lapse light microscopy have made possible imaging individual exocytic events hence advancing our understanding of this process at a molecular level. In this review, we focus on intravital microscopy a light microscopy-based approach that enables imaging subcellular structures in live animals, and discuss its recent application to study regulated exocytosis. Intravital microscopy has revealed differences in regulation and modality of regulated exocytosis between in vitro and in vivo model systems, unraveled novel aspects of this process that can be appreciated only in in vivo settings, and provided valuable and novel information on its molecular machinery. In conclusion, we make the case for intravital microscopy being a mature technique that can be used to investigate the molecular machinery of several intracellular events under physiological conditions. PMID:22243493

  4. Understanding liver immunology using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Marques, Pedro Elias; Oliveira, André Gustavo; Chang, Lynne; Paula-Neto, Heitor Affonso; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-09-01

    The liver has come a long way since it was considered only a metabolic organ attached to the gastrointestinal tract. The simultaneous ascension of immunology and intravital microscopy evidenced the liver as a central axis in the immune system, controlling immune responses to local and systemic agents as well as disease tolerance. The multiple hepatic cell populations are organized in a vascular environment that promotes intimate cellular interactions, including initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses, rapid leukocyte recruitment, pathogen clearance and production of a variety of immune mediators. In this review, we focus on the advances in liver immunology supported by intravital microscopy in diseases such as isquemia/reperfusion, acute liver injury and infections. PMID:26055800

  5. Intravital Microscopy for THz-Bio Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilhan

    Intravital microscopy is a high-resolution imaging technique to observe biological phenomena in living organisms. It often also stated as in vivo microscopy. Literal meaning of in vivo is "within the living" and there is another term, ex vivo of which literal meaning is "out of the living". Both terms are commonly used to describe the status of sample at the moment of biological manipulations or investigations are done. In vivo study is a form of research using whole living organism in experiment to investigate a certain biological phenomenon in its natural environment, whereas ex vivo study uses non-living subjects such as tissues or organs dissected from dead animal. In addition, in vitro of which literal meaning is "within the glass" is another commonly used term. In vitro study is a form of research using small living subject such as cell in a controlled environment such as petri dish or test tube. Cell culture, the process of growing cells in a petri dish, is the most common form of in vitro study. Figure 1 summarizes the status of samples for biological study categorized by in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo.

  6. Deep insights: intravital imaging with two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schießl, Ina Maria; Castrop, Hayo

    2016-09-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy is widely used to assess the structure and function of organs in live animals. Although different tissues vary in their accessibility for intravital multiphoton imaging, considerable progress has been made in the imaging quality of all tissues due to substantial technical improvements in the relevant imaging components, such as optics, excitation laser, detectors, and signal analysis software. In this review, we provide an overview of the technical background of intravital multiphoton microscopy. Then, we note a few seminal findings that were made through the use of multiphoton microscopy. Finally, we address the technical limitations of the method and provide an outlook for how these limitations may be overcome through future technical developments. PMID:27352273

  7. Intravital Microscopy for Imaging the Tumor Microenvironment in Live Mice.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Victor; Jenne, Craig; Mahoney, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    The development of intravital microscopy has provided unprecedented capacity to study the tumor microenvironment in live mice. The dynamic behavior of cancer, stromal, vascular, and immune cells can be monitored in real time, in situ, in both primary tumors and metastatic lesions, allowing treatment responses to be observed at single cell resolution and therapies tracked in vivo. These features provide a unique opportunity to elucidate the cellular mechanisms underlying the biology and treatment of cancer. We describe here a method for imaging the microenvironment of subcutaneous tumors grown in mice using intravital microscopy. PMID:27581025

  8. Intravital microscopy to image membrane trafficking in live rats

    PubMed Central

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Sramkova, Monika; Parente, Laura; Weigert, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intravital microscopy (IVM) is a powerful tool that enables imaging various biological processes in live animals. Here, we describe a series of procedures designed to image subcellular structures, such as endsosomes and secretory vesicles in the salivary glands (SGs) of live rats. To this aim, we used fluorescently labeled molecules and/or fluorescently-tagged proteins that were transiently transfected in the live animal. PMID:23027003

  9. Intravital microscopy of the lung: minimizing invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Fiole, Daniel; Tournier, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    In vivo microscopy has recently become a gold standard in lung immunology studies involving small animals, largely benefiting from the democratization of multiphoton microscopy allowing for deep tissue imaging. This technology represents currently our only way of exploring the lungs and inferring what happens in human respiratory medicine. The interest of lung in vivo microscopy essentially relies upon its relevance as a study model, fulfilling physiological requirements in comparison with in vitro and ex vivo experiments. However, strategies developed in order to overcome movements of the thorax caused by breathing and heartbeats remain the chief drawback of the technique and a major source of invasiveness. In this context, minimizing invasiveness is an unavoidable prerequisite for any improvement of lung in vivo microscopy. This review puts into perspective the main techniques enabling lung in vivo microscopy, providing pros and cons regarding invasiveness. PMID:26846880

  10. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Daniel T.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C.; Bogner, Paul N.; Evans, Sharon S.; Skitzki, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26883450

  11. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Daniel T; Muhitch, Jason B; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C; Bogner, Paul N; Evans, Sharon S; Skitzki, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26883450

  12. Multiphoton intravital microscopy setup to visualize the mouse mammary gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Herrera Torres, Ana M.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Baratti, Mariana O.; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, light microscopy-based techniques have been extended to live mammalian models leading to the development of a new imaging approach called intravital microscopy (IVM). Although IVM has been introduced at the beginning of the last century, its major advancements have occurred in the last twenty years with the development of non-linear microscopy that has enabled performing deep tissue imaging. IVM has been utilized to address many biological questions in basic research and is now a fundamental tool that provide information on tissues such as morphology, cellular architecture, and metabolic status. IVM has become an indispensable tool in numerous areas. This study presents and describes the practical aspects of IVM necessary to visualize epithelial cells of live mouse mammary gland with multiphoton techniques.

  13. Intravital video microscopy measurements of retinal blood flow in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Norman R; Watts, Megan N; Leskova, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in retinal blood flow can contribute to, or be a consequence of, ocular disease and visual dysfunction. Therefore, quantitation of altered perfusion can aid research into the mechanisms of retinal pathologies. Intravital video microscopy of fluorescent tracers can be used to measure vascular diameters and bloodstream velocities of the retinal vasculature, specifically the arterioles branching from the central retinal artery and of the venules leading into the central retinal vein. Blood flow rates can be calculated from the diameters and velocities, with the summation of arteriolar flow, and separately venular flow, providing values of total retinal blood flow. This paper and associated video describe the methods for applying this technique to mice, which includes 1) the preparation of the eye for intravital microscopy of the anesthetized animal, 2) the intravenous infusion of fluorescent microspheres to measure bloodstream velocity, 3) the intravenous infusion of a high molecular weight fluorescent dextran, to aid the microscopic visualization of the retinal microvasculature, 4) the use of a digital microscope camera to obtain videos of the perfused retina, and 5) the use of image processing software to analyze the video. The same techniques can be used for measuring retinal blood flow rates in rats. PMID:24429840

  14. Intravital microscopy of subpleural alveoli via transthoracic endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenninger, David; Runck, Hanna; Schumann, Stefan; Haberstroh, Jörg; Meissner, Sven; Koch, Edmund; Guttmann, Josef

    2011-04-01

    Transfer of too high mechanical energy from the ventilator to the lung's alveolar tissue is the main cause for ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). To investigate the effects of cyclic energy transfer to the alveoli, we introduce a new method of transthoracic endoscopy that provides morphological as well as functional information about alveolar geometry and mechanics. We evaluate the new endoscopic method to continuously record images of focused subpleural alveoli. The method is evaluated by using finite element modeling techniques and by direct observation of subpleural alveoli both in isolated rat lungs as well as in intact animals (rats). The results confirm the overall low invasiveness of the endoscopic method insofar as the mechanical influences on the recorded alveoli are only marginal. It is, hence, a suited method for intravital microscopy in the rat model as well as in larger animals.

  15. Intravital assessment of myelin molecular order with polarimetric multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Rutledge, Danette J; Bélanger, Erik; Dill, Dorothy; Macklin, Wendy B; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Myelin plays an essential role in the nervous system and its disruption in diseases such as multiple sclerosis may lead to neuronal death, thus causing irreversible functional impairments. Understanding myelin biology is therefore of fundamental and clinical importance, but no tools currently exist to describe the fine spatial organization of myelin sheaths in vivo. Here we demonstrate intravital quantification of the myelin molecular structure using a microscopy method based on polarization-resolved coherent Raman scattering. Developmental myelination was imaged noninvasively in live zebrafish. Longitudinal imaging of individual axons revealed changes in myelin organization beyond the diffraction limit. Applied to promyelination drug screening, the method uniquely enabled the identification of focal myelin regions with differential architectures. These observations indicate that the study of myelin biology and the identification of therapeutic compounds will largely benefit from a method to quantify the myelin molecular organization in vivo. PMID:27538357

  16. Advanced Motion Compensation Methods for Intravital Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has emerged in the recent decade as an indispensible imaging modality for the study of the micro-dynamics of biological processes in live animals. Technical advancements in imaging techniques and hardware components, combined with the development of novel targeted probes and new mice models, have enabled us to address long-standing questions in several biology areas such as oncology, cell biology, immunology and neuroscience. As the instrument resolution has increased, physiological motion activities have become a major obstacle that prevents imaging live animals at resolutions analogue to the ones obtained in vitro. Motion compensation techniques aim at reducing this gap and can effectively increase the in vivo resolution. This paper provides a technical review of some of the latest developments in motion compensation methods, providing organ specific solutions. PMID:24273405

  17. Intravital assessment of myelin molecular order with polarimetric multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Rutledge, Danette J.; Bélanger, Erik; Dill, Dorothy; Macklin, Wendy B.; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Myelin plays an essential role in the nervous system and its disruption in diseases such as multiple sclerosis may lead to neuronal death, thus causing irreversible functional impairments. Understanding myelin biology is therefore of fundamental and clinical importance, but no tools currently exist to describe the fine spatial organization of myelin sheaths in vivo. Here we demonstrate intravital quantification of the myelin molecular structure using a microscopy method based on polarization-resolved coherent Raman scattering. Developmental myelination was imaged noninvasively in live zebrafish. Longitudinal imaging of individual axons revealed changes in myelin organization beyond the diffraction limit. Applied to promyelination drug screening, the method uniquely enabled the identification of focal myelin regions with differential architectures. These observations indicate that the study of myelin biology and the identification of therapeutic compounds will largely benefit from a method to quantify the myelin molecular organization in vivo. PMID:27538357

  18. Topiramate inhibits trigeminovascular activation: an intravital microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Akerman, Simon; Goadsby, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    Activation, or the altered perception of activation, of trigeminal nerves that innervate the cranial vasculature is considered to be a pivotal component of the pathophysiology of acute migraine. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels are increased during migraine and after trigeminal nerve stimulation in the cat. Both CGRP and nitric oxide (NO) infusion causes headache and delayed migraine in migraineurs. Neurogenic stimulation of a cranial window, CGRP and NO injection all cause meningeal artery dilation in the rat when viewed using intravital microscopy. Topiramate is an antiepileptic drug with established efficacy as a migraine preventive, and has recently been shown to inhibit neurons of the trigeminocervical complex after superior sagittal sinus stimulation. In this study, we used intravital microscopy with neurogenic dural vasodilation, and CGRP- and NO-induced dilation to examine whether intravenous topiramate has effects on the trigeminovascular system. Topiramate was able to attentuate neurogenic dural vasodilation maximally after 15 min by 52% at 30 mg kg−1 (t5=6.78, n=6); there was no significant inhibition at 10 mg kg−1. There was also significant attenuation of the NO-induced dilation maximally after 15 min, at both 10 and 30 mg kg−1 by 21% (t6=6.09, n=7) and 41% (t6=5.3, n=7), respectively. CGRP-induced dilation was not inhibited at either dose of topiramate. The study demonstrates that topiramate is likely to inhibit neurogenic dural vasodilation by inhibiting the release of CGRP from prejunctional trigeminal neurons, thus attenuating the dural vasodilation. Topiramate is not able to act postsynaptically at the blood vessels themselves as the CGRP-induced dilation was not attenuated. The data are consistent with an effect of topiramate on trigeminovascular activation which may form part of its preventive antimigraine mechanisms of action. PMID:15980877

  19. Highly Resolved Intravital Striped-illumination Microscopy of Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Volker; Sporbert, Anje

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring cellular communication by intravital deep-tissue multi-photon microscopy is the key for understanding the fate of immune cells within thick tissue samples and organs in health and disease. By controlling the scanning pattern in multi-photon microscopy and applying appropriate numerical algorithms, we developed a striped-illumination approach, which enabled us to achieve 3-fold better axial resolution and improved signal-to-noise ratio, i.e. contrast, in more than 100 µm tissue depth within highly scattering tissue of lymphoid organs as compared to standard multi-photon microscopy. The acquisition speed as well as photobleaching and photodamage effects were similar to standard photo-multiplier-based technique, whereas the imaging depth was slightly lower due to the use of field detectors. By using the striped-illumination approach, we are able to observe the dynamics of immune complex deposits on secondary follicular dendritic cells – on the level of a few protein molecules in germinal centers. PMID:24748007

  20. Quantifying endocytosis in vivo using intravital two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Ruben M; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2008-01-01

    The recent introduction of multiphoton microscopy coupled with advances in optics, computer sciences, designer fluorophores, molecular labeling, and previously developed physiologic approaches have empowered investigators to quantitatively study the cell-specific dynamic events, such as endocytosis, within a functioning organ with subcellular resolution. This rapidly emerging field of investigation, with superior spatial and temporal resolution and high sensitivity, enables investigators to track molecules and determine their mode of cellular uptake, intracellular trafficking, and metabolism in a cell-specific fashion in complex heterogeneous organs such as the kidney with repeated determinations possible over a prolonged period of time. This approach is enhanced by the ability to obtain and quantify volumetric data with using up to three different fluorophores simultaneously. We have utilized this intravital approach to understand and quantify kidney proximal tubule cell uptake and intracellular distribution and metabolism of fluorescently labeled molecules, including folic acid, gentamicin, and small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA). Limitations of this technique include tissue penetration, which is the major barrier to successful clinical utilization of this technology. However, its use in preclinical animal models offers new insight into physiologic processes and the pathophysiology and treatment of disease processes. PMID:18369960

  1. Microbial pathogenesis revealed by intravital microscopy: pros, cons and cautions.

    PubMed

    Stolp, Bettina; Melican, Keira

    2016-07-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging allows visualization of infections and pathogenic mechanisms within intact organs in their physiological context. Today, most organs of mice and rats are applicable to in vivo or ex vivo imaging, opening completely new avenues for many researchers. Advances in fluorescent labeling of pathogens and infected cells, as well as improved small animal models for human pathogens, led to the increased application of in vivo imaging in infectious diseases research in recent years. Here, we review the latest literature on intravital or ex vivo imaging of viral and bacterial infections and critically discuss requirements, benefits and drawbacks of applied animal models, labeling strategies, and imaged organs. PMID:26938770

  2. Intravital microscopy as a tool to study drug delivery in preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The technical developments in the field of non-linear microscopy have made intravital microscopy one of the most successful techniques for studying physiological and pathological processes in live animals. Intravital microscopy has been utilized to address many biological questions in basic research and is now a fundamental tool for preclinical studies, with an enormous potential for clinical applications. The ability to dynamically image cellular and subcellular structures combined with the possibility to perform longitudinal studies have empowered investigators to use this discipline to study the mechanisms of action of therapeutic agents and assess the efficacy on their targets in vivo. The goal of this review is to provide a general overview of the recent advances in intravital microscopy and to discuss some of its applications in preclinical studies. PMID:20933026

  3. Early development of cutaneous cancer revealed by intravital nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Chou; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Shean-Jen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-09-01

    We performed intravital multiphoton microscopy to image and analyze normal and carcinogen treated skin tissues of nude mice in vivo. Using intravital images and the quantitative pixel to pixel ratiometric processing of multiphoton autofluorescence to second harmonic generation index (MAFSI), we can visualize the interaction between epithelial cells and extracellular matrix. We found that as the imaging depth increases, MAFSI has different distribution in normal and treated cutaneous specimens. Since the treated skin eventually became squamous cell carcinoma, our results show that the physiological changes to mouse skin en route to become cancer can be effectively tracked by multiphoton microscopy.

  4. Automated motion artifact removal for intravital microscopy, without a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungon; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matthew; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-03-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy, through extended penetration depth and imaging resolution, provides the ability to image at cellular and subcellular resolution in live animals, presenting an opportunity for new insights into in vivo biology. Unfortunately, physiological induced motion components due to respiration and cardiac activity are major sources of image artifacts and impose severe limitations on the effective imaging resolution that can be ultimately achieved in vivo. Here we present a novel imaging methodology capable of automatically removing motion artifacts during intravital microscopy imaging of organs and orthotopic tumors. The method is universally applicable to different laser scanning modalities including confocal and multiphoton microscopy, and offers artifact free reconstructions independent of the physiological motion source and imaged organ. The methodology, which is based on raw data acquisition followed by image processing, is here demonstrated for both cardiac and respiratory motion compensation in mice heart, kidney, liver, pancreas and dorsal window chamber.

  5. Intravital Microscopy of Leukocyte-endothelial and Platelet-leukocyte Interactions in Mesenterial Veins in Mice.

    PubMed

    Herr, Nadine; Mauler, Maximilian; Bode, Christoph; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is a method that can be used to investigate different processes in different regions and vessels in living animals. In this protocol, we describe intravital microscopy of mesentery veins. This can be performed in a short period of time with reproducible results showing leukocyte-endothelial interactions in vivo. We describe an inflammatory setting after LPS challenge of the endothelium. But in this model one can apply many different types of inflammatory conditions, like bacterial, chemical or biological and investigate the administration of drugs and their direct effects on the living animal and its impact on leukocyte recruitment. This protocol has been applied successfully to a number of different treatments of mice and their effects on inflammatory response in vessels. Herein, we describe the visualization of leukocytes and platelets by fluorescently labeling these with rhodamine 6G. Additionally, any specific imaging can be performed using targeted fluorescently labeled molecules. PMID:26325284

  6. Role for the actomyosin complex in regulated exocytosis revealed by intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Sramkova, Monika; Parente, Laura; Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Bugge, Thomas H.; Weigert, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The regulation and the dynamics of membrane trafficking events have been studied primarily in in vitro models that often do not fully reflect the functional complexity found in a living multicellular organism. Here we used intravital microscopy in the salivary glands of live rodents to investigate regulated exocytosis, a fundamental process in all of the secretory organs. We found that β-adrenergic stimulation elicits exocytosis of large secretory granules, which gradually collapse with the apical plasma membrane without any evidence of compound exocytosis, as was previously described. Furthermore, we show that the driving force required to complete the collapse of the granules is provided by the recruitment of F-actin and nonmuscle myosin II on the granule membranes that is triggered upon fusion with the plasma membrane. Our results provide information on the machinery controlling regulated secretion and show that intravital microscopy provides unique opportunities to address fundamental questions in cell biology under physiological conditions. PMID:21808006

  7. Intravital microscopy in tumor biology - current status and future perspectives (review).

    PubMed

    Leunig, M; Messmer, K

    1995-02-01

    To date, most progress in biomedical research is reported from cellular and/or molecular studies identifying important disease mechanisms and suggesting novel strategies in cancer therapy. Although these findings are fundamental for the understanding and treatment of neoplastic disease they often fail to be demonstrable in vivo. Many tumors resist complete eradication by anti-cancer agents indicating that caution has to be exercised in the extrapolation of in vitro observations to the clinical situation. This review emphasizes intravital microscopy as a quantitative method to analyze in vivo mechanisms of neoplastic disease and to test the in vivo function of novel strategies in cancer therapy derived from in vitro observations. Intravital microscopy facilitates a comprehensive analysis of the tumor microcirculation and microenvironment which should aid to improve the current understanding of tumor biology. PMID:21556553

  8. Intravital microscopy: a novel tool to study cell biology in living animals

    PubMed Central

    Weigert, Roberto; Sramkova, Monika; Parente, Laura; Masedunskas, Andrius

    2011-01-01

    Intravital microscopy encompasses various optical microscopy techniques aimed at visualizing biological processes in live animals. In the last decade, the development of non-linear optical microscopy resulted in an enormous increase of in vivo studies, which have addressed key biological questions in fields such as neurobiology, immunology and tumor biology. Recently, few studies have shown that subcellular processes can be imaged dynamically in the live animal at a resolution comparable to that achieved in cell cultures, providing new opportunities to study cell biology under physiological conditions. The overall aim of this review is to give the reader a general idea of the potential applications of intravital microscopy with a particular emphasis on subcellular imaging. An overview of some of the most exciting studies in this field will be presented using resolution as a main organizing criteria. Indeed, first we will focus on those studies in which organs where imaged at the tissue level, then on those focusing on single cells imaging, and finally on those imaging subcellular organelles and structures. PMID:20372919

  9. Probing the role of the actin cytoskeleton during regulated exocytosis by intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Milberg, Oleg; Tora, Muhibullah; Shitara, Akiko; Masedunskas, Andrius

    2015-01-01

    Summary The actin cytoskeleton plays a fundamental role in controlling several steps during regulated exocytosis. Here we describe a combination of procedures that are aimed at studying the dynamics and the mechanism of the actin cytoskeleton in the salivary glands of live rodents, a model for exocrine secretion. Our approach relies on intravital microscopy, an imaging technique that enables imaging biological events in live animals at a subcellular resolution, and it is complemented by the use of pharmacological agents and indirect immunofluorescence in the salivary tissue. PMID:24947398

  10. Assessment of microcirculatory effects of glycine by intravital microscopy in rats.

    PubMed

    Podoprigora, Guennady I; Blagosklonov, Oleg; Angoué, Orland; Boulahdour, Hatem; Nartsissov, Yaroslav R

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies using laboratory animal models have shown a potential vasoactive effect of natural metabolites such as glycine. The present study used intravital microscopy in laboratory rat models to study the microcirculation in the brain pial and mesentery vessels. To investigate the pial microvasculature, a stereotaxis-like animal fixing device was used. The intravital microscopy unit consisted of a binocular microscope equipped with a digital photo-video camera, processor, monitor and printer. Using reflected light, a special contact lens with an amplified focus depth provided high-resolution images of nontransparent tissue objects that typically have insufficient light exposure. Glycine had a vasodilatory effect on microvessels in the rat brain and mesenterium. The diameter of pial arterioles increased after glycine application especially markedly (up to 250% of initial size). These changes were not observed when physiological saline was used. Even a very small amount of glycine (a drop on the needle) was sufficient to stop the early stages of histamine-induced blood stasis development in 3-5 s in mesenterial microvessels. The vasodilatory effect of glycine on the pial microcirculation correlates with its reported positive therapeutic effect in cerebral ischemic stroke. The ability of glycine to avoid or prevent histamine-induced microcirculatory alterations in mesenterial microvessels may have potential clinical applications. PMID:23366470

  11. Autonomous T cell trafficking examined in vivo with intravital two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mark J.; Wei, Sindy H.; Cahalan, Michael D.; Parker, Ian

    2003-03-01

    The recirculation of T cells between the blood and secondary lymphoid organs requires that T cells are motile and sensitive to tissue-specific signals. T cell motility has been studied in vitro, but the migratory behavior of individual T cells in vivo has remained enigmatic. Here, using intravital two-photon laser microscopy, we imaged the locomotion and trafficking of naïve CD4+ T cells in the inguinal lymph nodes of anesthetized mice. Intravital recordings deep within the lymph node showed T cells flowing rapidly in the microvasculature and captured individual homing events. Within the diffuse cortex, T cells displayed robust motility with an average velocity of 11 μm·min1. T cells cycled between states of low and high motility roughly every 2 min, achieving peak velocities >25 μm·min1. An analysis of T cell migration in 3D space revealed a default trafficking program analogous to a random walk. Our results show that naïve T cells do not migrate collectively, as they might under the direction of pervasive chemokine gradients. Instead, they appear to migrate as autonomous agents, each cell taking an independent trafficking path. Our results call into question the role of chemokine gradients for basal T cell trafficking within T cell areas and suggest that antigen detection may result from a stochastic process through which a random walk facilitates contact with antigen-presenting dendritic cells.

  12. Automated Identification and Localization of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in 3D Intravital Microscopy Data

    PubMed Central

    Khorshed, Reema A.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Duarte, Delfim; Scott, Mark K.; Akinduro, Olufolake A.; Rashidi, Narges M.; Spitaler, Martin; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Summary Measuring three-dimensional (3D) localization of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) within the bone marrow microenvironment using intravital microscopy is a rapidly expanding research theme. This approach holds the key to understanding the detail of HSC-niche interactions, which are critical for appropriate stem cell function. Due to the complex tissue architecture of the bone marrow and to the progressive introduction of scattering and signal loss at increasing imaging depths, there is no ready-made software to handle efficient segmentation and unbiased analysis of the data. To address this, we developed an automated image analysis tool that simplifies and standardizes the biological interpretation of 3D HSC microenvironment images. The algorithm identifies HSCs and measures their localization relative to surrounding osteoblast cells and bone collagen. We demonstrate here the effectiveness, consistency, and accuracy of the proposed approach compared to current manual analysis and its wider applicability to analyze other 3D bone marrow components. PMID:26120058

  13. Intravital Microscopy Reveals Differences in the Kinetics of Endocytic Pathways between Cell Cultures and Live Animals

    PubMed Central

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Rechache, Kamil; Aye, Myo-Pale’; Weigert, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has enabled imaging of the dynamics of subcellular structures in live animals, thus opening the door to investigating membrane trafficking under physiological conditions. Here, we sought to determine whether the architecture and the environment of a fully developed tissue influences the dynamics of endocytic processes. To this aim, we imaged endocytosis in the stromal cells of rat salivary glands both in situ and after they were isolated and cultured on a solid surface. We found that the internalization of transferrin and dextran, two molecules that traffic via distinct mechanisms, is substantially altered in cultured cells, supporting the idea that the three dimensional organization of the tissue and the cues generated by the surrounding environment strongly affect membrane trafficking events. PMID:24710546

  14. Characterization of multiphoton microscopy in the bone marrow following intravital laser osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Alt, Clemens; Mortensen, Luke J; Lin, Charles P

    2014-10-01

    The bone marrow is an important site where all blood cells are formed from hematopoietic stem cells and where hematologic malignancies such as leukemia emerge. It is also a frequent site for metastasis of solid tumors such as breast cancer and prostate cancer. Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool for studying the bone marrow with single cell and sub-cellular resolution. To improve optical access to this rich biological environment, plasma-mediated laser ablation with sub-microjoule femtosecond pulses was used to thin cortical bone. By locally removing a superficial layer of bone (local laser osteotomy), significant improvements in multiphoton imaging were observed in individual bone marrow compartments in vivo. This work demonstrates the utility of scanning laser ablation of hard tissue with sub-microjoule pulses as a preparatory step to imaging. PMID:25360374

  15. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-15

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  16. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  17. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy: An emerging technique for intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates-only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  18. Deep-tissue multiphoton fluorescence lifetime microscopy for intravital imaging of protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruhwirth, G. O.; Matthews, D. R.; Brock, A.; Keppler, M.; Vojnovic, B.; Ng, T.; Ameer-Beg, S.

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has proven to be a valuable tool in beating the Rayleigh criterion for light microscopy by measuring Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorophores. Applying multiphoton FLIM, we previously showed in a human breast cancer cell line that recycling of a membrane receptorgreen fluorescent protein fusion is enhanced concomitantly with the formation of a receptor:protein kinase C α complex in the endosomal compartment. We have extended this established technique to probe direct protein-protein interactions also in vivo. Therefore, we used various expressible fluorescent tags fused to membrane receptor molecules in order to generate stable two-colour breast carcinoma cell lines via controlled retroviral infection. We used these cell lines for establishing a xenograft tumour model in immune-compromised Nude mice. Using this animal model in conjunction with scanning Ti:Sapphire laser-based two-photon excitation, we established deep-tissue multiphoton FLIM in vivo. For the first time, this novel technique enables us to directly assess donor fluorescence lifetime changes in vivo and we show the application of this method for intravital imaging of direct protein-protein interactions.

  19. Treadmill Exercise Induces Neutrophil Recruitment into Muscle Tissue in a Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Manner. An Intravital Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Nunes-Silva, Albená; Bernardes, Priscila T. T.; Rezende, Bárbara M.; Lopes, Fernando; Gomes, Elisa C.; Marques, Pedro E.; Lima, Paulo M. A.; Coimbra, Cândido C.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Pinho, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is a physiological stress capable of inducing the interaction of neutrophils with muscle endothelial cells and their transmigration into tissue. Mechanisms driving this physiological inflammatory response are not known. Here, we investigate whether production of reactive oxygen species is relevant for neutrophil interaction with endothelial cells and recruitment into the quadriceps muscle in mice subjected to the treadmill fatiguing exercise protocol. Mice exercised until fatigue by running for 56.3±6.8 min on an electric treadmill. Skeletal muscle was evaluated by intravital microscopy at different time points after exercise, and then removed to assess local oxidative stress and histopathological analysis. We observed an increase in plasma lactate and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations after exercise. The numbers of monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in blood increased 12 and 24 hours after the exercise. Numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours post-exercise, as assessed by intravital microscopy. Using LysM-eGFP mice and confocal intravital microscopy technology, we show that the number of transmigrating neutrophils increased 12 hours post-exercise. Mutant gp91phox-/- (non-functional NADPH oxidase) mice and mice treated with apocynin showed diminished neutrophil recruitment. SOD treatment promoted further adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes 12 hours after the exercise. These findings confirm our hypothesis that treadmill exercise increases the recruitment of leukocytes to the postcapillary venules, and NADPH oxidase-induced ROS plays an important role in this process. PMID:24798414

  20. Intravital Microscopy for Imaging Subcellular Structures in Live Mice Expressing Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Tora, Muhibullah; Milberg, Oleg; Weigert, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe a procedure to image subcellular structures in live rodents that is based on the use of confocal intravital microscopy. As a model organ, we use the salivary glands of live mice since they provide several advantages. First, they can be easily exposed to enable access to the optics, and stabilized to facilitate the reduction of the motion artifacts due to heartbeat and respiration. This significantly facilitates imaging and tracking small subcellular structures. Second, most of the cell populations of the salivary glands are accessible from the surface of the organ. This permits the use of confocal microscopy that has a higher spatial resolution than other techniques that have been used for in vivo imaging, such as two-photon microscopy. Finally, salivary glands can be easily manipulated pharmacologically and genetically, thus providing a robust system to investigate biological processes at a molecular level. In this study we focus on a protocol designed to follow the kinetics of the exocytosis of secretory granules in acinar cells and the dynamics of the apical plasma membrane where the secretory granules fuse upon stimulation of the beta-adrenergic receptors. Specifically, we used a transgenic mouse that co-expresses cytosolic GFP and a membrane-targeted peptide fused with the fluorescent protein tandem-Tomato. However, the procedures that we used to stabilize and image the salivary glands can be extended to other mouse models and coupled to other approaches to label in vivo cellular components, enabling the visualization of various subcellular structures, such as endosomes, lysosomes, mitochondria, and the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24022089

  1. Toward a comprehensive interpretation of intravital microscopy images in studies of lung tissue dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Schirrmann, Kerstin; Schnabel, Christian; Meissner, Sven; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Kirsten, Lars; Koch, Edmund

    2015-06-01

    Intravital microscopy (IVM) is a well-established imaging technique for real-time monitoring of microscale lung tissue dynamics. Although accepted as a gold standard in respiratory research, its characteristic image features are scarcely understood, especially when trying to determine the actual position of alveolar walls. To allow correct interpretation of these images with respect to the true geometry of the lung parenchyma, we analyzed IVM data of alveoli in a mouse model in comparison with simultaneously acquired optical coherence tomography images. Several IVM characteristics, such as double ring structures or disappearing alveoli in regions of liquid filling, could be identified and related to the position of alveoli relative to each other. Utilizing a ray tracing approach based on an idealized geometry of the mouse lung parenchyma, two major reflection processes could be attributed to the IVM image formation: partial reflection and total internal reflection between adjacent alveoli. Considering the origin of the reflexes, a model was developed to determine the true position of alveolar walls within IVM images. These results allow thorough understanding of IVM data and may serve as a basis for the correction of alveolar sizes for more accurate quantitative analysis within future studies of lung tissue dynamics.

  2. Intra-vital microscopy of lung tissue: A simulation based analysis of the image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Schirrmann, Kerstin; Schnabel, Christian; Meissner, Sven; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Kirsten, Lars; Koch, Edmund

    2013-06-01

    In the course of pulmonary research, understanding alveolar tissue dynamics plays a critical role in the treatment of patients suffering from acute lung diseases. As a gold standard technique for monitoring micro scale changes of lung tissue, real-time intra-vital microscopy (IVM) has been established to evaluate the behavior of the alveolar tissue. To allow profound qualitative and quantitative conclusions, characteristic features of the obtained images have to be thoroughly understood. These factors are strongly influenced by the imaging setup and physiological condition of the lung. To circumvent misinterpretations, a ray-tracing approach has been applied in this study using an idealized geometry of the mouse lung parenchyma deduced from optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a complementary imaging technique. Basic features of IVM images are double ring structures and disappearing of alveoli related to liquid infiltration. Ray propagation analysis reveals the formation of these features by two major reflection processes: partial reflection and total internal reflection. The results give rise to quantification errors of the alveolar area related to reflexes misinterpreted as alveolar borders and should further be used to yield a correction factor for future IVM lung tissue studies.

  3. Intravital analysis of vascular permeability in mice using two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Gyohei; Nakamizo, Satoshi; Natsuaki, Yohei; Doi, Hiromi; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Blood vessel endothelium forms a semi-permeable barrier and its permeability controls the traffics of plasma contents. Here we report an intravital evaluation system for vascular permeability in mice using two-photon microscopy. We used various sizes of fluorescein-conjugated dextran as a tracer and its efflux was quantified by measuring the changes of fluorescent intensity both on the blood vessel area and the interstitial space. Using this system, we demonstrated that skin blood vessels limited the passage of dextran larger than 70 kDa under homeostatic conditions. We evaluated the kinetics of vascular permeability in histamine- or IgE-induced type I allergic models and a hapten-induced type IV allergic model. In such inflammatory conditions, the hyperpermeability was selectively induced in the postcapillary venules and dextran as large as 2000-kDa leaked from the bloods. Taken together, our study provides a convenient method to characterize the skin blood vessels as a traffic barrier in physiological conditions. PMID:23732999

  4. Contribution of selectins to leucocyte sequestration in pulmonary microvessels by intravital microscopy in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Kuebler, W M; Kuhnle, G E; Groh, J; Goetz, A E

    1997-01-01

    1. Sequestration of leucocytes in the lung is the net result of leucocyte rolling and sticking in pulmonary arterioles and venules and their retention in alveolar capillaries. 2. In order to investigate whether adhesion molecules of the selectin family contribute to these phenomena the effects of fucoidin (an inhibitor of L- and P-selectin) on microhaemodynamics and leucocyte kinetic were studied in pulmonary arterioles, capillaries and venules by means of intravital fluorescence microscopy in a rabbit model. 3. Fucoidin reduced leucocyte rolling in pulmonary arterioles and venules by 75 and 83%, respectively, without affecting leucocyte sticking. In alveolar capillaries, fucoidin reduced leucocyte retention and accelerated leucocyte passage, thus reducing the alveolar transit time of leucocytes by 62%. 4. It is concluded that rolling of leucocytes in pulmonary microvessels is mediated by selectins, whereas sticking relies on selectin-independent mechanisms. 5. Leucocyte retention in alveolar capillaries is not due solely to mechanical hindrance of leucocyte passage through narrow vessel segments, as previously hypothesized, but also depends on interaction of leucocytes with the capillary endothelium. PMID:9192309

  5. Real-time intravital microscopy of individual nanoparticle dynamics in liver and tumors of live mice

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Anne L; Kim, Pilhan; Ferrari, Mauro; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is emerging as an important experimental tool for the research and development of multi-functional therapeutic nanoconstructs. The direct visualization of nanoparticle dynamics within live animals provides invaluable insights into the mechanisms that regulate nanotherapeutics transport and cell-particle interactions. Here we present a protocol to image the dynamics of nanoparticles within the liver and tumors of live mice immediately following systemic injection using a high-speed (30-400 fps) confocal or multi-photon laser-scanning fluorescence microscope. Techniques for quantifying the real-time accumulation and cellular association of individual particles with a size ranging from several tens of nanometers to micrometers are described, as well as an experimental strategy for labeling Kupffer cells in the liver in vivo. Experimental design considerations and controls are provided, as well as minimum equipment requirements. The entire protocol takes approximately 4-8 hours and yields quantitative information. These techniques can serve to study a wide range of kinetic parameters that drive nanotherapeutics delivery, uptake, and treatment response. PMID:25383179

  6. Multiphoton Microscopy Applied for Real-Time Intravital Imaging of Bacterial Infections In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Ferdinand X.; Sandoval, Ruben M.; Molitoris, Bruce A.; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta

    2014-01-01

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of bacterial infections, researchers have for long addressed the molecular interactions occurring when the bacterium interacts with host target cells. In these studies, primarily based on in vitro systems, molecular details have been revealed along with increased knowledge regarding the general infection process. With the recent advancements in in vivo imaging techniques, we are now in a position to bridge a transition from classical minimalistic in vitro approaches to allow infections to be studied in its native complexity—the live organ. Techniques such as multiphoton microscopy (MPM) allow cellular-level visualization of the dynamic infection process in real time within the living host. Studies in which all interplaying factors, such as the influences of the immune, lymphatic, and vascular systems can be accounted for, are likely to provide new insights to our current understanding of the infection process. MPM imaging becomes extra powerful when combined with advanced surgical procedure, allowing studies of the illusive early hours of infection. In this chapter, our intention is to provide a general view on how to design and carry out intravital imaging of a bacterial infection. While exemplifying this using a spatiotemporally well-controlled uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) infection in rat kidneys, we hope to provide the reader with general considerations that can be adapted to other bacterial infections in organs other than the kidney. PMID:22341218

  7. Automated measurement of blood flow velocity and direction and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the rat lung using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Gabi; Fontanella, Andrew; Palmer, Gregory; Shan, Siqing; Radiloff, Daniel R; Zhao, Yulin; Irwin, David; Hamilton, Karyn; Boico, Alina; Piantadosi, Claude A; Blueschke, Gert; Dewhirst, Mark; McMahon, Timothy; Schroeder, Thies

    2013-01-15

    Intravital microscopy of the pulmonary microcirculation in research animals is of great scientific interest for its utility in identifying regional changes in pulmonary microcirculatory blood flow. Although feasibility studies have been reported, the pulmonary window can be further refined into a practical tool for pharmaceutical research and drug development. We have established a method to visualize and quantify dynamic changes in three key features of lung function: microvascular red blood cell velocity, flow direction, and hemoglobin saturation. These physiological parameters were measured in an acute closed-chest pulmonary window, which allows real-time images to be captured by fluorescence and multispectral absorption microscopy; images were subsequently quantified using computerized analysis. We validated the model by quantifying changes in microcirculatory blood flow and hemoglobin saturation in two ways: 1) after changes in inspired oxygen content and 2) after pharmacological reduction of pulmonary blood flow via treatment with the β1 adrenergic receptor blocker metoprolol. This robust and relatively simple system facilitates pulmonary intravital microscopy in laboratory rats for pharmacological and physiological research. PMID:23161885

  8. Direct observation of liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo in skin blood vessels using intravital fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.; Begu, Sylvie; Desmettre, Thomas

    2000-04-01

    This study aimed to observe liposome uptake by leukocytes in vivo. The study was performed on skin by using a dorsal skin-fold chamber implanted in golden hamsters using intravital microscopy. 5,6-CF-encapsulated PEGylated liposomes were injected intravenously. The skin microcirculation was observed with an intravital Eclipse E800 Nikon microscope fitted with a Xenon light source and an epi-fluorescence assembly. An ultra-high sensitivity video-camera mounted on the microscope projected the image onto a monitor, and the images were recorded for playback analysis with a digital video cassette recorder. An acute inflammatory response was obtained by removing one complete layer of skin and the underlying fascia and avascular tissue on the opposing side of the flap corresponding to an area equivalent to the window aperture. Using these model and set-up, leukocyte rolling and adhesion were easily observed and the entry of PEGylated liposomes into hamster blood leukocytes was studied for a period of 6 hours. PEGylated liposomes were clearly identified alone inside the blood flow and inside the leukocytes as soon as the inflammatory reaction appeared. This study shows for the first time that blood leukocytes in their natural milieu of whole blood are capable of interacting with, and taking up liposomes. This observation is in accordance with previous in vitro studies.

  9. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated. PMID:27605489

  10. Holographic intravital microscopy for 2-D and 3-D imaging intact circulating blood cells in microcapillaries of live mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Choe, Kibaek; Park, Inwon; Kim, Pilhan; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an essential tool that reveals behaviours of live cells under conditions close to natural physiological states. So far, although various approaches for imaging cells in vivo have been proposed, most require the use of labelling and also provide only qualitative imaging information. Holographic imaging approach based on measuring the refractive index distributions of cells, however, circumvent these problems and offer quantitative and label-free imaging capability. Here, we demonstrate in vivo two- and three-dimensional holographic imaging of circulating blood cells in intact microcapillaries of live mice. The measured refractive index distributions of blood cells provide morphological and biochemical properties including three-dimensional cell shape, haemoglobin concentration, and haemoglobin contents at the individual cell level. With the present method, alterations in blood flow dynamics in live healthy and sepsis-model mice were also investigated. PMID:27605489

  11. Simultaneous three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and intravital microscopy for imaging subpleural pulmonary alveoli in isolated rabbit lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Sven; Knels, Lilla; Krueger, Alexander; Koch, Thea; Koch, Edmund

    2009-09-01

    There is a growing interest in analyzing lung mechanics at the level of the alveoli in order to understand stress-related pathogenesis and possibly avoid ventilator associated lung injury. Emerging quantitative models to simulate fluid mechanics and the associated stresses and strains on delicate alveolar walls require realistic quantitative input on alveolar geometry and its dynamics during ventilation. Here, three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) and conventional intravital microscopy are joined in one setup to investigate the geometric changes of subpleural alveoli during stepwise pressure increase and release in an isolated and perfused rabbit lung model. We describe good qualitative agreement and quantitative correlation between the OCT data and video micrographs. Our main finding is the inflation and deflation of individual alveoli with noticeable hysteresis. Importantly, this three-dimensional geometry data can be extracted and converted into input data for numerical simulations.

  12. Intravital two-photon microscopy for studying the uptake and trafficking of fluorescently conjugated molecules in live rodents

    PubMed Central

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Here we describe an experimental system based on intravital two-photon microscopy for studying endocytosis in live animals. The rodent submandibular glands were chosen as model organs since they can be exposed easily, imaged without compromising their function and, furthermore, they are amenable to pharmacological and genetic manipulations. We show that the fibroblasts within the stroma of the glands readily internalize systemically injected molecules such as fluorescently conjugated dextran and bovine serum albumin, providing a robust model to study endocytosis. We dynamically image the trafficking of these probes from the early endosomes to the late endosomes and lysosomes while also visualizing homotypic fusion events between early endosomes. Finally, we demonstrate that pharmacological agents can be delivered specifically to the submandibular salivary glands thus providing a powerful tool to study the molecular machinery regulating endocytosis in a physiological context. PMID:18647170

  13. Development of synchrotron radiation x-ray intravital microscopy for in vivo imaging of rat heart vascular function.

    PubMed

    Umetani, Keiji; Pearson, James T; Schwenke, Daryl O; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2011-01-01

    This study elucidates the vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation in closed-chest rats to evaluate endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilatory ability and to investigate disease mechanisms. For this study, we developed an X-ray intravital microscopy system using a microangiography technique and a synchrotron radiation source at SPring-8. An X-ray direct-conversion type detector with 7-μm spatial resolution was used for real-time imaging. Microangiographic images were stored in a digital frame memory system at a maximum rate of 30 frame/s with a 1024 × 1024-pixel, 10-bit format. In imaging experiments, the small coronary arteries were visualized after iodine contrast agent injection into the coronary artery. PMID:22256145

  14. Combined application of dynamic light scattering imaging and fluorescence intravital microscopy in vascular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, V.; Ziv, K.; Addadi, Y.; Madar-Balakirski, N.; Meglinski, I.; Neeman, M.; Harmelin, A.

    2010-08-01

    The dynamic light scattering imaging (DLSI) system combined with the conventional fluorescence intravital microscope (FIM) has been applied for the examination of blood and lymph vessels in the mouse ear in vivo. While the CCD camera can be shared by both techniques the combined application of DLSI and FIM allows rapid switching between the modalities. In current study temporal speckles fluctuations are used for rendering blood vessels structure and monitoring blood perfusion with the higher spatial resolution, whereas FIM provides the images of lymphatic vessels. The results clearly demonstrate that combined application of DLSI and FIM approaches provides synchronic in vivo images of blood and lymph vessels with higher contrast and specificity. The use of this new dual-modal diagnostic system is particularly important and has a great potential to significantly expand the capabilities of vascular diagnostics providing synchronic in vivo images of blood and lymph vessels.

  15. Quantitative intravital two-photon excitation microscopy reveals absence of pulmonary vaso-occlusion in unchallenged Sickle Cell Disease mice

    PubMed Central

    Bennewitz, Margaret F.; Watkins, Simon C.; Sundd, Prithu

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that leads to red blood cell (RBC) sickling, hemolysis and the upregulation of adhesion molecules on sickle RBCs. Chronic hemolysis in SCD results in a hyper-inflammatory state characterized by activation of circulating leukocytes, platelets and endothelial cells even in the absence of a crisis. A crisis in SCD is often triggered by an inflammatory stimulus and can lead to the acute chest syndrome (ACS), which is a type of lung injury and a leading cause of mortality among SCD patients. Although it is believed that pulmonary vaso-occlusion could be the phenomenon contributing to the development of ACS, the role of vaso-occlusion in ACS remains elusive. Intravital imaging of the cremaster microcirculation in SCD mice has been instrumental in establishing the role of neutrophil-RBC-endothelium interactions in systemic vaso-occlusion; however, such studies, although warranted, have never been done in the pulmonary microcirculation of SCD mice. Here, we show that two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy can be used to perform quantitative analysis of neutrophil and RBC trafficking in the pulmonary microcirculation of SCD mice. We provide the experimental approach that enables microscopic observations under physiological conditions and use it to show that RBC and neutrophil trafficking is comparable in SCD and control mice in the absence of an inflammatory stimulus. The intravital imaging scheme proposed in this study can be useful in elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanism of pulmonary vaso-occlusion in SCD mice following an inflammatory stimulus. PMID:25995970

  16. Intravital microscopy of the capillary perfusion in the corium limbi of the third toe of the minipig.

    PubMed

    Hiebl, B; Mrowietz, C; Braune, S; Franke, R P; Plendl, J; Jung, F

    2009-01-01

    Several methods are available today for the investigation of microcirculation in animal models, but they can be invasive and time-consuming depending on the area investigated. In particular, non-invasive methods that can be conducted rapidly and without dye or tracer injections are in demand. The cutaneous microcirculation can be easily studied in the dorsal corium limbi of the third toe of the porcine forelimb using intravital microscopy - analogous to nail fold capillary microscopy in humans. The capillary microscopy system consists of a reflected-light microscope with a cold light source, green and infrared filters and a video camera. The video sequences were recorded using the image capture system Framegrabber (Imagenation PXC-200) and a PC (with an Intel Core 2 Duo processor, 1024 MB RAM, 160 GB hard disk, Windows XP Pro), and stored via a DVD recorder (Panasonic LQ-MD800). Quantification of capillary erythrocyte flow velocities was performed using the computer-assisted image analysis system Cap Image Version 8.5 which includes a movie tool as a video sequence storage medium. The method allows estimation of capillary density and tortuosity as well as capillary circulation in the anesthetized pig within a few minutes. First measurements were made after anesthesia induction followed by further measurements during anesthesia maintenance (3 minutes each). No differences in capillary circulation were found. The present method is thus very well suited for long-term microcirculation measurements in pigs, e.g., to evaluate therapeutic interventions in the ischemic limb model. PMID:19713612

  17. Visualizing leukocyte trafficking in the living brain with 2-photon intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Saparna; Danne, Karyn J.; Qin, Jim; Cavanagh, Lois L.; Smith, Adrian; Hickey, Michael J.; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Intravital imaging of the superficial brain tissue in mice represents a powerful tool for the dissection of the cellular and molecular cues underlying inflammatory and infectious central nervous system (CNS) diseases. We present here a step-by-step protocol that will enable a non-specialist to set up a two-photon brain-imaging model. The protocol offers a two-part approach that is specifically optimized for imaging leukocytes but can be easily adapted to answer varied CNS-related biological questions. The protocol enables simultaneous visualization of fluorescently labeled immune cells, the pial microvasculature and extracellular structures such as collagen fibers at high spatial and temporal resolution. Intracranial structures are exposed through a cranial window, and physiologic conditions are maintained during extended imaging sessions via continuous superfusion of the brain surface with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF). Experiments typically require 1–2 h of preparation, which is followed by variable periods of immune cell tracking. Our methodology converges the experience of two laboratories over the past 10 years in diseased animal models such as cerebral ischemia, lupus, cerebral malaria, and toxoplasmosis. We exemplify the utility of this protocol by tracking leukocytes in transgenic mice in the pial vessels under steady-state conditions. PMID:23316136

  18. 4D intravital microscopy uncovers critical strain differences for the roles of PECAM and CD99 in leukocyte diapedesis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, David P; Watson, Richard L; Muller, William A

    2016-09-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) is an essential component of the inflammatory response. In vitro studies with human cells have demonstrated that platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) functions upstream of CD99 during TEM; however, results in vivo with mice have been apparently contradictory. In this study we use four-dimensional (4D) intravital microscopy to demonstrate that the site and order of function of PECAM and CD99 in vivo are dependent on the strain of mice. In FVB/n mice, PECAM functions upstream of CD99, as in human cells in vitro, and blocking antibodies against either molecule arrest neutrophils before they traverse the endothelium. However, in C57BL/6 mice, PECAM and CD99 appear to function at a different step, as the same antibodies arrest leukocyte migration through the endothelial basement membrane. These results are the first direct comparison of PECAM and CD99 function in different murine strains as well as the first demonstration of the sequential function of PECAM and CD99 in vivo. PMID:27422987

  19. Two photon microscopy intravital study of DC-mediated anti-tumor response of NK cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccia, Michele; Gorletta, Tatiana; Sironi, Laura; Zanoni, Ivan; Salvetti, Cristina; Collini, Maddalena; Granucci, Francesca; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in the activation of Natural Killer cells (NKs) that are responsible for anti-tumor innate immune responses. The focus of this report is on the role of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) activated-DCs in inducing NK cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. Mice transplanted sub-cute (s.c.) with AK7 cells, a mesothelioma cell line sensitive to NK cell responses, are injected with fluorescent NK cells and DC activation is then induced by s.c. injection of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using 4 dimensional tracking we follow the kinetic behavior of NK cells at the Draining Lymph-Node (DLN). As control, noninflammatory conditions are also evaluated. Our data suggest that NK cells are recruited to the DLN where they can interact with activated-DCs with a peculiar kinetic behavior: short lived interactions interleaved by rarer longer ones. We also found that the changes in the NK dynamic behavior in inflammatory conditions clearly affect relevant motility parameters such as the instantaneous and average velocity and the effective diffusion coefficient. This observation suggests that NK cells and activated-DCs might efficiently interact in the DLN, where cells could be activated. Therefore the interaction between activated-DCs and NK cells in DLN is not only a reality but it may be also crucial for the start of the immune response of the NKs.

  20. Intravital imaging of amyloid plaques in a transgenic mouse model using optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Song; Yan, Ping; Maslov, Konstantin; Lee, Jin-Moo; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    We report optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) for in vivo imaging of amyloid plaques in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model. Validation using conventional fluorescence microscopy and multiphoton microscopy shows that OR-PAM has sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution to identify amyloid plaques in living brains. In addition, with dual-wavelength OR-PAM, the three-dimensional morphology of amyloid plaques and the surrounding microvasculature are imaged simultaneously through a cranial window without angiographic contrast agents. OR-PAM, capable of providing both exogenous molecular contrast and endogenous hemoglobin contrast, has the potential to serve as a new technology for in vivo microscopic observations of cerebral plaque deposits. PMID:20016651

  1. Intravital imaging of the effects of 5-fluorouracil on the murine liver microenvironment using 2-photon laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    OKIGAMI, MASATO; TANAKA, KOJI; INOUE, YASUHIRO; SAIGUSA, SUSUMU; OKUGAWA, YOSHINAGA; TOIYAMA, YUJI; MOHRI, YASUHIKO; KUSUNOKI, MASATO

    2016-01-01

    5-fluorouracil (5FU) is often used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. 5FU improves the median overall and disease-free survival rates and reduces recurrence rates in patients who have undergone curative surgical resection. However, in the adjuvant setting, whether 5FU eradicates clinically undetectable micrometastases in target organs such as the liver, or whether 5-FU inhibits the adhesion of circulating tumor cells has not yet been established. In the present study, 5FU was administered following the inoculation of red fluorescent protein-expressing HT29 cells into green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic nude mice to examine its inhibitory effect. 2-photon laser scanning microscopy was performed at selected time points for time-series imaging of liver metastasis of GFP-transgenic mice. The cell number in vessels was quantified to evaluate the response of the tumor microenvironment to chemotherapy. HT29 cells were visualized in hepatic sinusoids at the single-cell level. A total of 2 hours after the injection (early stage), time-series imaging revealed that the number of caught tumor cells gradually reduced over time. In the 5FU treatment group, no significant difference was observed in the cell number in the early stage. One week after the injection (late stage), a difference in morphology was observed. The results of the present study indicated that 5FU eradicated clinically undetectable micrometastases in liver tissues by acting as a cytotoxic agent opposed to preventing adhesion. The present study indicated that time-series intravital 2-photon laser scanning microscopic imaging of metastatic tumor xenografts may facilitate the screening and evaluation of novel chemotherapeutic agents with less interindividual variability. PMID:27073493

  2. Stabilizing 3D in vivo intravital microscopy images with an iteratively refined soft-tissue model for immunology experiments.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Conde, Iván; Caetano, Susana S; Tadokoro, Carlos E; Olivieri, David N

    2015-09-01

    We describe a set of new algorithms and a software tool, StabiTissue, for stabilizing in vivo intravital microscopy images that suffer from soft-tissue background movement. Because these images lack predetermined anchors and are dominated by noise, we use a pixel weighted image alignment together with a correction for nonlinear tissue deformations. We call this correction a poor man׳s diffeomorphic map since it ascertains the nonlinear regions of the image without resorting to a full integral equation method. To determine the quality of the image stabilization, we developed an ensemble sampling method that quantifies the coincidence between image pairs from randomly distributed image regions. We obtain global stabilization alignment through an iterative constrained simulated annealing optimization procedure. To show the accuracy of our algorithm with existing software, we measured the misalignment error rate in datasets taken from two different organs and compared the results to a similar and popular open-source solution. Present open-source stabilization software tools perform poorly because they do not treat the specific needs of the IV-2pM datasets with soft-tissue deformation, speckle noise, full 5D inter- and intra-stack motion error correction, and undefined anchors. In contrast, the results of our tests demonstrate that our method is more immune to noise and provides better performance for datasets' possessing nonlinear tissue deformations. As a practical application of our software, we show how our stabilization improves cell tracking, where the presence of background movement would degrade track information. We also provide a qualitative comparison of our software with other open-source libraries/applications. Our software is freely available at the open source repository http://sourceforge.net/projects/stabitissue/. PMID:26232672

  3. A Novel Intravital Imaging Window for Longitudinal Microscopy of the Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, Filip; Fellus-Alyagor, Liat; Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Shinar, Shiri; Neeman, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The ovary is a dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic remodeling throughout the ovulatory cycle. Maturation of the ovarian follicle, release of the oocyte in the course of ovulation as well as formation and degradation of corpus luteum involve tightly controlled remodeling of the extracellular matrix and vasculature. Ovarian tumors, regardless of their tissue of origin, dynamically interact with the ovarian microenvironment. Their activity in the tissue encompasses recruitment of host stroma and immune cells, attachment of tumor cells to mesothelial layer, degradation of the extracellular matrix and tumor cell migration. High-resolution dynamic imaging of such processes is particularly challenging for internal organs. The implementation of a novel imaging window as reported here enabled longitudinal microscopy of ovarian physiology and orthotopic tumor invasion. PMID:26207832

  4. 4-Dimensional light-sheet microscopy to elucidate shear stress modulation of cardiac trabeculation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juhyun; Fei, Peng; Packard, René R. Sevag; Kang, Hanul; Xu, Hao; Baek, Kyung In; Jen, Nelson; Chen, Junjie; Yen, Hilary; Chi, Neil C.; Ho, Chih-Ming; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2016-01-01

    Hemodynamic shear forces are intimately linked with cardiac development, during which trabeculae form a network of branching outgrowths from the myocardium. Mutations that alter Notch signaling also result in trabeculation defects. Here, we assessed whether shear stress modulates trabeculation to influence contractile function. Specifically, we acquired 4D (3D + time) images with light sheets by selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) for rapid scanning and deep axial penetration during zebrafish morphogenesis. Reduction of blood viscosity via gata1a morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) reduced shear stress, resulting in downregulation of Notch signaling and attenuation of trabeculation. Arrest of cardiomyocyte contraction either by troponin T type 2a (tnnt2a) MO or in weak atriumm58 (wea) mutants resulted in reduced shear stress and downregulation of Notch signaling and trabeculation. Integrating 4D SPIM imaging with synchronization algorithm demonstrated that coinjection of neuregulin1 mRNA with gata1 MO rescued trabeculation to restore contractile function in association with upregulation of Notch-related genes. Crossbreeding of Tg(flk:mCherry) fish, which allows visualization of the vascular system with the Tg(tp1:gfp) Notch reporter line, revealed that shear stress–mediated Notch activation localizes to the endocardium. Deleting endocardium via the clochesk4 mutants downregulated Notch signaling, resulting in nontrabeculated ventricle. Subjecting endothelial cells to pulsatile flow in the presence of the ADAM10 inhibitor corroborated shear stress–activated Notch signaling to modulate trabeculation. PMID:27018592

  5. From optical bench to cageside: intravital microscopy on the long road to rational vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Heather D.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary No anti-viral vaccine is perfect. For some important pathogens, there are no effective vaccines. Many current vaccines are based on the working principles of Jenner and Pasteur, i.e. empiric administration of attenuated or inactivated forms of the pathogen. Tapping the full potential of vaccination requires a thorough understanding of the mechanism of immune activation by pathogens and their individual components. Though the rate of discovery continues to accelerate, the complexity of the immune system is daunting, particularly when integrated into the overall physiology of the host. Here, we review the application of multiphoton microscopy to examine host-pathogen interactions, focusing on our recent efforts to understand mouse CD8+ T-cell responses to viruses at the level of cellular interactions in lymph nodes draining the infection site. We also discuss our recent efforts to understand the influence of the sympathetic nervous system on antiviral immunity, with the ultimate goal of appreciating the traditional elements of immunity as just one facet of the total organismal response to infection and immunization. PMID:21198674

  6. Combination of an optical parametric oscillator and quantum-dots 655 to improve imaging depth of vasculature by intravital multicolor two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Clément; Lamasse, Lisa; Jaouen, Alexandre; Rougon, Geneviève; Debarbieux, Franck

    2016-06-01

    Simultaneous imaging of different cell types and structures in the mouse central nervous system (CNS) by intravital two-photon microscopy requires the characterization of fluorophores and advances in approaches to visualize them. We describe the use of a two-photon infrared illumination generated by an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) on quantum-dots 655 (QD655) nanocrystals to improve resolution of the vasculature deeper in the mouse brain both in healthy and pathological conditions. Moreover, QD655 signal can be unmixed from the DsRed2, CFP, EGFP and EYFP fluorescent proteins, which enhances the panel of multi-parametric correlative investigations both in the cortex and the spinal cord. PMID:27375951

  7. Combination of an optical parametric oscillator and quantum-dots 655 to improve imaging depth of vasculature by intravital multicolor two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Clément; Lamasse, Lisa; Jaouen, Alexandre; Rougon, Geneviève; Debarbieux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of different cell types and structures in the mouse central nervous system (CNS) by intravital two-photon microscopy requires the characterization of fluorophores and advances in approaches to visualize them. We describe the use of a two-photon infrared illumination generated by an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) on quantum-dots 655 (QD655) nanocrystals to improve resolution of the vasculature deeper in the mouse brain both in healthy and pathological conditions. Moreover, QD655 signal can be unmixed from the DsRed2, CFP, EGFP and EYFP fluorescent proteins, which enhances the panel of multi-parametric correlative investigations both in the cortex and the spinal cord. PMID:27375951

  8. The Use of Spinning-Disk Confocal Microscopy for the Intravital Analysis of Platelet Dynamics in Response to Systemic and Local Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jenne, Craig N.; Wong, Connie H. Y.; Petri, Björn; Kubes, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Platelets are central players in inflammation and are an important component of the innate immune response. The ability to visualize platelets within the live host is essential to understanding their role in these processes. Past approaches have involved adoptive transfer of labelled platelets, non-specific dyes, or the use of fluorescent antibodies to tag platelets in vivo. Often, these techniques result in either the activation of the platelet, or blockade of specific platelet receptors. In this report, we describe two new methods for intravital visualization of platelet biology, intravenous administration of labelled anti-CD49b, which labels all platelets, and CD41-YFP transgenic mice, in which a percentage of platelets express YFP. Both approaches label endogenous platelets and allow for their visualization using spinning-disk confocal fluorescent microscopy. Following LPS-induced inflammation, we were able to measure a significant increase in both the number and size of platelet aggregates observed within the vasculature of a number of different tissues. Real-time observation of these platelet aggregates reveals them to be large, dynamic structures that are continually expanding and sloughing-off into circulation. Using these techniques, we describe for the first time, platelet recruitment to, and behaviour within numerous tissues of the mouse, both under control conditions and following LPS induced inflammation. PMID:21949865

  9. Real-time visualization of RGD-quantum dot binding in tumor neovasculature using intravital microscopy in multiple living mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bryan Ronain; Cheng, Zhen; De, Abhijit; Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2009-02-01

    Quantum dots (Qdots) have become ubiquitous in biomedical research due to their excellent brightness, photostability, monodispersity, and fluorescent yield. Furthermore, they have become increasingly useful as imaging agents which are valuable for answering molecular questions in living subjects. However, little is currently known about how nanoparticles such as Qdots interact at the microscale within the vasculature and tumor microenvironments in living subjects. In order to further our understanding of the dynamic processes involved in Qdot targeting in the intact tumor, we developed an in vivo binding assay to visualize and fully elucidate this approach using a variety of animal models and tumor types. We employed argine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides to specifically target the αvβ3 integrins which are expressed on the surface of endothelial cells comprising newly formed or forming blood vessels; RGD peptides were conjugated to the Qdot surface. Exploiting intravital microscopy with subcellular-level resolution, we directly observed and recorded the binding of nanoparticle conjugates in two different murine models, using three different tumor cell lines. Using this generalizable approach, we learned that RGD-qdots unexpectedly bind to tumor blood vessels in all models tested only as aggregates rather than individually. Understanding these issues on the microscale using such techniques will provide a platform for the rational design of molecularly-targeted nanoparticles including Qdots. This is critical for nanoparticles to become a valuable research tool with the potential to become clinically valuable imaging and therapeutic agents, particularly for ensuring regulatory approval of such nanoparticles.

  10. An intravital microscopy study of radiation-induced changes in permeability and leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in the microvessels of the rat pia mater and cremaster muscle.

    PubMed

    Gaber, M Waleed; Yuan, Hong; Killmar, John T; Naimark, Michael D; Kiani, Mohammad F; Merchant, Thomas E

    2004-04-01

    Using intravital microscopy and a closed window method, we measured irradiation-induced changes in the vascular permeability and cell interactions in microcirculation networks of the rat pia mater; the same effects were monitored in the cremaster muscle as a control. The closed cranial window has many advantages, including long-term direct visualization of microcirculation. The method allows for repeated testing of the same vessel or network, thereby reducing variability. The method also allows for measurement of permeability changes and the accompanying leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in the same network or vessel, which permits correlative studies of these phenomena. However, this method is not without challenges. The optical conditions are difficult, because the brain is three-dimensional and its parenchyma is more complex than the thinner, flatter peripheral tissues. To overcome this limitation, we performed a dynamic background subtraction. The background is dynamically related to vessel intensity, and changes in intensity were determined by eliminating the effects of neighboring and underlying vessels. We applied this method to studying the effects of ionizing radiation on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cell interactions and the modulation of these effects by anti-ICAM-1 antibodies. Our results demonstrate that this method is sensitive to changes in these properties of the BBB. PMID:15063835

  11. Contributions of the immune system to the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury – evidence by intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzmaier, Susanne M.; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in immediate brain damage that is caused by the mechanical impact and is non-reversible. This initiates a cascade of delayed processes which cause additional—secondary—brain damage. Among these secondary mechanisms, the inflammatory response is believed to play an important role, mediating actions that can have both protective and detrimental effects on the progression of secondary brain damage. Histological data generated extensive information; however, this is only a snapshot of processes that are, in fact, very dynamic. In contrast, in vivo microscopy provides detailed insight into the temporal and spatial patterns of cellular dynamics. In this review, we aim to summarize data which was generated by in vivo microscopy, specifically investigating the immune response following brain trauma, and its potential effects on secondary brain damage. PMID:25408636

  12. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie; Davies, Catharina de L.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Larsson, Henrik B.W.; Haraldseth, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only because angiogenesis plays an important role in various pathologies, but also since endothelial cell surface receptors are directly accessible for relatively large circulating nanoparticles. Typically, nanoparticle targeting towards these receptors is studied by analyzing the contrast distribution on tumor images acquired before and at set time points after administration. Although several exciting proof-of-concept studies demonstrated qualitative assessment of relative target concentration and distribution, these studies did not provide quantitative information on the nanoparticle targeting kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and using compartment modeling we were able to quantify nanoparticle targeting rates. As such, this approach can facilitate optimization of targeted nanoparticle design and it holds promise for providing more quantitative information on in vivo receptor levels. Interestingly, we also observed a periodicity in the accumulation kinetics of αvβ3-integrin targeted nanoparticles and hypothesize that this periodicity is caused by receptor binding, internalization and recycling dynamics. Taken together, this demonstrates that our experimental approach provides new insights in in vivo nanoparticle targeting, which may proof useful for vascular targeting in general. PMID:23982332

  13. Mechanisms associated with tumor vascular shut-down induced by combretastatin A-4 phosphate: intravital microscopy and measurement of vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Tozer, G M; Prise, V E; Wilson, J; Cemazar, M; Shan, S; Dewhirst, M W; Barber, P R; Vojnovic, B; Chaplin, D J

    2001-09-01

    The tumor vascular effects of the tubulin destabilizing agent disodium combretastatinA-4 3-O-phosphate (CA-4-P) were investigated in the rat P22 tumor growing in a dorsal skin flap window chamber implanted into BD9 rats. CA-4-P is in clinical trial as a tumor vascular targeting agent. In animal tumors, it can cause the shut-down of blood flow, leading to extensive tumor cell necrosis. However, the mechanisms leading to vascular shut-down are still unknown. Tumor vascular effects were visualized and monitored on-line before and after the administration of two doses of CA-4-P (30 and 100 mg/kg) using intravital microscopy. The combined effect of CA-4-P and systemic nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition using N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) was also assessed, because this combination has been shown previously to have a potentiating effect. The early effect of CA-4-P on tumor vascular permeability to albumin was determined to assess whether this could be involved in the mechanism of action of the drug. Tumor blood flow reduction was extremely rapid after CA-4-P treatment, with red cell velocity decreasing throughout the observation period and dropping to <5% of the starting value by 1 h. NOS inhibition alone caused a 50% decrease in red cell velocity, and the combined treatment of CA-4-P and NOS inhibition was approximately additive. The mechanism of blood flow reduction was very different for NOS inhibition and CA-4-P. That of NOS inhibition could be explained by a decrease in vessel diameter, which was most profound on the arteriolar side of the tumor circulation. In contrast, the effects of CA-4-P resembled an acute inflammatory reaction resulting in a visible loss of a large proportion of the smallest blood vessels. There was some return of visible vasculature at 1 h after treatment, but the blood in these vessels was static or nearly so, and many of the vessels were distended. The hematocrit within larger draining tumor venules tended to increase at early times

  14. Intravital Microscopic Interrogation of Peripheral Taste Sensation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Myunghwan; Lee, Woei Ming; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool in neuroscience but has not been adapted to the taste sensory organ due to anatomical constraint. Here we developed an imaging window to facilitate microscopic access to the murine tongue in vivo. Real-time two-photon microscopy allowed the visualization of three-dimensional microanatomy of the intact tongue mucosa and functional activity of taste cells in response to topically administered tastants in live mice. Video microscopy also showed the calcium activity of taste cells elicited by small-sized tastants in the blood circulation. Molecular kinetic analysis suggested that intravascular taste sensation takes place at the microvilli on the apical side of taste cells after diffusion of the molecules through the pericellular capillaries and tight junctions in the taste bud. Our results demonstrate the capabilities and utilities of the new tool for taste research in vivo. PMID:25726964

  15. Intravital Microscopic Interrogation of Peripheral Taste Sensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myunghwan; Lee, Woei Ming; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-03-01

    Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool in neuroscience but has not been adapted to the taste sensory organ due to anatomical constraint. Here we developed an imaging window to facilitate microscopic access to the murine tongue in vivo. Real-time two-photon microscopy allowed the visualization of three-dimensional microanatomy of the intact tongue mucosa and functional activity of taste cells in response to topically administered tastants in live mice. Video microscopy also showed the calcium activity of taste cells elicited by small-sized tastants in the blood circulation. Molecular kinetic analysis suggested that intravascular taste sensation takes place at the microvilli on the apical side of taste cells after diffusion of the molecules through the pericellular capillaries and tight junctions in the taste bud. Our results demonstrate the capabilities and utilities of the new tool for taste research in vivo.

  16. Intravital autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy of murine intestinal mucosa with ultra-broadband femtosecond laser pulse excitation: image quality, photodamage, and inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Antje; Krapf, Lisa; Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Koop, Norbert; Vogel, Alfred; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2015-11-01

    Ultra-broadband excitation with ultrashort pulses may enable simultaneous excitation of multiple endogenous fluorophores in vital tissue. Imaging living gut mucosa by autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy with more than 150 nm broad excitation at an 800-nm central wavelength from a sub-10 fs titanium-sapphire (Ti:sapphire) laser with a dielectric mirror based prechirp was compared to the excitation with 220 fs pulses of a tunable Ti:sapphire laser at 730 and 800 nm wavelengths. Excitation efficiency, image quality, and photochemical damage were evaluated. At similar excitation fluxes, the same image brightness was achieved with both lasers. As expected, with ultra-broadband pulses, fluorescence from NAD(P)H, flavines, and lipoproteins was observed simultaneously. However, nonlinear photodamage apparent as hyperfluorescence with functional and structural alterations of the tissue occurred earlier when the laser power was adjusted to the same image brightness. After only a few minutes, the immigration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes into the epithelium and degranulation of these cells, a sign of inflammation, was observed. Photodamage is promoted by the higher peak irradiances and/or by nonoptimal excitation of autofluorescence at the longer wavelength. We conclude that excitation with a tunable narrow bandwidth laser is preferable to ultra-broadband excitation for autofluorescence-based 2-photon microscopy, unless the spectral phase can be controlled to optimize excitation conditions.

  17. Elucidation of monocyte/macrophage dynamics and function by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rua, Rejane; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are a diverse population of innate immune cells that play a critical role in homeostasis and inflammation. These cells are surveillant by nature and closely monitor the vasculature and surrounding tissue during states of health and disease. Given their abundance and strategic positioning throughout the body, myeloid cells are among the first responders to any inflammatory challenge and are active participants in most immune-mediated diseases. Recent studies have shed new light on myeloid cell dynamics and function by use of an imaging technique referred to as intravital microscopy (IVM). This powerful approach allows researchers to gain real-time insights into monocytes and macrophages performing homeostatic and inflammatory tasks in living tissues. In this review, we will present a contemporary synopsis of how intravital microscopy has revolutionized our understanding of myeloid cell contributions to vascular maintenance, microbial defense, autoimmunity, tumorigenesis, and acute/chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26162402

  18. [Analysis of bone tissues by intravital imaging].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hiroki; Yamashita, Erika; Ishii, Masaru

    2016-05-01

    In recent years,"the fluorescent imaging techniques"has made rapid advances, it has become possible to observe the dynamics of living cells in individuals or tissues. It has been considered that it is extremely difficult to observe the living bone marrow directly because bone marrow is surrounded by a hard calcareous. But now, we established a method for observing the cells constituting the bone marrow of living mice in real time by the use of the intravital two-photon imaging system. In this article, we show the latest data and the reports about the hematopoietic stem cells and the leukemia cells by using the intravital imaging techniques, and also discuss its further application. PMID:27117619

  19. Fluorescent Tobacco mosaic virus-Derived Bio-Nanoparticles for Intravital Two-Photon Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niehl, Annette; Appaix, Florence; Boscá, Sonia; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nicoud, Jean-François; Bolze, Frédéric; Heinlein, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Multi-photon intravital imaging has become a powerful tool to investigate the healthy and diseased brain vasculature in living animals. Although agents for multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of the microvasculature are available, issues related to stability, bioavailability, toxicity, cost or chemical adaptability remain to be solved. In particular, there is a need for highly fluorescent dyes linked to particles that do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in brain diseases like tumor or stroke to estimate the functional blood supply. Plant virus particles possess a number of distinct advantages over other particles, the most important being the multi-valency of chemically addressable sites on the particle surface. This multi-valency, together with biological compatibility and inert nature, makes plant viruses ideal carriers for in vivo imaging agents. Here, we show that the well-known Tobacco mosaic virus is a suitable nanocarrier for two-photon dyes and for intravital imaging of the mouse brain vasculature. PMID:26793221

  20. Real-time intravital imaging of pH variation associated with osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroki; Kowada, Toshiyuki; Kikuta, Junichi; Furuya, Masayuki; Shirazaki, Mai; Mizukami, Shin; Ishii, Masaru; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2016-08-01

    Intravital imaging by two-photon excitation microscopy (TPEM) has been widely used to visualize cell functions. However, small molecular probes (SMPs), commonly used for cell imaging, cannot be simply applied to intravital imaging because of the challenge of delivering them into target tissues, as well as their undesirable physicochemical properties for TPEM imaging. Here, we designed and developed a functional SMP with an active-targeting moiety, higher photostability, and a fluorescence switch and then imaged target cell activity by injecting the SMP into living mice. The combination of the rationally designed SMP with a fluorescent protein as a reporter of cell localization enabled quantitation of osteoclast activity and time-lapse imaging of its in vivo function associated with changes in cell deformation and membrane fluctuations. Real-time imaging revealed heterogenic behaviors of osteoclasts in vivo and provided insights into the mechanism of bone resorption. PMID:27272564

  1. Intravital Microscopic Methods to Evaluate Anti-inflammatory Effects and Signaling Mechanisms Evoked by Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, Mozow Y.; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule with potent anti-inflammatory properties. Exogenous application of H2S donors, administered either acutely during an inflammatory response or as an antecedent preconditioning intervention that invokes the activation of anti-inflammatory cell survival programs, effectively limits leukocyte rolling, adhesion and emigration, generation of reactive oxygen species, chemokine and cell adhesion molecule expression, endothelial barrier disruption,capillary perfusion deficits, and parenchymal cell dysfunction and injury. This chapter focuses on intravital microscopic methods that can be used to assess the anti-inflammatory effects exerted by H2S, as well as to explore the cellular signaling mechanisms by which this gaseous molecule limits the aforementioned inflammatory responses. Recent advances include use of intravital multiphoton microscopy and optical biosensor technology to explore signaling mechanisms in vivo. PMID:25747477

  2. Intravital Microscopic Research of Microembolization with Degradable Starch Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Juergen; Berger, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Treatment efficacy in cancer patients using systemically applied cytostatic drugs is decreased by cytotoxic side effects, which limits the use of efficient dosages. Degradable starch microspheres (DSM) are used to apply drugs into blood vessels which supply the target organ leading to drug accumulation in the target organ by reduction of the blood flow. The present investigations show that DSM is a very effective embolization material leading to effective and enhanced accumulation of 5-FU within the liver tumor tissue of experimental induced liver cancer in rats. By using intravital microscopy, a rapid deceleration of the blood flow into the target organ is observed immediately after application of DSM. The microspheres are stepwise degraded in the direction of the systemic blood flow and are totally dissolved after 25 minutes. These stepwise processes leave the degraded material during the degradation process within the vessels leading to temporally reciprocal blood flow via some of the side-arms of the major blood vessels. By using DMS in transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), severe adverse side effects like postembolization syndrome are rarely observed when compared to other embolization materials. The complete degradation of DSM causes only a short-lasting temporary vascular occlusion, which allows a repeat application of DSM in TACE. PMID:24324891

  3. Imaging Circulating Tumor Cells in Freely Moving Awake Small Animals Using a Miniaturized Intravital Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Sasportas, Laura Sarah; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM) strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals. PMID:24497977

  4. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S.; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  5. Intravital imaging of hair-cell development and regeneration in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Teixeira, Filipe; Muzzopappa, Mariana; Swoger, Jim; Mineo, Alessandro; Sharpe, James; López-Schier, Hernán

    2013-01-01

    Direct videomicroscopic visualization of organ formation and regeneration in toto is a powerful strategy to study cellular processes that often cannot be replicated in vitro. Intravital imaging aims at quantifying changes in tissue architecture or subcellular organization over time during organ development, regeneration or degeneration. A general feature of this approach is its reliance on the optical isolation of defined cell types in the whole animals by transgenic expression of fluorescent markers. Here we describe a simple and robust method to analyze sensory hair-cell development and regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line by high-resolution intravital imaging using laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM). The main advantage of studying hair-cell regeneration in the lateral line is that it occurs throughout the life of the animal, which allows its study in the most natural context. We detail protocols to achieve continuous videomicroscopy for up to 68 hours, enabling direct observation of cellular behavior, which can provide a sensitive assay for the quantitative classification of cellular phenotypes and cell-lineage reconstruction. Modifications to this protocol should facilitate pharmacogenetic assays to identify or validate otoprotective or reparative drugs for future clinical strategies aimed at preserving aural function in humans. PMID:24130521

  6. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Harney, Allison S; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  7. Correlative intravital imaging of cGMP signals and vasodilation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thunemann, Martin; Schmidt, Kjestine; de Wit, Cor; Han, Xiaoxing; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai; Feil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling molecule and drug target in the cardiovascular system. It is well known that stimulation of the vascular nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway results in vasodilation. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP signals themselves and the cGMP concentrations within specific cardiovascular cell types in health, disease, and during pharmacotherapy with cGMP-elevating drugs are largely unknown. To facilitate the analysis of cGMP signaling in vivo, we have generated transgenic mice that express fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cGMP sensor proteins. Here, we describe two models of intravital FRET/cGMP imaging in the vasculature of cGMP sensor mice: (1) epifluorescence-based ratio imaging in resistance-type vessels of the cremaster muscle and (2) ratio imaging by multiphoton microscopy within the walls of subcutaneous blood vessels accessed through a dorsal skinfold chamber. Both methods allow simultaneous monitoring of NO-induced cGMP transients and vasodilation in living mice. Detailed protocols of all steps necessary to perform and evaluate intravital imaging experiments of the vasculature of anesthetized mice including surgery, imaging, and data evaluation are provided. An image segmentation approach is described to estimate FRET/cGMP changes within moving structures such as the vessel wall during vasodilation. The methods presented herein should be useful to visualize cGMP or other biochemical signals that are detectable with FRET-based biosensors, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate or Ca2+, and to correlate them with respective vascular responses. With further refinement and combination of transgenic mouse models and intravital imaging technologies, we envision an exciting future, in which we are able to “watch” biochemistry, (patho-)physiology, and pharmacotherapy in the context of a living mammalian organism. PMID:25352809

  8. Fungal Infection in the Brain: What We Learned from Intravital Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Meiqing; Mody, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 1.2 billion people suffer from fungal diseases worldwide. Arguably, the most serious manifestation occurs when pathogenic fungi infect the brain, often causing fatal meningoencephalitis. For most fungi, infection occurs via the vascular route. The organism must first be arrested in the brain microvasculature and transmigrate into the brain parenchyma across the blood–brain barrier. As a result, host immune cells are recruited into the brain to contain the fungi. However, it remains poorly understood how fungi traffic to, and migrate into the brain and how immune cells interact with invading fungi in the brain. A new era of intravital fluorescence microscopy has begun to provide insights. We are able to employ this powerful approach to study dynamic interactions of disseminating fungi with brain endothelial cells as well as resident and recruited immune cells during the brain infection. In this review, with a focus on Cryptococcus neoformans, we will provide an overview of the application of intravital imaging in fungal infections in the brain, discuss recent findings and speculate on possible future research directions. PMID:27532000

  9. Intravital Imaging – Dynamic Insights into Natural Killer T Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Pei Xiong; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells were first recognized more than two decades ago as a separate and distinct lymphocyte lineage that modulates an expansive range of immune responses. As innate immune cells, NKT cells are activated early during inflammation and infection, and can subsequently stimulate or suppress the ensuing immune response. As a result, researchers hope to harness the immunomodulatory properties of NKT cells to treat a variety of diseases. However, many questions still remain unanswered regarding the biology of NKT cells, including how these cells traffic from the thymus to peripheral organs and how they play such contrasting roles in different immune responses and diseases. In this new era of intravital fluorescence microscopy, we are now able to employ this powerful tool to provide quantitative and dynamic insights into NKT cell biology including cellular dynamics, patrolling, and immunoregulatory functions with exquisite resolution. This review will highlight and discuss recent studies that use intravital imaging to understand the spectrum of NKT cell behavior in a variety of animal models. PMID:26042123

  10. Fungal Infection in the Brain: What We Learned from Intravital Imaging.

    PubMed

    Shi, Meiqing; Mody, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 1.2 billion people suffer from fungal diseases worldwide. Arguably, the most serious manifestation occurs when pathogenic fungi infect the brain, often causing fatal meningoencephalitis. For most fungi, infection occurs via the vascular route. The organism must first be arrested in the brain microvasculature and transmigrate into the brain parenchyma across the blood-brain barrier. As a result, host immune cells are recruited into the brain to contain the fungi. However, it remains poorly understood how fungi traffic to, and migrate into the brain and how immune cells interact with invading fungi in the brain. A new era of intravital fluorescence microscopy has begun to provide insights. We are able to employ this powerful approach to study dynamic interactions of disseminating fungi with brain endothelial cells as well as resident and recruited immune cells during the brain infection. In this review, with a focus on Cryptococcus neoformans, we will provide an overview of the application of intravital imaging in fungal infections in the brain, discuss recent findings and speculate on possible future research directions. PMID:27532000

  11. Visualizing the Tumor Microenvironment of Liver Metastasis by Spinning Disk Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Babes, Liane; Kubes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has evolved into an invaluable technique to study the complexity of tumors by visualizing individual cells in live organisms. Here, we describe a method for employing intravital spinning disk confocal microscopy to picture high-resolution tumor-stroma interactions in real time. We depict in detail the surgical procedures to image various tumor microenvironments and different cellular components in the liver. PMID:27581024

  12. Intravital Imaging of Axonal Interactions with Microglia and Macrophages in a Mouse Dorsal Column Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Teresa A.; Barkauskas, Deborah S.; Myers, Jay T.; Huang, Alex Y.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury causes an inflammatory reaction involving blood-derived macrophages and central nervous system (CNS)-resident microglia. Intra-vital two-photon microscopy enables the study of macrophages and microglia in the spinal cord lesion in the living animal. This can be performed in adult animals with a traumatic injury to the dorsal column. Here, we describe methods for distinguishing macrophages from microglia in the CNS using an irradiation bone marrow chimera to obtain animals in which only macrophages or microglia are labeled with a genetically encoded green fluorescent protein. We also describe a injury model that crushes the dorsal column of the spinal cord, thereby producing a simple, easily accessible, rectangular lesion that is easily visualized in an animal through a laminectomy. Furthermore, we will outline procedures to sequentially image the animals at the anatomical site of injury for the study of cellular interactions during the first few days to weeks after injury. PMID:25489963

  13. Intravital models of infection lay the foundation for tissue microbiology.

    PubMed

    Choong, Ferdinand X; Regberg, Jakob; Udekwu, Klas I; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta

    2012-04-01

    In complex environments, such as those found in the human host, pathogenic bacteria constantly battle the unfavorable conditions imposed by the host response to their presence. During Escherichia coli-induced pyelonephritis, a cascade of events are shown in an intravital animal model to occur in a timely and sequential manner, representing the dynamic interplay between host and pathogen. Today, intravital techniques allow for observing infection in the living host. At resolutions almost on the single-cell level, improved detection methods offer a movie-like description of infection dynamics. Tissue microbiology involves monitoring host-pathogen interaction within the dynamic microecology of infectious sites in the live host. This new field holds great promise for insightful research into microbial disease intervention strategies. PMID:22439728

  14. Intravital FRET: Probing Cellular and Tissue Function in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Radbruch, Helena; Bremer, Daniel; Mothes, Ronja; Günther, Robert; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Pohlan, Julian; Ulbricht, Carolin; Hauser, Anja E; Niesner, Raluca

    2015-01-01

    The development of intravital Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is required to probe cellular and tissue function in the natural context: the living organism. Only in this way can biomedicine truly comprehend pathogenesis and develop effective therapeutic strategies. Here we demonstrate and discuss the advantages and pitfalls of two strategies to quantify FRET in vivo-ratiometrically and time-resolved by fluorescence lifetime imaging-and show their concrete application in the context of neuroinflammation in adult mice. PMID:26006244

  15. A Novel Model of Intravital Platelet Imaging Using CD41-ZsGreen1 Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Makoto; Tomizawa, Atsuyuki; Ohno, Kousaku; Jakubowski, Joseph A.; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play pivotal roles in both hemostasis and thrombosis. Although models of intravital platelet imaging are available for thrombosis studies in mice, few are available for rat studies. The present effort aimed to generate fluorescent platelets in rats and assess their dynamics in a rat model of arterial injury. We generated CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats, in which green fluorescence protein ZsGreen1 was expressed specifically in megakaryocytes and thus platelets. The transgenic rats exhibited normal hematological and biochemical values with the exception of body weight and erythroid parameters, which were slightly lower than those of wild-type rats. Platelet aggregation, induced by 20 μM ADP and 10 μg/ml collagen, and blood clotting times were not significantly different between transgenic and wild-type rats. Saphenous arteries of transgenic rats were injured with 10% FeCl3, and the formation of fluorescent thrombi was evaluated using confocal microscopy. FeCl3 caused time-dependent increases in the mean fluorescence intensity of injured arteries of vehicle-treated rats. Prasugrel (3 mg/kg, p.o.), administered 2 h before FeCl3, significantly inhibited fluorescence compared with vehicle-treated rats (4.5 ± 0.4 vs. 14.9 ± 2.4 arbitrary fluorescence units at 30 min, respectively, n = 8, P = 0.0037). These data indicate that CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats represent a useful model for intravital imaging of platelet-mediated thrombus formation and the evaluation of antithrombotic agents. PMID:27128503

  16. A Novel Model of Intravital Platelet Imaging Using CD41-ZsGreen1 Transgenic Rats.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Makoto; Tomizawa, Atsuyuki; Ohno, Kousaku; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play pivotal roles in both hemostasis and thrombosis. Although models of intravital platelet imaging are available for thrombosis studies in mice, few are available for rat studies. The present effort aimed to generate fluorescent platelets in rats and assess their dynamics in a rat model of arterial injury. We generated CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats, in which green fluorescence protein ZsGreen1 was expressed specifically in megakaryocytes and thus platelets. The transgenic rats exhibited normal hematological and biochemical values with the exception of body weight and erythroid parameters, which were slightly lower than those of wild-type rats. Platelet aggregation, induced by 20 μM ADP and 10 μg/ml collagen, and blood clotting times were not significantly different between transgenic and wild-type rats. Saphenous arteries of transgenic rats were injured with 10% FeCl3, and the formation of fluorescent thrombi was evaluated using confocal microscopy. FeCl3 caused time-dependent increases in the mean fluorescence intensity of injured arteries of vehicle-treated rats. Prasugrel (3 mg/kg, p.o.), administered 2 h before FeCl3, significantly inhibited fluorescence compared with vehicle-treated rats (4.5 ± 0.4 vs. 14.9 ± 2.4 arbitrary fluorescence units at 30 min, respectively, n = 8, P = 0.0037). These data indicate that CD41-ZsGreen1 transgenic rats represent a useful model for intravital imaging of platelet-mediated thrombus formation and the evaluation of antithrombotic agents. PMID:27128503

  17. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C.; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L.; Padera, Timothy P.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates—only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  18. Intravital fluorescence microscopic study of the behavior of long-circulating liposomes during microvascular thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoisselle, Jean-Marie; Begu, Sylvie; Tourne-Peteilh, Corine; Buys, Bruno; Mordon, Serge R.

    2002-06-01

    Treatment of thrombosis depends on the selectivity of thrombolytic agents to the clot. It has been already demonstrated that liposomes can provide a better selectivity of such agents to the clot site. We have recently shown that intravital fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool to image in situ and in real time the labeling of leukocytes by long circulating liposomes. The aim of this study was to monitor the in vivo behavior of such liposomes in a clot site. Carboxyfluorescein-loaded long circulating liposomes were prepared and characterized in term of size and permeability. The liposomes suspension was injected intravenously to golden hamsters. The skin microcirculation was observed using a dorsal skin-fold chamber by fluorescence microscopy. Thrombosis were obtained as the consequence of the inflammatory response due to the surgery. Using this model, fluorescent dots were observed at the site of the clot. Liposomes accumulate at the clot site whatever the mechanism (passive deposition or uptake). There is a period of latency and 30 seconds after the blood flow stop, fluorescence increases very rapidly and a bright fluorescent spot is observed at the site of the clot. Further studies are needed to determine the exact localization of liposomes in the clot and the mechanism of interaction.

  19. Intravital imaging of embryonic and tumor neovasculature using viral nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Hon Sing; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Ablack, Amber; Destito, Giuseppe; Zijlstra, Andries; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Manchester, Marianne; Lewis, John D

    2011-01-01

    Viral nanoparticles are a novel class of biomolecular agents that take advantage of the natural circulatory and targeting properties of viruses to allow the development of therapeutics, vaccines and imaging tools. We have developed a multivalent nanoparticle platform based on the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) that facilitates particle labeling at high density with fluorescent dyes and other functional groups. Compared with other technologies, CPMV-based viral nanoparticles are particularly suited for long-term intravital vascular imaging because of their biocompatibility and retention in the endothelium with minimal side effects. The stable, long-term labeling of the endothelium allows the identification of vasculature undergoing active remodeling in real time. In this study, we describe the synthesis, purification and fluorescent labeling of cpMV nanoparticles, along with their use for imaging of vascular structure and for intravital vascular mapping in developmental and tumor angiogenesis models. Dye-labeled viral nanoparticles can be synthesized and purified in a single day, and imaging studies can be conducted over hours, days or weeks, depending on the application. PMID:20671724

  20. Intravital imaging reveals new ancillary mechanisms co-opted by cancer cells to drive tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Morghan C.; Timpson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging is providing new insights into the dynamics of tumor progression in native tissues and has started to reveal the layers of complexity found in cancer. Recent advances in intravital imaging have allowed us to look deeper into cancer behavior and to dissect the interactions between tumor cells and the ancillary host niche that promote cancer development. In this review, we provide an insight into the latest advances in cancer biology achieved by intravital imaging, focusing on recently discovered mechanisms by which tumor cells manipulate normal tissue to facilitate disease progression. PMID:27239290

  1. Intravital imaging reveals new ancillary mechanisms co-opted by cancer cells to drive tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Vennin, Claire; Herrmann, David; Lucas, Morghan C; Timpson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Intravital imaging is providing new insights into the dynamics of tumor progression in native tissues and has started to reveal the layers of complexity found in cancer. Recent advances in intravital imaging have allowed us to look deeper into cancer behavior and to dissect the interactions between tumor cells and the ancillary host niche that promote cancer development. In this review, we provide an insight into the latest advances in cancer biology achieved by intravital imaging, focusing on recently discovered mechanisms by which tumor cells manipulate normal tissue to facilitate disease progression. PMID:27239290

  2. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in 4-dimensional heterotic string

    SciTech Connect

    Maharana, J.

    1989-07-01

    The evolution of a 4-dimensional heterotic string is considered in the background of its massless excitations such as graviton, antisymmetric tensor, gauge fields and scalar bosons. The compactified bosonic coordinates are fermionized. The world-sheet supersymmetry requirement enforces Thirring-like four fermion coupling to the background scalar fields. The non-abelian gauge symmetry is exhibited through the Ward identities of the S-matrix elements. The spontaneous symmetry breaking mechanism is exhibited through the broken Ward identities. An effective 4-dimensional action is constructed and the consequence of spontaneous symmetry breaking is envisaged for the effective action. 19 refs.

  3. Intravital Placenta Imaging Reveals Microcirculatory Dynamics Impact on Sequestration and Phagocytosis of Plasmodium-Infected Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Luciana Vieira; Tadokoro, Carlos Eduardo; Gómez-Conde, Iván; Olivieri, David N.; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Malaria in pregnancy is exquisitely aggressive, causing a range of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes prominently linked to Plasmodium-infected erythrocyte cytoadherence to fetal trophoblast. To elucidate the physiopathology of infected erythrocytes (IE) sequestration in the placenta we devised an experimental system for intravital placental examination of P. berghei-infected mice. BALB/c females were mated to C57Bl/6 CFP+ male mice and infected with GFP+ P. berghei IE, and at gestational day 18, placentas were exposed for time-lapse imaging acquisition under two-photon microscopy. Real-time images and quantitative measurements revealed that trophoblast conformational changes transiently restrain blood flow in the mouse placental labyrinth. The complex dynamics of placental microcirculation promotes IE accumulation in maternal blood spaces with low blood flow and allows the establishment of stable IE-trophoblast contacts. Further, we show that the fate of sequestered IE includes engulfment by both macrophagic and trophoblastic fetal-derived cells. These findings reinforce the current paradigm that IE interact with the trophoblast and provide definitive evidence on two novel pathogenesis mechanisms: (1) trophoblast layer controls placental microcirculation promoting IE sequestration; and (2) fetal-derived placental cells engulf sequestered IE. PMID:23382682

  4. From morphology to biochemical state - intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin.

    PubMed

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R; Feger, Julia S; Fallah, Mohammad A; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W

    2016-01-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients' bedsides. These 'optical biopsies' generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27004454

  5. Intravital fluorescent microscopic evaluation of bacterial cellulose as scaffold for vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Esguerra, Maricris; Fink, Helen; Laschke, Matthias W; Jeppsson, Anders; Delbro, Dick; Gatenholm, Paul; Menger, Michael D; Risberg, Bo

    2010-04-01

    Although commonly used synthetic vascular grafts perform satisfactorily in large caliber blood vessels, they are prone to thrombosis in small diameter vessels. Therefore, small vessels might benefit from tissue engineered vascular grafts. This study evaluated bacterial cellulose (BC) as a potential biomaterial for biosynthetic blood vessels. We implanted the dorsal skinfold chambers in three groups of Syrian golden hamsters with BC (experimental group), polyglycolic acid, or expanded polytetrafluorethylene (control groups). Following implantation, we used intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology, and immunohistochemistry to analyze the biocompatibility, neovascularization, and incorporation of each material over a time period of 2 weeks. Biocompatibility was good in all groups, as indicated by the absence of leukocyte activation upon implantation. All groups displayed angiogenic response in the host tissue, but that response was highest in the polyglycolic acid group. Histology revealed vascularized granulation tissue surrounding all three biomaterials, with many proliferating cells and a lack of apoptotic cell death 2 weeks after implantation. In conclusion, BC offers good biocompatibility and material incorporation compared with commonly used materials in vascular surgery. Thus, BC represents a promising new biomaterial for tissue engineering of vascular grafts. PMID:19536832

  6. Parallelized TCSPC for Dynamic Intravital Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging: Quantifying Neuronal Dysfunction in Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Radbruch, Helena; Andresen, Volker; Mossakowski, Agata; Siffrin, Volker; Seelemann, Thomas; Spiecker, Heinrich; Moll, Ingrid; Herz, Josephine; Hauser, Anja E.; Zipp, Frauke; Behne, Martin J.; Niesner, Raluca

    2013-01-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy has revolutionized our view on vital processes by revealing motility and interaction patterns of various cell subsets in hardly accessible organs (e.g. brain) in living animals. However, current technology is still insufficient to elucidate the mechanisms of organ dysfunction as a prerequisite for developing new therapeutic strategies, since it renders only sparse information about the molecular basis of cellular response within tissues in health and disease. In the context of imaging, Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) is one of the most adequate tools to probe molecular mechanisms of cell function. As a calibration-free technique, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is superior for quantifying FRET in vivo. Currently, its main limitation is the acquisition speed in the context of deep-tissue 3D and 4D imaging. Here we present a parallelized time-correlated single-photon counting point detector (p-TCSPC) (i) for dynamic single-beam scanning FLIM of large 3D areas on the range of hundreds of milliseconds relevant in the context of immune-induced pathologies as well as (ii) for ultrafast 2D FLIM in the range of tens of milliseconds, a scale relevant for cell physiology. We demonstrate its power in dynamic deep-tissue intravital imaging, as compared to multi-beam scanning time-gated FLIM suitable for fast data acquisition and compared to highly sensitive single-channel TCSPC adequate to detect low fluorescence signals. Using p-TCSPC, 256×256 pixel FLIM maps (300×300 µm2) are acquired within 468 ms while 131×131 pixel FLIM maps (75×75 µm2) can be acquired every 82 ms in 115 µm depth in the spinal cord of CerTN L15 mice. The CerTN L15 mice express a FRET-based Ca-biosensor in certain neuronal subsets. Our new technology allows us to perform time-lapse 3D intravital FLIM (4D FLIM) in the brain stem of CerTN L15 mice affected by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and, thereby, to truly quantify neuronal

  7. A Fluorescent Polymer Probe with High Selectivity toward Vascular Endothelial Cells for and beyond Noninvasive Two-Photon Intravital Imaging of Brain Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Mettra, B; Appaix, F; Olesiak-Banska, J; Le Bahers, T; Leung, A; Matczyszyn, K; Samoc, M; van der Sanden, B; Monnereau, C; Andraud, C

    2016-07-13

    A chromophore-engineering strategy that relies on the introduction of a ground-state distortion in a quadrupolar chromophore was used to obtain a quasi-quadrupolar chromophore with red emission and large two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-section in polar solvents. This molecule was functionalized with water-solubilizing polymer chains. It constitutes not only a remarkable contrast agent for intravital two-photon microscopy of the functional cerebral vasculature in a minimally invasive configuration but presents intriguing endothelial staining ability that makes it a valuable probe for premortem histological staining. PMID:27267494

  8. What ticks do under your skin: two-photon intravital imaging of Ixodes scapularis feeding in the presence of the lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    Bockenstedt, Linda K; Gonzalez, David; Mao, Jialing; Li, Ming; Belperron, Alexia A; Haberman, Ann

    2014-03-01

    Lyme disease, due to infection with the Ixodes-tick transmitted spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common tick-transmitted disease in the northern hemisphere. Our understanding of the tick-pathogen-vertebrate host interactions that sustain an enzootic cycle for B. burgdorferi is incomplete. In this article, we describe a method for imaging the feeding of Ixodes scapularis nymphs in real-time using two-photon intravital microscopy and show how this technology can be applied to view the response of Lyme borrelia in the skin of an infected host to tick feeding. PMID:24600332

  9. What Ticks Do Under Your Skin: Two-Photon Intravital Imaging of Ixodes Scapularis Feeding in the Presence of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Bockenstedt, Linda K.; Gonzalez, David; Mao, Jialing; Li, Ming; Belperron, Alexia A.; Haberman, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, due to infection with the Ixodes-tick transmitted spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common tick-transmitted disease in the northern hemisphere. Our understanding of the tick-pathogen-vertebrate host interactions that sustain an enzootic cycle for B. burgdorferi is incomplete. In this article, we describe a method for imaging the feeding of Ixodes scapularis nymphs in real-time using two-photon intravital microscopy and show how this technology can be applied to view the response of Lyme borrelia in the skin of an infected host to tick feeding. PMID:24600332

  10. Brane compactifications and 4-dimensional geometry in the IKKT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polychronakos, Alexios P.; Steinacker, Harold; Zahn, Jochen

    2013-10-01

    We study in detail certain brane solutions with compact extra dimensions M4×K in the IKKT matrix model, with K being a two-dimensional rotating torus embedded in R6. We focus on the compactification moduli and the fluctuations of K⊂R6 and their physical significance. Mediated by the Poisson tensor, they contribute to the effective 4-dimensional metric on the brane, and thereby become gravitational degrees of freedom. We show that the zero modes corresponding to the global symmetries of the model lead to Ricci-flat 4-dimensional metric perturbations, wherever the energy-momentum tensor vanishes. Their coupling to the energy-momentum tensor depends on the extrinsic curvature of the brane.

  11. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bixler, Joel N.; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU. PMID:26901051

  12. Intravital imaging of intestinal lacteals unveils lipid drainage through contractility

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Kibaek; Jang, Jeon Yeob; Park, Intae; Kim, Yeseul; Ahn, Soyeon; Park, Dae-Young; Hong, Young-Kwon; Alitalo, Kari; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Pilhan

    2015-01-01

    Lacteals are lymphatic vessels located at the center of each intestinal villus and provide essential transport routes for lipids and other lipophilic molecules. However, it is unclear how absorbed molecules are transported through the lacteal. Here, we used reporter mice that express GFP under the control of the lymphatic-specific promoter Prox1 and a custom-built confocal microscope and performed intravital real-time visualization of the absorption and transport dynamics of fluorescence-tagged fatty acids (FAs) and various exogenous molecules in the intestinal villi in vivo. These analyses clearly revealed transepithelial absorption of these molecules via enterocytes, diffusive distribution over the lamina propria, and subsequent transport through lacteals. Moreover, we observed active contraction of lacteals, which seemed to be directly involved in dietary lipid drainage. Our analysis revealed that the smooth muscles that surround each lacteal are responsible for contractile dynamics and that lacteal contraction is ultimately controlled by the autonomic nervous system. These results indicate that the lacteal is a unique organ-specific lymphatic system and does not merely serve as a passive conduit but as an active pump that transports lipids. Collectively, using this efficient imaging method, we uncovered drainage of absorbed molecules in small intestinal villus lacteals and the involvement of lacteal contractibility. PMID:26436648

  13. Intravital imaging of intestinal lacteals unveils lipid drainage through contractility.

    PubMed

    Choe, Kibaek; Jang, Jeon Yeob; Park, Intae; Kim, Yeseul; Ahn, Soyeon; Park, Dae-Young; Hong, Young-Kwon; Alitalo, Kari; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Pilhan

    2015-11-01

    Lacteals are lymphatic vessels located at the center of each intestinal villus and provide essential transport routes for lipids and other lipophilic molecules. However, it is unclear how absorbed molecules are transported through the lacteal. Here, we used reporter mice that express GFP under the control of the lymphatic-specific promoter Prox1 and a custom-built confocal microscope and performed intravital real-time visualization of the absorption and transport dynamics of fluorescence-tagged fatty acids (FAs) and various exogenous molecules in the intestinal villi in vivo. These analyses clearly revealed transepithelial absorption of these molecules via enterocytes, diffusive distribution over the lamina propria, and subsequent transport through lacteals. Moreover, we observed active contraction of lacteals, which seemed to be directly involved in dietary lipid drainage. Our analysis revealed that the smooth muscles that surround each lacteal are responsible for contractile dynamics and that lacteal contraction is ultimately controlled by the autonomic nervous system. These results indicate that the lacteal is a unique organ-specific lymphatic system and does not merely serve as a passive conduit but as an active pump that transports lipids. Collectively, using this efficient imaging method, we uncovered drainage of absorbed molecules in small intestinal villus lacteals and the involvement of lacteal contractibility. PMID:26436648

  14. Live-Animal Imaging of Renal Function by Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kenneth W.; Sutton, Timothy A.; Sandoval, Ruben M.

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy, microscopy of living animals, is a powerful research technique that combines the resolution and sensitivity found in microscopic studies of cultured cells with the relevance and systemic influences of cells in the context of the intact animal. The power of intravital microscopy has recently been extended with the development of multiphoton fluorescence microscopy systems capable of collecting optical sections from deep within the kidney at subcellular resolution, supporting high-resolution characterizations of the structure and function of glomeruli, tubules, and vasculature in the living kidney. Fluorescent probes are administered to an anesthetized, surgically prepared animal, followed by image acquisition for up to 3 hr. Images are transferred via a high-speed network to specialized computer systems for digital image analysis. This general approach can be used with different combinations of fluorescent probes to evaluate processes such as glomerular permeability, proximal tubule endocytosis, microvascular flow, vascular permeability, mitochondrial function, and cellular apoptosis/necrosis. PMID:23042524

  15. Thin and open vessel windows for intra-vital fluorescence imaging of murine cochlear blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaorui; Zhang, Fei; Urdang, Zachary; Dai, Min; Neng, Lingling; Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Normal microvessel structure and function in the cochlea is essential for maintaining the ionic and metabolic homeostasis required for hearing function. Abnormal cochlear microcirculation has long been considered an etiologic factor in hearing disorders. A better understanding of cochlear blood flow (CoBF) will enable more effective amelioration of hearing disorders that result from aberrant blood flow. However, establishing the direct relationship between CoBF and other cellular events in the lateral wall and response to physio-pathological stress remains a challenge due to the lack of feasible interrogation methods and difficulty in accessing the inner ear. Here we report on new methods for studying the CoBF in a mouse model using a thin or open vessel-window in combination with fluorescence intra-vital microscopy (IVM). An open vessel-window enables investigation of vascular cell biology and blood flow permeability, including pericyte (PC) contractility, bone marrow cell migration, and endothelial barrier leakage, in wild type and fluorescent protein-labeled transgenic mouse models with high spatial and temporal resolution. Alternatively, the thin vessel-window method minimizes disruption of the homeostatic balance in the lateral wall and enables study CoBF under relatively intact physiological conditions. A thin vessel-window method can also be used for time-based studies of physiological and pathological processes. Although the small size of the mouse cochlea makes surgery difficult, the methods are sufficiently developed for studying the structural and functional changes in CoBF under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:24780131

  16. Quantum error correcting codes and 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Guth, Larry; Lubotzky, Alexander

    2014-08-15

    Using 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds, we construct some new homological quantum error correcting codes. They are low density parity check codes with linear rate and distance n{sup ε}. Their rate is evaluated via Euler characteristic arguments and their distance using Z{sub 2}-systolic geometry. This construction answers a question of Zémor [“On Cayley graphs, surface codes, and the limits of homological coding for quantum error correction,” in Proceedings of Second International Workshop on Coding and Cryptology (IWCC), Lecture Notes in Computer Science Vol. 5557 (2009), pp. 259–273], who asked whether homological codes with such parameters could exist at all.

  17. Quantum error correcting codes and 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guth, Larry; Lubotzky, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    Using 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds, we construct some new homological quantum error correcting codes. They are low density parity check codes with linear rate and distance nɛ. Their rate is evaluated via Euler characteristic arguments and their distance using {Z}_2-systolic geometry. This construction answers a question of Zémor ["On Cayley graphs, surface codes, and the limits of homological coding for quantum error correction," in Proceedings of Second International Workshop on Coding and Cryptology (IWCC), Lecture Notes in Computer Science Vol. 5557 (2009), pp. 259-273], who asked whether homological codes with such parameters could exist at all.

  18. [Forensic medical diagnostics of intra-vitality of the strangulation mark by morphological methods].

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, D V; Zbrueva, Yu V; Putintsev, V A; Denisova, O P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study WaS to overview the current domestic and foreign literature concerning the up-to-date methods employed for the expert evaluation of intra-vitality of the strangulation mark. The secondary objective was to propose the new approaches for addressing this problem. The methods of expert diagnostics with a view to determining the time of infliction of injuries as exemplified by mechanical asphyxia are discussed. It is concluded that immunohistochemical and morphometric studies provide the most promising tools for the evaluation of intra-vitality of the strangulation mark for the purpose of forensic medical expertise. PMID:27358932

  19. In vivo cell cycle profiling in xenograft tumors by quantitative intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chittajallu, Deepak R; Florian, Stefan; Kohler, Rainer H; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Orth, James D; Weissleder, Ralph; Danuser, Gaudenz; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of cell-cycle state at a single-cell level is essential to understand fundamental three-dimensional biological processes such as tissue development and cancer. Analysis of 3D in vivo images, however, is very challenging. Today’s best practice, manual annotation of select image events, generates arbitrarily sampled data distributions, unsuitable for reliable mechanistic inferences. Here, we present an integrated workflow for quantitative in vivo cell-cycle profiling. It combines image analysis and machine learning methods for automated 3D segmentation and cell-cycle state identification of individual cell-nuclei with widely varying morphologies embedded in complex tumor environments. We applied our workflow to quantify cell-cycle effects of three antimitotic cancer drugs over 8 days in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma xenografts in living mice using a dataset of 38,000 cells and compared the induced phenotypes. In contrast to 2D culture, observed mitotic arrest was relatively low, suggesting involvement of additional mechanisms in their antitumor effect in vivo. PMID:25867850

  20. Mechanical Stabilization of Mouse Carotid Artery for In Vivo Intravital Microscopy Imaging of Atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chèvre, Raphaël

    2015-01-01

    We present here a procedure that allows real-time high-resolution multichannel imaging of early atherosclerotic lesions of live mice, by dramatically reducing the respiratory and pulsatile movements of the athero-susceptible carotid artery, without significantly altering blood flow dynamics. This surgical preparation can be combined with the use of various fluorescent probes and reporter mice to simultaneously visualize the dynamics of inflammatory leukocytes, platelets, or even subcellular structures. Stabilization of the tissue renders it suitable for two-photon laser scanning microscopic imaging and allows tracking the behavior of inflammatory cells in three dimensions. PMID:26445802

  1. A Lie based 4-dimensional higher Chern-Simons theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchini, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    We present and study a model of 4-dimensional higher Chern-Simons theory, special Chern-Simons (SCS) theory, instances of which have appeared in the string literature, whose symmetry is encoded in a skeletal semistrict Lie 2-algebra constructed from a compact Lie group with non discrete center. The field content of SCS theory consists of a Lie valued 2-connection coupled to a background closed 3-form. SCS theory enjoys a large gauge and gauge for gauge symmetry organized in an infinite dimensional strict Lie 2-group. The partition function of SCS theory is simply related to that of a topological gauge theory localizing on flat connections with degree 3 second characteristic class determined by the background 3-form. Finally, SCS theory is related to a 3-dimensional special gauge theory whose 2-connection space has a natural symplectic structure with respect to which the 1-gauge transformation action is Hamiltonian, the 2-curvature map acting as moment map.

  2. Progress in multidisciplinary sensing of the 4-dimensional ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Tommy

    2009-05-01

    Many luminaries of oceanography have articulated the problem of adequately sampling a multiplicity of interdisciplinary ocean processes. Progress has accelerated within the past two decades as societal and naval interests in monitoring and predicting the state of the ocean environment has heightened. Oceanographers are capitalizing on a host of new platform and sensing technologies. Some recent programs contributing to improved 4-dimensional open and coastal ocean multi-disciplinary observations are used to highlight the development of new integrated optical, chemical, and physical measurement systems that can be deployed from stationary and mobile platforms to telemeter data in near real-time or real-time. For example, the NOPP O-SCOPE and MOSEAN projects have developed and tested several optical and chemical sensors in deep waters off Bermuda and Hawaii, at OWS 'P' in the North Pacific Ocean, and in coastal waters off Santa Barbara and Monterey, California. Most of the testing for these projects has been conducted using moorings; however, NOPP instrumentation is also being used on mobile platforms including AUVs, profiling floats, and gliders. Progress in adequately sampling the temporal and spatial variability of selected ocean 'sampling volumes' using multi-platform, multi-disciplinary sampling is described using examples from selected recent programs.

  3. From morphology to biochemical state – intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    PubMed Central

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27004454

  4. Reduction of Tubular Flow Rate as a Mechanism of Oliguria in the Early Phase of Endotoxemia Revealed by Intravital Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Daisuke; Doi, Kent; Kitamura, Hiroaki; Kuwabara, Takashige; Mori, Kiyoshi; Mukoyama, Masashi; Nishiyama, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Urine output is widely used as a criterion for the diagnosis of AKI. Although several potential mechanisms of septic AKI have been identified, regulation of urine flow after glomerular filtration has not been evaluated. This study evaluated changes in urine flow in mice with septic AKI. The intratubular urine flow rate was monitored in real time by intravital imaging using two-photon laser microscopy. The tubular flow rate, as measured by freely filtered dye (FITC-inulin or Lucifer yellow), time-dependently declined after LPS injection. At 2 hours, the tubular flow rate was slower in mice injected with LPS than in mice injected with saline, whereas BP and GFR were similar in the two groups. Importantly, fluorophore-conjugated LPS selectively accumulated in the proximal tubules that showed reduced tubular flow at 2 hours and luminal obstruction with cell swelling at 24 hours. Delipidation of LPS or deletion of Toll-like receptor 4 in mice abolished these effects, whereas neutralization of TNF-α had little effect on LPS-induced tubular flow retention. Rapid intravenous fluid resuscitation within 6 hours improved the tubular flow rate only when accompanied by the dilation of obstructed proximal tubules with accumulated LPS. These findings suggest that LPS reduces the intratubular urine flow rate during early phases of endotoxemia through a Toll-like receptor 4-dependent mechanism, and that the efficacy of fluid resuscitation may depend on the response of tubules with LPS accumulation. PMID:25855781

  5. From morphology to biochemical state – intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy.

  6. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanle; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  7. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  8. The Use of Fluorescent Proteins for Intravital Imaging of Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hulit, James; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Entenberg, David; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John; Segall, Jeffrey E.

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of cancer cell behavior in the primary tumor in living animals provides an opportunity to explore the process of invasion and intravasation in the complex microenvironment that is present in vivo. In this chapter, we describe the methods that we have developed for performing intravital imaging of mammary tumors. We provide procedures for generating tumors through injection of tumor cell lines, and multiphoton imaging using a skin-flap tumor dissection and a mammary imaging window. PMID:22700401

  9. Three-dimensional microscopy of the tumor microenvironment in vivo using optical frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vakoc, Benjamin J; Lanning, Ryan M; Tyrrell, James A; Padera, Timothy P; Bartlett, Lisa A; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Munn, Lance L; Tearney, Guillermo J; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Bouma, Brett E

    2009-01-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided powerful mechanistic insights into health and disease, and has become a common instrument in the modern biological laboratory. The requisite high numerical aperture and exogenous contrast agents that enable multiphoton microscopy, however, limit ability to investigate substantial tissue volumes or to probe dynamic changes repeatedly over prolonged periods. Here, we introduce optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) as an intravital microscopy that circumvents the technical limitations of multiphoton microscopy and, as a result, provides unprecedented access to previously unexplored, critically important aspects of tissue biology. Using novel OFDI-based approaches and entirely intrinsic mechanisms of contrast, we present rapid and repeated measurements of tumor angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, tissue viability and both vascular and cellular responses to therapy, thereby demonstrating the potential of OFDI to facilitate the exploration of physiological and pathological processes and the evaluation of treatment strategies. PMID:19749772

  10. A practical method for monitoring FRET-based biosensors in living animals using two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wen; Rubart, Michael; Ryan, Jennifer; Xiao, Xiao; Qiao, Chunping; Hato, Takashi; Davidson, Michael W; Dunn, Kenneth W; Day, Richard N

    2015-12-01

    The commercial availability of multiphoton microscope systems has nurtured the growth of intravital microscopy as a powerful technique for evaluating cell biology in the relevant context of living animals. In parallel, new fluorescent protein (FP) biosensors have become available that enable studies of the function of a wide range of proteins in living cells. Biosensor probes that exploit Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) are among the most sensitive indicators of an array of cellular processes. However, differences between one-photon and two-photon excitation (2PE) microscopy are such that measuring FRET by 2PE in the intravital setting remains challenging. Here, we describe an approach that simplifies the use of FRET-based biosensors in intravital 2PE microscopy. Based on a systematic comparison of many different FPs, we identified the monomeric (m) FPs mTurquoise and mVenus as particularly well suited for intravital 2PE FRET studies, enabling the ratiometric measurements from linked FRET probes using a pair of experimental images collected simultaneously. The behavior of the FPs is validated by fluorescence lifetime and sensitized emission measurements of a set of FRET standards. The approach is demonstrated using a modified version of the AKAR protein kinase A biosensor, first in cells in culture, and then in hepatocytes in the liver of living mice. The approach is compatible with the most common 2PE microscope configurations and should be applicable to a variety of different FRET probes. PMID:26333599

  11. Intravital imaging of hair follicle regeneration in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Cristiana M; Park, Sangbum; Mesa, Kailin R; Wolfel, Markus; Gonzalez, David G; Haberman, Ann M; Rompolas, Panteleimon; Greco, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Hair follicles are mammalian skin organs that periodically and stereotypically regenerate from a small pool of stem cells. Hence, hair follicles are a widely studied model for stem cell biology and regeneration. This protocol describes the use of two-photon laser-scanning microscopy (TPLSM) to study hair regeneration within a living, uninjured mouse. TPLSM provides advantages over conventional approaches, including enabling time-resolved imaging of single hair follicle stem cells. Thus, it is possible to capture behaviors including apoptosis, proliferation and migration, and to revisit the same cells for in vivo lineage tracing. In addition, a wide range of fluorescent reporter mouse lines facilitates TPLSM in the skin. This protocol also describes TPLSM laser ablation, which can spatiotemporally manipulate specific cellular populations of the hair follicle or microenvironment to test their regenerative contributions. The preparation time is variable depending on the goals of the experiment, but it generally takes 30–60 min. Imaging time is dependent on the goals of the experiment. Together, these components of TPLSM can be used to develop a comprehensive understanding of hair regeneration during homeostasis and injury. PMID:26110716

  12. Intravital imaging of hair follicle regeneration in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Cristiana M; Park, Sangbum; Mesa, Kailin R; Wolfel, Markus; Gonzalez, David G; Haberman, Ann M; Rompolas, Panteleimon; Greco, Valentina

    2015-07-01

    Hair follicles are mammalian skin organs that periodically and stereotypically regenerate from a small pool of stem cells. Hence, hair follicles are a widely studied model for stem cell biology and regeneration. This protocol describes the use of two-photon laser-scanning microscopy (TPLSM) to study hair regeneration within a living, uninjured mouse. TPLSM provides advantages over conventional approaches, including enabling time-resolved imaging of single hair follicle stem cells. Thus, it is possible to capture behaviors including apoptosis, proliferation and migration, and to revisit the same cells for in vivo lineage tracing. In addition, a wide range of fluorescent reporter mouse lines facilitates TPLSM in the skin. This protocol also describes TPLSM laser ablation, which can spatiotemporally manipulate specific cellular populations of the hair follicle or microenvironment to test their regenerative contributions. The preparation time is variable depending on the goals of the experiment, but it generally takes 30-60 min. Imaging time is dependent on the goals of the experiment. Together, these components of TPLSM can be used to develop a comprehensive understanding of hair regeneration during homeostasis and injury. PMID:26110716

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Human Cancer Cell Extravasation Using Intravital Imaging.

    PubMed

    Willetts, Lian; Bond, David; Stoletov, Konstantin; Lewis, John D

    2016-01-01

    microscopy techniques. PMID:27581012

  14. Intravital imaging technology reveals immune system dynamics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescent 'intravital' imaging is a new research technique by which the interior of living tissues and organs (in living bodies, if possible) can be observed, revealing the kinetics of cell and molecular processes in real time. Recent technological innovations in optical equipment and fluorescence imaging techniques have enabled a variety of cellular phenomena in different tissues and organs to be characterized under completely native conditions. This shift from static to dynamic biology constitutes the beginning of a new era in biomedical sciences. PMID:27238377

  15. Comparison of intravital thinned skull and cranial window approaches to study CNS immunobiology in the mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Dorand, R Dixon; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Evans, Teresa A; Petrosiute, Agne; Huang, Alex Y

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent imaging coupled with high-resolution femto-second pulsed infrared lasers allows for interrogation of cellular interactions deeper in living tissues than ever imagined. Intra-vital imaging of the central nervous system (CNS) has provided insights into neuronal development, synaptic transmission, and even immune interactions. In this review we will discuss the two most common intravital approaches for studying the cerebral cortex in the live mouse brain for pre-clinical studies, the thinned skull and cranial window techniques, and focus on the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. In addition, we will discuss the use of neuronal physiologic parameters as determinants of successful surgical and imaging preparation. PMID:25568834

  16. High resolution intravital imaging of subcellular structures of mouse abdominal organs using a microstage device.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liqin; Kobayakawa, Satoru; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Abe, Kuniya

    2012-01-01

    Intravital imaging of brain and bone marrow cells in the skull with subcellular resolution has revolutionized neurobiology, immunology and hematology. However, the application of this powerful technology in studies of abdominal organs has long been impeded by organ motion caused by breathing and heartbeat. Here we describe for the first time a simple device designated 'microstage' that effectively reduces organ motions without causing tissue lesions. Combining this microstage device with an upright intravital laser scanning microscope equipped with a unique stick-type objective lens, the system enables subcellular-level imaging of abdominal organs in live mice. We demonstrate that this technique allows for the quantitative analysis of subcellular structures and gene expressions in cells, the tracking of intracellular processes in real-time as well as three-dimensional image construction in the pancreas and liver of the live mouse. As the aforementioned analyses based on subcellular imaging could be extended to other intraperitoneal organs, the technique should offer great potential for investigation of physiological and disease-specific events of abdominal organs. The microstage approach adds an exciting new technique to the in vivo imaging toolbox. PMID:22479464

  17. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe-/-Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages "dancing on the spot" and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells.

  18. Setup and use of a two-laser multiphoton microscope for multichannel intravital fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Roussos, Evanthia T; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing biological mechanisms dependent upon the interaction of many cell types in vivo requires both multiphoton microscope systems capable of expanding the number and types of fluorophores that can be imaged simultaneously while removing the wavelength and tunability restrictions of existing systems, and enhanced software for extracting critical cellular parameters from voluminous 4D data sets. We present a procedure for constructing a two-laser multiphoton microscope that extends the wavelength range of excitation light, expands the number of simultaneously usable fluorophores and markedly increases signal to noise via ‘over-clocking’ of detection. We also utilize a custom-written software plug-in that simplifies the quantitative tracking and analysis of 4D intravital image data. We begin by describing the optics, hardware, electronics and software required, and finally the use of the plug-in for analysis. We demonstrate the use of the setup and plug-in by presenting data collected via intravital imaging of a mouse model of breast cancer. The procedure may be completed in ~24 h. PMID:21959234

  19. Intravital lectin perfusion analysis of vascular permeability in human micro- and macro- blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Debbage, P L; Sölder, E; Seidl, S; Hutzler, P; Hugl, B; Ofner, D; Kreczy, A

    2001-10-01

    We previously applied intravital lectin perfusion in mouse models to elucidate mechanisms underlying vascular permeability. The present work transfers this technique to human models, analysing vascular permeability in macro- and microvessels. Human vascular endothelial surface carbohydrate biochemistry differs significantly from its murine counterpart, lacking alpha-galactosyl epitopes and expressing the L-fucose moiety in the glycocalyx; the poly-N-lactosamine glycan backbone is common to all mammals. We examined extensively lectin binding specificities in sections and in vivo, and then applied the poly-N-lactosamine-specific lectin LEA and the L-fucose-specific lectin UEA-I in human intravital perfusions. Transendothelial transport differed in macrovessels and microvessels. In microvessels of adult human fat tissue, rectal wall and rectal carcinomas, slow transendothelial transport by vesicles was followed by significant retention at the subendothelial basement membrane; paracellular passage was not observed. Passage time exceeded 1 h. Thus we found barrier mechanisms resembling those we described previously in murine tissues. In both adult and fetal macrovessels, the vena saphena magna and the umbilical vein, respectively, rapid passage across the endothelial lining was observed, the tracer localising completely in the subendothelial tissues within 15 min; vesicular transport was more rapid than in microvessels, and retention at the subendothelial basement membrane briefer. PMID:11702193

  20. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe−/−Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages “dancing on the spot” and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells. PMID:25710308

  1. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries.

    PubMed

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe−/−Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP + macrophages “dancing on the spot” and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells. PMID:25710308

  2. Digital Correction of Motion Artifacts in Microscopy Image Sequences Collected from Living Animals Using Rigid and Non-Rigid Registration

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kevin S.; Salama, Paul; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Delp, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    Digital image analysis is a fundamental component of quantitative microscopy. However, intravital microscopy presents many challenges for digital image analysis. In general, microscopy volumes are inherently anisotropic, suffer from decreasing contrast with tissue depth, lack object edge detail, and characteristically have low signal levels. Intravital microscopy introduces the additional problem of motion artifacts, resulting from respiratory motion and heartbeat from specimens imaged in vivo. This paper describes an image registration technique for use with sequences of intravital microscopy images collected in time-series or in 3D volumes. Our registration method involves both rigid and non-rigid components. The rigid registration component corrects global image translations, while the non-rigid component manipulates a uniform grid of control points defined by B-splines. Each control point is optimized by minimizing a cost function consisting of two parts: a term to define image similarity, and a term to ensure deformation grid smoothness. Experimental results indicate that this approach is promising based on the analysis of several image volumes collected from the kidney, lung, and salivary gland of living rodents. PMID:22092443

  3. Digital correction of motion artefacts in microscopy image sequences collected from living animals using rigid and nonrigid registration.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, K S; Salama, P; Dunn, K W; Delp, E J

    2012-02-01

    Digital image analysis is a fundamental component of quantitative microscopy. However, intravital microscopy presents many challenges for digital image analysis. In general, microscopy volumes are inherently anisotropic, suffer from decreasing contrast with tissue depth, lack object edge detail and characteristically have low signal levels. Intravital microscopy introduces the additional problem of motion artefacts, resulting from respiratory motion and heartbeat from specimens imaged in vivo. This paper describes an image registration technique for use with sequences of intravital microscopy images collected in time-series or in 3D volumes. Our registration method involves both rigid and nonrigid components. The rigid registration component corrects global image translations, whereas the nonrigid component manipulates a uniform grid of control points defined by B-splines. Each control point is optimized by minimizing a cost function consisting of two parts: a term to define image similarity, and a term to ensure deformation grid smoothness. Experimental results indicate that this approach is promising based on the analysis of several image volumes collected from the kidney, lung and salivary gland of living rodents. PMID:22092443

  4. Intravital imaging of multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment through skin-fold window chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Tumor immune microenvironment became very important for the tumor immunotherapy. There were several kinds of immune cells in tumor stromal, and they played very different roles in tumor growth. In order to observe the behaviors of multiple immune cells in tumor microenvironment and the interaction between immune cells and tumor cells at the same time, we generated a multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment model. The tumor cells and immune cells were labeled by different fluorescent proteins. By using of skin-fold window chamber implanted into mice and intravital imaging technology, we could dynamically observe the different immune cells in tumor microenvironment. After data analysis from the video, we could know the behavior of TILs, DCs and Tregs in tumor immune microenvironment; furthermore, we could know these immune cells play different roles in the tumor microenvironment.

  5. Impact of rapamycin on phenotype and tolerogenic function of dendritic cells via intravital optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meijie; Zhang, Zhihong

    2014-03-01

    Rapamycin (RAPA) as a unique tolerance-promoting therapeutic drug is crucial to successful clinical organ transplantation. DC (Dendritic cells) play a critical role in antigen presentation to T cells to initiate immune responses involved in tissue rejection. Although the influence of RAPA on DC differentiation and maturation had been reported by some research groups, it is still controversial and unclear right now. In addition, it is also lack of study on investigating the role of DC in DTH reaction via intravital optical imaging. Herein, we investigated the effect of rapamycin on phenotype and function of bone marrow monocyte-derived DC both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments by flow cytometry (FACS) showed that DC displayed decreased cell size and lower expression levels of surface molecule CD80 induced by RAPA; Furthermore, the phagocytic ability to OVA of DC was inhibited by RAPA started from 1 h to 2 h post co-incubation, but recovered after 4 h; In addition, the capacity of DC to activate naïve OT-II T cell proliferation was also inhibited at 3 day post co-incubation, but had no effect at 5 day, the data indicated this effect was reversible when removing the drug. More importantly, the DC-T interaction was monitored both in vitro and in intravital lymph node explant, and showed that RAPA-DC had a significant lower proportion of long-lived (>15min) contacts. Thus, RAPA displayed immunosuppressive to phenotypic and functional maturation of DC, and this phenomenon induced by RAPA may favorable in the clinical organ transplantation in future.

  6. Intravital and Whole-Organ Imaging Reveals Capture of Melanoma-Derived Antigen by Lymph Node Subcapsular Macrophages Leading to Widespread Deposition on Follicular Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moalli, Federica; Proulx, Steven T.; Schwendener, Reto; Detmar, Michael; Schlapbach, Christoph; Stein, Jens V.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant antigens expressed by tumor cells, such as in melanoma, are often associated with humoral immune responses, which may in turn influence tumor progression. Despite recent data showing the central role of adaptive immune responses on cancer spread or control, it remains poorly understood where and how tumor-derived antigen (TDA) induces a humoral immune response in tumor-bearing hosts. Based on our observation of TDA accumulation in B cell areas of lymph nodes (LNs) from melanoma patients, we developed a pre-metastatic B16.F10 melanoma model expressing a fluorescent fusion protein, tandem dimer tomato, as a surrogate TDA. Using intravital two-photon microscopy (2PM) and whole-mount 3D LN imaging of tumor-draining LNs in immunocompetent mice, we report an unexpectedly widespread accumulation of TDA on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), which were dynamically scanned by circulating B cells. Furthermore, 2PM imaging identified macrophages located in the subcapsular sinus of tumor-draining LNs to capture subcellular TDA-containing particles arriving in afferent lymph. As a consequence, depletion of macrophages or genetic ablation of B cells and FDCs resulted in dramatically reduced TDA capture in tumor-draining LNs. In sum, we identified a major pathway for the induction of humoral responses in a melanoma model, which may be exploitable to manipulate anti-TDA antibody production during cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25821451

  7. Intravital and whole-organ imaging reveals capture of melanoma-derived antigen by lymph node subcapsular macrophages leading to widespread deposition on follicular dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moalli, Federica; Proulx, Steven T; Schwendener, Reto; Detmar, Michael; Schlapbach, Christoph; Stein, Jens V

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant antigens expressed by tumor cells, such as in melanoma, are often associated with humoral immune responses, which may in turn influence tumor progression. Despite recent data showing the central role of adaptive immune responses on cancer spread or control, it remains poorly understood where and how tumor-derived antigen (TDA) induces a humoral immune response in tumor-bearing hosts. Based on our observation of TDA accumulation in B cell areas of lymph nodes (LNs) from melanoma patients, we developed a pre-metastatic B16.F10 melanoma model expressing a fluorescent fusion protein, tandem dimer tomato, as a surrogate TDA. Using intravital two-photon microscopy (2PM) and whole-mount 3D LN imaging of tumor-draining LNs in immunocompetent mice, we report an unexpectedly widespread accumulation of TDA on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), which were dynamically scanned by circulating B cells. Furthermore, 2PM imaging identified macrophages located in the subcapsular sinus of tumor-draining LNs to capture subcellular TDA-containing particles arriving in afferent lymph. As a consequence, depletion of macrophages or genetic ablation of B cells and FDCs resulted in dramatically reduced TDA capture in tumor-draining LNs. In sum, we identified a major pathway for the induction of humoral responses in a melanoma model, which may be exploitable to manipulate anti-TDA antibody production during cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25821451

  8. Intravital Microscopy for Identifying Tumor Vessels in Patients With Stage IA-IV Melanoma That is Being Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  9. Subtraction method for intravital two-photon microscopy: intraparenchymal imaging and quantification of extravasation in mouse brain cortex.

    PubMed

    Vérant, Pascale; Serduc, Raphaël; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Chantal, Rémy; Ricard, Clément; Coles, Jonathan A; Vial, Jean-Claude

    2008-01-01

    Brain pathologies, including stroke and tumors, are associated with a variable degree of breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which can usefully be studied in animal models. We describe a new optical technique for quantifying extravasation in the cortex of the living mouse and for imaging intraparenchymal tissue. Leakiness of the BBB was induced by microbeam x-irradiation. Two fluorescent dyes were simultaneously infused intravenously, one of high molecular weight (fluorescein-labeled dextran, 70 kDa, green fluorescence) and one of low molecular weight (sulforhodamine B, 559 Da, red fluorescence). A two-photon microscope, directed through a cranial window, obtained separate images of the two dyes in the cortex. The gains of the two channels were adjusted so that the signals coming from within the vessels were equal. Subtraction of the image of the fluorescein-dextran from that of the sulforhodamine B gave images in which the vasculature was invisible and the sulforhodamine B in the parenchyma could be imaged with high resolution. Algorithms are presented for rapidly quantifying the extravasation without the need for shape recognition and for calculating the permeability of the BBB. Sulforhodamine B labeled certain intraparenchymal cells; these cells, and other details, were best observed using the subtraction method. PMID:18315351

  10. A 4-Dimensional Representation of Antennal Lobe Output Based on an Ensemble of Characterized Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Erich M.; Huetteroth, Wolf; Schachtner, Joachim; Daly, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    A central problem facing studies of neural encoding in sensory systems is how to accurately quantify the extent of spatial and temporal responses. In this study, we take advantage of the relatively simple and stereotypic neural architecture found in invertebrates. We combine standard electrophysiological techniques, recently developed population analysis techniques, and novel anatomical methods to form an innovative 4-dimensional view of odor output representations in the antennal lobe of the moth Manduca sexta. This novel approach allows quantification of olfactory responses of characterized neurons with spike time resolution. Additionally, arbitrary integration windows can be used for comparisons with other methods such as imaging. By assigning statistical significance to changes in neuronal firing, this method can visualize activity across the entire antennal lobe. The resulting 4-dimensional representation of antennal lobe output complements imaging and multi-unit experiments yet provides a more comprehensive and accurate view of glomerular activation patterns in spike time resolution. PMID:19464513

  11. In vivo quantitation of rare circulating tumor cells by multiphoton intravital flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Wang, Haifeng; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Low, Philip S.

    2007-01-01

    Quantitation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) constitutes an emerging tool for the diagnosis and staging of cancer, assessment of response to therapy, and evaluation of residual disease after surgery. Unfortunately, no existing technology has the sensitivity to measure the low numbers of tumor cells (<1 CTC per ml of whole blood) that characterize minimal levels of disease. We present a method, intravital flow cytometry, that noninvasively counts rare CTCs in vivo as they flow through the peripheral vasculature. The method involves i.v. injection of a tumor-specific fluorescent ligand followed by multiphoton fluorescence imaging of superficial blood vessels to quantitate the flowing CTCs. Studies in mice with metastatic tumors demonstrate that CTCs can be quantitated weeks before metastatic disease is detected by other means. Analysis of whole blood samples from cancer patients further establishes that human CTCs can be selectively labeled and quantitated when present at ≈2 CTCs per ml, opening opportunities for earlier assessment of metastatic disease. PMID:17601776

  12. Expanding Applications of the Nano Intravital Device as a Platform for Exploring Tumor Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgen, Michael R.

    The tumor microenvironment has been demonstrated to be a key determinant in the progression of cancer. Unfortunately, the mechanisms behind the different microenvironments (cytokine gradients, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, etc) have not been fully elucidated. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to targeted, individualized therapy to prevent metastasis. The Nano Intravital Device (NANIVID) is a microfabricated, implantable device designed to initiate specific microenvironments in vivo so that the time course of the effects can be observed. With both spatial and temporal control over the induced environments, the affected regions of the tumor can be compared to the rest of the tumor. The NANIVID was first used to establish cytokine gradients to monitor the migration of invasive cancer cells. The three projects that comprise this work expand the applications of the NANIVID to establish the device as a robust platform for investigating tumor microenvironment interactions. The first project released chemical mimics from the device to induce the cellular hypoxic response in tumors to determine how hypoxia affects the fate of disseminated tumor cells. The second project used the NANIVID in combination with an atomic force microscope to investigate the altered mechanics of migrating invasive cancer cells. The final project was to develop a cell counter to monitor the isolation of the invasive subpopulation of cells that were drawn into the device using a chemoattractant. These three projects demonstrate the potential of the NANIVID as a platform for investigating the tumor microenvironment.

  13. Intravital Fluorescence Facilitates Measurement of Multiple Physiologic Functions and Gene Expression in Tumors of Live Animals

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Mark W.; Shan, S.; Cao, Yiting; Moeller, Benjamin; Yuan, Fan; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the use of fluorescence imaging in vivo, with particular emphasis on oncology. It is important to note, however, that many of the methods described herein have been applied to the study of non-malignant tissues as well. Modern medicine and biology research has benefited greatly from an ever-expanding assortment of fluorescent markers and labels. These markers and labels have allowed investigators to observe the behavior and properties of cell and molecular entities of interest in the context of complicated biological systems such as a mammalian cell or a whole mouse. Methods developed to image fluorescence in whole mice have been valuable in studying patterns of tumor growth and metastases. Alternatively, more detailed information and a wide variety of endpoints can be obtained using “intravital” preparations. This review focuses on use of fluorescence imaging for intravital preparations. For detail on fluorescence imaging of whole animals, refer to reviews on this subject [1,2]. For oncologic applications, studies have focused primarily on window chamber preparations that allow for real-time visualization of tumor growth, vascularity, vascular responses to stimulation, vascular permeability, vascular orientation, flow instability, and the like. These endpoints have been used to show that there are functional differences between tumor and normal tissues with respect to these functions under baseline conditions and after therapeutic manipulation. Examples of some of these differences are provided in this review as a means to illustrate how they can be used. PMID:14646042

  14. Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Michael J.; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. PMID:25275114

  15. Electron Microscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  16. Intravital Imaging of Vascular Transmigration by the Lyme Spirochete: Requirement for the Integrin Binding Residues of the B. burgdorferi P66 Protein.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devender; Ristow, Laura C; Shi, Meiqing; Mukherjee, Priyanka; Caine, Jennifer A; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kubes, Paul; Coburn, Jenifer; Chaconas, George

    2015-12-01

    Vascular extravasation, a key step in systemic infection by hematogenous microbial pathogens, is poorly understood, but has been postulated to encompass features similar to vascular transmigration by leukocytes. The Lyme disease spirochete can cause a variety of clinical manifestations, including arthritis, upon hematogenous dissemination. This pathogen encodes numerous surface adhesive proteins (adhesins) that may promote extravasation, but none have yet been implicated in this process. In this work we report the novel use of intravital microscopy of the peripheral knee vasculature to study transmigration of the Lyme spirochete in living Cd1d-/-mice. In the absence of iNKT cells, major immune modulators in the mouse joint, spirochetes that have extravasated into joint-proximal tissue remain in the local milieu and can be enumerated accurately. We show that BBK32, a fibronectin and glycosaminoglycan adhesin of B. burgdorferi involved in early steps of endothelial adhesion, is not required for extravasation from the peripheral knee vasculature. In contrast, almost no transmigration occurs in the absence of P66, an outer membrane protein that has porin and integrin adhesin functions. Importantly, P66 mutants specifically defective in integrin binding were incapable of promoting extravasation. P66 itself does not promote detectable microvascular interactions, suggesting that vascular adhesion of B. burgdorferi mediated by other adhesins, sets the stage for P66-integrin interactions leading to transmigration. Although integrin-binding proteins with diverse functions are encoded by a variety of bacterial pathogens, P66 is the first to have a documented and direct role in vascular transmigration. The emerging picture of vascular escape by the Lyme spirochete shows similarities, but distinct differences from leukocyte transmigration. PMID:26684456

  17. Intravital Imaging of Vascular Transmigration by the Lyme Spirochete: Requirement for the Integrin Binding Residues of the B. burgdorferi P66 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Devender; Ristow, Laura C.; Shi, Meiqing; Mukherjee, Priyanka; Caine, Jennifer A.; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kubes, Paul; Coburn, Jenifer; Chaconas, George

    2015-01-01

    Vascular extravasation, a key step in systemic infection by hematogenous microbial pathogens, is poorly understood, but has been postulated to encompass features similar to vascular transmigration by leukocytes. The Lyme disease spirochete can cause a variety of clinical manifestations, including arthritis, upon hematogenous dissemination. This pathogen encodes numerous surface adhesive proteins (adhesins) that may promote extravasation, but none have yet been implicated in this process. In this work we report the novel use of intravital microscopy of the peripheral knee vasculature to study transmigration of the Lyme spirochete in living Cd1d-/-mice. In the absence of iNKT cells, major immune modulators in the mouse joint, spirochetes that have extravasated into joint-proximal tissue remain in the local milieu and can be enumerated accurately. We show that BBK32, a fibronectin and glycosaminoglycan adhesin of B. burgdorferi involved in early steps of endothelial adhesion, is not required for extravasation from the peripheral knee vasculature. In contrast, almost no transmigration occurs in the absence of P66, an outer membrane protein that has porin and integrin adhesin functions. Importantly, P66 mutants specifically defective in integrin binding were incapable of promoting extravasation. P66 itself does not promote detectable microvascular interactions, suggesting that vascular adhesion of B. burgdorferi mediated by other adhesins, sets the stage for P66-integrin interactions leading to transmigration. Although integrin-binding proteins with diverse functions are encoded by a variety of bacterial pathogens, P66 is the first to have a documented and direct role in vascular transmigration. The emerging picture of vascular escape by the Lyme spirochete shows similarities, but distinct differences from leukocyte transmigration. PMID:26684456

  18. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  19. Scaling Limits and Critical Behaviour of the 4 -Dimensional n -Component |\\varphi |^4 Spin Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerschmidt, Roland; Brydges, David C.; Slade, Gordon

    2014-08-01

    We consider the n -component |\\varphi |^4 spin model on {mathbb {Z}}^4 , for all n ge 1 , with small coupling constant. We prove that the susceptibility has a logarithmic correction to mean field scaling, with exponent n+2/n+8 for the logarithm. We also analyse the asymptotic behaviour of the pressure as the critical point is approached, and prove that the specific heat has fractional logarithmic scaling for n =1,2,3 ; double logarithmic scaling for n=4 ; and is bounded when n>4 . In addition, for the model defined on the 4 -dimensional discrete torus, we prove that the scaling limit as the critical point is approached is a multiple of a Gaussian free field on the continuum torus, whereas, in the subcritical regime, the scaling limit is Gaussian white noise with intensity given by the susceptibility. The proofs are based on a rigorous renormalisation group method in the spirit of Wilson, developed in a companion series of papers to study the 4-dimensional weakly self-avoiding walk, and adapted here to the |\\varphi |^4 model.

  20. Intravital Computer Morphometry on Protozoa: A Method for Monitoring of the Morphofunctional Disorders in Cells Exposed in the Cell Phone Communication Electromagnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Uskalova, D V; Igolkina, Yu V; Sarapultseva, E I

    2016-08-01

    Morphofunctional disorders in unicellular aquatic protozoa - Spirostomum ambiguum infusorians after 30-, 60-, and 360-min exposure in electromagnetic field at a radiation frequency of 1 GHz and energy flow density of 50 μW/cm(2) were analyzed by intravital computer morphometry. Significant disorders in morphometric values correlated with low mobility of the protozoa. The results suggested the use of intravital computer morphometry on the protozoa for early diagnosis of radiation-induced effects of the mobile communication electromagnetic field, for example, low mobility of spermatozoa. PMID:27591872

  1. Fast and precise targeting of single tumor cells in vivo by multimodal correlative microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Solecki, Gergely; Allio, Guillaume; Winkler, Frank; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard; Goetz, Jacky G.; Schwab, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intravital microscopy provides dynamic understanding of multiple cell biological processes, but its limited resolution has so far precluded structural analysis. Because it is difficult to capture rare and transient events, only a few attempts have been made to observe specific developmental and pathological processes in animal models using electron microscopy. The multimodal correlative approach that we propose here combines intravital microscopy, microscopic X-ray computed tomography and three-dimensional electron microscopy. It enables a rapid (c.a. 2 weeks) and accurate (<5 µm) correlation of functional imaging to ultrastructural analysis of single cells in a relevant context. We demonstrate the power of our approach by capturing single tumor cells in the vasculature of the cerebral cortex and in subcutaneous tumors, providing unique insights into metastatic events. Providing a significantly improved throughput, our workflow enables multiple sampling, a prerequisite for making correlative imaging a relevant tool to study cell biology in vivo. Owing to the versatility of this workflow, we envision broad applications in various fields of biological research, such as cancer or developmental biology. PMID:26659665

  2. Evaluation of 4-dimensional Computed Tomography to 4-dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Deformable Image Registration for Lung Cancer Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Balik, Salim; Weiss, Elisabeth; Jan, Nuzhat; Roman, Nicholas; Sleeman, William C.; Fatyga, Mirek; Christensen, Gary E.; Zhang, Cheng; Murphy, Martin J.; Lu, Jun; Keall, Paul; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate 2 deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for the purpose of contour mapping to support image-guided adaptive radiation therapy with 4-dimensional cone-beam CT (4DCBCT). Methods and Materials: One planning 4D fan-beam CT (4DFBCT) and 7 weekly 4DCBCT scans were acquired for 10 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients. The gross tumor volume was delineated by a physician in all 4D images. End-of-inspiration phase planning 4DFBCT was registered to the corresponding phase in weekly 4DCBCT images for day-to-day registrations. For phase-to-phase registration, the end-of-inspiration phase from each 4D image was registered to the end-of-expiration phase. Two DIR algorithms—small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic (SICLE) and Insight Toolkit diffeomorphic demons (DEMONS)—were evaluated. Physician-delineated contours were compared with the warped contours by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), average symmetric distance, and false-positive and false-negative indices. The DIR results are compared with rigid registration of tumor. Results: For day-to-day registrations, the mean DSC was 0.75 ± 0.09 with SICLE, 0.70 ± 0.12 with DEMONS, 0.66 ± 0.12 with rigid-tumor registration, and 0.60 ± 0.14 with rigid-bone registration. Results were comparable to intraobserver variability calculated from phase-to-phase registrations as well as measured interobserver variation for 1 patient. SICLE and DEMONS, when compared with rigid-bone (4.1 mm) and rigid-tumor (3.6 mm) registration, respectively reduced the average symmetric distance to 2.6 and 3.3 mm. On average, SICLE and DEMONS increased the DSC to 0.80 and 0.79, respectively, compared with rigid-tumor (0.78) registrations for 4DCBCT phase-to-phase registrations. Conclusions: Deformable image registration achieved comparable accuracy to reported interobserver delineation variability and higher accuracy than rigid-tumor registration. Deformable image registration

  3. Intravital Imaging of Neutrophil Priming Using IL-1β Promoter-driven DsRed Reporter Mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yi; Liu, Yun; Takashima, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood circulation and are quickly recruited to inflammatory sites. Priming is a critical event that enhances the phagocytic functionality of neutrophils. Although extensive studies have unveiled the existence and importance of neutrophil priming during infection and injury, means of visualizing this process in vivo have been unavailable. The protocol provided enables monitoring of the dynamic process of neutrophil priming in living animals by combining three methodologies: 1) DsRed reporter signal - used as a measure of priming 2) in vivo neutrophil labeling - achieved by injection of fluorescence-conjugated anti-lymphocyte antigen 6G (Ly6G) monoclonal antibody (mAb) and 3) intravital confocal imaging. Several critical steps are involved in this protocol: oxazolone-induced mouse ear skin inflammation, appropriate sedation of animals, repeated injections of anti-Ly6G mAb, and prevention of focus drift during imaging. Although a few limitations have been observed, such as the limit of continuous imaging time (~ 8 hr) in one mouse and the leakage of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran from blood vessels in the inflammatory state, this protocol provides a fundamental framework for intravital imaging of primed neutrophil behavior and function, which can easily be expanded to examination of other immune cells in mouse inflammation models. PMID:27403648

  4. Temperature and Energy of 4-Dimensional Axisymmetric Black Holes from Entropic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ren; Zhang, Li-Chun; Wu, Yue-Qin; Li, Huai-Fan

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the temperature and energy on holographic screens for 4-dimensional axisymmetric black holes with the entropic force idea proposed by Verlinde. According to the principle of thermal equilibrium, the location of holographic screen outside the axisymmetric black hole horizon is not a equivalent radius surface. The location of isothermal holographic screen outside the axisymmetric black hole horizon is obtained. Using the equipartition rule, we derive the correction expression of energy of isothermal holographic screen. When holographic screens are far away the black hole horizon, the entropic force of charged rotating particles can be expressed as Newton's law of gravity. When the screen crosses the event horizon, the temperature of the screen agrees with the Hawking temperature and the entropic force gives rise to the surface gravity for both of the black holes.

  5. Correlative Microscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microscopy and Imaging offers many opportunities to collaborate and cooperate with scientists in many different fields nationally and internationally. Images have proven to be very important components in basic research, product development and understanding structure/function relationships in addit...

  6. Correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  7. Expansion Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W.; Boyden, Edward S.

    2014-01-01

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. Here we report the discovery that, by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable super-resolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with effective ~70 nm lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color super-resolution imaging of ~107 μm3 of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope. PMID:25592419

  8. Photoacoustic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a hybrid in vivo imaging technique that acoustically detects optical contrast via the photoacoustic effect. Unlike pure optical microscopic techniques, PAM takes advantage of the weak acoustic scattering in tissue and thus breaks through the optical diffusion limit (~1 mm in soft tissue). With its excellent scalability, PAM can provide high-resolution images at desired maximum imaging depths up to a few millimeters. Compared with backscattering-based confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, PAM provides absorption contrast instead of scattering contrast. Furthermore, PAM can image more molecules, endogenous or exogenous, at their absorbing wavelengths than fluorescence-based methods, such as wide-field, confocal, and multi-photon microscopy. Most importantly, PAM can simultaneously image anatomical, functional, molecular, flow dynamic and metabolic contrasts in vivo. Focusing on state-of-the-art developments in PAM, this Review discusses the key features of PAM implementations and their applications in biomedical studies. PMID:24416085

  9. 5D-intravital tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in-vivo analysis of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans G.; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Stracke, Frank; Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Some years ago, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have been launched. These tomographs provide optical biopsies with submicron resolution based on two-photon excited autofluorescence (NAD(P)H, flavoproteins, keratin, elastin, melanin, porphyrins) and second harmonic generation by collagen. The 3D tomograph was now transferred into a 5D imaging system by the additional detection of the emission spectrum and the fluorescence lifetime based on spatially and spectrally resolved time-resolved single photon counting. The novel 5D intravital tomograph (5D-IVT) was employed for the early detection of atopic dermatitis and the analysis of treatment effects.

  10. Intravital fluorescence imaging of mouse brain using implantable semiconductor devices and epi-illumination of biological tissue

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Haruta, Makito; Nagasaki, Mizuki; Takehara, Hironari; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The application of the fluorescence imaging method to living animals, together with the use of genetically engineered animals and synthesized photo-responsive compounds, is a powerful method for investigating brain functions. Here, we report a fluorescence imaging method for the brain surface and deep brain tissue that uses compact and mass-producible semiconductor imaging devices based on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. An image sensor chip was designed to be inserted into brain tissue, and its size was 1500 × 450 μm. Sample illumination is also a key issue for intravital fluorescence imaging. Hence, for the uniform illumination of the imaging area, we propose a new method involving the epi-illumination of living biological tissues, and we performed investigations using optical simulations and experimental evaluation. PMID:26137364

  11. Optimizing 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Sampling for Respiratory Motion Analysis of Pancreatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H.N.; Senneville, Baudouin D. de

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimum sampling strategy for retrospective reconstruction of 4-dimensional (4D) MR data for nonrigid motion characterization of tumor and organs at risk for radiation therapy purposes. Methods and Materials: For optimization, we compared 2 surrogate signals (external respiratory bellows and internal MRI navigators) and 2 MR sampling strategies (Cartesian and radial) in terms of image quality and robustness. Using the optimized protocol, 6 pancreatic cancer patients were scanned to calculate the 4D motion. Region of interest analysis was performed to characterize the respiratory-induced motion of the tumor and organs at risk simultaneously. Results: The MRI navigator was found to be a more reliable surrogate for pancreatic motion than the respiratory bellows signal. Radial sampling is most benign for undersampling artifacts and intraview motion. Motion characterization revealed interorgan and interpatient variation, as well as heterogeneity within the tumor. Conclusions: A robust 4D-MRI method, based on clinically available protocols, is presented and successfully applied to characterize the abdominal motion in a small number of pancreatic cancer patients.

  12. Exploratory nuclear microprobe data visualisation using 3- and 4-dimensional biological volume rendering tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Harry J.; Ren, Minqin; van Kan, Jeroen A.; Watt, Frank; White, Dan

    2007-07-01

    The emergence of Confocal Microscopy (CM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) as everyday tools in cellular level biology has stimulated development of 3D data visualisation software. Conventional 2-dimensional images of cell (optical) sections obtained in a transmission electron or optical microscopes and more sophisticated multidimensional imaging methods require processing software capable of 3D rendering and mathematically transforming data in 3-, 4-, or more dimensions. The richness of data obtained from the different nuclear microscopy imaging techniques and often parallel information channels (X-ray, secondary electron, Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy) is often not obvious because subtleties and interrelations in the data could not be rendered in a human interpretable way. In this exploratory study we have applied the BioImageXD software, originally developed for rendering of multidimensional CM data, to some different nuclear microscopy data. Cells-on-Silicon STIM data from a human breast cancer cell line and elemental maps from lesions on rabbit aorta have been visualised. Mathematical filtering and averaging combined with hardware accelerated 3D rendering enabled dramatically clear visualisation of inter-cellular regions comprising extra cellular matrix proteins that were otherwise difficult to visualise, and also sub cellular structures. For elemental mapping, the use of filtered correlation surfaces and colour channels clearly revealed the interrelations in the data structures that are not easily discernible in the PIXE elemental maps.

  13. Intravital imaging of SRF and Notch signalling identifies a key role for EZH2 in invasive melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Manning, C S; Hooper, S; Sahai, E A

    2015-08-13

    The acquisition of cell motility is an early step in melanoma metastasis. Here we use intravital imaging of signalling reporter cell-lines combined with genome-wide transcriptional analysis to define signalling pathways and genes associated with melanoma metastasis. Intravital imaging revealed heterogeneous cell behaviour in vivo: <10% of cells were motile and both singly moving cells and streams of cells were observed. Motile melanoma cells had increased Notch- and SRF-dependent transcription. Subsequent genome-wide analysis identified an overlapping set of genes associated with high Notch and SRF activity. We identified EZH2, a histone methyltransferase in the Polycomb repressive complex 2, as a regulator of these genes. Heterogeneity of EZH2 levels is observed in melanoma models, and co-ordinated upregulation of genes positively regulated by EZH2 is associated with melanoma metastasis. EZH2 was also identified as regulating the amelanotic phenotype of motile cells in vivo by suppressing expression of the P-glycoprotein Oca2. Analysis of patient samples confirmed an inverse relationship between EZH2 levels and pigment. EZH2 targeting with siRNA and chemical inhibition reduced invasion in mouse and human melanoma cell lines. The EZH2-regulated genes KIF2C and KIF22 are required for melanoma cell invasion and important for lung colonization. We propose that heterogeneity in EZH2 levels leads to heterogeneous expression of a cohort of genes associated with motile behaviour including KIF2C and KIF22. EZH2-dependent increased expression of these genes promotes melanoma cell motility and early steps in metastasis. PMID:25381824

  14. Intravital imaging of SRF and Notch signalling identifies a key role for EZH2 in invasive melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Cerys S; Hooper, Steven; Sahai, Erik A

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of cell motility is an early step in melanoma metastasis. Here we use intravital imaging of signalling reporter cell-lines combined with genome-wide transcriptional analysis to define signalling pathways and genes associated with melanoma metastasis. Intravital imaging revealed heterogeneous cell behaviour in vivo: less than 10% of cells were motile and both singly moving cells and streams of cells were observed. Motile melanoma cells had increased Notch- and SRF-dependent transcription. Subsequent genome-wide analysis identified an overlapping set of genes associated with high Notch and SRF activity. We identified EZH2, a histone methyltransferase in the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2, as a regulator of these genes. Heterogeneity of EZH2 levels is observed in melanoma models and co-ordinated up-regulation of genes positively regulated by EZH2 is associated with melanoma metastasis. EZH2 was also identified as regulating the amelanotic phenotype of motile cells in vivo by suppressing expression of the P-glycoprotein Oca2. Analysis of patient samples confirmed an inverse relationship between EZH2 levels and pigment. EZH2 targeting with siRNA and chemical inhibition reduced invasion in mouse and human melanoma cell lines. The EZH2 regulated SRF target genes KIF2C and KIF22 are required for melanoma cell invasion and important for lung colonisation. We propose that heterogeneity in EZH2 levels leads to heterogeneous expression of a cohort of genes associated with motile behaviour including KIF2C and KIF22. EZH2 dependent increased expression of these genes promotes melanoma cell motility and early steps in metastasis. PMID:25381824

  15. Multimodal microscopy of immune cells and melanoma for longitudinal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entenberg, David; Aranda, Iana; Li, Yongbiao; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Schaer, David; Li, Yanyun

    2006-02-01

    Intravital microscopy of cancer is a well established tool that provides direct visualization of the tumor cycle. It traditionally involves one of several strategies: invasive subcutaneous (SC) implantation of tumors followed by surgical opening of skin flaps for imaging, techniques utilizing skin fold chambers and implanted optical windows or intradermal injections under 200μm from the skin surface. All of these techniques allow the use of fluorescent proteins as markers for biologically significant constituents. However, observation methods utilizing skin-flaps, skin-fold chambers and optical windows are invasive and tend to alter the immune environment of the tissue and/or limit the duration of studies that can be performed. If implanted correctly, intradermally injected tumors can be minimally invasive, will not require biopsies or surgical intervention to observe and are accessible for direct transdermal imaging with a number of in vivo modalities. We present our work in the development of a small animal intravital microscopy workstation that allows the acquisition of different contrast imaging modalities: reflectance confocal, wide field epifluorescence, multiphoton and second harmonic generation (SHG). The images are acquired pair-wise simultaneously and sequentially in time. The aim of our instrumentation is to gather all information generated by the single probing beam via the reflected or back-scattered signal, SHG signal and various fluorescence signals. Additionally, we also present our development of a microscopic tissue navigation technique to mark, label and track sites of interest. This technique enables us to revisit sites periodically and record, with different imaging contrasts, their biological changes over time.

  16. Positron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

    1995-02-01

    The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

  17. Endoscopic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Konstantin; Sung, Kung-Bin; Collier, Tom; Clark, Anne; Arifler, Dizem; Lacy, Alicia; Descour, Michael; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    In vivo endoscopic optical microscopy provides a tool to assess tissue architecture and morphology with contrast and resolution similar to that provided by standard histopathology – without need for physical tissue removal. In this article, we focus on optical imaging technologies that have the potential to dramatically improve the detection, prevention, and therapy of epithelial cancers. Epithelial pre-cancers and cancers are associated with a variety of morphologic, architectural, and molecular changes, which currently can be assessed only through invasive, painful biopsy. Optical imaging is ideally suited to detecting cancer-related alterations because it can detect biochemical and morphologic alterations with sub-cellular resolution throughout the entire epithelial thickness. Optical techniques can be implemented non-invasively, in real time, and at low cost to survey the tissue surface at risk. Our manuscript focuses primarily on modalities that currently are the most developed: reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). However, recent advances in fluorescence-based endoscopic microscopy also are reviewed briefly. We discuss the basic principles of these emerging technologies and their current and potential applications in early cancer detection. We also present research activities focused on development of exogenous contrast agents that can enhance the morphological features important for cancer detection and that have the potential to allow vital molecular imaging of cancer-related biomarkers. In conclusion, we discuss future improvements to the technology needed to develop robust clinical devices. PMID:14646041

  18. Substrate-Free Self-Assembled SiOx-Core Nanodots from Alkylalkoxysilane as a Multicolor Photoluminescence Source for Intravital Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Ying; Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Kung, Mei-Lang; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2013-01-01

    Intravital fluorescence imaging has great potential in biological and biomedical research, as it provides the ability to directly observe biological structures and processes in their natural state. Contrast agents for intravital imaging applications should exhibit good biocompatibility, multiphoton fluorescence, and long emission. Carbon nanodots and semiconductor nanocrystals meet these requirements in most cases, with the added benefit that their properties can be ‘tuned' for specific applications by controlling the size and surface chemistry of the nanoparticles. Here, we report on a simple heat-assisted strategy to fabricate SiOx-core self-assembled nanodots using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) materials. Our results demonstrate that substrate-free self-assembled nanodots from alkylalkoxysilane exhibit controllable structural and chemical characteristics that are well suited for applications in biological, biomedical, and clinical research, and may find further use in optoelectronic and sensor devices. PMID:23609156

  19. Management of Respiration-Induced Motion With 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) for Pancreas Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, An; Liang, Zhiwen; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to quantify respiration-induced organ motions for pancreatic cancer patients and to explore strategies to account for these motions. Methods and Materials: Both 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) and 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans were acquired sequentially for 15 pancreatic cancer patients, including 10 randomly selected patients and 5 patients selected from a subgroup of patients with large tumor respiratory motions. 3DCTs were fused with 2 sets of 4DCT data at the end of exhale phase (50%) and the end of inhale phase (0%). The target was delineated on the 50% and 0% phase CT sets, and the organs at risk were drawn on the 3DCT. These contours were populated to the CT sets at other respiratory phases based on deformable image registration. Internal target volumes (ITV) were generated by tracing the target contours of all phases (ITV{sub 10}), 3 phases of 0%, 20% and 50% (ITV{sub 3}), and 2 phases of 0% and 50% (ITV{sub 2}). ITVs generated from phase images were compared using percentage of volume overlap, Dice coefficient, geometric centers, and average surface distance. Results: Volume variations of pancreas, kidneys, and liver as a function of respiratory phases were small (<5%) during respiration. For the 10 randomly selected patients, peak-to-peak amplitudes of liver, left kidney, right kidney, and the target along the superior-inferior (SI) direction were 7.9 ± 3.2 mm, 7.1 ± 3.1 mm, 5.7 ± 3.2 mm, and 5.9 ± 2.8 mm, respectively. The percentage of volume overlap and Dice coefficient were 92% ± 1% and 96% ± 1% between ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub 2} and 96% ± 1% and 98% ± 1% between ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub 3}, respectively. The percentage of volume overlap between ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub 3} was 93.6 ± 1.1 for patients with tumor motion >8 mm. Conclusions: Appropriate motion management strategies are proposed for radiation treatment planning of pancreatic tumors based on magnitudes of tumor

  20. Modeling Pancreatic Tumor Motion Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Surrogate Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Yorke, Ellen D.; Davidson, Margaret; Zhang, Zhigang; Jackson, Andrew; Mageras, Gig S.; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To assess intrafractional positional variations of pancreatic tumors using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT), their impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) coverage, the reliability of biliary stent, fiducial seeds, and the real-time position management (RPM) external marker as tumor surrogates for setup of respiratory gated treatment, and to build a correlative model of tumor motion. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the respiration-correlated 4D-CT images acquired during simulation of 36 patients with either a biliary stent (n=16) or implanted fiducials (n=20) who were treated with RPM respiratory gated intensity modulated radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Respiratory displacement relative to end-exhalation was measured for the GTV, the biliary stent, or fiducial seeds, and the RPM marker. The results were compared between the full respiratory cycle and the gating interval. Linear mixed model was used to assess the correlation of GTV motion with the potential surrogate markers. Results: The average ± SD GTV excursions were 0.3 ± 0.2 cm in the left-right direction, 0.6 ± 0.3 cm in the anterior-posterior direction, and 1.3 ± 0.7 cm in the superior-inferior direction. Gating around end-exhalation reduced GTV motion by 46% to 60%. D95% was at least the prescribed 56 Gy in 76% of patients. GTV displacement was associated with the RPM marker, the biliary stent, and the fiducial seeds. The correlation was better with fiducial seeds and with biliary stent. Conclusions: Respiratory gating reduced the margin necessary for radiation therapy for pancreatic tumors. GTV motion was well correlated with biliary stent or fiducial seed displacements, validating their use as surrogates for daily assessment of GTV position during treatment. A patient-specific internal target volume based on 4D-CT is recommended both for gated and not-gated treatment; otherwise, our model can be used to predict the degree of GTV motion.

  1. High-Quality T2-Weighted 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Radiation Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dongsu; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Low, Daniel A.; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa; Hu, Yanle

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to improve triggering efficiency of the prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) method and to develop a 4DMRI imaging protocol that could offer T2 weighting for better tumor visualization, good spatial coverage and spatial resolution, and respiratory motion sampling within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications. Methods and Materials: The respiratory state splitting (RSS) and multi-shot acquisition (MSA) methods were analytically compared and validated in a simulation study by using the respiratory signals from 10 healthy human subjects. The RSS method was more effective in improving triggering efficiency. It was implemented in prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4DMRI. 4DMRI image datasets were acquired from 5 healthy human subjects. Liver motion was estimated using the acquired 4DMRI image datasets. Results: The simulation study showed the RSS method was more effective for improving triggering efficiency than the MSA method. The average reductions in 4DMRI acquisition times were 36% and 10% for the RSS and MSA methods, respectively. The human subject study showed that T2-weighted 4DMRI with 10 respiratory states, 60 slices at a spatial resolution of 1.5 × 1.5 × 3.0 mm{sup 3} could be acquired in 9 to 18 minutes, depending on the individual's breath pattern. Based on the acquired 4DMRI image datasets, the ranges of peak-to-peak liver displacements among 5 human subjects were 9.0 to 12.9 mm, 2.5 to 3.9 mm, and 0.5 to 2.3 mm in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right directions, respectively. Conclusions: We demonstrated that with the RSS method, it was feasible to acquire high-quality T2-weighted 4DMRI within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications.

  2. Planning 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) Cannot Adequately Represent Daily Intrafractional Motion of Abdominal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Noel, Camille; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) can adequately represent daily motion of abdominal tumors in regularly fractionated and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional tumor motion of 10 patients with abdominal tumors (4 pancreas-fractionated and 6 liver-stereotactic patients) with implanted fiducials was measured based on daily orthogonal fluoroscopic movies over 38 treatment fractions. The needed internal margin for at least 90% of tumor coverage was calculated based on a 95th and fifth percentile of daily 3-dimensional tumor motion. The planning internal margin was generated by fusing 4DCT motion from all phase bins. The disagreement between needed and planning internal margin was analyzed fraction by fraction in 3 motion axes (superior-inferior [SI], anterior-posterior [AP], and left-right [LR]). The 4DCT margin was considered as an overestimation/underestimation of daily motion when disagreement exceeded at least 3 mm in the SI axis and/or 1.2 mm in the AP and LR axes (4DCT image resolution). The underlying reasons for this disagreement were evaluated based on interfractional and intrafractional breathing variation. Results: The 4DCT overestimated daily 3-dimensional motion in 39% of the fractions in 7 of 10 patients and underestimated it in 53% of the fractions in 8 of 10 patients. Median underestimation was 3.9 mm, 3.0 mm, and 1.7 mm in the SI axis, AP axis, and LR axis, respectively. The 4DCT was found to capture irregular deep breaths in 3 of 10 patients, with 4DCT motion larger than mean daily amplitude by 18 to 21 mm. The breathing pattern varied from breath to breath and day to day. The intrafractional variation of amplitude was significantly larger than intrafractional variation (2.7 mm vs 1.3 mm) in the primary motion axis (ie, SI axis). The SBRT patients showed significantly larger intrafractional amplitude variation than fractionated patients (3.0 mm vs 2

  3. Clinical Validation of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Ventilation With Pulmonary Function Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Douglas; Schubert, Leah; Diot, Quentin; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Martel, Mary K.; Linderman, Derek; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Miften, Moyed; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: A new form of functional imaging has been proposed in the form of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation. Because 4DCTs are acquired as part of routine care for lung cancer patients, calculating ventilation maps from 4DCTs provides spatial lung function information without added dosimetric or monetary cost to the patient. Before 4DCT-ventilation is implemented it needs to be clinically validated. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) provide a clinically established way of evaluating lung function. The purpose of our work was to perform a clinical validation by comparing 4DCT-ventilation metrics with PFT data. Methods and Materials: Ninety-eight lung cancer patients with pretreatment 4DCT and PFT data were included in the study. Pulmonary function test metrics used to diagnose obstructive lung disease were recorded: forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and FEV1/forced vital capacity. Four-dimensional CT data sets and spatial registration were used to compute 4DCT-ventilation images using a density change–based and a Jacobian-based model. The ventilation maps were reduced to single metrics intended to reflect the degree of ventilation obstruction. Specifically, we computed the coefficient of variation (SD/mean), ventilation V20 (volume of lung ≤20% ventilation), and correlated the ventilation metrics with PFT data. Regression analysis was used to determine whether 4DCT ventilation data could predict for normal versus abnormal lung function using PFT thresholds. Results: Correlation coefficients comparing 4DCT-ventilation with PFT data ranged from 0.63 to 0.72, with the best agreement between FEV1 and coefficient of variation. Four-dimensional CT ventilation metrics were able to significantly delineate between clinically normal versus abnormal PFT results. Conclusions: Validation of 4DCT ventilation with clinically relevant metrics is essential. We demonstrate good global agreement between PFTs and 4DCT-ventilation, indicating that 4DCT

  4. SU-E-T-267: Proton Pencil Beam Scanning for Mediastinal Lymphoma: 4-Dimensional Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, C; Plastaras, J; Tochner, Z; Hill-Kayser, C; Hahn, S; Both, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) for the treatment of mediastinal lymphoma. Methods: A group of 6 patients were planned using an anterior field with PBS. Spots with ∼5 mm σ were used for all patients, while large spots (∼10 mm σ) were employed for patients with motion perpendicular to the beam (≥5 mm). We considered volumetric repainting such that, in each fraction, the same field would be delivered twice. Four-dimensional dose was calculated on initial and verification 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans (2—3) based on respiratory trace and beam delivery sequence. This was implemented by binning the spots into separate plans on each 4D-CT phase respectively. Four starting phases were sampled for each painting and 4 energy switching times (0.5 s, 1 s, 3 s, and 5 s) were tested, resulting in 2560 dose distributions for the cohort. Plan robustness was measured for target and critical structures in terms of the percentage difference between delivered dose and planned dose. Results: For 5 of the 6 patients, the ITV (internal target volume) D98% was degraded by <3% (standard deviations ∼ 0.1%) when averaged over the whole course (up to 5% per fraction). Deviations of mean lung dose, heart maximum dose, and cord maximum dose were within 5% of prescribed dose. For one patient with motion perpendicular to the beam (up to 5 mm), the degradation of ITV D98% was 9% over the whole course (12% per fraction), which was mitigated to 1% (3% per fraction) by employing large spots and repainting. No significant difference in coverage was observed for different energy switching times. Conclusion: This feasibility study demonstrates that, for mediastinal lymphoma, the PBS plan robustness can be maintained during delivery when target motion is measured and volumetric repainting and/or large spots are employed. This work was supported by Ion Beam Application.

  5. GeoGML - a Mark-up Language for 4-dimensional geomorphic objects and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwner, M.-O.

    2009-04-01

    We developed an use-oriented GML3 based data model that enables researchers to share 4-dimensional information about landforms and their process related interaction. Using the Unified Modelling Language it is implemented as a GML3-based application schema available on the Internet. As the science of the land's surface Geomorphology investigates landforms, their change, and the processes causing this change. The main problem of comparing research results in geomorphology is that the objects under investigation are composed of 3-dimensional geometries that change in time due to processes of material fluxes, e. g. soil erosion or mass movements. They have internal properties, e. g. soil texture or bulk density, that determine the effectiveness of these processes but are under change as well. Worldwide geographical data can be shared over the Internet using Web Feature Services. The precondition is the development of a semantic model or ontology based on international standards like GML3 as an implementation of the ISO 109107 and others. Here we present a GML3-based Mark-up Language or application schema for geomorphic purposes that fulfils the following requirements: First, an object-oriented view of landforms with a true 3-dimensional geometric data format was established. Second, the internal structure and attributes of landforms can be stored. Third, the interaction of processes and landforms is represented. Fourth, the change of all these mentioned attributes over time was considered. The presented application schema is available on the Internet and therefore a first step to enable researchers to share information using an OGC's Web feature service. In this vein comparing modelling results of landscape evolution with results of other scientist's observations is possible. Compared to prevalent data concepts the model presented makes it possible to store information about landforms, their geometry and the characteristics in more detail. It allows to represent the 3D

  6. Intravital Two-Photon Imaging of Lymphocytes Crossing High Endothelial Venules and Cortical Lymphatics in the Inguinal Lymph Node.

    PubMed

    Park, Chung; Hwang, Il-Young; Kehrl, John H

    2016-01-01

    Lymphocyte recirculation through lymph nodes (LNs) requires their crossing of endothelial barriers present in blood vessels and lymphatics by means of chemoattractant-triggered cell migration. The chemoattractant-chemoattractant receptor axes that predominately govern the trafficking of lymphocytes into, and out of, LNs are CCL19/CCR7 and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1PR1), respectively. Blood-borne lymphocytes downregulate S1PR1 and use CCR7 signaling to adhere to high endothelial venules (HEVs) for transmigration. During their LN residency, recirculating lymphocytes reacquire S1PR1 and attenuate their sensitivity to chemokines. Eventually lymphocytes exit the LN by entering the cortical or medullary lymphatics, a process that depends upon S1PR1 signaling. Upon entering into the lymph, lymphocytes lose their polarity, downregulate their sensitivity to S1P due to the high concentration of S1P, and upregulate their sensitivity to chemokines. However, many of the details of lymphocyte transmigration across endothelial barriers remain poorly understood. Intravital two-photon imaging with advanced microscope technologies not only allows the real-time observation of immune cells in intact LN of a live mouse, but also provides a means to monitor the interactions between circulating lymphocytes and stromal barriers. Here, we describe procedures to visualize lymphocytes engaging and crossing HEVs, and approaching and crossing the cortical lymphatic endothelium to enter the efferent lymph in live mice. PMID:27271904

  7. Tyrosine kinase-mediated axial motility of basal cells revealed by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Jeremy; Kim, Bongki; Hill, Eric; Visconti, Pablo; Krapf, Dario; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph; Brown, Dennis; Breton, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells are generally considered to be static relative to their neighbours. Basal cells in pseudostratified epithelia display a single long cytoplasmic process that can cross the tight junction barrier to reach the lumen. Using in vivo microscopy to visualize the epididymis, a model system for the study of pseudostratified epithelia, we report here the surprising discovery that these basal cell projections—which we call axiopodia—periodically extend and retract over time. We found that axiopodia extensions and retractions follow an oscillatory pattern. This movement, which we refer to as periodic axial motility (PAM), is controlled by c-Src and MEK1/2–ERK1/2. Therapeutic inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity induces a retraction of these projections. Such unexpected cell motility may reflect a novel mechanism by which specialized epithelial cells sample the luminal environment. PMID:26868824

  8. Intravital imaging of cardiac function at the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Aaron D.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matt; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of cardiomyocyte biology is limited by the lack of methods to interrogate single-cell physiology in vivo. Here we show that contracting myocytes can indeed be imaged with optical microscopy at high temporal and spatial resolution in the beating murine heart, allowing visualization of individual sarcomeres and measurement of the single cardiomyocyte contractile cycle. Collectively, this has been enabled by efficient tissue stabilization, a prospective real-time cardiac gating approach, an image processing algorithm for motion-artifact-free imaging throughout the cardiac cycle, and a fluorescent membrane staining protocol. Quantification of cardiomyocyte contractile function in vivo opens many possibilities for investigating myocardial disease and therapeutic intervention at the cellular level. PMID:25053815

  9. Tyrosine kinase-mediated axial motility of basal cells revealed by intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jeremy; Kim, Bongki; Hill, Eric; Visconti, Pablo; Krapf, Dario; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph; Brown, Dennis; Breton, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells are generally considered to be static relative to their neighbours. Basal cells in pseudostratified epithelia display a single long cytoplasmic process that can cross the tight junction barrier to reach the lumen. Using in vivo microscopy to visualize the epididymis, a model system for the study of pseudostratified epithelia, we report here the surprising discovery that these basal cell projections--which we call axiopodia--periodically extend and retract over time. We found that axiopodia extensions and retractions follow an oscillatory pattern. This movement, which we refer to as periodic axial motility (PAM), is controlled by c-Src and MEK1/2-ERK1/2. Therapeutic inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity induces a retraction of these projections. Such unexpected cell motility may reflect a novel mechanism by which specialized epithelial cells sample the luminal environment. PMID:26868824

  10. Noninvasive intravital cellular diagnosis of atopic dermatitis by using harmonic optical virtual biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Szu-Yu; Lee, Jyh-Hong; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2007-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is now very common in people who live in cities, especially for babies and children. Since the cause of AD is still not completely understood and each person may have his own mixed symptoms that can change over time, diagnosis of AD can not be done precisely. Unlike some skin diseases, physical biopsy is rarely used in diagnosing AD on account of its low urgency. Thus, only indirect diagnoses, like asking for a medical history to learn about the symptoms and to rule out other diseases can be carried out. To gain insight into cellular details of AD for long-term diagnosing without physical biopsy, a noninvasive in vivo tool with a sub-micron subsurface resolution and high penetrability has to be used. In this presentation, we show that harmonic optical virtual biopsy can provide the required noninvasive cellular imaging, and is ideal for future clinical diagnosis of AD. Harmonic optical microscopy has been demonstrated to have the capability to reveal cellular morphology of human skin from epidermis to dermis layer. Third harmonic generation (THG), which is sensitive to inhomogeneous interfaces, can show the structures of skins, and can be used to reveal the morphological changes, for example, the thicken cuticle which is a common symptom of AD. Second harmonic generation (SHG), which occurs in non-centrosymmetric structures, has excellent contrast in collagen fibers and can show the pathological changes of dermis layer. Utilizing both THG and SHG, useful information may be given to facilitate the diagnosis of AD.

  11. Microcirculatory effects of a homeopathic preparation in patients with mild vertigo: an intravital microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Klopp, R; Niemer, W; Weiser, M

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the homeopathic preparation Vertigoheel on variables related to microcirculation were investigated using vital microscopy techniques in patients with vestibular vertigo. In a non-randomized, open study, 16 patients given Vertigoheel were compared with 16 untreated patients. Measurements were carried out in two areas (defined by selecting 60 blood-cell perfused nodal points of arterioles, venules, and capillaries with a mean diameter > or = 40 microm): the cuticulum/subcuticulum of the inside left lower arm and an area 5 mm behind the left earlobe. After 12 weeks of treatment, patients receiving the homeopathic preparation exhibited an increased number of nodal points, increased flow rates of erythrocytes in both arterioles and venules, increased vasomotion, and a slight reduction in hematocrit vs. baseline. None of these changes were observed in the control group and the differences between treatment groups were statistically significant. Partial oxygen pressure increased significantly in the Vertigoheel group compared with the control group. In addition, in Vertigoheel patients, significantly increased numbers of cell-wall adhering leucocytes were observed, accompanied by increased local concentrations of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1. The microcirculatory changes were associated with a reduction in the severity of vertigo in the actively treated patients, both as assessed by the treating physician and by the patients themselves. The data support a pharmacological effect on microcirculation from the treatment. PMID:15797255

  12. Characterization of tumor microvascular structure and permeability: comparison between magnetic resonance imaging and intravital confocal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitan, Nina Kristine; Thuen, Marte; Goa, Pa˚L. Erik; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2010-05-01

    Solid tumors are characterized by abnormal blood vessel organization, structure, and function. These abnormalities give rise to enhanced vascular permeability and may predict therapeutic responses. The permeability and architecture of the microvasculature in human osteosarcoma tumors growing in dorsal window chambers in athymic mice were measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Dextran (40 kDa) and Gadomer were used as molecular tracers for CLSM and DCE-MRI, respectively. A significant correlation was found between permeability indicators. The extravasation rate Ki as measured by CLSM correlated positively with DCE-MRI parameters, such as the volume transfer constant Ktrans and the initial slope of the contrast agent concentration-time curve. This demonstrates that these two techniques give complementary information. Extravasation was further related to microvascular structure and was found to correlate with the fractal dimension and vascular density. The structural parameter values that were obtained from CLSM images were higher for abnormal tumor vasculature than for normal vessels.

  13. Spatiotemporal Analyses of Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis via Intravital Imaging in Cranial Bone Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunlan; Ness, Vincent P.; Yang, Xiaochuan; Chen, Hongli; Luo, Jiebo; Brown, Edward B; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis and angiogenesis are two integrated components in bone repair and regeneration. A deeper understanding of osteogenesis and angiogenesis has been hampered by technical difficulties of analyzing bone and neovasculature simultaneously in spatiotemporal scales and in three-dimensional formats. To overcome these barriers, a cranial defect window chamber model was established that enabled high-resolution, longitudinal, and real-time tracking of angiogenesis and bone defect healing via Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy (MPLSM). By simultaneously probing new bone matrix via second harmonic generation (SHG), neovascular networks via intravenous perfusion of fluorophore, and osteoblast differentiation via 2.3kb collagen type I promoter driven GFP (Col2.3GFP), we examined the morphogenetic sequence of cranial bone defect healing and further established the spatiotemporal analyses of osteogenesis and angiogenesis coupling in repair and regeneration. We demonstrated that bone defect closure was initiated in the residual bone around the edge of the defect. The expansion and migration of osteoprogenitors into the bone defect occurred during the first 3 weeks of healing, coupled with vigorous microvessel angiogenesis at the leading edge of the defect. Subsequent bone repair was marked by matrix deposition and active vascular network remodeling within new bone. Implantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) isolated from Col2.3GFP mice further showed that donor-dependent bone formation occurred rapidly within the first 3 weeks of implantation, in concert with early angiogenesis. The subsequent bone wound closure was largely host-dependent, associated with localized modest induction of angiogenesis. The establishment of a live imaging platform via cranial window provides a unique tool to understand osteogenesis and angiogenesis in repair and regeneration, enabling further elucidation of the spatiotemporal regulatory mechanisms of osteoprogenitor cell interactions

  14. Spatiotemporal Analyses of Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis via Intravital Imaging in Cranial Bone Defect Repair.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunlan; Ness, Vincent P; Yang, Xiaochuan; Chen, Hongli; Luo, Jiebo; Brown, Edward B; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-07-01

    Osteogenesis and angiogenesis are two integrated components in bone repair and regeneration. A deeper understanding of osteogenesis and angiogenesis has been hampered by technical difficulties of analyzing bone and neovasculature simultaneously in spatiotemporal scales and in 3D formats. To overcome these barriers, a cranial defect window chamber model was established that enabled high-resolution, longitudinal, and real-time tracking of angiogenesis and bone defect healing via multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM). By simultaneously probing new bone matrix via second harmonic generation (SHG), neovascular networks via intravenous perfusion of fluorophore, and osteoblast differentiation via 2.3-kb collagen type I promoter-driven GFP (Col2.3GFP), we examined the morphogenetic sequence of cranial bone defect healing and further established the spatiotemporal analyses of osteogenesis and angiogenesis coupling in repair and regeneration. We showed that bone defect closure was initiated in the residual bone around the edge of the defect. The expansion and migration of osteoprogenitors into the bone defect occurred during the first 3 weeks of healing, coupled with vigorous microvessel angiogenesis at the leading edge of the defect. Subsequent bone repair was marked by matrix deposition and active vascular network remodeling within new bone. Implantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) isolated from Col2.3GFP mice further showed that donor-dependent bone formation occurred rapidly within the first 3 weeks of implantation, in concert with early angiogenesis. The subsequent bone wound closure was largely host-dependent, associated with localized modest induction of angiogenesis. The establishment of a live imaging platform via cranial window provides a unique tool to understand osteogenesis and angiogenesis in repair and regeneration, enabling further elucidation of the spatiotemporal regulatory mechanisms of osteoprogenitor cell interactions with host bone

  15. The mouse cremaster muscle preparation for intravital imaging of the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Bagher, Pooneh; Segal, Steven S

    2011-01-01

    Throughout the body, the maintenance of homeostasis requires the constant supply of oxygen and nutrients concomitant with removal of metabolic by-products. This balance is achieved by the movement of blood through the microcirculation, which encompasses the smallest branches of the vascular supply throughout all tissues and organs. Arterioles branch from arteries to form networks that control the distribution and magnitude of oxygenated blood flowing into the multitude of capillaries intimately associated with parenchymal cells. Capillaries provide a large surface area for diffusional exchange between tissue cells and the blood supply. Venules collect capillary effluent and converge as they return deoxygenated blood towards the heart. To observe these processes in real time requires an experimental approach for visualizing and manipulating the living microcirculation. The cremaster muscle of rats was first used as a model for studying inflammation using histology and electron microscopy post mortem. The first in vivo report of the exposed intact rat cremaster muscle investigated microvascular responses to vasoactive drugs using reflected light. However curvature of the muscle and lack of focused illumination limited the usefulness of this preparation. The major breakthrough entailed opening the muscle, detaching it from the testicle and spreading it radially as a flat sheet for transillumination under a compound microscope. While shown to be a valuable preparation to study the physiology of the microcirculation in rats and hamsters, the cremaster muscle in mice has proven particularly useful in dissecting cellular pathways involved in regulating microvascular function and real-time imaging of intercellular signaling. The cremaster muscle is derived from the internal oblique and transverse abdominus muscles as the testes descend through the inguinal canal. It serves to support (Greek: cremaster = suspender) and maintain temperature of the testes. As described here

  16. Intravital imaging of Ca2+ signals in lymphocytes of Ca2+ biosensor transgenic mice: indication of autoimmune diseases before the pathological onset

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Soichiro; Usami, Takako; Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru; Sasano, Tetsuo; Sugiyama, Koji; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Nakasho, Eiji; Takayanagi, Hiroshi; Tedder, Thomas F.; Karasuyama, Hajime; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Adachi, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) signaling is a typical phenomenon mediated through immune receptors, such as the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR), and it is important for their biological activities. To analyze the signaling of immune receptors together with their in vivo dynamics, we generated stable transgenic mice with the Föster/fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based Ca2+ indicator yellow cameleon 3.60 (YC3.60), based on the Cre/loxP system (YC3.60flox). We successfully obtained mice with specific YC3.60 expression in immune or nerve cells as well as mice with ubiquitous expression of this indicator. We established five-dimensional (5D) (x, y, z, time, and Ca2+) intravital imaging of lymphoid tissues, including the bone marrow. Furthermore, in autoimmune-prone models, the CD22−/− and C57BL/6- lymphoproliferation (lpr)/lpr mouse, Ca2+ fluxes were augmented, although they did not induce autoimmune disease. Intravital imaging of Ca2+ signals in lymphocytes may improve assessment of the risk of autoimmune diseases in model animals. PMID:26732477

  17. Utilization of 4-Dimensional Data Visualization Modeling to Evaluate Burial Ground Contaminants at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Brindley, T. L.; Tarantino, J. J.; Locke, A. L.; Dollins, D. W.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes how 4-Dimensional (4D) Data Visualization Modeling was used to evaluate historical data and to help guide the decisions for the sampling necessary to complete a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for the burial ground sites at the Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). DOE at the Paducah Site is primarily involved in environmental cleanup and landlord activities. The scope of this project was to prepare a work plan for identifying the data available and the data required to conduct an RI/FS for the Burial Ground Operable Unit (BGOU) located within and near PGDP. The work plan focuses on collecting existing information about contamination in and around the burial grounds and determining what additional data are required to support an assessment of risks to human health and the environment and to support future decisions regarding actions to reduce these risks. (authors)

  18. Smart imaging of acute lung injury: exploration of myeloperoxidase activity using in vivo endoscopic confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chagnon, Frédéric; Bourgouin, Alexandra; Lebel, Réjean; Bonin, Marc-André; Marsault, Eric; Lepage, Martin; Lesur, Olivier

    2015-09-15

    The pathophysiology of acute lung injury (ALI) is well characterized, but its real-time assessment at bedside remains a challenge. When patients do not improve after 1 wk despite supportive therapies, physicians have to consider open lung biopsy (OLB) to identify the process(es) at play. Sustained inflammation and inadequate repair are often observed in this context. OLB is neither easy to perform in a critical setting nor exempt from complications. Herein, we explore intravital endoscopic confocal fluorescence microscopy (ECFM) of the lung in vivo combined with the use of fluorescent smart probe(s) activated by myeloperoxidase (MPO). MPO is a granular enzyme expressed by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and alveolar macrophages (AMs), catalyzing the synthesis of hypoclorous acid, a by-product of hydrogen peroxide. Activation of these probes was first validated in vitro in relevant cells (i.e., AMs and PMNs) and on MPO-non-expressing cells (as negative controls) and then tested in vivo using three rat models of ALI and real-time intravital imaging with ECFM. Semiquantitative image analyses revealed that in vivo probe-related cellular/background fluorescence was associated with corresponding enhanced lung enzymatic activity and was partly prevented by specific MPO inhibition. Additional ex vivo phenotyping was performed, confirming that fluorescent cells were neutrophil elastase(+) (PMNs) or CD68(+) (AMs). This work is a first step toward "virtual biopsy" of ALI without OLB. PMID:26232301

  19. Critical Correlation Functions for the 4-Dimensional Weakly Self-Avoiding Walk and n-Component {|\\varphi|^4} Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, Gordon; Tomberg, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    We extend and apply a rigorous renormalisation group method to study critical correlation functions, on the 4-dimensional lattice Z4, for the weakly coupled n-component {|\\varphi|4} spin model for all {n ≥ 1}, and for the continuous-time weakly self-avoiding walk. For the {|\\varphi|4} model, we prove that the critical two-point function has | x|-2 (Gaussian) decay asymptotically, for {n ≥ 1}. We also determine the asymptotic decay of the critical correlations of the squares of components of {\\varphi}, including the logarithmic corrections to Gaussian scaling, for {n ≥ 1}. The above extends previously known results for n = 1 to all {n ≥ 1}, and also observes new phenomena for n > 1, all with a new method of proof. For the continuous-time weakly self-avoiding walk, we determine the decay of the critical generating function for the "watermelon" network consisting of p weakly mutually- and self-avoiding walks, for all {p ≥ 1}, including the logarithmic corrections. This extends a previously known result for p = 1, for which there is no logarithmic correction, to a much more general setting. In addition, for both models, we study the approach to the critical point and prove the existence of logarithmic corrections to scaling for certain correlation functions. Our method gives a rigorous analysis of the weakly self-avoiding walk as the n = 0 case of the {|\\varphi|4} model, and provides a unified treatment of both models, and of all the above results.

  20. Cell-based and in vivo spectral analysis of fluorescent proteins for multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomonnson, Emma; Mihalko, Laura Anne; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2012-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy of cells and subcellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins is the state-of-the-art technology for longitudinal imaging studies in tissues and living animals. Successful analysis of separate cell populations or signaling events by intravital microscopy requires optimal pairing of multiphoton excitation wavelengths with spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins. While prior studies have analyzed two photon absorption properties of isolated fluorescent proteins, there is limited information about two photon excitation and fluorescence emission profiles of fluorescent proteins expressed in living cells and intact tissues. Multiphoton microscopy was used to analyze fluorescence outputs of multiple blue, green, and red fluorescent proteins in cultured cells and orthotopic tumor xenografts of human breast cancer cells. It is shown that commonly used orange and red fluorescent proteins are excited efficiently by 750 to 760 nm laser light in living cells, enabling dual color imaging studies with blue or cyan proteins without changing excitation wavelength. It is also shown that small incremental changes in excitation wavelength significantly affect emission intensities from fluorescent proteins, which can be used to optimize multi-color imaging using a single laser wavelength. These data will direct optimal selection of fluorescent proteins for multispectral two photon microscopy.

  1. Spatial Calibration of Structured Illumination Fluorescence Microscopy using Capillary Tissue Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Grace S.; Miele, Lino F.; Turhan, Aslihan; Lin, Miao; Hanidziar, Dusan; Konerding, Moritz A.; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of microvascular structure is relevant to the investigations of ischemic injury, reparative angiogenesis and tumor revascularization. In light microscopy applications, thick tissue specimens are necessary to characterize microvascular networks; however, thick tissue leads to image distortions due to out-of-focus light. Structured illumination confocal microscopy is an optical sectioning technique that improves contrast and resolution by using a grid pattern to identify the plane-of-focus within the specimen. Because structured illumination can be applied to wide-field (nonscanning) microscopes, the microcirculation can be studied by sequential intravital and confocal microscopy. To assess the application of structured illumination confocal microscopy to microvessel imaging, we studied cell-sized microspheres and fused silica microcapillary tissue phantoms. As expected, structured illumination produced highly accurate images in the lateral (X-Y) plane, but demonstrated a loss of resolution in the Z-Y plane. Because the magnitude of Z-axis distortion was variable in complex tissues, the silica microcapillaries were used as spatial calibration standards. Morphometric parameters, such as shape factor, were used to empirically optimize Z-axis software compression. We conclude that the silica microcapillaries provide a useful tissue phantom for in vitro studies as well as spatial calibration standard for in vivo morphometry of the microcirculation. PMID:18937249

  2. Spatial calibration of structured illumination fluorescence microscopy using capillary tissue phantoms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Grace S; Miele, Lino F; Turhan, Aslihan; Lin, Miao; Hanidziar, Dusan; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2009-02-01

    Quantitative assessment of microvascular structure is relevant to the investigations of ischemic injury, reparative angiogenesis and tumor revascularization. In light microscopy applications, thick tissue specimens are necessary to characterize microvascular networks; however, thick tissue leads to image distortions due to out-of-focus light. Structured illumination confocal microscopy is an optical sectioning technique that improves contrast and resolution by using a grid pattern to identify the plane-of-focus within the specimen. Because structured illumination can be applied to wide-field (nonscanning) microscopes, the microcirculation can be studied by sequential intravital and confocal microscopy. To assess the application of structured illumination confocal microscopy to microvessel imaging, we studied cell-sized microspheres and fused silica microcapillary tissue phantoms. As expected, structured illumination produced highly accurate images in the lateral (X-Y) plane, but demonstrated a loss of resolution in the Z-Y plane. Because the magnitude of Z-axis distortion was variable in complex tissues, the silica microcapillaries were used as spatial calibration standards. Morphometric parameters, such as shape factor, were used to empirically optimize Z-axis software compression. We conclude that the silica microcapillaries provide a useful tissue phantom for in vitro studies as well as spatial calibration standard for in vivo morphometry of the microcirculation. PMID:18937249

  3. Comparative Assessment of Liver Tumor Motion Using Cine–Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Yin, Lingshu; Zou, Wei; Rosen, Mark; Plastaras, John P.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Metz, James M.; Teo, Boon-Keng

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the extent of tumor motion between 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and cine-MRI in patients with hepatic tumors treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with liver tumors who underwent 4DCT and 2-dimensional biplanar cine-MRI scans during simulation were retrospectively reviewed to determine the extent of target motion in the superior–inferior, anterior–posterior, and lateral directions. Cine-MRI was performed over 5 minutes. Tumor motion from MRI was determined by tracking the centroid of the gross tumor volume using deformable image registration. Motion estimates from 4DCT were performed by evaluation of the fiducial, residual contrast (or liver contour) positions in each CT phase. Results: Sixteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (n=11), cholangiocarcinoma (n=3), and liver metastasis (n=2) were reviewed. Cine-MRI motion was larger than 4DCT for the superior–inferior direction in 50% of patients by a median of 3.0 mm (range, 1.5-7 mm), the anterior–posterior direction in 44% of patients by a median of 2.5 mm (range, 1-5.5 mm), and laterally in 63% of patients by a median of 1.1 mm (range, 0.2-4.5 mm). Conclusions: Cine-MRI frequently detects larger differences in hepatic intrafraction tumor motion when compared with 4DCT most notably in the superior–inferior direction, and may be useful when assessing the need for or treating without respiratory management, particularly in patients with unreliable 4DCT imaging. Margins wider than the internal target volume as defined by 4DCT were required to encompass nearly all the motion detected by cine-MRI for some of the patients in this study.

  4. Determination of Internal Target Volume for Radiation Treatment Planning of Esophageal Cancer by Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaojian; Lu, Haijun; Tai, An; Johnstone, Candice; Gore, Elizabeth; Li, X. Allen

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To determine an efficient strategy for the generation of the internal target volume (ITV) for radiation treatment planning for esophageal cancer using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Methods and Materials: 4DCT sets acquired for 20 patients with esophageal carcinoma were analyzed. Each of the 4DCT sets was binned into 10 respiratory phases. For each patient, the gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on the 4DCT set at each phase. Various strategies to derive ITV were explored, including the volume from the maximum intensity projection (MIP; ITV{sub M}IP), unions of the GTVs from selected multiple phases ITV2 (0% and 50% phases), ITV3 (ITV2 plus 80%), and ITV4 (ITV3 plus 60%), as well as the volumes expanded from ITV2 and ITV3 with a uniform margin. These ITVs were compared to ITV10 (the union of the GTVs for all 10 phases) and the differences were measured with the overlap ratio (OR) and relative volume ratio (RVR) relative to ITV10 (ITVx/ITV10). Results: For all patients studied, the average GTV from a single phase was 84.9% of ITV10. The average ORs were 91.2%, 91.3%, 94.5%, and 96.4% for ITV{sub M}IP, ITV2, ITV3, and ITV4, respectively. Low ORs were associated with irregular breathing patterns. ITV3s plus 1 mm uniform margins (ITV3+1) led to an average OR of 98.1% and an average RVR of 106.4%. Conclusions: The ITV generated directly from MIP underestimates the range of the respiration motion for esophageal cancer. The ITV generated from 3 phases (ITV3) may be used for regular breathers, whereas the ITV generated from 4 phases (ITV4) or ITV3 plus a 1-mm uniform margin may be applied for irregular breathers.

  5. Label-Free Determination of Hemodynamic Parameters in the Microcirculaton with Third Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dietzel, Steffen; Pircher, Joachim; Nekolla, A. Katharina; Gull, Mazhar; Brändli, André W.; Pohl, Ulrich; Rehberg, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Determination of blood flow velocity and related hemodynamic parameters is an important aspect of physiological studies which in many settings requires fluorescent labeling. Here we show that Third Harmonic Generation (THG) microscopy is a suitable tool for label-free intravital investigations of the microcirculation in widely-used physiological model systems. THG microscopy is a non-fluorescent multi-photon scanning technique combining the advantages of label-free imaging with restriction of signal generation to a focal spot. Blood flow was visualized and its velocity was measured in adult mouse cremaster muscle vessels, non-invasively in mouse ear vessels and in Xenopus tadpoles. In arterioles, THG line scanning allowed determination of the flow pulse velocity curve and hence the heart rate. By relocating the scan line we obtained velocity profiles through vessel diameters, allowing shear rate calculations. The cell free layer containing the glycocalyx was also visualized. Comparison of the current microscopic resolution with theoretical, diffraction limited resolution let us conclude that an about sixty-fold THG signal intensity increase may be possible with future improved optics, optimized for 1200–1300 nm excitation. THG microscopy is compatible with simultaneous two-photon excited fluorescence detection. It thus also provides the opportunity to determine important hemodynamic parameters in parallel to common fluorescent observations without additional label. PMID:24933027

  6. Two-Photon Microscopy Allows Imaging and Characterization of Cochlear Microvasculature In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bertlich, Mattis; Weiss, Bernhard; Dietzel, Steffen; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of cochlear blood flow has been discussed as factor in the pathophysiology of various inner ear disorders. However, the microscopic study of cochlear microcirculation is limited due to small scale and anatomical constraints. Here, two-photon fluorescence microscopy is applied to visualize cochlear microvessels. Guinea pigs were injected with Fluorescein isothiocyanate- or Texas red-dextrane as plasma marker. Intravital microscopy was performed in four animals and explanted cochleae from four animals were studied. The vascular architecture of the cochlea was visualized up to a depth of 90.0 ± 22.7 μm. Imaging yielded a mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 3.3 ± 1.7. Mean diameter in vivo was 16.5 ± 6.0 μm for arterioles and 8.0 ± 2.4 μm for capillaries. In explanted cochleae, the diameter of radiating arterioles and capillaries was measured with 12.2 ± 1.6 μm and 6.6 ± 1.0 μm, respectively. The difference between capillaries and arterioles was statistically significant in both experimental setups (P < 0.001 and P = 0.022, two-way ANOVA). Measured vessel diameters in vivo and ex vivo were in agreement with published data. We conclude that two-photon fluorescence microscopy allows the investigation of cochlear microvessels and is potentially a valuable tool for inner ear research. PMID:25883941

  7. The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 4-dimensional variational data assimilation systems . Part I - System overview and formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Andrew M.; Arango, Hernan G.; Broquet, Gregoire; Powell, Brian S.; Weaver, Anthony T.; Zavala-Garay, Javier

    2011-10-01

    The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) is one of the few community ocean general circulation models for which a 4-dimensional variational data assimilation (4D-Var) capability has been developed. The ROMS 4D-Var capability is unique in that three variants of 4D-Var are supported: a primal formulation of incremental strong constraint 4D-Var (I4D-Var), a dual formulation based on a physical-space statistical analysis system (4D-PSAS), and a dual formulation representer-based variant of 4D-Var (R4D-Var). In each case, ROMS is used in conjunction with available observations to identify a best estimate of the ocean circulation based on a set of a priori hypotheses about errors in the initial conditions, boundary conditions, surface forcing, and errors in the model in the case of 4D-PSAS and R4D-Var. In the primal formulation of I4D-Var the search for the best circulation estimate is performed in the full space of the model control vector, while for the dual formulations of 4D-PSAS and R4D-Var only the sub-space of linear functions of the model state vector spanned by the observations (i.e. the dual space) is searched. In oceanographic applications, the number of observations is typically much less than the dimension of the model control vector, so there are clear advantages to limiting the search to the space spanned by the observations. In the case of 4D-PSAS and R4D-Var, the strong constraint assumption (i.e. that the model is error free) can be relaxed leading to the so-called weak constraint formulation. This paper describes the three aforementioned variants of 4D-Var as they are implemented in ROMS. Critical components that are common to each approach are conjugate gradient descent, preconditioning, and error covariance models, which are also described. Finally, several powerful 4D-Var diagnostic tools are discussed, namely computation of posterior errors, eigenvector analysis of the posterior error covariance, observation impact, and observation sensitivity.

  8. On Darboux's approach to R-separability of variables. Classification of conformally flat 4-dimensional binary metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szereszewski, A.; Sym, A.

    2015-09-01

    are binary metrics. In this paper we solve the following problem: to classify all conformally flat (of arbitrary signature) 4-dimensional binary metrics. Among them there are 1) those that are separable in the sense of SRE metrics Kalnins-Miller (1978 Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 244 241-61 1982 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 15 2699-709 1984 Adv. Math. 51 91-106 1983 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 14 126-37) and 2) new examples of non-Stäckel R-separability in 4 dimensions.

  9. Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography: Comparison With Pulmonary Function Tests and SPECT Ventilation Images

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian; Mittra, Erik; Hong, Julian C.; Chung, Melody; Eclov, Neville; To, Jacqueline; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)-based pulmonary ventilation imaging is an emerging functional imaging modality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological significance of 4D-CT ventilation imaging by comparison with pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation images, which are the clinical references for global and regional lung function, respectively. Methods and Materials: In an institutional review board–approved prospective clinical trial, 4D-CT imaging and PFT and/or SPECT ventilation imaging were performed in thoracic cancer patients. Regional ventilation (V{sub 4DCT}) was calculated by deformable image registration of 4D-CT images and quantitative analysis for regional volume change. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were compared with the PFT measurements (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV{sub 1}; % predicted) and FEV{sub 1}/forced vital capacity (FVC; %). V{sub 4DCT} was also compared with SPECT ventilation (V{sub SPECT}) to (1) test whether V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions is significantly lower than in nondefect regions by using the 2-tailed t test; (2) to quantify the spatial overlap between V{sub 4DCT} and V{sub SPECT} defect regions with Dice similarity coefficient (DSC); and (3) to test ventral-to-dorsal gradients by using the 2-tailed t test. Results: Of 21 patients enrolled in the study, 18 patients for whom 4D-CT and either PFT or SPECT were acquired were included in the analysis. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were found to have significant, moderate correlations with PFT measurements. For example, V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} defect volume increased significantly with decreasing FEV{sub 1}/FVC (R=−0.65, P<.01). V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions was significantly lower than in nondefect regions (mean V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} 0.049 vs 0.076, P<.01). The average DSCs for the spatial overlap with SPECT ventilation defect regions were only moderate (V

  10. Intravital FRAP Imaging using an E-cadherin-GFP Mouse Reveals Disease- and Drug-Dependent Dynamic Regulation of Cell-Cell Junctions in Live Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Erami, Zahra; Herrmann, David; Warren, Sean C.; Nobis, Max; McGhee, Ewan J.; Lucas, Morghan C.; Leung, Wilfred; Reischmann, Nadine; Mrowinska, Agata; Schwarz, Juliane P.; Kadir, Shereen; Conway, James R.W.; Vennin, Claire; Karim, Saadia A.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Gallego-Ortega, David; Magenau, Astrid; Murphy, Kendelle J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Law, Andrew M.; Walters, Stacey N.; Grey, Shane T.; Croucher, David R.; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Hardeman, Edna C.; Gunning, Peter W.; Ormandy, Christopher J.; Evans, T.R. Jeffry; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen J.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Anderson, Kurt I.; Timpson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions play a prominent role in maintaining the epithelial architecture. The disruption or deregulation of these adhesions in cancer can lead to the collapse of tumor epithelia that precedes invasion and subsequent metastasis. Here we generated an E-cadherin-GFP mouse that enables intravital photobleaching and quantification of E-cadherin mobility in live tissue without affecting normal biology. We demonstrate the broad applications of this mouse by examining E-cadherin regulation in multiple tissues, including mammary, brain, liver, and kidney tissue, while specifically monitoring E-cadherin mobility during disease progression in the pancreas. We assess E-cadherin stability in native pancreatic tissue upon genetic manipulation involving Kras and p53 or in response to anti-invasive drug treatment and gain insights into the dynamic remodeling of E-cadherin during in situ cancer progression. FRAP in the E-cadherin-GFP mouse, therefore, promises to be a valuable tool to fundamentally expand our understanding of E-cadherin-mediated events in native microenvironments. PMID:26725115

  11. Advances in Urine Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Becker, Gavin J; Garigali, Giuseppe; Fogazzi, Giovanni B

    2016-06-01

    Urine microscopy is an important tool for the diagnosis and management of several conditions affecting the kidneys and urinary tract. In this review, we describe the automated instruments, based either on flow cytometry or digitized microscopy, that are currently in use in large clinical laboratories. These tools allow the examination of large numbers of samples in short periods. We also discuss manual urinary microscopy commonly performed by nephrologists, which we encourage. After discussing the advantages of phase contrast microscopy over bright field microscopy, we describe the advancements of urine microscopy in various clinical conditions. These include persistent isolated microscopic hematuria (which can be classified as glomerular or nonglomerular on the basis of urinary erythrocyte morphology), drug- and toxin-related cystalluria (which can be a clue for the diagnosis of acute kidney injury associated with intrarenal crystal precipitation), and some inherited conditions (eg, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency, which is associated with 2,8-dihydroxyadenine crystalluria, and Fabry disease, which is characterized by unique urinary lamellated fatty particles). Finally, we describe the utility of identifying "decoy cells" and atypical malignant cells, which can be easily done with phase contrast microscopy in unfixed samples. PMID:26806004

  12. Superresolution microscopy for microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Coltharp, Carla; Xiao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review provides a practical introduction to superresolution microscopy from the perspective of microbiological research. Because of the small sizes of bacterial cells, superresolution methods are particularly powerful and suitable for revealing details of cellular structures that are not resolvable under conventional fluorescence light microscopy. Here we describe the methodological concepts behind three major categories of super-resolution light microscopy: photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), structured illumination microscopy (SIM) and stimulated emission-depletion (STED) microscopy. We then present recent applications of each of these techniques to microbial systems, which have revealed novel conformations of cellular structures and described new properties of in vivo protein function and interactions. Finally, we discuss the unique issues related to implementing each of these superresolution techniques with bacterial specimens and suggest avenues for future development. The goal of this review is to provide the necessary technical background for interested microbiologists to choose the appropriate super-resolution method for their biological systems, and to introduce the practical considerations required for designing and analysing superresolution imaging experiments. PMID:22947061

  13. Knocking at the brain’s door: intravital two-photon imaging of autoreactive T cell interactions with CNS structures

    PubMed Central

    Flügel, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Since the first applications of two-photon microscopy in immunology 10 years ago, the number of studies using this advanced technology has increased dramatically. The two-photon microscope allows long-term visualization of cell motility in the living tissue with minimal phototoxicity. Using this technique, we examined brain autoantigen-specific T cell behavior in experimental autoimmune encephalitomyelitis, the animal model of human multiple sclerosis. Even before disease symptoms appear, the autoreactive T cells arrive at their target organ. There they crawl along the intraluminal surface of central nervous system (CNS) blood vessels before they extravasate. In the perivascular environment, the T cells meet phagocytes that present autoantigens. This contact activates the T cells to penetrate deep into the CNS parenchyma, where the infiltrated T cells again can find antigen, be further activated, and produce cytokines, resulting in massive immune cell recruitment and clinical disease. PMID:20623286

  14. Clinical specular microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, L.W.; Laing, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides the general ophthalmologist with a guide to the clinical applications of specular microscopy. Important material is included on laser injury, cataract surgery, corneal transplants, glaucoma, uveitis, and trauma.

  15. Signal improvement in multiphoton microscopy by reflection with simple mirrors near the sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehberg, Markus; Krombach, Fritz; Pohl, Ulrich; Dietzel, Steffen

    2010-03-01

    In conventional fluorescence or confocal microscopy, emitted light is generated not only in the focal plane but also above and below. The situation is different in multiphoton-induced fluorescence and multiphoton-induced higher harmonic generation. Here, restriction of signal generation to a single focal point permits that all emitted photons can contribute to image formation if collected, regardless of their path through the specimen. Often, the intensity of the emitted light is rather low in biological specimens. We present a method to significantly increase the fraction of photons collected by an epi (backward) detector by placing a simple mirror, an aluminum-coated coverslip, directly under the sample. Samples investigated include fluorescent test slides, collagen gels, and thin-layered, intact mouse skeletal muscles. Quantitative analysis revealed an intensity increase of second- and third-harmonic generated signal in skeletal muscle of nine- and sevenfold respectively, and of fluorescent signal in test slides of up to twofold. Our approach thus allows significant signal improvement also for situations were a forward detection is impossible, e.g., due to the anatomy of animals in intravital microscopy.

  16. Imaging immune response of skin mast cells in vivo with two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunqiang; Pastila, Riikka K.; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided insightful information of the dynamic process of immune cells in vivo. However, the use of exogenous labeling agents limits its applications. There is no method to perform functional imaging of mast cells, a population of innate tissue-resident immune cells. Mast cells are widely recognized as the effector cells in allergy. Recently their roles as immunoregulatory cells in certain innate and adaptive immune responses are being actively investigated. Here we report in vivo mouse skin mast cells imaging with two-photon microscopy using endogenous tryptophan as the fluorophore. We studied the following processes. 1) Mast cells degranulation, the first step in the mast cell activation process in which the granules are released into peripheral tissue to trigger downstream reactions. 2) Mast cell reconstitution, a procedure commonly used to study mast cells functioning by comparing the data from wild type mice, mast cell-deficient mice, and mast-cell deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Imaging the BMMCs engraftment in tissue reveals the mast cells development and the efficiency of BMMCs reconstitution. We observed the reconstitution process for 6 weeks in the ear skin of mast cell-deficient Kit wsh/ w-sh mice by two-photon imaging. Our finding is the first instance of imaging mast cells in vivo with endogenous contrast.

  17. Advances in small animal mesentery models for in vivo flow cytometry, dynamic microscopy, and drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Tuchin, Valery V; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2007-01-01

    Using animal mesentery with intravital optical microscopy is a well-established experimental model for studying blood and lymph microcirculation in vivo. Recent advances in cell biology and optical techniques provide the basis for extending this model for new applications, which should generate significantly improved experimental data. This review summarizes the achievements in this specific area, including in vivo label-free blood and lymph photothermal flow cytometry, super-sensitive fluorescence image cytometry, light scattering and speckle flow cytometry, microvessel dynamic microscopy, infrared (IR) angiography, and high-speed imaging of individual cells in fast flow. The capabilities of these techniques, using the rat mesentery model, were demonstrated in various studies; e.g., real-time quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells, studies on vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics under normal conditions and under different interventions (e.g. lasers, drugs, nicotine), assessment of lymphatic disturbances from experimental lymphedema, monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems, and high-speed imaging of cell transient deformability in flow. In particular, the obtained results demonstrated that individual cell transportation in living organisms depends on cell type (e.g., normal blood or leukemic cells), the cell’s functional state (e.g., live, apoptotic, or necrotic), and the functional status of the organism. Possible future applications, including in vivo early diagnosis and prevention of disease, monitoring immune response and apoptosis, chemo- and radio-sensitivity tests, and drug screening, are also discussed. PMID:17226898

  18. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.; Weiss, S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.; Chemla, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have developed a general technique which combines the temporal resolution of ultrafast laser spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of scanned probe microscopy (SPM). Using this technique with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), they have obtained simultaneous 2 ps time resolution and 50 {angstrom} spatial resolution. This improves the time resolution currently attainable with STM by nine orders of magnitude. The potential of this powerful technique for studying ultrafast dynamical phenomena on surfaces with atomic resolution is discussed.

  19. Intravital multiphoton imaging of the selective uptake of water-dispersible quantum dots into sinusoidal liver cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaowen; Grice, Jeffrey E; Zhu, Yian; Liu, David; Sanchez, Washington Y; Li, Zhen; Crawford, Darrell H G; Le Couteur, David G; Cogger, Victoria C; Liu, Xin; Xu, Zhi Ping; Roberts, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Although many studies reporting the organ-level biodistribution of nanoparticles (NPs) in animals, very few have addressed the fate of NPs in organs at the cellular level. The liver appears to be the main organ for accumulation of NPs after intravenous injection. In this study, for the first time, the in vivo spatiotemporal disposition of recently developed mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA)-capped cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide (CdTe/CdS) quantum dots (QDs) is explored in rat liver using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) coupled with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), with subcellular resolution (∼1 μm). With high fluorescence efficiency and largely improved stability in the biological environment, these QDs show a distinct distribution pattern in the liver compared to organic dyes, rhodamine 123 and fluorescein. After intravenous injection, fluorescent molecules are taken up by hepatocytes and excreted into the bile, while negatively charged QDs are retained in the sinusoids and selectively taken up by sinusoidal cells (Kupffer cells and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells), but not by hepatocytes within 3 h. The results could help design NPs targeting the specific types of liver cells and choose the fluorescent markers for appropriate cellular imaging. PMID:25504510

  20. Nonlinear optical microscopy for immunoimaging: a custom optimized system of high-speed, large-area, multicolor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Cui, Quan; Zhang, Zhihong; Luo, Qingming

    2015-01-01

    Background The nonlinear optical microscopy has become the current state-of-the-art for intravital imaging. Due to its advantages of high resolution, superior tissue penetration, lower photodamage and photobleaching, as well as intrinsic z-sectioning ability, this technology has been widely applied in immunoimaging for a decade. However, in terms of monitoring immune events in native physiological environment, the conventional nonlinear optical microscope system has to be optimized for live animal imaging. Generally speaking, three crucial capabilities are desired, including high-speed, large-area and multicolor imaging. Among numerous high-speed scanning mechanisms used in nonlinear optical imaging, polygon scanning is not only linearly but also dispersion-freely with high stability and tunable rotation speed, which can overcome disadvantages of multifocal scanning, resonant scanner and acousto-optical deflector (AOD). However, low frame rate, lacking large-area or multicolor imaging ability make current polygonbased nonlinear optical microscopes unable to meet the requirements of immune event monitoring. Methods We built up a polygon-based nonlinear optical microscope system which was custom optimized for immunoimaging with high-speed, large-are and multicolor imaging abilities. Results Firstly, we validated the imaging performance of the system by standard methods. Then, to demonstrate the ability to monitor immune events, migration of immunocytes observed by the system based on typical immunological models such as lymph node, footpad and dorsal skinfold chamber are shown. Finally, we take an outlook for the possible advance of related technologies such as sample stabilization and optical clearing for more stable and deeper intravital immunoimaging. Conclusions This study will be helpful for optimizing nonlinear optical microscope to obtain more comprehensive and accurate information of immune events. PMID:25694951

  1. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Scott Carney, P.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2007-02-01

    State-of-the-art methods in high-resolution three-dimensional optical microscopy require that the focus be scanned through the entire region of interest. However, an analysis of the physics of the light-sample interaction reveals that the Fourier-space coverage is independent of depth. Here we show that, by solving the inverse scattering problem for interference microscopy, computed reconstruction yields volumes with a resolution in all planes that is equivalent to the resolution achieved only at the focal plane for conventional high-resolution microscopy. In short, the entire illuminated volume has spatially invariant resolution, thus eliminating the compromise between resolution and depth of field. We describe and demonstrate a novel computational image-formation technique called interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM). ISAM has the potential to broadly impact real-time three-dimensional microscopy and analysis in the fields of cell and tumour biology, as well as in clinical diagnosis where in vivo imaging is preferable to biopsy.

  2. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  3. Intravital multiphoton tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory disease of human skin. Its pathogenesis is still unknown; however, dysfunctions of the epidermal barrier and the immune response are regarded as key factors for the development of AD. In our study we applied intravital multiphoton tomography (5D-IVT), equipped with a spectral-FLIM module for in-vivo and ex-vivo analysis of human skin affected with AD. In addition to the morphologic skin analysis, FLIM technology gain access to the metabolic status of the epidermal cells referring to the NADH specific fluorescence lifetime. We evaluated a characteristic 5D-IVT skin pattern of AD in comparison to histological sections and detected a correlation with the disease activity measured by SCORAD. FLIM analysis revealed a shift of the mean fluorescence lifetime (taum) of NADH, indicating an altered metabolic activity. Within an ex-vivo approach we have investigated cryo-sections of human skin with or without barrier defects. Spectral-FLIM allows the detection of autofluorescent signals that reflect the pathophysiological conditions of the defect skin barrier. In our study the taum value was shown to be different between healthy and affected skin. Application of the 5D-IVT allows non-invasive in-vivo imaging of human skin with a penetration depth of 150 μm. We could show that affected skin could be distinguished from healthy skin by morphological criteria, by FLIM and by spectral-FLIM. Further studies will evaluate the application of the 5D-IVT technology as a diagnostic tool and to monitor the therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Intravital multiphoton tomography as an appropriate tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Mess, Christian; Dimitrova, Valentina; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2011-03-01

    Increasing incidence of inflammatory skin diseases such as Atopic Dermatitis (AD) has been noted in the past years. According to recent estimations around 15% of newborn subjects are affected with a disease severity that requires medical treatment. Although its pathogenesis is multifactorial, recent reports indicate that an impaired physical skin barrier predispose for the development of AD. The major part of this barrier is formed by the stratum corneum (SC) wherein corneocytes are embedded in a complex matrix of proteins and lipids. Its components were synthesized in the stratum granulosum (SG) and secreted via lamellar bodies at the SC/SG interface. Within a clinical in vivo study we focused on the skin metabolism at the SC/SG interface in AD affected patients in comparison to healthy subjects. Measurement of fluorescence life-time of NADH provides access to the metabolic state of skin. Due to the application of a 5D intravital tomographic skin analysis we facilitate the non-invasive investigation of human epidermis in the longitudinal course of AD therapy. We could ascertain by blinded analysis of 40 skin areas of 20 patients in a three month follow-up that the metabolic status at the SC/SG interface was altered in AD compromised skin even in non-lesional, apparent healthy skin regions. This illustrates an impaired skin barrier formation even at non-affected skin of AD subjects appearing promotive for the development of acute skin inflammation. Therefore, our findings allow a deeper understanding of the individual disease development and the improved management of the therapeutic intervention in clinical application.

  5. Imaging interferometric microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Christian J; Kuznetsova, Yuliya; Brueck, S R J

    2003-08-15

    We introduce and demonstrate a new microscopy concept: imaging interferometric microscopy (IIM), which is related to holography, synthetic-aperture imaging, and off-axis-dark-field illumination techniques. IIM is a wavelength-division multiplex approach to image formation that combines multiple images covering different spatial-frequency regions to form a composite image with a resolution much greater than that permitted by the same optical system using conventional techniques. This new type of microscopy involves both off-axis coherent illumination and reinjection of appropriate zero-order reference beams. Images demonstrate high resolution, comparable with that of a high-numerical-aperture (NA) objective, while they retain the long working distance, the large depth of field, and the large field of view of a low-NA objective. A Fourier-optics model of IIM is in good agreement with the experiment. PMID:12943079

  6. Multiphoton microscopy in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Winfried

    2002-06-01

    The study of the nervous system requires to an exceptional extent observation of and experimentation on intact tissue. There, in particular, high-resolution optical microscopy benefits from the inherent advantages of multi-photon fluorescence excitation. Several cases will be presented from a number of different tissues and organisms, where multi-photon excited laser scanning fluorescence microscopy has been an essential experimental tool. Those examples include the discovery of biochemical coincidence detection in synaptic spines and the clarification of the underlying mechanism; the observation of sensory evoked dendritic signaling in intact animals and the observation of light induced calcium signals in the intact retina. Recently a fiber coupled two-photon microscopy has been developed that allows the imaging in moving animal.

  7. Controllable tomography phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Tomography phase microscopy (TPM) is a new microscopic method that can quantitatively yield the volumetric 3D distribution of a sample's refractive index (RI), which is significant for cell biology research. In this paper, a controllable TPM system is introduced. In this system a circulatory phase-shifting method and piezoelectric ceramic are used which enable the TPM system to record the 3D RI distribution at a more controllable speed, from 1 to 40 fps, than in the other TPM systems reported. The resolution of the RI distribution obtained by this controllable TPM is much better than that in images recorded by phase contrast microscopy and interference tomography microscopy. The realization of controllable TPM not only allows for the application of TPM to the measurement of kinds of RI sample, but also contributes to academic and technological support for the practical use of TPM.

  8. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Laura M.; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic.

  9. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Laura M; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E; Roth, Charles M; Moghe, Prabhas V; Pierce, Mark C

    2015-11-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4 : Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic. PMID:26603495

  10. Laser-induced (endo)vascular photothermal effects studied by combined brightfield and fluorescence microscopy in hamster dorsal skin fold venules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezemer, R.; Heger, M.; van den Wijngaard, J. P. H.; Mordon, S. R.; van Gemert, M. J. C.; Beek, J. F.

    2007-07-01

    The putative features of the (endo)vascular photothermal response, characterized by laser-induced thermal denaturation of blood and vessel wall constituents, have been elucidated individually, but not simultaneously in dynamic, isolated in vivo systems. A hamster dorsal skin fold model in combination with brightfield/fluorescence intravital microscopy was used to examine the effect of laser pulse duration and blood flow velocity on the size of the thermal coagulum, its attachment behavior, and laser-mediated vasomotion. The size of the coagulum and the extent of vasoconstriction and latent vasodilation were proportional to the laser pulse duration, but pulse duration had no effect on coagulum attachment/dislodgement. Blood flow velocity exhibited no significant effect on the studied parameters. The (endo)vascular photothermal response is governed predominantly by laser energy deposition and to a marginal extent by blood flow velocity.

  11. Probing the immune and healing response of murine intestinal mucosa by time-lapse 2-photon microscopy of laser-induced lesions with real-time dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Klinger, Antje; Freidank, Sebastian; Linz, Norbert; Eckert, Sebastian; Hüttmann, Gereon; Gebert, Andreas; Vogel, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Gut mucosa is an important interface between body and environment. Immune response and healing processes of murine small intestinal mucosa were investigated by intravital time-lapse two-photon excited autofluorescence microscopy of the response to localized laser-induced damage. Epithelial lesions were created by 355-nm, 500-ps pulses from a microchip laser that produced minute cavitation bubbles. Size and dynamics of these bubbles were monitored using a novel interferometric backscattering technique with 80 nm resolution. Small bubbles (< 2.5 µm maximum radius) merely resulted in autofluorescence loss of the target cell. Larger bubbles (7-25 µm) affected several cells and provoked immigration of immune cells (polymorphonuclear leucocytes). Damaged cells were expelled into the lumen, and the epithelium healed within 2 hours by stretching and migration of adjacent epithelial cells. PMID:25360369

  12. Non-linear spatio-temporal filtering of dynamic PET data using a 4-dimensional Gaussian filter and expectation-maximization deconvolution

    PubMed Central

    Holden, J E

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a method for denoising dynamic PET data, spatio-temporal expectation-maximization (STEM) filtering, that combines 4-dimensional Gaussian filtering with EM deconvolution. The initial Gaussian filter suppresses noise at a broad range of spatial and temporal frequencies and EM deconvolution quickly restores the frequencies most important to the signal. We aim to demonstrate that STEM filtering can improve variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images without introducing significant bias. We evaluate STEM filtering with a dynamic phantom study, and with simulated and human dynamic PET studies of a tracer with reversible binding behaviour, [C-11]raclopride, and a tracer with irreversible binding behaviour, [F-18]FDOPA. STEM filtering is compared to a number of established 3 and 4-dimensional denoising methods. STEM filtering provides substantial improvements in variance in both individual time frames and in parametric images generated with a number of kinetic analysis techniques while introducing little bias. STEM filtering does bias early frames, but this does not affect quantitative parameter estimates. STEM filtering is shown to be superior to the other simple denoising methods studied. STEM filtering is a simple and effective denoising method that could be valuable for a wide range of dynamic PET applications. PMID:23370699

  13. Video Telescope Operating Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Divers, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Exotic pet veterinarians frequently have to operate on small animals, and magnification is commonly used. Existing endoscopy equipment can be used with a mechanical arm and telescope to enable video telescope operating microscopy. The additional equipment items and their specifics are described, and several case examples are provided. PMID:26117519

  14. Photoacoustic computed microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lei; Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is emerging as a powerful technique for imaging microvasculature at depths beyond the ~1 mm depth limit associated with confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy and optical coherence tomography. PAM, however, is currently qualitative in nature and cannot quantitatively measure important functional parameters including oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), deoxyhemoglobin (HbR), oxygen saturation (sO2), blood flow (BF) and rate of oxygen metabolism (MRO2). Here we describe a new photoacoustic microscopic method, termed photoacoustic computed microscopy (PACM) that combines current PAM technique with a model-based inverse reconstruction algorithm. We evaluate the PACM approach using tissue-mimicking phantoms and demonstrate its in vivo imaging ability of quantifying HbO2, HbR, sO2, cerebral BF and cerebral MRO2 at the small vessel level in a rodent model. This new technique provides a unique tool for neuroscience research and for visualizing microvasculature dynamics involved in tumor angiogenesis and in inflammatory joint diseases.

  15. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Tyler S.

    State-of-the-art interferometric microscopies have problems representing objects that lie outside of the focus because the defocus and diffraction effects are not accounted for in the processing. These problems occur because of the lack of comprehensive models to include the scattering effects in the processing. In this dissertation, a new modality in three-dimensional (3D) optical microscopy, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM), is introduced to account for the scattering effects. Comprehensive models for interferometric microscopy, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) are developed, for which forward, adjoint, normal, and inverse operators are formulated. Using an accurate model for the probe beam, the resulting algorithms demonstrate accurate linear estimation of the susceptibility of an object from the interferometric data. Using the regularized least squares solution, an ISAM reconstruction of underlying object structure having spatially invariant resolution is obtained from simulated and experimental interferometric data, even in regions outside of the focal plane of the lens. Two-dimensional (2D) and 3D interferometric data is used to resolve objects outside of the confocal region with minimal loss of resolution, unlike in OCT. Therefore, high-resolution details are recovered from outside of the confocal region. Models and solutions are presented for the planar-scanned, the rotationally scanned, and the full-field illuminated geometry. The models and algorithms presented account for the effects of a finite beam width, the source spectrum, the illumination and collection fields, as well as defocus, diffraction and dispersion effects.

  16. Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1994-09-01

    Preface; List of acronyms; Introduction; Part I. Experimental Methods and Theoretical Background of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 1. Scanning tunnelling microscopy; 2. Scanning force microscopy; 3. Related scanning probe techniques; Part II. Applications of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 4. Condensed matter physics; 5. Chemistry; 6. Organic materials; 7. Metrology and standards; 8. Nanotechnology; References; Index.

  17. Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-10-12

    Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

  18. Quad stereo-microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Rebecca F.; Gibson, Graham M.; Lee, Michael P.; Padgett, Miles J.; Phillips, David B.

    2014-09-01

    Stereo-microscopy is a technique that enables a sample to be imaged from two directions simultaneously, allowing the tracking of microscopic objects in three dimensions. This is achieved by illuminating the sample from different directions, each illumination direction producing an individual image. These images are superimposed in the image plane but can be easily separated using a diffractive optical element in the Fourier plane of the imaging arm. Therefore this enables 3-dimensional coordinates to be reconstructed using simple 2-dimensional image tracking and parallax. This is a powerful technique when combined with holographic optical tweezers (HOT), where multiple objects can be trapped and tracked simultaneously in three dimensions. In this work, we extend this concept to four different illumination directions: quad stereo-microscopy. This allows us to measure the accuracy of tracking in three dimensions, and to optimise the system.

  19. Multimodal Nonlinear Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shuhua; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Because each nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging modality is sensitive to specific molecules or structures, multimodal NLO imaging capitalizes the potential of NLO microscopy for studies of complex biological tissues. The coupling of multiphoton fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has allowed investigation of a broad range of biological questions concerning lipid metabolism, cancer development, cardiovascular disease, and skin biology. Moreover, recent research shows the great potential of using CARS microscope as a platform to develop more advanced NLO modalities such as electronic-resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing, stimulated Raman scattering, and pump-probe microscopy. This article reviews the various approaches developed for realization of multimodal NLO imaging as well as developments of new NLO modalities on a CARS microscope. Applications to various aspects of biological and biomedical research are discussed. PMID:24353747

  20. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Shigeru; Bard, Allen J.; Fan, Fu-Ren F.; Mirkin, Michael V.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2008-07-01

    This review describes work done in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) since 2000 with an emphasis on new applications and important trends, such as nanometer-sized tips. SECM has been adapted to investigate charge transport across liquid/liquid interfaces and to probe charge transport in thin films and membranes. It has been used in biological systems like single cells to study ion transport in channels, as well as cellular and enzyme activity. It is also a powerful and useful tool for the evaluation of the electrocatalytic activities of different materials for useful reactions, such as oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation. SECM has also been used as an electrochemical tool for studies of the local properties and reactivity of a wide variety of materials, including metals, insulators, and semiconductors. Finally, SECM has been combined with several other nonelectrochemical techniques, such as atomic force microscopy, to enhance and complement the information available from SECM alone.

  1. Pure optical photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhixing; Chen, Sung-Liang; Ling, Tao; Guo, L. Jay; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2011-01-01

    The concept of pure optical photoacoustic microscopy(POPAM) was proposed based on optical rastering of a focused excitation beam and optically sensing the photoacoustic signal using a microring resonator fabricated by a nanoimprinting technique. After the refinements of the microring’s working wavelength and in the resonator structure and mold fabrication, an ultrahigh Q factor of 3.0×105 was achieved which provided high sensitivity with a noise equivalent detectable pressure(NEDP) value of 29Pa. This NEDP is much lower than the hundreds of Pascals achieved with existing optical resonant structures such as etalons, fiber gratings and dielectric multilayer interference filters available for acoustic measurement. The featured high sensitivity allowed the microring resonator to detect the weak photoacoustic signals from micro- or submicroscale objects. The inherent superbroad bandwidth of the optical microring resonator combined with an optically focused scanning beam provided POPAM with high resolution in the axial as well as both lateral directions while the axial resolution of conventional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) suffers from the limited bandwidth of PZT detectors. Furthermore, the broadband microring resonator showed similar sensitivity to that of our most sensitive PZT detector. The current POPAM system provides a lateral resolution of 5 μm and an axial resolution of 8 μm, comparable to that achieved by optical microscopy while presenting the unique contrast of optical absorption and functional information complementing other optical modalities. The 3D structure of microvasculature, including capillary networks, and even individual red blood cells have been discerned successfully in the proof-of-concept experiments on mouse bladders ex vivo and mouse ears in vivo. The potential of approximately GHz bandwidth of the microring resonator also might allow much higher resolution than shown here in microscopy of optical absorption and acoustic propagation

  2. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  3. Dual-CARS microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enejder, Annika; Brackmann, Christian; Burkacky, Ondrej; Åkeson, Madeleine

    2007-02-01

    We present a new Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy technique for label-free imaging of biomolecules in living cells; dual-CARS microscopy. The use of three synchronized laser pulses in a dual-pump/dualdetection configuration enables imaging of two species with different molecular vibrations simultaneously, as well as acquisition of images free of non-resonant background. We show the power of the method by imaging deuterated nonadecane slowly diffusing into a suspension of living yeast cells in medium, clearly distinguishing the medium and the lipid droplets in the cells by probing the CH II vibration from the D-nonadecane by probing the CD vibration. In addition, images of lipid stores in living C. elegans nematodes free of non-resonant background are shown. This results in a significant enhancement of the image contrast, allowing the visualization of emerging, low-density lipid stores in a dauer larva, difficult to distinguish in conventional CARS microscopy. The separation of the non-resonant background is shown to be beneficial also when monitoring molecules with weak vibrational modes. The improved sensitivity obtained is illustrated by probing the C=C vibration in polyunsaturated lipids extracted from fish. This enables the monitoring of the degree of unsaturation of lipids, a high value of which is reported in foods known to have positive effects on human health.

  4. Applications of Second-Harmonic Generation Imaging Microscopy in Ovarian and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tilbury, Karissa; Campagnola, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    In this perspective, we discuss how the nonlinear optical technique of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has been used to greatly enhance our understanding of the tumor microenvironment (TME) of breast and ovarian cancer. Striking changes in collagen architecture are associated with these epithelial cancers, and SHG can image these changes with great sensitivity and specificity with submicrometer resolution. This information has not historically been exploited by pathologists but has the potential to enhance diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. We summarize the utility of image processing tools that analyze fiber morphology in SHG images of breast and ovarian cancer in human tissues and animal models. We also describe methods that exploit the SHG physical underpinnings that are effective in delineating normal and malignant tissues. First we describe the use of polarization-resolved SHG that yields metrics related to macromolecular and supramolecular structures. The coherence and corresponding phase-matching process of SHG results in emission directionality (forward to backward), which is related to sub-resolution fibrillar assembly. These analyses are more general and more broadly applicable than purely morphology-based analyses; however, they are more computationally intensive. Intravital imaging techniques are also emerging that incorporate all of these quantitative analyses. Now, all these techniques can be coupled with rapidly advancing miniaturization of imaging systems to afford their use in clinical situations including enhancing pathology analysis and also in assisting in real-time surgical determination of tumor margins. PMID:25987830

  5. Applications of second-harmonic generation imaging microscopy in ovarian and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tilbury, Karissa; Campagnola, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    In this perspective, we discuss how the nonlinear optical technique of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has been used to greatly enhance our understanding of the tumor microenvironment (TME) of breast and ovarian cancer. Striking changes in collagen architecture are associated with these epithelial cancers, and SHG can image these changes with great sensitivity and specificity with submicrometer resolution. This information has not historically been exploited by pathologists but has the potential to enhance diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. We summarize the utility of image processing tools that analyze fiber morphology in SHG images of breast and ovarian cancer in human tissues and animal models. We also describe methods that exploit the SHG physical underpinnings that are effective in delineating normal and malignant tissues. First we describe the use of polarization-resolved SHG that yields metrics related to macromolecular and supramolecular structures. The coherence and corresponding phase-matching process of SHG results in emission directionality (forward to backward), which is related to sub-resolution fibrillar assembly. These analyses are more general and more broadly applicable than purely morphology-based analyses; however, they are more computationally intensive. Intravital imaging techniques are also emerging that incorporate all of these quantitative analyses. Now, all these techniques can be coupled with rapidly advancing miniaturization of imaging systems to afford their use in clinical situations including enhancing pathology analysis and also in assisting in real-time surgical determination of tumor margins. PMID:25987830

  6. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  7. Fast fluorescence holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wan; Yang, Xiaoqi; Li, Yingying; Peng, Xiang; Qu, Xinghua; Yao, Hai; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2015-01-01

    FINCHSCOPE is a new technology of fluorescence holographic microscopy. It has been successfully applied to recording high-resolution three-dimensional fluorescence images of biological specimens without the need for scanning. In this study, we revealed and analyzed an intrinsic phenomenon, called ghost lens effect, on spatial light modulator which is the core element enabling the incoherent correlation in the FINCHSCOPE. The ghost lens effect can degrade the imaging quality by introducing multiple spherical waves with different focal lengths into the correlation and thus increasing the noise in the recorded holograms. PMID:25767693

  8. High resolution MR microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, Luisa

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microscopy [1] has the potential to bring the full capabilities of NMR to arbitrarily specified localized positions within small samples. The most interesting target of study is the living biological cell, with typical dimensions ˜100 mum, but with substructures that are much smaller, such as the cell nucleus (typically ˜10 mu m) and mitochondria (1--10 mum). One anticipates that the development of MR microscopy with resolution at the level of these substructures or better and with a wide, three dimensional field-of-view could open a new avenue of investigation into the biology of the living cell. Although the first MR image of a single biological cell was reported in 1987 [2], the cell imaged had quite large (˜1 mm diameter) spatial dimensions and the resolution obtained (on the order of 10 mu m) was not adequate for meaningful imaging of more typically sized cells. The quest for higher resolution has continued. In 1989 Zhou et al. [3] obtained fully three dimensional images with spatial resolution of (6.37 mum)3, or 260 femtoliters. While better "in-plane" resolutions (i.e., the resolution in 2 of the 3 spatial dimensions) have since been obtained, [4, 5] this volume resolution was not exceeded until quite recently by Lee et al., [6] who report 2D images having volume resolution of 75 mum 3 and in-plane resolution of 1 mum. In parallel with these advances in raw resolution several investigators [7, 8, 9] have focused on localized spectroscopy and/or chemical shift imaging. The key obstacles to overcome in MR microscopy are (1) the loss of signal to noise that occurs when observing small volumes and (2) molecular diffusion during the measurement or encoding. To date the problem of sensitivity has typically been addressed by employing small micro-coil receivers. [10] The problem of molecular diffusion can only be defeated with strong magnetic field gradients that can encode spatial information quickly. We report MR microscopy

  9. In vivo two-photon microscopy study of short-term effects of microbeam irradiation on normal mouse brain microvasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Serduc, Raphael . E-mail: rserduc@ujf-grenoble.fr; Verant, Pascale; Vial, Jean-Claude; Farion, Regine; Rocas, Linda; Remy, Chantal; Fadlallah, Taoufik M.S.; Brauer, Elke M.S.; Bravin, Alberto; Laissue, Jean; Blattmann, Hans; Sanden, Boudewijn van der

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the early effects of microbeam irradiation on the vascular permeability and volume in the parietal cortex of normal nude mice using two-photon microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Methods and Materials: The upper part of the left hemisphere of 55 mice was irradiated anteroposteriorly using 18 vertically oriented beams (width 25 {mu}m, interdistance 211 {mu}m; peak entrance doses: 312 or 1000 Gy). At different times after microbeam exposure, the microvasculature in the cortex was analyzed using intravital two-photon microscopy after intravascular injection of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextrans and sulforhodamine B (SRB). Changes of the vascular volume were observed at the FITC wavelength over a maximum depth of 650 {mu}m from the dura. The vascular permeability was detected as extravasations of SRB. Results: For all times (12 h to 1 month) after microbeam irradiation and for both doses, the FITC-dextran remained in the vessels. No significant change in vascular volume was observed between 12 h and 3 months after irradiation. Diffusion of SRB was observed in microbeam irradiated regions from 12 h until 12 days only after a 1000 Gy exposure. Conclusion: No radiation damage to the microvasculature was detected in normal brain tissue after a 312 Gy microbeam irradiation. This dose would be more appropriate than 1000 Gy for the treatment of brain tumors using crossfired microbeams.

  10. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  11. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, António J; Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-18

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  12. Scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hua

    2002-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and development of the scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy (STAM). This research effort spans over a period of more than 12 years, which successfully elevated the acoustic microscopy from the traditional intensity-mapping mode to the level of holographic and tomographic imaging. The tomographic imaging capability of STAM was developed on the platform of the scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM), which operates in a coherent transmission mode with plane-wave illumination and scanning laser wavefield detection. The image formation techniques were based on the backward propagation method implemented in the plane-to-plane format. In this paper, the key elements of the design and development, including the modification of the data-acquisition hardware, implementation of image reconstruction algorithms for multiple-frequency and multiple-angle tomography, and the high-precision phase-correction and image registration techniques for the superposition of coherent sub-images, will be discussed. Results of full-scale experiments will also be included to demonstrate the capability of holographic and tomographic image formation in microscopic scale.

  13. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  14. Cameras for digital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Spring, Kenneth R

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews the fundamental characteristics of charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and related detectors, outlines the relevant parameters for their use in microscopy, and considers promising recent developments in the technology of detectors. Electronic imaging with a CCD involves three stages--interaction of a photon with the photosensitive surface, storage of the liberated charge, and readout or measurement of the stored charge. The most demanding applications in fluorescence microscopy may require as much as four orders of greater magnitude sensitivity. The image in the present-day light microscope is usually acquired with a CCD camera. The CCD is composed of a large matrix of photosensitive elements (often referred to as "pixels" shorthand for picture elements, which simultaneously capture an image over the entire detector surface. The light-intensity information for each pixel is stored as electronic charge and is converted to an analog voltage by a readout amplifier. This analog voltage is subsequently converted to a numerical value by a digitizer situated on the CCD chip, or very close to it. Several (three to six) amplifiers are required for each pixel, and to date, uniform images with a homogeneous background have been a problem because of the inherent difficulties of balancing the gain in all of the amplifiers. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensors also exhibit relatively high noise associated with the requisite high-speed switching. Both of these deficiencies are being addressed, and sensor performance is nearing that required for scientific imaging. PMID:23931507

  15. Correlative Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doory; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Sigal, Yaron M.; Babcock, Hazen P.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence light microscopy and electron microscopy allows the imaging of spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in the context of cellular ultrastructure. Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows the location of molecules to be determined with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. However, correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) still remains challenging because the optimal specimen preparation and imaging conditions for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and EM are often not compatible. Here, we have developed several experiment protocols for correlative stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and EM methods, both for un-embedded samples by applying EM-specific sample preparations after STORM imaging and for embedded and sectioned samples by optimizing the fluorescence under EM fixation, staining and embedding conditions. We demonstrated these methods using a variety of cellular targets. PMID:25874453

  16. Applications of subsurface microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Farahi, Rubye H; Voy, Brynn H; Thundat, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Exploring the interior of a cell is of tremendous importance in order to assess the effects of nanomaterials on biological systems. Outside of a controlled laboratory environment, nanomaterials will most likely not be conveniently labeled or tagged so that their translocation within a biological system cannot be easily identified and quantified. Ideally, the characterization of nanomaterials within a cell requires a nondestructive, label-free, and subsurface approach. Subsurface nanoscale imaging represents a real challenge for instrumentation. Indeed the tools available for high resolution characterization, including optical, electron or scanning probe microscopies, mainly provide topography images or require taggants that fluoresce. Although the intercellular environment holds a great deal of information, subsurface visualization remains a poorly explored area. Recently, it was discovered that by mechanically perturbing a sample, it was possible to observe its response in time with nanoscale resolution by probing the surface with a micro-resonator such as a microcantilever probe. Microcantilevers are used as the force-sensing probes in atomic force microscopy (AFM), where the nanometer-scale probe tip on the microcantilever interacts with the sample in a highly controlled manner to produce high-resolution raster-scanned information of the sample surface. Taking advantage of the existing capabilities of AFM, we present a novel technique, mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM), which has the ability to probe subsurface structures such as non-labeled nanoparticles embedded in a cell. In MSAFM mechanical actuators (PZTs) excite the probe and the sample at different frequencies as depicted in the first figure of this chapter. The nonlinear nature of the tip-sample interaction, at the point of contact of the probe and the surface of the sample, in the contact mode AFM configuration permits the mixing of the elastic waves. The new dynamic system comprises new

  17. Characterization of Polymer Blends: Optical Microscopy (*Polarized, Interference and Phase Contrast Microscopy*) and Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan; Darling, Seth B.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 15 surveys the characterization of macro, micro and meso morphologies of polymer blends by optical microscopy. Confocal Microscopy offers the ability to view the three dimensional morphology of polymer blends, popular in characterization of biological systems. Confocal microscopy uses point illumination and a spatial pinhole to eliminate out-of focus light in samples that are thicker than the focal plane.

  18. Hyperspectral light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jahr, Wiebke; Schmid, Benjamin; Schmied, Christopher; Fahrbach, Florian O; Huisken, Jan

    2015-01-01

    To study the development and interactions of cells and tissues, multiple fluorescent markers need to be imaged efficiently in a single living organism. Instead of acquiring individual colours sequentially with filters, we created a platform based on line-scanning light sheet microscopy to record the entire spectrum for each pixel in a three-dimensional volume. We evaluated data sets with varying spectral sampling and determined the optimal channel width to be around 5 nm. With the help of these data sets, we show that our setup outperforms filter-based approaches with regard to image quality and discrimination of fluorophores. By spectral unmixing we resolved overlapping fluorophores with up to nanometre resolution and removed autofluorescence in zebrafish and fruit fly embryos. PMID:26329685

  19. Hyperspectral light sheet microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahr, Wiebke; Schmid, Benjamin; Schmied, Christopher; Fahrbach, Florian O.; Huisken, Jan

    2015-09-01

    To study the development and interactions of cells and tissues, multiple fluorescent markers need to be imaged efficiently in a single living organism. Instead of acquiring individual colours sequentially with filters, we created a platform based on line-scanning light sheet microscopy to record the entire spectrum for each pixel in a three-dimensional volume. We evaluated data sets with varying spectral sampling and determined the optimal channel width to be around 5 nm. With the help of these data sets, we show that our setup outperforms filter-based approaches with regard to image quality and discrimination of fluorophores. By spectral unmixing we resolved overlapping fluorophores with up to nanometre resolution and removed autofluorescence in zebrafish and fruit fly embryos.

  20. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens. PMID:27103155

  1. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens.

  2. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens. PMID:27103155

  3. Sensitivity of photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Building on its high spatial resolution, deep penetration depth and excellent image contrast, 3D photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has grown tremendously since its first publication in 2005. Integrating optical excitation and acoustic detection, PAM has broken through both the optical diffusion and optical diffraction limits. PAM has 100% relative sensitivity to optical absorption (i.e., a given percentage change in the optical absorption coefficient yields the same percentage change in the photoacoustic amplitude), and its ultimate detection sensitivity is limited only by thermal noise. Focusing on the engineering aspects of PAM, this Review discusses the detection sensitivity of PAM, compares the detection efficiency of different PAM designs, and summarizes the imaging performance of various endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. It then describes representative PAM applications with high detection sensitivity, and outlines paths to further improvement. PMID:25302158

  4. Hyperspectral light sheet microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jahr, Wiebke; Schmid, Benjamin; Schmied, Christopher; Fahrbach, Florian O.; Huisken, Jan

    2015-01-01

    To study the development and interactions of cells and tissues, multiple fluorescent markers need to be imaged efficiently in a single living organism. Instead of acquiring individual colours sequentially with filters, we created a platform based on line-scanning light sheet microscopy to record the entire spectrum for each pixel in a three-dimensional volume. We evaluated data sets with varying spectral sampling and determined the optimal channel width to be around 5 nm. With the help of these data sets, we show that our setup outperforms filter-based approaches with regard to image quality and discrimination of fluorophores. By spectral unmixing we resolved overlapping fluorophores with up to nanometre resolution and removed autofluorescence in zebrafish and fruit fly embryos. PMID:26329685

  5. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  6. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  7. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  8. Scanning Tomographic Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G.; Meyyappan, A.

    1988-07-01

    The technology for "seeing" with sound has an important and interesting history. Some of nature's creatures have been using sound waves for many millenia to image otherwise unobservable objects. The human species, lacking this natural ability, have overcome this deficiency by developing several different ultrasonic imaging techniques. acoustic microscopy is one such technique, which produces high resolution images of detailed structure of small objects in a non-destructive fashion. Two types of acoustic microscopes have evolved for industrial exploitation. They are the scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) and the scanning acoustic microscope (SAM). In this paper, we review the principles of SLAM and describe how we use elements of SLAM to realize the scanning tomographic acoustic microscope (STAM). We describe the data acquisition process and the image reconstruction procedure. We also describe techniques to obtain projection data from different angles of wave incidence enabling us to reconstruct different planes of a complex specimen tomo-graphically. Our experimental results show that STAM is capable of producing high-quality high-resolution subsurface images.

  9. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  10. Adaptive scanning probe microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Swartzentruber, B.S.; Bouchard, A.M.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1997-02-01

    This work is comprised of two major sections. In the first section the authors develop multivariate image classification techniques to distinguish and identify surface electronic species directly from multiple-bias scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images. Multiple measurements at each site are used to distinguish and categorize inequivalent electronic or atomic species on the surface via a computerized classification algorithm. Then, comparison with theory or other suitably chosen experimental data enables the identification of each class. They demonstrate the technique by analyzing dual-polarity constant-current topographs of the Ge(111) surface. Just two measurements, negative- and positive-bias topography height, permit pixels to be separated into seven different classes. Labeling four of the classes as adatoms, first-layer atoms, and two inequivalent rest-atom sites, they find excellent agreement with the c(2 x 8) structure. The remaining classes are associated with structural defects and contaminants. This work represents a first step toward developing a general electronic/chemical classification and identification tool for multivariate scanning probe microscopy imagery. In the second section they report measurements of the diffusion of Si dimers on the Si(001) surface at temperatures between room temperature and 128 C using a novel atom-tracking technique that can resolve every diffusion event. The atom tracker employs lateral-positioning feedback to lock the STM probe tip into position above selected atoms with sub-Angstrom precision. Once locked the STM tracks the position of the atoms as they migrate over the crystal surface. By tracking individual atoms directly, the ability of the instrument to measure dynamic events is increased by a factor of {approximately} 1,000 over conventional STM imaging techniques.

  11. Epi-Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Donna J.; Brown, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Epi-fluorescence microscopy is available in most life sciences research laboratories, and when optimized can be a central laboratory tool. In this chapter, the epi-fluorescence light path is introduced and the various components are discussed in detail. Recommendations are made for incident lamp light sources, excitation and emission filters, dichroic mirrors, objective lenses, and charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras in order to obtain the most sensitive epi-fluorescence microscope. The even illumination of metal-halide lamps combined with new “hard” coated filters and mirrors, a high resolution monochrome CCD camera, and a high NA objective lens are all recommended for high resolution and high sensitivity fluorescence imaging. Recommendations are also made for multicolor imaging with the use of monochrome cameras, motorized filter turrets, individual filter cubes, and corresponding dyes that are the best choice for sensitive, high resolution multicolor imaging. Images should be collected using Nyquist sampling and should be corrected for background intensity contributions and nonuniform illumination across the field of view. Photostable fluorescent probes and proteins that absorb a lot of light (i.e., high extinction co-efficients) and generate a lot of fluorescence signal (i.e., high quantum yields) are optimal. A neuronal immune-fluorescence labeling protocol is also presented. Finally, in order to maximize the utility of sensitive wide-field microscopes and generate the highest resolution images with high signal-to-noise, advice for combining wide-field epi-fluorescence imaging with restorative image deconvolution is presented. PMID:23026996

  12. A Pilot Evaluation of a 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Scheme Based on Simultaneous Motion Estimation and Image Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Jun; Gu, Xuejun; Pan, Tinsu; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a 4-dimensional (4-D) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) reconstruction scheme based on simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) through patient studies. Methods and Materials: The SMEIR algorithm contains 2 alternating steps: (1) motion-compensated CBCT reconstruction using projections from all phases to reconstruct a reference phase 4D-CBCT by explicitly considering the motion models between each different phase and (2) estimation of motion models directly from projections by matching the measured projections to the forward projection of the deformed reference phase 4D-CBCT. Four lung cancer patients were scanned for 4 to 6 minutes to obtain approximately 2000 projections for each patient. To evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm on a conventional 1-minute CBCT scan, the number of projections at each phase was reduced by a factor of 5, 8, or 10 for each patient. Then, 4D-CBCTs were reconstructed from the down-sampled projections using Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, total variation (TV) minimization, prior image constrained compressive sensing (PICCS), and SMEIR. Using the 4D-CBCT reconstructed from the fully sampled projections as a reference, the relative error (RE) of reconstructed images, root mean square error (RMSE), and maximum error (MaxE) of estimated tumor positions were analyzed to quantify the performance of the SMEIR algorithm. Results: The SMEIR algorithm can achieve results consistent with the reference 4D-CBCT reconstructed with many more projections per phase. With an average of 30 to 40 projections per phase, the MaxE in tumor position detection is less than 1 mm in SMEIR for all 4 patients. Conclusion: The results from a limited number of patients show that SMEIR is a promising tool for high-quality 4D-CBCT reconstruction and tumor motion modeling.

  13. Verification of Planning Target Volume Settings in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy by Using In-Treatment 4-Dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Wataru; Yamashita, Hideomi; Kida, Satoshi; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Sakumi, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Haga, Akihiro

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate setup error and tumor motion during beam delivery by using 4-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) and to assess the adequacy of the planning target volume (PTV) margin for lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen lung cancer patients treated by single-arc VMAT-SBRT were selected in this analysis. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on maximum inspiration and maximum expiration CT datasets from 4D CT respiratory sorting and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The PTV margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Registration was automatically performed using “pre-3D” CBCT. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy delivered in 4 fractions. The 4D tumor locations during beam delivery were determined using in-treatment 4D CBCT images acquired in each fraction. Then, the discrepancy between the actual tumor location and the ITV was evaluated in the lateral, vertical, and longitudinal directions. Results: Overall, 55 4D CBCT sets during VMAT-SBRT were successfully obtained. The amplitude of tumor motion was less than 10 mm in all directions. The average displacements between ITV and actual tumor location during treatment were 0.41 ± 0.93 mm, 0.15 ± 0.58 mm, and 0.60 ± 0.99 mm for the craniocaudal, left-right, and anteroposterior directions, respectively. The discrepancy in each phase did not exceed 5 mm in any direction. Conclusions: With in-treatment 4D CBCT, we confirmed the required PTV margins when the registration for moving target was performed using pre-3D CBCT. In-treatment 4D CBCT is a direct method for quantitatively assessing the intrafractional location of a moving target.

  14. Electronic Blending in Virtual Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maybury, Terrence S.; Farah, Camile S.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual microscopy (VM) is a relatively new technology that transforms the computer into a microscope. In essence, VM allows for the scanning and transfer of glass slides from light microscopy technology to the digital environment of the computer. This transition is also a function of the change from print knowledge to electronic knowledge, or as…

  15. Multi-contrast Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie

    Photoacoustic microscopy is a hybrid imaging modality with high spatial resolution, moderate imaging depth, excellent imaging contrast and functional imaging capability. Taking full advantage of this powerful weapon, we have investigated different anatomical, functional, flow dynamic and metabolic parameter measurements using photoacoustic microscopy. Specifically, Evans-blue dye was used to enhance photoacoustic microscopy of capillaries; label-free transverse and axial blood flow was measured based on bandwidth broadening and time shift of the photoacoustic signals; metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified in vivo from all the five parameters measured by photoacoustic microcopy; whole cross-sectional imaging of small intestine was achieved on a double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of focus and imaging depth; hemodynamic imaging was performed on a MEMS-mirror enhanced photoacoustic microscopy with a cross-sectional imaging rate of 400 Hz. As a maturing imaging technique, PAM is expected to find new applications in both fundamental life science and clinical practice.

  16. Non-Invasive Multi-Dimensional Two-Photon Microscopy enables optical fingerprinting (TPOF) of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Gehlsen, Uta; Szaszák, Marta; Gebert, Andreas; Koop, Norbert; Hüttmann, Gereon; Steven, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    Mucosal surfaces are constantly exposed to pathogens and show high immunological activity. In a broad variety of ocular surface disorders inflammation is common, but underlying mechanisms are often not fully understood. However, the main clinical problem is that inflammatory processes are difficult to characterize and quantify due to the impossibility of repeated tissue probing of the delicate ocular surface. Therefore non-invasive optical methods are thought to have the potential for intravital investigation of ocular surface inflammation. This study demonstrates the general potential of two-photon microscopy to non-invasively detect and discriminate key players of inflammation in the ocular surface by using intrinsic fluorescence-based features without the necessity of tissue probing or the use of dyes. The use of wavelength dependent measurements of fluorescence lifetime, in addition to autofluorescence intensity enables a functional differentiation of isolated immune cells in vitro at excitation wavelengths between 710 to 830 nm. Mixed cell cultures and first in vivo results indicate the use of excitation wavelength of 710 to 750 nm for further experiments and future use in patients. Two photon based autofluorescence features of immune cells enables non-invasive differentiation. PMID:25186637

  17. TH-E-17A-06: Anatomical-Adaptive Compressed Sensing (AACS) Reconstruction for Thoracic 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, C; Kipritidis, J; OBrien, R; Cooper, B; Kuncic, Z; Keall, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used for clinical thoracic 4-dimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction suffers from noise and streaking artifacts due to projection under-sampling. Compressed sensing theory enables reconstruction of under-sampled datasets via total-variation (TV) minimization, but TV-minimization algorithms such as adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) often converge slowly and are prone to over-smoothing anatomical details. These disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating general anatomical knowledge via anatomy segmentation. Based on this concept, we have developed an anatomical-adaptive compressed sensing (AACS) algorithm for thoracic 4D-CBCT reconstruction. Methods: AACS is based on the ASD-POCS framework, where each iteration consists of a TV-minimization step and a data fidelity constraint step. Prior to every AACS iteration, four major thoracic anatomical structures - soft tissue, lungs, bony anatomy, and pulmonary details - were segmented from the updated solution image. Based on the segmentation, an anatomical-adaptive weighting was applied to the TV-minimization step, so that TV-minimization was enhanced at noisy/streaky regions and suppressed at anatomical structures of interest. The image quality and convergence speed of AACS was compared to conventional ASD-POCS using an XCAT digital phantom and a patient scan. Results: For the XCAT phantom, the AACS image represented the ground truth better than the ASD-POCS image, giving a higher structural similarity index (0.93 vs. 0.84) and lower absolute difference (1.1*10{sup 4} vs. 1.4*10{sup 4}). For the patient case, while both algorithms resulted in much less noise and streaking than FDK, the AACS image showed considerably better contrast and sharpness of the vessels, tumor, and fiducial marker than the ASD-POCS image. In addition, AACS converged over 50% faster than ASD-POCS in both cases. Conclusions: The proposed AACS

  18. Audio-Visual Biofeedback Does Not Improve the Reliability of Target Delineation Using Maximum Intensity Projection in 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei; Neuner, Geoffrey A.; George, Rohini; Wang, Zhendong; Sasor, Sarah; Huang, Xuan; Regine, William F.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether coaching patients' breathing would improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} (internal target volume generated by contouring in the maximum intensity projection scan) and ITV{sub 10} (generated by combining the gross tumor volumes contoured in 10 phases of a 4-dimensional CT [4DCT] scan). Methods and Materials: Eight patients with a thoracic tumor and 5 patients with an abdominal tumor were included in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. Patients underwent 3 4DCT scans with: (1) free breathing (FB); (2) coaching using audio-visual (AV) biofeedback via the Real-Time Position Management system; and (3) coaching via a spirometer system (Active Breathing Coordinator or ABC). One physician contoured all scans to generate the ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub MIP}. The match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} was quantitatively assessed with volume ratio, centroid distance, root mean squared distance, and overlap/Dice coefficient. We investigated whether coaching (AV or ABC) or uniform expansions (1, 2, 3, or 5 mm) of ITV{sub MIP} improved the match. Results: Although both AV and ABC coaching techniques improved frequency reproducibility and ABC improved displacement regularity, neither improved the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} over FB. On average, ITV{sub MIP} underestimated ITV{sub 10} by 19%, 19%, and 21%, with centroid distance of 1.9, 2.3, and 1.7 mm and Dice coefficient of 0.87, 0.86, and 0.88 for FB, AV, and ABC, respectively. Separate analyses indicated a better match for lung cancers or tumors not adjacent to high-intensity tissues. Uniform expansions of ITV{sub MIP} did not correct for the mismatch between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. Conclusions: In this pilot study, audio-visual biofeedback did not improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. In general, ITV{sub MIP} should be limited to lung cancers, and modification of ITV{sub MIP} in each phase of the 4DCT data set is recommended.

  19. Soil microstructure and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, P.; Fryer, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the process of comparing Martian soils with terrestial soils, high resolution electron microscopy and associated techniques should be used to examine the finer soil particles, and various techniques of electron and optical microscopy should be used to examine the undisturbed structure of Martian soils. To examine the structure of fine grained portions of the soil, transmission electron microscopy may be required. A striking feature of many Martian soils is their red color. Although the present-day Martian climate appears to be cold, this color is reminiscent of terrestial tropical red clays. Their chemical contents are broadly similar.

  20. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  1. Quantifying Glomerular Permeability of Fluorescent Macromolecules Using 2-Photon Microscopy in Munich Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Ruben M.; Molitoris, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Kidney diseases involving urinary loss of large essential macromolecules, such as serum albumin, have long been thought to be caused by alterations in the permeability barrier comprised of podocytes, vascular endothelial cells, and a basement membrane working in unison. Data from our laboratory using intravital 2-photon microscopy revealed a more permeable glomerular filtration barrier (GFB) than previously thought under physiologic conditions, with retrieval of filtered albumin occurring in an early subset of cells called proximal tubule cells (PTC)1,2,3. Previous techniques used to study renal filtration and establishing the characteristic of the filtration barrier involved micropuncture of the lumen of these early tubular segments with sampling of the fluid content and analysis4. These studies determined albumin concentration in the luminal fluid to be virtually non-existent; corresponding closely to what is normally detected in the urine. However, characterization of dextran polymers with defined sizes by this technique revealed those of a size similar to serum albumin had higher levels in the tubular lumen and urine; suggesting increased permeability5. Herein is a detailed outline of the technique used to directly visualize and quantify glomerular fluorescent albumin permeability in vivo. This method allows for detection of filtered albumin across the filtration barrier into Bowman's space (the initial chamber of urinary filtration); and also allows quantification of albumin reabsorption by proximal tubules and visualization of subsequent albumin transcytosis6. The absence of fluorescent albumin along later tubular segments en route to the bladder highlights the efficiency of the retrieval pathway in the earlier proximal tubule segments. Moreover, when this technique was applied to determine permeability of dextrans having a similar size to albumin virtually identical permeability values were reported2. These observations directly support the need to expand

  2. STED microscopy resolves nanoparticle assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willig, K. I.; Keller, J.; Bossi, M.; Hell, S. W.

    2006-06-01

    We demonstrate the ability of stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, a far-field fluorescence imaging technique with diffraction-unlimited resolution, to reveal the spatial order of fluorescent nanoparticles. Unlike its confocal counterpart, here STED microscopy resolves the arrangements of densely packed 40 nm beads, supramolecular aggregates in a cell membrane, and colloidal nanoparticles. Both raw and linearly deconvolved data disclose unprecedented details of both biological and non-biological nanopatterns.

  3. Accuracy of Routine Treatment Planning 4-Dimensional and Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Computed Tomography Delineation of the Left Anterior Descending Artery in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    White, Benjamin M.; Vennarini, Sabina; Lin, Lilie; Freedman, Gary; Santhanam, Anand; Low, Daniel A.; Both, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) CT to accurately contour the left anterior descending artery (LAD), a primary indicator of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity for patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten subjects were prospectively imaged with a cardiac-gated MRI protocol to determine cardiac motion effects, including the displacement of a region of interest comprising the LAD. A series of planar views were obtained and resampled to create a 3-dimensional (3D) volume. A 3D optical flow deformable image registration algorithm determined tissue displacement during the cardiac cycle. The measured motion was then used as a spatial boundary to characterize motion blurring of the radiologist-delineated LAD structure for a cohort of 10 consecutive patients enrolled prospectively on a breast study including 4DCT and DIBH scans. Coronary motion–induced blurring artifacts were quantified by applying an unsharp filter to accentuate the LAD structure despite the presence of motion blurring. The 4DCT maximum inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases were coregistered to determine the LAD displacement during tidal respiration, as visualized in 4DCT. Results: The average 90th percentile heart motion for the region of interest was 0.7 ± 0.1 mm (left–right [LR]), 1.3 ± 0.6 mm (superior–inferior [SI]), and 0.6 ± 0.2 mm (anterior–posterior [AP]) in the cardiac-gated MRI cohort. The average relative increase in the number of voxels comprising the LAD contour was 69.4% ± 4.5% for the DIBH. The LAD volume overestimation had the dosimetric impact of decreasing the reported mean LAD dose by 23% ± 9% on average in the DIBH. During tidal respiration the average relative LAD contour increase was 69.3% ± 5.9% and 67.9% ± 4.6% for inhalation and exhalation respiratory phases, respectively. The average 90th

  4. Semi-solid tumor model in Xenopus laevis/gilli cloned tadpoles for intravital study of neovascularization, immune cells and melanophore infiltration.

    PubMed

    Haynes-Gimore, Nikesha; Banach, Maureen; Brown, Edward; Dawes, Ryan; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Kim, Minsoo; Robert, Jacques

    2015-12-15

    Tumors have the ability to grow as a self-sustaining entity within the body. This autonomy is in part accomplished by the tumor cells ability to induce the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) and by controlling cell trafficking inside the tumor mass. These abilities greatly reduce the efficacy of many cancer therapies and pose challenges for the development of more effective cancer treatments. Hence, there is a need for animal models suitable for direct microscopy observation of blood vessel formation and cell trafficking, especially during early stages of tumor establishment. Here, we have developed a reliable and cost effective tumor model system in tadpoles of the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Tadpoles are ideally suited for direct microscopy observation because of their small size and transparency. Using the thymic lymphoid tumor line 15/0 derived from, and transplantable into, the X. laevis/gilli isogenic clone LG-15, we have adapted a system that consists in transplanting 15/0 tumor cells embedded into rat collagen under the dorsal skin of LG-15 tadpole recipients. This system recapitulates many facets of mammalian tumorigenesis and permits real time visualization of the active formation of the tumor microenvironment induced by 15/0 tumor cells including neovascularization, collagen rearrangements as well as infiltration of immune cells and melanophores. PMID:25601449

  5. Characteristic intraepidermal nerve fibre endings of the intervibrissal fur in the mystacial pad of the rat: morphological details revealed by intravital methylene blue staining and the zinc iodide-osmium tetroxide technique

    PubMed Central

    MÜLLER, T.

    1999-01-01

    Light microscopic observations employing intravital methylene blue staining and impregnation by the zinc iodide-osmium tetroxide technique are presented for intraepidermal nerve fibre endings of the intervibrissal fur in the mystacial pad of the rat snout. Both procedures revealed anatomical details of the intraepidermal nerve fibre plexus in epidermal hillocks often located very close to the mouths of hairs. These nerve fibres appeared to resemble those described in previous immunohistochemical studies as cluster or bush endings. The methylene blue preparations demonstrated the existence of an intensely stained enlargement at the site of the branching point of the nerve fibres which seemed to be functionally related to the development of such nerve fibre plexuses. Due to their close association with hairs, these nerve fibre plexuses are most likely to be mechanoreceptive. Additionally, solitary varicose nerve fibres were found loosely distributed within the epidermis. The visualisation of 2 different morphological types of nerve fibre endings extends the validity of the concept of punctate sensibility into the epidermis. Methylene blue staining appeared to be somewhat superior to the zinc iodide-osmium tetroxide technique. Due to their selectivity for intraepidermal nerve fibres, the methods applied here supplement immunohistochemical procedures in a helpful manner. PMID:10473302

  6. Sustainable, Rapid Synthesis of Bright-Luminescent CuInS2-ZnS Alloyed Nanocrystals: Multistage Nano-xenotoxicity Assessment and Intravital Fluorescence Bioimaging in Zebrafish-Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetty, S. Shashank; Praneetha, S.; Basu, Sandeep; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Murugan, A. Vadivel

    2016-05-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent CuInS2-ZnS alloyed nanocrystals (CIZS-NCs) for highly fluorescence bioimaging have received considerable interest in recent years. Owing, they became a desirable alternative to heavy-metal based-NCs and organic dyes with unique optical properties and low-toxicity for bioimaging and optoelectronic applications. In the present study, bright and robust CIZS-NCs have been synthesized within 5 min, as-high-as 230 °C without requiring any inert-gas atmosphere via microwave-solvothermal (MW-ST) method. Subsequently, the in vitro and in vivo nano-xenotoxicity and cellular uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs were investigated in L929, Vero, MCF7 cell lines and zebrafish-embryos. We observed minimal toxicity and acute teratogenic consequences upto 62.5 μg/ml of the CIZS-NCs in zebrafish-embryos. We also observed spontaneous uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs by 3 dpf older zebrafish-embryos that are evident through bright red fluorescence-emission at a low concentration of 7.8 μg/mL. Hence, we propose that the rapid, low-cost, large-scale “sustainable” MW-ST synthesis of CIZS-NCs, is an ideal bio-nanoprobe with good temporal and spatial resolution for rapid labeling, long-term in vivo tracking and intravital-fluorescence-bioimaging (IVBI).

  7. Sustainable, Rapid Synthesis of Bright-Luminescent CuInS2-ZnS Alloyed Nanocrystals: Multistage Nano-xenotoxicity Assessment and Intravital Fluorescence Bioimaging in Zebrafish-Embryos.

    PubMed

    Chetty, S Shashank; Praneetha, S; Basu, Sandeep; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Murugan, A Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent CuInS2-ZnS alloyed nanocrystals (CIZS-NCs) for highly fluorescence bioimaging have received considerable interest in recent years. Owing, they became a desirable alternative to heavy-metal based-NCs and organic dyes with unique optical properties and low-toxicity for bioimaging and optoelectronic applications. In the present study, bright and robust CIZS-NCs have been synthesized within 5 min, as-high-as 230 °C without requiring any inert-gas atmosphere via microwave-solvothermal (MW-ST) method. Subsequently, the in vitro and in vivo nano-xenotoxicity and cellular uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs were investigated in L929, Vero, MCF7 cell lines and zebrafish-embryos. We observed minimal toxicity and acute teratogenic consequences upto 62.5 μg/ml of the CIZS-NCs in zebrafish-embryos. We also observed spontaneous uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs by 3 dpf older zebrafish-embryos that are evident through bright red fluorescence-emission at a low concentration of 7.8 μg/mL. Hence, we propose that the rapid, low-cost, large-scale "sustainable" MW-ST synthesis of CIZS-NCs, is an ideal bio-nanoprobe with good temporal and spatial resolution for rapid labeling, long-term in vivo tracking and intravital-fluorescence-bioimaging (IVBI). PMID:27188464

  8. In vivo analysis of THz wave irradiation induced acute inflammatory response in skin by laser-scanning confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yoonha; Ahn, Jinhyo; Mun, Jungho; Bae, Sangyoon; Jeong, Young Uk; Vinokurov, Nikolay A; Kim, Pilhan

    2014-05-19

    The recent development of THz sources in a wide range of THz frequencies and power levels has led to greatly increased interest in potential biomedical applications such as cancer and burn wound diagnosis. However, despite its importance in realizing THz wave based applications, our knowledge of how THz wave irradiation can affect a live tissue at the cellular level is very limited. In this study, an acute inflammatory response caused by pulsed THz wave irradiation on the skin of a live mouse was analyzed at the cellular level using intravital laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Pulsed THz wave (2.7 THz, 4 μs pulsewidth, 61.4 μJ per pulse, 3Hz repetition), generated using compact FEL, was used to irradiate an anesthetized mouse's ear skin with an average power of 260 mW/cm(2) for 30 minutes using a high-precision focused THz wave irradiation setup. In contrast to in vitro analysis using cultured cells at similar power levels of CW THz wave irradiation, no temperature change at the surface of the ear skin was observed when skin was examined with an IR camera. To monitor any potential inflammatory response, resident neutrophils in the same area of ear skin were repeatedly visualized before and after THz wave irradiation using a custom-built laser-scanning confocal microscopy system optimized for in vivo visualization. While non-irradiated control skin area showed no changes in the number of resident neutrophils, a massive recruitment of newly infiltrated neutrophils was observed in the THz wave irradiated skin area after 6 hours, which suggests an induction of acute inflammatory response by the pulsed THz wave irradiation on the skin via a non-thermal process. PMID:24921268

  9. HelioScan: a software framework for controlling in vivo microscopy setups with high hardware flexibility, functional diversity and extendibility.

    PubMed

    Langer, Dominik; van 't Hoff, Marcel; Keller, Andreas J; Nagaraja, Chetan; Pfäffli, Oliver A; Göldi, Maurice; Kasper, Hansjörg; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2013-04-30

    Intravital microscopy such as in vivo imaging of brain dynamics is often performed with custom-built microscope setups controlled by custom-written software to meet specific requirements. Continuous technological advancement in the field has created a need for new control software that is flexible enough to support the biological researcher with innovative imaging techniques and provide the developer with a solid platform for quickly and easily implementing new extensions. Here, we introduce HelioScan, a software package written in LabVIEW, as a platform serving this dual role. HelioScan is designed as a collection of components that can be flexibly assembled into microscope control software tailored to the particular hardware and functionality requirements. Moreover, HelioScan provides a software framework, within which new functionality can be implemented in a quick and structured manner. A specific HelioScan application assembles at run-time from individual software components, based on user-definable configuration files. Due to its component-based architecture, HelioScan can exploit synergies of multiple developers working in parallel on different components in a community effort. We exemplify the capabilities and versatility of HelioScan by demonstrating several in vivo brain imaging modes, including camera-based intrinsic optical signal imaging for functional mapping of cortical areas, standard two-photon laser-scanning microscopy using galvanometric mirrors, and high-speed in vivo two-photon calcium imaging using either acousto-optic deflectors or a resonant scanner. We recommend HelioScan as a convenient software framework for the in vivo imaging community. PMID:23416135

  10. Structured illumination microscopy for superresolution.

    PubMed

    Allen, John R; Ross, Stephen T; Davidson, Michael W

    2014-03-17

    The ability to image beyond the diffraction limit is the central tenet of the burgeoning field of superresolution fluorescence microscopy, also referred to as optical nanoscopy. The advent of superresolution has revolutionized biological fluorescence microscopy and the field at large. However, much of that excitement has been tempered by prohibitive imaging requirements. Achieving superresolution entails certain sacrifices, namely imaging speed, choice of fluorophore, ease of multicolor and three-dimensional imaging, and generally more complex instrumentation as compared to standard widefield imaging techniques. Several techniques utilizing structured illumination occupy an intriguing middle ground between the ease of use associated with traditional fluorescence microscopies and the unprecedented resolving power of modern superresolution methods, resulting in undeniably robust imaging techniques. Presented here is a review of the conceptual basis of structured illumination and its implementation, including its performance in comparison to other nanoscopies and the most recent developments in the field. PMID:24497374

  11. Single laser beam photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, Andre; Selmke, Markus; Braun, Marco; Cichos, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopy provides a tool to study dynamics in softmatter materials on a molecular level. However, the observation time for fluorescent objects is limited due to bleaching. One way to overcome this limitation is the use of gold nanoparticles as labels. They are chemically inert under typical situations. These particles are selectively imaged using a modulated heating laser and a non-absorbed detection laser even in the presence of background scatterers. The absorbed power results in a localised temperature profile and to a refractive index change which only occurs for absorption. For finite thermal diffusivities the temperature profile does not instantly follow temperature changes present on the nanoparticle's surface. This results in an out-of-phase modulation of the detection laser. By exploiting the limited thermal diffusivity we show that a single laser beam being intensity modulated is enough to selectively image and quantify absorption. The use of a single laser makes photothermal microscopy easier to implement into existing microscopy setups.

  12. Correlative Fluorescence and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schirra, Randall T.; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associate with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology have led to rapid improvement in the protocols and have ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation – integration. PMID:25271959

  13. Structured illumination microscopy and correlative microscopy to study autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ligeon, Laure-Anne; Barois, Nicolas; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Bongiovanni, Antonino; Lafont, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Autophagy is a predominant eukaryotic mechanism for the engulfment of "portions" of cytoplasm allowing their degradation to recycle metabolites. The autophagy is ubiquitous among the life kingdom revealing the importance of this pathway that appears more complex than previously thought. Several reviews have already addressed how to monitor this pathway and have highlighted the existence of new routes such as the LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP) and the non-canonical autophagy. The principal difference between autophagosomes and LAP vacuoles is that the former has two limiting membranes positives for LC3 whereas the latter has one. Herein, we propose to emphasize the use of correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) to answer some autophagy's related questions. The structured illumination microscopy (SIM) relatively easy to implement allows to better observe the Atg proteins recruitment and localization during the autophagy process. While LC3 recruitment is performed using light microscopy the ultrastructural morphological analysis of LC3-vacuoles is ascertained by electron microscopy. Hence, these combined and correlated approaches allow to tackle the LAP vs. autophagosome issue. PMID:25667106

  14. Confocal microscopy and exfoliative cytology

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Shyam Prasad; Ramani, Pratibha; Nainani, Purshotam

    2013-01-01

    Context: Early detection of potentially malignant lesions and invasive squamous-cell carcinoma in the oral cavity could be greatly improved through techniques that permit visualization of subtle cellular changes indicative of the neoplastic transformation process. One such technique is confocal microscopy. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. Aims: The main objective of this study was to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis and the results were compared with that of the standard PAP stain. Settings and Design: Confocal microscope, acridine orange (AO) stain, PAP (Papanicolaou) stain. The study was designed to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis. In the process, smears of patients with (clinically diagnosed and/or suspected) oral squamous cell carcinoma as well as those of controls (normal people) were stained with acridine orange and observed under confocal microscope. The results were compared with those of the standard PAP method. Materials and Methods: Samples of buccal mucosa smears from normal patients and squamous cell carcinoma patients were made, fixed in 100% alcohol, followed by AO staining. The corresponding set of smears was stained with PAP stain using rapid PAP stain kit. The results obtained were compared with those obtained with AO confocal microscopy. Results: The study had shown nuclear changes (malignant cells) in the smears of squamous cell carcinoma patients as increased intensity of fluorescence of the nucleus, when observed under confocal microscope. Acridine orange confocal microscopy showed good amount of sensitivity and specificity (93%) in identifying malignant cells in exfoliative cytological smears. Conclusion: Confocal microscopy was found to have good sensitivity in the identification of cancer (malignant) cells in exfoliative cytology, at par with the PAP method. The rapidity of processing and screening a

  15. The future of electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifies to the importance of modern microscopy.

  16. The future of electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Yimei; Durr, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Seeing is believing. So goes the old adage and seen evidence is undoubtedly satisfying because it can be interpreted easily, though not always correctly. For centuries, humans have developed such instruments as telescopes that observe the heavens and microscopes that reveal bacteria and viruses. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William Moerner for their foundational work on superresolution fluorescence microscopy in which they overcame the Abbe diffraction limit for the resolving power of conventional light microscopes. (See Physics Today, December 2014, page 18.) That breakthrough enabled discoveries in biological research and testifiesmore » to the importance of modern microscopy.« less

  17. Optical microscopy versus scanning electron microscopy in urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Marickar, Y M Fazil; Lekshmi, P R; Varma, Luxmi; Koshy, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Stone analysis is incompletely done in many clinical centers. Identification of the stone component is essential for deciding future prophylaxis. X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) still remains a distant dream for routine hospital work. It is in this context that optical microscopy is suggested as an alternate procedure. The objective of this article was to assess the utility of an optical microscope which gives magnification of up to 40x and gives clear picture of the surface of the stones. In order to authenticate the morphological analysis of urinary stones, SEM and elemental distribution analysis were performed. A total of 250 urinary stones of different compositions were collected from stone clinic, photographed, observed under an optical microscope, and optical photographs were taken at different angles. Twenty-five representative samples among these were gold sputtered to make them conductive and were fed into the SEM machine. Photographs of the samples were taken at different angles at magnifications up to 4,000. Elemental distribution analysis (EDAX) was done to confirm the composition. The observations of the two studies were compared. The different appearances of the stones under optical illuminated microscopy were mostly standardized appearances, namely bosselations of pure whewellite, spiculations of weddellite, bright yellow colored appearance of uric acid, and dirty white amorphous appearance of phosphates. SEM and EDAX gave clearer pictures and gave added confirmation of the stone composition. From the references thus obtained, it was possible to confirm the composition by studying the optical microscopic pictures. Higher magnification capacity of the SEM and the EDAX patterns are useful to give reference support for performing optical microscopy work. After standardization, routine analysis can be performed with optical microscopy. The advantage of the optical microscope is that, it

  18. Multi-contrast photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Sohn, R.; Lu, Z.-H.; Soetikno, B.; Zhong, Q.; Yao, J.; Maslov, K.; Arbeit, J. M.; Wang, L. V.

    2012-02-01

    We developed multi-contrast photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) for in vivo anatomical, functional, metabolic, and molecular imaging. This technical innovation enables comprehensive understanding of the tumor microenvironment. With multi-contrast PAM, we longitudinally determined tumor vascular anatomy, blood flow, oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, and oxygen extraction fraction.

  19. Four-dimensional electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-04-01

    The discovery of the electron over a century ago and the realization of its dual character have given birth to one of the two most powerful imaging instruments: the electron microscope. The electron microscope's ability to resolve three-dimensional (3D) structures on the atomic scale is continuing to affect different fields, including materials science and biology. In this Review, we highlight recent developments and inventions made by introducing the fourth dimension of time in electron microscopy. Today, ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) enables a resolution that is 10 orders of magnitude better than that of conventional microscopes, which are limited by the video-camera rate of recording. After presenting the central concept involved, that of single-electron stroboscopic imaging, we discuss prototypical applications, which include the visualization of complex structures when unfolding on different length and time scales. The developed UEM variant techniques are several, and here we illucidate convergent-beam and near-field imaging, as well as tomography and scanning-pulse microscopy. We conclude with current explorations in imaging of nanomaterials and biostructures and an outlook on possible future directions in space-time, 4D electron microscopy. PMID:20378810

  20. Four-Dimensional Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-04-01

    The discovery of the electron over a century ago and the realization of its dual character have given birth to one of the two most powerful imaging instruments: the electron microscope. The electron microscope’s ability to resolve three-dimensional (3D) structures on the atomic scale is continuing to affect different fields, including materials science and biology. In this Review, we highlight recent developments and inventions made by introducing the fourth dimension of time in electron microscopy. Today, ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) enables a resolution that is 10 orders of magnitude better than that of conventional microscopes, which are limited by the video-camera rate of recording. After presenting the central concept involved, that of single-electron stroboscopic imaging, we discuss prototypical applications, which include the visualization of complex structures when unfolding on different length and time scales. The developed UEM variant techniques are several, and here we illucidate convergent-beam and near-field imaging, as well as tomography and scanning-pulse microscopy. We conclude with current explorations in imaging of nanomaterials and biostructures and an outlook on possible future directions in space-time, 4D electron microscopy.

  1. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy: Computed Imaging for Scanned Coherent Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brynmor J; Marks, Daniel L; Ralston, Tyler S; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2008-06-01

    Three-dimensional image formation in microscopy is greatly enhanced by the use of computed imaging techniques. In particular, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM) allows the removal of out-of-focus blur in broadband, coherent microscopy. Earlier methods, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), utilize interferometric ranging, but do not apply computed imaging methods and therefore must scan the focal depth to acquire extended volumetric images. ISAM removes the need to scan the focus by allowing volumetric image reconstruction from data collected at a single focal depth. ISAM signal processing techniques are similar to the Fourier migration methods of seismology and the Fourier reconstruction methods of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In this article ISAM is described and the close ties between ISAM and SAR are explored. ISAM and a simple strip-map SAR system are placed in a common mathematical framework and compared to OCT and radar respectively. This article is intended to serve as a review of ISAM, and will be especially useful to readers with a background in SAR. PMID:20948975

  2. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy: Computed Imaging for Scanned Coherent Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brynmor. J.; Marks, Daniel. L.; Ralston, Tyler. S.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen. A.

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional image formation in microscopy is greatly enhanced by the use of computed imaging techniques. In particular, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM) allows the removal of out-of-focus blur in broadband, coherent microscopy. Earlier methods, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), utilize interferometric ranging, but do not apply computed imaging methods and therefore must scan the focal depth to acquire extended volumetric images. ISAM removes the need to scan the focus by allowing volumetric image reconstruction from data collected at a single focal depth. ISAM signal processing techniques are similar to the Fourier migration methods of seismology and the Fourier reconstruction methods of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In this article ISAM is described and the close ties between ISAM and SAR are explored. ISAM and a simple strip-map SAR system are placed in a common mathematical framework and compared to OCT and radar respectively. This article is intended to serve as a review of ISAM, and will be especially useful to readers with a background in SAR. PMID:20948975

  3. Biocompatible Green and Red Fluorescent Organic Dots with Remarkably Large Two-Photon Action Cross Sections for Targeted Cellular Imaging and Real-Time Intravital Blood Vascular Visualization.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jiayun; Cai, Xiaolei; Lou, Xiaoding; Feng, Guangxue; Min, Xuehong; Luo, Wenwen; He, Bairong; Goh, Chi Ching; Ng, Lai Guan; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Zujin; Liu, Bin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-07-15

    Fluorescent organic dots are emerging as promising bioimaging reagents because of their high brightness, good photostability, excellent biocompatibility, and facile surface functionalization. Organic dots with large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross sections are highly desired for two-photon fluorescence microscopy. In this work, we report two biocompatible and photostable organic dots fabricated by encapsulating tetraphenylethene derivatives within DSPE-PEG matrix. The two organic dots show absorption maxima at 425 and 483 nm and emit green and red fluorescence at 560 and 645 nm, with high fluorescence quantum yields of 64% and 22%, respectively. Both organic dots exhibit excellent TPA property in the range of 800-960 nm, affording upon excitation at 820 nm remarkably large TPA cross sections of 1.2×10(6) and 2.5×10(6) GM on the basis of dot concentration. The bare fluorophores and their organic dots are biocompatible and have been used to stain living cells for one- and two-photon fluorescence bioimagings. The cRGD-modified organic dots can selectively target integrin αvβ3 overexpressing breast cancer cells for targeted imaging. The organic dots are also applied for real-time two-photon fluorescence in vivo visualization of the blood vasculature of mouse ear, providing the spatiotemporal information about the whole blood vascular network. These results demonstrate that the present fluorescent organic dots are promising candidates for living cell and tissue imaging. PMID:26094687

  4. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-02-20

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  5. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, A; Baum, P

    2016-07-22

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample's oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available. PMID:27463670

  6. Holographic microscopy studies of emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherow, W. K.

    1981-01-01

    A holographic microscopy system that records and observes the dynamic properties of separation of dispersed immiscible fluids is described. The holographic construction system and reconstruction system that were used to obtain particle size and distribution information from the holograms are discussed. The holographic microscopy system is used to observed the phase separating processes in immiscible fluids that were isothermally cooled into the two phase region. Nucleation, growth rates, coalescence, and particle motion are successfully demonstrated with this system. Thus a holographic particle sizing system with a resolution of 2 micrometers and a field of view of 100 cu cm was developed that provides the capability of testing the theories of separating immiscible fluids for particle number densities in the range of 10 to 10 to the 7th power particles.

  7. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A.; Baum, P.

    2016-07-01

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample’s oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available.

  8. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.

    1985-10-01

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  10. A history of urine microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2015-11-01

    The naked-eye appearance of the urine must have been studied by shamans and healers since the Stone Age, and an elaborate interpretation of so-called Uroscopy began around 600 AD as a form of divination. A 1000 years later, the first primitive monocular and compound microscopes appeared in the Netherlands, and along with many other objects and liquids, urine was studied from around 1680 onwards as the enlightenment evolved. However, the crude early instruments did not permit fine study because of chromatic and linear/spherical blurring. Only after complex multi-glass lenses which avoided these problems had been made and used in the 1820s in London by Lister, and in Paris by Chevalier and Amici, could urinary microscopy become a practical, clinically useful tool in the 1830s. Clinical urinary microscopy was pioneered by Rayer and his pupils in Paris (especially Vigla), in the late 1830s, and spread to UK and Germany in the 1840s, with detailed descriptions and interpretations of cells and formed elements of the urinary sediment by Nasse, Henle, Robinson and Golding Bird. Classes were held, most notably by Donné in Paris. After another 50 years, optical microscopy had reached its apogee, with magnifications of over 1000 times obtainable free of aberration, using immersion techniques. Atlases of the urinary sediment were published in all major European countries and in the US. Polarised light and phase contrast was used also after 1900 to study urine, and by the early 20th century, photomicroscopy (pioneered by Donné and Daguerre 50 years previously, but then ignored) became usual for teaching and recording. In the 1940s electron microscopy began, followed by detection of specific proteins and cells using immunofluorescent antibodies. All this had been using handheld methodology. Around 1980, machine-assisted observations began, and have dominated progress since. PMID:26079823

  11. Sustainable, Rapid Synthesis of Bright-Luminescent CuInS2-ZnS Alloyed Nanocrystals: Multistage Nano-xenotoxicity Assessment and Intravital Fluorescence Bioimaging in Zebrafish-Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Chetty, S. Shashank; Praneetha, S.; Basu, Sandeep; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Murugan, A. Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent CuInS2-ZnS alloyed nanocrystals (CIZS-NCs) for highly fluorescence bioimaging have received considerable interest in recent years. Owing, they became a desirable alternative to heavy-metal based-NCs and organic dyes with unique optical properties and low-toxicity for bioimaging and optoelectronic applications. In the present study, bright and robust CIZS-NCs have been synthesized within 5 min, as-high-as 230 °C without requiring any inert-gas atmosphere via microwave-solvothermal (MW-ST) method. Subsequently, the in vitro and in vivo nano-xenotoxicity and cellular uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs were investigated in L929, Vero, MCF7 cell lines and zebrafish-embryos. We observed minimal toxicity and acute teratogenic consequences upto 62.5 μg/ml of the CIZS-NCs in zebrafish-embryos. We also observed spontaneous uptake of the MUA-functionalized CIZS-NCs by 3 dpf older zebrafish-embryos that are evident through bright red fluorescence-emission at a low concentration of 7.8 μg/mL. Hence, we propose that the rapid, low-cost, large-scale “sustainable” MW-ST synthesis of CIZS-NCs, is an ideal bio-nanoprobe with good temporal and spatial resolution for rapid labeling, long-term in vivo tracking and intravital-fluorescence-bioimaging (IVBI). PMID:27188464

  12. Paleomagnetic Analysis Using SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Fong, Luis E.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.

    2007-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopes are a new generation of instruments that map magnetic fields with unprecedented spatial resolution and moment sensitivity. Unlike standard rock magnetometers, SQUID microscopes map magnetic fields rather than measuring magnetic moments such that the sample magnetization pattern must be retrieved from source model fits to the measured field data. In this paper, we presented the first direct comparison between paleomagnetic analyses on natural samples using joint measurements from SQUID microscopy and moment magnetometry. We demonstrated that in combination with apriori geologic and petrographic data, SQUID microscopy can accurately characterize the magnetization of lunar glass spherules and Hawaiian basalt. The bulk moment magnitude and direction of these samples inferred from inversions of SQUID microscopy data match direct measurements on the same samples using moment magnetometry. In addition, these inversions provide unique constraints on the magnetization distribution within the sample. These measurements are among the most sensitive and highest resolution quantitative paleomagnetic studies of natural remanent magnetization to date. We expect that this technique will be able to extend many other standard paleomagnetic techniques to previously inaccessible microscale samples.

  13. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  14. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  15. Virtual reflected-light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A P; Wong, C M; Joseph, D

    2011-12-01

    Research on better methods to digitally represent microscopic specimens has increased over recent decades. Opaque specimens, such as microfossils and metallurgic specimens, are often viewed using reflected light microscopy. Existing 3D surface estimation techniques for reflected light microscopy do not model reflectance, restricting the representation to only one illumination condition and making them an imperfect recreation of the experience of using an actual microscope. This paper introduces a virtual reflected-light microscopy (VRLM) system that estimates both shape and reflectance from a set of specimen images. When coupled with anaglyph creation, the system can depict both depth information and illumination cues under any desired lighting configuration. Digital representations are compact and easily viewed in an online setting. A prototype used to construct VRLM representations is comprised only of a microscope, a digital camera, a motorized stage and software. Such a system automatically acquires VRLM representations of large batches of specimens. VRLM representations are then disseminated in an interactive online environment, which allows users to change the virtual light source direction and type. Experiments demonstrate high quality VRLM representations of 500 microfossils. PMID:21919903

  16. Domain adaptation for microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Becker, Carlos; Christoudias, C Mario; Fua, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    Electron and light microscopy imaging can now deliver high-quality image stacks of neural structures. However, the amount of human annotation effort required to analyze them remains a major bottleneck. While machine learning algorithms can be used to help automate this process, they require training data, which is time-consuming to obtain manually, especially in image stacks. Furthermore, due to changing experimental conditions, successive stacks often exhibit differences that are severe enough to make it difficult to use a classifier trained for a specific one on another. This means that this tedious annotation process has to be repeated for each new stack. In this paper, we present a domain adaptation algorithm that addresses this issue by effectively leveraging labeled examples across different acquisitions and significantly reducing the annotation requirements. Our approach can handle complex, nonlinear image feature transformations and scales to large microscopy datasets that often involve high-dimensional feature spaces and large 3D data volumes. We evaluate our approach on four challenging electron and light microscopy applications that exhibit very different image modalities and where annotation is very costly. Across all applications we achieve a significant improvement over the state-of-the-art machine learning methods and demonstrate our ability to greatly reduce human annotation effort. PMID:25474809

  17. Multiphoton microscopy of atheroslcerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilledahl, Magnus B.; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Haugen, Olav A.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2007-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a techniques that fascilitates three dimensional imaging of intact, unstained tissue. Especially connective tissue has a relatively strong nonlinear optical response and can easily be imaged. Atherosclerosis is a disease where lipids accumulate in the vessel wall and there is a thickening of the intima by growth of a cap of connective tissue. The mechanical strength of this fibrous cap is of clinically importance. If the cap ruptures a thrombosis forms which can block a coronary vessel and therby causing myocardial infarction. Multiphoton microscopy can be used to image the fibrous cap and thereby determine the thickness of the cap and the structure of the connective fibres. This could possibly be developed into a diagnostic and clincal tool to monitor the vulnerability of a plaque and also to better understand the development of a plaque and effects of treatment. We have collected multiphoton microscopy images from atherosclerotic plaque in human aorta, both two photon excited fluorescens and second harmonic generated signal. The feasability of using this technique to determine the state of the plaque is explored.

  18. Visualization of localization microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Baddeley, David; Cannell, Mark B; Soeller, Christian

    2010-02-01

    Localization microscopy techniques based on localizing single fluorophore molecules now routinely achieve accuracies better than 30 nm. Unlike conventional optical microscopies, localization microscopy experiments do not generate an image but a list of discrete coordinates of estimated fluorophore positions. Data display and analysis therefore generally require visualization methods that translate the position data into conventional images. Here we investigate the properties of several widely used visualization techniques and show that a commonly used algorithm based on rendering Gaussians may lead to a 1.44-fold loss of resolution. Existing methods typically do not explicitly take sampling considerations into account and thus may produce spurious structures. We present two additional visualization algorithms, an adaptive histogram method based on quad-trees and a Delaunay triangulation based visualization of point data that address some of these deficiencies. The new visualization methods are designed to suppress erroneous detail in poorly sampled image areas but avoid loss of resolution in well-sampled regions. A number of criteria for scoring visualization methods are developed as a guide for choosing among visualization methods and are used to qualitatively compare various algorithms. PMID:20082730

  19. Holographic opto-fluidic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bishara, Waheb; Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade microfluidics has created a versatile platform that has significantly advanced the ways in which micro-scale organisms and objects are controlled, processed and investigated, by improving the cost, compactness and throughput aspects of analysis. Microfluidics has also expanded into optics to create reconfigurable and flexible optical devices such as reconfigurable lenses, lasers, waveguides, switches, and on-chip microscopes. Here we present a new opto-fluidic microscopy modality, i.e., Holographic Opto-fluidic Microscopy (HOM), based on lensless holographic imaging. This imaging modality complements the miniaturization provided by microfluidics and would allow the integration of microscopy into existing on-chip microfluidic devices with various functionalities. Our imaging modality utilizes partially coherent in-line holography and pixel super-resolution to create high-resolution amplitude and phase images of the objects flowing within micro-fluidic channels, which we demonstrate by imaging C. elegans, Giardia lamblia, and Mulberry pollen. HOM does not involve complicated fabrication processes or precise alignment, nor does it require a highly uniform flow of objects within microfluidic channels. PMID:21197025

  20. Holographic opto-fluidic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bishara, Waheb; Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-12-20

    Over the last decade microfluidics has created a versatile platform that has significantly advanced the ways in which micro-scale organisms and objects are controlled, processed and investigated, by improving the cost, compactness and throughput aspects of analysis. Microfluidics has also expanded into optics to create reconfigurable and flexible optical devices such as reconfigurable lenses, lasers, waveguides, switches, and on-chip microscopes. Here we present a new opto-fluidic microscopy modality, i.e., Holographic Opto-fluidic Microscopy (HOM), based on lensless holographic imaging. This imaging modality complements the miniaturization provided by microfluidics and would allow the integration of microscopy into existing on-chip microfluidic devices with various functionalities. Our imaging modality utilizes partially coherent in-line holography and pixel super-resolution to create high-resolution amplitude and phase images of the objects flowing within micro-fluidic channels, which we demonstrate by imaging C. elegans, Giardia lamblia, and Mulberry pollen. HOM does not involve complicated fabrication processes or precise alignment, nor does it require a highly uniform flow of objects within microfluidic channels. PMID:21197025

  1. Time lapse in vivo microscopy reveals distinct dynamics of microglia-tumor environment interactions-a new role for the tumor perivascular space as highway for trafficking microglia.

    PubMed

    Bayerl, Simon Heinrich; Niesner, Raluca; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Radbruch, Helena; Pohlan, Julian; Brandenburg, Susan; Czabanka, Marcus Alexander; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Microglial cells are critical for glioma growth and progression. However, only little is known about intratumoral microglial behavior and the dynamic interaction with the tumor. Currently the scarce understanding of microglial appearance in malignant gliomas merely originates from histological studies and in vitro investigations. In order to understand the pattern of microglia activity, motility and migration we designed an intravital study in an orthotopic murine glioma model using CX3CR1-eGFP(GFP/wt) mice. We analysed the dynamics of intratumoral microglia accumulation and activity, as well as microglia/tumor blood vessel interaction by epi-illumination and 2-photon laser scanning microscopy. We further investigated cellular and tissue function, including the enzyme activity of intratumoral and microglial NADPH oxidase measured by in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging. We identified three morphological phenotypes of tumor-associated microglia cells with entirely different motility patterns. We found that NADPH oxidase activation is highly divergent in these microglia subtypes leading to different production levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We observed that microglia motility is highest within the perivascular niche, suggesting relevance of microglia/tumor blood vessel interactions. In line, reduction of tumor blood vessels by antivascular therapy confirmed the relevance of the tumor vessel compartment on microglia biology in brain tumors. In summary, we provide new insights into in vivo microglial behavior, regarding both morphology and function, in malignant gliomas. GLIA 2016;64:1210-1226. PMID:27143298

  2. Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy and Raman Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harootunian, Alec Tate

    1987-09-01

    Both a one dimensional near-field scanning optical microscope and Raman microprobe were constructed. In near -field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) a subwavelength aperture is scanned in the near-field of the object. Radiation transmitted through the aperture is collected to form an image as the aperture scans over the object. The resolution of an NSOM system is essentially wavelength independent and is limited by the diameter of the aperture used to scan the object. NSOM was developed in an effort to provide a nondestructive in situ high spatial resolution probe while still utilizing photons at optical wavelengths. The Raman microprobe constructed provided vibrational Raman information with spatial resolution equivalent that of a conventional diffraction limited microscope. Both transmission studies and near-field diffration studies of subwavelength apertures were performed. Diffraction theories for a small aperture in an infinitely thin conducting screen, a slit in a thick conducting screen, and an aperture in a black screen were examined. All three theories indicate collimation of radiation to the size to the size of the subwavelength aperture or slit in the near-field. Theoretical calculations and experimental results indicate that light transmitted through subwavelength apertures is readily detectable. Light of wavelength 4579 (ANGSTROM) was transmitted through apertures with diameters as small as 300 (ANGSTROM). These studies indicate the feasibility of constructing an NSOM system. One dimensional transmission and fluorescence NSOM systems were constructed. Apertures in the tips of metallized glass pipettes width inner diameters of less than 1000 (ANGSTROM) were used as a light source in the NSOM system. A tunneling current was used to maintain the aperture position in the near-field. Fluorescence NSOM was demonstrated for the first time. Microspectroscopic and Raman microscopic studies of turtle cone oil droplets were performed. Both the Raman vibrational

  3. Aperture scanning Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is implemented through aperture scanning by an LCOS spatial light modulator at the back focal plane of the objective lens. This FPM configuration enables the capturing of the complex scattered field for a 3D sample both in the transmissive mode and the reflective mode. We further show that by combining with the compressive sensing theory, the reconstructed 2D complex scattered field can be used to recover the 3D sample scattering density. This implementation expands the scope of application for FPM and can be beneficial for areas such as tissue imaging and wafer inspection. PMID:27570705

  4. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Callahan, Daniel E.; Parvin, Bahram

    2011-05-24

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  5. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Callahan, Daniel E.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-06-09

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time: quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  6. Advances in multiphoton microscopy technology

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Erich E.; Squier, Jeff A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has enabled unprecedented dynamic exploration in living organisms. A significant challenge in biological research is the dynamic imaging of features deep within living organisms, which permits the real-time analysis of cellular structure and function. To make progress in our understanding of biological machinery, optical microscopes must be capable of rapid, targeted access deep within samples at high resolution. In this Review, we discuss the basic architecture of a multiphoton microscope capable of such analysis and summarize the state-of-the-art technologies for the quantitative imaging of biological phenomena. PMID:24307915

  7. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Callahan, Daniel E; Parvin, Bahram

    2013-10-01

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  8. Confocal microscopy in microgravity research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.; Brakenhoff, G. J.; Woldringh, C. L.; Aalders, J. W. G.; Imhof, J. P.; van Kralingen, P.; Mels, W. A.; Schreinemakers, P.; Zegers, A.

    We have studied the application and the feasibility of confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) in microgravity research. Its superior spatial resolution and 3D imaging capabilities and its use of light as a probe, render this instrument ideally suited for the study of living biological material on a (sub-)cellular level. In this paper a number of pertinent biological microgravity experiments is listed, concentrating on the direct observation of developing cells and cellular structures under microgravity condition. A conceptual instrument design is also presented, aimed at sounding rocket application followed by Biorack/Biolab application at a later stage.

  9. Computerised image analysis in conjunction with fluorescence microscopy for the study of blood-brain barrier permeability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Findling, A; Schilling, L; Bultmann, A; Wahl, M

    1994-05-01

    The present paper describes a new method using computerised image analysis techniques for quantification of tracer extravasation over the blood-brain barrier as studied by intravital fluorescence microscopy. Cats were equipped with an open cranial window and continuously infused with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled dextran (FITC-dextran, mol. wt. 70,000) to maintain a steady plasma concentration. Several cortical fields were recorded in each experiment and the images stored on video tape for off-line analysis. This procedure, which largely eliminates the superficial pial vasculature and allows extraction of the extravasation areas, consists of the following steps: (1) averaging of images, (2) software shading correction based on the original images for compensation of optical non-uniformity, (3) correction of displacement artefacts, (4) intensity adjustment, (5) generation of subtraction images by subtracting the first image of a series from the subsequent ones, (6) median filtering and thresholding, (7) a length recognition algorithm, and (8) elimination of small areas. Compared to the previously described method, step (2) has been newly developed and steps (4) and (8) added to enhance sensitivity for detecting tracer extravasation. The degree of extravasation in a cortical field at a given time point [E(f) value] was calculated as the mean intensity of the remaining pixels. The E(f) is a quantitative value computed by a fully automatised procedure which takes into account the number, as well as the size and intensity, of extravasation areas in a given cortical field. The E(f) values obtained at different times in a series of experiments were averaged to give the E(I) value.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7520160

  10. RGB digital lensless holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2013-11-01

    The recent introduction of color digital lensless holographic microscopy (CDLHM) has shown the possibility of imaging microscopic specimens at full color without the need of lenses. Owing to the simplicity, robustness, and compactness of the digital lensless holographic microscopes (DLHM), they have been presented as the ideal candidates to being developed into portable holographic microscopes. However, in the case of CDLHM the utilization of three independent lasers hinders the portability option for this microscope. In this contribution an alternative to reduce the complexity of CDLHM aimed to recover the portability of this microscopy technology is presented. A super-bright white-light light-emitting diode (LED) is spectrally and spatially filtered to produce the needed illumination by CDLHM to work. CDLHM with LED illumination is used to image at full color a section of the head of a drosophila melanogaster fly (fruit fly). The LED-CDLHM method shows the capability of imaging objects of 2μm size in comparison with the micrometer resolution reported for LASER-CDLHM.

  11. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM)

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael W.; Loftus, Andrew F.; Dunn, Sarah E.; Joens, Matthew S.; Fitzpatrick, James A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light Sheet Fluorescent Microscopy (LSFM), a century old idea (Siedentopf and Zsigmondy, 1902) made possible with modern developments in both excitation and detection optics, provides sub-cellular resolution and optical sectioning capabilities without compromising speed or excitation efficiency. Over the past decade, several variations of LSFM have been implemented each with its own benefits and deficiencies. Here we discuss LSFM fundamentals and outline the basic principles of several major light sheet based imaging modalities (SPIM, inverted SPIM, multi-view SPIM, Bessel beam SPIM, and stimulated emission depletion SPIM while considering their biological relevance in terms of intrusiveness, temporal resolution, and sample requirements. PMID:25559221

  12. Virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changho; Lee, Donghyun; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-07-01

    A virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy at 1064 nm wavelength (VISPAM) system was designed and fabricated by integrating a commercial type surgical microscope and laser scanning photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) with a 1064 nm pulsed laser. Based on simple augmented reality device, VISPAM could simultaneously provide 2D depth-resolved photoacoustic and magnified microscope images of surgery regions on the same vision of surgeon via an eyepiece of the microscope. The invisible 1064 nm laser removed the interruption of surgical sight due to visible laser scanning of previous report, and decreased the danger of tissue damage caused by over irradiated laser. In addition, to approach the real practical surgery application, a needle-type transducer was utilized without a water bath for PA signal coupling. In order to verify our system's performance, we conducted needle guiding as ex vivo phantom study and needle guiding and injection of carbon particles mixtures into a melanoma tumor region as in vivo study. We expect that VISPAM can be essential tool of brain and ophthalmic microsurgery.

  13. Digital holography applied to microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depeursinge, Christian D.; Cuche, Etienne; Marquet, Pierre; Colomb, Tristan; Dahlgren, Pia; Marian, Anca A.; Montfort, Frederic; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2002-06-01

    We report on new developments of a technique called Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM), for the numerical reconstruction of digital holograms taken in microscopy, which allows simultaneous amplitude and quantitative phase contrast imaging. The reconstruction method computes the propagation of the complex optical wavefront diffracted by the object and is used to determine the refractive index and/or shape of the object with accuracies in the nanometer range along the optical axis.. The method requires the acquisition of a single hologram. The technique comprises the recording of a digital hologram of the specimen by means of a standard CCD camera at the exit of a Mach-Zehnder or Michelson type interferometer. The quantitative nature of the reconstructed phase distribution has been demonstrated by an application to surface profilometry where step height differences of a few nanometers have been measured. Another application takes place in biology for transmission phase- contrast imaging of living cells in culture. The resolution for thickness measurements depends on the refractive index of the specimen and a resolution of approximately 30 nanometers in height, and about half of a micro in width, has been achieved for living neural cells in cultures by using a high numerical aperture.

  14. Developing Photo Activated Localization Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Harald

    2015-03-01

    Photo Activated Localization Microscopy, PALM, acquires super-resolution images by activating a subset of activatable fluorescent labels and estimating the center of the each molecular label to sub-diffractive accuracy. When this process is repeated thousands of times for different subsets of molecules, then an image can be rendered from all the center coordinates of the molecules. I will describe the circuitous story of its development that began with another super-resolution technique, NSOM, developed by my colleague Eric Betzig, who imaged single molecules at room temperature, and later we spectrally resolved individual luminescent centers of quantum wells. These two observations inspired a generalized path to localization microscopy, but that path was abandoned because no really useful fluorescent labels were available. After a decade of nonacademic industrial pursuits and the subsequent freedom of unemployment, we came across a class of genetically expressible fluorescent proteins that were switchable or convertible that enabled the concept to be implemented and be biologically promising. The past ten years have been very active with many groups exploring applications and enhancements of this concept. Demonstrating significant biological relevance will be the metric if its success.

  15. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  16. Nonlinear microscopy of collagen fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Fabre, A.; Marchal-Somme, J.; Crestani, B.; Débarre, D.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-02-01

    We used intrinsic Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) by fibrillar collagen to visualize the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibrosis at the micrometer scale using laser scanning nonlinear microscopy. We showed that SHG signals are highly specific to fibrillar collagen and provide a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in tissues. Moreover, recording simultaneously other nonlinear optical signals in a multimodal setup, we visualized the tissue morphology using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) signals from endogenous chromophores such as NADH or elastin. We then compared different methods to determine accurate indexes of collagen fibrosis using nonlinear microscopy, given that most collagen fibrils are smaller than the microscope resolution and that second harmonic generation is a coherent process. In order to define a robust method to process our three-dimensional images, we either calculated the fraction of the images occupied by a significant SHG signal, or averaged SHG signal intensities. We showed that these scores provide an estimation of the extension of renal and pulmonary fibrosis in murine models, and that they clearly sort out the fibrotic mice.

  17. Pinhole shifting lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramshesh, Venkat K; Lemasters, John J

    2008-01-01

    Lifetime imaging microscopy is a powerful tool to probe biological phenomena independent of luminescence intensity and fluorophore concentration. We describe time-resolved imaging of long-lifetime luminescence with an unmodified commercial laser scanning confocal/multiphoton microscope. The principle of the measurement is displacement of the detection pinhole to collect delayed luminescence from a position lagging the rasting laser beam. As proof of principle, luminescence from microspheres containing europium (Eu(3+)), a red emitting probe, was compared to that of short-lifetime green-fluorescing microspheres and/or fluorescein and rhodamine in solution. Using 720-nm two-photon excitation and a pinhole diameter of 1 Airy unit, the short-lifetime fluorescence of fluorescein, rhodamine and green microspheres disappeared much more rapidly than the long-lifetime phosphorescence of Eu(3+) microspheres as the pinhole was repositioned in the lagging direction. In contrast, repositioning of the pinhole in the leading and orthogonal directions caused equal loss of short- and long-lifetime luminescence. From measurements at different lag pinhole positions, a lifetime of 270 micros was estimated for the Eu(3+) microspheres, consistent with independent measurements. This simple adaptation is the basis for quantitative 3-D lifetime imaging microscopy. PMID:19123648

  18. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  19. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, M Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid-liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid-liquid interface. PMID:25671164

  20. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  1. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q watermore » and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.« less

  2. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  3. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    PubMed

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution. PMID:26773299

  4. Off-Axis Photoacoustic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Ryan L.

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a high-contrast, high-resolution imaging modality, used primarily for imaging hemoglobin and melanin. Important applications include mapping of the microvasculature and melanoma tumor margins. We demonstrate a novel PAM design that markedly simplifies the implementation by separating the optical illumination from the acoustic detection path. This modification enables the use of high-quality commercial optics and transducers, and may be readily adapted to commercial light microscopes. The designed PAM system is only sensitive to signals generated in the overlap of the illumination and detection solid angles, providing the additional benefit of quasi-dark-field detection. An off-axis PAM system with a lateral resolution of 26 μm and a modest axial resolution of 410 μm has been assembled and characterized using tissue samples. The axial resolution is readily scaled down to tens of micrometers within the same design, by utilizing commercially available high-frequency acoustic transducers. PMID:20176531

  5. Stochastic scanning multiphoton multifocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jureller, Justin E; Kim, Hee Y; Scherer, Norbert F

    2006-04-17

    Multiparticle tracking with scanning confocal and multiphoton fluorescence imaging is increasingly important for elucidating biological function, as in the transport of intracellular cargo-carrying vesicles. We demonstrate a simple rapid-sampling stochastic scanning multifocal multiphoton microscopy (SS-MMM) fluorescence imaging technique that enables multiparticle tracking without specialized hardware at rates 1,000 times greater than conventional single point raster scanning. Stochastic scanning of a diffractive optic generated 10x10 hexagonal array of foci with a white noise driven galvanometer yields a scan pattern that is random yet space-filling. SS-MMM creates a more uniformly sampled image with fewer spatio-temporal artifacts than obtained by conventional or multibeam raster scanning. SS-MMM is verified by simulation and experimentally demonstrated by tracking microsphere diffusion in solution. PMID:19516485

  6. Note: Direct piezoelectric effect microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T. J. A.; Stamenov, P.; Dorneles, L. S.

    2015-07-01

    An alternative method for investigating piezoelectric surfaces is suggested, exploiting the direct piezoeffect. The technique relies on acoustic (ultrasonic) excitation of the imaged surface and mapping of the resulting oscillatory electric potential. The main advantages arise from the spatial resolution of the conductive scanning probe microscopy in combination with the relatively large magnitude of the forward piezo signal Upf, which can be of the order of tens of mV even for non-ferroelectric piezoelectric materials. The potency of this experimental strategy is illustrated with measurements on well-crystallized quartz surfaces, where Upf ˜ 50 mV, for a piezoelectric coefficient of d33 = - 2.27 × 10-12 m/V, and applied stress of about T3 ˜ 5.7 kPa.

  7. Scanning Probe Microscopy of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, Pamela

    2011-10-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy has been used to study the unusual electronic properties of graphene. In an effort to support the graphene with minimal interaction with the substrate, we used a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) substrate. To minimize contaminants between the CVD graphene and boron nitride, the graphene samples were cleaned with distilled water and isopropanol prior to transfer to hBN substrate. We have also examined the growth of graphene flakes by chemical vapor deposition. In particular, we examined the relationship between the orientations of the first and second layer of CVD grown graphene. We found the growth mechanism preferentially resulted in rotations of 9^o or less indicating flakes with first and second layers aligned.

  8. Multifocal interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Chng, Xiong Kai Benjamin; Adie, Steven G.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Scott Carney, P.

    2014-01-01

    There is an inherent trade-off between transverse resolution and depth of field (DOF) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) which becomes a limiting factor for certain applications. Multifocal OCT and interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) each provide a distinct solution to the trade-off through modification to the experiment or via post-processing, respectively. In this paper, we have solved the inverse problem of multifocal OCT and present a general algorithm for combining multiple ISAM datasets. Multifocal ISAM (MISAM) uses a regularized combination of the resampled datasets to bring advantages of both multifocal OCT and ISAM to achieve optimal transverse resolution, extended effective DOF and improved signal-to-noise ratio. We present theory, simulation and experimental results. PMID:24977909

  9. Multifocal interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Chng, Xiong Kai Benjamin; Adie, Steven G; Boppart, Stephen A; Carney, P Scott

    2014-06-30

    There is an inherent trade-off between transverse resolution and depth of field (DOF) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) which becomes a limiting factor for certain applications. Multifocal OCT and interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) each provide a distinct solution to the trade-off through modification to the experiment or via post-processing, respectively. In this paper, we have solved the inverse problem of multifocal OCT and present a general algorithm for combining multiple ISAM datasets. Multifocal ISAM (MISAM) uses a regularized combination of the resampled datasets to bring advantages of both multifocal OCT and ISAM to achieve optimal transverse resolution, extended effective DOF and improved signal-to-noise ratio. We present theory, simulation and experimental results. PMID:24977909

  10. Direct Detectors for Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, R. N.; Moldovan, G.; Kirkland, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    There is interest in improving the detectors used to capture images in transmission electron microscopy. Detectors with an improved modulation transfer function at high spatial frequencies allow for higher resolution in images at lower magnification, which leads to an increased effective field of view. Detectors with improved detective quantum efficiency are important for low dose applications. One way in which these performance enhancements can be achieved is through direct detection, where primary electrons are converted directly into suitable electrical signals by the detector rather than relying on an indirect electron to photon conversion before detection. In this paper we present the characterisation of detector performance for a number of different direct detection technologies, and compare these technologies to traditional indirect detectors. Overall our results show that direct detection enables a significant improvement in all aspects of detector performance.

  11. Off-axis photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Ryan L; Applegate, Brian E

    2010-08-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a high-contrast, high-resolution imaging modality, used primarily for imaging hemoglobin and melanin. Important applications include mapping of the microvasculature and melanoma tumor margins. We demonstrate a novel PAM design that markedly simplifies the implementation by separating the optical illumination from the acoustic detection path. This modification enables the use of high-quality commercial optics and transducers, and may be readily adapted to commercial light microscopes. The designed PAM system is only sensitive to signals generated in the overlap of the illumination and detection solid angles, providing the additional benefit of quasi-dark-field detection. An off-axis PAM system with a lateral resolution of 26 microm and a modest axial resolution of 410 microm has been assembled and characterized using tissue samples. The axial resolution is readily scaled down to tens of micrometers within the same design, by utilizing commercially available high-frequency acoustic transducers. PMID:20176531

  12. Differential Multiphoton Laser Scanning Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Chandler, Eric V.; Hoover, Erich E.; Young, Michael D.; Ding, Shi-you; Sylvester, Anne W.; Kleinfeld, David; Squier, Jeff A.

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) in the biological and medical sciences has become an important tool for obtaining high resolution images at video rates. While current implementations of MMM achieve very high frame rates, they are limited in their applicability to essentially those biological samples that exhibit little or no scattering. In this paper, we report on a method for MMM in which imaging detection is not necessary (single element point detection is implemented), and is therefore fully compatible for use in imaging through scattering media. Further, we demonstrate that this method leads to a new type of MMM wherein it is possible to simultaneously obtain multiple images and view differences in excitation parameters in a single shot. PMID:27390511

  13. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy in Neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Albert; Nebel, Michaela; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews recent work involving the application of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to the study of individual cultured living cells, with an emphasis on topographical and functional imaging of neuronal and secretory cells of the nervous and endocrine system. The basic principles of biological SECM and associated negative amperometric-feedback and generator/collector-mode SECM imaging are discussed, and successful use of the methodology for screening soft and fragile membranous objects is outlined. The drawbacks of the constant-height mode of probe movement and the benefits of the constant-distance mode of SECM operation are described. Finally, representative examples of constant-height and constant-distance mode SECM on a variety of live cells are highlighted to demonstrate the current status of single-cell SECM in general and of SECM in neuroscience in particular.

  14. Interference techniques in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Mehmet

    We developed a set of interference-based optical microscopy techniques to study biological structures through nanometer-scale axial localization of fluorescent biomarkers. Spectral self-interference fluorescence microscopy (SSFM) utilizes interference of direct and reflected waves emitted from fluorescent molecules in the vicinity of planar reflectors to reveal the axial position of the molecules. A comprehensive calculation algorithm based on Green's function formalism is presented to verify the validity of approximations used in a far-field approach that describes the emission of fluorescent markers near interfaces. Using the validated model, theoretical limits of axial localization were determined with emphasis given to numerical aperture (NA) dependence of localization uncertainty. SSFM was experimentally demonstrated in conformational analysis of nucleoproteins. In particular, interaction between surface-tethered 75-mer double strand DNA and integration host factor (IHF) protein was probed on Si-SiO2 substrates by determining the axial position of fluorescent labels attached to the free ends of DNA molecules. Despite its sub-nanometer precision axial localization capability, SSFM lacks high lateral resolution due to the low-NA requirement for planar reflectors. We developed a second technique, 4Pi-SSFM, which improves the lateral resolution of a conventional SSFM system by an order of magnitude while achieving nanometer-scale axial localization precision. Using two opposing high-NA objectives, fluorescence signal is interferometrically collected and spectral interference pattern is recorded. Axial position of emitters is found from analysis of the spectra. The 4Pi-SSFM technique was experimentally demonstrated by determining the surface profiles of fabricated glass surfaces and outer membranes of Shigella, a type of Gram-negative bacteria. A further discussion is presented to localize surface O antigen, which is an important oligosaccharide structure in the

  15. Dynamic atomic force microscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Ricardo; Pérez, Rubén

    2002-09-01

    In this report we review the fundamentals, applications and future tendencies of dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. Our focus is on understanding why the changes observed in the dynamic properties of a vibrating tip that interacts with a surface make possible to obtain molecular resolution images of membrane proteins in aqueous solutions or to resolve atomic-scale surface defects in ultra high vacuum (UHV). Our description of the two major dynamic AFM modes, amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) emphasises their common points without ignoring the differences in experimental set-ups and operating conditions. Those differences are introduced by the different feedback parameters, oscillation amplitude in AM-AFM and frequency shift and excitation amplitude in FM-AFM, used to track the topography and composition of a surface. The theoretical analysis of AM-AFM (also known as tapping-mode) emphasises the coexistence, in many situations of interests, of two stable oscillation states, a low and high amplitude solution. The coexistence of those oscillation states is a consequence of the presence of attractive and repulsive components in the interaction force and their non-linear dependence on the tip-surface separation. We show that key relevant experimental properties such as the lateral resolution, image contrast and sample deformation are highly dependent on the oscillation state chosen to operate the instrument. AM-AFM allows to obtain simultaneous topographic and compositional contrast in heterogeneous samples by recording the phase angle difference between the external excitation and the tip motion (phase imaging). Significant applications of AM-AFM such as high-resolution imaging of biomolecules and polymers, large-scale patterning of silicon surfaces, manipulation of single nanoparticles or the fabrication of single electron devices are also reviewed. FM-AFM (also called non

  16. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Wilt, Dave; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Tin, Padetha; Lau, Janice; Castro, Stephanie; Jenkins, Philip; Scheiman, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy (STORM) is a method, now undergoing development, for measuring optoelectronic properties of materials and devices on the nanoscale by means of a combination of (1) traditional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with (2) tunable laser spectroscopy. In STORM, an STM tip probing a semiconductor is illuminated with modulated light at a wavelength in the visible-to-near-infrared range and the resulting photoenhancement of the tunneling current is measured as a function of the illuminating wavelength. The photoenhancement of tunneling current occurs when the laser photon energy is sufficient to excite charge carriers into the conduction band of the semiconductor. Figure 1 schematically depicts a proposed STORM apparatus. The light for illuminating the semiconductor specimen at the STM would be generated by a ring laser that would be tunable across the wavelength range of interest. The laser beam would be chopped by an achromatic liquid-crystal modulator. A polarization-maintaining optical fiber would couple the light to the tip/sample junction of a commercial STM. An STM can be operated in one of two modes: constant height or constant current. A STORM apparatus would be operated in the constant-current mode, in which the height of the tip relative to the specimen would be varied in order to keep the tunneling current constant. In this mode, a feedback control circuit adjusts the voltage applied to a piezoelectric actuator in the STM that adjusts the height of the STM tip to keep the tunneling current constant. The exponential relationship between the tunneling current and tip-to-sample distance makes it relatively easy to implement this mode of operation. The choice of method by which the photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current would be measured depends on choice of the frequency at which the input illumination would be modulated (chopped). If the frequency of modulation were low enough (typically < 10 Hz) that the

  17. Developments in optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, J. P.; Meemon, P.; Thompson, K. P.; Murali, S.; Lee, K. S.

    2010-11-01

    Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) utilizes a high NA microscope objective in the sample arm to achieve an axially and laterally high resolution OCT image. An increase in NA, however, leads to a dramatically decreased depth of focus (DOF), and hence shortens the imaging depth range so that high lateral resolution is maintained only within a small depth region around the focal plane. One solution to increase the depth of imaging while keeping a high lateral resolution is dynamic-focusing. Utilizing the voltage controlled refocus capability of a liquid lens, we have recently presented a solution for invariant high resolution imaging using the liquid lens embedded within a fixed optics hand-held custom microscope designed specifically for optical imaging systems using a broadband light source centered at 800 nm with a 120 nm bandwidth. Subsequently, we have developed a Gabor-Domain Optical Coherence Microscopy (GD-OCM) that utilizes the high speed imaging of spectral domain OCT, the high lateral resolution of OCM, and the ability of real time refocusing of our custom design variable focus objective. Finally, key developments in Phase-Resolved Doppler OCT (PR-DOCT) are key enablers to combine high-resolution structural imaging with functional imaging. In this paper we review achievements in GD-OCM and detail how portions of in-focus cross-sectional images can be extracted and fused to form an invariant lateral resolution image with multiple cross-sectional images acquired corresponding to a discrete refocusing step along depth enabled by the varifocal device. We demonstrate sub-cellular resolution imaging of an African frog tadpole (Xenopus Laevis) taken from a 500 μm × 500 μm cross-section as well as cellular imaging in in vivo skin. Finally, A novel dual-detection full-range Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography system was developed that provides 7 μm axial resolution (in air) at about 90 kHz axial scan rate for mirror-image phase resolved Doppler imaging

  18. Acoustic microscopy of living cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, J A; Rugar, D; Johnston, R N; Quate, C F

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary results of the observation by acoustic microscopy of living cells in vitro. The scanning acoustic microscope uses high-frequency sound waves to produce images with submicrometer resolution. The contrast observed in acoustic micrographs of living cells depends on the acoustic properties (i.e., density, stiffness, and attenuation) and on the topographic contour of the cell. Variation in distance separating the acoustic lens and the viewed cell also has a profound effect on the image. When the substratum is located at the focal plane, thick regions of the cell show a darkening that can be related to cellular acoustic attenuation (a function of cytoplasmic viscosity). When the top of the cell is placed near the focal plane, concentric bright and dark rings appear in the image. The location of the rings can be related to cell topography, and the ring contrast can be correlated to the stiffness and density of the cell. In addition, the character of the images of single cells varies dramatically when the substratum upon which they are grown is changed to a different material. By careful selection of the substratum, the information content of the acoustic images can be increased. Our analysis of acoustic images of actively motile cells indicates that leading lamella are less dense or stiff than the quiescent trailing processes of the cells. Images PMID:6940179

  19. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-01-01

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications. PMID:26586153

  20. Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Stephen J; Colliex, C.

    2012-01-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

  1. Electron microscopy of pharmaceutical systems.

    PubMed

    Klang, Victoria; Valenta, Claudia; Matsko, Nadejda B

    2013-01-01

    During the last decades, the focus of research in pharmaceutical technology has steadily shifted towards the development and optimisation of nano-scale drug delivery systems. As a result, electron microscopic methods are increasingly employed for the characterisation of pharmaceutical systems such as nanoparticles and microparticles, nanoemulsions, microemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, different types of vesicles, nanofibres and many more. Knowledge of the basic properties of these systems is essential for an adequate microscopic analysis. Classical transmission and scanning electron microscopic techniques frequently have to be adapted for an accurate analysis of formulation morphology, especially in case of hydrated colloidal systems. Specific techniques such as environmental scanning microscopy or cryo preparation are required for their investigation. Analytical electron microscopic techniques such as electron energy-loss spectroscopy or energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are additional assets to determine the elemental composition of the systems, but are not yet standard tools in pharmaceutical research. This review provides an overview of pharmaceutical systems of interest in current research and strategies for their successful electron microscopic analysis. Advantages and limitations of the different methodological approaches are discussed and recent findings of interest are presented. PMID:22921788

  2. Recent developments in GSDIM microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyba, Marcus; Simonutti, Giulio A.; Fölling, Jonas

    2012-02-01

    In the presented study we characterized the suitability of 15 conventional fluorescence dyes for GSDIM microscopy. For all dyes involved in the screening labeled secondary antibodies for immunohistochemistry are commercially available. The dye performance was tested after staining to fixed mammalian cells. Chemical environments were chosen to be compatible with the applicative and spectroscopic demands. Investigated watery environments are suitable for TIRF based applications. To the best of our knowledge, we present for the first time systematic screening for configurations of dyes embedded in solid polymer. The polymer mounting matches well to the refractive index of oil immersion optics. This is crucial for applications at high penetration depth into the sample and suitable for long-term sample storage. We rated the final super-resolution image quality additional to quantitative characterization of important spectroscopic parameters. Therefore, this dye screening is optimized for various biological imaging applications. Control of the single molecule blinking rate by 405nm light exposure is quantified, as well. It is shown that this important effect is applicable to numerous fluorescent dyes. Thus, the controlled application of low intensities of 405nm light allows to maximize recording speed. As this option is already included in commercial GSDIM microscopes the results of our study allow optimized super-resolution imaging down to ~20nm with multiple dyes and multi-color staining.

  3. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-11-01

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications.

  4. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-15

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  5. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adie, Steven G.; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Ralston, Tyler S.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    The trade-off between transverse resolution and depth-of-field, and the mitigation of optical aberrations, are long-standing problems in optical imaging. The deleterious impact of these problems on three-dimensional tomography increases with numerical aperture (NA), and so they represent a significant impediment for real-time cellular resolution tomography over the typical imaging depths achieved with OCT. With optical coherence microscopy (OCM), which utilizes higher-NA optics than OCT, the depth-of-field is severely reduced, and it has been postulated that aberrations play a major role in reducing the useful imaging depth in OCM. Even at lower transverse resolution, both these phenomena produce artifacts that degrade the imaging of fine tissue structures. Early approaches to the limited depth-of-field problem in time-domain OCT utilized dynamic focusing. In spectral-domain OCT, this focus-shifting approach to data acquisition leads to long acquisition times and large datasets. Adaptive optics (AO) has been utilized to correct optical aberrations, in particular for retinal OCT, but in addition to requiring elaborate and expensive setups, the real-time optimization requirements at the time of imaging, and the correction of spatially varying effects of aberrations throughout an imaged volume, remain as significant challenges. This chapter presents computed imaging solutions for the reconstruction of sample structure when imaging with ideal and aberrated Gaussian beams.

  6. Lensfree microscopy on a cellphone.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Derek; Mudanyali, Onur; Oztoprak, Cetin; Isikman, Serhan O; Sencan, Ikbal; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-07-21

    We demonstrate lensfree digital microscopy on a cellphone. This compact and light-weight holographic microscope installed on a cellphone does not utilize any lenses, lasers or other bulky optical components and it may offer a cost-effective tool for telemedicine applications to address various global health challenges. Weighing approximately 38 grams (<1.4 ounces), this lensfree imaging platform can be mechanically attached to the camera unit of a cellphone where the samples are loaded from the side, and are vertically illuminated by a simple light-emitting diode (LED). This incoherent LED light is then scattered from each micro-object to coherently interfere with the background light, creating the lensfree hologram of each object on the detector array of the cellphone. These holographic signatures captured by the cellphone permit reconstruction of microscopic images of the objects through rapid digital processing. We report the performance of this lensfree cellphone microscope by imaging various sized micro-particles, as well as red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and a waterborne parasite (Giardia lamblia). PMID:20445943

  7. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. PMID:25554301

  8. Thermal radiation scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wilde, Yannick; Formanek, Florian; Carminati, Rémi; Gralak, Boris; Lemoine, Paul-Arthur; Joulain, Karl; Mulet, Jean-Philippe; Chen, Yong; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2006-12-01

    In standard near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), a subwavelength probe acts as an optical `stethoscope' to map the near field produced at the sample surface by external illumination. This technique has been applied using visible, infrared, terahertz and gigahertz radiation to illuminate the sample, providing a resolution well beyond the diffraction limit. NSOM is well suited to study surface waves such as surface plasmons or surface-phonon polaritons. Using an aperture NSOM with visible laser illumination, a near-field interference pattern around a corral structure has been observed, whose features were similar to the scanning tunnelling microscope image of the electronic waves in a quantum corral. Here we describe an infrared NSOM that operates without any external illumination: it is a near-field analogue of a night-vision camera, making use of the thermal infrared evanescent fields emitted by the surface, and behaves as an optical scanning tunnelling microscope. We therefore term this instrument a `thermal radiation scanning tunnelling microscope' (TRSTM). We show the first TRSTM images of thermally excited surface plasmons, and demonstrate spatial coherence effects in near-field thermal emission.

  9. Disposable optics for microscopy diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Vilmi, Pauliina; Varjo, Sami; Sliz, Rafal; Hannuksela, Jari; Fabritius, Tapio

    2015-01-01

    The point-of-care testing (POCT) is having increasing role on modern health care systems due to a possibility to perform tests for patients conveniently and immediately. POCT includes lot of disposable devices because of the environment they are often used. For a disposable system to be reasonably utilized, it needs to be high in quality but low in price. Optics based POCT systems are interesting approach to be developed, and here we describe a low-cost fabrication process for microlens arrays for microscopy. Lens arrays having average lens diameter of 222 μm with 300 μm lens pitch were fabricated. The lenses were characterized to have standard deviation of 0.06 μm in height and 4.61 μm in diameter. The resolution limit of 3.9μm is demonstrated with real images, and the images were compared with ones made with glass and polycarbonate lens arrays. The image quality is at the same level than with the glass lenses and the manufacturing costs are very low, thus making them suitable for POCT applications. PMID:26586153

  10. Microtech: Microscopy technician training program

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.; Thorp, K.E.; Adams, W.W.

    1994-12-31

    Recognizing the need for modernization of vocational training and to provide the U.S. with a more highly skilled pool of technical workers, researchers at the Air Force`s Wright Laboratory, Aeronautical System Center formed a partnership with local schools to establish a high school vocational training program in microscopy. Utilizing equipment donated by government labs and private industry, a laboratory was established at the local urban vocational school to provide training needed for immediate job placement of students. a former contract employee at the Wright Laboratory became a full-time instructor at the school. Student enrollment is quickly growing and utilization of the equipment by other teachers and classes looks promising. While enrolled in the program, students will be required to analyze and report on a variety of samples which will be supplied by teachers from across the district. These reports can then be used by the teachers to supplement their science curricula. Obtaining projects and completing formal reports will require development of marketing and publication skills by the students.

  11. PLS photoemission electron microscopy beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tai-Hee; Kim, Ki-jeong; Hwang, C. C.; Rah, S.; Park, C. Y.; Kim, Bongsoo

    2001-07-01

    The performance of a recently commissioned beamline at the Pohang Light Source (PLS) is described. The beamline, which is located at 4B1 at PLS, is a Varied Line Spacing (VLS) Plane Grating Monochromator (PGM) beamline. VLS PGM has become very popular because of the simple scanning mechanism and the fixed exit slit. The beamline which takes 3 mrad horizontal beam fan from bending magnet, covers the energy range 200-1000 eV for Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) experiments. Simplicity of the optics and high flux with medium resolution were the design goals for these applications. The beamline consists of a horizontal focusing mirror, a vertical focusing mirror, VLS plane grating and exit slit. The source of PLS could be used as a virtual entrance slit because of its small size and stability. The flux and the resolution of the beamline at the experimental station have been measured using an ion chamber and a calibrated photodiode. Test images of PEEM from a standard sample were taken to illustrate the further performance of the beamline and PEEM station.

  12. Electron microscopy and forensic practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrlý, Marek; Turková, Ivana

    2013-05-01

    Electron microanalysis in forensic practice ranks among basic applications used in investigation of traces (latents, stains, etc.) from crime scenes. Applying electron microscope allows for rapid screening and receiving initial information for a wide range of traces. SEM with EDS/WDS makes it possible to observe topography surface and morphology samples and examination of chemical components. Physical laboratory of the Institute of Criminalistics Prague use SEM especially for examination of inorganic samples, rarely for biology and other material. Recently, possibilities of electron microscopy have been extended considerably using dual systems with focused ion beam. These systems are applied mainly in study of inner micro and nanoparticles , thin layers (intersecting lines in graphical forensic examinations, analysis of layers of functional glass, etc.), study of alloys microdefects, creating 3D particles and aggregates models, etc. Automated mineralogical analyses are a great asset to analysis of mineral phases, particularly soils, similarly it holds for cathode luminescence, predominantly colour one and precise quantitative measurement of their spectral characteristics. Among latest innovations that are becoming to appear also at ordinary laboratories are TOF - SIMS systems and micro Raman spectroscopy with a resolution comparable to EDS/WDS analysis (capable of achieving similar level as through EDS/WDS analysis).

  13. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  14. Photoacoustic microscopy of human teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin; Cai, Xin; Favazza, Christopher; Yao, Junjie; Li, Li; Duong, Steven; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Holtzman, Jennifer; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) utilizes short laser pulses to deposit energy into light absorbers and sensitively detects the ultrasonic waves the absorbers generate in response. PAM directly renders a three-dimensional spatial distribution of sub-surface optical absorbers. Unlike other optical imaging technologies, PAM features label-free optical absorption contrast and excellent imaging depths. Standard dental imaging instruments are limited to X-ray and CCD cameras. Subsurface optical dental imaging is difficult due to the highly-scattering enamel and dentin tissue. Thus, very few imaging methods can detect dental decay or diagnose dental pulp, which is the innermost part of the tooth, containing the nerves, blood vessels, and other cells. Here, we conducted a feasibility study on imaging dental decay and dental pulp with PAM. Our results showed that PAM is sensitive to the color change associated with dental decay. Although the relative PA signal distribution may be affected by surface contours and subsurface reflections from deeper dental tissue, monitoring changes in the PA signals (at the same site) over time is necessary to identify the progress of dental decay. Our results also showed that deep-imaging, near-infrared (NIR) PAM can sensitively image blood in the dental pulp of an in vitro tooth. In conclusion, PAM is a promising tool for imaging both dental decay and dental pulp.

  15. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-27

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM. PMID:27215823

  16. Lensfree microscopy on a cellphone

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Derek; Mudanyali, Onur; Oztoprak, Cetin; Isikman, Serhan O.; Sencan, Ikbal; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate lensfree digital microscopy on a cellphone. This compact and light-weight holographic microscope installed on a cellphone does not utilize any lenses, lasers or other bulky optical components and it may offer a cost-effective tool for telemedicine applications to address various global health challenges. Weighing ~38 grams (<1.4 ounces), this lensfree imaging platform can be mechanically attached to the camera unit of a cellphone where the samples are loaded from the side, and are vertically illuminated by a simple light-emitting diode (LED). This incoherent LED light is then scattered from each micro-object to coherently interfere with the background light, creating the lensfree hologram of each object on the detector array of the cellphone. These holographic signatures captured by the cellphone permit reconstruction of microscopic images of the objects through rapid digital processing. We report the performance of this lensfree cellphone microscope by imaging various sized micro-particles, as well as red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and a waterborne parasite (Giardia lamblia). PMID:20445943

  17. Four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lobastov, Vladimir A.; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2005-01-01

    Electron microscopy is arguably the most powerful tool for spatial imaging of structures. As such, 2D and 3D microscopies provide static structures with subnanometer and increasingly with ångstrom-scale spatial resolution. Here we report the development of 4D ultrafast electron microscopy, whose capability imparts another dimension to imaging in general and to dynamics in particular. We demonstrate its versatility by recording images and diffraction patterns of crystalline and amorphous materials and images of biological cells. The electron packets, which were generated with femtosecond laser pulses, have a de Broglie wavelength of 0.0335 Å at 120 keV and have as low as one electron per pulse. With such few particles, doses of few electrons per square ångstrom, and ultrafast temporal duration, the long sought after but hitherto unrealized quest for ultrafast electron microscopy has been realized. Ultrafast electron microscopy should have an impact on all areas of microscopy, including biological imaging. PMID:15883380

  18. Experimental investigation of 4-dimensional superspace crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Rasing, T.; Janner, A.

    1983-09-01

    The symmetry of incommensurate crystals can be described by higher dimensional space groups in the so called superspace approach. The basic ideas are explained and used for showing that superspace groups provide an adequate frame for analyzing experimental results on incommensurate crystals.

  19. Off-axis photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Ryan; Applegate, Brian E.

    2010-02-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a high-contrast, high-resolution imaging modality used primarily for imaging hemoglobin and melanin. Important applications include mapping of the microvasculature and melanoma tumor margins. We have developed a novel photoacoustic microscope design, which substantially simplifies construction by enabling the use of unmodified commercial optics and ultrasonic transducers. Moreover, the simple design may be readily incorporated into a standard light microscope, thus providing a familiar imaging platform for clinical researchers. A proof-of-concept Off-Axis PAM system with a lateral resolution of 26 μm and a modest axial resolution of 410 μm has been assembled and characterized using tissue samples. We have derived the appropriate equations to describe the relevant design parameters and verified the equations via measurements made on our prototype Off-Axis PAM system. A consequence of the simple design is a reduction in axial resolution compared to coaxial designs. The reduction is inversely proportional to the cosine of the angle between excitation and detection and equal to 15% and 41% for angles of 30º and 45º, respectively. While resolution is negatively affected by off-axis detection, the ability to measure weak signals at depth is enhanced. Off-axis detection has an inherent dark-field quality; chromophores excited outside the numerical aperture of the ultrasonic detector will not be detected. The physical geometry of Off-Axis PAM enables the placement of the ultrasonic transducer at the minimum distance from the sample with no obstructions between the sample and transducer. This may prove to be an additional advantage of Off-Axis PAM over designs that incorporate long working distance ultrasonic transducers and/or require the propagation of the acoustic wave through the laser excitation optics to achieve co-axial detection.

  20. The 2015 super-resolution microscopy roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Stefan W.; Sahl, Steffen J.; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Heintzmann, Rainer; Booth, Martin J.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Shtengel, Gleb; Hess, Harald; Tinnefeld, Philip; Honigmann, Alf; Jakobs, Stefan; Testa, Ilaria; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim; Ewers, Helge; Davis, Simon J.; Eggeling, Christian; Klenerman, David; Willig, Katrin I.; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Castello, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Cordes, Thorben

    2015-11-01

    Far-field optical microscopy using focused light is an important tool in a number of scientific disciplines including chemical, (bio)physical and biomedical research, particularly with respect to the study of living cells and organisms. Unfortunately, the applicability of the optical microscope is limited, since the diffraction of light imposes limitations on the spatial resolution of the image. Consequently the details of, for example, cellular protein distributions, can be visualized only to a certain extent. Fortunately, recent years have witnessed the development of ‘super-resolution’ far-field optical microscopy (nanoscopy) techniques such as stimulated emission depletion (STED), ground state depletion (GSD), reversible saturated optical (fluorescence) transitions (RESOLFT), photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM), stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), structured illumination microscopy (SIM) or saturated structured illumination microscopy (SSIM), all in one way or another addressing the problem of the limited spatial resolution of far-field optical microscopy. While SIM achieves a two-fold improvement in spatial resolution compared to conventional optical microscopy, STED, RESOLFT, PALM/STORM, or SSIM have all gone beyond, pushing the limits of optical image resolution to the nanometer scale. Consequently, all super-resolution techniques open new avenues of biomedical research. Because the field is so young, the potential capabilities of different super-resolution microscopy approaches have yet to be fully explored, and uncertainties remain when considering the best choice of methodology. Thus, even for experts, the road to the future is sometimes shrouded in mist. The super-resolution optical microscopy roadmap of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics addresses this need for clarity. It provides guidance to the outstanding questions through a collection of short review articles from experts in the field, giving a thorough

  1. Servo-controlled intravital microscope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, M. N.; Wayland, H. J.; Chapman, C. P. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A microscope system is described for viewing an area of a living body tissue that is rapidly moving, by maintaining the same area in the field-of-view and in focus. A focus sensing portion of the system includes two video cameras at which the viewed image is projected, one camera being slightly in front of the image plane and the other slightly behind it. A focus sensing circuit for each camera differentiates certain high frequency components of the video signal and then detects them and passes them through a low pass filter, to provide dc focus signal whose magnitudes represent the degree of focus. An error signal equal to the difference between the focus signals, drives a servo that moves the microscope objective so that an in-focus view is delivered to an image viewing/recording camera.

  2. Analytical transmission electron microscopy in materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    Microcharacterization of materials on a scale of less than 10 nm has been afforded by recent advances in analytical transmission electron microscopy. The factors limiting accurate analysis at the limit of spatial resolution for the case of a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are examined in this paper.

  3. Digital microscopy. Bringing new technology into focus.

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    Digital microscopy enables the scanning of microscope slides so that they can be viewed, analyzed, and archived on a computer. While the technology is not yet widely accepted by pathologists, a switch to digital microscopy systems seems to be inevitable in the near future. PMID:21309285

  4. Microscopy & microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michael, Joseph R.

    2016-01-08

    The article provides information about an upcoming conference from the program chair. The Microscopy Society of America (MSA), the Microanalysis Society (MAS), and the International Metallographic Society (IMS) invite participation in Microscopy & Microanalysis 2016 in Columbus, Ohio, July 24 through July 28, 2016.

  5. Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja

    Time domain Optical Coherence Tomography (TD-OCT), first reported in 1991, makes use of the low temporal coherence properties of a NIR broadband laser to create depth sectioning of up to 2mm under the surface using optical interferometry and point to point scanning. Prior and ongoing work in OCT in the research community has concentrated on improving axial resolution through the development of broadband sources and speed of image acquisition through new techniques such as Spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT). In SD-OCT, an entire depth scan is acquired at once with a low numerical aperture (NA) objective lens focused at a fixed point within the sample. In this imaging geometry, a longer depth of focus is achieved at the expense of lateral resolution, which is typically limited to 10 to 20 mum. Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), introduced in 1994, combined the advantages of high axial resolution obtained in OCT with high lateral resolution obtained by increasing the NA of the microscope placed in the sample arm. However, OCM presented trade-offs caused by the inverse quadratic relationship between the NA and the DOF of the optics used. For applications requiring high lateral resolution, such as cancer diagnostics, several solutions have been proposed including the periodic manual re-focusing of the objective lens in the time domain as well as the spectral domain C-mode configuration in order to overcome the loss in lateral resolution outside the DOF. In this research, we report for the first time, high speed, sub-cellular imaging (lateral resolution of 2 mum) in OCM using a Gabor domain image processing algorithm with a custom designed and fabricated dynamic focus microscope interfaced to a Ti:Sa femtosecond laser centered at 800 nm within an SD-OCM configuration. It is envisioned that this technology will provide a non-invasive replacement for the current practice of multiple biopsies for skin cancer diagnosis. The research reported here presents three important advances

  6. Visualizing quantitative microscopy data: History and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Sailem, Heba Z.; Cooper, Sam; Bakal, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Data visualization is a fundamental aspect of science. In the context of microscopy-based studies, visualization typically involves presentation of the images themselves. However, data visualization is challenging when microscopy experiments entail imaging of millions of cells, and complex cellular phenotypes are quantified in a high-content manner. Most well-established visualization tools are inappropriate for displaying high-content data, which has driven the development of new visualization methodology. In this review, we discuss how data has been visualized in both classical and high-content microscopy studies; as well as the advantages, and disadvantages, of different visualization methods. PMID:26906253

  7. Soft x-ray holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickler, Daniel; Frömter, Robert; Stillrich, Holger; Menk, Christian; Tieg, Carsten; Streit-Nierobisch, Simone; Sprung, Michael; Gutt, Christian; Stadler, Lorenz-M.; Leupold, Olaf; Grübel, Gerhard; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a new x-ray microscopy technique based on Fourier transform holography (FTH), where the sample is separate from the optics part of the setup. The sample can be shifted with respect to the holography optics, thus large-scale or randomly distributed objects become accessible. As this extends FTH into a true microscopy technique, we call it x-ray holographic microscopy (XHM). FTH allows nanoscale imaging without the need for nanometer-size beams. Simple Fourier transform yields an unambiguous image reconstruction. We demonstrate XHM by studying the magnetic domain evolution of a Co/Pt multilayer film as function of locally varied iron overlayer thickness.

  8. X-ray microscopy using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Pounds, J.G.; Rivers, M.L.; Schidlovsky, G.; Smith, J.V.; Spanne, P.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The system for x-ray microscopy now being developed at the X-26 beam line of the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is described here. Examples of the use of x-ray microscopy for trace element geochemistry, biology and medicine, and materials investigations are given to emphasize the scientific applications of the technique. Future directions for the improvement and further development of the X-26 microscope and of the x-ray microscopy field in general are discussed. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Visualizing quantitative microscopy data: History and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sailem, Heba Z; Cooper, Sam; Bakal, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Data visualization is a fundamental aspect of science. In the context of microscopy-based studies, visualization typically involves presentation of the images themselves. However, data visualization is challenging when microscopy experiments entail imaging of millions of cells, and complex cellular phenotypes are quantified in a high-content manner. Most well-established visualization tools are inappropriate for displaying high-content data, which has driven the development of new visualization methodology. In this review, we discuss how data has been visualized in both classical and high-content microscopy studies; as well as the advantages, and disadvantages, of different visualization methods. PMID:26906253

  10. Probe microscopy: Scanning below the cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Ozgur

    2008-08-01

    Conventional atomic force microscopy probes only the surface of specimens. A related technique called scanning near-field ultrasonic holography can now image nanoparticles buried below the surfaces of cells, which could prove useful in nanotoxicology.

  11. Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Nonlinear Vibrational Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chao-Yu; Boik, John; Potma, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    Optical imaging with spectroscopic vibrational contrast is a label-free solution for visualizing, identifying, and quantifying a wide range of biomolecular compounds in biological materials. Both linear and nonlinear vibrational microscopy techniques derive their imaging contrast from infrared active or Raman allowed molecular transitions, which provide a rich palette for interrogating chemical and structural details of the sample. Yet nonlinear optical methods, which include both second-order sum-frequency generation (SFG) and third-order coherent Raman scattering (CRS) techniques, offer several improved imaging capabilities over their linear precursors. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy features unprecedented vibrational imaging speeds, provides strategies for higher spatial resolution, and gives access to additional molecular parameters. These advances have turned vibrational microscopy into a premier tool for chemically dissecting live cells and tissues. This review discusses the molecular contrast of SFG and CRS microscopy and highlights several of the advanced imaging capabilities that have impacted biological and biomedical research. PMID:23245525

  12. Polarization-sensitive interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, Fredrick A.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Xu, Yang; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional optical microscopy suffers from the well-known compromise between transverse resolution and depth-of-field. This is true for both structural imaging methods and their functional extensions. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) is a solution to the 3D coherent microscopy inverse problem that provides depth-independent transverse resolution. We demonstrate the extension of ISAM to polarization sensitive imaging, termed polarization-sensitive interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (PS-ISAM). This technique is the first functionalization of the ISAM method and provides improved depth-of-field for polarization-sensitive imaging. The basic assumptions of polarization-sensitive imaging are explored, and refocusing of birefringent structures is experimentally demonstrated. PS-ISAM enables high-resolution volumetric imaging of birefringent materials and tissue.

  13. Using hydrogels in microscopy: A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Flood, Peter; Page, Henry; Reynaud, Emmanuel G

    2016-05-01

    Sample preparation for microscopy is a crucial step to ensure the best experimental outcome. It often requires the use of specific mounting media that have to be tailored to not just the sample but the chosen microscopy technique. The media must not damage the sample or impair the optical path, and may also have to support the correct physiological function/development of the sample. For decades, researchers have used embedding media such as hydrogels to maintain samples in place. Their ease of use and transparency has promoted them as mainstream mounting media. However, they are not as straightforward to implement as assumed. They can contain contaminants, generate forces on the sample, have complex diffusion and structural properties that are influenced by multiple factors and are generally not designed for microscopy in mind. This short review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using hydrogels for microscopy sample preparation and highlight some of the less obvious problems associated with the area. PMID:26921550

  14. Tomographic phase microscopy and its biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonshik

    2012-12-01

    Conventional interferometric microscopy techniques such as digital holographic microscopy and quantitative phase microscopy are often classified as 3D imaging techniques because a recorded complex field image can be numerically propagated to a different depth. In a strict sense, however, a single complex field image contains only 2D information on a specimen. The measured 2D image is only a subset of the 3D structure. For the 3D mapping of an object, multiple independent 2D images are to be taken, for example at multiple incident angles or wavelengths, and then combined by the so-called optical diffraction tomography (ODT). In this Letter, tomographic phase microscopy (TPM) is reviewed that experimentally realizes the concept of the ODT for the 3D mapping of biological cells in their native state, and some of its interesting biological and biomedical applications are introduced. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Fluorescence Microscopy Imaging in Biomedical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuansheng; Periasamy, Ammasi

    Fluorescence microscopy is an important tool in biological sciences which provides excellent sensitivity for detecting very low concentrations of molecules over broad spatial and temporal dimensions. With fast developments of new fluorescent probes, advanced electronic and optical devices, and sophisticated data acquisition and analysis software, fluorescence microscopy resides on the central stage of life-sciences research. This chapter covers several commonly used and advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques and focuses on fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). A number of FLIM systems and their applications are reviewed. As an example, we describe how we built and calibrated a two-photon excitation time-correlated single-photon counting (TPE-TCSPC) FLIM system and employed the system to investigate protein-protein interactions in living cells.

  16. Multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Crawford, Darrell; Burczynski, Frank J.; Liu, Xin; Liau, Ian; Roberts, Michael S.

    2014-09-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is the preferred method when in vivo deep-tissue imaging is required. This review presents the application of multiphoton microscopy in defining liver function. In particular, multiphoton microscopy is useful in imaging intracellular events, such as mitochondrial depolarization and cellular metabolism in terms of NAD(P)H changes with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The morphology of hepatocytes can be visualized without exogenously administered fluorescent dyes by utilizing their autofluorescence and second harmonic generation signal of collagen, which is useful in diagnosing liver disease. More specific imaging, such as studying drug transport in normal and diseased livers are achievable, but require exogenously administered fluorescent dyes. If these techniques can be translated into clinical use to assess liver function, it would greatly improve early diagnosis of organ viability, fibrosis, and cancer.

  17. Subwavelength optical microscopy in the far field

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Qingqing; Zubairy, M. Suhail; Al-Amri, M.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2011-06-15

    We present a procedure for subwavelength optical microscopy. The identical atoms are distributed on a plane and shined with a standing wave. We rotate the plane to different angles and record the resonant fluorescence spectra in the far field, from which we can obtain their distance and location information. This procedure also works for atomic separation above one wavelength and therefore provides a seamless microscopy.

  18. Numerical focusing in diffraction phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaikova, N. A.; Grebenyuk, A. A.; Kalyanov, A. L.; Ryabukho, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Diffraction phase microscopy (DPM) provides the possibility of high-resolution quantitative phase imaging, based on equipment of an optical microscope with a special module working in a common-path off-axis configuration. As an optical microscopy technique, DPM has a limited focus depth, which is the smaller the higher is the objective's numerical aperture. In this paper we present the results of experimental investigation of numerical focusing with the angular spectrum method in DPM.

  19. Coatings and alternatives for SEM microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.H.

    1995-03-01

    Several methods of preparing samples of low electrical conductivity for conventional scanning electron microscopy are reviewed. Two new methods are chromium sputter-coating and low-voltage electron microscopy with a field emission gun. Photomicrographs of different coatings at high magnification show the structure of each coating. Advantages and disadvantages of each material are presented. Results with sputtered coatings are compared to an evaporated carbon coating.

  20. Investigation of wear phenomena by microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved in the loss of material from metallic and nonmetallic surfaces are discussed. The results presented indicate how various microscopy techniques used in conjunction with other analytical tools can assist in the elucidation of a wear mechanism. Without question, microscopy is the single most important tool for the study of the wear of surfaces, to assess and address inherent mechanisms of the material removal process.

  1. Scanning probe microscopy on new dental alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, B.; Geis-Gerstorfer, J.; Ziegler, C.

    Surface analytical methods such as scanning force microscopy (SFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the surface properties of amalgam substitutes as tooth filling materials. In particular the corrosion and the passivation behavior of new gallium restorative materials were studied. To give relevant practical data, the measurements were performed with and without the alloys being stored in artificial saliva to simulate physiological oral conditions.

  2. Dielectric constant microscopy for biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valavade, A. V.; Kothari, D. C.; Löbbe, C.

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the work on the development of Dielectric Constant Microscopy for biological materials using double pass amplitude modulation method. The dielectric constant information can be obtained at nanometer scales using this technique. Electrostatic force microscopy images of biological materials are presented. The images obtained from the EFM technique mode clearly show inversion contrast and gives the spatial variation of tip-sample capacitance. The EFM images are further processed to obtain dielectric constant information at nanometer scales.

  3. The emergence of multifrequency force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ricardo; Herruzo, Elena T

    2012-04-01

    In atomic force microscopy a cantilever with a sharp tip attached to it is scanned over the surface of a sample, and information about the surface is extracted by measuring how the deflection of the cantilever - which is caused by interactions between the tip and the surface - varies with position. In the most common form of atomic force microscopy, dynamic force microscopy, the cantilever is made to vibrate at a specific frequency, and the deflection of the tip is measured at this frequency. But the motion of the cantilever is highly nonlinear, and in conventional dynamic force microscopy, information about the sample that is encoded in the deflection at frequencies other than the excitation frequency is irreversibly lost. Multifrequency force microscopy involves the excitation and/or detection of the deflection at two or more frequencies, and it has the potential to overcome limitations in the spatial resolution and acquisition times of conventional force microscopes. Here we review the development of five different modes of multifrequency force microscopy and examine its application in studies of proteins, the imaging of vibrating nanostructures, measurements of ion diffusion and subsurface imaging in cells. PMID:22466857

  4. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy applied to lipid biology.

    PubMed

    Zumbusch, Andreas; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2013-10-01

    Optical microscopy is an indispensable tool that is driving progress in cell biology. It still is the only practical means of obtaining spatial and temporal resolution within living cells and tissues. Most prominently, fluorescence microscopy based on dye-labeling or protein fusions with fluorescent tags is a highly sensitive and specific method of visualizing biomolecules within sub-cellular structures. It is however severely limited by labeling artifacts, photo-bleaching and cytotoxicity of the labels. Coherent Raman Scattering (CRS) has emerged in the last decade as a new multiphoton microscopy technique suited for imaging unlabeled living cells in real time with high three-dimensional spatial resolution and chemical specificity. This technique has proven to be particularly successful in imaging unstained lipids from artificial membrane model systems, to living cells and tissues to whole organisms. In this article, we will review the experimental implementations of CRS microscopy and their application to imaging lipids. We will cover the theoretical background of linear and non-linear vibrational micro-spectroscopy necessary for the understanding of CRS microscopy. The different experimental implementations of CRS will be compared in terms of sensitivity limits and excitation and detection methods. Finally, we will provide an overview of the applications of CRS microscopy to lipid biology. PMID:24051337

  5. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Viktoria; Barlag, Britta; Nietschke, Monika; Hensel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded markers such as fluorescent proteins or self-labelling enzyme tags allow observations in living cells. Various genetically encoded tags are available for FM and SRM, but only few tags are suitable for CLEM. Here, we describe the red fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) as a multimodal marker for CLEM. TMR is used as fluorochrome coupled to ligands of genetically encoded self-labelling enzyme tags HaloTag, SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag in FM and SRM. We demonstrate that TMR can additionally photooxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) to an osmiophilic polymer visible on TEM sections, thus being a marker suitable for FM, SRM and TEM. We evaluated various organelle markers with enzymatic tags in mammalian cells labelled with TMR-coupled ligands and demonstrate the use as efficient and versatile DAB photooxidizer for CLEM approaches. PMID:26643905

  6. Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liss, Viktoria; Barlag, Britta; Nietschke, Monika; Hensel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded markers such as fluorescent proteins or self-labelling enzyme tags allow observations in living cells. Various genetically encoded tags are available for FM and SRM, but only few tags are suitable for CLEM. Here, we describe the red fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) as a multimodal marker for CLEM. TMR is used as fluorochrome coupled to ligands of genetically encoded self-labelling enzyme tags HaloTag, SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag in FM and SRM. We demonstrate that TMR can additionally photooxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) to an osmiophilic polymer visible on TEM sections, thus being a marker suitable for FM, SRM and TEM. We evaluated various organelle markers with enzymatic tags in mammalian cells labelled with TMR-coupled ligands and demonstrate the use as efficient and versatile DAB photooxidizer for CLEM approaches. PMID:26643905

  7. Resolution measures in molecular electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Penczek, Pawel A.

    2011-01-01

    Resolution measures in molecular electron microscopy provide means to evaluate quality of macromolecular structures computed from sets of their two-dimensional line projections. When the amount of detail in the computed density map is low there are no external standards by which the resolution of the result can be judged. Instead, resolution measures in molecular electron microscopy evaluate consistency of the results in reciprocal space and present it as a one-dimensional function of the modulus of spatial frequency. Here we provide description of standard resolution measures commonly used in electron microscopy. We point out that the organizing principle is the relationship between these measures and the Spectral Signal-to-Noise Ratio of the computed density map. Within this framework it becomes straightforward to describe the connection between the outcome of resolution evaluations and the quality of electron microscopy maps, in particular, the optimum filtration, in the Wiener sense, of the computed map. We also provide a discussion of practical difficulties of evaluation of resolution in electron microscopy, particularly in terms of its sensitivity to data processing operations used during structure determination process in single particle analysis and in electron tomography. PMID:20888958

  8. Nano-contact microscopy of supracrystals

    PubMed Central

    Goubet, Nicolas; Lekkas, Ioannis; Pileni, Marie Paule; Moriarty, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: Highly ordered three-dimensional colloidal crystals (supracrystals) comprised of 7.4 nm diameter Au nanocrystals (with a 5% size dispersion) have been imaged and analysed using a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy and dynamic force microscopy. Results: By exploring the evolution of both the force and tunnel current with respect to tip–sample separation, we arrive at the surprising finding that single nanocrystal resolution is readily obtained in tunnelling microscopy images acquired more than 1 nm into the repulsive (i.e., positive force) regime of the probe–nanocrystal interaction potential. Constant height force microscopy has been used to map tip–sample interactions in this regime, revealing inhomogeneities which arise from the convolution of the tip structure with the ligand distribution at the nanocrystal surface. Conclusion: Our combined STM–AFM measurements show that the contrast mechanism underpinning high resolution imaging of nanoparticle supracrystals involves a form of nanoscale contact imaging, rather than the through-vacuum tunnelling which underpins traditional tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:26114081

  9. Lighting up microscopy with random Raman lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokr, Brett H.; Nodurft, Dawson T.; Thompson, Jonathan V.; Bixler, Joel N.; Noojin, Gary D.; Redding, Brandon; Thomas, Robert J.; Cao, Hui; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    Wide-field microscopy, where full images are obtained simultaneously, is limited by the power available from speckle-free light sources. Currently, the vast majority of wide-field microscopes use either mercury arc lamps, or LEDs as the illumination source. The power available from these sources limits wide-field fluorescent microscopy to tens of microseconds temporal resolution. Lasers, while capable of producing high power and short pulses, have high spatial coherence. This leads to the formation of laser speckle that makes such sources unsuitable for wide-field imaging applications. Random Raman lasers offer the best of both worlds by producing laser-like intensities, short, nanosecond-scale, pulses, and low spatial coherence, speckle-free, output. These qualities combine to make random Raman lasers 4 orders of magnitude brighter than traditional wide-field microscopy light sources. Furthermore, the unique properties of random Raman lasers make possible the entirely new possibilities of wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging or wide-field Raman microscopy. We will introduce the relevant physics that give rise to the unique properties of random Raman lasing, and demonstrate early proof of principle results demonstrating random Raman lasing emission being used as an imaging light source. Finally, we will discuss future directions and elucidate the benefits of using random Raman lasers as a wide-field microscopy light source.

  10. [Pili annulati. A scanning electron microscopy study].

    PubMed

    Lalević-Vasić, B; Polić, D

    1988-01-01

    A case of ringed hair studied by light and electron microscopy is reported. The patient, a 20-year old girl, had been presenting with the hair abnormality since birth. At naked eye examination the hairs were dry, 6 to 7 cm long, and they showed dull and shining areas giving the scalp hair a scintillating appearance (fig. 1). Several samples of hair were taken and examined by light microscopy under white and polarized light. Hair shafts and cryo-fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS. 1. Light microscopy. Lesions were found in every hair examined. There were abnormal, opaque and fusiform areas alternating with normal areas all along the hair shaft (fig. 2). The abnormal areas resulted from intracortical air-filled cavities. Fractures similar to those of trichorrhexis nodosa were found in the opaque areas of the distal parts of the hairs. 2. Scanning electron microscopy. A. Hair shaft surface. The abnormal areas showed a longitudinal, "curtain-like" folding of the cuticular cells which had punctiform depressions on their surface and worn free edges (fig. 4, 5, 6); trichorrhexis-type fractures were seen in the distal parts of the hair shafts (fig. 7, 8). Normal areas regularly presented with longitudinal, superficial, short and non-systematized depressions (fig. 9); the cuticular cells were worn, and there were places where the denuded cortex showed dissociated cortical fibres (fig. 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3415147

  11. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  12. Piezoresistive sensors for scanning probe microscopy

    PubMed

    Gotszalk; Grabiec; Rangelow

    2000-02-01

    In this article we summarize the efforts devoted to the realization of our ideas of the development of piezoresistive sensor family used in scanning probe microscopy. All the sensors described here are fabricated based on advanced silicon micromachining and standard CMOS processing. The fabrication scenario presented in this article allows for the production of different sensors with the same tip deflection piezoresistive detection scheme. In this way we designed and fabricated, as a basic sensor, piezoresistive cantilever for atomic force microscopy, which enables surface topography measurements with a resolution of 0.1 nm. Next, by introducing a conductive tip isolated from the beam we obtained a microprobe for scanning capacitance microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. With this microprobe we measured capacitance between the microtip and the surface in the range of 10(-22) F. Furthermore, a modification of the piezoresistors placement, based on the finite element method (FEM) simulation permits fabrication of the multipurpose sensor for lateral force microscopy, which enables measurements of friction forces with a resolution of 1 nN. Finally, using the same basic device idea and only slightly modified process sequence we manufactured femtocalorimeter for the detection of heat energy in the range of 50 pJ. PMID:10741650

  13. X-ray microscopy of human malaria

    SciTech Connect

    Magowan, C.; Brown, J.T.; Mohandas, N.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-04-01

    Associations between intracellular organisms and host cells are complex and particularly difficult to examine. X-ray microscopy provides transmission images of subcellular structures in intact cells at resolutions superior to available methodologies. The spatial resolution is 50-60nm with a 1 micron depth of focus, superior to anything achievable with light microscopy. Image contrast is generated by differences in photoelectric absorption by the atoms in different areas (i.e. subcellular structures) throughout the full thickness of the sample. Absorption due to carbon dominates among all the elements in the sample at 2.4 nm x-ray wavelength. Thus images show features or structures, in a way not usually seen by other types of microscopy. The authors used soft x-ray microscopy to investigate structural development of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in normal and genetically abnormal erythrocytes, and in infected erythrocytes treated with compounds that have anti-malarial effects. X-ray microscopy showed newly elaborated structures in the cytosol of unstained, intact erythrocytes, redistribution of mass (carbon) in infected erythrocytes, and aberrant parasite morphology. Better understanding of the process of intracellular parasite maturation and the interactions between the parasite and its host erythrocyte can help define new approaches to the control of this deadly disease.

  14. Photoswitching microscopy with subdiffraction-resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Linde, Sebastian; Schüttpelz, Mark; Kasper, Robert; Seefeldt, Britta; Heilemann, Mike; Sauer, Markus

    2009-02-01

    High-resolution fluorescence imaging has a vast impact on our understanding of intracellular organization. The key elements for high-resolution microscopy are reversibly photo-switchable fluorophores that can be cycled between a fluorescent and a non-fluorescent (dark) state and can be localized with nanometer accuracy. For example, it has been demonstrated that conventional cyanine dyes (Cy5, Alexa647) can serve as efficient photoswitchable fluorescent probes. We extended this principle for carbocyanines without the need of an activator fluorophore nearby, and named our approach direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). Recently, we introduced a general approach for superresolution microscopy that uses commercial fluorescent probes as molecular photoswitches by generating long lived dark states such as triplet states or radical states. Importantly, this concept can be extended to a variety of conventional fluorophores, such as ATTO520, ATTO565, or ATTO655. The generation of non-fluorescent dark states as the underlying principle of superresolution microscopy is generalized under the term photoswitching microscopy, and unlocks a broad spectrum of organic fluorophores for multicolor application. Hereby, this method supplies subdiffraction-resolution of subcellular compartments and can serve as a tool for molecular quantification.

  15. CARS microscopy of Alzheimer's diseased brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enejder, Annika; Kiskis, Juris; Fink, Helen; Nyberg, Lena; Thyr, Jakob; Li, Jia-Yi

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder currently without cure, characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques surrounded by dystrophic neurites. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanisms, biochemical analysis (protein immunoblot) of plaque extracts reveals that they consist of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides assembled as oligomers, protofibrils and aggregates. Their spatial distribution has been confirmed by Thioflavin-S or immuno-staining with fluorescence microscopy. However, it is increasingly understood that the protein aggregation is only one of several mechanism that causes neuronal dysfunction and death. This raises the need for a more complete biochemical analysis. In this study, we have complemented 2-photon fluorescence microscopy of Thioflavin-S and Aβ immuno-stained human AD plaques with CARS microscopy. We show that the chemical build-up of AD plaques is more complex and that Aβ staining does not provide the complete picture of the spatial distribution or the molecular composition of AD plaques. CARS images provide important complementary information to that obtained by fluorescence microscopy, motivating a broader introduction of CARS microscopy in the AD research field.

  16. Wet electron microscopy with quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Timp, Winston; Watson, Nicki; Sabban, Alon; Zik, Ory; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-09-01

    Wet electron microscopy (EM) is a new imaging method with the potential to allow higher spatial resolution of samples. In contrast to most EM methods, it requires little time to perform and does not require complicated equipment or difficult steps. We used this method on a common murine macrophage cell line, IC-21, in combination with various stains and preparations, to collect high resolution images of the actin cytoskeleton. Most importantly, we demonstrated the use of quantum dots in conjunction with this technique to perform light/electron correlation microscopy. We found that wet EM is a useful tool that fits into a niche between the simplicity of light microscopy and the high spatial resolution of EM. PMID:16989089

  17. Tomographic phase microscopy using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habaza, Mor; Gilboa, Barak; Roichman, Yael; Shaked, Natan T.

    2015-07-01

    We review our technique for tomographic phase microscopy with optical tweezers [1]. This tomographic phase microscopy approach enables full 3-D refractive-index reconstruction. Tomographic phase microscopy measures quantitatively the 3- D distribution of refractive-index in biological cells. We integrated our external interferometric module with holographic optical tweezers for obtaining quantitative phase maps of biological samples from a wide range of angles. The close-tocommon- path, off-axis interferometric system enables a full-rotation tomographic acquisition of a single cell using holographic optical tweezers for trapping and manipulating with a desired array of traps, while acquiring phase information of a single cell from all different angles and maintaining the native surrounding medium. We experimentally demonstrated two reconstruction algorithms: the filtered back-projection method and the Fourier diffraction method for 3-D refractive index imaging of yeast cells.

  18. Fluorescence microscopy: A tool to study autophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Shashank; Manjithaya, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling process through which a cell degrades old and damaged cellular components such as organelles and proteins and the degradation products are reused to provide energy and building blocks. Dysfunctional autophagy is reported in several pathological situations. Hence, autophagy plays an important role in both cellular homeostasis and diseased conditions. Autophagy can be studied through various techniques including fluorescence based microscopy. With the advancements of newer technologies in fluorescence microscopy, several novel processes of autophagy have been discovered which makes it an essential tool for autophagy research. Moreover, ability to tag fluorescent proteins with sub cellular targets has enabled us to evaluate autophagy processes in real time under fluorescent microscope. In this article, we demonstrate different aspects of autophagy in two different model organisms i.e. yeast and mammalian cells, with the help of fluorescence microscopy.

  19. Space station microscopy: Beyond the box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, N. R.; Pierson, Duane L.; Mishra, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Microscopy aboard Space Station Freedom poses many unique challenges for in-flight investigations. Disciplines such as material processing, plant and animal research, human reseach, enviromental monitoring, health care, and biological processing have diverse microscope requirements. The typical microscope not only does not meet the comprehensive needs of these varied users, but also tends to require excessive crew time. To assess user requirements, a comprehensive survey was conducted among investigators with experiments requiring microscopy. The survey examined requirements such as light sources, objectives, stages, focusing systems, eye pieces, video accessories, etc. The results of this survey and the application of an Intelligent Microscope Imaging System (IMIS) may address these demands for efficient microscopy service in space. The proposed IMIS can accommodate multiple users with varied requirements, operate in several modes, reduce crew time needed for experiments, and take maximum advantage of the restrictive data/ instruction transmission environment on Freedom.

  20. Artifacts in single-molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Burgert, Anne; Letschert, Sebastian; Doose, Sören; Sauer, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy provides subdiffraction resolution images with virtually molecular resolution. Through the availability of commercial instruments and open-source reconstruction software, achieving super resolution is now public domain. However, despite its conceptual simplicity, localization microscopy remains prone to user errors. Using direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, we investigate the impact of irradiation intensity, label density and photoswitching behavior on the distribution of membrane proteins in reconstructed super-resolution images. We demonstrate that high emitter densities in combination with inappropriate photoswitching rates give rise to the appearance of artificial membrane clusters. Especially, two-dimensional imaging of intrinsically three-dimensional membrane structures like microvilli, filopodia, overlapping membranes and vesicles with high local emitter densities is prone to generate artifacts. To judge the quality and reliability of super-resolution images, the single-molecule movies recorded to reconstruct the images have to be carefully investigated especially when investigating membrane organization and cluster analysis. PMID:26138928

  1. Near-field optical microscopy nanoarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semin, David J.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Goodwin, Peter M.; Wendt, Joel R.; Keller, Richard A.

    1997-04-01

    Multiplexing near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) by the use of a nanoarray with parallel imaging is studied. The fabrication, characterization, and utilization of nanoarrays with approximately 100 nm diameter apertures spaced 500 nm center-to-center is presented. Extremely uniform nanoarrays with approximately 108 apertures were fabricated by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. The nanoarrays were characterized by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In this paper we utilize these nanoarrays in a laser-illuminated microscope with parallel detection on a charge-coupled device. Detection of B-phycoerythrin molecules using near- field illumination is presented. In principle, our system can be used to obtain high lateral resolution NSOM images over a wide-field of view (e.g. 50 - 100 micrometers ) within seconds.

  2. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging: beyond fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W; Lu, Sijia; Xie, X Sunney

    2011-01-01

    The quest for ultrahigh detection sensitivity with spectroscopic contrasts other than fluorescence has led to various novel approaches to optical microscopy of biological systems. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging, especially the recently developed nonlinear dissipation microscopy (including stimulated Raman scattering and two-photon absorption) and pump-probe microscopy (including excited-state absorption, stimulated emission, and ground-state depletion), provides new image contrasts for nonfluorescent species. Thanks to the high-frequency modulation transfer scheme, these imaging techniques exhibit superb detection sensitivity. By directly interrogating vibrational and/or electronic energy levels of molecules, they offer high molecular specificity. Here we review the underlying principles and excitation and detection schemes, as well as exemplary biomedical applications of this emerging class of molecular imaging techniques. PMID:21453061

  3. Space station microscopy: Beyond the box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, N. R.; Pierson, Duane L.; Mishra, S. K.

    Microscopy aboard Space Station Freedom poses many unique challenges for in-flight investigations. Disciplines such as material processing, plant and animal research, human reseach, enviromental monitoring, health care, and biological processing have diverse microscope requirements. The typical microscope not only does not meet the comprehensive needs of these varied users, but also tends to require excessive crew time. To assess user requirements, a comprehensive survey was conducted among investigators with experiments requiring microscopy. The survey examined requirements such as light sources, objectives, stages, focusing systems, eye pieces, video accessories, etc. The results of this survey and the application of an Intelligent Microscope Imaging System (IMIS) may address these demands for efficient microscopy service in space. The proposed IMIS can accommodate multiple users with varied requirements, operate in several modes, reduce crew time needed for experiments, and take maximum advantage of the restrictive data/ instruction transmission environment on Freedom.

  4. Coherent Nonlinear Optical Imaging: Beyond Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Wei; Freudiger, Christian W.; Lu, Sijia; Xie, X. Sunney

    2012-01-01

    The quest for ultrahigh detection sensitivity with spectroscopic contrasts other than fluorescence has led to various novel approaches to optical microscopy of biological systems. Coherent nonlinear optical imaging, especially the recently developed nonlinear dissipation microscopy, including stimulated Raman scattering and two photon absorption, and pump-probe microscopy, including stimulated emission, excited state absorption and ground state depletion, provide distinct and powerful image contrasts for non-fluorescent species. Thanks to high-frequency modulation transfer scheme, they exhibit superb detection sensitivity. By directly interrogating vibrational and/or electronic energy levels of molecules, they offer high molecular specificity. Here we review the underlying principles, excitation and detection schemes, as well as exemplary biomedical applications of this emerging class of molecular imaging techniques. PMID:21453061

  5. Digital image inpainting and microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Stanciu, Stefan G; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A

    2011-11-01

    A considerable amount of image processing techniques known as inpainting techniques have been recently developed aiming to provide solutions for filling in missing or damaged regions in a digital image. Typical such techniques reconstruct a defined area by using information from its neighborhood, for example, by completing inside the missing region the isophote lines arriving at its boundaries. In this article, we show that inpainting techniques have considerable potential usefulness in microscopy imaging, even though experimenting and using them in this domain has been almost entirely neglected up until now. In this purpose, we experiment the "curvature-preserving" partial differential equations as a solution to inpainting regions in images collected by several optical and scanning probe microscopy techniques. The results achieved are presented along with a discussion on typical problematic scenarios of microscopy imaging for which this type of techniques can provide a viable solution. PMID:21563264

  6. A near-field optical microscopy nanoarray

    SciTech Connect

    Semin, D.J.; Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Kwller, A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Multiplexing near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) by the use of a nanoarray with parallel imaging is studied. The fabrication, characterization, and utilization of nanoarrays with {approximately} 100 nm diameter apertures spaced 500 nm center-to- center is presented. Extremely uniform nanoarrays with {approximately} 10{sup 8} apertures were fabricated by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. The nanoarrays were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this paper we utilize these nanoarrays in a laser-illuminated microscope with parallel detection on a charge- coupled device (CCD). Detection of B-phycoerythrin (B-PE) molecules using near-field illumination is presented. In principle, our system can be used to obtain high lateral resolution NSOM images over a wide-field of view (e.g. 50-100 {mu}m) within seconds.

  7. Light microscopy: an ongoing contemporary revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenburger, Siegfried; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2015-04-01

    The optical microscope is one of the oldest scientific instruments that is still used in forefront research. Ernst Abbe's nineteenth century formulation of the resolution limit in microscopy let generations of scientists believe that optical studies of individual molecules and resolving subwavelength structures were not feasible. The Nobel Prize in 2014 for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy marks a clear recognition that the old beliefs have to be revisited. In this article, we present a critical overview of various recent developments in optical microscopy. In addition to the popular super-resolution fluorescence methods, we discuss the prospects of various other techniques and imaging contrasts and consider some of the fundamental and practical challenges that lie ahead.

  8. [Virtual microscopy systems: analysis and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Marín, Diana; Romero, Eduardo

    2011-03-01

    Microscopy has been constantly evolving since the end of the Twentieth Century, with the introduction of new resources which have improved its practice. For example, the use of the virtual microscope has reached a high level of maturity; it is a synergy among disciplines such as pathology, histology, medical informatics and image analysis. This technology has moved forward many paradigms in research, diagnosis, education and medical training. The virtual microscopy systems require the digitalization of a physical slide, using motorized microscopes, pre and post image processing, compression, transmission and visualization. This article provides an extensive analysis of each of these processes. The main characteristics of virtual microscopy are presented as well as the impact of these systems in image interpretation and in diagnostic activities. PMID:22159493

  9. Time-Adjusted Internal Target Volume: A Novel Approach Focusing on Heterogeneity of Tumor Motion Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Imaging for Radiation Therapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Kimura, Tomoki; Nakashima, Takeo; Ochi, Yusuke; Takahashi, Ippei; Doi, Yoshiko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Ozawa, Syuichi; Murakami, Yuji; Wadasaki, Koichi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To consider nonuniform tumor motion within the internal target volume (ITV) by defining time-adjusted ITV (TTV), a volume designed to include heterogeneity of tumor existence on the basis of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Methods and Materials: We evaluated 30 lung cancer patients. Breath-hold CT (BH-CT) and free-breathing 4D-CT scans were acquired for each patient. The tumors were manually delineated using a lung CT window setting (window, 1600 HU; level, −300 HU). Tumor in BH-CT images was defined as gross tumor volume (GTV), and the sum of tumors in 4D-CT images was defined as ITV-4D. The TTV images were generated from the 4D-CT datasets, and the tumor existence probability within ITV-4D was calculated. We calculated the TTV{sub 80} value, which is the percentage of the volume with a tumor existence probability that exceeded 80% on ITV-4D. Several factors that affected the TTV{sub 80} value, such as the ITV-4D/GTV ratio or tumor centroid deviation, were evaluated. Results: Time-adjusted ITV images were acquired for all patients, and tumor respiratory motion heterogeneity was visualized. The median (range) ITV-4D/GTV ratio and median tumor centroid deviation were 1.6 (1.0-4.1) and 6.3 mm (0.1-30.3 mm), respectively. The median TTV{sub 80} value was 43.3% (2.9-98.7%). Strong correlations were observed between the TTV{sub 80} value and the ITV-4D/GTV ratio (R=−0.71) and tumor centroid deviation (R=−0.72). The TTV images revealed the tumor motion pattern features within ITV. Conclusions: The TTV images reflected nonuniform tumor motion, and they revealed the tumor motion pattern features, suggesting that the TTV concept may facilitate various aspects of radiation therapy planning of lung cancer while incorporating respiratory motion in the future.

  10. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  11. Simulated single molecule microscopy with SMeagol

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Martin; Ćurić, Vladimir; Boucharin, Alexis; Fange, David; Elf, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Summary: SMeagol is a software tool to simulate highly realistic microscopy data based on spatial systems biology models, in order to facilitate development, validation and optimization of advanced analysis methods for live cell single molecule microscopy data. Availability and implementation: SMeagol runs on Matlab R2014 and later, and uses compiled binaries in C for reaction–diffusion simulations. Documentation, source code and binaries for Mac OS, Windows and Ubuntu Linux can be downloaded from http://smeagol.sourceforge.net. Contact: johan.elf@icm.uu.se Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153711

  12. Super-Resolved Traction Force Microscopy (STFM)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Measuring small forces is a major challenge in cell biology. Here we improve the spatial resolution and accuracy of force reconstruction of the well-established technique of traction force microscopy (TFM) using STED microscopy. The increased spatial resolution of STED-TFM (STFM) allows a greater than 5-fold higher sampling of the forces generated by the cell than conventional TFM, accessing the nano instead of the micron scale. This improvement is highlighted by computer simulations and an activating RBL cell model system. PMID:26923775

  13. Active Pixel Sensors for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denes, P.; Bussat, J.-M.; Lee, Z.; Radmillovic, V.

    2007-09-01

    The technology used for monolithic CMOS imagers, popular for cell phone cameras and other photographic applications, has been explored for charged particle tracking by the high-energy physics community for several years. This technology also lends itself to certain imaging detector applications in electron microscopy. We have been developing such detectors for several years at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and we and others have shown that this technology can offer excellent point-spread function, direct detection and high readout speed. In this paper, we describe some of the design constraints peculiar to electron microscopy and summarize where such detectors could play a useful role.

  14. Orientation imaging microscopy of polycrystalline sodium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Staiger, M.P.; Kolbeinsson, I.; Newman, J.; Woodfield, T.; Sato, T.

    2010-04-15

    A novel preparation technique is described that makes possible grain size analysis of polycrystalline NaCl using orientation imaging microscopy via electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The preparation methodology is specifically developed to overcome difficulties in preparing microporous NaCl for microscopy. The grain size and crystallographic texture of polycrystalline NaCl samples, prepared via solution pressure and sintered in the range of 650-780 deg. C, were able to be measured successfully with EBSD. The limitations of the preparation technique for EBSD analysis of NaCl are also discussed.

  15. Super-Resolved Traction Force Microscopy (STFM).

    PubMed

    Colin-York, Huw; Shrestha, Dilip; Felce, James H; Waithe, Dominic; Moeendarbary, Emad; Davis, Simon J; Eggeling, Christian; Fritzsche, Marco

    2016-04-13

    Measuring small forces is a major challenge in cell biology. Here we improve the spatial resolution and accuracy of force reconstruction of the well-established technique of traction force microscopy (TFM) using STED microscopy. The increased spatial resolution of STED-TFM (STFM) allows a greater than 5-fold higher sampling of the forces generated by the cell than conventional TFM, accessing the nano instead of the micron scale. This improvement is highlighted by computer simulations and an activating RBL cell model system. PMID:26923775

  16. Fidelity imaging for atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, Sayan Salapaka, Murti

    2015-01-05

    Atomic force microscopy is widely employed for imaging material at the nanoscale. However, real-time measures on image reliability are lacking in contemporary atomic force microscopy literature. In this article, we present a real-time technique that provides an image of fidelity for a high bandwidth dynamic mode imaging scheme. The fidelity images define channels that allow the user to have additional authority over the choice of decision threshold that facilitates where the emphasis is desired, on discovering most true features on the sample with the possible detection of high number of false features, or emphasizing minimizing instances of false detections. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of fidelity imaging.

  17. Multimodal CARS microscopy of structured carbohydrate biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Slepkov, Aaron D.; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Moffatt, Douglas J.; Stolow, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy for the study of structured condensed carbohydrate systems. Simultaneous second-harmonic generation (SHG) and spectrally-scanned CARS microscopy was used to elucidate structure, alignment, and density in cellulose cotton fibers and in starch grains undergoing rapid heat-moisture swelling. Our results suggest that CARS response of the O-H stretch region (3000 cm−1–3400 cm−1), together with the commonly-measured C-H stretch (2750 cm−1–2970 cm−1) and SHG provide potentially important structural information and contrast in these materials. PMID:21258555

  18. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  19. Structural examination of lithium niobate ferroelectric crystals by combining scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, P. V.; Ped'ko, B. B.; Kuznecova, Yu. V.

    2016-02-01

    The structure of lithium niobate single crystals is studied by a complex technique that combines scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. By implementing the piezoresponse force method on an atomic force microscope, the domain structure of lithium niobate crystals, which was not revealed without electron beam irradiation, is visualized

  20. Graphene-enabled electron microscopy and correlated super-resolution microscopy of wet cells

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Michal; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Moon, Seonah; Xu, Ke

    2015-01-01

    The application of electron microscopy to hydrated biological samples has been limited by high-vacuum operating conditions. Traditional methods utilize harsh and laborious sample dehydration procedures, often leading to structural artefacts and creating difficulties for correlating results with high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, we utilize graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon meshwork, as the thinnest possible impermeable and conductive membrane to protect animal cells from vacuum, thus enabling high-resolution electron microscopy of wet and untreated whole cells with exceptional ease. Our approach further allows for facile correlative super-resolution and electron microscopy of wet cells directly on the culturing substrate. In particular, individual cytoskeletal actin filaments are resolved in hydrated samples through electron microscopy and well correlated with super-resolution results. PMID:26066680

  1. Light Microscopy Module (LMM)-Emulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Howard G.; Smith, Trent M.; Richards, Stephanie E.

    2016-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a microscope facility developed at Glenn Research Center (GRC) that provides researchers with powerful imaging capability onboard the International Space Station (ISS). LMM has the ability to have its hardware recongured on-orbit to accommodate a wide variety of investigations, with the capability of remotely acquiring and downloading digital images across multiple levels of magnication.

  2. Dark-field differential dynamic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bayles, Alexandra V; Squires, Todd M; Helgeson, Matthew E

    2016-02-28

    Differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) is an emerging technique to measure the ensemble dynamics of colloidal and complex fluid motion using optical microscopy in systems that would otherwise be difficult to measure using other methods. To date, DDM has successfully been applied to linear space invariant imaging modes including bright-field, fluorescence, confocal, polarised, and phase-contrast microscopy to study diverse dynamic phenomena. In this work, we show for the first time how DDM analysis can be extended to dark-field imaging, i.e. a linear space variant (LSV) imaging mode. Specifically, we present a particle-based framework for describing dynamic image correlations in DDM, and use it to derive a correction to the image structure function obtained by DDM that accounts for scatterers with non-homogeneous intensity distributions as they move within the imaging plane. To validate the analysis, we study the Brownian motion of gold nanoparticles, whose plasmonic structure allows for nanometer-scale particles to be imaged under dark-field illumination, in Newtonian liquids. We find that diffusion coefficients of the nanoparticles can be reliably measured by dark-field DDM, even under optically dense concentrations where analysis via multiple-particle tracking microrheology fails. These results demonstrate the potential for DDM analysis to be applied to linear space variant forms of microscopy, providing access to experimental systems unavailable to other imaging modes. PMID:26822331

  3. Microscopy using source and detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Castello, Marco; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Duocastella, Martí; Diaspro, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    There are basically two types of microscope, which we call conventional and scanning. The former type is a full-field imaging system. In the latter type, the object is illuminated with a probe beam, and a signal detected. We can generalize the probe to a patterned illumination. Similarly we can generalize the detection to a patterned detection. Combining these we get a range of different modalities: confocal microscopy, structured illumination (with full-field imaging), spinning disk (with multiple illumination points), and so on. The combination allows the spatial frequency bandwidth of the system to be doubled. In general we can record a four dimensional (4D) image of a 2D object (or a 6D image from a 3D object, using an acoustic tuneable lens). The optimum way to directly reconstruct the resulting image is by image scanning microscopy (ISM). But the 4D image is highly redundant, so deconvolution-based approaches are also relevant. ISM can be performed in fluorescence, bright field or interference microscopy. Several different implementations have been described, with associated advantages and disadvantages. In two-photon microscopy, the illumination and detection point spread functions are very different. This is also the case when using pupil filters or when there is a large Stokes shift.

  4. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also…

  5. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  6. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH).

  7. Value of Reflected Light Microscopy in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasteris, Jill Dill

    1983-01-01

    Briefly reviews some optical and other physical properties of minerals that can be determined in reflected/incident light. Topics include optical properties of minerals, reflectance, internal reflections, color, bireflectance and reflection pleochroism, anisotropism, zonation, and reflected light microscopy as a teaching tool in undergraduate…

  8. Electron Microscopy Characterization of Hybrid Metallic Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, Daisuke; Akase, Zentaro

    In order to understand the excellent properties of nanoscale hybridized materials, it is very important to investigate the microstructures and interfaces of these materials at the nanometer scale. In this chapter, we present the basic principles of transmission electron microscopy and its applications to these materials. In addition to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) and high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), analytical electron microscopy, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energyloss spectroscopy (EELS) as well as elemental mapping methods using these spectroscopy techniques will be presented. Also, the electron holographic technique for characterization of magnetic fields of nanohybridized materials will be explained. In addition to electron microscopic observation techniques, recently developed specimen preparation techniques, which are indispensable for obtaining homogeneous and thin films of nanohybridized materials, will be presented. In particular, a focused ion beam (FIB) method will be emphasized. The nanohybridized materials discussed in this chapter include carbon-based core-shell structure, nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials, nanocomposite magnets, and high-T c superconducting oxides. Application data will be provided in order to explain the usefulness of these analytical techniques for characterization of nanohybridized materials.

  9. Two-dimensional structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schropp, M; Uhl, R

    2014-10-01

    In widefield fluorescence microscopy, images from all but very flat samples suffer from fluorescence emission from layers above or below the focal plane of the objective lens. Structured illumination microscopy provides an elegant approach to eliminate this unwanted image contribution. To this end a line grid is projected onto the sample and phase images are taken at different positions of the line grid. Using suitable algorithms 'quasi-confocal images' can be derived from a given number of such phase-images. Here, we present an alternative structured illumination microscopy approach, which employs two-dimensional patterns instead of a one-dimensional one. While in one-dimensional structured illumination microscopy the patterns are shifted orthogonally to the pattern orientation, in our two-dimensional approach it is shifted at a single, pattern-dependent angle, yet it already achieves an isotropic power spectral density with this unidirectional shift, which otherwise would require a combination of pattern-shift and -rotation. Moreover, our two-dimensional approach also yields a better signal-to-noise ratio in the evaluated image. PMID:25113075

  10. The rapidly changing face of electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John Meurig; Leary, Rowan K.; Eggeman, Alexander S.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2015-07-01

    This short but wide-ranging review is intended to convey to chemical physicists and others engaged in the interfaces between solid-state chemistry and solid-state physics the growing power and extensive applicability of multiple facets of the technique of electron microscopy.

  11. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A; Berer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  12. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  13. Dissecting tripartite synapses with STED microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Panatier, Aude; Arizono, Misa; Nägerl, U. Valentin

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the tripartite synapse reflects the important role that astrocytic processes are thought to play in the function and regulation of neuronal synapses in the mammalian nervous system. However, many basic aspects regarding the dynamic interplay between pre- and postsynaptic neuronal structures and their astrocytic partners remain to be explored. A major experimental hurdle has been the small physical size of the relevant glial and synaptic structures, leaving them largely out of reach for conventional light microscopic approaches such as confocal and two-photon microscopy. Hence, most of what we know about the organization of the tripartite synapse is based on electron microscopy, which does not lend itself to investigating dynamic events and which cannot be carried out in parallel with functional assays. The development and application of superresolution microscopy for neuron–glia research is opening up exciting experimental opportunities in this regard. In this paper, we provide a basic explanation of the theory and operation of stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, outlining the potential of this recent superresolution imaging modality for advancing our understanding of the morpho-functional interactions between astrocytes and neurons that regulate synaptic physiology. PMID:25225091

  14. Selective plane illumination microscopy on a chip.

    PubMed

    Paiè, Petra; Bragheri, Francesca; Bassi, Andrea; Osellame, Roberto

    2016-04-26

    Selective plane illumination microscopy can image biological samples at a high spatiotemporal resolution. Complex sample preparation and system alignment normally limit the throughput of the method. Using femtosecond laser micromachining, we created an integrated optofluidic device that allows obtaining continuous flow imaging, three-dimensional reconstruction and high-throughput analysis of large multicellular spheroids at a subcellular resolution. PMID:27030116

  15. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Allison, David P; Mortensen, Ninell P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH). PMID:20672388

  16. Laboratory cryo soft X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hertz, H M; von Hofsten, O; Bertilson, M; Vogt, U; Holmberg, A; Reinspach, J; Martz, D; Selin, M; Christakou, A E; Jerlström-Hultqvist, J; Svärd, S

    2012-02-01

    Lens-based water-window X-ray microscopy allows two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) imaging of intact unstained cells in their near-native state with unprecedented contrast and resolution. Cryofixation is essential to avoid radiation damage to the sample. Present cryo X-ray microscopes rely on synchrotron radiation sources, thereby limiting the accessibility for a wider community of biologists. In the present paper we demonstrate water-window cryo X-ray microscopy with a laboratory-source-based arrangement. The microscope relies on a λ=2.48-nm liquid-jet high-brightness laser-plasma source, normal-incidence multilayer condenser optics, 30-nm zone-plate optics, and a cryo sample chamber. We demonstrate 2D imaging of test patterns, and intact unstained yeast, protozoan parasites and mammalian cells. Overview 3D information is obtained by stereo imaging while complete 3D microscopy is provided by full tomographic reconstruction. The laboratory microscope image quality approaches that of the synchrotron microscopes, but with longer exposure times. The experimental image quality is analyzed from a numerical wave-propagation model of the imaging system and a path to reach synchrotron-like exposure times in laboratory microscopy is outlined. PMID:22119891

  17. Confocal microscopy imaging of solid tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a technique that is capable of generating serial sections of whole-mount tissue and then reassembling the computer acquired images as a virtual 3-dimensional structure. In many ways CLSM offers an alternative to traditional sectioning ...

  18. Scanning Probe Microscopy of Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Obadiah G.

    Nanostructured composites of organic semiconductors are a promising class of materials for the manufacture of low-cost solar cells. Understanding how the nanoscale morphology of these materials affects their efficiency as solar energy harvesters is crucial to their eventual potential for large-scale deployment for primary power generation. In this thesis we describe the use of optoelectronic scanning-probe based microscopy methods to study this efficiency-structure relationship with nanoscale resolution. In particular, our objective is to make spatially resolved measurements of each step in the power conversion process from photons to an electric current, including charge generation, transport, and recombination processes, and correlate them with local device structure. We have achieved two aims in this work: first, to develop and apply novel electrically sensitive scanning probe microscopy experiments to study the optoelectronic materials and processes discussed above; and second, to deepen our understanding of the physics underpinning our experimental techniques. In the first case, we have applied conductive-, and photoconductive atomic force (cAFM & pcAFM) microscopy to measure both local photocurrent collection and dark charge transport properties in a variety of model and novel organic solar cell composites, including polymer/fullerene blends, and polymer-nanowire/fullerene blends, finding that local heterogeneity is the rule, and that improvements in the uniformity of specific beneficial nanostructures could lead to large increases in efficiency. We have used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) and time resolved-electrostatic force microscopy (trEFM) to characterize all-polymer blends, quantifying their sensitivity to photochemical degradation and the subsequent formation of local charge traps. We find that while trEFM provides a sensitive measure of local quantum efficiency, SKPM is generally unsuited to measurements of efficiency, less sensitive than tr

  19. Fast Ion Beam Microscopy of Whole Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Frank; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Ce-Belle; Udalagama, Chammika Nb; Ren, Minqin; Pastorin, G.; Bettiol, Andrew

    2013-08-01

    The way in which biological cells function is of prime importance, and the determination of such knowledge is highly dependent on probes that can extract information from within the cell. Probing deep inside the cell at high resolutions however is not easy: optical microscopy is limited by fundamental diffraction limits, electron microscopy is not able to maintain spatial resolutions inside a whole cell without slicing the cell into thin sections, and many other new and novel high resolution techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) are essentially surface probes. In this paper we show that microscopy using fast ions has the potential to extract information from inside whole cells in a unique way. This novel fast ion probe utilises the unique characteristic of MeV ion beams, which is the ability to pass through a whole cell while maintaining high spatial resolutions. This paper first addresses the fundamental difference between several types of charged particle probes, more specifically focused beams of electrons and fast ions, as they penetrate organic material. Simulations show that whereas electrons scatter as they penetrate the sample, ions travel in a straight path and therefore maintain spatial resolutions. Also described is a preliminary experiment in which a whole cell is scanned using a low energy (45 keV) helium ion microscope, and the results compared to images obtained using a focused beam of fast (1.2 MeV) helium ions. The results demonstrate the complementarity between imaging using low energy ions, which essentially produce a high resolution image of the cell surface, and high energy ions, which produce an image of the cell interior. The characteristics of the fast ion probe appear to be ideally suited for imaging gold nanoparticles in whole cells. Using scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) to image the cell interior, forward scattering transmission ion microscopy (FSTIM) to improve the

  20. NMR Microscopy - Micron-Level Resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Wing-Chi Edmund

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been developed into a powerful and widely used diagnostic tool since the invention of techniques using linear magnetic field gradients in 1973. The variety of imaging contrasts obtainable in MRI, such as spin density, relaxation times and flow rate, gives MRI a significant advantage over other imaging techniques. For common diagnostic applications, image resolutions have been in the order of millimeters with slice thicknesses in centimeters. For many research applications, however, resolutions in the order of tens of microns or smaller are needed. NMR Imaging in these high resolution disciplines is known as NMR microscopy. Compared with conventional microscopy, NMR microscopy has the advantage of being non-invasive and non-destructive. The major obstacles of NMR microscopy are low signal-to-noise ratio and effects due to spin diffusion. To overcome these difficulties, more sensitive RF probes and very high magnetic field gradients have to be used. The most effective way to increase sensitivity is to build smaller probes. Microscope probes of different designs have been built and evaluated. Magnetic field gradient coils that can produce linear field gradients up to 450 Gauss/cm were also assembled. In addition, since microscope probes often employ remote capacitors for RF tuning, the associated signal loss in the transmission line was studied. Imaging experiments have been carried out in a 2.1 Tesla small bore superconducting magnet using the typical two-dimensional spin warp imaging technique. Images have been acquired for both biological and non-biological samples. The highest resolution was obtained in an image of a nerve bundle from the spinal cord of a racoon and has an in-plane resolution of 4 microns. These experiments have demonstrated the potential application of NMR microscopy to pathological research, nervous system study and non -destructive testings of materials. One way to further improve NMR microscopy is

  1. Atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy on the cytoskeleton of permeabilised and embedded cells.

    PubMed

    Meller, Karl; Theiss, Carsten

    2006-03-01

    We describe a technical method of cell permeabilisation and embedding to study the organisation and distribution of intracellular proteins with aid of atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy in identical areas. While confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for the identification of certain proteins subsequent labelling with markers or antibodies, atomic force microscopy allows the observation of macromolecular structures in fixed and living cells. To demonstrate the field of application of this preparatory technique, cells were permeabilised, fixed, and the actin cytoskeleton was stained with phalloidin-rhodamine. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to show the organisation of these microfilaments, e.g. geodesic dome structures. Thereafter, cells were embedded in Durcupan water-soluble resin, followed by UV-polymerisation of resin at 4 degrees C. This procedure allowed intracellular visualisation of the cell nucleus or cytoskeletal elements by atomic force microscopy, for instance to analyse the globular organisation of actin filaments. Therefore, this method offers a great potential to combine both microscopy techniques in order to understand and interpret intracellular protein relations, for example, the biochemical and morphological interaction of the cytoskeleton. PMID:16360280

  2. Traditional microscopy instruction versus process-oriented virtual microscopy instruction: a naturalistic experiment with control group

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Virtual microscopy is being introduced in medical education as an approach for learning how to interpret information in microscopic specimens. It is, however, far from evident how to incorporate its use into existing teaching practice. The aim of the study was to explore the consequences of introducing virtual microscopy tasks into an undergraduate pathology course in an attempt to render the instruction more process-oriented. The research questions were: 1) How is virtual microscopy perceived by students? 2) Does work on virtual microscopy tasks contribute to improvement in performance in microscopic pathology in comparison with attending assistant-led demonstrations only? Method During a one-week period, an experimental group completed three sets of virtual microscopy homework assignments in addition to attending demonstrations. A control group attended the demonstrations only. Performance in microscopic pathology was measured by a pre-test and a post-test. Student perceptions of regular instruction and virtual microscopy were collected one month later by administering the Inventory of Intrinsic Motivation and open-ended questions. Results The students voiced an appreciation for virtual microscopy for the purposes of the course and for self-study. As for learning gains, the results indicated that learning was speeded up in a subgroup of students consisting of conscientious high achievers. Conclusions The enriched instruction model may be suited as such for elective courses following the basic course. However, the instructional model needs further development to be suited for basic courses. PMID:21489203

  3. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A.

    2015-09-15

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate.

  4. Investigation of the depletion layer by scanning capacitance force microscopy with Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uruma, Takeshi; Satoh, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hidekazu

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a scanning probe microscope (SPM) that combines atomic force microscopy (AFM) with both Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM — to measure the surface potential) and scanning capacitance force microscopy (SCFM — to measure the differential capacitance). The surface physical characteristics of a commercial Si Schottky barrier diode (Si-SBD), with and without an applied reverse bias, were measured over the same area by our AFM/KFM/SCFM system. We thus investigated the discrete power device by calculating the depletion-layer width and drawing an energy-band diagram.

  5. VirtualMicroscopy: ultra-fast interactive microscopy of gigapixel/terapixel images over internet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Hung, Chu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    As digital imaging technology advances, gigapixel or terapixel super resolution microscopic images become available. We have built a real time virtual microscopy technique for interactive analysis of super high resolution microscopic images over internet on standard desktops, laptops or mobile devices. The presented virtual microscopy technique is demonstrated to perform as fast as using a microscopy locally without any delay to assess gigapixel ultra high resolution image data through wired or wireless internet by a Tablet or a standard PC. More importantly, the presented technology enables analysis of super high resolution microscopic image across sites and time and allows multi-person analysis at the same time, which greatly speed up data analysis process and reduces miscommunication among scientists and doctors. A web site has been created for illustration purposes. (http://www-o.ntust.edu.tw/~cweiwang/VirtualMicroscopy). PMID:26360909

  6. VirtualMicroscopy: ultra-fast interactive microscopy of gigapixel/terapixel images over internet

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Hung, Chu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    As digital imaging technology advances, gigapixel or terapixel super resolution microscopic images become available. We have built a real time virtual microscopy technique for interactive analysis of super high resolution microscopic images over internet on standard desktops, laptops or mobile devices. The presented virtual microscopy technique is demonstrated to perform as fast as using a microscopy locally without any delay to assess gigapixel ultra high resolution image data through wired or wireless internet by a Tablet or a standard PC. More importantly, the presented technology enables analysis of super high resolution microscopic image across sites and time and allows multi-person analysis at the same time, which greatly speed up data analysis process and reduces miscommunication among scientists and doctors. A web site has been created for illustration purposes. (http://www-o.ntust.edu.tw/~cweiwang/VirtualMicroscopy). PMID:26360909

  7. Fast interferometric second harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Couture, Charles-André; Légaré, Katherine; Pinsard, Maxime; Rivard, Maxime; Brown, Cameron; Légaré, François

    2016-01-01

    We report the implementation of fast Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation (I-SHG) microscopy to study the polarity of non-centrosymmetric structures in biological tissues. Using a sample quartz plate, we calibrate the spatially varying phase shift introduced by the laser scanning system. Compensating this phase shift allows us to retrieve the correct phase distribution in periodically poled lithium niobate, used as a model sample. Finally, we used fast interferometric second harmonic generation microscopy to acquire phase images in tendon. Our results show that the method exposed here, using a laser scanning system, allows to recover the polarity of collagen fibrils, similarly to standard I-SHG (using a sample scanning system), but with an imaging time about 40 times shorter. PMID:26977349

  8. Confocal Raman Microscopy in Pharmaceutical Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefele, Thomas F.; Paulus, Kurt

    There is a wide range of applications of confocal Raman microscopy in pharmaceutical development. It is a powerful tool to probe the distribution of components within a formulation, to characterize homogeneity of pharmaceutical samples, to determine solid state of drug substances and excipients and to characterize contaminations and foreign particulates. The information obtained by confocal Raman microscopy is extremely useful, sometimes even crucial, for drug substance design, for the development of solid and liquid formulations, as a tool for process analytics and for patent infringements and counterfeit analysis. In this chapter, those aspects and applications will be presented, focusing on solid drug formulations. This chapter will also reveal the advantages and demonstrate the synergies of Raman mapping as compared to similar imaging methods such as SEM/EDX, NIR and MIR imaging.

  9. Three-Dimensional Reflectance Traction Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher A. R.; Groves, Nicholas Scott; Sun, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Cells in three-dimensional (3D) environments exhibit very different biochemical and biophysical phenotypes compared to the behavior of cells in two-dimensional (2D) environments. As an important biomechanical measurement, 2D traction force microscopy can not be directly extended into 3D cases. In order to quantitatively characterize the contraction field, we have developed 3D reflectance traction microscopy which combines confocal reflection imaging and partial volume correlation postprocessing. We have measured the deformation field of collagen gel under controlled mechanical stress. We have also characterized the deformation field generated by invasive breast cancer cells of different morphologies in 3D collagen matrix. In contrast to employ dispersed tracing particles or fluorescently-tagged matrix proteins, our methods provide a label-free, computationally effective strategy to study the cell mechanics in native 3D extracellular matrix. PMID:27304456

  10. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Gustavo de; Norlin, Nils; Gunther, Stefan; Albert, Marvin; Panavaite, Laura; Fiuza, Ulla-Maj; Peri, Francesca; Hiiragi, Takashi; Krzic, Uros; Hufnagel, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Selective-plane illumination microscopy has proven to be a powerful imaging technique due to its unsurpassed acquisition speed and gentle optical sectioning. However, even in the case of multiview imaging techniques that illuminate and image the sample from multiple directions, light scattering inside tissues often severely impairs image contrast. Here we combine multiview light-sheet imaging with electronic confocal slit detection implemented on modern camera sensors. In addition to improved imaging quality, the electronic confocal slit detection doubles the acquisition speed in multiview setups with two opposing illumination directions allowing simultaneous dual-sided illumination. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy eliminates the need for specimen-specific data fusion algorithms, streamlines image post-processing, easing data handling and storage. PMID:26602977

  11. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope. PMID:23931503

  12. Resonance response of scanning force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J.; Thundat, T.; Allison, D.P. ); Huang, A. )

    1994-08-01

    A variational method is used to calculate the deflection and the fundamental and harmonic resonance frequencies of commercial V-shaped and rectangular atomic force microscopy cantilevers. The effective mass of V-shaped cantilevers is roughly half that calculated for the equivalent rectangular cantilevers. Damping by environmental gases, including air, nitrogen, argon, and helium, affects the frequency of maximum response and to a much greater degree the quality factor [ital Q]. Helium has the lowest viscosity, resulting in the highest [ital Q], and thus provides the best sensitivity in noncontact force microscopy. Damping in liquids is dominated by an increase in effective mass of the cantilever due to an added mass of the liquid being dragged with that cantilever.

  13. Subdiffractive microscopy: techniques, applications, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Long, Brian R; Robinson, Danielle C; Zhong, Haining

    2014-01-01

    Cellular processes rely on the precise orchestration of signaling and effector molecules in space and time, yet it remains challenging to gain a comprehensive picture of the molecular organization underlying most basic biological functions. This organization often takes place at length scales below the resolving power of conventional microscopy. In recent years, several “superresolution” fluorescence microscopic techniques have emerged that can surpass the diffraction limit of conventional microscopy by a factor of two to twenty. These methods have been used to reveal previously unknown organization of macromolecular complexes and cytoskeletal structures. The resulting high-resolution view of molecular organization and dynamics is already changing our understanding of cellular processes at the systems level. However, current subdiffractive microscopic techniques are not without limitations; challenges remain to be overcome before these techniques achieve their full potential. Here, we introduce three primary types of subdiffractive microscopic techniques, consider their current limitations and challenges, and discuss recent biological applications. PMID:24443323

  14. Photorejuvenation observation based on two photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shu-lian; Li, Hui; Xiao, Zheng-ying; Xie, Shu-sen

    2008-12-01

    With low risk of complications and little down-time, the non-ablative photo-rejuvenation is playing an increasing role in the therapy of the photo-damaged skin, but the appraisal standard is different. This paper mainly observed the effect of the mouse skin irradiated by intense pulse light source through two photo microscopy in sub-micrometer. The spectrum and morphological imaging between pre- and post-irradiated by Intense Pulse Light (IPL) were obtained from two photon microscopy respectively. The outcome showed that non-ablative IPL irradiated the aging mouse skin got the better effect, and then have gained the changes of spectrum intensity and corresponding photon numbers in a rectangular area, these probable achieve the mechanism of light irradiated skin. The intention of this was offer the theory basis in clinic.

  15. Gaussian beam photothermal single particle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Selmke, Markus; Braun, Marco; Cichos, Frank

    2012-10-01

    We explore the intuitive lensing picture of laser-heated nanoparticles occurring in single particle photothermal (PT) microscopy. The effective focal length of the thermal lens (TL) is derived from a ray-optics treatment and used to transform the probing focused Gaussian beam with ABCD Gaussian matrix optics. The relative PT signal is obtained from the relative beam-waist change far from the TL. The analytical expression is semiquantitative, capable of describing the entire phenomenology of single particle PT microscopy, and shows that the signal is the product of the point-spread functions of the involved lasers times a linear function of the axial coordinate. The presented particularly simple and intuitive Gaussian beam lensing picture compares favorably to the experimental results for 60 nm gold nanoparticles and provides the prescription for optimum setup calibration. PMID:23201674

  16. Confocal microscopy of the living eye.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, H D; Jester, J V; Essepian, J; Shields, W; Lemp, M A

    1990-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is an imaging paradigm that allows optical sectioning of almost any material with increased axial and lateral spatial resolution and better image contrast. We have applied this technology to the study of the living eye of cats, albino rabbits, and humans. The technique allows in vivo, noninvasive, real time images of the eye at magnifications (630x) which allow resolution of anatomical detail at the cellular level. In this paper we report details of our current instrument techniques and some of our results. The past development, present state-of-the-art, and projected future advances and applications of this novel microscopy are discussed. Preliminary observations are reported for all layers of the cornea, the limbus, and wound-healing responses in single animals. PMID:2407380

  17. Coated tips for scanning thermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Nicolás; Eklund, Peter; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a unique solution to the inaccuracies produced when thermally scanning various micro and nano systems with thermistor tip scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). Under dc measurement conditions, thermistor tip heating induces perturbations in the measured system that change with sample properties like material and geometry. As a result, normal SThM scans are affected by errors that make it difficult to interpret the 2D-temperature scans of such systems. By coating the SThM tips with a thermally resistive material (100nm of Si 3N 4) we demonstrate that the temperature dependence on sample material and geometry can be minimized and the tip heating problem can be mitigated to that of a constant temperature offset problem. Included are the first images of coated scanning thermal microscopy (C-SThM) as well as a lumped model that describes the basis of the improvement seen in the thermal images.

  18. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  19. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bench, Graham S.; Balhorn, Rod; Friz, Alexander M.

    1995-05-01

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  20. Raman microscopy investigation of beryllium materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardanaud, C.; Rusu, M. I.; Giacometti, G.; Martin, C.; Addab, Y.; Roubin, P.; Lungu, C. P.; Porosnicu, C.; Jepu, I.; Dinca, P.; Lungu, M.; Pompilian, O. G.; Mateus, R.; Alves, E.; Rubel, M.; contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    We report for the first time on the ability of Raman microscopy to give information on the structure and composition of Be related samples mimicking plasma facing materials that will be found in ITER. For that purpose, we investigate two types of material. First: Be, W, Be1W9, and Be5W5 deposits containing a few percents of D or N, and second: a Mo mirror exposed to plasma in the main JET chamber (in the framework of the first mirror test in JET with ITER-like wall). We performed atomic quantifications using ion beam analysis for the first samples. We also did atomic force microscopy. We found defect induced Raman bands in Be, Be1W9, and Be5W5 deposits. Molybdenum oxide has been identified showing an enhancement due to a resonance effect in the UV domain.

  1. Camera array based light field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xing; Wu, Jiamin; Zheng, Guoan; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for high-resolution light field microscopy imaging by using a camera array. In this approach, we apply a two-stage relay system for expanding the aperture plane of the microscope into the size of an imaging lens array, and utilize a sensor array for acquiring different sub-apertures images formed by corresponding imaging lenses. By combining the rectified and synchronized images from 5 × 5 viewpoints with our prototype system, we successfully recovered color light field videos for various fast-moving microscopic specimens with a spatial resolution of 0.79 megapixels at 30 frames per second, corresponding to an unprecedented data throughput of 562.5 MB/s for light field microscopy. We also demonstrated the use of the reported platform for different applications, including post-capture refocusing, phase reconstruction, 3D imaging, and optical metrology. PMID:26417490

  2. Frontiers of in situ electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by inmore » this issue of MRS Bulletin explore the frontiers of in situ electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by in situ TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.« less

  3. Nonlinear magic: multiphoton microscopy in the biosciences.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Warren R; Williams, Rebecca M; Webb, Watt W

    2003-11-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has found a niche in the world of biological imaging as the best noninvasive means of fluorescence microscopy in tissue explants and living animals. Coupled with transgenic mouse models of disease and 'smart' genetically encoded fluorescent indicators, its use is now increasing exponentially. Properly applied, it is capable of measuring calcium transients 500 microm deep in a mouse brain, or quantifying blood flow by imaging shadows of blood cells as they race through capillaries. With the multitude of possibilities afforded by variations of nonlinear optics and localized photochemistry, it is possible to image collagen fibrils directly within tissue through nonlinear scattering, or release caged compounds in sub-femtoliter volumes. PMID:14595365

  4. Circumventing photodamage in live-cell microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Valentin; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool in cell biology. This technique allows researchers to visualize the dynamics of tissue, cells, individual organelles and macromolecular assemblies inside the cell. Unfortunately, fluorescence microscopy is not completely ‘non-invasive’ as the high-intensity excitation light required for excitation of fluorophores is inherently toxic for live cells. Physiological changes induced by excessive illumination can lead to artifacts and abnormal responses. In this chapter we review major factors that contribute to phototoxicity and discuss practical solutions for circumventing photodamage. These solutions include the proper choice of image acquisition parameters, optimization of filter sets, hardware synchronization, and the use of intelligent illumination to avoid unnecessary light exposure. PMID:23931522

  5. High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Toshio; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Kodera, Noriyuki

    2012-08-01

    The technology of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) has reached maturity. HS-AFM enables us to directly visualize the structure and dynamics of biological molecules in physiological solutions at subsecond to sub-100 ms temporal resolution. By this microscopy, dynamically acting molecules such as myosin V walking on an actin filament and bacteriorhodopsin in response to light are successfully visualized. High-resolution molecular movies reveal the dynamic behavior of molecules in action in great detail. Inferences no longer have to be made from static snapshots of molecular structures and from the dynamic behavior of optical markers attached to biomolecules. In this review, we first describe theoretical considerations for the highest possible imaging rate, then summarize techniques involved in HS-AFM and highlight recent imaging studies. Finally, we briefly discuss future challenges to explore.

  6. Camera array based light field microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xing; Wu, Jiamin; Zheng, Guoan; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for high-resolution light field microscopy imaging by using a camera array. In this approach, we apply a two-stage relay system for expanding the aperture plane of the microscope into the size of an imaging lens array, and utilize a sensor array for acquiring different sub-apertures images formed by corresponding imaging lenses. By combining the rectified and synchronized images from 5 × 5 viewpoints with our prototype system, we successfully recovered color light field videos for various fast-moving microscopic specimens with a spatial resolution of 0.79 megapixels at 30 frames per second, corresponding to an unprecedented data throughput of 562.5 MB/s for light field microscopy. We also demonstrated the use of the reported platform for different applications, including post-capture refocusing, phase reconstruction, 3D imaging, and optical metrology. PMID:26417490

  7. Advances in Light Microscopy for Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Wilt, Brian A.; Burns, Laurie D.; Ho, Eric Tatt Wei; Ghosh, Kunal K.; Mukamel, Eran A.

    2010-01-01

    Since the work of Golgi and Cajal, light microscopy has remained a key tool for neuroscientists to observe cellular properties. Ongoing advances have enabled new experimental capabilities using light to inspect the nervous system across multiple spatial scales, including ultrastructural scales finer than the optical diffraction limit. Other progress permits functional imaging at faster speeds, at greater depths in brain tissue, and over larger tissue volumes than previously possible. Portable, miniaturized fluorescence microscopes now allow brain imaging in freely behaving mice. Complementary progress on animal preparations has enabled imaging in head-restrained behaving animals, as well as time-lapse microscopy studies in the brains of live subjects. Mouse genetic approaches permit mosaic and inducible fluorescence-labeling strategies, whereas intrinsic contrast mechanisms allow in vivo imaging of animals and humans without use of exogenous markers. This review surveys such advances and highlights emerging capabilities of particular interest to neuroscientists. PMID:19555292

  8. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G.S.; Balhorn, R.; Friz, A.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.

    1994-09-28

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  9. Comparative microscopy study of Vibrio cholerae flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konnov, Nikolai P.; Baiburin, Vil B.; Zadnova, Svetlana P.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    1999-06-01

    A fine structure of bacteria flagella is an important problem of molecular cell biology. Bacteria flagella are the self-assembled structures that allow to use the flagellum protein in a number of biotechnological applications. However, at present, there is a little information about high resolution scanning probe microscopy study of flagellum structure, in particular, about investigation of Vibrio cholerae flagella. In our lab have been carried out the high resolution comparative investigation of V. cholerae flagella by means of various microscopes: tunneling (STM), scanning force (SFM) and electron transmission. As a scanning probe microscope is used designed in our lab versatile SPM with replaceable measuring heads. Bacteria were grown, fixed and treated according to the conventional techniques. For STM investigations samples were covered with Pt/Ir thin films by rotated vacuum evaporation, in SFM investigations were used uncovered samples. Electron microscopy of the negatively stained bacteria was used as a test procedure.

  10. Image Correlation Microscopy for Uniform Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Gaborski, Thomas R.; Sealander, Michael N.; Ehrenberg, Morton; Waugh, Richard E.; McGrath, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Image cross-correlation microscopy (ICM) is a technique that quantifies the motion of fluorescent features in an image by measuring the temporal autocorrelation function decay in a time-lapse image sequence. ICM has traditionally employed laser-scanning microscopes because the technique emerged as an extension of laser-based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In this work, we show that image correlation can also be used to measure fluorescence dynamics in uniform illumination or wide-field imaging systems and we call our new approach uniform illumination image correlation microscopy (UI-ICM). Wide-field microscopy is not only a simpler, less expensive imaging modality, but it offers the capability of greater temporal resolution over laser-scanning systems. In traditional laser-scanning ICM, lateral mobility is calculated from the temporal de-correlation of an image, where the characteristic length is the illuminating laser beam width. In wide-field microscopy, the diffusion length is defined by the feature size using the spatial autocorrelation function (SACF). Correlation function decay in time occurs as an object diffuses from its original position. We show that theoretical and simulated comparisons between Gaussian and uniform features indicate the temporal autocorrelation function (TACF) depends strongly on particle size and not particle shape. In this report, we establish the relationships between the SACF feature size, TACF characteristic time and the diffusion coefficient for UI-ICM using analytical, Monte-Carlo and experimental validation with particle tracking algorithms. Additionally, we demonstrate UI-ICM analysis of adhesion molecule domain aggregation and diffusion on the surface of human neutrophils. PMID:20055917

  11. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  12. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    SciTech Connect

    Augspurger, Ashley E; Stender, Anthony S; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J; Fang, Ning

    2014-06-10

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also observe and measure individual crystal growth during a replacement reaction between copper and silver nitrate. The experiment allows for quantitative, qualitative, and image data analyses for undergraduate students.

  13. Multiphoton microscopy with near infrared contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Joo, Chulmin; Zhan, Chun; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Akers, Walter J.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2010-05-01

    While multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has been performed with a wide range of excitation wavelengths, fluorescence emission has been limited to the visible spectrum. We introduce a paradigm for MPM of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecular probes via nonlinear excitation at 1550 nm. This all-NIR system expands the range of available MPM fluorophores, virtually eliminates background autofluorescence, and allows for use of fiber-based, turnkey ultrafast lasers developed for telecommunications.

  14. Real-time interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Tyler S; Marks, Daniel L; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2008-02-18

    An interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) system design with real-time 2D cross-sectional processing is described in detail. The system can acquire, process, and display the ISAM reconstructed images at frame rates of 2.25 frames per second for 512 X 1024 pixel images. This system provides quantitatively meaningful structural information from previously indistinguishable scattering intensities and provides proof of feasibility for future real-time ISAM systems. PMID:18542337

  15. Acoustic microscopy of silicon carbide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Heitman, P. W.; Yuhas, D.; Vorres, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) is able to detect such fracture-controlling flaws in dense silicon carbide materials as surface voids, whose diameter-by-depth size is a minimum of 75 by 17 microns in reaction-bonded SiC and 68 by 25 microns in alpha-SiC. Surface conditions such as pitting, which have been found to limit the discernibility of drilled holes, become important when pit and drilled hole sizes become comparable.

  16. Multidepth imaging by chromatic dispersion confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsovsky, Cory A.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Saldua, Meagan A.; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Applegate, Brian E.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-03-01

    Confocal microscopy has shown potential as an imaging technique to detect precancer. Imaging cellular features throughout the depth of epithelial tissue may provide useful information for diagnosis. However, the current in vivo axial scanning techniques for confocal microscopy are cumbersome, time-consuming, and restrictive when attempting to reconstruct volumetric images acquired in breathing patients. Chromatic dispersion confocal microscopy (CDCM) exploits severe longitudinal chromatic aberration in the system to axially disperse light from a broadband source and, ultimately, spectrally encode high resolution images along the depth of the object. Hyperchromat lenses are designed to have severe and linear longitudinal chromatic aberration, but have not yet been used in confocal microscopy. We use a hyperchromat lens in a stage scanning confocal microscope to demonstrate the capability to simultaneously capture information at multiple depths without mechanical scanning. A photonic crystal fiber pumped with a 830nm wavelength Ti:Sapphire laser was used as a supercontinuum source, and a spectrometer was used as the detector. The chromatic aberration and magnification in the system give a focal shift of 140μm after the objective lens and an axial resolution of 5.2-7.6μm over the wavelength range from 585nm to 830nm. A 400x400x140μm3 volume of pig cheek epithelium was imaged in a single X-Y scan. Nuclei can be seen at several depths within the epithelium. The capability of this technique to achieve simultaneous high resolution confocal imaging at multiple depths may reduce imaging time and motion artifacts and enable volumetric reconstruction of in vivo confocal images of the epithelium.

  17. Photoacoustic microscopy of ceramic turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Kinnick, R. R.; Heitman, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Scanning photoacoustic microscopy (SPAM) is evaluated as a nondestructive technique for the detection of both surface and subsurface flaws in polycrystalline ceramics, such as those currently under consideration for the high temperature components of small vehicular and industrial gas turbine engines; the fracture strength of these brittle materials is controlled by small, 25-200 micron flaws. Attention is given to the correlation of SPAM-detected flaws with actual, fracture-controlling flaws in ceramic turbine blades.

  18. Energy dissipation in multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pukhova, Valentina; Banfi, Francesco; Ferrini, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The instantaneous displacement, velocity and acceleration of a cantilever tip impacting onto a graphite surface are reconstructed. The total dissipated energy and the dissipated energy per cycle of each excited flexural mode during the tip interaction is retrieved. The tip dynamics evolution is studied by wavelet analysis techniques that have general relevance for multi-mode atomic force microscopy, in a regime where few cantilever oscillation cycles characterize the tip-sample interaction. PMID:24778976

  19. Comprehensive volumetric confocal microscopy with adaptive focusing

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongKyun; Yoo, Hongki; Jillella, Priyanka; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive microscopy of distal esophagus could greatly improve the screening and surveillance of esophageal diseases such as Barrett’s esophagus by providing histomorphologic information over the entire region at risk. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a high-speed reflectance confocal microscopy technology that can be configured to image the entire distal esophagus by helically scanning the beam using optics within a balloon-centering probe. It is challenging to image the human esophagus in vivo with balloon-based SECM, however, because patient motion and anatomic tissue surface irregularities decenter the optics, making it difficult to keep the focus at a predetermined location within the tissue as the beam is scanned. In this paper, we present a SECM probe equipped with an adaptive focusing mechanism that can compensate for tissue surface irregularity and dynamic focal variation. A tilted arrangement of the objective lens is employed in the SECM probe to provide feedback signals to an adaptive focusing mechanism. The tilted configuration also allows the probe to obtain reflectance confocal data from multiple depth levels, enabling the acquisition of three-dimensional volumetric data during a single scan of the probe. A tissue phantom with a surface area of 12.6 cm2 was imaged using the new SECM probe, and 8 large-area reflectance confocal microscopy images were acquired over the depth range of 56 μm in 20 minutes. Large-area SECM images of excised swine small intestine tissue were also acquired, enabling the visualization of villous architecture, epithelium, and lamina propria. The adaptive focusing mechanism was demonstrated to enable acquisition of in-focus images even when the probe was not centered and the tissue surface was irregular. PMID:21698005

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques E; Castro, Luis Antonio Suita de

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225