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Sample records for 4-hour cocaine infusion

  1. Tolerance to cocaine in brain stimulation reward following continuous cocaine infusions.

    PubMed

    Pudiak, Cindy M; KuoLee, Rhonda; Bozarth, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    This study examined tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect in brain stimulation reward (BSR) following continuous cocaine infusions and secondly, used the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to determine NO's involvement in the development of cocaine tolerance. Animals were continuously infused with saline or cocaine (30 mg/kg per day) via osmotic minipump for 14 days and injected daily with saline or L-NAME (30 mg/kg, i.p.) following BSR testing. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with saline showed stable BSR thresholds across the 14-day infusion period. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed markedly lowered BSR thresholds on Day 1 followed by a progressive increase in BSR thresholds across the infusion period - indicating the development of tolerance. L-NAME-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed stimulation thresholds that were not significantly different from saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine. A cocaine challenge injection (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 3 and again at 10 days following minipump removal revealed that saline-treated animals continuously infused with saline showed lowered BSR thresholds. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine displayed lowered BSR thresholds that were not significantly different from saline-infused animals. L-NAME treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed higher BSR thresholds to a challenge 3 days following pump removal. However, stimulation thresholds for this group failed to reach statistical significance on both days (i.e., Days 3 and 10) following pump removal. Results showed that animals continuously infused with cocaine develop robust tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect during the 14-day infusion period. Tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect was short-lived and dissipated soon after minipump removal. L-NAME treatment failed to significantly

  2. Response to CRH Infusion in Cocaine-Dependent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Kathleen T.; McRae, Aimee L.; Moran-Santa Maria, Megan M.; DeSantis, Stacia M.; Simpson, Annie N.; Waldrop, Angela E.; Back, Sudie E.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    Context Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), through the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis and other brain stress systems, is involved in the emotional dysregulation associated with cocaine dependence. Little is known about the response of cocaine-dependent individuals to CRH administration. Objective The primary objective was to examine the HPA axis, subjective and physiologic response to CRH in cocaine-dependent individuals and controls. Design Case-control study Setting Subjects were admitted to a General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) for testing and abstinence verified with urine drug screening. Participants Participants were control males (n=23), control females (n=24), cocaine-dependent males (n=28), and cocaine-dependent females (n=25). Individuals with dependence on other substances (except caffeine, nicotine) or with major depression, PTSD, bipolar, psychotic and eating disorders were excluded. Intervention Subjects received i.v. CRH (1ug/kg). Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes included plasma ACTH and cortisol, heart rate, and subjective measurements. Results Cocaine-dependent individuals exhibited higher stress (P < 0.001) and craving to CRH compared to controls. A positive correlation (rs=.51, P=0.0002) between stress and craving was found in cocaine dependent subjects. CRH elevated heart rates in all groups, however cocaine dependent females, demonstrated a significantly higher heart rate at all time points (P=0.05). Women had higher cortisol response to CRH (P=0.028). No effect of cocaine status was observed. ACTH response to CRH was independent of gender and cocaine. Cortisol and ACTH were positively correlated in the controls and cocaine-dependent males, but not in cocaine-dependent females (rs = 0.199; P = 0.4). Conclusion There is an increased subjective and heart rate response to CRH and a relationship between stress and craving in cocaine-dependent individuals. The lack of difference in HPA axis response between the cocaine and

  3. Potentiated reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior following D-amphetamine infusion into the basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Christopher C; Fuchs, Rita A; See, Ronald E

    2003-10-01

    Reinstatement of extinguished drug-seeking behavior following chronic drug self-administration has been demonstrated in rats in the presence of conditioned cues. This experimental model of cue-induced relapse can be used to assess the neural circuitry involved in relapse. We have previously shown that blockade of dopamine D1 receptors in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) abolishes conditioned cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. The present study tested the hypothesis that D-amphetamine-induced facilitation of monoamine neurotransmission in the BLA would potentiate conditioned cue-induced reinstatement of extinguished drug-seeking behavior. During daily self-administration sessions over 10 consecutive days, rats pressed a lever to receive cocaine infusions (0.2 mg/0.05 ml) paired with a light+tone compound stimulus. Following self-administration, rats underwent daily extinction sessions, during which no stimuli were presented. On the test days, rats received intra-BLA D-amphetamine (10 or 30 micro g/side) or vehicle infusions followed by extinction or conditioned cue-induced reinstatement testing. D-amphetamine infusions did not alter extinction responding relative to vehicle infusions. During reinstatement testing, conditioned cue presentation significantly increased responding over extinction levels, and intra-BLA D-amphetamine produced a dose-dependent increase in lever responding relative to vehicle infusions. These findings suggest that enhanced monoamine tone in the BLA potentiates the motivational effect and/or salience of cocaine-paired cues during reinstatement. PMID:12865896

  4. Cocaine but not natural reward self-administration nor passive cocaine infusion produces persistent LTP in the VTA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Billy T.; Bowers, M. Scott; Martin, Miquel; Hopf, F. Woodward; Gilroy, Anitra M.; Carelli, Regina M.; Chou, Jonathan K.; Bonci, Antonello

    2008-01-01

    Summary Persistent drug-seeking behavior is hypothesized to co-opt the brain's natural reward-motivational system. Although ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons represent a crucial component of this system, the synaptic adaptations underlying natural rewards and drug-related motivation have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that self-administration of cocaine, but not passive cocaine infusions, produced a persistent potentiation of VTA excitatory synapses, which was still present after 3 months abstinence. Further, enhanced synaptic function in VTA was evident even after 3 weeks of extinction training. Food or sucrose self-administration induced only a transient potentiation of VTA glutamatergic signaling. Our data show that synaptic function in VTA DA neurons is readily but reversibly enhanced by natural reward-seeking behavior, while voluntary cocaine self-administration induced a persistent synaptic enhancement that is resistant to behavioral extinction. Such persistent synaptic potentiation in VTA DA neurons may represent a fundamental cellular phenomenon driving pathological drug-seeking behavior. PMID:18667156

  5. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cocaine KidsHealth > For Teens > Cocaine Print A A A ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Cocaine What Is Cocaine? Cocaine is a powerful and highly addictive drug ...

  6. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... DEA Press Room » Multi-Media Library » Image Gallery » Cocaine COCAINE To Save Images: First click on the thumbnail ... your Save in directory and then click Save. Cocaine Crack Cocaine RESOURCE CENTER Controlled Substances Act DEA ...

  7. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Share Print Home » Drugs of Abuse » Cocaine Cocaine Email Facebook Twitter Brief Description Cocaine is a ... NIDA for Teens: Stimulants NIDA Therapy Manuals for Cocaine Addiction (Archives): Manual 1: A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach: ...

  8. Cocaine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Nick J.; Yeager, Rebecca D.

    Cocaine was first used by Europeans in the nineteenth century when extract from the coca leaf was combined with various beverages. Cocaine comes as a white crystalline powder. However, a product called crack cocaine may come as an opaque crystal similar in size and shape to rock salt. A third form of cocaine is known as coca paste, which is an…

  9. A Single Amphetamine Infusion Reverses Deficits in Dopamine Nerve-Terminal Function Caused by a History of Cocaine Self-Administration.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Mark J; Calipari, Erin S; Rose, Jamie H; Siciliano, Cody A; Sun, Haiguo; Chen, Rong; Jones, Sara R

    2015-07-01

    There are ∼ 1.6 million people who meet the criteria for cocaine addiction in the United States, and there are currently no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies. Amphetamine-based dopamine-releasing drugs have shown efficacy in reducing the motivation to self-administer cocaine and reducing intake in animals and humans. It is hypothesized that amphetamine acts as a replacement therapy for cocaine through elevation of extracellular dopamine levels. Using voltammetry in brain slices, we tested the ability of a single amphetamine infusion in vivo to modulate dopamine release, uptake kinetics, and cocaine potency in cocaine-naive animals and after a history of cocaine self-administration (1.5 mg/kg/infusion, fixed-ratio 1, 40 injections/day × 5 days). Dopamine kinetics were measured 1 and 24 h after amphetamine infusion (0.56 mg/kg, i.v.). Following cocaine self-administration, dopamine release, maximal rate of uptake (Vmax), and membrane-associated dopamine transporter (DAT) levels were reduced, and the DAT was less sensitive to cocaine. A single amphetamine infusion reduced Vmax and membrane DAT levels in cocaine-naive animals, but fully restored all aspects of dopamine terminal function in cocaine self-administering animals. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate pharmacologically induced, immediate rescue of deficits in dopamine nerve-terminal function in animals with a history of high-dose cocaine self-administration. This observation supports the notion that the DAT expression and function can be modulated on a rapid timescale and also suggests that the pharmacotherapeutic actions of amphetamine for cocaine addiction go beyond that of replacement therapy. PMID:25689882

  10. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    Cocaine is a white powder. It can be snorted up the nose or mixed with water and injected with a needle. Cocaine can also be made into small white rocks, called crack. Crack is smoked in a small glass pipe. ...

  11. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    Cocaine is a white powder. It can be snorted up the nose or mixed with water and injected with a needle. Cocaine can also be made into small white rocks, ... Crack is smoked in a small glass pipe. Cocaine speeds up your whole body. You may feel ...

  12. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the neurotransmitter in the brain. It is this flood of dopamine that causes cocaine’s high. The drug ... Articles: Stimulants Research Report Series: Cocaine Statistics and Trends NIDA: DrugFacts: High School and Youth Trends Centers ...

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    McGinty, Jacqueline F; Whitfield, Timothy W; Berglind, William J

    2010-02-16

    The effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on cocaine-seeking are brain region-specific. Infusion of BDNF into subcortical structures, like the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area, enhances cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and cocaine-seeking. Conversely, repeated administration of BDNF antiserum into the nucleus accumbens during chronic cocaine self-administration attenuates cocaine-induced reinstatement. In contrast, BDNF infusion into the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex immediately following a final session of cocaine self-administration attenuates relapse to cocaine-seeking after abstinence, as well as cue- and cocaine prime-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking following extinction. BDNF-induced alterations in the ERK-MAP kinase cascade and in prefronto-accumbens glutamatergic transmission are implicated in BDNF's ability to alter cocaine-seeking. Within 22 hours after infusion into the prefrontal cortex, BDNF increases BDNF protein in prefrontal cortical targets, including nucleus accumbens, and restores cocaine-mediated decreases in phospho-ERK expression in the nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, 3 weeks after BDNF infusion in animals with a cocaine self-administration history, suppressed basal levels of glutamate are normalized and a cocaine prime-induced increase in extracellular glutamate levels in the nucleus accumbens is prevented. Thus, BDNF may have local effects at the site of infusion and distal effects in target areas that are critical to mediating or preventing cocaine-induced dysfunctional neuroadaptations. PMID:19732758

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    McGinty, Jacqueline F.; Whitfield, Timothy W.; Berglind, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on cocaine-seeking are brain region-specific. Infusion of BDNF into subcortical structures, like the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area, enhances cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and cocaine seeking. Conversely, repeated administration of BDNF antiserum into the nucleus accumbens during chronic cocaine self-administration attenuates cocaine-induced reinstatement. In contrast, BDNF infusion into the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex immediately following a final session of cocaine self-administration attenuates relapse to cocaine seeking after abstinence, as well as cue- and cocaine prime-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking following extinction. BDNF-induced alterations in the ERK-MAP kinase cascade and in prefronto-accumbens glutamatergic transmission are implicated in BDNF’s ability to alter cocaine seeking. Within 22 hr after infusion into the prefrontal cortex, BDNF increases BDNF protein in prefrontal cortical targets, including nucleus accumbens, and restores cocaine-mediated decreases in phospho-ERK expression in the nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, three weeks after BDNF infusion in animals with a cocaine self-administration history, suppressed basal levels of glutamate are normalized and a cocaine-prime-induced increase in extracellular glutamate levels in the nucleus accumbens is prevented. Thus, BDNF may have local effects at the site of infusion and distal effects in target areas that are critical to mediating or preventing cocaine-induced dysfunctional neuroadaptations. PMID:19732758

  15. Prenatal stress enhances responsiveness to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Kippin, Tod E; Szumlinski, Karen K; Kapasova, Zuzana; Rezner, Betsy; See, Ronald E

    2008-03-01

    Early environmental events have profound influences on a wide range of adult behavior. In the current study, we assessed the influence of maternal stress during gestation on psychostimulant and neurochemical responsiveness to cocaine, cocaine self-administration, and reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in adult offspring. Pregnant, female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either no treatment or to restraint stress three times per day for the last 7 days of gestation and cocaine-related behavior was assessed in offspring at 10 weeks of age. Relative to controls, a noncontingent cocaine injection elevated locomotor activity as well as nucleus accumbens levels of extracellular dopamine and glutamate to a greater extent in both cocaine-naive and cocaine-experienced prenatal stress (PNS) rats and elevated prefrontal cortex dopamine in cocaine-experienced PNS rats. To assess the impact of PNS on cocaine addiction-related behavior, rats were trained to lever press for intravenous (i.v.) infusions of cocaine (0.25, 0.5, or 1 mg/kg/infusion), with each infusion paired with a light+tone-conditioned stimulus. Lever-pressing was extinguished and cocaine-seeking reinstated by re-exposure to the conditioned cues or by intraperitoneal cocaine-priming injections (5 or 10 mg/kg). PNS elevated active lever responding both during extinction and cocaine-primed reinstatement, but not during self-administration or conditioned-cued reinstatement. PNS also did not alter intake during self-administration. These findings demonstrate that PNS produces enduring nervous system alterations that increase the psychomotor stimulant, motivational, and neurochemical responsiveness to noncontingent cocaine. Thus, early environmental factors contribute to an individual's initial responsiveness to cocaine and propensity to relapse to cocaine-seeking. PMID:17487224

  16. Cocaine withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    Cocaine withdrawal occurs when someone who has used a lot of cocaine cuts down or quits taking the drug. Symptoms ... even if the user is not completely off cocaine and still has some of the drug in ...

  17. Differential antagonism of cocaine self-administration and cocaine-induced disruptions of learning by haloperidol in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Winsauer, Peter J; Moerschbaecher, Joseph M; Roussell, Alison M

    2008-03-01

    Six rhesus monkeys responding under a three-component multiple schedule were administered haloperidol to determine its effects on cocaine self-administration and on cocaine's disruptive effects on the repeated acquisition and performance of response chains. In the absence of haloperidol, 0.0032-0.032 mg/kg/infusion of cocaine increased response rate and the number of infusions in the self-administration component when compared to saline administration, whereas 0.1-0.32 mg/kg/infusion decreased response rate and the number of infusions. When compared to saline administration, the two lowest infusion doses of cocaine had little or no effect on responding in the acquisition and performance components; however, higher infusion doses of cocaine dose-dependently decreased response rate in these components. In addition, the higher doses of cocaine also increased the percentage of errors in the acquisition and performance components. Pretreatment with haloperidol (0.0032 or 0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) antagonized the effects of low doses of cocaine on the number of infusions in the self-administration component, whereas only the 0.01-mg/kg dose antagonized the effects of high doses of cocaine on the number of infusions. Neither dose of haloperidol antagonized the rate-decreasing effects of cocaine on responding in the acquisition and performance components significantly; the highest dose of haloperidol alone decreased rates of responding in each component. Antagonism of cocaine's error-increasing effects by haloperidol was only evident at one dose of cocaine (0.032 mg/kg/infusion), and was more complete in the performance components than in the acquisition components. Together, these data show the limited suitability of haloperidol for selectively antagonizing cocaine self-administration in the context of a multiple schedule involving transition behavior, and show the lack of uniform antagonism across operant behaviors. PMID:18422020

  18. Differential Antagonism of Cocaine Self-Administration and Cocaine-Induced Disruptions of Learning by Haloperidol in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winsauer, Peter J.; Moerschbaecher, Joseph M.; Roussell, Alison M.

    2008-01-01

    Six rhesus monkeys responding under a three-component multiple schedule were administered haloperidol to determine its effects on cocaine self-administration and on cocaine's disruptive effects on the repeated acquisition and performance of response chains. In the absence of haloperidol, 0.0032 - 0.032 mg/kg/infusion of cocaine increased response…

  19. [Cocaine addiction].

    PubMed

    Pitchot, W; Scantamburlo, G; Pinto, E; Karila, L

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine is the second most commonly used illicit drug after cannabis in the general population. Cocaine is a powerful stimulating agent of the central nervous system and a highly addictogenic drug. Somatic and psychiatric consequences of cocaine addiction are major and clinically relevant. The increasing consumption of cocaine and the importance of its consequences justify an update of our knowledge about cocaine addiction. PMID:23888579

  20. Cocaine intoxication

    MedlinePlus

    ... deadly. See also: Drug abuse Drug abuse and dependence Drug abuse first aid Cocaine withdrawal ... Perrone J, Hoffman RS. Cocaine, amphetamines, caffeine, and ... eds. Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide . 6th ed. ...

  1. Cocaine withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000947.htm Cocaine withdrawal To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cocaine withdrawal occurs when someone who has used a ...

  2. IT infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Infusing IT technology is a perennial challenge. The Technology Infusion and Maturity Assessment approach of Cornford & Hicks is shown applied to an example of IT infusion: moedl-based V&V of spacecraft software.

  3. Effects of mazindol on behavior maintained or occasioned by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Mansbach, R S; Balster, R L

    1993-01-01

    The effects of mazindol, cocaine and D-amphetamine were studied in rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine, and in rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline. Non-contingent intravenous drug injections were administered to monkeys responding under a session consisting of a 5-min period during which lever-pressing produced food reinforcement and a 60-min session in which responding produced i.v. cocaine infusions (10 or 33 micrograms/kg per infusion). Acute i.v. injections of cocaine (0.1-1.7 mg/kg), D-amphetamine (0.1-1 mg/kg) and the dopamine re-uptake inhibitor mazindol (0.03-0.56 mg/kg) given 5 min before the session decreased self-administration of cocaine, but also decreased rates of behavior maintained by the presentation of food. In both rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline in a two-lever, food-maintained procedure, mazindol, cocaine and D-amphetamine substituted for cocaine in a dose-related manner. Despite a lack of selectivity to decrease cocaine self-administration as compared to behavior maintained by food, the present data provide some rationale for further consideration of mazindol as a potential pharmacotherapy for stimulant abuse, due to its relatively low abuse liability and cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects. PMID:8436063

  4. Lack of effect of ethanol on cocaine prime-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Czoty, Paul W

    2016-10-01

    Cocaine and alcohol are commonly co-abused for reasons that are incompletely understood. Laboratory animal studies have suggested that, although the reinforcing effects of low cocaine doses are increased following chronic ethanol (EtOH) consumption, acute EtOH administration does not consistently alter cocaine self-administration. The present study examined whether EtOH influences another abuse-related effect of cocaine: reinstatement of extinguished responding. Rhesus monkeys that had previously consumed EtOH for 8 weeks (2.0 g/kg over 1 h, 5 days/week) self-administered up to 10 injections per day of 0.1 mg/kg cocaine under a fixed-interval 300-s schedule. After responding had been extinguished by substituting saline for cocaine, a pre-session infusion of saline or EtOH (0.5 or 1.0 g/kg, intravenously over 10 min) was followed by a 'priming' injection of saline or cocaine (intravenously). Responding was increased significantly by priming injections of cocaine, but not saline. EtOH infusions neither reinstated behavior when administered before a saline prime nor altered the priming effect of cocaine. The inability of EtOH to alter the response-reinstating ability of cocaine provides further evidence for a lack of acute behavioral interactions between cocaine and EtOH. PMID:27509315

  5. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  6. Alcohol-preferring (P) rats are more sensitive than Wistar rats to the reinforcing effects of cocaine self-administered directly into the nucleus accumbens shell.

    PubMed

    Katner, Simon N; Oster, Scott M; Ding, Zheng-Ming; Deehan, Gerald A; Toalston, Jamie E; Hauser, Sheketha R; McBride, William J; Rodd, Zachary A

    2011-10-01

    Wistar rats will self-administer cocaine directly into the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), but not into the nucleus accumbens core. In human and animal literature, there is a genetic association between alcoholism and cocaine dependency. The current experiment examined whether selective breeding for high alcohol preference is also associated with greater sensitivity of the AcbSh to the reinforcing properties of cocaine. P and Wistar rats were given cocaine (0, 100, 200, 400, or 800 pmol/100 nl) to self-infuse into the AcbSh. Rats were given cocaine for the first 4 sessions (acquisition), artificial CSF for sessions 5 and 6 (extinction), and cocaine again in session 7 (reinstatement). During acquisition, P rats self-infused 200-800 pmol cocaine (59 infusions/session), whereas Wistar rats only reliably self-infused 800 pmol cocaine (38 infusions/session). Furthermore, P rats received a greater number of cocaine infusions in the 200, 400 and 800 pmol cocaine groups compared to respective Wistar groups during acquisition. Both P and Wistar rats reduced responding on the active lever when aCSF was substituted for cocaine, and reinstated responding in session 7 when cocaine was restored. However, P rats had significantly greater infusions during session 7 compared to session 4 at all concentrations of cocaine tested, whereas Wistar rats only displayed greater infusions during session 7 compared to session 4 at the 400 and 800 pmol cocaine concentrations. The present results suggest that, compared to Wistar rats, the AcbSh of P rats was more sensitive to the reinforcing effects of cocaine. The reinstatement data suggest that the AcbSh of P rats may have become sensitized to the reinforcing effects of cocaine. Overall, the findings from this study support a genetic association between high alcohol preference and greater sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of cocaine. PMID:21723879

  7. Infusion Extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  8. Deep venous thrombophlebitis: detection with 4-hour versus 24-hour platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Seabold, J.E.; Conrad, G.R.; Ponto, J.A.; Kimball, D.A.; Frey, E.E.; Ahmed, F.; Coughlan, J.D.; Jensen, K.C.

    1987-11-01

    Thirty-one nonheparinized patients with suspected deep venous thrombophlebitis (DVT) underwent contrast venography and indium-111 platelet scintigraphy (In-111 PS). Venography permitted identification of acute DVT in 12 of 31 cases (39%). One additional patient was considered to have acute DVT despite nonconclusive venography results. In-111 PS results were positive at 4 hours in nine of 13 cases (69%) and at 24 hours in 12 of 13 cases (92%). Two of four patients with false-negative 4-hour In-111 PS studies had received warfarin. Thus, the sensitivity of 4-hour In-111 PS in patients not receiving anticoagulants was 82%. Venography results were negative for acute DVT in 18 cases, and 4-hour In-111 PS studies were negative or equivocal in each. In-111 PS is an alternative to contrast venography for detecting acute DVT. If 4-hour In-111 PS results are positive, anticoagulation can be initiated. Delayed images are necessary if the 4-hour images are negative or equivocal.

  9. [Sucrose reward promotes rats' motivation for cocaine].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Qing; LE, Qiu-Min; Yu, Xiang-Chen; Ma, Lan; Wang, Fei-Fei

    2016-06-25

    Caloric diet, such as fat and sugar intake, has rewarding effects, and has been indicated to affect the responses to addictive substances in animal experiments. However, the possible association between sucrose reward and the motivation for addictive drugs remains to be elucidated. Thus, we carried out behavioral tests after sucrose self-administration training to determine the effects of sucrose experience on rats' motivation for cocaine, locomotor sensitivity to cocaine, basal locomotor activity, anxiety level, and associative learning ability. The sucrose-experienced (sucrose) group exhibited higher lever press, cocaine infusion and break point, as well as upshift of cocaine dose-response curve in cocaine self-administration test, as compared with the control (chow) group. Additionally, despite similar locomotor activity in open field test and comparable score in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference, the sucrose group showed higher cocaine-induced locomotor sensitivity as compared with the chow group. The anxiety level and the performance in vocal-cue induced fear memory were similar between these two groups in elevated plus maze and fear conditioning tests, respectively. Taken together, our work indicates that sucrose experience promotes the rats' motivation for cocaine. PMID:27350195

  10. Development of translational preclinical models in substance abuse: Effects of cocaine administration on cocaine choice in humans and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Foltin, Richard W; Haney, Margaret; Rubin, Eric; Reed, Stephanie C; Vadhan, Nehal; Balter, Rebecca; Evans, Suzette M

    2015-07-01

    Human drug use involves repeated choices to take drugs or to engage in alternative behaviors. The purpose of this study was to examine how response cost for cocaine and the value of an alternative reinforcer (opportunity to play a game of chance) and how 'free' doses (with minimal response cost) affected cocaine choice. Two laboratory studies of cocaine self-administration were conducted in a group of humans who were habitual cocaine smokers and in a group of rhesus monkeys that intravenously self-administered cocaine. Nine human cocaine smokers who were not seeking treatment for their cocaine were repeatedly presented with the choice to smoke 25mg cocaine base or play a game of chance for a monetary bonus paid at study completion. The response cost for choosing cocaine varied (up to 4000 responses/dose) and the number of game plays varied (up to 8). In this sample of humans, increasing either the response cost for cocaine or increasing the value of the alternative reinforcer did not significantly affect cocaine choice, while increasing both simultaneously slightly decreased cocaine choice and increased choice of the alternative. In monkeys, the dose-response function for cocaine self-administration (10 choices of 0.0125-0.1mg/kg/infusion vs. candy coated chocolate) was steep and we failed to achieve a 50/50 cocaine/candy choice even after substantially manipulating cost and number of candies available. Providing a large 'free' self-administered cocaine dose to humans did not significantly affect cocaine choice, whereas in monkeys, a large free dose of cocaine decreased cocaine choice when higher doses of cocaine were available for self-administration. The present results demonstrate that in the laboratory, it is difficult to modify on-going cocaine self-administration behavior in both humans and non-human primates. PMID:25933796

  11. Functional consequences of cocaine re-exposure after discontinuation of cocaine availability.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Thomas J R; Smith, Hilary R; Nader, Susan H; Nader, Michael A; Porrino, Linda J

    2014-10-01

    Cocaine users exhibit a wide range of behavioral impairments accompanied by brain structural, neurochemical and functional abnormalities. Metabolic mapping studies in cocaine users and animal models have shown extensive functional alterations throughout the striatum, limbic system, and cortex. Few studies, however, have evaluated the persistence of these effects following cessation of cocaine availability. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to assess the functional effects of re-exposure to cocaine in nonhuman primates after the discontinuation of cocaine self-administration for 30 or 90 days, using the quantitative autoradiographic 2-[14C]deoxyglucose (2DG) method. Rhesus monkeys self-administered cocaine (fixed interval 3-min schedule, 30 infusions per session, 0.3 mg/kg/infusion) for 100 sessions followed by 30 (n=4) or 90 days (n=3) during which experimental sessions were not conducted. Food-reinforced control animals (n=5) underwent identical schedules of reinforcement. Animals were then re-exposed to cocaine or food for one final session and the 2DG method applied immediately after session completion. Compared to controls, re-exposure to cocaine after 30 or 90 day drug-free periods resulted in lower rates of glucose utilization in ventral and dorsal striatum, prefrontal and temporal cortex, limbic system, thalamus, and midbrain. These data demonstrate that vulnerability to the effects of cocaine persists for as long as 90 days after cessation of drug use. While there was some evidence for recovery (fewer brain areas were affected by cocaine re-exposure at 90 days as compared to 30 days), this was not uniform across regions, thus suggesting that recovery occurs at different rates in different brain systems. PMID:24953829

  12. Functional Consequences of Cocaine Re-exposure after Discontinuation of Cocaine Availability

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Thomas J.R.; Smith, Hilary R.; Nader, Susan H.; Nader, Michael A.; Porrino, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine users exhibit a wide range of behavioral impairments accompanied by brain structural, neurochemical and functional abnormalities. Metabolic mapping studies in cocaine users and animal models have shown extensive functional alterations throughout the striatum, limbic system, and cortex. Few studies, however, have evaluated the persistence of these effects following cessation of cocaine availability. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to assess the functional effects of re-exposure to cocaine in nonhuman primates after the discontinuation of cocaine self-administration for 30 or 90 days, using the quantitative autoradiographic 2-[14C]deoxyglucose (2DG) method. Rhesus monkeys self-administered cocaine (fixed interval 3-min schedule, 30 infusions per session, 0.3 mg/kg/infusion) for 100 sessions followed by 30 (n=4) or 90 days (n=3) during which experimental sessions were not conducted. Food-reinforced control animals (n=5) underwent identical schedules of reinforcement. Animals were then re-exposed to cocaine or food for one final session and the 2DG method applied immediately after session completion. Compared to controls, re-exposure to cocaine after 30 or 90 day drug-free periods resulted in lower rates of glucose utilization in ventral and dorsal striatum, prefrontal and temporal cortex, limbic system, thalamus, and midbrain. These data demonstrate that vulnerability to the effects of cocaine persists for as long as 90 days after cessation of drug use. While there was some evidence for recovery (fewer brain areas were affected by cocaine re-exposure at 90 days as compared to 30 days), this was not uniform across regions, thus suggesting that recovery occurs at different rates in different brain systems. PMID:24953829

  13. Infusion extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction. A piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber. The method is applicable to operation in low or micro-gravity environments.

  14. Cocaine. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    This compilation of journal articles on cocaine includes a report describing cocaine as the recreational drug of the middle class, statistics from the United States Department of Health on health consequences of cocaine use, an article on "speedballing" (use of cocaine and heroin in combination), and a discussion of the various ways cocaine is…

  15. The selective dopamine uptake inhibitor, D-84, suppresses cocaine self-administration, but does not occasion cocaine-like levels of generalization.

    PubMed

    Batman, Angela M; Dutta, Aloke K; Reith, Maarten E A; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2010-12-01

    A successful replacement pharmacotherapy for treating cocaine dependency would likely reduce cocaine's abuse, support a low abuse liability, overlap cocaine's subjective effects, and have a long duration of action. Inhibitors with varying selectivity at the dopamine transporter (DAT) have approximated these properties. The objective of the present study was to characterize the behavioural effects of an extremely selective DAT inhibitor, (+) trans-4-(2-Benzhydryloxyethyl)-1-(4-fluorobenzyl) piperadin-3-ol (D-84), a 3-hydroxy substituted piperidine derivative of GBR-12935, for its cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects, its effects on cocaine self-administration, and for its own self-administration. During cocaine discrimination tests, cocaine occasioned the 10 mg/kg cocaine training stimulus with an ED(50) value of 3.13 (1.54-6.34) mg/kg, and reduced response rates with an ED(50) value of 20.39 (7.24-57.44) mg/kg. D-84 incompletely generalized to the cocaine stimulus occasioning a maximal 76% cocaine-lever responding, while reducing response rates with lower potency than cocaine (ED(50)=30.94 (12.34-77.60) mg/kg). Pretreatment with D-84 (9.6-30.4 mg/kg) significantly (P<0.05) reduced cocaine intake at 17.1 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.5 mg/kg/infusion, and at 30.4 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.1, 0.5 .and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion. During self-administration tests with D-84 (0.1-1 mg/kg/infusion), numbers of infusions significantly exceeded vehicle levels at 0.3 mg/kg/infusion. These results show that D-84 pretreatment can decrease cocaine intake especially when high doses of cocaine are being self-administered. This observation, combined with its incomplete generalization to the cocaine discriminative stimulus and its reported long duration of action, provides a profile consistent with a potential replacement therapy for treating cocaine-abusing patients. PMID:20840845

  16. Repeated stress exposure causes strain-dependent shifts in the behavioral economics of cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Groblewski, Peter A; Zietz, Chad; Willuhn, Ingo; Phillips, Paul E M; Chavkin, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Cocaine-experienced Wistar and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats received four daily repeated forced swim stress sessions (R-FSS), each of which preceded 4-hour cocaine self-administration sessions. Twenty-four hours after the last swim stress, cocaine valuation was assessed during a single-session threshold procedure. Prior exposure to R-FSS significantly altered cocaine responding in Wistar, but not WKY, rats. Behavioral economic analysis of responding revealed that the Wistar rats that had received R-FSS exhibited an increase in the maximum price that they were willing to pay for cocaine (Pmax ). Pre-treatment with the long-lasting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist norbinaltorphimine prevented the stress-induced increase in Pmax . Thus, R-FSS exposure had strain-dependent effects on cocaine responding during the threshold procedure, and the stress effects on cocaine valuation exhibited by Wistar, but not WKY, required intact KOR signaling. PMID:24919534

  17. Repeated stress exposure causes strain-dependent shifts in the behavioral economics of cocaine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Groblewski, Peter A.; Zietz, Chad; Willuhn, Ingo; Phillips, Paul E. M.; Chavkin, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine-experienced Wistar and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats received four daily repeated forced swim stress sessions (R-FSS), each of which preceded 4-hour cocaine self-administration sessions. Twenty-four hours after the last swim stress, cocaine valuation was assessed during a single-session threshold procedure. Prior exposure to R-FSS significantly altered cocaine responding in Wistar, but not WKY, rats. Behavioral economic analysis of responding revealed that the Wistar rats that had received R-FSS exhibited an increase in the maximum price that they were willing to pay for cocaine (Pmax). Pre-treatment with the long-lasting kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist norbinaltorphimine prevented the stress-induced increase in Pmax. Thus, R-FSS exposure had strain-dependent effects on cocaine responding during the threshold procedure, and the stress effects on cocaine valuation exhibited by Wistar, but not WKY, required intact KOR signaling. PMID:24919534

  18. Mind Over Matter: Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Term(s): Teachers / NIDA Teaching Guide / Mind Over Matter Teaching Guide and Series / Cocaine Print Mind Over Matter: Cocaine Order Free Publication in: English Spanish Download PDF 806.08 KB Cocaine is made ...

  19. Substance use -- cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000793.htm Substance use - cocaine To use the sharing features on this page, ... Charlie, coca, coke, flake, rock, snow, speedball, toot. Cocaine's Effects on Your Brain Cocaine is a strong ...

  20. fMRI of cocaine self-administration in macaques reveals functional inhibition of basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Joseph B; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Jarraya, Bechir; Rosen, Bruce R; Jenkins, Bruce G; Vanduffel, Wim

    2011-05-01

    Disparities in cocaine-induced neurochemical and metabolic responses between human beings and rodents motivate the use of non-human primates (NHP) to model consequences of repeated cocaine exposure in human subjects. To characterize the functional response to cocaine infusion in NHP brain, we employed contrast-enhanced fMRI during both non-contingent injection of drug and self-administration of cocaine in the magnet. Cocaine robustly decreased cerebral blood volume (CBV) throughout basal ganglia and motor/pre-motor cortex and produced subtle functional inhibition of prefrontal cortex. No brain regions exhibited significant elevation of CBV in response to cocaine challenge. Theses effects in NHP brain are opposite in sign to the cocaine-induced fMRI response in rats, but consistent with previous measurements in NHP based on glucose metabolism. Because the striatal ratio of D2 to D1 receptors is larger in human beings and NHP than rats, we hypothesize that the inhibitory effects of D2 receptor binding dominate the functional response in primates, whereas excitatory D1 receptor stimulation predominates in the rat. If the NHP accurately models the human response to cocaine, downregulation of D2 receptors in human cocaine-abusing populations can be expected to blunt cocaine-induced functional responses, contributing to the weak and variable fMRI responses reported in human basal ganglia following cocaine infusion. PMID:21307843

  1. Adolescent-onset of cocaine use is associated with heightened stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wai Chong; Marinelli, Michela

    2016-05-01

    Adolescent rats take cocaine more readily than adults, are more sensitive to lower doses of the drug and work harder for it. It remains unknown if adolescent-onset of cocaine use has long-term consequences on adult relapse liability. Therefore, we tested if self-administering cocaine during adolescence impacts subsequent stress-induced reinstatement to cocaine seeking and taking, after a prolonged drug-free period. Adolescent (~P42) or adult (P88) rats self-administered cocaine (0.6 or 1.2 mg/kg/infusion) for 7 or 10 days. Then, they underwent a prolonged drug-free period (21-40 days), after which they were tested for reinstatement of cocaine-seeking (i.e. responding in the absence of cocaine) induced by the stress hormone corticosterone, the pharmacological stressor yohimbine or electric footshock. Studies employed either single extinction session (within-session extinction/reinstatement) or repeated extinction prior to reinstatement (between-session extinction/reinstatement). Finally, in a separate set of experiments, rats underwent a prolonged drug-free period (~40 days) and were then allowed to self-administer cocaine again, using progressive-ratio procedures that appraise the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine. Rats with adolescent-onset of cocaine use showed greater stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking than rats with adult-onset of cocaine use. This was observed across conditions, providing external validity to these results. Groups did not differ on drug taking in progressive-ratio tests. Our studies indicate that experiencing cocaine during adolescence renders subjects particularly responsive to the subsequent effects of stress on drug seeking. This heightened propensity for reinstatement puts adolescent-onset drug users at heightened risk for relapse. PMID:26202521

  2. Examination of cocaine dose in a preclinical model of natural reward devaluation by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Green, Jennifer L; Dykstra, Linda A; Carelli, Regina M

    2015-06-01

    In a preclinical model of natural reward devaluation by cocaine, taste cues elicit aversive taste reactivity when they predict impending but delayed cocaine self-administration. Here, we investigated this negative affective state as a function of cocaine dose. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were given 45 brief intraoral infusions of a 0.15% saccharin solution before 2 h cocaine self-administration for 14 days. Rats were video recorded; taste reactivity and patterns of self-administration were quantified on the first and last days. On day 14, a significant decrease in appetitive taste reactivity and increase in aversive taste reactivity was observed (compared with day 1) that did not vary as a function of cocaine dose. In contrast, patterns of cocaine self-administration (i.e. the total number of lever presses and load-up behavior) varied as a function of dose across days. Further, load-up behavior was positively correlated with aversive taste reactivity (i.e. gapes) on day 14 across all doses tested. Collectively, these findings indicate that the emergence of negative affect in this preclinical model is not dependent on cocaine dose. PMID:25738759

  3. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in cocaine-taking behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Young; Ryu, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Bong Hyo; Chang, Su-Chan; Yeo, Mi Jin; Kim, Sang Hyun; Folsom, Ryan J; Schilaty, Nathan D; Kim, Kwang Joong; Yang, Chae Ha; Steffensen, Scott C; Kim, Hee Young

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the development of behavioral sensitization following repeated cocaine exposure. We hypothesized that increased ROS following cocaine exposure would act as signaling molecules in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system, which might play an important role in mediating the reinforcing effects of cocaine. The aim of this study was to evaluate cocaine enhancement of brain metabolic activity and the effects of ROS scavengers on cocaine self-administration behavior, cocaine-induced ROS production in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and cocaine enhancement of DA release in the NAc. Metabolic neural activity monitored by temperature and oxidative stress were increased in NAc following cocaine exposure. Systemic administration of the ROS scavenger N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) or 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL), either pre- or post-treatment, significantly decreased cocaine self-administration without affecting food intake. Infusion of TEMPOL into the NAc inhibited cocaine self-administration. Increased oxidative stress was found mainly on neurons, but not astrocytes, microglia or oligodendrocytes, in NAc of rats self-administering cocaine. TEMPOL significantly attenuated cocaine-induced enhancement of DA release in the NAc, compared to saline controls. TEMPOL had no effect on the enhancement of DA release produced by the DA transporter inhibitor GBR12909. Taken together, these findings suggest that enhancement of ROS production in NAc neurons contributes to the reinforcing effect of cocaine. PMID:24975938

  4. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in cocaine-taking behaviors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eun Young; Ryu, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Bong Hyo; Chang, Su-Chan; Yeo, Mi Jin; Kim, Sang Hyun; Folsom, Ryan J.; Schilaty, Nathan D.; Kim, Kwang Joong; Yang, Chae Ha; Steffensen, Scott C.; Kim, Hee Young

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the development of behavioral sensitization following repeated cocaine exposure. We hypothesized that increased ROS following cocaine exposure would act as signaling molecules in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system, which might play an important role in mediating the reinforcing effects of cocaine. The aim of this study was to evaluate cocaine enhancement of brain metabolic activity and the effects of ROS scavengers on cocaine self-administration behavior, cocaine-induced ROS production in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and cocaine enhancement of DA release in the NAc. Metabolic neural activity monitored by temperature and oxidative stress were increased in NAc following cocaine exposure. Systemic administration of the ROS scavenger N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) or 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL), either pre- or post-treatment, significantly decreased cocaine self-administration without affecting food intake. Infusion of TEMPOL into the NAc inhibited cocaine self-administration. Increased oxidative stress was found mainly on neurons, but not astrocytes, microglia or oligodendrocytes, in NAc of rats self-administering cocaine. TEMPOL significantly attenuated cocaine-induced enhancement of DA release in the NAc, compared to saline controls. TEMPOL had no effect on the enhancement of DA release produced by the DA transporter inhibitor GBR12909. Taken together, these findings suggest that enhancement of ROS production in NAc neurons contributes to the reinforcing effect of cocaine. PMID:24975938

  5. Plasma progesterone levels and cocaine-seeking in freely cycling female rats across the estrous cycle

    PubMed Central

    Feltenstein, Matthew W.; See, Ronald E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have reported sex and estrous cycle dependent differences in the reinstatement of cocaine-seeking triggered by cocaine injections or drug-paired cues. However, the relationship between estradiol or progesterone levels and cocaine-seeking in a reinstatement model of relapse has not been explored. Thus, we examined changes in plasma hormone levels during cocaine-taking and cocaine-seeking behaviors in gonadally intact female rats. Rats self-administered cocaine (0.5 mg/kg/infusion) during daily 2-h sessions, followed by extinction. For reinstatement, cocaine (0, 5, or 10 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 30 min prior to testing. Vaginal smears and blood samples were collected prior to and during chronic cocaine self-administration, extinction, and reinstatement testing. Relative to nonestrous females, females in estrus showed greater responding during self-administration, extinction, and during cocaine-primed reinstatement. The highest progesterone levels were noted at the time of lowest cocaine-seeking (proestrus) and the lowest levels of progesterone occurred at the time of highest cocaine-seeking (estrus). In contrast, plasma estradiol levels did not show any clear pattern with cocaine-seeking. These data from an animal model of relapse supports recent clinical evidence that progesterone reduces subjective craving in cocaine-dependent women. Overall, these results suggest that progesterone administration may be a useful intervention for reducing the incidence of relapse. PMID:17240083

  6. Acquisition of Cocaine Self-Administration with Unsignaled Delayed Reinforcement in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galuska, Chad M.; Woods, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Six experimentally naive rhesus monkeys produced 0.01 mg/kg/infusion cocaine by lever pressing under a tandem fixed-ratio 1 differential-reinforcement-of-other- behavior schedule. One lever press initiated an unsignaled 15- or 30-s delay culminating in cocaine delivery. Each press made during the delay reset the delay interval. With two…

  7. Self administration of cocaine in monkeys receiving LAAM acutely or chronically.

    PubMed

    Gerak, Lisa R; Galici, Ruggero; France, Charles P

    2008-01-28

    Polydrug abuse remains a common problem among opioid abusers as well as patients in opioid maintenance programs. Although cocaine abuse has been reported in patients receiving methadone, the incidence of cocaine use in patients receiving l-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM) has not been well established. The goal of this study was to determine whether acute or chronic administration of LAAM modified the reinforcing effects of cocaine using a self-administration procedure in rhesus monkeys. Four monkeys responded under a fixed ratio (FR) 30 schedule to receive i.v. infusions of cocaine (0.0032-0.32 mg/kg/infusion) in the absence of other treatment, after acute LAAM administration (0.1-1.0 mg/kg, s.c.), and during daily administration of 1.0 mg/kg of LAAM. Cocaine maintained self-administration responding that exceeded responding maintained by saline; acutely administered LAAM had small and variable effects on self administration of cocaine. Daily LAAM administration increased the number of infusions received of at least one dose of cocaine. These studies indicated that LAAM administration did not attenuate the reinforcing effects of cocaine, suggesting that LAAM would not likely alter cocaine abuse in patients undergoing treatment for opioid abuse. PMID:17764707

  8. Early methylphenidate exposure enhances cocaine self-administration but not cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in young adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Cynthia A.; Baella, Shelley A.; Farley, Cristal M.; Herbert, Matthew S.; Horn, Leslie R.; Campbell, Rachel H.; Zavala, Arturo R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Previous studies in rodents show that early exposure to methylphenidate alters later responsiveness to drugs of abuse. An interesting feature of these studies is that early methylphenidate treatment decreases the rewarding value of cocaine when measured by conditioned place preference (CPP), but the same treatment increases cocaine self-administration. Objective The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of early methylphenidate exposure on cocaine-induced responding using both reward paradigms. Methods Rats were treated with methylphenidate (0, 2, or 5 mg/kg) from postnatal day (PD) 11 to PD 20 and then cocaine-induced CPP or cocaine self-administration was measured in separate groups of rats in adulthood. The CPP procedure included eight days of acquisition training, eight days of extinction training, and a reinstatement test. Rats were conditioned with 0, 10 or 20 mg/kg cocaine. Reinstatement was assessed after a priming dose of cocaine (10 mg/kg). For the self-administration experiment, a jugular catheter was implanted and rats were trained to press a lever reinforced with cocaine (0.25 or 0.75 mg/kg/infusion) on a fixed ratio (FR) 1 schedule. Rats were gradually moved from an FR1 to an FR10 schedule and, after criterion was reached, rats were placed on a progressive ratio schedule for five days. Results Cocaine produced robust rewarding effects as determined by both the CPP and self-administration experiments; however, early methylphenidate exposure only enhanced the reinforcing effects of cocaine on the self-administration paradigm. Interestingly, this methylphenidate enhancement was only seen in male rats. Conclusions These data suggest that in males methylphenidate enhances the reinforcing value of cocaine, but not cocaine-associated cues. PMID:20848087

  9. Intraosseous infusion.

    PubMed

    LaRocco, Brian G; Wang, Henry E

    2003-01-01

    Establishing vascular access is vital in the resuscitation of critically-ill children and adults. Intraosseous infusion (IOI) is a viable route for providing vascular access when traditional intravenous methods cannot be accomplished. IOI is relatively easy to perform and is a standard recommended intervention for the resuscitation of both adults and children. The authors review the history, anatomy, technique, and clinical application of IOI. They also highlight the use of IOI in the prehospital setting. PMID:12710793

  10. Effects of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist, U69593, on the development of sensitization and on the maintenance of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Schenk, S; Partridge, B; Shippenberg, T S

    2001-04-01

    Previous studies showed that prior administration of kappa-opioid agonists decreased the development of sensitization to some of the behavioral effects of cocaine. The present study sought to determine whether the development of sensitization to cocaine's reinforcing effects was also sensitive to antagonism by kappa-opioid agonists. During a pretreatment phase, the kappa-opioid agonist, U69593 (0.0 or 0.32 mg/kg) was administered prior to (1) 2 daily injections of cocaine (0.0 or 20.0 mg/kg), or (2) cocaine or saline administered via a yoking procedure. Cocaine pretreatment decreased the latency to acquisition of cocaine self-administration. However, prior administration of U69593 during the pretreatment phase failed to attenuate the development of this sensitized response to cocaine's reinforcing effect. In other groups, the effect of acute U69593 pretreatment on the maintenance of cocaine self-administration was examined during a 10 hr session. During training and testing, a stimulus was associated with each self-administered cocaine infusion for one group whereas responding of another group was reinforced by a cocaine infusion alone. On the test day, pretreatment with U69593 (0.32 mg/kg) decreased responding during each hour of the 10 hr session for the group that was reinforced with cocaine plus the cocaine-associated stimulus. U69593 failed to produce a long-lasting disruption of cocaine self-administration for rats that were trained and tested without the cocaine-associated stimulus. These data suggest that the acquisition and maintenance of cocaine self-administration are differentially sensitive to manipulations of kappa-opioid systems. Further, the disruption of cocaine self-administration by U69593 may be due to interactions with mechanisms that underlie facilitative effects of stimuli that have been associated with self-administered cocaine infusions. PMID:11182539

  11. Cocaine and Cardiovascular Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, John D.; Rose, Fred D.

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 21-year-old man who suffered a myocardial infarction after using cocaine and amphetamines is reported. A brief literature review provides evidence of cocaine's potential cardiovascular effects. (Author/MT)

  12. Substance use - cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... injecting into a vein (speedballing) Smoking it (this type of cocaine is called freebase or crack) Street names for cocaine include blow, bump, C, candy, Charlie, coca, coke, flake, rock, snow, speedball, toot.

  13. Effects of menstrual cycle phase on cocaine self-administration in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ziva D; Foltin, Richard W; Evans, Suzette M

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological findings suggest that men and women vary in their pattern of cocaine use resulting in differences in cocaine dependence and relapse rates. Preclinical laboratory studies have demonstrated that female rodents are indeed more sensitive to cocaine's reinforcing effects than males, with estrous cycle stage as a key determinant of this effect. The current study sought to extend these findings to normally cycling female rhesus macaques, a species that shares a nearly identical menstrual cycle to humans. Dose-dependent intravenous cocaine self-administration (0.0125, 0.0250, and 0.0500 mg/kg/infusion) using a progressive-ratio schedule of reinforcement was determined across the menstrual cycle. The menstrual cycle was divided into 5 discrete phases - menses, follicular, periovulatory, luteal, and late luteal phases - verified by the onset of menses and plasma levels of estradiol and progesterone. Dependent variables including number of infusions self-administered per session, progressive ratio breakpoint, and cocaine intake were analyzed according to cocaine dose and menstrual cycle phase. Analysis of plasma hormone levels verified phase-dependent fluctuations of estradiol and progesterone, with estrogen levels peaking during the periovulatory phase, and progesterone peaking during the luteal phase. Progressive ratio breakpoint, infusions self-administered, and cocaine intake did not consistently vary based on menstrual cycle phase. These findings demonstrate that under the current experimental parameters, the reinforcing effects of cocaine did not vary across the menstrual cycle in a systematic fashion in normally cycling rhesus macaques. PMID:23098805

  14. The mu/kappa agonist nalbuphine attenuates sensitization to the behavioral effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Smith, M A; Cole, K T; Iordanou, J C; Kerns, D C; Newsom, P C; Peitz, G W; Schmidt, K T

    2013-03-01

    Sensitization refers to an increase in sensitivity to a drug and is believed to play a role in the etiology of substance use disorders. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the mixed mu/kappa agonist nalbuphine to modulate sensitization to the locomotor and positive reinforcing effects of cocaine. Rats were habituated to a locomotor activity chamber and treated with saline (1.0 ml/kg, ip), cocaine (10 mg/kg, ip), or cocaine+nalbuphine (10 mg/kg, ip) every day for 10 days. Following locomotor activity testing, rats were implanted with intravenous catheters and cocaine self-administration was examined on fixed ratio (FR) and progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. Rats treated with cocaine exhibited a progressive increase in locomotor activity over the 10-day treatment period, and this effect was significantly reduced in rats treated with cocaine+nalbuphine. In self-administration tests, rats treated with cocaine exhibited significantly higher levels of responding at a threshold dose of cocaine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) on both FR and PR schedules than rats treated with saline. This increase in responding at a threshold dose of cocaine was blocked completely in rats treated with cocaine+nalbuphine. These data suggest that nalbuphine attenuates the development of sensitization to the behavioral effects of cocaine. PMID:23305678

  15. D2R DNA Transfer Into the Nucleus Accumbens Attenuates Cocaine Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    THANOS, PANAYOTIS K.; MICHAELIDES, MICHAEL; UMEGAKI, HIROYUKI; VOLKOW, NORA D.

    2009-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) D2 receptor (D2R) agonists and antagonists can modulate self-administration behavior, conditioned place preference, and locomotor responses to cocaine. Low levels of D2R have also been observed in cocaine addicted subjects and in non human primates after chronic cocaine exposures. Prior studies had shown that D2R upregulation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in rodents trained to self-administer alcohol markedly attenuated alcohol preference and intake. Here we assess the effects of D2R upregulation in the NAc on cocaine intake in rats trained to self-administer cocaine. Following 2 weeks of i.v. cocaine self-administration (CSA), rats were stereotaxically treated with an adenovirus that carried the D2R gene to upregulate D2R in the NAc. D2R vector treatment resulted in a significant decrease (75%) in cocaine infusions and lever presses (70%) for cocaine. This effect lasted 6 days before cocaine consumption returned to baseline levels, which corresponds roughly to the time it takes D2R to return to baseline levels. These findings show that CSA and D2R in the NAc are negatively correlated and suggest that cocaine intake is modulated in part by D2R levels in NAc. Thus strategies aimed at increasing D2R expression in NAc may be beneficial in treating cocaine abuse and addiction. PMID:18418874

  16. Increased latencies to initiate cocaine self-administration following laterodorsal tegmental nucleus lesions

    PubMed Central

    Steidl, Stephan; Cardiff, Katherine M.; Wise, Roy A.

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic input to the ventral tegmental area (VTA), origin of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system that is critical for cocaine reward, is important for both cocaine seeking and cocaine taking. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg) provides one of the two major sources of excitatory cholinergic input to the VTA, but little is known of the role of the LDTg in cocaine reward. LDTg cholinergic cells express urotensin-II receptors and here we used local microinjections of a conjugate of the endogenous ligand for these receptors with diphtheria toxin (Dtx::UII) to lesion the cholinergic cells of the LDTg in rats previously trained to self-administer cocaine (1 mg/kg/infusion, i.v.). Lesioned rats showed long latencies to initiate cocaine self-administration after treatment with the toxin, which resulted in a reduction in cocaine intake per session. Priming injections reduced latencies to initiate responding for cocaine in lesioned rats, and once they began to respond the rats regulated their moment-to-moment cocaine intake within normal limits. Thus we conclude that while LDTg cholinergic cell loss does not significantly alter the rewarding effects of cocaine, LDTg lesions can reduce the rat’s responsiveness to cocaine-predictive stimuli. PMID:25746513

  17. Inhibition of Cdk5 in the nucleus accumbens enhances the locomotor-activating and incentive-motivational effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jane R; Lynch, Wendy J; Sanchez, Hayde; Olausson, Peter; Nestler, Eric J; Bibb, James A

    2007-03-01

    Neuronal adaptations in striatal dopamine signaling have been implicated in enhanced responses to addictive drugs. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) regulates striatal dopamine signaling and is a downstream target gene of the transcription factor DeltaFosB, which accumulates in striatal neurons after chronic cocaine exposure. Here we investigated the role of Cdk5 activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) on cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, responding for reward-associated stimuli (conditioned reinforcement), and cocaine self-administration under a progressive ratio schedule. Repeated infusions of the Cdk5 inhibitor roscovitine into the NAc before cocaine injections augmented both the development and expression of cocaine sensitization without having any intrinsic stimulant actions of its own. Additionally, repeated intra-NAc infusions of roscovitine to saline-injected rats enhanced locomotor responses to a subsequent cocaine challenge. Similar effects were found after infusions of another Cdk5 inhibitor, olomoucine, but not its inactive congener, iso-olomoucine. Repeated inhibition of Cdk5 within the NAc also robustly enhanced the incentive-motivational effects of cocaine, similar to the effect of prior repeated cocaine exposure. The enhanced responding with conditioned reinforcement induced by cocaine persisted at least 2 weeks after the final roscovitine infusion. NAc infusions of olomoucine also produced acute and enduring increases in "breakpoints" achieved on a progressive ratio schedule for cocaine reinforcement. These results demonstrate profound and persistent effects of NAc Cdk5 inhibition on locomotor sensitization and incentive-motivational processes and provide direct evidence for a role for striatal Cdk5-induced alterations in the brain's long-term adaptations to cocaine. PMID:17360491

  18. Role of Mu and Delta Opioid Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens in Cocaine-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Diana; Self, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that opioid receptors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but not the nucleus accumbens (NAc), play a role in relapse to drug-seeking behavior. However, environmental stimuli that elicit relapse also release the endogenous opioid β-endorphin in the NAc. Using a within–session extinction/reinstatement paradigm in rats that self-administer cocaine, we found that NAc infusions of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO moderately reinstated responding on the cocaine-paired lever at low doses (1.0–3.0 ng/side), whereas the delta opioid receptor (DOR) agonist DPDPE induced greater responding at higher doses (300–3000 ng/side) that also enhanced inactive lever responding. Using doses of either agonist that induced responding on only the cocaine-paired lever, we found that DAMGO-induced responding was blocked selectively by pretreatment with the MOR antagonist CTAP, while DPDPE-induced responding was selectively blocked by the DOR antagonist naltrindole. Cocaine-primed reinstatement was blocked by intra-NAc CTAP but not naltrindole, indicating a role for endogenous MOR-acting peptides in cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. In this regard, intra-NAc infusions of β-endorphin (100–1000 ng/side) induced marked cocaine-seeking behavior, an effect blocked by intra-NAc pretreatment with the MOR but not DOR antagonist. Conversely, cocaine seeking elicited by the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan (1–10 μg/side) was blocked by naltrindole but not CTAP. MOR stimulation in more dorsal caudate-putamen sites was ineffective, while DPDPE infusions induced cocaine seeking. Together, these findings establish distinct roles for MOR and DOR in cocaine relapse, and suggest that NAc MOR could be an important therapeutic target to neutralize the effects of endogenous β-endorphin release on cocaine relapse. PMID:19279569

  19. Transfer of neuroplasticity from nucleus accumbens core to shell is required for cocaine reward.

    PubMed

    Marie, Nicolas; Canestrelli, Corinne; Noble, Florence

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that cocaine induces an increase of dendritic spines density in some brain regions. However, few studies have addressed the role of this neuroplastic changes in cocaine rewarding effects and have often led to contradictory results. So, we hypothesized that using a rigorous time- and subject-matched protocol would demonstrate the role of this spine increase in cocaine reward. We designed our experiments such as the same animals (rats) were used for spine analysis and behavioral studies. Cocaine rewarding effects were assessed with the conditioned place preference paradigm. Spines densities were measured in the two subdivisions of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), core and shell. We showed a correlation between the increase of spine density in NAcc core and shell and cocaine rewarding effects. Interestingly, when cocaine was administered in home cages, spine density was increase in NAcc core only. With anisomycin, a protein synthesis inhibitor, injected in the core we blocked spine increase in core and shell and also cocaine rewarding effects. Strikingly, whereas injection of this inhibitor in the shell immediately after conditioning had no effect on neuroplasticity or behavior, its injection 4 hours after conditioning was able to block neuroplasticity in shell only and cocaine-induced place preference. Thus, it clearly appears that the neuronal plasticity in the NAcc core is essential to induce plasticity in the shell, necessary for cocaine reward. Altogether, our data revealed a new mechanism in the NAcc functioning where a neuroplasticity transfer occurred from core to shell. PMID:22272316

  20. Transfer of Neuroplasticity from Nucleus Accumbens Core to Shell Is Required for Cocaine Reward

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Nicolas; Canestrelli, Corinne; Noble, Florence

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that cocaine induces an increase of dendritic spines density in some brain regions. However, few studies have addressed the role of this neuroplastic changes in cocaine rewarding effects and have often led to contradictory results. So, we hypothesized that using a rigorous time- and subject-matched protocol would demonstrate the role of this spine increase in cocaine reward. We designed our experiments such as the same animals (rats) were used for spine analysis and behavioral studies. Cocaine rewarding effects were assessed with the conditioned place preference paradigm. Spines densities were measured in the two subdivisions of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), core and shell. We showed a correlation between the increase of spine density in NAcc core and shell and cocaine rewarding effects. Interestingly, when cocaine was administered in home cages, spine density was increase in NAcc core only. With anisomycin, a protein synthesis inhibitor, injected in the core we blocked spine increase in core and shell and also cocaine rewarding effects. Strikingly, whereas injection of this inhibitor in the shell immediately after conditioning had no effect on neuroplasticity or behavior, its injection 4 hours after conditioning was able to block neuroplasticity in shell only and cocaine-induced place preference. Thus, it clearly appears that the neuronal plasticity in the NAcc core is essential to induce plasticity in the shell, necessary for cocaine reward. Altogether, our data revealed a new mechanism in the NAcc functioning where a neuroplasticity transfer occurred from core to shell. PMID:22272316

  1. Effects of mesolimbic dopamine depletion on responding maintained by cocaine and food.

    PubMed Central

    Caine, S B; Koob, G F

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that mesolimbic dopamine is selectively involved in cocaine reinforcement was investigated in the rat. Animals were trained under a multiple schedule in which responding was reinforced by intravenous cocaine (0.75 mg/kg/injection) or food (45-mg pellets) under fixed-ratio 15 schedule requirements in alternate 30-min components of a 2-hr daily session. Infusion of the catecholaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine, but not the vehicle solution, into the region of the nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercle produced selective reductions in cocaine self-administration without significantly altering responding maintained by food within the same sessions. This effect was reproduced in intact animals by substituting saline for cocaine in the self-administration component. These results support the hypothesis that the reinforcing effects of cocaine are dependent upon mesolimbic dopamine and demonstrate that cocaine self-administration can be disrupted in animals without altering behavior maintained by a nondrug reinforcer. PMID:8169570

  2. Behavioral and electrophysiological indices of negative affect predict cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Robert A; Twining, Robert C; Jones, Joshua L; Slater, Jennifer M; Grigson, Patricia S; Carelli, Regina M

    2008-03-13

    The motivation to seek cocaine comes in part from a dysregulation of reward processing manifested in dysphoria, or affective withdrawal. Learning is a critical aspect of drug abuse; however, it remains unclear whether drug-associated cues can elicit the emotional withdrawal symptoms that promote cocaine use. Here we report that a cocaine-associated taste cue elicited a conditioned aversive state that was behaviorally and neurophysiologically quantifiable and predicted subsequent cocaine self-administration behavior. Specifically, brief intraoral infusions of a cocaine-predictive flavored saccharin solution elicited aversive orofacial responses that predicted early-session cocaine taking in rats. The expression of aversive taste reactivity also was associated with a shift in the predominant pattern of electrophysiological activity of nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons from inhibitory to excitatory. The dynamic nature of this conditioned switch in affect and the neural code reveals a mechanism by which cues may exert control over drug self-administration. PMID:18341996

  3. Cocaine Addiction: Psychology and Neurophysiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawin, Frank H.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical characteristics of cocaine addiction, cocaine abstinence symptoms, and the short-term and long-term neurochemical actions of cocaine are discussed. The relative therapeutic value of various medications and treatment programs are discussed. (KR)

  4. Chronic methylphenidate alters locomotor activity and dopamine transporters differently from cocaine.

    PubMed

    Izenwasser, S; Coy, A E; Ladenheim, B; Loeloff, R J; Cadet, J L; French, D

    1999-06-01

    Continuous infusion of cocaine produces partial behavioral tolerance to its locomotor activating effects, while daily injections produce sensitization. Methylphenidate binds with a similar affinity to cocaine at the dopamine transporter, but has a much lower affinity for the serotonin transporter than does cocaine. This study was done to compare the effects of chronic methylphenidate with chronic cocaine. The pattern of locomotor activity over a 7 day treatment period was significantly different from cocaine. Methylphenidate elevated activity on each day, compared to saline, yet neither tolerance to a continuous infusion of the drug, nor sensitization to repeated daily injections was produced. We have previously shown that neither of these treatments with cocaine produces significant alterations in dopamine transporter density 1 day after the end of treatment. In contrast, methylphenidate injections significantly decreased dopamine transporters in rostral caudate putamen, with no change in nucleus accumbens. Continuous infusion of methylphenidate had no effect on dopamine transporters in either brain region. These findings provide further evidence that different classes of dopamine uptake inhibitors may interact with the dopamine transporter in qualitatively different manners. Furthermore, it is possible that the inhibition of serotonin uptake by cocaine may contribute to the adaptations in behavioral activity that are seen during chronic treatment. PMID:10414438

  5. EFFECTS OF MENSTRUAL CYCLE PHASE ON COCAINE SELF-ADMINISTRATION IN RHESUS MACAQUES

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ziva D.; Foltin, Richard W.; Evans, Suzette M.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological findings suggest that men and women vary in their pattern of cocaine use resulting in differences in cocaine dependence and relapse rates. Preclinical laboratory studies have demonstrated that female rodents are indeed more sensitive to cocaine’s reinforcing effects than males, with estrous cycle stage as a key determinant of this effect. The current study sought to extend these findings to normally cycling female rhesus macaques, a species that shares a nearly identical menstrual cycle to humans. Dose-dependent intravenous cocaine self-administration (0.0125, 0.0250, and 0.0500 mg/kg/infusion) using a progressive-ratio schedule of reinforcement was determined across the menstrual cycle. The menstrual cycle was divided into 5 discrete phases: menses, follicular, periovulatory, luteal, and late luteal phases: verified by the onset of menses and plasma levels of estradiol and progesterone. Dependent variables including number of infusions self-administered per session, progressive ratio breakpoint, and cocaine intake were analyzed according to cocaine dose and menstrual cycle phase. Analysis of plasma hormone levels verified phase-dependent fluctuations of estradiol and progesterone, with estrogen levels peaking during the periovulatory phase, and progesterone peaking during the luteal phase. Progressive ratio breakpoint, infusions self-administered, and cocaine intake did not consistently vary based on menstrual cycle phase. These findings demonstrate that under the current experimental parameters, the reinforcing effects of cocaine did not vary across the menstrual cycle in a systematic fashion in normally cycling rhesus macaques. PMID:23098805

  6. Stimulation of dopamine D2/D3 but not D1 receptors in the central amygdala decreases cocaine-seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Kenneth J.; Wenzel, Jennifer M.; Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Hobbs, Rebecca J.; Alleweireldt, Andrea T.; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in dopamine output within the various subnuclei of the amygdala have previously been implicated in cocaine reinforcement, as well as cocaine-seeking behavior. To elucidate the potential for increased stimulation of D1- and D2-like receptors (D1Rs and D2Rs, respectively) specifically in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) to modulate cue- and cocaine-elicited reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior, we infused either the D1R agonist, SKF-38393 (0 – 4.0 μg/side) or the D2R agonist, 7-OH-DPAT (0 – 4.0 μg/side) into the CeA immediately prior to tests for cue and cocaine-primed reinstatement. We also examined the effects of 7-OH-DPAT on cocaine self-administration as a positive behavioral control. 7-OH-DPAT decreased cue and cocaine-primed reinstatement, and reduced the number of cocaine infusions during self-administration; SKF-38393 produced no discernable effects. The results suggest that enhanced stimulation of D2Rs, but not D1Rs, in the CeA is sufficient to inhibit expression of the incentive motivational effects of cocaine priming and cocaine-paired cues. Together with previous findings that D1R blockade attenuates reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior, the results suggest that D1R stimulation may be necessary, but not sufficient, to modulate the incentive motivational effects of cues and cocaine priming. PMID:20600343

  7. Stimulation of dopamine D2/D3 but not D1 receptors in the central amygdala decreases cocaine-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Kenneth J; Wenzel, Jennifer M; Pentkowski, Nathan S; Hobbs, Rebecca J; Alleweireldt, Andrea T; Neisewander, Janet L

    2010-12-25

    Alterations in dopamine output within the various subnuclei of the amygdala have previously been implicated in cocaine reinforcement, as well as cocaine-seeking behavior. To elucidate the potential for increased stimulation of D1- and D2-like receptors (D1Rs and D2Rs, respectively) specifically in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) to modulate cue- and cocaine-elicited reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior, we infused either the D1R agonist, SKF-38393 (0-4.0 microg/side) or the D2R agonist, 7-OH-DPAT (0-4.0 microg/side) into the CeA immediately prior to tests for cue and cocaine-primed reinstatement. We also examined the effects of 7-OH-DPAT on cocaine self-administration as a positive behavioral control. 7-OH-DPAT decreased cue-and cocaine-primed reinstatement, and reduced the number of cocaine infusions obtained during self-administration; SKF-38393 produced no discernable effects. The results suggest that enhanced stimulation of D2Rs, but not D1Rs, in the CeA is sufficient to inhibit expression of the incentive motivational effects of cocaine priming and cocaine-paired cues. Together with previous findings that D1R blockade attenuates reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior, the results suggest that D1R stimulation may be necessary, but not sufficient, to modulate the incentive motivational effects of cues and cocaine priming. PMID:20600343

  8. Yoked delivery of cocaine is aversive and protects against the motivation for drug in rats.

    PubMed

    Twining, Robert C; Bolan, Matthew; Grigson, Patricia S

    2009-08-01

    In Experiment 1, water-deprived rats had 5-min access to saccharin followed by active or yoked intravenous delivery of saline or cocaine (0.33 mg/infusion). Both cocaine groups avoided intake of the saccharin cue following saccharin-cocaine pairings; however, the rats in the yoked condition exhibited greater avoidance of the taste cue than did the actively administering rats. Experiment 2 evaluated subsequent self-administration behavior on fixed- and progressive-ratio schedules of reinforcement. The results showed that prior yoked exposure to cocaine reduced subsequent drug-taking behavior on a progressive-ratio but not on a fixed-ratio schedule. Finally, Experiment 3 used a choice test to determine the impact of yoked drug delivery on the relative preference for cocaine versus water. The results showed that rats with a history of self-administering cocaine preferred to perform operant behaviors on the side of the chamber previously paired with cocaine, whereas the rats with a history of yoked delivery of cocaine avoided this side. These data show that, in most rats, the unpredictable, uncontrollable delivery of cocaine protects against the subsequent motivation for cocaine through an aversive mechanism. PMID:19634952

  9. Action of cocaine and chronic sympathetic denervation on vagal escape

    PubMed Central

    Campos, H. A.; Urquilla, P. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. The effect of cocaine has been studied on vagal escape and on the tachycardia due to vagal stimulation in the atropinized dog. All the dogs were submitted to acute cervical section of the spinal cord and acute or chronic sympathetic denervation. 2. Cocaine, 5 mg/kg or 40 μg/kg/min, I.V., induces a significant enhancement of the ventricular escape. The effects of a continuous infusion of cocaine are more reproducible than those of a single injection of the drug. 3. Cocaine, 40 μg/kg/min, I.V., potentiates the tachycardia due to vagal stimulation in the atropinized dog. 4. Chronic thoracic sympathectomy markedly retards the recovery of the ventricular rate from the inhibitory action of the vagus. Under this condition, the infusion of cocaine does not significantly enhance the ventricular escape. 5. These findings suggest that an adrenergic mechanism located at the sympathetic nerves supplying the heart is substantially involved in the phenomenon of vagal escape. PMID:5249864

  10. Medical consequences of cocaine.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Cocaine use among middle-class North Americans increased dramatically during the 1980s. Medical complications involve almost every organ system and are produced by intense vasoconstriction. Managing cocaine-induced disease requires careful identification and the use of alpha-adrenergic blocking agents, in addition to standard therapy and referral to specialists to manage cocaine withdrawal. Images p1976-a p1980-a PMID:8106032

  11. Long-Term Reduction of Cocaine Self-Administration in Rats Treated with Adenoviral Vector-Delivered Cocaine Hydrolase: Evidence for Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zlebnik, Natalie E; Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang; Saykao, Amy T; Parks, Robin J; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2014-01-01

    A new pharmacokinetic approach treating cocaine addiction involves rapidly metabolizing cocaine before it reaches brain reward centers using mutated human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) or cocaine hydrolase (CocH). Recent work has shown that helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector-mediated plasma CocH reduced the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine and prevented reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior up to 6 months in rats. The present study investigated whether hdAD-CocH could decrease ongoing intravenous cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) self-administration. The hdAD-CocH vector was injected into self-administering rats, and after accumulation of plasma CocH, there was a dramatic reduction in cocaine infusions earned under a fixed ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement that lasted for the length of the study (>2 months). Pretreatment with the selective BChE and CocH inhibitor iso-OMPA (1.5 mg/kg) restored cocaine intake; therefore, the decline in self-administration was likely due to rapid CocH-mediated cocaine metabolism. Direct measurements of cocaine levels in plasma and brain samples taken after the conclusion of behavioral studies provided strong support for this conclusion. Further, rats injected with hdAD-CocH did not experience a deficit in operant responding for drug reinforcement and self-administered methamphetamine (0.05 mg/kg) at control levels. Overall, these outcomes suggest that viral gene transfer can yield plasma CocH levels that effectively diminish long-term cocaine intake and may have potential treatment implications for cocaine-dependent individuals seeking to become and remain abstinent. PMID:24407266

  12. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  13. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  14. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  15. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  16. Extended cocaine-seeking produces a shift from goal-directed to habitual responding in rats.

    PubMed

    Leong, Kah-Chung; Berini, Carole R; Ghee, Shannon M; Reichel, Carmela M

    2016-10-01

    Cocaine addiction is often characterized by a rigid pattern of behavior in which cocaine users continue seeking and taking drug despite negative consequences associated with its use. As such, full acquisition and relapse of drug-seeking behavior may be attributed to a shift away from goal-directed responding and a shift towards the maladaptive formation of rigid and habit-like responses. This rigid nature of habitual responding can be developed with extended training and is typically characterized by insensitivity to changes in outcome value. The present study determined whether cocaine (primary reinforcer) and cocaine associated cues (secondary reinforcer) could be devalued in rats with different histories of cocaine self-administration. Specifically, rats were trained on two schedules of cocaine self-administration (long-access vs. short-access). Following training the cocaine reinforcer was devalued through three separate pairings of lithium chloride with cocaine infusions. Cocaine history did not have an impact on devaluation of cocaine-associated cues. However, the reinforcing properties of cocaine were devalued only in rats on a short-access cocaine schedule but not those trained on a long-access schedule. Taken together this pattern of findings suggests that, in short access rats, devaluation is specific to the primary reinforcer and not associative stimuli such as cues. Importantly, rats that received extended training during self-administration displayed insensitivity to outcome devaluation of the primary reinforcer as well as all associative stimuli, thus displaying rigid behavioral responding similar to behavioral patterns found in addiction. Alternatively, long access cocaine exposure may have altered the devaluation threshold. PMID:27321756

  17. Control of within-binge cocaine-seeking by dopamine and glutamate in the core of nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Suto, Nobuyoshi; Ecke, Laurel E.; Wise, Roy A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Dopamine and glutamate are thought to interact in the ventral striatum and to play important roles there in the cocaine-seeking of cocaine-experienced animals. Objectives We sought to determine the relative roles of the two transmitters in the two major zones of the nucleus accumbens (NAS), the core and shell subregions. Methods We assessed the effects of dopamine and glutamate receptor blockade in the core and shell on intravenous cocaine self-administration in rats. Trained animals were allowed to self-administer cocaine for an initial hour, and then D1-type or D2-type dopamine receptor blockers or NMDA-type or AMPA-type glutamate receptor blockers were infused by reverse microdialysis into one of the two regions for an additional 3 h of testing. Results The D1-type antagonist SCH23390 and the D2-type antagonist raclopride each increased cocaine intake whereas the AMPA-type antagonist CNQX decreased responding when infused into the core. SCH23390 increased cocaine intake less strongly when infused into the shell, while raclopride and CNQX were each ineffective when infused into the shell. The NMDA-antagonist CPP failed to affect cocaine self-administration when infused into either site. Conclusions These findings implicate the core of NAS in the maintenance of established cocaine self-administration in trained animals, despite the fact that the reinforcement of responding in untrained animals appears to results from cocaine actions in the olfactory tubercle and medial shell and not the core of accumbens. PMID:19436996

  18. The rate of intravenous cocaine or amphetamine delivery: influence on drug-taking and drug-seeking behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Crombag, Hans S.; Ferrario, Carrie R.; Robinson, Terry E.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the influence of rate of intravenous infusion of cocaine or amphetamine on drug-taking and seeking behavior. First, drug-naive rats were tested for acquisition of self-administration of increasing doses of amphetamine or cocaine infused over 5 or 100s. Second, self-administration of cocaine or amphetamine infused over 5–100 sec was assessed on fixed or progressive-ratio (PR) reinforcement schedules. Finally, the ability of a single 5 or 100 sec amphetamine or cocaine infusion to reinstate extinguished drug seeking was assessed. Although slower infusion rates produced a small effect on drug taking under continuous-reinforcement conditions, infusion rate did not alter drug taking on intermittent or PR reinforcement schedules, or the ability of cocaine or amphetamine to reinstate drug seeking. Taken together, our results suggest that variation in drug delivery rate over a range that we previously found alters the induction of behavioral sensitization, gene-expression and striatal dopamine activity, does not markedly alter drug-taking or seeking behavior. PMID:18586051

  19. [Complications of cocaine addiction].

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Lowenstein, William; Coscas, Sarah; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel

    2009-06-20

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by repetitive and compulsive drug-seeking behavior and drug abuse despite negative health or social consequences. Cocaine addiction is a significant worldwide public health problem, which has somatic, psychological, psychiatric, socio-economic and judicial complications. Some of the most frequent complications are cardiovascular effects (acute coronary syndrome, cardiac arrhythmias, increased blood pressure); respiratory effects (fibrosis, interstitial pneumonitis, pulmonary hypertension, alveolar haemorrhage, asthma exacerbation; emphysema), neurological effects (strokes, aneurysms, seizures, headaches); risk for contracting HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, sexual transmitted disease and otolaryngologic effects. Other complications are not discussed here. The vast majority of studies indicate that there are cognitive deficits induced by cocaine addiction. Attention, visual and working memories, executive functioning are affected in cocaine users. Psychiatric complications found in clinical practice are major depressive disorders, cocaine-induced paranoia, cocaine-induced compulsive foraging and panic attacks. PMID:19642439

  20. Role of GABA-active neurosteroids in the efficacy of metyrapone against cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Schmoutz, Christopher D; Guerin, Glenn F; Goeders, Nicholas E

    2014-09-01

    Previous research has demonstrated a complicated role for stress and HPA axis activation in potentiating various cocaine-related behaviors in preclinical models of drug dependence. However, the investigation of several antiglucocorticoid therapies has yielded equivocal results in reducing cocaine-related behaviors, possibly because of varying mechanisms of actions. Specifically, research suggests that metyrapone (a corticosterone synthesis inhibitor) may reduce cocaine self-administration in rats via a nongenomic, extra-adrenal mechanism without altering plasma corticosterone. In the current experiments, male rats were trained to self-administer cocaine infusions and food pellets in a multiple, alternating schedule of reinforcement. Metyrapone pretreatment dose-dependently decreased cocaine self-administration as demonstrated previously. Pharmacological inhibition of neurosteroid production by finasteride had significant effects on cocaine self-administration, regardless of metyrapone pretreatment. However, metyrapone's effects on cocaine self-administration were significantly attenuated with bicuculline pretreatment, suggesting a role for GABA-active neurosteroids in cocaine-reinforced behaviors. In vitro binding data also confirmed that metyrapone does not selectively bind to GABA-related proteins. The results of these experiments support the hypothesis that metyrapone may increase neurosteroidogenesis to produce effects on cocaine-related behaviors. PMID:24959859

  1. [Cocaine - Characteristics and addiction].

    PubMed

    Girczys-Połedniok, Katarzyna; Pudlo, Robert; Jarząb, Magdalena; Szymlak, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine use leads to health, social and legal problems. The aim of this paper is to discuss cocaine action, addicts characteristics, use patterns and consequences, as well as addiction treatment methods. A literature review was based on the Medline, PubMed, Polish Medical Bibliography databases and the Silesian Library resources. The Police and Central Statistical Office statistics, as well as the World Health Organization, the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction and the National Office for Combating Drug Addiction reports were used. Cocaine leads to mood improvement, appetite decrease, physical and intellectual activity enhancement, euphoria, inflated self-esteem, social networking ease and increased sexual desire. Cocaine hydrochloride is mainly used intranasaly, but also as intravenous and subcutaneous injections. Cocaine use and first addiction treatment fall in later age compared to other psychoactive substances. There is a high men to women ratio among addicts. There is a relationship between cocaine addiction, the presence of other disorders and genetic predisposition to addiction development. Polish reports indicate higher popularity of cocaine among people with a high economic and social status. Although Poland is a country with the low percentage of cocaine use, its popularity is growing. The consequences of cocaine use concern somatic and mental health problems, socioeconomic and legal conditions. The drug plays a role in crimes and traffic accidents. Because of the risks associated with cocaine use, it has been listed in a register of drugs attached to the Act on Counteracting Drug Addiction. Addiction treatment includes psychological, pharmacological and harm reduction strategies. Med Pr 2016;67(4):537-544. PMID:27623834

  2. Selective activation of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 decreases cocaine's reinforcing efficacy and prevents cocaine-induced changes in brain reward thresholds.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yue; Mortas, Patrick; Hoener, Marius C; Canales, Juan J

    2015-12-01

    The newly discovered trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) has emerged as a promising target for medication development in stimulant addiction due to its ability to regulate dopamine (DA) function and modulate stimulants' effects. Recent findings indicate that TAAR1 activation blocks some of the abuse-related physiological and behavioral effects of cocaine. However, findings from existing self-administration studies are inconclusive due to the very limited range of cocaine unit doses tested. Here, in order to shed light on the influence of TAAR1 on cocaine's reward and reinforcement, we studied the effects of partial and full activation of TAAR1on (1) the dose-response curve for cocaine self-administration and (2) cocaine-induced changes in intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). In the first experiment, we examined the effects of the selective full and partial TAAR1 agonists, RO5256390 and RO5203648, on self-administration of five unit-injection doses of cocaine (0.03, 0.1, 0.2, 0.45, and 1mg/kg/infusion). Both agonists induced dose-dependent downward shifts in the cocaine dose-response curve, indicating that both partial and full TAAR1 activation decrease cocaine, reinforcing efficacy. In the second experiment, RO5256390 and the partial agonist, RO5263397, dose-dependently prevented cocaine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds. Taken together, these data demonstrated that TAAR1 stimulation effectively suppresses the rewarding and reinforcing effects of cocaine in self-administration and ICSS models, supporting the candidacy of TAAR1 as a drug discovery target for cocaine addiction. PMID:26048337

  3. Prior extended daily access to cocaine elevates the reward threshold in a conditioned place preference test.

    PubMed

    Su, Zu-In; Wenzel, Jennifer; Ettenberg, Aaron; Ben-Shahar, Osnat

    2014-09-01

    We have previously shown that extended-access subjects exhibit heightened motivation for cocaine in the runway model, as reflected by reduced number of retreats. This heightened motivation could reflect either an increase in cocaine-induced reward or a decrease in cocaine-induced aversion. The current experiment was therefore devised to assess the cocaine-induced reward and aversion in extended-access rats using a place conditioning test. Rats trained to lever press for intravenous (IV) cocaine (0.25 mg/infusion) were provided 6-hour daily access to the drug over 10 days. Lever pressing in control subjects produced IV infusions of saline. Following drug self-administration, subjects underwent place conditioning for the immediate or delayed effects of cocaine (1.0 or 2.5 mg/kg, IV). In control subjects, the immediate effects of the low dose of cocaine produced conditioned places preferences (CPPs), while the delayed effects produced conditioned place aversions (CPAs). In contrast, the animals receiving low cocaine dose for 6 hours, exhibited place aversions but not preferences; an effect that was reversed when the dose of cocaine was increased. Additionally, in the 6-hour group, delayed conditioning was associated with a reduction in zif268 immunoreactivity in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens shell while immediate conditioning was associated with an increase in zif268-positive cells in the central nucleus of the amygdala. Collectively, these data suggest that extended daily access to cocaine produces a shift in the subject's perceived reward threshold that is paralleled by alterations in the activity of both the reward and stress pathways. PMID:23634951

  4. Method of infusion extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  5. Cellular phone-based image acquisition and quantitative ratiometric method for detecting cocaine and benzoylecgonine for biological and forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Cadle, Brian A; Rasmus, Kristin C; Varela, Juan A; Leverich, Leah S; O'Neill, Casey E; Bachtell, Ryan K; Cooper, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    determine the effectiveness of the QRPDA method for quantifying cocaine in biological samples, mice were injected with a sub-locomotor activating dose of cocaine (5 mg/kg; i.p.) and were found to have detectable levels of COC/BE in their urine (160.6 ng/ml) and blood plasma (8.1 ng/ml) after 15-30 minutes. By comparison rats self-administering cocaine in a 4 hour session obtained a final BE blood plasma level of 910 ng/ml with an average of 62.5 infusions. It is concluded that automated QRPDA is a low-cost, rapid and highly sensitive method for the detection of COC/BE with health, forensics, and bioinformatics application and the potential to be used with other rapid immunotest strips directed at several other targets. Thus, this report serves as a general reference and method describing the use of image analysis of lateral flow rapid test strips. PMID:22879741

  6. Treatment with Modafinil and Escitalopram, Alone and in Combination, on Cocaine-Induced Effects: a Randomized, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled Human Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Verrico, Christopher D.; Haile, Colin N.; Mahoney, James J.; Thompson-Lake, Daisy G. Y.; Newton, Thomas F.; De La Garza, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Concurrent administration of dopamine and serotonin reuptake inhibitors reduces cocaine self-administration in monkeys. Consonant with this, clinical trials assessing modafinil and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors alone show some efficacy as potential pharmacotherapies for cocaine dependence. We hypothesized that combining modafinil with escitalopram would attenuate the euphoric effects of cocaine to a greater degree than modafinil alone. Methods In a randomized, double blind, parallel groups design participants received either placebo (0 mg/day; n = 16), modafinil (200 mg/day; n = 16), escitalopram (20 mg/day; n = 17), or modafinil+escitalopram (200+20 mg/day; n = 15) for 5 days. On day 5, during separate sessions participants received an intravenous sample of cocaine (0 or 20mg; randomized) and five $1 bills. Participants rated the subjective effects of the infusions and subsequently made choices to either return $1 and receive another infusion or keep $1 and receive no infusion. Results Compared to saline, cocaine (20mg) significantly (p ≤ 0.008) increased most ratings, including “Good Effects”, “Stimulated”, and “High”. Relative to placebo, modafinil significantly (p ≤ 0.007) attenuated subject-rated increases of “Any Drug Effect”, “High”, “Good Effects”, and “Stimulated” produced by cocaine. Compared to saline, participants chose cocaine infusions significantly more; however, no treatment significantly reduced choices for cocaine infusions. Escitalopram did not enhance the efficacy of modafinil to reduce any measure. Conclusions Modafinil attenuated many positive subjective effects produced by cocaine; however, escitalopram combined with modafinil did not enhance the efficacy of modafinil to reduce cocaine effects. PMID:24928479

  7. Increased Impulsivity Retards the Transition to Dorsolateral Striatal Dopamine Control of Cocaine Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jennifer E.; Dilleen, Ruth; Pelloux, Yann; Economidou, Daina; Dalley, Jeffrey W.; Belin, David; Everitt, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of maladaptive drug-seeking habits occurs in conjunction with a ventral-to-dorsal striatal shift in dopaminergic control over behavior. Although these habits readily develop as drug use continues, high impulsivity predicts loss of control over drug seeking and taking. However, whether impulsivity facilitates the transition to dorsolateral striatum (DLS) dopamine-dependent cocaine-seeking habits or whether impulsivity and cocaine-induced intrastriatal shifts are additive processes is unknown. Methods High- and low-impulsive rats identified in the five-choice serial reaction-time task were trained to self-administer cocaine (.25 mg/infusion) with infusions occurring in the presence of a cue-light conditioned stimulus. Dopamine transmission was blocked in the DLS after three stages of training: early, transition, and late-stage, by bilateral intracranial infusions of α-flupenthixol (0, 5, 10, or 15 μg/side) during 15-min cocaine-seeking test sessions in which each response was reinforced by a cocaine-associated conditioned stimulus presentation. Results In early-stage tests, neither group was affected by DLS dopamine receptor blockade. In transition-stage tests, low-impulsive rats showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in cocaine seeking, whereas high-impulsive rats were still unaffected by α-flupenthixol infusions. In the final, late-stage seeking test, both groups showed dose-dependent sensitivity to dopamine receptor blockade. Conclusions The results demonstrate that high impulsivity is associated with a delayed transition to DLS-dopamine-dependent control over cocaine seeking. This suggests that, if impulsivity confers an increased propensity to addiction, it is not simply through a more rapid development of habits but instead through interacting corticostriatal and striato-striatal processes that result ultimately in maladaptive drug-seeking habits. PMID:24157338

  8. Cocaine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the semen and may reduce the number of sperm, and increase the number of abnormal sperm. This can result in fertility problems. Cocaine can attach to sperm. This has led to the suggestion that sperm ...

  9. Phenytoin Toxicity from Cocaine Adulteration

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of phenytoin (PHT) as a cocaine adulterant was reported decades ago; that practice is still current. Ironically PHT has also been used for the treatment of cocaine dependence. A drug smuggler developed PHT toxicity after swallowing several rocks of crack. We investigated the current trends of PHT as a cocaine adulterant and its toxicological implications. We also reviewed the clinical use of PTH in relation to cocaine. The use of PHT as cocaine cut is a current practice. This may affect the clinical manifestations and the management of the cocaine-related visits to the emergency department. PMID:24672596

  10. Lorcaserin Reduces the Discriminative Stimulus and Reinforcing Effects of Cocaine in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory T; Gerak, Lisa R; Javors, Martin A; France, Charles P

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine abuse and obesity are serious public health problems, and studies suggest that both dopamine and serotonin systems are involved in regulating the consumption of drugs and food. Lorcaserin has serotonin (5-HT)2C receptor agonist actions, is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating obesity, and might be effective for treating cocaine abuse. These studies characterized the pharmacokinetic and behavioral profiles of lorcaserin (intragastric administration) and determined the effectiveness of lorcaserin to alter discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects of cocaine (intravenous administration) in rhesus monkeys. Administered acutely, lorcaserin dose-dependently increased the occurrence of yawning while decreasing spontaneous activity and operant responding for food. These effects appeared within 30-60 minutes of administration and began to dissipate by 240 minutes, a time course closely matching plasma concentrations of lorcaserin. In monkeys discriminating cocaine from saline, lorcaserin alone did not occasion cocaine-appropriate responding but shifted the cocaine dose-response curve to the right and down in two of three monkeys. When administered acutely, lorcaserin dose-dependently decreased the rate at which monkeys responded for infusions of cocaine. When administered chronically, 3.2 mg/kg lorcaserin reduced the rate of cocaine-maintained responding by 50% for the duration of a 14-day treatment period. Together, these results show that lorcaserin attenuates the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine after acute administration and the reinforcing effects of cocaine after acute and repeated administration, consistent with the view that it might have utility in treating cocaine abuse. PMID:26534942

  11. Sex differences in reinstatement of cocaine-seeking with combination treatments of progesterone and atomoxetine.

    PubMed

    Swalve, Natashia; Smethells, John R; Zlebnik, Natalie E; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2016-06-01

    Two repurposed medications have been proposed to treat cocaine abuse. Progesterone, a gonadal hormone, and atomoxetine, a medication commonly used to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, have both been separately shown to reduce cocaine self-administration and reinstatement (i.e., relapse). The goal of the present study was to examine sex differences in the individual effects of PRO and ATO as well as the combination PRO+ATO treatment on cocaine (COC), caffeine (CAF), and/or cue-primed reinstatement of cocaine-seeking. Adult male and female Wistar rats lever-pressed under a FR 1 schedule for cocaine infusions (0.4mg/kg/inf). After 14 sessions of stable responding in daily 2-h sessions, rats underwent a 21-day extinction period when no drug or drug-related stimuli were present. Rats were then separated into four groups that received PRO (0.5mg/kg) alone (PRO+SAL), ATO (1.5mg/kg) alone (VEH+ATO), control (VEH+SAL) or combination (PRO+ATO) treatments prior to the reinstatement condition. Reinstatement of cocaine-seeking to cues and/or drug injections of cocaine or caffeine was tested after extinction. During maintenance, females self-administered more cocaine than males, but no sex differences were seen during extinction. Females showed greater cocaine-seeking than males after a CAF priming injection. Individual treatment with ATO did not decrease reinstatement under any priming condition; however, the combination treatment decreased cocaine-seeking under the COC+CUES priming condition in males, and both PRO alone and the combination treatment decreased cocaine-seeking in the CAF+CUES condition in females. Overall, PRO alone was only effective in reducing reinstatement in females, while the combination treatment was consistently effective in reducing reinstatement in both sexes. PMID:27003832

  12. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 within Nucleus Accumbens Shell modulates environment-elicited cocaine conditioning expression

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Rivera, Arlene; Rodríguez-Borrero, Enrique; Matías-Alemán, Maria; Montalvo-Acevedo, Alexandra; Guerrero-Figuereo, Kathleen; Febo-Rodriguez, Liz. J; Morales-Rivera, Amarilys; Maldonado-Vlaar, Carmen S.

    2014-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors 5 (mGluRs5) within the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) have been implicated in the modulation of psychostimulant reward. We hypothesized that blockade of mGluR5 within the NAc shell would impair cocaine conditioning in rats. For this study, animals were implanted with cannulae within the NAc shell, and separate groups were exposed to a multimodal environment within activity chambers that signaled cocaine (cocaine-paired) or saline (controls, cocaine-unpaired) injections. Prior to placing the animals in the chambers, rats received systemic intraperitoneal injections of saline or cocaine for 10 consecutive sessions. In the test session (D12), animals were exposed to the multimodal environment without any cocaine or saline pre-treatment. Before placing the rats in the chambers, separate groups of animals were infused within the NAc shell with 2.5, 12 or 25nmol/0.5μl/side of 2-methyl-6- (phenylethynyl) pyridine (MPEP), an antagonist of mGluR5 or with vehicle. Blockade of the mGluR5 subtype at a 2.5nmol dose showed no significant difference in either the ambulatory distance (AD) or the vertical plane move time (VPT). In contrast, mGluR5 blockade at 12nmol and 25nmol decreased conditioned locomotion in the cocaine-paired groups. An association of the environmental cues with the effects of cocaine implies the involvement of memory process during the conditioning response. Our results suggest that mGluR5 within the NAc shell could be modulating the expression of memory related to the association of environmental cues with the effects of cocaine. We suggest that mGluR5 could be taking into account to further studies related with cocaine exposure and cocaine addiction treatments. PMID:23850523

  13. Reinforcement-Related Regulation of AMPA Glutamate Receptor Subunits in the Ventral Tegmental Area Enhances Motivation for Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwang Ho; Edwards, Scott; Graham, Danielle L.; Larson, Erin B.; Whisler, Kimberly N.; Simmons, Diana; Friedman, Allyson K.; Walsh, Jessica J.; Rahman, Zia; Monteggia, Lisa M.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Neve, Rachael L.; Nestler, Eric J.; Han, Ming-Hu; Self, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic cocaine use produces numerous biological changes in brain, but relatively few are functionally associated with cocaine reinforcement. Here we show that daily intravenous cocaine self-administration, but not passive cocaine administration, induces dynamic up-regulation of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunits GluR1 and GluR2 in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of rats. Increases in GluR1 protein and GluR1S845 phosphorylation are associated with increased GluR1 mRNA in self-administering animals, while increased GluR2 protein levels occurred despite substantial decreases in GluR2 mRNA. We investigated the functional significance of GluR1 up-regulation in the VTA on cocaine self-administration using localized viral-mediated gene transfer. Over-expression of GluR1WT in rat VTA primarily infected dopamine neurons (75%), and increased AMPA receptor-mediated membrane rectification in these neurons with AMPA application. Similar GluR1WT over-expression potentiated locomotor responses to intra-VTA AMPA, but not NMDA, infusions. In cocaine self-administering animals, over-expression of GluR1WT in the VTA markedly increased the motivation for cocaine injections on a progressive ratio schedule of cocaine reinforcement. In contrast, over-expression of protein kinase A-resistant GluR1S845A in the VTA reduced peak rates of cocaine self-administration on a fixed ratio reinforcement schedule. Neither viral vector altered sucrose self-administration, and over-expression of GluR1WT or GluR1S845A in the adjacent substantia nigra had no effect on cocaine self-administration. Taken together, these results suggest that dynamic regulation of AMPA receptors in the VTA during cocaine self-administration contributes to cocaine addiction by acting to facilitate subsequent cocaine use. PMID:21613507

  14. Activator of G protein signaling 3: a gatekeeper of cocaine sensitization and drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Bowers, M Scott; McFarland, Krista; Lake, Russell W; Peterson, Yuri K; Lapish, Christopher C; Gregory, Mary Lee; Lanier, Stephen M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2004-04-22

    Chronic cocaine administration reduces G protein signaling efficacy. Here, we report that the expression of AGS3, which binds to GialphaGDP and inhibits GDP dissociation, was upregulated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) during late withdrawal from repeated cocaine administration. Increased AGS3 was mimicked in the PFC of drug-naive rats by microinjecting a peptide containing the Gialpha binding domain (GPR) of AGS3 fused to the cell permeability domain of HIV-Tat. Infusion of Tat-GPR mimicked the phenotype of chronic cocaine-treated rats by manifesting sensitized locomotor behavior and drug seeking and by increasing glutamate transmission in nucleus accumbens. By preventing cocaine withdrawal-induced AGS3 expression with antisense oligonucleotides, signaling through Gialpha was normalized, and both cocaine-induced relapse to drug seeking and locomotor sensitization were prevented. When antisense oligonucleotide infusion was discontinued, drug seeking and sensitization were restored. It is proposed that AGS3 gates the expression of cocaine-induced plasticity by regulating G protein signaling in the PFC. PMID:15091342

  15. Upregulation of Arc mRNA Expression in the Prefrontal Cortex Following Cue-Induced Reinstatement of Extinguished Cocaine-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    ZAVALA, ARTURO R.; OSREDKAR, TRACY; JOYCE, JEFFREY N.; NEISEWANDER, JANET L.

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine-associated cues acquire incentive motivational effects that manifest as cue-elicited craving in humans and cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. Here we examine the hypothesis that neuronal processes associated with incentive motivational effects of cocaine cues involve increased expression of the plasticity-associated gene, Arc. Rats trained to self-administer cocaine subsequently underwent extinction training, during which cocaine-seeking behavior (i.e., responses without cocaine reinforcement) progressively decreased. Rats were then tested for cocaine-seeking behavior either with or without response-contingent presentations of light/tone cues that had been previously paired with cocaine infusions during self-administration training. Cues elicited reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior and were accompanied by increased Arc mRNA levels in the orbitofrontal, prelimbic, and anterior cingulate cortices, suggesting Arc involvement in conditioned plasticity associated with incentive motivational effects of cocaine cues. Additionally, rats with a history of cocaine self-administration and extinction exhibited upregulation of Arc expression in several limbic and cortical regions relative to saline-yoked controls regardless of cue exposure condition, suggesting persistent neuroadaptations involving Arc within these regions. PMID:18361437

  16. When a good taste turns bad: Neural mechanisms underlying the emergence of negative affect and associated natural reward devaluation by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Regina M; West, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    An important feature of cocaine addiction in humans is the emergence of negative affect (e.g., dysphoria, irritability, anhedonia), postulated to play a key role in craving and relapse. Indeed, the DSM-IV recognizes that social, occupational and/or recreational activities become reduced as a consequence of repeated drug use where previously rewarding experiences (e.g., food, job, family) become devalued as the addict continues to seek and use drug despite serious negative consequences. Here, research in the Carelli laboratory is reviewed that examined neurobiological mechanisms that may underlie these processes using a novel animal model. Oromotor responses (taste reactivity) were examined as rats learned that intraoral infusion of a sweet (e.g., saccharin) predicts impending but delayed access to cocaine self-administration. We showed that rats exhibit aversive taste reactivity (i.e., gapes/rejection responses) during infusion of the sweet paired with impending cocaine, similar to aversive responses observed during infusion of quinine, a bitter tastant. Critically, the expression of this pronounced aversion to the sweet predicted the subsequent motivation to self-administer cocaine. Electrophysiology studies show that this shift in palatability corresponds to an alteration in nucleus accumbens (NAc) cell firing; neurons that previously responded with inhibition during infusion of the palatable sweet shifted to excitatory activity during infusion of the cocaine-devalued tastant. This excitatory response profile is typically observed during infusion of quinine, indicating that the once palatable sweet becomes aversive following its association with impending but delayed cocaine, and NAc neurons encode this aversive state. We also review electrochemical studies showing a shift (from increase to decrease) in rapid NAc dopamine release during infusion of the cocaine-paired tastant as the aversive state developed, again, resulting in responses similar to quinine

  17. Cocaine self-administration in Warsaw alcohol high-preferring (WHP) and Warsaw alcohol low-preferring (WLP) rats.

    PubMed

    Acewicz, Albert; Mierzejewski, Pawel; Dyr, Wanda; Jastrzebska, Agata; Korkosz, Izabela; Wyszogrodzka, Edyta; Nauman, Pawel; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Kostowski, Wojciech; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw

    2012-01-15

    Individuals prone to drug self-administration may be vulnerable not only to a single drug reinforcer but to a variety of drug reinforcers. It has been shown that two thirds of alcoholics regularly use drugs other than ethanol (alcohol). Up to 30% of alcohol-dependent patients report concurrent misuse of cocaine. The aim of the present study was to investigate intravenous cocaine self-administration in selectively bred, alcohol-preferring WHP (Warsaw high-preferring) and non-preferring WLP (Warsaw low-preferring) rats. It was hypothesized that WHPs could be more prone to cocaine self-administration in comparison to WLPs. Rats from both lines were allowed to nose-poke for cocaine infusions (0.33 mg/kg/infusion) under the FR-1, FR-2, and FR-3 schedule of reinforcement. Dose-response curves were assessed with increasing doses of cocaine (0.03, 0.1, 0.33, 1.0mg/kg/infusion). The WHP and WLP rats did not differ in cocaine self-administration. Both groups quickly acquired nose-poke responding for cocaine, presented a similar response profile when the schedule of reinforcement was increased from FR-1 to FR-3, and similar sensitivity to cocaine in the dose-response test. The present results may indicate that the selective breeding of alcohol-preferring WHP and alcohol non-preferring WLP rats did not lead to differences in cocaine's rewarding effects as assessed in the self-administration procedure. PMID:22101231

  18. Methamphetamine Cured my Cocaine Addiction.

    PubMed

    Haile, Colin N; De La Garza, Richard; Newton, Thomas F

    2010-10-14

    Cocaine dependence is an enduring problem and years of research and drug development has yet to produce an efficacious pharmacotherapy. Recent clinical research suggests that chronic treatment with amphetamine-like medications produces tolerance to cocaine's reinforcing effects and may offer a viable pharmacotherapy. Three methamphetamine-dependent participants that had been in our clinical laboratory experiments and previously addicted to cocaine are reviewed. Data obtained from initial screen and informal conversation suggested that all participants considered methamphetamine to have helped them stop using cocaine and eliminate cocaine craving. Methamphetamine also significantly decreased their alcohol consumption but did not alter cannabis or nicotine use. PMID:23066512

  19. Fluorescence Immunoassay for Cocaine Detection.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjjou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki; Ito, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    A fluorescence immunoassay (FIA) has been developed for the detection of cocaine using norcocaine labeled with merocyanine dye and a monoclonal antibody specific to cocaine. Using this FIA, the detection range for cocaine was between 20.0 and 1700 μg/L with a limit of detection of 20.0 μg/L. Other cocaine derivatives did not interfere significantly with the detection when using this immunoassay technique with cross-reactivity values of less than 20%. Thus this FIA could be considered a useful tool for the detection of cocaine. PMID:26977890

  20. Safety and Preliminary Efficacy of the Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor Huperzine A as a Treatment for Cocaine Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Verrico, Christopher D.; Newton, Thomas F.; Mahoney, James J.; Thompson-Lake, Daisy G. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cholinergic transmission is altered by drugs of abuse and contributes to psychostimulant reinforcement. In particular, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, like huperzine A, may be effective as treatments for cocaine use disorder. Methods: The current report describes results from a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in which participants (n=14–17/group) were randomized to huperzine A (0.4 or 0.8mg) or placebo. Participants received randomized infusions of cocaine (0 and 40mg, IV) on days 1 and 9. On day 10, participants received noncontingent, randomized infusions of cocaine (0 and 20mg, IV) before making 5 choices to receive additional infusions. Results: Huperzine A was safe and well-tolerated and compared with placebo, treatment with huperzine A did not cause significant changes in any cocaine pharmacokinetic parameters (all P>.05). Time-course and peak effects analyses show that treatment with 0.4mg of huperzine A significantly attenuated cocaine-induced increases of “Any Drug Effect,” “High,” “Stimulated,” “Willing to Pay,” and “Bad Effects” (all P>.05). Conclusions: The current study represents a significant contribution to the addiction field since it serves as the first published report on the safety and potential efficacy of huperzine A as a treatment for cocaine use disorder. PMID:26364275

  1. Cocaine detection using piezoresistive microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srijanto, Bernadeta; Cheney, Christine P.; Hedden, David L.; Gehl, Anthony; Ferrell, Thomas L.

    2008-03-01

    Sensitive and inexpensive sensors play a significant role in the analysis of drugs and drug metabolites. Specifically, reliable in vivo detection of cocaine and cocaine metabolites serves as a useful tool in research of the body's reaction to the drug and in the treatment of the drug addiction. We present here a promising cocaine biosensor to be used in the human body. The sensor's active element consists of piezoresistive microcantilevers coated with an oligonucleotide-based aptamer as the cocaine binder. In vitro cocaine detection was carried out by flowing a cocaine solution over the microcantilevers. Advantages of this device are its low power consumption, its high sensitivity, and its potential for miniaturization into an implantable capsule. The limit of detection for cocaine in distilled water was found to be 1 ng/ml.

  2. Environmental enrichment counters cocaine abstinence-induced stress and brain reactivity to cocaine cues but fails to prevent the incubation effect.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Kenneth J; Painter, Michael R; Pentkowski, Nathan S; Mitroi, Danut; Crawford, Cynthia A; Neisewander, Janet L

    2012-03-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) during a period of forced abstinence attenuates incentive motivational effects of cocaine-paired stimuli. Here we examined whether EE during forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration would prevent time-dependent increases in cue-elicited cocaine-seeking behavior (i.e. the incubation effect). Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine, which was paired with light/tone cues, for 15 days while living in isolated conditions (IC). Controls received yoked saline infusions. Subsequently, rats were assigned to live in either continued IC or EE for either 1 or 21 days of forced abstinence prior to a test for cocaine-seeking behavior. During testing, responding resulted only in presentation of the light/tone cues. Contrary to our prediction, cocaine-seeking behavior increased over time regardless of living condition during abstinence; however, EE attenuated cocaine-seeking behavior relative to IC regardless of length of abstinence. Brains were harvested and trunk blood was collected immediately after the 60-minute test and later assayed. Results indicated that short-term EE elevated hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and reduced plasma corticosterone compared with IC. Furthermore, 21 days of EE during forced abstinence prevented increases in the cue-elicited amygdala phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase expression that was observed in IC rats. These findings suggest that EE attenuates incentive motivational effects of cocaine cues through a mechanism other than preventing the incubation effect, perhaps involving reduction of stress and neural activity in response to cocaine-paired cues during acute withdrawal. PMID:21812872

  3. Environmental enrichment counters cocaine abstinence-induced stress and brain reactivity to cocaine cues but fails to prevent the incubation effect

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Kenneth J.; Painter, Michael R.; Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Mitroi, Danut; Crawford, Cynthia A.; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) during a period of forced abstinence attenuates incentive motivational effects of cocaine-paired stimuli. Here we examined whether EE during forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration would prevent time-dependent increases in cue-elicited cocaine-seeking behavior (i.e., the incubation effect). Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine, which was paired with light/tone cues, for 15 days while living in isolated conditions (IC). Controls received yoked saline infusions. Subsequently, rats were assigned to live in either continued IC or EE for either 1 or 21 days of forced abstinence prior to a test for cocaine-seeking behavior. During testing, responding resulted only in presentation of the light/tone cues. Contrary to our prediction, cocaine-seeking behavior increased over time regardless of living condition during abstinence; however, EE attenuated cocaine-seeking behavior relative to IC regardless of length of abstinence. Brains were harvested and trunk blood was collected immediately after the 60-min test and later assayed. Results indicated that short-term EE elevated hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and reduced plasma corticosterone compared to IC. Furthermore, 21 days of EE during forced abstinence prevented increases in the cue-elicited amygdala phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase expression that was observed in IC rats. These findings suggest that EE attenuates incentive motivational effects of cocaine cues through a mechanism other than preventing the incubation effect, perhaps involving reduction of stress and neural activity in response to cocaine-paired cues during acute withdrawal. PMID:21812872

  4. Cocaine-Induced Synaptic Alterations in Thalamus to Nucleus Accumbens Projection.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Peter A; Wang, Yicun; Yan, Yijin; Wang, Yao; Ishikawa, Masago; Cui, Ranji; Huang, Yanhua H; Sesack, Susan R; Schlüter, Oliver M; Dong, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to cocaine induces addiction-associated behaviors partially through remodeling neurocircuits in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). The paraventricular nucleus of thalamus (PVT), which projects to the NAc monosynaptically, is activated by cocaine exposure and has been implicated in several cocaine-induced emotional and motivational states. Here we show that disrupting synaptic transmission of select PVT neurons with tetanus toxin activated via retrograde trans-synaptic transport of cre from NAc efferents decreased cocaine self-administration in rats. This projection underwent complex adaptations after self-administration of cocaine (0.75 mg/kg/infusion; 2 h/d × 5 d, 1d overnight training). Specifically, 1d after cocaine self-administration, we observed increased levels of AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-silent glutamatergic synapses in this projection, accompanied by a decreased ratio of AMPAR-to-NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated EPSCs. Furthermore, the decay kinetics of NMDAR EPSCs was significantly prolonged, suggesting insertion of new GluN2B-containing NMDARs to PVT-to-NAc synapses. After 45-d withdrawal, silent synapses within this projection returned to the basal levels, accompanied by a return of the AMPAR/NMDAR ratio and NMDAR decay kinetics to the basal levels. In amygdala and infralimbic prefrontal cortical projections to the NAc, a portion of cocaine-generated silent synapses becomes unsilenced by recruiting calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) after drug withdrawal. However, the sensitivity of PVT-to-NAc synapses to CP-AMPAR-selective antagonists was not changed after withdrawal, suggesting that CP-AMPAR trafficking is not involved in the evolution of cocaine-generated silent synapses within this projection. Meanwhile, the release probability of PVT-to-NAc synapses was increased after short- and long-term cocaine withdrawal. These results reveal complex and profound alterations at PVT-to-NAc synapses after cocaine exposure and withdrawal. PMID:27074816

  5. Programmable physiological infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. H.; Young, D. R.; Adachi, R. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A programmable physiological infusion device and method are provided wherein a program source, such as a paper tape, is used to actuate an infusion pump in accordance with a desired program. The system is particularly applicable for dispensing calcium in a variety of waveforms.

  6. Nucleus accumbens shell and core involvement in drug context-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Rita A.; Ramirez, Donna R.; Bell, Guinevere H.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale The nucleus accumbens (NAC) is a functionally heterogeneous brain region with respect to its involvement in cocaine-seeking behavior triggered by drug-associated explicit conditioned stimuli, foot shock stress, or cocaine itself in the reinstatement animal model of drug relapse. However, it is not known whether the NAC or its subregions are critical for reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior produced by re-exposure to a previously cocaine-paired environmental context. Objectives The present study was designed to evaluate potentially unique contributions of the NAC core and shell to this behavior. Materials and methods Rats were trained to lever press for unsignaled cocaine infusions (0.15 mg/infusion, intravenous) in a distinct environmental context. Lever responding was then extinguished in a distinctly different environmental context (extinction context) during a minimum of seven daily training sessions. Subsequently, using a counterbalanced testing design, rats were re-exposed to the cocaine-paired context or the extinction context while cocaine seeking (i.e., responding on the previously cocaine-reinforced lever) was assessed. Before each test session, neural activity was inhibited selectively in the NAC core or shell using bilateral microinfusions of the γ-aminobutyric acid agonists, baclofen and muscimol (0/0 or 1.0/0.1 mM; 0.3 μl per hemisphere). Results Neural inactivation of the NAC shell or core attenuated responding in the cocaine context and, interestingly, increased responding in the extinction context. Control experiments indicated no effects on general activity or food-reinforced instrumental behavior. Conclusions These findings suggest that both subregions of the NAC may promote context-induced reinstatement by facilitating drug context-induced motivation for cocaine and context discrimination. PMID:18597075

  7. Upregulation of GLT1 attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Sari, Youssef; Smith, Kathryn D; Ali, Pir K; Rebec, George V

    2009-07-22

    Relapse to cocaine-seeking behavior depends on increased glutamate transmission in key regions of the mesocorticolimbic motive circuit, including prefrontal cortex (PFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Because GLT1 is responsible for the uptake of >or=90% of extracellular glutamate, we tested the hypothesis that increased GLT1 expression attenuates cocaine relapse. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.125 mg per intravenous infusion) in a lever-pressing task in a daily 2 h session for 10-14 d followed by 5 d of extinction training. Immediately after each extinction session, rats received ceftriaxone (intraperitoneally), a beta-lactam antibiotic believed to increase GLT1 expression, or vehicle. On the following day, presentation of the cue (light and tone) previously associated with cocaine self-administration reinstated lever pressing in rats treated with vehicle, whereas 100 or 200, but not 50 mg/kg ceftriaxone blocked this response. Immunoblotting confirmed that the ceftriaxone-induced blockade of cocaine relapse was associated with an increase in GLT1 expression in both PFC and NAcc. In separate groups of rats, 200 mg/kg ceftriaxone failed to block cue-induced food seeking, arguing against a ceftriaxone-induced effect unique to extinction training or lever pressing. Our results suggest that glutamate plays a key role in cue-induced relapse to cocaine-seeking behavior, implicating GLT1 as a potential therapeutic target for cocaine addiction. PMID:19625514

  8. Cocaine withdrawal symptoms identify "Type B" cocaine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Kampman, Kyle; Dackis, Charles; Sparkman, Thorne; Pettinati, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies of substance dependence typologies briefly show that multivariate systems originally developed for identifying subtypes of alcoholics, such as Babor's Type A and B system, may also be valid in abusers of other substances, such as cocaine. Type B patients are characterized by an earlier onset of addiction and more severe symptoms of their addiction, psychopathology, and impulsivity. The Type B classification has also been associated with deficits in serotonergic function. We have found that patients who exhibit more severe cocaine withdrawal symptoms, as measured by scores on the Cocaine Selective Severity Assessment (CSSA), have poor treatment outcome and share many characteristics with "Type B" patients. In this paper, we review baseline characteristics of cocaine-dependent patients from several recently completed outpatient cocaine dependence treatment trials to assess the association of cocaine withdrawal symptom severity and the Type B profile. Identifying subtypes of cocaine-dependent patients may improve our ability to treat cocaine dependence by targeting treatments for specific subtypes of patients. We examined the ability of the CSSA scores to capture Type B characteristics in cocaine dependence by analyzing a series of cocaine medication trials that included 255 cocaine-dependent subjects. High CSSA scores at baseline were associated with a history of violent behavior, a family history of substance abuse, antisocial personality disorder, higher addiction severity, and co-morbid psychiatric diseases. Patients with high CSSA scores are also more likely to meet criteria for Type B (Type II) cocaine dependence. Identifying Type B cocaine-dependent patients may help to develop targeted psychosocial or pharmacological treatments for these difficult-to-treat patients. PMID:18214724

  9. Hapten Optimization for Cocaine Vaccine with Improved Cocaine Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Muthu; Kinsey, Berma M.; Singh, Rana A.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Orson, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of any effective pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction, immunotherapy is being actively pursued as a therapeutic intervention. While several different cocaine haptens have been explored to develop anti-cocaine antibodies, none of the hapten was successfully designed which had a protonated tropane nitrogen as is found in native cocaine under physiological conditions, including the succinyl norcocaine (SNC) hapten that has been tested in phase II clinical trials. Herein, we discuss three different cocaine haptens: hexyl-norcocaine (HNC), bromoacetamido butyl- norcocaine (BNC), and succinyl-butyl- norcocaine (SBNC), each with a tertiary nitrogen structure mimicking that of native cocaine which could optimize the specificity of anti-cocaine antibodies for better cocaine recognition. Mice immunized with these haptens conjugated to immunogenic proteins produced high titer anti-cocaine antibodies. However, during chemical conjugation of HNC and BNC haptens to carrier proteins, the 2β methyl ester group is hydrolyzed and immunizing mice with these conjugate vaccines in mice produced antibodies that bound both cocaine and the inactive benzoylecgonine metabolite. While in the case of the SBNC conjugate vaccine hydrolysis of the methyl ester did not appear to occur, leading to antibodies with high specificity to cocaine over BE. Though we observed similar specificity with a SNC hapten, the striking difference is that SBNC carries a positive charge on the tropane nitrogen atom, and therefore it is expected to have better binding of cocaine. The 50% cocaine inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for SBNC antibodies (2.8 μM) was significantly better than the SNC antibodies (9.4 μM) when respective hapten-BSA was used as a substrate. In addition, antibodies from both sera had no inhibitory effect from BE. In contrast to BNC and HNC, the SBNC conjugate was also found to be highly stable without any noticeable hydrolysis for several months at 4°C and 2-3 days in p

  10. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Activation in the Ventral Tegmental Area Decreases the Reinforcing Efficacy of Cocaine.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Heath D; Mietlicki-Baase, Elizabeth G; Ige, Kelsey Y; Maurer, John J; Reiner, David J; Zimmer, Derek J; Van Nest, Duncan S; Guercio, Leonardo A; Wimmer, Mathieu E; Olivos, Diana R; De Jonghe, Bart C; Hayes, Matthew R

    2016-06-01

    Cocaine addiction continues to be a significant public health problem for which there are currently no effective FDA-approved treatments. Thus, there is a clear need to identify and develop novel pharmacotherapies for cocaine addiction. Recent evidence indicates that activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) reduces intake of highly palatable food. As the neural circuits and neurobiological mechanisms underlying drug taking overlap to some degree with those regulating food intake, these findings suggest that activation of central GLP-1 receptors may also attenuate cocaine taking. Here, we show that intra-VTA administration of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 (0.05 μg) significantly reduced cocaine, but not sucrose, self-administration in rats. We also demonstrate that cocaine taking is associated with elevated plasma corticosterone levels and that systemic infusion of cocaine activates GLP-1-expressing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), a hindbrain nucleus that projects monosynaptically to the VTA. To determine the potential mechanisms by which cocaine activates NTS GLP-1-expressing neurons, we microinjected corticosterone (0.5 μg) directly into the hindbrain fourth ventricle. Intraventricular corticosterone attenuated cocaine self-administration and this effect was blocked in animals pretreated with the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) (10 μg) in the VTA. Finally, AAV-shRNA-mediated knockdown of VTA GLP-1 receptors was sufficient to augment cocaine self-administration. Taken together, these findings indicate that increased activation of NTS GLP-1-expressing neurons by corticosterone may represent a homeostatic response to cocaine taking, thereby reducing the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine. Therefore, central GLP-1 receptors may represent a novel target for cocaine addiction pharmacotherapies. PMID:26675243

  11. Emotion recognition during cocaine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, K P C; Steenbergen, L; Theunissen, E L; Toennes, S W; Ramaekers, J G

    2015-11-01

    Chronic or repeated cocaine use has been linked to impairments in social skills. It is not clear whether cocaine is responsible for this impairment or whether other factors, like polydrug use, distort the observed relation. We aimed to investigate this relation by means of a placebo-controlled experimental study. Additionally, associations between stressor-related activity (cortisol, cardiovascular parameters) induced by the biological stressor cocaine, and potential cocaine effects on emotion recognition were studied. Twenty-four healthy recreational cocaine users participated in this placebo-controlled within-subject study. Participants were tested between 1 and 2 h after treatment with oral cocaine (300 mg) or placebo. Emotion recognition of low and high intensity expressions of basic emotions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, and happiness) was tested. Findings show that cocaine impaired recognition of negative emotions; this was mediated by the intensity of the presented emotions. When high intensity expressions of Anger and Disgust were shown, performance under influence of cocaine 'normalized' to placebo-like levels while it made identification of Sadness more difficult. The normalization of performance was most notable for participants with the largest cortisol responses in the cocaine condition compared to placebo. It was demonstrated that cocaine impairs recognition of negative emotions, depending on the intensity of emotion expression and cortisol response. PMID:26328908

  12. Signs of Cocaine Abuse and Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Signs of Cocaine Use and Addiction Signs of Cocaine Use and Addiction Listen After the "high" of ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  13. Stimulus control of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Stanley J; Kearns, David N; Cohn, Scott I; Schindler, Charles W; Panlilio, Leigh V

    2003-01-01

    Environmental stimuli that set the occasion wherein drugs are acquired can "trigger" drug-related behavior. Investigating the stimulus control of drug self-administration in laboratory animals should help us better understand this aspect of human drug abuse. Stimulus control of cocaine self-administration was generated here for the first time using multiple and chained schedules with short, frequently-alternating components--like those typically used to study food-maintained responding. The procedures and results are presented along with case histories to illustrate the strategies used to produce this stimulus control. All these multicomponent schedules contained variable-interval (VI) components as well as differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior (DRO) or extinction components. Schedule parameters and unit dose were adjusted for each rat to produce stable, moderate rates in VI components, with minimal postreinforcement (infusion) pausing, and response cessation in extinction and DRO components. Whole-body drug levels on terminal baselines calculated retrospectively revealed that all rats maintained fairly stable drug levels (mean, 2.3 to 3.4 mg/kg) and molar rates of intake (approximately 6.0 mg/kg/hr). Within this range, no relation between local VI response rates and drug level was found. The stimulus control revealed in cumulative records was indistinguishable from that achieved with food under these schedules, suggesting that common mechanisms may underlie the control of cocaine- and food-maintained behavior. PMID:12696744

  14. Enhanced Choice for Viewing Cocaine Pictures in Cocaine Addiction

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, S.J.; Goldstein, R.; Moeller, S.J.; Maloney, T. Parvaz, M.A.; Dunning, J.P.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Hajcak, G.; Telang, F.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2009-02-01

    Individuals with cocaine use disorder (CUD) chose cocaine over nondrug rewards. In two newly designed laboratory tasks with pictures, we document this modified choice outside of a cocaine administration paradigm. Choice for viewing cocaine, pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral pictures-under explicit contingencies (choice made between two fully visible side-by-side images) and under more implicit contingencies (selections made between pictures hidden under flipped-over cards)-was examined in 20 CUD and 20 matched healthy control subjects. Subjects also provided self-reported ratings of each picture's pleasantness and arousal. Under both contingencies, CUD subjects chose to view more cocaine pictures than control subjects, group differences that were not fully explained by the self-reported picture ratings. Furthermore, whereas CUD subjects choice for viewing cocaine pictures exceeded choice for viewing unpleasant pictures (but did not exceed choice for viewing pleasant pictures, in contrast to their self-reported ratings), healthy control subjects avoided viewing cocaine pictures as frequently as, or even more than, unpleasant pictures. Finally, CUD subjects with the most cocaine viewing selections, even when directly compared with selections of the pleasant pictures, also reported the most frequent recent cocaine use. Enhanced drug-related choice in cocaine addiction can be demonstrated even for nonpharmacologic (pictorial) stimuli. This choice, which is modulated by alternative stimuli, partly transcends self-reports (possibly indicative of a disconnect in cocaine addiction between self-reports and objective behavior) to provide an objective marker of addiction severity. Neuroimaging studies are needed to establish the neural underpinnings of such enhanced cocaine-related choice.

  15. Prenatal and postnatal cocaine exposure predict teen cocaine use

    PubMed Central

    Delaney-Black, Virginia; Chiodo, Lisa M.; Hannigan, John H.; Greenwald, Mark K.; Janisse, James; Patterson, Grace; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Partridge, Robert T.; Ager, Joel; Sokol, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies have identified alterations in cocaine and alcohol self-administration and behavioral responses to pharmacological challenges in adolescent offspring following prenatal exposure. To date, no published human studies have evaluated the relation between prenatal cocaine exposure and postnatal adolescent cocaine use. Human studies of prenatal cocaine-exposed children have also noted an increase in behaviors previously associated with substance use/abuse in teens and young adults, specifically childhood and teen externalizing behaviors, impulsivity, and attention problems. Despite these findings, human research has not addressed prior prenatal exposure as a potential predictor of teen drug use behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between prenatal cocaine exposure and teen cocaine use in a prospective longitudinal cohort (n = 316) that permitted extensive control for child, parent and community risk factors. Logistic regression analyses and Structural Equation Modeling revealed that both prenatal exposure and postnatal parent/caregiver cocaine use were uniquely related to teen use of cocaine at age 14 years. Teen cocaine use was also directly predicted by teen community violence exposure and caregiver negativity, and was indirectly related to teen community drug exposure. These data provide further evidence of the importance of prenatal exposure, family and community factors in the intergenerational transmission of teen/young adult substance abuse/use. PMID:20609384

  16. Cardiac Depression Induced by Cocaine or Cocaethylene are Alleviated by Lipid Emulsion More Effectively Than by Sulfobutylether β-Cyclodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Fettiplace, Michael R.; Pichurko, Adrian; Ripper, Richard; Lin, Bocheng; Kowal, Katarzyna; Lis, Kinga; Schwartz, David; Feinstein, Douglas L.; Rubinstein, Israel; Weinberg, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cocaine intoxication leads to over 500,000 emergency department visits annually in the USA and ethanol co-intoxication occurs in 34% of those cases. Cardiotoxicity is an ominous complication of cocaine and cocaethylene overdose for which no specific antidote exists. Because infusion of lipid emulsion (Intralipid) can treat lipophilic local anesthetic toxicity and cocaine is an amphipathic local anesthetic, the authors tested whether lipid emulsion could attenuate cocaine cardiotoxicity in vivo. The effects of lipid emulsion were compared with the metabolically inert sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (Captisol) in an isolated heart model of cocaine and cocaethylene toxicity to determine if capture alone could exert similar benefit as lipid emulsion which exhibits multi-modal effects. The authors then tested if cocaine and cocaethylene, like bupivacaine, inhibit lipid-based metabolism in isolated cardiac mitochondria. Methods For whole animal experiments, Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, instrumented, and pretreated with lipid emulsion followed by a continuous infusion of cocaine to assess time of onset of cocaine toxicity. For ex vivo experiments, rat hearts were placed onto a non-recirculating Langendorff system perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution. Heart rate, left ventricle maximum developed pressure (LVdevP), left ventricle diastolic pressure (LVDP), maximum rate of contraction (+dP/dtmax), maximum rate of relaxation (−dP/dtmax), rate-pressure product (RPP = heart rate*LVdevP), and line pressure were monitored continuously during the experiment. A dose-response to cocaine (10, 30, 50, and 100 μM) and cocaethylene (10, 30, 50 μM) was generated in the absence or presence of either 0.25% lipid emulsion, or sulfobutyl-β-cyclodextrin. Substrate-specific rates of oxygen consumption were measured in interfibrillar cardiac mitochondria in the presence of cocaine, cocaethylene, ecgonine, and benzoylecgonine. Results Treatment with lipid emulsion

  17. Saline infusion sonohysterography.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Saline infusion sonohysterography consists of ultrasonographic imaging of the uterus and uterocervical cavity, using real-time ultrasonography during injection of sterile saline into the uterus. When properly performed, saline infusion sonohysterography can provide information about the uterus and endometrium. The most common indication for sonohysterography is abnormal uterine bleeding. sonohysterography should not be performed in a woman who is pregnant or could be pregnant or in a woman with a pelvic infection or unexplained pelvic tenderness. Physicians who perform or supervise diagnostic saline infusion sonohysterograpy should have training, experience, and demonstrated competence in gynecologic ultrasonography and saline infusion sonohysterography. Portions of this document were developed jointly with the American College of Radiology and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. PMID:14968760

  18. Escalation of cocaine intake with extended access in rats: dysregulated addiction or regulated acquisition?

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, JS; Gipson, CD; Marusich, JA; Bardo, MT

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Understanding the neurobehavioral mechanisms underlying dysregulated cocaine intake is important for the development of new cocaine-abuse therapies. Objectives The current study determined if cocaine escalation under extended access conditions (6-hr access) is regulated by discrimination learning processes. Methods Rats were initially trained on cocaine self-administration (0.1 or 0.25 mg/kg/infusion) using a fixed ratio 1 (FR 1) schedule under 1-hr access for 12 sessions. Some rats were then trained to self-administer cocaine under 1-hr or 6-hr access conditions exclusively for an additional 14 sessions, while other rats were trained under both 1- and 6-hr access conditions that were cued or noncued for an additional 28 sessions (14 sessions for 1- and 6-hr access). Two additional groups of rats were initially trained to self-administer cocaine using an FR 1 schedule under 10-min access for 12 sessions; half of the animals were then switched to 60-min access conditions for an additional 14 sessions. Results When access conditions were differentially cued, escalation of cocaine intake was evident in animals with both 1- and 6-hr access during the escalation phase. Escalation also was evident in animals initially trained with 10-min access and then switched to 60-min access. Conclusions The results demonstrate that dysregulated and regulated intake can be expressed within the same animal, indicating that escalation is context-dependent. Furthermore, escalated cocaine intake can be expressed under 1-hr access conditions. Overall, these results suggest that escalated cocaine intake may be representative of a discrimination-dependent regulated intake process, rather than addiction-like, compulsive intake. PMID:22249361

  19. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Performance testing carried out in the development of the prototype zero-g fluid infusion system is described and summarized. Engineering tests were performed in the course of development, both on the original breadboard device and on the prototype system. This testing was aimed at establishing baseline system performance parameters and facilitating improvements. Acceptance testing was then performed on the prototype system to verify functional performance. Acceptance testing included a demonstration of the fluid infusion system on a laboratory animal.

  20. Methamphetamine Cured my Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Haile, Colin N.; De La Garza, Richard; Newton, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is an enduring problem and years of research and drug development has yet to produce an efficacious pharmacotherapy. Recent clinical research suggests that chronic treatment with amphetamine-like medications produces tolerance to cocaine’s reinforcing effects and may offer a viable pharmacotherapy. Three methamphetamine-dependent participants that had been in our clinical laboratory experiments and previously addicted to cocaine are reviewed. Data obtained from initial screen and informal conversation suggested that all participants considered methamphetamine to have helped them stop using cocaine and eliminate cocaine craving. Methamphetamine also significantly decreased their alcohol consumption but did not alter cannabis or nicotine use. PMID:23066512

  1. Anisomycin in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Reduces Reconsolidation of Cocaine-associated Memories in the Rat Self-administration Model

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Barbara A.; Todd, Ryan P.; Slaker, Megan; Churchill, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that infusion of anisomycin into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) disrupts the reconsolidation of a cocaine-associated memory in the rat cocaine self-administration model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to lever press for cocaine self-administration (0.5 mg/kg/infusion) along with a cue light presentation on an FR1 followed by an FR3 schedule of reinforcement for 2 hr/day. Rats were then given extinction sessions or an equivalent forced abstinence period followed by a 5 min memory reactivation session during which time they received an ip cocaine injection (10 mg/kg, ip) and were allowed to press for contingent cue light presentation. Immediately after reactivation, they were administered an intra-mPFC infusion of vehicle or anisomycin. Two additional control groups received extinction and either no memory reactivation and intra-mPFC infusions as above or intra-mPFC infusions 6 hr after memory reactivation. A fourth group received forced abstinence and intra-mPFC infusions immediately after memory reactivation. Combined cocaine + cue-induced reinstatement was given 2–3 days (early) and 8–12 days (late) later. Rats given anisomycin in the Extinction + Reactivation demonstrated decreased reinstatement, while anisomycin treatment did not alter behavior in any of the other three groups. These results suggest that extinction training may recruit the mPFC such that it renders the memory susceptible to disruption by anisomycin. These findings have implications for using extinction training prior to or in conjunction with other therapies, including reconsolidation disruption, to enhance prefrontal control over drug-seeking behavior. PMID:25576371

  2. D-cycloserine potentiates the reconsolidation of cocaine-associated memories

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jonathan L.C.; Gardner, Richard J.; Butler, Victoria J.; Everitt, Barry J.

    2009-01-01

    Conditioned cue-induced relapse to drug seeking is a major challenge to the treatment of drug addiction. It has been proposed that D-cycloserine might be useful in the prevention of relapse by reducing the conditioned reinforcing properties of drug-associated stimuli through facilitation of extinction. Here we show that intrabasolateral amygdala infusions of D-cycloserine in fact potentiate the reconsolidation of stimulus–cocaine memories to increase cue-induced relapse to drug seeking in rats with an extensive drug self-administration history. This elevation of cocaine seeking was correlated with an increase in the expression of the reconsolidation-associated gene zif268. PMID:19144966

  3. Copper thiocyanato complexes and cocaine - a case of 'black cocaine'.

    PubMed

    Laussmann, Tim; Grzesiak, Ireneus; Krest, Alexander; Stirnat, Kathrin; Meier-Giebing, Sigrid; Ruschewitz, Uwe; Klein, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of a black powder confiscated by German customs was elucidated. Black powders are occasionally used as a 'transporter' for cocaine and are obviously especially designed to cloak the presence of the drug. The material consisting of cocaine, copper, iron, thiocyanate, and graphite was approached by analytical tools and chemical modelling. Graphite is added to the material probably with the intention of masking the typical infrared (IR) fingerprints of cocaine and can be clearly detected by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Cu(2+) and NCS(-) ions, when carefully reacted with cocaine hydrochloride, form the novel compound (CocH)2 [Cu(NCS)4 ] (CocH(+)  = protonated cocaine), which has been characterised by single crystal XRD, IR, NMR, UV/Vis absorption and EPR spectroscopy. Based on some further experiments the assumed composition of the original black powder is discussed. PMID:24753444

  4. Palatine perforation induced by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Rosas, Miguel; Jimenez-Santos, Cecilia Irene; García-González, Claudia Lorena

    2006-05-01

    Worldwide, the use of cocaine has an increased over the years, various secondary effects have been described. Here we present a 48 years old female with a 2-month evolution bucconasal ulcer in the hard palate induced by cocaine usage accompanied by swallow and phonation dysfunctions. Ethiopathogenesis, differential diagnoses and treatment are discussed. PMID:16648760

  5. Cocaine/Crack: The Big Lie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This pamphlet focuses on cocaine and crack use and the addictive nature of cocaine/crack. It contains a set of 21 questions about crack and cocaine, each accompanied by a clear and complete response. Interspersed throughout the booklet are photographs and quotes from former cocaine or crack users/addicts. Questions and answers focus on what…

  6. Immunotoxicity of cocaine and crack.

    PubMed

    Stefanidou, Maria; Loutsidou, Ariadni C; Chasapis, Christos T; Spiliopoulou, Chara A

    2011-06-01

    The toxicity of cocaine and crack was studied on the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis, using several endpoints, such as the DNA content of the macronuclei and the phagocytic ability. Both forms induced an increase in the DNA content of the protozoan, which indicates the stimulation of the mitotic process. In contrast, the phagocytic activity, of the protozoan was decreased after the administration of cocaine, an effect that was more extensive after the administration of crack. These results, derived from previous experiments, suggest a possible relationship between the observed immunosuppression in cocaine abusers and the immunosuppression found in the protozoan. This suppression subsequently may play a role in the development of other opportunistic infections in drug abusers. This paper, based on in vivo experiments with the protozoan Tetrahymena, suggests the compromised immune response in cocaine addicts and assures the reported effects of cocaine on immune cell function. PMID:21696343

  7. Cocaine Intoxication and Thyroid Storm

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Cocaine, a widely used sympathomimetic drug, causes thermoregulatory and cardiac manifestations that can mimic a life-threatening thyroid storm. Case. A man presented to the emergency department requesting only cocaine detoxification. He reported symptoms over the last few years including weight loss and diarrhea, which he attributed to ongoing cocaine use. On presentation he had an elevated temperature of 39.4°C and a heart rate up to 130 beats per minute. Examination revealed the presence of an enlarged, nontender goiter with bilateral continuous bruits. He was found to have thyrotoxicosis by labs and was treated for thyroid storm and cocaine intoxication concurrently. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with Graves’ disease and treated with iodine-131 therapy. Conclusion. Cocaine use should be considered a possible trigger for thyroid storm. Recognition of thyroid storm is critical because of the necessity for targeted therapy and the significant mortality associated with the condition if left untreated. PMID:26425625

  8. Glutamatergic neuroplasticity in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Uys, Joachim D; Reissner, Kathryn J

    2011-01-01

    Neuroadaptations among glutamatergic projections within the mesocorticolimbic circuits engaged by drugs of abuse have been described since the 1990s. There is now substantial evidence that drugs of abuse lead to long-term changes in glutamatergic signaling and encompass multiple levels of analysis. For example, cocaine induces changes in extracellular glutamate concentrations and in synaptic glutamatergic transmission. In addition, glutamate receptors are required for the expression of cocaine-related behaviors, and long-term changes have been reported in the expression of proteins at glutamatergic synapses, in glutamate-related redox regulation of neurons, and in glutamatergic synaptic and structural plasticity following chronic exposure to cocaine. In this chapter, we will describe the neurocircuitry involved, and will summarize evidence for adaptations in glutamatergic neuroplasticity as a mechanism for cocaine addiction. Finally, we will discuss progress in the development of glutamate-mediated pharmacotherapies for the treatment of cocaine dependence. PMID:21199777

  9. Heavy cocaine use by adolescents.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E; Schwartz, R H; Martin, D M

    1989-04-01

    Adolescents are susceptible to becoming cocaine users. Twenty-eight teenagers in a drug rehabilitation program were identified as heavy cocaine users and questioned about their experiences. They reported family conflict leading to running away (86%), school drop-out (24%) and delinquent behaviors such as stealing (96%) and vandalism (57%). Cocaine use started at 14 years for 21%, with progression from onset to at least weekly use within eight weeks (54%). Side effects included sleep disturbance (18%) and tolerance to cocaine (25%). Withdrawal was characterized by cocaine craving up to one month later (93%). The majority (96%) were polydrug abusers. Possible causes of teen substance abuse are discussed, and the importance of prevention is emphasized. PMID:2927994

  10. Covalent modification of proteins by cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shi-Xian; Bharat, Narine; Fischman, Marian C.; Landry, Donald W.

    2002-03-01

    Cocaine covalently modifies proteins through a reaction in which the methyl ester of cocaine acylates the -amino group of lysine residues. This reaction is highly specific in vitro, because no other amino acid reacts with cocaine, and only cocaine's methyl ester reacts with the lysine side chain. Covalently modified proteins were present in the plasma of rats and human subjects chronically exposed to cocaine. Modified endogenous proteins are immunogenic, and specific antibodies were elicited in mouse and detected in the plasma of human subjects. Covalent modification of proteins could explain cocaine's autoimmune effects and provide a new biochemical approach to cocaine's long-term actions.

  11. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Development of a fluid infusion system was undertaken in response to a need for an intravenous infusion device operable under conditions of zero-g. The initial design approach, pursued in the construction of the first breadboard instrument, was to regulate the pressure of the motive gas to produce a similar regulated pressure in the infusion liquid. This scheme was not workable because of the varying bag contact area, and a major design iteration was made. A floating sensor plate in the center of the bag pressure plate was made to operate a pressure regulator built into the bellows assembly, effectively making liquid pressure the directly controlled variable. Other design changes were made as experience was gained with the breadboard. Extensive performance tests were conducted on both the breadboard and the prototype device; accurately regulated flows from 6 m1/min to 100 m1/min were achieved. All system functions were shown to operate satisfactorily.

  12. Cocaine and alcohol interactions in the rat: effect of cocaine and alcohol pretreatments on cocaine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Pan, W J; Hedaya, M A

    1999-12-01

    This experiment was designed to investigate the effect of pretreatment with cocaine and alcohol on cocaine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Four groups of rats (n = 8 per group) received one of the following pretreatments for two weeks: none, alcohol (10% v/v in drinking water), cocaine (15 mg/kg/day ip), and alcohol+cocaine (10% v/v in drinking water + 15 mg/kg/day ip). On the day of the experiment, cocaine was administered (30 mg/kg, ip) to each rat, either alone or in combination with alcohol (5 g/kg, po), in a balanced crossover experimental design. Plasma and brain ECF concentrations of cocaine and its three metabolites: benzoylecgonine, norcocaine, and cocaethylene were assayed by HPLC-UV. The percent change in brain dopamine concentration, mean arterial blood pressure, and heart rate were determined simultaneously. A sigmoid-E(max) model was used to describe the brain cocaine concentration-neurochemical effect (dopamine) relationship, and an indirect pharmacodynamic response model was used to describe the plasma cocaine concentration-cardiovascular effect relationships. Alcohol pretreatment led to significant increase in cocaine AUC(p), alpha(t1/2), and beta(t1/2). Cocaine pretreatment significantly increased cocaine bioavailability, absorption rate constant, TBC, and the formation clearance of cocaethylene. Acute alcohol coadministration with cocaine increased cocaine AUC(p) and bioavailability, reduced the fraction of cocaine dose converted to benzoylecgonine, and increased the formation of norcocaine. These results indicate that the pharmacokinetics of cocaine, either administered alone or in combination with alcohol, is significantly altered due to prior cocaine and/or alcohol use. Both cocaine and alcohol pretreatments increased the E(max) for dopamine, with no effect on the EC(50). Acute alcohol coadministration with cocaine significantly increased the E(max) for dopamine and reduced the EC(50). Cocaine pretreatment significantly decreased the I

  13. Cocaine treatment alters oxytocin receptor binding but not mRNA production in postpartum rat dams.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, T M; McMurray, M S; Walker, C H; Johns, J M

    2006-06-01

    Gestational cocaine treatment in rat dams results in decreased oxytocin (OT) levels, up-regulated oxytocin receptor (OTR) binding density and decreased receptor affinity in the whole amygdala, all concomitant with a significant increase in maternal aggression on postpartum day six. Rat dams with no gestational drug treatment that received an infusion of an OT antagonist directly into the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) exhibited similarly high levels of maternal aggression towards intruders. Additionally, studies indicate that decreased OT release from the hypothalamic division of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is coincident with heightened maternal aggression in rats. Thus, it appears that cocaine-induced alterations in OT system dynamics (levels, receptors, production, and/or release) may mediate heightened maternal aggression following cocaine treatment, but the exact mechanisms through which cocaine impacts the OT system have not yet been determined. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that two likely mechanisms of cocaine's action would be, increased OTR binding specifically in the CeA, and decreased OT mRNA production in the PVN. Autoradiography and in situ hybridization assays were performed on targeted nuclei in brain regions of rat dams on postpartum day six, following gestational treatment twice daily with cocaine (15 mg/kg) or normal saline (1 ml/kg). We now report cocaine-induced reductions in OTR binding density in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), but not the CeA. There was no significant change in OT mRNA production in the PVN following cocaine treatment. PMID:16677710

  14. Blockade of hypocretin receptor-1 preferentially prevents cocaine seeking: comparison with natural reward seeking.

    PubMed

    Martin-Fardon, Rémi; Weiss, Friedbert

    2014-05-01

    Hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin (Orx/Hcrt) peptides participate in the regulation of a wide range of physiological processes and are recruited by drugs of abuse. To advance our understanding of the potential of the Orx/Hcrt receptor-1 (Hcrt-r1) as a treatment target for cocaine addiction, the effect of SB334867 [N-(2-methyl-6-benzoxazolyl)-N'-1,5-n-aphthyridin-4-yl urea], a specific Hcrt-r1 antagonist, on reinstatement elicited by cocaine-associated stimuli versus stimuli associated with a highly palatable conventional reinforcer [sweetened condensed milk (SCM)] was tested. Two separate groups of male Wistar rats were trained to associate a discriminative stimulus (S⁺) with the response-contingent availability of cocaine (0.25 mg/0.1 ml/infusion) or SCM [2/1 (v/v)] and subjected to reinstatement tests following extinction of cocaine-reinforced or SCM-reinforced behavior, during which the reinforcers and S⁺ were withheld. Following extinction, presentation of the cocaine or SCM S⁺ produced comparable recovery of responding. Hcrt-r1 blockade by SB334867 (1-10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) dose-dependently and selectively reversed conditioned reinstatement induced by cocaine-related stimuli, without interfering with reward seeking produced by the same stimulus when conditioned to SCM. The findings suggest an important role for Hcrt-r1 in appetitive behavior controlled by reward-related stimuli with selectivity for cocaine seeking and identify Hcrt-r1 as a potential treatment target for cocaine relapse prevention. PMID:24407199

  15. Striatal 5-HT6 Receptors Regulate Cocaine Reinforcement in a Pathway-Selective Manner.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Matthew; Gibson, Alec W; Smirnov, Denis; Nair, Sunila G; Neumaier, John F

    2016-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the ventral striatum integrates many neurochemical inputs including dopamine and serotonin projections from midbrain nuclei to modulate drug reward. Although D1 and D2 dopamine receptors are differentially expressed in the direct and indirect pathway medium spiny neurons (dMSNs and iMSNs, respectively), 5-HT6 receptors are expressed in both pathways, more strongly than anywhere else in the brain, and are an intriguing target for neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, we used viral vectors utilizing dynorphin or enkephalin promoters to drive expression of 5-HT6 receptors or green fluorescent protein (GFP) selectively in the dMSNs or iMSNs of the NAc shell. Rats were then trained to self-administer cocaine. Increased 5-HT6 receptor expression in dMSNs did not change any parameter of cocaine self-administration measured. However, increasing 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs reduced the amount of cocaine self-administered under fixed-ratio schedules, especially at low doses, increased the time to the first response and the length of the inter-infusion interval, but did not alter motivation as measured by progressive ratio 'break point' analysis. Modeling of cocaine pharmacokinetics in NAc showed that increased 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs reduced the rat's preferred tissue cocaine concentration at each dose. Finally, increased 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs facilitated conditioned place preference for a low dose of cocaine. We conclude that 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs of NAcSh increase the sensitivity to the reinforcing properties of cocaine, particularly at low doses, suggesting that these receptors may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:27032690

  16. Environmental living conditions introduced during forced abstinence alter cocaine-seeking behavior and Fos protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Kenneth J.; Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Peartree, Natalie A.; Painter, Michael R.; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) introduced during abstinence from cocaine self-administration is protective in reducing cue-elicited incentive motivation for cocaine in rats. This study examined neural activation associated with this protective effect of EE using Fos protein expression as a marker. Rats were trained to press a lever reinforced by cocaine (0.75 mg/kg/0.1 ml infusion) and light and tone cues across 15 consecutive days during which they were all housed in isolated conditions (IC). Rats were then assigned to either remain in IC, or to live in pair-housed conditions (PC) or EE for 30 days of forced abstinence from cocaine. Subsequently, cocaine-seeking behavior (lever presses without cocaine reinforcement) elicited by response-contingent cue presentations was assessed for 90 min, after which the rats' brains were immediately harvested for Fos protein immunohistochemistry. EE attenuated, whereas IC enhanced, cue-elicited cocaine-seeking behavior relative to PC. Also, within the prelimbic and orbitofrontal cortices and basolateral amygdala, IC enhanced, whereas EE reduced, Fos expression relative to PC. Furthermore, EE attenuated Fos expression in the infralimbic and anterior cingulate cortices, the nucleus accumbens (core and shell), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and ventral tegmental area, evident as a reduction relative to both PC and IC. In contrast, IC enhanced Fos expression in the dorsal caudate putamen, substantia nigra, and central amygdala, evident as an increase relative to both PC and EE. These results suggest that EE blunts neural activation throughout the mesocorticolimbic circuitry involved in cue-elicited incentive motivation for cocaine, whereas IC enhances activation primarily within the nigrostriatal dopamine pathway. These findings have important implications for understanding and treating drug-conditioned craving in humans. PMID:20933585

  17. Environmental living conditions introduced during forced abstinence alter cocaine-seeking behavior and Fos protein expression.

    PubMed

    Thiel, K J; Pentkowski, N S; Peartree, N A; Painter, M R; Neisewander, J L

    2010-12-29

    Environmental enrichment (EE) introduced during abstinence from cocaine self-administration is protective in reducing cue-elicited incentive motivation for cocaine in rats. This study examined neural activation associated with this protective effect of EE using Fos protein expression as a marker. Rats were trained to press a lever reinforced by cocaine (0.75 mg/kg/0.1 mL infusion) and light and tone cues across 15 consecutive days during which they were all housed in isolated conditions (IC). Rats were then assigned to either remain in IC, or to live in pair-housed conditions (PC) or EE for 30 days of forced abstinence from cocaine. Subsequently, cocaine-seeking behavior (lever presses without cocaine reinforcement) elicited by response-contingent cue presentations was assessed for 90 min, after which the rats' brains were immediately harvested for Fos protein immunohistochemistry. EE attenuated, whereas IC enhanced, cue-elicited cocaine-seeking behavior relative to PC. Also, within the prelimbic and orbitofrontal cortices and basolateral amygdala, IC enhanced, whereas EE reduced, Fos expression relative to PC. Furthermore, EE attenuated Fos expression in the infralimbic and anterior cingulate cortices, the nucleus accumbens (core and shell), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and ventral tegmental area, evident as a reduction relative to both PC and IC. In contrast, IC enhanced Fos expression in the dorsal caudate putamen, substantia nigra, and central amygdala, evident as an increase relative to both PC and EE. These results suggest that EE blunts neural activation throughout the mesocorticolimbic circuitry involved in cue-elicited incentive motivation for cocaine, whereas IC enhances activation primarily within the nigrostriatal dopamine pathway. These findings have important implications for understanding and treating drug-conditioned craving in humans. PMID:20933585

  18. Effects of continuous nicotine treatment and subsequent termination on cocaine versus food choice in male rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schwienteck, Kathryn L; Negus, S Stevens; Poklis, Justin L; Banks, Matthew L

    2015-10-01

    One complicating factor in cocaine addiction may be concurrent exposure and potential dependence on nicotine. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of continuous nicotine treatment and subsequent termination on cocaine versus food choice in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). For comparison, we also determined effects of the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine on cocaine versus food choice during continuous saline and nicotine treatment. Rhesus monkeys (N = 3) responded under a concurrent schedule of food pellet (1 g) and intravenous cocaine (0-0.1 mg/kg/injection) availability. Saline and ascending nicotine doses (0.1-1.0 mg/kg/hr, intravenous) were continuously infused for 7-day treatment periods and separated by 24-hr saline treatment periods. Acute effects of mecamylamine (0.32-1.8 mg/kg, intramuscular, 15 min pretreatment) were determined during continuous saline and 0.32-mg/kg/hr nicotine treatments. During saline treatment, cocaine maintained a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice. Nicotine treatment did not alter cocaine versus food choice. In contrast, preference of 0.032 mg/kg/injection cocaine was attenuated 24 hr following termination of 0.32-mg/kg/hr nicotine treatment, despite no somatic abstinence signs being observed. Acute mecamylamine enhanced cocaine choice during saline treatment and mainly suppressed rates of behavior during nicotine treatment. Overall, continuous nicotine exposure, up to 1 mg/kg/hr, does not enhance cocaine choice and does not produce nicotine dependence, as demonstrated by the lack of abstinence signs. PMID:26098473

  19. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the nucleus accumbens core and shell contribute to cocaine priming-induced reinstatement of drug seeking

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Judy; Famous, Katie R.; Hopkins, Thomas J.; McMullen, Michael C.; Pierce, R. Christopher; Schmidt, Heath D.

    2011-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the nucleus accumbens play an important role in mediating the reinforcing effects of cocaine. However, there is a paucity of data regarding the role of accumbal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. The goal of these experiments was to assess the role of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the nucleus accumbens core and shell in cocaine and sucrose priming-induced reinstatement. Rats were initially trained to self-administer cocaine or sucrose on a fixed-ratio schedule of reinforcement. Lever-pressing behavior was then extinguished and followed by a subsequent reinstatement phase during which operant responding was induced by either a systemic injection of cocaine in cocaine-experienced rats or non-contingent delivery of sucrose pellets in subjects with a history of sucrose self-administration. Results indicated that systemic administration of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine (5.0 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently attenuated cocaine, but not sucrose, reinstatement. Furthermore, administration of scopolamine (36.0 μg) directly into the nucleus accumbens shell or core attenuated cocaine-priming induced reinstatement. In contrast, infusion of scopolamine (36.0 μg) directly into the accumbens core, but not shell, attenuated sucrose reinstatement, which suggests that muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in these two subregions of the nucleus accumbens have differential roles in sucrose seeking. Taken together, these results indicate that cocaine-priming induced reinstatement is mediated, in part, by increased signaling through muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the shell subregion of the nucleus accumbens. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the core of the accumbens, in contrast, appear to play a more general (i.e. not cocaine specific) role in motivated behaviors. PMID:21034738

  20. Reward and Toxicity of Cocaine Metabolites Generated by Cocaine Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Vishakantha; Geng, Liyi; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Bin; Miller, Jordan D; Reyes, Santiago; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) gene therapy is emerging as a promising concept for treatment of cocaine addiction. BChE levels after gene transfer can rise 1000-fold above those in untreated mice, making this enzyme the second most abundant plasma protein. For months or years, gene transfer of a BChE mutated into a cocaine hydrolase (CocH) can maintain enzyme levels that destroy cocaine within seconds after appearance in the blood stream, allowing little to reach the brain. Rapid enzyme action causes a sharp rise in plasma levels of two cocaine metabolites, benzoic acid (BA) and ecgonine methyl ester (EME), a smooth muscle relaxant that is mildly hypotensive and, at best, only weakly rewarding. The present study, utilizing Balb/c mice, tested reward effects and cardiovascular effects of administering EME and BA together at molar levels equivalent to those generated by a given dose of cocaine. Reward was evaluated by conditioned place preference. In this paradigm, cocaine (20 mg/kg) induced a robust positive response but the equivalent combined dose of EME + BA failed to induce either place preference or aversion. Likewise, mice that had undergone gene transfer with mouse CocH (mCocH) showed no place preference or aversion after repeated treatments with a near-lethal 80 mg/kg cocaine dose. Furthermore, a single administration of that same high cocaine dose failed to affect blood pressure as measured using the noninvasive tail-cuff method. These observations confirm that the drug metabolites generated after CocH gene transfer therapy are safe even after a dose of cocaine that would ordinarily be lethal. PMID:25814464

  1. Individual differences in discount rate are associated with demand for self-administered cocaine, but not sucrose.

    PubMed

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Woods, James H

    2013-01-01

    Substance abusers, including cocaine abusers, discount delayed rewards to a greater extent than do matched controls. In the current experiment, individual differences in discounting of delayed rewards in rats (choice of one immediate over three delayed sucrose pellets) were assessed for associations with demand for either sucrose pellets or an intravenous dose of 0.1 mg/kg/infusion cocaine. Twenty-four male Sprague Dawley rats were split into three groups based on sensitivity to delay to reinforcement. Then, demand for sucrose pellets and cocaine was determined across a range of fixed-ratio values. Delay discounting was then reassessed to determine the stability of this measure over the course of the experiment. Individual differences in impulsive choice were positively associated with elasticity of demand for cocaine, a measure of reinforcer value, indicating that rats having higher discount rates also valued cocaine more. Impulsive choice was not associated with the level of cocaine consumption as price approached 0 or with any parameter associated with demand for sucrose. Individual sensitivity to delay was correlated with the initial assessment when reassessed at the end of the experiment, although impulsive choice increased for this cohort of rats as a whole. These findings suggest that impulsive choice in rats is positively associated with valuation of cocaine, but not sucrose. PMID:21812874

  2. Conditioned cued recovery of responding following prolonged withdrawal from self-administered cocaine in rats: an animal model of relapse.

    PubMed

    Meil, W.M.; See, R.E.

    1996-12-01

    The present study investigated the ability of drug-associated cues to reinstate extinguished responding following an extended period of withdrawal from cocaine self-administration. Rats self-administered cocaine (0.33mg/infusion) for 2 weeks of daily 3-h limited-access sessions under a fixed-interval (FI) schedule of reinforcement, in which responding resulted in simultaneous illumination of a stimulus light and drug infusions. Rats were then exposed to 20 daily extinction sessions. Noncontingent presentation of the stimulus light and infusion pump sound on day 21 of extinction resulted in a significant increase in responding. Twenty days later (43 days after cocaine withdrawal), rats returned to the operant chamber and exposed to drug-associated cues responded significantly more than animals exposed to extinction conditions. In a second experiment, using a form of variable-interval schedule in which the stimulus light was presented prior to drug infusions, stimulus-cued recovery of responding was similar to that obtained under the FI schedule. A third experiment showed that noncontingent presentation of the stimulus light alone on day 21 failed to reinstate extinguished responding, suggesting that stimulus-cued reinstatement of responding was due to a compound stimulus or preferential conditioning of the infusion pump sound. The present paradigm may serve as a useful model for the investigation of drug abuse and relapse, since it allows for the independent examination of the reinforcing and conditioned effects of a drug. PMID:11224470

  3. Sign-tracking Predicts Increased Choice of Cocaine Over Food in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tunstall, Brendan J.; Kearns, David N.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the tendency to sign-track to a food cue was predictive of rats’ choice of cocaine over food. First, rats were trained on a procedure where insertion of a retractable lever was paired with food. A sub-group of rats – sign-trackers – primarily approached and contacted the lever, while another subgroup – goal-trackers – approached the site of food delivery. Rats were then trained on a choice task where they could choose between an infusion of cocaine (1.0 mg/kg) and a food pellet (45 mg). Sign-trackers chose cocaine over food significantly more often than did goal-trackers. These results support the incentive-salience theory of addiction and add to a growing number of studies which suggest that sign-trackers may model an addiction-prone phenotype. PMID:25541036

  4. Cocaine tolerance in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Søvik, Eirik; Cornish, Jennifer L; Barron, Andrew B

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly invertebrates are being used to investigate the molecular and cellular effects of drugs of abuse to explore basic mechanisms of addiction. However, in mammals the principle factors contributing to addiction are long-term adaptive responses to repeated drug use. Here we examined whether adaptive responses to cocaine are also seen in invertebrates using the honey bee model system. Repeated topical treatment with a low dose of cocaine rendered bees resistant to the deleterious motor effects of a higher cocaine dose, indicating the development of physiological tolerance to cocaine in bees. Cocaine inhibits biogenic amine reuptake transporters, but neither acute nor repeated cocaine treatments caused measurable changes in levels of biogenic amines measured in whole bee brains. Our data show clear short and long-term behavioural responses of bees to cocaine administration, but caution that, despite the small size of the bee brain, measures of biogenic amines conducted at the whole-brain level may not reveal neurochemical effects of the drug. PMID:23741423

  5. Sigma receptors and cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sanju; Mesangeau, Christophe; Poupaert, Jacques H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptors have been well documented as a protein target for cocaine and have been shown to be involved in the toxic and stimulant actions of cocaine. Strategies to reduce the access of cocaine to sigma receptors have included antisense oligonucleotides to the sigma-1 receptor protein as well as small molecule ligand with affinity for sigma receptor sites. These results have been encouraging as novel protein targets that can attenuate the actions of cocaine are desperately needed as there are currently no medications approved for treatment of cocaine toxicity or addiction. Many years of research in this area have yet to produce an effective treatment and much focus was on dopamine systems. A flurry of research has been carried out to elucidate the role of sigma receptors in the blockade of cocaine effects but this research has yet to yield a clinical agent. This review summarizes the work to date on the linkage of sigma receptors and the actions of cocaine and the progress that has been made with regard to small molecules. Although there is still a lack of an agent in clinical trials with a sigma receptor mechanism of action, work is progressing and the ligands are becoming more selective for sigma systems and the potential remains high. PMID:21050176

  6. Reconsolidation of a cocaine-associated stimulus requires amygdalar protein kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Hayde; Quinn, Jennifer J.; Torregrossa, Mary M.; Taylor, Jane R.

    2010-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic disorder associated with recurrent craving and relapse often precipitated by the presence of drug-associated stimuli. Pharmacological and behavioral treatments that disrupt drug-associated stimulus memories could be beneficial in the treatment of addictive disorders. Memory re-stabilization (or reconsolidation) following retrieval of drug-paired stimuli depends upon the amygdala. Here we assessed whether amygdalar PKA is required for the reconsolidation of an appetitive, cocaine-paired stimulus. Rats were trained to lever press for i.v. cocaine infusions paired with a light/tone conditioned stimulus. After 12 days of acquisition, rats either underwent lever extinction (8–12 days) followed by light/tone reactivation and subsequent cue-induced and cocaine-induced (15 mg/kg, i.p.) reinstatement testing or were subsequently tested to assess the ability of the light/tone stimulus to serve as a conditioned reinforcer in the acquisition of a new instrumental response (nosepoking). Bilateral intra-amygdalar infusions of the PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMPS (18 µg per side), given immediately following light/tone stimulus reactivation decreased subsequent cue-induced reinstatement and responding with a conditioned reinforcer, while having no effect on cocaine-induced reinstatement. Intra-amygdalar infusions of Rp-cAMPS made 3hr following reactivation or immediately following no stimulus reactivation had no effect on subsequent cue-induced reinstatement. These data show that memory reconsolidation for a cocaine-paired stimulus is retrieval-dependent, time-limited, and critically depends upon amygdalar PKA. PMID:20335476

  7. Dose and elasticity of demand for self-administered cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Kearns, David N; Silberberg, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The present experiment tested whether the elasticity of demand for self-administered cocaine in rats is dose-dependent. Subjects lever pressed for three different doses of intravenous cocaine - 0.11, 0.33, and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion - on a demand procedure where the number of lever presses required per infusion increased within a session. The main finding was that demand for the 0.11 mg/kg dose was more elastic than it was for the two larger doses. There was no difference in demand elasticity between the 0.33 and 1.0 mg/kg doses. These results parallel findings previously reported in monkeys. The present study also demonstrated that a within-session procedure can be used to generate reliable demand curves. PMID:26866971

  8. Cocaine modulates locomotion behavior in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alex; Walker, Vyvyca J; Feng, Zhaoyang; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine, a potent addictive substance, is an inhibitor of monoamine transporters, including DAT (dopamine transporter), SERT (serotonin transporter) and NET (norepinephrine transporter). Cocaine administration induces complex behavioral alterations in mammals, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we tested the effect of cocaine on C. elegans behavior. We show for the first time that acute cocaine treatment evokes changes in C. elegans locomotor activity. Interestingly, the neurotransmitter serotonin, rather than dopamine, is required for cocaine response in C. elegans. The C. elegans SERT MOD-5 is essential for the effect of cocaine, consistent with the role of cocaine in targeting monoamine transporters. We further show that the behavioral response to cocaine is primarily mediated by the ionotropic serotonin receptor MOD-1. Thus, cocaine modulates locomotion behavior in C. elegans primarily by impinging on its serotoninergic system. PMID:19536276

  9. Cocaine, Appetitive Memory and Neural Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Suchismita

    2013-01-01

    This review examines existing cognitive experimental and brain imaging research related to cocaine addiction. In section 1, previous studies that have examined cognitive processes, such as implicit and explicit memory processes in cocaine users are reported. Next, in section 2, brain imaging studies are reported that have used chronic users of cocaine as study participants. In section 3, several conclusions are drawn. They are: (a) in cognitive experimental literature, no study has examined both implicit and explicit memory processes involving cocaine related visual information in the same cocaine user, (b) neural mechanisms underlying implicit and explicit memory processes for cocaine-related visual cues have not been directly investigated in cocaine users in the imaging literature, and (c) none of the previous imaging studies has examined connectivity between the memory system and craving system in the brain of chronic users of cocaine. Finally, future directions in the field of cocaine addiction are suggested. PMID:25009766

  10. Cocaine Use: 2002 and 2003. The NSDUH Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Cocaine, including crack cocaine, was responsible for 12.8 percent of admissions to substance abuse treatment services in 2002.1 The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) asks persons aged 12 or older to report their use of illicit drugs, including cocaine. NSDUH defines cocaine use as use of cocaine in any form, including crack cocaine.…

  11. Responsiveness to cocaine challenge in adult rats following prenatal exposure to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Heyser, C J; Rajachandran, L; Spear, N E; Spear, L P

    1994-09-01

    Adult rats that were gestationally exposed to cocaine and control offspring were examined for their sensitivity to challenge doses of cocaine. Offspring were derived from Sprague-Dawley dams that had received subcutaneous injections of 40 mg/kg per 3 cc cocaine hydrochloride daily on gestational days 8-20, pair-fed dams that were injected with saline, and nontreated control dams. In order to investigate the sensitivity to challenge doses of cocaine, offspring were assessed in adulthood for locomotor activity, cocaine drug discrimination, and the time course of cocaine in brain tissue following acute cocaine challenge. Adult offspring prenatally exposed to cocaine were observed to exhibit a reduced sensitivity to the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine as evidenced by a significant shift to the right in the dose-response curve of cocaine discrimination. No prenatal treatment effects were observed in terms of the temporal patterns of cocaine discrimination or with regard to brain levels of cocaine. In addition, baseline locomotor activity and locomotor responses to challenge doses of cocaine were comparable across the prenatal treatment groups. Thus, prenatal cocaine exposure reduced sensitivity of offspring to the discriminative stimulus properties of cocaine without altering either the distribution of cocaine to the brain or the sensitivity of the offspring to the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. PMID:7862930

  12. The role of ventral and dorsal striatum mGluR5 in relapse to cocaine-seeking and extinction learning.

    PubMed

    Knackstedt, Lori A; Trantham-Davidson, Heather L; Schwendt, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a chronic, relapsing disease characterized by an inability to regulate drug-seeking behavior. Here we investigated the role of mGluR5 in the ventral and dorsal striatum in regulating cocaine-seeking following both abstinence and extinction. Animals underwent 2 weeks of cocaine self-administration followed by 3 weeks of home-cage abstinence. Animals were then reintroduced to the operant chamber for a context-induced relapse test, followed by 7-10 days of extinction training. Once responding was extinguished, cue-primed reinstatement test was conducted. Both drug-seeking tests were conducted in the presence of either mGluR5 negative allosteric modulator, MTEP or vehicle infused into either the nucleus accumbens (NA) core or dorsolateral striatum (dSTR). We found that MTEP infused in the NA core attenuated both context-induced relapse following abstinence and cue-primed reinstatement following extinction training. Blocking dSTR mGluR5 had no effect on context- or cue-induced cocaine-seeking. However, the intra-dSTR MTEP infusion on the context-induced relapse test day attenuated extinction learning for 4 days after the infusion. Furthermore, mGluR5 surface expression was reduced and LTD was absent in dSTR slices of animals undergoing 3 weeks of abstinence from cocaine but not sucrose self-administration. LTD was restored by bath application of VU-29, a positive allosteric modulator of mGluR5. Bath application of MTEP prevented the induction of LTD in dSTR slices from sucrose animals. Taken together, this data indicates that dSTR mGluR5 plays an essential role in extinction learning but not cocaine relapse, while NA core mGluR5 modulates drug-seeking following both extinction and abstinence from cocaine self-administration. PMID:23710649

  13. mTOR signalling in the nucleus accumbens shell is critical for augmented effect of TFF3 on behavioural response to cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yi-Xiao; Han, Hua; Shao, Juan; Gao, Yuan; Yin, Xi; Zhu, Wei-Li; Han, Ying; Shi, Hai-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides play important roles in modulating the rewarding value of abused drugs. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) was recently reported to modulate withdrawal syndrome of morphine, but the effects of TFF3 on the cocaine-induced behavioral changes are still elusive. In the present study, cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and conditioned place preference (CPP) rat paradigms were provided to investigate the role of TFF3 in the reward response to cocaine. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis was used to analyse the dopamine concentration. The results showed that systemic TFF3 administration (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) significantly augmented cocaine- induced hyperlocomotion and CPP formation, without any effects on locomotor activity and aversive or rewarding effects per se. TFF3 significantly augmented the increment of the dopamine concentration in the NAc and the activity of the mTOR signalling pathway induced by acute cocaine exposure (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the NAc shell, but not the core. The Intra-NAc shell infusion of rapamycin blocked TFF3-induced hyperactivity in cocaine-treatment rats. These findings indicated that TFF3 could potentiate behavioural response to cocaine, which may be associated with regulating dopamine concentration. Furthermore, the findings indicated that mTOR signalling pathway in the NAc shell is important for TFF3-induced enhancement on the cocaine-induced behavioral changes. PMID:27282818

  14. mTOR signalling in the nucleus accumbens shell is critical for augmented effect of TFF3 on behavioural response to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi-Xiao; Han, Hua; Shao, Juan; Gao, Yuan; Yin, Xi; Zhu, Wei-Li; Han, Ying; Shi, Hai-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides play important roles in modulating the rewarding value of abused drugs. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) was recently reported to modulate withdrawal syndrome of morphine, but the effects of TFF3 on the cocaine-induced behavioral changes are still elusive. In the present study, cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and conditioned place preference (CPP) rat paradigms were provided to investigate the role of TFF3 in the reward response to cocaine. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis was used to analyse the dopamine concentration. The results showed that systemic TFF3 administration (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) significantly augmented cocaine- induced hyperlocomotion and CPP formation, without any effects on locomotor activity and aversive or rewarding effects per se. TFF3 significantly augmented the increment of the dopamine concentration in the NAc and the activity of the mTOR signalling pathway induced by acute cocaine exposure (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the NAc shell, but not the core. The Intra-NAc shell infusion of rapamycin blocked TFF3-induced hyperactivity in cocaine-treatment rats. These findings indicated that TFF3 could potentiate behavioural response to cocaine, which may be associated with regulating dopamine concentration. Furthermore, the findings indicated that mTOR signalling pathway in the NAc shell is important for TFF3-induced enhancement on the cocaine-induced behavioral changes. PMID:27282818

  15. Alcohol administration increases cocaine craving but not cocaine cue attentional bias

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Katherine R.; Pike, Erika; Stoops, William W.; Rush, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol consumption is a known antecedent to cocaine relapse. Through associative conditioning, it is hypothesized that alcohol increases incentive motivation for cocaine and thus the salience of cocaine-related cues, which are important in maintaining drug-taking behavior. Cocaine-using individuals display a robust cocaine cue attentional bias as measured by fixation time during the visual probe task. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the influence of alcohol administration on cocaine cue attentional bias using eye-tracking technology to directly measure attentional allocation. Methods Twenty current cocaine users completed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects study that tested the effect of three doses of alcohol (0.00, 0.325, 0.65 g/kg alcohol) on cocaine cue attentional bias using the visual probe task with eye-tracking technology. The participant-rated and physiological effects of alcohol were also assessed. Results Participants displayed a robust cocaine cue attentional bias following both placebo and alcohol administration as measured by fixation time, but not response time. Alcohol administration did not influence cocaine cue attentional bias, but increased craving for cocaine in a dose dependent manner. Alcohol produced prototypic psychomotor and participant-rated effects. Conclusions Alcohol administration increases cocaine craving but not cocaine cue attentional bias. Alcohol-induced cocaine craving suggests that alcohol increases incentive motivation for cocaine but not the salience of cocaine-related cues. PMID:26331880

  16. Reinstatement of cocaine seeking induced by drugs, cues, and stress in adolescent and adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale In human and animal studies, adolescence marks a period of increased vulnerability to the initiation and subsequent abuse of drugs. Adolescents may be especially vulnerable to relapse, and a critical aspect of drug abuse is that it is a chronically relapsing disorder. However, little is known of how vulnerability factors such as adolescence are related to conditions that induce relapse, triggered by the drug itself, drug-associated cues, or stress. Objective The purpose of this study was to compare adolescent and adult rats on drug-, cue-, and stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Methods On postnatal days 23 (adolescents) and 90 (adults), rats were implanted with intravenous catheters and trained to lever press for i.v. infusions of cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) during two daily 2-h sessions. The rats then self-administered i.v. cocaine for ten additional sessions. Subsequently, visual and auditory stimuli that signaled drug delivery were unplugged, and rats were allowed to extinguish lever pressing for 20 sessions. Rats were then tested on cocaine-, cue-, and yohimbine (stress)-induced cocaine seeking using a within-subject multicomponent reinstatement procedure. Results Results indicated that adolescents had heightened cocaine seeking during maintenance and extinction compared to adults. During reinstatement, adolescents (vs adults) responded more following cocaine- and yohimbine injections, while adults (vs adolescents) showed greater responding following presentations of drug-associated cues. Conclusion These results demonstrated that adolescents and adults differed across several measures of drug-seeking behavior, and adolescents may be especially vulnerable to relapse precipitated by drugs and stress. PMID:19953228

  17. Differential effect of viral overexpression of nucleus accumbens shell 5-HT1B receptors on stress- and cocaine priming-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sunila G.; Furay, Amy R.; Liu, Yusha; Neumaier, John F.

    2013-01-01

    5-HT1B receptors are densely expressed on terminals of medium spiny neurons projecting from the nucleus accumbens shell (NAccSh) to the ventral tegmental area, where 5-HT1B receptors modulate GABA release directly, and firing of dopaminergic neurons indirectly. While interactions between NAccSh 5-HT1B receptors and stress have been reported in early stages of psychostimulant-induced neuroadaptations, specifically psychomotor sensitization, the effect of this interaction on later stages of drug seeking is currently unknown. Here, we examined the effect of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-mediated overexpression of NAccSh 5-HT1B receptors on reinstatement of cocaine seeking induced by exposure to stress or a cocaine prime. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg/infusion) and the operant response was extinguished. Rats were then injected with viral vector expressing 5-HT1B and green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP alone into the NAccSh. The effect of 5-HT1B receptor overexpression was assessed on reinstatement induced by intermittent footshock (0.5 mA for 15 minutes) or a cocaine prime (10 mg/kg, ip). Results indicate that NAccSh 5-HT1B receptor overexpression had no effect on footshock reinstatement while significantly decreasing cocaine priming-induced reinstatement. We also found that NAccSh overexpression of 5-HT1B receptors had no effect on saccharin intake following social defeat stress. These results suggest that the efficacy of pharmacological agents targeting 5-HT1B receptors for the treatment of cocaine relapse will depend largely on the nature of the reinstating stimulus. Taken together with previous results it appears that NAccSh 5-HT1B receptors influence stress responses in early, but not in the later stages of psychostimulant-induced neuroadaptations. PMID:24075973

  18. Antibody-Catalyzed Degradation of Cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Donald W.; Zhao, Kang; Yang, Ginger X.-Q.; Glickman, Michael; Georgiadis, Taxiarchis M.

    1993-03-01

    Immunization with a phosphonate monoester transition-state analog of cocaine provided monoclonal antibodies capable of catalyzing the hydrolysis of the cocaine benzoyl ester group. An assay for the degradation of radiolabeled cocaine identified active enzymes. Benzoyl esterolysis yields ecgonine methyl ester and benzoic acid, fragments devoid of cocaine's stimulant activity. Passive immunization with such an artificial enzyme could provide a treatment for dependence by blunting reinforcement.

  19. Cortical mechanisms of cocaine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Steketee, Jeffery D

    2005-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization is the augmented motor-stimulant response that occurs with repeated, intermittent exposure to most drugs of abuse, including cocaine. Sensitization, which is a long-lasting phenomenon, is thought to underlie drug craving and relapse to drug use. Much research has been conducted to determine the neural mechanisms of sensitization. The bulk of this effort has focused on the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area (VTA) that comprise a portion of the mesolimbic dopamine system. Recently, studies have begun to also explore the role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in sensitization, in part because this region provides glutamatergic innervation to the VTA and nucleus accumbens. The present review will coalesce these studies into a working hypothesis that states that cocaine sensitization results from a decrease in inhibitory modulation of excitatory transmission from the mPFC to the VTA and nucleus accumbens. The discussion will revolve around how repeated cocaine exposure alters dopamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutamate regulation of pyramidal cell activity. It will be proposed that cocaine-induced alterations in cortical transmission occur in two phases. During early withdrawal from repeated cocaine exposure, changes in neurotransmitter release are thought to underlie the decreased inhibitory modulation of pyramidal projection neurons. Following more prolonged withdrawal, the attenuation in inhibitory transmission appears to occur at the receptor level. A model will be presented that may serve to direct future studies on the involvement of the mPFC in the development of cocaine sensitization, which ultimately could lead to development of pharmacotherapies for cocaine addiction. PMID:16808728

  20. Pyrolysis and volatilization of cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.R.; Lue, L.P.; Boni, J.P. )

    1989-05-01

    The increasing popularity of inhaling cocaine vapor prompted the present study, to determine cocaine's fate during this process. The free base of (3H)cocaine (1 microCi/50 mg) was added to a glass pipe, which was then heated in a furnace to simulate freebasing. Negative pressure was used to draw the vapor through a series of glass wool, ethanol, acidic, and basic traps. Air flow rate and temperature were found to have profound effects on the volatilization and pyrolysis of cocaine. At a temperature of 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min, 37% of the radioactivity remained in the pipe, 39% was found in the glass wool trap, and less than 1% in the remainder of the volatilization apparatus after a 10-min volatilization. Reducing the air flow rate to 100 mL/min reduced the amount of radioactivity collected in the glass wool trap to less than 10% of the starting material and increased the amount that remained in the pipe to 58%. GC/MS analysis of the contents of the glass wool trap after volatilization at 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min revealed that 60% of the cocaine remained intact, while approximately 6 and 2% of the starting material was recovered as benzoic acid and methylecgonidine, respectively. As the temperature was increased to 650 degrees C, benzoic acid and methylecgonidine accounted for 83 and 89% of the starting material, respectively, whereas only 2% of the cocaine remained intact. Quantitation of cocaine in the vapor during the course of volatilization revealed high concentrations during the first two min and low concentrations for the remaining time.

  1. Discriminative and reinforcing stimulus effects of nicotine, cocaine, and cocaine + nicotine combinations in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Newman, Jennifer L

    2011-06-01

    Concurrent cigarette smoking and cocaine use is well documented. However, the behavioral pharmacology of cocaine and nicotine combinations is poorly understood, and there is a need for animal models to examine this form of polydrug abuse. The purpose of this study was twofold: first to assess the effects of nicotine on the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine, and second, to study self-administration of nicotine/cocaine combinations in a novel polydrug abuse model. In drug discrimination experiments, nicotine increased the discriminative stimulus effects of low cocaine doses in two of three monkeys, but nicotine did not substitute for cocaine in any monkey. Self-administration of cocaine and nicotine alone, and cocaine + nicotine combinations was studied under a second-order fixed ratio 2, variable ratio 16 (FR2[VR16:S]) schedule of reinforcement. Cocaine and nicotine alone were self-administered in a dose-dependent manner. The combination of marginally reinforcing doses of cocaine and nicotine increased drug self-administration behavior above levels observed with the same dose of either cocaine or nicotine alone. These findings indicate that nicotine may increase cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects in rhesus monkeys, and illustrate the feasibility of combining cocaine and nicotine in a preclinical model of polydrug abuse. Further studies of the behavioral effects of nicotine + cocaine combinations will contribute to our understanding the pharmacology of dual nicotine and cocaine dependence, and will be useful for evaluation of new treatment medications. PMID:21480727

  2. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infant Cortisol Reactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiden, Rina D.; Veira, Yvette; Granger, Douglas A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and reactivity at 7 months of infant age. Participants were 168 caregiver-infant dyads (87 cocaine exposed, 81 not cocaine exposed; 47% boys). Maternal behavior, caregiving instability, and infant growth and behavior were assessed,…

  3. Tips for Teens: The Truth about Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rock (Crack) Get the Facts… Cocaine affects your brain. The word “cocaine” refers to the drug in both a powder ( ... when you’re not high. Cocaine is addictive. Cocaine interferes with the way your brain processes chemicals that create feelings of pleasure, so ...

  4. Unrecognized "crack" cocaine abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D; Parr, M J; Shutt, L E

    1996-10-01

    We report a case of "crack" cocaine abuse in a pregnant patient associated with haematuria, proteinuria, haemolytic anaemia, renal impairment, thrombocytopenia and pulmonary oedema. The case illustrates the problems for clinicians where unrecognized cocaine abuse interferes with the diagnosis and management of a complicated pregnancy. In addition, we discuss the principles for the safe conduct of anaesthesia in the pregnant cocaine abuser. PMID:8942348

  5. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  6. Effects of extended cocaine access and cocaine withdrawal on choice between cocaine and food in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Negus, S Stevens

    2010-01-01

    Chronic drug use may lead to sufficient drug intake to produce dependence and the emergence of abstinence signs during withdrawal. Although withdrawal can increase the reinforcing effects of some drugs (eg opioids), the impact of withdrawal on the reinforcing effects of stimulants like cocaine is less clear. This study used a novel cocaine vs food choice procedure to examine the relative reinforcing strength of cocaine before, during, and after exposure to graded levels of extended cocaine access. Responding in four rhesus monkeys was maintained by cocaine (0-0.1 mg/kg/injection) and food delivery under a concurrent-choice schedule during daily 2-h sessions. Under baseline conditions, cocaine maintained a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice. Subsequently, subjects were exposed to and withdrawn from periods of extended cocaine access, which was accomplished by implementing daily 21-h supplemental sessions of cocaine self-administration in addition to daily choice sessions. During supplemental sessions, cocaine (0.1 mg/kg/injection) was available under a fixed-ratio 10/time-out X schedule, and the duration of the time-out was varied from 30 to 7.5 min. Cocaine intake increased 10-fold to >11 mg/kg/day during exposure to supplemental sessions with the shortest post-injection time-out. However, parameters of cocaine choice were not significantly affected either during or after extended cocaine access. These results do not support the hypothesis that cocaine withdrawal increases the reinforcing strength of cocaine. This differs from results with the opioid agonist heroin and suggests that withdrawal may have different functions in the maintenance of opioid and stimulant abuse. PMID:19776729

  7. An investigation of interactions between hypocretin/orexin signaling and glutamate receptor surface expression in the rat nucleus accumbens under basal conditions and after cocaine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Zabala, Ainhoa; Li, Xuan; Milovanovic, Mike; Loweth, Jessica A.; Maldonado, Rafael; Berrendero, Fernando; Wolf, Marina E.

    2013-01-01

    Hypocretin peptides are critical for the effects of cocaine on excitatory synaptic strength in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). However, little is known about their role in cocaine-induced synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). First, we tested whether hypocretin-1 by itself could acutely modulate glutamate receptor surface expression in the NAc, given that hypocretin-1 in the VTA reproduces cocaine’s effects on glutamate transmission. We found no effect of hypocretin-1 infusion on AMPA or NMDA receptor surface expression in the NAc, measured by biotinylation, either 30 min or 3 h after the infusion. Second, we were interested in whether changes in hypocretin receptor-2 (Hcrtr-2) expression contribute to cocaine-induced plasticity in the NAc. As a first step towards addressing this question, Hcrtr-2 surface expression was compared in the NAc after withdrawal from extended-access self-administration of saline (control) versus cocaine. We found that surface Hcrtr-2 levels remain unchanged following 14, 25 or 48 days of withdrawal from cocaine, a time period in which high conductance GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors progressively emerge in the NAc. Overall, our results fail to support a role for hypocretins in acute modulation of glutamate receptor levels in the NAc or a role for altered Hcrtr-2 expression in withdrawal-dependent synaptic adaptations in the NAc following cocaine self-administration. PMID:24262606

  8. Dopamine D4 receptors linked to protein kinase G are required for changes in dopamine release followed by locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Dong Kun; Shim, Yoon-Bo; Ryu, In Soo; Seo, Su Yeon; Kim, Jieun; Yang, Ju Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Wook; Choe, Eun Sang

    2015-05-01

    We previously found that the dopamine D2-type receptors (D2 and D3 receptors), coupled to protein kinase G (PKG), upregulate locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. In this study, D4 receptors, another type of D2 receptor also coupled to PKG, were examined to determine their requirement in the regulation of locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. The results demonstrated that repeated injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg), given once a day for seven consecutive days, significantly increased extracellular dopamine concentrations. Intra-caudate infusion of the D4 receptor agonist, PD168077 (10 nmol), and the PKG inhibitor, KT5823 (2 nmol), significantly decreased the repeated cocaine-induced increase in dopamine levels and locomotor activity. However, intra-caudate infusion of KT5823, but not PD168077, decreased ∆FosB immunoreactivity elevated by repeated cocaine administration. These findings suggest that D4 receptors linked to PKG could be a key modulator for dopamine release required for changes in locomotor activity caused by repeated cocaine exposure. PMID:25702161

  9. The role of the neurokinin-1 receptor in stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol and cocaine seeking.

    PubMed

    Schank, Jesse R; King, Courtney E; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Heilig, Markus; Weinshenker, David; Schroeder, Jason P

    2014-04-01

    Neurokinin-1 receptors (NK1Rs) have been shown to mediate alcohol and opiate, but not cocaine reward in rodents. We recently reported that NK1R antagonism also blocks stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in rats, but it is presently unknown whether these antirelapse properties extend to other drug classes. Although some work has suggested that intracranial substance P (SP) infusion reinstates cocaine seeking following extinction, no studies have indicated a direct role for the NK1R in reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Here, we explored the effect of the NK1R antagonist L822429 on yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol or cocaine seeking in Long-Evans rats. Consistent with our previous findings with footshock-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in Wistar rats, we found that L822429 attenuates yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking, but does not affect baseline alcohol self-administration. We observed a similar suppression of yohimbine-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking by L822429, and found that Long-Evans rats exhibit greater sensitivity to NK1R antagonism than Wistar rats. Accordingly, Long-Evans rats exhibit differences in the expression of NK1Rs in some subcortical brain regions. Combined, our findings suggest that while NK1R antagonism differentially influences alcohol- and cocaine-related behavior, this receptor mediates stress-induced seeking of both drugs. PMID:24173499

  10. The neuropathology of cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Andreas; Mall, Gita; Penning, Randolph; Sachs, Hans; Weis, Serge

    2003-03-01

    Cocaine abuse represents a worldwide significant forensic issue as it is becoming widely recognized as one of the most dangerous illicit drugs in common use today. Besides cardiovascular complications, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms are the most common manifestations of cocaine toxicity. The latter include seizures, movement disorders and cerebrovascular complications. In chronic cocaine abusers morphological, physiological, and neurochemical abnormalities have been demonstrated by using neuroradiological techniques such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography or single photon emission computed tomography. The spectrum of neuropathologic changes encountered in the brains of cocaine abusers is broad, but the major findings consist of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhages and cerebral ischemia. Especially persons with underlying arteriovenous malformation or aneurysm are at risk for such events. Except for a few instances of vasculitis, the etiology of cocaine-related cerebrovascular accidents is still unclear. Besides pharmacologically-induced vasospasm, impaired hemostasis and platelet function and decreased cerebral blood flow have been proposed. At the cellular level, abnormalities in the expression of transcription factors and changes of brain neurotransmitter systems have been reported. PMID:12935600

  11. The relationship between years of cocaine use and brain activation to cocaine and response inhibition cues

    PubMed Central

    Prisciandaro, James J.; Joseph, Jane E.; Myrick, Hugh; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Henderson, Scott; Pfeifer, James; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging research has attempted to elucidate the neurobehavioral underpinnings of cocaine dependence by evaluating differences in brain activation to cocaine and response inhibition cues between cocaine dependent individuals and controls. Less research has investigated associations between task-related brain activation and cocaine use characteristics; the present study was designed to address this gap in the literature. Design Cross-sectional. Setting The Center for Brain Imaging at the Medical University of South Carolina. Participants 51 cocaine users (41 dependent). Measurements Brain activation to cocaine-cue exposure and go no-go tasks in six a priori selected brain regions of interest and cocaine use characteristics (i.e., cocaine dependence status, years of cocaine use, cocaine use in the past 90 days) assessed via standardized interviews. Findings Participants demonstrated elevated activation to cocaine (bilateral ventral striatum, dorsal caudate, amygdala; mean F=19.00, mean p<.001) and response inhibition (bilateral anterior cingulate, insula, inferior frontal gyrus; mean F=7.01, mean p=.02) cues in all hypothesized brain regions. Years of cocaine use was associated with task-related brain activation, with more years of cocaine use associated with greater activation to cocaine cues in right (F=7.97,p=.01) and left (F=5.47,p=.02) ventral striatum and greater activation to response inhibition cues in left insula (F=5.10,p=.03) and inferior frontal gyrus (F=4.12,p=.05) controlling for age, cocaine dependence status, and cocaine use in the past 90 days. Conclusions Years of cocaine use may be more centrally related to cocaine cue and response inhibition brain activation as compared to cocaine dependence diagnosis or amount of recent use. PMID:24938849

  12. [Intraosseous infusion for adults].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kirchhoff, C

    2008-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion methods have been common for emergency treatment in infants and children for years. The role of IO access in adults is however much less clear, but its importance in this patient group is increasing, and different devices are available today. Each device has strengths and weaknesses, but all achieve rapid vascular access even in challenging situations. The potential of IO access regarding both therapeutic and diagnostic options has been shown in several operational studies in and out of hospital. Insertion times require between 1 and 2 min in most cases, while insertion and handling of the IO access devices seem to be easy and reliable. The flow rates of IO access devices for adults are lower than those of large-bore peripheral intravenous catheters, but fluid resuscitation is possible in most cases at least with pressure bag infusion systems. Most drugs administered intravenously can be given intraosseously in equivalent dosages and with the same effects. Nevertheless the limitations and risks of IO access routes need to be considered for each application. Rapid IO access is now possible in all age groups, and the 2005 AHA Guidelines favor it over drug administration via the endotracheal tube. PMID:18250995

  13. Blockade of 5-HT2A receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex attenuates reinstatement of cue-elicited cocaine-seeking behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pockros, Lara A.; Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Swinford, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The action of serotonin (5-HT) at the 5-HT2A receptor subtype is thought to be involved in cocaine-seeking behavior that is motivated by exposure to drug-associated cues and drug priming. 5-HT2A receptors are densely clustered in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), an area that plays a role in mediating cocaine-seeking behavior. Objectives This study examined the hypothesis that M100907, a 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, infused directly in the vmPFC attenuates cue- and cocaine-primed reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Methods Rats trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg, i.v.) paired with light and tone cues underwent extinction training during which operant responses produced no consequences. Once behavior extinguished, rats were tested for reinstatement of responding elicited by either response-contingent presentations of the cocaine-paired light/tone cues or by cocaine-priming injections (10 mg/kg, i.p.) within 1 min after pretreatment with microinfusions of M100907 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0, or 1.5 μg/0.2 μl/side) into the vmPFC. Results Intra-vmPFC M100907 decreased cue-elicited reinstatement at the two highest doses (1.0 and 1.5 μg) but produced only a slight decrease in cocaine-primed reinstatement that was not dose dependent. The decrease in cue reinstatement was not likely due to impaired ability to respond since intra-vmPFC M100907 infusions had minimal effect on cocaine self-administration and no effect on cue-elicited sucrose-seeking behavior, or spontaneous or cocaine-induced locomotion. M100907 infusions into the adjacent anterior cingulate cortex had no effect on cue reinstatement. Conclusions The results suggest that the blockade of 5-HT2A receptors in the vmPFC selectively attenuates the incentive motivational effects of cocaine-paired cues. PMID:21079923

  14. A novel monoclonal antibody specific for cocaine.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjyou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki

    2013-08-01

    Detection systems for the illegal drug cocaine need to have a high sensitivity and specificity for cocaine and to be relatively easy to use. In the current study, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) with a high specificity for cocaine was produced. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence quenching immunoassay were used to screen the hybridomas. The MAb S27Y (IgG1) was shown to be sensitive and specific for cocaine and quenched fluorescence. Thus, S27Y has the potential to be used in screening assays for the rapid and sensitive detection of cocaine. PMID:23909419

  15. Effects of adolescent nicotine exposure and withdrawal on intravenous cocaine self-administration during adulthood in male C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Price E; Miller, Mellessa M; Rogers, Tiffany D; Blaha, Charles D; Mittleman, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Studies of adolescent drug use show (1) a pattern in which the use of tobacco precedes the use of other drugs and (2) a positive relationship between adolescent tobacco use and later drug use. These observations have led to the hypothesis that a causal relationship exists between early exposure to nicotine and the later use of hard drugs such as cocaine. Using male C57BL/6J mice, we tested the hypothesis that nicotine exposure in adolescence leads to increased intravenous self-administration (IVSA) of cocaine in adulthood. Using miniature osmotic pumps, we exposed mice and their littermate controls to nicotine (24 mg/kg/day) or vehicle, respectively, over the entire course of adolescence [postnatal days (P) 28-56]. Nicotine exposure was terminated on P56 and mice were not exposed to nicotine again during the experiment. On P73, mice were allowed to acquire cocaine IVSA (1.0 mg/kg/infusion) and a dose-response curve was generated (0.18, 0.32, 0.56, 1.0, 1.8 mg/kg/infusion). Lever pressing during extinction conditions was also evaluated. All mice rapidly learned to lever press for the combination of cocaine infusions and non-drug stimuli. Analysis of the dose-response curve revealed that adolescent nicotine-exposed mice self-administered significantly more (P < 0.05) cocaine than controls at all but the highest dose. No significant differences were observed between adolescent nicotine-exposed and control mice during the acquisition or extinction stages. These results indicate that adolescent nicotine exposure can increase cocaine IVSA in mice, which suggests the possibility of a causal link between adolescent tobacco use and later cocaine use in humans. PMID:22978678

  16. Cocaine cue versus cocaine dosing in humans: Evidence for distinct neurophysiological response profiles

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Malcolm S.; Flammino, Frank; Howard, Bryant; Nilsen, Diana; Prichep, Leslie S.

    2008-01-01

    Subjective, physiological and electroencephalographic (EEG) profiles were studied in cocaine dependent study participants in response to cocaine cue exposure or a dose of smoked cocaine. Both stimuli increased subjective ratings of cocaine high and craving, enhanced negative affect, and boosted plasma ACTH and skin conductance levels. However, cocaine dose produced a greater increase in high and a more prolonged increase in plasma ACTH, while cocaine cue produced a decline in skin temperature. Both stimuli produced increases in absolute theta, alpha and beta EEG power over the prefrontal cortex. However, interhemispheric EEG coherence over the prefrontal cortex decreased during cocaine cue exposure but increased following cocaine dose. Moreover, correlation analysis of subjective, physiological and EEG responding to cocaine cue and dose revealed distinct profiles. Delta and theta activity were associated with negative affect during cocaine cue exposure, but were associated with cocaine craving and reward following cocaine dosing. In both conditions, alpha activity was marker for anxiousness but not high. These data demonstrate similar subjective, physiological responding in clinical laboratory states of cocaine craving and reward. However, differences in EEG response profiles, and their relationship to function, indicate distinct neurophysiological mediators of cocaine craving and reward within the prefrontal cortex. PMID:18674556

  17. Cocaine Constrictor Mechanisms of the Cerebral Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Robert M; Yoon, SeongHun; Zuccarello, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Cocaine constriction of the cerebral vasculature is thought to contribute to the ischemia associated with cocaine use. However, the mechanisms whereby cocaine elicits relevant vasoconstriction remain elusive. Indeed, proposed intra- and intercellular mechanisms based on over 3 decades of ex vivo vascular studies are, for the most part, of questionable relevancy due to the generally low contractile efficacy of cocaine combined with the use of nonresistance-type vessels. Furthermore, the significance attached to mechanisms derived from in vivo animal studies may be limited by the inability to demonstrate cocaine-induced decreased cerebral blood flow, as observed in (awake) humans. Despite these apparent limitations, we surmise that the vasoconstriction relevant to cocaine-induced ischemia is elicited by inhibition of dilator and activation of constrictor pathways because of cocaine action on the neurovascular unit (neuron, astrocyte, and vessel) and on vessels outside the unit. Furthermore, previous cocaine exposure, that is, conditions present in human subjects, downregulates and sensitizes these dilator and constrictor pathways, respectively, thereby enhancing constriction to acute cocaine. Identification of specific intra- and intercellular mechanisms requires investigations in the isolated microvasculature and the neurovascular unit from species chronically exposed to cocaine and in which cocaine decreases cerebral blood flow. PMID:26771152

  18. Cocaine use and the breastfeeding mother.

    PubMed

    Jones, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is the second most commonly used illicit drug. Use in pregnancy and breastfeeding may have severe consequences for the baby due to its pharmacokinetic properties. Midwives need to be aware of the prolonged action of cocaine and be alert to the possibility of cocaine toxicity if a baby is excessively irritable and tachycardic. Euphoric highs are brief but breast milk and urine remain positive for long periods. Infant urine following exposure to cocaine via breast milk may remain positive for up to 60 hours. Mothers who snort cocaine should pump and dump breast milk for 24-48 hours. Passive inhalation of crack cocaine smoke may also result in infants with positive toxicology screens. Cocaine powder should never be applied to the nipples of breastfeeding mothers. PMID:26310088

  19. Cocaine abuse among heroin addicts in Spain.

    PubMed

    Torrens, M; San, L; Peri, J M; Olle, J M

    1991-01-01

    Abuse of cocaine is becoming a major problem among heroin addicts in Spain. Between 1987 and 1988, 75% of patients admitted as inpatients for detoxification from opiate dependence had consumed cocaine during the 6 months prior to admission and 25% had abused cocaine daily or several times/week. These cocaine abusers showed more toxicologic and psychopathologic problems than opiate addicts who did not abuse cocaine. The opiate addicts who also abused cocaine had begun using illicit drugs earlier and showed a higher frequency of anti-HIV antibodies. They also had more antisocial personality disorders and persistence of depressive symptoms during opiate detoxification than heroin addicts who did not abuse cocaine. Based on these findings, we insist on the need to develop different treatments for detoxifying patients with this dual addiction. PMID:2029857

  20. Differential regulation of mGlu5 R and ΜOPr by priming- and cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Polymnia; Zanos, Panos; Ehteramyan, Mazdak; Hourani, Susanna; Kitchen, Ian; Maldonado, Rafael; Bailey, Alexis

    2015-09-01

    The key problem for the treatment of drug addiction is relapse to drug use after abstinence that can be triggered by drug-associated cues, re-exposure to the drug itself and stress. Understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underlying relapse is essential in order to develop effective pharmacotherapies for its prevention. Given the evidence implicating the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5 R), μ-opioid receptor (MOPr), κ-opioid receptor (ΚOPr) and oxytocin receptor (OTR) systems in cocaine addiction and relapse, our aim was to assess the modulation of these receptors using a mouse model of cue- and priming-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Male mice were trained to self-administer cocaine (1 mg/kg/infusion, i.v.) and were randomized into different groups: (1) cocaine self-administration; (2) cocaine extinction; (3) cocaine-primed (10 mg/kg i.p.); or (4) cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Mice undergoing the same protocols but receiving saline instead of cocaine were used as controls. Quantitative autoradiography of mGlu5 R, MOPr, KOPr and OTR showed a persistent cocaine-induced upregulation of the mGlu5 R and OTR in the lateral septum and central amygdala, respectively. Moreover, a downregulation of mGlu5 R and MOPr was observed in the basolateral amygdala and striatum, respectively. Further, we showed that priming- but not cue-induced reinstatement upregulates mGlu5 R and MOPr binding in the nucleus accumbens core and basolateral amygdala, respectively, while cue- but not priming-induced reinstatement downregulates MOPr binding in caudate putamen and nucleus accumbens core. This is the first study to provide direct evidence of reinstatement-induced receptor alterations that are likely to contribute to the neurobiological mechanisms underpinning relapse to cocaine seeking. PMID:25522112

  1. Does surgical treatment within 4 hours after trauma have an influence on neurological remission in patients with acute spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Biglari, Bahram; Child, Christopher; Yildirim, Timur Mert; Swing, Tyler; Reitzel, Tim; Moghaddam, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Background The proper timing for surgery in patients with acute spinal cord injury is controversial. This study was conducted to detect if there is an advantage in early (within the first 4 hours after trauma) compared to late (between 4 and 24 hours after trauma) surgery on neurological outcome. Methods In this single institution prospective cohort study, data were analyzed from 51 spinal cord injured patients with an average age of 43.4 (±19.2) years. The influence of early (29 patients within the first 4 hours) as opposed to late (22 patients between 4 and 24 hours) decompression was evaluated by comparing data for neurological outcome. Patients of the study collectively suffered acute spinal fractures from C2 to L3 (cervical 39.2%, thoracic 29.4%, and lumbal 21.6%) or nonosseous lesions (9.8%). American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades were assessed at time of admission and 6 months after trauma or longer depending on the time of release. Surgical treatment included early stabilization and decompression within 24 hours. Results No significant difference between improved neurological function, measured with the AIS, and an early or late surgery time can be seen (P=0.402). Furthermore, binary logistic regression shows no significant difference between sex or age, and AIS improvement as possible confounders. Conclusion In our study, all patients with spinal cord injury were treated with spine stabilization and decompression within the first 24 hours after trauma. Surgical decompression within the first 4 hours after trauma was not associated with improved neurological outcome compared to treatment between 4 and 24 hours. In a clinical context, this indicates that there is a time frame of at least 1 day in which optimal care is possible. PMID:27621643

  2. [Development of smart infusion system].

    PubMed

    Li, Junyang

    2014-01-01

    The free care smart infusion system which has the function of liquid end alarm and automatic stopping has been designed. In addition, the system can send the alarm to the health care staff by Zigbee wireless network. Besides, the database of infusion information has been set up, it can be used for inquiry afterwards. PMID:24839846

  3. Removing the confusion about infusion.

    PubMed

    Bayne, C G

    1997-02-01

    There is more to infusion technology than simply connecting the "pump-du-jour" to the central line. The purpose of infusion technology, its safety products and four categories of devices-elastomeric, mechanical, gas and membrane-are discussed. PMID:9287736

  4. Intravenous Cocaine Priming Reinstates Cocaine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombas, Andres S.; Freeman, Kevin B.; Roma, Peter G.; Riley, Anthony L.

    2007-01-01

    Separate groups of rats underwent an unbiased conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure involving alternate pairings of distinct environments with intravenous (IV) injections of cocaine (0.75 mg/kg) or saline immediately or 15 min after injection. A subsequent extinction phase consisted of exposure to both conditioning environments preceded by…

  5. Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens shell attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of both cocaine and sucrose seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Guercio, Leonardo A; Schmidt, Heath D; Pierce, R Christopher

    2015-03-15

    Stimuli previously associated with drug taking can become triggers that can elicit craving and lead to relapse of drug-seeking behavior. Here, we examined the influence of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the nucleus accumbens shell on cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, an animal model of relapse. Rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.254 mg, i.v.) for 2 h daily for 21 days, with each infusion of cocaine being paired with a cue light. After 21 days of self-administration, cocaine-taking behavior was extinguished by replacing cocaine with saline in the absence of the cue light. Next, during the reinstatement phase, DBS was administered bilaterally into the nucleus accumbens shell through bipolar stainless steel electrodes immediately prior to re-exposure to cues previously associated with cocaine reinforcement. DBS continued throughout the 2 h reinstatement session. Parallel studies examined the influence of accumbens shell DBS on reinstatement induced by cues previously associated with sucrose reinforcement. Results indicated that DBS of the nucleus accumbens shell significantly attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine and sucrose seeking. Together, these results indicate that DBS of the accumbens shell disrupts cue-induced reinstatement associated with both a drug and a natural reinforcer. PMID:25529183

  6. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Nucleus Accumbens Shell Attenuates Cue-Induced Reinstatement of Both Cocaine and Sucrose Seeking in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guercio, Leonardo A.; Schmidt, Heath D.; Pierce, R. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli previously associated with drug taking can become triggers that can elicit craving and lead to relapse of drug-seeking behavior. Here, we examined the influence of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the nucleus accumbens shell on cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, an animal model of relapse. Rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.254 mg, i.v.) for 2 h daily for 21 d, with each infusion of cocaine being paired with a cue light. After 21 d of self-administration, cocaine-taking behavior was extinguished by replacing cocaine with saline in the absence of the cue light. Next, during the reinstatement phase, DBS was administered bilaterally into the nucleus accumbens shell through bipolar stainless steel electrodes immediately prior to re-exposure to cues previously associated with cocaine reinforcement. DBS continued throughout the 2 h reinstatement session. Parallel studies examined the influence of accumbens shell DBS on reinstatement induced by cues previously associated with sucrose reinforcement. Results indicated that DBS of the nucleus accumbens shell significantly attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine and sucrose seeking. Together, these results indicate that DBS of the accumbens shell disrupts cue-induced reinstatement associated with both a drug and a natural reinforcer. PMID:25529183

  7. A therapeutic combination of metyrapone and oxazepam increases brain levels of GABA-active neurosteroids and decreases cocaine self-administration in male rats.

    PubMed

    Schmoutz, Christopher D; Guerin, Glenn F; Runyon, Scott P; Dhungana, Suraj; Goeders, Nicholas E

    2015-09-15

    In rodents, the behavioral and neurochemical effects resulting from the pharmacological blockade of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are unclear. Metyrapone, a corticosterone synthesis inhibitor, has been demonstrated to reduce cocaine-related behaviors, especially in a low-dose combination with oxazepam, a benzodiazepine. Although this combination therapy (MET/OX) also reduces drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors in both rodents and cocaine-dependent humans, these effects are not correlated with plasma glucocorticoid levels. In this brief report, we present data demonstrating that this MET/OX combination enhances brain levels of the GABA-active steroid metabolites, tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC) and allopregnanolone. Male rats, trained to self-administer cocaine or that received yoked-saline infusions, were pretreated with MET/OX, at doses that reduced cocaine-motivated responding, or vehicle. Allopregnanolone and THDOC were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala in the brains from these rats. THDOC levels were enhanced following MET/OX pretreatment in both brain regions, regardless of cocaine self-administration experience. However, allopregnanolone was selectively enhanced in the rats that self-administered cocaine, but not in rats in the yoked-saline group. Thus, the MET/OX combination increased neurosteroid content in brain regions important for drug addiction. These neurosteroids have been shown to reduce cocaine-related behaviors and may contribute to the behavioral effects of MET/OX combination therapy. PMID:26003946

  8. Acute brain metabolic effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys with a history of cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Henry, Porche' Kirkland; Murnane, Kevin S; Votaw, John R; Howell, Leonard L

    2010-12-01

    Cocaine addiction involves an escalation in drug intake which alters many brain functions. The present study documented cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolic activity as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Experimentally naive rhesus monkeys (N = 6) were given increasing access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug self-administration. PET imaging with F-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to measure acute intramuscular (i.m.) cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolism in the cocaine-naïve state, following 60 sessions under limited-access conditions (1 h/day), following 60 sessions under extended-access conditions (4 h/day), and following 4 weeks of drug withdrawal. In the cocaine-naïve state, cocaine-induced increases in brain metabolism were restricted to the prefrontal cortex. As cocaine exposure increased from limited to extended access, metabolic effects expanded throughout the frontal cortex and were induced within the striatum. Conversely, cocaine-induced activation was far less robust following withdrawal. The results highlight a progressive expansion of the metabolic effects of cocaine to include previously unaffected dopamine innervated brain regions as a consequence of cocaine self-administration history. The identification of brain regions progressively influenced by drug exposure may be highly relevant toward efforts to develop treatments for cocaine addiction. PMID:20680706

  9. Occult cocaine exposure in children.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, N M; Meert, K L; Knazik, S R; Yee, H; Kauffman, R E

    1991-12-01

    We determined the prevalence of cocaine and cannabinoid exposure among young children presenting to an urban pediatric emergency department without signs or symptoms suggestive of the exposure. The study included 460 children between 1 and 60 months of age in whom urinalysis was required for investigation of routine pediatric complaints. Anonymously and without informed consent, an aliquot of urine was screened for cocaine metabolite (benzoylecgonine) and 11- or delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9 carboxylic acid with the enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique. Positive specimens were rescreened with a radioimmunoassay and confirmed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, if a sufficient quantity of urine was available. Benzoylecgonine was identified in 25 patients (5.4%) by both screening techniques. Enough urine was available for confirmatory testing in eight patients, and all eight urine specimens contained benzoylecgonine. Neither 11- nor delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9 carboxylic acid was detected in any patient. We documented the magnitude of the problem of occult passive cocaine exposure in young children living in an urban environment. Such exposure has serious implications for the assessment of outcomes in postnatal follow-up studies of prenatally exposed children as well as potential risks to children living in household environments where occult cocaine exposure occurs. PMID:1669673

  10. Medical outcome of cocaine bodystuffers.

    PubMed

    June, R; Aks, S E; Keys, N; Wahl, M

    2000-02-01

    To describe the clinical course of cocaine "bodystuffers" presenting to regional emergency departments, a descriptive retrospective analysis was performed on all cases of cocaine bodystuffers received by a metropolitan poison control center and associated toxicology service from January 1993 to May 1994. We identified 46 cases of patients classified as bodystuffers. Of these, 34 patients (74%) remained asymptomatic. Eight patients (18%) had mild symptoms including hypertension and tachycardia that resolved with no treatment beyond decontamination or benzodiazepines (one patient). Two patients (4%) had moderate symptoms including agitation and fever that resolved with no treatment beyond decontamination or benzodiazepines (one patient). Two patients (4%) had severe symptoms including seizure and cardiac dysrhythmia. Both died. Radiographs of the abdomen were negative for foreign body in all 23 examinations performed. Mild cocaine intoxication is common in cocaine bodystuffers. Severe intoxication can occur, resulting in death. Abdominal radiographs are not of value for stuffers ingesting cellophane-wrapped packets. More experience is needed to determine the length of intensive care monitoring that these patients require. PMID:10699526

  11. The First American Cocaine Epidemic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtwright, David T.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the wave of cocaine abuse that followed the drug's recommendation by the late nineteenth-century medical community as a cure all. Details drug addiction among ethnic and social groups at the turn of the century. Warns that drug epidemics have important social and legal consequences. Suggests legal pressure may alter the form of drug…

  12. Multiple faces of BDNF in cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Wolf, Marina E.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to play roles in many types of plasticity including drug addiction. Here we focus on rodent studies over the past two decades that have demonstrated diverse roles of BDNF in models of cocaine addiction. First, we will provide an overview of studies showing that cocaine exposure alters (and generally increases) BDNF levels in reward-related regions including the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. Then we will review evidence that BDNF contributes to behavioral changes in animal models of cocaine addiction, focusing on conditioned place preference, behavioral sensitization, maintenance and reinstatement of self-administration, and incubation of cocaine craving. Last, we will review the role of BDNF in synaptic plasticity, particularly as it relates to plasticity of AMPA receptor transmission after cocaine exposure. We conclude that BDNF regulates cocaine-induced behaviors in a highly complex manner that varies depending on the brain region (and even among different cell types within the same brain region), the nature of cocaine exposure, and the “addiction phase” examined (e.g., acquisition vs maintenance; early vs late withdrawal). These complexities make BDNF a daunting therapeutic target for treating cocaine addiction. However, recent clinical evidence suggests that the serum BDNF level may serve as a biomarker in cocaine addicts to predict future relapse, providing an alternative direction for exploring BDNF’s potential relevance to treating cocaine addiction. PMID:25449839

  13. Multiple faces of BDNF in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Wolf, Marina E

    2015-02-15

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to play roles in many types of plasticity including drug addiction. Here, we focus on rodent studies over the past two decades that have demonstrated diverse roles of BDNF in models of cocaine addiction. First, we will provide an overview of studies showing that cocaine exposure alters (and generally increases) BDNF levels in reward-related regions including the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. Then we will review evidence that BDNF contributes to behavioral changes in animal models of cocaine addiction, focusing on conditioned place preference, behavioral sensitization, maintenance and reinstatement of self-administration, and incubation of cocaine craving. Last, we will review the role of BDNF in synaptic plasticity, particularly as it relates to plasticity of AMPA receptor transmission after cocaine exposure. We conclude that BDNF regulates cocaine-induced behaviors in a highly complex manner that varies depending on the brain region (and even among different cell types within the same brain region), the nature of cocaine exposure, and the "addiction phase" examined (e.g., acquisition vs maintenance; early vs late withdrawal). These complexities make BDNF a daunting therapeutic target for treating cocaine addiction. However, recent clinical evidence suggests that the serum BDNF level may serve as a biomarker in cocaine addicts to predict future relapse, providing an alternative direction for exploring BDNF's potential relevance to treating cocaine addiction. PMID:25449839

  14. Adverse health consequences of cocaine abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Cregler, L. L.

    1989-01-01

    Cocaine creates a strong physical addiction and is becoming recognized as one of the most dangerous illicit drugs abused today. The myth is that cocaine is harmless and nonaddictive. An estimated 30 million Americans have used cocaine, but the number may be as high as 40 million. Five to six million individuals are compulsive users. A review of the current literature revealed multiple reports of acute myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident with a temporal relation to cocaine use. Cocaine has also been associated with acute rupture of the aorta, cardiac arrhythmia, and sudden death. Cocaine has multisystem toxicity involving neurologic, psychiatric, obstetric, pulmonary, dermatologic, and gastrointestinal systems. The dopamine depletion hypothesis may explain why cocaine is repeatedly administered; cocaine produces a transient increase in synaptic dopamine. Alterations in dopamine neurotransmission may be responsible for the development of compulsive use patterns. When cocaine use becomes compulsive, psychosocial dysfunction, deviant behaviors, and a wide spectrum of social, financial, and family problems invariably result. Addiction, major medical complications, and death are true hazards of cocaine use. PMID:2657079

  15. Metabolic Enzymes of Cocaine Metabolite Benzoylecgonine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiabin; Zheng, Xirong; Zhan, Max; Zhou, Ziyuan; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zheng, Fang

    2016-08-19

    Cocaine is one of the most addictive drugs without a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medication. Enzyme therapy using an efficient cocaine-metabolizing enzyme is recognized as the most promising approach to cocaine overdose treatment. The actual enzyme, known as RBP-8000, under current clinical development for cocaine overdose treatment is our previously designed T172R/G173Q mutant of bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE). The T172R/G173Q mutant is effective in hydrolyzing cocaine but inactive against benzoylecgonine (a major, biologically active metabolite of cocaine). Unlike cocaine itself, benzoylecgonine has an unusually stable zwitterion structure resistant to further hydrolysis in the body and environment. In fact, benzoylecgonine can last in the body for a very long time (a few days) and, thus, is responsible for the long-term toxicity of cocaine and a commonly used marker for drug addiction diagnosis in pre-employment drug tests. Because CocE and its mutants are all active against cocaine and inactive against benzoylecgonine, one might simply assume that other enzymes that are active against cocaine are also inactive against benzoylecgonine. Here, through combined computational modeling and experimental studies, we demonstrate for the first time that human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is actually active against benzoylecgonine, and that a rationally designed BChE mutant can not only more efficiently accelerate cocaine hydrolysis but also significantly hydrolyze benzoylecgonine in vitro and in vivo. This sets the stage for advanced studies to design more efficient mutant enzymes valuable for the development of an ideal cocaine overdose enzyme therapy and for benzoylecgonine detoxification in the environment. PMID:27224254

  16. Effects of repeated cocaine on medial prefrontal cortical GABAB receptor modulation of neurotransmission in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Prathiba; Steketee, Jeffery D

    2004-08-01

    Increased excitatory output from medial prefrontal cortex is an important component in the development of cocaine sensitization. Activation of GABAergic systems in the prefrontal cortex can decrease glutamatergic activity. A recent study suggested that sensitization might be associated with a decrease in GABAB receptor responsiveness in the medial prefrontal cortex. Therefore, the present study examined whether repeated exposure to cocaine-modified neurochemical changes in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system induced by infusion of baclofen into the medial prefrontal cortex. In vivo microdialysis studies were conducted to monitor dopamine, glutamate and GABA levels in the medial prefrontal cortex and glutamate levels in the ipsilateral nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area during the infusion of baclofen into medial prefrontal cortex. Baclofen minimally affected glutamate levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area of control animals, but dose-dependently increased glutamate levels in each of these regions in animals sensitized to cocaine. This effect was not the result of changes in GABAB receptor-mediated modulation of dopamine or GABA in the medial prefrontal cortex. The data suggest that alterations in GABAB receptor modulation of medial prefrontal cortical excitatory output may play an important role in the development of sensitization to cocaine. PMID:15287889

  17. Resurgence of Sucrose and Cocaine Seeking in Free-Feeding Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shahan, Timothy A.; Craig, Andrew R.; Sweeney, Mary M.

    2014-01-01

    Resurgence is relapse of an extinguished operant response following the removal of alternative reinforcement. In animal models of resurgence to date, rats have been food deprived and food is used as the source of alternative reinforcement. Thus, when the alternative reinforcer is removed, the only remaining source of food during experimental sessions is no longer available. Acute food deprivation is known to produce reinstatement of drug seeking, thus such deprivation has been suggested a potential mechanism of resurgence. The present experiments examined whether resurgence of sucrose and cocaine seeking could be obtained with rats that were not food deprived. Free feeding rats were trained to press a lever for either sucrose (Exp 1) or cocaine infusions (Exp 2). Next, lever pressing was extinguished and an alternative response (nose poking) was reinforced with sucrose. When nose poking was also placed on extinction, resurgence of both sucrose and cocaine seeking were observed. Thus, resurgence of both sucrose and cocaine seeking can be obtained in rats that are not food restricted and it appears unlikely that an acute hunger state is responsible for resurgence. In addition, the present procedures for studying resurgence in the absence of interpretive complexities introduced by the use of food-deprivation may prove useful for further investigations of the neurobiological mechanisms of resurgence. PMID:25446761

  18. Acquisition of cocaine self-administration with unsignaled delayed reinforcement in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Galuska, Chad M; Woods, James H

    2005-09-01

    Six experimentally naive rhesus monkeys produced 0.01 mg/kg/infusion cocaine by lever pressing under a tandem fixed-ratio 1 differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule. One lever press initiated an unsignaled 15- or 30-s delay culminating in cocaine delivery. Each press made during the delay reset the delay interval. With two exceptions, responding was acquired and maintained at higher rates than responding on a second (inoperative) lever. For the exceptions, a cancellation contingency was arranged in which each formerly inoperative-lever response reset the tandem schedule. This manipulation reduced presses on the inoperative lever. Subsequently, the consequences of responding on the two levers were reversed, and the monkeys again responded at higher rates on the operative lever. As a comparison, 3 additional experimentally naive monkeys received response-independent cocaine deliveries. Although lever pressing was observed, it extinguished and was subsequently reestablished under the tandem schedule. The results suggest that although response-reinforcer contiguity is not required for cocaine to acquire reinforcing functions, a response-reinforcer relation appears necessary. PMID:16262189

  19. NMDA receptor blockade in the basolateral amygdala disrupts consolidation of stimulus-reward memory and extinction learning during reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in an animal model of relapse.

    PubMed

    Feltenstein, Matthew W; See, Ronald E

    2007-11-01

    Previous research from our laboratory has implicated the basolateral amygdala (BLA) complex in the acquisition and consolidation of cue-cocaine associations, as well as extinction learning, which may regulate the long-lasting control of conditioned stimuli (CS) over drug-seeking behavior. Given the well established role of NMDA glutamate receptor activation in other forms of amygdalar-based learning, we predicted that BLA-mediated drug-cue associative learning would be NMDA receptor dependent. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered i.v. cocaine (0.6 mg/kg/infusion) in the absence of explicit CS pairings (2-h sessions, 5 days), followed by a single 1-h classical conditioning (CC) session, during which they received passive infusions of cocaine discretely paired with a light+tone stimulus complex. Following additional cocaine self-administration sessions in the absence of the CS (2-h sessions, 5 days) and extinction training sessions (no cocaine or CS presentation, 2-h sessions, 7 days), the ability of the CS to reinstate cocaine-seeking on three test days was assessed. Rats received bilateral intra-BLA infusions (0.5 microl/hemisphere) of vehicle or the selective NMDA receptor antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP-5), immediately prior to the CC session (acquisition), immediately following the CC session (consolidation), or immediately following reinstatement testing (consolidation of conditioned-cued extinction learning). AP-5 administered before or after CC attenuated subsequent CS-induced reinstatement, whereas AP-5 administered immediately following the first two reinstatement tests impaired the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior. These results suggest that NMDA receptor-mediated mechanisms within the BLA play a crucial role in the consolidation of drug-CS associations into long-term memories that, in turn, drive cocaine-seeking during relapse. PMID:17613253

  20. NMDA receptor blockade in the basolateral amygdala disrupts consolidation of stimulus-reward memory and extinction learning during reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in an animal model of relapse

    PubMed Central

    Feltenstein, Matthew W.; See, Ronald E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research from our laboratory has implicated the basolateral amygdala (BLA) complex in the acquisition and consolidation of cue-cocaine associations, as well as extinction learning, which may regulate the long-lasting control of conditioned stimuli (CS) over drug-seeking behavior. Given the well established role of NMDA glutamate receptor activation in other forms of amygdalar-based learning, we predicted that BLA-mediated drug-cue associative learning would be NMDA receptor dependent. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered i.v. cocaine (0.6 mg/kg/infusion) in the absence of explicit CS pairings (2-h sessions, 5 days), followed by a single 1-h classical conditioning (CC) session, during which they received passive infusions of cocaine discretely paired with a light+tone stimulus complex. Following additional cocaine self-administration sessions in the absence of the CS (2-h sessions, 5 days) and extinction training sessions (no cocaine or CS presentation, 2-h sessions, 7 days), the ability of the CS to reinstate cocaine-seeking on three test days was assessed. Rats received bilateral intra-BLA infusions (0.5 μl/hemisphere) of vehicle or the selective NMDA receptor antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP-5), immediately prior to the CC session (acquisition), immediately following the CC session (consolidation), or immediately following reinstatement testing (consolidation of conditioned-cued extinction learning). AP-5 administered before or after CC attenuated subsequent CS-induced reinstatement, whereas AP-5 administered immediately following the first two reinstatement tests impaired the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior. These results suggest that NMDA receptor-mediated mechanisms within the BLA play a crucial role in the consolidation of drug-CS associations into long-term memories that, in turn, drive cocaine-seeking during relapse. PMID:17613253

  1. The emergency care of cocaine intoxications.

    PubMed

    Vroegop, M P; Franssen, E J; van der Voort, P H J; van den Berg, T N A; Langeweg, R J; Kramers, C

    2009-04-01

    Cocaine is frequently used, especially among adolescents and by men between the age of 25 and 44. Many of them are able to use cocaine in normal day-to-day life, without any problems. Reduced prices of cocaine and other recreational drugs such as MDMA (ecstasy) and gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has led to an increased incidence of intoxications with these drugs. Since the production of cocaine is illegal, it may be impure and mixtures with other drugs such as atropine may occur. The treatment of patients with an acute cocaine intoxication can be complicated. Combination of cocaine with other drugs results in clinical pictures which are difficult to discriminate and that may have important consequences for treatment. PMID:19581655

  2. Cocaine self-administration disrupts mesolimbic dopamine circuit function and attenuates dopaminergic responsiveness to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Cody A; Ferris, Mark J; Jones, Sara R

    2015-08-01

    Dopaminergic projections from the ventral midbrain to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) have long been implicated in encoding associations between reward availability and environmental stimuli. As such, this circuit is instrumental in guiding behaviors towards obtaining maximal rewards based on previous experience. Cocaine acts on the dopamine system to exert its reinforcing effects and it is thought that cocaine-induced dysregulation of dopamine neurotransmission contributes to the difficulty that cocaine addicts exhibit in selecting environmentally appropriate behaviors. Here we used cocaine self-administration combined with in vivo fast scan cyclic voltammetry in anesthetised rats to examine the function of the ventral tegmental area to NAc projection neurons. Over 5 days of cocaine self-administration (fixed-ratio 1; 1.5 mg/kg/injection; 40 injections/day), animals increased their rate of intake. Following cocaine self-administration, there was a marked reduction in ventral tegmental area-stimulated NAc dopamine release. Additionally, there was a decreased augmentation of stimulated dopamine overflow in response to a cocaine challenge. These findings demonstrate that cocaine induces a hypodopaminergic state, which may contribute to the inflexible drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors observed in cocaine abusers. Additionally, tolerance to the ability of cocaine to elevate dopamine may lead to increased cocaine intake in order to overcome decreased effects, another hallmark of cocaine abuse. PMID:26037018

  3. Impaired insight in cocaine addiction: laboratory evidence and effects on cocaine-seeking behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, S.J.; Moeller, S.J.; Maloney, T.; Parvaz, M.A.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Telang, F.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-04-15

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are often characterized by impaired insight into behaviour. Such an insight deficit has been suggested, but never directly tested, in drug addiction. Here we tested for the first time this impaired insight hypothesis in drug addiction, and examined its potential association with drug-seeking behaviour. We also tested potential modulation of these effects by cocaine urine status, an individual difference known to impact underlying cognitive functions and prognosis. Sixteen cocaine addicted individuals testing positive for cocaine in urine, 26 cocaine addicted individuals testing negative for cocaine in urine, and 23 healthy controls completed a probabilistic choice task that assessed objective preference for viewing four types of pictures (pleasant, unpleasant, neutral and cocaine). This choice task concluded by asking subjects to report their most selected picture type; correspondence between subjects self-reports with their objective choice behaviour provided our index of behavioural insight. Results showed that the urine positive cocaine subjects exhibited impaired insight into their own choice behaviour compared with healthy controls; this same study group also selected the most cocaine pictures (and fewest pleasant pictures) for viewing. Importantly, however, it was the urine negative cocaine subjects whose behaviour was most influenced by insight, such that impaired insight in this subgroup only was associated with higher cocaine-related choice on the task and more severe actual cocaine use. These findings suggest that interventions to enhance insight may decrease drug-seeking behaviour, especially in urine negative cocaine subjects, potentially to improve their longer-term clinical outcomes.

  4. Impaired insight in cocaine addiction: laboratory evidence and effects on cocaine-seeking behaviour.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Scott J; Maloney, Thomas; Parvaz, Muhammad A; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Woicik, Patricia A; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2010-05-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are often characterized by impaired insight into behaviour. Such an insight deficit has been suggested, but never directly tested, in drug addiction. Here we tested for the first time this impaired insight hypothesis in drug addiction, and examined its potential association with drug-seeking behaviour. We also tested potential modulation of these effects by cocaine urine status, an individual difference known to impact underlying cognitive functions and prognosis. Sixteen cocaine addicted individuals testing positive for cocaine in urine, 26 cocaine addicted individuals testing negative for cocaine in urine, and 23 healthy controls completed a probabilistic choice task that assessed objective preference for viewing four types of pictures (pleasant, unpleasant, neutral and cocaine). This choice task concluded by asking subjects to report their most selected picture type; correspondence between subjects' self-reports with their objective choice behaviour provided our index of behavioural insight. Results showed that the urine positive cocaine subjects exhibited impaired insight into their own choice behaviour compared with healthy controls; this same study group also selected the most cocaine pictures (and fewest pleasant pictures) for viewing. Importantly, however, it was the urine negative cocaine subjects whose behaviour was most influenced by insight, such that impaired insight in this subgroup only was associated with higher cocaine-related choice on the task and more severe actual cocaine use. These findings suggest that interventions to enhance insight may decrease drug-seeking behaviour, especially in urine negative cocaine subjects, potentially to improve their longer-term clinical outcomes. PMID:20395264

  5. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862.3250 Section 862.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and...

  6. Impaired insight in cocaine addiction: laboratory evidence and effects on cocaine-seeking behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Thomas; Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Woicik, Patricia A.; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2010-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are often characterized by impaired insight into behaviour. Such an insight deficit has been suggested, but never directly tested, in drug addiction. Here we tested for the first time this impaired insight hypothesis in drug addiction, and examined its potential association with drug-seeking behaviour. We also tested potential modulation of these effects by cocaine urine status, an individual difference known to impact underlying cognitive functions and prognosis. Sixteen cocaine addicted individuals testing positive for cocaine in urine, 26 cocaine addicted individuals testing negative for cocaine in urine, and 23 healthy controls completed a probabilistic choice task that assessed objective preference for viewing four types of pictures (pleasant, unpleasant, neutral and cocaine). This choice task concluded by asking subjects to report their most selected picture type; correspondence between subjects’ self-reports with their objective choice behaviour provided our index of behavioural insight. Results showed that the urine positive cocaine subjects exhibited impaired insight into their own choice behaviour compared with healthy controls; this same study group also selected the most cocaine pictures (and fewest pleasant pictures) for viewing. Importantly, however, it was the urine negative cocaine subjects whose behaviour was most influenced by insight, such that impaired insight in this subgroup only was associated with higher cocaine-related choice on the task and more severe actual cocaine use. These findings suggest that interventions to enhance insight may decrease drug-seeking behaviour, especially in urine negative cocaine subjects, potentially to improve their longer-term clinical outcomes. PMID:20395264

  7. A severe complication of crack cocaine use

    PubMed Central

    Vidyasankar, Gokul; Souza, Carolina; Lai, Chi; Mulpuru, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes a 48-year-old woman with a history of recurrent ‘crack’ cocaine use, who developed progressive shortness of breath over a period of years. Serial imaging revealed progressive interstitial fibrosis secondary to recurrent alveolar hemorrhage and inflammation from crack cocaine. The present case serves as a reminder of the numerous sequelae of crack cocaine use, highlighting one particularly severe outcome. PMID:25848717

  8. Intraosseous infusion in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Neal, C J; McKinley, D F

    1994-01-01

    In traumatically injured or medically unstable pediatric patients requiring resuscitation, gaining intravenous access often is frustrating for the physician and agonizing for the patient. Even when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is performed by trained professionals, cardiac arrests in children in the prehospital setting have a mortality of 79% to 100%. Immediate vascular access such as that obtained by intraosseous infusion improves survival. The intraosseous infusion technique uses the medullary cavity in the tibia as a "noncollapsible vein" for parenteral infusion. It is indicated in a child in shock or cardiac arrest when two attempts to access peripheral vasculature have failed or when more than 2 minutes have elapsed in the attempt to gain access. Epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, lidocaine, and volume expanders can be infused via the intraosseous route. Complications rarely occur. The technique described here is gaining acceptance in both prehospital and emergency department settings. PMID:8169160

  9. Proctoclysis: emergency rectal fluid infusion.

    PubMed

    Tremayne, Vincent

    This article describes the use and effectiveness of proctoclysis (rectal fluid infusion) in providing fluid resuscitation in the absence of intravenous access in rural and remote environments. PMID:19856644

  10. Adolescent atomoxetine treatment in a rodent model of ADHD: effects on cocaine self-administration and dopamine transporters in frontostriatal regions.

    PubMed

    Somkuwar, Sucharita S; Jordan, Chloe J; Kantak, Kathleen M; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2013-12-01

    Cocaine abuse and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are often comorbid. Preclinical research indicates that medial prefrontal (mPFC) and orbitofrontal (OFC) cortices are important neural substrates for both disorders. Using the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model of ADHD, we reported that adolescent treatment with the stimulant methylphenidate, a dopamine (DAT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporter inhibitor, enhanced cocaine self-administration during adulthood, and was associated with increased DAT function in mPFC. This study investigates the effects of atomoxetine ((R)-N-methyl-γ-(2-methylphenoxy)-benzenepropanamine hydrochloride) treatment, a selective NET inhibitor, during adolescence on cocaine self-administration and on DAT function and cell-surface expression in mPFC and OFC during adulthood. SHR acquired cocaine self-administration faster than Wistar-Kyoto and Wistar. Across cocaine doses, SHR earned more cocaine infusions and had higher progressive-ratio breakpoints than Wistar-Kyoto and Wistar, demonstrating that the SHR phenotype models comorbid ADHD and cocaine abuse. Prior atomoxetine treatment did not augment cocaine self-administration in SHR, but acquisition was enhanced in Wistar-Kyoto. No strain differences were found for DAT kinetic parameters or cellular localization in the vehicle controls. Atomoxetine did not alter DAT kinetic parameters or localization in SHR mPFC. Rather, atomoxetine decreased V(max) and DAT cell surface expression in SHR OFC, indicating that inhibition of NET by atomoxetine treatment during adolescence indirectly reduced DAT function and trafficking to the cell surface in OFC, specifically in the ADHD model. Thus, atomoxetine, unlike methylphenidate, does not enhance vulnerability to cocaine abuse in SHR and may represent an important alternative for teens with ADHD when drug addiction is a concern. PMID:23822950

  11. Higher rate alternative non-drug reinforcement produces faster suppression of cocaine seeking but more resurgence when removed.

    PubMed

    Craig, Andrew R; Nall, Rusty W; Madden, Gregory J; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    Relapse following removal of an alternative source of reinforcement introduced during extinction of a target behavior is called resurgence. This form of relapse may be related to relapse of drug taking following loss of alternative non-drug reinforcement in human populations. Laboratory investigations of factors mediating resurgence with food-maintained behavior suggest higher rates of alternative reinforcement produce faster suppression of target behavior but paradoxically generate more relapse when alternative reinforcement is discontinued. At present, it is unknown if a similar effect occurs when target behavior is maintained by drug reinforcement and the alternative is a non-drug reinforcer. In the present experiment three groups of rats were trained to lever press for infusions of cocaine during baseline. Next, during treatment, cocaine reinforcement was suspended and an alternative response was reinforced with either high-rate, low-rate, or no alternative food reinforcement. Finally, all reinforcement was suspended to test for relapse of cocaine seeking. Higher rate alternative reinforcement produced faster elimination of cocaine seeking than lower rates or extinction alone, but when treatment was suspended resurgence of cocaine seeking occurred following only high-rate alternative reinforcement. Thus, although higher rate alternative reinforcement appears to more effectively suppress drug seeking, should it become unavailable, it can have the unfortunate effect of increasing relapse. PMID:26988268

  12. Effects of phentermine on responding maintained by progressive-ratio schedules of cocaine and food delivery in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Stafford, D; LeSage, M G; Glowa, J R

    1999-12-01

    Previous reports indicate that intravenous pretreatment with phentermine can decrease cocaine-maintained responding without affecting food-reinforced responding under fixed-ratio schedules. The present experiments were designed to explore the generality of this effect using progressive-ratio schedules of reinforcement and different routes of phentermine administration. Unit doses of cocaine and food-pellet magnitudes were identified that maintained similar breaking points, and the effects of acute exposure to phentermine were assessed. In Experiment 1, a 'conventional' (one-trial) progressive-ratio schedule was used, in which response requirements increased after each reinforcer delivery; in Experiment 2, a 'modified' (five-trial) progressive-ratio schedule was used, in which response requirements increased after every five reinforcer deliveries. In one group of monkeys, responding was maintained by food; in another, cocaine infusions maintained responding. Phentermine (0.1-5.6mg/kg, intramuscularly (i.m.)) dose-dependently decreased breakpoints on both progressive-ratio schedules. There were no differences in phentermine's effects on cocaine- and food-maintained behavior. In Experiment 3, intravenous administration of phentermine had largely similar effects. Taken together with results from previous reports, these data suggest that the effects of phentermine pretreatment are influenced by the behavioral procedure used to maintain responding and/or by the efficacy of the food and cocaine reinforcers. PMID:10780293

  13. [Transitory hyperbilirubinemia and oxytocin infusion].

    PubMed

    Quoss, I

    1978-01-01

    Serum bilirubin levels at 5th day of life was compared between 100 mature newborns with oxytocin infusion to the mother during labour and 100 mature newborns without oxytocin. Newborns, whose mothers received more than 5 IU oxytocin had significant higher bilirubin values than the controll group without oxytocin and the cases with oxytocin administration under 5 U. Hyperbilirubinaemie was also present in babies after vacuum extraction and oxytocin infusion. PMID:645287

  14. Molecular approaches to treatments for cocaine abuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippen-Anderson, Judith L.; George, Clifford; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.

    2003-02-01

    Cocaine is a potent stimulant of the central nervous system with severe addiction potential. Its abuse is a major problem worldwide. The exact mechanism of action of cocaine is still uncertain but it is known that its reinforcing and stimulant effects are related to its ability to inhibit the membrane bound dopamine transporter (DAT). This paper discusses efforts that are underway to identify ligands for possible use in the treatment of cocaine abuse. Much of this effort has been focussed on understanding cocaine interactions at DAT receptor sites.

  15. [Comorbidity between cocaine addiction and personality disorders].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montalvo, J; Lorea, I

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the current knowledge about the comorbidity between cocaine dependence and personality disorders. Results concerning a specific profile of cocaine patients are not conclusive. The prevalence rate of personality disorders in cocaine dependents is very heterogeneous (with a mean of 66% of cases), and a great variability is observed between all the studies carried out. There is a tendency for a higher proportion of cocaine dependents to be found within the cluster B category (mainly antisocial and borderline). Lastly, implications of this kind of study for future research and clinical practice are commented upon. PMID:17898818

  16. Neuropsychiatric effects of cocaine use disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Nnadi, Charles U.; Mimiko, Olubansile A.; McCurtis, Henry L.; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2005-01-01

    Individuals who use cocaine report a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms that are yet to be adequately targeted with treatment modalities. To address this problem requires an understanding of these symptoms and their neurobiological origins. Our paper reviewed the existing data on the neuropsychiatic implications of cocaine. We conducted a Medline search from 1984-2004 using terms, such as "cocaine", "cocaine addiction", "cocaine abuse", "cocaine neuropsychiatry" and "dual diagnosis". The search produced additional reference materials that were used in this review, although we focused on data that have likely clinical implications. The literature evidence suggested that, whereas acute cocaine overdose is potentially fatal, the ingestion of mild-to-moderate doses could result in fatal or nonfatal neuropsychiatric events. Also, chronic cocaine use may be associated with deficits in neurocognition, brain perfusion and brain activation patterns. Some of these deficits were unresolved with periods of abstinence ranging from 3-200 days. Taken together, these studies suggest the need for further investigations to fully characterize the neurobiological substrates of cocaine use disorders (CUDs) with the future possibility of more efficient treatment modalities. PMID:16334497

  17. Epigenetic Inheritance of a Cocaine Resistance Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Vassoler, Fair M.; White, Samantha L.; Schmidt, Heath D.; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Pierce, R. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    A heritable phenotype resulting from the self-administration of cocaine in rats was delineated. We observed delayed acquisition and reduced maintenance of cocaine self-administration in male, but not female, offspring of sires that self-administered cocaine. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein were increased in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and there was an increased association of acetylated histone H3 with BDNF promoters only in the male offspring of cocaine-experienced sires. Administration of a BDNF receptor antagonist (the TrkB receptor antagonist ANA-12) reversed the diminished cocaine self-administration in male cocaine-sired rats. In addition, the association of acetylated histone H3 with BDNF promoters was increased in the sperm of sires that self-administered cocaine. Collectively, these findings indicate that voluntary paternal ingestion of cocaine results in epigenetic reprograming of the germline resulting in profound effects on mPFC gene expression and resistance to cocaine reinforcement in male offspring. PMID:23242310

  18. Sleep Regulates Incubation of Cocaine Craving

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Wang, Yao; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    After withdrawal from cocaine, chronic cocaine users often experience persistent reduction in total sleep time, which is accompanied by increased sleep fragmentation resembling chronic insomnia. This and other sleep abnormalities have long been speculated to foster relapse and further drug addiction, but direct evidence is lacking. Here, we report that after prolonged withdrawal from cocaine self-administration, rats exhibited persistent reduction in nonrapid-eye-movement (NREM) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, as well as increased sleep fragmentation. In an attempt to improve sleep after cocaine withdrawal, we applied chronic sleep restriction to the rats during their active (dark) phase of the day, which selectively decreased the fragmentation of REM sleep during their inactive (light) phase without changing NREM or the total amount of daily sleep. Animals with improved REM sleep exhibited decreased incubation of cocaine craving, a phenomenon depicting the progressive intensification of cocaine seeking after withdrawal. In contrast, experimentally increasing sleep fragmentation after cocaine self-administration expedited the development of incubation of cocaine craving. Incubation of cocaine craving is partially mediated by progressive accumulation of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). After withdrawal from cocaine, animals with improved REM sleep exhibited reduced accumulation of CP-AMPARs in the NAc, whereas increasing sleep fragmentation accelerated NAc CP-AMPAR accumulation. These results reveal a potential molecular substrate that can be engaged by sleep to regulate cocaine craving and relapse, and demonstrate sleep-based therapeutic opportunities for cocaine addiction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sleep abnormalities are common symptoms in chronic drug users long after drug withdrawal. These withdrawal-associated sleep symptoms, particularly reduction in total sleep time and deteriorating sleep quality, have been

  19. [Cocaine addiction: current data for the clinician].

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Zarmdini, Rim; Petit, Aymeric; Lafaye, Geneviève; Lowenstein, William; Reynaud, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine remains the second most commonly used illicit drug worldwide after cannabis. Observed levels of cocaine use among countries considerably vary. An increased cocaine use is recorded in the general European population. Cocaine addiction is a worldwide public health problem, which has somatic, psychiatric, socio-economic and judicial complications. It is a multifactorial disorder variable in its clinical manifestations and heritable. Compared to the general population, there is a high prevalence of somatic and psychiatric disorders among cocaine-dependent patients. There are predictable dose-related effects of pharmacological action of cocaine and effects which are uncommon, unrelated to dose and occur randomly in this population. The number of patients entering drug treatment for primary cocaine use has been increasing in Europe for several years. However, there is no specific pharmacotherapy with established efficacy for the treatment of cocaine addiction, nor is any medication approved by regulatory authorities for such treatment. Recent controlled clinical studies and laboratory studies have highlighted some very promising medications. The perfect therapeutic platform for abstinence initiation and relapse prevention of cocaine addiction is a combination of pharmacological treatments and behavioral treatments. Targeting somatic and psychiatric comorbidity is another way to use pharmacological treatments in addictions. PMID:23727012

  20. Nifedipine lowers cocaine-induced brain and liver enzyme activity and cocaine urinary excretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Vitcheva, Vessela; Simeonova, Rumyana; Karova, Dima; Mitcheva, Mitka

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to see how nifedipine counters the effects of cocaine on hepatic and brain enzymatic activity in rats and whether it affects urinary excretion of cocaine. Male Wistar rats were divided in four groups of six: control, nifedipine group (5 mg kg-1i.p. a day for five days); cocaine group (15 mg kg-1i.p. a day for five days), and the nifedipine+cocaine group. Twenty-four hours after the last administration, we measured neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity in the brain and cytochrome P450 quantity, ethylmorphine-N-demethylase, and anilinehydroxylase activity in the liver. Urine samples were collected 24 h after the last cocaine and cocaine+nifedipine administration. Urinary cocaine concentration was determined using the GC/MS method.Cocaine administration increased brain nNOS activity by 55 % (p<0.05) in respect to control, which indicates the development of tolerance and dependence. In the combination group, nifedipine decreased the nNOS activity in respect to the cocaine-only group.In the liver, cocaine significantly decreased and nifedipine significantly increased cytochrome P450, ethylmorphine-N-demethylase, and anilinehydroxylase in respect to control. In combination, nifedipine successfully countered cocaine effects on these enzymes.Urine cocaine excretion in the cocaine+nifedipine group significantly dropped (by 35 %) compared to the cocaine-only group.Our results have confirmed the effects of nifedipine against cocaine tolerance and development of dependence, most likely due to metabolic interactions between them. PMID:21705300

  1. Effects of GABA(B) receptor agents on cocaine priming, discrete contextual cue and food induced relapses.

    PubMed

    Filip, Małgorzata; Frankowska, Małgorzata

    2007-10-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of the GABA(B) receptor antagonist (2S)-(+)-5,5-dimethyl-2-morpholineacetic acid (SCH 50911), the agonists baclofen and 3-aminopropyl(methyl)phosphinic acid (SKF 97541), and the allosteric positive modulator 3,5-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-hydroxy-beta,beta-dimethylbenzenepropanol (CGP 7930) on cocaine seeking behavior. The effects of the above drugs on the reinstatement of responding induced by natural reinforcer (food) were also studied. Male Wistar rats were trained to self-administer either cocaine (0.5 mg/kg/infusion) or food (sweet milk) and responding on the reinforcer-paired lever was extinguished. Reinstatement of responding was induced by a noncontingent presentation of the self-administered reinforcer (10 mg/kg cocaine, i.p.), a discrete contextual cue, or a contingent presentation of food. SCH 50911 (3-10 mg/kg) dose-dependently attenuated responding on the previously cocaine-paired lever during both reinstatement conditions, with slightly greater efficacy at reducing conditioned cue reinstatement. At the same time, it failed to alter reinstatement of food-seeking behavior. Baclofen (1.25-5 mg/kg) and SKF 97541 (0.03-0.3 mg/kg) attenuated cocaine- or food-seeking behavior; the effect of the drug appeared more effective for cocaine-seeking than food-seeking. CGP 7930 (10-30 mg/kg) reduced cocaine seeking without affecting food-induced reinstatement on reward seeking. Our results indicate that tonic activation of GABA(B) receptors is required for cocaine seeking behavior in rats. Moreover, the GABA(B) receptor antagonist SCH 50911 was effective in reducing relapse to cocaine at doses that failed to alter reinstatement of food-seeking behavior (present study), basal locomotor activity, cocaine and food self-administration (Filip et al., submitted for publication), suggesting its selective effects on motivated drug-seeking behavior. The potent inhibitory responses on cocaine seeking behavior were also seen

  2. Reversible and persistent decreases in cocaine self-administration after cholinesterase inhibition: different effects of donepezil and rivastigmine.

    PubMed

    Grasing, Kenneth; Yang, Yungao; He, Shuangteng

    2011-02-01

    We recently observed that pretreatment with the cholinesterase inhibitor, tacrine can produce long-lasting reductions in cocaine-reinforced behavior, described as persistent attenuation. In addition to inhibiting both acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase, tacrine can potentiate actions of dopamine. This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of donepezil (which selectively inhibits AChE) and rivastigmine (which inhibits both AChE and butyrylcholinesterase) on cocaine self-administration. High self-administration rats self-administered different doses of cocaine under a fixed ratio-5 schedule. Over a 4-day period, vehicle, donepezil, or rivastigmine was infused as animals were maintained in home cages (21 h per day), with signs of cholinergic stimulation (fasciculation, vacuous jaw movements, yawning, and diarrhea) scored by a blinded observer. Both compounds dose-dependently decreased cocaine self-administration, but differed in the potency and temporal pattern of their effects. Self-administration of low-dose cocaine was decreased to a greater degree by rivastigmine than donepezil (50% effective doses of 2.33 and 6.21 mg/kg/day, respectively), but this early effect did not continue beyond sessions immediately after treatment with rivastigmine. Group means for cocaine self-administration were decreased at some time points occurring between 1 and 3 days after the treatment with 10 mg/kg/day of donepezil (late effects), with decreases of more than 80% observed in some individual rats that persisted for 1 week or longer. Early, but not late, effects were correlated with signs of cholinergic stimulation. In summary, pretreatment with donepezil, but not rivastigmine produced persistent reductions in cocaine-reinforced behavior, which were not associated with signs of cholinergic stimulation. PMID:22173266

  3. The encoding of cocaine vs. natural rewards in the striatum of nonhuman primates: categories with different activations.

    PubMed

    Opris, I; Hampson, R E; Deadwyler, S A

    2009-09-29

    The behavioral and motivational changes that result from use of abused substances depend upon activation of neuronal populations in the reward centers of the brain, located primarily in the corpus striatum in primates. To gain insight into the cellular mechanisms through which abused drugs reinforce behavior in the primate brain, changes in firing of neurons in the ventral (VStr, nucleus accumbens) and dorsal (DStr, caudate-putamen) striatum to "natural" (juice) vs. drug (i.v. cocaine) rewards were examined in four rhesus monkeys performing a visual Go-Nogo decision task. Task-related striatal neurons increased firing to one or more of the specific events that occurred within a trial represented by (1) Target stimuli (Go trials) or (2) Nogotarget stimuli (Nogo trials), and (3) Reward delivery for correct performance. These three cell populations were further subdivided into categories that reflected firing exclusively on one or the other type of signaled reward (juice or cocaine) trial (20%-30% of all cells), or, a second subpopulation that fired on both (cocaine and juice) types of rewarded trial (50%). Results show that neurons in the primate striatum encoded cocaine-rewarded trials similar to juice-rewarded trials, except for (1) increased firing on cocaine-rewarded trials, (2) prolonged activation during delivery of i.v. cocaine infusion, and (3) differential firing in ventral (VStr cells) vs. dorsal (DStr cells) striatum cocaine-rewarded trials. Reciprocal activations of antithetic subpopulations of cells during different temporal intervals within the same trial suggest a functional interaction between processes that encode drug and natural rewards in the primate brain. PMID:19501630

  4. Cocaine Self-Administration in Social Dyads Using Custom-Built Operant Conditioning Chambers

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Ryan T.; Strickland, Justin C.; Smith, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditionally, the analysis of intravenous drug self-administration is limited to conditions in which subjects are tested in isolation. This limits the translational appeal of these studies because drug use in humans often occurs in the presence of others. Newmethod We used custom-built operant conditioning chambers that allowed social dyads visual, olfactory, auditory, and limited tactile contact while concurrently self-administering cocaine. Male rats were trained to respond according to a fixed interval schedule of reinforcement (with a limited hold) in order to determine if patterns of cocaine (0.75 mg/kg/infusion) self-administration became more similar over time in social pairs. Cocaine self-administration was tested across five days according to a 10-min fixed interval schedule (with a 5-min limited hold). Quarter-life values (time at which 25% of responses were emitted per interval) were analyzed using intraclass correlations. Results The total number of reinforcers obtained did not vary across the five days of testing; however, quarter-life values became progressively more similar between individuals within the social dyads. Comparison with existing methods Standard operant conditioning chambers are unable to assess responding in multiple animals due to their small size, the need to prevent subjects from responding on the lever of their partner, and the need to prevent infusion lines from entangling. By using custom-built social operant conditioning chambers, we assessed the effects of social contact on cocaine self-administration. Conclusion Social operant conditioning chambers can be used as a preclinical method to examine social influences on drug self-administration under conditions that approximate human substance use. PMID:25109902

  5. Stimulation of 5-HT1B receptors enhances cocaine reinforcement yet reduces cocaine-seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Acosta, Jazmin I.; Browning, Jenny R.; Hamilton, Elizabeth C.; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2010-01-01

    Paradoxically, stimulation of 5-HT1B receptors (5-HT1BRs) enhances sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of cocaine but attenuates incentive motivation for cocaine as measured using the extinction/reinstatement model. We revisited this issue by examining the effects of a 5-HT1BR agonist, CP94253, on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-primed reinstatement, predicting that CP94253would enhance cocaine-seeking behavior reinstated by a low priming dose, similar to its effect on cocaine reinforcement. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg, i.v.) paired with light and tone cues. For reinstatement experiments, they then underwent daily extinction training to reduce cocaine-seeking behavior (operant responses without cocaine reinforcement). Next, they were pre-treated with CP94253 (3–10 mg/kg, s.c.) and either tested for cocaine-primed (10 or 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or cue-elicited reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-seeking behavior. For reinforcement, effects of CP94253 (5.6 mg/kg) across a range of self-administered cocaine doses (0–1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) were examined. Cocaine dose-dependently reinstated cocaine-seeking behavior, but contrary to our prediction, CP94253 reduced reinstatement with both priming doses. Similarly, CP94253 reduced cue-elicited reinstatement. In contrast, CP94253 shifted the self-administration dose-effect curve leftward, consistent with enhanced cocaine reinforcement. When saline was substituted for cocaine, CP94253 reduced response rates (i.e. cocaine-seeking behavior). In subsequent control experiments, CP94253 decreased open-arm exploration in an elevated plus-maze suggesting an anxiogenic effect, but had no effect on locomotion or sucrose reinforcement. These results provide strong evidence that stimulation of 5-HT1BRs produces opposite effects on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-seeking behavior, and further suggest that 5-HT1BRs may be a novel target for developing medications for cocaine dependence. PMID:19650818

  6. Stimulation of 5-HT(1B) receptors enhances cocaine reinforcement yet reduces cocaine-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Pentkowski, Nathan S; Acosta, Jazmin I; Browning, Jenny R; Hamilton, Elizabeth C; Neisewander, Janet L

    2009-09-01

    Paradoxically, stimulation of 5-HT(1B) receptors (5-HT(1B)Rs) enhances sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of cocaine but attenuates incentive motivation for cocaine as measured using the extinction/reinstatement model. We revisited this issue by examining the effects of a 5-HT(1B)R agonist, CP94253, on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-primed reinstatement, predicting that CP94253 would enhance cocaine-seeking behavior reinstated by a low priming dose, similar to its effect on cocaine reinforcement. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg, i.v.) paired with light and tone cues. For reinstatement experiments, they then underwent daily extinction training to reduce cocaine-seeking behavior (operant responses without cocaine reinforcement). Next, they were pre-treated with CP94253 (3-10 mg/kg, s.c.) and either tested for cocaine-primed (10 or 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or cue-elicited reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-seeking behavior. For reinforcement, effects of CP94253 (5.6 mg/kg) across a range of self-administered cocaine doses (0-1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) were examined. Cocaine dose-dependently reinstated cocaine-seeking behavior, but contrary to our prediction, CP94253 reduced reinstatement with both priming doses. Similarly, CP94253 reduced cue-elicited reinstatement. In contrast, CP94253 shifted the self-administration dose-effect curve leftward, consistent with enhanced cocaine reinforcement. When saline was substituted for cocaine, CP94253 reduced response rates (i.e. cocaine-seeking behavior). In subsequent control experiments, CP94253 decreased open-arm exploration in an elevated plus-maze suggesting an anxiogenic effect, but had no effect on locomotion or sucrose reinforcement. These results provide strong evidence that stimulation of 5-HT(1B)Rs produces opposite effects on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-seeking behavior, and further suggest that 5-HT(1B)Rs may be a novel target for developing medications for cocaine dependence. PMID:19650818

  7. Electroencephalographic activity and mood in cocaine-dependent outpatients: effects of cocaine cue exposure.

    PubMed

    Bauer, L O; Kranzler, H R

    1994-08-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) and subjective reactions to cocaine cues were evaluated in 18 cocaine-dependent outpatients, after 14 or fewer days of abstinence, and 16 noncocaine-dependent controls. EEG activity and desire for cocaine were recorded while subjects viewed three 5-min films that featured either cocaine-associated, erotic, or neutral stimuli. Other measures of mood state and cocaine craving, derived from the Mood Adjective Checklist and the Cocaine Craving Questionnaire, respectively, were recorded immediately after each film. Analyses of absolute EEG power within six frequency bands (delta, theta, slow and fast alpha, slow and fast beta) revealed no EEG abnormalities in the cocaine-dependent group under any condition. In both subject groups, the cocaine-associated and erotic films produced a similar reduction in total EEG power. The cocaine-associated and erotic films also produced a similar increase in the self-rated desire for cocaine, but this change only occurred in the cocaine-dependent group. PMID:7948456

  8. A thermostable bacterial cocaine esterase rapidly eliminates cocaine from brain in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Howell, L L; Nye, J A; Stehouwer, J S; Voll, R J; Mun, J; Narasimhan, D; Nichols, J; Sunahara, R; Goodman, M M; Carroll, F I; Woods, J H

    2014-01-01

    A long-acting, thermostable bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE) has been identified that rapidly degrades cocaine with a K(M) of 1.33+0.085 μM. In vivo evaluation of CocE has shown protection against convulsant and lethal effects of cocaine in rodents, confirming the therapeutic potential of CocE against cocaine overdose. However, the current study is the first to evaluate the effects of CocE on cocaine brain levels. Positron emission tomogrpahy neuroimaging of [(11)C]cocaine was used to evaluate the time course of cocaine elimination from brain in the presence and absence of CocE in nonhuman primates. Systemic administration of CocE eliminated cocaine from the rhesus-monkey brain approximately three times faster than control conditions via peripheral actions through attenuating the input function from blood plasma. The efficiency of this process is sufficient to alleviate or prevent adverse central nervous system effects induced by cocaine. Although the present study used tracer doses of cocaine to access brain clearance, these findings further support the development of CocE for the treatment of acute cocaine toxicity. PMID:24984194

  9. Role of oxidative stress in cocaine-induced cardiotoxicity and cocaine-related death.

    PubMed

    Cerretani, D; Fineschi, V; Bello, S; Riezzo, I; Turillazzi, E; Neri, M

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine-induced cardiovascular disorders such as hypertension, thrombosis, myocardial dysfunction, cardiac dysrhythmias and endocarditis have received widespread attention in the context of cocaine abuse. The number of sudden deaths from cardiac causes, including myocardial infarction, ventricular tachyarrhythmia or aortic dissection, is also increasing. This manuscript will highlight the recent employment of study about cocaine cardiotoxicity and oxidative stress. Evidence has revealed that cardiac oxidative stress is a prominent early event of cocaine administration, which severely compromises the cardiac antioxidant cellular system and causes cardiac antioxidant cellular system injuries. Oxidative damage such as peroxidation of membrane phospholipids and depletion of nonenzymatic antioxidants such as glutathione have been found in the myocardium of chronic cocaine-treated animals and in patients. The data indicate that cocaine administration compromised the heart's antioxidant defense system. About the mechanisms involved in the cellular damage, the evidence that cocaine causes apoptosis in the heart comes from in vivo study. In animals model after short-term and long term-cocaine administration, the investigators demonstrates the role of Reactive Oxygen Species as a trigger of cardiac injury induced by cocaine. Cocaine also increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the heart, and apoptotic cells were predominantly found near inflammatory cells. The role of oxidative stress in cocaine-induced apoptosis in the heart is wide studied and documented. PMID:22856662

  10. Blockade of mesolimbic dopamine D3 receptors inhibits stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jeremy; Campos, Arlene C.; Kline, Nicole; Ashby, Charles R.; Hagan, Jim J.; Heidbreder, Christian A.; Gardner, Eliot L.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale The dopamine (DA) D3 receptor is preferentially expressed in the mesolimbic system. We have previously shown that selective D3 receptor blockade by the novel D3 antagonist SB-277011A inhibits cocaine’s reinforcing action and cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Objective In the present study, we investigated whether SB-277011A similarly inhibits stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Methods Rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.5 mg/kg per infusion, 3 h per session) for 10–14 days, followed by a once-daily extinction session for 7–14 days during which saline was substituted for cocaine. Extinction criteria were fewer than ten lever-presses per 3-h session for at least 3 consecutive days. After cocaine-seeking behavior was extinguished, each animal was tested twice for footshock-stress-induced reinstatement, once with vehicle (25% hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin) and once with one of three doses of SB-277011A in counterbalanced fashion. Results During the last 3 days of cocaine self-administration (SA), active lever-presses were approximately 100 per session under fixed-ratio 2 reinforcement (~25 mg/kg cocaine per session). After extinction, intermittent footshock (10 min, 0.5 mA, 0.5 s on with a mean inter-shock interval of 40 s) robustly reinstated the cocaine-seeking behavior (8.4±3.6 active lever-presses in last extinction session to 35.3±5.2 in animals after footshock stress). Intraperitoneal (IP) injections of SB-277011A (3, 6, and 12 mg/kg) dose-dependently blocked stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking. Reinstatement was also blocked by microinjections of SB-277011A (1.5 μg/0.5 μl per side) bilaterally into the nucleus accumbens, but not into the dorsal striatum. Conclusions The mesolimic DA D3 receptor plays an important role in mediating stress-induced reinstatement. PMID:15083257

  11. Early albumin infusion to infants at risk for respiratory distress

    PubMed Central

    Bland, R. D.; Clarke, T. L.; Harden, L. B.; Mayer, Judith L.; Ries, J. P.; Madden, W. A.; Crast, F. W.; Coyer, W. F.; Bass, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    In a randomized prospective study, 100 high-risk infants (selected on the basis of a cord serum protein level of 4·6 g/100 ml or less, gestational age under 37 weeks, birthweight 2500 g or less, and/or arterial pH below 7·25) received 8 ml/kg of either 25% salt-poor albumin or 5% dextrose in water before the age of 2 hours. All infants were then managed supportively with warmth, appropriate oxygen supplementation, isotonic fluid infusion, and close monitoring, without further administration of colloid or hypertonic alkali solutions over the first 4 hours of life. No statistically significant difference was shown between early colloid and early dextrose-water administration for either the incidence of idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or the mortality of high-risk infants, suggesting no apparent advantage of albumin over simple glucose-water infusion to hypoproteinaemic newborns shortly after birth. However, among the infants of 28 weeks' gestation or less admitted to the study, 3 of 4 albumin-treated patients survived, while 5 comparable infants in the dextrose-water group died within 12 hours of birth. For the 100 infants taken together there was a significant improvement in morbidity and mortality from previous experience in the same nursery, indicating that prompt supportive care, including early fluid administration, may be instrumental in reducing the incidence and severity of RDS. PMID:4749684

  12. Follow-up of inpatient cocaine withdrawal for cocaine-using methadone patients.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, A; Foote, J; Magura, S; Sturiano, V; Xu, N; Stimmel, B

    1996-01-01

    Significant proportions of opiate-dependent persons entering methadone treatment are also addicted to cocaine and continue to use cocaine during treatment. One standard response to cocaine use has been inpatient detoxification. This study examined the effectiveness of this procedure by comparing pre- and posttreatment urine toxicologies for methadone patients who had been hospitalized for cocaine withdrawal. The results showed a negligible effect on cocaine abstinence (less than 1 out of 10 patients abstinent 12 weeks after detox) and a modest reduction in the frequency of cocaine use (one-quarter decline in urine tests positive after 12 weeks). These findings raise serious doubts about the cost-effectiveness of inpatient cocaine detoxification. Better strategies need to be implemented to enhance the chances of remaining abstinent once detoxified. PMID:9219143

  13. Familiar companions diminish cocaine conditioning and attenuate cocaine-stimulated dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Wen-Yu; Cherng, Chian-Fang G; Wang, Shyi-Wu; Yu, Lung

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of companions on the rewarding effects of cocaine. Three cage mates, serving as companions, were housed with each experimental mouse throughout cocaine-place conditioning in a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm using conditioning doses of 10 and 20mg/kg. The presence of companions decreased the magnitude of the CPP. At 20mg/kg, cocaine stimulated dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens as evidenced by a significant decrease in total (spontaneous and electrical stimulation-provoked) DA release in accumbal superfusate samples. The presence of companions prevented this cocaine-stimulated DA release; such a reduction in cocaine-induced DA release may account for the reduction in the magnitude of the CPP in the presence of the companions. Furthermore, cocaine pretreatment (2.5mg/kg) was found to prevent the companion-produced decreases in cocaine (10mg/kg/conditioning)-induced CPP as well as the cocaine (10mg/kg)-stimulated DA release. Moreover, the presence of methamphetamine (MA) (1mg/kg)-treated companions decreased cocaine (20mg/kg/conditioning)-induced CPP and prevented the cocaine (20mg/kg)-stimulated DA release. Finally, the presence of companions decreased the magnitude of the CPP could not seem to be accounted for by cocaine-stimulated corticosterone (CORT) release. Taken together, these results indicate that familiar companions, regardless of their pharmacological status, may exert dampening effects on CPP induced by moderate to high conditioning doses of cocaine, at least in part, by preventing cocaine-stimulated DA release in the nucleus accumbens. PMID:27001454

  14. Differential roles of ventral pallidum subregions during cocaine self-administration behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Root, David H.; Ma, Sisi; Barker, David J.; Megehee, Laura; Striano, Brendan M.; Ralston, Carla M.; Fabbricatore, Anthony T.; West, Mark O.

    2012-01-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is necessary for drug-seeking behavior. VP contains ventromedial (VPvm) and dorsolateral (VPdl) subregions which receive projections from the nucleus accumbens shell and core, respectively. To date, no study has investigated the behavioral functions of the VPdl and VPvm subregions. To address this issue, we investigated whether changes in firing rate (FR) differed between VP subregions during four events: approaching toward, responding on, or retreating away from a cocaine-reinforced operandum, and a cocaine-associated cue. Baseline FR and waveform characteristics did not differ between subregions. VPdl neurons exhibited a greater change in FR compared to VPvm neurons during approaches toward, as well as responses on, the cocaine-reinforced operandum. VPdl neurons were more likely to exhibit a similar change in FR (direction and magnitude) during approach and response than VPvm neurons. In contrast, VPvm firing patterns were heterogeneous, changing FRs during approach or response alone, or both. VP neurons did not discriminate cued behaviors from uncued behaviors. No differences were found between subregions during the retreat and no VP neurons exhibited patterned changes in FR in response to the cocaine-associated cue. The stronger, sustained FR changes of VPdl neurons during approach and response may implicate VPdl in the processing of drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior via projections to subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata. In contrast, heterogeneous firing patterns of VPvm neurons may implicate VPvm in facilitating mesocortical structures with information related to the sequence of behaviors predicting cocaine self-infusions via projections to mediodorsal thalamus and ventral tegmental area. PMID:22806483

  15. Children of Cocaine: Facing the Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fact Find, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Statistical data illustrate the incidence of babies who have been prenatally exposed to cocaine. The damaging effects of maternal cocaine use on the fetus, infant, and young child are described, including: (1) prenatal strokes, malformed kidneys and limbs, and deformed hearts and lungs; (2) physical problems, social and emotional problems, and…

  16. Maternal Cocaine Addiction: Correlates and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Theresa Lawton

    This study investigated the effects of cocaine addiction on mothers' ability to care for their children. The population interviewed included 25 cocaine-addicted mothers in a drug treatment center and a comparison group of 25 mothers of children in a Head Start program. Each mother was questioned about: (1) her pregnancy with a specific child…

  17. Progesterone receptors activation after acute cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Bing K; Fabian, Sosimo; Jenab, Shirzad; Quiñones-Jenab, Vanya

    2006-12-18

    Cocaine modulates serum levels of progesterone in intact female and male rats, as well as in pregnant dams, and progesterone decreases or attenuates cocaine-induced behavioral and reward responses. It has been postulated that cocaine's modulation of serum progesterone levels may in turn alter progesterone receptor activity, thereby contributing to cocaine-induced alterations of neuronal functions and genomic regulations. To test this hypothesis, intact male rats received acute injections of saline or cocaine (15 or 30 mg/kg, dissolved in 0.9% saline, intraperitoneal). Progesterone serum levels, progesterone receptor (PR) protein levels, and PR-DNA binding complexes were measured in the striatum by radioimmunoassay, Western blot, and gel shift analyses, respectively. After injection of 15 mg/kg of cocaine, induction of progesterone serum levels was closely followed by an increase in receptor protein levels and DNA binding complexes. After injection of 30 mg/kg of cocaine, similar effects were observed along with an attenuation of receptor protein levels and DNA binding complexes at 60 min. Our results suggest that activation of progesterone receptors may be a mechanism by which cocaine mediates behavior through molecular alterations in the central nervous system. PMID:17109827

  18. Children of Cocaine: Treatment and Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howze, Kate; Howze, Wendell M.

    Information concerning the treatment and care of children addicted to cocaine is provided. Contents: (1) describe the drug; (2) put cocaine use in its historical and demographic perspectives; (3) report findings of a study documenting the incidence of maternal substance abuse in Pinellas County, Florida; (4) point out false perceptions,…

  19. Cocaine Abuse: The Evolution from Coca Leaves to Freebase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forno, Joseph J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes historical and sociological patterns of cocaine use. Discusses cocaine as an example of a new drug abuse trend as users search for new ways of using old drugs in ways that produce enhanced euphoria. Describes the use of cocaine freebase and emergency treatment of cocaine toxicity. (Author)

  20. [Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and delayed puberty: differential diagnosis using the LH-RH-infusion test].

    PubMed

    Vierhapper, H

    1983-08-26

    Serum concentrations of LH and FSH were determined during an intravenous infusion of LH-RH (200 micrograms, t = 4 hours) in 8 patients (age: 15 to 20 years) with delayed sexual maturation and retarded bone age. Four patients who by clinical criteria were later recognized as suffering from hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) presented during the infusion of LH-RH with only a small response of LH (and, in three cases, of FSH). In 3 patients with HH a deficiency of endogenous LH-RH due to a hypothalamic defect was suggested by an enhanced secretion of LH and FSH during a second LH-RH infusion test performed after priming of the pituitary by pulsatile, subcutaneous infusions of LH-RH (50 micrograms/night for 9 consecutive nights). The fourth patient with HH, who suffered from a pituitary adenoma, failed to display this enhanced secretion of gonadotropins following pituitary priming by intermittent administration of LH-RH. As compared with the patients with HH, 4 patients in whom puberty, although delayed, later occurred spontaneously (pubertas tarda, PT), presented with a considerably more pronounced secretion of LH and FSH during the infusion of LH-RH, and priming by intermittent subcutaneous LH-RH failed to achieve further enhancement of the secretion of LH and FSH during a second infusion test in these patients. The intravenous infusion of LH-RH in combination with a protocol of pituitary priming offers a possibility of distinguishing patients with delayed puberty from those with various forms of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. PMID:6417915

  1. Regulation of opioid receptors by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Unterwald, E M

    2001-06-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused psychostimulant. Its direct actions include inhibition of dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine reuptake into presynaptic nerve terminals, thereby potentiating the actions of these transmitters in the synapse. A variety of studies have demonstrated that cocaine can also have profound effects on the endogenous opioid system. Compelling evidence points to the importance of mu opioid receptors in human cocaine addiction and craving. Animal studies support these findings and demonstrate that chronic cocaine administration can result in alterations in opioid receptor expression and function as measured by changes in critical signal transduction pathways. This chapter reviews studies on the regulation of opioid receptors as the result of exposure to cocaine. PMID:11458541

  2. Hypomanic personality trait in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Lemere, F; Smith, J W

    1990-04-01

    An analysis of 292 private patients treated for cocaine addiction showed the following. Comorbid Axis I psychiatric disorders were found in 19% and preaddiction Axis I disorders in 9% of these patients. Psychopathology at the time of treatment appeared to be more the result of than the cause of the addiction. Of these patients 63% had become addicted pursuing euphoria. A definitive nonpathologic unipolar hypomanic subtype of cocaine addict was observed in 13% of these 292 patients. This was manifested more as a trait than a disorder. This subgroup had been reasonably well adjusted, fun-loving and action oriented extroverts before their addiction. The rush and lifestyle of cocaine fit the imperatives of their personality. In a significant subtype of cocaine addict, an underlying hypomanic personality trait is ego-syntonic with the abuse of cocaine. PMID:2346798

  3. Increased Sensitivity to Cocaine Self-Administration in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats is Associated with Changes in Striatal Dopamine Transporter Binding.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Pattison, Lindsey P; Childers, Steven R; Hemby, Scott E

    2015-09-01

    Cocaine abuse in HIV patients accelerates the progression and severity of neuropathology, motor impairment and cognitive dysfunction compared to non-drug using HIV patients. Cocaine and HIV interact with the dopamine transporter (DAT); however, the effect of their interaction on DAT binding remains understudied. The present study compared the dose-response functions for intravenous self-administration of cocaine and heroin between male HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1 Tg) and Fischer 344 rats. The cocaine and heroin dose-response functions exhibit an inverted U-shape for both HIV-1 Tg and F344 rats. For cocaine, the number of infusions for each dose on the ascending limb was greater for HIV-1 Tg versus F344 rats. No significant changes in the heroin dose-response function were observed in HIV-1 Tg animals. Following the conclusion of self-administration experiments, DAT binding was assessed in striatal membranes. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [(125)I] 3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125)I]RTI-55) in rat striatal membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to a two-site binding model, allowing for calculation of dissociation constant (Kd) and binding density (Bmax) values that correspond to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Control HIV-1 Tg rats exhibited a significantly greater affinity (i.e., decrease in Kd value) in the low-affinity DAT binding site compared to control F344 rats. Furthermore, cocaine self-administration in HIV-1 Tg rats increased low-affinity Kd (i.e., decreased affinity) compared to levels observed in control F344 rats. Cocaine also increased low-affinity Bmax in HIV-1 Tg rats as compared to controls, indicating an increase in the number of low-affinity DAT binding sites. F344 rats did not exhibit any change in high- or low-affinity Kd or Bmax values following cocaine or heroin self-administration. The increase in DAT affinity in cocaine HIV-1 Tg rats is consistent with the leftward shift of the

  4. Illicit traffic and abuse of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Stamler, R T; Fahlman, R C; Keele, S A

    1984-01-01

    There has been an increasing availability and abuse of cocaine in Canada in recent years. Cocaine abuse has spread from the affluent adult sectors of society to middle-income groups and the young, involving large sections of the population. The increase in illicit demand for, and the social acceptability of, cocaine has led to an increase in illicit cocaine supply. The availability of cocaine on the illicit market has been sustained by a vast over-production of the raw materials needed to produce cocaine in coca-growing areas of South America and the activities of sophisticated trafficking organizations with large operations and profits. As a result, cocaine prices at the wholesale level in South America and Canada are declining, and at the retail level in Canada have remained relatively stable or have slightly decreased. It has been estimated that more than one half of the amount of cocaine on the illicit market in Canada was illegally produced in Colombia, but the main quantities of the raw materials used for such production originated in Bolivia and Peru. Cocaine is smuggled into Canada primarily by commercial air transport, arriving at the three principal ports of entry, namely Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver, from whence it is distributed to other parts of the country. As drug law enforcement efforts increase in one area, traffickers shift their illicit operations to other areas in an attempt to escape detection. Current evidence suggests that both the availability and abuse of cocaine in Canada are likely to increase in the coming years. PMID:6569821

  5. Levamisole and cocaine synergism: a prevalent adulterant enhances cocaine's action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tallarida, Christopher S; Egan, Erin; Alejo, Gissel D; Raffa, Robert; Tallarida, Ronald J; Rawls, Scott M

    2014-04-01

    Levamisole is estimated by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to be present in about 80% of cocaine seized in the United States and linked to debilitating, and sometimes fatal, immunologic effects in cocaine abusers. One explanation for the addition of levamisole to cocaine is that it increases the amount of product and enhances profits. An alternative possibility, and one investigated here, is that levamisole alters cocaine's action in vivo. We specifically investigated effects of levamisole on cocaine's stereotypical and place-conditioning effects in an established invertebrate (planarian) assay. Acute exposure to levamisole or cocaine produced concentration-dependent increases in stereotyped movements. For combined administration of the two agents, isobolographic analysis revealed that the observed stereotypical response was enhanced relative to the predicted effect, indicating synergism for the interaction. In conditioned place preference (CPP) experiments, cocaine produced a significant preference shift; in contrast, levamisole was ineffective at all concentrations tested. For combination experiments, a submaximal concentration of cocaine produced CPP that was enhanced by inactive concentrations of levamisole, indicating synergism. The present results provide the first experimental evidence that levamisole enhances cocaine's action in vivo. Most important is the identification of synergism for the levamisole/cocaine interaction, which now requires further study in mammals. PMID:24440755

  6. Cocaine Dependent Individuals Discount Future Rewards more than Future Losses for both Cocaine and Monetary Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew W.; Bruner, Natalie R.; Johnson, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine dependence and other forms of drug dependence are associated with steeper devaluation of future outcomes (delay discounting). Although studies in this domain have typically assessed choices between monetary gains (e.g., receive less money now versus receive more money after a delay), delay discounting is also applicable to decisions involving losses (e.g., small loss now versus larger delayed loss), with gains typically discounted more than losses (the “sign effect”). It is also known that drugs are discounted more than equivalently valued money. In the context of drug dependence, however, relatively little is known about the discounting of delayed monetary and drug losses and the presence of the sign effect. In this within-subject, laboratory study, delay discounting for gains and losses was assessed for cocaine and money outcomes in cocaine-dependent individuals (n=89). Both cocaine and monetary gains were discounted at significantly greater rates than cocaine and monetary losses, respectively (i.e., the sign effect). Cocaine gains were discounted significantly more than monetary gains, but cocaine and monetary losses were discounted similarly. Results suggest that cocaine is discounted by cocaine-dependent individuals in a systematic manner similar to other rewards. Because the sign effect was shown for both cocaine and money, delayed aversive outcomes may generally have greater impact than delayed rewards in shaping present behavior in this population. PMID:25260200

  7. Cocaine-induced psychosis and impulsivity in cocaine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Roncero, Carlos; Daigre, Constanza; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Pérez-Pazos, Jesús; Gonzalvo, Begoña; Corominas, Margarita; Casas, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine-dependent patients have high impulsiveness. Cocaine-induced psychosis is common among cocaine-dependent patients. Different risk factors associated with cocaine-induced psychosis have been reported. The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between psychotic symptoms in cocaine-dependent patients and impulsivity and mental disorders characterized by impulsivity. This descriptive study included 287 outpatients with cocaine dependence according to the DSM-IV-TR criteria. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I and II, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and a specific questionnaire on the presence of cocaine-induced psychosis were used to assess patients. Symptoms were observed in 59.9% of the study population. Total and cognitive impulsiveness scores obtained from the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale were significantly higher in patients with cocaine-induced psychosis. Individuals from this group reported more overdose incidents, initiated more treatments during their lifetime, and had a significantly greater prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Patients with cocaine-induced psychosis have a greater degree of impulsivity and a higher prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Thus, if these disorders are observed in cocaine-dependent participants, the presence of psychotic symptoms should be evaluated to prevent further occurrence and their consequences. PMID:24074192

  8. Levamisole and cocaine synergism: a prevalent adulterant enhances cocaine's action in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tallarida, Christopher S.; Egan, Erin; Alejo, Gissel D.; Raffa, Robert; Tallarida, Ronald J.; Rawls, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Levamisole is estimated by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to be present in about 80% of cocaine seized in the United States and linked to debilitating, and sometimes fatal, immunologic effects in cocaine abusers. One explanation for the addition of levamisole to cocaine is that it increases the amount of product and enhances profits. An alternative possibility, and one investigated here, is that levamisole alters cocaine's action in vivo. We specifically investigated effects of levamisole on cocaine's stereotypical and place-conditioning effects in an established invertebrate (planarian) assay. Acute exposure to levamisole or cocaine produced concentration-dependent increases in stereotyped movements. For combined administration of the two agents, isobolographic analysis revealed that the observed stereotypical response was enhanced relative to the predicted effect, indicating synergism for the interaction. In conditioned place preference (CPP) experiments, cocaine produced a significant preference shift; in contrast, levamisole was ineffective at all concentrations tested. For combination experiments, a submaximal concentration of cocaine produced CPP that was enhanced by inactive concentrations of levamisole, indicating synergism. The present results provide the first experimental evidence that levamisole enhances cocaine's action in vivo. Most important is the identification of synergism for the levamisole/cocaine interaction, which now requires further study in mammals. PMID:24440755

  9. Cocaine dependent individuals discount future rewards more than future losses for both cocaine and monetary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew W; Bruner, Natalie R; Johnson, Patrick S

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine dependence and other forms of drug dependence are associated with steeper devaluation of future outcomes (delay discounting). Although studies in this domain have typically assessed choices between monetary gains (e.g., receive less money now versus receive more money after a delay), delay discounting is also applicable to decisions involving losses (e.g., small loss now versus larger delayed loss), with gains typically discounted more than losses (the "sign effect"). It is also known that drugs are discounted more than equivalently valued money. In the context of drug dependence, however, relatively little is known about the discounting of delayed monetary and drug losses and the presence of the sign effect. In this within-subject, laboratory study, delay discounting for gains and losses was assessed for cocaine and money outcomes in cocaine-dependent individuals (n=89). Both cocaine and monetary gains were discounted at significantly greater rates than cocaine and monetary losses, respectively (i.e., the sign effect). Cocaine gains were discounted significantly more than monetary gains, but cocaine and monetary losses were discounted similarly. Results suggest that cocaine is discounted by cocaine-dependent individuals in a systematic manner similar to other rewards. Because the sign effect was shown for both cocaine and money, delayed aversive outcomes may generally have greater impact than delayed rewards in shaping present behavior in this population. PMID:25260200

  10. Pharmacologic approaches to the treatment of cocaine dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W A; Gold, M S

    1990-01-01

    When pharmacologic agents are considered in the treatment of cocaine addiction, the objective of such treatment--sustained abstinence--must be considered. Medication and medical approaches have been disappointing in the treatment of cocaine overdose. The central neurobiologic mechanism(s) involved in cocaine toxicity are poorly understood. Without a cocaine antagonist, pharmacologic approaches have been less than promising in preventing relapse. Various psychoactive medications have been tried in early cocaine abstinence, with some success. PMID:1971975

  11. Dopamine D1/D5 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus are required for the acquisition and expression of a single trial cocaine-associated memory.

    PubMed

    Kramar, Cecilia P; Barbano, M Flavia; Medina, Jorge H

    2014-12-01

    The role of the hippocampus in memory supporting associative learning between contexts and unconditioned stimuli is well documented. Hippocampal dopamine neurotransmission modulates synaptic plasticity and memory processing of fear-motivated and spatial learning tasks. Much less is known about the involvement of the hippocampus and its D1/D5 dopamine receptors in the acquisition, consolidation and expression of memories for drug-associated experiences, more particularly, in the processing of single pairing cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP) training. To determine the temporal dynamics of cocaine CPP memory formation, we trained rats in a one-pairing CPP paradigm and tested them at different time intervals after conditioning. The cocaine-associated memory lasted 24 h but not 72 h. Then, we bilaterally infused the dorsal hippocampus with the GABA A receptor agonist muscimol or the D1/D5 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390 at different stages to evaluate the mechanisms involved in the acquisition, consolidation or expression of cocaine CPP memory. Blockade of D1/D5 dopamine receptors at the moment of training impaired the acquisition of cocaine CPP memories, without having any effect when administered immediately or 12 h after training. The expression of cocaine CPP memory was also affected by the administration of SCH 23390 at the moment of the test. Conversely, muscimol impaired the consolidation of cocaine CPP memory only when administered 12 h post conditioning. These findings suggests that dopaminergic inputs to the dorsal hippocampus are required for the acquisition and expression of one trial cocaine-associated memory while neural activity of this structure is required for the late consolidation of these types of memories. PMID:25452086

  12. Role of a hippocampal SRC-family kinase-mediated glutamatergic mechanism in drug context-induced cocaine seeking.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaohu; Arguello, Amy A; Wells, Audrey M; Reittinger, Andrew M; Fuchs, Rita A

    2013-12-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) is necessary for drug context-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior in an animal model of drug relapse. Furthermore, in vitro studies suggest that the Src family of tyrosine kinases critically regulates glutamatergic cellular functions within the DH. Thus, Src-family kinases in the DH may similarly control contextual cocaine-seeking behavior. To test this hypothesis, rats were trained to lever press for un-signaled cocaine infusions in a distinct context followed by extinction training in a different context. Cocaine-seeking behavior (non-reinforced active lever pressing) was then assessed in the previously cocaine-paired and extinction contexts after AP5 (N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) antagonist; 0.25 or 2.5 μg/0.5 μl/hemisphere), PP2 (Src-family kinase inhibitor; 6.25 or 62.5 ng/0.5 μl/hemisphere), Ro25-6981 (NR2B subunit-containing NMDAR antagonist; 0.2 or 2 μg/0.5 μl/hemisphere), or vehicle administration into the DH. Administration of AP5, PP2, or Ro25-6981 into the DH dose-dependently impaired drug context-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior relative to vehicle, without altering instrumental behavior in the extinction context or food-reinforced instrumental responding and general motor activity in control experiments. Cocaine-seeking behavior during the first 20 min of the test session in the cocaine-paired context was associated with an increase in NR2B subunit activation, and intra-DH PP2 pretreatment disrupted this relationship. Together, these findings suggest that Src-family kinase activation, NMDAR stimulation, and likely Src-family kinase-mediated NR2B subunit-containing NMDAR activation in the DH are necessary for incentive motivational and/or memory processes that promote contextual cocaine-seeking behavior. PMID:23872878

  13. Infusing Culture in Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the culture-infused career counselling (CICC) model. Six principles are foundational to a tripartite model emphasizing cultural self-awareness, awareness of client cultural identities, and development of a culturally sensitive working alliance. The core competencies ensure the cultural validity and relevance of career…

  14. Infusing Service Learning into Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrington, Harriette J.; Moore, Sara Delano

    2001-01-01

    Describes how service learning can link to the middle school curriculum to strengthen the learning of various skills and concepts. Presents service learning model involving preparation, action, reflection, and recognition. Includes examples of effective infusion of service learning into units, lessons, and projects. Concludes with recommendations…

  15. Enhancing Instruction through Software Infusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sia, Archie P.

    The presence of the computer in the classroom is no longer considered an oddity; it has become an ordinary resource for teachers to use for the enhancement of instruction. This paper presents an examination of software infusion, i.e., the use of computer software to enrich instruction in an academic curriculum. The process occurs when a chosen…

  16. Pharmacological manipulation of glucocorticoid receptors differentially affects cocaine self-administration in environmentally enriched and isolated rats

    PubMed Central

    Hofford, Rebecca S.; Prendergast, Mark A.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Social isolation rearing (isolated condition, IC) is used as a model of early life stress in rodents. Rats raised in this condition are often compared to rats raised in an environmentally enriched condition (EC). However, EC rats are repeatedly exposed to forced novelty, another classic stressor in rodents. These studies explored the relationship between cocaine self-administration and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation and measured total levels of GR protein in reward-related brain regions (medial prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, amygdala) in rats chronically exposed to these conditions. For experiment 1, rats were housed in EC or IC and were then trained to self-administer cocaine. Rats raised in these housing conditions were tested for their cocaine responding after pretreatment with the GR antagonist, RU486, or the GR agonist, corticosterone (CORT). For experiment 2, levels of GR from EC and IC rats were measured in brain regions implicated in drug abuse using Western blot analysis. Pretreatment with RU486 (20 mg/kg) decreased responding for a low unit dose of cocaine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) in EC rats only. IC rats were unaffected by RU486 pretreatment, but earned significantly more cocaine than EC rats after pretreatment with CORT (10 mg/kg). No difference in GR expression was found between EC and IC rats in any brain area examined. These results, along with previous literature, suggest that enrichment enhances responsivity of the HPA axis related to cocaine reinforcement, but this effect is unlikely due simply to differential baseline GR expression in areas implicated in drug abuse. PMID:25655510

  17. Choice to view cocaine images predicts concurrent and prospective drug use in cocaine addiction*

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Scott J.; Beebe-Wang, Nicasia; Woicik, Patricia A.; Konova, Anna B.; Maloney, Thomas; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background Identifying variables that predict drug use in treatment-seeking drug addicted individuals is a crucial research and therapeutic goal. This study tested the hypothesis that choice to view cocaine images is associated with concurrent and prospective drug use in cocaine addiction. Methods To establish choice-concurrent drug use associations, 71 cocaine addicted subjects (43 current users and 28 treatment seekers) provided data on (A) choice to view cocaine images and affectively pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral images [collected under explicit contingencies (when choice was made between two fully visible side-by-side images) and under more probabilistic contingencies (when choice was made between pictures hidden under flipped-over cards)]; and (B) past-month cocaine and other drug use. To establish choice-prospective drug use associations, 20 of these treatment-seeking subjects were followed over the next six months. Results Baseline cocaine-related picture choice as measured by both tasks positively correlated with subjects’ concurrent cocaine and other drug use as driven by the actively-using subjects. In a subsequent multiple regression analysis, choice to view cocaine images as compared with affectively pleasant images (under probabilistic contingencies) was the only predictor that continued to be significantly associated with drug use. Importantly, this same baseline cocaine>pleasant probabilistic choice also predicted the number of days drugs were used (cocaine, alcohol, and marijuana) over the next six months. Conclusions Simulated cocaine choice – especially when probabilistic and when compared with other positive reinforcers – may provide a valid laboratory marker of current and future drug use in cocaine addiction. PMID:23218913

  18. Oral fluid cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations following controlled intravenous cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, Kayla N; Concheiro, Marta; Pirard, Sandrine; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-03-01

    Limited oral fluid (OF) pharmacokinetic data collected with commercially available collection devices after controlled cocaine administration hinder OF result interpretations. Ten cocaine-using adults provided OF, collected with Oral-Eze(®) (OE) and StatSure Saliva Sampler™ (SS) devices, an hour prior to and up to 69 h after 25mg intravenous (IV) cocaine administration. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine (BE) were quantified by a validated 2D-GC-MS method. Large inter-subject variability was observed. Cocaine was detected in OF in the first 0.17 h sample after IV administration, with much more rapid elimination than BE. OE observed Cmax median (range) concentrations were 932 (394-1574)μg/L for cocaine and 248 (96.9-953)μg/L for BE. SS observed cocaine and BE Cmax median (range) concentrations trended lower at 732 (83.3-1892)μg/L and 360 (77.2-836)μg/L, respectively. OE and SS cocaine OF detection times were 12.5 and 6.5h and for BE 30.5 and 28.0 h, respectively at 1 μg/L. There were no significant pharmacokinetic differences between OE and SS OF collection devices, except cocaine half-life was significantly shorter in SS OF specimens. This difference could be attributed to differences in stabilizing buffers present in OF collection devices, which may affect cocaine stability in OF specimens, or decreased recovery from collection pads. Both OE and SS OF collection devices were effective in monitoring cocaine and metabolite concentrations with similar detection windows. Furthermore, we demonstrated that different confirmatory OF cutoffs can be selected to produce shorter or longer cocaine and metabolite detection windows to address specific needs of clinical and forensic drug testing programs. PMID:26851651

  19. A neurocomputational model for cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Dezfouli, Amir; Piray, Payam; Keramati, Mohammad Mahdi; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Lucas, Caro; Mokri, Azarakhsh

    2009-10-01

    Based on the dopamine hypotheses of cocaine addiction and the assumption of decrement of brain reward system sensitivity after long-term drug exposure, we propose a computational model for cocaine addiction. Utilizing average reward temporal difference reinforcement learning, we incorporate the elevation of basal reward threshold after long-term drug exposure into the model of drug addiction proposed by Redish. Our model is consistent with the animal models of drug seeking under punishment. In the case of nondrug reward, the model explains increased impulsivity after long-term drug exposure. Furthermore, the existence of a blocking effect for cocaine is predicted by our model. PMID:19635010

  20. Synaptic mechanisms underlying persistent cocaine craving.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marina E

    2016-06-01

    Although it is challenging for individuals with cocaine addiction to achieve abstinence, the greatest difficulty is avoiding relapse to drug taking, which is often triggered by cues associated with prior cocaine use. This vulnerability to relapse persists for long periods (months to years) after abstinence is achieved. Here, I discuss rodent studies of cue-induced cocaine craving during abstinence, with a focus on neuronal plasticity in the reward circuitry that maintains high levels of craving. Such work has the potential to identify new therapeutic targets and to further our understanding of experience-dependent plasticity in the adult brain under normal circumstances and in the context of addiction. PMID:27150400

  1. Developmental trajectories of cocaine-and-other-drug-exposed and non-cocaine-exposed children.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Linda C; Cicchetti, Domenic; Acharyya, Suddhasatta; Zhang, Heping

    2003-10-01

    Few data are available concerning the trajectories of mental and motor development across time for cocaine-exposed children compared with others. Findings are presented from individual group curve analyses of the mental and motor development measured by the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II (BSID-II) on repeated visits from 3 through 36 months of a group of prenatally cocaine-and-other-drug-exposed children (n = 265) compared with those exposed to no drugs (n = 129) or no-cocaine-but-other-drugs (n = 66), including alcohol and/or tobacco. Across time, there was a general decline in motor performance but cocaine-exposed-infants showed a trend toward a greater decrease than children in the other two comparison groups. For mental performance, there was also a decline across age but only through 24 months and no differences in the trajectory of the cocaine-exposed group compared to the other two. And, across all assessment ages, cocaine-exposed-infants showed lower BSID-II mental performance compared to both non-drug and non-cocaine-exposed children. Results suggest that prenatally cocaine-exposed children show delayed developmental indices, particularly in their mental performance, but their trajectories across time are similar to those from impoverished, non-cocaine-exposed groups. PMID:14578693

  2. Cocaine attenuates vasoconstriction to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Bove, A.A.; Morley, D.; Vosacek, R.; Zhang, X.Y.; Shah, R. )

    1991-03-11

    The purpose of this study was to determine the combined effects of cocaine and ethanol on vasomotor tone. Using a standard isolated vascular ring preparation, 24 rings from 7 New Zealand White Rabbits were studied. All rings were denuded as verified by methacholine challenge. The dose response to NE for each ring was used as a standard for vasoconstrictors Dose response curves to ETH and C were done in random order. Concentrations of both ETH and C employed were physiologically attainable in man and below thresholds for coma or death. The dose response curve to ETH was repeated after addition of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M C to the arterial bath. After adding 1,500 ug/ml of ETH, the dose response curve to C was repeated. Ethanol, alone caused significant vasoconstriction of arterial rings. After the addition of C to the bath, the dose response to ETH was significantly shifted to the right, peak contraction achieved was 36.6 {plus minus} 3.2% of maximal NE contraction. Cocaine alone did not result in any change in resting tension of the rings. When ETH was added to the bath, C caused vasoconstriction, the peak value equivalent to 12.5 {plus minus} 2.2% of maximal contraction to NE.

  3. Naloxone injections into CA3 disrupt pattern completion associated with relapse from cocaine seeking.

    PubMed

    Kesner, Raymond P; Kirk, Ryan A; Clark, Jascha K; Moore, Angela; Keefe, Kristen

    2016-07-01

    The goal of the present research was to assess the degree to which a pattern completion process operates in cue-induced relapse to cocaine-seeking behavior. Using a novel cue-preference version of the place preference task, rats were administered cocaine or saline, which resulted in a preference for the cocaine-paired cues. After 21 days of abstinence and prior to the preference test, for one group, PBS or naloxone was injected into the CA3 subregion of the hippocampus and for a second group, saline or naloxone was injected systemically. The results indicated that infusions of naloxone into CA3 or systemic injections produced a marked disruption for one and two cues, but had minimal disruptive effect for three or four cues, suggesting that naloxone injections disrupt CA3 function and trigger a deficit in a pattern completion process. Thus, it appears that cue-based activation of the dorsal CA3 might be a critical trigger via a pattern completion process. Based on additional analyses it appears that there is a disruption primarily for object touches for one cue naloxone injections into the CA3 or systemic injections, but no effect on time (spatial context). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26815290

  4. Relative reinforcing effects of cocaine, remifentanil, and their combination in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Winger, G; Galuska, C M; Hursh, S R; Woods, J H

    2006-07-01

    Human polydrug abusers often take combinations of opioids and stimulants, but it is not clear why. Behavioral economics with demand curve analysis is uniquely able to separate two of the possibilities: that the drug combination increases the reinforcing potency of the component drugs or that the drug combination is a more effective reinforcer than either drug alone. Rhesus monkeys self-administered a range of doses of cocaine, remifentanil, and combinations of the drugs through indwelling intravenous catheters; the number of responses required for each drug infusion increased across drug-availability sessions. Combining small doses of cocaine and remifentanil that by themselves resulted in very low rates of responding yielded rates of responding that were higher than the maximum maintained by any dose of the constituent drugs. Nevertheless, demand curve analysis demonstrated that the drug combination was equally elastic as the component drugs, indicating that it was not more effective as a reinforcer than either cocaine or remifentanil alone. This suggests that enhanced self-administration of this particular drug combination is due primarily to the drug enhancement of the potency of the other drug. PMID:16571623

  5. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or...

  6. Forced Abstinence from Cocaine Self-Administration is Associated with DNA Methylation Changes in Myelin Genes in the Corpus Callosum: a Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, David A.; Huang, Wen; Hamon, Sara C.; Maili, Lorena; Witkin, Brian M.; Fox, Robert G.; Cunningham, Kathryn A.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Background: Human cocaine abuse is associated with alterations in white matter integrity revealed upon brain imaging, an observation that is recapitulated in an animal model of continuous cocaine exposure. The mechanism through which cocaine may affect white matter is unknown and the present study tested the hypothesis that cocaine self-administration results in changes in DNA methylation that could result in altered expression of several myelin genes that could contribute to the effects of cocaine on white matter integrity. Methods: In the present study, we examined the impact of forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration on chromatin associated changes in white matter. To this end, rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg/0.1 mL infusion) for 14 days followed by forced abstinence for 1 day (n = 6) or 30 days (n = 6) before sacrifice. Drug-free, sham surgery controls (n = 7) were paired with the experimental groups. Global DNA methylation and DNA methylation at specific CpG sites in the promoter regions ofmyelin basic protein (Mbp), proteolipid protein-1 (Plp1), and SRY-related HMG-box-10 (Sox10) genes were analyzed in DNA extracted from corpus callosum. Results: Significant differences in the overall methylation patterns of the Sox10 promoter region were observed in the corpus callosum of rats at 30 days of forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration relative to sham controls; the −189, −142, −93, and −62 CpG sites were significantly hypomethylated point-wise at this time point. After correction for multiple comparisons, no differences in global methylation or the methylation patterns of Mbp or Plp1 were found. Conclusion: Forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration was associated with differences in DNA methylation at specific CpG sites in the promoter region of the Sox10 gene in corpus callosum. These changes may be related to reductions in normal age related changes in DNA methylation and

  7. Opioid and cocaine combined effect on cocaine-induced changes in HPA and HPG axes hormones in men.

    PubMed

    Goletiani, Nathalie V; Mendelson, Jack H; Sholar, Michelle B; Siegel, Arthur J; Mello, Nancy K

    2009-02-01

    Nalbuphine, a mixed micro-/kappa-opioid analgesic, may have potential as a new medication for the treatment of cocaine abuse. Kappa-opioid agonists functionally antagonize some abuse-related and locomotor effects of cocaine, and both kappa-selective and mixed micro-/kappa-opioids reduce cocaine self-administration by rhesus monkeys. Because cocaine's interactions with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and (HPA) hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes may contribute to its reinforcing properties, we examined the effects of cocaine alone and in combination with nalbuphine. Neuroendocrine effects of a single dose of cocaine alone (0.2 mg/kg, IV), with nalbuphine (5 mg/70 kg, IV)+cocaine (0.2 mg/kg, IV) in combination were compared in seven adult men (ages 18-35) who met DSM-IV criteria for current cocaine abuse. Cocaine alone, and in combination with nalbuphine was administered on separate test days under placebo-controlled, double blind conditions. Cocaine stimulated ACTH, cortisol, and LH, whereas cocaine+nalbuphine in combination produced a smaller increase in ACTH, and decreased cortisol and LH. Thus it appears that nalbuphine attenuated cocaine's effects on ACTH, cortisol, and LH. These data are consistent with our earlier report that nalbuphine modestly attenuated cocaine's positive subjective effects, and that the subjective and cardiovascular effects of cocaine+nalbuphine in combination were not additive. PMID:18848957

  8. Levamisole-contaminated cocaine: a hairy affair.

    PubMed

    van der Veer, Tjeerd; Pennings, Ed; Tervaert, J W Cohen; Korswagen, Lindy-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Levamisole-contaminated cocaine can induce severe systemic vasculitis. The diagnosis can be challenging, especially when substance abuse is uncertain. We present the case of a 42-year-old woman suffering from vasculitis due to levamisole-contaminated cocaine, who persistently denied substance abuse. Symptoms included ulcerating skin lesions, arthralgia and myalgia, and the occurrence of an ileal intussusception. The definitive diagnosis was made using hair testing for toxins. She recovered through cocaine abstinence, but re-exposure resulted in a severe relapse with glomerulonephritis. Importantly, at time of the relapse, the patient became positive for both myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and proteinase 3-ANCA. Cocaine-levamisole-induced vasculitis poses a great clinical challenge. The proper diagnostic strategy and therapy is still controversial. We highlight our diagnostic and therapeutic considerations, including hair testing for definitive proof of exposure. PMID:26311010

  9. Cocaine causes atrial Purkinje fiber damage.

    PubMed

    Gilloteaux, Jacques; Ekwedike, Nelson N

    2010-04-01

    Comparisons of atrial tissues from Syrian hamster offspring born from cocaine-treated mothers during the last days of pregnancy with sham-treated ones demonstrate irreversible focal ischemic damage in the Purkinje myofibers and minor endocardial damages as well as minute cardiomyocyte vacuolization. These defects are consistent with the pharmacotoxicity of cocaine or its metabolites. The damaged Purkinje myocytes apparently remain in contact with adjacent cardiomyocytes but undergo autolytic process similar to that found in autoschizic cell death. Adjacent cell type(s) appear to segregate or engulf the injured cells. Data collected in this report demonstrate why clinical bradyarrhythmias, arrhythmias, or sudden death as cardiac arrest can be found in pre- and postnatal cocaine-abused babies as well as those found in young individuals caused by acute or chronic cocaine abuse. PMID:20192706

  10. Impaired Inhibitory Control in Recreational Cocaine Users

    PubMed Central

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.; Hommel, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Chronic use of cocaine is associated with impairment in response inhibition but it is an open question whether and to which degree findings from chronic users generalize to the upcoming type of recreational users. This study compared the ability to inhibit and execute behavioral responses in adult recreational users and in a cocaine-free-matched sample controlled for age, race, gender distribution, level of intelligence, and alcohol consumption. Response inhibition and response execution were measured by a stop-signal paradigm. Results show that users and non users are comparable in terms of response execution but users need significantly more time to inhibit responses to stop-signals than non users. Interestingly, the magnitude of the inhibitory deficit was positively correlated with the individuals lifetime cocaine exposure suggesting that the magnitude of the impairment is proportional to the degree of cocaine consumed. PMID:17989775

  11. Methylphenidate attenuates limbic brain inhibition after cocaine-cues exposure in cocaine abusers.

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.; Fowler, J.S.; Pradhan, K.; Jayne, M.; Logan, J.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

    2010-07-01

    Dopamine (phasic release) is implicated in conditioned responses. Imaging studies in cocaine abusers show decreases in striatal dopamine levels, which we hypothesize may enhance conditioned responses since tonic dopamine levels modulate phasic dopamine release. To test this we assessed the effects of increasing tonic dopamine levels (using oral methylphenidate) on brain activation induced by cocaine-cues in cocaine abusers. Brain metabolism (marker of brain function) was measured with PET and {sup 18}FDG in 24 active cocaine abusers tested four times; twice watching a Neutral video (nature scenes) and twice watching a Cocaine-cues video; each video was preceded once by placebo and once by methylphenidate (20 mg). The Cocaine-cues video increased craving to the same extent with placebo (68%) and with methylphenidate (64%). In contrast, SPM analysis of metabolic images revealed that differences between Neutral versus Cocaine-cues conditions were greater with placebo than methylphenidate; whereas with placebo the Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism (p<0.005) in left limbic regions (insula, orbitofrontal, accumbens) and right parahippocampus, with methylphenidate it only decreased in auditory and visual regions, which also occurred with placebo. Decreases in metabolism in these regions were not associated with craving; in contrast the voxel-wise SPM analysis identified significant correlations with craving in anterior orbitofrontal cortex (p<0.005), amygdala, striatum and middle insula (p<0.05). This suggests that methylphenidate's attenuation of brain reactivity to Cocaine-cues is distinct from that involved in craving. Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism in limbic regions (reflects activity over 30 minutes), which contrasts with activations reported by fMRI studies (reflects activity over 2-5 minutes) that may reflect long-lasting limbic inhibition following activation. Studies to evaluate the clinical significance of methylphenidate's blunting of cue-induced limbic

  12. Effects of estradiol on cocaine self-administration and cocaine discrimination by female rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Negus, S Stevens; Knudson, Inge M; Kelly, Maureen; Mendelson, Jack H

    2008-03-01

    The ovarian steroid hormone, estradiol, enhances the reinforcing and locomotor activating effects of cocaine in rodents under some conditions. The present study evaluated the acute effects of estradiol benzoate (E(2)beta) on cocaine self-administration and cocaine discrimination in female rhesus monkeys. Cocaine self-administration (0.10 mg/kg/inj., i.v.) was maintained on a fixed-ratio (FR) 30 schedule of reinforcement, and monkeys had access to cocaine during one 2-h session each day. E(2)beta in a cyclodextrin vehicle (0.00001-0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) was administered 30 min before test sessions conducted twice each week. Cocaine doses were administered in an irregular order during each dose-effect curve determination (0.001-0.3 mg/kg/inj.). Blood samples were collected after test sessions to determine 17beta-estradiol levels. Banana-flavored food pellets were available on an FR 30 schedule in three 1-h sessions each day. Five monkeys were trained to discriminate cocaine (0.18 mg/kg, i.m.) from saline in a two-key food-reinforced procedure, and the effects of pretreatment with E(2)beta in cyclodextrin and in sesame oil were studied. Acute administration of E(2)beta did not consistently alter the cocaine self-administration or drug discrimination dose-effect curves in comparison to saline control treatment. Females also did not self-administer E(2)beta (0.00001-0.10 mg/kg, i.v.) above saline levels. Finally, E(2)beta (0.0001-0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) did not substitute for cocaine in monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline. Taken together, these data suggest that over the dose range studied, estradiol administration does not consistently alter the abuse-related effects of cocaine in female rhesus monkeys. PMID:17507915

  13. Single prolonged stress effects on sensitization to cocaine and cocaine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Andrew L; Singh, Robby; Kohler, Robert J; Friedman, Amy L; Liebowitz, Chelsea P; Galloway, Matthew P; Enman, Nicole M; Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Perrine, Shane A

    2015-05-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often comorbid with substance use disorders (SUD). Single prolonged stress (SPS) is a well-validated rat model of PTSD that provides a framework to investigate drug-induced behaviors as a preclinical model of the comorbidity. We hypothesized that cocaine sensitization and self-administration would be increased following exposure to SPS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to SPS or control treatment. After SPS, cocaine (0, 10 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered for 5 consecutive days and locomotor activity was measured. Another cohort was assessed for cocaine self-administration (0.1 or 0.32 mg/kg/i.v.) after SPS. Rats were tested for acquisition, extinction and cue-induced reinstatement behaviors. Control animals showed a dose-dependent increase in cocaine-induced locomotor activity after acute cocaine whereas SPS rats did not. Using a sub-threshold sensitization paradigm, control rats did not exhibit enhanced locomotor activity at Day 5 and therefore did not develop behavioral sensitization, as expected. However, compared to control rats on Day 5 the locomotor response to 20mg/kg repeated cocaine was greatly enhanced in SPS-treated rats, which exhibited enhanced cocaine locomotor sensitization. The effect of SPS on locomotor activity was unique in that SPS did not modify cocaine self-administration behaviors under a simple schedule of reinforcement. These data show that SPS differentially affects cocaine-mediated behaviors causing no effect to cocaine self-administration, under a simple schedule of reinforcement, but significantly augmenting cocaine locomotor sensitization. These results suggest that SPS shares common neurocircuitry with stimulant-induced plasticity, but dissociable from that underlying psychostimulant-induced reinforcement. PMID:25712697

  14. Anxiogenic effects of cocaine withdrawal in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    López-Patiño, Marcos A; Yu, Lili; Cabral, Howard; Zhdanova, Irina V

    2008-01-28

    Continued usage of cocaine is determined by genetic, conditioned and homeostatic factors, while it is reinforced by drug-induced reward and the emotionally negative state of drug withdrawal, which includes anxiety. The molecular mechanisms of these long-term behavioral and physiological alterations have yet to be fully elucidated. Here we demonstrate that in zebrafish, a wide range of non-anesthetic cocaine doses, 0.015-15 muM, does not result in acute alterations in locomotor activity, in spite of the high brain cocaine levels induced (7-120 pg/microg protein). Conversely, cocaine withdrawal causes hyperactivity associated with stereotypy. The behavioral hyperactivity is progressively increased during the initial period of withdrawal (24-72 h) and is maintained for at least 5 days. Such effect of cocaine withdrawal is aggravated by environmental stimulation and attenuated in the home environment. Administration of cocaine (1.5 microM) or a non-sedative dose of diazepam (5 microM, immersion) acutely counteracts withdrawal-associated hyperactivity and stereotypy in zebrafish, with the magnitude of these effects positively correlating with the degree of prior increase in basal activity. Administration of an anxiogenic benzodiazepine inverse agonist, FG-7142, results in zebrafish behavior similar to that observed during cocaine withdrawal. Together, the results suggest that cocaine withdrawal produces long-lasting behavioral effects in zebrafish which are consistent with an anxiety-like state. Thus, zebrafish, a powerful model for the study of vertebrate genetics, could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of drug withdrawal. PMID:17889042

  15. Immunopharmacotherapeutic Manifolds and Modulation of Cocaine Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Treweek, Jennifer B.; Roberts, Amanda J.; Janda, Kim D.

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine achieves its psychostimulant, reinforcing properties through selectively blocking dopamine transporters, and this neurobiological mechanism impedes the use of classical receptor-antagonist pharmacotherapies to outcompete cocaine at CNS sites. Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for cocaine circumvents this problem as drug is sequestered in the periphery prior to entry into the brain. To optimize an immunopharmacotherapeutic strategy for reversing severe cocaine toxicity, the therapeutic properties of mAb GNC92H2 IgG were compared to those of its engineered formats in a mouse overdose model. Whereas the extended half-life of an IgG justifies its application to the prophylactic treatment of addiction, the rapid, thorough biodistribution of mAb-based fragments, including F(ab')2, Fab and scFv, may correlate to accelerated scavenging of cocaine and reversal of toxicity. To test this hypothesis, mice were administered the anti-cocaine IgG (180 mg/kg, i.v.) or GNC92H2-based agent after receiving an LD50 cocaine dose (93 mg/kg, i.p.), and the timeline of overdose symptoms was recorded. All formats lowered the rate of lethality despite the >100-fold molar excess of drug to antibody binding capacity. However, only F(ab')2-92H2 and Fab-92H2 significantly attenuated the progression of premorbid behaviors, and Fab-92H2 prevented seizure generation in a percentage of mice. The calculation of serum half-life of each format demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic profile of Fab-92H2 (elimination half-life, t1/2 ∼ 100 minutes) best approximated that of cocaine. These results not only confirm the importance of highly specific and tight drug binding by the mAb, but also highlight the benefit of aligning the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the immunopharmacotherapeutic with the targeted drug. PMID:21356233

  16. Modulation of behavioral sensitization to cocaine by NAALADase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shippenberg, T S; Rea, W; Slusher, B S

    2000-11-01

    Sensitization to cocaine has been attributed to alterations in excitatory amino acid and dopamine neurotransmission in the mesolimbic system. The present study sought to determine whether inhibition of NAALADase, an enzyme that cleaves glutamate from the endogenous neuropeptide, N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), attenuates sensitization to the psychomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. Rats received daily injections of cocaine (20.0 mg/kg/day; i.p.) or saline for 5 days. Fifteen minutes prior to these injections they received an i.p. injection of the NAALADase inhibitor, 2-PMPA (50.0-100 mg/kg), or vehicle. Locomotor activity and stereotypy produced by a challenge dose of cocaine (15.0 mg/kg) were assessed 3 days later. Acute cocaine administration increased locomotor activity in control animals. In animals with a prior history of cocaine administration, the behavioral response to cocaine was significantly enhanced. In animals that had received 2-PMPA in combination with cocaine, the enhancement of cocaine-induced locomotor activity was attenuated. No alteration in cocaine-evoked activity was observed in animals that had received once daily injections of 2-PMPA, alone. Acute administration of 2-PMPA also did not modify saline-induced locomotor activity or activity produced by an acute cocaine challenge. These data demonstrate that NAALADase inhibition attenuates the development of sensitization to the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine. Furthermore, this action cannot be attributed to an antagonism of the acute effects of cocaine. PMID:11018790

  17. Cardiovascular effects of cocaine: cellular, ionic and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Turillazzi, E; Bello, S; Neri, M; Pomara, C; Riezzo, I; Fineschi, V

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused drug responsible for the majority of deaths ascribed to drug overdose. Many mechanisms have been proposed in order to explain the various cocaine associated cardiovascular complications. Conventionally, cocaine cardiotoxicity has been thought to be mediated indirectly through its sympathomimetic effect, i.e., by inhibiting the reuptake and thus increasing the levels of neuronal catecholamines at work on adrenoceptors. Increased oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, and cocaine-induced apoptosis in the heart muscle have suggested a new way to understand the cardiotoxic effects of cocaine. More recent studies have led the attention to the interaction of cocaine and some metabolites with cardiac sodium, calcium and potassium channels. The current paper is aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of cocaine cardiotoxicity which have a specific clinical and forensic interest. From a clinical point of view the full knowledge of the exact mechanisms by which cocaine exerts cardio - vascular damage is essential to identify potential therapeutic targets and improve novel strategies for cocaine related cardiovascular diseases. From a forensic point of view, it is to be underlined that cocaine use is often associated to sudden death in young, otherwise healthy individuals. While such events are widely reported, the relationship between cardiac morphological alterations and molecular/cellular mechanisms is still controversial. In conclusion, the study of cocaine cardiovascular toxicity needs a strict collaboration between clinicians and pathologists which may be very effective in further dissecting the mechanisms underlying cocaine cardiotoxicity and understanding the cardiac cocaine connection. PMID:22856657

  18. Levamisole-adulterated cocaine: Two fatal case reports and evaluation of possible cocaine toxicity potentiation.

    PubMed

    Indorato, Francesca; Romano, Guido; Barbera, Nunziata

    2016-08-01

    Levamisole has been identified as a cocaine adulterant in the United States since 2002. Although there is a variation in the percentage of levamisole in cocaine samples between European countries, measurement of levamisole in human samples of cocaine users has become increasingly important. To our best knowledge, only five deaths are reported (one twice) as a result of complications secondary to levamisole-tainted cocaine and none of these cases reports the post-mortem levamisole concentration. In this article, we present the post-mortem levamisole concentrations in fluids and tissues in two young cocaine users, dead after levamisole-adulterated cocaine intake. With the dearth of levamisole reported concentrations in literature, this particular report is of interest to the forensic toxicological and pathological communities. This article aims to be a supplementary alert to aware the risk that may occur using levamisole-adulterated cocaine and an incentive to publication of toxicity reports and new researches involving the combination of levamisole and cocaine. PMID:26866560

  19. Changes in endocannabinoid and N-acylethanolamine levels in rat brain structures following cocaine self-administration and extinction training.

    PubMed

    Bystrowska, Beata; Smaga, Irena; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Filip, Małgorzata

    2014-04-01

    Preclinical investigations have demonstrated that drugs of abuse alter the levels of lipid-based signalling molecules, including endocannabinoids (eCBs) and N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), in the rodent brain. In addition, several drugs targeting eCBs and/or NAEs are implicated in reward and/or seeking behaviours related to the stimulation of dopamine systems in the brain. In our study, the brain levels of eCBs (anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)) and NAEs (oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA)) were analyzed via an LC-MS/MS method in selected brain structures of rats during cocaine self-administration and after extinction training according to the "yoked" control procedure. Repeated (14days) cocaine (0.5mg/kg/infusion) self-administration and yoked drug delivery resulted in a significant decrease (ca. 52%) in AEA levels in the cerebellum, whereas levels of 2-AG increased in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus and the cerebellum and decreased in the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. In addition, we detected increases (>150%) in the levels of OEA and PEA in the limbic areas in both cocaine treated groups, as well as an increase in the tissue levels of OEA in the dorsal striatum in only the yoked cocaine group and increases in the tissue levels of PEA in the dorsal striatum (both cocaine groups) and the nucleus accumbens (yoked cocaine group only). Compared to the yoked saline control group, extinction training (10days) resulted in a potent reduction in AEA levels in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus and the nucleus accumbens and in 2-AG levels in the hippocampus, the dorsal striatum and the cerebellum. The decreases in the limbic and subcortical areas were more apparent for rats that self-administered cocaine. Following extinction, there was a region-specific change in the levels of NAEs in rats previously injected with cocaine; a potent increase (ca. 100%) in the levels of OEA and PEA was detected in the prefrontal cortex and the

  20. Effects of chronic varenicline treatment on nicotine, cocaine, and concurrent nicotine+cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Fivel, Peter A; Kohut, Stephen J; Carroll, F Ivy

    2014-04-01

    Nicotine dependence and cocaine abuse are major public health problems, and most cocaine abusers also smoke cigarettes. An ideal treatment medication would reduce both cigarette smoking and cocaine abuse. Varenicline is a clinically available, partial agonist at α4β2* and α6β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and a full agonist at α7 nAChRs. Varenicline facilitates smoking cessation in clinical studies and reduced nicotine self-administration, and substituted for the nicotine-discriminative stimulus in preclinical studies. The present study examined the effects of chronic varenicline treatment on self-administration of IV nicotine, IV cocaine, IV nicotine+cocaine combinations, and concurrent food-maintained responding by five cocaine- and nicotine-experienced adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Varenicline (0.004-0.04 mg/kg/h) was administered intravenously every 20 min for 23 h each day for 7-10 consecutive days. Each varenicline treatment was followed by saline-control treatment until food- and drug-maintained responding returned to baseline. During control treatment, nicotine+cocaine combinations maintained significantly higher levels of drug self-administration than nicotine or cocaine alone (P<0.05-0.001). Varenicline dose-dependently reduced responding maintained by nicotine alone (0.0032 mg/kg/inj) (P<0.05), and in combination with cocaine (0.0032 mg/kg/inj) (P<0.05) with no significant effects on food-maintained responding. However, varenicline did not significantly decrease self-administration of a low dose of nicotine (0.001 mg/kg), cocaine alone (0.0032 and 0.01 mg/kg/inj), or 0.01 mg/kg cocaine combined with the same doses of nicotine. We conclude that varenicline selectively attenuates the reinforcing effects of nicotine alone but not cocaine alone, and its effects on nicotine+cocaine combinations are dependent on the dose of cocaine. PMID:24304823

  1. Striatal patch compartment lesions reduce stereotypy following repeated cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ryan C; Logan, Mary C; Horner, Kristen A

    2015-08-27

    Stereotypy can be characterized as inflexible, repetitive behaviors that occur following repeated exposure to psychostimulants, such as cocaine (COC). Stereotypy may be related to preferential activation of the patch (striosome) compartment of striatum, as enhanced relative activation of the patch compartment has been shown to positively correlate with the emergence of stereotypy following repeated psychostimulant treatment. However, the specific contribution of the patch compartment to COC-induced stereotypy following repeated exposure is unknown. To elucidate the involvement of the patch compartment to the development of stereotypy following repeated COC exposure, we determined if destruction of this sub-region altered COC-induced behaviors. The neurons of the patch compartment were ablated by bilateral infusion of the neurotoxin dermorphin-saporin (DERM-SAP; 17 ng/μl) into the striatum. Animals were allowed to recover for eight days following the infusion, and then were given daily injections of COC (25mg/kg) or saline for one week, followed by a weeklong drug-free period. Animals were then given a challenge dose of saline or COC, observed for 2h in activity chambers and sacrificed. The number of mu-labeled patches in the striatum were reduced by DERM-SAP pretreatment. In COC-treated animals DERM-SAP pretreatment significantly reduced the immobilization and intensity of stereotypy but increased locomotor activity. DERM-SAP pretreatment attenuated COC-induced c-Fos expression in the patch compartment, while enhancing COC-induced c-Fos expression in the matrix compartment. These data indicate that the patch compartment contributes to repetitive behavior and suggests that alterations in activity in the patch vs matrix compartments may underlie to this phenomenon. PMID:26100338

  2. Pharmacological modulation of lateral habenular dopamine D2 receptors alters the anxiogenic response to cocaine in a runway model of drug self-administration.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Kerisa; Bogyo, Kelsie; Schick, Tinisha; Ettenberg, Aaron

    2016-09-01

    Cocaine has long been known to produce an initial "high" followed by an aversive/anxiogenic "crash". While much is known about the neurobiology of cocaine's positive/rewarding effects, the mechanisms that give rise to the drug's negative/anxiogenic actions remain unclear. Recent research has implicated the lateral habenula (LHb) in the encoding of aversive events including the anxiogenic response to cocaine. Of particular interest in this regard are the reciprocal connections between the LHb and the ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA-DA neurons innervate different subsets of LHb cells that in turn feedback upon and modulate VTA neuronal activity. Here we examined the impact of D2 receptor activation and inhibition on the anxiogenic response to cocaine using a runway model of self-administration that is sensitive to the dual and opposing effects of the drug. Male rats ran a straight alley for IV cocaine (1.0mg/kg) following bilateral intra-LHb infusions of the D2 receptor antagonist, cis-flupenthixol (0, 7.5 or 15μg/side) or the D2 agonist, sumanirole (0, 5 or 10μg/side). Vehicle-pretreated controls developed approach-avoidance conflict behaviors about goal-box entry reflective of the dual positive and negative effects of cocaine. These behaviors were significantly diminished during LHb-D2 receptor antagonism and increased by the LHb D2 receptor agonist. These results demonstrate that activity at the D2 receptor in the lateral habenula serves to modulate the anxiogenic response to cocaine. PMID:27155504

  3. Daily cocaine self-administration under long-access conditions augments restraint-induced increases in plasma corticosterone and impairs glucocorticoid receptor-mediated negative feedback in rats.

    PubMed

    Mantsch, John R; Cullinan, William E; Tang, Lee C; Baker, David A; Katz, Eric S; Hoks, Michael A; Ziegler, Dana R

    2007-09-01

    Cocaine addiction appears to be associated with a drug-induced dysregulation of stressor responsiveness that may contribute to further cocaine use. The present study examined alterations in stressor-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in rats provided daily access to cocaine for self-administration (SA) under long-access conditions (1.0 mg/kg/infusion; 6 hx14 days). Cocaine self-administering rats displayed reduced basal plasma corticosterone (CORT) levels but showed an augmented restraint-induced percent increase response from baseline compared to saline self-administering controls when measured 24 days after SA testing. This augmented CORT response may have been attributable to impaired glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated feedback regulation of HPA function, since cocaine self-administering rats were also less susceptible to dexamethasone (0.01 mg/kg, i.p.) suppression of plasma CORT levels. GR protein expression measured using Western blot analysis was significantly reduced in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (including the paraventricular nucleus [PVN]) but not in the pituitary gland, ventromedial hypothalamus, dorsal hippocampus, ventral subiculum, medial prefrontal cortex or amygdala in cocaine self-administering rats. Surprisingly, basal corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA or post-restraint increases in CRH mRNA measured at a single (90 min) time-point in the PVN using in situ hybridization did not differ between groups. The findings suggest that cocaine use produces persistent changes in individual responsiveness to stressors that may contribute to the addiction process. PMID:17689506

  4. Overexpression of BDNF in the ventral tegmental area enhances binge cocaine self-administration in rats exposed to repeated social defeat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junshi; Bastle, Ryan M; Bass, Caroline E; Hammer, Ronald P; Neisewander, Janet L; Nikulina, Ella M

    2016-10-01

    Stress is a major risk factor for substance abuse. Intermittent social defeat stress increases drug self-administration (SA) and elevates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in rats. Intra-VTA BDNF overexpression enhances social defeat stress-induced cross-sensitization to psychostimulants and induces nucleus accumbens (NAc) ΔFosB expression. Therefore, increased VTA BDNF may mimic or augment the development of drug abuse-related behavior following social stress. To test this hypothesis, adeno-associated virus (AAV) was infused into the VTA to overexpress either GFP alone (control) or GFP + BDNF. Rats were then either handled or exposed to intermittent social defeat stress before beginning cocaine SA training. The SA acquisition and maintenance phases were followed by testing on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule of cocaine reinforcement, and then during a 12-h access "binge" cocaine SA session. BDNF and ΔFosB were quantified postmortem in regions of the mesocorticolimbic circuitry using immunohistochemistry. Social defeat stress increased cocaine intake on a PR schedule, regardless of virus treatment. While stress alone increased intake during the 12-h binge session, socially-defeated rats that received VTA BDNF overexpression exhibited even greater cocaine intake compared to the GFP-stressed group. However, VTA BDNF overexpression alone did not alter binge intake. BDNF expression in the VTA was also positively correlated with total cocaine intake during binge session. VTA BDNF overexpression increased ΔFosB expression in the NAc, but not in the dorsal striatum. Here we demonstrate that VTA BDNF overexpression increases long-access cocaine intake, but only under stressful conditions. Therefore, enhanced VTA-BDNF expression may be a facilitator for stress-induced increases in drug abuse-related behavior specifically under conditions that capture compulsive-like drug intake. PMID:27154426

  5. Effects of the 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP809101 in the amygdala on reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior and anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Pockros-Burgess, Lara A; Pentkowski, Nathan S; Der-Ghazarian, Taleen; Neisewander, Janet L

    2014-11-01

    Serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2CR) agonists attenuate reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. These receptors are found throughout the limbic system, including the basolateral amygdala (BlA), which is involved in forming associations between emotional stimuli and environmental cues, and the central amygdala (CeA), which is implicated in the expression of conditioned responding to emotional stimuli. This study investigated whether 5-HT2CRs in the amygdala are involved in cue and cocaine-primed reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg, i.v.) which that was paired with light and tone cues, and then subsequently they underwent daily extinction training. Rats then received bilateral microinfusions of the 5-HT2CR agonist CP809101 (0.01-1.0 μg/0.2 μl/side) into either the BlA or CeA prior to tests for cue or cocaine-primed (10 mg/kg, i.p.) reinstatement. Rats were also tested for CP809101 effects on anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus-maze (EPM). Surprisingly, intra-BlA CP809101 had no effect on cue reinstatement, though it did increase anxiety-like behavior on the EPM. Intra-CeA infusions of CP809101 attenuated cocaine-primed reinstatement, an effect that was prevented with concurrent administration of the 5-HT2CR antagonist SB242084 (0.1 μg/0.2 μl/side). CP809101 had no effect on cue reinstatement or anxiety-like behavior on the EPM. These findings suggest that 5-HT2CRs in the BlA modulate anxiety, whereas those in the CeA modulate incentive motivational effects induced by cocaine priming injections. PMID:24984080

  6. Prolonged withdrawal following cocaine self-administration increases resistance to punishment in a cocaine binge.

    PubMed

    Gancarz-Kausch, Amy M; Adank, Danielle N; Dietz, David M

    2014-01-01

    Drug addiction is characterized by compulsive drug-taking behaviors and a high propensity to relapse following drug cessation. Drug craving and seeking can increase during a period of abstinence, but this phenomenon is not observed in drug-induced reinstatement models. To investigate the effect of withdrawal on cocaine relapse, rats were exposed to extended-access cocaine self-administration and subjected to either 1 or 30 d of withdrawal. When tested during 12 h unlimited access to cocaine (binge), the duration of the withdrawal did not influence cocaine intake. However, using a histamine punishment procedure that greatly suppresses drug-taking behavior, we demonstrate that longer periods of abstinence from cocaine induce a greater persistence in responding for drug in the face of negative consequences. PMID:25363133

  7. Orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortex neurons selectively process cocaine-associated environmental cues in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Baeg, Eun Ha; Jackson, Mark E; Jedema, Hank P; Bradberry, Charles W

    2009-09-16

    Encounters with stimuli associated with drug use are believed to contribute to relapse. To probe the neurobiology of environmentally triggered drug use, we have conducted single-unit recordings in rhesus monkeys during presentation of two distinct types of drug paired cues that differentially support drug-seeking. The animals were highly conditioned to these cues via exposure during self-administration procedures conducted over a 4 year period. The cues studied were a discriminative cue that signaled response-contingent availability of cocaine, and a discrete cue that was temporally paired with the cocaine infusion (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg). Two cortical regions consistently activated by cocaine-associated cues in human imaging studies are the orbitofrontal (OFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), though little is known about cortical neuronal activity responses to drug cues. We simultaneously recorded single-unit activity in OFC and ACC as well as in dorsal striatum in rhesus monkeys during cocaine self-administration. Dorsal striatal neurons were less engaged by drug cues than cortical regions. Between OFC and ACC, distinct functionality was apparent in neuronal responses. OFC neurons preferentially responded to the discriminative cue, consistent with a role in cue-induced drug-seeking. In contrast, the ACC did not respond more to the discriminative cue than to the discrete cue. Also distinct from the OFC, ACC showed sustained firing throughout the 18 s duration of the discrete cue. This pattern of sustained activation in ACC is consistent with a role in reward expectation and/or in mediating behavioral effects of discrete cues paired with drug infusions. PMID:19759309

  8. Influence of abstinence and conditions of cocaine access on the reinforcing strength of cocaine in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Czoty, Paul W; Martelle, Jennifer L; Nader, Michael A

    2006-12-01

    The development of addiction is marked by a transition from recreational to uncontrolled drug use. Investigators modeling this phenomenon in rodents observed increases in cocaine self-administration when conditions of drug access were altered as well as after abstinence. The present studies were designed to extend this research to nonhuman primates by examining whether the reinforcing strength of cocaine could be altered by changing conditions of cocaine availability or by introducing abstinence periods. Rhesus monkeys self-administered cocaine (0.03-0.3 mg/kg per injection) under a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement in evening sessions, with the number of injections earned serving as a measure of reinforcing strength. Alterations in the reinforcing strength of cocaine were assessed after additional access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio (FR) schedule was provided in morning sessions and following various periods of abstinence (3, 7 and 14 days) from regimens of self-administration that resulted in a range of cocaine intakes. Under baseline PR conditions, the maximum number of cocaine injections increased dose-dependently, peaking when 0.3 mg/kg per injection cocaine was available. No increases in the reinforcing strength of cocaine were observed under any condition. In contrast, a statistically significant decrease in the reinforcing strength of cocaine was observed following 14 days of abstinence under one condition. These results fail to support the views that increasing access to cocaine or abstinence enhances the reinforcing strength of cocaine. PMID:16730922

  9. Temporal pattern of cocaine intake determines tolerance vs sensitization of cocaine effects at the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Zimmer, Benjamin A; Roberts, David C S; Jones, Sara R

    2013-11-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is responsible for terminating dopamine (DA) signaling and is the primary site of cocaine's reinforcing actions. Cocaine self-administration has been shown previously to result in changes in cocaine potency at the DAT. To determine whether the DAT changes associated with self-administration are due to differences in intake levels or temporal patterns of cocaine-induced DAT inhibition, we manipulated cocaine access to produce either continuous or intermittent elevations in cocaine brain levels. Long-access (LgA, 6 h) and short-access (ShA, 2 h) continuous self-administration produced similar temporal profiles of cocaine intake that were sustained throughout the session; however, LgA had greater intake. ShA and intermittent-access (IntA, 6 h) produced the same intake, but different temporal profiles, with 'spiking' brain levels in IntA compared with constant levels in ShA. IntA consisted of 5-min access periods alternating with 25-min timeouts, which resulted in bursts of high responding followed by periods of no responding. DA release and uptake, as well as the potency of cocaine for DAT inhibition, were assessed by voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens slices following control, IntA, ShA, and LgA self-administration. Continuous-access protocols (LgA and ShA) did not change DA parameters, but the 'spiking' protocol (IntA) increased both release and uptake of DA. In addition, high continuous intake (LgA) produced tolerance to cocaine, while 'spiking' (IntA) produced sensitization, relative to ShA and naive controls. Thus, intake and pattern can both influence cocaine potency, and tolerance seems to be produced by high intake, while sensitization is produced by intermittent temporal patterns of intake. PMID:23719505

  10. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find Help Publications Videos Vigil for Lost Promise Red Ribbon Week PRESS ROOM DEA News News Releases Speeches and Testimony Major ... Find Help Publications Videos Vigil for Lost Promise Red Ribbon Week Press Room Top Story News Releases Speeches and Testimony Major ...

  11. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... amounts to build up between nerve cells. This flood of dopamine ultimately disrupts normal brain communication and ... in brain circuits controlling pleasure and movement. This flood of dopamine ultimately disrupts normal brain communication and ...

  12. The Safety of Target-Controlled Infusions.

    PubMed

    Schnider, Thomas W; Minto, Charles F; Struys, Michel M R F; Absalom, Anthony R

    2016-01-01

    Target-controlled infusion (TCI) technology has been available in most countries worldwide for clinical use in anesthesia for approximately 2 decades. This infusion mode uses pharmacokinetic models to calculate infusion rates necessary to reach and maintain the desired drug concentration. TCI is computationally more complex than traditional modes of drug administration. The primary difference between TCI and conventional infusions is that TCI decreases the infusion rate at regular intervals to account for the uptake of drug into saturable compartments. Although the calculated infusion rates are consistent with manually controlled infusion rates, there are concerns that TCI administration of IV anesthetics could introduce unique safety concerns. After approximately 2 decades of clinical use, it is appropriate to assess the safety of TCI. Our aim in this article was to describe safety-relevant issues related to TCI, which should have emerged after its use in millions of patients. We collected information from published medical literature, TCI manufacturers, and publicly available governmental Web sites to find evidence of safety issues with the clinical use of TCI. Although many case reports emphasize that IV anesthesia is technically more demanding than inhaled anesthesia, including human errors associated with setting up IV infusions, no data suggest that a TCI mode of drug delivery introduces unique safety issues other than selecting the wrong pharmacokinetic model. This is analogous to the risk of selecting the wrong drug with current infusion pumps. We found no evidence that TCI is not at least as safe as anesthetic administration using constant rate infusions. PMID:26516801

  13. Cocaine challenge enhances release of neuroprotective amino acid taurine in the striatum of chronic cocaine treated rats: a microdialysis study

    PubMed Central

    Yablonsky-Alter, Elena; Agovic, Mervan S.; Gashi, Eleonora; Lidsky, Theodore I.; Friedman, Eitan; Banerjee, Shailesh P.

    2009-01-01

    Drug addiction is a serious public health problem. There is increasing evidence on the involvement of augmented glutamatergic transmission in cocaine-induced addiction and neurotoxicity. We investigated effects of acute or chronic cocaine administration and cocaine challenge following chronic cocaine exposure on the release of excitotoxic glutamate and neuroprotective taurine in the rat striatum by microdialysis. Cocaine challenge, following withdrawal after repeated cocaine exposure markedly increased the release of glutamate, which may cause neurotoxicity. Simultaneously, cocaine challenge after withdrawal also significantly increased the release of taurine, which counteracts glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity and possibly cell death. Thus, the mammalian brain has an endogenous self-protective mechanism against cocaine-mediated neurotoxicity and potentially addiction. PMID:19166917

  14. Filthy Lucre: The Chemical Detection of Cocaine-Contaminated Currency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acheson, Ed

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the problem of seizing cocaine-tainted money. Describes an experiment designed to determine what percentage of paper currency is contaminated with cocaine. Considers sampling, the analysis method, contamination, levels of cocaine in money and criminal activity, and the reliability of results. (SAH)

  15. [Treatment of cocaine dependence. Intoxication, withdrawal and prevention of relapse].

    PubMed

    Preuss, U W; Bahlmann, M; Koller, G; Soyka, M

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this review article is to evaluate the treatment of cocaine-withdrawal, cocaine-intoxication and long-term relapse prevention of cocaine-addicts. Some 25% of police recognized first time drug users in Germany consume cocaine. However, there is an increasing number of cocaine-abusers and -addicts in the USA. The withdrawal of cocaine can be divided into three phases dominated mainly by psychiatric symptoms. Life-threatening condition can occur in cocaine-intoxication mainly in combination with other drug-use. A high risk of relapse is seen in follow-up trials of cocaine-addicts. Intensive craving, high cocaine- and substance-abuse is reported regularly in cocaine-addicts after detoxification therapy. Recommendations in the treatment of cocaine-intoxication, withdrawal and long-term relapse prevention are made. The use of antidepressives, anticonvulsants, dopaminergic and serotonergic medications as well as behavioural, psychoanalytical and combined therapies and their efficacy in clinical and trails is evaluated. A short review of new experimental therapies in the treatment of cocaine-dependence is shown. PMID:10858947

  16. Discrete cell gene profiling of ventral tegmental dopamine neurons after acute and chronic cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Backes, Eric; Hemby, Scott E

    2003-11-01

    Chronic cocaine administration induces a number of biochemical alterations within the mesolimbic dopamine system that may mediate various aspects of the addictive process such as sensitization, craving, withdrawal, and relapse. In the present study, rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.5 mg/infusion) for 1 or 20 days. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunopositive cells were microdissected from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) using laser capture microdissection, and changes in the abundances of 95 mRNAs were assessed using cDNA macroarrays. Five GABA-A receptor subunit mRNAs (alpha4, alpha6, beta2, gamma2, and delta) were down-regulated at both 1 and 20 days of cocaine self-administration. In contrast, the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2alpha), GABA-A alpha1, and Galphai2 were significantly increased at both time points. Additionally, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha mRNA levels were increased initially followed by a slight decrease after 20 days, whereas neuronal nitric-oxide synthase mRNA levels were initially decreased but returned to near control levels by day 20. These results indicate that alterations of specific GABA-A receptor subtypes and other signal transduction transcripts seem to be specific neuroadaptations associated with cocaine self-administration. Moreover, as subunit composition determines the functional properties of GABA-A receptors, the observed changes may indicate alterations in the excitability of dopamine transmission underlying long-term biochemical and behavioral effects of cocaine. PMID:12966149

  17. The expanding effects of cocaine: studies in a nonhuman primate model of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Porrino, Linda J; Daunais, James B; Smith, Hilary R; Nader, Michael A

    2004-01-01

    Although neuroimaging investigations in human cocaine abusers have provided important insights into the brain changes that accompany drug use, the interpretation of reports in human abusers can be very difficult. Studies in nonhuman primates provide a way to systematically evaluate the structural and functional adaptations engendered by cocaine self-administration without the confounds of human research. Functional activity, measured with metabolic mapping methods, and markers of the dopamine system, assessed autoradiographically, were evaluated over the course of chronic cocaine self-administration (5 days, 3.3 months, and 15-22 months). Within the striatum the topography of these responses shifts dramatically over time. Changes in functional activity and alterations in the dopamine system occupy larger and larger portions of dorsal and ventral striatum with increasing durations of cocaine exposure. The growing impact of cocaine suggests that the elements of the behavioral repertoire outside of the influence of cocaine become smaller and smaller with increasing durations of exposure to drug use resulting in cocaine's dominance over all aspects of the addict's life. PMID:15019430

  18. Infusing PDA technology into nursing education.

    PubMed

    White, Ann; Allen, Patricia; Goodwin, Linda; Breckinridge, Daya; Dowell, Jeffery; Garvy, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    Use of the personal digital assistant (PDA) has been infused into the accelerated baccalaureate program at Duke University to help prepare nursing students for professional practice. The authors provide an overview of the use of PDAs in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical setting. Technical aspects of PDA infusion and steps to ensure regulatory compliance are explored. Benefits of PDA use by both faculty and students in the program and challenges met with the infusion of this technology are also described. PMID:16030450

  19. Internally concealed cocaine: analytical and diagnostic aspects.

    PubMed

    Bogusz, M J; Althoff, H; Erkens, M; Maier, R D; Hofmann, R

    1995-09-01

    Thirty persons arrested at Frankfurt airport for smuggling internally concealed cocaine in 1993/1994 were investigated. An X-ray examination (in all 30 cases), immunochemical examination of urine (in 27 cases) and of saliva (in 20 cases) was performed in parallel. An X-ray examination gave positive results in all examined persons. EMIT cocaine metabolite assay (cut off 300 ng benzoylecgonine (BE)/mL) was positive in eight urine samples. After reducing the cut off to 150 ng BE/mL urine, eleven samples were classified as positive. The results were confirmed by means of chromatographic determinations. These findings showed limited role of immunological examination of urine as a screening test in suspected smuggling of internally concealed drugs. All saliva samples showed negative immunochemical results. The number of concealed containers ranged from 44 to 135 per person. The amount of cocaine hydrochloride found in particular cases ranged from 242 to 1050 g net weight, divided into containers weighing from 5.7 to 13.8 g. Drug packages were obviously machine-made. The packages smuggled by a particular person were uniform. However, a distinct interpersonal variability in drug packages was observed, in regard to the number of protective layers (4-7), size, weight, and cocaine purity. This may be helpful for the identification of production site. The leaching of cocaine from selected containers was investigated in a stirring bath and was independent of the conditions applied. PMID:7595327

  20. Novel pharmacotherapeutic treatments for cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine is a stimulant that leads to the rapid accumulation of catecholamines and serotonin in the brain due to prevention of their re-uptake into the neuron that released the neurotransmitter. Cocaine dependence is a public health concern and cause of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. At present, there are no approved medications for the treatment of this devastating illness, and behavioral interventions have proven to be of limited use. However, there have been a number of recent trials testing promising agents including dopamine agonists, GABAergic medications and the cocaine vaccine. Here we discuss the most recent human clinical trials of potential medications for treatment of cocaine dependence, as well as pre-clinical studies for another promising agent, levo tetrahydropalmatine. Examination of these recent findings shows promise for GABAergic medications and the cocaine vaccine, as well as unique medications such as disulfiram, whose mechanism remains to be determined. Future work may also confirm specific subgroups of patients for treatment response based on clinical characteristics, biomarkers and pharmacogenetics. This review highlights the need for further, bigger studies in order to determine optimal clinical usage. PMID:22047090

  1. Gambling Problems Among Community Cocaine Users.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Magali; Nguyen, Noël; Bertrand, Karine; Perreault, Michel; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Morvannou, Adèle; Bruneau, Julie; Berbiche, Djamal; Roy, Élise

    2016-09-01

    Cocaine use is highly prevalent and a major public health problem. While some studies have reported frequent comorbidity problems among cocaine users, few studies have included evaluation of gambling problems. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of gambling problems and compare those who were at-risk gamblers with non-problem gamblers in terms of mental health problems, substance use problems, and some risk factors (i.e. family antecedents, erroneous perceptions and coping strategies) among individuals who smoke or inject cocaine. A total of 424 smoked or injected cocaine users recruited through community-based programs in Montreal (Quebec) completed the questionnaire, including the Canadian Pathological Gambling Index, the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, the CAGE, and the Severity Dependence Scale. Of the sample, 18.4 % were considered at-risk gamblers, of whom 7.8 % had problems gambling and 10.6 % were moderate-risk gamblers. The at-risk group was more likely to have experienced a recent phobic disorder and alcohol problems than the non-problem group. A multivariate analysis showed that, compared to those who were non-problem gamblers, the at-risk ones were more likely to have lost a large sum of money when they first started gambling, believed that their luck would turn, and gambled in reaction to painful life events. These results indicate the need to include routines for screening to identify gambling problem among cocaine users. PMID:26983825

  2. Adenovirus capsid-based anti-cocaine vaccine prevents cocaine from binding to the nonhuman primate CNS dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Maoz, Anat; Hicks, Martin J; Vallabhjosula, Shankar; Synan, Michael; Kothari, Paresh J; Dyke, Jonathan P; Ballon, Douglas J; Kaminsky, Stephen M; De, Bishnu P; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; Martinez, Diana; Koob, George F; Janda, Kim D; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-10-01

    Cocaine addiction is a major problem for which there is no approved pharmacotherapy. We have developed a vaccine to cocaine (dAd5GNE), based on the cocaine analog GNE linked to the capsid proteins of a serotype 5 adenovirus, designed to evoke anti-cocaine antibodies that sequester cocaine in the blood, preventing access to the CNS. To assess the efficacy of dAd5GNE in a large animal model, positron emission tomography (PET) and the radiotracer [(11)C]PE2I were used to measure cocaine occupancy of the dopamine transporter (DAT) in nonhuman primates. Repeat administration of dAd5GNE induced high anti-cocaine titers. Before vaccination, cocaine displaced PE2I from DAT in the caudate and putamen, resulting in 62±4% cocaine occupancy. In contrast, dAd5GNE-vaccinated animals showed reduced cocaine occupancy such that when anti-cocaine titers were >4 × 10(5), the cocaine occupancy was reduced to levels of <20%, significantly below the 47% threshold required to evoke the subjective 'high' reported in humans. PMID:23660705

  3. Fundamental Reaction Mechanism and Free Energy Profile for (−)-Cocaine Hydrolysis Catalyzed by Cocaine Esterase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjun; Hamza, Adel; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2009-01-01

    Fundamental reaction mechanism of cocaine esterase (CocE)-catalyzed hydrolysis of (−)-cocaine and the corresponding free energy profile have been studied by performing pseudobond first-principle quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM)-free energy (FE) calculations. Based on the QM/MM-FE results, the entire hydrolysis reaction consists of four reaction steps, including the nucleophilic attack on carbonyl carbon of (−)-cocaine benzoyl ester by hydroxyl group of Ser117, dissociation of (−)-cocaine benzoyl ester, nucleophilic attack on carbonyl carbon of (−)-cocaine benzoyl ester by water, and finally the dissociation between (−)-cocaine benzoyl group and Ser117 of CocE. The third reaction step involving the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule was found to be rate-determining, which is remarkably different from (−)-cocaine hydrolysis catalyzed by wild-type butyrylcholinesterase (where the formation of prereactive BChE-(−)-cocaine complex is rate-determining) or its mutants containing Tyr332Gly or Tyr332Gly mutation (where the first chemical reaction step is rate-determining). Besides, the role of Asp259 in the catalytic triad of CocE does not follow the general concept of the “charge-relay system” for all serine esterases. The free energy barrier calculated for the rate-determining step of CocE-catalyzed hydrolysis of (−)-cocaine is 17.9 kcal/mol, which is in good agreement with the experimentally derived activation free energy of 16.2 kcal/mol. In present study, where many sodium ions are present, the effects of counter ions are found to be significant in determining the free energy barrier. The finding of the significant effects of counter ions on the free energy barrier may also be valuable in guiding future mechanistic studies on other charged enzymes. PMID:19642701

  4. Reduced Metabolsim in Brain 'Control Networks' Following Cocaine-Cues Exposure in Female Cocaine Abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

    2011-03-01

    Gender differences in vulnerability for cocaine addiction have been reported. Though the mechanisms are not understood, here we hypothesize that gender differences in reactivity to conditioned-cues, which contributes to relapse, are involved. To test this we compared brain metabolism (using PET and {sup 18}FDG) between female (n = 10) and male (n = 16) active cocaine abusers when they watched a neutral video (nature scenes) versus a cocaine-cues video. Self-reports of craving increased with the cocaine-cue video but responses did not differ between genders. In contrast, changes in whole brain metabolism with cocaine-cues differed by gender (p<0.05); females significantly decreased metabolism (-8.6% {+-} 10) whereas males tended to increase it (+5.5% {+-} 18). SPM analysis (Cocaine-cues vs Neutral) in females revealed decreases in frontal, cingulate and parietal cortices, thalamus and midbrain (p<0.001) whereas males showed increases in right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45) (only at p<0.005). The gender-cue interaction showed greater decrements with Cocaine-cues in females than males (p<0.001) in frontal (BA 8, 9, 10), anterior cingulate (BA 24, 32), posterior cingulate (BA 23, 31), inferior parietal (BA 40) and thalamus (dorsomedial nucleus). Females showed greater brain reactivity to cocaine-cues than males but no differences in craving, suggesting that there may be gender differences in response to cues that are not linked with craving but could affect subsequent drug use. Specifically deactivation of brain regions from 'control networks' (prefrontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, thalamus) in females could increase their vulnerability to relapse since it would interfere with executive function (cognitive inhibition). This highlights the importance of gender tailored interventions for cocaine addiction.

  5. Motivated Attention to Cocaine and Emotional Cues in Abstinent and Current Cocaine Users: An ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Jonathan P.; Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Hajcak, Greg; Maloney, Thomas; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Woicik, Patricia A.; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2011-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) are a direct measure of neural activity and are ideally suited to study the time-course of attentional engagement with emotional and drug-related stimuli in addiction. In particular, the late positive potential (LPP) appears enhanced following cocaine-related compared to neutral stimuli in individuals with cocaine use disorders (CUD). However, previous studies have not directly compared cocaine-related to emotional stimuli while examining potential differences between abstinent and current cocaine users. The present study examined ERPs in 55 CUD (27 abstinent and 28 current users) and 29 matched healthy controls while they passively viewed pleasant, unpleasant, neutral, and cocaine-related pictures. To examine the time-course of attention to these stimuli, we analyzed both an early and later window in the LPP as well as the early posterior negativity (EPN), established in assessing motivated attention. Cocaine pictures elicited increased electrocortical measures of motivated attention in ways similar to affectively pleasant and unpleasant pictures in all CUD, an effect that was no longer discernible during the late LPP window for the current users. This group also exhibited deficient processing of the other emotional stimuli (early LPP window: pleasant pictures; late LPP window: pleasant and unpleasant pictures). Results were unique to the LPP and not EPN. Taken together, results support a relatively early attention bias to cocaine stimuli in cocaine addicted individuals further suggesting that recent cocaine use decreases such attention bias during later stages of processing but at the expense of deficient processing of other emotional stimuli. PMID:21450043

  6. Design of low cost smart infusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, Yohanes David; Purnamaningsih, Retno Wigajatri

    2015-01-01

    We propose design of a smart infusion device suitable for public hospitals in Indonesia. The device comprised of LED, photodiode and DC motor to measure and control the infusion rate, using the principle of LED beam absorption. The infusion rate was identified by using microcontroller and displayed through computer unit. Experiment results for different flow rate level and concentration of Dextrose showed that the device is able to detect, measure, and control the infusion droplets flow rate by the average error rate of 1.0081%.

  7. Cocaine abuse in North America: a milestone in history.

    PubMed

    Das, G

    1993-04-01

    The euphoric effects of coca leaves have been known to mankind for thousands of years. Yet the first epidemic of cocaine use in America occurred during the late 19th century. Initially, there were no laws restricting the consumption or sale of cocaine. In fact, cocaine was freely available in drug stores, saloons, from mail-order vendors, and even in grocery stores. It is reported that one drug manufacturer, in 1885, was selling cocaine in 15 different forms, including cigarettes, cheroots, inhalants, cordials, crystals, and solutions. Many famous imported wines, such as "Vin Mariani," contained a mixture of wine and coca. For consumers on budgets, the wonder drug was available as Coca-Cola and dozens of other soda pops and pick-me-up drinks. One of them even had a simple and direct name, Dope. Soon enough, the ill effects of cocaine became apparent, and by the 1920s cocaine was the most feared of all illicit drugs. Most states began enacting laws against cocaine use. President William Taft proclaimed cocaine as Public Enemy No. 1, and in 1914 the Congress passed the Harrison act, which tightly regulated the distribution and sale of cocaine. By the late 1950s, cocaine use in the United States was simply considered a problem in the past. Unfortunately, the people who were aware of the nation's first cocaine epidemic gradually passed away, and America once again was ready for its fling with cocaine in the 1960s. Today, it is estimated that upwards of 50 million Americans, that is one in four, have used cocaine. In addition, another fifty thousand people use this substance for the first time each day. More than 6 million Americans use cocaine on a regular basis. Little wonder, then, that America as well as the other countries have declared a "War on Drugs." In this review, pharmacology of cocaine, major complications arising from its use, and efforts to curb its abuse are discussed. PMID:8473543

  8. Butyrylcholinesterase Genetic Variants: Association with Cocaine Dependence and Related Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Negrão, André Brooking; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Guindalini, Camila; Santos, Hadassa Campos; Messas, Guilherme Peres; Laranjeira, Ronaldo; Vallada, Homero

    2013-01-01

    Objective The search for genetic vulnerability factors in cocaine dependence has focused on the role that neuroplasticity plays in addiction. However, like many other drugs, the ability of an individual to metabolize cocaine can also influence susceptibility to dependence. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) metabolizes cocaine, and genetic variants of the BChE gene (BCHE) alter its catalytic activity. Therefore, we hypothesize that cocaine users with polymorphisms in BCHE can show diverse addictive behaviors due to differences in effective plasma concentrations of cocaine. Those polymorphisms might also influence users to prefer one of the two main preparations (crack or powder cocaine), despite having equal access to both. The present work investigates polymorphisms in BCHE and if those genetic variants constitute risk factors for cocaine dependence and for crack cocaine use. Methods A total of 1,436 individuals (698 cocaine-dependent patients and 738 controls) were genotyped for three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in BCHE: rs1803274, rs4263329, and rs4680662. Results For rs4263329, a nominal difference was found between cases and controls. For rs1803274 (the functional SNP), a statistically significant difference was found between patients who used crack cocaine exclusively and those who used only powder cocaine (P = 0.027; OR = 4.36; 95% CI = 1.18–16.04). Allele frequencies and genotypes related to other markers did not differ between cases and controls or between the two cocaine subgroups. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the AA genotype of rs1803274 is a risk factor for crack cocaine use, which is more addictive than powder cocaine use. Further studies are needed in order to confirm this preliminary result and clarify the role of BCHE and its variants in cocaine dependence. PMID:24312228

  9. Repeated administration of a mutant cocaine esterase: effects on plasma cocaine levels, cocaine-induced cardiovascular activity, and immune responses in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory T; Brim, Remy L; Noon, Kathleen R; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Sunahara, Roger K; Woods, James H; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the capacity of a long-acting mutant form of a naturally occurring bacterial double mutant cocaine esterase (DM CocE) to antagonize the reinforcing, discriminative, convulsant, and lethal effects of cocaine in rodents and reverse the increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) produced by cocaine in rhesus monkeys. This study was aimed at characterizing the immunologic responses to repeated dosing with DM CocE and determining whether the development of anti-CocE antibodies altered the capacity of DM CocE to reduce plasma cocaine levels and ameliorate the cardiovascular effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys. Under control conditions, intravenous administration of cocaine (3 mg/kg) resulted in a rapid increase in the plasma concentration of cocaine (n = 2) and long-lasting increases in MAP and HR (n = 3). Administration of DM CocE (0.32 mg/kg i.v.) 10 min after cocaine resulted in a rapid hydrolysis of cocaine with plasma levels below detection limits within 5 to 8 min. Elevations in MAP and HR were significantly reduced within 25 and 50 min of DM CocE administration, respectively. Although slight (10-fold) increases in anti-CocE antibodies were observed after the fourth administration of DM CocE, these antibodies did not alter the capacity of DM CocE to reduce plasma cocaine levels or ameliorate cocaine's cardiovascular effects. Anti-CocE titers were transient and generally dissipated within 8 weeks. Together, these results suggest that highly efficient cocaine esterases, such as DM CocE, may provide a novel and effective therapeutic for the treatment of acute cocaine intoxication in humans. PMID:22518021

  10. Perioperative Continuous Ropivacaine Wound Infusion in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Randomized Controlled Double-blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Fassoulaki, Argyro; Vassi, Emilia; Korkolis, Dimitrios; Zotou, Marianna

    2016-02-01

    Wound infusion with local anesthetics has been used for postoperative pain relief with variable results. This randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial examines the effect of ropivacaine infusion on pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A total of 110 patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups. After induction of anesthesia a 75-mm catheter was inserted subcutaneously and connected to an elastomeric pump containing either 0.75% ropivacaine (ropivacaine group) or normal saline (control group) for 24 hours postoperatively. Before skin closure, each hole was infiltrated with 2 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine or normal saline according to randomization. Pain at rest, pain during cough, and analgesic consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit and at 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. Analgesic requirements and pain scores were recorded 1 and 3 months after surgery. The ropivacaine group reported less pain during cough (P=0.044) in the postanesthesia care unit (P=0.017) and 4 hours postoperatively (P=0.038). Ropivacaine wound infusion had no effect on late and chronic pain. PMID:26679680

  11. Effects of chronic cocaine abuse on postsynaptic dopamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.; Schlyer, D.; Shiue, C.Y.; Alpert, R.; Dewey, S.L.; Logan, J.; Bendriem, B.; Christman, D. )

    1990-06-01

    To assess the effects of chronic cocaine intoxication on dopamine receptors in human subjects, the authors evaluated ({sup 18}F)N-methylspiroperidol binding using positron emission tomography in 10 cocaine abusers and 10 normal control subjects. Cocaine abusers who had been detoxified for 1 week or less showed significantly lower values for uptake of ({sup 18}F)N-methylspiroperidol in striatum than the normal subjects, whereas the cocaine abusers who had been detoxified for 1 month showed values comparable to those obtained from normal subjects. The authors conclude that postsynaptic dopamine receptor availability decreases with chronic cocaine abuse but may recover after a drug-free interval.

  12. Analysis of volatile organic compounds from illicit cocaine samples

    SciTech Connect

    Robins, W.H.; Wright, B.W.

    1994-07-01

    Detection of illicit cocaine hydrochloride shipments can be improved if there is a greater understanding of the identity and quantity of volatile compounds present. This study provides preliminary data concerning the volatile organic compounds detected in a limited Set of cocaine hydrochloride samples. In all cases, cocaine was one of the major volatile compounds detected. Other tropeines were detected in almost all samples. Low concentrations of compounds that may be residues of processing solvents were observed in some samples. The equilibrium emissivity of. cocaine from cocaine hydrochloride was investigated and a value of 83 parts-per-trillion was determined.

  13. Arousal Modulation in Cocaine-Exposed Infants

    PubMed Central

    Bendersky, Margaret; Lewis, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The ability to modulate arousal is a critical skill with wide-ranging implications for development. In this study, the authors examined arousal regulation as a function of levels of prenatal cocaine exposure in 107 infants at 4 months of age using a “still-face” procedure. Facial expressions were coded. A greater percentage of heavily cocaine-exposed infants, compared with those who were unexposed to cocaine, showed less enjoyment during en face play with their mothers and continued to show negative expressions during the resumption of play following a period when the interaction was interrupted. This finding was independent of other substance exposure, neonatal medical condition, environmental risk, maternal contingent responsivity, and concurrent maternal sensitivity and vocalizations. PMID:9597364

  14. Hippocampal Volume Mediates the Relationship between Measures of Pre-treatment Cocaine Use and Within-treatment Cocaine Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiansong; Kober, Hedy; Wang, Xin; DeVito, Elise E.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Data suggest that the amygdala and hippocampus contribute to cocaine seeking and use, particularly following exposure to cocaine-related cues and contexts. Furthermore, indices of pre-treatment cocaine-use severity have been shown to correlate with treatment outcome in cocaine-dependent patients. Methods The aim of this study was to assess the relationships between amygdalar and hippocampal volumes and cocaine use before and during treatment. High-resolution magnetic-resonance brain images were obtained from 23 cocaine-dependent patients prior to treatment and 54 healthy comparison individuals. Automated segmentation of the amygdala and hippocampus images was performed in FreeSurfer. Cocaine-dependent patients subsequently received behavioral therapy alone or combined with contingency management as part of a treatment trial, and cocaine-use indices (self-report, urine toxicology) were collected. Results Comparison participants and cocaine-dependent patients did not show significant difference in amygdalar and hippocampal volumes at pretreatment. Within the patient group, greater hippocampal volumes were correlated with more days of cocaine use before treatment and with poorer treatment outcome as indexed by shorter durations of continuous abstinence from cocaine and lower percentages of cocaine-negative urine samples during treatment. Mediation analysis indicated that pre-treatment hippocampal volumes mediated the relationships between pre-treatment cocaine use and treatment outcomes. Conclusions The finding of a significant correlation between hippocampal volume and pre-treatment cocaine-use severity and treatment response suggests that hippocampal volume should be considered when developing individualized treatments for cocaine dependence. PMID:25115748

  15. Maternal Cocaine Use and Mother-Toddler Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Eiden, Rina D.; Schuetze, Pamela; Colder, Craig; Veira, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the direct and indirect associations between maternal cocaine use during pregnancy and mother-toddler aggression in an interactive context at 2 years of child age. We hypothesized that in addition to direct effects of cocaine exposure on maternal and child aggression, the association between maternal cocaine use and mother-toddler aggression may be indirect via higher maternal psychiatric symptoms, negative affect, or poor infant autonomic regulation at 13 months. Participants consisted of 220 (119 cocaine exposed, 101 non-cocaine exposed) mother-toddler dyads participating in an ongoing longitudinal study of prenatal cocaine exposure. Results indicated that mothers who used cocaine during pregnancy displayed higher levels of aggression toward their toddlers compared to mothers in the control group. Results from model testing indicated significant indirect associations between maternal cocaine use and maternal aggression via higher maternal negative affect as well as lower infant autonomic regulation at 13 months. Although there were no direct associations between cocaine exposure and toddler aggression, there was a significant indirect effect via lower infant autonomic regulation at 13 months. Results highlight the importance of including maternal aggression in predictive models of prenatal cocaine exposure examining child aggression. Results also emphasize the important role of infant regulation as a mechanism partially explaining associations between cocaine exposure and mother-toddler aggression. PMID:21396441

  16. Cocaine facilitates glutamatergic transmission and activates lateral habenular neurons.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wanhong; Chen, Lixin; Wang, Liwei; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2013-07-01

    Cocaine administration can be both rewarding and aversive. While much effort has gone to investigating the rewarding effect, the mechanisms underlying cocaine-induced aversion remain murky. There is increasing evidence that the lateral habenula (LHb), a small epithalamic structure, plays a critical role in the aversive responses of many addictive drugs including cocaine. However, the effects of cocaine on LHb neurons are not well explored. Here we show that, in acute brain slices from rats, cocaine depolarized LHb neurons and accelerated their spontaneous firing. The AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists, 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione, DL-2-amino-5-phosphono-valeric acid, attenuated cocaine-induced acceleration. In addition, cocaine concentration-dependently enhanced glutamatergic excitation: enhanced the amplitude but reduced the paired pulse ratio of EPSCs elicited by electrical stimulations, and increased the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs in the absence and presence of tetrodotoxin. Dopamine and the agonists of dopamine D1 (SKF 38393) and D2 (quinpirole) receptors, as well as the dopamine transporter blocker (GBR12935), mimicked the effects of cocaine. Conversely, both D1 (SKF83566) and D2 (raclopride) antagonists substantially attenuated cocaine's effects on EPSCs and firing. Together, our results provide evidence that cocaine may act primarily via an increase in dopamine levels in the LHb that activates both D1 and D2 receptors. This leads to an increase in presynaptic glutamate release probability and LHb neuron activity. This may contribute to the aversive effect of cocaine observed in vivo. PMID:23347950

  17. Decreased brain dopamine cell numbers in human cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Little, Karley Y; Ramssen, Eric; Welchko, Ryan; Volberg, Vitaly; Roland, Courtney J; Cassin, Bader

    2009-08-15

    Cocaine use diminishes striatal and midbrain dopamine neuronal components in both post-mortem and in vivo human experiments. The diffuse nature of these declines suggests the possibility that cocaine use might cause a loss of dopamine neurons in humans. Previous rodent studies have not detected cocaine-induced dopamine cell damage. The present experiment involved counting midbrain dopamine neurons utilizing both melanin and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Well-preserved blocks ranging from +38 mm obex to +45 mm obex were examined in 10 cocaine users and 9 controls. Sections were also examined for signs of acute pathological injury by counting activated macrophages and microglia. Melanized cells at six midbrain levels were significantly reduced in cocaine users by both drug exposures. The estimated total number of melanized dopamine cells in the anterior midbrain was significantly reduced in cocaine users by 16%. Results with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity were less conclusive because of variability in staining. Both activated macrophages and activated microglia were significantly increased among cocaine users. Cocaine exposure may have neurotoxic effects on dopamine neurons in humans. The infiltration of phagocytic cells suggests that the lower number of dopamine cells found in cocaine users was a relatively recent effect. The loss of dopamine cells could contribute to and intensify cocaine dependence, as well as anhedonic and depressive symptoms, in some cocaine users. Further efforts at clarifying the pathophysiological mechanisms involved may help explain treatment refractoriness, and identify targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19233481

  18. Demonstration of specific binding of cocaine to human spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Yazigi, R.A.; Odem, R.R.; Polakoski, K.L. )

    1991-10-09

    Exposure of males to cocaine has been linked to abnormal development of their offspring. To investigate the possible role of sperm, this study examined the interaction of cocaine with human spermatozoa. Washed sperm were incubated with tritiated cocaine and the samples were filtered and the remaining radioactivity quantitated. The specific binding was optimal at 20 minutes and 23C. Competition studies with tritiated cocaine indicated the presence of approximately 3.6 {times} 10{sup 3} binding sites per cell, with a high affinity receptor dissociation constant. Cocaine concentrations as high as 670 {mu}mol/L had no detectable effect on either the motility or viability of the cells. These results support the hypothesis that the sperm may act as a vector to transport cocaine into an ovum. This novel mechanism could be involved in the abnormal development of offspring of cocaine-exposed males.

  19. Malignant hypertension-associated thrombotic microangiopathy following cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Lamia, Rais; El Ati, Zohra; Ben Fatma, Lilia; Zouaghi, Karim; Smaoui, Wided; Rania, Khedher; Krid, Madiha; Ben Hmida, Fathi; Béji, Soumaya; Ben Moussa, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine is one of the most commonly used illicit drugs with distribution and consumption throughout the world. Acute renal failure associated with rhabdomyolysis, direct vasoconstriction and hemodynamic alteration is well described in patients with cocaine intoxication. Cocaine use is associated with high blood pressure and may rarely induce malignant hypertension associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. We report the case of a patient who developed malignant hypertension associated with thrombotic microangiopathy after chronic consumption of cocaine. A kidney biopsy revealed thrombotic microangiopathy with fibrinoid necrosis of arterioles and glomerular tufts. He required dialysis sessions. Cocaine-mediated endothelial injury and platelet activation may play important pathogenetic roles in cocaine abusers who develop malignant hypertension associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. Clinicians need to be aware of this rare feature of cocaine intoxication. PMID:26787585

  20. Extended access of cocaine self-administration results in tolerance to the dopamine-elevating and locomotor-stimulating effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Jones, Sara R

    2014-01-01

    Tolerance to the neurochemical and psychoactive effects of cocaine after repeated use is a hallmark of cocaine addiction in humans. However, comprehensive studies on tolerance to the behavioral, psychoactive, and neurochemical effects of cocaine following contingent administration in rodents are lacking. We outlined the consequences of extended access cocaine self-administration as it related to tolerance to the psychomotor activating, dopamine (DA) elevating, and DA transporter (DAT) inhibiting effects of cocaine. Cocaine self-administration (1.5 mg/kg/inj; 40 inj; 5 days), which resulted in escalation of first hour intake, caused reductions in evoked DA release and reduced maximal rates of uptake through the DAT as measured by slice voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens core. Furthermore, we report reductions in cocaine-induced uptake inhibition and a corresponding increase in the dose of cocaine required for 50% inhibition of DA uptake (Ki ) at the DAT. Cocaine tolerance at the DAT translated to reductions in cocaine-induced DA overflow as measured by microdialysis. In addition, cocaine-induced elevations in locomotor activity and stereotypy were reduced, while rearing behavior was enhanced in animals with a history of cocaine self-administration. Here, we demonstrate both neurochemical and behavioral cocaine tolerance in an extended-access rodent model of cocaine abuse, which allows for a better understanding of the neurochemical and psychomotor tolerance that develops to cocaine in human addicts. We demonstrate tolerance to the neurochemical and behavioral effects of cocaine following extended-access cocaine self-administration. With respect to neurochemistry, we show reduced cocaine-induced dopamine uptake inhibition, an increased dose of cocaine required for 50% inhibition of the dopamine transporter, and reduced cocaine-induced dopamine overflow. In addition, we show escalation of cocaine intake and reduced cocaine-induced locomotor activity following

  1. Ceftriaxone attenuates locomotor activity induced by acute and repeated cocaine exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Tallarida, Christopher S; Corley, Gladys; Kovalevich, Jane; Yen, William; Langford, Dianne; Rawls, Scott M

    2013-11-27

    Ceftriaxone (CTX) decreases locomotor activation produced by initial cocaine exposure and attenuates development of behavioral sensitization produced by repeated cocaine exposure. An important question that has not yet been answered is whether or not CTX reduces behavioral sensitization to cocaine in cases in which the antibiotic is administered only during the period of cocaine absence that follows repeated cocaine exposure and precedes reintroduction to cocaine. We investigated this question using C57BL/6 mice. Mice pretreated with cocaine (15mg/kg×14 days) and then challenged with cocaine (15mg/kg) after 30 days of cocaine absence displayed sensitization of locomotor activity. For combination experiments, CTX injected during the 30 days of cocaine absence attenuated behavioral sensitization produced by cocaine challenge. In the case in which CTX was injected together with cocaine for 14 days, development of behavioral sensitization to cocaine challenge was also reduced. CTX attenuated the increase in locomotor activity produced by acute cocaine exposure; however, its efficacy was dependent on the dose of cocaine as inhibition was detected against 30mg/kg, but not 15mg/kg, of cocaine. These results from mice indicate that CTX attenuates locomotor activity produced by acute and repeated cocaine exposure and counters cocaine's locomotor activating properties in a paradigm in which the antibiotic is injected during the period of forced cocaine absence that follows repeated cocaine exposure. PMID:24120434

  2. Postnatal consequences of prenatal cocaine exposure and myocardial apoptosis: does cocaine in utero imperil the adult heart?

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qingping

    2005-01-01

    Cocaine use is common among pregnant women with a history of substance abuse, and has been shown to cause abnormalities in the heart during fetal and postnatal development. However, mechanisms underlying the detrimental effects of cocaine on the developing heart are not fully understood. In this issue, Bae and Zhang show that prenatal cocaine exposure increases the susceptibility of the postnatal heart to ischemia and reperfusion injury. Their results suggest that myocardial apoptosis induced by cocaine during fetal development may represent one of the mechanisms by which prenatal cocaine exposure exerts its long-term, deleterious consequences on postnatal cardiac function. PMID:15685202

  3. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  4. Infusing Systems Thinking into Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Charles W.; Tomlin, James H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of career counselors in infusing systems thinking into occupational advising. The authors conducted a qualitative review and analysis of selected literature on systems thinking and analyzed trends for adaptation to career counseling practice. This analysis suggests that career counselors need to infuse systems…

  5. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5725 Infusion pump. (a) Identification....

  6. Comparative behavioral pharmacology and toxicology of cocaine and its ethanol-derived metabolite, cocaine ethyl-ester (cocaethylene)

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.L.; Terry, P.; Witkin, J.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The present study compared the behavioral and toxic effects of cocaine and its ethanol derived metabolite, cocaine ethyl-ester (cocaethylene). Both drugs produced qualitatively similar psychomoter stimulant effects. Cocaine and cocaethylene increased locomotor activity in mice, with cocaine approximately four times more potent than cocaethylene. The durations of action of ED{sub 75} doses of each of the drugs were comparable. Each of the drugs also produced stimulation of operant responding in rats. In rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine injections from saline, cocaine was approximately three to five times more potent than cocaethylene in producing these cocaine-like interoceptive effects. In contrast to the behavioral effects, cocaine and cocaethylene were equipotent in producing convulsions, and cocaethylene was more potent than cocaine in producing lethality. These results suggest that the conversion of cocaine to cocaethylene with simultaneous cocaine and alcohol use may produce an increased risk of toxicity due to a decrease in the potency of cocaethylene in producing psychomotor stimulant effects, and its increased potency in producing toxicity.

  7. Cocaine Self-Administration Elevates GluN2B within dmPFC Mediating Heightened Cue-Elicited Operant Responding

    PubMed Central

    Szumlinski, Karen K; Wroten, Melissa G; Miller, Bailey W; Sacramento, Arianne D; Cohen, Matan; Ben-Shahar, Osnat; Kippin, Tod E

    2016-01-01

    Cue-elicited drug-craving correlates with hyperactivity within prefrontal cortex (PFC), which is theorized to result from dysregulated excitatory neurotransmission. The NMDA glutamate receptor is highly implicated in addiction-related neuroplasticity. As NMDA receptor function is regulated critically by its GluN2 subunits, herein, we assayed the relation between incubated cue-elicited cocaine-seeking following extended access to intravenous cocaine (6 h/d; 0.25 mg/infusion for 10 d) and the expression of GluN2A/B receptor subunits within PFC sub regions during early versus late withdrawal (respectively, 3 vs. 30 days). Cocaine-seeking rats exhibited elevated GluN2B expression within the dorsomedial aspect of the PFC (dmPFC); this effect was apparent at both 3 and 30 days withdrawal and occurred in cocaine-experienced rats, regardless of experiencing an extinction test or not. Thus, elevated dmPFC GluN2B expression appears to reflect a pharmacodynamic response to excessive cocaine intake that is independent of the duration of drug withdrawal or re-exposure to drug-taking context. The functional relevance of elevated dmPFC GluN2B expression for drug-seeking was assessed by the local infusion of the prototypical GluN2B-selective antagonist ifenprodil (1.0 µg/side). Ifenprodil did not alter cue-elicited responding in animals with a history of saline self-administration. In contrast, ifenprodil lowered cue-elicited cocaine-seeking, while potentiating cue-elicited sucrose-seeking. Thus, the effects of an intra-dmPFC ifenprodil infusion upon cue reactivity are reinforcer-specific, arguing in favor of targeting GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors as a pharmacological strategy for reducing behavioral reactivity to drug-associated cues with the potential benefit of heightening the reinforcing properties of cues associated with non-drug primary rewards. PMID:27478879

  8. Implementing and maintaining an infusion alliance.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britt M

    2010-01-01

    Infusion therapy models are ever changing and growing in modern health care. New technologies and problems arise daily as researchers and clinicians explore our world. As technologies advance, health care costs are also skyrocketing. The vast majority of hospitalized patients will receive some form of infusion therapy during their stay, and many will continue to receive therapy after they are discharged from the inpatient setting. Infusion alliances can aid cost containment by decreasing infusion-related complication rates, affect customer satisfaction, and promote interdisciplinary collaboration. This article discusses the potential benefits of an infusion alliance, details steps for using the performance improvement process when implementing and maintaining an alliance, and outlines the components of a successful business plan. PMID:20841983

  9. The 5-HT(2C) receptor agonist lorcaserin reduces cocaine self-administration, reinstatement of cocaine-seeking and cocaine induced locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Harvey-Lewis, Colin; Li, Zhaoxia; Higgins, Guy A; Fletcher, Paul J

    2016-02-01

    Lorcaserin (Lorqess, Belviq(®)) is a selective 5-HT(2C) receptor agonist that has received FDA approval for the treatment of obesity. 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists are also efficacious in decreasing multiple aspects of cocaine motivation and reward in preclinical models. This would suggest that lorcaserin is a clinically available therapeutic with the potential to treat cocaine addiction. Here we report the effects of lorcaserin (0.1 mg/kg-1.0 mg/kg) on multiple aspects of cocaine-related behaviours in rats. We find that lorcaserin dose-dependently decreases cocaine self-administration on progressive and fixed ratio schedules of reinforcement. Lorcaserin also reduces reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behaviour in response to priming injections of cocaine and/or reintroduction of cocaine-associated cues. Finally, lorcaserin dose-dependently decreases cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. Our results, when considered in concert with similar emergent findings in non-human primates, strongly support continued research into the potential of lorcaserin as a clinical treatment for cocaine addiction. PMID:26427596

  10. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow response to a 5HT3 antagonist in early- and late-onset cocaine-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Adinoff, Bryon; Devous, Michael D; Williams, Mark J; Harris, Thomas S; Best, Susan E; Dong, Hongyun; Zielinski, Tanya

    2014-03-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5HT3) receptors are important modulators of mesostriatal dopaminergic transmission and have been implicated in the pathophysiology of cocaine reward, withdrawal and self-administration. In addition, the 5HT3 antagonist ondansetron is effective in treating early-onset, but not late-onset, alcohol-dependent subjects. To explore the role of 5HT3 receptor systems in cocaine addiction using functioning imaging, we administered ondansetron to 23 abstinent, treatment-seeking cocaine-addicted and 22 sex-, age- and race-matched healthy control participants. Differences between early- (first use before 20 years, n = 10) and late-onset (first use after 20 years, n = 10) cocaine-addicted subjects were also assessed. On two separate days, subjects were administered ondansetron (0.15 mg/kg intravenously over 15 minutes) or saline. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured following each infusion with single photon emission computed tomography. No significant rCBF differences between the cocaine-addicted and control participants were observed following ondansetron relative to saline. Early-onset subjects, however, showed increased (P < 0.001) right posterior parahippocampal rCBF following ondansetron. In contrast, late-onset subjects showed decreased rCBF following ondansetron in an overlapping region of the right parahippocampal/hippocampal gyrus. Early-onset subjects also displayed increased rCBF in the left anterior insula and subthalamic nucleus following ondansetron; late-onset subjects showed decreased rCBF in the right anterior insula. These findings suggest that the age of drug use onset is associated with serotonergic biosignatures in cocaine-addicted subjects. Further clarification of these alterations may guide targeted treatment with serotonergic medications similar to those successfully used in alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:22458709

  11. Social defeat stress-induced sensitization and escalated cocaine self-administration: The role of ERK signaling in the rat ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Jasmine J.; Chartoff, Elena H.; Holly, Elizabeth N.; Potter, David N.; Carlezon, William A.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Intermittent social defeat stress can induce neuroadaptations that promote compulsive drug taking. Within the mesocorticolimbic circuit, repeated cocaine administration activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Objective The present experiments examine whether changes in ERK phosphorylation are necessary for the behavioral and neural adaptations that occur as a consequence of intermittent defeat stress. Materials and methods Rats were exposed to four brief intermittent defeats over the course of 10 days. Ten days after the last defeat, rats were challenged with cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline, and ERK activity was examined in mesocorticolimbic regions. To determine the role of ERK in defeat stress-induced behavioral sensitization, we bilaterally microinjected the MAPK/ERK kinase inhibitor U0126 (1 μg/side) or vehicle (20% DMSO) into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) prior to each of 4 defeats. Ten days following the last defeat, locomotor activity was assessed for the expression of behavioral cross-sensitization to cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Thereafter, rats self-administered cocaine under fixed and progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement, including a 24-h continuous access “binge” (0.3 mg/kg/infusion). Results We found that repeated defeat stress increased ERK phosphorylation in the VTA. Inhibition of VTA ERK prior to each social defeat attenuated the development of stress-induced sensitization and prevented stress-induced enhancement of cocaine self-administration during a continuous access binge. Conclusions These results suggest that enhanced activation of ERK in the VTA due to brief defeats is critical in the induction of sensitization and escalated cocaine taking. PMID:25373870

  12. Chronic cocaine-induced H3 acetylation and transcriptional activation of CaMKIIalpha in the nucleus accumbens is critical for motivation for drug reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Lv, Zhigang; Hu, Zhaoyang; Sheng, Jian; Hui, Bin; Sun, Jie; Ma, Lan

    2010-03-01

    The regulation of gene expression in the brain reward regions is known to contribute to the pathogenesis and persistence of drug addiction. Increasing evidence suggests that the regulation of gene transcription is mediated by epigenetic mechanisms that alter the chromatin structure at specific gene promoters. To better understand the involvement of epigenetic regulation in drug reinforcement properties, rats were subjected to cocaine self-administration paradigm. Daily histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor infusions in the shell of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) caused an upward shift in the dose-response curve under fixed-ratio schedule and increased the break point under progressive-ratio schedule, indicating enhanced motivation for self-administered drug. The effect of the HDAC inhibitor is attributed to the increased elevation of histone acetylation induced by chronic, but not acute, cocaine experience. In contrast, neutralizing the chronic cocaine-induced increase in histone modification by the bilateral overexpression of HDAC4 in the NAc shell reduced drug motivation. The association between the motivation for cocaine and the transcriptional activation of addiction-related genes by H3 acetylation in the NAc shell was analyzed. Among the genes activated by chronic cocaine experiences, the expression of CaMKIIalpha, but not CaMKIIbeta, correlated positively with motivation for the drug. Lentivirus-mediated shRNA knockdown experiments showed that CaMKIIalpha, but not CaMKIIbeta, in the NAc shell is essential for the maintenance of motivation to self-administered cocaine. These findings suggest that chronic drug-use-induced transcriptional activation of genes, such as CaMKIIalpha, modulated by H3 acetylation in the NAc is a critical regulatory mechanism underlying motivation for drug reinforcement. PMID:20010550

  13. Oxytocin Reduces Cocaine Seeking and Reverses Chronic Cocaine-Induced Changes in Glutamate Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Luyi; Sun, Wei-Lun; Young, Amy B.; Lee, Kunhee; McGinty, Jacqueline F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxytocin, a neurohypophyseal neuropeptide, is a potential mediator and regulator of drug addiction. However, the cellular mechanisms of oxytocin in drug seeking remain unknown. Methods: In the present study, we used a self-administration/reinstatement model to study the effects of oxytocin on cocaine seeking and its potential interaction with glutamate function at the receptor level. Results: Systemic oxytocin dose-dependently reduced cocaine self-administration during various schedules of reinforcement, including fixed ratio 1, fixed ratio 5, and progressive ratio. Oxytocin also attenuated reinstatement to cocaine seeking induced by cocaine prime or conditioned cues. Western-blot analysis indicated that oxytocin increased phosphorylation of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-type glutamate receptor GluA1 subunit at the Ser 845 site with or without accompanying increases in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, in several brain regions, including the prefrontal cortex, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, amygdala, and dorsal hippocampus. Immunoprecipitation of oxytocin receptor and GluA1 subunit receptors further demonstrated a physical interaction between these 2 receptors, although the interaction was not influenced by chronic cocaine or oxytocin treatment. Oxytocin also attenuated sucrose seeking in a GluA1- or extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-independent manner. Conclusions: These findings suggest that oxytocin mediates cocaine seeking through interacting with glutamate receptor systems via second messenger cascades in mesocorticolimbic regions. PMID:25539504

  14. Bacterial cocaine esterase: a protein-based therapy for cocaine overdose and addiction

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Woods, James H; Sunahara, Roger K

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine is highly addictive and there are no pharmacotherapeutic drugs available to treat acute cocaine toxicity or chronic abuse. Antagonizing an inhibitor such as cocaine using a small molecule has proven difficult. The alternative approach is to modify cocaine’s pharmacokinetic properties by sequestering or hydrolyzing it in serum and limiting access to its sites of action. We took advantage of a bacterial esterase (CocE) that has evolved to hydrolyze cocaine and have developed it as a therapeutic that rapidly and specifically clears cocaine from the subject. Native enzyme was unstable at 37°C, thus limiting CocE’s potential. Innovative computational methods based on the protein’s structure helped elucidate its mechanism of destabilization. Novel protein engineering methodologies were applied to substantially improve its stability in vitro and in vivo. These improvements rendered CocE as a powerful and efficacious therapeutic to treat cocaine intoxication and lead the way towards developing a therapy for addiction. PMID:22300094

  15. The skinny on cocaine: insights into eating behavior and body weight in cocaine-dependent men.

    PubMed

    Ersche, Karen D; Stochl, Jan; Woodward, Jeremy M; Fletcher, Paul C

    2013-12-01

    There is a general assumption that weight loss associated with cocaine use reflects its appetite suppressing properties. We sought to determine whether this was justified by characterizing, in detail, alterations in dietary food intake and body composition in actively using cocaine-dependent individuals. We conducted a cross-sectional case-control comparison of 65 male volunteers from the local community, half of whom satisfied the DSM-IV-TR criteria for cocaine dependence (n=35) while the other half had no personal or family history of a psychiatric disorder, including substance abuse (n=30). Assessments were made of eating behavior and dietary food intake, estimation of body composition, and measurement of plasma leptin. Although cocaine users reported significantly higher levels of dietary fat and carbohydrates as well as patterns of uncontrolled eating, their fat mass was significantly reduced compared with their non-drug using peers. Levels of leptin were associated with fat mass, and with the duration of stimulant use. Tobacco smoking status or concomitant use of medication did not affect the significance of the results. Weight changes in cocaine users reflect fundamental perturbations in fat regulation. These are likely to be overlooked in clinical practice but may produce significant health problems when cocaine use is discontinued during recovery. PMID:23920064

  16. Fluid delivery from infusion-pump syringes.

    PubMed

    Carl, J L; Erstad, B L; Murphy, J E; Slack, M K

    1995-07-01

    Fluid-delivery rates of five small-volume infusion-pump syringes were compared. The study consisted of a comparison of the infusion-pump syringes in their respective infusion pumps (1) set for continuous delivery at 1 mL/hr, (2) set for continuous delivery at 3 mL/hr, and (3) set to deliver 1-mL bolus volumes during continuous delivery at 4 mL/hr. The Life-care prefilled 30-mL syringe (Abbott), the DBL 30-mL syringe no. 770205 (DBL Inc.), and the Pump-Jet 30-mL syringe no. 1931 (International Medication Systems) were tested in the Lifecare PCA Plus II infusion pump no. 4100 (Abbott). The 30-mL Pump-Jet syringe no. 1911 (International Medication Systems) and the DBL 30-mL syringe no. 709700 (DBL Inc.) were tested in the Stratofuse PCA infusion pump (Baxter). The infusion pumps were set to deliver fluid continuously at 1 mL/hr for 30 hours, and the solutions were collected separately and weighed. The procedure was repeated with the infusion rate set at 3 mL/hr for 10 hours. For the third part of the study, each syringe was tested to deliver 1-mL boluses with 0, 5, 15, and 25 mL removed from the syringe. The solutions were collected and weighed before and after each bolus was delivered. The volume of solution collected was calculated by using the specific gravity of the solution. The syringes delivered significantly different volumes during the first hour of infusion at both the 1- and 3-mL/hr rates. Differences also existed across time for most of the syringes. Bolus volumes varied greatly after infusion of 0 or 5 mL of fluid but were acceptable for the remainder of the infusions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7671041

  17. Modification of pharmacokinetic and abuse-related effects of cocaine by human-derived cocaine hydrolase in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Charles W; Justinova, Zuzana; Lafleur, David; Woods, Doug; Roschke, Viktor; Hallak, Hussein; Sklair-Tavron, Liora; Redhi, Godfrey H; Yasar, Sevil; Bergman, Jack; Goldberg, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    Although substantial research effort has focused on developing pharmacological treatments for cocaine abuse, no effective medications have been developed. Recent studies show that enzymes that metabolize cocaine in the periphery, forestalling its entry into the brain, can prevent cocaine toxicity and its behavioral effects in rodents. Here we report on effects of one such enzyme (Albu-CocH) on the pharmacokinetic and behavioral effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys. Albu-CocH was developed from successive mutations of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and has 1000-fold greater catalytic activity against cocaine than naturally occurring BChE. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that Albu-CocH (5 mg/kg) had a half-life of 56.6 hours in squirrel monkeys. In these studies, plasma levels of cocaine following i.v. 1 mg/kg cocaine were reduced 2 hours after administration of Albu-CocH, whereas plasma levels of the cocaine metabolite ecgonine methyl ester were increased. These effects were still evident 72 hours following Albu-CocH administration. In behavioral experiments in monkeys, pre-treatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH dramatically decreased self-administration of a reinforcing dose of i.v. cocaine (30 µg/kg/injection) for over 24 hours. Pre-treatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH also attenuated the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine self-administration by an i.v. priming injection of cocaine (0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg) and, in separate studies, attenuated the discriminative-stimulus effects of cocaine. The ability of Albu-CocH to attenuate the abuse-related effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys indicates that further investigation of BChE mutants as potential treatment for cocaine abuse and toxicity is warranted. PMID:22264200

  18. mGlu5 Receptors and Relapse to Cocaine-Seeking: The Role of Receptor Trafficking in Postrelapse Extinction Learning Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Knackstedt, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that MTEP, an allosteric antagonist of mGlu5, infused into the nucleus accumbens attenuates relapse after abstinence from cocaine self-administration. MTEP infused into the dorsolateral striatum (dlSTR) does not alter relapse but has long-lasting effects on subsequent extinction learning. Here we tested whether systemic MTEP would prevent relapse after abstinence or alter extinction learning. We also investigated the mechanism of action by which intra-dlSTR MTEP on test day alters extinction on subsequent days. Animals self-administered cocaine for 12 days followed by abstinence for 20-21 days. MTEP (0.5–5 mg/kg IP) was administered prior to placement into the operant chamber for a context-primed relapse test. A separate group of animals received intra-dlSTR MTEP prior to the relapse test and were sacrificed day later. Systemic administration of MTEP attenuated abstinent-relapse without significantly affecting extinction learning. Surface biotinylation analysis of protein expression in the dlSTR revealed that, in cocaine animals, intra-dlSTR MTEP administration decreased mGlu5 surface expression and prevented changes in Arc and GluA1/GluA2 observed in their vehicle counterparts. Thus, blockade of mGlu5 receptors may be utilized in future treatment strategies for relapse prevention in humans, although the effects of chronic blockade on extinction learning should be further evaluated. PMID:26881139

  19. Cocaine-induced pulmonary changes: HRCT findings *

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Renata Rocha; Zanetti, Gláucia; Souza, Arthur Soares; de Souza, Luciana Soares; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate HRCT scans of the chest in 22 patients with cocaine-induced pulmonary disease. Methods: We included patients between 19 and 52 years of age. The HRCT scans were evaluated by two radiologists independently, discordant results being resolved by consensus. The inclusion criterion was an HRCT scan showing abnormalities that were temporally related to cocaine use, with no other apparent causal factors. Results: In 8 patients (36.4%), the clinical and tomographic findings were consistent with "crack lung", those cases being studied separately. The major HRCT findings in that subgroup of patients included ground-glass opacities, in 100% of the cases; consolidations, in 50%; and the halo sign, in 25%. In 12.5% of the cases, smooth septal thickening, paraseptal emphysema, centrilobular nodules, and the tree-in-bud pattern were identified. Among the remaining 14 patients (63.6%), barotrauma was identified in 3 cases, presenting as pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and hemopneumothorax, respectively. Talcosis, characterized as perihilar conglomerate masses, architectural distortion, and emphysema, was diagnosed in 3 patients. Other patterns were found less frequently: organizing pneumonia and bullous emphysema, in 2 patients each; and pulmonary infarction, septic embolism, eosinophilic pneumonia, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema, in 1 patient each. Conclusions: Pulmonary changes induced by cocaine use are varied and nonspecific. The diagnostic suspicion of cocaine-induced pulmonary disease depends, in most of the cases, on a careful drawing of correlations between clinical and radiological findings. PMID:26398752

  20. Case Study: The Chemistry of Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo

    2011-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's case study focuses on the chemistry of cocaine to teach a number of core concepts in organic chemistry. It also requires that students read and analyze an original research paper on…

  1. The effects of cocaine on HIV transcription.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Mudit; Weber, Jaime; Bukrinsky, Michael; Simon, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    Illicit drug users are a high-risk population for infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A strong correlation exists between prohibited drug use and an increased rate of HIV transmission. Cocaine stands out as one of the most frequently abused illicit drugs, and its use is correlated with HIV infection and disease progression. The central nervous system (CNS) is a common target for both drugs of abuse and HIV, and cocaine intake further accelerates neuronal injury in HIV patients. Although the high incidence of HIV infection in illicit drug abusers is primarily due to high-risk activities such as needle sharing and unprotected sex, several studies have demonstrated that cocaine enhances the rate of HIV gene expression and replication by activating various signal transduction pathways and downstream transcription factors. In order to generate mature HIV genomic transcript, HIV gene expression has to pass through both the initiation and elongation phases of transcription, which requires discrete transcription factors. In this review, we will provide a detailed analysis of the molecular mechanisms that regulate HIV transcription and discuss how cocaine modulates those mechanisms to upregulate HIV transcription and eventually HIV replication. PMID:26572787

  2. Identification of Progressive Cocaine Abuse among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortuna, Jeffrey L.

    1983-01-01

    Primary symptoms of cocaine use and behavioral characteristics of chronic users are pointed out. Ways that school health services can help identify and assist students who abuse the substance are suggested. Approaches such as peer identification, self-diagnosis, and use of a school ombudsman are discussed. (PP)

  3. Cocaine Babies: Florida's Substance-Exposed Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpring, Jayme

    This report is designed to provide Florida's school personnel with assistance in working with students prenatally exposed to cocaine or other toxic substances. The report offers background data, practical strategies for teaching and learning, and resources for networking. The first chapter outlines statistics on the incidence of the problem of…

  4. Management of severe preeclampsia detected in early labor by prostaglandin A1 or dihydralazine infusions.

    PubMed

    Toppozada, M K; Darwish, E; Barakat, A A

    1991-05-01

    The presence of severe pregnancy-induced hypertension at the onset of labor requires therapy with a potent hypotensive agent. Prostaglandin A1 is a powerful vasodepressor that augments renal blood flow and glomerular filtration and possesses antiplatelet aggregator and oxytocic properties. A continuous intravenous infusion of prostaglandin A1 (40 to 50 micrograms/min) or dihydralazine (35 to 50 micrograms/min) was administered to 20 women with severe preeclampsia (10 in each group). The induced hypotensive response was similar with both drugs but the maximum reduction in blood pressure was achieved sooner with dihydralazine (4 hours) compared with prostaglandin A1 (7.5 hours). The more gradual hypotensive response is probably less dangerous on placental perfusion than a sudden change. Moreover, the oxytocic property of prostaglandin A1 shortened the time to delivery, which constitutes another potential advantage. PMID:2035562

  5. Cocaine and kidney injury: a kaleidoscope of pathology

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Narender; Pullman, James M.; Coco, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine is abused worldwide as a recreational drug. It is a potent activator of the sympathetic nervous system leading to intense vasoconstriction, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, platelet activation and decrease in prostaglandins E2 and prostacyclin. Cocaine can lead to widespread systemic adverse effects such as stroke, myocardial infarction, arterial dissection, vascular thrombosis and rhabdomyolysis. In human and rat kidneys, cocaine has been associated with glomerular, tubular, vascular and interstitial injury. It is not uncommon to diagnose cocaine-related acute kidney injury (AKI), malignant hypertension and chronic kidney disease. Cocaine abuse can lead to AKI by rhabdomyolysis, vasculitis, infarction, thrombotic microangiopathy and malignant hypertension. It is reported that 50–60% of people who use both cocaine and heroin are at increased risk of HIV, hepatitis and additional risk factors that can cause kidney diseases. While acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is a known cause of AKI, an association of AIN with cocaine is unusual and seldom reported. We describe a patient with diabetes mellitus, hypertension and chronic hepatitis C, who presented with AKI. Urine toxicology was positive for cocaine and a kidney biopsy was consistent with AIN. Illicit drugs such as cocaine or contaminants may have caused AIN in this case and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of causes of AKI in a patient with substance abuse. We review the many ways that cocaine adversely impacts on kidney function. PMID:25859366

  6. Adolescent cocaine abuse. Addictive potential, behavioral and psychiatric effects.

    PubMed

    Estroff, T W; Schwartz, R H; Hoffmann, N G

    1989-12-01

    Four hundred seventy-nine drug abusing adolescent patients enrolled in seven Straight, Inc. Adolescent Drug-Abuse Treatment Programs in five geographic regions across the United States were studied to determine the severity and patterns of cocaine abuse. Of these, 341 admitted to cocaine use and became part of this survey. Cocaine use was categorized as heavy, intermediate, or light. Areas examined were the addictive spectrum, psychosocial dysfunction, and psychiatric symptoms. Intermediate and heavy users of cocaine abused significantly less marijuana and inhalants than light cocaine abusers. Heavy and intermediate users were more likely to use cocaine intravenously and to use crack. They developed tachyphylaxis more frequently, progressed to weekly use in less than 3 months more frequently, and became preoccupied with obtaining and using cocaine significantly more frequently. They used more sedative hypnotics to calm themselves and engaged in more criminal behavior, such as stealing from parents and stores and passing bad checks. They had more arrests for possession of drugs, stole more cars, sold more drugs, and were more likely to trade sexual favors to obtain the drug. Heavy and intermediate users were significantly more psychiatrically disturbed than light users, becoming more suspicious, nervous, aggressive, and demonstrating increased symptoms of fatigue, sleeplessness, decreased appetite, and increasing cocaine dysphoria. All of these symptoms could be mistaken for psychiatric disorders. This study suggests that cocaine is as addictive in adolescents as in adults; possibly more so. It also causes psychosocial dysfunction and psychiatric symptoms. Further research into cocaine addiction among adolescents is indicated. PMID:2582695

  7. Cocaine disposition in discrete regions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Javaid, J I; Davis, J M

    1993-05-01

    It has been proposed that various effects of psychoactive drugs on the central nervous system may be related to the capacity of the drug to selectively concentrate in specific regions of the brain. In rat brain, cocaine effects on striatal and nucleus accumbens dopaminergic systems show quantitative differences. However, the disposition of cocaine in various brain regions has not been reported. In the present studies we examined the cocaine concentrations over time in serum and discrete brain regions of the rat after single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. At different time points (5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min) after i.p. injection of cocaine hydrochloride (10 mg kg-1, free base) the rats were decapitated and cocaine in serum and various brain regions was quantitated by a specific gas liquid chromatographic method. There was large inter-individual variability in different rats at each time-point. The disposition pattern of cocaine in rats after i.p. administration was similar to that observed in humans after intranasal administration. Initial absorption rate was rapid and, on average, the peak levels of cocaine were achieved in 10 min. The cocaine levels remained relatively high over the next 50 min indicating continual absorption, and then declined with a rate such that the levels 4 h after cocaine administration were undetectable in most of the animals. The overall changes in cocaine levels in various brain regions paralleled the serum concentrations. The area under the cocaine concentration-time curve (AUC) revealed more than three-fold differences in cocaine accumulation in various brain regions. This unequal disposition of cocaine may be responsible in part for differential biochemical effects in different brain regions. PMID:8499585

  8. Comparison of Two High-Dose Magnesium Infusion Regimens in the Treatment of Status Asthmaticus

    PubMed Central

    Vaiyani, Danish

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the feasibility and safety of a simplified high-dose magnesium sulfate infusion (sHDMI) for the treatment of status asthmaticus. METHODS: We retrospectively compared 2 different high-dose magnesium sulfate infusion regimens, as adjunctive treatment in status asthmatics, using data that were preciously collected. The initial high-dose, prolonged magnesium infusion (HDMI) regimen consisted of a loading dose of 75 mg/kg (weight ≤ 30 kg) or 50 mg/kg (weight > 30 kg) over a period of 30 to 45 minutes followed by a continuous infusion of 40 mg/kg/hr for an additional 4 hours. This was compared to the sHDMI regimen that consisted of 50 mg/kg/hr for 5 hours. No loading dose was given to the patients in the sHDMI arm. Obese patients were dosed by using ideal body weight. Physiologic parameters (i.e., heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation) and serum magnesium (SrMg) concentrations were monitored during administration of magnesium sulfate. RESULTS: Nineteen patients receiving the initial HDMI regimen were compared with 10 patients who received the sHDMI regimen. There was no significant difference in SrMg concentrations or physiologic parameters between the 2 dose regimens. CONCLUSIONS: The HDMI and sHDMI regimens both produced SrMg concentrations that are associated with bronchodilation. The safety profile was also similar for the 2 regimens. The unambiguity of sHDMI has the potential to reduce medication errors that are associated with calculation of the loading dose, product preparation, and ultimate administration. PMID:27453701

  9. The role of acetylcholine in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark J; Adinoff, Bryon

    2008-07-01

    Central nervous system cholinergic neurons arise from several discrete sources, project to multiple brain regions, and exert specific effects on reward, learning, and memory. These processes are critical for the development and persistence of addictive disorders. Although other neurotransmitters, including dopamine, glutamate, and serotonin, have been the primary focus of drug research to date, a growing preclinical literature reveals a critical role of acetylcholine (ACh) in the experience and progression of drug use. This review will present and integrate the findings regarding the role of ACh in drug dependence, with a primary focus on cocaine and the muscarinic ACh system. Mesostriatal ACh appears to mediate reinforcement through its effect on reward, satiation, and aversion, and chronic cocaine administration produces neuroadaptive changes in the striatum. ACh is further involved in the acquisition of conditional associations that underlie cocaine self-administration and context-dependent sensitization, the acquisition of associations in conditioned learning, and drug procurement through its effects on arousal and attention. Long-term cocaine use may induce neuronal alterations in the brain that affect the ACh system and impair executive function, possibly contributing to the disruptions in decision making that characterize this population. These primarily preclinical studies suggest that ACh exerts a myriad of effects on the addictive process and that persistent changes to the ACh system following chronic drug use may exacerbate the risk of relapse during recovery. Ultimately, ACh modulation may be a potential target for pharmacological treatment interventions in cocaine-addicted subjects. However, the complicated neurocircuitry of the cholinergic system, the multiple ACh receptor subtypes, the confluence of excitatory and inhibitory ACh inputs, and the unique properties of the striatal cholinergic interneurons suggest that a precise target of cholinergic

  10. Disrupting astrocyte-neuron lactate transfer persistently reduces conditioned responses to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Boury-Jamot, B; Carrard, A; Martin, J L; Halfon, O; Magistretti, P J; Boutrel, B

    2016-08-01

    A central problem in the treatment of drug addiction is the high risk of relapse often precipitated by drug-associated cues. The transfer of glycogen-derived lactate from astrocytes to neurons is required for long-term memory. Whereas blockade of drug memory reconsolidation represents a potential therapeutic strategy, the role of astrocyte-neuron lactate transport in long-term conditioning has received little attention. By infusing an inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase into the basolateral amygdala of rats, we report that disruption of astrocyte-derived lactate not only transiently impaired the acquisition of a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference but also persistently disrupted an established conditioning. The drug memory was rescued by L-Lactate co-administration through a mechanism requiring the synaptic plasticity-related transcription factor Zif268 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway but not the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf). The long-term amnesia induced by glycogenolysis inhibition and the concomitant decreased expression of phospho-ERK were both restored with L-Lactate co-administration. These findings reveal a critical role for astrocyte-derived lactate in positive memory formation and highlight a novel amygdala-dependent reconsolidation process, whose disruption may offer a novel therapeutic target to reduce the long-lasting conditioned responses to cocaine. PMID:26503760

  11. Disrupting astrocyte–neuron lactate transfer persistently reduces conditioned responses to cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Boury-Jamot, B; Carrard, A; Martin, J L; Halfon, O; Magistretti, P J; Boutrel, B

    2016-01-01

    A central problem in the treatment of drug addiction is the high risk of relapse often precipitated by drug-associated cues. The transfer of glycogen-derived lactate from astrocytes to neurons is required for long-term memory. Whereas blockade of drug memory reconsolidation represents a potential therapeutic strategy, the role of astrocyte–neuron lactate transport in long-term conditioning has received little attention. By infusing an inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase into the basolateral amygdala of rats, we report that disruption of astrocyte-derived lactate not only transiently impaired the acquisition of a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference but also persistently disrupted an established conditioning. The drug memory was rescued by L-Lactate co-administration through a mechanism requiring the synaptic plasticity-related transcription factor Zif268 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway but not the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf). The long-term amnesia induced by glycogenolysis inhibition and the concomitant decreased expression of phospho-ERK were both restored with L-Lactate co-administration. These findings reveal a critical role for astrocyte-derived lactate in positive memory formation and highlight a novel amygdala-dependent reconsolidation process, whose disruption may offer a novel therapeutic target to reduce the long-lasting conditioned responses to cocaine. PMID:26503760

  12. Overflow cascades in liquid-infused substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, I.; Wexler, J. S.; Stone, H. A.

    2015-08-01

    Liquid-infused patterned surfaces offer a promising new platform for generating omniphobic surface coatings. However, the liquid infused in these surfaces is susceptible to shear-driven dewetting. Recent work [Wexler et al., "Shear-driven failure of liquid-infused surfaces," Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 168301 (2015)] has shown how the substrate pattern in these surfaces can be designed to exploit capillary forces in order to retain infused lubricants against the action of an immiscible shear flow. In this study, we explore the behavior of the infused lubricant when external shear causes the lubricant to overflow finite or "dead-end" surface features, resulting in either temporary or permanent lubricant loss. Microfluidic experiments illustrate how both geometry and chemical Marangoni stresses within liquid-infused surfaces generate an overflow cascade in which the lubricant escapes from the substrate and forms droplets on the surface, after which the droplets depin and are washed away by the external shear flow, allowing the overflow to repeat. General guidelines are developed to estimate the onset of the different stages of the cascade with the aim of providing additional robustness criteria for the design of future liquid-infused surfaces.

  13. Infliximab-Related Infusion Reactions: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Yulia; Kivity, Shmuel; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Israeli, Eran; Fraser, Gerald M.; Dotan, Iris; Chowers, Yehuda; Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Weiss, Batia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Administration of infliximab is associated with a well-recognised risk of infusion reactions. Lack of a mechanism-based rationale for their prevention, and absence of adequate and well-controlled studies, has led to the use of diverse empirical administration protocols. The aim of this study is to perform a systematic review of the evidence behind the strategies for preventing infusion reactions to infliximab, and for controlling the reactions once they occur. Methods: We conducted extensive search of electronic databases of MEDLINE [PubMed] for reports that communicate various aspects of infusion reactions to infliximab in IBD patients. Results: We examined full texts of 105 potentially eligible articles. No randomised controlled trials that pre-defined infusion reaction as a primary outcome were found. Three RCTs evaluated infusion reactions as a secondary outcome; another four RCTs included infusion reactions in the safety evaluation analysis; and 62 additional studies focused on various aspects of mechanism/s, risk, primary and secondary preventive measures, and management algorithms. Seven studies were added by a manual search of reference lists of the relevant articles. A total of 76 original studies were included in quantitative analysis of the existing strategies. Conclusions: There is still paucity of systematic and controlled data on the risk, prevention, and management of infusion reactions to infliximab. We present working algorithms based on systematic and extensive review of the available data. More randomised controlled trials are needed in order to investigate the efficacy of the proposed preventive and management algorithms. PMID:26092578

  14. Infusion pump development and implications for nurses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul

    Infusion pumps are commonplace in today's healthcare settings and their design and development has kept pace with technology over the decades. In the 1970s and 1980s infusion pumps began to emerge in the UK market and were basic, mechanical devices with limited functions. Today, infusion pumps have a plethora of functions and features and a range of alarms to help alert the user and the patient that infusions are nearing completion, have ended or their range of sensors has detected that the infusion pump, or patient, requires attention. The role of the nurse in safely managing this ever-changing technology should not be underestimated. This paper reviews the progress made over the past 40 years in the UK healthcare setting and how the nurses have had to keep up to speed with the technology as it develops. It highlights the importance of fully integrating infusion pumps into intravenous (IV) therapy training and assessment. The important role the nurse plays is highlighted as well as exploring how he or she can help organisations better understand infusion pumps in the day-to-day management of patients undergoing intravenous therapy. PMID:26496875

  15. Pharmacokinetics and toxicology of continuously infused nitroimidazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Eifel, P.J.; Brown, J.M.

    1984-08-01

    The pharmacokinetics and toxicology of misonidazole (MISO) and SR-2508 given by continuous intraperitoneal infusion were studied in female C/sub 3/H mice. The survival (time to death) of animals receiving continuous infusions of SR-2508 and MISO was compared and related to plasma concentration, rate of infusion and total amount of drug delivered. Brain and plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC. For SR-2508, plasma concentration was directly proportional to the infusion rate. However, as the infusion rate of MISO was doubled, the plasma concentration of MISO increased approximately 6-fold, reflecting a substantial increase in the apparent half-life. The brain/plasma concentration ratio in animals infused for up to 6 days with SR-2508 remained constant, at approximately 0.09. At plasma concentrations of 0.08-1.5 mM, animals receiving SR-2508 survived approximately 3 times as long as animals exposed to a comparable plasma concentration of MISO. Even at the lowest infusion rates employed in this study, the survival of mice receiving SR-2508 was much shorter than would have been predicted if the toxicity of these two drugs were solely related to the integral brain exposure. The low brain/plasma concentration ratio of SR-2508 was maintained throughout long continuous exposures.

  16. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I–III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  17. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I-III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  18. Mephedrone interactions with cocaine: prior exposure to ‘bath salt’ constituent enhances cocaine-induced locomotor activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Ryan A.; Tallarida, Christopher S.; Reitz, Allen B.; Rawls, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent use of mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) (MEPH) and established drugs of abuse is now commonplace, but knowledge about interactions between these drugs is sparse. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that prior MEPH exposure enhances the locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine and methamphetamine (METH). For cocaine experiments, rats pretreated with saline, cocaine (15 mg/kg), or MEPH (15 mg/kg) for 5 days were injected with cocaine after 10 days of drug absence. For METH experiments, rats pretreated with saline, METH (2 mg/kg), or MEPH (15 mg/kg) were injected with METH after 10 days of drug absence. Cocaine challenge produced greater locomotor activity following pretreatment with cocaine or MEPH than following pretreatment with saline. METH challenge produced greater locomotor activity following METH pretreatment than following saline pretreatment; however, locomotor activity in rats pretreated with MEPH or saline and then challenged with METH was not significantly different. The locomotor response to MEPH (15 mg/kg) was not significantly affected by pretreatment with cocaine (15 mg/kg) or METH (0.5, 2 mg/kg). The present demonstration that cocaine-induced locomotor activation is enhanced by prior MEPH exposure suggests that MEPH cross-sensitizes to cocaine and increases cocaine efficacy. Interestingly, MEPH cross-sensitization was not bi-directional and did not extend to METH, suggesting the phenomenon is sensitive to specific psychostimulants. PMID:24126218

  19. Mephedrone interactions with cocaine: prior exposure to the 'bath salt' constituent enhances cocaine-induced locomotor activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Ryan A; Tallarida, Christopher S; Reitz, Allen B; Rawls, Scott M

    2013-12-01

    Concurrent use of mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone; MEPH) and established drugs of abuse is now commonplace, but knowledge about interactions between these drugs is sparse. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that prior MEPH exposure enhances the locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine and methamphetamine (METH). For cocaine experiments, rats pretreated with saline, cocaine (15 mg/kg), or MEPH (15 mg/kg) for 5 days were injected with cocaine after 10 days of drug absence. For METH experiments, rats pretreated with saline, METH (2 mg/kg), or MEPH (15 mg/kg) were injected with METH after 10 days of drug absence. Cocaine challenge produced greater locomotor activity after pretreatment with cocaine or MEPH than after pretreatment with saline. METH challenge produced greater locomotor activity after METH pretreatment than after saline pretreatment; however, locomotor activity in rats pretreated with MEPH or saline and then challenged with METH was not significantly different. The locomotor response to MEPH (15 mg/kg) was not significantly affected by pretreatment with cocaine (15 mg/kg) or METH (0.5, 2 mg/kg). The present demonstration that cocaine-induced locomotor activation is enhanced by prior MEPH exposure suggests that MEPH cross-sensitizes to cocaine and increases cocaine efficacy. Interestingly, MEPH cross-sensitization was not bidirectional and did not extend to METH, suggesting that the phenomenon is sensitive to specific psychostimulants. PMID:24126218

  20. Myocardial uptake of cocaine and effects of cocaine on myocardial substrate utilization and perfusion in hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Wang, G.J.; Oster, Z.H.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Yonekura, Y.; Fujibayashi, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Kubota, K.

    1992-12-31

    Cocaine abuse is a problem causing world-wide concern and the number of deaths following cocaine use is increasing. Cardiovascular complications following cocaine include severe tachyarrythmias, pulmonary edema, myocardial infarction, and acute renal failure, which are major problems confronting emergency facilities. While the studies of cocaine effects on the brain have been given the most attention, it is clear that the effects of cocaine on the cardiovascular system are of great importance, given the increasing number of reports on sudden death and myocardial infarctions in young adults related to cocaine use. The precise mechanisms of cardiotoxic actions of cocaine are unclear. We investigated the whole-body distribution of C-14-labeled cocaine to determine the cocaine-binding sites, including blocking experiments to determine the nature of regional binding sites, and differential response of the normal vs. diseased heart (hypertensive cardiomyopathy) in an animal model to mimic a potentially high risk population. We investigated the acute effects of cocaine on myocardial metabolism using two myocardial energy substrate analogs, fatty acid and glucose with comparison with regional perfusion.

  1. Myocardial uptake of cocaine and effects of cocaine on myocardial substrate utilization and perfusion in hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Wang, G.J. ); Oster, Z.H. ); Knapp, F.F. Jr. ); Yonekura, Y. . Faculty of Medicine); Fujibayashi, Y. . Hospital); Yamamoto, K. . Medical School); Kubota, K. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai

    1992-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is a problem causing world-wide concern and the number of deaths following cocaine use is increasing. Cardiovascular complications following cocaine include severe tachyarrythmias, pulmonary edema, myocardial infarction, and acute renal failure, which are major problems confronting emergency facilities. While the studies of cocaine effects on the brain have been given the most attention, it is clear that the effects of cocaine on the cardiovascular system are of great importance, given the increasing number of reports on sudden death and myocardial infarctions in young adults related to cocaine use. The precise mechanisms of cardiotoxic actions of cocaine are unclear. We investigated the whole-body distribution of C-14-labeled cocaine to determine the cocaine-binding sites, including blocking experiments to determine the nature of regional binding sites, and differential response of the normal vs. diseased heart (hypertensive cardiomyopathy) in an animal model to mimic a potentially high risk population. We investigated the acute effects of cocaine on myocardial metabolism using two myocardial energy substrate analogs, fatty acid and glucose with comparison with regional perfusion.

  2. Role of GluR1 expression in nucleus accumbens neurons in cocaine sensitization and cocaine-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Bachtell, Ryan K; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Simmons, Diana L; Falcon, Edgardo; Monteggia, Lisa M; Neve, Rachael L; Self, David W

    2008-05-01

    Chronic cocaine use reduces glutamate levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), and is associated with experience-dependent changes in (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptor membrane expression in NAc neurons. These changes accompany behavioral sensitization to cocaine and increased susceptibility to cocaine relapse. The functional relationship between neuroplasticity in AMPA receptors and the behavioral manifestation of cocaine addiction remains unclear. Thus, we examined the behavioral effects of up- and downregulating basal AMPA receptor function in the NAc core and shell using viral-mediated gene transfer of wild-type glutamate receptor 1 (wt-GluR1) or a dominant-negative pore-dead GluR1 (pd-GluR1), respectively. Transient increases in wt-GluR1 during or after cocaine treatments diminished the development of cocaine sensitization, while pd-GluR1 expression exacerbated cocaine sensitization. Parallel changes were found in D2, but not D1, receptor-mediated behavioral responses. As a correlate of the sensitization experiments, we overexpressed wt- or pd-GluR1 in the NAc core during cocaine self-administration, and tested the effects on subsequent drug-seeking behavior 3 weeks after overexpression declined. wt-GluR1 overexpression during self-administration had no effect on cocaine intake, but subsequently reduced cocaine seeking in extinction and cocaine-induced reinstatement, whereas pd-GluR1 facilitated cocaine-induced reinstatement. When overexpressed during reinstatement tests, wt-GluR1 directly attenuated cocaine- and D2 agonist-induced reinstatement, while pd-GluR1 enhanced reinstatement. In both experimental procedures, neither wt- nor pd-GluR1 expression affected cue-induced reinstatement. Together, these results suggest that degrading basal AMPA receptor function in NAc neurons is sufficient to facilitate relapse via sensitization in D2 receptor responses, whereas elevating basal AMPA receptor function

  3. Effects of progesterone and testosterone on cocaine self-administration and cocaine discrimination by female rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Knudson, Inge M; Kelly, Maureen; Fivel, Peter A; Mendelson, Jack H

    2011-10-01

    The neuroactive steroid hormone progesterone attenuates cocaine's abuse-related effects in women and in rodents under some conditions, but the effects of testosterone are unknown. We compared the acute effects of progesterone (0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mg/kg, intramuscularly (i.m.)), testosterone (0.001, 0.003, and 0.01 mg/kg, i.m.), and placebo on cocaine self-administration and cocaine discrimination dose-effect curves in female rhesus monkeys. Cocaine self-administration (0.03 mg/kg per inj.) was maintained on a fixed ratio 30 schedule of reinforcement, and monkeys had unlimited access to cocaine for 2 h each day. Cocaine doses were administered in an irregular order during each dose-effect curve determination, and the same dose order was used in each subject in all treatment conditions. Blood samples for hormone analysis were collected at the end of each test session. Banana-flavored food pellets (1 g) were also available in three 1-h daily sessions. In drug discrimination studies, the effects of pretreatment with progesterone (0.032-0.32 mg/kg, i.m.) and testosterone (0.001-0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) on the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine (0.18 mg/kg, i.m.) were examined. Progesterone and testosterone did not alter cocaine discrimination, and did not substitute for cocaine. In contrast, progesterone and testosterone each significantly decreased cocaine self-administration, and produced a downward and rightward shift in the cocaine self-administration dose-effect curve. These findings are concordant with clinical reports that progesterone administration may decrease ratings of positive subjective effects of cocaine in women, and suggest the possible value of neuroactive steroid hormones for the treatment of cocaine abuse and reduction of risk for relapse. PMID:21796112

  4. Financial analysis for the infusion alliance.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Roxanne

    2010-01-01

    Providing high-quality, cost-efficient care is a major strategic initiative of every health care organization. Today's health care environment is transparent; very competitive; and focused upon providing exceptional service, safety, and quality. Establishing an infusion alliance facilitates the achievement of organizational strategic initiatives, that is, increases patient throughput, decreases length of stay, prevents the occurrence of infusion-related complications, enhances customer satisfaction, and provides greater cost-efficiency. This article will discuss how to develop a financial analysis that promotes value and enhances the financial outcomes of an infusion alliance. PMID:20841984

  5. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    PubMed

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas. PMID:2434670

  6. Space Tethers Programmatic Infusion Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, J. A.; Frame, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Programmatic opportunities abound for space Cables, Stringers and Tethers, justified by the tremendous performance advantages that these technologies offer and the rather wide gaps that must be filled by the NASA Exploration program, if the "sustainability goal" is to be met. A definition and characterization of the three categories are presented along with examples. A logical review of exploration requirements shows how each class can be infused throughout the program, from small experimental efforts to large system deployments. The economics of tethers in transportation is considered along with the impact of stringers for structural members. There is an array of synergistic methodologies that interlace their fabrication, implementation and operations. Cables, stringers and tethers can enhance a wide range of other space systems and technologies, including power storage, formation flying, instrumentation, docking mechanisms and long-life space components. The existing tether (i.e., MXER) program's accomplishments are considered consistent with NASA's new vision and can readily conform to requirements-driven technology development.

  7. [Dragées bengué with cocaine. Historic review of legislation concerning cocaine].

    PubMed

    Vandewiele, L J

    1991-01-01

    The Bengué sugar-coated pills with menthol and cocaine, followed by the "B.M.C. pills" (with borax, methanol and cocaine) were delivered freely at the chemist's shop. The fact that nobody seemed shocked by the free delivery of this dope does not result only from the circumstance that it was allowed by law, but also because, in our countries, in the XIXth century, there were as good as no cases of cocaine mania. Owing to personal experiments, it became known in wide social circles that cocaine was not only an anesthetic and pain-killing remedy, but also an intoxicating drug that can quickly lead to addiction. Physicians began to search for means of eliminating the plague of addiction: a first International Opium-meeting was held in Shanghai in 1909. After that time, international meetings were held in The Hague (1912) and Geneva (1924 and 1925). Strangely enough, we find that in the promulgated laws an exception is made for pharmaceutical products which contain less than 0.2% morphine or less than 0.1% cocaine. When the medical world began to devote more attention to the danger of cocaine mania, the pharmaceutical and the chemical world became alarmed. A synthetic substitute was searched for and found; it should be less toxic and less addicting. The producers of the BMC pills eagerly adopted the new drugs. They replaced cocaine by amylocaine. The name of the pills was changed into BMA pills (borax-menthol-amylocaine). The coat of the pills remained the same and not one single patient ever noticed the substitution! PMID:1816703

  8. Inhalational model of cocaine exposure in mice: neuroteratological effects.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; Lidow, Irina A; Lidow, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    We developed a novel inhalation-based mouse model of prenatal cocaine exposure. This model approximates cocaine abuse via smoking, the preferred route of cocaine administration by heavy drug users. The model is also characterized by (i) absence of procedural stress from drug administration, (ii) long-term drug exposure starting weeks before pregnancy and continuing throughout the entire gestation, and (iii) self-administration of cocaine in multi-hour daily sessions reminiscent of drug binges, which allows animals to set up the levels of their own drug consumption. The offspring of female mice inhaling cocaine in our model displayed no gross alterations in their cortical cytoarchitecture. These offspring, however, showed significant impairments in sustained attention and spatial working memory. We hope that the introduction of the present model will lead to a significant increase in our understanding of outcomes of prenatal cocaine exposure. PMID:16414242

  9. Dancing on coke: smuggling cocaine dispersed in polyvinyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    van Nuijs, Alexander L N; Maudens, Kristof E; Lambert, Willy E; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Risseeuw, Martijn D P; Van hee, Paul; Covaci, Adrian; Neels, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Recent trends suggest that cocaine smugglers have become more and more inventive to avoid seizures of large amounts of cocaine transported between countries. We report a case of a mail parcel containing a dance pad which was seized at the Customs Department of Brussels Airport, Belgium. After investigation, the inside of the dance pad was found to contain a thick polymer, which tested positive for cocaine. Analysis was performed using a routine colorimetric swipe test, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The polymer was identified as polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and contained 18% cocaine, corresponding to a street value of € 20,000. Laboratory experiments showed that cocaine could be easily extracted from the PVA matrix. This case report reveals a new smuggling technique for the transportation of large amounts of cocaine from one country to another. PMID:22040352

  10. Particulate contaminants of intravenous medications and infusions.

    PubMed

    Backhouse, C M; Ball, P R; Booth, S; Kelshaw, M A; Potter, S R; McCollum, C N

    1987-04-01

    Particulate contamination in small volume parenteral medications has been studied and compared with that found in a selection of large volume infusions. Particle counts in 39 commonly used small volume medications and 7 large volume infusions were performed by an automated light blockage method (HIAC) or by optical microscopy. Based on these results and a random survey of drug therapy of intensive care patients, it is concluded that the contribution of intravenous medications to the total particle load received by such patients is likely to be many times greater than from infusion fluids. Until firm evidence regarding the harmful systemic effects of drug particles is available and the manufacturing regulations adjusted appropriately, final in-line filtration of infusions immediately proximal to the intravenous cannula should be considered when drugs are being given intravenously. PMID:2884285

  11. Dynorphin/KOP and nociceptin/NOP gene expression and epigenetic changes by cocaine in rat striatum and nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Caputi, Francesca Felicia; Di Benedetto, Manuela; Carretta, Donatella; Bastias del Carmen Candia, Sussy; D'Addario, Claudio; Cavina, Chiara; Candeletti, Sanzio; Romualdi, Patrizia

    2014-03-01

    Cocaine induces neurochemical changes of endogenous prodynorphin-kappa opioid receptor (pDYN-KOP) and pronociceptin/orphaninFQ-nociceptin receptor (pN/OFQ-NOP) systems. Both systems play an important role in rewarding mechanisms and addictive stimulus processing by modulating drug-induced dopaminergic activation in the mesocortico-limbic brain areas. They are also involved in regulating stress mechanisms related to addiction. The aim of this study was to investigate possible changes of gene expression of the dynorphinergic and nociceptinergic system components in the nucleus accumbens (NA) and in medial and lateral caudate putamen (mCPu and lCPu, respectively) of rats, following chronic subcutaneous infusion of cocaine. In addition, the epigenetic histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 (an activating and a repressive marker, respectively) at the promoter level of the pDYN, KOP, pN/OFQ and NOP genes were investigated. Results showed that cocaine induced pDYN gene expression up-regulation in the NA and lCPu, and its down-regulation in the mCPu, whereas KOP mRNA levels were unchanged. Moreover, cocaine exposure decreased pN/OFQ gene expression in the NA and lCPu, while NOP mRNA levels appeared significantly increased in the NA and decreased in the lCPu. Specific changes of the H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 levels were found at pDYN, pN/OFQ, and NOP gene promoter, consistent with the observed gene expression alterations. The present findings contribute to better define the role of endogenous pDYN-KOP and pN/OFQ-NOP systems in neuroplasticity mechanisms following chronic cocaine treatment. The epigenetic histone modifications underlying the gene expression changes likely mediate the effects of cocaine on transcriptional regulation of specific gene promoters that result in long-lasting drug-induced plasticity. PMID:24184686

  12. Conditioning Effects of Chronic Infusions of Dobutamine

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chang-Seng; Tuttle, Ronald R.; Hood, William B.; Gavras, Haralambos

    1979-01-01

    We studied the conditioning effects of chronic infusion of dobutamine and exercise training in three groups of chronically instrumented dogs. One group was infused with normal saline, a second group was infused with dobutamine (40 μg/kg per min), and the third group was exercised on a treadmill at 4 mph, up a 10° incline. Each group was either infused or exercised for 2 h a day, 5 d a week for 5 consecutive wk. Resting heart rate and arterial blood lactate concentration, measured at weekly intervals, decreased progressively in the dobutamine and exercise groups, but not in the group that received normal saline infusion. Cardiovascular responses to submaximal treadmill exercise were not changed by 5 wk of normal saline infusion. However, the increases in heart rate, cardiac output, mean aortic blood pressure, arterial blood lactate, plasma renin activity, and norepinephrine concentration during exercise were significantly smaller after 5 wk of conditioning with either dobutamine or exercise training. After conditioning, the increases in arteriovenous oxygen difference during exercise were larger in the latter two groups, but the increases in total body oxygen consumption did not differ before and after conditioning. To assess ventricular function, we intravenously infused methoxamine both before and after conditioning. The slope of the line that related systolic aortic blood pressure and mean left atrial pressure increased in the animals conditioned with either dobutamine or exercise, indicating enhanced myocardial contractility. Left ventricular blood flow was lower in these two groups of animals than it was in the normal saline group. Left ventricular weight did not differ among the three groups. Our results show that chronic infusion of dobutamine produced cardiovascular and metabolic conditioning effects like those produced by exercise training, and further suggest that sympathetic stimulation during exercise plays a role in physical conditioning. PMID:457872

  13. Cannabidiol Rescues Acute Hepatic Toxicity and Seizure Induced by Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Luciano Rezende; Gomides, Lindisley Ferreira; David, Bruna Araújo; Antunes, Maísa Mota; Diniz, Ariane Barros; Moreira, Fabrício de Araújo; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is a commonly abused illicit drug that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The most severe and common complications are seizures, ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction, and acute liver injury. Here, we demonstrated that acute cocaine intoxication promoted seizure along with acute liver damage in mice, with intense inflammatory infiltrate. Considering the protective role of the endocannabinoid system against cell toxicity, we hypothesized that treatment with an anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor, URB597, or with a phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), protects against cocaine toxicity. URB597 (1.0 mg/kg) abolished cocaine-induced seizure, yet it did not protect against acute liver injury. Using confocal liver intravital microscopy, we observed that CBD (30 mg/kg) reduced acute liver inflammation and damage induced by cocaine and prevented associated seizure. Additionally, we showed that previous liver damage induced by another hepatotoxic drug (acetaminophen) increased seizure and lethality induced by cocaine intoxication, linking hepatotoxicity to seizure dynamics. These findings suggest that activation of cannabinoid system may have protective actions on both liver and brain induced by cocaine, minimizing inflammatory injury promoted by cocaine, supporting its further clinical application in the treatment of cocaine abuse. PMID:25999668

  14. Acute coronary syndrome after levamisole-adultered cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Katarzyna; Grabherr, Silke; Shiferaw, Kebede; Doenz, Franceso; Augsburger, Marc; Mangin, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine is a well known trigger of acute coronary syndromes. Over the last 10 years levamisole, a veterinary anthelminthic drug has been increasingly used as an adulterant of cocaine. Levamisole was used to treat pediatric nephritic syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis before being withdrawn from the market due to its significant toxicity, i.e. hematological complications and vasculitis. The major complications of levamisole-adultered cocaine reported up to now are hematological and dermatological. The case reported here is of a 25 year old man with a history of cocaine abuse who died at home after complaining of retrosternal pain. Postmortem CT-angiography, autopsy, and chemical and toxicological analyses were performed. An eroded coronary artery plaque was found at the proximal segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Two myocardial infarct scars were present in the left ventricle. Microscopic examination of the coronary artery revealed infiltration of eosinophils into the adventitia and intima. Toxicological examination confirmed the presence of cocaine and its metabolites in the peripheral blood, and of levamisole in the urine and pericardial fluid. Eosinophilic inflammatory coronary artery pathologies have been clinically linked to coronary dissection, hypersensitivity coronary syndrome and vasospastic allergic angina. The coronary pathology in the presented case could be a complication of levamisole-adultered cocaine use, in which an allergic or immune-mediated mechanism might play a role. The rise in cocaine addiction worldwide and the increase of levamisole adulterated cocaine highlights the importance of updating our knowledge of the effects of adultered cocaine abuse. PMID:24365689

  15. The effects of intrauterine cocaine exposure in newborns.

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, D A; Ng, S K; Hansen, C A; Heagarty, M C

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. We sought to determine the effects of intrauterine cocaine exposure in newborns, in an inner-city population in which cocaine use during pregnancy was common. METHODS. During a 1-year period, 12.8% (361 of 2810) of all live singleton infants at Harlem Hospital in New York were identified as cocaine exposed, either by universal urine toxicologic screening or by maternal history. Cocaine-exposed infants were compared with a control group of 387 infants not known to be exposed to cocaine or other illicit drugs. RESULTS. Low birthweight (< 2500 g) was more common among cocaine-exposed infants (31% vs 10%), as was preterm birth (< 37 completed weeks of gestation) (32% vs 14%). In multivariate analyses controlled for demographic and life-style factors and duration of gestation, cocaine was associated with decreased birthweight (154 g), length (1.02 cm), head circumference (0.69 cm), and duration of gestation (0.74 weeks). The birthweight deficits were larger for infants born to mothers who used cocaine in combination with other drugs (195 g) and for infants born to mothers who specifically admitted using crack (200 g). CONCLUSIONS. Intrauterine cocaine exposure is linked with fetal growth retardation and shortened gestation in this population. PMID:8427321

  16. Effects of cocaine on maternal behavior and neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Nephew, Benjamin C; Febo, Marcelo

    2012-03-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that involves drug seeking and abuse despite the negative social and health consequences. While the potential effects of cocaine on child development have been extensively studied over the last 30 years, few researchers have focused on the effects of cocaine on maternal behavior, which includes offspring care and maternal aggression towards an unfamiliar individual. In humans, maternal cocaine use can lead to child neglect, abuse, and disrupt the mother-child bond. While it has been argued the developmental effects of maternal cocaine use on children were initially overstated, it is clear that disruptions of typical maternal behavior (i.e. postpartum depression, anxiety disorders) are detrimental to the physical and emotional health of offspring. Cocaine use in mothers is commonly associated with psychological disorders, including depression and anxiety, and it is postulated that many of the negative effects of maternal cocaine use on offspring are mediated through changes in maternal behavior. This review will summarize research on cocaine and maternal behavior in animal and human studies, discuss potential mechanisms, and suggest therapeutic strategies for treating cocaine-affected maternal behavior which may improve the physical and behavioral health of both mother and child. The primary objective is to stimulate future communication, cooperation, and collaboration between researchers who use animals and humans to study cocaine and maternal behavior. PMID:22942878

  17. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Childhood Obesity at Nine Years

    PubMed Central

    LaGasse, Linda L.; Gaskins, Ronnesia B.; Bada, Henrietta S.; Shankaran, Seetha; Liu, Jing; Lester, Barry M.; Bauer, Charles R.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Das, Abhik; Roberts, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the association between prenatal cocaine exposure and obesity. We tested whether prenatal cocaine exposure increases the likelihood of obesity in 561 9-year-old term children from the Maternal Lifestyle Study (MLS). Overall, 21.6% of children met criterion for obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 95th percentile, age and sex-specific). While there was no overall cocaine effect on obesity, multivariate logistic analysis revealed that children exposed to cocaine but not alcohol were 4 times more likely to be obese (OR 4.11, CI 2.04–9.76) than children not exposed to either drug. No increase in obesity prevalence was found in children exposed to alcohol but not cocaine (OR 1.08, CI .59–1.93) or both (OR 1.21, CI 0.66–2.22). Alcohol exposure may attenuate the effect of cocaine exposure on obesity. Increased obesity associated with cocaine but not alcohol exposure was first observed at 7 years. BMI was also elevated from 3 to 9 years in children exposed to cocaine but not alcohol, due to increasing weight but normal height. Prenatal exposure to cocaine may alter the neuroendocrine system and metabolic processes resulting in increased weight gain and childhood obesity. PMID:21109003

  18. Cocaine potentiates defensive behaviors related to fear and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, D C; Blanchard, R J

    1999-11-01

    Cocaine use has been associated with a number of psychiatric disturbances, and an emerging literature attests to its ability to enhance anxiety-like behaviors in animal models. Ethoexperimental analyses of defensive behaviors, and tests designed specifically to provide individual measures of these behaviors, have been shown to respond very selectively and appropriately to anxiolytic and panicogenic or panicolytic drugs, suggesting that these tests, and this approach, might provide a more detailed and comprehensive description of the emotionality effects of cocaine than is currently available. In a Mouse Defense Test Battery (MDTB) using mouse subjects and an anesthetized rat as the threat stimulus, cocaine consistently enhanced flight and escape, with effects seen at 10-30 mg/kg (i.p.) dose levels. The effect was so potent that a lack of cocaine effect on other behaviors may have been due to response competition, or to early distancing of cocaine-dosed subjects from the threat stimulus. In a Rat Runway Test (RRT) similar to the MDTB but with rat subjects, 4 mg/kg cocaine, i.v. produced an explosive, but well directed, flight response. Flight was still elevated, although of lesser magnitude than originally, 30 min. after the i.v. cocaine, and defensive threat/attack to the oncoming threat stimulus were also reliably increased. Cocaine enhancement of defense was also seen in tests of sniffing "stereotypy" in rats. Sniffing after 30 mg/kg cocaine, i.p. was found to be appropriately oriented toward the direction of incoming air flow, suggesting that it may be part of a defensive risk assessment pattern. In undosed rats, risk assessment is suppressed by the presence of high-magnitude threat stimuli such as a cat, and the same, durable, phenomenon was obtained after 30 mg/kg (i.p.) cocaine. Toy cat exposure initially suppressed sniffing in cocaine-dosed rats, but this suppression was removed and sniffing increased, over repeated dose/toy cat exposures. Crouching in the

  19. The impact of orbitofrontal dysfunction on cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lucantonio, Federica; Stalnaker, Thomas A; Shaham, Yavin; Niv, Yael; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by poor judgment and maladaptive decision-making. Here we review evidence implicating the orbitofrontal cortex in such behavior. This evidence suggests that cocaine-induced changes in orbitofrontal cortex disrupt the representation of states and transition functions that form the basis of flexible and adaptive ‘model-based’ behavioral control. By impairing this function, cocaine exposure leads to an overemphasis on less flexible, maladaptive ‘model-free’ control systems. We propose that such an effect accounts for the complex pattern of maladaptive behaviors associated with cocaine addiction. PMID:22267164

  20. Childhood Medical and Behavioral Consequences of Maternal Cocaine Use1

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Lynn; Farkas, Kathleen; Kliegman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Reviewed available studies of the impact of fetal cocaine exposure on child medical and developmental outcome, as well as the current status of clinical psychological interventions and research strategies. Current studies are inconclusive but suggest that prenatal exposure to crack-cocaine can have significant effects on the growth and neurological development of the infant, with the potential of later learning and behavioral disabilities. Social-environmental correlates of maternal cocaine use are confounding factors with known negative effects on child outcome. Large, population-based studies using multivariate analyses are needed to determine the independent effects of cocaine on child outcome relative to other confounding variables. PMID:1382125

  1. [Perioperative infusion therapy in children].

    PubMed

    Altemeyer, K H; Kraus, G B

    1990-03-01

    An incorrect fluid therapy can lead to serious complications considerably more rapidly in children, especially in newborns and infants, than in adults. The pediatric patient has a limited range of compensation for maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance. Precise knowledge of the physiological age-dependent fluid balance, i.e. the large extracellular space, the developing renal function, the increased metabolism, the acid-base state, the electrolyte balance with the relatively higher sodium and chloride requirements must be the basis of an adequate fluid therapy. The basic fluid requirement (normal fluid and electrolyte requirement) varies with age and is influenced considerably by environmental conditions, body temperature and metabolism. For substitution of this basic fluid requirement one-third to one-half strength electrolyte solution in 5% dextrose is used, the amount depending on age. The perioperative fluid requirement, however, has to be calculated with due consideration for the characteristic changes in fluid and electrolyte balance during anaesthesia and surgery, the preoperative fasting period, drug effects of anesthetics, hormonal changes and ventilation; it is higher than the basic fluid requirement (infants 6-8 ml.kg-1.h-1, toddlers 4-6 ml.kg.h-1, schoolchildren 2-4 ml.kg-1.h-1). For intraoperative fluid therapy infusions with an increased sodium concentration (70-100 mmol/l) or Ringer's lactate (Na+ = 130 mmol/l) must be used. On no account must electrolyte-free solutions, e.g., 5-10% glucose, be used intraoperatively, as they can lead to water intoxication. The third-space requirements compensate for the additional losses by drainage, third-space deficits by evaporation and gastric and enteral secretions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2184693

  2. Cocaine self-administration leads to alterations in temporal responses to cocaine challenge in limbic and motor circuitry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y Iris; Famous, K; Xu, H; Choi, J-K; Mandeville, Joseph B; Schmidt, H D; Pierce, R Christopher; Jenkins, Bruce G

    2011-09-01

    Chronic use of cocaine is associated with lasting alterations in brain metabolism, circuitry, and receptor properties. We used neuroimaging with pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging to assess alterations in response to cocaine (0.5 mg/kg) in animals trained to self-administer cocaine on a fixed-ratio 5 schedule of reinforcement, as well as saline-yoked controls, after 28 days of cocaine abstinence. We fitted the cerebral blood volume (CBV) curves for full-width half-maximum (FWHM) as well as peak CBV response. There were significant increases in the FWHM of the response curves in the cocaine self-administering (SA) animals as compared with saline-yoked controls in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the caudate/putamen (CPu), and increases in peak CBV in the M1 motor cortex, CPu, and pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. Functional connectivity analysis showed increased correlations in the cocaine SA rats upon acute cocaine challenge, especially in the S1, mPFC, and thalamus. As D3 receptor expression is postulated to increase following chronic cocaine administration, we also examined the response to 0.2 mg/kg of the D3-preferring agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propyl-2-aminotetralin (7-OHDPAT). Cocaine SA animals showed a decreased overall CBV response to this drug, except in the globus pallidus. The hypothalamus showed a negative CBV change in response to cocaine challenge, similar to that noted with the D3 agonist, and showed a smaller response in the cocaine SA animals than in the controls. Given the good coupling of cerebral hemodynamics with dopamine dynamics previously observed with pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging, these data suggest that increased persistence of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex may be responsible for some of the behavioral alterations observed subsequent to chronic cocaine use. PMID:21896062

  3. Effects of phendimetrazine treatment on cocaine vs food choice and extended-access cocaine consumption in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E; Fennell, Timothy R; Snyder, Rodney W; Negus, S Stevens

    2013-12-01

    There is currently no Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction. Monoamine releasers such as d-amphetamine constitute one class of candidate medications, but clinical use and acceptance are hindered by their own high-abuse liability. Phendimetrazine (PDM) is a schedule III anorectic agent that functions as both a low-potency monoamine-uptake inhibitor and as a prodrug for the monoamine-releaser phenmetrazine (PM), and it may serve as a clinically available, effective, and safer alternative to d-amphetamine. This study determined efficacy of chronic PDM to reduce cocaine self-administration by rhesus monkeys (N=4) using a novel procedure that featured both daily assessments of cocaine vs food choice (to assess medication efficacy to reallocate behavior away from cocaine choice and toward choice of an alternative reinforcer) and 20 h/day cocaine access (to allow high-cocaine intake). Continuous 21-day treatment with ramping PDM doses (days 1-7: 0.32 mg/kg/h; days 8-21: 1.0 mg/kg/h) reduced cocaine choices, increased food choices, and nearly eliminated extended-access cocaine self-administration without affecting body weight. There was a trend for plasma PDM and PM levels to correlate with efficacy to decrease cocaine choice such that the monkey with the highest plasma PDM and PM levels also demonstrated the greatest reductions in cocaine choice. These results support further consideration of PDM as a candidate anti-cocaine addiction pharmacotherapy. Moreover, PDM may represent a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach for cocaine addiction because it may simultaneously function as both a monoamine-uptake inhibitor (via the parent drug PDM) and as a monoamine releaser (via the active metabolite PM). PMID:23893022

  4. A Recombinant Humanized Anti-Cocaine Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits the Distribution of Cocaine to the Brain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gooden, Felicia C. T.; Tabet, Michael R.; Ball, William J.

    2014-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb), h2E2, is a humanized version of the chimeric human/murine anti-cocaine mAb 2E2. The recombinant h2E2 protein was produced in vitro from a transfected mammalian cell line and retained high affinity (4 nM Kd) and specificity for cocaine over its inactive metabolites benzoylecgonine (BE) and ecgonine methyl ester. In rats, pharmacokinetic studies of h2E2 (120 mg/kg i.v.) showed a long terminal elimination half-life of 9.0 days and a low volume of distribution at steady state (Vdss) of 0.3 l/kg. Pretreatment with h2E2 produced a dramatic 8.8-fold increase in the area under the plasma cocaine concentration-time curve (AUC) and in brain a concomitant decrease of 68% of cocaine’s AUC following an i.v. injection of an equimolar cocaine dose. Sequestration of cocaine in plasma by h2E2, shown via reduction of cocaine’s Vdss, indicates potential clinical efficacy. Although the binding of cocaine to h2E2 in plasma should inhibit distribution and metabolism, the elimination of cocaine remained multicompartmental and was still rapidly eliminated from plasma despite the presence of h2E2. BE was the major cocaine metabolite, and brain BE concentrations were sixfold higher than in plasma, indicating that cocaine is normally metabolized in the brain. In the presence of h2E2, brain BE concentrations were decreased and plasma BE was increased, consistent with the observed h2E2-induced changes in cocaine disposition. The inhibition of cocaine distribution to the brain confirms the humanized mAb, h2E2, as a lead candidate for development as an immunotherapy for cocaine abuse. PMID:24733787

  5. Incubation of cocaine seeking following brief cocaine experience in mice is enhanced by mGluR1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Halbout, Briac; Bernardi, Rick E; Hansson, Anita C; Spanagel, Rainer

    2014-01-29

    The incubation of cocaine craving describes the time-dependent augmentation of cue-induced cocaine seeking during withdrawal from prolonged cocaine self-administration and requires time-dependent changes in neuroplasticity at the level of glutamatergic synapses in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). In contrast to most studies that use multiple cocaine-cue conditioning sessions, the present study tested mice with limited cocaine experience (i.e., a single conditioning session) in the incubation of cue-mediated cocaine seeking and its associated changes in the glutamate system. Mice that self-administered cocaine during a single session exhibited a time-dependent increase in their response for the drug-associated cue as compared to mice that self-administered saline. This behavior was associated with changes in AMPA and NMDA receptor binding characteristics. Furthermore, Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1) mRNA levels were altered in several brain regions, including the NAc. Because of the pivotal role of mGluR1 in the control of cocaine-induced plasticity, we investigated the role of mGluR1 in the formation of drug cue-mediated cocaine seeking. After prolonged withdrawal, mice in which an mGluR1 antagonist was administered following cocaine self-administration displayed increased cocaine seeking compared to vehicle-treated mice. These results suggest that limited cocaine experience is sufficient to induce neurobiological changes that enable an initially neutral cue to acquire motivational value that increases over time, an effect that likely involves glutamate signaling through mGluR1. PMID:24478360

  6. Interaction between behavioral and pharmacological treatment strategies to decrease cocaine choice in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E; Negus, S Stevens

    2013-02-01

    Behavioral and pharmacotherapeutic approaches constitute two prominent strategies for treating cocaine dependence. This study investigated interactions between behavioral and pharmacological strategies in a preclinical model of cocaine vs food choice. Six rhesus monkeys, implanted with a chronic indwelling double-lumen venous catheter, initially responded under a concurrent schedule of food delivery (1-g pellets, fixed-ratio (FR) 100 schedule) and cocaine injections (0-0.1 mg/kg/injection, FR 10 schedule) during continuous 7-day treatment periods with saline or the agonist medication phenmetrazine (0.032-0.1 mg/kg/h). Subsequently, the FR response requirement for cocaine or food was varied (food, FR 100; cocaine, FR 1-100; cocaine, FR 10; food, FR 10-300), and effects of phenmetrazine on cocaine vs food choice were redetermined. Decreases in the cocaine FR or increases in the food FR resulted in leftward shifts in the cocaine choice dose-effect curve, whereas increases in the cocaine FR or decreases in the food FR resulted in rightward shifts in the cocaine choice dose-effect curve. The efficacy of phenmetrazine to decrease cocaine choice varied systematically as a function of the prevailing response requirements, such that phenmetrazine efficacy was greatest when cocaine choice was maintained by relatively low unit cocaine doses. These results suggest that efficacy of pharmacotherapies to modulate cocaine use can be influenced by behavioral contingencies of cocaine availability. Agonist medications may be most effective under contingencies that engender choice of relatively low cocaine doses. PMID:22968813

  7. Dose-related distribution of codeine, cocaine, and metabolites into human hair following controlled oral codeine and subcutaneous cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Scheidweiler, Karl B; Cone, Edward J; Moolchan, Eric T; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2005-05-01

    Hair testing for the determination of drug exposure has many useful applications. Drug incorporated into hair can be found for extended periods following drug exposure. There are few controlled drug administration studies investigating drug distribution into human hair. Ten volunteers participated in a 10-week controlled cocaine and codeine administration study while residing in the secure research ward. Weekly hair samples were collected by electric razor. During the low-dose week (week 4), volunteers received 75 mg/70 kg cocaine subcutaneously and 60 mg/70 kg codeine orally on alternating days, a total of three doses for each drug. Similarly, during week 7, volunteers received three doses 150 mg/70 kg cocaine and 120 mg/70 kg codeine. Maximum hair concentrations (C(max)) were found 1 to 3 weeks after low and high doses. Dose-related C(max) values of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, norcocaine, cocaethylene, and codeine were found following low and high doses. Hair analysis was performed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. A positive linear relationship was found between total melanin content of hair and C(max) of codeine, cocaine, and metabolites following high dosing. This study demonstrated dose-related concentrations of cocaine and metabolites in human hair following controlled cocaine administration. These data are the first demonstrating melanin-related incorporation of cocaine and metabolites into human hair following controlled cocaine administration. PMID:15743923

  8. Concentrations of cocaine and benzoylecgonine in femoral blood from cocaine-related deaths compared with venous blood from impaired drivers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alan Wayne; Holmgren, Anita

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of cocaine and its major metabolite benzoylecgonine (BZE) were determined in femoral blood from 132 cocaine-related deaths and compared with venous blood from 988 apprehended drivers. Cocaine and BZE were determined by solid-phase extraction and isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with limits of quantitation of 0.02 mg/L for both substances. Significantly more men (95-98%) than women (2-5%) abused cocaine, although their mean age was about the same (29-30 years). Mean age (±SD) of cocaine-related deaths was 29 ± 7 years, which was not significantly different from 30 ± 8 years in traffic cases (P > 0.05). The median concentration of cocaine in blood in 61 fatalities was 0.10 mg/L compared with 0.06 mg/L in traffic cases (P < 0.001). In drug intoxication deaths, the median concentration of cocaine was 0.13 mg/L (N = 25), which was not significantly different from 0.09 mg/L (N = 36) in other causes of death. Cocaine-related deaths mostly involved mixed drug intoxications including co-ingestion of heroin, cannabis, amphetamines as well as legal drugs, such as benzodiazepines and/or ethanol. The concentrations of cocaine in blood from living and deceased persons overlapped, which makes it infeasible to predict toxicity from the analytical toxicology results alone. PMID:24327622

  9. Transient quadriceps paresis following cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Demetriou, George A

    2014-01-01

    A 31-year-old man presented with bilateral thigh muscle paralysis several hours after intranasal cocaine use. His blood results showed a creatine kinase (CK) level of 3447 u/L and a normal renal function. He made a marked recovery in just 2 h following the intravenous normal saline 0.9%, and was able to walk. He was discharged home the next day. PMID:24395880

  10. Role of environmental factors in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Badiani, Aldo; Spagnolo, Primavera A

    2013-01-01

    Decades of experimentation with a variety of pharmacological treatments have identified some effective therapies for heroin addiction but not for cocaine addiction. This may be due, at least in part, to our incomplete understanding of the factors involved in the differential vulnerability to these addictions, which are often considered mere variations of the same disorder. Indeed, the preference for one drug or another has been variously attributed to factors such as drug availability or price, to the addict's lifestyle, or even to chance. Yet, there is evidence of substance-specific influences on drug taking. Data from twin registries, for example, suggest that a sizeable portion of the variability in the susceptibility to drug abuse is due to environmental factors that are unique to opiates or to psychostimulants. Very little is known about the nature of these environmental influences. We report here original data, based on retrospective reports in human addicts, indicating that the setting of drug taking exerts a differential influence on heroin versus cocaine use. We also review additional clinical and pre-clinical data pointing to fundamental differences in the way in which the environment interacts with cocaine relative to heroin and other addictive drugs. These findings - as well as other evidence, including the lack of pharmacological treatments effective for both cocaine and heroin addiction - support the notion that much is to be gained by taking into account the substance-specific aspects of drug addiction. At a therapeutic level, for example, it appears reasonable to propose that cognitive-behavioral approaches should be tailored in a substance-specific manner in order to allow the addict to anticipate, and cope with, the risks associated to the various environmental settings of drug use. PMID:23574438

  11. Subcutaneous insulin infusion: change in basal infusion rate has no immediate effect on insulin absorption rate

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrandt, P.; Birch, K.; Jensen, B.M.; Kuehl, C.

    1986-11-01

    Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were simultaneously given subcutaneous infusions (1.12 IU/h each) of /sup 125/I-labeled Actrapid insulin in each side of the abdominal wall. After 24 h of infusion, the size of the infused insulin depots was measured by external counting for 5 h. The basal infusion rate was then doubled in one side and halved in the other for the next 4 h. Finally, 1.12 IU/h of insulin was given in both sides of the abdominal wall for an additional 3 h. The changes in the size of the depots were measured, and the absorption rates for each hour were calculated. During the first 5 h of infusion, the depot size was almost constant (approximately 5 IU) with an absorption rate that equaled the infusion rate. Doubling the infusion rate led to a significant increase in depot size, but the absorption rate remained unchanged for the first 3 h, and only thereafter was a significant increase seen. When the infusion rate was reduced to the initial 1.12 IU/h, the absorption rate remained elevated during the next 3 h. Correspondingly, when the infusion rate was decreased, the depot size also decreased, but the absorption rate remained unchanged for the first 3 h. The results show that a change in the basal insulin infusion rate does not lead to any immediate change in the insulin absorption rate. This should be considered when planning an insulin-infusion program that includes alteration(s) in the basal-rate setting.

  12. Usefulness of intravenous lipid emulsion for cardiac toxicity from cocaine overdose.

    PubMed

    Arora, Natasha Purai; Berk, William Allen; Aaron, Cynthia Kurke; Williams, Kim Allan

    2013-02-01

    The investigators describe the clinical course of a 26-year-old-man who was brought to the emergency department in a comatose state with status epilepticus after smoking a large amount of crack cocaine. In the emergency department, he was intubated because of depressed mental status and respiratory acidosis. His troponin I remained negative, and electrocardiography showed wide-complex tachycardia with a prolonged corrected QT interval. Because of the corrected QT interval prolongation and wide-complex tachycardia, the patient was started on intravenous magnesium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate. Despite these interventions, no improvement in cardiac rhythm was observed, and electrocardiography continued to show wide-complex tachycardia. The patient became more unstable from a cardiovascular standpoint, with a decrease in blood pressure to 85/60 mm Hg. He was then given 100 ml of 20% lipid emulsion (Intralipid). Within 10 minutes of starting the infusion of 20% lipid emulsion, wide-complex tachycardia disappeared, with an improvement in systemic blood pressure to 120/70 mm Hg. Repeat electrocardiography after the infusion of intravenous lipid emulsion showed regular sinus rhythm with normal QRS and corrected QT intervals. The patient was successfully extubated on day 8 of hospitalization and discharged home on day 10. His cardiac rhythm and blood pressure remained stable throughout his further stay in the hospital. PMID:23186600

  13. Thallium scintigraphy during dobutamine infusion: nonexercise-dependent screening test for coronary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.R.; Palac, R.T.; Freeman, M.L.; Virupannavar, S.; Loeb, H.S.; Kaplan, E.; Gunnar, R.M.

    1984-03-01

    Exercise thallium scintigraphy has proven to be a sensitive method for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD). However, early redistribution of thallium and inadequate exercise can reduce its sensitivity. In this study, dobutamine was infused in incremental doses (5, 10, 15, and 20 micrograms/kg/min) in 24 patients being evaluated for chest pain. Thallium scintigraphy was completed during the maximum dose of dobutamine tolerated and repeated 4 hours later. Significant CAD was present in 16 patients; the remaining eight had normal coronaries. Exercise ECG was obtained in 23 patients. During dobutamine thallium scintigraphy, reversible perfusion defects occurred in 15 of 16 CAD and in one of eight non-CAD patients, resulting in a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 87%. Exercise ECG had a sensitivity of 60% and a specificity of 63%. We conclude that: (1) dobutamine thallium scintigraphy appears to be a sensitive method for detecting significant CAD and provided a more sensitive screening test than exercise ECG; (2) dobutamine thallium scintigraphy is especially useful in patients who cannot exercise; and (3) because imaging occurs during dobutamine infusion, the problem of early redistribution may be mitigated.

  14. Topical cocaine for relief of mucosal pain.

    PubMed

    Newport, Kristina; Coyne, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Painful mucosal lesions negatively affect quality of life. When located in the oral cavity, they can cause pain that interferes with speech and swallowing. Acute pain from intra-oral lesions is difficult to treat with conventional methods such as systemic opioids or viscous lidocaine. These cases exemplify a safe, fast and effective method for treating painful mouth lesions that are not responsive to standard treatments. Mr. D and Mr. G had from painful oral lesions caused by squamous cell carcinoma. Severe pain interfered with their ability to speak and swallow, resulting in poor nutrition and dehydration. 4% liquid cocaine, self-applied topically to the open mouth sores, resulted in relief within minutes in both cases. Repeated dosing every six hours allowed both patients to restart oral nutrition without any reported side effects. Topical cocaine has not been described for repeated dosing for oral or other mucosal pain. Potential side effects of mucosal administration include gingival recession and erythematous lesions. If the recommended topical doses are exceeded, liquid cocaine may be absorbed systemically causing a stimulant response or addiction. When used appropriately, however, this intervention can result in a dramatic improvement in quality of life and functional status. PMID:20504138

  15. [Addiction to cocaine and other stimulants].

    PubMed

    Lacoste, Jérôme; Delavenne-Garcia, Héloïse; Charles-Nicolas, Aimé; Duarte Garcia, Frederico; Jehel, Louis

    2012-12-01

    Due to many available forms (powder, pasta base, freebase and crack…) and because of multiple routes of administration (intranasal, intravenous, or smoked), cocaine has become in 30 years one of the most consumed illegal drugs worldwide, after cannabis. While the frequency of consumption decreases in North America, it continues to rise in Europe, and in some countries in South America, including Brazil, despite a growing knowledge of its specific effects, physical complications and psychiatric consequences. Elsewhere (notably in Asia and Indian Ocean), amphetamine and other stimulants (including methamphetamine), whose properties and patterns of use are very similar to those of cocaine, tend to replace it. Another amphetamine derivative, MDMA or ecstasy, is also consumed by many young people of less than 25 years, in Europe and North America, in a festive setting, with specific consequences and special procedures of care. Although there is currently no consensus for a specific medication, the most appropriate therapeutic approach seems to involve a psychosocial treatment associated with an anticraving medication, which will reduce compulsive desire to consume, in order to facilitate the psychotherapeutic and social care. However, pharmacological research remains very active, and many options are explored (GABAergic or dopaminergic agonists, amphetamine derivatives with long half-life, vaccine…), whether to treat addiction to cocaine or to methamphetamine. PMID:23021656

  16. Chronic cocaine disrupts mesocortical learning mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Buchta, William C.; Riegel, Arthur C.

    2016-01-01

    The addictive power of drugs of abuse such as cocaine comes from their ability to hijack natural reward and plasticity mechanisms mediated by dopamine signaling in the brain. Reward learning involves burst firing of midbrain dopamine neurons in response to rewards and cues predictive of reward. The resulting release of dopamine in terminal regions is thought to act as a teaching signaling to areas such as the prefrontal cortex and striatum. In this review, we posit that a pool of extrasynaptic dopaminergic D1-like receptors activated in response to dopamine neuron burst firing serve to enable synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex in response to rewards and their cues. We propose that disruptions in these mechanisms following chronic cocaine use contribute to addiction pathology, in part due to the unique architecture of the mesocortical pathway. By blocking dopamine reuptake in the cortex, cocaine elevates dopamine signaling at these extra-synaptic receptors, prolonging D1-receptor activation and the subsequent activation of intracellular signaling cascades, and thus inducing long-lasting maladaptive plasticity. These cellular adaptations may account for many of the changes in cortical function observed in drug addicts, including an enduring vulnerability to relapse. Therefore, understanding and targeting these neuroadaptations may provide cognitive benefits and help prevent relapse in human drug addicts. PMID:25704202

  17. Multicriteria wavenumber selection in cocaine classification.

    PubMed

    Anzanello, M J; Kahmann, A; Marcelo, M C A; Mariotti, K C; Ferrão, M F; Ortiz, R S

    2015-11-10

    Cocaine ATR-FTIR spectra consist of a large number of wavenumbers that typically decreases the performance of exploratory and predictive multivariate techniques. This paper proposes a framework for selecting the most relevant wavenumbers to classify cocaine samples into two categories regarding chemical composition, i.e. salt and base. The proposed framework builds a wavenumber importance index based on the Bhattacharyya distance (BD) followed by a procedure that removes wavenumbers from the spectra according to the order suggested by the BD index. The recommended wavenumber subset is chosen based on multiple criteria assessing classification performance, which are recalculated after each wavenumber is eliminated. The method was applied to ATR-FTIR spectra from 513 samples of cocaine, remarkably reducing the percent of retained wavenumbers and yielding near to perfect classifications in the testing set. In addition, we compared our propositions with other methods tailored to wavenumber selection; we found that the proposed framework, which relies on simple mathematical fundamentals, yielded competitive results. PMID:26319749

  18. Chronic cocaine disrupts mesocortical learning mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Buchta, William C; Riegel, Arthur C

    2015-12-01

    The addictive power of drugs of abuse such as cocaine comes from their ability to hijack natural reward and plasticity mechanisms mediated by dopamine signaling in the brain. Reward learning involves burst firing of midbrain dopamine neurons in response to rewards and cues predictive of reward. The resulting release of dopamine in terminal regions is thought to act as a teaching signaling to areas such as the prefrontal cortex and striatum. In this review, we posit that a pool of extrasynaptic dopaminergic D1-like receptors activated in response to dopamine neuron burst firing serve to enable synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex in response to rewards and their cues. We propose that disruptions in these mechanisms following chronic cocaine use contribute to addiction pathology, in part due to the unique architecture of the mesocortical pathway. By blocking dopamine reuptake in the cortex, cocaine elevates dopamine signaling at these extrasynaptic receptors, prolonging D1-receptor activation and the subsequent activation of intracellular signaling cascades, and thus inducing long-lasting maladaptive plasticity. These cellular adaptations may account for many of the changes in cortical function observed in drug addicts, including an enduring vulnerability to relapse. Therefore, understanding and targeting these neuroadaptations may provide cognitive benefits and help prevent relapse in human drug addicts. PMID:25704202

  19. Long-acting cocaine hydrolase for addiction therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiabin; Xue, Liu; Hou, Shurong; Jin, Zhenyu; Zhang, Ting; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-01-12

    Cocaine abuse is a world-wide public health and social problem without a US Food and Drug Administration-approved medication. An ideal anticocaine medication would accelerate cocaine metabolism, producing biologically inactive metabolites by administration of an efficient cocaine-specific exogenous enzyme. Our recent studies have led to the discovery of the desirable, highly efficient cocaine hydrolases (CocHs) that can efficiently detoxify and inactivate cocaine without affecting normal functions of the CNS. Preclinical and clinical data have demonstrated that these CocHs are safe for use in humans and are effective for accelerating cocaine metabolism. However, the actual therapeutic use of a CocH in cocaine addiction treatment is limited by its short biological half-life (e.g., 8 h or shorter in rats). Here we demonstrate a novel CocH form, a catalytic antibody analog, which is a fragment crystallizable (Fc)-fused CocH dimer (CocH-Fc) constructed by using CocH to replace the Fab region of human IgG1. The CocH-Fc not only has a high catalytic efficiency against cocaine but also, like an antibody, has a considerably longer biological half-life (e.g., ∼107 h in rats). A single dose of CocH-Fc was able to accelerate cocaine metabolism in rats even after 20 d and thus block cocaine-induced hyperactivity and toxicity for a long period. Given the general observation that the biological half-life of a protein drug is significantly longer in humans than in rodents, the CocH-Fc reported in this study could allow dosing once every 2-4 wk, or longer, for treatment of cocaine addiction in humans. PMID:26712009

  20. Pharmacokinetics of cysteamine bitartrate following gastrointestinal infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Meredith C; Barshop, Bruce A; Gangoiti, Jon A; Deutsch, Reena; Martin, Michael; Schneider, Jerry A; Dohil, Ranjan

    2007-01-01

    Aims Although cysteamine was first used in the treatment of cystinosis in 1976 and approved by the FDA as cysteamine bitartrate (Cystagon™) in 1994, surprisingly little pharmacological data are available for this compound. Cysteamine and its related drugs are currently being evaluated for the treatment of Huntington’s and Parkinson’s disease. The aim of te study was to understand the pharmacokinetics of cysteamine bitartrate following gastrointestinal infusion. Method Cysteamine bitartrate was delivered through a naso-enteric catheter into the stomach (n = 8), small intestine (n = 8) and caecum (n = 4) of normal subjects. Plasma cysteamine concentrations were determined using LC-MS/MS. Results The rate and extent of drug absorption were assessed by comparing AUC(0, ∞), Cmax and tmax, among the gastrointestinal infusion sites. Total cysteamine exposure, expressed as area under the curve (AUC(0, ∞)) was greatest when the drug was infused into the small intestine (4331.3 ± 1907.6 min × µm) followed by stomach (3901.9 ± 1591.9 min × µm) and caecum (3141.4 ± 1627.6 min × µm). Cysteamine infusion into the small intestine resulted in the most rapid rise to maximal plasma concentrations (tmax = 21 ± 0.56 min); tmax was delayed to 50 ± 26 min and 64 ± 26 min after gastric and caecal infusion, respectively. The maximum cysteamine plasma concentration (Cmax) was reached after infusion of the drug into the small intestine (51 ± 21 µm), which was higher than plasma Cmax concentrations after gastric (39 ± 16 µm) and caecal infusion (23 ± 15 µm). Conclusions The pharmacokinetic data generated help extend our understanding of cysteamine. PMID:17229040

  1. Blocking Infralimbic Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF or FGF2) Facilitates Extinction of Drug Seeking After Cocaine Self-Administration.

    PubMed

    Hafenbreidel, Madalyn; Twining, Robert C; Rafa Todd, Carolynn; Mueller, Devin

    2015-12-01

    Drug exposure results in structural and functional changes in brain regions that regulate reward and these changes may underlie the persistence of compulsive drug seeking and relapse. Neurotrophic factors, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF2), are necessary for neuronal survival, growth, and differentiation, and may contribute to these drug-induced changes. Following cocaine exposure, bFGF is increased in addiction-related brain regions, including the infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex (IL-mPFC). The IL-mPFC is necessary for extinction, but whether drug-induced overexpression of bFGF in this region affects extinction of drug seeking is unknown. Thus, we determined whether blocking bFGF in IL-mPFC would facilitate extinction following cocaine self-administration. Rats were trained to lever press for intravenous infusions of cocaine before extinction. Blocking bFGF in IL-mPFC before four extinction sessions resulted in facilitated extinction. In contrast, blocking bFGF alone was not sufficient to facilitate extinction, as blocking bFGF and returning rats to their home cage had no effect on subsequent extinction. Furthermore, bFGF protein expression increased in IL-mPFC following cocaine self-administration, an effect reversed by extinction. These results suggest that cocaine-induced overexpression of bFGF inhibits extinction, as blocking bFGF during extinction permits rapid extinction. Therefore, targeted reductions in bFGF during therapeutic interventions could enhance treatment outcomes for addiction. PMID:25994078

  2. Cocaine hydrolase encoded in viral vector blocks the reinstatement of cocaine seeking in rats for 6 months

    PubMed Central

    Anker, Justin J.; Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang; Geng, Liyi; Zlebnik, Natalie E.; Parks, Robin J.; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cocaine dependence is a pervasive disorder with high rates of relapse. In a previous study, direct administration of a quadruple mutant albumin-fused butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) that efficiently catalyzes hydrolysis of cocaine to benzoic acid and ecgonine methyl ester acutely blocked cocaine seeking in an animal model of relapse. In the present experiments these results were extended to achieve a long duration blockade of cocaine seeking with a gene transfer paradigm using a related BChE-based cocaine hydrolase, termed “CocH”. Methods Male and female rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement for approximately 14 days. Following the final self-administration session, rats were injected with CocH vector or a control injection (empty vector or saline), and their cocaine solutions were replaced with saline for 14 days to allow for extinction of lever pressing. Subsequently, they were tested for drug-primed reinstatement by administering i.p. injections of saline (S), cocaine (5, 10, and 15 mg/kg, C), and d-amphetamine (A) according to the following sequence: S, C, S, C, S, C, S, A. Rats then received cocaine-priming injections once weekly for 4 weeks, and subsequently, once monthly for up to 6 months. Results Administration of CocH vector produced substantial and sustained CocH activity in plasma that corresponded with diminished cocaine- (but not amphetamine-) induced reinstatement responding for up to 6 months following treatment (compared to high responding controls). Conclusion These results demonstrate that viral transfer of CocH may be useful in promoting long-term resistance to relapse to cocaine addiction. PMID:22209637

  3. Functional consequences of cocaine expectation: findings in a non-human primate model of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Porrino, Linda J; Beveridge, Thomas J R; Smith, Hilary R; Nader, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to stimuli and environments associated with drug use is considered one of the most important contributors to relapse among substance abusers. Neuroimaging studies have identified neural circuits underlying these responses in cocaine-dependent subjects. But these studies are often difficult to interpret because of the heterogeneity of the participants, substances abused, and differences in drug histories and social variables. Therefore, the goal of this study was to assess the functional effects of exposure to cocaine-associated stimuli in a non-human primate model of cocaine self-administration, providing precise control over these variables, with the 2-[(14) C]deoxyglucose method. Rhesus monkeys self-administered 0.3 mg/kg/injection cocaine (n = 4) under a fixed-interval 3-minute (FI 3-min) schedule of reinforcement (30 injections/session) for 100 sessions. Control animals (n = 4) underwent identical schedules of food reinforcement. Sessions were then discontinued for 30 days, after which time, monkeys were exposed to cocaine- or food-paired cues, and the 2-[(14) C]deoxyglucose experiment was conducted. The presentation of the cocaine-paired cues resulted in significant increases in functional activity within highly restricted circuits that included portions of the pre-commissural striatum, medial prefrontal cortex, rostral temporal cortex and limbic thalamus when compared with control animals presented with the food-paired cues. The presentation of cocaine-associated cues increased brain functional activity in contrast to the decreases observed after cocaine consumption. Furthermore, the topography of brain circuits engaged by the expectation of cocaine is similar to the distribution of effects during the earliest phases of cocaine self-administration, prior to the onset of neuroadaptations that accompany chronic cocaine exposure. PMID:25684556

  4. Amelioration of the cardiovascular effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys by a long-acting mutant form of cocaine esterase.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory T; Carey, Kathy A; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Nichols, Joseph; Berlin, Aaron A; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Sunahara, Roger K; Woods, James H; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2011-04-01

    A long-acting mutant form of a naturally occurring bacterial cocaine esterase (T172R/G173Q CocE; double mutant CocE (DM CocE)) has previously been shown to antagonize the reinforcing, convulsant, and lethal effects of cocaine in rodents. However, the effectiveness and therapeutic characteristics of DM CocE in nonhuman primates, in a more clinically relevant context, are unknown. The current studies were aimed at (1) characterizing the cardiovascular effects of cocaine in freely moving rhesus monkeys, (2) evaluating the capacity of DM CocE to ameliorate these cocaine-induced cardiovascular effects when administered 10 min after cocaine, and (3) assessing the immunological responses of monkeys to DM CocE following repeated administration. Intravenous administration of cocaine produced dose-dependent increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) that persisted throughout the 2-h observation period following a dose of 3.2 mg/kg cocaine. Cocaine failed to produce reliable changes in electrocardiograph (ECG) parameters, body temperature, and locomotor activity. DM CocE produced a rapid and dose-dependent amelioration of the cardiovascular effects, with saline-like MAP measures restored within 5-10 min, and saline-like HR measures restored within 20-40 min of DM CocE administration. Although administration of DM CocE produced increases in anti-CocE antibodies, they did not appear to have a neutralizing effect on the capacity of DM CocE to reverse the cardiovascular effects of cocaine. In conclusion, these findings in monkeys provide strong evidence to suggest that highly efficient cocaine esterases, such as DM CocE, can provide a potential therapeutic option for treatment of acute cocaine intoxication in humans. PMID:21289605

  5. Characterizing the cognitive effects of cocaine: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Spronk, Desirée B; van Wel, Janelle H P; Ramaekers, Johannes G; Verkes, Robbert J

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the cognitive sequela of repeated cocaine use is a growing area of research and is crucial to the development of cognitive models of addiction. We systematically reviewed all available placebo-controlled and case-controlled studies on the acute and long-term effects of cocaine on cognitive functioning. In order to compare the magnitude of cognitive effects across cognitive domains we conducted several meta-analyses on a subset of data from long-term effect studies. Studies on acute cocaine administration suggest enhancement of response inhibition and psychomotor speed, while all other domains appear to be unaffected or not investigated adequately. Long-term effects of cocaine show a wide array of deteriorated cognitive functions, indicating that long term cocaine use is characterized by a general cognitive impairment across functions, rather than by specific cognitive deficits. Literature on long-term cocaine effects is more substantial than literature on acute effects. This comprehensive review outlines possible dissociations and similarities of acute vs. long-term cocaine effects in the human brain. Atherosclerosis after cocaine exposure may underlie cognitive dysfunction, suggesting involvement of multiple brain areas. Acute drug studies are important to the future development of addiction models. PMID:23876288

  6. Cocaine's appetite for fat and the consequences on body weight.

    PubMed

    Billing, Lawrence; Ersche, Karen D

    2015-03-01

    For many individuals in treatment for cocaine dependence, weight gain is a substantial problem during recovery. This weight gain causes significant distress and seems to increase the risk of relapse. The mechanisms underlying cocaine's effects on weight remain elusive. It is widely assumed that this weight gain reflects a metabolic or behavioural compensatory response to the cessation of cocaine use. Here we challenge this assumption and outline potential mechanisms by which chronic cocaine use produces disturbances in the regulation of fat intake and storage, through its effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems, specifically the sympathetic nervous system. We hypothesize that the cocaine-induced alteration in fat regulation results in cocaine users developing a pronounced appetite for fatty food but keeps their fat mass low. This altered fat appetite subsequently leads to excessive weight gain when individuals enter treatment and stop using cocaine. Our aim is to shed light on the neurobiological mechanisms that may underlie the alterations in eating and fat regulation in cocaine-dependent individuals, to open up potential new avenues to support these individuals in recovery. PMID:25321424

  7. Effects of chronic cocaine in rat C6 astroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Badisa, Ramesh B; Goodman, Carl B

    2012-09-01

    Investigations with astroglial cells carry equal importance as those with neurons in drug abuse studies. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of chronic cocaine administration on cell viability, nitric oxide (NO) production, general respiratory status of mitochondria and total protein levels in rat astroglioma cells after 24 h of treatment. In addition, the effect of cocaine was assessed for 24 h on brine shrimp larvae in order to study their sensitivity to the drug. It was observed that cocaine caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in astroglial cell viability with an LC(50) of 4.717 mM. It was found that cocaine did not induce or inhibit NO production in the cells. Evaluation of mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity in terms of formazan production in astroglial cells indicated that cocaine significantly interfered with the general respiratory status of mitochondria with an ED(50) of 6.153 mM. Furthermore, cocaine was shown to deplete the total protein levels in the cells with an ED(50) of 5.435 mM. In vivo study with brine shrimp larvae showed that these larvae were highly sensitive to cocaine with an ED(50) of 2.41 mM. In summary, our findings suggest that cocaine-induced cytotoxicity in the cells was non-specific. The cumulative effect arising from the significant loss of respiration and total cellular proteins is the cause of astroglial cell death. PMID:22735768

  8. Cognitive Predictors of Children's Attitudes toward Alcohol and Cocaine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Lisa J.; Sigelman, Carol K.; Brewster, Albert B.; Leach, Diane B.; Mack, Keisha L.; Rinehart, Cheryl S.; Sorongon, Alberto G.

    2003-01-01

    Examines age differences in, and associations among, children's attitudes and intentions regarding alcohol and cocaine use and possible cognitive underpinnings of such orientations. Attitudes and intentions were negative and became less negative with age for alcohol, but more negative with age for cocaine. The cognitive predictors contributed to…

  9. Reactivity and Regulation in Children Prenatally Exposed to Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Tracy; Bendersky, Margaret; Ramsay, Douglas; Lewis, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Children prenatally exposed to cocaine may be at elevated risk for adjustment problems in early development because of greater reactivity and reduced regulation during challenging tasks. Few studies have examined whether cocaine-exposed children show such difficulties during the preschool years, a period marked by increased social and cognitive…

  10. On the atomic structure of cocaine in solution.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Andrew J; Busch, Sebastian; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Callear, Samantha K; Biggin, Philip C; McLain, Sylvia E

    2016-01-14

    Cocaine is an amphiphilic drug which has the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, a combination of neutron diffraction and computation has been used to investigate the atomic scale structure of cocaine in aqueous solutions. Both the observed conformation and hydration of cocaine appear to contribute to its ability to cross hydrophobic layers afforded by the BBB, as the average conformation yields a structure which might allow cocaine to shield its hydrophilic regions from a lipophilic environment. Specifically, the carbonyl oxygens and amine group on cocaine, on average, form ∼5 bonds with the water molecules in the surrounding solvent, and the top 30% of water molecules within 4 Å of cocaine are localized in the cavity formed by an internal hydrogen bond within the cocaine molecule. This water mediated internal hydrogen bonding suggests a mechanism of interaction between cocaine and the BBB that negates the need for deprotonation prior to interaction with the lipophilic portions of this barrier. This finding also has important implications for understanding how neurologically active molecules are able to interact with both the blood stream and BBB and emphasizes the use of structural measurements in solution in order to understand important biological function. PMID:26660073

  11. Sonographic and Endoscopic Findings in Cocaine-Induced Ischemic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Leth, Thomas; Wilkens, Rune; Bonderup, Ole K.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine-induced ischemic colitis is a recognized entity. The diagnosis is based on clinical and endoscopic findings. However, diagnostic imaging is helpful in the evaluation of abdominal symptoms and prior studies have suggested specific sonographic findings in ischemic colitis. We report sonographic and endoscopic images along with abdominal computed tomography in a case of cocaine-induced ischemic colitis. PMID:26798523

  12. Children with Prenatal Cocaine Exposure: Resilient or Handicapped?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, LeAdelle; Cox, Deborah

    1993-01-01

    Notes that prenatal exposure to cocaine may result in broad range of deficits. Reviews pharmacological properties of cocaine critical to neurological and behavioral outcomes. Delineates specific multilevel and multidisciplinary interventions with family unit. Advocates that services for each child be based on individual strengths and weaknesses…

  13. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine constrict cerebral arteries by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Madden, J A; Konkol, R J; Keller, P A; Alvarez, T A

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to determine possible mechanisms underlying the vasoconstrictor activity of cocaine and its principal metabolite, benzoylecgonine (BE) in cat isolated cerebral arteries. The arteries constricted significantly in response to single doses of cocaine, BE and norepinephrine (NE; (P < 0.05). After 6-OHDA treatment to remove adrenergic nerve endings, NE-induced constrictions were essentially unchanged from those before treatment. Denervated arteries exposed to cocaine dilated significantly (P < 0.05) but those exposed to BE constricted as much as before denervation. Following exposure to prazosin and yohimbine, arterial constrictions to NE and cocaine were significantly reduced from control (P < 0.05) but the BE-induced constriction was unchanged. Ryanodine eliminated the cocaine-induced contraction (P < 0.05) whereas verapamil eliminated the BE response (P < 0.05). These data suggest that while cocaine's vasoconstrictor action may be significantly mediated through adrenergic transmission, BE may act through a mechanism involving calcium (Ca2+) channels. Cocaine levels peak and decline in the body more rapidly than BE levels which can remain detectable for days. This study suggests there may also be different pharmacological mechanisms as well as temporal differences underlying the vasoreactivity of these two substances. Our findings may have implications for pharmacological management of cocaine-induced toxic vascular events. PMID:7869849

  14. Perceived risk and sources of information regarding cocaine.

    PubMed

    Hickey, J E; Brown, B S; Chung, A S; Kolar, A F; Michaelson, B S

    1991-07-01

    A study was made of the perceptions of risk and of the sources of information about risk regarding cocaine. Subjects were adult (N = 90) and juvenile (N = 20) cocaine abusers in seven Baltimore area treatment programs. Using structured interview, it was found that 87.8% of adults and 80.0% of youth had experienced at least one negative consequence of their cocaine use, other than addiction, prior to entry into treatment. The most common negative experience reported by both groups was the loss of reality testing. Moreover, 86.6% of adults and 65.0% of youth reported becoming addicted to cocaine before entering treatment. While juveniles sampled had entered treatment within a year of first cocaine use, adults entered treatment 7.9 years after first use and reported an average of 6.6 years of cocaine use before experiencing the first negative consequences. Television received consistently high ratings as an accessible and credible source of information about cocaine. Adolescents rated schools relatively high on the amount and accuracy of cocaine-related information provided. PMID:1959999

  15. Cocaine: Pharmacology, Effects, and Treatment of Abuse. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Monograph 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, John, Ed.

    This monograph consists of eight papers which refer in one way or another to the pharmacology of cocaine. The papers are: (1) Cocaine 1984: Introduction and Overview" (John Grabowski); (2) "Cocaine: A Growing Public Health Problem" (Edgar H. Adams and Jack Durell); (3) "Neural Mechanisms of the Reinforcing Action of Cocaine" (Roy A. Wise); (4)…

  16. A neurotensin analog blocks cocaine-conditioned place preference and reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Boules, Mona; Netz, Rebecca; Fredrickson, Paul A; Richelson, Elliott

    2016-04-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a neuropeptide that acts as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in the central nervous system. Several studies suggest a therapeutic role for NT analogs in nicotine and other psychostimulant addictions. We studied the effects of the nonselective NT receptor agonist NT69L, which has equal affinity for the two major NT receptors, NTS1 and NTS2, on the expression of cocaine-conditioned place preference (cocaine-CPP) and reinstatement after extinction. Robust cocaine-CPP was obtained after 5 days of conditioning. Extinction was induced using eight repeated daily injections of saline. Reinstatement was prompted by priming with one injection of cocaine (12 mg/kg intraperitoneally). On the test day, NT69L (1 mg/kg intraperitoneally) was administered 30 min before assessing cocaine-CPP. Extinction led to the loss of cocaine-CPP. One injection of cocaine (12 mg/kg intraperitoneally) for cocaine priming reinstated cocaine-CPP. NT69L blocked cocaine-CPP reinstatement in cocaine-primed animals. In addition, NT69L blocked cocaine-CPP reinstatement when administered before priming with cocaine. Thus, the NT agonist NT69L blocked both cocaine-CPP and reinstatement to cocaine preference. NT69L may exert this action by modulating the mesocorticolimbic dopamine and glutamatergic pathways involved in addiction and relapse processes. Therefore, NT agonists may represent a novel therapy for the treatment of addiction to cocaine and possibly to other psychostimulants. PMID:26901162

  17. Preclinical Assessment of Lisdexamfetamine as an Agonist Medication Candidate for Cocaine Addiction: Effects in Rhesus Monkeys Trained to Discriminate Cocaine or to Self-Administer Cocaine in a Cocaine Versus Food Choice Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Hutsell, Blake A.; Blough, Bruce E.; Poklis, Justin L.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic amphetamine treatment decreases cocaine consumption in preclinical and human laboratory studies and in clinical trials. Lisdexamfetamine is an amphetamine prodrug in which L-lysine is conjugated to the terminal nitrogen of d-amphetamine. Prodrugs may be advantageous relative to their active metabolites due to slower onsets and longer durations of action; however, lisdexamfetamine treatment’s efficacy in decreasing cocaine consumption is unknown. Methods: This study compared lisdexamfetamine and d-amphetamine effects in rhesus monkeys using two behavioral procedures: (1) a cocaine discrimination procedure (training dose = 0.32mg/kg cocaine, i.m.); and (2) a cocaine-versus-food choice self-administration procedure. Results: In the cocaine-discrimination procedure, lisdexamfetamine (0.32–3.2mg/kg, i.m.) substituted for cocaine with lower potency, slower onset, and longer duration of action than d-amphetamine (0.032–0.32mg/kg, i.m.). Consistent with the function of lisdexamfetamine as an inactive prodrug for amphetamine, the time course of lisdexamfetamine effects was related to d-amphetamine plasma levels by a counter-clockwise hysteresis loop. In the choice procedure, cocaine (0–0.1mg/kg/injection, i.v.) and food (1g banana-flavored pellets) were concurrently available, and cocaine maintained a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice under baseline conditions. Treatment for 7 consecutive days with lisdexamfetamine (0.32–3.2mg/kg/day, i.m.) or d-amphetamine (0.032–0.1mg/kg/h, i.v.) produced similar dose-dependent rightward shifts in cocaine dose-effect curves and decreases in preference for 0.032mg/kg/injection cocaine. Conclusions: Lisdexamfetamine has a slower onset and longer duration of action than amphetamine but retains amphetamine’s efficacy to reduce the choice of cocaine in rhesus monkeys. These results support further consideration of lisdexamfetamine as an agonist-based medication candidate for cocaine addiction. PMID

  18. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Cocaine Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Abu-Abed Abdin, Asma; Hamza, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad S; Ahmed, Awab

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is characterized by elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia, and elevated ketones in urine and blood. Hyperglycemia is a key component of DKA; however, a subset of DKA patients can present with near-normal blood glucose, an entity described as "euglycemic DKA." This rare phenomenon is thought to be due to starvation and food restriction in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Cocaine abuse is considered a trigger for development of DKA. Cocaine also has anorexic effects. We describe an interesting case of euglycemic DKA in a middle-aged diabetic female presenting with elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, with near-normal blood glucose, in the settings of noncompliance to insulin and cocaine abuse. We have postulated that cocaine abuse was implicated in the pathophysiology of euglycemic DKA in this case. This case highlights complex physiological interplay between type-1 diabetes, noncompliance to insulin, and cocaine abuse leading to DKA, with starvation physiology causing development of euglycemic DKA. PMID:27579186

  19. Cocaine use and withdrawal: the effect on sleep and mood.

    PubMed

    Watson, R; Bakos, L; Compton, P; Gawin, F

    1992-01-01

    Three recreational cocaine users (age, 26.7 years), after one adaptation night, spent 5 days and nights in the laboratory where their EEG, EOG, and submental EMG were recorded during all of their sleep. On the second afternoon and evening of the study, subjects used an estimated 1 to 2 g cocaine intranasally. They all slept between 2:00 A.M. and 9:00 A.M. that night. Blood samples were drawn each evening and morning. Absolute plasma cocaine levels and patterns of elimination were consistent with subjects report of dose and time of administration. Mood ratings were made repeatedly throughout the study. There was suppression of REM sleep during the use of cocaine followed by a rebound which is specific to REM sleep and is not seen in other stages of sleep. REM variables subsided to normal levels on the third recovery night following cocaine use. PMID:1562006

  20. Cocaine-induced vasospasm causing spinal cord transient ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, N; Tampieri, D

    2012-07-01

    A 25-year-old woman developed a spinal cord infarction leading to quadriplegia and respiratory insufficiency after consuming cocaine and vodka for several days. Within five months, she regained full motor and respiratory function. A literature review revealed 11 cases of cocaine-induced spinal cord infarction. A complete recovery from quadriplegia and respiratory failure following cocaine abuse has never been reported to date. The value of diffusion-weighted imaging in cocaine-induced spinal cord infarction is here presented and discussed. The literature proposes several mechanisms for cocaine-induced infarction including vasospasm, arteritis, and thrombosis. In this case, the imaging studies and the full recovery suggest that the spinal cord ischemia was secondary to a transient vasospasm of the anterior spinal artery. PMID:24028991

  1. Examining possible gender differences among cocaine-dependent outpatients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Conrad J; Badger, Gary J; Sigmon, Stacey C; Higgins, Stephen T

    2002-08-01

    Potential differences in sociodemographics, drug use, and measures of treatment outcome were examined among 137 male and 51 female cocaine-dependent outpatients. More women than men were unemployed, received public assistance, and were living with their children. Women reported fewer years of regular cocaine use, spending less money per week on cocaine, less prior treatment for cocaine abuse, and were more likely than men to test positive for cocaine at intake. With respect to other drug use, fewer women than men reported using sedatives and tested positive for sedatives at intake. Women reported a lower frequency of alcohol use before intake, and fewer women than men met criteria for cannabis dependence. Men and women experienced comparable improvement during the course of treatment and follow-up. PMID:12233993

  2. Disrupted Functional Connectivity with Dopaminergic Midbrain in Cocaine Abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, D.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, R.; Carrillo, J.; Maloney, T.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Telang, F.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-06-01

    Chronic cocaine use is associated with disrupted dopaminergic neurotransmission but how this disruption affects overall brain function (other than reward/motivation) is yet to be fully investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that cocaine addicted subjects will have disrupted functional connectivity between the midbrain (where dopamine neurons are located) and cortical and subcortical brain regions during the performance of a sustained attention task. We measured brain activation and functional connectivity with fMRI in 20 cocaine abusers and 20 matched controls. When compared to controls, cocaine abusers had lower positive functional connectivity of midbrain with thalamus, cerebellum, and rostral cingulate, and this was associated with decreased activation in thalamus and cerebellum and enhanced deactivation in rostral cingulate. These findings suggest that decreased functional connectivity of the midbrain interferes with the activation and deactivation signals associated with sustained attention in cocaine addicts.

  3. A comparison of male and female cocaine abusers.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M L; Weiss, R D; Mirin, S M; Lange, U

    1989-02-01

    Little has been written about the differences between male and female cocaine abusers. We therefore compared sociodemographic characteristics, reasons for cocaine use, drug effects, depressive symptoms, and psychiatric diagnoses in 95 men and 34 women hospitalized for cocaine abuse. Men were more likely to be employed, to hold higher status jobs, and to be self-supporting. Women were more likely to cite specific reasons for drug use, while men tended to use cocaine as part of a larger pattern of antisocial behavior. Women were diagnosed more often as having major depression, and their depressive symptoms improved much more slowly than men's when drug free. These findings suggest that women cocaine abusers may initially experience more residual problems, eg, depression and job dissatisfaction, than men after becoming drug free. Drug treatment centers should be alert to possible differences based on gender. PMID:2913971

  4. PRENATAL COCAINE ELIMINATES THE SEX-DEPENDENT DIFFERENCES IN ACTIVATION OBSERVED IN ADULT RATS AFTER COCAINE CHALLENGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the adult rat, acute administration of cocaine results in enhanced expression of certain behaviors. his activation is often referred to as "stereotypy" because of its repetitive nature. epeated exposure to the same dose of cocaine does not result in tolerance or a diminution o...

  5. Evaluation of neonatal exposure to cocaine on learning, activity, startle, scent marking, immobility, and plasma cocaine concentrations.

    PubMed

    Vorhees, C V; Inman-Wood, S L; Morford, L L; Reed, T M; Moran, M S; Pu, C; Cappon, G D

    2000-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine treatment produces equivocal effects on spatial learning and memory; however, no data are available on neonatal treatment as a model of human third-trimester exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated on postnatal days (P) 1-10 or 11-20 with cocaine (15 mg/kg x 4 per day at 2-h intervals) or saline (P1-P20) and evaluated as adults in the Morris water maze and on tests of activity, startle, scent marking, swimming immobility, and sequential learning. Neonatal cocaine had no effect on mortality; however, early treatment reduced body weight, whereas later treatment did not. Neonatal cocaine had no effects on exploratory activity, swimming ability, sequential learning, multiday activity rhythms, scent marking, or swimming immobility, but augmented acoustic startle amplitude in the early-treated group. Neonatal cocaine also produced an interaction on spatial learning in which the cocaine early-treated males performed slightly more efficiently than controls. Plasma cocaine concentrations were significantly higher in the early-treated group than the later-treated group despite receiving the same weight-adjusted doses. It was concluded that neonatal cocaine, when administered during a stage of brain development analogous to human third trimester, induces few behavioral effects based on the assessments used in this study. PMID:10758355

  6. Enhanced regional brain metabolic responses to benzodiazepines in cocaine abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Fowler, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    While dopamine (DA) appears to be crucial for cocaine reinforcement, its involvement in cocaine addiction is much less clear. Using PET we have shown persistent reductions in striatal DA D2 receptors (which arc predominantly located on GABA cells) in cocaine abusers. This finding coupled to GABA`s role as an effector for DA led us to investigate if there were GABAergic abnormalities in cocaine abusers. In this study we measured regional brain metabolic responses to lorazepam, to indirectly assess GABA function (benzodiazepines facilitate GABAergic neurotransmission). Methods: The experimental subjects consisted of 12 active cocaine abusers and 32 age matched controls. Each subject underwent two PET FDG scans obtained within 1 week of each other. The first FDG scan was obtained after administration of placebo (3 cc of saline solution) given 40-50 minutes prior to FDG; and the second after administration of lorazepam (30 {mu}g/kg) given 40-50 minutes prior to FDG. The subjects were blind to the drugs received. Results: Lorazepam-induced sleepiness was significantly greater in abusers than in controls (p<0.001). Lorazepam-induced decreases in brain glucose metabolism were significantly larger in cocaine abusers than in controls. Whereas in controls whole brain metabolism decreased 13{+-}7 %, in cocaine abusers it decreased 21{+-}13 % (p < 0.05). Lorazepam-induced decrements in regional metabolism were significantly larger in striatum (p < 0.0 1), thalamus (p < 0.01) and cerebellum (p < 0.005) of cocaine abusers than of controls (ANOVA diagnosis by condition (placebo versus lorazepam) interaction effect). The only brain region for which the absolute metabolic changes-induced by lorazepam in cocaine abusers were equivalent to those in controls was the orbitofrontal cortex. These results document an accentuated sensitivity to benzodiazepines in cocaine abusers which is compatible with disrupted GABAergic function in these patients.

  7. Effects of chronic buspirone treatment on cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Fivel, Peter A; Kohut, Stephen J; Bergman, Jack

    2013-02-01

    Cocaine abuse and dependence is a major public health problem that continues to challenge medication-based treatment. Buspirone (Buspar) is a clinically available, non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic medication that acts on both serotonin and dopamine systems. In recent preclinical studies, acute buspirone treatment reduced cocaine self-administration at doses that did not also decrease food-reinforced behavior in rhesus monkeys (Bergman et al, 2012). The present study evaluated the effectiveness of chronic buspirone treatment on self-administration of cocaine and food. Five adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to self-administer cocaine and food during four 1-h daily sessions under a second-order schedule of reinforcement (FR2 [VR 16:S]). Buspirone (0.32 and 0.56 mg/kg/h) was administered intravenously through one lumen of a double-lumen catheter every 20 min for 23 h each day for 7-10 consecutive days. Each buspirone treatment period was followed by saline control treatment until drug- and food-maintained responding returned to baseline levels. Buspirone significantly reduced responding maintained by cocaine, and shifted the dose-effect curve downwards. Buspirone had minimal effects on food-maintained responding. In cocaine discrimination studies, buspirone (0.1-0.32 mg/kg, IM) did not antagonize the discriminative stimulus and rate-altering effects of cocaine in four of six monkeys. These findings indicate that buspirone selectively attenuates the reinforcing effects of cocaine in a nonhuman primate model of cocaine self-administration, and has variable effects on cocaine discrimination. PMID:23072835

  8. Influence of Vancomycin Infusion Methods on Endothelial Cell Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral intravenous therapy is frequently used in routine hospital practice and, due to various factors, its most common side effect is phlebitis. The infusion of vancomycin is particularly associated with phlebitis despite its widespread use. French guidelines recommend central intravenous infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous therapy is often preferred in intensive care units. Methods of vancomycin infusion are either intermittent infusion or continuous infusion. A comparison of these methods under in vitro conditions simulating clinical use could result in better infusion efficacy. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were therefore challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over a 24- to 72-h period using these infusion methods. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. Concentration-dependent and time-dependent vancomycin toxicity on HUVECs was noted with a 50% lethal dose at 5 mg/ml after 24 h, reaching 2.5 mg/ml after 72 h of infusion, simulating long-term infusion. This toxicity does not seem to be induced by acidic pH. In comparing infusion methods, we observed that continuous infusion induced greater cell toxicity than intermittent infusion at doses higher than 1 g/day. The increasing use of vancomycin means that new guidelines are required to avoid phlebitis. If peripheral intravenous therapy is used to reduce infusion time, along with intermittent infusion, vein irritation and localized phlebitis may be reduced. Further studies have to be carried out to explore the causes of vancomycin endothelial toxicity. PMID:25421476

  9. Sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and plasma biomarkers for cocaine addiction in abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects in outpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Pedraz, María; Araos, Pedro; García-Marchena, Nuria; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermín; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Pastor, Antoni; Barrios, Vicente; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Torrens, Marta; de la Torre, Rafael; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are sex differences in the progression of drug addiction, relapse, and response to therapies. Because biological factors participate in these differences, they should be considered when using biomarkers for addiction. In the current study, we evaluated the sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and the concentrations of plasma mediators that have been reported to be affected by cocaine. Fifty-five abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects diagnosed with lifetime cocaine use disorders (40 men and 15 women) and 73 healthy controls (48 men and 25 women) were clinically assessed with the diagnostic interview "Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders." Plasma concentrations of chemokines, cytokines, N-acyl-ethanolamines, and 2-acyl-glycerols were analyzed according to history of cocaine addiction and sex, controlling for covariates age and body mass index (BMI). Relationships between these concentrations and variables related to cocaine addiction were also analyzed in addicted subjects. The results showed that the concentrations of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2/MCP-1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL12/SDF-1) were only affected by history of cocaine addiction. The plasma concentrations of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) were affected by history of cocaine addiction and sex. In fact, whereas cytokine concentrations were higher in control women relative to men, these concentrations were reduced in cocaine-addicted women without changes in addicted men. Regarding fatty acid derivatives, history of cocaine addiction had a main effect on the concentration of each acyl derivative, whereas N-acyl-ethanolamines were increased overall in the cocaine group, 2-acyl-glycerols were decreased. Interestingly, N-palmitoleoyl-ethanolamine (POEA) was only increased in cocaine-addicted women. The covariate BMI had a significant

  10. Sex Differences in Psychiatric Comorbidity and Plasma Biomarkers for Cocaine Addiction in Abstinent Cocaine-Addicted Subjects in Outpatient Settings

    PubMed Central

    Pedraz, María; Araos, Pedro; García-Marchena, Nuria; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermín; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Pastor, Antoni; Barrios, Vicente; Chowen, Julie A.; Argente, Jesús; Torrens, Marta; de la Torre, Rafael; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are sex differences in the progression of drug addiction, relapse, and response to therapies. Because biological factors participate in these differences, they should be considered when using biomarkers for addiction. In the current study, we evaluated the sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and the concentrations of plasma mediators that have been reported to be affected by cocaine. Fifty-five abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects diagnosed with lifetime cocaine use disorders (40 men and 15 women) and 73 healthy controls (48 men and 25 women) were clinically assessed with the diagnostic interview “Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders.” Plasma concentrations of chemokines, cytokines, N-acyl-ethanolamines, and 2-acyl-glycerols were analyzed according to history of cocaine addiction and sex, controlling for covariates age and body mass index (BMI). Relationships between these concentrations and variables related to cocaine addiction were also analyzed in addicted subjects. The results showed that the concentrations of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2/MCP-1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL12/SDF-1) were only affected by history of cocaine addiction. The plasma concentrations of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) were affected by history of cocaine addiction and sex. In fact, whereas cytokine concentrations were higher in control women relative to men, these concentrations were reduced in cocaine-addicted women without changes in addicted men. Regarding fatty acid derivatives, history of cocaine addiction had a main effect on the concentration of each acyl derivative, whereas N-acyl-ethanolamines were increased overall in the cocaine group, 2-acyl-glycerols were decreased. Interestingly, N-palmitoleoyl-ethanolamine (POEA) was only increased in cocaine-addicted women. The covariate BMI had a significant

  11. Placement of tibial intraosseous infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H Theodore; Crawley, Geoffrey; Mabry, Robert; Mazuchowski, Edward

    2011-07-01

    Post-mortem preautopsy multidetector computed tomography was used to assess the placement of tibial intraosseous infusion needles in 52 cases of battlefield trauma deaths for which medical intervention included the use of the technique. In 58 (95%) of 61 needles, the tip was positioned in medullary bone. All 3 (5%) unsuccessful placements were in the left leg, and the needle was not directed perpendicular to the medial tibial cortex as recommended. Considering the nature of military trauma and the environmental conditions under which care is rendered, military medical personnel appear to be highly successful in the placement of tibial intraosseous infusion needles. PMID:22128726

  12. Cultural Congruence and Infusion Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Abitz, Tracey L

    2016-01-01

    The importance of cultural competence in every nursing practice setting in today's world cannot be understated. Unconscious bias can have detrimental effects on therapeutic relationships and health outcomes. Nursing models of cultural competence by Purnell, Leininger, and Campinha-Bacote are reviewed. The Kleinman Model and LEARN Model offer questions and guidelines to facilitate assessment of patients' understanding of illness and treatment. The Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice contains elements of diversity and cultural competence throughout. Self-reflection of one's own values, beliefs, biases, and practice as an infusion nurse will promote the development of cultural competence. PMID:26934161

  13. A Thermally Stable Form of Bacterial Cocaine Esterase: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Treatment of Cocaine Abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Brim, Remy L.; Nance, Mark R.; Youngstrom, Daniel W.; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Woods, James H.

    2010-09-03

    Rhodococcal cocaine esterase (CocE) is an attractive potential treatment for both cocaine overdose and cocaine addiction. CocE directly degrades cocaine into inactive products, whereas traditional small-molecule approaches require blockade of the inhibitory action of cocaine on a diverse array of monoamine transporters and ion channels. The usefulness of wild-type (wt) cocaine esterase is hampered by its inactivation at 37 C. Herein, we characterize the most thermostable form of this enzyme to date, CocE-L169K/G173Q. In vitro kinetic analyses reveal that CocE-L169K/G173Q displays a half-life of 2.9 days at 37 C, which represents a 340-fold improvement over wt and is 15-fold greater than previously reported mutants. Crystallographic analyses of CocE-L169K/G173Q, determined at 1.6-{angstrom} resolution, suggest that stabilization involves enhanced domain-domain interactions involving van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding. In vivo rodent studies reveal that intravenous pretreatment with CocE-L169K/G173Q in mice provides protection from cocaine-induced lethality for longer time periods before cocaine administration than wt CocE. Furthermore, intravenous administration (pretreatment) of CocE-L169K/G173Q prevents self-administration of cocaine in a time-dependent manner. Termination of the in vivo effects of CoCE seems to be dependent on, but not proportional to, its clearance from plasma as its half-life is approximately 2.3 h and similar to that of wt CocE (2.2 h). Taken together these data suggest that CocE-L169K/G173Q possesses many of the properties of a biological therapeutic for treating cocaine abuse but requires additional development to improve its serum half-life.

  14. Effects of the dopamine/norepinephrine releaser phenmetrazine on cocaine self-administration and cocaine-primed reinstatement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Czoty, Paul W.; Tran, Phuong; Thomas, Leanne N.; Martin, Thomas J.; Grigg, Amanda; Blough, Bruce E.; Beveridge, Thomas J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Like other monoamine releasers such as d-amphetamine, chronic treatment with phenmetrazine can attenuate cocaine self-administration in monkeys. Objectives The present studies extended this finding to rodents and to cocaine-primed reinstatement, a putative laboratory animal model of relapse. Methods In Experiment 1, rats self-administered food pellets or injections of 0.19 mg/kg cocaine (i.v.) under a progressive-ratio schedule. When responding was stable, subcutaneous osmotic pumps were implanted containing saline or (+)-phenmetrazine (25 or 50 mg/kg per day). In Experiment 2, rats self-administered injections of 0.75 mg/kg cocaine under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule in daily 6-hr sessions. When responding was stable, rats were removed from the self-administration environment for 7 days and treated continuously with saline, 5 mg/kg per day d-amphetamine or phenmetrazine (25 or 50 mg/kg per day) via osmotic pumps. Rats were then returned to the self-administration context while treatment continued, and responding was extinguished by removing response-contingent stimulus changes and cocaine injections. Once responding was extinguished, reinstatement tests were conducted using cocaine injections (10 mg/kg i.p.). Results Phenmetrazine decreased self-administration of cocaine, but not food pellets, during the 14-day treatment period; effects persisted for several days after treatment was discontinued. Moreover, cocaine-induced increases in responding during the reinstatement test were attenuated by d-amphetamine and both phenmetrazine doses. Conclusions These results extend the study of the effects of phenmetrazine on cocaine self-administration to a rodent model, and provide further support for the use of monoamine releasers as agonist medications for cocaine abuse. PMID:25673020

  15. Cocaine-induced adaptations in cellular redox balance contributes to enduring behavioral plasticity.

    PubMed

    Uys, Joachim D; Knackstedt, Lori; Hurt, Phelipe; Tew, Kenneth D; Manevich, Yefim; Hutchens, Steven; Townsend, Danyelle M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2011-11-01

    Impaired glutamate homeostasis in the nucleus accumbens has been linked to cocaine relapse in animal models, and results in part from cocaine-induced downregulation of the cystine-glutamate exchanger. In addition to regulating extracellular glutamate, the uptake of cystine by the exchanger is a rate-limiting step in the synthesis of glutathione (GSH). GSH is critical for balancing cellular redox in response to oxidative stress. Cocaine administration induces oxidative stress, and we first determined if downregulated cystine-glutamate exchange alters redox homeostasis in rats withdrawn from daily cocaine injections and then challenged with acute cocaine. Among the daily cocaine-induced changes in redox homeostasis were an increase in protein S-glutathionylation and a decrease in expression of GSH-S-transferase pi (GSTpi). To mimic reduced GSTpi, a genetic mouse model of GSTpi deletion or pharmacological inhibition of GSTpi by administering ketoprofen during daily cocaine administration was used. The capacity of cocaine to induce conditioned place preference or locomotor sensitization was augmented, indicating that reducing GSTpi may contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral neuroplasticity. Conversely, an acute cocaine challenge after withdrawal from daily cocaine elicited a marked increase in accumbens GSTpi, and the expression of behavioral sensitization to a cocaine challenge injection was inhibited by ketoprofen pretreatment; supporting a protective effect by the acute cocaine-induced rise in GSTpi. Together, these data indicate that cocaine-induced oxidative stress induces changes in GSTpi that contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity. PMID:21796101

  16. Cocaine-Induced Adaptations in Cellular Redox Balance Contributes to Enduring Behavioral Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Uys, Joachim D; Knackstedt, Lori; Hurt, Phelipe; Tew, Kenneth D; Manevich, Yefim; Hutchens, Steven; Townsend, Danyelle M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2011-01-01

    Impaired glutamate homeostasis in the nucleus accumbens has been linked to cocaine relapse in animal models, and results in part from cocaine-induced downregulation of the cystine–glutamate exchanger. In addition to regulating extracellular glutamate, the uptake of cystine by the exchanger is a rate-limiting step in the synthesis of glutathione (GSH). GSH is critical for balancing cellular redox in response to oxidative stress. Cocaine administration induces oxidative stress, and we first determined if downregulated cystine–glutamate exchange alters redox homeostasis in rats withdrawn from daily cocaine injections and then challenged with acute cocaine. Among the daily cocaine-induced changes in redox homeostasis were an increase in protein S-glutathionylation and a decrease in expression of GSH-S-transferase pi (GSTpi). To mimic reduced GSTpi, a genetic mouse model of GSTpi deletion or pharmacological inhibition of GSTpi by administering ketoprofen during daily cocaine administration was used. The capacity of cocaine to induce conditioned place preference or locomotor sensitization was augmented, indicating that reducing GSTpi may contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral neuroplasticity. Conversely, an acute cocaine challenge after withdrawal from daily cocaine elicited a marked increase in accumbens GSTpi, and the expression of behavioral sensitization to a cocaine challenge injection was inhibited by ketoprofen pretreatment; supporting a protective effect by the acute cocaine-induced rise in GSTpi. Together, these data indicate that cocaine-induced oxidative stress induces changes in GSTpi that contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity. PMID:21796101

  17. Psychopathology among cocaine abusers entering treatment.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, P H; Miller, A B; Millman, R B; Woody, G E; Todd, T; Kemp, J; Lipton, D S

    1990-07-01

    A number of different indicators of psychopathology were assessed in this study of 76 cocaine and crack abusers who entered outpatient treatment in New York City between June and December 1987. The majority (75%) had used cocaine for 4 years or more, and the majority (62%) spent over one thousand dollars a month on cocaine in the 6 months before entry into treatment. Forty-seven percent of the sample were found to be clinically depressed. Phobic disorders were the only other axis I diagnoses found in addition to depression, and all persons who were found to have phobic disorders also were diagnosed as having some form of depressive disorder. The four most common axis II diagnoses were antisocial personality (21%), passive-aggressive (21%), borderline (18%) and self-defeating (18%). Subjects were classified as falling into one of the following three categories of a newly developed "psychopathology classification": a) no diagnosed psychopathology except substance abuse or dependency; b) one or more axis II diagnoses, but no axis I diagnoses except for substance abuse or dependency; c) at least one axis I diagnosis in addition to drug disorders whether or not accompanied by an axis II diagnosis. Mean scores on subscales and total score on the SCL-90, as well as total score on the Beck Depression Inventory, were ordered by category of the classification scheme, with those having no diagnosed psychopathology except substance abuse having the lowest score and persons in the third category having the highest score.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2366058

  18. "The home infusion patient": patient profiles for the home infusion therapy market.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, K W; Powers, T

    1999-01-01

    The authors review the relevant literature regarding home health care patient profiles. An empirical analysis is provided from archival data for a home infusion company servicing patients in urban and rural areas. The results are provided as a 2 x 2 matrix for patients in urban and rural areas seeing either a specialist or primary care physicians. A series of moderated regressions indicate that type of treating physician, patient's gender, geographic residence and level of acuity are cogent in predicting the complexity of prescribed infusion therapies. Managerial implications are provided for the home care marketer in segmenting patient markets for infusion services. PMID:10538737

  19. Purpura and leukopenia in a cocaine user.

    PubMed

    Dezman, Zachary; Rimi, Barbara; McClain, Joshua

    2016-08-01

    A previously healthy 42-year-old woman presented to the emergency department (ED) for arthralgias and painful lesions on her ears, feet, and knee (Figures 1 and 2) that had developed over the last month. She had no significant past medical history and was not taking any prescribed medications. The rash was purpuric with violaceous borders and hemorrhagic bullae. While she had mild pain with movement, her joint examination was otherwise normal and without signs of infection. ED laboratory testing revealed leukopenia (2500/mm(3)) and cocaine metabolites in her urine. PMID:27174436

  20. The NASA SARP Software Research Infusion Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Mike; Pressburger, Tom; Markosian, Lawrence; Feather, Martin

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the NASA Software Assurance Research Program (SARP) research infusion projects is shown. The topics include: 1) Background/Motivation; 2) Proposal Solicitation Process; 3) Proposal Evaluation Process; 4) Overview of Some Projects to Date; and 5) Lessons Learned.

  1. A Telecommunications-Infused Community Action Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, Thomas; Puma, Jessica

    1996-01-01

    The Nonprofit Prophets, a telecommunications-infused community action project, was designed for high school students. Students were teamed with a nonprofit organization and produced videoconferences or Web sites for them. Although specific skills were acquired, students also gained confidence and self-esteem as well as a belief that they…

  2. Infusing Earth Systems Concepts throughout the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Boyd, Sally

    The Program for Leadership in Earth Systems Education (PLESE), a teacher enhancement program sponsored by the National Science Foundation in 1990-94, was a coordinated effort to infuse Earth Systems concepts throughout the K-12 science curriculum across the United States. Characteristics of the program are reviewed in this paper and the results of…

  3. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 1b

    PubMed Central

    Cassano-Piché, A; Fan, M; Sabovitch, S; Masino, C; Easty, AC

    2012-01-01

    Background Minimal research has been conducted into the potential patient safety issues related to administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient. Previous research has highlighted that there are a number of related safety risks. In Phase 1a of this study, an analysis of 2 national incident-reporting databases (Institute for Safe Medical Practices Canada and United States Food and Drug Administration MAUDE) found that a high percentage of incidents associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions resulted in patient harm. Objectives The primary objectives of Phase 1b of this study were to identify safety issues with the potential to cause patient harm stemming from the administration of multiple IV infusions; and to identify how nurses are being educated on key principles required to safely administer multiple IV infusions. Data Sources and Review Methods A field study was conducted at 12 hospital clinical units (sites) across Ontario, and telephone interviews were conducted with program coordinators or instructors from both the Ontario baccalaureate nursing degree programs and the Ontario postgraduate Critical Care Nursing Certificate programs. Data were analyzed using Rasmussen’s 1997 Risk Management Framework and a Health Care Failure Modes and Effects Analysis. Results Twenty-two primary patient safety issues were identified with the potential to directly cause patient harm. Seventeen of these (critical issues) were categorized into 6 themes. A cause-consequence tree was established to outline all possible contributing factors for each critical issue. Clinical recommendations were identified for immediate distribution to, and implementation by, Ontario hospitals. Future investigation efforts were planned for Phase 2 of the study. Limitations This exploratory field study identifies the potential for errors, but does not describe the direct observation of such errors, except in a few cases where errors were observed. Not all

  4. 21 CFR 526.1590 - Novobiocin infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... strains of Staphylococcus aureus. (iii) Limitations. Do not milk for at least 6 hours after treatment... is used in dry cows for the treatment of mastitis caused by susceptible strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae. (iii) Limitations. Infuse each quarter at the time of drying...

  5. Infusing Catholic Identity throughout the Campus Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Amata

    2011-01-01

    This article, originally presented as a plenary address at the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities 2011 Annual Meeting, addresses a bottom-up methodology for infusing the spirit of Catholic identity more deeply throughout a campus community. The author begins with an exploration of some theoretical underpinnings of this approach and…

  6. Cocaine-induced psychotic symptoms in clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Moragues, Esperanza; Araos Gómez, Pedro; González-Saiz, Francisco; Rodríguez-Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-06-30

    Cocaine use is significantly associated with psychiatric co-morbidities of which psychotic symptoms are the most typical. The primary goal of this study is to estimate the life-time prevalence of cocaine-induced psychotic symptoms (CIPS) in a sample of patients without a history of primary psychosis, who attended specific out-patient drug-dependence treatment centres (ODDTCs). This is an observational, cross-sectional design and a consecutive sampling technique. The Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms-Cocaine Induced Psychosis (SAPS-CIP) was used to interview 114 patients who request treatment at specific ODDTCs for problems related to cocaine use. Most patients, 89.5% (95% CIs: 83.8-95.2%) had dependence of cocaine and 84.2% (95% CIs: 77.5-90.9%) showed at least one CIPS. Patients with CIPS had used cocaine more times throughout their lives and had a more frequency of use during the period of higher abuse severity in the last year, had higher severity of dependence score and had fewer abstinence periods greater than 30 days compared with those without CIPS. Cocaine dependency severity scale scores were significantly greater in patients with CIPS compared with those without CIPS. PMID:24679995

  7. Changes in rat frontal cortex gene expression following chronic cocaine.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Willard M; Brebner, Karen; Lynch, Wendy J; Patel, Kruti M; Robertson, Daniel J; Roberts, David C S; Vrana, Kent E

    2002-07-15

    Alterations in gene expression caused by repeated cocaine administration have been implicated in the long-term behavioral aspects of cocaine abuse. The frontal cortex mediates reinforcement, sensory, associative, and executive functions and plays an important role in the mesocortical dopamine reinforcement system. Repeated cocaine administration causes changes in frontal cortex gene expression that may lead to changes in the behaviors subserved by this brain region. Rats treated non-contingently with a binge model of cocaine (45 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 14 days were screened for changes in relative mRNA abundance in the frontal cortex by cDNA hybridization arrays. To confirm changes, immunoreactive protein was measured (via protein-specific immunoblots) in a second group of identically-treated animals. Protein levels of protein tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2), activity-regulated cytoskeletal protein (ARC), as well as an antigen related to nerve growth factor I-B (NGFI-B-RA) were shown to be significantly induced after cocaine administration. Levels of NGFI-B mRNA were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR to be increased with cocaine administration. These observations are similar to previously reported cocaine-responsive changes in gene expression but novel to the frontal cortex. This study also validates the use of hybridization arrays for screening of neuronal gene expression changes and the utility of relative protein quantification as a post-hoc confirmation tool. PMID:12117546

  8. Cocaine induction of dopamine transporter trafficking to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Little, Karley Y; Elmer, Lawrence W; Zhong, Huailing; Scheys, Joshua O; Zhang, Lian

    2002-02-01

    Several previous human postmortem experiments have detected an increase in striatal [(3)H]WIN 35428 binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT) in chronic cocaine users. However, animal experiments have found considerable variability in DAT radioligand binding levels in brain after cocaine administration, perhaps caused by length and dose of treatment and type of radioligand used. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that [(3)H]WIN 35428 binding and [(3)H]dopamine uptake would be increased by exposure to cocaine through alterations in DAT cellular trafficking, rather than increased protein synthesis. Experiments were conducted in stably hDAT-transfected N2A cells and assessed the dose response and time course of cocaine effects on [(3)H]WIN 35428 binding to the DAT, [(3)H]dopamine uptake, measures of DAT protein and mRNA, as well as DAT subcellular location. Cocaine doses of 10(-6) M caused statistically significant increases in [(3)H]WIN 35428 binding and [(3)H]dopamine uptake after 12 and 3 h, respectively. Despite these increases in DAT function, there was no change in DAT total protein or mRNA. Immunofluorescence and biotinylation experiments indicated that cocaine treatment induced increases in plasma membrane DAT immunoreactivity and intracellular decreases. The present model system may further our understanding of regulatory alterations in DAT radioligand binding and function caused by cocaine exposure. PMID:11809869

  9. Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to chronic cocaine abuse: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cocaine is a potent sympathomimetic agent associated with the development of possible fatal cardiovascular complications. Dysrhythmias, acute myocardial infarction, hypertension and dilated cardiomyopathy are just some of many cardiovascular effects related to the abuse of cocaine. Case presentation A 38-year-old Hispanic male with a past medical history of hypertension presented with a chief complaint of progressive shortness of breath. The patient confessed to the use of cocaine for almost 18 years once per week. On examination he was hypertensive and tachycardic with a systolic murmur over the 5th intercostal space at the level of the left mid-clavicular line. Laboratory workup revealed an elevated Brain natriuretic peptide; urine toxicology was positive for cocaine. 2D-echocardiogram showed dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac catheterization excluded angioischemic cause. He was managed medically and subsequently discharged with drug rehabilitation. On follow-up diagnostic evaluation after 5 months of cocaine cessation, his ejection function improved significantly. Conclusion The exact incidence of cocaine related cardiomyopathy is unknown and likely underreported. The clinical course is abrupt and comparatively similar to other types of cardiomyopathy. The management is like other forms of cardiomyopathy; however β-blockers should be avoided. The myocardial dysfunction is reversible with abstaining from additional cocaine ingestion. Non-invasive testing should be performed after several months to re-evaluate the treatment response. PMID:24341463

  10. Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Nance, Mark R.; Gao, Daquan; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Macdonald, Joanne; Tamburi, Patricia; Yoon, Dan; Landry, Donald M.; Woods, James H.; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K.

    2010-09-03

    Cocaine is considered to be the most addictive of all substances of abuse and mediates its effects by inhibiting monoamine transporters, primarily the dopamine transporters. There are currently no small molecules that can be used to combat its toxic and addictive properties, in part because of the difficulty of developing compounds that inhibit cocaine binding without having intrinsic effects on dopamine transport. Most of the effective cocaine inhibitors also display addictive properties. We have recently reported the use of cocaine esterase (CocE) to accelerate the removal of systemic cocaine and to prevent cocaine-induced lethality. However, wild-type CocE is relatively unstable at physiological temperatures ({tau}{sub 1/2} {approx} 13 min at 37 C), presenting challenges for its development as a viable therapeutic agent. We applied computational approaches to predict mutations to stabilize CocE and showed that several of these have increased stability both in vitro and in vivo, with the most efficacious mutant (T172R/G173Q) extending half-life up to 370 min. Here we present novel X-ray crystallographic data on these mutants that provide a plausible model for the observed enhanced stability. We also more extensively characterize the previously reported variants and report on a new stabilizing mutant, L169K. The improved stability of these engineered CocE enzymes will have a profound influence on the use of this protein to combat cocaine-induced toxicity and addiction in humans.

  11. Effects of concurrent use of alcohol and cocaine.

    PubMed

    Pennings, Ed J M; Leccese, Arthur P; Wolff, Frederik A de

    2002-07-01

    The combination of alcohol and cocaine is popular among drug users, perhaps because of more intense feelings of 'high' beyond that perceived with either drug alone, less intense feelings of alcohol-induced inebriation and tempering of discomfort when coming down from a cocaine 'high'. A review is presented of the medical literature on psychological and somatic effects and consequences of combined use of alcohol and cocaine in man. The search was carried out with Medline, the Science Citation Index/Web of Science and Toxline. Exclusion and inclusion criteria for this search are identified. There is generally no evidence that the combination of the two drugs does more than enhance additively the already strong tendency of each drug to induce a variety of physical and psychological disorders. A few exceptions must be noted. Cocaine consistently antagonizes the learning deficits, psychomotor performance deficits and driving deficits induced by alcohol. The combination of alcohol and cocaine tends to have greater-than-additive effects on heart rate, concomitant with up to 30% increased blood cocaine levels. Both prospective and retrospective data further reveal that co-use leads to the formation of cocaethylene, which may potentiate the cardiotoxic effects of cocaine or alcohol alone. More importantly, retrospective data suggest that the combination can potentiate the tendency towards violent thoughts and threats, which may lead to an increase of violent behaviours. PMID:12133112

  12. Selective neuronal toxicity of cocaine in embryonic mouse brain cocultures.

    PubMed Central

    Nassogne, M C; Evrard, P; Courtoy, P J

    1995-01-01

    Cocaine exposure in utero causes severe alterations in the development of the central nervous system. To study the basis of these teratogenic effects in vitro, we have used cocultures of neurons and glial cells from mouse embryonic brain. Cocaine selectively affected embryonic neuronal cells, causing first a dramatic reduction of both number and length of neurites and then extensive neuronal death. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated a shift from a multipolar neuronal pattern towards bi- and unipolarity prior to the rounding up and eventual disappearance of the neurons. Selective toxicity of cocaine on neurons was paralleled by a concomitant decrease of the culture content in microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), a neuronal marker measured by solid-phase immunoassay. These effects on neurons were reversible when cocaine was removed from the culture medium. In contrast, cocaine did not affect astroglial cells and their glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) content. Thus, in embryonic neuronal-glial cell cocultures, cocaine induces major neurite perturbations followed by neuronal death without affecting the survival of glial cells. Provided similar neuronal alterations are produced in the developing human brain, they could account for the qualitative or quantitative defects in neuronal pathways that cause a major handicap in brain function following in utero exposure to cocaine. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:7479930

  13. Individual differences in cocaine addiction: maladaptive behavioural traits.

    PubMed

    Homberg, Judith R; Karel, Peter; Verheij, Michel M M

    2014-07-01

    Cocaine use leads to addiction in only a subset of individuals. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these individual differences in the transition from cocaine use to cocaine abuse is important to develop treatment strategies. There is agreement that specific behavioural traits increase the risk for addiction. As such, both high impulsivity and high anxiety have been reported to predict (compulsive) cocaine self-administration behaviour. Here, we set out a new view explaining how these two behavioural traits may affect addictive behaviour. According to psychological and psychiatric evolutionary views, organisms flourish well when they fit (match) their environment by trait and genotype. However, under non-fit conditions, the need to compensate the failure to deal with this environment increases, and, as a consequence, the functional use of rewarding drugs like cocaine may also increase. It suggests that neither impulsivity nor anxiety are bad per se, but that the increased risk to develop cocaine addiction is dependent on whether behavioural traits are adaptive or maladaptive in the environment to which the animals are exposed. This 'behavioural (mal)adaptation view' on individual differences in vulnerability to cocaine addiction may help to improve therapies for addiction. PMID:24835358

  14. Cocaine during pregnancy: a critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Offidani, C; Pomini, F; Caruso, A; Ferrazzani, S; Chiarotti, M; Fiori, A

    1995-09-01

    A number of epidemiological indices suggest that the use of cocaine in Italy is increasing, thus explaining the importance of scientific interest in this field. There is considerable disparity between the scientific papers published in the literature concerning the damaging effects on fetus and mother linked to the use of cocaine during pregnancy. The main problem consists of the method used to identify those patients using cocaine. These methods are burdened by a high level of false negatives: subjects who often use a variety of active pharmacological substances are identified and the methods are not always suitable for classifying subjects according to useful clinical parameters. This is reflected in the poor quality of data concerning the epidemiology and clinical aspects of cocaine abuse during pregnancy. A careful selection of the best scientific papers published in the literature shows that the effects on the maternal organism are slight, whereas those on the fetus are more severe. Compared to controls, the use of cocaine is associated with a high percentage of cardiac malformations, preterm delivery, low birth weight and minor anomalies of the nervous system. Results relating to sudden neonatal death are discordant. This paper shows that the use of cocaine is often underestimated both in epidemiological terms and from the fetal point of view. This behaviour is linked to the belief that the effects of cocaine are benign. PMID:8545039

  15. Spatiotemporal analysis of Fos expression associated with cocaine- and PTZ-induced seizures in prenatally cocaine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Snyder-Keller, A; Keller, R W

    2001-07-01

    We previously reported that prenatal cocaine exposure (40 mg/kg s.c., E10-E20) increased susceptibility to convulsant-induced seizures later in life, with female rats becoming more sensitive to seizures induced by cocaine and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), and males more sensitive to PTZ-induced seizures (Snyder-Keller and Keller, 1995, 2000). In order to determine the locus of enhanced seizure susceptibility in the brains of prenatally cocaine-treated rats, we examined the distribution and density of Fos-immunoreactive cells after cocaine- and PTZ-induced seizures in mature rats. Subconvulsive cocaine doses induced c-fos in cortical areas as well as densely dopamine-innervated regions such as striatum and nucleus accumbens. Following cocaine-induced seizures, intense c-fos induction was observed in piriform cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus. Quantification of the number of Fos-immunoreactive cells in the brains of prenatally cocaine-treated versus prenatally saline-treated rats revealed differences in piriform cortex and amygdala that were indicative of a lower threshold in prenatally cocaine-treated female rats. Following PTZ-induced seizures, the same pattern of limbic structures were recruited with increasing seizure severity. Only females exhibited changes in the number of Fos-immunoreactive cells as a result of prenatal cocaine treatment. Pretreatment with the noncompetitive NMDA antagonist MK-801 blocked both cocaine- and PTZ-induced seizures, and Fos expression in limbic areas was also blocked. The dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 blocked cocaine-induced seizures and associated c-fos induction, but not PTZ-induced seizures or Fos. Examination of the pattern of Fos expression at 15-20 min postseizure revealed that the initial site of c-fos induction associated with PTZ-induced seizures appeared to be the piriform cortex, whereas cocaine-induced seizures induced early expression in both piriform cortex and lateral amygdala. These findings suggest that neural

  16. Neurodevelopment of adopted children exposed in utero to cocaine.

    PubMed Central

    Nulman, I; Rovet, J; Altmann, D; Bradley, C; Einarson, T; Koren, G

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the neurodevelopment of adopted children who had been exposed in utero to cocaine. DESIGN: A case-control observational study. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-three children aged 14 months to 6.5 years exposed in utero to cocaine and their adoptive mothers, and 23 age-matched control children not exposed to cocaine and their mothers, matched with the adoptive mothers for IQ and socioeconomic status. SETTING: The Motherisk Programme at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, a consultation service for chemical exposure during pregnancy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Height, weight and head circumference at birth and at follow-up, and achievement on standard tests of cognitive and language development. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, children exposed in utero to cocaine had an 8-fold increased risk for microcephaly (95% confidence interval 1.5 to 42.3); they also had a lower mean birth weight (p = 0.005) and a lower gestational age (p = 0.002). In follow-up the cocaine-exposed children caught up with the control subjects in weight and stature but not in head circumference (mean 31st percentile v. 63rd percentile) (p = 0.001). Although there were no significant differences between the two groups in global IQ, the cocaine-exposed children had significantly lower scores than the control subjects on the Reynell language test for both verbal comprehension (p = 0.003) and expressive language (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to document that intrauterine exposure to cocaine is associated with measurable and clinically significant toxic neurologic effects, independent of postnatal home and environmental confounders. Because women who use cocaine during pregnancy almost invariably smoke cigarettes and often use alcohol, it is impossible to attribute the measured toxic effects to cocaine alone. PMID:7954158

  17. Neonatal fibroblast growth factor treatment enhances cocaine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Sarah M; Turner, Cortney A; Flagel, Shelly B; Simpson, Danielle N; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda

    2012-11-01

    Growth factors are critical in neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity, and recent studies point to their involvement in addiction. We previously reported increased levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) in high novelty/drug-seeking rats (bred high responders, bHR) compared to low novelty/drug-seeking rats(bred low responders, bLRs). The present study asked whether an early life manipulation of the FGF system(a single FGF2 injection on postnatal day 2) can impact cocaine sensitization and associated neurobiological markers in adult bHR/bLR animals. Neonatal FGF2- and vehicle-treated bHR/bLR rats were sensitized to cocaine(7 daily injections, 15 mg/kg/day, i.p.) in adulthood. Neonatal FGF2 markedly increased bLRs' typically low psychomotor sensitization to cocaine (day 7 locomotor response to cocaine), but had little effect on bHRs' cocaine sensitization. Gene expression studies examined dopaminergic molecules as well as FGF2 and the FGFR1 receptor in cocaine naïve animals, to investigate possible neurobiological alterations induced by neonatal FGF2 exposure that may influence behavioral response to cocaine. bLRs showed decreased tyrosine hydroxylase in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), decreased D1 and increased D2 receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as decreased FGF2 in the VTA, substantia nigra, accumbens core, and caudate putamen compared to bHRs. Neonatal FGF2 selectively increased D1 receptor and FGF2 mRNA in the accumbens core of bLRs, which may contribute to their heightened cocaine sensitization. Our results suggest increased FGF2 in the mesodopaminergic circuit (as in baseline bHRs and neonatal FGF2-exposed bLRs vs. baseline bLRs) enhances an individual's susceptibility to cocaine sensitization and may increase vulnerability to drug seeking and addiction. PMID:22819969

  18. Neonatal Fibroblast Growth Factor Treatment Enhances Cocaine Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, Sarah M.; Turner, Cortney A.; Flagel, Shelly B.; Simpson, Danielle N.; Watson, Stanley J.; Akil, Huda

    2012-01-01

    Growth factors are critical in neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity, and recent studies point to their involvement in addiction. We previously reported increased levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) in high novelty/drug-seeking rats (bred High Responders, bHR) compared to low novelty/drug-seeking rats (bred Low Responders, bLRs). The present study asked whether an early life manipulation of the FGF system (a single FGF2 injection on postnatal day 2) can impact cocaine sensitization and associated neurobiological markers in adult bHR/bLR animals. Neonatal FGF2- and vehicle-treated bHR/bLR rats were sensitized to cocaine (7 daily injections, 15 mg/kg/day, i.p.) in adulthood. Neonatal FGF2 markedly increased bLRs’ typically low psychomotor sensitization to cocaine (day 7 locomotor response to cocaine), but had little effect on bHRs’ cocaine sensitization. Gene expression studies examined dopaminergic molecules as well as FGF2 and the FGFR1 receptor in cocaine naïve animals, to investigate possible neurobiological alterations induced by neonatal FGF2 exposure that may influence behavioral response to cocaine. bLRs showed decreased tyrosine hydroxylase in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), decreased D1 and increased D2 receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as decreased FGF2 in the VTA, substantia nigra, accumbens core, and caudate putamen compared to bHRs. Neonatal FGF2 selectively increased D1 receptor and FGF2 mRNA in the accumbens core of bLRs, which may contribute to their heightened cocaine sensitization. Our results suggest increased FGF2 in the mesodopaminergic circuit (as in baseline bHRs and neonatal FGF2-exposed bLRs vs. baseline bLRs) enhances an individual’s susceptibility to cocaine sensitization and may increase vulnerability to drug seeking and addiction. PMID:22819969

  19. Histone arginine methylation in cocaine action in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Damez-Werno, Diane M; Sun, HaoSheng; Scobie, Kimberly N; Shao, Ningyi; Rabkin, Jaclyn; Dias, Caroline; Calipari, Erin S; Maze, Ian; Pena, Catherine J; Walker, Deena M; Cahill, Michael E; Chandra, Ramesh; Gancarz, Amy; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Landry, Joseph A; Cates, Hannah; Lobo, Mary-Kay; Dietz, David; Allis, C David; Guccione, Ernesto; Turecki, Gustavo; Defilippi, Paola; Neve, Rachael L; Hurd, Yasmin L; Shen, Li; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-08-23

    Repeated cocaine exposure regulates transcriptional regulation within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), and epigenetic mechanisms-such as histone acetylation and methylation on Lys residues-have been linked to these lasting actions of cocaine. In contrast to Lys methylation, the role of histone Arg (R) methylation remains underexplored in addiction models. Here we show that protein-R-methyltransferase-6 (PRMT6) and its associated histone mark, asymmetric dimethylation of R2 on histone H3 (H3R2me2a), are decreased in the NAc of mice and rats after repeated cocaine exposure, including self-administration, and in the NAc of cocaine-addicted humans. Such PRMT6 down-regulation occurs selectively in NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) expressing dopamine D2 receptors (D2-MSNs), with opposite regulation occurring in D1-MSNs, and serves to protect against cocaine-induced addictive-like behavioral abnormalities. Using ChIP-seq, we identified Src kinase signaling inhibitor 1 (Srcin1; also referred to as p140Cap) as a key gene target for reduced H3R2me2a binding, and found that consequent Srcin1 induction in the NAc decreases Src signaling, cocaine reward, and the motivation to self-administer cocaine. Taken together, these findings suggest that suppression of Src signaling in NAc D2-MSNs, via PRMT6 and H3R2me2a down-regulation, functions as a homeostatic brake to restrain cocaine action, and provide novel candidates for the development of treatments for cocaine addiction. PMID:27506785

  20. Covalent thiol adducts arising from reactive intermediates of cocaine biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Kevin J; DeCaprio, Anthony P

    2013-11-18

    Exposure to cocaine results in the depletion of hepatocellular glutathione and macromolecular protein binding in humans. Such cocaine-induced responses have generally been attributed to oxidative stress and reactive metabolites resulting from oxidative activation of the cocaine tropane nitrogen. However, little conclusive data exists on the mechanistic pathways leading to protein modification or the structure and specificity of cocaine-derived adduction products. We now report a previously uncharacterized route of cocaine bioactivation leading to the covalent adduction of biological thiols, including cysteine and glutathione. Incubation of cocaine with biological nucleophiles in an in vitro biotransformation system containing human liver microsomes identified a monooxygenase-mediated event leading to the oxidation of, and subsequent sulfhydryl addition to, the cocaine aryl moiety. Adduct structures were confirmed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution, high mass accuracy mass spectrometry. Examination of assays containing transgenic bactosomes expressing single human cytochrome P450 isoforms determined the role of P450s 1A2, 2C19, and 2D6 in the oxidation process resulting in adduct formation. P450-catalyzed aryl epoxide formation and subsequent attack by free nucleophilic moieties is consistent with the resulting adduct structures, mechanisms of formation, and the empirical observation of multiple structural and stereo isomers. Analogous adduction mechanisms were maintained across all sulfhydryl-containing nucleophile models examined; N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, and a synthetic cysteine-containing hexapeptide. Predictive in silico calculations of molecular reactivity and electrophilicity/nucleophilicity were compared to the results of in vitro assay incubations in order to better understand the adduction process using the principles of hard and soft acid and base (HSAB) theory. This study elucidated a novel metabolic

  1. Reduced Interhemispheric Resting State Functional Connectivity in Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Clare; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Gotimer, Kristin; Cox, Christine; Lynch, Lauren; Brock, Dylan; Imperati, Davide; Garavan, Hugh; Rotrosen, John; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Milham, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Models of cocaine addiction emphasize the role of disrupted frontal circuitry supporting cognitive control processes. Yet, addiction-related alterations in functional interactions among brain regions, especially between the cerebral hemispheres, are rarely examined directly. Resting state fMRI approaches, which reveal patterns of coherent spontaneous fluctuations in the fMRI signal, offer a means to directly quantify functional interactions between the hemispheres. We examined interhemispheric resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) in cocaine dependence using a recently validated approach named “voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity.” Methods We compared interhemispheric RSFC between 25 adults (aged 35.0±8.8) meeting DSM-IV criteria for cocaine dependence within the past 12 months, but currently abstaining (>2 weeks) from cocaine, and 24 healthy comparisons (35.1±7.5), group-matched on age, sex, education and employment status. Results We observed reduced prefrontal interhemispheric RSFC in cocaine dependent participants relative to controls. Further analyses demonstrated a striking cocaine-dependence-related reduction in interhemispheric RSFC among nodes of the dorsal attention network (DAN), comprising bilateral lateral frontal, medial premotor and posterior parietal areas. Further, within the cocaine-dependent group, RSFC within the DAN was associated with self-reported lapses of attention. Conclusions Our findings provide further evidence of an association between chronic exposure to cocaine and disruptions within large-scale brain circuitry supporting cognitive control. We did not detect group differences in DTI measures, suggesting that alterations in the brain’s functional architecture associated with cocaine exposure can be observed in the absence of detectable abnormalities in the white matter microstructure supporting that architecture. PMID:21251646

  2. Hippocampal neurogenesis protects against cocaine-primed relapse

    PubMed Central

    Deschaux, Olivier; Vendruscolo, Leandro; Schlosburg, Joel; Diaz-Aguilar, Luis; Yuan, Clara J.; Sobieraj, Jeffery C.; George, Olivier; Koob, George F.; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates a functional role for the hippocampus in mediating relapse to cocaine-seeking behavior and extinction-induced inhibition of cocaine seeking, and dentate gyrus neurogenesis in the hippocampus may have a role. Here, we tested the hypothesis that disruption of normal hippocampal activity during extinction alters relapse to cocaine-seeking behavior as a function of dentate gyrus neurogenesis. Adult rats were trained to self-administer cocaine on a fixed-ratio schedule, followed by extinction and cocaine-primed reinstatement testing. Some rats received low frequency stimulation (LFS; 2 Hz for 25 min) after each extinction session in the dorsal or ventral hippocampal formation. All rats received an injection of the mitotic marker 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label developing dentate gyrus neurons during self-administration, as well as before or after extinction and LFS. We found that LFS during extinction did not alter extinction behavior, but enhanced cocaine-primed reinstatement. Cocaine self-administration reduced levels of twenty-four day old BrdU cells and dentate gyrus neurogenesis, which was normalized by extinction. LFS during extinction prevented extinction-induced normalization of dentate gyrus neurogenesis and potentiated cocaine-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. LFS inhibition of extinction-induced neurogenesis was not due to enhanced cell death, revealed by quantification of activated caspase3 labeled cells. These data suggest that LFS during extinction disrupts hippocampal networking via disrupting neurogenesis and also strengthens relapse-like behaviors. Thus, newly born dentate gyrus neurons during withdrawal and extinction learning facilitate hippocampal networking that mediates extinction-induced inhibition of cocaine seeking and may play a key role in preventing relapse. PMID:23278919

  3. Propofol Infusion Syndrome in Refractory Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Woo Sub; Gwak, Hye Min; Seo, Dae-Won

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Propofol is used for treating refractory status epilepticus, which has high rate of mortality. Propofol infusion syndrome is a rare but often fatal syndrome, characterized by lactic acidosis, lipidemia, and cardiac failure, associated with propofol infusion over prolonged periods of time. We investigated the clinical factors that characterize propofol infusion syndrome to know the risk of them in refractory status epilepticus. Methods: This retrospective observation study was conducted in Samsung medical center from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2009. Thirty two patients (19 males, 13 females, aged between 16 and 64 years), with refractory status epilepsy were included. Their clinical findings and treatment outcomes were evaluated retrospectively. We divided our patients into established status epilepticus (ESE) and refractory status epilepticus (RSE). And then the patients with RSE was further subdivided into propofol treatment group (RSE-P) and the other anesthetics treatment group (RSE-O). We analyzed the clinical characteristics by comparison of the groups. Results: There were significant differences of hypotension and lipid change between ESE and RSE (p<0.05). However, there was no significant difference between RSE-P and RSE-O groups. The hospital days were longer in RSE than in ESE (p=0.012) and treatment outcome was also worse in RSE than in ESE (p=0.007) but there were no significant differences of hospital stays and treatment outcome between RSE-P and RSE-O. Conclusions: RSE is very critical disease with high mortality, which may show as many clinical changes as propofol infusion syndrome. Therefore propofol infusion syndrome might be considered as one of the clinical manifestations of RSE. PMID:24649467

  4. Infusion fluids contain harmful glucose degradation products

    PubMed Central

    Bryland, Anna; Broman, Marcus; Erixon, Martin; Klarin, Bengt; Lindén, Torbjörn; Friberg, Hans; Wieslander, Anders; Kjellstrand, Per; Ronco, Claudio; Carlsson, Ola

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Glucose degradation products (GDPs) are precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that cause cellular damage and inflammation. We examined the content of GDPs in commercially available glucose-containing infusion fluids and investigated whether GDPs are found in patients’ blood. Methods The content of GDPs was examined in infusion fluids by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. To investigate whether GDPs also are found in patients, we included 11 patients who received glucose fluids (standard group) during and after their surgery and 11 control patients receiving buffered saline (control group). Blood samples were analyzed for GDP content and carboxymethyllysine (CML), as a measure of AGE formation. The influence of heat-sterilized fluids on cell viability and cell function upon infection was investigated. Results All investigated fluids contained high concentrations of GDPs, such as 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG). Serum concentration of 3-DG increased rapidly by a factor of eight in patients receiving standard therapy. Serum CML levels increased significantly and showed linear correlation with the amount of infused 3-DG. There was no increase in serum 3-DG or CML concentrations in the control group. The concentration of GDPs in most of the tested fluids damaged neutrophils, reducing their cytokine secretion, and inhibited microbial killing. Conclusions These findings indicate that normal standard fluid therapy involves unwanted infusion of GDPs. Reduction of the content of GDPs in commonly used infusion fluids may improve cell function, and possibly also organ function, in intensive-care patients. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-010-1873-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20397009

  5. Intravenous infusions in chronic pain management.

    PubMed

    Kosharskyy, Boleslav; Almonte, Wilson; Shaparin, Naum; Pappagallo, Marco; Smith, Howard

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, millions of Americans are affected by chronic pain, which adds heavily to national rates of morbidity, mortality, and disability, with an ever-increasing prevalence. According to a 2011 report titled Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, pain not only exacts its toll on people's lives but also on the economy with an estimated annual economic cost of at least $560 - 635 billion in health care costs and the cost of lost productivity attributed to chronic pain. Intravenous infusions of certain pharmacologic agents have been known to provide substantial pain relief in patients with various chronic painful conditions. Some of these infusions are better, and although not necessarily the first therapeutic choice, have been widely used and extensively studied. The others show promise, however are in need of further investigations. This article will focus on non-opiate intravenous infusions that have been utilized for chronic painful disorders such as fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain, phantom limb pain, post-herpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS), diabetic neuropathy, and central pain related to stroke or spinal cord injuries. The management of patients with chronic pain conditions is challenging and continues to evolve as new treatment modalities are explored and tested. The following intravenous infusions used to treat the aforementioned chronic pain conditions will be reviewed: lidocaine, ketamine, phentolamine, dexmedetomidine, and bisphosphonates. This overview is intended to familiarize the practitioner with the variety of infusions for patients with chronic pain. It will not, however, be able to provide guidelines for their use due to the lack of sufficient evidence. PMID:23703410

  6. Early adolescent cocaine use as determined by hair analysis in a prenatal cocaine exposure cohort

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Tamara Duckworth; Behnke, Marylou; Eyler, Fonda Davis; Szabo, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Preclinical and other research suggest that youth with prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) may be at high risk for cocaine use due to both altered brain development and exposure to unhealthy environments. Methods Participants are early adolescents who were prospectively enrolled in a longitudinal study of PCE prior to or at birth. Hair samples were collected from the youth at ages 10½ and 12½ (N=263). Samples were analyzed for cocaine and its metabolites using ELISA screening with gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) confirmation of positive samples. Statistical analyses included comparisons between the hair-positive and hair-negative groups on risk and protective factors chosen a priori as well as hierarchical logistical regression analyses to predict membership in the hair-positive group. Results Hair samples were positive for cocaine use for 14% (n=36) of the tested cohort. Exactly half of the hair-positive preteens had a history of PCE. Group comparisons revealed that hair-negative youth had significantly higher IQ scores at age 10½; the hair-positive youth had greater availability of cigarettes, alcohol, and other drugs in the home; caregivers with more alcohol problems and depressive symptoms; less nurturing home environments; and less positive attachment to their primary caregivers and peers. The caregivers of the hair-positive preteens reported that the youth displayed more externalizing and social problems, and the hair-positive youth endorsed more experimentation with cigarettes, alcohol, and/or other drugs. Mental health problems, peer drug use, exposure to violence, and neighborhood characteristics did not differ between the groups. Regression analyses showed that the availability of drugs in the home had the greatest predictive value for hair-positive group membership while higher IQ, more nurturing home environments, and positive attachment to caregivers or peers exerted some protective effect. Conclusion The results do not support a

  7. Effects of the kappa opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) on cocaine versus food choice and extended-access cocaine intake in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hutsell, Blake A; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Negus, Sidney Stevens; Banks, Matthew L

    2016-03-01

    The dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system has been implicated as one potential neurobiological modulator of the abuse-related effects of cocaine and as a potential target for medications development. This study determined effects of the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) on cocaine self-administration under a novel procedure that featured two daily components: (1) a 2-hour 'choice' component (9:00-11:00 am) when monkeys could choose between food pellets and cocaine injections (0-0.1 mg/kg per injection, intravenous) and (2) a 20-hour 'extended-access' component (noon to 8:00 am) when cocaine (0.1 mg/kg per injection) was available under a fixed-ratio schedule to promote high daily cocaine intakes. Rhesus monkeys (n = 4) were given 14 days of exposure to the choice + extended-access procedure then treated with nor-BNI (3.2 or 10.0 mg/kg, intramuscular), and cocaine choice and extended-access cocaine intake were evaluated for an additional 14 days. Consistent with previous studies, cocaine maintained both a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice during choice components and a high level of cocaine intake during extended-access components. Neither 3.2 nor 10 mg/kg nor-BNI significantly altered cocaine choice or extended-access cocaine intake. In two additional monkeys, nor-BNI also had no effect on cocaine choice or extended-access cocaine intake when it was administered at the beginning of exposure to the extended-access components. Overall, these results do not support a major role for the dynorphin/KOR system in modulating cocaine self-administration under these conditions in non-human primates nor do they support the clinical utility of KOR antagonists as a pharmacotherapeutic strategy for cocaine addiction. PMID:25581305

  8. A fibre optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. Hien; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Hardwick, S. A.

    2010-09-01

    A fibre-optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine has been developed, based on a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) containing a fluorescein moiety as the signalling group. The fluorescent MIP was formed and covalently attached to the distal end of an optical fibre. The sensor exhibited an increase in fluorescence intensity in response to cocaine in the concentration range of 0 - 500 μM in aqueous acetonitrile mixtures with good reproducibility over 24 h. Selectivity for cocaine over others drugs has also been demonstrated.

  9. Cocaine use and delayed myocardial ischaemia and/or infarction

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Kee Wei; Wood, Alice

    2014-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman was admitted into the coronary care unit following chest pain after using cocaine. She was found to have significant myocardial ischaemia on blood and ECG investigations despite a recent coronary angiogram that had not demonstrated flow-limiting coronary disease. This case report summarises the risks of myocardial ischaemia and/or infarction for patients taking cocaine and the pathophysiology behind it, focusing in particular on the risks of delayed reaction some time after cocaine ingestion. PMID:25201873

  10. The Bermuda Triangle of cocaine-induced neuroadaptations.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marina E

    2010-09-01

    Activation of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens is critical for goal-directed behaviors including cocaine seeking. Studies in cocaine-experienced rodents have revealed three major categories of neuroadaptations that influence the ability of glutamate inputs to activate MSNs: changes in synaptic AMPA receptor levels, changes in extracellular non-synaptic glutamate levels and changes in MSN intrinsic membrane excitability. Most studies have focused on one of these adaptations. This review will consider the possibility that they are causally related and speculate about how time-dependent changes in their interactions may regulate MSN output during early and late withdrawal from repeated cocaine exposure. PMID:20655604

  11. Effect of cocaine and sucrose withdrawal period on extinction behavior, cue-induced reinstatement, and protein levels of the dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase in limbic and cortical areas in rats.

    PubMed

    Grimm, J W; Shaham, Y; Hope, B T

    2002-09-01

    Lever pressing during tests for resistance to extinction and cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking in rats progressively increases over the first 2 months of withdrawal. In the present report, we investigated the generality of these findings in rats trained to self-administer sucrose, a non-drug reinforcer. We also examined whether the time-dependent changes in cocaine seeking correlate with the levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) proteins in the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.5 mg/kg/i.v. infusion) or 10% sucrose (0.2 ml/infusion into a liquid drop receptacle) for 10 days (6 h/day); each reward delivery was paired with a tone+light cue. Tests for cocaine seeking were conducted following 1 or 15 reward-free days. On the test day, rats were initially tested for resistance to extinction during 6-7 60-min extinction sessions in the absence of the tone-light cue, until they reached the extinction criterion of less than 15 responses/60 min. Subsequently, rats were tested for cue-induced reinstatement during a 60-min session in which each lever press led to a contingent presentation of the tone-light cue. Lever pressing during the tests for reward seeking was significantly greater on day 15 than on day 1 following withdrawal from both cocaine and sucrose self-administration training. The levels of DAT, but not TH, were greater in the prefrontal cortex of cocaine-trained rats than in sucrose-trained rats on both days 1 and 15 of withdrawal. The levels of DAT and TH in other brain areas were not altered following withdrawal from cocaine or sucrose self-administration. These data suggest that the withdrawal can modulate reward seeking of both drug and non-drug reinforcers, and that alterations in DAT and TH levels in the brain regions examined do not mediate this effect. PMID:12394414

  12. Delay discounting of cocaine by rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Woolverton, William L; Myerson, Joel; Green, Leonard

    2007-06-01

    The present, subjective value of a reinforcer typically decreases as a function of the delay to its receipt, a phenomenon termed delay discounting. Delay discounting, which is assumed to reflect impulsivity, is hypothesized to play an important role in drug abuse. The present study examined delay discounting of cocaine injections by rhesus monkeys. Subjects were studied on a discrete-trials task in which they chose between 2 doses of cocaine: a smaller, immediate dose and a larger, delayed dose. The immediate dose varied between 0.012 and 0.4 mg/kg/injection, whereas the delayed dose was always 0.2 mg/kg/injection and was delivered after a delay that varied between 0 and 300 s in different conditions. At each delay, the point at which a monkey chose the immediate and delayed doses equally often (i.e., the ED50) provided a measure of the present, subjective value of the delayed dose. Dose-response functions for the immediate dose shifted to the left as delay increased. The amount of the immediate dose predicted to be equal in subjective value to the delayed dose decreased as a function of the delay, and hyperbolic discounting functions provided good fits to the data (median R(2)=.86). The current approach may provide the basis for an animal model of the effect of delay on the subjective value of drugs of abuse. PMID:17563210

  13. Fixed-ratio schedules of cocaine self-administration in rhesus monkeys: joint control of responding by past and upcoming doses.

    PubMed

    Galuska, Chad M; Wade-Galuska, Tammy; Woods, James H; Winger, Gail

    2007-03-01

    By manipulating a signaled upcoming cocaine dose, we investigated how the dose just received and the upcoming dose jointly controlled cocaine self-administration. Three rhesus monkeys self-administered cocaine according to a multiple schedule differing in dose following completion of a fixed-ratio response requirement. The larger dose (0.03 or 0.056 mg/kg) was 10-fold higher than the smaller dose (0.003 or 0.0056 mg/kg). Following each infusion, there was an equal probability that the next dose would be large or small. This resulted in four types of signaled transitions: from a small dose to a small dose, small to large, large to large, and large to small. Across conditions the response requirement was increased. At lower ratios, pauses were brief and run rates were controlled by the upcoming dose. At larger ratios, pauses were pronounced, and run rates suppressed, in transitions from a large to a small dose. The behavioral disruption engendered by this transition occurred with both dose combinations. The results suggest that negative discriminable shifts in drug availability disrupt ongoing responding. PMID:17351424

  14. Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor 1 Is Increased following Abstinence from Cocaine Self-Administration, but Not Cocaine Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Gancarz-Kausch, Amy M.; Schroeder, Gabrielle L.; Panganiban, Clarisse; Adank, Danielle; Humby, Monica S.; Kausch, Michael A.; Clark, Stewart D.; Dietz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The addicted phenotype is characterized as a long-lasting, chronically relapsing disorder that persists following long periods of abstinence, suggesting that the underlying molecular changes are stable and endure for long periods even in the absence of drug. Here, we investigated Transforming Growth Factor-Beta Type I receptor (TGF-β R1) expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following periods of withdrawal from cocaine self-administration (SA) and a sensitizing regimen of non-contingent cocaine. Rats were exposed to either (i) repeated systemic injections (cocaine or saline), or (ii) self-administration (cocaine or saline) and underwent a period of forced abstinence (either 1 or 7 days of drug cessation). Withdrawal from cocaine self-administration resulted in an increase in TGF-β R1 protein expression in the NAc compared to saline controls. This increase was specific for volitional cocaine intake as no change in expression was observed following a sensitizing regimen of experimenter-administered cocaine. These findings implicate TGF-β signaling as a novel potential therapeutic target for treating drug addiction. PMID:24386286

  15. Subcutaneous infusion in palliative care: a focus on the neria soft 90 infusion set.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Janice

    2014-11-01

    Subcutaneous administration of medications and/or fluids can play a crucial part in supporting patients at home and thereby avoiding the need for hospitalisation. It is an area of patient care that has received little attention compared with other types of parenteral therapies. However, it is an effective and safe route for continuous administration for individuals requiring palliative care. Technological advancements have led to improved subcutaneous infusion devices, such as fine-gauge cannulae with integral sharps protection, as well as integral hypoallergenic dressings. These design features not only help to increase patient comfort but also minimise the potential for needlestick injuries, as well as providing the health professional with one sterile package containing all of the components needed to establish subcutaneous infusion. However, technological developments alone are insufficient to improve patient outcomes. Knowledge of the individual patient, together with their diagnosis and intended treatment, will influence the choice of subcutaneous infusion device, with the overall aim of minimising the potential for complications and improving comfort. This paper provides an overview of subcutaneous infusion, including the importance of patient assessment and the education and training needs of health professionals, and then focuses on one specific subcutaneous infusion device: the neria soft 90 infusion set. PMID:25426880

  16. Bradycardia as a Marker of Chronic Cocaine Use: A Novel Cardiovascular Finding.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jyoti; Rathnayaka, Nuvan; Green, Charles; Moeller, F Gerard; Schmitz, Joy M; Shoham, Daniel; Dougherty, Anne Hamilton

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of chronic cocaine use on the resting surface electrocardiogram (ECG) between exposures to cocaine. Researchers compared 12-lead ECGs from 97 treatment-seeking cocaine-dependent patients, with ECG parameters from 8,513 non-cocaine-using control patients from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. After matching and adjusting for relevant covariates, cocaine use demonstrated large and statistically reliable effects on early repolarization, bradycardia, severe bradycardia, and heart rate. Current cocaine dependence corresponds to an increased odds of demonstrating early repolarization by a factor of 4.92 and increased odds of bradycardia and severe bradycardia by factors 3.02 and 5.11, respectively. This study demonstrates the novel finding that long-lasting effects of cocaine use on both the cardiac conduction and the autonomic nervous system pose a risk of adverse cardiovascular events between episodes of cocaine use, and that bradycardia is a marker of chronic cocaine use. PMID:24621090

  17. Phase 1 and pharmacokinetic study of bolus-infusion flavopiridol followed by cytosine arabinoside and mitoxantrone for acute leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Smith, B. Douglas; Resar, Linda S.; Greer, Jacqueline M.; Blackford, Amanda; Zhao, Ming; Moton-Nelson, Dwella; Alino, Katrina; Levis, Mark J.; Gore, Steven D.; Joseph, Biju; Carraway, Hetty; McDevitt, Michael A.; Bagain, Lorena; Mackey, Karen; Briel, Janet; Doyle, L. Austin; Wright, John J.; Rudek, Michelle A.

    2011-01-01

    Flavopiridol is a protein bound, cytotoxic, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Flavopiridol given by 1-hour bolus at 50 mg/m2 daily 3 times followed by cytosine arabinoside and mitoxantrone (FLAM) is active in adults with poor-risk acute leukemias. A pharmacologically derived “hybrid” schedule (30-minute bolus followed by 4-hour infusion) of flavopiridol was more effective than bolus administration in refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Our phase 1 trial “hybrid FLAM” in 55 adults with relapsed/refractory acute leukemias began at a total flavopiridol dose of 50 mg/m2 per day 3 times (20-mg/m2 bolus, 30-mg/m2 infusion). Dose-limiting toxicity occurred at level 6 (30-mg/m2 bolus, 70-mg/m2 infusion) with tumor lysis, hyperbilirubinemia, and mucositis. Death occurred in 5 patients (9%). Complete remission occurred in 22 (40%) across all doses. Overall and disease-free survivals for complete remission patients are more than 60% at more than 2 years. Pharmacokinetics demonstrated a dose-response for total and unbound plasma flavopiridol unrelated to total protein, albumin, peripheral blast count, or toxicity. Pharmacodynamically, flavopiridol inhibited mRNAs of multiple cell cycle regulators, but with uniform increases in bcl-2. “Hybrid FLAM” is active in relapsed/refractory acute leukemias, with a recommended “hybrid” dose of bolus 30 mg/m2 followed by infusion of 60 mg/m2 daily for 3 days. This clinical trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00470197. PMID:21239698

  18. Neuroticism Associated with Cocaine-Induced Psychosis in Cocaine-Dependent Patients: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, Carlos; Daigre, Constanza; Barral, Carmen; Ros-Cucurull, Elena; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Tarifa, Nuria; Casas, Miguel; Valero, Sergi

    2014-01-01

    Background Cocaine consumption can induce transient psychotic symptoms, which has been correlated with more severe addiction and aggressive behavior. However, little is known about the nature of the relationship between personality traits and psychotic symptoms in cocaine-dependent patients. This study examined the relationship between neuroticism and cocaine-induced psychosis. Methods A total of 231 cocaine-dependent patients seeking treatment were recruited to the study. Personality was evaluated by the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire. Cocaine-induced psychosis questionnaire, SCID-I, and SCID-II were used to evaluate comorbidity and clinical characteristics. Data analysis was performed in three steps: descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses. Results Cocaine-induced psychosis was reported in 65.4% of the patients and some personality disorder in 46.8%. Two personality dimensions (Neuroticism-Anxiety and Aggression-Hostility) presented a significant effect on the risk of experiencing psychotic symptoms (t(229) = 2.69, p = 0.008; t(229) = 2.06, p = 0.004), and patients with psychotic symptoms showed higher scores in both variables. On the multivariate analysis, only Neuroticism remained as a significant personality factor independently associated with psychotic symptoms (Wald = 7.44, p<0.05, OR = 1.08, CI 95% 1.02–1.16) after controlling for age, gender and number of consumption substances. Conclusions An association between high neuroticism scores and presence of psychotic symptoms induced by cocaine has been found, independently of other consumption variables. Personality dimensions should be evaluated in cocaine-dependent patients in order to detect high scores of neuroticism and warn patients about the risk of developing cocaine-induced psychotic symptoms. PMID:25254365

  19. Lower reinforcing strength of the phenyltropane cocaine analogs RTI-336 and RTI-177 compared to cocaine in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Czoty, Paul W; Martelle, Jennifer L; Carroll, F Ivy; Nader, Michael A

    2010-09-01

    Drugs that inhibit brain dopamine transporters (DAT) have been developed as potential agonist medications for cocaine abuse and dependence. Because the mechanism of action of such drugs is similar to cocaine, one concern regarding their use is the abuse potential of the medications themselves. The present study compared the reinforcing strength of cocaine (0.003-0.3mg/kg) and two 3-phenyltropane analogs of cocaine, RTI-336 (3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)-2beta-[3-(4'-methylphenyl)isoxazol-5-yl]tropane hydrochloride; 0.003-0.1mg/kg) and RTI-177 (3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)-2beta-[3-phenylisoxazol-5-yl]tropane hydrochloride; 0.003-0.1mg/kg), using a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule in rhesus monkeys (n=4). PR schedules of reinforcement are frequently used to measure reinforcing strength of drugs. Earlier research using limited-access conditions reported that cocaine was a stronger reinforcer than either RTI-336 or RTI-177. Because the 3-phenyltropanes have longer durations of action, one purpose of the present study was to examine reinforcing strength using longer experimental sessions. Under these conditions, cocaine functioned as a reinforcer in all monkeys, and RTI-336 and RTI-177 functioned as a reinforcer in three of four subjects. Consistent with their documented slower onset of neurochemical and pharmacological effects, RTI-336 and RTI-177 were weaker reinforcers, resulting in fewer injections than cocaine. On average, the potencies of the two RTI compounds were not different than that of cocaine. These results support the view that slow-onset DA-selective uptake inhibitors have lower abuse liability than cocaine. In addition, the present findings suggest that changes in PR session length can influence potency comparisons between drugs, but not measures of reinforcing strength. PMID:20580733

  20. N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) inhibits intravenous cocaine self-administration and cocaine-enhanced brain-stimulation reward in rats.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Kiyatkin, Michael; Li, Xia; Peng, Xiao-Qing; Wiggins, Armina; Spiller, Krista; Li, Jie; Gardner, Eliot L

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological activation of group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2 and mGlu3) receptors inhibits reward-seeking behavior and/or rewarding efficacy induced by drugs (cocaine, nicotine) or natural rewards (food, sucrose). In the present study, we investigated whether elevation of brain N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), an endogenous group II mGlu receptor agonist, by the NAAG peptidase inhibitor 2-PMPA attenuates cocaine's rewarding effects, as assessed by intravenous cocaine self-administration and intracranial electrical brain-stimulation reward (BSR) in rats. Systemic administration of 2-PMPA (10, 30, 100 mg/kg, i.p.) or intranasal administration of NAAG (100, 300 microg/10 microl/nostril) significantly inhibited