Science.gov

Sample records for 4-hydroxylase gene impact

  1. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase activity-responsive transcription factors: From hydroxylation to gene expression and neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Ambreena; Aminova, Leila R; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2008-01-01

    Most homeostatic processes including gene transcription occur as a result of deviations in physiological tone that threatens the survival of the organism. A prototypical homeostatic stress response includes changes in gene expression following alterations in oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate levels. Each of these cofactors plays an important role in cellular metabolism. Accordingly, a family of enzymes known as the Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (PHD) enzymes are a group of dioxygenases that have evolved to sense changes in 2-oxoglutarate, oxygen and iron via changes in enzyme activity. Indeed, PHDs are a part of an established oxygen sensor system that regulates transcriptional regulation of hypoxia/stress-regulated genes and thus are an important component of events leading to cellular rescue from oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate deprivations. The ability of PHD activity to regulate homeostatic responses to oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate metabolism has led to the development of small molecule inhibitors of the PHDs as a strategy for activating or augmenting cellular stress responses. These small molecules are proving effective in preclinical models of stroke and Parkinson's disease. However the precise protective pathways engaged by PHD inhibition are only beginning to be defined. In the current review, we summarize the role of iron, 2-oxoglutarate and oxygen in the PHD catalyzed hydroxylation reaction and provide a brief discussion of some of the transcription factors that play an effective role in neuroprotection against oxidative stress as a result of changes in PHD activity. PMID:17981760

  2. Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase of sorghum [Sorghum biocolor (L.) Moench] gene SbC4H1 restricts lignin synthesis in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H) is the first hydroxylase enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway, and its content and activity affects the lignin synthesis. In this study, we isolated a C4H gene SbC4H1 from the suppression subtractive hybridization library of brown midrib (bmr) mutants of Sorghum b...

  3. Virus induced gene silencing of three putative prolyl 4-hydroxylases enhances plant growth in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Sedeek, Khalid E M; Raad, Maya; Zaki, Marwa Samir; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis

    2014-07-01

    Proline hydroxylation is a major posttranslational modification of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) that is catalyzed by prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs). HRGPs such as arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) and extensios play significant roles on cell wall structure and function and their implication in cell division and expansion has been reported. We used tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based virus induced gene silencing to investigate the role of three tomato P4Hs, out of ten present in the tomato genome, in growth and development. Eight-days old tomato seedlings were infected with the appropriate TRV vectors and plants were allowed to grow under standard conditions for 6 weeks. Lower P4H mRNA levels were associated with lower hydroxyproline content in root and shoot tissues indicating successful gene silencing. P4H-silenced plants had longer roots and shoots and larger leaves. The increased leaf area can be attributed to increased cell division as indicated by the higher leaf epidermal cell number in SlP4H1- and SlP4H9-silenced plants. In contrast, SlP4H7-silenced plants had larger leaves due to enhanced cell expansion. Western blot analysis revealed that silencing of SlP4H7 and SlP4H9 was associated with reduced levels of JIM8-bound AGP and JIM11-bound extensin epitopes, while silencing of SlP4H1 reduced only the levels of AGP proteins. Collectively these results show that P4Hs have significant and distinct roles in cell division and expansion of tomato leaves. PMID:24803411

  4. No association between schizophrenia and polymorphisms within the genes for debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) and the dopamine transporter (DAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.; Williams, J.; Asherson, P.; McGuffin, P.; Owen, M.

    1995-02-27

    It has been suggested that the cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase, debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase, is involved in the catabolism and processing of neurotransmitters subsequent to their reuptake into target cells. It is also thought to be related to the dopamine transporter that acts to take released dopamine back up into presynaptic terminals. The present study used the association approach to test the hypothesis that mutations in the genes for debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) and the dopamine transporter (DAT) confer susceptibility to schizophrenia. There were no differences in allele or genotype frequencies between patients and controls in the mutations causing the poor metaboliser phenotype in CYP2D6. In addition there was no association found between schizophrenia and a 48 bp repeat within the 3{prime} untranslated region of DAT. 18 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Proline with or without hydroxyproline influences collagen concentration and regulates prolyl 4-hydroxylase α (I) gene expression in juvenile turbo ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaikai; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui; Liufu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yanjiao; Peng, Mo; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary proline (Pro), and Pro and hydroxyproline (Hyp) in combination on the growth performance, total Hyp and collagen concentrations of tissues, and prolyl 4-hydroxylase α(I) (P4H α(I)) gene expression in juvenile turbot feeding high plant protein diets. A diet containing 50% crude protein and 12% crude lipid was formulated as the basal and control, on which other two protein and lipid contents identical experimental diets were formulated by supplementing the basal with either 0.75% Pro (Pro-0.75) or 0.75% Pro and 0.75% Hyp (Pro+Hyp). Four groups of fish in indoor seawater recirculating systems, 35 individuals each, were fed twice a day to apparent satiation for 10 weeks. The results showed that dietary Pro and Hyp supplementation had no significant effect on growth performance and feed utilization of juvenile turbot (P > 0.05). Total Hyp and collagen concentrations in muscle were significantly increased when dietary Pro and Hyp increased (P <0.05), and fish fed diet Pro+Hyp showed significantly higher free Hyp content in plasma than those fed other diets (P <0.05). The expression of P4H a(I) gene in liver and muscle was significantly up regulated in fish fed diet Pro-0.75 in comparison with control (P <0.05); however the gene was significantly down regulated in fish fed diet Pro+Hyp in muscle in comparison with fish fed diet Pro-0.75 (P <0.05). It can be concluded that supplement of crystal L-Pro and L-Hyp to high plant protein diets did not show positive effects on growth performance of juvenile turbot, but enhanced total collagen concentrations in muscle.

  6. Expression analysis of kenaf cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) ortholog during developmental and stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to clone and analyze the expression pattern of a C4H gene encoding cinnamate 4-hydroxylase from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.). A full-length C4H ortholog was cloned using degenerate primers and the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) method. The full-length C4H ortholog...

  7. Down-regulation of p-coumaroyl quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H) and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) genes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway of Eucalyptus urophylla x E. grandis leads to improved sugar release

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sykes, Robert W.; Gjersing, Erica L.; Foutz, Kirk; Rottmann, William H.; Kuhn, Sean A.; Foster, Cliff E.; Ziebell, Angela; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Decker, Stephen R.; Hinchee, Maud A. W.; et al

    2015-08-27

    In this study, lignocellulosic materials provide an attractive replacement for food-based crops used to produce ethanol. Understanding the interactions within the cell wall is vital to overcome the highly recalcitrant nature of biomass. One factor imparting plant cell wall recalcitrance is lignin, which can be manipulated by making changes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway. In this study, eucalyptus down-regulated in expression of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H, EC 1.14.13.11) or p-coumaroyl quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H, EC 1.14.13.36) were evaluated for cell wall composition and reduced recalcitrance.

  8. RNAi down-regulation of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase increases artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ritesh; Vashisth, Divya; Misra, Amita; Akhtar, Md Qussen; Jalil, Syed Uzma; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Rout, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Shasany, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) converts trans-cinnamic acid (CA) to p-coumaric acid (COA) in the phenylpropanoid/lignin biosynthesis pathway. Earlier we reported increased expression of AaCYP71AV1 (an important gene of artemisinin biosynthesis pathway) caused by CA treatment in Artemisia annua. Hence, AaC4H gene was identified, cloned, characterized and silenced in A. annua with the assumption that the elevated internal CA due to knock down may increase the artemisinin yield. Accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid in the plant due to AaC4H knockdown was accompanied with the reduction of p-coumaric acid, total phenolics, anthocyanin, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities but increase in salicylic acid (SA) and artemisinin. Interestingly, feeding trans-cinnamic acid to the RNAi line increased the level of artemisinin along with benzoic (BA) and SA with no effect on the downstream metabolites p-coumaric acid, coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde, whereas p-coumaric acid feeding increased the content of downstream coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde with no effect on BA, SA, trans-cinnamic acid or artemisinin. SA is reported earlier to be inducing the artemisinin yield. This report demonstrates the link between the phenylpropanoid/lignin pathway with artemisinin pathway through SA, triggered by accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid because of the blockage at C4H. PMID:27220407

  9. RNAi down-regulation of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase increases artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ritesh; Vashisth, Divya; Misra, Amita; Akhtar, Md Qussen; Jalil, Syed Uzma; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Rout, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Shasany, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) converts trans-cinnamic acid (CA) to p-coumaric acid (COA) in the phenylpropanoid/lignin biosynthesis pathway. Earlier we reported increased expression of AaCYP71AV1 (an important gene of artemisinin biosynthesis pathway) caused by CA treatment in Artemisia annua. Hence, AaC4H gene was identified, cloned, characterized and silenced in A. annua with the assumption that the elevated internal CA due to knock down may increase the artemisinin yield. Accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid in the plant due to AaC4H knockdown was accompanied with the reduction of p-coumaric acid, total phenolics, anthocyanin, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities but increase in salicylic acid (SA) and artemisinin. Interestingly, feeding trans-cinnamic acid to the RNAi line increased the level of artemisinin along with benzoic (BA) and SA with no effect on the downstream metabolites p-coumaric acid, coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde, whereas p-coumaric acid feeding increased the content of downstream coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde with no effect on BA, SA, trans-cinnamic acid or artemisinin. SA is reported earlier to be inducing the artemisinin yield. This report demonstrates the link between the phenylpropanoid/lignin pathway with artemisinin pathway through SA, triggered by accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid because of the blockage at C4H. PMID:27220407

  10. Selective Inhibition of Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vasta, James D.; Andersen, Kristen A.; Deck, Kathryn M.; Nizzi, Christopher P.; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. Its overproduction is associated with fibrosis and cancer metastasis. The stability of collagen relies on post-translational modifications, the most prevalent being the hydroxylation of collagen strands by collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases (CP4Hs). Catalysis by CP4Hs enlists an iron cofactor to convert proline residues to 4 hydroxyproline residues, which are essential for the conformational stability of mature collagen. Ethyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (EDHB) is commonly used as a “P4H” inhibitor in cells, but suffers from low potency, poor selectivity, and off-target effects that cause iron deficiency. Dicarboxylates of 2,2′-bipyridine are among the most potent known CP4H inhibitors but suffer from a high affinity for free iron. A screen of biheteroaryl compounds revealed that replacing one pyridyl group with a thiazole moiety retains potency and enhances selectivity. A diester of 2 (5-carboxythiazol-2-yl)pyridine-5-carboxylic acid is bioavailable to human cells and inhibits collagen biosynthesis at concentrations that neither cause general toxicity nor disrupt iron homeostasis. These data anoint a potent and selective probe for CP4H and a potential lead for the development of a new class of antifibrotic and antimetastatic agents. PMID:26535807

  11. Down-regulation of p-coumaroyl quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H) and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) genes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway of Eucalyptus urophylla x E. grandis leads to improved sugar release

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, Robert W.; Gjersing, Erica L.; Foutz, Kirk; Rottmann, William H.; Kuhn, Sean A.; Foster, Cliff E.; Ziebell, Angela; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Decker, Stephen R.; Hinchee, Maud A. W.; Davis, Mark F.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, lignocellulosic materials provide an attractive replacement for food-based crops used to produce ethanol. Understanding the interactions within the cell wall is vital to overcome the highly recalcitrant nature of biomass. One factor imparting plant cell wall recalcitrance is lignin, which can be manipulated by making changes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway. In this study, eucalyptus down-regulated in expression of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H, EC 1.14.13.11) or p-coumaroyl quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H, EC 1.14.13.36) were evaluated for cell wall composition and reduced recalcitrance.

  12. Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase expression in Arabidopsis. Regulation in response to development and the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Lelong, D A; Cusumano, J C; Meyer, K; Chapple, C

    1997-01-01

    Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) is the first Cyt P450-dependent monooxygenase of the phenylpropanoid pathway. To study the expression of this gene in Arabidopsis thaliana, a C4H cDNA clone from the Arabidopsis expressed sequence tag database was identified and used to isolate its corresponding genomic clone. The entire C4H coding sequence plus 2.9 kb of its promoter were isolated on a 5.4-kb HindIII fragment of this cosmid. Inspection of the promoter sequence revealed the presence of a number of putative regulatory motifs previously identified in the promoters of other phenylpropanoid pathway genes. The expression of C4H was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization analysis and in transgenic Arabidopsis carrying a C4H-beta-glucuronidase transcriptional fusion. C4H message accumulation was light-dependent, but was detectable even in dark-grown seedlings. Consistent with these data, C4H mRNA was accumulated to light-grown levels in etiolated det1-1 mutant seedlings. C4H is widely expressed in various Arabidopsis tissues, particularly in roots and cells undergoing lignification. The C4H-driven beta-glucuronidase expression accurately reflected the tissue-specificity and wound-inducibility of the C4H promoter indicated by RNA blot hybridization analysis. A modest increase in C4H expression was observed in the tt8 mutant of Arabidopsis. PMID:9085570

  13. miR-190 Enhances HIF-Dependent Responses to Hypoxia in Drosophila by Inhibiting the Prolyl-4-hydroxylase Fatiga

    PubMed Central

    De Lella Ezcurra, Ana Laura; Bertolin, Agustina Paola; Kim, Kevin; Gándara, Lautaro; Luschnig, Stefan; Perrimon, Norbert; Melani, Mariana; Wappner, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Cellular and systemic responses to low oxygen levels are principally mediated by Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs), a family of evolutionary conserved heterodimeric transcription factors, whose alpha- and beta-subunits belong to the bHLH-PAS family. In normoxia, HIFα is hydroxylated by specific prolyl-4-hydroxylases, targeting it for proteasomal degradation, while in hypoxia the activity of these hydroxylases decreases due to low oxygen availability, leading to HIFα accumulation and expression of HIF target genes. To identify microRNAs required for maximal HIF activity, we conducted an overexpression screen in Drosophila melanogaster, evaluating the induction of a HIF transcriptional reporter. miR-190 overexpression enhanced HIF-dependent biological responses, including terminal sprouting of the tracheal system, while in miR-190 loss of function embryos the hypoxic response was impaired. In hypoxic conditions, miR-190 expression was upregulated and required for induction of HIF target genes by directly inhibiting the HIF prolyl-4-hydroxylase Fatiga. Thus, miR-190 is a novel regulator of the hypoxia response that represses the oxygen sensor Fatiga, leading to HIFα stabilization and enhancement of hypoxic responses. PMID:27223464

  14. Chemical Genetics Uncovers Novel Inhibitors of Lignification, Including p-Iodobenzoic Acid Targeting CINNAMATE-4-HYDROXYLASE.

    PubMed

    Van de Wouwer, Dorien; Vanholme, Ruben; Decou, Raphaël; Goeminne, Geert; Audenaert, Dominique; Nguyen, Long; Höfer, René; Pesquet, Edouard; Vanholme, Bartel; Boerjan, Wout

    2016-09-01

    Plant secondary-thickened cell walls are characterized by the presence of lignin, a recalcitrant and hydrophobic polymer that provides mechanical strength and ensures long-distance water transport. Exactly the recalcitrance and hydrophobicity of lignin put a burden on the industrial processing efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass. Both forward and reverse genetic strategies have been used intensively to unravel the molecular mechanism of lignin deposition. As an alternative strategy, we introduce here a forward chemical genetic approach to find candidate inhibitors of lignification. A high-throughput assay to assess lignification in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings was developed and used to screen a 10-k library of structurally diverse, synthetic molecules. Of the 73 compounds that reduced lignin deposition, 39 that had a major impact were retained and classified into five clusters based on the shift they induced in the phenolic profile of Arabidopsis seedlings. One representative compound of each cluster was selected for further lignin-specific assays, leading to the identification of an aromatic compound that is processed in the plant into two fragments, both having inhibitory activity against lignification. One fragment, p-iodobenzoic acid, was further characterized as a new inhibitor of CINNAMATE 4-HYDROXYLASE, a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway synthesizing the building blocks of the lignin polymer. As such, we provide proof of concept of this chemical biology approach to screen for inhibitors of lignification and present a broad array of putative inhibitors of lignin deposition for further characterization. PMID:27485881

  15. Molecular cloning of the. alpha. -subunit of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase: The complete cDNA-derived amino acid sequence and evidence for alternative splicing of RNA transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Helaakoski, T.; Vuori, K.; Myllylae, R.; Kivirikko, K.I.; Pihlajaniemi, T. )

    1989-06-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} tetramer, catalyzes the formation of 4-hydroxyproline in collagens by the hydroxylation of proline residues in peptide linkages. The authors report here on the isolation of cDNA clones encoding the {alpha}-subunit of the enzyme from human tumor HT-1080, placenta, and fibroblast cDNA libraries. Eight overlapping clones covering almost all of the corresponding 3,000-nucleotide mRNA, including all the coding sequences, were characterized. These clones encode a polypeptide of 517 amino acid residues and a signal peptide of 17 amino acids. Previous characterization of cDNA clones for the {beta}-subunit of prolyl 4-hydroxylase has indicated that its C terminus has the amino acid sequence Lys-Asp-Gly-Leu, which, it has been suggested, is necessary for the retention of a polypeptide within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. The {alpha}-subunit does not have this C-terminal sequence, and thus one function of the {beta}-subunit in the prolyl 4-hydroxylase tetramer appears to be to retain the enzyme within this cell organelle. Southern blot analyses of human genomic DNA with a cDNA probe for the {alpha}-subunit suggested the presence of only one gene encoding the two types of mRNA, which appear to result from mutually exclusive alternative splicing of primary transcripts of one gene.

  16. Functional Characterization and Subcellular Localization of Poplar (Populus trichocarpa × Populus deltoides) Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase1

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae Kyun; Mah, Nancy; Ellis, Brian E.; Douglas, Carl J.

    2001-01-01

    Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H), a member of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase superfamily, plays a central role in phenylpropanoid metabolism and lignin biosynthesis and possibly anchors a phenylpropanoid enzyme complex to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). A full-length cDNA encoding C4H was isolated from a hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa × P. deltoides) young leaf cDNA library. RNA-blot analysis detected C4H transcripts in all organs tested, but the gene was most highly expressed in developing xylem. C4H expression was also strongly induced by elicitor-treatment in poplar cell cultures. To verify the catalytic activity of the putative C4H cDNA, two constructs, C4H and C4H fused to the FLAG epitope (C4H::FLAG), were expressed in yeast. Immunoblot analysis showed that C4H was present in the microsomal fraction and microsomal preparations from strains expressing both enzymes efficiently converted cinnamic acid to p-coumaric acid with high specific activities. To investigate the subcellular localization of C4H in vivo, a chimeric C4H-green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was engineered and stably expressed in Arabidopsis. Confocal laser microscopy analysis clearly showed that in Arabidopsis the C4H::GFP chimeric enzyme was localized to the ER. When expressed in yeast, the C4H::GFP fusion enzyme was also active but displayed significantly lower specific activity than either C4H or C4H::FLAG in in vitro and in vivo enzyme assays. These data definitively show that C4H is localized to the ER in planta. PMID:11351095

  17. Increased prolyl 4-hydroxylase expression and differential regulation of hypoxia-inducible factors in the aged rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Ndubuizu, Obinna I.; Chavez, Juan C.; LaManna, Joseph C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are heterodimeric transcription factors that mediate the adaptive response of mammalian cells and tissues to changes in tissue oxygenation. In the present study, we show an age-dependent decline in cortical HIF-1α accumulation and activation of HIF target genes in response to hypoxia. This inducible response is significantly attenuated in the cerebral cortex of 18-mo-old Fischer 344 rat yet virtually absent in the cerebral cortex of 24-mo-old Fischer 344 rat. This attenuated HIF-1α response had no effect on mRNA upregulation of HIF-independent genes in the aged cortex. We have provided evidence that this absent HIF-1α response is directly correlated with an increase in the expression of the HIF regulatory enzyme, prolyl 4-hydroxylase (PHD). In addition, our study shows that cortical HIF-2α expression in senescent normoxic controls is also significantly greater than that of younger normoxic controls, despite no difference in HIF-2α mRNA levels. The posttranslational regulation of HIF-2α under normoxic conditions seems to be attenuated in the aged rat brain, which is an in vivo demonstration of differential regulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α. PMID:19420289

  18. Human Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Is Activated by Ligands for Its Iron Center.

    PubMed

    Vasta, James D; Raines, Ronald T

    2016-06-14

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. The posttranslational hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen contributes greatly to its conformational stability. Deficient hydroxylation is associated with a variety of disease states, including scurvy. The hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen is catalyzed by an Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase (CP4H). CP4H has long been known to suffer oxidative inactivation during catalysis, and the cofactor ascorbate (vitamin C) is required to reactivate the enzyme by reducing its iron center from Fe(III) to Fe(II). Herein, we report on the discovery of the first synthetic activators of CP4H. Specifically, we find that 2,2'-bipyridine-4-carboxylate and 2,2'-bipyridine-5-carboxylate serve as ligands for the iron center in human CP4H that enhance the rate of ascorbate-dependent reactivation. This new mode of CP4H activation is available to other biheteroaryl compounds but does not necessarily extend to other prolyl 4-hydroxylases. As collagen is weakened in many indications, analogous activators of CP4H could have therapeutic benefits. PMID:27183028

  19. Inhibition of HIF-prolyl-4-hydroxylases prevents mitochondrial impairment and cell death in a model of neuronal oxytosis.

    PubMed

    Neitemeier, S; Dolga, A M; Honrath, B; Karuppagounder, S S; Alim, I; Ratan, R R; Culmsee, C

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial impairment induced by oxidative stress is a main characteristic of intrinsic cell death pathways in neurons underlying the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, protection of mitochondrial integrity and function is emerging as a promising strategy to prevent neuronal damage. Here, we show that pharmacological inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-4-hydroxylases (HIF-PHDs) by adaptaquin inhibits lipid peroxidation and fully maintains mitochondrial function as indicated by restored mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, reduced formation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and preserved mitochondrial respiration, thereby protecting neuronal HT-22 cells in a model of glutamate-induced oxytosis. Selective reduction of PHD1 protein using CRISPR/Cas9 technology also reduced both lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial impairment, and attenuated glutamate toxicity in the HT-22 cells. Regulation of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) expression levels and related target genes may mediate these beneficial effects. Overall, these results expose HIF-PHDs as promising targets to protect mitochondria and, thereby, neurons from oxidative cell death. PMID:27148687

  20. Inhibition of HIF-prolyl-4-hydroxylases prevents mitochondrial impairment and cell death in a model of neuronal oxytosis

    PubMed Central

    Neitemeier, S; Dolga, A M; Honrath, B; Karuppagounder, S S; Alim, I; Ratan, R R; Culmsee, C

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial impairment induced by oxidative stress is a main characteristic of intrinsic cell death pathways in neurons underlying the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, protection of mitochondrial integrity and function is emerging as a promising strategy to prevent neuronal damage. Here, we show that pharmacological inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-4-hydroxylases (HIF-PHDs) by adaptaquin inhibits lipid peroxidation and fully maintains mitochondrial function as indicated by restored mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, reduced formation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and preserved mitochondrial respiration, thereby protecting neuronal HT-22 cells in a model of glutamate-induced oxytosis. Selective reduction of PHD1 protein using CRISPR/Cas9 technology also reduced both lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial impairment, and attenuated glutamate toxicity in the HT-22 cells. Regulation of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) expression levels and related target genes may mediate these beneficial effects. Overall, these results expose HIF-PHDs as promising targets to protect mitochondria and, thereby, neurons from oxidative cell death. PMID:27148687

  1. Biphenyl 4-Hydroxylases Involved in Aucuparin Biosynthesis in Rowan and Apple Are Cytochrome P450 736A Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Debabrata; Gaid, Mariam M; Chizzali, Cornelia; Reckwell, Dennis; Kaufholdt, David; Beuerle, Till; Broggini, Giovanni A L; Flachowsky, Henryk; Liu, Benye; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2015-06-01

    Upon pathogen attack, fruit trees such as apple (Malus spp.) and pear (Pyrus spp.) accumulate biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexins, with aucuparin as a major biphenyl compound. 4-Hydroxylation of the biphenyl scaffold, formed by biphenyl synthase (BIS), is catalyzed by a cytochrome P450 (CYP). The biphenyl 4-hydroxylase (B4H) coding sequence of rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) was isolated and functionally expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). SaB4H was named CYP736A107. No catalytic function of CYP736 was known previously. SaB4H exhibited absolute specificity for 3-hydroxy-5-methoxybiphenyl. In rowan cell cultures treated with elicitor from the scab fungus, transient increases in the SaB4H, SaBIS, and phenylalanine ammonia lyase transcript levels preceded phytoalexin accumulation. Transient expression of a carboxyl-terminal reporter gene construct directed SaB4H to the endoplasmic reticulum. A construct lacking the amino-terminal leader and transmembrane domain caused cytoplasmic localization. Functional B4H coding sequences were also isolated from two apple (Malus × domestica) cultivars. The MdB4Hs were named CYP736A163. When stems of cv Golden Delicious were infected with the fire blight bacterium, highest MdB4H transcript levels were observed in the transition zone. In a phylogenetic tree, the three B4Hs were closest to coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylases involved in lignin biosynthesis, suggesting a common ancestor. Coniferaldehyde and related compounds were not converted by SaB4H. PMID:25862456

  2. Biphenyl 4-Hydroxylases Involved in Aucuparin Biosynthesis in Rowan and Apple Are Cytochrome P450 736A Proteins1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kaufholdt, David; Broggini, Giovanni A.L.; Flachowsky, Henryk; Hänsch, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Upon pathogen attack, fruit trees such as apple (Malus spp.) and pear (Pyrus spp.) accumulate biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexins, with aucuparin as a major biphenyl compound. 4-Hydroxylation of the biphenyl scaffold, formed by biphenyl synthase (BIS), is catalyzed by a cytochrome P450 (CYP). The biphenyl 4-hydroxylase (B4H) coding sequence of rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) was isolated and functionally expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). SaB4H was named CYP736A107. No catalytic function of CYP736 was known previously. SaB4H exhibited absolute specificity for 3-hydroxy-5-methoxybiphenyl. In rowan cell cultures treated with elicitor from the scab fungus, transient increases in the SaB4H, SaBIS, and phenylalanine ammonia lyase transcript levels preceded phytoalexin accumulation. Transient expression of a carboxyl-terminal reporter gene construct directed SaB4H to the endoplasmic reticulum. A construct lacking the amino-terminal leader and transmembrane domain caused cytoplasmic localization. Functional B4H coding sequences were also isolated from two apple (Malus × domestica) cultivars. The MdB4Hs were named CYP736A163. When stems of cv Golden Delicious were infected with the fire blight bacterium, highest MdB4H transcript levels were observed in the transition zone. In a phylogenetic tree, the three B4Hs were closest to coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylases involved in lignin biosynthesis, suggesting a common ancestor. Coniferaldehyde and related compounds were not converted by SaB4H. PMID:25862456

  3. Monooxygenase mediating catecholestrogen formation by rat anterior pituitary is an estrogen-4-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Bui, Q D; Weisz, J

    1989-02-01

    Microsomes from rat anterior pituitaries (AP) were incubated with (3H)estradiol under conditions previously shown to support catecholestrogen (CE) formation by placental microsomes via an NADPH- or an organic hydroperoxide-dependent, peroxidatic mechanism. Under conditions optimized for monooxygenase activity (pH 8.0, 5 mM NADPH), 4-hydroxylation predominated (apparent Vmax = 65 pmol and 13 pmol/mg protein/30 min for 4- and 2-hydroxy-E2, respectively). Under conditions optimized for peroxidatic activity (pH 6.0, 50 mM cumene hydroperoxide) 2- and 4-hydroxylated-E2 were produced in similar amounts. Thus in the AP, unlike in other target tissues studied, NADPH-dependent CE synthetase is a 4-hydroxylase and significant 2-hydroxylation occurs only via the peroxidatic mechanism. We propose that 4-hydroxylated CEs, which are both potent, long acting estrogens and catechols, serve as local mediators of actions of phenolic estrogens on the AP. PMID:2536311

  4. Developmental and Light Regulation of Desacetoxyvindoline 4-Hydroxylase in Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don.1

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Flota, Felipe A.; De Luca, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    The expression of desacetoxyvindoline 4-hydroxylase (D4H), which catalyzes the second to the last reaction in vindoline biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus, appears to be under complex, multilevel developmental and light regulation. Developmental studies with etiolated and light-treated seedlings suggested that although light had variable effects on the levels of d4h transcripts, those of D4H protein and enzyme activity could be increased, depending on seedling development, up to 9- and 8-fold, respectively, compared with etiolated seedlings. However, light treatment of etiolated seedlings could stop and reverse the decline of d4h transcripts at later stages of seedling development. Repeated exposure of seedlings to light was also required to maintain the full spectrum of enzyme activity observed during seedling development. Further studies showed that a photoreversible phytochrome appeared to be involved in the activation of D4H, since red-light treatment of etiolated seedlings increased the detectable levels of d4h transcripts, D4H protein, and D4H enzyme activity, whereas far-red-light treatment completely reversed this process. Additional studies also confirmed that different major isoforms of D4H protein exist in etiolated (isoelectric point, 4.7) and light-grown (isoelectric point, 4.6) seedlings, suggesting that a component of the light-mediated activation of D4H may involve an undetermined posttranslational modification. The biological reasons for this complex control of vindoline biosynthesis may be related to the need to produce structures that could sequester away from cellular activities the cytotoxic vinblastine and vincristine dimers that are derived partially from vindoline. PMID:9701591

  5. Bacillus anthracis Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Modifies Collagen-like Substrates in Asymmetric Patterns.

    PubMed

    Schnicker, Nicholas J; Dey, Mishtu

    2016-06-17

    Proline hydroxylation is the most prevalent post-translational modification in collagen. The resulting product trans-4-hydroxyproline (Hyp) is of critical importance for the stability and thus function of collagen, with defects leading to several diseases. Prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs) are mononuclear non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate (αKG)-dependent dioxygenases that catalyze Hyp formation. Although animal and plant P4Hs target peptidyl proline, prokaryotes have been known to use free l-proline as a precursor to form Hyp. The P4H from Bacillus anthracis (BaP4H) has been postulated to act on peptidyl proline in collagen peptides, making it unusual within the bacterial clade, but its true physiological substrate remains enigmatic. Here we use mass spectrometry, fluorescence binding, x-ray crystallography, and docking experiments to confirm that BaP4H recognizes and acts on peptidyl substrates but not free l-proline, using elements characteristic of an Fe(II)/αKG-dependent dioxygenases. We further show that BaP4H can hydroxylate unique peptidyl proline sites in collagen-derived peptides with asymmetric hydroxylation patterns. The cofactor-bound crystal structures of BaP4H reveal active site conformational changes that define open and closed forms and mimic "ready" and "product-released" states of the enzyme in the catalytic cycle. These results help to clarify the role of BaP4H as well as provide broader insights into human collagen P4H and proteins with poly-l-proline type II helices. PMID:27129244

  6. Human Prolyl-4-hydroxylase α(I) Transcription Is Mediated by Upstream Stimulatory Factors *

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.; Wang, Xinwen; Wang, Jing; Gan, Yehua; Chen, Nanyue; Wang, Jian; LeMaire, Scott A.; Coselli, Joseph S.; Wang, Xing Li

    2010-01-01

    Prolyl-4-hydroxylase α(I) (P4Hα(I)) is the rate-limiting subunit forP4Henzyme activity, which is essential for procollagen hydroxylation and secretion. In the current study, we have characterized the human P4Hα(I) promoter for transcription factors and DNA elements regulating P4Hα(I) expression. Using a progressive deletion cloning approach, we have constructed pGL3-P4Hα(I) recombinant plasmids. We have identified a positive regulatory region at the positions of bp −184 to −97 responsible for ~80% of the P4Hα(I) promoter efficiency. Three E-boxes were located within this region, and the E-box at position bp −135 explains most of the regulatory capacity. Upstream stimulatory factors (USF1/USF2) were shown to bind on the E-box using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Suppression of USF1 and/or USF2 using specific short interference RNA resulted in a significant reduction in P4Hα(I) promoter activity, and overexpressed USF1 or USF2 increased P4Hα(I) promoter activity significantly. Although transforming growth factor β1 increased the USF1/USF2-E-box binding and P4Hα(I) promoter activity, this up-regulatory effect can be largely prevented by USF1/USF2-specific short interference RNA. On the other hand, cigarette smoking extracts, which have been shown to suppress P4Hα(I) expression, inhibited the binding between the USF1/USF2 and E-box, resulting in a reduced P4Hα(I) promoter activity. Furthermore, the E-box on the P4Hα(I) promoter appeared to indiscriminately bind with either USF1 or USF2, with a similar outcome on the promoter efficiency. In conclusion, our study shows that USF1/USF2 plays a critical role in basal P4Hα(I) expression, and both positive (transforming growth factor β1) and negative (cigarette smoking extract) regulators appear to influence the USF-E-box interaction and affect P4Hα(I) expression. PMID:16488890

  7. Antisense and sense expression of cDNA coding for CYP73A15, a class II cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, leads to a delayed and reduced production of lignin in tobacco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blee, K.; Choi, J. W.; O'Connell, A. P.; Jupe, S. C.; Schuch, W.; Lewis, N. G.; Bolwell, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    A number of plant species contain the class II of genes encoding the cytochrome P450, CYP73, the cognate protein of which cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase, is the second enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway. In order to begin to determine possible functionality, tobacco has been transformed with a truncated French bean class II cinnamate hydroxylase (CYP73A15) in the sense and antisense orientations. Signals for C4H protein could be detected in vascular tissue from wild-type plants using heterologous probes. The transformed plants showed a normal phenotype, even though detectable C4H protein was much reduced in tissue prints. Young propagated transformants displayed a range of reduced C4H activities, as well as either reduced or no phloroglucinol-stainable lignin. However, all mature tobacco plants showed the accumulation of lignin, even though its deposition was apparently delayed. This was not due to induction of tyrosine ammonia-lyase activity, which was not detected, but instead it is presumed due to sufficient C4H residual activity. Analysis of the lignin content of the plants showed reductions of up to 30% with a slightly reduced syringyl to guaiacyl ratio as compared to wild type. This reduction level was favourable in comparison with some other targets in the lignification pathway that have been manipulated including that of class I cinnamate 4-hydroxylase. It is proposed that the class II cinnamate 4-hydroxylase might also function in lignification in a number of species including French bean and tobacco, based on these data.

  8. Regulation of the Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase (CYP73A1) in Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers in Response to Wounding and Chemical Treatments.

    PubMed Central

    Batard, Y.; Schalk, M.; Pierrel, M. A.; Zimmerlin, A.; Durst, F.; Werck-Reichhart, D.

    1997-01-01

    trans-Cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) is a plant-specific cytochrome (P450) that is encoded by the gene CYP73A and catalyzes the second step of the multibranched phenylpropanoid pathway. Increases in C4H activity in response to physical and chemical stresses have been well documented, but the mechanism of these increases has never been studied in detail. This paper reports on the regulatory mechanism controlling C4H activity in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) tubers in response to wounding and chemical treatments. We compared induction of C4H and other P450-catalyzed activities. C4H was moderately induced by chemicals relative to other P450s. Increases in enzyme activity, C4H protein, and transcripts were quantified and compared in tuber tissue 48 h after wounding and chemical treatments. Our data suggest that induction of the enzyme activity results primarily from gene activation. Time-course experiments were performed after wounding and aminopyrine treatment. Compared with wounded tissues, aminopyrine triggered an additional and delayed peak of transcript accumulation. The timing of the induced changes in activity, protein, and transcripts confirms that C4H induction results primarily from an increase in CYP73A1 mRNA, in both wounded and aminopyrine-treated tissues. However, posttranscriptional mechanisms might also contribute to the regulation of C4H activity. PMID:12223655

  9. Preconditioning of Cardiosphere-Derived Cells With Hypoxia or Prolyl-4-Hydroxylase Inhibitors Increases Stemness and Decreases Reliance on Oxidative Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Suat Cheng; Gomes, Renata S M; Yeoh, Kar Kheng; Perbellini, Filippo; Malandraki-Miller, Sophia; Ambrose, Lucy; Heather, Lisa C; Faggian, Giuseppe; Schofield, Christopher J; Davies, Kay E; Clarke, Kieran; Carr, Carolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs), which can be isolated from heart explants, are a promising candidate cell source for infarcted myocardium regeneration. However, current protocols used to expand CDCs require at least 1 month in vitro to obtain sufficient cells for transplantation. We report that CDC culture can be optimized by preconditioning the cells under hypoxia (2% oxygen), which may reflect the physiological oxygen level of the stem cell niche. Under hypoxia, the CDC proliferation rate increased by 1.4-fold, generating 6 × 10(6) CDCs with higher expression of cardiac stem cell and pluripotency gene markers compared to normoxia. Furthermore, telomerase (TERT), cytokines/ligands involved in stem cell trafficking (SDF/CXCR-4), erythropoiesis (EPO), and angiogenesis (VEGF) were increased under hypoxia. Hypoxic preconditioning was mimicked by treatment with two types of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl-4-hydroxylase inhibitors (PHDIs): dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG) and 2-(1-chloro-4-hydroxyisoquinoline-3-carboxamido) acetic acid (BIC). Despite the difference in specificity, both PHDIs significantly increased c-Kit expression and activated HIF, EPO, and CXCR-4. Furthermore, treatment with PHDIs for 24 h increased cell proliferation. Notably, all hypoxic and PHDI-preconditioned CDCs had decreased oxygen consumption and increased glycolytic metabolism. In conclusion, cells cultured under hypoxia could have potentially enhanced therapeutic potential, which can be mimicked, in part, by PHDIs. PMID:25751158

  10. Expression, Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Studies of a Prolyl-4-Hydroxylase Protein From Bacillus Anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.A.; Scott, E.E.; Limburg, J.

    2009-05-26

    Collagen prolyl-4-hydroxylase (C-P4H) catalyzes the hydroxylation of specific proline residues in procollagen, which is an essential step in collagen biosynthesis. A new form of P4H from Bacillus anthracis (anthrax-P4H) that shares many characteristics with the type I C-P4H from human has recently been characterized. The structure of anthrax-P4H could provide important insight into the chemistry of C-P4Hs and into the function of this unique homodimeric P4H. X-ray diffraction data of selenomethionine-labeled anthrax-P4H recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli have been collected to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution.

  11. Isolation and characterization of isochorismate synthase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase during salinity stress, wounding, and salicylic acid treatment in Carthamus tinctorius

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mahnaz; Dehghan, Sara; Fischer, Rainer; Wenzel, Uwe; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Kavousi, Hamid Reza; Rahnamaeian, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a prominent signaling molecule during biotic and abiotic stresses in plants biosynthesized via cinnamate and isochorismate pathways. Cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) and isochorismate synthase (ICS) are the main enzymes in phenylpropanoid and isochorismate pathways, respectively. To investigate the actual roles of these genes in resistance mechanism to environmental stresses, here, the coding sequences of these enzymes in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius), as an oilseed industrial medicinal plant, were partially isolated and their expression profiles during salinity stress, wounding, and salicylic acid treatment were monitored. As a result, safflower ICS (CtICS) and C4H (CtC4H) were induced in early time points after wounding (3–6 h). Upon salinity stress, CtICS and CtC4H were highly expressed for the periods of 6–24 h and 3–6 h after treatment, respectively. It seems evident that ICS expression level is SA concentration dependent as if safflower treatment with 1 mM SA could induce ICS much stronger than that with 0.1 mM, while C4H is less likely to be so. Based on phylogenetic analysis, safflower ICS has maximum similarity to its ortholog in Vitis vinifera up to 69%, while C4H shows the highest similarity to its ortholog in Echinacea angustifolia up to 96%. Overall, the isolated genes of CtICS and CtC4H in safflower could be considered in plant breeding programs for salinity tolerance as well as for pathogen resistance. PMID:24309561

  12. The Skp1 Protein from Toxoplasma Is Modified by a Cytoplasmic Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Associated with Oxygen Sensing in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuechi; Brown, Kevin M.; Wang, Zhuo A.; van der Wel, Hanke; Teygong, Crystal; Zhang, Dongmei; Blader, Ira J.; West, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    In diverse types of organisms, cellular hypoxic responses are mediated by prolyl 4-hydroxylases that use O2 and α-ketoglutarate as substrates to hydroxylate conserved proline residues in target proteins. Whereas in metazoans these enzymes control the stability of the HIFα family of transcription factor subunits, the Dictyostelium enzyme (DdPhyA) contributes to O2 regulation of development by a divergent mechanism involving hydroxylation and subsequent glycosylation of DdSkp1, an adaptor subunit in E3SCF ubiquitin ligases. Sequences related to DdPhyA, DdSkp1, and the glycosyltransferases that cap Skp1 hydroxyproline occur also in the genomes of Toxoplasma and other protists, suggesting that this O2 sensing mechanism may be widespread. Here we show by disruption of the TgphyA locus that this enzyme is required for Skp1 glycosylation in Toxoplasma and that disrupted parasites grow slowly at physiological O2 levels. Conservation of cellular function was tested by expression of TgPhyA in DdphyA-null cells. Simple gene replacement did not rescue Skp1 glycosylation, whereas overexpression not only corrected Skp1 modification but also restored the O2 requirement to a level comparable to that of overexpressed DdPhyA. Bacterially expressed TgPhyA protein can prolyl hydroxylate both Toxoplasma and Dictyostelium Skp1s. Kinetic analyses showed that TgPhyA has similar properties to DdPhyA, including a superimposable dependence on the concentration of its co-substrate α-ketoglutarate. Remarkably, however, TgPhyA had a significantly higher apparent affinity for O2. The findings suggest that Skp1 hydroxylation by PhyA is a conserved process among protists and that this biochemical pathway may indirectly sense O2 by detecting the levels of O2-regulated metabolites such as α-ketoglutarate. PMID:22648409

  13. Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase expression in arabidopsis. Regulation in response to development and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bell-Lelong, D.A.; Cusumano, J.C.; Meyer, K.; Chapple, C.

    1997-03-01

    Cinnamate-r-hydroxylase (C4H) is the first Cyt P450-dependent monooxygenase of the phenylpropanoid pathway. To study the expression of this gene in Arabidopsis thaliana, a C4H cDNA clone from the Arabidopsis expressed sequence tag database was identified and used to isolate its corresponding genomic clone. The entire C4H coding sequence plus 2.9 kb of its promoter were isolated on a 5.4-kb HindIII fragment of this cosmid. Inspection of the promoter sequence revealed the presence of a number of putative regulatory motifs previously identified in the promoters of other phenylpropanoid pathway genes. The expression of C4H was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization analysis and in transgenic Arabidopsis carrying a C4H-{beta}-glucuronidase transcriptional fusion. C4H message accumulation was light-dependent, but was detectable even in dark-grown seedlings. Consistent with these data, C4H mRNA was accumulated to light-grown levels in etiolated det1-1 mutant seedlings. C4H is widely expressed in various Arabidopsis tissues, particularly in roots and cells undergoing lignification. The C4H-driven {beta}-glucuronidase expression accurately reflected the tissue-specificity and wound-inducibility of the C4H promoter indicated by RNA blot hybridization analysis. A modest increase in C4H expression was observed in the tt8 mutant of Arabidopsis. 77 refs., 5 figs.

  14. HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylase-2 inhibition improves glucose and lipid metabolism and protects against obesity and metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rahtu-Korpela, Lea; Karsikas, Sara; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Mäkelä, Kari A; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Walkinshaw, Gail; Kivirikko, Kari I; Myllyharju, Johanna; Serpi, Raisa; Koivunen, Peppi

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem, predisposing subjects to metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Specific prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs) regulate the stability of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), a potent governor of metabolism, with isoenzyme 2 being the main regulator. We investigated whether HIF-P4H-2 inhibition could be used to treat obesity and its consequences. Hif-p4h-2-deficient mice, whether fed normal chow or a high-fat diet, had less adipose tissue, smaller adipocytes, and less adipose tissue inflammation than their littermates. They also had improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of the HIF-1 targets glucose transporters, glycolytic enzymes, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 were increased in their tissues, whereas acetyl-CoA concentration was decreased. The hepatic mRNA level of the HIF-2 target insulin receptor substrate-2 was higher, whereas that of two key enzymes of fatty acid synthesis was lower. Serum cholesterol levels and de novo lipid synthesis were decreased, and the mice were protected against hepatic steatosis. Oral administration of an HIF-P4H inhibitor, FG-4497, to wild-type mice with metabolic dysfunction phenocopied these beneficial effects. HIF-P4H-2 inhibition may be a novel therapy that not only protects against the development of obesity and its consequences but also reverses these conditions. PMID:24789921

  15. The Endothelial Prolyl-4-Hydroxylase Domain 2/Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2 Axis Regulates Pulmonary Artery Pressure in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P; Rajendran, Ganeshkumar; Astleford, Lindsay; Michael, Mark; Schonfeld, Michael P; Fields, Timothy; Shay, Sheila; French, Jaketa L; West, James; Haase, Volker H

    2016-05-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2 (HIF-1 and -2) control oxygen supply to tissues by regulating erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and vascular homeostasis. HIFs are regulated in response to oxygen availability by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) proteins, with PHD2 being the main oxygen sensor that controls HIF activity under normoxia. In this study, we used a genetic approach to investigate the endothelial PHD2/HIF axis in the regulation of vascular function. We found that inactivation of Phd2 in endothelial cells specifically resulted in severe pulmonary hypertension (∼118% increase in right ventricular systolic pressure) but not polycythemia and was associated with abnormal muscularization of peripheral pulmonary arteries and right ventricular hypertrophy. Concurrent inactivation of either Hif1a or Hif2a in endothelial cell-specific Phd2 mutants demonstrated that the development of pulmonary hypertension was dependent on HIF-2α but not HIF-1α. Furthermore, endothelial HIF-2α was required for the development of increased pulmonary artery pressures in a model of pulmonary hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia. We propose that these HIF-2-dependent effects are partially due to increased expression of vasoconstrictor molecule endothelin 1 and a concomitant decrease in vasodilatory apelin receptor signaling. Taken together, our data identify endothelial HIF-2 as a key transcription factor in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26976644

  16. Monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against purified cinnamate 4-hydroxylase from Helianthus tuberosus. Immunopurification, immunoquantitation, and interspecies cross-reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Werck-Reichhart, D; Batard, Y; Kochs, G; Lesot, A; Durst, F

    1993-01-01

    We recently reported the purification of cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (CA4H), a cytochrome P-450 catalyzing the second reaction of the general phenylpropanoid pathway, from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) (B. Gabriac, D. Werck-Reichhart, H. Teutsch, F. Durst [1991] Arch Biochem Biophys 288: 302-309). Rabbit polyclonal antibodies were raised against the native and denaturated nitrocellulose-bound enzyme. Only the immunoglobulins G (IgGs) elicited upon immunization with native enzyme produced strong inhibition of catalytic activity and good cross-reactivity on western blots. In microsomes from H. tuberosus tissues induced by wounding and various chemicals, a positive correlation between catalytic activity and amounts of immunoreactive protein on western blots was observed. When coupled to cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose, purified IgGs selectively retained CA4H activity from solubilized plant microsomes. Acid elution from the immunoaffinity matrix provided a rapid procedure for high-yield purification of the CA4H protein. The same IgGs immunoprecipitated a single protein from the in vitro translation products of mRNA isolated from wounded tissues. The apparent molecular weight (57,000) of this polypeptide was identical to that of CA4H purified from tuber microsomes. Immunochemical relatedness between CA4H from different plant species was demonstrated by strong inhibition of catalytic activity and immunopurification of several orthologous enzymes, using IgGs directed against CA4H from H. tuberosus. However, only limited interspecies cross-reactivity was observed on western blots. A careful immunochemical analysis indicates that CA4H immunoreactivity significantly differs from plant to plant. Results are discussed in terms of antibody specificity, enzyme glycosylation, and CA4H regulation. PMID:8278549

  17. Neuronal deficiency of HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylase 2 in mice improves ischemic stroke recovery in an HIF dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Li, Lexiao; Saliba, Pamela; Reischl, Stefan; Marti, Hugo H; Kunze, Reiner

    2016-07-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) mediate the endogenous adaptive responses to hypoxia. HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylase domain proteins (PHD) are important suppressors of the HIF pathway. Recently, we demonstrated that neuron-specific deletion of Phd2 reduces cerebral tissue damage in the very acute phase of ischemic stroke. In the present study, we investigated whether neuronal Phd2 ablation is likewise beneficial for stroke recovery, and aimed to identify underlying cellular mechanisms. Mice underwent permanent occlusion of the distal middle cerebral artery (pdMCAO) for either 7days (sub-acute stage) or 30days (chronic stage). One week after pdMCAO the infarct size of Phd2-deficient mice was significantly reduced as compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Accordingly, Phd2-deficient animals showed less impaired sensorimotor function. Neuronal loss of Phd2 upregulated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and significantly increased microvascular density along the infarct border in the sub-acute stage of stroke. Phd2-deficient mice showed reduced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased numbers of resting microglia/macrophages and reactive astrocytes within peri-infarct regions in comparison to WT littermates. Finally, brain tissue protection and increased angiogenesis upon sub-acute ischemic stroke was completely absent in Phd2 knockout mice that were additionally deficient for both Hif1a and Hif2a. Our findings suggest that lack of PHD2 in neurons improves histological and functional long-term outcome from ischemic stroke at least partly by amplifying endogenous adaptive neovascularization through activation of the HIF-VEGF axis. PMID:27001147

  18. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase from Volvox carteri. A low-Mr enzyme antigenically related to the alpha subunit of the vertebrate enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Kaska, D D; Myllylä, R; Günzler, V; Gibor, A; Kivirikko, K I

    1988-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase was isolated in a highly purified form from a multi-cellular green alga, Volvox carteri, by a procedure consisting of ion-exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography on poly(L-hydroxyproline) coupled to Sepharose. Two other affinity-column procedures were also developed, one involving 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate and the other 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionate linked to Sepharose. The Km values of the Volvox enzyme for the co-substrates and the peptide substrate, as well as the inhibition constants for selected 2-oxoglutarate analogues, were similar to those of the enzyme from Chlamydomonas reinhardii, except that the Km for 2-oxoglutarate with the Volvox enzyme was 6-fold greater. The temperature optimum of the Volvox enzyme was also 10 degrees C higher. The apparent Mr of the Volvox enzyme by gel filtration was about 40,000, being similar to that reported for the Chlamydomonas enzyme but markedly lower than that of the vertebrate enzymes. A similar apparent Mr of about 40,000 was also found for prolyl 4-hydroxylase from the green alga Enteromorpha intestinalis, whereas the enzyme from various vascular plants gave an apparent Mr greater than 300,000. SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis demonstrated in the highly purified Volvox enzyme the presence of a major protein band doublet with a Mr of about 65,000 and a minor doublet of Mr about 55,000-57,000. A polyclonal antiserum, prepared against the Mr-65,000 doublet, stained in immunoblotting the Mr-65,000 doublet as well as the alpha subunit, but not the beta subunit, of the vertebrate prolyl 4-hydroxylase. An antiserum against the beta subunit of the vertebrate enzyme stained in immunoblotting a Mr-50,000 polypeptide in a partially purified Volvox enzyme preparation, but did not stain either the Mr-65,000 or the Mr-55,000-57,000 doublet of the highly purified enzyme. The data thus suggest that the active Volvox carteri prolyl 4-hydroxylase is an enzyme monomer antigenically related to the

  19. Genetic interaction between Caenorhabditis elegans teneurin ten-1 and prolyl 4-hydroxylase phy-1 and their function in collagen IV–mediated basement membrane integrity during late elongation of the embryo

    PubMed Central

    Topf, Ulrike; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Teneurins are a family of phylogenetically conserved proteins implicated in pattern formation and morphogenesis. The sole orthologue in Caenorhabditis elegans, ten-1, is important for hypodermal cell migration, neuronal migration, path finding and fasciculation, gonad development, and basement membrane integrity of some tissues. However, the mechanisms of TEN-1 action remain to be elucidated. Using a genome-wide RNA interference approach, we identified phy-1 as a novel interaction partner of ten-1. phy-1 codes for the catalytic domain of collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase. Loss of phy-1 significantly enhanced the embryonic lethality of ten-1 null mutants. Double-mutant embryos arrested during late elongation with epidermal defects, disruption of basement membranes, and detachment of body wall muscles. We found that deletion of phy-1 caused aggregation of collagen IV in body wall muscles in elongated embryos and triggered the loss of tissue integrity in ten-1 mutants. In addition, phy-1 and ten-1 each genetically interact with genes encoding collagen IV. These findings support a functional mechanism in which loss of ten-1, together with a reduction of assembled and secreted basement membrane collagen IV protein, leads to detachment of the epidermis from muscle cells during late elongation of the embryo when mechanical stress is generated by muscle contractions. PMID:21795395

  20. Characterization of recombinant plant cinnamate 4-hydroxylase produced in yeast. Kinetic and spectral properties of the major plant P450 of the phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Urban, P; Werck-Reichhart, D; Teutsch, H G; Durst, F; Regnier, S; Kazmaier, M; Pompon, D

    1994-06-15

    Helianthus tuberosus cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (CYP73 or CA4H), a member of the P450 superfamily which catalyses the first oxidative step of the phenylpropanoid pathway in higher plants by transforming cinnamate into p-coumarate, was expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The PCR-amplified CA4H open reading frame was inserted into pYeDP60 under the transcriptional control of a galactose-inducible artificial promoter. Engineered S. cerevisiae strains producing human P450 reductase or normal or overproduced amounts of yeast P450 reductase were transformed to express recombinant CA4H. When grown on galactose, yeast cells produced CA4H holoprotein bound to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane as judged from the reduced iron/carbon monoxide difference spectrum centered at 452 nm and from typical cinnamate 4-hydroxylase activity upon coupling with the different P450 reductases and NADPH. Some CA4H protein was found also addressed to the yeast mitochondria but as a low-activity form. The spectral and kinetic characterizations of the yeast-produced CA4H in different redox protein environments are presented using both assays on yeast microsomal fractions and bioconversions on living cells. Results indicate that the microsomal system constituted by the overexpressed yeast P450 reductase and CA4H is characterized by a 1:1 coupling between NADPH oxidation and cinnamate hydroxylation and by one of the highest turnover numbers reported for an NADPH-dependent P450 reaction. Based on spectral perturbation and inhibition studies, coumarate appeared to have no detectable affinity for the enzyme. A possible geometry of the substrate recognition pocket is discussed in the light of these data. PMID:8026495

  1. Cellular oxygen sensing: Importins and exportins are mediators of intracellular localisation of prolyl-4-hydroxylases PHD1 and PHD2

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, Amrei; Pientka, Friederike Katharina; Moeckel, Sylvia; Kettelhake, Antje; Hartmann, Enno; Koehler, Matthias; Depping, Reinhard

    2009-10-02

    Hypoxia-inducible factors are crucial in the regulatory process of oxygen homeostasis of vertebrate cells. Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylation of HIF-{alpha} subunits by prolyl-hydroxylases (PHD1, PHD2 and PHD3) leads to transcription of a greater number of hypoxia responsive genes. We have investigated the subcellular distribution and the molecular mechanisms regulating the intracellular allocation of PHD1 and PHD2. As reported earlier we find PHD1 located exclusively in the nucleus. We demonstrate that nuclear import of PHD1 occurs importin {alpha}/{beta} dependently and relies on a nuclear localisation signal (NLS). By contrast PHD2 is cycling between nucleus and cytoplasm, and nuclear import seems to be independent of 'classical' importin {alpha}/{beta} receptors. Furthermore, we reveal that the exit of PHD2 from the nucleus requires CRM1 and the N-terminal 100 amino acids of the protein. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of the regulation of the oxygen sensor cascade of PHDs in different cellular compartments.

  2. Reduced Lignin Content and Altered Lignin Composition in Transgenic Tobacco Down-Regulated in Expression of L-Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase or Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Sewalt, VJH.; Ni, W.; Blount, J. W.; Jung, H. G.; Masoud, S. A.; Howles, P. A.; Lamb, C.; Dixon, R. A.

    1997-09-01

    We analyzed lignin content and composition in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) lines altered in the expression of the early phenylpropanoid biosynthetic enzymes L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H). The reduction of C4H activity by antisense expression or sense suppression resulted in reduced levels of Klason lignin, accompanied by a decreased syringyl/guaiacyl monomer ratio as determined by pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry Similar reduction of lignin levels by down -regulation of L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, the enzyme preceding C4H in the central phenylpropanoid pathway, did not result in a decreased syringyl/guaiacyl ratio. Rather, analysis of lignin methoxyl content and pyrolysis suggested an increased syringyl/guaiacyl ratio. One possible explanation of these results is that monolignol biosynthesis from L-phenylalanine might occur by more than one route, even at the early stages of the core phenylpropanoid pathway, prior to the formation of specific monolignol precursors. PMID:12223790

  3. Refined regio- and stereoselective hydroxylation of L-pipecolic acid by protein engineering of L-proline cis-4-hydroxylase based on the X-ray crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Koketsu, Kento; Shomura, Yasuhito; Moriwaki, Kei; Hayashi, Mikiro; Mitsuhashi, Satoshi; Hara, Ryotaro; Kino, Kuniki; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2015-04-17

    Enzymatic regio- and stereoselective hydroxylation are valuable for the production of hydroxylated chiral ingredients. Proline hydroxylases are representative members of the nonheme Fe(2+)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family. These enzymes catalyze the conversion of L-proline into hydroxy-L-prolines (Hyps). L-Proline cis-4-hydroxylases (cis-P4Hs) from Sinorhizobium meliloti and Mesorhizobium loti catalyze the hydroxylation of L-proline, generating cis-4-hydroxy-L-proline, as well as the hydroxylation of L-pipecolic acid (L-Pip), generating two regioisomers, cis-5-Hypip and cis-3-Hypip. To selectively produce cis-5-Hypip without simultaneous production of two isomers, protein engineering of cis-P4Hs is required. We therefore carried out protein engineering of cis-P4H to facilitate the conversion of the majority of L-Pip into the cis-5-Hypip isomer. We first solved the X-ray crystal structure of cis-P4H in complex with each of L-Pro and L-Pip. Then, we conducted three rounds of directed evolution and successfully created a cis-P4H triple mutant, V97F/V95W/E114G, demonstrating the desired regioselectivity toward cis-5-Hypip. PMID:25171735

  4. Reduced Lignin Content and Altered Lignin Composition in Transgenic Tobacco Down-Regulated in Expression of L-Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase or Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Sewalt, VJH.; Ni, W.; Blount, J. W.; Jung, H. G.; Masoud, S. A.; Howles, P. A.; Lamb, C.; Dixon, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    We analyzed lignin content and composition in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) lines altered in the expression of the early phenylpropanoid biosynthetic enzymes L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H). The reduction of C4H activity by antisense expression or sense suppression resulted in reduced levels of Klason lignin, accompanied by a decreased syringyl/guaiacyl monomer ratio as determined by pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry Similar reduction of lignin levels by down -regulation of L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, the enzyme preceding C4H in the central phenylpropanoid pathway, did not result in a decreased syringyl/guaiacyl ratio. Rather, analysis of lignin methoxyl content and pyrolysis suggested an increased syringyl/guaiacyl ratio. One possible explanation of these results is that monolignol biosynthesis from L-phenylalanine might occur by more than one route, even at the early stages of the core phenylpropanoid pathway, prior to the formation of specific monolignol precursors. PMID:12223790

  5. Pichia pastoris production of a prolyl 4-hydroxylase derived from Chondrosia reniformis sponge: A new biotechnological tool for the recombinant production of marine collagen.

    PubMed

    Pozzolini, Marina; Scarfì, Sonia; Mussino, Francesca; Salis, Annalisa; Damonte, Gianluca; Benatti, Umberto; Giovine, Marco

    2015-08-20

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H) is a α2β2 tetramer catalyzing the post-translational hydroxylation of prolines in collagen. Its recombinant production is mainly pursued to realize biotechnological tools able to generate animal contaminant-free hydroxylated collagen. One promising candidate for biomedical applications is the collagen extracted from the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis, because of its biocompatibility and because is devoid of the health risks associated with bovine and porcine collagens. Here we report on the production and selection, by enzymatic and biomolecular analyses, of a triple transformed Pichia pastoris strain expressing a stable P4H tetramer derived from C. reniformis sponge and a hydroxylated non fibrillar procollagen polypeptide from the same animal. The percentage of recombinant procollagen hydroxylated prolines inside the transformed yeast was of 36.3% analyzed by mass spectrometry indicating that the recombinant enzyme is active on its natural substrate inside the yeast cell host. Furthermore, the recombinant sponge P4H has the ability to hydroxylate its natural substrate in both X and Y positions in the Xaa-Yaa-Gly collagenous triplets. In conclusion this Pichia system seems ideal for high-level production of hydroxylated sponge- or marine-derived collagen polypeptides as well as of conotoxins or other marine proteins of high pharmacological interest needing this particular post-translational modification. PMID:26022422

  6. Isolation and sequence of a cDNA encoding the Jerusalem artichoke cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, a major plant cytochrome P450 involved in the general phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Teutsch, H G; Hasenfratz, M P; Lesot, A; Stoltz, C; Garnier, J M; Jeltsch, J M; Durst, F; Werck-Reichhart, D

    1993-01-01

    Cinnamate 4-hydroxylase [CA4H; trans-cinnamate,NADPH:oxygen oxidoreductase (4-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.13.11] is a cytochrome P450 that catalyzes the first oxygenation step of the general phenylpropanoid metabolism in higher plants. The compounds formed are essential for lignification and defense against predators and pathogens. We recently reported the purification of this enzyme from Mn(2+)-induced Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tuber tissues. Highly selective polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified protein were used to screen a lambda gt11 cDNA expression library from wound-induced Jerusalem artichoke, allowing isolation of a 1130-base-pair insert. Typical P450 domains were identified in this incomplete sequence, which was used as a probe for the isolation of a 1.7-kilobase clone in a lambda gt10 library. A full-length open reading frame of 1515 base pairs, encoding a P450 protein of 505 residues (M(r) = 57,927), was sequenced. The N terminus, essentially composed of hydrophobic residues, matches perfectly the microsequenced N terminus of the purified protein. The calculated pI is 9.78, in agreement with the chromatographic behavior and two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of CA4H. Synthesis of the corresponding mRNA is induced in wounded plant tissues, in correlation with CA4H enzymatic activity. This P450 protein exhibits the most similarity (28% amino acid identity) with avocado CYP71, but also good similarity with CYP17 and CYP21, or with CYP1 and CYP2 families. According to current criteria, it qualifies as a member of a new P450 family. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8097885

  7. Phenotypic debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase activity among extensive metabolizers is unrelated to genotype as determined by the Xba-I restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, J; Evans, W E; Relling, M V; Wilkinson, G R; Roden, D M

    1991-01-01

    1. The major pathway for 4-hydroxylation of debrisoquine in man is polymorphic and under genetic control. More than 90% of subjects (extensive metabolizers, EMs) have active debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (cytochrome P450IID6) while in the remainder (poor metabolizers, PMs), cytochrome P450IID6 activity is greatly impaired. 2. Within the EM group, cytochrome P450IID6-mediated metabolism of a range of substrates varies widely. Some of this intra-phenotype non-uniformity may be explained by the presence of two subsets of subjects with different genotypes (heterozygotes and homozygotes). 3. Cytochrome P450IID6 substrates have not differentiated between these two genotypes. However, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) which identifies mutant alleles of cytochrome P450IID6 locus has been described and can definitively assign genotype in some heterozygous EM subjects. 4. In this study, we used RFLP analysis and encainide as a model substrate to determine if non-uniformity in cytochrome P450IID6 activity among EMs is related to genotype. We tested the hypothesis that heterozygotes exhibit intermediate metabolic activity and that homozygous dominants exhibit the highest activity. We proposed encainide as a useful substrate for this purpose since cytochrome P450IID6 catalyzes not only its biotransformation to O-desmethyl encainide (ODE) but also the subsequent metabolism of ODE to 3-methoxy-O-desmethyl encainide (MODE). 5. A single 50 mg oral dose of encainide was administered to 139 normal volunteers and 14 PMs were identified. Urinary ratios among encainide, ODE and MODE in the remaining 125 EM subjects revealed a wide range of cytochrome P450IID6 activity. However, Southern blotting of genomic DNA digested with XbaI identified obligate heterozygotes in both extremes of all ratio distributions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 PMID:1685663

  8. Cell-free synthesis and assembly of prolyl 4-hydroxylase: the role of the beta-subunit (PDI) in preventing misfolding and aggregation of the alpha-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    John, D C; Grant, M E; Bulleid, N J

    1993-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4-H) catalyses a vital post-translational modification in the biosynthesis of collagen. The enzyme consists of two distinct polypeptides forming an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer (alpha = 64 kDa, beta = 60 kDa), the beta-subunit being identical to the multifunctional enzyme protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). By studying the cell-free synthesis of the rat alpha-subunit of P4-H we have shown that the alpha-subunit can be translocated, glycosylated and the signal peptide cleaved by dog pancreatic microsomal membranes to yield both singly and doubly glycosylated forms. When translations were carried out under conditions which prevent disulfide bond formation, the product synthesized formed aggregates which were associated with the immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP). Translations carried out under conditions that promote disulfide bond formation yielded a product that was not associated with BiP but formed a complex with the endogenous beta-subunit (PDI). Complex formation was detected by co-precipitation of the newly synthesized alpha-subunit with antibodies raised against PDI, by sucrose gradient centrifugation and by chemical cross-linking. When microsomal vesicles were depleted of PDI, BiP and other soluble endoplasmic reticulum proteins, no complex formation was observed and the alpha-subunit aggregated even under conditions that promote disulfide bond formation. We have therefore demonstrated that the enzyme P4-H can be assembled at synthesis in a cell-free system and that the solubility of the alpha-subunit is dependent upon its association with PDI. Images PMID:8385607

  9. Prolyl-4-hydroxylase Domain Protein 2 Controls NF-κB/p65 Transactivation and Enhances the Catabolic Effects of Inflammatory Cytokines on Cells of the Nucleus Pulposus*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Yuan, Wen; Jiang, Shuai; Ye, Wei; Yang, Hao; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2015-01-01

    Prolyl-4-hydroxylase (PHD) proteins are key in sensing tissue hypoxia. In nucleus pulposus (NP) cells, our previous work demonstrated that PHD isoforms have a differential contribution in controlling hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-α degradation and activity. Recently we have shown that a regulatory relationship exists between PHD3 and inflammatory cytokines in NP cells. With respect to PHD2, the most abundant PHD isoform in NP cells, very little is known concerning its function and regulation under inflammatory conditions that characterize intervertebral disc degeneration. Here, we show that PHD2 is a potent regulator of the catabolic activities of TNF-α; silencing of PHD2 significantly decreased TNF-α-induced expression of catabolic markers including SDC4, MMP-3, MMP-13, and ADAMTS5, as well as several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, while partially restoring aggrecan and collagen II expression. Use of NF-κB reporters with ShPHD2, SiHIF-1α, as well as p65−/−, PHD2−/−, and PHD3−/− cells, shows that PHD2 serves as a co-activator of NF-κB/p65 signaling in HIF-1-independent fashion. Immunoprecipitation of endogenous and exogenously expressed tagged proteins, as well as fluorescence microscopy, indicates that following TNF-α treatment, PHD2 interacts and co-localizes with p65. Conversely, loss of function experiments using lentivirally delivered Sh-p65, Sh-IKKβ, and NF-κB inhibitor confirmed that cytokine-dependent PHD2 expression in NP cells requires NF-κB signaling. These findings clearly demonstrate that PHD2 forms a regulatory circuit with TNF-α via NF-κB and thereby plays an important role in enhancing activity of this cytokine. We propose that during disc degeneration PHD2 may offer a therapeutic target to mitigate the deleterious actions of TNF-α, a key proinflammatory cytokine. PMID:25635047

  10. Severe Extracellular Matrix Abnormalities and Chondrodysplasia in Mice Lacking Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Isoenzyme II in Combination with a Reduced Amount of Isoenzyme I*

    PubMed Central

    Aro, Ellinoora; Salo, Antti M.; Khatri, Richa; Finnilä, Mikko; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Sormunen, Raija; Pakkanen, Outi; Holster, Tiina; Soininen, Raija; Prein, Carina; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Aszódi, Attila; Tuukkanen, Juha; Kivirikko, Kari I.; Schipani, Ernestina; Myllyharju, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases (C-P4H-I, C-P4H-II, and C-P4H-III) catalyze formation of 4-hydroxyproline residues required to form triple-helical collagen molecules. Vertebrate C-P4Hs are α2β2 tetramers differing in their catalytic α subunits. C-P4H-I is the major isoenzyme in most cells, and inactivation of its catalytic subunit (P4ha1−/−) leads to embryonic lethality in mouse, whereas P4ha1+/− mice have no abnormalities. To study the role of C-P4H-II, which predominates in chondrocytes, we generated P4ha2−/− mice. Surprisingly, they had no apparent phenotypic abnormalities. To assess possible functional complementarity, we established P4ha1+/−;P4ha2−/− mice. They were smaller than their littermates, had moderate chondrodysplasia, and developed kyphosis. A transient inner cell death phenotype was detected in their developing growth plates. The columnar arrangement of proliferative chondrocytes was impaired, the amount of 4-hydroxyproline and the Tm of collagen II were reduced, and the extracellular matrix was softer in the growth plates of newborn P4ha1+/−;P4ha2−/− mice. No signs of uncompensated ER stress were detected in the mutant growth plate chondrocytes. Some of these defects were also found in P4ha2−/− mice, although in a much milder form. Our data show that C-P4H-I can to a large extent compensate for the lack of C-P4H-II in proper endochondral bone development, but their combined partial and complete inactivation, respectively, leads to biomechanically impaired extracellular matrix, moderate chondrodysplasia, and kyphosis. Our mouse data suggest that inactivating mutations in human P4HA2 are not likely to lead to skeletal disorders, and a simultaneous decrease in P4HA1 function would most probably be required to generate such a disease phenotype. PMID:26001784

  11. Examining the Impact of Gene Variants on Histone Lysine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Van Rechem, Capucine; Whetstine, Johnathan R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a boom in the amount of genome-wide sequencing data that has uncovered important and unappreciated links between certain genes, families of genes and enzymatic processes and diseases such as cancer. Such studies have highlighted the impact that chromatin modifying enzymes could have in cancer and other genetic diseases. In this review, we summarize characterized mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in histone lysine methyltransferases (KMTs), histone lysine demethylases (KDMs) and histones. We primarily focus on variants with strong disease correlations and discuss how they could impact histone lysine methylation dynamics and gene regulation. PMID:24859469

  12. Impact of gene family evolutionary histories on phylogenetic species tree inference by gene tree parsimony.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Complicated history of gene duplication and loss brings challenge to molecular phylogenetic inference, especially in deep phylogenies. However, phylogenomic approaches, such as gene tree parsimony (GTP), show advantage over some other approaches in its ability to use gene families with duplications. GTP searches the 'optimal' species tree by minimizing the total cost of biological events such as duplications, but accuracy of GTP and phylogenetic signal in the context of different gene families with distinct histories of duplication and loss are unclear. To evaluate how different evolutionary properties of different gene families can impact on species tree inference, 3900 gene families from seven angiosperms encompassing a wide range of gene content, lineage-specific expansions and contractions were analyzed. It was found that the gene content and total duplication number in a gene family strongly influence species tree inference accuracy, with the highest accuracy achieved at either very low or very high gene content (or duplication number) and lowest accuracy centered in intermediate gene content (or duplication number), as the relationship can fit a binomial regression. Besides, for gene families of similar level of average gene content, those with relatively higher lineage-specific expansion or duplication rates tend to show lower accuracy. Additional correlation tests support that high accuracy for those gene families with large gene content may rely on abundant ancestral copies to provide many subtrees to resolve conflicts, whereas high accuracy for single or low copy gene families are just subject to sequence substitution per se. Very low accuracy reached by gene families of intermediate gene content or duplication number can be due to insufficient subtrees to resolve the conflicts from loss of alternative copies. As these evolutionary properties can significantly influence species tree accuracy, I discussed the potential weighting of the duplication cost by

  13. Distance Matters: The Impact of Gene Proximity in Bacterial Gene Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, Otto; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-05-01

    Following recent discoveries of colocalization of downstream-regulating genes in living cells, the impact of the spatial distance between such genes on the kinetics of gene product formation is increasingly recognized. We here show from analytical and numerical analysis that the distance between a transcription factor (TF) gene and its target gene drastically affects the speed and reliability of transcriptional regulation in bacterial cells. For an explicit model system, we develop a general theory for the interactions between a TF and a transcription unit. The observed variations in regulation efficiency are linked to the magnitude of the variation of the TF concentration peaks as a function of the binding site distance from the signal source. Our results support the role of rapid binding site search for gene colocalization and emphasize the role of local concentration differences.

  14. Catechol estrogen formation by brain tissue: characterization of a direct product isolation assay for estrogen-2- and 4-hydroxylase activity and its application to studies of 2- and 4-hydroxyestradiol formation by rabbit hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Hersey, R.M.; Williams, K.I.; Weisz, J.

    1981-12-01

    A direct product isolation assay for quantifying the formation of 2- and 4-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2 and 4-OHE2) from (6,7-3H)estradiol by rabbit hypothalami in vitro was developed, and the assay was used to characterize some properties of estrogen-2- and 4-hydroxylase activity in this tissue. The reaction was carried out under conditions that minimized further metabolism of enzymatically formed catechol estrogens. A simple two-step separation procedure, involving the use of a neutral alumina column, followed by thin layer chromatography, was developed to isolate the enzymatically formed catechol estrogens in a radiochemically homogeneous form. The detergent, Tween-80, was found to activate the enzyme and was used routinely at a concentration of 0.1% in the assay. The formation of 2-OHE2 was linear up to 10 min and with increasing protein concentrations up to 150 micrograms/incubation. Similar values were obtained for 4-OHE2. Maximum velocities (Vmax) for the formation of 2- and 4-OHE2 were 190 and 270 pmol/mg protein . 10 min, respectively. The apparent Km values with respect to estradiol for 2-OHE2 and 4-OHE2 were 125 and 150 microM, respectively. The highest specific activity for the enzyme was present in the 100,000 X g supernatant (S3), while the activity in the microsomal fraction (P3) was less than that in the original homogenate. Enzyme activity depended on the presence of NADPH and oxygen and was inhibited by CO as well as by high concentrations of SKF-525A. Estrogen-2- and 4-hydroxylase activity in rabbit hypothalamus differed from that in rat liver in two respects. In the liver, enzyme activity was localized in the microsomal fraction and was virtually abolished by Tween-80. In contrast, enzyme activity in rabbit hypothalamus was maximal in the soluble fraction (100,000 X g supernatant)and was stimulated by the detergent.

  15. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  16. Intracellular dissociation and reassembly of prolyl 4-hydroxylase:the alpha-subunits associated with the immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) allowing reassembly with the beta-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    John, D C; Bulleid, N J

    1996-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4-H) consists of two distinct polypeptides; the catalytically more important alpha-subunit and the beta-subunit, which is identical to the multifunctional enzyme protein disulphide isomerase. The enzyme appears to be assembled in vivo into an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer from newly synthesized alpha-subunits associating with an endogenous pool of beta-subunits. Using a cell-free system, we have shown previously that enzyme assembly is redox-dependent and that assembled alpha-subunits are intramolecularly disulphide-bonded [John and Bulleid (1994) Biochemistry 33, 14018-14025]. Here we have studied this assembly process within intact cells by expressing both subunits in COS-1 cells. Newly synthesized alpha-subunits were shown to assemble with the beta-subunit, to form insoluble aggregates, or to remain soluble but not associate with the beta-subunit. Treatment of cells with dithiothreitol (DTT) led to dissociation of P4-H into subunits and on removal of DTT the enzyme reassembled. This reassembly was ATP-dependent, suggesting an interaction with an ATP-dependent chaperone. This was confirmed when immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) and alpha-subunits were co-immunoprecipitated with antibodies against the alpha-subunit and BiP, respectively. These results indicate that unassembled alpha-subunits are maintained in an assembly-competent form by interacting with the molecular chaperone BiP. PMID:8760347

  17. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  18. Impact of gene stacking on gene flow: the case of maize.

    PubMed

    Paul, Lénaïc; Angevin, Frédérique; Collonnier, Cécile; Messéan, Antoine

    2012-04-01

    To respect the European labelling threshold for the adventitious presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food and feed, stakeholders mainly rely on real-time PCR analysis, which provides a measurement expressed as a percentage of GM-DNA. However, this measurement veils the complexity of gene flow, especially in the case of gene stacking. We have investigated the impact of gene stacking on adventitious GM presence due to pollen flow and seed admixture as well as its translation in terms of the percentage of GM-DNA in a non-GM maize harvest. In the case of varieties bearing one to four stacked events, we established a set of relationships between the percentage of GM kernels and the percentage of GM-DNA in a non-GM harvest as well as a set of relationships between the rate of seed admixture and the percentages of GM material in a non-GM harvest. Thanks to these relationships, and based on simulations with a gene flow model, we have been able to demonstrate that the number of events and the stacking structure of the emitting fields impact the ability of a non-GM maize producer to comply with given GM kernel or GM-DNA thresholds. We also show that a great variability in the rates of GM kernels, embryos and DNA results from seed admixture. Finally, the choice of a unit of measurement for a GM threshold in seed lots can have opposite effects on the ability of farmers to comply with a given threshold depending on whether they are crop or seed producers. PMID:21681483

  19. Impact of gene editing on the study of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Patrick T; Sanz, David J; Hollywood, Jennifer A

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic and progressive autosomal recessive disorder of secretory epithelial cells, which causes obstructions in the lung airways and pancreatic ducts of 70,000 people worldwide (for recent review see Cutting Nat Rev Genet 16(1):45-56, 2015). The finding that mutations in the CFTR gene cause CF (Kerem et al. Science 245(4922):1073-1080, 1989; Riordan et al. Science 245(4922):1066-1073, 1989; Rommens et al. Science 245(4922):1059-1065, 1989), was hailed as the very happy middle of a story whose end is a cure for a fatal disease (Koshland Science 245(4922):1029, 1989). However, despite two licensed drugs (Ramsey et al. N Engl J Med 365(18):1663-1672, 2011; Wainwright et al. N Engl J Med 373(3):220-231, 2015), and a formal demonstration that repeated administration of CFTR cDNA to patients is safe and effects a modest but significant stabilisation of disease (Alton et al. Lancet Respir Med 3(9):684-691, 2015), we are still a long way from a cure, with many patients taking over 100 tablets per day, and a mean age at death of 28 years. The aim of this review is to discuss the impact on the study of CF of gene-editing techniques as they have developed over the last 30 years, up to and including the possibility of editing as a therapeutic approach. PMID:27325484

  20. Impact of ESR1 Gene Polymorphisms on Migraine Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Liu, Ruozhuo; Dong, Zhao; Wang, Xiaolin; Yu, Shengyuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An increasing number of studies have explored genetic associations between the functionally important polymorphisms in estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) gene and migraine susceptibility. The previously reported associations have nevertheless been inconsistent. The present work incorporating the published data derived from 8 publications was performed to assess the impact of these polymorphisms on incident migraine. Strength of the genetic risk was estimated by means of an odds ratio along with the 95% confidence interval (OR and 95% CI). From the results, we found individuals who harbored the 325-GG genotype, compared with those harboring the CC genotype or CG and CC combined genotypes, had almost 50% greater risk of migraine. The same genetic models showed notable associations in subgroups of Caucasians and migraine with aura (MA). For 594G>A, a moderately increased risk of migraine was seen under AG versus GG. The AA + AG versus GG model, however, showed a borderline association with migraine. Subgroup analyses according to ethnicity and subtype of migraine provided statistical evidence of significantly increased risk of migraine in Caucasians and of a marginal association with MA, respectively. Both 325C>G and 594G>A polymorphisms showed no major effects either in males or in females. Based on the statistical data, we conclude some of the ESR1 gene polymorphisms may have major contributions to the pathogenesis of migraine in Caucasian populations. PMID:26334887

  1. Homeobox Gene Deregulation: Impact on the Hallmarks of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haria, Dhwani; Naora, Honami

    2014-01-01

    Homeobox genes comprise a super-family of evolutionarily conserved genes that play essential roles in controlling body plan specification and cell fate determination. Substantial evidence indicates that leukemogenesis is driven by abnormal expression of homeobox genes that control hematopoiesis. In solid tumors, aberrant expression of homeobox genes has been increasingly found to modulate diverse processes such as cell proliferation, cell death, metastasis, angiogenesis and DNA repair. This review discusses how homeobox genes are deregulated in solid tumors and the functional significance of this deregulation in the hallmarks of cancer. PMID:24761365

  2. Has gene duplication impacted the evolution of Eutherian longevity?

    PubMed

    Doherty, Aoife; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2016-10-01

    One of the greatest unresolved questions in aging biology is determining the genetic basis of interspecies longevity variation. Gene duplication is often the key to understanding the origin and evolution of important Eutherian phenotypes. We systematically identified longevity-associated genes in model organisms that duplicated throughout Eutherian evolution. Longevity-associated gene families have a marginally significantly higher rate of duplication compared to non-longevity-associated gene families. Anti-longevity-associated gene families have significantly increased rate of duplication compared to pro-longevity gene families and are enriched in neurodegenerative disease categories. Conversely, duplicated pro-longevity-associated gene families are enriched in cell cycle genes. There is a cluster of longevity-associated gene families that expanded solely in long-lived species that is significantly enriched in pathways relating to 3-UTR-mediated translational regulation, metabolism of proteins and gene expression, pathways that have the potential to affect longevity. The identification of a gene cluster that duplicated solely in long-lived species involved in such fundamental processes provides a promising avenue for further exploration of Eutherian longevity evolution. PMID:27378378

  3. Impact of recurrent gene duplication on adaptation of plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent gene duplication and retention played an important role in angiosperm genome evolution. It has been hypothesized that these processes contribute significantly to plant adaptation but so far this hypothesis has not been tested at the genome scale. Results We studied available sequenced angiosperm genomes to assess the frequency of positive selection footprints in lineage specific expanded (LSE) gene families compared to single-copy genes using a dN/dS-based test in a phylogenetic framework. We found 5.38% of alignments in LSE genes with codons under positive selection. In contrast, we found no evidence for codons under positive selection in the single-copy reference set. An analysis at the branch level shows that purifying selection acted more strongly on single-copy genes than on LSE gene clusters. Moreover we detect significantly more branches indicating evolution under positive selection and/or relaxed constraint in LSE genes than in single-copy genes. Conclusions In this – to our knowledge –first genome-scale study we provide strong empirical support for the hypothesis that LSE genes fuel adaptation in angiosperms. Our conservative approach for detecting selection footprints as well as our results can be of interest for further studies on (plant) gene family evolution. PMID:24884640

  4. Identification and Validation of Reference Genes and Their Impact on Normalized Gene Expression Studies across Cultivated and Wild Cicer Species.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Dumbala Srinivas; Bhatnagar-Mathur, Pooja; Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar; Sri Cindhuri, Katamreddy; Sivaji Ganesh, Adusumalli; Sharma, Kiran Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR) is a preferred and reliable method for accurate quantification of gene expression to understand precise gene functions. A total of 25 candidate reference genes including traditional and new generation reference genes were selected and evaluated in a diverse set of chickpea samples. The samples used in this study included nine chickpea genotypes (Cicer spp.) comprising of cultivated and wild species, six abiotic stress treatments (drought, salinity, high vapor pressure deficit, abscisic acid, cold and heat shock), and five diverse tissues (leaf, root, flower, seedlings and seed). The geNorm, NormFinder and RefFinder algorithms used to identify stably expressed genes in four sample sets revealed stable expression of UCP and G6PD genes across genotypes, while TIP41 and CAC were highly stable under abiotic stress conditions. While PP2A and ABCT genes were ranked as best for different tissues, ABCT, UCP and CAC were most stable across all samples. This study demonstrated the usefulness of new generation reference genes for more accurate qPCR based gene expression quantification in cultivated as well as wild chickpea species. Validation of the best reference genes was carried out by studying their impact on normalization of aquaporin genes PIP1;4 and TIP3;1, in three contrasting chickpea genotypes under high vapor pressure deficit (VPD) treatment. The chickpea TIP3;1 gene got significantly up regulated under high VPD conditions with higher relative expression in the drought susceptible genotype, confirming the suitability of the selected reference genes for expression analysis. This is the first comprehensive study on the stability of the new generation reference genes for qPCR studies in chickpea across species, different tissues and abiotic stresses. PMID:26863232

  5. Identification and Validation of Reference Genes and Their Impact on Normalized Gene Expression Studies across Cultivated and Wild Cicer Species

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar; Sri Cindhuri, Katamreddy; Sivaji Ganesh, Adusumalli; Sharma, Kiran Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR) is a preferred and reliable method for accurate quantification of gene expression to understand precise gene functions. A total of 25 candidate reference genes including traditional and new generation reference genes were selected and evaluated in a diverse set of chickpea samples. The samples used in this study included nine chickpea genotypes (Cicer spp.) comprising of cultivated and wild species, six abiotic stress treatments (drought, salinity, high vapor pressure deficit, abscisic acid, cold and heat shock), and five diverse tissues (leaf, root, flower, seedlings and seed). The geNorm, NormFinder and RefFinder algorithms used to identify stably expressed genes in four sample sets revealed stable expression of UCP and G6PD genes across genotypes, while TIP41 and CAC were highly stable under abiotic stress conditions. While PP2A and ABCT genes were ranked as best for different tissues, ABCT, UCP and CAC were most stable across all samples. This study demonstrated the usefulness of new generation reference genes for more accurate qPCR based gene expression quantification in cultivated as well as wild chickpea species. Validation of the best reference genes was carried out by studying their impact on normalization of aquaporin genes PIP1;4 and TIP3;1, in three contrasting chickpea genotypes under high vapor pressure deficit (VPD) treatment. The chickpea TIP3;1 gene got significantly up regulated under high VPD conditions with higher relative expression in the drought susceptible genotype, confirming the suitability of the selected reference genes for expression analysis. This is the first comprehensive study on the stability of the new generation reference genes for qPCR studies in chickpea across species, different tissues and abiotic stresses. PMID:26863232

  6. The Impact of Multifunctional Genes on "Guilt by Association" Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Jesse; Pavlidis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Many previous studies have shown that by using variants of “guilt-by-association”, gene function predictions can be made with very high statistical confidence. In these studies, it is assumed that the “associations” in the data (e.g., protein interaction partners) of a gene are necessary in establishing “guilt”. In this paper we show that multifunctionality, rather than association, is a primary driver of gene function prediction. We first show that knowledge of the degree of multifunctionality alone can produce astonishingly strong performance when used as a predictor of gene function. We then demonstrate how multifunctionality is encoded in gene interaction data (such as protein interactions and coexpression networks) and how this can feed forward into gene function prediction algorithms. We find that high-quality gene function predictions can be made using data that possesses no information on which gene interacts with which. By examining a wide range of networks from mouse, human and yeast, as well as multiple prediction methods and evaluation metrics, we provide evidence that this problem is pervasive and does not reflect the failings of any particular algorithm or data type. We propose computational controls that can be used to provide more meaningful control when estimating gene function prediction performance. We suggest that this source of bias due to multifunctionality is important to control for, with widespread implications for the interpretation of genomics studies. PMID:21364756

  7. Systematic analysis of somatic mutations impacting gene expression in 12 tumour types

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jiarui; McConechy, Melissa K.; Horlings, Hugo M.; Ha, Gavin; Chun Chan, Fong; Funnell, Tyler; Mullaly, Sarah C.; Reimand, Jüri; Bashashati, Ali; Bader, Gary D.; Huntsman, David; Aparicio, Samuel; Condon, Anne; Shah, Sohrab P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel hierarchical Bayes statistical model, xseq, to systematically quantify the impact of somatic mutations on expression profiles. We establish the theoretical framework and robust inference characteristics of the method using computational benchmarking. We then use xseq to analyse thousands of tumour data sets available through The Cancer Genome Atlas, to systematically quantify somatic mutations impacting expression profiles. We identify 30 novel cis-effect tumour suppressor gene candidates, enriched in loss-of-function mutations and biallelic inactivation. Analysis of trans-effects of mutations and copy number alterations with xseq identifies mutations in 150 genes impacting expression networks, with 89 novel predictions. We reveal two important novel characteristics of mutation impact on expression: (1) patients harbouring known driver mutations exhibit different downstream gene expression consequences; (2) expression patterns for some mutations are stable across tumour types. These results have critical implications for identification and interpretation of mutations with consequent impact on transcription in cancer. PMID:26436532

  8. High-resolution genome-wide scan of genes, gene-networks and cellular systems impacting the yeast ionome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To balance the demand for uptake of essential elements with their potential toxicity living cells have complex regulatory mechanisms. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen to identify genes that impact the elemental composition (‘ionome’) of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using inductively coupled...

  9. The impact of RNA-seq aligners on gene expression estimation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng; Wu, Po-Yen; Tong, Li; Phan, John H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    While numerous RNA-seq data analysis pipelines are available, research has shown that the choice of pipeline influences the results of differentially expressed gene detection and gene expression estimation. Gene expression estimation is a key step in RNA-seq data analysis, since the accuracy of gene expression estimates profoundly affects the subsequent analysis. Generally, gene expression estimation involves sequence alignment and quantification, and accurate gene expression estimation requires accurate alignment. However, the impact of aligners on gene expression estimation remains unclear. We address this need by constructing nine pipelines consisting of nine spliced aligners and one quantifier. We then use simulated data to investigate the impact of aligners on gene expression estimation. To evaluate alignment, we introduce three alignment performance metrics, (1) the percentage of reads aligned, (2) the percentage of reads aligned with zero mismatch (ZeroMismatchPercentage), and (3) the percentage of reads aligned with at most one mismatch (ZeroOneMismatchPercentage). We then evaluate the impact of alignment performance on gene expression estimation using three metrics, (1) gene detection accuracy, (2) the number of genes falsely quantified (FalseExpNum), and (3) the number of genes with falsely estimated fold changes (FalseFcNum). We found that among various pipelines, FalseExpNum and FalseFcNum are correlated. Moreover, FalseExpNum is linearly correlated with the percentage of reads aligned and ZeroMismatchPercentage, and FalseFcNum is linearly correlated with ZeroMismatchPercentage. Because of this correlation, the percentage of reads aligned and ZeroMismatchPercentage may be used to assess the performance of gene expression estimation for all RNA-seq datasets.

  10. Impact of ACTH Signaling on Transcriptional Regulation of Steroidogenic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Carmen; Lalli, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The trophic peptide hormone adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) stimulates steroid hormone biosynthesis evoking both a rapid, acute response and a long-term, chronic response, via the activation of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The acute response is initiated by the mobilization of cholesterol from lipid stores and its delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane, a process that is mediated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. The chronic response results in the increased coordinated transcription of genes encoding steroidogenic enzymes. ACTH binding to its cognate receptor, melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), stimulates adenylyl cyclase, thus inducing cAMP production, PKA activation, and phosphorylation of specific nuclear factors, which bind to target promoters and facilitate coactivator protein recruitment to direct steroidogenic gene transcription. This review provides a general view of the transcriptional control exerted by the ACTH/cAMP system on the expression of genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes in the adrenal cortex. Special emphasis will be given to the transcription factors required to mediate ACTH-dependent transcription of steroidogenic genes. PMID:27065945

  11. Impact of distinct insect pollinators on gene flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The vast majority of fruits and vegetables, together with some hay crops (alfalfa) and some oil-producing crops (canola) are pollinated by insects. However we have little information on how insect pollinators affect the movement of genes via pollen and even less on how distinct insect pollinators ma...

  12. Estrogen Signaling Multiple Pathways to Impact Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Maria; Galluzzo, Paola; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Steroid hormones exert profound effects on cell growth, development, differentiation, and homeostasis. Their effects are mediated through specific intracellular steroid receptors that act via multiple mechanisms. Among others, the action mechanism starting upon 17β-estradiol (E2) binds to its receptors (ER) is considered a paradigmatic example of how steroid hormones function. Ligand-activated ER dimerizes and translocates in the nucleus where it recognizes specific hormone response elements located in or near promoter DNA regions of target genes. Behind the classical genomic mechanism shared with other steroid hormones, E2 also modulates gene expression by a second indirect mechanism that involves the interaction of ER with other transcription factors which, in turn, bind their cognate DNA elements. In this case, ER modulates the activities of transcription factors such as the activator protein (AP)-1, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and stimulating protein-1 (Sp-1), by stabilizing DNA-protein complexes and/or recruiting co-activators. In addition, E2 binding to ER may also exert rapid actions that start with the activation of a variety of signal transduction pathways (e.g. ERK/MAPK, p38/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC/PKC). The debate about the contribution of different ER-mediated signaling pathways to coordinate the expression of specific sets of genes is still open. This review will focus on the recent knowledge about the mechanism by which ERs regulate the expression of target genes and the emerging field of integration of membrane and nuclear receptor signaling, giving examples of the ways by which the genomic and non-genomic actions of ERs on target genes converge. PMID:18369406

  13. Impact of experience-dependent and -independent factors on gene expression in songbird brain.

    PubMed

    Drnevich, Jenny; Replogle, Kirstin L; Lovell, Peter; Hahn, Thomas P; Johnson, Frank; Mast, Thomas G; Nordeen, Ernest; Nordeen, Kathy; Strand, Christy; London, Sarah E; Mukai, Motoko; Wingfield, John C; Arnold, Arthur P; Ball, Gregory F; Brenowitz, Eliot A; Wade, Juli; Mello, Claudio V; Clayton, David F

    2012-10-16

    Songbirds provide rich natural models for studying the relationships between brain anatomy, behavior, environmental signals, and gene expression. Under the Songbird Neurogenomics Initiative, investigators from 11 laboratories collected brain samples from six species of songbird under a range of experimental conditions, and 488 of these samples were analyzed systematically for gene expression by microarray. ANOVA was used to test 32 planned contrasts in the data, revealing the relative impact of different factors. The brain region from which tissue was taken had the greatest influence on gene expression profile, affecting the majority of signals measured by 18,848 cDNA spots on the microarray. Social and environmental manipulations had a highly variable impact, interpreted here as a manifestation of paradoxical "constitutive plasticity" (fewer inducible genes) during periods of enhanced behavioral responsiveness. Several specific genes were identified that may be important in the evolution of linkages between environmental signals and behavior. The data were also analyzed using weighted gene coexpression network analysis, followed by gene ontology analysis. This revealed modules of coexpressed genes that are also enriched for specific functional annotations, such as "ribosome" (expressed more highly in juvenile brain) and "dopamine metabolic process" (expressed more highly in striatal song control nucleus area X). These results underscore the complexity of influences on neural gene expression and provide a resource for studying how these influences are integrated during natural experience. PMID:23045667

  14. Impact of asymmetric gene repertoire between cyclostomes and gnathostomes.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2013-02-01

    Extant vertebrates are divided into the two major groups, cyclostomes and gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates). The former includes jawless fishes, hagfishes and lampreys, and the latter includes all extant jawed vertebrates. In many research fields, the phenotypic traits of the cyclostomes have been considered crucial in understanding the evolutionary process from invertebrates to vertebrates. Recent studies have suggested that the common ancestor of the extant vertebrates including hagfishes and lampreys underwent two-round of whole genome duplications, and thus the genome expansion solely does not account for phenotypic differences between cyclostomes and gnathostomes. Emerging evidence from molecular phylogeny of individual gene families indicates that the gene repertoire expanded at the common ancestor of vertebrates were later reshaped asymmetrically between the two lineages, resulting in the retention of differential gene sets. This also confuses interpretation of conserved synteny which often serves as indicator of orthology and the ploidy level. In this review, current controversy and future perspectives of cyclostome genomics are discussed with reference to evolutionary developmental biology. PMID:23291292

  15. Impact of obesity-related genes in Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective was to investigate the association between BMI and single nucleotide polymorphisms previously identified of obesity-related genes in two Spanish populations. Forty SNPs in 23 obesity-related genes were evaluated in a rural population characterized by a high prevalence of obesity (869 subjects, mean age 46 yr, 62% women, 36% obese) and in an urban population (1425 subjects, mean age 54 yr, 50% women, 19% obese). Genotyping was assessed by using SNPlex and PLINK for the association analysis. Results Polymorphisms of the FTO were significantly associated with BMI, in the rural population (beta 0.87, p-value <0.001). None of the other SNPs showed significant association after Bonferroni correction in the two populations or in the pooled analysis. A weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) was constructed using the risk alleles of the Tag-SNPs with a positive Beta parameter in both populations. From the first to the fifth quintile of the score, the BMI increased 0.45 kg/m2 in Hortega and 2.0 kg/m2 in Pizarra. Overall, the obesity predictive value was low (less than 1%). Conclusion The risk associated with polymorphisms is low and the overall effect on BMI or obesity prediction is minimal. A weighted genetic risk score based on genes mainly acting through central nervous system mechanisms was associated with BMI but it yields minimal clinical prediction for the obesity risk in the general population. PMID:24267414

  16. Clinical impact of recurrently mutated genes on lymphoma diagnostics: state-of-the-art and beyond.

    PubMed

    Rosenquist, Richard; Rosenwald, Andreas; Du, Ming-Qing; Gaidano, Gianluca; Groenen, Patricia; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Ghia, Paolo; Gaulard, Philippe; Campo, Elias; Stamatopoulos, Kostas

    2016-09-01

    Similar to the inherent clinical heterogeneity of most, if not all, lymphoma entities, the genetic landscape of these tumors is markedly complex in the majority of cases, with a rapidly growing list of recurrently mutated genes discovered in recent years by next-generation sequencing technology. Whilst a few genes have been implied to have diagnostic, prognostic and even predictive impact, most gene mutations still require rigorous validation in larger, preferably prospective patient series, to scrutinize their potential role in lymphoma diagnostics and patient management. In selected entities, a predominantly mutated gene is identified in almost all cases (e.g. Waldenström's macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and hairy-cell leukemia), while for the vast majority of lymphomas a quite diverse mutation pattern is observed, with a limited number of frequently mutated genes followed by a seemingly endless tail of genes with mutations at a low frequency. Herein, the European Expert Group on NGS-based Diagnostics in Lymphomas (EGNL) summarizes the current status of this ever-evolving field, and, based on the present evidence level, segregates mutations into the following categories: i) immediate impact on treatment decisions, ii) diagnostic impact, iii) prognostic impact, iv) potential clinical impact in the near future, or v) should only be considered for research purposes. In the coming years, coordinated efforts aiming to apply targeted next-generation sequencing in large patient series will be needed in order to elucidate if a particular gene mutation will have an immediate impact on the lymphoma classification, and ultimately aid clinical decision making. PMID:27582569

  17. Identifying and assessing the impact of wine acid-related genes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Chidi, Boredi S; Rossouw, Debra; Bauer, Florian F

    2016-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used for winemaking show a wide range of fermentation phenotypes, and the genetic background of individual strains contributes significantly to the organoleptic properties of wine. This strain-dependent impact extends to the organic acid composition of the wine, an important quality parameter. However, little is known about the genes which may impact on organic acids during grape must fermentation. To generate novel insights into the genetic regulation of this metabolic network, a subset of genes was identified based on a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes and organic acid profiles of different yeast strains showing different production levels of organic acids. These genes showed significant inter-strain differences in their transcription levels at one or more stages of fermentation and were also considered likely to influence organic acid metabolism based on existing functional annotations. Genes selected in this manner were ADH3, AAD6, SER33, ICL1, GLY1, SFC1, SER1, KGD1, AGX1, OSM1 and GPD2. Yeast strains carrying deletions for these genes were used to conduct fermentations and determine organic acid levels at various stages of alcoholic fermentation in synthetic grape must. The impact of these deletions on organic acid profiles was quantified, leading to novel insights and hypothesis generation regarding the role/s of these genes in wine yeast acid metabolism under fermentative conditions. Overall, the data contribute to our understanding of the roles of selected genes in yeast metabolism in general and of organic acid metabolism in particular. PMID:26040556

  18. The impact of self-identified race on epidemiologic studies of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunita; Murphy, Amy; Howrylak, Judie; Himes, Blanca; Cho, Michael H; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Hunninghake, Gary M; Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Klanderman, Barbara; Ziniti, John; Senter-Sylvia, Jody; Liu, Andy; Szefler, Stanley J; Strunk, Robert; Castro, Mario; Hansel, Nadia N; Diette, Gregory B; Vonakis, Becky M; Adkinson, N Franklin; Carey, Vincent J; Raby, Benjamin A

    2011-02-01

    Although population differences in gene expression have been established, the impact on differential gene expression studies in large populations is not well understood. We describe the effect of self-reported race on a gene expression study of lung function in asthma. We generated gene expression profiles for 254 young adults (205 non-Hispanic whites and 49 African Americans) with asthma on whom concurrent total RNA derived from peripheral blood CD4(+) lymphocytes and lung function measurements were obtained. We identified four principal components that explained 62% of the variance in gene expression. The dominant principal component, which explained 29% of the total variance in gene expression, was strongly associated with self-identified race (P<10(-16)). The impact of these racial differences was observed when we performed differential gene expression analysis of lung function. Using multivariate linear models, we tested whether gene expression was associated with a quantitative measure of lung function: pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)). Though unadjusted linear models of FEV(1) identified several genes strongly correlated with lung function, these correlations were due to racial differences in the distribution of both FEV(1) and gene expression, and were no longer statistically significant following adjustment for self-identified race. These results suggest that self-identified race is a critical confounding covariate in epidemiologic studies of gene expression and that, similar to genetic studies, careful consideration of self-identified race in gene expression profiling studies is needed to avoid spurious association. PMID:21254216

  19. Tandem repeat variation in human and great ape populations and its impact on gene expression divergence.

    PubMed

    Bilgin Sonay, Tugce; Carvalho, Tiago; Robinson, Mark D; Greminger, Maja P; Krützen, Michael; Comas, David; Highnam, Gareth; Mittelman, David; Sharp, Andrew; Marques-Bonet, Tomàs; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are stretches of DNA that are highly variable in length and mutate rapidly. They are thus an important source of genetic variation. This variation is highly informative for population and conservation genetics. It has also been associated with several pathological conditions and with gene expression regulation. However, genome-wide surveys of TR variation in humans and closely related species have been scarce due to technical difficulties derived from short-read technology. Here we explored the genome-wide diversity of TRs in a panel of 83 human and nonhuman great ape genomes, in a total of six different species, and studied their impact on gene expression evolution. We found that population diversity patterns can be efficiently captured with short TRs (repeat unit length, 1-5 bp). We examined the potential evolutionary role of TRs in gene expression differences between humans and primates by using 30,275 larger TRs (repeat unit length, 2-50 bp). Genes that contained TRs in the promoters, in their 3' untranslated region, in introns, and in exons had higher expression divergence than genes without repeats in the regions. Polymorphic small repeats (1-5 bp) had also higher expression divergence compared with genes with fixed or no TRs in the gene promoters. Our findings highlight the potential contribution of TRs to human evolution through gene regulation. PMID:26290536

  20. Tandem repeat variation in human and great ape populations and its impact on gene expression divergence

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin Sonay, Tugce; Carvalho, Tiago; Robinson, Mark D.; Greminger, Maja P.; Krützen, Michael; Comas, David; Highnam, Gareth; Mittelman, David; Sharp, Andrew; Marques-Bonet, Tomàs; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are stretches of DNA that are highly variable in length and mutate rapidly. They are thus an important source of genetic variation. This variation is highly informative for population and conservation genetics. It has also been associated with several pathological conditions and with gene expression regulation. However, genome-wide surveys of TR variation in humans and closely related species have been scarce due to technical difficulties derived from short-read technology. Here we explored the genome-wide diversity of TRs in a panel of 83 human and nonhuman great ape genomes, in a total of six different species, and studied their impact on gene expression evolution. We found that population diversity patterns can be efficiently captured with short TRs (repeat unit length, 1–5 bp). We examined the potential evolutionary role of TRs in gene expression differences between humans and primates by using 30,275 larger TRs (repeat unit length, 2–50 bp). Genes that contained TRs in the promoters, in their 3′ untranslated region, in introns, and in exons had higher expression divergence than genes without repeats in the regions. Polymorphic small repeats (1–5 bp) had also higher expression divergence compared with genes with fixed or no TRs in the gene promoters. Our findings highlight the potential contribution of TRs to human evolution through gene regulation. PMID:26290536

  1. Epigenetics Meets Genetics in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Clinical Impact of a Novel Seven-Gene Score

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Guido; Yan, Pearlly; Maharry, Kati; Frankhouser, David; Nicolet, Deedra; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Bucci, Donna; Curfman, John P.; Whitman, Susan P.; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Mendler, Jason H.; Schwind, Sebastian; Becker, Heiko; Bär, Constance; Carroll, Andrew J.; Baer, Maria R.; Wetzler, Meir; Carter, Thomas H.; Powell, Bayard L.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Byrd, John C.; Plass, Christoph; Garzon, Ramiro; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Stone, Richard M.; Volinia, Stefano; Bundschuh, Ralf; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Molecular risk stratification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is largely based on genetic markers. However, epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation, deregulate gene expression and may also have prognostic impact. We evaluated the clinical relevance of integrating DNA methylation and genetic information in AML. Methods Next-generation sequencing analysis of methylated DNA identified differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with prognostic mutations in older (≥ 60 years) cytogenetically normal (CN) patients with AML (n = 134). Genes with promoter DMRs and expression levels significantly associated with outcome were used to compute a prognostic gene expression weighted summary score that was tested and validated in four independent patient sets (n = 355). Results In the training set, we identified seven genes (CD34, RHOC, SCRN1, F2RL1, FAM92A1, MIR155HG, and VWA8) with promoter DMRs and expression associated with overall survival (OS; P ≤ .001). Each gene had high DMR methylation and lower expression, which were associated with better outcome. A weighted summary expression score of the seven gene expression levels was computed. A low score was associated with a higher complete remission (CR) rate and longer disease-free survival and OS (P < .001 for all end points). This was validated in multivariable models and in two younger (< 60 years) and two older independent sets of patients with CN-AML. Considering the seven genes individually, the fewer the genes with high expression, the better the outcome. Younger and older patients with no genes or one gene with high expression had the best outcomes (CR rate, 94% and 87%, respectively; 3-year OS, 80% and 42%, respectively). Conclusion A seven-gene score encompassing epigenetic and genetic prognostic information identifies novel AML subsets that are meaningful for treatment guidance. PMID:24378410

  2. Signalling pathway impact analysis based on the strength of interaction between genes.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhenshen; Li, Xianbin; Zan, Xiangzhen; Shen, Liangzhong; Ma, Runnian; Liu, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Signalling pathway analysis is a popular approach that is used to identify significant cancer-related pathways based on differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from biological experiments. The main advantage of signalling pathway analysis lies in the fact that it assesses both the number of DEGs and the propagation of signal perturbation in signalling pathways. However, this method simplifies the interactions between genes by categorising them only as activation (+1) and suppression (-1), which does not encompass the range of interactions in real pathways, where interaction strength between genes may vary. In this study, the authors used newly developed signalling pathway impact analysis (SPIA) methods, SPIA based on Pearson correlation coefficient (PSPIA), and mutual information (MSPIA), to measure the interaction strength between pairs of genes. In analyses of a colorectal cancer dataset, a lung cancer dataset, and a pancreatic cancer dataset, PSPIA and MSPIA identified more candidate cancer-related pathways than were identified by SPIA. Generally, MSPIA performed better than PSPIA. PMID:27444024

  3. Genetic variants in microRNA genes: impact on microRNA expression, function, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Cammaerts, Sophia; Strazisar, Mojca; De Rijk, Peter; Del Favero, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression and like any other gene, their coding sequences are subject to genetic variation. Variants in miRNA genes can have profound effects on miRNA functionality at all levels, including miRNA transcription, maturation, and target specificity, and as such they can also contribute to disease. The impact of variants in miRNA genes is the focus of the present review. To put these effects into context, we first discuss the requirements of miRNA transcripts for maturation. In the last part an overview of available databases and tools and experimental approaches to investigate miRNA variants related to human disease is presented. PMID:26052338

  4. Prognostic Impact of WT-1 Gene Expression in Egyptian Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hagag, Adel A; Badraia, Ibrahim M; Hassan, Samir M; Abd El-Lateef, Amal E

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer representing 23% of pediatric cancers. Wilms’ tumor -1 gene is a novel prognostic factor, minimal residual disease marker and therapeutic target in acute leukemia. Aim of the work The aim of this work was to study the impact of WT-1 gene expression in the prognosis of ALL. Patients and methods This study was conducted on 40 Egyptian children with newly diagnosed ALL who were subjected to full history taking, thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations including; complete blood count, LDH, BM aspiration, cytochemistry, immunophenotyping, FISH technique for detection of t(12;21) and t(9;22) and assessment of WT-1 Gene by real-time PCR in BM samples at time of diagnosis. Results Positive WT-1 gene expression was found in 22 cases (55%) and negative expression in 18 cases (45%). Positive WT-1 gene expression group (n=22) includes 14 males and 8 females with mean age at presentation of 5.261 ± 0.811 while negative WT-1 gene expression group (n=18) includes 12 males and 6 females with mean age at diagnosis of 9.669 ± 3.731 with significantly older age in negative WT-1 gene expression group but no significant differences between positive and negative WT-1 gene expression groups regarding sex and clinical presentations. There were no significant differences in platelets and WBCs counts, hemoglobin and LDH levels and the number of peripheral blood and BM blast cells at diagnosis between positive and negative WT-1 gene expression groups but after induction therapy there were significantly lower BM blast cells in positive WT-1 gene expression group. There were no statistically significant differences between positive and negative WT-1 gene expression groups regarding immunophenotyping and chromosomal translocations including t(12;21) and t(9;22). There were a significantly higher relapse and death rate and a lower rate of CR, DFS, and OAS in negative WT-1 gene expression

  5. Diversity of benzyl- and alkylsuccinate synthase genes in hydrocarbon-impacted environments and enrichment cultures.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Amy V; Davidova, Irene A; Savage-Ashlock, Kristen; Parisi, Victoria A; Gieg, Lisa M; Suflita, Joseph M; Kukor, Jerome J; Wawrik, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms play an important role in the natural attenuation of spilled petroleum in a variety of anoxic environments. The role of benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS) in aromatic hydrocarbon degradation and its use as a biomarker for field investigations are well documented. The recent discovery of alkylsuccinate synthase (ASS) allows the opportunity to test whether its encoding gene, assA, can serve as a comparable biomarker of anaerobic alkane degradation. Degenerate assA- and bssA-targeted PCR primers were designed in order to survey the diversity of genes associated with aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in petroleum-impacted environments and enrichment cultures. DNA was extracted from an anaerobic alkane-degrading isolate (Desulfoglaeba alkenexedens ALDC), hydrocarbon-contaminated river and aquifer sediments, a paraffin-degrading enrichment, and a propane-utilizing mixed culture. Partial assA and bssA genes were PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced, yielding several novel clades of assA genes. These data expand the range of alkane-degrading conditions for which relevant gene sequences are available and indicate that considerable diversity of assA genes can be found in hydrocarbon-impacted environments. The detection of genes associated with anaerobic alkane degradation in conjunction with the in situ detection of alkylsuccinate metabolites was also demonstrated. Comparable molecular signals of assA/bssA were not found when environmental metagenome databases of uncontaminated sites were searched. These data confirm that the assA gene is a useful biomarker for anaerobic alkane metabolism. PMID:20504044

  6. Impact of gene patents on diagnostic testing: a new patent landscaping method applied to spinocerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Berthels, Nele; Matthijs, Gert; Van Overwalle, Geertrui

    2011-01-01

    Recent reports in Europe and the United States raise concern about the potential negative impact of gene patents on the freedom to operate of diagnosticians and on the access of patients to genetic diagnostic services. Patents, historically seen as legal instruments to trigger innovation, could cause undesired side effects in the public health domain. Clear empirical evidence on the alleged hindering effect of gene patents is still scarce. We therefore developed a patent categorization method to determine which gene patents could indeed be problematic. The method is applied to patents relevant for genetic testing of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). The SCA test is probably the most widely used DNA test in (adult) neurology, as well as one of the most challenging due to the heterogeneity of the disease. Typically tested as a gene panel covering the five common SCA subtypes, we show that the patenting of SCA genes and testing methods and the associated licensing conditions could have far-reaching consequences on legitimate access to this gene panel. Moreover, with genetic testing being increasingly standardized, simply ignoring patents is unlikely to hold out indefinitely. This paper aims to differentiate among so-called ‘gene patents' by lifting out the truly problematic ones. In doing so, awareness is raised among all stakeholders in the genetic diagnostics field who are not necessarily familiar with the ins and outs of patenting and licensing. PMID:21811306

  7. Epigenetic regulation of intragenic transposable elements impacts gene transcription in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Le, Tu N.; Miyazaki, Yuji; Takuno, Shohei; Saze, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Genomes of higher eukaryotes, including plants, contain numerous transposable elements (TEs), that are often silenced by epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone modifications and DNA methylation. Although TE silencing adversely affects expression of nearby genes, recent studies reveal the presence of intragenic TEs marked by repressive heterochromatic epigenetic marks within transcribed genes. However, even for the well-studied plant model Arabidopsis thaliana, the abundance of intragenic TEs, how they are epigenetically regulated, and their potential impacts on host gene expression, remain unexplored. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed genome-wide distribution and epigenetic regulation of intragenic TEs in A. thaliana. Our analysis revealed that about 3% of TEs are located within gene bodies, dominantly at intronic regions. Most of them are shorter and less methylated than intergenic TEs, but they are still targeted by RNA-directed DNA methylation-dependent and independent pathways. Surprisingly, the heterochromatic epigenetic marks at TEs are maintained within actively transcribed genes. Moreover, the heterochromatic state of intronic TEs is critical for proper transcription of associated genes. Our study provides the first insight into how intragenic TEs affect the transcriptional landscape of the A. thaliana genome, and suggests the importance of epigenetic mechanisms for regulation of TEs within transcriptional gene units. PMID:25813042

  8. Bacteria and Genes Involved in Arsenic Speciation in Sediment Impacted by Long-Term Gold Mining

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Patrícia S.; Scholte, Larissa L. S.; Reis, Mariana P.; Chaves, Anderson V.; Oliveira, Pollyanna L.; Itabayana, Luiza B.; Suhadolnik, Maria Luiza S.; Barbosa, Francisco A. R.; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial community and genes involved in geobiocycling of arsenic (As) from sediment impacted by long-term gold mining were characterized through culture-based analysis of As-transforming bacteria and metagenomic studies of the arsC, arrA, and aioA genes. Sediment was collected from the historically gold mining impacted Mina stream, located in one of the world’s largest mining regions known as the “Iron Quadrangle”. A total of 123 As-resistant bacteria were recovered from the enrichment cultures, which were phenotypically and genotypically characterized for As-transformation. A diverse As-resistant bacteria community was found through phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene. Bacterial isolates were affiliated with Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria and were represented by 20 genera. Most were AsV-reducing (72%), whereas AsIII-oxidizing accounted for 20%. Bacteria harboring the arsC gene predominated (85%), followed by aioA (20%) and arrA (7%). Additionally, we identified two novel As-transforming genera, Thermomonas and Pannonibacter. Metagenomic analysis of arsC, aioA, and arrA sequences confirmed the presence of these genes, with arrA sequences being more closely related to uncultured organisms. Evolutionary analyses revealed high genetic similarity between some arsC and aioA sequences obtained from isolates and clone libraries, suggesting that those isolates may represent environmentally important bacteria acting in As speciation. In addition, our findings show that the diversity of arrA genes is wider than earlier described, once none arrA-OTUs were affiliated with known reference strains. Therefore, the molecular diversity of arrA genes is far from being fully explored deserving further attention. PMID:24755825

  9. Characterization of the differentially methylated region of the Impact gene that exhibits Glires-specific imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Kohji; Wintle, Richard F; Scherer, Stephen W

    2008-01-01

    Background Imprinted genes are exclusively expressed from one of the two parental alleles in a parent-of-origin-specific manner. In mammals, nearly 100 genes are documented to be imprinted. To understand the mechanism behind this gene regulation and to identify novel imprinted genes, common features of DNA sequences have been analyzed; however, the general features required for genomic imprinting have not yet been identified, possibly due to variability in underlying molecular mechanisms from locus to locus. Results We performed a thorough comparative genomic analysis of a single locus, Impact, which is imprinted only in Glires (rodents and lagomorphs). The fact that Glires and primates diverged from each other as recent as 70 million years ago makes comparisons between imprinted and non-imprinted orthologues relatively reliable. In species from the Glires clade, Impact bears a differentially methylated region, whereby the maternal allele is hypermethylated. Analysis of this region demonstrated that imprinting was not associated with the presence of direct tandem repeats nor with CpG dinucleotide density. In contrast, a CpG periodicity of 8 bp was observed in this region in species of the Glires clade compared to those of carnivores, artiodactyls, and primates. Conclusions We show that tandem repeats are dispensable, establishment of the differentially methylated region does not rely on G+C content and CpG density, and the CpG periodicity of 8 bp is meaningful to the imprinting. This interval has recently been reported to be optimal for de novo methylation by the Dnmt3a-Dnmt3L complex, suggesting its importance in the establishment of imprinting in Impact and other genes. PMID:19014519

  10. Predictive performance of microarray gene signatures: impact of tumor heterogeneity and multiple mechanisms of drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    A’Hern, Roger; Bidard, Francois-Clement; Lemetre, Christophe; Swanton, Charles; Shen, Ronglai; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.

    2014-01-01

    Gene signatures have failed to predict responses to breast cancer therapy in patients to date. In this study, we used bioinformatic methods to explore the hypothesis that the existence of multiple drug resistance mechanisms in different patients may limit the power of gene signatures to predict responses to therapy. Additionally, we explored whether sub-stratification of resistant cases could improve performance. Gene expression profiles from 1,550 breast cancers analyzed with the same microarray platform were retrieved from publicly available sources. Gene expression changes were introduced in cases defined as sensitive or resistant to a hypothetical therapy. In the resistant group, up to five different mechanisms of drug resistance causing distinct or overlapping gene expression changes were generated bioinformatically, and their impact on sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the signatures was investigated. We found that increasing the number of resistance mechanisms corresponding to different gene expression changes weakened the performance of the predictive signatures generated, even if the resistance-induced changes in gene expression were sufficiently strong and informative. Performance was also affected by cohort composition and the proportion of sensitive versus resistant cases or resistant cases that were mechanistically distinct. It was possible to improve response prediction by sub-stratifying chemotherapy-resistant cases from actual datasets (non-bioinformatically-perturbed datasets), and by using outliers to model multiple resistance mechanisms. Our work supports the hypothesis that the presence of multiple resistance mechanisms to a given therapy in patients limits the ability of gene signatures to make clinically-useful predictions. PMID:24706696

  11. Significant impact of miRNA–target gene networks on genetics of human complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yukinori; Muramatsu, Tomoki; Suita, Naomasa; Kanai, Masahiro; Kawakami, Eiryo; Iotchkova, Valentina; Soranzo, Nicole; Inazawa, Johji; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The impact of microRNA (miRNA) on the genetics of human complex traits, especially in the context of miRNA-target gene networks, has not been fully assessed. Here, we developed a novel analytical method, MIGWAS, to comprehensively evaluate enrichment of genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals in miRNA–target gene networks. We applied the method to the GWAS results of the 18 human complex traits from >1.75 million subjects, and identified significant enrichment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), kidney function, and adult height (P < 0.05/18 = 0.0028, most significant enrichment in RA with P = 1.7 × 10−4). Interestingly, these results were consistent with current literature-based knowledge of the traits on miRNA obtained through the NCBI PubMed database search (adjusted P = 0.024). Our method provided a list of miRNA and target gene pairs with excess genetic association signals, part of which included drug target genes. We identified a miRNA (miR-4728-5p) that downregulates PADI2, a novel RA risk gene considered as a promising therapeutic target (rs761426, adjusted P = 2.3 × 10−9). Our study indicated the significant impact of miRNA–target gene networks on the genetics of human complex traits, and provided resources which should contribute to drug discovery and nucleic acid medicine. PMID:26927695

  12. Microevolution of Duplications and Deletions and Their Impact on Gene Expression in the Nematode Pristionchus pacificus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of diversity across the animal kingdom has been accompanied by tremendous gene loss and gain. While comparative genomics has been fruitful to characterize differences in gene content across highly diverged species, little is known about the microevolution of structural variations that cause these differences in the first place. In order to investigate the genomic impact of structural variations, we made use of genomic and transcriptomic data from the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, which has been established as a satellite model to Caenorhabditis elegans for comparative biology. We exploit the fact that P. pacificus is a highly diverse species for which various genomic data including the draft genome of a sister species P. exspectatus is available. Based on resequencing coverage data for two natural isolates we identified large (> 2kb) deletions and duplications relative to the reference strain. By restriction to completely syntenic regions between P. pacificus and P. exspectatus, we were able to polarize the comparison and to assess the impact of structural variations on expression levels. We found that while loss of genes correlates with lack of expression, duplication of genes has virtually no effect on gene expression. Further investigating expression of individual copies at sites that segregate between the duplicates, we found in the majority of cases only one of the copies to be expressed. Nevertheless, we still find that certain gene classes are strongly depleted in deletions as well as duplications, suggesting evolutionary constraint acting on synteny. In summary, our results are consistent with a model, where most structural variations are either deleterious or neutral and provide first insights into the microevolution of structural variations in the P. pacificus genome. PMID:26125626

  13. Significant impact of miRNA-target gene networks on genetics of human complex traits.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Muramatsu, Tomoki; Suita, Naomasa; Kanai, Masahiro; Kawakami, Eiryo; Iotchkova, Valentina; Soranzo, Nicole; Inazawa, Johji; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The impact of microRNA (miRNA) on the genetics of human complex traits, especially in the context of miRNA-target gene networks, has not been fully assessed. Here, we developed a novel analytical method, MIGWAS, to comprehensively evaluate enrichment of genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals in miRNA-target gene networks. We applied the method to the GWAS results of the 18 human complex traits from >1.75 million subjects, and identified significant enrichment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), kidney function, and adult height (P < 0.05/18 = 0.0028, most significant enrichment in RA with P = 1.7 × 10(-4)). Interestingly, these results were consistent with current literature-based knowledge of the traits on miRNA obtained through the NCBI PubMed database search (adjusted P = 0.024). Our method provided a list of miRNA and target gene pairs with excess genetic association signals, part of which included drug target genes. We identified a miRNA (miR-4728-5p) that downregulates PADI2, a novel RA risk gene considered as a promising therapeutic target (rs761426, adjusted P = 2.3 × 10(-9)). Our study indicated the significant impact of miRNA-target gene networks on the genetics of human complex traits, and provided resources which should contribute to drug discovery and nucleic acid medicine. PMID:26927695

  14. Hepatic catecholestrogen synthases: differential effect of sex, inducers of cytochromes P-450 and of antibody to the glucocorticoid inducible cytochrome P-450 on NADPH-dependent estrogen-2-hydroxylase and on organic hydroperoxide-dependent estrogen-2/4-hydroxylase activity of rat hepatic microsomes.

    PubMed

    Bui, Q D; Weisz, J; Wrighton, S A

    1990-10-01

    Formation of catecholestrogens (CE) by rat hepatic microsomes was re-examined because as recently shown; (1) CE formation can be catalyzed by an NADPH-dependent estrogen-4-hydroxylase (E-4-H(NADPH)) and by a peroxidatic, organic hydroperoxide-dependent estrogen-2/4-hydroxylase (E-2/4-H(OHP)), in addition to the established NADPH-dependent estrogen 2-hydroxylase (E-2-H(NADPH)); and (2) the indirect radiometric and the COMT-coupled radioenzymatic assays, used in many previous studies, may fail to provide an accurate measure, in particular, of 4-OH-CE. Using a direct product isolation assay, hepatic microsomes of both male and female rats were shown to express E-2/4-H(OHP) activity with properties similar to those of peroxidatic activity in other tissues. The activities of E-2/4-H(OHP) and E-2-H(NADPH) were affected differently by 5 out of 7 inducers of cytochromes P-450 administered in vivo. Phenobarbital and dexamethasone caused a 4- and 2-3-fold increase in E-2-H(NADPH) activity, respectively, but only a 38 and 20% increase in E-2/4-H(OHP) activity. Ketoconazol and beta-naphtoflavone caused a modest increase in E-2-H(NADPH) activity but a decrease in OHP-dependent activity. Clofibrate decreased peroxidatic activity by 50% and NADPH-dependent activity by approximately 20%. Both activities were increased by ethanol but decreased by isoniazide, an agent which induces the same form of cytochromes P-450 as ethanol. Polyclonal antibody against P-450p, a form of P-450 induced by glucocorticoids, inhibited E-2-H(NADPH) but not E-2/4-H(OHP) activity of untreated and of dexamethasone- and phenobarbital-treated rats. This study establishes that CE formation may occur in liver via the peroxidatic pathway and indicates that this pathway depends on forms of P-450 different from those mediating E-2-H(NADPH) activity. It also confirms and extends previous observations of the involvement of multiple, constitutive and induced forms of cytochrome P-450 in NADPH-dependent 2

  15. Gene patents and personalized cancer care: impact of the Myriad case on clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Offit, Kenneth; Bradbury, Angela; Storm, Courtney; Merz, Jon F; Noonan, Kevin E; Spence, Rebecca

    2013-07-20

    Genomic discoveries have transformed the practice of oncology and cancer prevention. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances based on cancer genomics developed during a time when it was possible to patent genes. A case before the Supreme Court, Association for Molecular Pathology v Myriad Genetics, Inc seeks to overturn patents on isolated genes. Although the outcomes are uncertain, it is suggested here that the Supreme Court decision will have few immediate effects on oncology practice or research but may have more significant long-term impact. The Federal Circuit court has already rejected Myriad's broad diagnostic methods claims, and this is not affected by the Supreme Court decision. Isolated DNA patents were already becoming obsolete on scientific grounds, in an era when human DNA sequence is public knowledge and because modern methods of next-generation sequencing need not involve isolated DNA. The Association for Molecular Pathology v Myriad Supreme Court decision will have limited impact on new drug development, as new drug patents usually involve cellular methods. A nuanced Supreme Court decision acknowledging the scientific distinction between synthetic cDNA and genomic DNA will further mitigate any adverse impact. A Supreme Court decision to include or exclude all types of DNA from patent eligibility could impact future incentives for genomic discovery as well as the future delivery of medical care. Whatever the outcome of this important case, it is important that judicial and legislative actions in this area maximize genomic discovery while also ensuring patients' access to personalized cancer care. PMID:23766521

  16. Next-generation gene discovery for variants of large impact on lipid traits

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Elisabeth; Blue, Elizabeth; Jarvik, Gail P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Detection of high impact variants on lipid traits is complicated by complex genetic architecture. Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) successfully identified many novel genes associated with lipid traits, it was less successful in identifying variants with a large impact on the phenotype. This is not unexpected, as the more common variants detectable by GWAS typically have small effects. The availability of large familial datasets and sequence data has changed the paradigm for successful genomic discovery of the novel genes and pathogenic variants underlying lipid disorders. Recent findings Novel loci with large effects have been successfully mapped in families, and next-generation sequencing allowed for the identification of the underlying lipid associated variants of large effect size. The success of this strategy relies on the simplification of the underlying genetic variation by focusing on large single families segregating extreme lipid phenotypes. Summary Rare, high impact variants are expected to have large effects and be more relevant for medical and pharmaceutical applications. Family data have many advantages over population-based data because they allow for the efficient detection of high-impact variants with an exponentially smaller sample size and increased power for follow-up studies. PMID:25636063

  17. The impact of endurance exercise on global and AMPK gene-specific DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    King-Himmelreich, Tanya S; Schramm, Stefanie; Wolters, Miriam C; Schmetzer, Julia; Möser, Christine V; Knothe, Claudia; Resch, Eduard; Peil, Johannes; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2016-05-27

    Alterations in gene expression as a consequence of physical exercise are frequently described. The mechanism of these regulations might depend on epigenetic changes in global or gene-specific DNA methylation levels. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in maintenance of energy homeostasis and is activated by increases in the AMP/ATP ratio as occurring in skeletal muscles after sporting activity. To analyze whether exercise has an impact on the methylation status of the AMPK promoter, we determined the AMPK methylation status in human blood samples from patients before and after sporting activity in the context of rehabilitation as well as in skeletal muscles of trained and untrained mice. Further, we examined long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) as indicator of global DNA methylation changes. Our results revealed that light sporting activity in mice and humans does not alter global DNA methylation but has an effect on methylation of specific CpG sites in the AMPKα2 gene. These regulations were associated with a reduced AMPKα2 mRNA and protein expression in muscle tissue, pointing at a contribution of the methylation status to AMPK expression. Taken together, these results suggest that exercise influences AMPKα2 gene methylation in human blood and eminently in the skeletal muscle of mice and therefore might repress AMPKα2 gene expression. PMID:27103439

  18. Psychological resilience and the gene regulatory impact of posttraumatic stress in Nepali child soldiers.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Brandon A; Worthman, Carol M; Adhikari, Ramesh P; Luitel, Nagendra P; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Ma, Jeffrey; McCreath, Heather; Seeman, Teresa E; Crimmins, Eileen M; Cole, Steven W

    2016-07-19

    Adverse social conditions in early life have been linked to increased expression of proinflammatory genes and reduced expression of antiviral genes in circulating immune cells-the conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA). However, it remains unclear whether such effects are specific to the Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic (WEIRD) cultural environments in which previous research has been conducted. To assess the roles of early adversity and individual psychological resilience in immune system gene regulation within a non-WEIRD population, we evaluated CTRA gene-expression profiles in 254 former child soldiers and matched noncombatant civilians 5 y after the People's War in Nepal. CTRA gene expression was up-regulated in former child soldiers. These effects were linked to the degree of experienced trauma and associated distress-that is, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity-more than to child soldier status per se. Self-perceived psychological resilience was associated with marked buffering of CTRA activation such that PTSD-affected former child soldiers with high levels of personal resilience showed molecular profiles comparable to those of PTSD-free civilians. These results suggest that CTRA responses to early life adversity are not restricted to WEIRD cultural contexts and they underscore the key role of resilience in determining the molecular impact of adverse environments. PMID:27402736

  19. Impact of blue LED irradiation on proliferation and gene expression of cultured human keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Anja; Sticht, Carsten; Dweep, Harsh; van Abeelen, Frank A.; Gretz, Norbert; Oversluizen, Gerrit

    2015-03-01

    Blue light is known for its anti-microbial, anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory effects. Furthermore, it is already used for the treatment of neonatal jaundice and acne. However, little is known about the exact mechanisms of action on gene expression level. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of blue LED irradiation on the proliferation and gene expression in immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT) in vitro. Furthermore its safety was assessed. XTT-tests revealed a decrease in cell proliferation in blue light irradiated cells depending on the duration of light irradiation. Moreover, gene expression analysis demonstrated deregulated genes already 3 hours after blue light irradiation. 24 hours after blue light irradiation the effects seemed to be even more pronounced. The oxidative stress response was significantly increased, pointing to increased ROS production due to blue light, as well as steroid hormone biosynthesis. Downregulated pathways or biological processes were connected to anti-inflammatory response. Interestingly, also the melanoma pathway contained significantly downregulated genes 24 hours after blue light irradiation, which stands in accordance to literature that blue light can also inhibit proliferation in cancer cells. First tests with melanoma cells revealed a decrease in cell proliferation after blue light irradiation. In conclusion, blue light irradiation might open avenues to new therapeutic regimens; at least blue light seems to have no effect that induces cancer growth or formation.

  20. Widespread Impact of Chromosomal Inversions on Gene Expression Uncovers Robustness via Phenotypic Buffering.

    PubMed

    Naseeb, Samina; Carter, Zorana; Minnis, David; Donaldson, Ian; Zeef, Leo; Delneri, Daniela

    2016-07-01

    The nonrandom gene organization in eukaryotes plays a significant role in genome evolution and function. Chromosomal structural changes impact meiotic fitness and, in several organisms, are associated with speciation and rapid adaptation to different environments. Small sized chromosomal inversions, encompassing few genes, are pervasive in Saccharomyces "sensu stricto" species, while larger inversions are less common in yeasts compared with higher eukaryotes. To explore the effect of gene order on phenotype, reproductive isolation, and gene expression, we engineered 16 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains carrying all possible paracentric and pericentric inversions between Ty1 elements, a natural substrate for rearrangements. We found that 4 inversions were lethal, while the other 12 did not show any fitness advantage or disadvantage in rich and minimal media. At meiosis, only a weak negative correlation with fitness was seen with the size of the inverted region. However, significantly lower fertility was seen in heterozygote invertant strains carrying recombination hotspots within the breakpoints. Altered transcription was observed throughout the genome rather than being overrepresented within the inversions. In spite of the large difference in gene expression in the inverted strains, mitotic fitness was not impaired in the majority of the 94 conditions tested, indicating that the robustness of the expression network buffers the deleterious effects of structural changes in several environments. Overall, our results support the notion that transcriptional changes may compensate for Ty-mediated rearrangements resulting in the maintenance of a constant phenotype, and suggest that large inversions in yeast are unlikely to be a selectable trait during vegetative growth. PMID:26929245

  1. Tetracycline residues and tetracycline resistance genes in groundwater impacted by swine production facilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mackie, R.I.; Koike, S.; Krapac, I.; Chee-Sanford, J.; Maxwell, Susan; Aminov, R.I.

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotics are used at therapeutic levels to treat disease; at slightly lower levels as prophylactics; and at low, subtherapeutic levels for growth promotion and improvement of feed efficiency. Over 88% of swine producers in the United States gave antimicrobials to grower/finisher pigs in feed as a growth promoter in 2000. It is estimated that ca. 75% of antibiotics are not absorbed by animals and are excreted in urine and feces. The extensive use of antibiotics in swine production has resulted in antibiotic resistance in many intestinal bacteria, which are also excreted in swine feces, resulting in dissemination of resistance genes into the environment.To assess the impact of manure management on groundwater quality, groundwater samples have been collected near two swine confinement facilities that use lagoons for manure storage and treatment. Several key contaminant indicators-including inorganic ions, antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance genes-were analyzed in groundwater collected from the monitoring wells. Chloride, ammonium, potassium, and sodium were predominant inorganic constituents in the manure samples and served as indicators of groundwater contamination. Based on these analyses, shallow groundwater has been impacted by lagoon seepage at both sites. Liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) was used to measure the dissolved concentrations of tetracycline, chlortetracycline, and oxytetracycline in groundwater and manure. Although tetracyclines were regularly used at both facilities, they were infrequently detected in manure samples and then at relatively trace concentrations. Concentrations of all tetracyclines and their breakdown products in the groundwater sampled were generally less than 0.5 ??g/L.Bacterial tetracycline resistance genes served as distinct genotypic markers to indicate the dissemination and mobility of antibiotic resistance genes that originated from the lagoons. Applying PCR to genomic DNA extracted from the lagoon and

  2. Impact of virulence genes on sepsis severity and survival in Escherichia coli bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Rillo, Marta; Fernández-Romero, Natalia; Francisco, Carolina Navarro-San; Díez-Sebastián, Jesús; Romero-Gómez, Maria Pilar; Fernández, Francisco Arnalich; López, Jose Ramon Arribas; Mingorance, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) are a frequent cause of bacteremia and sepsis, but the role of ExPEC genetic virulence factors (VFs) in sepsis development and outcome is ill-defined. Prospective study including 120 adult patients with E. coli bacteremia to investigate the impact of bacterial and host factors on sepsis severity and mortality. Patients' clinical and demographic data were registered. Phylogenetic background of E. coli isolates was analyzed by SNP pyrosequencing and VFs by PCR. The E. coli isolates presented an epidemic population structure with 6 dominant clones making up to half of the isolates. VF gene profiles were highly diverse. Multivariate analysis for sepsis severity showed that the presence of cnf and blaTEM genes increased the risk of severe illness by 6.75 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.79–24.71) and 2.59 (95% CI 1.04–6.43) times respectively, while each point in the Pitt score increased the risk by 1.34 (95% CI 1.02–1.76) times. Multivariate analysis for mortality showed that active chemotherapy (OR 17.87, 95% CI 3.35–95.45), McCabe-Jackson Index (OR for rapidly fatal category 120.15, 95% CI 4.19–3446.23), Pitt index (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.25–2.56) and presence of fyuA gene (OR 8.05, 95% CI 1.37–47.12) were associated to increased mortality while the presence of P fimbriae genes had a protective role (OR 0.094, 95%IC 0.018–0.494). Bacteremic E. coli had a high diversity of genetic backgrounds and VF gene profiles. Bacterial VFs and host determinants had an impact on disease evolution and mortality. PMID:25654604

  3. René Stet's impact on the study of teleost major histocompatibility genes: evolution from loci to populations.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brian

    2008-02-01

    René Josephus Maria Stet pursued a 35-year-long scientific career contributing to human immunology, shrimp immunity and teleost immunity. His most significant contributions, however, were to the field of teleost major histocompatibility (MH) gene research from 1988 to 2007, a field in which he was a leader and an innovator. This review will discuss his work on these genes, highlighting the impact he had in three temporally overlapping phases of his career that can be characterized as MH gene discovery, MH gene function and evolution and population dynamics of teleost MH genes. PMID:18193417

  4. CARDIOPULMONARY GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN NORMO- AND SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERSENSITIVE (SH) RATS: IMPACT OF PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    CARDIOPULMONARY GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN NORMO- AND SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE (SH) RATS: IMPACT OF PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) EXPOSURE. SS Nadadur UP Kodavanti, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, ETD, ORD, NHEERL, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

  5. The impact of detoxifying and repair gene polymorphisms on oxidative stress in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Gürdal; Elkama, Aylin; Mungan, Semra Öztürk; Eruyar, Esra; Karahalil, Bensu

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is a multifactorial disease caused by the combination of certain risk factors and genetic factors. There are possible risk factors having important role in the pathogenesis of stroke. The most important environmental factors are cigarette smoking and oxidative stress which have different sources. GST (M1, T1, P1) have major roles in detoxification of the products of oxidative stress and they are polymorphic. DNA damages can also be repaired by repair enzymes such as OGG1 and XRCC1 which are highly polymorphic and have pivotal roles in repair systems. In the present study, we investigated that polymorphisms in genes involved in detoxification and DNA-repair pathways might modify the individual's risk for ischemic stroke. Furthermore, the products of oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity were measured and the impact of gene polymorphism on them was evaluated. Our data showed that OGG1 Ser326Cys and XRCC1 Arg399Gln gene polymorphisms had impacts on the development of stroke. PMID:26936466

  6. Impact of high predation risk on genome-wide hippocampal gene expression in snowshoe hares.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, Sophia G; McGowan, Patrick O; Krebs, Charles J; Boonstra, Rudy

    2014-11-01

    The population dynamics of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) are fundamental to the ecosystem dynamics of Canada's boreal forest. During the 8- to 11-year population cycle, hare densities can fluctuate up to 40-fold. Predators in this system (lynx, coyotes, great-horned owls) affect population numbers not only through direct mortality but also through sublethal effects. The chronic stress hypothesis posits that high predation risk during the decline severely stresses hares, leading to greater stress responses, heightened ability to mobilize cortisol and energy, and a poorer body condition. These effects may result in, or be mediated by, differential gene expression. We used an oligonucleotide microarray designed for a closely-related species, the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), to characterize differences in genome-wide hippocampal RNA transcript abundance in wild hares from the Yukon during peak and decline phases of a single cycle. A total of 106 genes were differentially regulated between phases. Array results were validated with quantitative real-time PCR, and mammalian protein sequence similarity was used to infer gene function. In comparison to hares from the peak, decline phase hares showed increased expression of genes involved in metabolic processes and hormone response, and decreased expression of immune response and blood cell formation genes. We found evidence for predation risk effects on the expression of genes whose putative functions correspond with physiological impacts known to be induced by predation risk in snowshoe hares. This study shows, for the first time, a link between changes in demography and alterations in neural RNA transcript abundance in a natural population. PMID:25234370

  7. Middle age has a significant impact on gene expression during skin wound healing in male mice.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Hagai; Lumenta, David Benjamin; Vierlinger, Klemens; Hofner, Manuela; Kitzinger, Hugo-Benito; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Nöhammer, Christa; Chilosi, Marco; Fraifeld, Vadim E

    2016-08-01

    The vast majority of research on the impact of age on skin wound healing (WH) compares old animals to young ones. The middle age is often ignored in biogerontological research despite the fact that many functions that decline in an age-dependent manner have starting points in mid-life. With this in mind, we examined gene expression patterns during skin WH in late middle-aged versus young adult male mice, using the head and back punch models. The rationale behind this study was that the impact of age would first be detectable at the transcriptional level. We pinpointed several pathways which were over-activated in the middle-aged mice, both in the intact skin and during WH. Among them were various metabolic, immune-inflammatory and growth-promoting pathways. These transcriptional changes were much more pronounced in the head than in the back. In summary, the middle age has a significant impact on gene expression in intact and healing skin. It seems that the head punch model is more sensitive to the effect of age than the back model, and we suggest that it should be more widely applied in aging research on wound healing. PMID:27241672

  8. Apolipoprotein A5: A newly identified gene impacting plasmatriglyceride levels in humans and mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-09-15

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is a newly described member of theapolipoprotein gene family whose initial discovery arose from comparativesequence analysis of the mammalian APOA1/C3/A4 gene cluster. Functionalstudies in mice indicated that alteration in the level of APOA5significantly impacted plasma triglyceride concentrations. Miceover-expressing human APOA5 displayed significantly reducedtriglycerides, while mice lacking apoA5 had a large increase in thislipid parameter. Studies in humans have also suggested an important rolefor APOA5 in determining plasma triglyceride concentrations. In theseexperiments, polymorphisms in the human gene were found to define severalcommon haplotypes that were associated with significant changes intriglyceride concentrations in multiple populations. Several separateclinical studies have provided consistent and strong support for theeffect with 24 percent of Caucasians, 35 percent of African-Americans and53 percent of Hispanics carrying APOA5 haplotypes associated withincreased plasma triglyceride levels. In summary, APOA5 represents anewly discovered gene involved in triglyceride metabolism in both humansand mice whose mechanism of action remains to be deciphered.

  9. Natural variation of histone modification and its impact on gene expression in the rat genome

    PubMed Central

    Rintisch, Carola; Heinig, Matthias; Bauerfeind, Anja; Schafer, Sebastian; Mieth, Christin; Patone, Giannino; Hummel, Oliver; Chen, Wei; Cook, Stuart; Cuppen, Edwin; Colomé-Tatché, Maria; Johannes, Frank; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Neil, Helen; Werner, Michel; Pravenec, Michal; Vingron, Martin; Hubner, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Histone modifications are epigenetic marks that play fundamental roles in many biological processes including the control of chromatin-mediated regulation of gene expression. Little is known about interindividual variability of histone modification levels across the genome and to what extent they are influenced by genetic variation. We annotated the rat genome with histone modification maps, identified differences in histone trimethyl-lysine levels among strains, and described their underlying genetic basis at the genome-wide scale using ChIP-seq in heart and liver tissues in a panel of rat recombinant inbred and their progenitor strains. We identified extensive variation of histone methylation levels among individuals and mapped hundreds of underlying cis- and trans-acting loci throughout the genome that regulate histone methylation levels in an allele-specific manner. Interestingly, most histone methylation level variation was trans-linked and the most prominent QTL identified influenced H3K4me3 levels at 899 putative promoters throughout the genome in the heart. Cis- acting variation was enriched in binding sites of distinct transcription factors in heart and liver. The integrated analysis of DNA variation together with histone methylation and gene expression levels showed that histoneQTLs are an important predictor of gene expression and that a joint analysis significantly enhanced the prediction of gene expression traits (eQTLs). Our data suggest that genetic variation has a widespread impact on histone trimethylation marks that may help to uncover novel genotype–phenotype relationships. PMID:24793478

  10. Natural variation of histone modification and its impact on gene expression in the rat genome.

    PubMed

    Rintisch, Carola; Heinig, Matthias; Bauerfeind, Anja; Schafer, Sebastian; Mieth, Christin; Patone, Giannino; Hummel, Oliver; Chen, Wei; Cook, Stuart; Cuppen, Edwin; Colomé-Tatché, Maria; Johannes, Frank; Jansen, Ritsert C; Neil, Helen; Werner, Michel; Pravenec, Michal; Vingron, Martin; Hubner, Norbert

    2014-06-01

    Histone modifications are epigenetic marks that play fundamental roles in many biological processes including the control of chromatin-mediated regulation of gene expression. Little is known about interindividual variability of histone modification levels across the genome and to what extent they are influenced by genetic variation. We annotated the rat genome with histone modification maps, identified differences in histone trimethyl-lysine levels among strains, and described their underlying genetic basis at the genome-wide scale using ChIP-seq in heart and liver tissues in a panel of rat recombinant inbred and their progenitor strains. We identified extensive variation of histone methylation levels among individuals and mapped hundreds of underlying cis- and trans-acting loci throughout the genome that regulate histone methylation levels in an allele-specific manner. Interestingly, most histone methylation level variation was trans-linked and the most prominent QTL identified influenced H3K4me3 levels at 899 putative promoters throughout the genome in the heart. Cis- acting variation was enriched in binding sites of distinct transcription factors in heart and liver. The integrated analysis of DNA variation together with histone methylation and gene expression levels showed that histoneQTLs are an important predictor of gene expression and that a joint analysis significantly enhanced the prediction of gene expression traits (eQTLs). Our data suggest that genetic variation has a widespread impact on histone trimethylation marks that may help to uncover novel genotype-phenotype relationships. PMID:24793478

  11. Potential impact of human mitochondrial replacement on global policy regarding germline gene modification.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    Previous discussions regarding human germline gene modification led to a global consensus that no germline should undergo genetic modification. However, the UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, having conducted at the UK Government's request a scientific review and a wide public consultation, provided advice to the Government on the pros and cons of Parliament's lifting a ban on altering mitochondrial DNA content of human oocytes and embryos, so as to permit the prevention of maternal transmission of mitochondrial diseases. In this commentary, relevant ethical and biomedical issues are examined and requirements for proceeding with this novel procedure are suggested. Additionally, potentially significant impacts of the UK legalization on global policy concerning germline gene modification are discussed in the context of recent advances in genome-editing technology. It is concluded that international harmonization is needed, as well as further ethical and practical consideration, prior to the legalization of human mitochondrial replacement. PMID:24832374

  12. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew L; Norman, Jane E; Morgan, Neil V; Mundell, Stuart J; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Daly, Martina E; Simpson, Michael A; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P; Mumford, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70 % had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05 %. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21 %) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF< 1 % and 22 with MAF≥ 1 %). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  13. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew L.; Norman, Jane E.; Morgan, Neil V.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Daly, Martina E.; Simpson, Michael A.; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P.; Mumford, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70% had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05%. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21%) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF<1% and 22 with MAF≥1%). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  14. Characterisation of porin genes from Mycobacterium fortuitum and their impact on growth

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Highly pathogenic mycobacteria like Mycobacterium tuberculosis are characterised by their slow growth and their ability to reside and multiply in the very hostile phagosomal environment and a correlation between the growth rate of mycobacteria and their pathogenicity has been hypothesised. Here, porin genes from M. fortuitum were cloned and characterised to address their impact on the growth rate of fast-growing and pathogenic mycobacteria. Results Two genes encoding porins orthologous to MspA from M. smegmatis, porM1 and porM2, were cloned from M. fortuitum strains, which were originally isolated from human patients. Both porin genes were at least partially able to complement the mutations of a M. smegmatis mutant strain lacking the genes mspA and mspC with respect to the growth rate. PorM1 and porM2 were present in different strains of M. fortuitum including the type strain. Comparative expression analysis of porM genes revealed divergent porin expression among analysed M. fortuitum strains. Repression of the expression of porins by antisense technique decreased the growth rates of different M. fortuitum. The effects of over-expression of porM1 as well as porM2 varied depending on the strain and the concentration of antibiotic added to the medium and indicated that PorM1 and PorM2 enhance the growth of M. fortuitum strains, but also the diffusion of the antibiotic kanamycin into the cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates the important role of porin expression in growth as well as antibiotic susceptibility of the opportunistic bacterium M. fortuitum. PMID:19203364

  15. Widespread Impact of Chromosomal Inversions on Gene Expression Uncovers Robustness via Phenotypic Buffering

    PubMed Central

    Naseeb, Samina; Carter, Zorana; Minnis, David; Donaldson, Ian; Zeef, Leo; Delneri, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The nonrandom gene organization in eukaryotes plays a significant role in genome evolution and function. Chromosomal structural changes impact meiotic fitness and, in several organisms, are associated with speciation and rapid adaptation to different environments. Small sized chromosomal inversions, encompassing few genes, are pervasive in Saccharomyces “sensu stricto” species, while larger inversions are less common in yeasts compared with higher eukaryotes. To explore the effect of gene order on phenotype, reproductive isolation, and gene expression, we engineered 16 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains carrying all possible paracentric and pericentric inversions between Ty1 elements, a natural substrate for rearrangements. We found that 4 inversions were lethal, while the other 12 did not show any fitness advantage or disadvantage in rich and minimal media. At meiosis, only a weak negative correlation with fitness was seen with the size of the inverted region. However, significantly lower fertility was seen in heterozygote invertant strains carrying recombination hotspots within the breakpoints. Altered transcription was observed throughout the genome rather than being overrepresented within the inversions. In spite of the large difference in gene expression in the inverted strains, mitotic fitness was not impaired in the majority of the 94 conditions tested, indicating that the robustness of the expression network buffers the deleterious effects of structural changes in several environments. Overall, our results support the notion that transcriptional changes may compensate for Ty-mediated rearrangements resulting in the maintenance of a constant phenotype, and suggest that large inversions in yeast are unlikely to be a selectable trait during vegetative growth. PMID:26929245

  16. Burden analysis of rare microdeletions suggests a strong impact of neurodevelopmental genes in genetic generalised epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Lal, Dennis; Ruppert, Ann-Kathrin; Trucks, Holger; Schulz, Herbert; de Kovel, Carolien G; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée; Sonsma, Anja C M; Koeleman, Bobby P; Lindhout, Dick; Weber, Yvonne G; Lerche, Holger; Kapser, Claudia; Schankin, Christoph J; Kunz, Wolfram S; Surges, Rainer; Elger, Christian E; Gaus, Verena; Schmitz, Bettina; Helbig, Ingo; Muhle, Hiltrud; Stephani, Ulrich; Klein, Karl M; Rosenow, Felix; Neubauer, Bernd A; Reinthaler, Eva M; Zimprich, Fritz; Feucht, Martha; Møller, Rikke S; Hjalgrim, Helle; De Jonghe, Peter; Suls, Arvid; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Strauch, Konstantin; Gieger, Christian; Schurmann, Claudia; Schminke, Ulf; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Genetic generalised epilepsy (GGE) is the most common form of genetic epilepsy, accounting for 20% of all epilepsies. Genomic copy number variations (CNVs) constitute important genetic risk factors of common GGE syndromes. In our present genome-wide burden analysis, large (≥ 400 kb) and rare (< 1%) autosomal microdeletions with high calling confidence (≥ 200 markers) were assessed by the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array in European case-control cohorts of 1,366 GGE patients and 5,234 ancestry-matched controls. We aimed to: 1) assess the microdeletion burden in common GGE syndromes, 2) estimate the relative contribution of recurrent microdeletions at genomic rearrangement hotspots and non-recurrent microdeletions, and 3) identify potential candidate genes for GGE. We found a significant excess of microdeletions in 7.3% of GGE patients compared to 4.0% in controls (P = 1.8 x 10-7; OR = 1.9). Recurrent microdeletions at seven known genomic hotspots accounted for 36.9% of all microdeletions identified in the GGE cohort and showed a 7.5-fold increased burden (P = 2.6 x 10-17) relative to controls. Microdeletions affecting either a gene previously implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (P = 8.0 x 10-18, OR = 4.6) or an evolutionarily conserved brain-expressed gene related to autism spectrum disorder (P = 1.3 x 10-12, OR = 4.1) were significantly enriched in the GGE patients. Microdeletions found only in GGE patients harboured a high proportion of genes previously associated with epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders (NRXN1, RBFOX1, PCDH7, KCNA2, EPM2A, RORB, PLCB1). Our results demonstrate that the significantly increased burden of large and rare microdeletions in GGE patients is largely confined to recurrent hotspot microdeletions and microdeletions affecting neurodevelopmental genes, suggesting a strong impact of fundamental neurodevelopmental processes in the pathogenesis of common GGE syndromes. PMID:25950944

  17. Burden Analysis of Rare Microdeletions Suggests a Strong Impact of Neurodevelopmental Genes in Genetic Generalised Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Trucks, Holger; Schulz, Herbert; de Kovel, Carolien G.; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée; Sonsma, Anja C. M.; Koeleman, Bobby P.; Lindhout, Dick; Weber, Yvonne G.; Lerche, Holger; Kapser, Claudia; Schankin, Christoph J.; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Surges, Rainer; Elger, Christian E.; Gaus, Verena; Schmitz, Bettina; Helbig, Ingo; Muhle, Hiltrud; Stephani, Ulrich; Klein, Karl M.; Rosenow, Felix; Neubauer, Bernd A.; Reinthaler, Eva M.; Zimprich, Fritz; Feucht, Martha; Møller, Rikke S.; Hjalgrim, Helle; De Jonghe, Peter; Suls, Arvid; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Strauch, Konstantin; Gieger, Christian; Schurmann, Claudia; Schminke, Ulf; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Genetic generalised epilepsy (GGE) is the most common form of genetic epilepsy, accounting for 20% of all epilepsies. Genomic copy number variations (CNVs) constitute important genetic risk factors of common GGE syndromes. In our present genome-wide burden analysis, large (≥ 400 kb) and rare (< 1%) autosomal microdeletions with high calling confidence (≥ 200 markers) were assessed by the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array in European case-control cohorts of 1,366 GGE patients and 5,234 ancestry-matched controls. We aimed to: 1) assess the microdeletion burden in common GGE syndromes, 2) estimate the relative contribution of recurrent microdeletions at genomic rearrangement hotspots and non-recurrent microdeletions, and 3) identify potential candidate genes for GGE. We found a significant excess of microdeletions in 7.3% of GGE patients compared to 4.0% in controls (P = 1.8 x 10-7; OR = 1.9). Recurrent microdeletions at seven known genomic hotspots accounted for 36.9% of all microdeletions identified in the GGE cohort and showed a 7.5-fold increased burden (P = 2.6 x 10-17) relative to controls. Microdeletions affecting either a gene previously implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (P = 8.0 x 10-18, OR = 4.6) or an evolutionarily conserved brain-expressed gene related to autism spectrum disorder (P = 1.3 x 10-12, OR = 4.1) were significantly enriched in the GGE patients. Microdeletions found only in GGE patients harboured a high proportion of genes previously associated with epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders (NRXN1, RBFOX1, PCDH7, KCNA2, EPM2A, RORB, PLCB1). Our results demonstrate that the significantly increased burden of large and rare microdeletions in GGE patients is largely confined to recurrent hotspot microdeletions and microdeletions affecting neurodevelopmental genes, suggesting a strong impact of fundamental neurodevelopmental processes in the pathogenesis of common GGE syndromes. PMID:25950944

  18. Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease Demonstrate Distinctive Pulmonary Gene Expressions for Vascular Response Genes: Impact of Ozone Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative gene expression profiling of multiple tissues from rat strains with genetic predisposition to diverse cardiovascular diseases (CVD) can help decode the transcriptional program that governs organ-specific functions. We examined expressions of CVD genes in the lungs of ...

  19. Interactions between DNA and gemini surfactant: impact on gene therapy: part II.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Taksim; Kamel, Amany O; Wettig, Shawn D

    2016-02-01

    Nonviral gene delivery, provides distinct treatment modalities for the inherited and acquired diseases, relies upon the encapsulation of a gene of interest, which is then ideally delivered to the target cells. Variations in the chemical structure of gemini surfactants and subsequent physicochemical characteristics of the gemini-based lipoplexes and their impact on efficient gene transfection were assessed in part I, which was published in first March 2016 issue of Nanomedicine (1103). In order to design an efficient vector using gemini surfactants, the interaction of the surfactant with DNA and other components of the delivery system must be characterized, and more critically, well understood. Such studies will help to understand how nonviral transfection complexes, in general, overcome various cellular barriers. The Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer studies, atomic force microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, isothermal titration calorimetry, small-angle x-ray scattering, are extensively used to evaluate the interaction behavior of gemini surfactants with DNA and other vector components. Part II of this review focuses on the use of these unique techniques to understand their interaction with DNA. PMID:26784450

  20. Growth of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in human plasma: impacts on virulence and metabolic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Marie-Laure; Chauvaux, Sylvie; Dessein, Rodrigue; Laurans, Caroline; Frangeul, Lionel; Lacroix, Céline; Schiavo, Angèle; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Foulon, Jeannine; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Médigue, Claudine; Carniel, Elisabeth; Simonet, Michel; Marceau, Michaël

    2008-01-01

    Background In man, infection by the Gram-negative enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is usually limited to the terminal ileum. However, in immunocompromised patients, the microorganism may disseminate from the digestive tract and thus cause a systemic infection with septicemia. Results To gain insight into the metabolic pathways and virulence factors expressed by the bacterium at the blood stage of pseudotuberculosis, we compared the overall gene transcription patterns (the transcriptome) of bacterial cells cultured in either human plasma or Luria-Bertani medium. The most marked plasma-triggered metabolic consequence in Y. pseudotuberculosis was the switch to high glucose consumption, which is reminiscent of the acetogenic pathway (known as "glucose overflow") in Escherichia coli. However, upregulation of the glyoxylate shunt enzymes suggests that (in contrast to E. coli) acetate may be further metabolized in Y. pseudotuberculosis. Our data also indicate that the bloodstream environment can regulate major virulence genes (positively or negatively); the yadA adhesin gene and most of the transcriptional units of the pYV-encoded type III secretion apparatus were found to be upregulated, whereas transcription of the pH6 antigen locus was strongly repressed. Conclusion Our results suggest that plasma growth of Y. pseudotuberculosis is responsible for major transcriptional regulatory events and prompts key metabolic reorientations within the bacterium, which may in turn have an impact on virulence. PMID:19055764

  1. Temperature and Development Impacts on Housekeeping Gene Expression in Cowpea Aphid, Aphis craccivora (Hemiptera: Aphidiae)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a powerful technique to quantify gene expression. To standardize gene expression studies and obtain more accurate qRT-PCR analysis, normalization relative to consistently expressed housekeeping genes (HKGs) is required. In this study, ten candidate HKGs including elongation factor 1 α (EF1A), ribosomal protein L11 (RPL11), ribosomal protein L14 (RPL14), ribosomal protein S8 (RPS8), ribosomal protein S23 (RPS23), NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NADH), vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (ATPase), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), 18S ribosomal RNA (18S), and 12S ribosomal RNA (12S) from the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch were selected. Four algorithms, geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and the ΔCt method were employed to evaluate the expression profiles of these HKGs as endogenous controls across different developmental stages and temperature regimes. Based on RefFinder, which integrates all four analytical algorithms to compare and rank the candidate HKGs, RPS8, RPL14, and RPL11 were the three most stable HKGs across different developmental stages and temperature conditions. This study is the first step to establish a standardized qRT-PCR analysis in A. craccivora following the MIQE guideline. Results from this study lay a foundation for the genomics and functional genomics research in this sap-sucking insect pest with substantial economic impact. PMID:26090683

  2. Impact of metallothionein gene polymorphisms on the risk of lung cancer in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Hideo; Hirano, Minoru; Ito, Hidemi; Hosono, Satoyo; Oze, Isao; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Tanaka, Hideo; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2015-06-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are cysteine-rich proteins that act as antioxidants. A case-control study was conducted to assess the effects of gene polymorphisms in the MT region on the risk of lung cancer in Japanese subjects: 769 lung cancer cases and 939 non-cancer controls. Associations were evaluated using logistic regression models with adjustment for potential confounders (age, sex, and lifestyle factors including smoking, drinking, and green-yellow vegetable intake). We found five polymorphisms in the MT-1 gene region that showed statistically significant associations with lung cancer. Of these polymorphisms, rs7196890 showed the strongest association (odds ratio: 1.30, P = 0.004, 95% confidence interval: 1.09-1.55). The impact of the polymorphism decreased with the increase of smoking, and virtually no association with lung cancer was observed among heavy smokers whose pack-year values were 30 or more (odds ratio: 1.02, P = 0.93, 95% confidence interval: 0.67-1.55). These results suggest that polymorphisms in the MT gene are moderately associated with the risk of lung cancer and that the associations are modified by lifestyle factors. PMID:25174824

  3. Associating disease-related genetic variants in intergenic regions to the genes they impact

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheng Soon

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to assist in interpretation of the functional impact of intergenic disease-associated SNPs that is not limited to search strategies proximal to the SNP. The method builds on two sources of external knowledge: the growing understanding of three-dimensional spatial relationships in the genome, and the substantial repository of information about relationships among genetic variants, genes, and diseases captured in the published biomedical literature. We integrate chromatin conformation capture data (HiC) with literature support to rank putative target genes of intergenic disease-associated SNPs. We demonstrate that this hybrid method outperforms a genomic distance baseline on a small test set of expression quantitative trait loci, as well as either method individually. In addition, we show the potential for this method to uncover relationships between intergenic SNPs and target genes across chromosomes. With more extensive chromatin conformation capture data becoming readily available, this method provides a way forward towards functional interpretation of SNPs in the context of the three dimensional structure of the genome in the nucleus. PMID:25374782

  4. Chemical dispersant potentiates crude oil impacts on growth, reproduction, and gene expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanqiong; Chen, Dongliang; Ennis, Adrien C; Polli, Joseph R; Xiao, Peng; Zhang, Baohong; Stellwag, Edmund J; Overton, Anthony; Pan, Xiaoping

    2013-02-01

    The economic, environmental, and human health impacts of the deepwater horizon (DWH) oil spill have been of significant concern in the general public and among scientists. This study employs parallel experiments to test the effects of crude oil from the DWH oil well, chemical dispersant Corexit 9500A, and dispersant-oil mixture on growth and reproduction in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Both the crude oil and the dispersant significantly inhibited the reproduction of C. elegans. Dose-dependent inhibitions of hatched larvae production were observed in worms exposed to both crude oil and dispersant. Importantly, the chemical dispersant Corexit 9500A potentiated crude oil effects; dispersant-oil mixture induced more significant effects than oil or dispersant-alone exposures. While oil-alone exposure and dispersant-alone exposure have none to moderate inhibitory effects on hatched larvae production, respectively, the mixture of dispersant and oil induced much more significant inhibition of offspring production. The production of hatched larvae was almost completely inhibited by several high concentrations of the dispersant-oil mixture. This suggests a sensitive bioassay for future investigation of oil/dispersant impacts on organisms. We also investigated the effects of crude oil/dispersant exposure at the molecular level by measuring the expressions of 31 functional genes. Results showed that the dispersant and the dispersant-oil mixture induced aberrant expressions of 12 protein-coding genes (cat-4, trxr-2, sdhb-1, lev-8, lin-39, unc-115, prdx-3, sod-1, acr-16, ric-3, unc-68, and acr-8). These 12 genes are associated with a variety of biological processes, including egg-laying, oxidative stress, muscle contraction, and neurological functions. In summary, the toxicity potentiating effect of chemical dispersant must be taken into consideration in future crude oil cleanup applications. PMID:22990136

  5. Evolution of gene structure in the conifer Picea glauca: a comparative analysis of the impact of intron size

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A positive relationship between genome size and intron length is observed across eukaryotes including Angiosperms plants, indicating a co-evolution of genome size and gene structure. Conifers have very large genomes and longer introns on average than most plants, but impacts of their large genome and longer introns on gene structure has not be described. Results Gene structure was analyzed for 35 genes of Picea glauca obtained from BAC sequencing and genome assembly, including comparisons with A. thaliana, P. trichocarpa and Z. mays. We aimed to develop an understanding of impact of long introns on the structure of individual genes. The number and length of exons was well conserved among the species compared but on average, P. glauca introns were longer and genes had four times more intronic sequence than Arabidopsis, and 2 times more than poplar and maize. However, pairwise comparisons of individual genes gave variable results and not all contrasts were statistically significant. Genes generally accumulated one or a few longer introns in species with larger genomes but the position of long introns was variable between plant lineages. In P. glauca, highly expressed genes generally had more intronic sequence than tissue preferential genes. Comparisons with the Pinus taeda BACs and genome scaffolds showed a high conservation for position of long introns and for sequence of short introns. A survey of 1836 P. glauca genes obtained by sequence capture mostly containing introns <1 Kbp showed that repeated sequences were 10× more abundant in introns than in exons. Conclusion Conifers have large amounts of intronic sequence per gene for seed plants due to the presence of few long introns and repetitive element sequences are ubiquitous in their introns. Results indicate a complex landscape of intron sizes and distribution across taxa and between genes with different expression profiles. PMID:24734980

  6. Memory acquisition and retrieval impact different epigenetic processes that regulate gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background A fundamental question in neuroscience is how memories are stored and retrieved in the brain. Long-term memory formation requires transcription, translation and epigenetic processes that control gene expression. Thus, characterizing genome-wide the transcriptional changes that occur after memory acquisition and retrieval is of broad interest and importance. Genome-wide technologies are commonly used to interrogate transcriptional changes in discovery-based approaches. Their ability to increase scientific insight beyond traditional candidate gene approaches, however, is usually hindered by batch effects and other sources of unwanted variation, which are particularly hard to control in the study of brain and behavior. Results We examined genome-wide gene expression after contextual conditioning in the mouse hippocampus, a brain region essential for learning and memory, at all the time-points in which inhibiting transcription has been shown to impair memory formation. We show that most of the variance in gene expression is not due to conditioning and that by removing unwanted variance through additional normalization we are able provide novel biological insights. In particular, we show that genes downregulated by memory acquisition and retrieval impact different functions: chromatin assembly and RNA processing, respectively. Levels of histone 2A variant H2AB are reduced only following acquisition, a finding we confirmed using quantitative proteomics. On the other hand, splicing factor Rbfox1 and NMDA receptor-dependent microRNA miR-219 are only downregulated after retrieval, accompanied by an increase in protein levels of miR-219 target CAMKIIγ. Conclusions We provide a thorough characterization of coding and non-coding gene expression during long-term memory formation. We demonstrate that unwanted variance dominates the signal in transcriptional studies of learning and memory and introduce the removal of unwanted variance through normalization as a

  7. Development and impact of the Gene-Tox-Program, genetic activity profiles, and their computerized data bases.

    PubMed

    Waters, M D

    1994-01-01

    This invited historical review traces the development and impact of two major data bases in the field of genetic toxicology. Discussed from a personal perspective are the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Gene-Tox Program and the EPA/International Agency for Research on Cancer Genetic Activity Profiles (GAPs) and their respective data bases. Whereas Gene-Tox was focused on the assessment of short-term tests and their role in predicting carcinogens and mutagens, GAPs and the GAP data base were designed specifically to aid in the evaluation of individual chemicals. Both data bases have been computerized. Gene-Tox is available on TOXNET and GAP is available in a personal computer format from the author. The Gene-Tox and GAP data bases appear to have had substantial impact, particularly on hazard identification activities in cancer risk assessment. PMID:8162911

  8. The impact of reference gene selection in quantification of gene expression levels in guinea pig cervical tissues and cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate measurements of mRNA expression levels in tissues or cells are crucially dependent on the use of relevant reference genes for normalization of data. In this study we used quantitative real-time PCR and two Excel-based applets (geNorm and BestKeeper) to determine the best reference genes for quantification of target gene mRNA in a complex tissue organ such as the guinea pig cervix. Results Gene expression studies were conducted in cervical epithelium and stroma during pregnancy and parturition and in cultures of primary cells from this tissue. Among 15 reference gene candidates examined, both geNorm and BestKeeper found CLF1 and CLTC to be the most stable in cervical stroma and cervical epithelium, ACTB and PPIB in primary stroma cells, and CLTC and PPIB in primary epithelial cells. The order of stability among the remaining candidate genes was not in such an agreement. Commonly used reference such as GAPDH and B2M demonstrated lower stability. Determination of pairwise variation values for reference gene combinations using geNorm revealed that the geometric mean of the two most stable genes provides sufficient normalization in most cases. However, for cervical stroma tissue in which many reference gene candidates displayed low stability, inclusion of three reference genes in the geometric mean may improve accuracy of target gene expression level analyses. Using the top ranked reference genes we examined the expression levels of target gene PTGS2 in cervical tissue and cultured cervical cells. We compared the results with PTGS2 expression normalized to the least stable gene and found significant differences in gene expression, up to 10-fold in some samples, emphasizing the importance of appropriately selecting reference genes. Conclusions We recommend using the geometric mean of CFL1 and CLTC for normalization of qPCR studies in guinea pig cervical tissue studies, ACTB and PPIB in primary stroma cells and CLTC and PPIB in primary epithelial cells

  9. Impact of UGT2B17 gene deletion on the steroid profile of an athlete.

    PubMed

    Martín-Escudero, Pilar; Muñoz-Guerra, Jesús; Del Prado, Nayade; Galindo Canales, Mercedes; Fuentes Ferrer, Manuel; Vargas, Soledad; Soldevilla, Ana B; Serrano-Garde, Ester; Miguel-Tobal, Francisco; Maestro de Las Casas, Marisa; Fernandez-Pérez, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    The measurement of the testosterone to epitestosterone ratio (T/E ratio) in urine is often used as a marker for testosterone administration in the doping control field. This study examines the frequencies of the different expression forms of the UGT2B17 gene, and assesses their effects on this marker in volunteer subjects. The sample for this descriptive study was composed of male and female athletes aged between 16 and 55 years old who practiced different sports disciplines. All participants underwent a sports-medical physical examination, and subsequently provided 10 urine samples consecutively over a period of 48 h. The dependent variable examined was T/E and the main independent variable was the UGT2B17 gene polymorphism. During 1 year, 1410 urine samples were obtained from 141 athletes. The frequencies of the three genotypes were as follows: wt homozygotes (ins/ins) 48.2% (n = 68), mutant homozygotes (del/del) 12.1% (n = 17), and heterozygotes (ins/del) 39.7% (n = 56). Genotype distributions varied significantly (P < 0.001) according to ethnicity, 80% of Asian subjects being homozygous for the gene deletion (del/del) compared to 6.9% of Caucasian subjects. A multivariate analysis adjusted for genotype, age, sex, and sports discipline revealed that athletes with the del/del polymorphism showed a significantly lower mean T/E than heterozygotes (ins/del). In contrast, homozygous athletes for the gene insertion (ins/ins) showed higher mean T/E ratios than heterozygotes (ins/del). UGT2B17 gene deletion has a strong influence on the T/E ratio in urine, which is the most efficient indicator of testosterone prohormone misuse. Others factors studied seem not to have such an impact. The genotyping of UGT2B17 is an important source of information for understanding steroid profiling in the doping control field; therefore it is suggested that it be included in the Athletes Biological Passport. PMID:26668303

  10. Impact of ESR1 Gene Polymorphisms on Migraine Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Ruozhuo; Dong, Zhao; Wang, Xiaolin; Yu, Shengyuan

    2015-09-01

    An increasing number of studies have explored genetic associations between the functionally important polymorphisms in estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) gene and migraine susceptibility. The previously reported associations have nevertheless been inconsistent.The present work incorporating the published data derived from 8 publications was performed to assess the impact of these polymorphisms on incident migraine. Strength of the genetic risk was estimated by means of an odds ratio along with the 95% confidence interval (OR and 95% CI).From the results, we found individuals who harbored the 325-GG genotype, compared with those harboring the CC genotype or CG and CC combined genotypes, had almost 50% greater risk of migraine. The same genetic models showed notable associations in subgroups of Caucasians and migraine with aura (MA). For 594G>A, a moderately increased risk of migraine was seen under AG versus GG. The AA + AG versus GG model, however, showed a borderline association with migraine. Subgroup analyses according to ethnicity and subtype of migraine provided statistical evidence of significantly increased risk of migraine in Caucasians and of a marginal association with MA, respectively. Both 325C>G and 594G>A polymorphisms showed no major effects either in males or in females.Based on the statistical data, we conclude some of the ESR1 gene polymorphisms may have major contributions to the pathogenesis of migraine in Caucasian populations. PMID:26334887

  11. The Impact of Gene Polymorphisms on the Success of Anticholinergic Treatment in Children with Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Gurocak, Serhat; Konac, Ece; Ure, Iyimser; Senol, Cem; Onen, Ilke Hacer; Sozen, Sinan; Menevse, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To determine the impact of gene polymorphisms on detrusor contraction-relaxation harmony in children with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Materials and Methods. Toilet trained children older than 5 years of age with LUTS and normal neurological examination underwent videourodynamic study. The control group was composed of age matched children with no voiding complaints. The study group who filled out the voiding dysfunction symptom score before and after the treatment received standard oxybutynin treatment and was reevaluated 1 year after treatment. Genomic DNA was isolated from all patients and subjected to PCR for amplification. Genotyping of ARGHEF10, ROCK2, ADRB3, and CYP3A4 was carried out with Polymerase Chain Reaction- Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Results. 34 (45%) and 42 (55%) patients were enrolled in the study and control group, respectively. ARGEF10 GG, ADRB3 TC, and CYP3A4 AG genotype patients displayed insignificant difference between pre- and posttreatment voiding dysfunction symptom score and bladder volumes. Conclusions. The polymorphism of genes in the cholinergic pathway did not significantly differ clinical parameters. On the other hand, polymorphic patients in the adrenergic pathway seemed to suffer from clinical disappointment. For this reason, we think that the neglected adrenergic pathway could be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of anticholinergic resistant LUTS in children. PMID:26166934

  12. Impact of altered actin gene expression on vinculin, talin, cell spreading, and motility.

    PubMed

    Schevzov, G; Lloyd, C; Gunning, P

    1995-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a strong correlation between the expression of vinculin and the shape and motility of a cell (Rodriguez Fernandez et al., 1992a, b, 1993). This hypothesis was tested by comparing the expression of vinculin and talin with the motility of morphologically altered myoblasts. These mouse C2 myoblasts were previously generated by directly perturbing the cell cytoskeleton via the stable transfection of a mutant-form of the beta-actin gene (beta sm) and three different forms of the gamma-actin gene; gamma, gamma minus 3'UTR (gamma delta'UTR), and gamma minus intron III (gamma delta IVSIII) (Schevzov et al., 1992; Lloyd and Gunning, 1993). In the case of the beta sm and gamma-actin transfectants, a two-fold decrease in the cell surface area was coupled, as predicted, with a decrease in vinculin and talin expression. In contrast, the gamma delta IVSIII transfectants with a seven-fold decrease in the cell surface area showed an unpredicted slight increase in vinculin and talin expression and the gamma delta 3'-UTR transfectants with a slight increase in the cell surface area showed no changes in talin expression and a decrease in vinculin expression. We conclude that changes in actin gene expression alone can impact on the expression of vinculin and talin. Furthermore, we observed that these actin transfectants failed to show a consistent relationship between cell shape, motility, and the expression of vinculin. However, a relationship between talin and cell motility was found to exist, suggesting a role for talin in the establishment of focal contacts necessary for motility. PMID:7646816

  13. Impact of gene polymorphisms of gonadotropins and their receptors on human reproductive success.

    PubMed

    Casarini, Livio; Santi, Daniele; Marino, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Gonadotropins and their receptors' genes carry several single-nucleotide polymorphisms resulting in endocrine genotypes modulating reproductive parameters, diseases, and lifespan leading to important implications for reproductive success and potential relevance during human evolution. Here we illustrate common genotypes of the gonadotropins and gonadotropin receptors' genes and their clinical implications in phenotypes relevant for reproduction such as ovarian cycle length, age of menopause, testosterone levels, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. We then discuss their possible role in human reproduction and adaptation to the environment. Gonadotropins and their receptors' variants are differently distributed among human populations. Some hints suggest that they may be the result of natural selection that occurred in ancient times, increasing the individual chance of successful mating, pregnancy, and effective post-natal parental cares. The gender-related differences in the regulation of the reproductive endocrine systems imply that many of these genotypes may lead to sex-dependent effects, increasing the chance of mating and reproductive success in one sex at the expenses of the other sex. Also, we suggest that sexual conflicts within the FSH and LH-choriogonadotropin receptor genes contributed to maintain genotypes linked to subfertility among humans. Because the distribution of polymorphic markers results in a defined geographical pattern due to human migrations rather than natural selection, these polymorphisms may have had only a weak impact on reproductive success. On the contrary, such genotypes could acquire relevant consequences in the modern, developed societies in which parenthood attempts often occur at a later age, during a short, suboptimal reproductive window, making clinical fertility treatments necessary. PMID:26370242

  14. The impact of microRNA gene regulation on the survival and function of mature cell types in the eye.

    PubMed

    Sundermeier, Thomas R; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate multiple genes, often within the same pathway, fine-tuning expression of key factors and stabilizing gene networks against aberrant fluctuations. The demanding physiologic functions of photoreceptor cells and the retinal pigmented epithelium necessitate precise gene regulation to maintain their homeostasis and function, thus rendering these postmitotic cells vulnerable to premature death in retinal degenerative disorders. Recent studies of the physiologic impact of miRNAs in these cells clearly demonstrate that miRNAs are an essential component of that gene regulation. These important advances provide the foundation for future exploration of miRNA-regulated gene networks in the eye to facilitate the development of miRNA-targeted therapeutics to combat blinding diseases. PMID:26399786

  15. Antimicrobial-resistant bacterial populations and antimicrobial resistance genes obtained from environments impacted by livestock and municipal waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal waste water treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact...

  16. Zinc Methionine Supplementation Impacts Gene and Protein Expression in Calf-Fed Holstein Steers with Minimal Impact on Feedlot Performance.

    PubMed

    Hergenreder, J E; Legako, J F; Dinh, T T N; Spivey, K S; Baggerman, J O; Broadway, P R; Beckett, J L; Branine, M E; Johnson, B J

    2016-06-01

    Providing cattle a more bioavailable zinc (Zn) source prior to administering a beta adrenergic agonist (βAA) may enhance the metabolic pool of primary nutrients that will influence the magnitude of the βAA response. Calf-fed Holstein steers were supplemented with a Zn methionine supplement (ZnMet; ZINPRO(®); Zinpro Corporation, Eden Prairie, MN) for 115 ± 5 days prior to harvest along with zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; Zilmax(®); Merck Animal Health, Summit, NJ) for the last 20 days with a 3-day withdrawal to evaluate the effects on growth and carcass performance together with gene and protein expression of skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and fatty acid composition of polar and neutral lipid depots. Steers (n = 1296; initial weight = 468.5 ± 0.5 kg) were sorted by weight, blocked by harvest date, and randomly assigned to pens (n = 12) and treatments: control (90 ppm Zn from ZnSO4) and ZnMet (Control plus 720 mg Zn from ZnMet/hd/d). There were no differences (P > 0.05) in growth performance or carcass characteristics. The ZnMet-fed cattle had reduced (P < 0.05) abundance of myosin heavy chain (MHC)-IIX, β1-adrenergic receptor (βAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase mRNA in skeletal muscle tissue. The ZnMet cattle had greater (P < 0.05) abundance of MHC-II protein, increased MHC-IIA and IIX cross-sectional areas (P < 0.05), an increased percentage of MHC-I fibers (P < 0.05), and a decreased percentage of MHC-IIX fibers (P < 0.05). The combination of ZnMet and ZH had positive biological effects on musculoskeletal tissue; however, these molecular effects were not significant enough to impact overall feedlot and carcass performance. PMID:26446862

  17. Impact of SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation and dietary cholesterol on hepatic lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Klipsic, Devon; Landrock, Danilo; Martin, Gregory G.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Mackie, John T.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    While a high-cholesterol diet induces hepatic steatosis, the role of intracellular sterol carrier protein-2/sterol carrier protein-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) proteins is unknown. We hypothesized that ablating SCP-2/SCP-x [double knockout (DKO)] would impact hepatic lipids (cholesterol and cholesteryl ester), especially in high-cholesterol-fed mice. DKO did not alter food consumption, and body weight (BW) gain decreased especially in females, concomitant with hepatic steatosis in females and less so in males. DKO-induced steatosis in control-fed wild-type (WT) mice was associated with 1) loss of SCP-2; 2) upregulation of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP); 3) increased mRNA and/or protein levels of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBP1 and SREBP2) as well as increased expression of target genes of cholesterol synthesis (Hmgcs1 and Hmgcr) and fatty acid synthesis (Acc1 and Fas); and 4) cholesteryl ester accumulation was also associated with increased acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase-2 (ACAT2) in males. DKO exacerbated the high-cholesterol diet-induced hepatic cholesterol and glyceride accumulation, without further increasing SREBP1, SREBP2, or target genes. This exacerbation was associated both with loss of SCP-2 and concomitant downregulation of Ceh/Hsl, apolipoprotein B (ApoB), MTP, and/or L-FABP protein expression. DKO diminished the ability to secrete excess cholesterol into bile and oxidize cholesterol to bile acid for biliary excretion, especially in females. This suggested that SCP-2/SCP-x affects cholesterol transport to particular intracellular compartments, with ablation resulting in less to the endoplasmic reticulum for SREBP regulation, making more available for cholesteryl ester synthesis, for cholesteryl-ester storage in lipid droplets, and for bile salt synthesis and/or secretion. These alterations are significant findings, since they affect key processes in regulation of sterol metabolism. PMID:26113298

  18. Impact of SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation and dietary cholesterol on hepatic lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Klipsic, Devon; Landrock, Danilo; Martin, Gregory G; McIntosh, Avery L; Landrock, Kerstin K; Mackie, John T; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Kier, Ann B

    2015-09-01

    While a high-cholesterol diet induces hepatic steatosis, the role of intracellular sterol carrier protein-2/sterol carrier protein-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) proteins is unknown. We hypothesized that ablating SCP-2/SCP-x [double knockout (DKO)] would impact hepatic lipids (cholesterol and cholesteryl ester), especially in high-cholesterol-fed mice. DKO did not alter food consumption, and body weight (BW) gain decreased especially in females, concomitant with hepatic steatosis in females and less so in males. DKO-induced steatosis in control-fed wild-type (WT) mice was associated with 1) loss of SCP-2; 2) upregulation of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP); 3) increased mRNA and/or protein levels of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBP1 and SREBP2) as well as increased expression of target genes of cholesterol synthesis (Hmgcs1 and Hmgcr) and fatty acid synthesis (Acc1 and Fas); and 4) cholesteryl ester accumulation was also associated with increased acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase-2 (ACAT2) in males. DKO exacerbated the high-cholesterol diet-induced hepatic cholesterol and glyceride accumulation, without further increasing SREBP1, SREBP2, or target genes. This exacerbation was associated both with loss of SCP-2 and concomitant downregulation of Ceh/Hsl, apolipoprotein B (ApoB), MTP, and/or L-FABP protein expression. DKO diminished the ability to secrete excess cholesterol into bile and oxidize cholesterol to bile acid for biliary excretion, especially in females. This suggested that SCP-2/SCP-x affects cholesterol transport to particular intracellular compartments, with ablation resulting in less to the endoplasmic reticulum for SREBP regulation, making more available for cholesteryl ester synthesis, for cholesteryl-ester storage in lipid droplets, and for bile salt synthesis and/or secretion. These alterations are significant findings, since they affect key processes in regulation of sterol metabolism. PMID:26113298

  19. The Impact of Selection, Gene Conversion, and Biased Sampling on the Assessment of Microbial Demography.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Marguerite; Blin, Camille; Lambert, Amaury; Achaz, Guillaume; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have linked demographic changes and epidemiological patterns in bacterial populations using coalescent-based approaches. We identified 26 studies using skyline plots and found that 21 inferred overall population expansion. This surprising result led us to analyze the impact of natural selection, recombination (gene conversion), and sampling biases on demographic inference using skyline plots and site frequency spectra (SFS). Forward simulations based on biologically relevant parameters from Escherichia coli populations showed that theoretical arguments on the detrimental impact of recombination and especially natural selection on the reconstructed genealogies cannot be ignored in practice. In fact, both processes systematically lead to spurious interpretations of population expansion in skyline plots (and in SFS for selection). Weak purifying selection, and especially positive selection, had important effects on skyline plots, showing patterns akin to those of population expansions. State-of-the-art techniques to remove recombination further amplified these biases. We simulated three common sampling biases in microbiological research: uniform, clustered, and mixed sampling. Alone, or together with recombination and selection, they further mislead demographic inferences producing almost any possible skyline shape or SFS. Interestingly, sampling sub-populations also affected skyline plots and SFS, because the coalescent rates of populations and their sub-populations had different distributions. This study suggests that extreme caution is needed to infer demographic changes solely based on reconstructed genealogies. We suggest that the development of novel sampling strategies and the joint analyzes of diverse population genetic methods are strictly necessary to estimate demographic changes in populations where selection, recombination, and biased sampling are present. PMID:26931140

  20. The Impact of Selection, Gene Conversion, and Biased Sampling on the Assessment of Microbial Demography

    PubMed Central

    Lapierre, Marguerite; Blin, Camille; Lambert, Amaury; Achaz, Guillaume; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have linked demographic changes and epidemiological patterns in bacterial populations using coalescent-based approaches. We identified 26 studies using skyline plots and found that 21 inferred overall population expansion. This surprising result led us to analyze the impact of natural selection, recombination (gene conversion), and sampling biases on demographic inference using skyline plots and site frequency spectra (SFS). Forward simulations based on biologically relevant parameters from Escherichia coli populations showed that theoretical arguments on the detrimental impact of recombination and especially natural selection on the reconstructed genealogies cannot be ignored in practice. In fact, both processes systematically lead to spurious interpretations of population expansion in skyline plots (and in SFS for selection). Weak purifying selection, and especially positive selection, had important effects on skyline plots, showing patterns akin to those of population expansions. State-of-the-art techniques to remove recombination further amplified these biases. We simulated three common sampling biases in microbiological research: uniform, clustered, and mixed sampling. Alone, or together with recombination and selection, they further mislead demographic inferences producing almost any possible skyline shape or SFS. Interestingly, sampling sub-populations also affected skyline plots and SFS, because the coalescent rates of populations and their sub-populations had different distributions. This study suggests that extreme caution is needed to infer demographic changes solely based on reconstructed genealogies. We suggest that the development of novel sampling strategies and the joint analyzes of diverse population genetic methods are strictly necessary to estimate demographic changes in populations where selection, recombination, and biased sampling are present. PMID:26931140

  1. Development and Characterization of Novel Empty Adenovirus Capsids and Their Impact on Cellular Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Stilwell, Jackie L.; McCarty, Douglas M.; Negishi, Atsuko; Superfine, Richard; Samulski, R. Jude

    2003-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) has been extensively studied as a eukaryotic viral vector. As these vectors have evolved from first-generation vectors to vectors that contain either very few or no viral genes (“gutless” Ad), significant reductions in the host innate immune response upon infection have been observed. Regardless of these vector improvements an unknown amount of toxicity has been associated with the virion structural proteins. Here we demonstrate the ability to generate high particle numbers (1011 to 1012) of Ad empty virions based on a modification of Cre/lox gutless Ad vectors. Using a battery of analyses (electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, confocal images, and competition assays) we characterized this reagent and determined that it (i) makes intact virion particles, (ii) competes for receptor binding with wild-type Ad, and (iii) enters the cell proficiently, demonstrating an ability to carry out essential steps of viral entry. To further study the biological impact of these Ad empty virions on infected cells, we carried out DNA microarray analysis. Compared to that for recombinant Ad, the number of mRNAs modulated upon infection was significantly reduced but the expression signatures were similar. This reagent provides a valuable tool for studies of Ad in that researchers can examine the effect of infection in the presence of the virion capsid alone. PMID:14610209

  2. Gene patents, patenting life and the impact of court rulings on US stem cell patents and research.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Kirstin R W; Cuchiara, Maude L

    2014-03-01

    In June 2013, the US Supreme Court ruled that naturally occurring genes were unpatentable in the case Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics. Up until this decision, Myriad Genetics was the only company in the USA that could legally conduct diagnostic testing for BRCA1 and 2, genes that are linked to familial breast and ovarian cancer. The court case and rulings garnered discussion in public about patenting biological materials. This paper will describe the progression of the Myriad Genetics case, similar US rulings and biological intellectual property policies. In addition, it will discuss the impact of the case on biological patents - specifically those for human embryonic stem cells. PMID:24750060

  3. Diversity of tet resistance genes in tetracycline-resistant bacteria isolated from a swine lagoon with low antibiotic impact.

    PubMed

    Macauley, John J; Adams, Craig D; Mormile, Melanie R

    2007-12-01

    Tetracycline resistance has been extensively studied and shown to be widespread. A number of previous studies have clearly demonstrated that a variety of tetracycline resistance genes are present in swine fecal material, treatment lagoons, and the environments surrounding concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). The diversity of tetracycline resistance within a swine lagoon located at a CAFO that used only bacitricin methylene disalicylate as an antibiotic was evaluated by screening 85 tetracycline-resistant isolates for the presence of 18 different genes by performing PCR with primers that target tetracycline efflux genes of Gram-negative bacteria and ribosomal protection proteins. In addition, partial 16S rRNA sequences from each of these isolates were sequenced to determine the identity of these isolates. Of the 85 isolates examined, 17 may represent potential novel species based on BLAST results. Greater than 50% of the isolates (48 out of 85) were found to not contain targeted tet efflux genes. Though minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged widely (16 - >256 mg/L), these values did not give an indication of the tet genes present. Ten new genera were identified that contain at least one tet efflux gene. Five other genera possessed tet efflux genes that were not found in these organisms previously. Interestingly, none of the isolates possessed any of the selected ribosomal protection protein genes. Though tetracycline resistance was found in bacteria isolated from a swine CAFO lagoon, it appears that the limited antibiotic use at this CAFO might have impacted the presence and diversity of tetracycline resistance genes. PMID:18059563

  4. Does human activity impact the natural antibiotic resistance background? Abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in 21 Swiss lakes.

    PubMed

    Czekalski, Nadine; Sigdel, Radhika; Birtel, Julia; Matthews, Blake; Bürgmann, Helmut

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging environmental contaminants, known to be continuously discharged into the aquatic environment via human and animal waste. Freshwater aquatic environments represent potential reservoirs for ARG and potentially allow sewage-derived ARG to persist and spread in the environment. This may create increased opportunities for an eventual contact with, and gene transfer to, human and animal pathogens via the food chain or drinking water. However, assessment of this risk requires a better understanding of the level and variability of the natural resistance background and the extent of the human impact. We have analyzed water samples from 21 Swiss lakes, taken at sampling points that were not under the direct influence of local contamination sources and analyzed the relative abundance of ARG using quantitative real-time PCR. Copy numbers of genes mediating resistance to three different broad-spectrum antibiotic classes (sulfonamides: sul1, sul2, tetracyclines: tet(B), tet(M), tet(W) and fluoroquinolones: qnrA) were normalized to copy numbers of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We used multiple linear regression to assess if ARG abundance is related to human activities in the catchment, microbial community composition and the eutrophication status of the lakes. Sul genes were detected in all sampled lakes, whereas only four lakes contained quantifiable numbers of tet genes, and qnrA remained below detection in all lakes. Our data indicate higher abundance of sul1 in lakes with increasing number and capacity of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the catchment. sul2 abundance was rather related to long water residence times and eutrophication status. Our study demonstrates the potential of freshwater lakes to preserve antibiotic resistance genes, and provides a reference for ARG abundance from lake systems with low human impact as a baseline for assessing ARG contamination in lake water. PMID:25913323

  5. Evolutionary analysis of multidrug resistance genes in fungi - impact of gene duplication and family conservation.

    PubMed

    Gossani, Cristiani; Bellieny-Rabelo, Daniel; Venancio, Thiago M

    2014-11-01

    Although the emergence of bacterial drug resistance is of great concern to the scientific community, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon systematically in fungi by using genome-wide datasets. In the present study, we assembled a large compendium of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemical genetic data to study the evolution of multidrug resistance genes (MDRs) in the fungal lineage. We found that MDRs typically emerge in widely conserved families, most of which containing homologs from pathogenic fungi, such as Candida albicans and Coccidioides immitis, which could favor the evolution of drug resistance in those species. By integrating data from chemical genetics with protein family conservation, genetic and protein interactions, we found that gene families rarely have more than one MDR, indicating that paralogs evolve asymmetrically with regard to multidrug resistance roles. Furthermore, MDRs have more genetic and protein interaction partners than non-MDRs, supporting their participation in complex biochemical systems underlying the tolerance to multiple bioactive molecules. MDRs share more chemical genetic interactions with other MDRs than with non-MDRs, regardless of their evolutionary affinity. These results suggest the existence of an intricate system involved in the global drug tolerance phenotypes. Finally, MDRs are more likely to be hit repeatedly by mutations in laboratory evolution experiments, indicating that they have great adaptive potential. The results presented here not only reveal the main genomic features underlying the evolution of MDRs, but also shed light on the gene families from which drug resistance is more likely to emerge in fungi. PMID:25220072

  6. Widespread impact of horizontal gene transfer on plant colonization of land

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jipei; Hu, Xiangyang; Sun, Hang; Yang, Yongping; Huang, Jinling

    2012-01-01

    In complex multicellular eukaryotes such as animals and plants, horizontal gene transfer is commonly considered rare with very limited evolutionary significance. Here we show that horizontal gene transfer is a dynamic process occurring frequently in the early evolution of land plants. Our genome analyses of the moss Physcomitrella patens identified 57 families of nuclear genes that were acquired from prokaryotes, fungi or viruses. Many of these gene families were transferred to the ancestors of green or land plants. Available experimental evidence shows that these anciently acquired genes are involved in some essential or plant-specific activities such as xylem formation, plant defence, nitrogen recycling as well as the biosynthesis of starch, polyamines, hormones and glutathione. These findings suggest that horizontal gene transfer had a critical role in the transition of plants from aquatic to terrestrial environments. On the basis of these findings, we propose a model of horizontal gene transfer mechanism in nonvascular and seedless vascular plants. PMID:23093189

  7. Classification of Human Chromosome 21 Gene-Expression Variations in Down Syndrome: Impact on Disease Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Aït Yahya-Graison, E. ; Aubert, J. ; Dauphinot, L. ; Rivals, I. ; Prieur, M. ; Golfier, G. ; Rossier, J. ; Personnaz, L. ; Créau, N. ; Bléhaut, H. ; Robin, S. ; Delabar, J. M. ; Potier, M.-C. 

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome caused by chromosome 21 trisomy is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation in humans. Disruption of the phenotype is thought to be the result of gene-dosage imbalance. Variations in chromosome 21 gene expression in Down syndrome were analyzed in lymphoblastoid cells derived from patients and control individuals. Of the 359 genes and predictions displayed on a specifically designed high-content chromosome 21 microarray, one-third were expressed in lymphoblastoid cells. We performed a mixed-model analysis of variance to find genes that are differentially expressed in Down syndrome independent of sex and interindividual variations. In addition, we identified genes with variations between Down syndrome and control samples that were significantly different from the gene-dosage effect (1.5). Microarray data were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found that 29% of the expressed chromosome 21 transcripts are overexpressed in Down syndrome and correspond to either genes or open reading frames. Among these, 22% are increased proportional to the gene-dosage effect, and 7% are amplified. The other 71% of expressed sequences are either compensated (56%, with a large proportion of predicted genes and antisense transcripts) or highly variable among individuals (15%). Thus, most of the chromosome 21 transcripts are compensated for the gene-dosage effect. Overexpressed genes are likely to be involved in the Down syndrome phenotype, in contrast to the compensated genes. Highly variable genes could account for phenotypic variations observed in patients. Finally, we show that alternative transcripts belonging to the same gene are similarly regulated in Down syndrome but sense and antisense transcripts are not. PMID:17701894

  8. Impact of new mutations in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene assessed on biochemical phenotypes: a familial study.

    PubMed

    Tonetti, C; Amiel, J; Munnich, A; Zittoun, J

    2001-12-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency was identified in two out of four children born from nonconsanguineous parents. One of the affected children exhibited some clinical findings suggesting cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency; MTHFR activity was extremely reduced. In addition, hyperhomocysteinaemia, hypomethioninaemia, low total folate, especially methylfolate in red blood cells, and a reduced methylfolate/total folate ratio were found. Two mutations not yet reported, one on exon 1 of the gene changing an arginine to stop codon and one other on exon 9 changing an arginine to tryptophan were identified in both children in the compound heterozygous state associated with a common polymorphism, 1298A>C, also in the heterozygous state. The mother, homozygous for the mutation on exon 9 and for the polymorphism 1298A>C on exon 7, was clinically and biochemically normal, with normal folate status, mainly methylfolate levels in red blood cells, although MTHFR activity was moderately decreased. The father, heterozygous for the transition arginine to stop codon and for the common polymorphism 677C>T on exon 4, exhibited major biochemical abnormalities, hyperhomocysteinaemia and low methylfolate levels in red blood cells, but was clinically normal. The unaffected children had a biochemical pattern close to that of their mother and were heterozygous for the mutation on exon 9 and also for the two common polymorphisms, 677C>T and 1298A>C. In the affected children, some biochemical abnormalities, including folate status, especially methylfolate levels, were improved with treatment combining methyltetrahydrofolic acid, hydroxocobalamin, pyridoxine and betaine; however, homocysteine concentrations remained high and methionine concentrations were lowered. The father was treated with folic acid, which partially improved biochemical abnormalities. The impact of these mutations is discussed. PMID:11916316

  9. Impact of the PPAR gamma-2 gene polymorphisms on the metabolic state of postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Grygiel-Gorniak, Bogna; Mosor, Maria; Marcinkowska, Justyna; Przyslawski, Juliusz; Nowak, Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    The relationship Pro12Ala (rs1801282) and C1431T (rs3856806) polymorphisms of PPAR gamma-2 with glucose and lipid metabolism is not clear after menopause. We investigated the impact of the Pro12Ala and C1431T silent substitution in the 6th exon in PPAR gamma-2 gene on nutritional and metabolic status in 271 postmenopausal women (122 lean and 149 obese). The general linear model (GLM) approach to the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to infer the interactions between the analysed genotypes. The frequency of the Pro-T haplotype was higher in obese than in lean women (p less than 0.0349). In the analysed GLM models according to obesity status, the C1431C genotype was related to a lower glucose concentration (beta=-0.2103) in lean women, and to higher folliculotropic hormone FSH levels (beta=0.1985) and lower waist circumferences (beta=-0.1511) in obese women. The influence of C1431C was present regardless of the occurrence of the Pro12Ala polymorphism. The co-existence of the C1431C and Pro12Pro genotypes was related to lower values for triceps skinfold thickness compared those for the T1241/X and Ala12/X polymorphisms (beta=-0.1425). The presence of C1431C decreased the differences between triceps values that were determined by Pro or Ala allele. In conclusion, C1431T polymorphism seems to have a more essential influence on anthropometric and biochemical parameters than is the case with Pro12Ala polymorphism. PMID:27581934

  10. Experimental evidence of genome-wide impact of ecological selection during early stages of speciation-with-gene-flow.

    PubMed

    Egan, Scott P; Ragland, Gregory J; Assour, Lauren; Powell, Thomas H Q; Hood, Glen R; Emrich, Scott; Nosil, Patrik; Feder, Jeffrey L

    2015-08-01

    Theory predicts that speciation-with-gene-flow is more likely when the consequences of selection for population divergence transitions from mainly direct effects of selection acting on individual genes to a collective property of all selected genes in the genome. Thus, understanding the direct impacts of ecologically based selection, as well as the indirect effects due to correlations among loci, is critical to understanding speciation. Here, we measure the genome-wide impacts of host-associated selection between hawthorn and apple host races of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae), a model for contemporary speciation-with-gene-flow. Allele frequency shifts of 32 455 SNPs induced in a selection experiment based on host phenology were genome wide and highly concordant with genetic divergence between co-occurring apple and hawthorn flies in nature. This striking genome-wide similarity between experimental and natural populations of R. pomonella underscores the importance of ecological selection at early stages of divergence and calls for further integration of studies of eco-evolutionary dynamics and genome divergence. PMID:26077935

  11. Phylogenetic Diversity of Archaea and the Archaeal Ammonia Monooxygenase Gene in Uranium Mining-Impacted Locations in Bulgaria

    PubMed Central

    Radeva, Galina; Kenarova, Anelia; Bachvarova, Velina; Popov, Ivan; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Uranium mining and milling activities adversely affect the microbial populations of impacted sites. The negative effects of uranium on soil bacteria and fungi are well studied, but little is known about the effects of radionuclides and heavy metals on archaea. The composition and diversity of archaeal communities inhabiting the waste pile of the Sliven uranium mine and the soil of the Buhovo uranium mine were investigated using 16S rRNA gene retrieval. A total of 355 archaeal clones were selected, and their 16S rDNA inserts were analysed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) discriminating 14 different RFLP types. All evaluated archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences belong to the 1.1b/Nitrososphaera cluster of Crenarchaeota. The composition of the archaeal community is distinct for each site of interest and dependent on environmental characteristics, including pollution levels. Since the members of 1.1b/Nitrososphaera cluster have been implicated in the nitrogen cycle, the archaeal communities from these sites were probed for the presence of the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA). Our data indicate that amoA gene sequences are distributed in a similar manner as in Crenarchaeota, suggesting that archaeal nitrification processes in uranium mining-impacted locations are under the control of the same key factors controlling archaeal diversity. PMID:24711725

  12. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste.

    PubMed

    Agga, Getahun E; Arthur, Terrance M; Durso, Lisa M; Harhay, Dayna M; Schmidt, John W

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact" environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar prevalences

  13. Dietary tomato and lycopene impact androgen signaling- and carcinogenesis-related gene expression during early TRAMP prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lei; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Pearl, Dennis K; Erdman, John W; Moran, Nancy E; Clinton, Steven K

    2014-12-01

    Consumption of tomato products containing the carotenoid lycopene is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. To identify gene expression patterns associated with early testosterone-driven prostate carcinogenesis, which are impacted by dietary tomato and lycopene, wild-type (WT) and transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice were fed control or tomato- or lycopene-containing diets from 4 to 10 weeks of age. Eight-week-old mice underwent sham surgery, castration, or castration followed by testosterone repletion (2.5 mg/kg/d initiated 1 week after castration). Ten-week-old intact TRAMP mice exhibit early multifocal prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Of the 200 prostate cancer-related genes measured by quantitative NanoString, 189 are detectable, 164 significantly differ by genotype, 179 by testosterone status, and 30 by diet type (P < 0.05). In TRAMP, expression of Birc5, Mki67, Aurkb, Ccnb2, Foxm1, and Ccne2 is greater compared with WT and is decreased by castration. In parallel, castration reduces Ki67-positive staining (P < 0.0001) compared with intact and testosterone-repleted TRAMP mice. Expression of genes involved in androgen metabolism/signaling pathways is reduced by lycopene feeding (Srd5a1) and by tomato feeding (Srd5a2, Pxn, and Srebf1). In addition, tomato feeding significantly reduced expression of genes associated with stem cell features, Aldh1a and Ly6a, whereas lycopene feeding significantly reduced expression of neuroendocrine differentiation-related genes, Ngfr and Syp. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a profile of testosterone-regulated genes associated with early prostate carcinogenesis that are potential mechanistic targets of dietary tomato components. Future studies on androgen signaling/metabolism, stem cell features, and neuroendocrine differentiation pathways may elucidate the mechanisms by which dietary tomato and lycopene impact prostate cancer risk. PMID:25315431

  14. Dietary tomato and lycopene impact androgen signaling- and carcinogenesis-related gene expression during early TRAMP prostate carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lei; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Pearl, Dennis K.; Erdman, John W.; Moran, Nancy E.; Clinton, Steven K.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of tomato products containing the carotenoid lycopene is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. To identify gene expression patterns associated with early testosterone-driven prostate carcinogenesis, which are impacted by dietary tomato and lycopene, wild type (WT) and transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice were fed control or tomato- or lycopene-containing diets from 4-10 wk-of-age. Eight-week-old mice underwent sham surgery, castration, or castration followed by testosterone-repletion (2.5 mg/kg/d initiated 1 wk after castration). Ten-wk-old intact TRAMP mice exhibit early multifocal prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). Of the 200 prostate cancer-related genes measured by quantitative NanoString®, 189 are detectable, 164 significantly differ by genotype, 179 by testosterone status, and 30 by diet type (P<0.05). In TRAMP, expression of Birc5, Mki67, Aurkb, Ccnb2, Foxm1, and Ccne2 is greater compared to WT and is decreased by castration. In parallel, castration reduces Ki67-positive staining (P<0.0001) compared to intact and testosterone-repleted TRAMP mice. Expression of genes involved in androgen metabolism/signaling pathways are reduced by lycopene feeding (Srd5a1) and by tomato-feeding (Srd5a2, Pxn, and Srebf1). Additionally, tomato-feeding significantly reduced expression of genes associated with stem cell features, Aldh1a and Ly6a, while lycopene-feeding significantly reduced expression of neuroendocrine differentiation-related genes, Ngfr and Syp. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a profile of testosterone-regulated genes associated with early stages of prostate carcinogenesis that are potential mechanistic targets of dietary tomato components. Future studies on androgen signaling/metabolism, stem cell features, and neuroendocrine differentiation pathways may elucidate the mechanisms by which dietary tomato and lycopene impact prostate cancer risk. PMID:25315431

  15. Does your gene need a background check? How genetic background impacts the analysis of mutations, genes, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Christopher H.; Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2013-01-01

    The premise of genetic analysis is that a causal link exists between phenotypic and allelic variation. Yet it has long been documented that mutant phenotypes are not a simple result of a single DNA lesion, but rather are due to interactions of the focal allele with other genes and the environment. Although an experimentally rigorous approach focused on individual mutations and isogenic control strains has facilitated amazing progress within genetics and related fields, a glimpse back suggests that a vast complexity has been omitted from our current understanding of allelic effects. Armed with traditional genetic analyses and the foundational knowledge they have provided, we argue that the time and tools are ripe to return to the under-explored aspects of gene function and embrace the context-dependent nature of genetic effects. We assert that a broad understanding of genetic effects and the evolutionary dynamics of alleles requires identifying how mutational outcomes depend upon the “wild-type” genetic background. Furthermore, we discuss how best to exploit genetic background effects to broaden genetic research programs. PMID:23453263

  16. Palaeophylogenomics of the vertebrate ancestor--impact of hidden paralogy on hagfish and lamprey gene phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2010-07-01

    In dissecting the transition from invertebrates to vertebrates at the molecular level, whole-genome duplications are recognized as a key event. This gave rise to more copies of genes in jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes), such as the four Hox clusters in the human, compared to the single ancestral cluster in invertebrates. To date, as the most early-branching lineages in vertebrates, cyclostomes (hagfishes and lampreys) have been used for comparative analyses of gene regulations and functions. However, assignment of orthology/paralogy for cyclostomes' genes is not unambiguously demonstrated. Thus, there is a high degree of incongruence in tree topologies between gene families, although whole genome duplications postulate uniform patterns in gene phylogeny. In this review, we demonstrate how expansion of an ancient genome before the cyclostome-gnathostome split, followed by reciprocal gene loss, can cause this incongruence. This is sometimes referred to as 'hidden paralogy'. PMID:21558193

  17. Gene Model Annotations for Drosophila melanogaster: Impact of High-Throughput Data

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Beverley B.; dos Santos, Gilberto; Crosby, Madeline A.; Emmert, David B.; St. Pierre, Susan E.; Gramates, L. Sian; Zhou, Pinglei; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Falls, Kathleen; Strelets, Victor; Russo, Susan M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2015-01-01

    We report the current status of the FlyBase annotated gene set for Drosophila melanogaster and highlight improvements based on high-throughput data. The FlyBase annotated gene set consists entirely of manually annotated gene models, with the exception of some classes of small non-coding RNAs. All gene models have been reviewed using evidence from high-throughput datasets, primarily from the modENCODE project. These datasets include RNA-Seq coverage data, RNA-Seq junction data, transcription start site profiles, and translation stop-codon read-through predictions. New annotation guidelines were developed to take into account the use of the high-throughput data. We describe how this flood of new data was incorporated into thousands of new and revised annotations. FlyBase has adopted a philosophy of excluding low-confidence and low-frequency data from gene model annotations; we also do not attempt to represent all possible permutations for complex and modularly organized genes. This has allowed us to produce a high-confidence, manageable gene annotation dataset that is available at FlyBase (http://flybase.org). Interesting aspects of new annotations include new genes (coding, non-coding, and antisense), many genes with alternative transcripts with very long 3′ UTRs (up to 15–18 kb), and a stunning mismatch in the number of male-specific genes (approximately 13% of all annotated gene models) vs. female-specific genes (less than 1%). The number of identified pseudogenes and mutations in the sequenced strain also increased significantly. We discuss remaining challenges, for instance, identification of functional small polypeptides and detection of alternative translation starts. PMID:26109357

  18. Host gene constraints and genomic context impact the expression and evolution of human microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    França, Gustavo S.; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Galante, Pedro A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that recent miRNAs tend to emerge within coding genes. Here we conjecture that human miRNA evolution is tightly influenced by the genomic context, especially by host genes. Our findings show a preferential emergence of intragenic miRNAs within old genes. We found that miRNAs within old host genes are significantly more broadly expressed than those within young ones. Young miRNAs within old genes are more broadly expressed than their intergenic counterparts, suggesting that young miRNAs have an initial advantage by residing in old genes, and benefit from their hosts' expression control and from the exposure to diverse cellular contexts and target genes. Our results demonstrate that host genes may provide stronger expression constraints to intragenic miRNAs in the long run. We also report associated functional implications, highlighting the genomic context and host genes as driving factors for the expression and evolution of human miRNAs. PMID:27109497

  19. Impacts of anthropogenic activity on the ecology of class 1 integrons and integron-associated genes in the environment

    PubMed Central

    Gaze, William H; Zhang, Lihong; Abdouslam, Nouradin A; Hawkey, Peter M; Calvo-Bado, Leo; Royle, Jeremy; Brown, Helen; Davis, Susan; Kay, Paul; Boxall, Alistair B A; Wellington, Elizabeth M H

    2011-01-01

    The impact of human activity on the selection for antibiotic resistance in the environment is largely unknown, although considerable amounts of antibiotics are introduced through domestic wastewater and farm animal waste. Selection for resistance may occur by exposure to antibiotic residues or by co-selection for mobile genetic elements (MGEs) which carry genes of varying activity. Class 1 integrons are genetic elements that carry antibiotic and quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) resistance genes that confer resistance to detergents and biocides. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and diversity of class 1 integron and integron-associated QAC resistance genes in bacteria associated with industrial waste, sewage sludge and pig slurry. We show that prevalence of class 1 integrons is higher in bacteria exposed to detergents and/or antibiotic residues, specifically in sewage sludge and pig slurry compared with agricultural soils to which these waste products are amended. We also show that QAC resistance genes are more prevalent in the presence of detergents. Studies of class 1 integron prevalence in sewage sludge amended soil showed measurable differences compared with controls. Insertion sequence elements were discovered in integrons from QAC contaminated sediment, acting as powerful promoters likely to upregulate cassette gene expression. On the basis of this data, >1 × 1019 bacteria carrying class 1 integrons enter the United Kingdom environment by disposal of sewage sludge each year. PMID:21368907

  20. geneLAB: Expanding the Impact of NASA's Biological Research in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayl, Nicole; Smith, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The geneLAB project is designed to leverage the value of large 'omics' datasets from molecular biology projects conducted on the ISS by making these datasets available, citable, discoverable, interpretable, reusable, and reproducible. geneLAB will create a collaboration space with an integrated set of tools for depositing, accessing, analyzing, and modeling these diverse datasets from spaceflight and related terrestrial studies.

  1. Impact of Docosahexaenoic Acid on Gene Expression during Osteoclastogenesis in Vitro—A Comprehensive Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Masako; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are known to protect against inflammation-induced bone loss in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, periodontitis and osteoporosis. We previously reported that DHA, not EPA, inhibited osteoclastogenesis induced by the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (sRANKL) in vitro. In this study, we performed gene expression analysis using microarrays to identify genes affected by the DHA treatment during osteoclastogenesis. DHA strongly inhibited osteoclastogenesis at the late stage. Among the genes upregulated by the sRANKL treatment, 4779 genes were downregulated by DHA and upregulated by the EPA treatment. Gene ontology analysis identified sets of genes related to cell motility, cell adhesion, cell-cell signaling and cell morphogenesis. Quantitative PCR analysis confirmed that DC-STAMP, an essential gene for the cell fusion process in osteoclastogenesis, and other osteoclast-related genes, such as Siglec-15, Tspan7 and Mst1r, were inhibited by DHA. PMID:23945674

  2. UPDATE ON SLA GENES AND THEIR IMPACT ON IMMUNE AND DISEASE INTERACTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) complex is one of the most gene-dense regions in the swine genome. It consists of three major gene clusters, the SLA class I, class III and class II regions, that span ~1.1, 0.7 and 0.5 Mb, respectively, making the swi...

  3. Gene-diet interactions and their impact on colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have evaluated the role of gene-diet interaction in the etiology of colorectal cancer (CRC). Historically, these studies focused on established dietary risk factors and genes involved in their metabolism. However, results from these candidate gene studies were inconsistent, possibly due to multiple testing and publication bias. In recent years, genome-wide association studies have identified a number of CRC susceptibility loci, and subsequent meta-analyses have observed limited evidence that diet may modify the risk associated with these susceptibility loci. Statistical techniques have been recently developed to evaluate the presence of interaction across the entire genome; results from these genome-wide studies have demonstrated limited evidence of interaction and have failed to replicate results from candidate gene studies and those using established susceptibility loci. However, larger sample sizes are likely needed to elucidate modest or weak interaction in genome-wide studies of gene-diet interaction. PMID:25844273

  4. Impact of Pre-Existing Immunity on Gene Transfer to Nonhuman Primate Liver with Adeno-Associated Virus 8 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Calcedo, Roberto; Bell, Peter; Lin, Jianping; Grant, Rebecca L; Siegel, Don L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vectors based on the primate-derived adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) are being evaluated in preclinical and clinical models. Natural infections with related AAVs activate memory B cells that produce antibodies capable of modulating the efficacy and safety of the vector. We have evaluated the biology of AAV8 gene transfer in macaque liver, with a focus on assessing the impact of pre-existing humoral immunity. Twenty-one macaques with various levels of AAV neutralizing antibody (NAb) were injected intravenously with AAV8 vector expressing green fluorescent protein. Pre-existing antibody titers in excess of 1:10 substantially diminished hepatocyte transduction that, in the absence of NAbs, was highly efficient. Vector-specific NAb diminished liver deposition of genomes and unexpectedly increased genome distribution to the spleen. The majority of animals showed high-level and stable sequestration of vector capsid protein by follicular dendritic cells of splenic germinal centers. These studies illustrate how natural immunity to a virus that is related to a vector can impact the efficacy and potential safety of in vivo gene therapy. We propose to use the in vitro transduction inhibition assay to evaluate research subjects before gene therapy and to preclude from systemic AAV8 trials those that have titers in excess of 1:10. PMID:21476868

  5. Identifying genes that impact on aroma profiles produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the production of higher alcohols.

    PubMed

    Styger, Gustav; Jacobson, Dan; Bauer, Florian F

    2011-08-01

    During alcoholic fermentation, many volatile aroma compounds are formed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including esters, fatty acids, and higher alcohols. While the metabolic network that leads to the formation of these compounds is reasonably well mapped, surprisingly little is known about specific enzymes involved in specific reactions, the regulation of the network, and the physiological roles of individual pathways within the network. Furthermore, different yeast strains tend to produce significantly different aroma profiles. These differences are of tremendous biotechnological interest, since producers of alcoholic beverages such as wine and beer are searching for means to diversify and improve their product range. Various factors such as the redox, energy, and nutritional balance of a cell have previously been suggested to directly or indirectly affect and regulate the network. To gain a better understanding of the regulations and physiological role of this network, we screened a subset of the EUROSCARF strain deletion library for genes that, when deleted, would impact most significantly on the aroma profile produced under fermentative conditions. The 10 genes whose deletion impacted most significantly on higher alcohol production were selected and further characterized to assess their mode of action within or on this metabolic network. This is the first description of a large-scale screening approach using aroma production as the primary selection criteria, and the data suggest that many of the identified genes indeed play central and direct roles within the aroma production network of S. cerevisiae. PMID:21547456

  6. Aggregation of AcMNPV LEF-10 and Its Impact on Viral Late Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaodong; Zhou, Xinyu; Nan, Hao; Zhao, Yu; Bai, Yu; Ou, Yanmei; Chen, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) late expression factor gene lef-10 has been identified to be required for viral late gene expression by transient expression assay. Our previous work has shown that the gene product LEF-10 can form very stable high-molecular-weight complexes, but the structure and function of the protein remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that LEF-10 was essential for the replication of AcMNPV, and its truncated fragment containing amino acid residues 1 to 48 were sufficient to support the virus survival. Our data also suggested that the LEF-10 could spontaneously aggregate to form punctate spots in virus infected Sf9 cells at low frequency, and the aggregation of the protein could be induced by LEF-10 over-expression. When the protein aggregated to form punctate spots, soluble LEF-10 proteins were depleted and this could result in the down-regulation of viral late gene expression. PMID:27152613

  7. Impact of persistent cytomegalovirus infection on human neuroblastoma cell gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hoever, Gerold; Vogel, Jens-Uwe; Lukashenko, Polina; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Komor, Martina; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2005-01-14

    In a model of human neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines persistently infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) we previously showed that persistent HCMV infection is associated with an increased malignant phenotype, enhanced drug resistance, and invasive properties. To gain insights into the mechanisms of increased malignancy we analyzed the global changes in cellular gene expression induced by persistent HCMV infection of human neuroblastoma cells by use of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays (HG-U133A, Affymetrix) and RT-PCR. Comparing the gene expression of different NB cell lines with persistently infected cell sub-lines revealed 11 host cell genes regulated in a similar manner throughout all infected samples. Nine of these 11 genes may contribute to the previously observed changes in malignant phenotype of persistently HCMV infected NB cells by influencing invasive growth, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and proliferation. Thus, this work provides the basis for further functional studies. PMID:15582591

  8. DNA Compaction Induced by a Cationic Polymer or Surfactant Impact Gene Expression and DNA Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ainalem, Marie-Louise; Bartles, Andrew; Muck, Joscha; Dias, Rita S.; Carnerup, Anna M.; Zink, Daniele; Nylander, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in achieving gene regulation in biotechnological and biomedical applications by using synthetic DNA-binding agents. Most studies have so far focused on synthetic sequence-specific DNA-binding agents. Such approaches are relatively complicated and cost intensive and their level of sophistication is not always required, in particular for biotechnological application. Our study is inspired by in vivo data that suggest that DNA compaction might contribute to gene regulation. This study exploits the potential of using synthetic DNA compacting agents that are not sequence-specific to achieve gene regulation for in vitro systems. The semi-synthetic in vitro system we use include common cationic DNA-compacting agents, poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers and the surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which we apply to linearized plasmid DNA encoding for the luciferase reporter gene. We show that complexing the DNA with either of the cationic agents leads to gene expression inhibition in a manner that depends on the extent of compaction. This is demonstrated by using a coupled in vitro transcription-translation system. We show that compaction can also protect DNA against degradation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, our study shows that these effects are reversible and DNA can be released from the complexes. Release of DNA leads to restoration of gene expression and makes the DNA susceptible to degradation by Dnase. A highly charged polyelectrolyte, heparin, is needed to release DNA from dendrimers, while DNA complexed with CTAB dissociates with the non-ionic surfactant C12E5. Our results demonstrate the relation between DNA compaction by non-specific DNA-binding agents and gene expression and gene regulation can be achieved in vitro systems in a reliable dose-dependent and reversible manner. PMID:24671109

  9. Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacterial Populations and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes Obtained from Environments Impacted by Livestock and Municipal Waste

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Lisa M.; Harhay, Dayna M.; Schmidt, John W.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal wastewater treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two “low impact” environments (an urban lake and a relict prairie). Multiple liquid and solid samples were collected from each environment. The prevalences and concentrations of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica) and Gram-positive (enterococci) bacteria were determined from individual samples (n = 174). The prevalences of 84 antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic DNA isolated from samples pooled (n = 44) by collection date, location, and sample type were determined. The prevalences and concentrations of AMR E. coli and Salmonella were similar among the livestock and municipal sample sources. The levels of erythromycin-resistant enterococci were significantly higher in liquid samples from cattle catchment ponds and swine waste lagoons than in liquid samples from municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but solid samples from these environments did not differ significantly. Similarly, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-resistant E. coli concentrations were significantly higher in swine liquid than in municipal liquid samples, but there was no difference in solid samples. Multivariate analysis of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes using principal coordinate analysis showed distinct clustering of samples with livestock (cattle and swine), low impact environment and municipal samples forming three separate clusters. The numbers of class A beta-lactamase, class C beta-lactamase, and fluoroquinolone resistance genes detected were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in municipal samples than in cattle runoff or swine lagoon samples. In conclusion, we report that AMR is a very widespread phenomenon and that similar

  10. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Fiffer, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Genetic testing for heritable hearing loss involves a mix of patented and unpatented genes, mutations and testing methods. More than half of all hearing loss is linked to inherited mutations, and five genes are most commonly tested in the United States. There are no patents on three of these genes, but Athena Diagnostics holds exclusive licenses to test for a common mutation in the GJB2 gene associated with about 50% of all cases, as well as mutations in the MTRNR1 gene. This fragmented intellectual property landscape made hearing loss a useful case study for assessing whether patent rights in genetic testing can proliferate or overlap, and whether it is possible to gather the rights necessary to perform testing. Testing for hearing loss is widely available, primarily from academic medical centers. Based on literature reviews and interviews with researchers, research on the genetics of hearing loss has generally not been impeded by patents. There is no consistent evidence of a premium in testing prices attributable to patent status. Athena Diagnostics has, however, used its intellectual property to discourage other providers from offering some tests. There is no definitive answer about the suitability of current patenting and licensing of commonly tested genes because of continuing legal uncertainty about the extent of enforcement of patent rights. Clinicians have also expressed concerns that multiplex tests will be difficult to develop because of overlapping intellectual property and conflict with Athena’s sole provider business model. PMID:20393307

  11. Comparative RNAi Screens in C. elegans and C. briggsae Reveal the Impact of Developmental System Drift on Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Verster, Adrian J.; Ramani, Arun K.; McKay, Sheldon J.; Fraser, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Although two related species may have extremely similar phenotypes, the genetic networks underpinning this conserved biology may have diverged substantially since they last shared a common ancestor. This is termed Developmental System Drift (DSD) and reflects the plasticity of genetic networks. One consequence of DSD is that some orthologous genes will have evolved different in vivo functions in two such phenotypically similar, related species and will therefore have different loss of function phenotypes. Here we report an RNAi screen in C. elegans and C. briggsae to identify such cases. We screened 1333 genes in both species and identified 91 orthologues that have different RNAi phenotypes. Intriguingly, we find that recently evolved genes of unknown function have the fastest evolving in vivo functions and, in several cases, we identify the molecular events driving these changes. We thus find that DSD has a major impact on the evolution of gene function and we anticipate that the C. briggsae RNAi library reported here will drive future studies on comparative functional genomics screens in these nematodes. PMID:24516395

  12. Identification of Nucleotide-Level Changes Impacting Gene Content and Genome Evolution in Orthopoxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Eneida L.; Hendrickson, Robert Curtis

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poxviruses are composed of large double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes coding for several hundred genes whose variation has supported virus adaptation to a wide variety of hosts over their long evolutionary history. Comparative genomics has suggested that the Orthopoxvirus genus in particular has undergone reductive evolution, with the most recent common ancestor likely possessing a gene complement consisting of all genes present in any existing modern-day orthopoxvirus species, similar to the current Cowpox virus species. As orthopoxviruses adapt to new environments, the selection pressure on individual genes may be altered, driving sequence divergence and possible loss of function. This is evidenced by accumulation of mutations and loss of protein-coding open reading frames (ORFs) that progress from individual missense mutations to gene truncation through the introduction of early stop mutations (ESMs), gene fragmentation, and in some cases, a total loss of the ORF. In this study, we have constructed a whole-genome alignment for representative isolates from each Orthopoxvirus species and used it to identify the nucleotide-level changes that have led to gene content variation. By identifying the changes that have led to ESMs, we were able to determine that short indels were the major cause of gene truncations and that the genome length is inversely proportional to the number of ESMs present. We also identified the number and types of protein functional motifs still present in truncated genes to assess their functional significance. IMPORTANCE This work contributes to our understanding of reductive evolution in poxviruses by identifying genomic remnants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels left behind by evolutionary processes. Our comprehensive analysis of the genomic changes leading to gene truncation and fragmentation was able to detect some of the remnants of these evolutionary processes still present in orthopoxvirus genomes and

  13. Tau Overexpression Impacts a Neuroinflammation Gene Expression Network Perturbed in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wes, Paul D.; Easton, Amy; Corradi, John; Barten, Donna M.; Devidze, Nino; DeCarr, Lynn B.; Truong, Amy; He, Aiqing; Barrezueta, Nestor X.; Polson, Craig; Bourin, Clotilde; Flynn, Marianne E.; Keenan, Stefanie; Lidge, Regina; Meredith, Jere; Natale, Joanne; Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Cadelina, Greg W.; Albright, Charlie F.; Cacace, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous inclusions of the microtubule-associated protein, tau, define a variety of neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To better understand the role of tau-mediated effects on pathophysiology and global central nervous system function, we extensively characterized gene expression, pathology and behavior of the rTg4510 mouse model, which overexpresses a mutant form of human tau that causes Frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). We found that the most predominantly altered gene expression pathways in rTg4510 mice were in inflammatory processes. These results closely matched the causal immune function and microglial gene-regulatory network recently identified in AD. We identified additional gene expression changes by laser microdissecting specific regions of the hippocampus, which highlighted alterations in neuronal network activity. Expression of inflammatory genes and markers of neuronal activity changed as a function of age in rTg4510 mice and coincided with behavioral deficits. Inflammatory changes were tau-dependent, as they were reversed by suppression of the tau transgene. Our results suggest that the alterations in microglial phenotypes that appear to contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease may be driven by tau dysfunction, in addition to the direct effects of beta-amyloid. PMID:25153994

  14. Impact of Hfq on Global Gene Expression and Virulence in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Ming-Ko; Lu, Min-Chi; Liu, Li-Cheng; Lin, Ching-Ting; Lai, Yi-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is responsible for a wide range of clinical symptoms. How this bacterium adapts itself to ever-changing host milieu is still a mystery. Recently, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) have received considerable attention for their functions in fine-tuning gene expression at a post-transcriptional level to promote bacterial adaptation. Here we demonstrate that Hfq, an RNA-binding protein, which facilitates interactions between sRNAs and their mRNA targets, is critical for K. pneumoniae virulence. A K. pneumoniae mutant lacking hfq (Δhfq) failed to disseminate into extra-intestinal organs and was attenuated on induction of a systemic infection in a mouse model. The absence of Hfq was associated with alteration in composition of envelope proteins, increased production of capsular polysaccharides, and decreased resistance to H2O2, heat shock, and UV irradiation. Microarray-based transcriptome analyses revealed that 897 genes involved in numerous cellular processes were deregulated in the Δhfq strain. Interestingly, Hfq appeared to govern expression of many genes indirectly by affecting sigma factor RpoS and RpoE, since 19.5% (175/897) and 17.3% (155/897) of Hfq-dependent genes belong to the RpoE- and RpoS-regulon, respectively. These results indicate that Hfq regulates global gene expression at multiple levels to modulate the physiological fitness and virulence potential of K. pneumoniae. PMID:21779404

  15. RNA-seq analysis of impact of PNN on gene expression and alternative splicing in corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Debra; Newman, Jeremy R.B.; McIntyre, Lauren M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The specialized corneal epithelium requires differentiated properties, specific for its role at the anterior surface of the eye. Thus, tight maintenance of the differentiated qualities of the corneal epithelial is essential. Pinin (PNN) is an exon junction component (EJC) that has dramatic implications for corneal epithelial cell differentiation and may act as a stabilizer of the corneal epithelial cell phenotype. Our studies revealed that PNN is involved in transcriptional repression complexes and spliceosomal complexes, placing PNN at the fulcrum between chromatin and mRNA splicing. Transcriptome analysis of PNN-knockdown cells revealed clear and reproducible alterations in transcript profiles and splicing patterns of a subset of genes that would significantly impact the epithelial cell phenotype. We further investigated PNN’s role in the regulation of gene expression and alternative splicing (AS) in a corneal epithelial context. Methods Human corneal epithelial (HCET) cells that carry the doxycycline-inducible PNN-knockdown shRNA vector were used to perform RNA-seq to determine differential gene expression and differential AS events. Results Multiple genes and AS events were identified as differentially expressed between PNN-knockdown and control cells. Genes upregulated by PNN knockdown included a large proportion of genes that are associated with enhanced cell migration and ECM remodeling processes, such as MMPs, ADAMs, HAS2, LAMA3, CXCRs, and UNC5C. Genes downregulated in response to PNN depletion included IGFBP5, FGD3, FGFR2, PAX6, RARG, and SOX10. AS events in PNN-knockdown cells compared to control cells were also more likely to be detected, and upregulated. In particular, 60% of exon-skipping events, detected in only one condition, were detected in PNN-knockdown cells and of the shared exon-skipping events, 92% of those differentially expressed were more frequent in the PNN knockdown. Conclusions These data suggest that lowering of PNN levels in

  16. γ-Resorcylate Catabolic-Pathway Genes in the Soil Actinomycete Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Daisuke; Araki, Naoto; Motoi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Shota; Iino, Toju; Imai, Shunsuke; Masai, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 gene cluster required for γ-resorcylate (GRA) catabolism was characterized. The cluster includes tsdA, tsdB, tsdC, tsdD, tsdR, tsdT, and tsdX, which encode GRA decarboxylase, resorcinol 4-hydroxylase, hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase, maleylacetate reductase, an IclR-type regulator, a major facilitator superfamily transporter, and a putative hydrolase, respectively. The tsdA gene conferred GRA decarboxylase activity on Escherichia coli. Purified TsdB oxidized NADH in the presence of resorcinol, suggesting that tsdB encodes a unique NADH-specific single-component resorcinol 4-hydroxylase. Mutations in either tsdA or tsdB resulted in growth deficiency on GRA. The tsdC and tsdD genes conferred hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase and maleylacetate reductase activities, respectively, on E. coli. Inactivation of tsdT significantly retarded the growth of RHA1 on GRA. The growth retardation was partially suppressed under acidic conditions, suggesting the involvement of tsdT in GRA uptake. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the tsd genes constitute three transcriptional units, the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons and tsdR. Transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons was induced during growth on GRA. Inactivation of tsdR derepressed transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons in the absence of GRA, suggesting that tsd gene transcription is negatively regulated by the tsdR-encoded regulator. Binding of TsdR to the tsdR-tsdB and tsdT-tsdR intergenic regions was inhibited by the addition of GRA, indicating that GRA interacts with TsdR as an effector molecule. PMID:26319878

  17. Interactions between DNA and Gemini surfactant: impact on gene therapy: part I.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Taksim; Kamel, Amany O; Wettig, Shawn D

    2016-02-01

    Nonviral gene therapy using gemini surfactants is a unique approach to medicine that can be adapted toward the treatment of various diseases. Recently, gemini surfactants have been utilized as candidates for the formation of nonviral vectors. The chemical structure of the surfactant (variations in the alkyl tail length and spacer/head group) and the resulting physicochemical properties of the lipoplexes are critical parameters for efficient gene transfection. Moreover, studying the interaction of the surfactant with DNA can help in designing an efficient vector and understanding how transfection complexes overcome various cellular barriers. Part I of this review provides an overview of various types of gemini surfactants designed for gene therapy and their transfection efficiency; and Part II will focus on different novel methods utilized to understand the interactions between the gemini and DNA in a lipoplex. PMID:26785905

  18. Potential impact of gene regulatory mechanisms on the evolution of multicellularity in the volvocine algae.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how multicellular organisms can arise from their single-celled precursors. The evolution of multicellularity requires the adoption of new traits in unicellular ancestors that allows the generation of form by, for example, increasing the size and developing new cell types. But what are the genetic, cellular and biochemical bases underlying the evolution of multicellularity? Recent advances in evolutionary developmental biology suggest that the regulation of gene expression by cis-regulatory factors, gene duplication and alternative splicing contribute to phenotypic evolution. These mechanisms enable different degrees of phenotypic divergence and complexity with variation in traits from genomes with similar gene contents. In addition, signaling pathways specific to cell types are developed to guarantee the modulation of cellular and developmental processes matched to the cell types as well as the maintenance of multicellularity. PMID:26479715

  19. No significant impact of IFN-γ pathway gene variants on tuberculosis susceptibility in a West African population.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christian G; Intemann, Christopher D; Förster, Birgit; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Franke, Andre; Horstmann, Rolf D; Thye, Thorsten

    2016-05-01

    The concept of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) having a central role in cell-mediated immune defence to Mycobacterium tuberculosis has long been proposed. Observations made through early candidate gene studies of constituents of the IFN-γ pathway have identified moderately associated variants associated with resistance or susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB). By analysing 20 major genes whose proteins contribute to IFN-γ signalling we have assessed a large fraction of the variability in genes that might contribute to susceptibility to TB. Genetic variants were identified by sequencing the promoter regions and all exons of IFNG, IFNGR1, IFNGR2, IRF1, IL12A, IL12B, IL12RB1, IL12RB2, IL23A, IL23R, IL27, EBI3, IL27RA, IL6ST, SOCS1, STAT1, STAT4, JAK2, TYK2 and TBX21 in 69 DNA samples from Ghana. In addition, we screened all exons of IFNGR1 in a Ghanaian study group comprising 1999 TB cases and 2589 controls by high-resolution melting point analysis. The fine-mapping approach allows for a detailed screening of all variants, common and rare. Statistical comparisons of cases and controls, however, did not yield significant results after correction for multiple testing with any of the 246 variants selected for genotyping in this investigation. Gene-wise haplotype tests and analysis of rare variants did not reveal any significant association with susceptibility to TB in our investigation as well. Although this analysis was applied on a plausible set of IFN-γ pathway genes in the largest African TB cohort available so far, the lack of significant results challenges the view that genetic marker of the IFN-γ pathway have an important impact on susceptibility to TB. PMID:26242990

  20. Impact of I/D polymorphism of ACE gene on risk of development and course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Homa-Mlak, Iwona; Powrózek, Tomasz; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Michnar, Marek; Krawczyk, Paweł; Dziedzic, Marcin; Rubinsztajn, Renata; Chazan, Ryszarda; Milanowski, Janusz; Małecka-Massalska, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects more than 10% of the world's population over 40 years of age. The main exogenous risk factor is cigarette smoking; however, only 20% of smokers develop COPD, indicating that some other factors, e.g. genetic, may play an important role in the disease pathogenesis. Recent research indicates that ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) may be a susceptibility gene for asthma or COPD. The aim of our study was to determine the influence of I/D (insertion/deletion) polymorphism of the ACE gene (AluYa5, rs4646994) on the risk and course of COPD. Material and methods We investigated ACE I/D polymorphism in 206 COPD and 165 healthy Caucasian subjects. Results In the generalized linear model (GLZ) analysis of the influence of selected factors on presence of COPD we found a significant independent effect for male sex (repeatedly increases the risk of COPD, OR = 7.7, p = 0.049), as well as smoking or lower body mass index, but only in combination with older age (OR = 0.96, p = 0.003 and OR = 1.005, p = 0.04 respectively). Interestingly, analysis of factors which may influence the risk of a higher number of exacerbations demonstrated that occurrence of DD genotype, but only in men, is associated with a lower risk (OR = 0.7, p = 0.03) of this complication. Conclusions We suggest that ACE may not be a susceptibility gene for the origin of COPD but a disease-modifying gene. Since the impact of I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene on COPD risk is moderate or negligible, other molecular changes, that will help predict the development of this disease, should still be sought. PMID:27186170

  1. The impact of distinct insect pollinators on the movement of genes via pollen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in the foraging behavior and grooming patterns of pollinators can influence the patterns of gene dispersal and the resulting genetic structure of plant populations. Bumblebees groom and are thought to visit nearest neighbor plants, behaviors which are both expected to generate more local...

  2. The Impact of Distinct Insect Species on Pollination and Gene Flow in Alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pollinator species and plant density can influence pollination and gene flow. The efficacy of different floral visitors at tripping alfalfa flowers was examined in both low and high density patches to determine their potential role in pollination. In addition, for a subset of the floral visitors, th...

  3. Gene-environment interactions and the impact on obesity and lipid profile phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequencing the human genome provided the data, human intellectual capital and technology, particularly in terms of infrastructure and methodologies, to begin discovering genes involved in a wide range of human diseases and afflictions. This has led to a resurgence in genetics with the advent of geno...

  4. Potential impact of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the hyaluronan synthase 1 gene in Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Adamia, Sophia; Treon, Steven P; Reiman, Tony; Tournilhac, Olivier; McQuarrie, Carrie; Mant, Michael J; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2005-03-01

    The hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS1) gene encodes a plasma membrane protein that synthesizes hyaluronan, an extracellular matrix molecule. Previously, in patients with Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), we detected upregulation of HAS1 transcripts and identified aberrant splice variants of this gene. Aberrant splicing of HAS1 results from activation of cryptic splice sites. In turn, activation of cryptic donor and acceptor splice sites can be promoted by mutations occurring upstream of these sites and/or at the branch point of slicing. We measured the frequency of the HAS1 833A/G polymorphism (ie, single-nucleotide polymorphism; SNP) in patients with WM and healthy donors. Additionally, HAS1 gene expression was evaluated in the same group of patients. Our observations so far suggest that HAS1 833A/G SNPs contribute to aberrant splicing of this gene; this idea is supported by the fact that 833A/G SNP is located on an exonic splicing enhancer motif. Based on the results obtained thus far, we speculate that individuals with HAS1 833G/G genotype are predisposed toward aberrant HAS1 splicing and expression of HAS1 variants, resulting in an enhanced risk of developing WM. Study of a larger group of patients and healthy donors is needed to confirm these speculations and to evaluate the prognostic significance of these findings. PMID:15794859

  5. Population diversity and adaptive evolution in keratinization genes: impact of environment in shaping skin phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Pramod; Chaurasia, Amit; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Grover, Ritika; Mukerji, Mitali; Natarajan, Vivek T

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of climatic factors in shaping skin phenotypes, particularly pigmentation. Keratinization is another well-designed feature of human skin, which is involved in modulating transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Although this physiological process is closely linked to climate, presently it is not clear whether genetic diversity is observed in keratinization and whether this process also responds to the environmental pressure. To address this, we adopted a multipronged approach, which involved analysis of 1) copy number variations in diverse Indian and HapMap populations from varied geographical regions; 2) genetic association with geoclimatic parameters in 61 populations of dbCLINE database in a set of 549 genes from four processes namely keratinization, pigmentation, epidermal differentiation, and housekeeping functions; 3) sequence divergence in 4,316 orthologous promoters and corresponding exonic regions of human and chimpanzee with macaque as outgroup, and 4) protein sequence divergence (Ka/Ks) across nine vertebrate classes, which differ in their extent of TEWL. Our analyses demonstrate that keratinization and epidermal differentiation genes are under accelerated evolution in the human lineage, relative to pigmentation and housekeeping genes. We show that this entire pathway may have been driven by environmental selection pressure through concordant functional polymorphisms across several genes involved in skin keratinization. Remarkably, this underappreciated function of skin may be a crucial determinant of adaptation to diverse environmental pressures across world populations. PMID:25534032

  6. Hypolipidemic effect of dietary pea proteins: Impact on genes regulating hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, Elena; Parolini, Cinzia; Marchesi, Marta; Diani, Erika; Brambilla, Stefano; Sirtori, Cesare R; Chiesa, Giulia

    2010-05-01

    Controversial data on the lipid-lowering effect of dietary pea proteins have been provided and the mechanisms behind this effect are not completely understood. The aim of the study was to evaluate a possible hypolipidemic activity of a pea protein isolate and to determine whether pea proteins could affect the hepatic lipid metabolism through regulation of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid homeostasis. Rats were fed Nath's hypercholesterolemic diets for 28 days, the protein sources being casein or a pea protein isolate from Pisum sativum. After 14 and 28 days of dietary treatment, rats fed pea proteins had markedly lower plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels than rats fed casein (p<0.05). Pea protein-fed rats displayed higher hepatic mRNA levels of LDL receptor versus those fed casein (p<0.05). Hepatic mRNA concentration of genes involved in fatty acids synthesis, such as fatty acid synthase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase, was lower in pea protein-fed rats than in rats fed casein (p<0.05). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates a marked cholesterol and triglyceride-lowering activity of pea proteins in rats. Moreover, pea proteins appear to affect cellular lipid homeostasis by upregulating genes involved in hepatic cholesterol uptake and by downregulating fatty acid synthesis genes. PMID:20077421

  7. Differential Impact of the "FMR1" Gene on Visual Processing in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Cary S.; Boutet, Isabelle; Cornish, Kim; Zangenehpour, Shahin; Mullen, Kathy T.; Holden, Jeanette J. A.; Kaloustian, Vazken M. Der; Andermann, Eva; Chaudhuri, Avi

    2004-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of heritable mental retardation, affecting (~ around) 1 in 4000 males. The syndrome arises from expansion of a trinucleotide repeat in the 5'-untranslated region of the fragile X mental retardation 1 ("FMR1") gene, leading to methylation of the promoter sequence and lack of the fragile X mental…

  8. The Protein Kinase KIS Impacts Gene Expression during Development and Fear Conditioning in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Manceau, Valérie; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Maucuer, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    The brain-enriched protein kinase KIS (product of the gene UHMK1) has been shown to phosphorylate the human splicing factor SF1 in vitro. This phosphorylation in turn favors the formation of a U2AF65-SF1-RNA complex which occurs at the 3′ end of introns at an early stage of spliceosome assembly. Here, we analyzed the effects of KIS knockout on mouse SF1 phosphorylation, physiology, adult behavior, and gene expression in the neonate brain. We found SF1 isoforms are differently expressed in KIS-ko mouse brains and fibroblasts. Re-expression of KIS in fibroblasts restores a wild type distribution of SF1 isoforms, confirming the link between KIS and SF1. Microarray analysis of transcripts in the neonate brain revealed a subtle down-regulation of brain specific genes including cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels and metabolic enzymes. Q-PCR analyses confirmed these defects and point to an increase of pre-mRNA over mRNA ratios, likely due to changes in splicing efficiency. While performing similarly in prepulse inhibition and most other behavioral tests, KIS-ko mice differ in spontaneous activity and contextual fear conditioning. This difference suggests that disregulation of gene expression due to KIS inactivation affects specific brain functions. PMID:22937132

  9. Oxytocin Pathway Genes: Evolutionary Ancient System Impacting on Human Affiliation, Sociality, and Psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ruth; Monakhov, Mikhail; Pratt, Maayan; Ebstein, Richard P

    2016-02-01

    Oxytocin (OT), a nonapeptide signaling molecule originating from an ancestral peptide, appears in different variants across all vertebrate and several invertebrate species. Throughout animal evolution, neuropeptidergic signaling has been adapted by organisms for regulating response to rapidly changing environments. The family of OT-like molecules affects both peripheral tissues implicated in reproduction, homeostasis, and energy balance, as well as neuromodulation of social behavior, stress regulation, and associative learning in species ranging from nematodes to humans. After describing the OT-signaling pathway, we review research on the three genes most extensively studied in humans: the OT receptor (OXTR), the structural gene for OT (OXT/neurophysin-I), and CD38. Consistent with the notion that sociality should be studied from the perspective of social life at the species level, we address human social functions in relation to OT-pathway genes, including parenting, empathy, and using social relationships to manage stress. We then describe associations between OT-pathway genes with psychopathologies involving social dysfunctions such as autism, depression, or schizophrenia. Human research particularly underscored the involvement of two OXTR single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs53576, rs2254298) with fewer studies focusing on other OXTR (rs7632287, rs1042778, rs2268494, rs2268490), OXT (rs2740210, rs4813627, rs4813625), and CD38 (rs3796863, rs6449197) single nucleotide polymorphisms. Overall, studies provide evidence for the involvement of OT-pathway genes in human social functions but also suggest that factors such as gender, culture, and early environment often confound attempts to replicate first findings. We conclude by discussing epigenetics, conceptual implications within an evolutionary perspective, and future directions, especially the need to refine phenotypes, carefully characterize early environments, and integrate observations of social behavior across

  10. Impact of murine intestinal apolipoprotein A-IV expression on regional lipid absorption, gene expression, and growth

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Trang; Cook, Victoria R.; Rao, Anuradha; Weinberg, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) is synthesized by intestinal enterocytes during lipid absorption and secreted into lymph on the surface of nascent chylomicrons. A compelling body of evidence supports a central role of apoA-IV in facilitating intestinal lipid absorption and in regulating satiety, yet a longstanding conundrum is that no abnormalities in fat absorption, feeding behavior, or weight gain were observed in chow-fed apoA-IV knockout (A4KO) mice. Herein we reevaluated the impact of apoA-IV expression in C57BL6 and A4KO mice fed a high-fat diet. Fat balance and lymph cannulation studies found no effect of intestinal apoA-IV gene expression on the efficiency of fatty acid absorption, but gut sac transport studies revealed that apoA-IV differentially modulates lipid transport and the number and size of secreted triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in different anatomic regions of the small bowel. ApoA-IV gene deletion increased expression of other genes involved in chylomicron assembly, impaired the ability of A4KO mice to gain weight and increase adipose tissue mass, and increased the distal gut hormone response to a high-fat diet. Together these findings suggest that apoA-IV may play a unique role in integrating feeding behavior, intestinal lipid absorption, and energy storage. PMID:21840868

  11. Impact of diurnal temperature variation on grape berry development, proanthocyanidin accumulation, and the expression of flavonoid pathway genes

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Seth D.; Tarara, Julie M.; Gambetta, Greg A.; Matthews, Mark A.; Kennedy, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of temperature on proanthocyanidin (PA) accumulation in grape skins, despite its significance in berry composition and wine quality. Field-grown grapes (cv. Merlot) were cooled during the day or heated at night by +/–8 °C, from fruit set to véraison in three seasons, to determine the effect of temperature on PA accumulation. Total PA content per berry varied only in one year, when PA content was highest in heated berries (1.46 mg berry−1) and lowest in cooled berries (0.97 mg berry−1). In two years, cooling berries resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of (–)-epigallocatechin as an extension subunit. In the third year, rates of berry development, PA accumulation, and the expression levels of several genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis were assessed. Heating and cooling berries altered the initial rates of PA accumulation, which was correlated strongly with the expression of core genes in the flavonoid pathway. Both heating and cooling altered the rate of berry growth and coloration, and the expression of several structural genes within the flavonoid pathway. PMID:22268158

  12. Impact of dietary protein on lipid metabolism-related gene expression in porcine adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background High dietary protein can reduce fat deposition in animal subcutaneous adipose tissue, but little is known about the mechanism. Methods Sixty Wujin pigs of about 15 kg weight were fed either high protein (HP: 18%) or low protein (LP: 14%) diets, and slaughtered at body weights of 30, 60 or 100 kg. Bloods were collected to measure serum parameters. Subcutaneous adipose tissues were sampled for determination of adipocyte size, protein content, lipid metabolism-related gene expression, and enzyme activities. Results HP significantly reduced adipocyte size, fat meat percentage and backfat thickness, but significantly increased daily gain, lean meat percentage and loin eye area at 60 and 100 kg. Serum free fatty acid and triglyceride concentrations in the HP group were significantly higher than in the LP group. Serum glucose and insulin concentrations were not significantly affected by dietary protein at any body weight. HP significantly reduced gene expression of acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) at 60 kg and 100 kg; however, the mRNA level and enzyme activity of FAS were increased at 30 kg. HP promoted gene and protein expression and enzyme activities of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), carmitine palmtoyltransferase-1B (CPT-1B), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and adipocyte-fatty acid binding proteins (A-FABP) at 60 kg, but reduced their expression at 100 kg. Gene expression and enzyme activity of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) was reduced markedly at 60 kg but increased at 100 kg by the high dietary protein. Levels of mRNA, enzyme activities and protein expression of ACC, FAS, SREBP-1c and PPARγ in both LP and HP groups increased with increasing body weight. However, gene and protein expression levels/enzyme activities of LPL, CPT-1B, A-FABP and HSL in both groups were higher at 60 kg than at 30 and 100 kg. Conclusion Fat deposition in Wujin pigs fed high

  13. Impacts of Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Adiponectin Receptor 1 Gene on Corresponding Protein Stability: A Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Md. Abu; Solayman, Md.; Paul, Sudip; Saha, Moumoni; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Despite the reported association of adiponectin receptor 1 (ADIPOR1) gene mutations with vulnerability to several human metabolic diseases, there is lack of computational analysis on the functional and structural impacts of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the human ADIPOR1 at protein level. Therefore, sequence- and structure-based computational tools were employed in this study to functionally and structurally characterize the coding nsSNPs of ADIPOR1 gene listed in the dbSNP database. Our in silico analysis by SIFT, nsSNPAnalyzer, PolyPhen-2, Fathmm, I-Mutant 2.0, SNPs&GO, PhD-SNP, PANTHER, and SNPeffect tools identified the nsSNPs with distorting functional impacts, namely, rs765425383 (A348G), rs752071352 (H341Y), rs759555652 (R324L), rs200326086 (L224F), and rs766267373 (L143P) from 74 nsSNPs of ADIPOR1 gene. Finally the aforementioned five deleterious nsSNPs were introduced using Swiss-PDB Viewer package within the X-ray crystal structure of ADIPOR1 protein, and changes in free energy for these mutations were computed. Although increased free energy was observed for all the mutants, the nsSNP H341Y caused the highest energy increase amongst all. RMSD and TM scores predicted that mutants were structurally similar to wild type protein. Our analyses suggested that the aforementioned variants especially H341Y could directly or indirectly destabilize the amino acid interactions and hydrogen bonding networks of ADIPOR1. PMID:27294143

  14. Impacts of Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Adiponectin Receptor 1 Gene on Corresponding Protein Stability: A Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Md Abu; Solayman, Md; Paul, Sudip; Saha, Moumoni; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Despite the reported association of adiponectin receptor 1 (ADIPOR1) gene mutations with vulnerability to several human metabolic diseases, there is lack of computational analysis on the functional and structural impacts of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the human ADIPOR1 at protein level. Therefore, sequence- and structure-based computational tools were employed in this study to functionally and structurally characterize the coding nsSNPs of ADIPOR1 gene listed in the dbSNP database. Our in silico analysis by SIFT, nsSNPAnalyzer, PolyPhen-2, Fathmm, I-Mutant 2.0, SNPs&GO, PhD-SNP, PANTHER, and SNPeffect tools identified the nsSNPs with distorting functional impacts, namely, rs765425383 (A348G), rs752071352 (H341Y), rs759555652 (R324L), rs200326086 (L224F), and rs766267373 (L143P) from 74 nsSNPs of ADIPOR1 gene. Finally the aforementioned five deleterious nsSNPs were introduced using Swiss-PDB Viewer package within the X-ray crystal structure of ADIPOR1 protein, and changes in free energy for these mutations were computed. Although increased free energy was observed for all the mutants, the nsSNP H341Y caused the highest energy increase amongst all. RMSD and TM scores predicted that mutants were structurally similar to wild type protein. Our analyses suggested that the aforementioned variants especially H341Y could directly or indirectly destabilize the amino acid interactions and hydrogen bonding networks of ADIPOR1. PMID:27294143

  15. Heme Signaling Impacts Global Gene Expression, Immunity and Dengue Virus Infectivity in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Bottino-Rojas, Vanessa; Talyuli, Octávio A. C.; Jupatanakul, Natapong; Sim, Shuzhen; Dimopoulos, George; Venancio, Thiago M.; Bahia, Ana C.; Sorgine, Marcos H.; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Paiva-Silva, Gabriela O.

    2015-01-01

    Blood-feeding mosquitoes are exposed to high levels of heme, the product of hemoglobin degradation. Heme is a pro-oxidant that influences a variety of cellular processes. We performed a global analysis of heme-regulated Aedes aegypti (yellow fever mosquito) transcriptional changes to better understand influence on mosquito physiology at the molecular level. We observed an iron- and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-independent signaling induced by heme that comprised genes related to redox metabolism. By modulating the abundance of these transcripts, heme possibly acts as a danger signaling molecule. Furthermore, heme triggered critical changes in the expression of energy metabolism and immune response genes, altering the susceptibility towards bacteria and dengue virus. These findings seem to have implications on the adaptation of mosquitoes to hematophagy and consequently on their ability to transmit diseases. Altogether, these results may also contribute to the understanding of heme cell biology in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26275150

  16. Meiotic Drive Impacts Expression and Evolution of X-Linked Genes in Stalk-Eyed Flies

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Josephine A.; Brand, Cara L.; Paczolt, Kimberly A.; Johns, Philip M.; Baker, Richard H.; Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Although sex chromosome meiotic drive has been observed in a variety of species for over 50 years, the genes causing drive are only known in a few cases, and none of these cases cause distorted sex-ratios in nature. In stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), driving X chromosomes are commonly found at frequencies approaching 30% in the wild, but the genetic basis of drive has remained elusive due to reduced recombination between driving and non-driving X chromosomes. Here, we used RNAseq to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between males carrying either a driving X (XSR) or a standard X chromosome (XST), and found hundreds of these, the majority of which are X-linked. Drive-associated transcripts show increased levels of sequence divergence (dN/dS) compared to a control set, and are predominantly expressed either in testes or in the gonads of both sexes. Finally, we confirmed that XSR and XST are highly divergent by estimating sequence differentiation between the RNAseq pools. We found that X-linked transcripts were often strongly differentiated (whereas most autosomal transcripts were not), supporting the presence of a relatively large region of recombination suppression on XSR presumably caused by one or more inversions. We have identified a group of genes that are good candidates for further study into the causes and consequences of sex-chromosome drive, and demonstrated that meiotic drive has had a profound effect on sequence evolution and gene expression of X-linked genes in this species. PMID:24832132

  17. Interactions of early adversity with stress-related gene polymorphisms impact regional brain structure in females.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arpana; Labus, Jennifer; Kilpatrick, Lisa A; Bonyadi, Mariam; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Heendeniya, Nuwanthi; Bradesi, Sylvie; Chang, Lin; Mayer, Emeran A

    2016-04-01

    Early adverse life events (EALs) have been associated with regional thinning of the subgenual cingulate cortex (sgACC), a brain region implicated in the development of disorders of mood and affect, and often comorbid functional pain disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Regional neuroinflammation related to chronic stress system activation has been suggested as a possible mechanism underlying these neuroplastic changes. However, the interaction of genetic and environmental factors in these changes is poorly understood. The current study aimed to evaluate the interactions of EALs and candidate gene polymorphisms in influencing thickness of the sgACC. 210 female subjects (137 healthy controls; 73 IBS) were genotyped for stress and inflammation-related gene polymorphisms. Genetic variation with EALs, and diagnosis on sgACC thickness was examined, while controlling for race, age, and total brain volume. Compared to HCs, IBS had significantly reduced sgACC thickness (p = 0.03). Regardless of disease group (IBS vs. HC), thinning of the left sgACC was associated with a significant gene-gene environment interaction between the IL-1β genotype, the NR3C1 haplotype, and a history of EALs (p = 0.05). Reduced sgACC thickness in women with the minor IL-1β allele, was associated with EAL total scores regardless of NR3C1 haplotype status (p = 0.02). In subjects homozygous for the major IL-1β allele, reduced sgACC with increasing levels of EALs was seen only with the less common NR3C1 haplotype (p = 0.02). These findings support an interaction between polymorphisms related to stress and inflammation and early adverse life events in modulating a key region of the emotion arousal circuit. PMID:25630611

  18. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Long QT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Angrist, Misha; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Genetic testing for Long QT syndrome (LQTS) exemplifies patenting and exclusive licensing with different outcomes at different times. Exclusive licensing from the University of Utah changed the business model from sole provider to two US providers of LQTS testing. LQTS is associated with mutations in many genes, ten of which are now tested by two competing firms in the United States, PGxHealth and GeneDx. Until 2009, PGxHealth was sole provider, based largely on exclusive rights to patents from the University of Utah and other academic institutions. University of Utah patents were initially licensed to DNA Sciences, whose patent rights were acquired by Gennaissance, and then by Clinical Data, Inc., which owns PGxHealth. In 2002, DNA Sciences “cleared the market” by sending cease and desist patent enforcement letters to university and reference laboratories offering LQTS genetic testing. There was no test on the market for a one- to two-year period. From 2005-2008, most LQTS-related patents were controlled by Clinical Data, Inc., and its subsidiary PGxHealth. BioReference Laboratories, Inc., secured countervailing exclusive patent rights starting in 2006, also from the University of Utah, and broke the PGxHealth monopoly in early 2009, creating a duopoly for genetic testing in the United States, and expanding the number of genes for which commercial testing is available from five to ten. PMID:20393304

  19. Morphological restriction of human coronary artery endothelial cells substantially impacts global gene expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Jessica M; Pham, Robert; Rowntree, Rebecca K; Amaya, Clarissa; Battiste, James; Boucheron, Laura E; Mitchell, Dianne C; Bryan, Brad A

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in cell shape have been shown to modulate chromatin condensation and cell lineage specification; however, the mechanisms controlling these processes are largely unknown. Because endothelial cells experience cyclic mechanical changes from blood flow during normal physiological processes and disrupted mechanical changes as a result of abnormal blood flow, cell shape deformation and loss of polarization during coronary artery disease, we aimed to determine how morphological restriction affects global gene expression patterns. Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were cultured on spatially defined adhesive micropatterns, forcing them to conform to unique cellular morphologies differing in cellular polarization and angularity. We utilized pattern recognition algorithms and statistical analysis to validate the cytoskeletal pattern reproducibility and uniqueness of each micropattern, and performed microarray analysis on normal-shaped and micropatterned HCAECs to determine how constrained cellular morphology affects gene expression patterns. Analysis of the data revealed that forcing HCAECs to conform to geometrically-defined shapes significantly affects their global transcription patterns compared to nonrestricted shapes. Interestingly, gene expression patterns were altered in response to morphological restriction in general, although they were consistent regardless of the particular shape the cells conformed to. These data suggest that the ability of HCAECs to spread, although not necessarily their particular morphology, dictates their genomics patterns. PMID:23802622

  20. Quercetin Impacts Expression of Metabolism- and Obesity-Associated Genes in SGBS Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Leiherer, Andreas; Stoemmer, Kathrin; Muendlein, Axel; Saely, Christoph H; Kinz, Elena; Brandtner, Eva M; Fraunberger, Peter; Drexel, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by the rapid expansion of visceral adipose tissue, resulting in a hypoxic environment in adipose tissue which leads to a profound change of gene expression in adipocytes. As a consequence, there is a dysregulation of metabolism and adipokine secretion in adipose tissue leading to the development of systemic inflammation and finally resulting in the onset of metabolic diseases. The flavonoid quercetin as well as other secondary plant metabolites also referred to as phytochemicals have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic effects known to be protective in view of obesity-related-diseases. Nevertheless, its underlying molecular mechanism is still obscure and thus the focus of this study was to explore the influence of quercetin on human SGBS (Simpson Golabi Behmel Syndrome) adipocytes' gene expression. We revealed for the first time that quercetin significantly changed expression of adipokine (Angptl4, adipsin, irisin and PAI-1) and glycolysis-involved (ENO2, PFKP and PFKFB4) genes, and that this effect not only antagonized but in part even overcompensated the effect mediated by hypoxia in adipocytes. Thus, these results are explained by the recently proposed hypothesis that the protective effect of quercetin is not solely due to its free radical-scavenging activity but also to a direct effect on mitochondrial processes, and they demonstrate that quercetin might have the potential to counteract the development of obesity-associated complications. PMID:27187453

  1. Impacts of enterotoxin gene cluster-encoded superantigens on local and systemic experimental Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzian, F L; Ali, A; Badiou, C; Dauwalder, O; Lina, G; Josefsson, E

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is both a component of the normal skin flora and an important pathogen. It expresses a range of recognized and putative virulence factors, such as enterotoxins with superantigenic properties. Several superantigen genes, i.e., seg, sei, selm, seln, and selo, are encoded by the enterotoxin gene cluster (egc), which is found in the majority of S. aureus isolates. Carriage of egc is associated with fitness of S. aureus in the gut microbiota, but it is not known if it contributes to pathogenicity. We constructed egc+ (functional for the seg, selm, and selo genes) and isogenic egc- S. aureus mutants, and investigated their virulence profiles in murine infection models. No effect of egc was seen in a local skin and soft tissue infection model, but in an invasive infection model, increased weight loss was observed after infection with the egc+ as compared to the egc- mutant. Mortality and arthritis were not affected by egc status. Our data suggest that egc has limited effects on the virulence of S. aureus. It may primarily function as a colonization factor increasing commensal fitness, although it might have some aggravating effects on the infection when the bacteria reach the blood. PMID:25864191

  2. Quercetin Impacts Expression of Metabolism- and Obesity-Associated Genes in SGBS Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Leiherer, Andreas; Stoemmer, Kathrin; Muendlein, Axel; Saely, Christoph H.; Kinz, Elena; Brandtner, Eva M.; Fraunberger, Peter; Drexel, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by the rapid expansion of visceral adipose tissue, resulting in a hypoxic environment in adipose tissue which leads to a profound change of gene expression in adipocytes. As a consequence, there is a dysregulation of metabolism and adipokine secretion in adipose tissue leading to the development of systemic inflammation and finally resulting in the onset of metabolic diseases. The flavonoid quercetin as well as other secondary plant metabolites also referred to as phytochemicals have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic effects known to be protective in view of obesity-related-diseases. Nevertheless, its underlying molecular mechanism is still obscure and thus the focus of this study was to explore the influence of quercetin on human SGBS (Simpson Golabi Behmel Syndrome) adipocytes’ gene expression. We revealed for the first time that quercetin significantly changed expression of adipokine (Angptl4, adipsin, irisin and PAI-1) and glycolysis-involved (ENO2, PFKP and PFKFB4) genes, and that this effect not only antagonized but in part even overcompensated the effect mediated by hypoxia in adipocytes. Thus, these results are explained by the recently proposed hypothesis that the protective effect of quercetin is not solely due to its free radical-scavenging activity but also to a direct effect on mitochondrial processes, and they demonstrate that quercetin might have the potential to counteract the development of obesity-associated complications. PMID:27187453

  3. The impact of intragenic CpG content on gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Asli Petra; Leikam, Doris; Krinner, Simone; Notka, Frank; Ludwig, Christine; Längst, Gernot; Wagner, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    The development of vaccine components or recombinant therapeutics critically depends on sustained expression of the corresponding transgene. This study aimed to determine the contribution of intragenic CpG content to expression efficiency in transiently and stably transfected mammalian cells. Based upon a humanized version of green fluorescent protein (GFP) containing 60 CpGs within its coding sequence, a CpG-depleted variant of the GFP reporter was established by carefully modulating the codon usage. Interestingly, GFP reporter activity and detectable protein amounts in stably transfected CHO and 293 cells were significantly decreased upon CpG depletion and independent from promoter usage (CMV, EF1α). The reduction in protein expression associated with CpG depletion was likewise observed for other unrelated reporter genes and was clearly reflected by a decline in mRNA copy numbers rather than translational efficiency. Moreover, decreased mRNA levels were neither due to nuclear export restrictions nor alternative splicing or mRNA instability. Rather, the intragenic CpG content influenced de novo transcriptional activity thus implying a common transcription-based mechanism of gene regulation via CpGs. Increased high CpG transcription correlated with changed nucleosomal positions in vitro albeit histone density at the two genes did not change in vivo as monitored by ChIP. PMID:20203083

  4. Mutations in HAMP and HJV genes and their impact on expression of clinical hemochromatosis in a cohort of 100 Spanish patients homozygous for the C282Y mutation of HFE gene.

    PubMed

    Altès, Albert; Bach, Vanessa; Ruiz, Angels; Esteve, Anna; Felez, Jordi; Remacha, Angel F; Sardà, M Pilar; Baiget, Montserrat

    2009-10-01

    Most hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) patients are homozygous for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene. Nevertheless, penetrance of the disease is very variable. In some patients, penetrance can be mediated by concomitant mutations in other iron master genes. We evaluated the clinical impact of hepcidin (HAMP) and hemojuvelin mutations in a cohort of 100 Spanish patients homozygous for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene. HAMP and hemojuvelin mutations were evaluated in all patients by bidirectional direct cycle sequencing. Phenotype-genotype interactions were evaluated. A heterozygous mutation of the HAMP gene (G71D) was found in only one out of 100 cases. Following, we performed a study of several members of that family, and we observed several members had a digenic inheritance of the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene and the G71D mutation of the HAMP gene. This mutation in the HAMP gene did not modify the phenotype of the individuals who were homozygous for the C282Y mutation. One other patient presented a new polymorphism in the hemojuvelin gene, without consequences in iron load or clinical course of the disease. In conclusion, HAMP and hemojuvelin mutations are rare among Spanish HH patients, and their impact in this population is not significant. PMID:19214511

  5. Nutritional impacts on gene expression in the surface mucosa of blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short-term feed deprivation is a common occurrence in both wild and farmed fish species, due to reproductive processes, seasonal variations in temperature, or in response to a disease outbreak. Fasting can have dramatic physiological and biological onsequences for fish, including impacts on mucosal ...

  6. Dual-site phosphorylation of the control of virulence regulator impacts group a streptococcal global gene expression and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Nicola; Saldaña, Miguel; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Thompson, Erika; Koller, Antonius; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorylation relays are a major mechanism by which bacteria alter transcription in response to environmental signals, but understanding of the functional consequences of bacterial response regulator phosphorylation is limited. We sought to characterize how phosphorylation of the control of virulence regulator (CovR) protein from the major human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) influences GAS global gene expression and pathogenesis. CovR mainly serves to repress GAS virulence factor-encoding genes and has been shown to homodimerize following phosphorylation on aspartate-53 (D53) in vitro. We discovered that CovR is phosphorylated in vivo and that such phosphorylation is partially heat-stable, suggesting additional phosphorylation at non-aspartate residues. Using mass spectroscopy along with targeted mutagenesis, we identified threonine-65 (T65) as an additional CovR phosphorylation site under control of the serine/threonine kinase (Stk). Phosphorylation on T65, as mimicked by the recombinant CovR T65E variant, abolished in vitro CovR D53 phosphorylation. Similarly, isoallelic GAS strains that were either unable to be phosphorylated at D53 (CovR-D53A) or had functional constitutive phosphorylation at T65 (CovR-T65E) had essentially an identical gene repression profile to each other and to a CovR-inactivated strain. However, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E isoallelic strains retained the ability to positively influence gene expression that was abolished in the CovR-inactivated strain. Consistent with these observations, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E strains were hypervirulent compared to the CovR-inactivated strain in a mouse model of invasive GAS disease. Surprisingly, an isoalleic strain unable to be phosphorylated at CovR T65 (CovR-T65A) was hypervirulent compared to the wild-type strain, as auto-regulation of covR gene expression resulted in lower covR gene transcript and CovR protein levels in the CovR-T65A strain. Taken together, these data establish that Cov

  7. Dual-Site Phosphorylation of the Control of Virulence Regulator Impacts Group A Streptococcal Global Gene Expression and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Nicola; Saldaña, Miguel; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Thompson, Erika; Koller, Antonius; Shelburne, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation relays are a major mechanism by which bacteria alter transcription in response to environmental signals, but understanding of the functional consequences of bacterial response regulator phosphorylation is limited. We sought to characterize how phosphorylation of the control of virulence regulator (CovR) protein from the major human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) influences GAS global gene expression and pathogenesis. CovR mainly serves to repress GAS virulence factor-encoding genes and has been shown to homodimerize following phosphorylation on aspartate-53 (D53) in vitro. We discovered that CovR is phosphorylated in vivo and that such phosphorylation is partially heat-stable, suggesting additional phosphorylation at non-aspartate residues. Using mass spectroscopy along with targeted mutagenesis, we identified threonine-65 (T65) as an additional CovR phosphorylation site under control of the serine/threonine kinase (Stk). Phosphorylation on T65, as mimicked by the recombinant CovR T65E variant, abolished in vitro CovR D53 phosphorylation. Similarly, isoallelic GAS strains that were either unable to be phosphorylated at D53 (CovR-D53A) or had functional constitutive phosphorylation at T65 (CovR-T65E) had essentially an identical gene repression profile to each other and to a CovR-inactivated strain. However, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E isoallelic strains retained the ability to positively influence gene expression that was abolished in the CovR-inactivated strain. Consistent with these observations, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E strains were hypervirulent compared to the CovR-inactivated strain in a mouse model of invasive GAS disease. Surprisingly, an isoalleic strain unable to be phosphorylated at CovR T65 (CovR-T65A) was hypervirulent compared to the wild-type strain, as auto-regulation of covR gene expression resulted in lower covR gene transcript and CovR protein levels in the CovR-T65A strain. Taken together, these data establish that Cov

  8. High-Resolution Gene Flow Model for Assessing Environmental Impacts of Transgene Escape Based on Biological Parameters and Wind Speed

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Haccou, Patsy; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Environmental impacts caused by transgene flow from genetically engineered (GE) crops to their wild relatives mediated by pollination are longstanding biosafety concerns worldwide. Mathematical modeling provides a useful tool for estimating frequencies of pollen-mediated gene flow (PMGF) that are critical for assessing such environmental impacts. However, most PMGF models are impractical for this purpose because their parameterization requires actual data from field experiments. In addition, most of these models are usually too general and ignored the important biological characteristics of concerned plant species; and therefore cannot provide accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies. It is necessary to develop more accurate PMGF models based on biological and climatic parameters that can be easily measured in situ. Here, we present a quasi-mechanistic PMGF model that only requires the input of biological and wind speed parameters without actual data from field experiments. Validation of the quasi-mechanistic model based on five sets of published data from field experiments showed significant correlations between the model-simulated and field experimental-generated PMGF frequencies. These results suggest accurate prediction for PMGF frequencies using this model, provided that the necessary biological parameters and wind speed data are available. This model can largely facilitate the assessment and management of environmental impacts caused by transgene flow, such as determining transgene flow frequencies at a particular spatial distance, and establishing spatial isolation between a GE crop and its coexisting non-GE counterparts and wild relatives. PMID:26959240

  9. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  10. Unraveling the estrogen receptor (er) genes in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) reveals expression differences between the two adult life stages but little impact from polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) load.

    PubMed

    Nikoleris, Lina; Hansson, Maria C

    2015-01-15

    Estrogen receptors (ers) not only are activated by hormones but also interact with many human-derived environmental contaminants. Here, we present evidence for four expressed er genes in Atlantic salmon cDNA - two more ers (erα2 and erβ2) than previously published. To determine if er gene expression differs between two adult life-stages we sampled 20 adult salmon from the feeding phase in the Baltic Sea and during migration in the River Mörrum, Sweden. Results show that all four er genes are present in the investigated tissues, except for erα2 not appearing in the spleen. Overall, a profile analysis reveals the erα1 gene to be the most highly expressed er gene in both female and male Baltic Sea salmon tissues, and also in female River Mörrum salmon. In contrast, this gene has the lowest gene expression level of the four er genes in male salmon from the River Mörrum. The erα2 gene is expressed at the lowest levels in both female/male Baltic Sea salmon and in female River Mörrum salmon. Statistical analyses indicate a significant and complex interaction where both sex and adult life stage can impact er gene expression. Regression analyses did not demonstrate any significant relationship between polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) body burden and er gene expression level, suggesting that accumulated pollutants from the Baltic Sea may be deactivated inside the salmon's lipid tissues and have limited impact on er activity. This study is the first comprehensive analysis of four er gene expression levels in two wild salmon populations from two different adult life stages where information about PCB load is also available. PMID:25451980

  11. Impact of rli87 gene deletion on response of Listeria monocytogenes to environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Kun, Xie; Qingling, Meng; Qiao, Jun; Yelong, Peng; Tianli, Liu; Cheng, Chen; Yu, Ma; Zhengxiang, Hu; Xuepeng, Cai; Chuangfu, Chen

    2014-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a zoonotic pathogen that widely adapts to various environments. Recent studies have found that noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) play regulatory roles in LM responses to environmental stress. To understand the role of ncRNA rli87 in the response regulation, a rli87 deletion strain LM-Δrli87 was constructed by homologous recombination and tested for stress responses to high temperature, low temperature, high osmotic pressure, alcohol, acidity, alkaline and oxidative environments, along with LM EGD-e strain (control). The results showed that compared with LM EGD-e, LM-Δrli87 grew faster (P < 0.05) at low temperature (30 °C), high temperature (42 °C), and in alkaline condition (pH = 9), similarly (P > 0.05) in acidic and high osmatic pressure (10% NaCl) conditions. When cultured in medium containing 3.8% ethanol, the growth was not significantly different between the two strains (P > 0.05). When cultured at pH 9, they had similar growth rates in the first 5 h (P > 0.05), but the rates were significantly different after 6 h (P < 0.05). The expression of rsbV, rsbW, hpt, clpP, and ctsR was upregulated in LM-∆rli87 compared with LM EGD-e at pH 9, indicating that the rli87 gene regulated the expression of the five genes in alkaline environment. Our results suggest that the rli87 gene has an important regulatory role in LM's response to temperature (30 and 42 °C), alkaline stresses. PMID:25091276

  12. Impact of Pre-Analytical Variables on Cancer Targeted Gene Sequencing Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Luiz H; Timmers, Cynthia; Shilo, Konstantin; Zhao, Weiqiang; Zhang, Jianying; Yu, Lianbo; Natarajan, Thanemozhi G; Miller, Clinton J; Yilmaz, Ayse Selen; Liu, Tom; Amann, Joseph; Lapa E Silva, José Roberto; Ferreira, Carlos Gil; Carbone, David P

    2015-01-01

    Tumor specimens are often preserved as formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks, the most common clinical source for DNA sequencing. Herein, we evaluated the effect of pre-sequencing parameters to guide proper sample selection for targeted gene sequencing. Data from 113 FFPE lung tumor specimens were collected, and targeted gene sequencing was performed. Libraries were constructed using custom probes and were paired-end sequenced on a next generation sequencing platform. A PCR-based quality control (QC) assay was utilized to determine DNA quality, and a ratio was generated in comparison to control DNA. We observed that FFPE storage time, PCR/QC ratio, and DNA input in the library preparation were significantly correlated to most parameters of sequencing efficiency including depth of coverage, alignment rate, insert size, and read quality. A combined score using the three parameters was generated and proved highly accurate to predict sequencing metrics. We also showed wide read count variability within the genome, with worse coverage in regions of low GC content like in KRAS. Sample quality and GC content had independent effects on sequencing depth, and the worst results were observed in regions of low GC content in samples with poor quality. Our data confirm that FFPE samples are a reliable source for targeted gene sequencing in cancer, provided adequate sample quality controls are exercised. Tissue quality should be routinely assessed for pre-analytical factors, and sequencing depth may be limited in genomic regions of low GC content if suboptimal samples are utilized. PMID:26605948

  13. The major histocompatibility complex genes impact pain response in DA and DA.1U rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Yao, Fan-Rong; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Li, Li; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Xie, Wen; Zhao, Yan

    2015-08-01

    Our recent studies have shown that the difference in basal pain sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimulation between Dark-Agouti (DA) rats and a novel congenic DA.1U rats is major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes dependent. In the present study, we further used DA and DA.1U rats to investigate the role of MHC genes in formalin-induced pain model by behavioral, electrophysiological and immunohistochemical methods. Behavioral results showed biphasic nociceptive behaviors increased significantly following the intraplantar injection of formalin in the hindpaw of DA and DA.1U rats. The main nociceptive behaviors were lifting and licking, especially in DA rats (P<0.001 and P<0.01). The composite pain scores (CPS) in DA rats were significantly higher than those in DA.1U rats in both phases of the formalin test (P<0.01). Electrophysiological results also showed the biphasic increase in discharge rates of C and Aδ fibers of L5 dorsal root in the two strains, and the net change of the discharge rate of DA rats was significantly higher than that of DA.1U rats (P<0.05). The mechanical thresholds decreased after formalin injection in both strains (P<0.01), and the net change in the mechanical threshold in DA was greater than that in DA.1U rats (P<0.05). The expression of RT1-B, representation of MHC class II molecule, in laminae I-II of L4/5 spinal cord in DA rats was significantly higher than that in DA.1U rats in the respective experimental group (P<0.05). These results suggested that both DA and DA.1U rats exhibited nociceptive responses in formalin-induced pain model and DA rats were more sensitive to noxious chemical stimulus than DA.1U rats, indicating that MHC genes might contribute to the difference in pain sensitivity. PMID:25861730

  14. Impact of Mannose-Binding Protein Gene Polymorphisms in Omani Sickle Cell Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, Mathew; Al Zadjali, Shoaib; Bashir, Wafa; Al Ambusaidi, Rahma; Misquith, Rhea; Wali, Yasser; Pathare, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to study mannose-binding protein (MBP) polymorphisms in exonic and promoter region and correlate it with associated infections and vasoocculsive (VOC) episodes in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients since MBP plays an important role in innate immunity by activating the complement system. Methods We studied the genetic polymorphisms in the Exon 1 (alleles A/O) and promoter region (alleles Y/X; H/L, P/Q) of the MBL2 gene, in SCD patients as an increased incidence of infections is seen in these patients. A PCR-based, targeted genomic DNA sequencing of MBL2 was used to study 68 SCD Omani patients and 44 controls (healthy voluntary blood donors). Results In SCD patients, the frequency of the genotype related to the high production of MBL was 0.35 (YA/YA) and for intermediate/low production was 0.65 (YA/XA, XA/XA, YA/YO, XA/YO, YO/YO). The observed frequencies of MBL2 gene promoter polymorphism (-221, Y/X) were 44.4% and 20.5% for the heterozygous genotype Y/X and 3.2% and 2.2% for the homozygous (X/X) respectively between SCD patients and controls. MBL2 Exon1 gene mutations were 29.4% and 50% for the heterozygous genotype A/O and 5.9% and 6.8% respectively for the homozygous (O/O) genotype between SCD patients and controls. The distribution of variant MBL2 gene polymorphisms did not show any correlation in SCD patients with or without VOC attacks (p=0.16; OR −0.486; CI=0.177 −1.33), however, it was correlated with infections (p=0.0162; OR −3.55; CI 1.25–10.04). Conclusions Although the frequency of the genotypes and haplotypes of MBL2 in SCD patients did not differ from controls, overall in the SCD patient cohort the increased representation of variant alleles was significantly correlated with infections (p<0.05). However, these variant MBL2 polymorphisms did not seem to play a significant role in the VOC episodes in this SCD cohort. PMID:26977272

  15. Impact of APOE gene polymorphisms on the lipid profile in an Algerian population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of apolipoprotein E (APOE) in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism is well established. However, the impact of APOE polymorphisms has never been investigated in an Algerian population. This study assessed, for the fist time, the relationships between three APOE polymorphisms (epsilon, rs439401, rs4420638) and plasma lipid concentrations in a general population sample from Algeria. Methods The association analysis was performed in the ISOR study, a representative sample of the population living in Oran (787 subjects aged between 30 and 64). Polymorphisms were considered both individually and as haplotypes. Results In the ISOR sample, APOE ϵ4 allele carriers had higher plasma triglyceride (p=0.0002), total cholesterol (p=0.009) and LDL-cholesterol (p=0.003) levels than ϵ3 allele carriers. No significant associations were detected for the rs4420638 and rs439401 SNPs. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analyses confirmed the respectively deleterious and protective impacts of the ϵ4 and ϵ2 alleles on LDL-cholesterol levels and showed that the G allele of the rs4420638 polymorphism may exert a protective effect on LDL-cholesterol levels in subjects bearing the APOE epsilon 4 allele. Conclusion Our results showed that (i) the APOE epsilon polymorphism has the expected impact on the plasma lipid profile and (ii) the rs4420638 G allele may counterbalance the deleterious effect of the ϵ4 allele on LDL-cholesterol levels in an Algerian population. PMID:24160669

  16. Two Novel Tyrosinase (TYR) Gene Mutations with Pathogenic Impact on Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 1 (OCA1)

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsinejad Kalahroudi, Vadieh; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Arasteh Kani, Ahoura; Aryani, Omid; Tondar, Mahdi; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh; Chung, Lip Yong; Houshmand, Massoud

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders resulting from mutations of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene and presents with either complete or partial absence of pigment in the skin, hair and eyes due to a defect in an enzyme involved in the production of melanin. In this study, mutations in the TYR gene of 30 unrelated Iranian OCA1 patients and 100 healthy individuals were examined using PCR-sequencing. Additionally, in order to predict the possible effects of new mutations on the structure and function of tyrosinase, these mutations were analyzed by SIFT, PolyPhen and I-Mutant 2 software. Here, two new pathogenic p.C89S and p.H180R mutations were detected in two OCA1 patients. Moreover, the R402Q and S192Y variants, which are common non-pathogenic polymorphisms, were detected in 17.5% and 35% of the patients, respectively. The outcome of this study has extended the genotypic spectrum of OCA1 patients, which paves the way for more efficient carrier detection and genetic counseling. PMID:25216246

  17. The Impact of Unprotected T Cells in RNAi-based Gene Therapy for HIV-AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Liu, Ying Poi; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is highly effective in inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by the expression of antiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in stably transduced T-cell lines. For the development of a durable gene therapy that prevents viral escape, we proposed to combine multiple shRNAs against highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 RNA genome. The future in vivo application of such a gene therapy protocol will reach only a fraction of the T cells, such that HIV-1 replication will continue in the unmodified T cells, thereby possibly frustrating the therapy by generation of HIV-1 variants that escape from the inhibition imposed by the protected cells. We studied virus inhibition and evolution in pure cultures of shRNA-expressing cells versus mixed cell cultures of protected and unprotected T cells. The addition of the unprotected T cells indeed seems to accelerate HIV-1 evolution and escape from a single shRNA inhibitor. However, expression of three antiviral shRNAs from a single lentiviral vector prevents virus escape even in the presence of unprotected cells. These results support the idea to validate the therapeutic potential of this anti-HIV approach in appropriate in vivo models. PMID:24336172

  18. Gastric Cancer and Helicobacter pylori: Impact of hopQII Gene.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, E; Kahrizi, D; Moradi, M T; Sohrabi, M; Yari, K

    2016-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative, microaerophilic bacterium found usually in the stomach and use a number of mechanisms to survive in the stomach lumen. The presence of these bacteria in the stomach can lead to gastritis and reduction in stomach acid production. Acute inflammation can directly damage to the peripheral cells that are responsible for the secretion of acid. The risk of developing gastric carcinoma is associated to heterogeneity of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors. The HopQII is one of the outer membrane proteins involved in bacterial adherence to gastric mucosa and has been suggested to also play a role in the virulence of H. pylori. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the association between different H. pylori virulence hopQII allele and patients with gastroduodenal disorders. For this purpose 58 stomach biopsies of patients with gastric cancer and 100 saliva samples from healthy individuals were collected. Then genomic DNA was purified and PCR for was done for desired genes via specific primers. The H. pylori infections were diagnosed by PCR for GlmM gene. Then frequencies of hopQII+ and hopQII- genotypes was determined in H. pylori infected cases. Statistical analysis showed that there were not significant differences between healthy and diseased ones for genotype hopQII+. PMID:26950460

  19. Impacts of CA9 Gene Polymorphisms on Urothelial Cell Carcinoma Susceptibility and Clinicopathologic Characteristics in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yen-Chuan; Chen, Chuan-Shu; Li, Jian-Ri; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) is reportedly overexpressed in several types of carcinomas and is generally considered a marker of malignancy. The current study explored the effect of CA9 gene polymorphisms on the susceptibility of developing urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) and the clinicopathological status. Methodology and Principal Findings A total of 442 participants, including 221 healthy people and 221 patients with UCC, were recruited for this study. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the CA9 gene were assessed by a real-time PCR with the TaqMan assay. After adjusting for other co-variants, the individuals carrying at least one A allele at CA9 rs1048638 had a 2.303-fold risk of developing UCC than did wild-type (CC) carriers. Furthermore, UCC patients who carried at least one A allele at rs1048638 had a higher invasive stage risk (p< 0.05) than did patients carrying the wild-type allele. Moreover, among the UCC patients with smoker, people with at least one A allele of CA9 polymorphisms (rs1048638) had a 4.75-fold (95% CI = 1.204–18.746) increased risk of invasive cancer. Conclusion The rs1048638 polymorphic genotypes of CA9 might contribute to the prediction of susceptibility to and pathological development of UCC. This is the first study to provide insight into risk factors associated with CA9 variants in carcinogenesis of UCC in Taiwan. PMID:24349364

  20. Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) in plants: a complex gene family with major impacts on plant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Kerrie L; Bhave, Mrinal

    2007-10-01

    The ubiquitous cell membrane proteins called aquaporins are now firmly established as channel proteins that control the specific transport of water molecules across cell membranes in all living organisms. The aquaporins are thus likely to be of fundamental significance to all facets of plant growth and development affected by plant-water relations. A majority of plant aquaporins have been found to share essential structural features with the human aquaporin and exhibit water-transporting ability in various functional assays, and some have been shown experimentally to be of critical importance to plant survival. Furthermore, substantial evidence is now available from a number of plant species that shows differential gene expression of aquaporins in response to abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, or cold and clearly establishes the aquaporins as major players in the response of plants to conditions that affect water availability. This review summarizes the function and regulation of these genes to develop a greater understanding of the response of plants to water insufficiency, and particularly, to identify tolerant genotypes of major crop species including wheat and rice and plants that are important in agroforestry. PMID:17562090

  1. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Pitlick, Emily; Heaney, Christopher; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an iron metabolism disorder that leads to excess iron buildup, especially in the heart, liver, and pancreas. Mutations in the HFE gene are the single most common cause of HH, which can be treated effectively if diagnosed early. Patents cover the HFE gene, related proteins, screening methods, and testing kits. Most initial testing for HH is biochemical, but HFE DNA testing or genotyping is used to confirm a diagnosis of inherited hemochromatosis. Concerns over patents covering HFE testing emerged in 2002, when scholars argued that exclusive licensing and the patent-enabled sole provider model then in place led to high prices and limited access. Critics of the sole provider model noted that the test was available at multiple laboratories prior to the enforcement of patents. By 2007, however, Bio-Rad, Limited, acquired the key intellectual property and sub-licensed it widely. In part because of broad, non-exclusive licensing, there are now multiple providers and testing technologies, and research continues. This case study illustrates how both changes in intellectual property ownership and evolving clinical utility of HFE genetic testing in the last decade have effected the licensing of patents and availability of genetic testing. PMID:20393306

  2. Expected genetic contributions and their impact on gene flow and genetic gain.

    PubMed

    Woolliams, J A; Bijma, P; Villanueva, B

    1999-10-01

    Long-term genetic contributions (r(i)) measure lasting gene flow from an individual i. By accounting for linkage disequilibrium generated by selection both within and between breeding groups (categories), assuming the infinitesimal model, a general formula was derived for the expected contribution of ancestor i in category q (mu(i)(q)), given its selective advantages (s(i)(q)). Results were applied to overlapping generations and to a variety of modes of inheritance and selection indices. Genetic gain was related to the covariance between r(i) and the Mendelian sampling deviation (a(i)), thereby linking gain to pedigree development. When s(i)(q) includes a(i), gain was related to E[mu(i)(q))a(i)], decomposing it into components attributable to within and between families, within each category, for each element of s(i)(q). The formula for mu(i)(q) was consistent with previous index theory for predicting gain in discrete generations. For overlapping generations, accurate predictions of gene flow were obtained among and within categories in contrast to previous theory that gave qualitative errors among categories and no predictions within. The generation interval was defined as the period for which mu(i)(q), summed over all ancestors born in that period, equaled 1. Predictive accuracy was supported by simulation results for gain and contributions with sib-indices, BLUP selection, and selection with imprinted variation. PMID:10511574

  3. Two novel tyrosinase (TYR) gene mutations with pathogenic impact on oculocutaneous albinism type 1 (OCA1).

    PubMed

    Ghodsinejad Kalahroudi, Vadieh; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Arasteh Kani, Ahoura; Aryani, Omid; Tondar, Mahdi; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh; Chung, Lip Yong; Houshmand, Massoud

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders resulting from mutations of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene and presents with either complete or partial absence of pigment in the skin, hair and eyes due to a defect in an enzyme involved in the production of melanin. In this study, mutations in the TYR gene of 30 unrelated Iranian OCA1 patients and 100 healthy individuals were examined using PCR-sequencing. Additionally, in order to predict the possible effects of new mutations on the structure and function of tyrosinase, these mutations were analyzed by SIFT, PolyPhen and I-Mutant 2 software. Here, two new pathogenic p.C89S and p.H180R mutations were detected in two OCA1 patients. Moreover, the R402Q and S192Y variants, which are common non-pathogenic polymorphisms, were detected in 17.5% and 35% of the patients, respectively. The outcome of this study has extended the genotypic spectrum of OCA1 patients, which paves the way for more efficient carrier detection and genetic counseling. PMID:25216246

  4. Reassessing Domain Architecture Evolution of Metazoan Proteins: Major Impact of Gene Prediction Errors

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Alinda; Szláma, György; Szarka, Eszter; Trexler, Mária; Bányai, László; Patthy, László

    2011-01-01

    In view of the fact that appearance of novel protein domain architectures (DA) is closely associated with biological innovations, there is a growing interest in the genome-scale reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the domain architectures of multidomain proteins. In such analyses, however, it is usually ignored that a significant proportion of Metazoan sequences analyzed is mispredicted and that this may seriously affect the validity of the conclusions. To estimate the contribution of errors in gene prediction to differences in DA of predicted proteins, we have used the high quality manually curated UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot database as a reference. For genome-scale analysis of domain architectures of predicted proteins we focused on RefSeq, EnsEMBL and NCBI's GNOMON predicted sequences of Metazoan species with completely sequenced genomes. Comparison of the DA of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot sequences of worm, fly, zebrafish, frog, chick, mouse, rat and orangutan with those of human Swiss-Prot entries have identified relatively few cases where orthologs had different DA, although the percentage with different DA increased with evolutionary distance. In contrast with this, comparison of the DA of human, orangutan, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, worm and fly RefSeq, EnsEMBL and NCBI's GNOMON predicted protein sequences with those of the corresponding/orthologous human Swiss-Prot entries identified a significantly higher proportion of domain architecture differences than in the case of the comparison of Swiss-Prot entries. Analysis of RefSeq, EnsEMBL and NCBI's GNOMON predicted protein sequences with DAs different from those of their Swiss-Prot orthologs confirmed that the higher rate of domain architecture differences is due to errors in gene prediction, the majority of which could be corrected with our FixPred protocol. We have also demonstrated that contamination of databases with incomplete, abnormal or mispredicted sequences introduces a bias in DA

  5. Reassessing domain architecture evolution of metazoan proteins: major impact of gene prediction errors.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Alinda; Szláma, György; Szarka, Eszter; Trexler, Mária; Bányai, László; Patthy, László

    2011-01-01

    In view of the fact that appearance of novel protein domain architectures (DA) is closely associated with biological innovations, there is a growing interest in the genome-scale reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the domain architectures of multidomain proteins. In such analyses, however, it is usually ignored that a significant proportion of Metazoan sequences analyzed is mispredicted and that this may seriously affect the validity of the conclusions. To estimate the contribution of errors in gene prediction to differences in DA of predicted proteins, we have used the high quality manually curated UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot database as a reference. For genome-scale analysis of domain architectures of predicted proteins we focused on RefSeq, EnsEMBL and NCBI's GNOMON predicted sequences of Metazoan species with completely sequenced genomes. Comparison of the DA of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot sequences of worm, fly, zebrafish, frog, chick, mouse, rat and orangutan with those of human Swiss-Prot entries have identified relatively few cases where orthologs had different DA, although the percentage with different DA increased with evolutionary distance. In contrast with this, comparison of the DA of human, orangutan, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, worm and fly RefSeq, EnsEMBL and NCBI's GNOMON predicted protein sequences with those of the corresponding/orthologous human Swiss-Prot entries identified a significantly higher proportion of domain architecture differences than in the case of the comparison of Swiss-Prot entries. Analysis of RefSeq, EnsEMBL and NCBI's GNOMON predicted protein sequences with DAs different from those of their Swiss-Prot orthologs confirmed that the higher rate of domain architecture differences is due to errors in gene prediction, the majority of which could be corrected with our FixPred protocol. We have also demonstrated that contamination of databases with incomplete, abnormal or mispredicted sequences introduces a bias in DA

  6. Impact of thrombophilic genes mutations on thrombosis risk in Egyptian nonmetastatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Mona Ahmed; Ismail, Mona Ahmed; Saad, Abeer Attia; Habashy, Deena Mohamed; Hafeez, Zeinab Mohamed Abdel; Boshnak, Noha Hussein

    2015-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in cancer patients. Several genetic risk factors related to thrombophilia are known; however, their contributions to thrombotic tendency in cancer patients have conflicting results. We aimed to determine the prevalence of factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin (PTH) G20210A and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T gene polymorphisms in Egyptian nonmetastatic cancer patients and their influence on thrombosis risk in those patients. Factor V Leiden, PTH G20210A and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms were detected in 40 cancer patients with VTE (group 1) and 40 cancer patients with no evidence of VTE (group 2) by PCR-based DNA analysis. Factor V and MTHFR mutations were higher in group 1 than in group 2 (factor V heterozygous mutation: 20 vs. 7.5%, homozygous mutation: 10 vs. 2.5%; MTHFR heterozygous mutation: 40 vs. 25%, homozygous mutation 5 vs. 0%, respectively) (P = 0.03). Mortality rate was higher in group 1 (75%) than in group 2 (25%; P < 0.001). No difference was found between those groups regarding PTH mutation (P = 1). Mortality rate was higher in the presence of homozygous and heterozygous factor V mutation (100 and 82%, respectively) compared to the wild type (41%) (P = 0.0006). Having any of the three studied gene mutations worsened the overall survival (P = 0.0003). Cox regression proved that both thrombosis and presence of factor V mutation are independent factors affecting survival in cancer patients (P < 0.001 and P = 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, there is an association between factor V and MTHFR mutations and risk of VTE in Egyptian cancer patients. Thrombosis and presence of factor V mutation are independent factors that influence survival in those patients. PMID:25565385

  7. Impact of Gene Patents and Licensing Practices on Access to Genetic Testing for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; James, Tamara; Conover, Chris; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most commonly tested autosomal recessive disorders in the US. Clinical CF is associated with mutations in the CFTR gene, of which the most common mutation among Caucasians, ΔF508, was identified in 1989. The University of Michigan, Johns Hopkins University, and the Hospital for Sick Children, where much of the initial research occurred, hold key patents for CF genetic sequences, mutations and methods for detecting them. Several patents including the one that covers detection of the ΔF508 mutation are jointly held by the University of Michigan and the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, with Michigan administering patent licensing in the US. The University of Michigan broadly licenses the ΔF508 patent for genetic testing with over 60 providers of genetic testing to date. Genetic testing is now used in newborn screening, diagnosis, and reproductive decisions. Interviews with key researchers and intellectual property managers, a survey of laboratories’ prices for CF genetic testing, a review of literature on CF tests’ cost effectiveness, and a review of the developing market for CF testing provide no evidence that patents have significantly hindered access to genetic tests for CF or prevented financially cost-effective screening. Current licensing practices for cystic fibrosis (CF) genetic testing appear to facilitate both academic research and commercial testing. More than one thousand different CFTR mutations have been identified, and research continues to determine their clinical significance. Patents have been nonexclusively licensed for diagnostic use, and have been variably licensed for gene transfer and other therapeutic applications. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has been engaged in licensing decisions, making CF a model of collaborative and cooperative patenting and licensing practice. PMID:20393308

  8. Impact of VEGF-C Gene Polymorphisms and Environmental Factors on Oral Cancer Susceptibility in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Ming-Hsien; Liu, Yu-Fan; Hsin, Chung-Han; Lin, Chien-Huang; Shih, Chun-Han; Yang, Shun-Fa; Cheng, Chao-Wen; Lin, Chiao-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral cancer, which is the fourth most common male cancer, is associated with environmental carcinogens in Taiwan. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C, an angiogenic/lymphangiogenic factor with high expression levels in tumor tissues, plays important roles in the development of several malignancies. This study was designed to examine associations of five VEGF-C gene polymorphisms with the susceptibility to and clinicopathological characteristics of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Methodology/Principal Findings Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of VEGF-C were analyzed by a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 470 male patients with oral cancer and 426 cancer-free controls. In this study, we found that the VEGF-C rs7664413 and rs2046463 polymorphisms were associated with oral-cancer susceptibility but not with any clinicopathological parameters. The GGACA or GACTG haplotype of five VEGF-C SNPs (rs3775194, rs11947611, rs1485766, rs7664413, and rs2046463) combined was also related to the risk of oral cancer. Among 611 male smokers, VEGF-C polymorphism carriers who also chewed betel quid were found to have a 14.5–24.2-fold risk of having oral cancer compared to the VEGF-C wild-type carrier who did not chew betel quid. Among 461 male betel-quid chewers, VEGF-C polymorphism carriers who also smoked had a 2.7–18.1-fold risk of having oral cancer compared to those who carried the wild type but did not smoke. Conclusions Our results suggest that the two SNPs of VEGF-C (rs7664413 and rs2046463) and either of two haplotypes of five SNPs combined have potential predictive significance in oral carcinogenesis. Gene-environmental interactions among VEGF-C polymorphisms, smoking, and betel-quid chewing might alter one's susceptibility to oral cancer. PMID:23593187

  9. Sexual Polyploidization in Medicago sativa L.: Impact on the Phenotype, Gene Transcription, and Genome Methylation.

    PubMed

    Rosellini, Daniele; Ferradini, Nicoletta; Allegrucci, Stefano; Capomaccio, Stefano; Zago, Elisa Debora; Leonetti, Paola; Balech, Bachir; Aversano, Riccardo; Carputo, Domenico; Reale, Lara; Veronesi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidization as the consequence of 2n gamete formation is a prominent mechanism in plant evolution. Studying its effects on the genome, and on genome expression, has both basic and applied interest. We crossed two diploid (2n = 2x = 16) Medicago sativa plants, a subsp. falcata seed parent, and a coerulea × falcata pollen parent that form a mixture of n and 2n eggs and pollen, respectively. Such a cross produced full-sib diploid and tetraploid (2n = 4x = 32) hybrids, the latter being the result of bilateral sexual polyploidization (BSP). These unique materials allowed us to investigate the effects of BSP, and to separate the effect of intraspecific hybridization from those of polyploidization by comparing 2x with 4x full sib progeny plants. Simple sequence repeat marker segregation demonstrated tetrasomic inheritance for all chromosomes but one, demonstrating that these neotetraploids are true autotetraploids. BSP brought about increased biomass, earlier flowering, higher seed set and weight, and larger leaves with larger cells. Microarray analyses with M. truncatula gene chips showed that several hundred genes, related to diverse metabolic functions, changed their expression level as a consequence of polyploidization. In addition, cytosine methylation increased in 2x, but not in 4x, hybrids. Our results indicate that sexual polyploidization induces significant transcriptional novelty, possibly mediated in part by DNA methylation, and phenotypic novelty that could underpin improved adaptation and reproductive success of tetraploid M. sativa with respect to its diploid progenitor. These polyploidy-induced changes may have promoted the adoption of tetraploid alfalfa in agriculture. PMID:26858330

  10. Sexual Polyploidization in Medicago sativa L.: Impact on the Phenotype, Gene Transcription, and Genome Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Rosellini, Daniele; Ferradini, Nicoletta; Allegrucci, Stefano; Capomaccio, Stefano; Zago, Elisa Debora; Leonetti, Paola; Balech, Bachir; Aversano, Riccardo; Carputo, Domenico; Reale, Lara; Veronesi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidization as the consequence of 2n gamete formation is a prominent mechanism in plant evolution. Studying its effects on the genome, and on genome expression, has both basic and applied interest. We crossed two diploid (2n = 2x = 16) Medicago sativa plants, a subsp. falcata seed parent, and a coerulea × falcata pollen parent that form a mixture of n and 2n eggs and pollen, respectively. Such a cross produced full-sib diploid and tetraploid (2n = 4x = 32) hybrids, the latter being the result of bilateral sexual polyploidization (BSP). These unique materials allowed us to investigate the effects of BSP, and to separate the effect of intraspecific hybridization from those of polyploidization by comparing 2x with 4x full sib progeny plants. Simple sequence repeat marker segregation demonstrated tetrasomic inheritance for all chromosomes but one, demonstrating that these neotetraploids are true autotetraploids. BSP brought about increased biomass, earlier flowering, higher seed set and weight, and larger leaves with larger cells. Microarray analyses with M. truncatula gene chips showed that several hundred genes, related to diverse metabolic functions, changed their expression level as a consequence of polyploidization. In addition, cytosine methylation increased in 2x, but not in 4x, hybrids. Our results indicate that sexual polyploidization induces significant transcriptional novelty, possibly mediated in part by DNA methylation, and phenotypic novelty that could underpin improved adaptation and reproductive success of tetraploid M. sativa with respect to its diploid progenitor. These polyploidy-induced changes may have promoted the adoption of tetraploid alfalfa in agriculture. PMID:26858330

  11. A gene to organism approach--assessing the impact of environmental pollution in eelpout (Zoarces viviparus) females and larvae.

    PubMed

    Asker, Noomi; Carney Almroth, Bethanie; Albertsson, Eva; Coltellaro, Mariateresa; Bignell, John Paul; Hanson, Niklas; Scarcelli, Vittoria; Fagerholm, Björn; Parkkonen, Jari; Wijkmark, Emma; Frenzilli, Giada; Förlin, Lars; Sturve, Joachim

    2015-07-01

    A broad biomarker approach was applied to study the effects of marine pollution along the Swedish west coast using the teleost eelpout (Zoarces viviparus) as the sentinel species. Measurements were performed on different biological levels, from the molecular to the organismal, including measurements of messenger RNA (mRNA), proteins, cellular and tissue changes, and reproductive success. Results revealed that eelpout captured in Stenungsund had significantly higher hepatic ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity, high levels of both cytochrome P4501A and diablo homolog mRNA, and high prevalence of dead larvae and nuclear damage in erythrocytes. Eelpout collected in Göteborg harbor displayed extensive macrovesicular steatosis, whereby the majority of hepatocytes were affected throughout the liver, which could indicate an effect on lipid metabolism. Results also indicate that eelpouts collected at polluted sites might have an affected immune system, with lower mRNA expression of genes involved in the innate immune system and a higher number of lymphocytes. Biomarker assessment also was performed on livers dissected from unborn eelpout larvae collected from the ovary of the females. No significant differences were noted, which might indicate that the larvae to some extent are protected from effects of environmental pollutants. In conclusion, usage of the selected set of biological markers, covering responses from gene to organism, has demonstrated site-specific biomarker patterns that provided a broad and comprehensive picture of the impact of environmental stressors. PMID:25663503

  12. Impact of cluster thinning on transcriptional regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes in 'Summer Black' grapes.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiaojun; Zha, Qian; Jiang, Aili; Tian, Yihua

    2016-07-01

    Cluster thinning is an agronomic practice that strongly affects anthocyanin biosynthesis in the skin of grape berries. However, the impact of cluster thinning on anthocyanin biosynthesis has not been fully elucidated at the molecular level. Here, we investigated its effects on the berry quality, the biosynthesis of anthocyanins, and the expression levels of related genes from the onset of véraison to harvest in 'Summer Black' grapes. It was observed that the total soluble solid and anthocyanin content in berry skin significantly increased under cluster thinning, whereas the berry weight and titratable acidity showed no differences from the beginning of véraison to harvest. The expression level of most anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes was significantly up-regulated by cluster thinning from the beginning of véraison and was higher at its end compared to the control. Up-regulation of flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) and O-methyltransferase (OMT) expression, and down-regulation of flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) expression were observed, which might be the cause of shift in the anthocyanin profile. These findings provide insights into the molecular basis of the relationship between cluster thinning and anthocyanin biosynthesis in the grape berry skin. PMID:27035257

  13. The Escherichia coli Cpx Envelope Stress Response Regulates Genes of Diverse Function That Impact Antibiotic Resistance and Membrane Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Shannon K. D.; Price, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The Cpx envelope stress response mediates adaptation to stresses that cause envelope protein misfolding. Adaptation is partly conferred through increased expression of protein folding and degradation factors. The Cpx response also plays a conserved role in the regulation of virulence determinant expression and impacts antibiotic resistance. We sought to identify adaptive mechanisms that may be involved in these important functions by characterizing changes in the transcriptome of two different Escherichia coli strains when the Cpx response is induced. We show that, while there is considerable strain- and condition-specific variability in the Cpx response, the regulon is enriched for proteins and functions that are inner membrane associated under all conditions. Genes that were changed by Cpx pathway induction under all conditions were involved in a number of cellular functions and included several intergenic regions, suggesting that posttranscriptional regulation is important during Cpx-mediated adaptation. Some Cpx-regulated genes are centrally involved in energetics and play a role in antibiotic resistance. We show that a number of small, uncharacterized envelope proteins are Cpx regulated and at least two of these affect phenotypes associated with membrane integrity. Altogether, our work suggests new mechanisms of Cpx-mediated envelope stress adaptation and antibiotic resistance. PMID:23564175

  14. Impacts of light and temperature on shoot branching gradient and expression of strigolactone synthesis and signalling genes in rose.

    PubMed

    Djennane, Samia; Hibrand-Saint Oyant, Laurence; Kawamura, Koji; Lalanne, David; Laffaire, Michel; Thouroude, Tatiana; Chalain, Séverine; Sakr, Soulaiman; Boumaza, Rachid; Foucher, Fabrice; Leduc, Nathalie

    2014-03-01

    Light and temperature are two environmental factors that deeply affect bud outgrowth. However, little is known about their impact on the bud burst gradient along a stem and their interactions with the molecular mechanisms of bud burst control. We investigated this question in two acrotonic rose cultivars. We demonstrated that the darkening of distal buds or exposure to cold (5 °C) prior to transfer to mild temperatures (20 °C) both repress acrotony, allowing the burst of quiescent medial and proximal buds. We sequenced the strigolactone pathway MAX-homologous genes in rose and studied their expression in buds and internodes along the stem. Only expressions of RwMAX1, RwMAX2 and RwMAX4 were detected. Darkening of the distal part of the shoot triggered a strong increase of RwMAX2 expression in darkened buds and bark-phloem samples, whereas it suppressed the acropetal gradient of the expression of RwMAX1 observed in stems fully exposed to light. Cold treatment induced an acropetal gradient of expression of RwMAX1 in internodes and of RwMAX2 in buds along the stem. Our results suggest that the bud burst gradient along the stem cannot be explained by a gradient of expression of RwMAX genes but rather by their local level of expression at each individual position. PMID:23992149

  15. Multifaceted effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neurons: impact on neuronal firing rate, signal transduction and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Dominik; Kuo, Wen Ping; Frühbeis, Carsten; Sun, Jyh-Jang; Zehendner, Christoph M; Luhmann, Heiko J; Pinto, Sheena; Toedling, Joern; Trotter, Jacqueline; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria

    2014-09-26

    Exosomes are small membranous vesicles of endocytic origin that are released by almost every cell type. They exert versatile functions in intercellular communication important for many physiological and pathological processes. Recently, exosomes attracted interest with regard to their role in cell-cell communication in the nervous system. We have shown that exosomes released from oligodendrocytes upon stimulation with the neurotransmitter glutamate are internalized by neurons and enhance the neuronal stress tolerance. Here, we demonstrate that oligodendroglial exosomes also promote neuronal survival during oxygen-glucose deprivation, a model of cerebral ischaemia. We show the transfer from oligodendrocytes to neurons of superoxide dismutase and catalase, enzymes which are known to help cells to resist oxidative stress. Additionally, we identify various effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neuronal physiology. Electrophysiological analysis using in vitro multi-electrode arrays revealed an increased firing rate of neurons exposed to oligodendroglial exosomes. Moreover, gene expression analysis and phosphorylation arrays uncovered differentially expressed genes and altered signal transduction pathways in neurons after exosome treatment. Our study thus provides new insight into the broad spectrum of action of oligodendroglial exosomes and their effects on neuronal physiology. The exchange of extracellular vesicles between neural cells may exhibit remarkable potential to impact brain performance. PMID:25135971

  16. Multifaceted effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neurons: impact on neuronal firing rate, signal transduction and gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Dominik; Kuo, Wen Ping; Frühbeis, Carsten; Sun, Jyh-Jang; Zehendner, Christoph M.; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Pinto, Sheena; Toedling, Joern; Trotter, Jacqueline; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes are small membranous vesicles of endocytic origin that are released by almost every cell type. They exert versatile functions in intercellular communication important for many physiological and pathological processes. Recently, exosomes attracted interest with regard to their role in cell–cell communication in the nervous system. We have shown that exosomes released from oligodendrocytes upon stimulation with the neurotransmitter glutamate are internalized by neurons and enhance the neuronal stress tolerance. Here, we demonstrate that oligodendroglial exosomes also promote neuronal survival during oxygen–glucose deprivation, a model of cerebral ischaemia. We show the transfer from oligodendrocytes to neurons of superoxide dismutase and catalase, enzymes which are known to help cells to resist oxidative stress. Additionally, we identify various effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neuronal physiology. Electrophysiological analysis using in vitro multi-electrode arrays revealed an increased firing rate of neurons exposed to oligodendroglial exosomes. Moreover, gene expression analysis and phosphorylation arrays uncovered differentially expressed genes and altered signal transduction pathways in neurons after exosome treatment. Our study thus provides new insight into the broad spectrum of action of oligodendroglial exosomes and their effects on neuronal physiology. The exchange of extracellular vesicles between neural cells may exhibit remarkable potential to impact brain performance. PMID:25135971

  17. Impact of nandrolone decanoate on gene expression in endocrine systems related to the adverse effects of anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Alsiö, Johan; Birgner, Carolina; Björkblom, Lars; Isaksson, Pernilla; Bergström, Lena; Schiöth, Helgi B; Lindblom, Jonas

    2009-11-01

    Elite athletes, body builders and adolescents misuse anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) in order to increase muscle mass or to enhance physical endurance and braveness. The high doses misused are associated with numerous adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of chronic supratherapeutic AAS treatment on circulating hormones and gene expression in peripheral tissues related to such adverse effects. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure expression levels of in total 37 genes (including peptide hormones, cell membrane receptors, nuclear receptors, steroid synthesising enzymes and other enzymes) in the pituitary, testes, adrenals, adipose tissue, kidneys and liver of male Sprague-Dawley rats after 14-day administration of the AAS nandrolone decanoate, 3 or 15 mg/kg. Plasma glucose and levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), adiponectin, corticosterone, ghrelin, insulin and leptin were also measured. We found several expected effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, while the treatment also caused a number of other not previously identified changes in circulating factors and gene transcription levels such as the dose-dependent reduction of the beta(3)-adrenergic receptor in adipose tissue, reduction of both circulating and mRNA levels of adiponectin, up-regulation of both hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA-reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in de novo synthesis of cholesterol, and the receptor for ACTH in the adrenals. The results provide evidence for wide ranging effects of AAS on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, adipose tissue and substrates of the renal control of blood pressure. PMID:19549128

  18. Impact of the Type I Interferon Receptor on the Global Gene Expression Program During the Course of Dendritic Cell Maturation Induced by Polyinosinic Polycytidylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Olex, Amy L; Turkett, William H; Brzoza-Lewis, Kristina L; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M

    2016-06-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation involves widespread changes in cellular function and gene expression. The regulatory role of IFNAR in the program of DC maturation remains incompletely defined. Thus, the time evolution impact of IFNAR on this process was evaluated. Changes in DC phenotype, function, and gene expression induced by poly I:C were measured in wild-type and IFNAR(-/-) DC at 9 time points over 24 h. Temporal gene expression profiles were filtered on consistency and response magnitude across replicates. The number of genes whose expression was altered by poly I:C treatment was greatly reduced in IFNAR(-/-) DC, including the majority of the downregulated gene expression program previously observed in wild-type (WT) DC. Furthermore, the number of genes upregulated was almost equal between WT and IFNAR(-/-) DC, yet the identities of those genes were distinct. Integrating these data with protein-protein interaction data revealed several novel subnetworks active during maturation, including nucleotide synthesis, metabolism, and repair. A subnetwork associated with redox activity was uniquely identified in IFNAR(-/-) DC. Overall, temporal gene expression and network analyses identified many genes regulated by the type I interferon response and revealed previously unidentified aspects of the DC maturation process. PMID:27035059

  19. CYP1A2 and CYP2D6 Gene Polymorphisms in Schizophrenic Patients with Neuroleptic Drug-Induced Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, S A; Filipenko, M L; Vyalova, N M; Voronina, E N; Pozhidaev, I V; Osmanova, D Z; Ivanov, M V; Fedorenko, O Yu; Semke, A V; Bokhan, N A

    2016-03-01

    Polymorphic variants of CYP1A2 and CYP2D6 genes of the cytochrome P450 system were studied in patients with schizophrenia with drug-induced motor disorders and hyperprolactinemia against the background of long-term neuroleptic therapy. We revealed an association of polymorphic variant C-163A CYP1A2*1F of CYP1A2 gene with tardive dyskinesia and association of polymorphic variant 1846G>A CY2D6*4 and genotype A/A of CYP2D6 gene (responsible for debrisoquin-4-hydroxylase synthesis) with limbotruncal tardive dyskinesia in patients with schizophrenia receiving neuroleptics for a long time. PMID:27021090

  20. Survival and impact of genetically engineered Pseudomonas putida harboring mercury resistance gene in soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, K; Uchiyama, H; Yagi, O

    1994-01-01

    The survival of genetically engineered and wild-type Pseudomonas putida PpY101, that contained a recombinant plasmid pSR134 conferring mercury resistance, were monitored in andosol and sand microcosms. The survival of genetically engineered and wild-type P. putida was not significantly different in andosol. The population change of the two strains was dissimilar in andosol and sand. The survival of genetically engineered and wild-type P. putida strains was affected by the water content of andosol, and increased with the increment of the water content. The impact of the addition of genetically engineered and wild-type P. putida strains on indigenous bacteria and fungi was examined. Inoculation of both strains had no apparent effect on the density of indigenous microorganisms. PMID:7764510

  1. Investigating the impact of hepatitis B virus surface gene polymorphism on antigenicity using ex vivo phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Ijaz, Samreen; Szypulska, Renata; Andrews, Nick; Tedder, Richard S

    2012-11-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) is a complex protein, and understanding accurately the impact of amino acid changes on the antigenicity of the immunodominant a determinant must take this complexity into consideration. Epitope mapping with four mAbs was used to phenotype HBsAg directly from patients' sera to investigate the effect of mutations in their native genetic backbone. The expected mAb reactivity was established initially for samples harbouring 'wild-type' HBsAg sequences across genotypes A-E. The alteration of HBsAg antigenicity, defined by mAb epitope loss, was demonstrated in a number of samples with sequence-inferred amino acid changes. Individual mutations within the mapped epitopes to which the mAbs were directed usually affected their binding. However, the loss of more than one epitope was observed as the number of mutations within a sequence increased. Conversely, not all mutations occurring in the a determinant altered the HBsAg conformation. The genotype backbone, the specific amino acid substitution and amino acid changes occurring outside the major antigenic region appeared to be important in determining expression of the predicted epitope loss. These data clearly demonstrate that sequence-based methods alone may not accurately define HBsAg phenotype. This phenotyping methodology allows for the rapid and accurate identification of antigenically altered viruses and will greatly enhance current HBV surveillance, research and diagnostic activities. The data generated can be used to inform on public health issues relating to prevalence, transmission and impact of HBsAg mutants in HBV-infected populations. PMID:22855781

  2. Impacts of selective logging on inbreeding and gene flow in two Amazonian timber species with contrasting ecological and reproductive characteristics.

    PubMed

    Vinson, C C; Kanashiro, M; Harris, S A; Boshier, D H

    2015-01-01

    Selective logging in Brazil allows for the removal of up to 90% of trees above 50 cm diameter of a given timber species, independent of a species' life history characteristics or how quickly it will recover. The genetic and demographic effects of selective logging on two Amazonian timber species (Dipteryx odorata Leguminosae, Jacaranda copaia Bignoniaceae) with contrasting ecological and reproductive characteristics were assessed in the same forest. Genetic diversity and gene flow were characterized by genotyping adults and seed sampled before and after logging, using hypervariable microsatellite markers. Overall, there were no short-term genetic impacts on the J. copaia population, with commercial application of current Brazilian forest management regulations. In contrast, for D. Odorata, selective logging showed a range of genetic impacts, with a 10% loss of alleles, and reductions in siring by pollen from trees within the 546-ha study area (23-11%) and in the number of pollen donors per progeny array (2.8-1.6), illustrating the importance of the surrounding landscape. Asynchrony in flowering between D. odorata trees led to trees with no breeding partners, which could limit the species reproduction and regeneration under current regulations. The results are summarized with other published studies from the same site and the implications for forest management discussed. The different types and levels of impacts associated with each species support the idea that ecological and genetic information by species, ecological guild or reproductive group is essential in helping to derive sustainable logging guidelines for tropical forests. PMID:25402015

  3. Impact of Genetic Background on Neonatal Lethality of Gga2 Gene-Trap Mice

    PubMed Central

    Doray, Balraj; Govero, Jennifer; Kornfeld, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The functional redundancy of the three mammalian Golgi-localized, γ-ear–containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins (GGAs) was addressed in a previous study. Using insertional mutagenesis, we found that Gga1 or Gga3 homozygous knockout mice were for the most part normal, whereas mice homozygous for two different Gga2 gene-trap alleles exhibited either embryonic or neonatal lethality in the C57BL/6 background, depending on the source of the vector utilized (Byg vs. Tigm, respectively). We now show that the Byg strain harbors a disrupted Gga2 allele that is hypomorphic, indicating that the Byg lethality is attributable to a mechanism independent of GGA2. This is in contrast to the Tigm Gga2 allele, which is a true knockout and establishes a role for GGA2 during the neonatal period. Placement of the Tigm Gga2 allele into the C57BL6/Ola129Sv mixed background results in a lower incidence of neonatal lethality, showing the importance of genetic background in determining the requirement for GGA2 during this period. The Gga2−/− mice that survive have reduced body weight at birth and this runted phenotype is maintained through adulthood. PMID:24637350

  4. PACAP receptor gene polymorphism impacts fear responses in the amygdala and hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Jennifer Strafford; Almli, Lynn M.; Fani, Negar; Gutman, David A.; Bradley, Bekh; Norrholm, Seth D.; Reiser, Emily; Ely, Timothy D.; Dhanani, Rahim; Glover, Ebony M.; Jovanovic, Tanja; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2014-01-01

    We have recently found higher circulating levels of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a highly traumatized cohort of women but not men. Furthermore, a single nucleotide polymorphism in the PACAP receptor gene ADCYAP1R1, adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide 1 receptor type 1, was associated with individual differences in PTSD symptoms and psychophysiological markers of fear and anxiety. The current study outlines an investigation of individual differences in brain function associated with ADCYAP1R1 genotype. Forty-nine women who had experienced moderate to high levels of lifetime trauma participated in a functional MRI task involving passive viewing of threatening and neutral face stimuli. Analyses focused on the amygdala and hippocampus, regions that play central roles in the pathophysiology of PTSD and are known to have high densities of PACAP receptors. The risk genotype was associated with increased reactivity of the amygdala and hippocampus to threat stimuli and decreased functional connectivity between the amygdala and hippocampus. The findings indicate that the PACAP system modulates medial temporal lobe function in humans. Individual differences in ADCYAP1R1 genotype may contribute to dysregulated fear circuitry known to play a central role in PTSD and other anxiety disorders. PMID:24516127

  5. Impact of nonrandom mating on genetic variance and gene flow in populations with mass selection.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Leopoldo; Woolliams, John A

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms by which nonrandom mating affects selected populations are not completely understood and remain a subject of scientific debate in the development of tractable predictors of population characteristics. The main objective of this study was to provide a predictive model for the genetic variance and covariance among mates for traits subjected to directional selection in populations with nonrandom mating based on the pedigree. Stochastic simulations were used to check the validity of this model. Our predictions indicate that the positive covariance among mates that is expected to result with preferential mating of relatives can be severely overpredicted from neutral expectations. The covariance expected from neutral theory is offset by an opposing covariance between the genetic mean of an individual's family and the Mendelian sampling term of its mate. This mechanism was able to predict the reduction in covariance among mates that we observed in the simulated populations and, in consequence, the equilibrium genetic variance and expected long-term genetic contributions. Additionally, this study provided confirmatory evidence on the postulated relationships of long-term genetic contributions with both the rate of genetic gain and the rate of inbreeding (deltaF) with nonrandom mating. The coefficient of variation of the expected gene flow among individuals and deltaF was sensitive to nonrandom mating when heritability was low, but less so as heritability increased, and the theory developed in the study was sufficient to explain this phenomenon. PMID:15020441

  6. Impact of angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism on insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Mesallamy, H; El-Refaie, T; El-Razek, R A

    2013-04-01

    Insulin resistance is allegedly a target pathophysiological mechanism in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome. Moreover, this metabolic alteration is possibly genetically determined. In view of the recent evidence implicating genetic variants of the renin-angiotensin system as candidates in several metabolic disorders, we investigated the allele and genotype frequencies of the A1166 C polymorphism of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor in relation with various metabolic and biochemical parameters in affected females trying to asses its role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. The study was conducted on 83 females of which 39 females served as the control group. The participants were matched for age, body mass index and degree of obesity. For all subjects biochemical parameters were assayed including soluble CD40 ligand together with fasting glucose and insulin which were used for calculation of insulin resistance indices, Genotyping performed using real time polymerase chain reaction revealed that the C allele frequency and the AC genotype were less frequently observed in patients compared to controls, however this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.146). Lack of the C allele was associated with adverse metabolic parameters including higher rate of insulin resistance as well as solubes CD40 ligand in the patients group. Results of the current study support a causative role for the A1166 C polymorphism of the angiotensin II type 1 gene polymorphism in the pathogenesis or phenotypic expression of polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:23564192

  7. Dopamine D2 gene expression interacts with environmental enrichment to impact lifespan and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Hamilton, John; O'Rourke, Joseph R.; Napoli, Anthony; Febo, Marcelo; Volkow, Nora D.; Blum, Kenneth; Gold, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Aging produces cellular, molecular, and behavioral changes affecting many areas of the brain. The dopamine (DA) system is known to be vulnerable to the effects of aging, which regulate behavioral functions such as locomotor activity, body weight, and reward and cognition. In particular, age-related DA D2 receptor (D2R) changes have been of particular interest given its relationship with addiction and other rewarding behavioral properties. Male and female wild-type (Drd2 +/+), heterozygous (Drd2 +/−) and knockout (Drd2 −/−) mice were reared post-weaning in either an enriched environment (EE) or a deprived environment (DE). Over the course of their lifespan, body weight and locomotor activity was assessed. While an EE was generally found to be correlated with longer lifespan, these increases were only found in mice with normal or decreased expression of the D2 gene. Drd2 +/+ EE mice lived nearly 16% longer than their DE counterparts. Drd2 +/+ and Drd2 +/− EE mice lived 22% and 21% longer than Drd2 −/− EE mice, respectively. Moreover, both body weight and locomotor activity were moderated by environmental factors. In addition, EE mice show greater behavioral variability between genotypes compared to DE mice with respect to body weight and locomotor activity. PMID:26992232

  8. Impact of clock gene Bmal1 deficiency on nutritionally induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hemmeryckx, Bianca; Himmelreich, Uwe; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Lijnen, Henri R

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that the clock gene Bmal1 (brain and muscle arnt like protein-1) plays a role in the development of obesity, 5-week-old male Bmal1-deficient (Bmal1(-/-)) mice and wild-type littermates (Bmal1(+/+)) were kept on a high-fat diet (HFD) for 15 weeks. Despite an initial accelerated weight gain of Bmal1(-/-) mice, body weight and subcutaneous (SC) and gonadal (GON) adipose tissue mass were comparable to Bmal1(+/+) mice at the end of the diet period. Noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging scanning revealed a modest increase in fat content in Bmal1(-/-) mice after 10 weeks of HFD, whereas at the start and the end of the HFD feeding no differences were observed between both genotypes. After 15 weeks of HFD, adipocyte and blood vessel size and density were similar for Bmal1(+/+) and Bmal1(-/-) mice. However, the weight of major organs was significantly reduced in Bmal1(-/-) mice, confirming the premature ageing phenotype. Thus, we hypothesize that an initial accelerated increase in body weight and fat mass of Bmal1(-/-) mice on HFD may have been offset by the effect of premature ageing on organ weight, resulting in comparable weights after 15 weeks of HFD. PMID:21030946

  9. AMPK/Snf1 signaling regulates histone acetylation: Impact on gene expression and epigenetic functions.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kauppinen, Anu; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-08-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its yeast homolog, Snf1, are critical regulators in the maintenance of energy metabolic balance not only stimulating energy production but also inhibiting energy-consuming processes. The AMPK/Snf1 signaling controls energy metabolism by specific phosphorylation of many metabolic enzymes and transcription factors, enhancing or suppressing their functions. The AMPK/Snf1 complexes can be translocated from cytoplasm into nuclei where they are involved in the regulation of transcription. Recent studies have indicated that AMPK/Snf1 activation can control histone acetylation through different mechanisms affecting not only gene transcription but also many other epigenetic functions. For instance, AMPK/Snf1 enzymes can phosphorylate the histone H3S10 (yeast) and H2BS36 (mammalian) sites which activate specific histone acetyltransferases (HAT), consequently enhancing histone acetylation. Moreover, nuclear AMPK can phosphorylate type 2A histone deacetylases (HDAC), e.g. HDAC4 and HDAC5, triggering their export from nuclei thus promoting histone acetylation reactions. AMPK activation can also increase the level of acetyl CoA, e.g. by inhibiting fatty acid and cholesterol syntheses. Acetyl CoA is a substrate for HATs, thus increasing their capacity for histone acetylation. On the other hand, AMPK can stimulate the activity of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) which increases the level of NAD(+). NAD(+) is a substrate for nuclear sirtuins, especially for SIRT1 and SIRT6, which deacetylate histones and transcription factors, e.g. those regulating ribosome synthesis and circadian clocks. Histone acetylation is an important epigenetic modification which subsequently can affect chromatin remodeling, e.g. via bromodomain proteins. We will review the signaling mechanisms of AMPK/Snf1 in the control of histone acetylation and subsequently clarify their role in the epigenetic regulation of ribosome synthesis and circadian clocks

  10. Economic Impact of Gene Expression Profiling in Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer in France

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Gregory; Romano, Olivier; Foa, Cyril; Vataire, Anne-Lise; Chantelard, Jean-Victor; Hervé, Robert; Barletta, Hugues; Durieux, Axel; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Salmon, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The heterogeneous nature of breast cancer can make decisions on adjuvant chemotherapy following surgical resection challenging. Oncotype DX is a validated gene expression profiling test that predicts the likelihood of adjuvant chemotherapy benefit in early-stage breast cancer. The aim of this study is to determine the costs of chemotherapy in private hospitals in France, and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of Oncotype DX from national insurance and societal perspectives. Methods A multicenter study was conducted in seven French private hospitals, capturing retrospective data from 106 patient files. Cost estimates were used in conjunction with a published Markov model to assess the cost-effectiveness of using Oncotype DX to inform chemotherapy decision making versus standard care. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Results The cost of adjuvant chemotherapy in private hospitals was estimated at EUR 8,218 per patient from a national insurance perspective and EUR 10,305 from a societal perspective. Cost-effectiveness analysis indicated that introducing Oncotype DX improved life expectancy (+0.18 years) and quality-adjusted life expectancy (+0.17 QALYs) versus standard care. Oncotype DX was found cost-effective from a national insurance perspective (EUR 2,134 per QALY gained) and cost saving from a societal perspective versus standard care. Inclusion of lost productivity costs in the modeling analysis meant that costs for eligible patients undergoing Oncotype DX testing were on average EUR 602 lower than costs for those receiving standard care. Conclusions As Oncotype DX was found both cost and life-saving from a societal perspective, the test was considered to be dominant to standard care. However, the delay in coverage has the potential to erode the quality of the French healthcare system, thus depriving patients of technologies that could improve clinical outcomes and allow healthcare professionals to better allocate hospital resources to