Science.gov

Sample records for 400d cluster catalog

  1. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Sung, Eon-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Chung, Jiwon; Pak, Mina; Yi, Wonhyeong; Lee, Woong

    2014-12-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg2 or 60.1 Mpc2. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s-1. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  2. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Soo-Chang

    2015-08-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg2 or 60.1 Mpc2. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s-1. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  3. THE EXTENDED VIRGO CLUSTER CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Chung, Jiwon; Pak, Mina; Yi, Wonhyeong; Lee, Woong; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Sung, Eon-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg{sup 2} or 60.1 Mpc{sup 2}. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s{sup –1}. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  4. Catalog of open clusters and associated interstellar matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David

    1988-01-01

    The Catalog of Open Clusters and Associated Interstellar Matter summarizes observations of 128 open clusters and their associated ionized, atomic, and molecular iinterstellar matter. Cluster sizes, distances, radial velocities, ages, and masses, and the radial velocities and masses of associated interstellar medium components, are given. The database contains information from approximately 400 references published in the scientific literature before 1988.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalog of stellar clusters in the inner Galaxy (Morales+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, E. F. E.; Wyrowski, F.; Schuller, F.; Menten, K. M.

    2013-09-01

    We compiled a catalog of 695 embedded and open clusters within the ATLASGAL Galactic range (|l|<=60° and |b|<=1.5°) from different cluster catalogs in the literature, including 69 new (mostly embedded) clusters discovered in this work using the Spitzer-GLIMPSE survey (out of a total of 75 new clusters in the full GLIMPSE I and II coverage). The catalog is focused on information related to the correlation of the stellar clusters with the submm dust emission from ATLASGAL (which traces dense molecular gas), including: the morphology of the submm and mid-infrared emission, line velocities for the submm clumps from the literature or follow-up observations, kinematic distances, and membership in big molecular complexes. Additional information from the literature is also provided, such as: correlation with IR dark clouds, IR bubbles, and HII regions, stellar distance, age, and the corresponding references. (3 data files).

  6. Automated surface photometry for the Coma Cluster galaxies: The catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Okamura, S.; Tarusawa, K.

    1995-01-01

    A homogeneous photometry catalog is presented for 450 galaxies with B(sub 25.5) less than or equal to 16 mag located in the 9.8 deg x 9.8 deg region centered on the Coma Cluster. The catalog is based on photographic photometry using an automated surface photometry software for data reduction applied to B-band Schmidt plates. The catalog provides accurate positions, isophotal and total magnitudes, major and minor axes, and a few other photometric parameters including rudimentary morphology (early of late type).

  7. Statistical analysis of catalogs of extragalactic objects. II - The Abell catalog of rich clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, M. G.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a power-spectrum analysis are presented for the distribution of clusters in the Abell catalog. Clear and direct evidence is found for superclusters with small angular scale, in agreement with the recent study of Bogart and Wagoner (1973). It is also found that the degree and angular scale of the apparent superclustering varies with distance in the manner expected if the clustering is intrinsic to the spatial distribution rather than a consequence of patchy local obscuration.

  8. Revised GALEX Ultraviolet Catalog of Globular Clusters in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Soo-Chang; Lee, K.; Kang, Y.; Sohn, T.; GALEX Science Team

    2010-01-01

    We present near-ultraviolet (NUV) and far-ultraviolet (FUV) photometry of the globular clusters (GCs) and globular cluster candidates in M31 from 23 mosaic observations of Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). We construct revised UV-optical merged catalog of GCs and GC candidates in M31 by cross-matching between UV photometry and optical and near-IR photometry from Revised Bolobna Catalog and Caldwell et al. (2009). The UV catalog of M31 GCs includes 626 GCs and 529 GC candidates. We explored the general UV properties and age distribution of GCs comparing with the stellar population models. We suggest UV color-color diagram has advantage of separating GCs very effectively from background galaxies and foreground stars than the optical one.

  9. A GMBCG galaxy cluster catalog of 55,880 rich clusters from SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Annis, James; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; /Fermilab /Michigan U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /UC, Santa Barbara /KICP, Chicago /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Caltech /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  10. A GMBCG Galaxy Cluster Catalog of 55,424 Rich Clusters from SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Annis, James; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; Gerdes, David; Johnston, David E.; Sheldon, Erin; /Brookhaven

    2011-08-22

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GALEX catalog of star clusters in M31 (Kang+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y.; Rey, S.-C.; Bianchi, L.; Lee, K.; Kim, Y.; Sohn, S. T.

    2012-07-01

    We construct a new compiled catalog of star clusters in M31 carefully considering three previously published catalogs: RBC version 4 (v4; see also Galleti et al., 2004, Cat. J/A+A/416/917), Caldwell et al. (2009, Cat. J/AJ/137/94, 2011AJ....141...61C), and Peacock et al. (2010, Cat. J/MNRAS/402/803). In this paper, we only consider 700 star clusters that are classified as confirmed star clusters at least in one of the three catalogs. We used UV images from the Nearby Galaxy Survey (NGS) obtained by GALEX in two UV bands: far-ultraviolet (FUV; 1350-1750Å) and near-ultraviolet (NUV; 1750-2750Å). A total of 23 images (about 17deg2) have covered most of the disk and halo of M31. The details of the GALEX observations for M31 are presented in Rey et al. (2005ApJ...619L.119R, 2007, Cat. J/ApJS/173/643). (2 data files).

  12. Radio Sources In Galaxy Clusters Using The Maxbcg Cluster Catalog, First And NVSS Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wai Ling; McKay, T. A.

    2008-05-01

    Using the maxBCG cluster catalog derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the FIRST, and the NVSS radio surveys, we studied the fraction of brightest central galaxies (BCG) in clusters that host a radio source, how much more likely is a radio source to live in a cluster environment compare to the field, and we differentiate the luminosity effect from the richness effect on the radio fraction using a sample of luminous red galaxies (LRG). We present a method to cross-correlate the optical survey and the radio surveys. We also apply the matching of radio sources to clusters to help better determine cluster centers in some pathological cases in the maxBCG cluster catalog.

  13. Cosmological Constraints from the SDSS maxBCG Cluster Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Wechsler, Risa H.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Annis, James T.; Becker, Matthew R.; Evrard, August E.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Hansen, Sarah M.; Hao, Jia; Johnston, David E.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Sheldon, Erin S.; Weinberg, David H.; /CCAPP /Ohio State U.

    2009-08-03

    We use the abundance and weak lensing mass measurements of the SDSS maxBCG cluster catalog to simultaneously constrain cosmology and the richness-mass relation of the clusters. Assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we find {sigma}{sub 8}({Omega}{sub m}/0.25){sup 0.41} = 0.832 {+-} 0.033 after marginalization over all systematics. In common with previous studies, our error budget is dominated by systematic uncertainties, the primary two being the absolute mass scale of the weak lensing masses of the maxBCG clusters, and uncertainty in the scatter of the richness-mass relation. Our constraints are fully consistent with the WMAP five-year data, and in a joint analysis we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.807 {+-} 0.020 and {Omega}{sub m} = 0.265 {+-} 0.016, an improvement of nearly a factor of two relative to WMAP5 alone. Our results are also in excellent agreement with and comparable in precision to the latest cosmological constraints from X-ray cluster abundances. The remarkable consistency among these results demonstrates that cluster abundance constraints are not only tight but also robust, and highlight the power of optically-selected cluster samples to produce precision constraints on cosmological parameters.

  14. BLOX: the Bonn lensing, optical, and X-ray selected galaxy clusters. I. Cluster catalog construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, J. P.; Erben, T.; Lamer, G.; Schneider, P.; Schwope, A.; Hartlap, J.; Maturi, M.

    2007-08-01

    The mass function of galaxy clusters is an important cosmological probe. Differences in the selection method could potentially lead to biases when determining the mass function. From the optical and X-ray data of the XMM-Newton Follow-Up Survey, we obtained a sample of galaxy cluster candidates using weak gravitational lensing, the optical Postman matched filter method, and a search for extended X-ray sources. We developed our weak-lensing search criteria by testing the performance of the aperture mass statistic on realistic ray-tracing simulations matching our survey parameters and by comparing two filter functions. We find that the dominant noise source for our survey is shape noise at almost all significance levels and that spurious cluster detections due to projections of large-scale structures are negligible, except possibly for highly significantly detected peaks. Our full cluster catalog has 155 cluster candidates, 116 found with the Postman matched filter, 59 extended X-ray sources, and 31 shear selected potential clusters. Most of these cluster candidates were not previously known. The present catalog will be a solid foundation for studying possible selection effects in either method. Based on observations carried out at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile under program Nos. 170.A-0789, 70.A-0529, 71.A-0110, 072.A-0061, 073.A-0050. The cluster catalogs are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/470/821

  15. The ACS Fornax Cluster Survey. XI. Catalog of Globular Cluster Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán, Andrés; Peng, Eric W.; Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Eyheramendy, Susana; Ferrarese, Laura

    2015-11-01

    We present catalogs of globular cluster (GC) candidates for 43 galaxies from the ACS Fornax Cluster survey, a program designed to carry out imaging of early-type members of the Fornax cluster using the Advanded Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The procedure to select bona fide GC candidates from the full list of detections is based on model-based clustering methods, similar to those adopted for a survey of 100 galaxies in the Virgo cluster, the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. For each detected source, we measure its position, magnitudes in the F475W (≈Sloan g) and F850LP (≈Sloan z) bandpasses, half-light radii obtained by fitting point-spread function-convolved King models to the observed light distribution, and an estimate of the probabilty {p}{GC} that each cataloged source is a GC. These measurements are presented for 9136 sources, of which 6275 have {p}{GC}≥slant 0.5, and are thus likely GCs. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  16. Machine learning etudes in astrophysics: selection functions for mock cluster catalogs

    SciTech Connect

    Hajian, Amir; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Bond, J. Richard E-mail: malvarez@cita.utoronto.ca

    2015-01-01

    Making mock simulated catalogs is an important component of astrophysical data analysis. Selection criteria for observed astronomical objects are often too complicated to be derived from first principles. However the existence of an observed group of objects is a well-suited problem for machine learning classification. In this paper we use one-class classifiers to learn the properties of an observed catalog of clusters of galaxies from ROSAT and to pick clusters from mock simulations that resemble the observed ROSAT catalog. We show how this method can be used to study the cross-correlations of thermal Sunya'ev-Zeldovich signals with number density maps of X-ray selected cluster catalogs. The method reduces the bias due to hand-tuning the selection function and is readily scalable to large catalogs with a high-dimensional space of astrophysical features.

  17. AN UPDATED CATALOG OF M33 CLUSTERS AND CANDIDATES: UBVRI PHOTOMETRY AND SOME STATISTICAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jun

    2012-08-15

    We present UBVRI photometry for 392 star clusters and candidates in the field of M33, which are selected from the most recent star cluster catalog. In this catalog, the authors listed star clusters' parameters such as cluster positions, magnitudes, colors in the UBVRIJHK{sub s} filters, and so on. However, a large fraction of objects in this catalog do not have previously published photometry. Photometry is performed using archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the major axis of M33. Detailed comparisons show that, in general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements. Positions (right ascension and declination) for some clusters are corrected here. Combined with previous literature, ours constitute a large sample of M33 star clusters. Based on this cluster sample, we present some statistical results: none of the youngest M33 clusters ({approx}10{sup 7} yr) have masses approaching 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} ; roughly half the star clusters are consistent with the 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} mass models; the continuous distribution of star clusters along the model line indicates that M33 star clusters have been formed continuously from the epoch of the first star cluster formation until recent times; and there are {approx}50 star clusters which are overlapped with the Galactic globular clusters on the color-color diagram, and these clusters are old globular cluster candidates in M33.

  18. PHAT STELLAR CLUSTER SURVEY. I. YEAR 1 CATALOG AND INTEGRATED PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Hodge, Paul W.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Beerman, Lori C.; Seth, Anil C.; Caldwell, Nelson; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Larsen, Soren S.; Olsen, Knut A. G.; San Roman, Izaskun; Sarajedini, Ata; Bianchi, Luciana; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Girardi, Leo; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Lang, Dustin; and others

    2012-06-20

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey is an ongoing Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multi-cycle program to obtain high spatial resolution imaging of one-third of the M31 disk at ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths. In this paper, we present the first installment of the PHAT stellar cluster catalog. When completed, the PHAT cluster catalog will be among the largest and most comprehensive surveys of resolved star clusters in any galaxy. The exquisite spatial resolution achieved with HST has allowed us to identify hundreds of new clusters that were previously inaccessible with existing ground-based surveys. We identify 601 clusters in the Year 1 sample, representing more than a factor of four increase over previous catalogs within the current survey area (390 arcmin{sup 2}). This work presents results derived from the first {approx}25% of the survey data; we estimate that the final sample will include {approx}2500 clusters. For the Year 1 objects, we present a catalog with positions, radii, and six-band integrated photometry. Along with a general characterization of the cluster luminosities and colors, we discuss the cluster luminosity function, the cluster size distributions, and highlight a number of individually interesting clusters found in the Year 1 search.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Properties of asteroids in Karin cluster (Carruba+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruba, V.; Nesvorny, D.; Vokrouhlicky, D.

    2016-07-01

    Many new asteroids have been discovered since the last dynamical analysis of the Karin cluster. Here we repeat the analysis of Nesvorny & Bottke (2004Icar..170..324N) with an orbital catalog that contains nearly seven times more asteroids than there were available back in 2004. We revise the Karin family membership by applying the usual clustering method on the new orbital catalog. The taxonomical and albedo interlopers are eliminated. We then apply a more stringent criterion of the Karin family membership by requiring that orbits converged with each other ~5.75Myr ago. In Table1, we report the list of 480 identified Karin cluster members. (1 data file).

  20. A survey by HEAO 1 of clusters of galaxies. III - The complete Abell catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. W.; Cruddace, R. G.; Wood, K. S.; Ulmer, M. P.; Kowalski, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    A catalog of 128 X-ray emitting clusters, including the Virgo Cluster, is presented. Ninety-one of these are new identifications. The catalog was obtained by searching the HEAO 1 survey observations for coincidences of X-ray sources with Abell clusters. The distribution of these sources in the sky has been examined in search of associations with other Abell clusters, with a null result. The X-ray luminosity has been correlated with cluster richness, but no association with Bautz-Morgan class has been found. The cluster luminosity function has been evaluated, and using this function the contribution of clusters to the diffuse X-ray background radiation has been estimated. It amounts to less than 15% at 2 keV and 3% at 6 keV.

  1. A Comprehensive GALEX Ultraviolet Catalog of Star Clusters in M31 and a Study of the Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yongbeom; Rey, Soo-Chang; Bianchi, Luciana; Lee, Kyungsook; Kim, YoungKwang; Sohn, Sangmo Tony

    2012-04-01

    We present a comprehensive catalog of 700 confirmed star clusters in the field of M31 compiled from three major existing catalogs. We detect 418 and 257 star clusters in Galaxy Evolution Explorer near-ultraviolet and far-ultraviolet (FUV) imaging, respectively. Our final catalog includes photometry of star clusters in up to 16 passbands ranging from FUV to NIR as well as ancillary information such as reddening, metallicity, and radial velocities. In particular, this is the most extensive and updated catalog of UV-integrated photometry for M31 star clusters. Ages and masses of star clusters are derived by fitting the multi-band photometry with model spectral energy distribution (SED); UV photometry enables more accurate age estimation of young clusters. Our catalog includes 182 young clusters with ages less than 1 Gyr. Our estimated ages and masses of young clusters are in good agreement with previously determined values in the literature. The mean age and mass of young clusters are about 300 Myr and 104 M ⊙, respectively. We found that the compiled [Fe/H] values of young clusters included in our catalog are systematically lower (by more than 1 dex) than those from recent high-quality spectroscopic data and our SED-fitting result. We confirm that most of the young clusters' kinematics shows systematic rotation around the minor axis and association with the thin disk of M31. The young cluster distribution exhibits a distinct peak in the M31 disk around 10-12 kpc from the center and follows a spatial distributions similar to other tracers of disk structure such as OB stars, UV star-forming regions, and dust. Some young clusters also show concentration around the ring splitting regions found in the southern part of the M31 disk and most of them have systematically younger (<100 Myr) ages. Considering the kinematical properties and spatial distribution of young clusters, they might be associated with the well-known 10 kpc star formation ring structure in the M31 disk

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LAMOST DR2 star clusters candidate members (Zhang+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Chen, X.-Y.; Liu, C.; Chen, L.; Deng, L.-C.; Hou, J.-L.; Shao, Z.-Y.; Yang, F.; Wu, Y.; Yang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.

    2015-11-01

    We adopt the Milky Way Star Cluster (MWSC) catalog (Kharchenko et al. 2012, Cat. J/A+A/543/A156; 2013, Cat. J/A+A/558/A53) as the list of target star clusters since it provides homogeneous parameters of Milky Way star clusters and is complete in the volume observed by LAMOST. Thus we use the MWSC radius parameters for star clusters, i.e., r0 in the MWSC is the angular radius of the core of the cluster, and r2 (hereafter rewritten as rc) stands for the angular radius of the cluster. A star cluster is covered by the LAMOST footprint if the number of stars located within 2rc of the cluster is larger than zero. In total, 457 star clusters, including open clusters, globular clusters, stellar associations and moving groups, are included in LAMOST DR2. (2 data files).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Abundances in Galactic open clusters (Marsakov+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsakov, V. A.; Gozha, M. L.; Koval', V. V.; Shpigel', L. V.

    2016-07-01

    Spectroscopic determinations of the relative abundances of alpha-elements (O, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti), slow neutron capture elements (Y, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, and Zr), rapid neutron capture element (Eu), and elements with an odd number of protons (Na, Al) are collected for 90 open clusters of the Galaxy. Metallicities are presented for 346 clusters. In addition catalog contains positions, ages, velocities, elements of Galactic orbits for open clusters. (2 data files)

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Abundances in Galactic open clusters (Marsakov+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsakov, V. A.; Gozha, M. L.; Koval', V. V.; Shpigel', L. V.

    2016-07-01

    Spectroscopic determinations of the relative abundances of alpha-elements (O, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti), slow neutron capture elements (Y, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, and Zr), rapid neutron capture element (Eu), and elements with an odd number of protons (Na, Al) are collected for 90 open clusters of the Galaxy. Metallicities are presented for 346 clusters. In addition catalog contains positions, ages, velocities, elements of Galactic orbits for open clusters. (2 data files).

  5. Catalog of Ultra-diffuse Galaxies in the Coma Clusters from Subaru Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Masafumi; Koda, Jin; Komiyama, Yutaka; Yamanoi, Hitomo

    2016-07-01

    We present a catalog of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in the Coma cluster. UDGs are a subset of low surface brightness (SB) galaxies with very large effective radii defined by van Dokkum et al. We surveyed the Subaru data archive for deep Suprime-Cam/Subaru R-band images, and used data covering the 1.°7 × 2.°7 region of the Coma cluster. The data are ∼1 magnitude deeper than the data of van Dokkum et al (2015a) in limiting SB. This paper explains the details of our sample selection procedure. This UDG catalog includes positions, magnitudes, effective radii, mean and central SBs, and colors (when available). Comparisons with previous galaxy catalogs in the literature are performed, and we show that the current catalog is the largest for UDGs. We also discuss that most of the UDGs are members of the Coma cluster, and the major axis of the UDGs tends to align toward the cluster center (radial alignment). Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  6. Deep Galex Observations of the Coma Cluster: Source Catalog and Galaxy Counts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Smith, R.; Arnouts, S.; Milliard, B.; Jenkins, L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a source catalog from deep 26 ks GALEX observations of the Coma cluster in the far-UV (FUV; 1530 Angstroms) and near-UV (NUV; 2310 Angstroms) wavebands. The observed field is centered 0.9 deg. (1.6 Mpc) south-west of the Coma core, and has full optical photometric coverage by SDSS and spectroscopic coverage to r-21. The catalog consists of 9700 galaxies with GALEX and SDSS photometry, including 242 spectroscopically-confirmed Coma member galaxies that range from giant spirals and elliptical galaxies to dwarf irregular and early-type galaxies. The full multi-wavelength catalog (cluster plus background galaxies) is 80% complete to NUV=23 and FUV=23.5, and has a limiting depth at NUV=24.5 and FUV=25.0 which corresponds to a star formation rate of 10(exp -3) solar mass yr(sup -1) at the distance of Coma. The GALEX images presented here are very deep and include detections of many resolved cluster members superposed on a dense field of unresolved background galaxies. This required a two-fold approach to generating a source catalog: we used a Bayesian deblending algorithm to measure faint and compact sources (using SDSS coordinates as a position prior), and used the GALEX pipeline catalog for bright and/or extended objects. We performed simulations to assess the importance of systematic effects (e.g. object blends, source confusion, Eddington Bias) that influence source detection and photometry when using both methods. The Bayesian deblending method roughly doubles the number of source detections and provides reliable photometry to a few magnitudes deeper than the GALEX pipeline catalog. This method is also free from source confusion over the UV magnitude range studied here: conversely, we estimate that the GALEX pipeline catalogs are confusion limited at NUV approximately 23 and FUV approximately 24. We have measured the total UV galaxy counts using our catalog and report a 50% excess of counts across FUV=22-23.5 and NUV=21.5-23 relative to previous GALEX

  7. The Swift X-Ray Telescope Cluster Survey. III. Cluster Catalog from 2005-2012 Archival Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Teng; Tozzi, Paolo; Tundo, Elena; Moretti, Alberto; Rosati, Piero; Wang, Jun-Xian; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Campana, Sergio; Giavalisco, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    We present the Swift X-ray Cluster Survey (SWXCS) catalog obtained using archival data from the X-ray telescope (XRT) on board the Swift satellite acquired from 2005 February to 2012 November, extending the first release of the SWXCS. The catalog provides positions, soft fluxes, and, when possible, optical counterparts for a flux-limited sample of X-ray group and cluster candidates. We consider the fields with Galactic latitude |b| > 20° to avoid high H I column densities. We discard all of the observations targeted at groups or clusters of galaxies, as well as particular extragalactic fields not suitable to search for faint extended sources. We finally select ~3000 useful fields covering a total solid angle of ~400 deg2. We identify extended source candidates in the soft-band (0.5-2 keV) images of these fields using the software EXSdetect, which is specifically calibrated for the XRT data. Extensive simulations are used to evaluate contamination and completeness as a function of the source signal, allowing us to minimize the number of spurious detections and to robustly assess the selection function. Our catalog includes 263 candidate galaxy clusters and groups down to a flux limit of 7 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 in the soft band, and the logN-logS is in very good agreement with previous deep X-ray surveys. The final list of sources is cross-correlated with published optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev-Zeldovich catalogs of clusters. We find that 137 sources have been previously identified as clusters in the literature in independent surveys, while 126 are new detections. Currently, we have collected redshift information for 158 sources (60% of the entire sample). Once the optical follow-up and the X-ray spectral analysis of the sources are complete, the SWXCS will provide a large and well-defined catalog of groups and clusters of galaxies to perform statistical studies of cluster properties and tests of cosmological models.

  8. THE SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE CLUSTER SURVEY. III. CLUSTER CATALOG FROM 2005-2012 ARCHIVAL DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Teng; Wang, Jun-Xian; Tozzi, Paolo; Tundo, Elena; Moretti, Alberto; Rosati, Piero; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Campana, Sergio; Giavalisco, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    We present the Swift X-ray Cluster Survey (SWXCS) catalog obtained using archival data from the X-ray telescope (XRT) on board the Swift satellite acquired from 2005 February to 2012 November, extending the first release of the SWXCS. The catalog provides positions, soft fluxes, and, when possible, optical counterparts for a flux-limited sample of X-ray group and cluster candidates. We consider the fields with Galactic latitude |b| > 20° to avoid high H I column densities. We discard all of the observations targeted at groups or clusters of galaxies, as well as particular extragalactic fields not suitable to search for faint extended sources. We finally select ∼3000 useful fields covering a total solid angle of ∼400 deg{sup 2}. We identify extended source candidates in the soft-band (0.5-2 keV) images of these fields using the software EXSdetect, which is specifically calibrated for the XRT data. Extensive simulations are used to evaluate contamination and completeness as a function of the source signal, allowing us to minimize the number of spurious detections and to robustly assess the selection function. Our catalog includes 263 candidate galaxy clusters and groups down to a flux limit of 7 × 10{sup –15} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} in the soft band, and the logN-logS is in very good agreement with previous deep X-ray surveys. The final list of sources is cross-correlated with published optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev-Zeldovich catalogs of clusters. We find that 137 sources have been previously identified as clusters in the literature in independent surveys, while 126 are new detections. Currently, we have collected redshift information for 158 sources (60% of the entire sample). Once the optical follow-up and the X-ray spectral analysis of the sources are complete, the SWXCS will provide a large and well-defined catalog of groups and clusters of galaxies to perform statistical studies of cluster properties and tests of cosmological models.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: M87 globular cluster candidates catalog (Oldham+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, L. J.; Auger, M. W.

    2015-10-01

    A catalogue of 17620 globular cluster (GC) candidates, extending out to ~440kpc around M87, is presented. Photometry in the CFHT ugriz bands is given for each object, along with probabilities of the given object belonging to the red GC, blue GC, Milky Way star or background populations. Magnitudes are reported in the AB system, and have been corrected for galactic extinction. (1 data file).

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxies in Fornax Cluster and five nearby groups (Ferguson+ 1990)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, H. C.

    1997-07-01

    This catalog represents the combination of results published in two papers: Ferguson, H.C. 1989 A.J. 98, 367 (Paper II) and Ferguson, H.C. and Sandage, A. 1990 A.J. 100, 1 (Paper III). See the Historical Notes section below. Please note that the data from Paper II were previously archived as catalog VII/160. This catalog supersedes that earlier dataset. The following paragraphs describe the data included from the two papers. (Paper II) This paper presents a catalog of 2678 galaxies within an area of nearly 40 deg2 centered on the Fornax Cluster at α=3h35m and δ=-35.7deg. The data have been obtained from visual inspection of 26 deep large-scale (10.9arcsec/mm) plates taken with the du Pont 2.5m reflector at the Las Campanas Observatory, and from digital photometry of an ESO/SRC blue survey plate covering roughly the same area of the sky. The catalog is essentially diameter limited, with a limiting diameter of 17arcsec at an isophoto of BT =26.5. Within this survey region, the catalog includes 340 likely cluster members and 2338 likely background galaxies. For cluster members, this listing should be complete to BT=18 (corresponding to MBT=13.0, assuming a distance modulus of m-M=31.9) and contains likely members down to BT=20. Cluster membership is for the most part based on galaxy morphology. By virtue of their low surface brightness, dwarf galaxies in the cluster can be distinguished with a high degree of certainty from background galaxies. Radial velocities are included for 89 galaxies in the survey, providing a reliable indicator of membership in these cases. As additional support for our rejection of background galaxies, we model the spatial distribution of various types of galaxies as the sum of a King model cluster component superimposed on a uniform background. Using maximum-likelyhood fits to these spatial distributions, we find a core radius of 0.7deg. for a King model fit to the cluster, and show that there are few, if any, cluster members contained in

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Pleiades cluster membership probabilities (Sarro+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarro, L. M.; Bouy, H.; Bertin, E.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Barrado, D.; Solano, E.

    2014-03-01

    Astrometry and photometry from the DANCe project is used to derive statistical models of the distribution of sources in the Pleiades region of the sky, in the space of proper motions, colours and magnitudes. These models are subsequently used to estimate membership probabilities to the Pleaides cluster. This catalog contains the original data from the DANCe project and the infered membership probabilities obtained in various setups. (1 data file).

  12. A Catalog of Galaxy Clusters Observed by XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Mushotzky, R. M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Davis, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Images and the radial profiles of the temperature, abundance, and brightness for 70 clusters of galaxies observed by XMM-Newton are presented along with a detailed discussion of the data reduction and analysis methods, including background modeling, which were used in the processing. Proper consideration of the various background components is vital to extend the reliable determination of cluster parameters to the largest possible cluster radii. The various components of the background including the quiescent particle background, cosmic diffuse emission, soft proton contamination, and solar wind charge exchange emission are discussed along with suggested means of their identification, filtering, and/or their modeling and subtraction. Every component is spectrally variable, sometimes significantly so, and all components except the cosmic background are temporally variable as well. The distributions of the events over the FOV vary between the components, and some distributions vary with energy. The scientific results from observations of low surface brightness objects and the diffuse background itself can be strongly affected by these background components and therefore great care should be taken in their consideration.

  13. Improved proper motion determinations for 15 open clusters based on the UCAC4 catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtenkov, Alexander; Dimitrova, Nadezhda; Atanasov, Alexander; Aleksiev, Teodor D.

    2016-07-01

    The proper motions of 15 nearby (d > 1 kpc) open clusters (OCs) were recalculated using data from the UCAC4 catalog. Only evolved or main sequence stars inside a certain radius from the center of the cluster were used. The results significantly differ from the ones presented by Dias et al. (2014). This could be explained by a different approach in which we take the field star contamination into account. The present work aims to emphasize the importance of applying photometric criteria for the calculation of OC proper motions.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) (Kim+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Rey, S.-C.; Jerjen, H.; Lisker, T.; Sung, E.-C.; Lee, Y.; Chung, J.; Pak, M.; Yi, W.; Lee, W.

    2015-02-01

    The construction of the EVCC is based on the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7; Abazajian et al. 2009, II/294). The SDSS-DR7 images have pixel scale of 0.396" and the average seeing of 1.4" correspond to a physical size of 32pc and 112pc, respectively, at a Virgo cluster distance of 16.5Mpc. We took advantage of the SDSS spectroscopic data for the determination of galaxy membership and classification of spectroscopic morphology. The SDSS spectroscopic data were searched in the window of 175°

  15. A Photometric redshift galaxy catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Yee, H.K.C.; Lin, H.; Gladders, M.D.; /Carnegie Inst. Observ.

    2005-02-01

    The Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS) provides a large and deep photometric catalog of galaxies in the z' and R{sub c} bands for 90 square degrees of sky, and supplemental V and B data have been obtained for 33.6 deg{sup 2}. They compile a photometric redshift catalog from these 4-band data by utilizing the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique in combination with CNOC2 and GOODS/HDF-N redshift data. The training set includes 4924 spectral redshifts. The resulting catalog contains more than one million galaxies with photometric redshifts < 1.5 and R{sub c} < 24, giving an rms scatter {delta}({Delta}z) < 0.06 within the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 and {sigma}({Delta}z) < 0.11 for galaxies at 0.0 < z < 1.5. They describe the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique which they use to determine the relation between red-shift and photometry. A kd-tree algorithm is used to divide up the sample to improve the accuracy of the catalog. They also present a method for estimating the photometric redshift error for individual galaxies. They show that the redshift distribution of the sample is in excellent agreement with smaller and much deeper photometric and spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  16. An Alternative and Efficient Cluster-Link Approach for Declustering of Earthquake Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibi, R.; Blanco, J.; Fatehi, A.

    2011-12-01

    Poisson model is widely used to describe the temporal occurrence of earthquakes in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) studies for various reasons. The most important of these is that Poisson model is simple, yet adequate enough to describe a complex phenomenon. Studies of temporal earthquake distribution show that earthquake sequences are Poissonian only after foreshocks and aftershocks have been removed from the listing. Hence, the identification and removal of foreshocks and aftershocks from earthquake catalogs, a process referred to as declustering, are a prerequisite for any PSHA study based on a Poissonian model for earthquake occurrence. Two main approaches and their variants are widely used in the seismic hazard assessment community for catalog declustering: (1) the standard space-time windowing technique, such as Gardner and Knopoff (1974) method, and (2) the cluster-link scheme, such as Reasenberg (1985) algorithm or Davis and Frohlich (1991) method. Each of these methods possesses some advantages as well as shortcomings. We propose a cluster-link declustering approach that is adapted from Reasenberg's (1985) technique, in which the interaction time window based on Poisson's probability is replaced by a simple, but more efficient magnitude-dependent time criterion. Application of the proposed scheme to earthquake catalogs of Slovenia and the Middle East suggests that, depending on the character of the original catalog in terms of event sizes, the proposed approach identifies up to13% more dependent events, more efficiently depletes or removes clusters of earthquakes, and, as consequence, dramatically improves the fit to the expected Poisson model, with respect to Reasenberg's (1985) method.

  17. The 400 Square Degree ROSAT PSPC Galaxy Cluster Survey: Catalog and Statistical Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burenin, R. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Hornstrup, A.; Ebeling, H.; Quintana, H.; Mescheryakov, A.

    2007-10-01

    We present a catalog of galaxy clusters detected in a new ROSAT PSPC survey. The survey is optimized to sample, at high redshifts, the mass range corresponding to T>5 keV clusters at z=0. Technically, our survey is the extension of the 160 square degree survey (160d). We use the same detection algorithm, thus preserving high quality of the resulting sample; the main difference is a significant increase in sky coverage. The new survey covers 397 deg2 and is based on 1610 high Galactic latitude ROSAT PSPC pointings, virtually all pointed ROSAT data suitable for the detection of distant clusters. The search volume for X-ray luminous clusters within z<1 exceeds that of the entire local universe (z<0.1). We detected 287 extended X-ray sources with fluxes f>1.4×10-13 ergs s-1 cm-2 in the 0.5-2 keV energy band, of which 266 (93%) are optically confirmed as galaxy clusters, groups or individual elliptical galaxies. This paper provides a description of the input data, the statistical calibration of the survey via Monte Carlo simulations, and the catalog of detected clusters. We also compare the basic results to those from previous, smaller area surveys and find good agreement for the logN-logS distribution and the local X-ray luminosity function. Our sample clearly shows a decrease in the number density for the most luminous clusters at z>0.3. The comparison of our ROSAT-derived fluxes with the accurate Chandra measurements for a subset of high-redshift clusters demonstrates the validity of the 400 square degree survey's statistical calibration.

  18. A Catalog of [O III] 5007 Photometric Standards In The Virgo Cluster Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Frances; Ganguly, R.; Feldmeier, J.; Barlow, R.

    2009-01-01

    The number of sources that can be used for the calibration of narrow band photometry is small compared to that of broadband photometry.Narrowband photometry of point sources is important for a variety of reasons, from the search for intracluster planetary nebulae to understanding the star-formation history of the universe (e.g.,through Lyman alpha-emitting galaxies). There will be a need in the next several years for more photometric narrow-band standard stars with the next generation of surveys (e.g., with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope,or the One-Degree Imager). Thus, more standard stars (both primary and secondary) for narrow band need to be identified and cataloged. Over the last three years, we have been collecting narrow-band [OIII]5007 images of portions of the Virgo Cluster, along with broad-band V and R. The data were collected at the 2.3m Wyoming Infrared Observatory and the Kitt Peak 0.9m.We present our [OIII]5007 photometry calibration of point sources in the Virgo Cluster region, most of which are intracluster planetary nebula. For greater utility of this catalog, we also cross-calibrate our photometry with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz system. In addition, we take advantage of the long basline of our observatios to find time-variable sources (rejected from the standard star catalog) such as background quasars, supernovae, novae, and micro-lensing events.

  19. The RedMaPPer Galaxy Cluster Catalog From DES Science Verification Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykoff, E. S.; Rozo, E.; Hollowood, D.; Bermeo-Hernandez, A.; Jeltema, T.; Mayers, J.; Romer, A. K.; Rooney, P.; Saro, A.; Vergara Cervantes, C.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wilcox, H.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Castander, F. J.; Childress, M.; Collins, C. A.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, T. M.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Glazebrook, K.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Hilton, M.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; James, D. J.; Kay, S. T.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, G. F.; Lidman, C.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Mann, R. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Sahlén, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stott, J. P.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Uddin, S.; Viana, P. T. P.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We describe updates to the redMaPPer algorithm, a photometric red-sequence cluster finder specifically designed for large photometric surveys. The updated algorithm is applied to 150 {{deg}}2 of Science Verification (SV) data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), and to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 photometric data set. The DES SV catalog is locally volume limited and contains 786 clusters with richness λ \\gt 20 (roughly equivalent to {M}{{500c}}≳ {10}14 {h}70-1 {M}ȯ ) and 0.2\\lt z\\lt 0.9. The DR8 catalog consists of 26,311 clusters with 0.08\\lt z\\lt 0.6, with a sharply increasing richness threshold as a function of redshift for z≳ 0.35. The photometric redshift performance of both catalogs is shown to be excellent, with photometric redshift uncertainties controlled at the {σ }z/(1+z)˜ 0.01 level for z≲ 0.7, rising to ˜0.02 at z˜ 0.9 in DES SV. We make use of Chandra and XMM X-ray and South Pole Telescope Sunyaev–Zeldovich data to show that the centering performance and mass–richness scatter are consistent with expectations based on prior runs of redMaPPer on SDSS data. We also show how the redMaPPer photo-z and richness estimates are relatively insensitive to imperfect star/galaxy separation and small-scale star masks.

  20. The RedMaPPer Galaxy Cluster Catalog From DES Science Verification Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykoff, E. S.; Rozo, E.; Hollowood, D.; Bermeo-Hernandez, A.; Jeltema, T.; Mayers, J.; Romer, A. K.; Rooney, P.; Saro, A.; Vergara Cervantes, C.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wilcox, H.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Castander, F. J.; Childress, M.; Collins, C. A.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, T. M.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Glazebrook, K.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Hilton, M.; Honscheid, K.; Hoyle, B.; James, D. J.; Kay, S. T.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, G. F.; Lidman, C.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Mann, R. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Sahlén, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Stott, J. P.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Uddin, S.; Viana, P. T. P.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We describe updates to the redMaPPer algorithm, a photometric red-sequence cluster finder specifically designed for large photometric surveys. The updated algorithm is applied to 150 {{deg}}2 of Science Verification (SV) data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), and to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 photometric data set. The DES SV catalog is locally volume limited and contains 786 clusters with richness λ \\gt 20 (roughly equivalent to {M}{{500c}}≳ {10}14 {h}70-1 {M}ȯ ) and 0.2\\lt z\\lt 0.9. The DR8 catalog consists of 26,311 clusters with 0.08\\lt z\\lt 0.6, with a sharply increasing richness threshold as a function of redshift for z≳ 0.35. The photometric redshift performance of both catalogs is shown to be excellent, with photometric redshift uncertainties controlled at the {σ }z/(1+z)∼ 0.01 level for z≲ 0.7, rising to ∼0.02 at z∼ 0.9 in DES SV. We make use of Chandra and XMM X-ray and South Pole Telescope Sunyaev–Zeldovich data to show that the centering performance and mass–richness scatter are consistent with expectations based on prior runs of redMaPPer on SDSS data. We also show how the redMaPPer photo-z and richness estimates are relatively insensitive to imperfect star/galaxy separation and small-scale star masks.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of variable stars in open clusters (Zejda+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zejda, M.; Paunzen, E.; Baumann, B.; Mikulasek, Z.; Liska, J.

    2012-08-01

    The catalogue of variable stars in open clusters were prepared by cross-matching of Variable Stars Index (http://www.aavso.org/vsx) version Apr 29, 2012 (available online, Cat. B/vsx) against the version 3.1. catalogue of open clusters DAML02 (Dias et al. 2002A&A...389..871D, Cat. B/ocl) available on the website http://www.astro.iag.usp.br/~wilton. The open clusters were divided into two categories according to their size, where the limiting diameter was 60 arcmin. The list of all suspected variables and variable stars located within the fields of open clusters up to two times of given cluster radius were generated (Table 1). 8938 and 9127 variable stars are given in 461 "smaller" and 74 "larger" clusters, respectively. All found variable stars were matched against the PPMXL catalog of positions and proper motions within the ICRS (Roeser et al., 2010AJ....139.2440R, Cat. I/317). Proper motion data were included in our catalogue. Unfortunately, a homogeneous data set of mean cluster proper motions has not been available until now. Therefore we used the following sources (sorted alphabetically) to compile a new catalogue: Baumgardt et al. (2000, Cat. J/A+AS/146/251): based on the Hipparcos catalogue Beshenov & Loktin (2004A&AT...23..103B): based on the Tycho-2 catalogue Dias et al. (2001, Cat. J/A+A/376/441, 2002A&A...389..871D, Cat. B/ocl): based on the Tycho-2 catalogue Dias et al. (2006, Cat. J/A+A/446/949): based on the UCAC2 catalog (Zacharias et al., 2004AJ....127.3043Z, Cat. I/289) Frinchaboy & Majewski (2008, Cat. J/AJ/136/118): based on the Tycho-2 catalogue Kharchenko et al. (2005, J/A+A/438/1163): based on the ASCC2.5 catalogue (Kharchenko, 2001KFNT...17..409K, Cat. I/280) Krone-Martins et al. (2010, Cat. J/A+A/516/A3): based on the Bordeaux PM2000 proper motion catalogue (Ducourant et al., 2006A&A...448.1235D, Cat. I/300) Robichon et al. (1999, Cat. J/A+A/345/471): based on the Hipparcos catalogue van Leeuwen (2009A&A...497..209V): based on the new

  2. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. II. DATA DESCRIPTION AND SOURCE CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, Derek; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Hoyos, Carlos; Balcells, Marc; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Smith, Russell J.; Lucey, John R.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Jogee, Shardha; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.

    2010-11-15

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers {approx}50% of the core high-density region in Coma. Observations were performed for 25 fields that extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii ({approx}1.75 Mpc or 1{sup 0}) with a total coverage area of 274 arcmin{sup 2}. The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the southwest region of the cluster. In this paper, we present reprocessed images and SEXTRACTOR source catalogs for our survey fields, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for {approx}73,000 unique objects; approximately one-half of our detections are brighter than the 10{sigma} point-source detection limit at F814W = 25.8 mag (AB). The slight majority of objects (60%) are unresolved or only marginally resolved by ACS. We estimate that Coma members are 5%-10% of all source detections, which consist of a large population of unresolved compact sources (primarily globular clusters but also ultra-compact dwarf galaxies) and a wide variety of extended galaxies from a cD galaxy to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The red sequence of Coma member galaxies has a color-magnitude relation with a constant slope and dispersion over 9 mag (-21 < M {sub F814W} < -13). The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in 2008

  3. Globular Cluster Membership Probabilities from All-Sky Proper Motion Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Richard F.; Cudworth, Kyle M.

    2014-06-01

    Recent all-sky catalogs such as UCAC4 (Zacharias et al. 2013, AJ, 145:44) and PPMXL (Roeser et al. 2010, AJ, 139, 2440) contain proper motions with errors of 1-10 mas/yr. This precision is sufficient to determine membership probabilities for stars in the fields of globular clusters if the cluster motion is reasonably different from the field star motion. We use membership probabilities for stars in the field of the globular cluster NGC 6397 derived from very high precision relative proper motions 0.2 mas/yr errors) from long-focus plates to test membership probabilities derived from UCAC4 and PPMXL motions. We also explore the use of UCAC4 and PPMXL to search for cluster members beyond the small field of the long-focus plates.This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by NASA and the NSF. This research has made use of the VizieR catalogue access tool, CDS, Strasbourg, France. This research has been partially supported by the NSF.

  4. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XVII. SPIRE point-source catalogs and number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Ciro; Bendo, George J.; Bianchi, Simone; Hunt, Leslie; Zibetti, Stefano; Corbelli, Edvige; di Serego Alighieri, Sperello; Grossi, Marco; Davies, Jonathan; Baes, Maarten; De Looze, Ilse; Fritz, Jacopo; Pohlen, Michael; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Verstappen, Joris; Boquien, Médéric; Boselli, Alessandro; Cortese, Luca; Hughes, Thomas; Viaene, Sebastien; Bizzocchi, Luca; Clemens, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We present three independent catalogs of point-sources extracted from SPIRE images at 250, 350, and 500 μm, acquired with the Herschel Space Observatory as a part of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). The catalogs have been cross-correlated to consistently extract the photometry at SPIRE wavelengths for each object. Methods: Sources have been detected using an iterative loop. The source positions are determined by estimating the likelihood to be a real source for each peak on the maps, according to the criterion defined in the sourceExtractorSussextractor task. The flux densities are estimated using the sourceExtractorTimeline, a timeline-based point source fitter that also determines the fitting procedure with the width of the Gaussian that best reproduces the source considered. Afterwards, each source is subtracted from the maps, removing a Gaussian function in every position with the full width half maximum equal to that estimated in sourceExtractorTimeline. This procedure improves the robustness of our algorithm in terms of source identification. We calculate the completeness and the flux accuracy by injecting artificial sources in the timeline and estimate the reliability of the catalog using a permutation method. Results: The HeViCS catalogs contain about 52 000, 42 200, and 18 700 sources selected at 250, 350, and 500 μm above 3σ and are ~75%, 62%, and 50% complete at flux densities of 20 mJy at 250, 350, 500 μm, respectively. We then measured source number counts at 250, 350, and 500 μm and compare them with previous data and semi-analytical models. We also cross-correlated the catalogs with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the redshift distribution of the nearby sources. From this cross-correlation, we select ~2000 sources with reliable fluxes and a high signal-to-noise ratio, finding an average redshift z ~ 0.3 ± 0.22 and 0.25 (16-84 percentile). Conclusions: The number counts at 250, 350, and 500 μm show an increase in

  5. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; Den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Davies, Jonathan I.; Del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of a HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially-completed survey still covers approximately 50% of the core high density region in Coma. Observations were performed for twenty-five fields with a total coverage area of 274 aremin(sup 2), and extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (approximately 1.75 Mpe or 1 deg). The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the south-west region of the cluster. In this paper we present SEXTRACTOR source catalogs generated from the processed images, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for 76,000 objects that consist of roughly equal numbers of extended galaxies and unresolved objects. Approximately two-thirds of all detections are brighter than F814W=26.5 mag (AB), which corresponds to the 10sigma, point-source detection limit. We estimate that Coma members are 5-10% of the source detections, including a large population of compact objects (primarily GCs, but also cEs and UCDs), and a wide variety of extended galaxies from cD galaxies to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in August 2008. The images and catalogs described in this study relate to our second data release.

  6. Dumb-bell galaxies in southern clusters: Catalog and preliminary statistical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vettolani, G.; Gregorini, L.; Parma, P.; Deruiter, H. R.

    1990-01-01

    The dominant galaxy of a rich cluster is often an object whose formation and evolution is closely connected to the dynamics of the cluster itself. Hoessel (1980) and Schneider et al. (1983) estimate that 50 percent of the dominant galaxies are either of the dumb-bell type or have companions at projected distances less than 20 kpc, which is far in excess of the number expected from chance projection (see also Rood and Leir 1979). Presently there is no complete sample of these objects, with the exception of the listing of dumb-bell galaxies in BM type I and I-II clusters in the Abell statistical sample of Rood and Leir (1979). Recent dynamical studies of dumb-bell galaxies in clusters (Valentijn and Casertano, 1988) still suffer from inhomogeneity of the sample. The fact that it is a mixture of optically and radio selected objects may have introduced an unknown biases, for instance if the probability of radio emission is enhanced by the presence of close companions (Stocke, 1978, Heckman et al. 1985, Vettolani and Gregorini 1988) a bias could be present in their velocity distribution. However, this situation is bound to improve: a new sample of Abell clusters in the Southern Hemisphere has been constructed (Abell et al., 1988 hereafter ACO), which has several advantages over the original northern catalog. The plate material (IIIaJ plates) is of better quality and reaches fainter magnitudes. This makes it possible to classify the cluster types with a higher degree of accuracy, as well as to fainter magnitudes. The authors therefore decided to reconsider the whole problem constructing a new sample of dumb-bell galaxies homogeneously selected from the ACO survey. Details of the classification criteria are given.

  7. Toward An Understanding of Cluster Evolution: A Deep X-Ray Selected Cluster Catalog from ROSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christine; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In the past year, we have focussed on studying individual clusters found in this sample with Chandra, as well as using Chandra to measure the luminosity-temperature relation for a sample of distant clusters identified through the ROSAT study, and finally we are continuing our study of fossil groups. For the luminosity-temperature study, we compared a sample of nearby clusters with a sample of distant clusters and, for the first time, measured a significant change in the relation as a function of redshift (Vikhlinin et al. in final preparation for submission to Cape). We also used our ROSAT analysis to select and propose for Chandra observations of individual clusters. We are now analyzing the Chandra observations of the distant cluster A520, which appears to have undergone a recent merger. Finally, we have completed the analysis of the fossil groups identified in ROM observations. In the past few months, we have derived X-ray fluxes and luminosities as well as X-ray extents for an initial sample of 89 objects. Based on the X-ray extents and the lack of bright galaxies, we have identified 16 fossil groups. We are comparing their X-ray and optical properties with those of optically rich groups. A paper is being readied for submission (Jones, Forman, and Vikhlinin in preparation).

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Dynamical parameters of open clusters (Danilov+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, V. M.; Putkov, S. I.

    2012-11-01

    α0 - is the mean value of a virial factor, δ{alp the amplitude of virial factor oscillations, ν={rho}c/{rho}0-is the density contrast ({rho}c - is the mean density of a cluster core, {rho}0 - is the cluster centre density), NK/N - is the ratio of the stars number in a cluster received by King's distribution and by stellar counts, P1-is the period of cluster core oscillations, P2 - is the period of cluster oscillations, δR1/R10-is the relative amplitude of core radius oscillations, λ=σ/σiz, σiz2 - is the velocity dispersion of an isolated virialized cluster, σ2, σ12, σ22 - are the velocity dispersions of nonisolated nonsteady clusters with spherical halo; with ellipsoidal halo elongated to the centre of Galaxy; with ellipsoidal halo elongated to the direction of cluster motion correspondingly. Errors of values α0, δα, δR1/R10, P1 have been estimated by the assumption of the normal distribution of the values M (the mass of a cluster), R2 (the radius of a cluster), {xi} (the ratio of core radius to halo radius), μ (the ratio of core mass to halo mass). Assuming a deviation of one of the four values equal to zero we receive four sections of 1σ-errors ellipsoid. These sections are the spheres of radius 20.5. Taking points on each sphere with the step 0.25*π on angular coordinates we receive 96 points on a surface of the 1σ-errors ellipsoid. The values α0, δα, δR1/R10, P1 were calculated in the 96 points. The centre of the ellipsoidal was used for calculation of the mean values. The errors of the values were computed as root-mean-squire deviations of 96 values from the same mean values. The errors of the others values of the catalog were computed by the errors calculation rule of indirect measuring. (3 data files).

  9. A MULTI-COLOR OPTICAL SURVEY OF THE ORION NEBULA CLUSTER. I. THE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rio, N.; Robberto, M.; Soderblom, D. R.; Panagia, N.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Palla, F.; Stassun, K.

    2009-08-01

    We present U, B, V, I broadband, 6200 A TiO mediumband, and H{alpha} narrowband photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) obtained with the WFI imager at the ESO/MPI 2.2 telescope at La Silla Observatory. The nearly simultaneous observations cover the entire ONC in a field of about 34 x 34 arcmin. They enable us to determine stellar colors avoiding the additional scatter in the photometry induced by stellar variability typical of pre-main-sequence stars. We identify 2612 point-like sources in the I band; 58%, 43%, and 17% of them are also detected in V, B, and U, respectively. 1040 sources are identified in the H{alpha} band. In this paper we present the observations, the calibration techniques adopted, and the resulting catalog. We show the derived color-magnitude diagram of the population and discuss the completeness of our photometry. We define a spectrophotometric TiO index that takes into account the fluxes in the V, I, and TiO bands. Comparing it with spectral types of ONC members in the literature, we find a correlation between the index and the spectral type valid for M-type stars, which is accurate to better than 1 spectral subclass for M3-M6 types and better than 2 spectral subclasses for M0-M2 types.. This allows us to newly classify 217 stars. In a similar way, we subtract from our H{alpha} photometry the photospheric continuum at its wavelength, deriving calibrated line excess for the full sample. This represents the largest H{alpha} star catalog obtained to date on the ONC. This data set enables a full re-analysis of the properties of the pre-main-sequence population in the Orion Nebula Cluster to be presented in an accompanying paper.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Milky Way global survey of star clusters (Kharchenko+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Roeser, S.; Schilbach, E.; Scholz, R.-D.

    2012-07-01

    probable members located in the central cluster regions and determined - with a homogeneous method/pipeline - angular sizes of the main morphological parts, heliocentric distances, colour-excesses, mean proper motions, sometimes radial velocities, ages, tidal parameters. There are 4 globular clusters in the 2nd quadrant, they are listed in index_q2.dat, but the data for globular clusters will be submitted to the CDS as a separate catalogue. We present for the 2nd quadrant of the Milky Way: * The Catalogue of the MWSC Data with: Catalogue of parameters for confirmed clusters; Index (full list) of MWSC objects; Notes (full object list with notes); Inside each list the entries are ordered by MWSC number (i.e. right ascension J2000 from the target list). * The Catalogues of the MWSC Stars in 650 circular sky areas with classified clusters. Files are ordered by MWSC number order; inside each sky area the entries are ordered by Ks magnitudes. * The Atlas of MWSC diagrams. In the Atlas the Cluster pages are ordered by MWSC number. This catalog is superseded by Kharchenko et al., 2013, J/A+A/558/A53 (5 data files).

  11. THE RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY-2 (RCS-2): SURVEY DETAILS AND PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG CONSTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbank, David G.; Gladders, M. D.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.

    2011-03-15

    The second Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS-2) is a {approx}1000 deg{sup 2}, multi-color imaging survey using the square-degree imager, MegaCam, on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. It is designed to detect clusters of galaxies over the redshift range 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 1. The primary aim is to build a statistically complete, large ({approx}10{sup 4}) sample of clusters, covering a sufficiently long redshift baseline to be able to place constraints on cosmological parameters via the evolution of the cluster mass function. Other main science goals include building a large sample of high surface brightness, strongly gravitationally lensed arcs associated with these clusters, and an unprecedented sample of several tens of thousands of galaxy clusters and groups, spanning a large range of halo mass, with which to study the properties and evolution of their member galaxies. This paper describes the design of the survey and the methodology for acquiring, reducing, and calibrating the data for the production of high-precision photometric catalogs. We describe the method for calibrating our griz imaging data using the colors of the stellar locus and overlapping Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. This yields an absolute accuracy of <0.03 mag on any color and {approx}0.05 mag in the r-band magnitude, verified with respect to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our astrometric calibration is accurate to <<0.''3 from comparison with SDSS positions. RCS-2 reaches average 5{sigma} point-source limiting magnitudes of griz = [24.4, 24.3, 23.7, 22.8], approximately 1-2 mag deeper than the SDSS. Due to the queue-scheduled nature of the observations, the data are highly uniform and taken in excellent seeing, mostly FWHM {approx}< 0.''7 in the r band. In addition to the main science goals just described, these data form the basis for a number of other planned and ongoing projects (including the WiggleZ survey), making RCS-2 an important next-generation imaging survey.

  12. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PROPER MOTION (HSTPROMO) CATALOGS OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. I. SAMPLE SELECTION, DATA REDUCTION, AND NGC 7078 RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, A.; Anderson, J.; Van der Marel, R. P.; Watkins, L. L.; King, I. R.; Bianchini, P.; Chanamé, J.; Chandar, R.; Cool, A. M.; Ferraro, F. R.; Massari, D.; Ford, H.

    2014-12-20

    We present the first study of high-precision internal proper motions (PMs) in a large sample of globular clusters, based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data obtained over the past decade with the ACS/WFC, ACS/HRC, and WFC3/UVIS instruments. We determine PMs for over 1.3 million stars in the central regions of 22 clusters, with a median number of ∼60,000 stars per cluster. These PMs have the potential to significantly advance our understanding of the internal kinematics of globular clusters by extending past line-of-sight (LOS) velocity measurements to two- or three-dimensional velocities, lower stellar masses, and larger sample sizes. We describe the reduction pipeline that we developed to derive homogeneous PMs from the very heterogeneous archival data. We demonstrate the quality of the measurements through extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We also discuss the PM errors introduced by various systematic effects and the techniques that we have developed to correct or remove them to the extent possible. We provide in electronic form the catalog for NGC 7078 (M 15), which consists of 77,837 stars in the central 2.'4. We validate the catalog by comparison with existing PM measurements and LOS velocities and use it to study the dependence of the velocity dispersion on radius, stellar magnitude (or mass) along the main sequence, and direction in the plane of the sky (radial or tangential). Subsequent papers in this series will explore a range of applications in globular-cluster science and will also present the PM catalogs for the other sample clusters.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Proper Motion (HSTPROMO) Catalogs of Galactic Globular Clusters. I. Sample Selection, Data Reduction, and NGC 7078 Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, A.; Anderson, J.; van der Marel, R. P.; Watkins, L. L.; King, I. R.; Bianchini, P.; Chanamé, J.; Chandar, R.; Cool, A. M.; Ferraro, F. R.; Ford, H.; Massari, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first study of high-precision internal proper motions (PMs) in a large sample of globular clusters, based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data obtained over the past decade with the ACS/WFC, ACS/HRC, and WFC3/UVIS instruments. We determine PMs for over 1.3 million stars in the central regions of 22 clusters, with a median number of ~60,000 stars per cluster. These PMs have the potential to significantly advance our understanding of the internal kinematics of globular clusters by extending past line-of-sight (LOS) velocity measurements to two- or three-dimensional velocities, lower stellar masses, and larger sample sizes. We describe the reduction pipeline that we developed to derive homogeneous PMs from the very heterogeneous archival data. We demonstrate the quality of the measurements through extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We also discuss the PM errors introduced by various systematic effects and the techniques that we have developed to correct or remove them to the extent possible. We provide in electronic form the catalog for NGC 7078 (M 15), which consists of 77,837 stars in the central 2.'4. We validate the catalog by comparison with existing PM measurements and LOS velocities and use it to study the dependence of the velocity dispersion on radius, stellar magnitude (or mass) along the main sequence, and direction in the plane of the sky (radial or tangential). Subsequent papers in this series will explore a range of applications in globular-cluster science and will also present the PM catalogs for the other sample clusters. Based on proprietary and archival observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  14. A Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner Catalog of Galaxies Behind the Virgo Cluster and Toward its Antipode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, G. Lyle; Dickey, John M.; Lu, Nayao Y.; Fromhold-Treu, Rene

    1996-01-01

    We present a catalog of 1268 galxies, essentially complete to B(is less than or equal to)17.0, found by scanning glass copies of several fields of the original Palomar Sky Survey using the Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner in its isodensitometricmode(as opposed to the threshold densitometric mode used in the APS Catalog of the POSS I).

  15. A PARAMETERIZED GALAXY CATALOG SIMULATOR FOR TESTING CLUSTER FINDING, MASS ESTIMATION, AND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ESTIMATION IN OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jeeseon; Mohr, Joseph J.; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Rude, Cody; Warren, Michael S.; Dolag, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    We present a galaxy catalog simulator that converts N-body simulations with halo and subhalo catalogs into mock, multiband photometric catalogs. The simulator assigns galaxy properties to each subhalo in a way that reproduces the observed cluster galaxy halo occupation distribution, the radial and mass-dependent variation in fractions of blue galaxies, the luminosity functions in the cluster and the field, and the color-magnitude relation in clusters. Moreover, the evolution of these parameters is tuned to match existing observational constraints. Parameterizing an ensemble of cluster galaxy properties enables us to create mock catalogs with variations in those properties, which in turn allows us to quantify the sensitivity of cluster finding to current observational uncertainties in these properties. Field galaxies are sampled from existing multiband photometric surveys of similar depth. We present an application of the catalog simulator to characterize the selection function and contamination of a galaxy cluster finder that utilizes the cluster red sequence together with galaxy clustering on the sky. We estimate systematic uncertainties in the selection to be at the {<=}15% level with current observational constraints on cluster galaxy populations and their evolution. We find the contamination in this cluster finder to be {approx}35% to redshift z {approx} 0.6. In addition, we use the mock galaxy catalogs to test the optical mass indicator B{sub gc} and a red-sequence redshift estimator. We measure the intrinsic scatter of the B{sub gc}-mass relation to be approximately log normal with {sigma}{sub log10M}{approx}0.25 and we demonstrate photometric redshift accuracies for massive clusters at the {approx}3% level out to z {approx} 0.7.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Slug analysis of star clusters in NGC 628 & 7793 (Krumholz+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, M. R.; Adamo, A.; Fumagalli, M.; Wofford, A.; Calzetti, D.; Lee, J. C.; Whitmore, B. C.; Bright, S. N.; Grasha, K.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Kim, H.; Nair, P.; Ryon, J. E.; Smith, L. J.; Thilker, D.; Ubeda, L.; Zackrisson, E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we use slug, the Stochastically Lighting Up Galaxies code (da Silva et al. 2012ApJ...745..145D, 2014MNRAS.444.3275D; Krumholz et al. 2015MNRAS.452.1447K), and its post-processing tool for analysis of star cluster properties, cluster_slug, to analyze an initial sample of clusters from the LEGUS (Calzetti et al. 2015AJ....149...51C). A description of the steps required to produce final cluster catalogs of the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) targets can be found in Calzetti et al. (2015AJ....149...51C), and in A. Adamo et al. (2015, in preparation). LEGUS is an HST Cycle 21 Treasury program that is imaging 50 nearby galaxies in five broadbands with the WFC3/UVIS, from the NUV to the I band. (1 data file).

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HST photometry of M31 globular clusters (Federici+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federici, L.; Cacciari, C.; Bellazzini, M.; Fusi Pecci, F.; Galleti, S.; Perina, S.

    2013-01-01

    -square parameter<1.5 if V>23.5,and <2.5 if V<23.5 and sharpness parameter between -0.3 and 0.3. The x,y coordinates, the magnitudes both in the Vegamag and in the Johnson-Cousins system, the global parameters 'chi', signal to noise, sharpness, and the ACS_WFC chip number are listed for each of the selected stars. BVI photometry for the clusters B008-G060, B010-G062, B023-G078, B088-G150, B158-G213, B220-G275, B224-G279, B225-G280, B366-G291, B407-G352,B255D-D072, B292-G010, B336-G067, B337-G068, B350-G162, and B531 has been taken from the CDS catalogs J/A+A/507/1375 (Perina et al., 2009) and J/A+A/531/A155 (Perina et al., 2011). (33 data files).

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hectospec survey of SZ clusters (HeCS-SZ) (Rines+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rines, K. J.; Geller, M. J.; Diaferio, A.; Hwang, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    HeCS-SZ is an extension of the HeCS survey to include clusters that enable the construction of an SZ-limited sample. We measured 7721 new redshifts with MMT/Hectospec in 21 clusters selected from the Planck SZ catalog (2014A&A...571A..20P; arXiv:1502.01597). We combine these new measurements with the existing HeCS (Hectospec Cluster Survey; Rines et al. 2013, J/ApJ/767/15) and CIRS (Cluster Infall Regions in SDSS project; Rines & Diaferio 2006, J/AJ/132/1275) surveys and with data from the literature to construct a total sample of 123 clusters. We use SDSS photometry for all clusters. The HeCS is a spectroscopic survey of 58 galaxy clusters at moderate redshift (z=0.1-0.3) with MMT/Hectospec. HeCS includes all clusters with ROSAT X-ray fluxes of f_X>5x10-12erg/s at [0.5-2.0]keV from the Bright Cluster Survey (BCS; Ebeling et al. 1998, J/MNRAS/301/881) or REFLEX survey (Bohringer et al. 2004, J/A+A/425/367) with optical imaging in the sixth Data Release (DR6) of SDSS (Adelman-McCarthy et al. 2008, II/282; superseded by II/294). CIRS used spectroscopy from the fourth Data Release of SDSS. Table 3 lists 168 redshifts measured with the FAST instrument on the 1.5m Tillinghast telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory. The additional single-slit spectra from FAST reduce the incompleteness of bright (SDSS r<~16.5) galaxies in the HeCS-SZ clusters. (4 data files).

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Young and embedded clusters in Cygnus-X (Maia+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, F. F. S.; Moraux, E.; Joncour, I.

    2016-02-01

    CFHT/WIRCam was used to acquire deep (960s, 1200s, 480s) JHK exposures of five fields covering ~1 degree squared in the Cygnus-X complex, in six nights between 04/09/2012 and 29/10/2012. The frames were detrended and coadded into a master mosaic where PSF photometry was carried out using SExtractor and PSFex software using a 2-sigma detection threshold. The resulting catalog was calibrated against the 2MASS catalog, but no transformation was done to our data. Instead, bright sources (brighter than the saturation magnitude) were recovered from 2MASS and calibrated to the WIRCam instrumental system to complement our catalog. The final table contains about 310000 stars spanning 12 magnitudes and reaching K=18.5 at 95% completeness. The fundamental parameters of 10 young stellar systems in the region were derived through this final catalogue. (2 data files).

  20. The EMSS catalog of X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies. 1: An atlas of CCD images of 41 distant clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gioia, I. M.; Luppino, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    An atlas of deep, wide-field R-band charge coupled device (CCD) images of a complete sample of distant, X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies is presented. These clusters are the 41 most distant (z is greater than or equal to 0.15) and most X-ray-luminous (L(sub x) is greater than or equal to 2 x 10(exp 44) ergs/s) clusters in the Einstein Observatory Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) catalog that are observable from Mauna Kea (delta is greater than -40 deg). The sample spans a redshift range of 0.15 is less than or equal to z is less than or equal to 0.81 and includes at least two and possibly as many as six rich clusters with z is greater than 0.5. For the most part, the data are of superior quality, with a median seeing of 0.8 sec full width half-maximum (FWHM) and coverage of at least 1 Mpc x 1 Mpc in the cluster frame (H(sub 0) = 50; q(sub 0) = 1/2). In addition, we update the available optical, X-ray, and radio data on the entire EMSS sample of 104 clusters. We outline the cluster selection criteria in detail and emphasize that X-ray-selected cluster samples may prove to be more useful for cosmological studies than optically selected samples. The EMSS cluster sample in particular can be exploited for diverse cosmological investigations, as demonstrated by the detection of evolution in the X-ray luminosity function previously reported, and more recently by the discovery of a large number of gravitationally lensed images in these clusters.

  1. The XMM-BCS galaxy cluster survey: I. The X-ray selected cluster catalog from the initial 6 deg$^2$

    SciTech Connect

    Suhada, R.; Song, J.; Bohringer, H.; Mohr, J.J.; Chon, G.; Finoguenov, A.; Fassbender, R.; Desai, S.; Armstrong, R.; Zenteno, A.; Barkhouse, W.A.; /North Dakota U. /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.

    2011-11-01

    The XMM-Newton - Blanco Cosmology Survey project (XMM-BCS) is a coordinated X-ray, optical and mid-infrared cluster survey in a field also covered by Sunyaev-Zel dovich effect (SZE) surveys by the South Pole Telescope and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The aim of the project is to study the cluster population in a 14 deg{sup 2} field (center: {alpha} {approx} 23:29:18.4, {delta} {approx} -54:40:33.6). The uniform multi-wavelength coverage will also allow us for the first time to comprehensively compare the selection function of the different cluster detection approaches in a single test field and perform a cross-calibration of cluster scaling relations. In this work, we present a catalog of 46 X-ray selected clusters from the initial 6 deg{sup 2} survey core.We describe the XMM-BCS source detection pipeline and derive physical properties of the clusters. We provide photometric redshift estimates derived from the BCS imaging data and spectroscopic redshift measurements for a low redshift subset of the clusters. The photometric redshift estimates are found to be unbiased and in good agreement with the spectroscopic values. Our multi-wavelength approach gives us a comprehensive look at the cluster and group population up to redshifts z {approx} 1. The median redshift of the sample is 0.47 and the median mass M{sub 500} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 14} M{sub {circle_dot}} ({approx} 2 keV). From the sample, we derive the cluster log N - log S using an approximation to the survey selection function and find it in good agreement with previous studies. We compare optical mass estimates from the Southern Cosmology Survey available for part of our cluster sample with our estimates derived from the X-ray luminosity. Weak lensing masses available for a subset of the cluster sample are in agreement with our estimates. Optical masses based on cluster richness and total optical luminosity are found to be significantly higher than the X-ray values. The present results illustrate the

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Velocity distributions in galaxy clusters (Sampaio+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, F. S.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.

    2015-03-01

    We study 416 galaxy systems selected from the 2MASS (Two Micron All Sky Survey Extended Source Catalog - Crook et al. (2007, Cat. J/ApJ/655/790)). We used just groups with more than 7 members to avoid severe sample size effects (1 data file).

  3. Hubble Space Telescope Proper Motion (HSTPROMO) Catalogs of Galactic Globular Clusters. III. Dynamical Distances and Mass-to-Light Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Laura L.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Bellini, Andrea; Anderson, Jay

    2015-10-01

    We present dynamical distance estimates for 15 Galactic globular clusters (GCs) and use these to check the consistency of dynamical and photometric distance estimates. For most of the clusters, this is the first dynamical distance estimate ever determined. We extract proper-motion (PM) dispersion profiles using cleaned samples of bright stars from the Hubble Space Telescope PM catalogs recently presented in Bellini et al. and compile a set of line of sight (LOS) velocity-dispersion profiles from a variety of literature sources. Distances are then estimated by fitting spherical, non-rotating, isotropic, constant mass-to-light ratio (M/L) dynamical models to the PM and LOS dispersion profiles together. We compare our dynamical distance estimates with literature photometric estimates from the Harris GC catalog and find that the mean fractional difference between the two types is consistent with zero at just -1.9 ± 1.7%. This indicates that there are no significant biases in either estimation method and provides an important validation of the stellar-evolution theory that underlies photometric distance estimates. The analysis also estimates dynamical M/Ls for our clusters; on average, the dynamically inferred M/Ls agree with existing stellar-population-based M/Ls that assume a Chabrier initial mass function (IMF) to within -8.8 ± 6.4%, implying that such an IMF is consistent with our data. Our results are also consistent with a Kroupa IMF, but strongly rule out a Salpeter IMF. We detect no correlation between our M/L offsets from literature values and our distance offsets from literature values, strongly indicating that our methods are reliable and our results are robust. Based on proprietary and archival observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Open clusters in Auriga OB2 (Marco+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, A.; Negueruela, I.

    2016-05-01

    We present tables with coordinates in J2000, near IR photometry and Stromgren photometry for stars in the open cluster Stock 8 and in the two new open clusters: Alicante 11 and Alicante 12 (7 data files).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: XCS-DR1 Cluster Catalogue (Mehrtens+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtens, N.; Romer, A. K.; Hilton, M.; Lloyd-Davies, E. J.; Miller, C. J.; Stanford, S. A.; Hosmer, M.; Hoyle, B.; Collins, C. A.; Liddle, A. R.; Viana, P. T. P.; Nichol, R. C.; Stott, J. P.; Dubois, E. N.; Kay, S. T.; Sahlen, M.; Young, O.; Short, C. J.; Christodoulou, L.; Watson, W. A.; Davidson, M.; Harrison, C. D.; Baruah, L.; Smith, M.; Burke, C.; Mayers, J. A.; Deadman, P.-J.; Rooney, P. J.; Edmondson, E. M.; West, M.; Campbell, H. C.; Edge, A. C.; Mann, R. G.; Sabirli, K.; Wake, D.; Benoist, C.; da Costa, L.; Maia, M. A. G.; Ogando, R.

    2013-04-01

    The XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) is a serendipitous search for galaxy clusters using all publicly available data in the XMM-Newton Science Archive. Its main aims are to measure cosmological parameters and trace the evolution of X-ray scaling relations. In this paper we present the first data release from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS-DR1). This consists of 503 optically confirmed, serendipitously detected, X-ray clusters. Of these clusters, 256 are new to the literature and 357 are new X-ray discoveries. We present 463 clusters with a redshift estimate (0.06clusters with spectroscopic redshifts. The remainder have photometric redshifts. In addition, we have measured X-ray temperatures (TX) for 401 clusters (0.4

  6. Implementing Performance-Based Vocational Education Utilizing V-TECS Catalogs. Module 3. Selecting, Clustering and Sequencing Performance and Supplemental Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This learning module on selecting, clustering, and sequencing performance and supplemental objectives is one of nine developed for use in training administrators, teachers, and prospective teachers in the utilization of Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States (V-TECS) catalogs of performance objectives, criterion-referenced measures,…

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Alignment of galaxies in galaxy clusters (Sifon+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifon, C.; Hoekstra, H.; Cacciato, M.; Viola, M.; Koehlinger, F.; van der Burg, R. F. J.; Sand, D. J.; Graham, M. L.

    2015-04-01

    The cluster sample is drawn from two large, nonoverlapping X-ray selected cluster surveys carried out with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), namely the Multi-Epoch Nearby Cluster Survey (MENeaCS; Sand et al., 2012ApJ...746..163S) and the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project (CCCP; Hoekstra et al., 2012MNRAS.427.1298H). MENeaCS performed multi-epoch observations of 57 clusters in the redshift range 0.05clusters. For this, clusters were observed using the g and r bands with MegaCam. CCCP was designed to study the scaling relations between different tracers of mass in galaxy clusters, and includes 50 clusters in the redshift range 0.15clusters had archival B- and R-band data taken with the CFH12k camera, and 30 clusters were observed with the g and r bands with MegaCam (Hoekstra, 2007MNRAS.379..317H; Hoekstra et al., 2012MNRAS.427.1298H). (2 data files).

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cluster galaxy circular velocity function (Desai+, 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, V.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Mayer, L.; Reed, D.; Quinn, T.; Governato, F.

    2004-07-01

    We present galaxy circular velocity functions (GCVFs) for 34 low-redshift (z<~0.15) clusters identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS, Cat. ), for 15 clusters drawn from dark matter simulations of hierarchical structure growth in a {LAMBDA}CDM cosmology, and for ~22000 SDSS field galaxies. We find that the simulations successfully reproduce the shape, amplitude and scatter in the observed distribution of cluster galaxy circular velocities. The power-law slope of the observed cluster GCVF is ~-2.4, independent of cluster velocity dispersion. The average slope of the simulated GCVFs is somewhat steeper, although formally consistent given the errors. We find that the effects of baryons on galaxy rotation curves is to flatten the simulated cluster GCVF into better agreement with observations. The cumulative GCVFs of the simulated clusters are very similar across a wide range of cluster masses, provided individual subhalo circular velocities are scaled by the circular velocities of the parent cluster. The scatter is consistent with that measured in the cumulative, scaled observed cluster GCVF. Finally, the observed field GCVF deviates significantly from a power law, being flatter than the cluster GCVF at circular velocities less than 200km/s. (1 data file).

  9. Ground-based CCD astrometry with wide field imagers. III. WFI@2.2m proper-motion catalog of the globular cluster ω Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, A.; Piotto, G.; Bedin, L. R.; Anderson, J.; Platais, I.; Momany, Y.; Moretti, A.; Milone, A. P.; Ortolani, S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: ω Centauri is the most well studied Galactic Globular Cluster because of its numerous puzzling features: significant dispersion in metallicity, multiple populations, triple main-sequence, horizontal branch morphology, He-rich population(s), and extended star-formation history. Intensive spectroscopic follow-up observing campaigns targeting stars at different positions in the color-magnitude diagram promises to clarify some of these peculiarities. Aims: To be able to target cluster members reliably during spectroscopic surveys and both spatial and radial distributions in the cluster outskirts without including field stars, a high quality proper-motion catalog of ω Cen and membership probability determination are required. The only available wide field proper-motion catalog of ω Cen is derived from photographic plates, and only for stars brighter than B~16. Using ESO archive data, we create a new, CCD-based, proper-motion catalog for this cluster, extending to B~20. Methods: We used high precision astrometric software developed specifically for data acquired by WFI@2.2m telescope and presented in the first paper of this series. We demonstrated previously that a 7 mas astrometric precision level can be achieved with this telescope and camera for well exposed stars in a single exposure, assuming an empirical PSF and a local transformation approach in measuring star displacements. Results: We achieved a good cluster-field separation with a temporal base-line of only four years. We corrected our photometry for sky-concentration effects. We provide calibrated photometry for UBVR_CIC wide-band data plus narrow-band filter data centered on Hα for almost 360 000 stars. We confirm that the ω Cen metal-poor and metal-rich components have the same proper motion, and demonstrate that the metal-intermediate component in addition exhibits the same mean motion as the other RGB stars. We provide membership probability determinations for published ω Cen variable star

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Young Massive Star Clusters. II. (Larsen, 1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, S. S.

    1999-07-01

    Table 4 lists photometric data for Young Massive Star Clusters identified in a sample of 21 nearby galaxies. The photometric data have been corrected for Galactic foreground extinction. Each cluster is identified by the abbreviated NGC number of its host galaxy and an object number: nxxx-yyy is object number yyy in the galaxy NGC xxx. Effective cluster radii have been obtained by modeling the cluster images as MOFFAT15 functions convolved with the point-spread function measured on the CCD images. (1 data file).

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Rich galaxy clusters richness-based masses (Andreon, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreon, S.

    2016-01-01

    Table 1 provides refined cluster position, redshift, cross-identification and more importantly mass of 275 galaxy clusters with logn200>21.6 (logM200/M_⊙>14) in the low-extinction part of the SDSS footprint and with 0.05

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SMC BV photometry of 9 star cluster fields (Dias+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, B.; Kerber, L.; Barbuy, B.; Bica, E.; Ortolani, S.

    2016-05-01

    Photometric magnitudes from SOAR Optical Imager for individual stars in nine stellar clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud are presented. The following clusters are presented: Bruck2, Bruck4, Bruck6, HW5, HW6, Kron8, Kron11, Lindsay14, and NGC152. For each star equatorial coordinates and B, V (Bessel) magnitudes with their errors are given. (10 data files).

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometry in globular cluster NGC 6229 (Carney+, 1991)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, B. W.; Fullton, L. K.; Trammell, S. R.

    2016-06-01

    We present CCD-based BV photometry for over 1100 stars in and around the globular cluster NGC 6229. For the first time, the cluster's entire giant branch and its horizontal branch are delineated, from which metallicity ([Fe/H]~-1.4) and distance (dȯ_~28kpc; dGC~27kpc) estimates ensue. NGC 6229 is found to have a relatively blue horizontal branch for its intermediate metallicity, which is unusual for an outer halo cluster. Its low R value (defined as NHB/NRG) hints that the blue color of its horizontal branch is due to a lower than average helium abundance. Three possible new variable stars are identified, including one RR Lyrae and two long-period variables. We present a brief review of our knowledge of basic data for the 13 globular clusters lying more than 24 kpc from the Galactic center. The unusually red horizontal branch phenomenon is common only among the outermost clusters. An average R value for these clusters suggests the effect is not caused by an overabundance of helium. The Oosterhoff dichotomy apparently persists into the outer halo, although the number of clusters with RR Lyrae variables is small. (1 data file).

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Star clusters in M33 (Beasley+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, M. A.; San, Roman I.; Gallart, G.; Sarajedini, A.; Aparicio, A.

    2015-08-01

    Basic and derived data for M33 cluster sample. This is the full table 2 corresponding to the abbreviated one in the online journal article. Previously confirmed candidates (identified by radial velocities or high-resolution imaging) were observed using OSIRIS on the GTC in long-slit mode during semesters 2010B-2012A. Previously identified star clusters and star cluster candidates identified by San Roman et al. (2010ApJ...720.1674S, Cat. J/ApJ/720/1674) were observed using the WYFFOS/AF2 multifibre instrument on the WHT in La Palma. (1 data file).

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HST Frontier Fields clusters (Richard+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, J.; Jauzac, M.; Limousin, M.; Jullo, E.; Clement, B.; Ebeling, H.; Kneib, J.-P.; Atek, H.; Natarajan, P.; Egami, E.; Livermore, R.; Bower, R.

    2016-02-01

    The HST Frontier Fields initiative, announced in the spring of 2013, devotes 140 orbits of HST time to deep imaging observations of each of six carefully selected cluster lenses. As a compromise between depth and spectral coverage, each target field will be observed for 20 orbits in each of the F435W, F606W, and F814W filters (all ACS), as well as in the F105W, F125W, F140W, and F160W filters (all WFC3), reaching m~29 (AB) uniformly in all passbands. The total commitment of 840 orbits of Director's Discretionary Time is spread out over three cycles, starting with Cycle 21, with two clusters being targeted per cycle. All six HFF clusters have previously been targeted with HST. These observations were instrumental in the selection of the respective clusters for the HFF project as highly efficient gravitational lenses. (7 data files).

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Gaia-ESO Survey. Parameters for cluster members (Jacobson+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, H. R.; Friel, E. D.; Jilkova, L.; Magrini, L.; Bragaglia, A.; Vallenari, A.; Tosi, M.; Randich, S.; Donati, P.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Sordo, R.; Smiljanic, R.; Overbeek, J. C.; Carraro, G.; Tautvaisiene, G.; San, Roman I.; Villanova, S.; Geisler, D.; Munoz, C.; Jimenez-Esteban, F.; Tang, B.; Gilmore, G.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bensby, T.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Korn, A. J.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Casey, A. R.; Costado, M. T.; Franciosini, E.; Heiter, U.; Hill, V.; Hourihane, A.; Lardo, C.; de Laverny, P.; Lewis, J.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Sousa, S. G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.

    2016-05-01

    Parameters for confirmed stellar members of the open clusters Berkeley 44, Berkeley 81, NGC 2516, NGC 3532, NGC 4815, NGC 6005, NGC 6633, NGC 6705, NGC 6802, Pismis 18, Trumpler 20, Trumpler 23. (1 data file).

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio properties of brightest cluster galaxies (Hogan+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. T.; Edge, A. C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Hamer, S. L.; Mahony, E. K.; Russell, H. R.; Fabian, A. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Wilman, R. J.

    2016-02-01

    Our parent sample is drawn from three ROSAT X-ray selected cluster catalogues - the Brightest Cluster Sample (BCS; Ebeling et al., 1998, Cat. J/MNRAS/301/881), the extended BCS (eBCS; Ebeling et al., 2000, Cat. J/MNRAS/318/333) and ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray (REFLEX; Bohringer et al., 2004, Cat. J/A+A/425/367) samples, which contain 206, 107 and 447 clusters, respectively. Since publication some catalogue entries have been reclassified, and there are also a small number of cross-catalogue duplicates. We therefore remove a minority of sources, leaving us with a sample of 199, 104 and 417 sources in the BCS, eBCS and REFLEX samples, respectively. Our total X-ray selected parent sample therefore consists of 720 clusters. (3 data files).

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Milky Way global survey of star clusters. V. (Kharchenko+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Schilbach, E.; Roeser, S.; Scholz, R.-D.

    2015-11-01

    The catalogue presents integrated parameters in near-infrared (JHKs) passbands for 3208 Galactic star clusters. The integrated magnitudes are based on the most probable cluster members selected from the high-precision, homogeneous all-sky catalogue 2MAst that is constructed on the basis of catalogues PPMXL (Roeser et al., 2010, Cat. I/317) and 2MASS (Cutri et al., 2003, Cat. II/246). The integrated magnitudes are computed by adding the individual luminosities of the most secure cluster members. In order to put the computed magnitudes into a uniform and unbiased system they were corrected for the effect of unseen stars in the 2MAst. The clusters in the catalogue are sorted according to their numbers in the MWSC. (1 data file).

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Star clusters distances and extinctions. II. (Buckner+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, A. S. M.; Froebrich, D.

    2015-04-01

    Until now, it has been impossible to observationally measure how star cluster scaleheight evolves beyond 1Gyr as only small samples have been available. Here, we establish a novel method to determine the scaleheight of a cluster sample using modelled distributions and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. This allows us to determine the scaleheight with a 25% accuracy for samples of 38 clusters or more. We apply our method to investigate the temporal evolution of cluster scaleheight, using homogeneously selected sub-samples of Kharchenko et al. (MWSC, 2012, Cat. J/A+A/543/A156, 2013, J/A+A/558/A53 ), Dias et al. (DAML02, 2002A&A...389..871D, Cat. B/ocl), WEBDA, and Froebrich et al. (FSR, 2007MNRAS.374..399F, Cat. J/MNRAS/374/399). We identify a linear relationship between scaleheight and log(age/yr) of clusters, considerably different from field stars. The scaleheight increases from about 40pc at 1Myr to 75pc at 1Gyr, most likely due to internal evolution and external scattering events. After 1Gyr, there is a marked change of the behaviour, with the scaleheight linearly increasing with log(age/yr) to about 550pc at 3.5Gyr. The most likely interpretation is that the surviving clusters are only observable because they have been scattered away from the mid-plane in their past. A detailed understanding of this observational evidence can only be achieved with numerical simulations of the evolution of cluster samples in the Galactic disc. Furthermore, we find a weak trend of an age-independent increase in scaleheight with Galactocentric distance. There are no significant temporal or spatial variations of the cluster distribution zero-point. We determine the Sun's vertical displacement from the Galactic plane as Z⊙=18.5+/-1.2pc. (1 data file).

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Early-type galaxies in Ursa Major cluster (Pak+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, M.; Rey, S.-C.; Lisker, T.; Lee, Y.; Kim, S.; Sung, E.-C.; Jerjen, H.; Chung, J.

    2015-04-01

    Our sample in the Ursa Major cluster is predominantly based on the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7; Abazajian et al., 2009ApJS..182..543A). In order to investigate the ultraviolet properties of our sample galaxies in the Ursa Major cluster, we used far-ultraviolet (FUV, 1350-1750Å) and near-ultraviolet (NUV, 1750-2750Å) images from the GALEX GR6. (1 data file).

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SALT galaxy clusters detected by ACT (Kirk+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, B.; Hilton, M.; Cress, C.; Crawford, S. M.; Hughes, J. P.; Battaglia, N.; Bond, J. R.; Burke, C.; Gralla, M. B.; Hajian, A.; Hasselfield, M.; Hincks, A. D.; Infante, L.; Kosowsky, A.; Marriage, T. A.; Menanteau, F.; Moodley, K.; Niemack, M. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Sifon, C.; Wilson, S.; Wollack, E. J.; Zunckel, C.

    2016-01-01

    The clusters targeted for SALT observations were drawn from the SZ-selected sample constructed by the ACT team. ACT is a 6m telescope located in northern Chile that observes the sky in three frequency bands (centred at 148, 218, and 277GHz) simultaneously with arcminute resolution. We conducted observations of the seven target ACT clusters with RSS in multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) mode, which uses custom designed slit masks. (7 data files).

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Massive quiescent ETG in clusters (Delaye+ 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaye, L.; Huertas-Company, M.; Mei, S.; Lidman, C.; Licitra, R.; Newman, A.; Raichoor, A.; Shankar, F.; Barrientos, F.; Bernardi, M.; Cerulo, P.; Couch, W.; Demarco, R.; Munoz, R.; Sanchez-Janssen, R.; Tanaka, M.

    2015-01-01

    Our targets have been selected according to the following criteria: (1) they cover a broad redshift range 0.84cluster members. All clusters have HST/ACS WFC (Wide Field Camera) images in at least two bandpasses. The ACS WFC resolution is 0.05-arcsec/pix, and its field of view is 210-arcsecx204-arcsec. The ACS/WFC PSF width is around 0.11arcsec. Our ACS/WFC images were mostly obtained in a programme designed to find Type Ia supernovae in distant galaxy clusters (Dawson et al., 2009AJ....138.1271D). See Meyers et al. (2012ApJ...750....1M) for a description of how these data were processed. Three clusters (see below): RDCS J1252-2927, XMMU J2235.3-2557 and RX J0152-1357 had been previously targeted with the ACS camera on HST in the context of the ACS Intermediate Redshift Cluster Survey (Ford 2004, HST Proposal ID 10327, ACS Imaging of a High-Redshift Cluster of Galaxies; Postman et al. 2005ApJ...623..721P; Mei et al. 2009ApJ...690...42M) and these data have been included. (1 data file).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MWSC IV. 63 new open clusters (Scholz+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.-D.; Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Roeser, S.; Schilbach, E.

    2015-08-01

    We first selected high-quality samples from the 2MAst and UCAC4 catalogues for comparison and verification of the proper motions. For 441 circular proper motion bins (radius 15mas/yr) within+/-50mas/yr, the sky outside a thin Galactic plane zone (|b|<5°) was binned in small areas ('sky pixels') of 0.25x0.25°2, Sky pixels with enhanced numbers of stars with a certain common proper motion in both catalogues were considered as cluster candidates. In total we discovered 692 density enhancements (regarded as cluster candidates). These candidates were cross-identified with known objects. Unidentified objects were passed through the standard MWSC pipeline (described in Kharchenko et al., 2012, Cat. J/A+A/543/A156) for verification, cluster membership construction and structure, kinematic and astrophysical parameter determination. The basic stellar data were taken from the all-sky catalogue 2MAst (2MASS with Astrometry), that was extracted from the all-sky catalogues PPMXL (Roeser et al. 2010, Cat.) and 2MASS (Cutri et al. 2003, Cat.). We found that 355 candidates coincide or overlap with known objects. From the remaining candidates, 270 could not be confirmed by the MWSC pipeline, whereas 63 were classified as real star clusters, for which we determined their basic cluster parameters. Around each confirmed object from our target list we defined a circular area with a radius of ra=r2+radd where r2 is an initial estimate of the cluster radius, and radd=0.3deg. In these areas we selected in 2MAst only those stars with flags Rflg (the 2nd triple of the flags in 2MASS) set to 1, 2, or 3 in each band, i.e. the stars with the best quality detections in photometric and astrometric data. The 63 sky areas with confirmed clusters contain about 0.49 mln 2MAst stars with best quality detections in photometric and astrometric data. We selected most probable members and determined - with a homogeneous method/pipeline - angular sizes of the main morphological parts

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cepheids in open clusters (Anderson+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. I.; Eyer, L.; Mowlavi, N.

    2013-07-01

    Cepheids in open clusters (cluster Cepheids: CCs) are of great importance as zero-point calibrators of the Galactic Cepheid period-luminosity relationship (PLR). We perform an 8-dimensional all-sky census that aims to identify new bona-fide CCs and provide a ranking of membership confidence for known CC candidates according to membership probabilities. The probabilities are computed for combinations of known Galactic open clusters and classical Cepheid candidates, based on spatial, kinematic, and population-specific membership constraints. Data employed in this analysis are taken largely from published literature and supplemented by a year-round observing program on both hemispheres dedicated to determining systemic radial velocities of Cepheids. In total, we find 23 bona-fide CCs, 5 of which are candidates identified for the first time, including an overtone-Cepheid member in NGC 129. We discuss a subset of CC candidates in detail, some of which have been previously mentioned in the literature. Our results indicate unlikely membership for 7 Cepheids that have been previously discussed in terms of cluster membership. We furthermore revisit the Galactic PLR using our bona fide CC sample and obtain a result consistent with the recent calibration by Turner (2010). However, our calibration remains limited mainly by cluster uncertainties and the small number of long-period calibrators. In the near future, Gaia will enable our study to be carried out in much greater detail and accuracy, thanks to data homogeneity and greater levels of completeness. (4 data files).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxy properties in clusters. II. (Muriel+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriel, H.; Coenda, V.

    2014-06-01

    In paper I (Coenda & Muriel, 2009A&A...504..347C, Cat. J/A+A/504/347), we selected an X-ray sample of 49 clusters of galaxies from Popesso et al. (2004A&A...423..449P, Cat. J/A+A/423/449, hereafter P04) in the redshift range 0.05clusters were identified using the Main Galaxy Sample (MGS; Strauss et al. 2002AJ....124.1810S) of the Fifth Data Release (DR5; Adelman-McCarthy et al. 2007ApJS..172..634A, Cat. II/276) of SDSS, which includes spectroscopic redshifts down to a Petrosian magnitude r=17.77. In this paper, we expand the X-ray cluster sample using the cross-correlation between NORAS and SDSS. We identify a subsample from Bohringer et al. (2000ApJS..129..435B, Cat. J/ApJS/129/435, hereafter B00), which we labelled C-B00-I, using the MGS of the Seventh Data Release (DR7; Abazajian et al. 2009ApJS..182..543A) of SDSS. This subsample comprises 55 galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.05clusters are listed in Table 1). (1 data file).

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SFRs of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (Fraser-McKelvie+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser-McKelvie, A.; Brown, M. J. I.; Pimbblet, K. A.

    2015-04-01

    A homogeneous BCG sample was created based on X-ray selection of host clusters with LX>1x1044erg/s in the ROSAT 0.1-2.4keV band, corresponding to an approximate cluster mass of M2500>~1x1014M⊙ (Hoekstra et al., 2011ApJ...726...48H). We identified 144 BCGs by cross-matching the cluster sample with the BCG catalogues of Stott et al. (2008, Cat. J/MNRAS/384/1502), Coziol et al. (2009, Cat. J/AJ/137/4795) and Wen, Han & Liu (2012, Cat. J/ApJS/199/34). The remaining 123 unmatched clusters were inspected visually by AFM and KAP in both optical (Digitized Sky Survey) and IR (Two Micron All Sky Survey, 2MASS) images, along with a NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database object search to verify the redshifts of the candidate BCGs. The vast majority of identifications were unambiguous, and in all cases, the brightest galaxy in the 2MASS K-band at the cluster redshift was chosen as the BCG. (1 data file).

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Redshifts in nine galaxy cluster fields (Hwang+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, H. S.; Geller, M. J.; Diaferio, A.; Rines, K. J.; Zahid, H. J.

    2016-05-01

    Among the 30 clusters at z ~ 0.2 with Subaru weak-lensing maps in Okabe et al. (2010PASJ...62..811O), we first select five clusters with dense redshift data in the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS; Rines et al. 2013, J/ApJ/767/15). We supplement these data with redshifts from the literature (Girardi et al. 2006, J/A+A/455/45; Drinkwater et al. 2010, J/MNRAS/401/1429; Owers et al. 2011, J/ApJ/741/122; Lemze et al. 2013, J/ApJ/776/91; Jaffe et al. 2013, J/MNRAS/431/2111; Geller et al. 2014ApJ...783...52G), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 10 (SDSS DR10; Ahn et al. 2014ApJS..211...17A), and the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED). We made additional observations of four HeCS clusters (A689, A697, A750, and A963) in 2013 February and March with the 300 fiber Hectospec on the MMT 6.5m telescope (Fabricant et al. 2005PASP..117.1411F). The four clusters are within the footprint of the SDSS DR10. (2 data files).

  8. BRIGHTEST X-RAY CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES IN THE CFHTLS WIDE FIELDS: CATALOG AND OPTICAL MASS ESTIMATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkazemi, M.; Finoguenov, A.; Lerchster, M.; Erfanianfar, G.; Seitz, S.; Pereira, M. J.; Egami, E.; Tanaka, M.; Brimioulle, F.; Kettula, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Kneib, J. P.; Rykoff, E.; Erben, T.; Taylor, J. E.

    2015-01-20

    The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) presents a unique data set for weak-lensing studies, having high-quality imaging and deep multiband photometry. We have initiated an XMM-CFHTLS project to provide X-ray observations of the brightest X-ray-selected clusters within the wide CFHTLS area. Performance of these observations and the high quality of CFHTLS data allow us to revisit the identification of X-ray sources, introducing automated reproducible algorithms, based on the multicolor red sequence finder. We have also introduced a new optical mass proxy. We provide the calibration of the red sequence observed in the Canada-France-Hawaii filters and compare the results with the traditional single-color red sequence and photo-z. We test the identification algorithm on the subset of highly significant XMM clusters and identify 100% of the sample. We find that the integrated z-band luminosity of the red sequence galaxies correlates well with the X-ray luminosity, with a surprisingly small scatter of 0.20 dex. We further use the multicolor red sequence to reduce spurious detections in the full XMM and ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) data sets, resulting in catalogs of 196 and 32 clusters, respectively. We made spectroscopic follow-up observations of some of these systems with HECTOSPEC and in combination with BOSS DR9 data. We also describe the modifications needed to the source detection algorithm in order to maintain high purity of extended sources in the shallow X-ray data. We also present the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity and velocity dispersion.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS photometry of LMC cluster SL 529 (Piatti, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.

    2014-04-01

    Based on data obtained from the Gemini Science Archive, we collected CCD SDSS gr (Fukugita et al., 1996AJ....111.1748F) images centred on 26 LMC clusters (GS-2010B-Q-74, PI: Pessev) along with observations of standard fields and calibration frames (zero, sky-flat, dome-flat). The data were obtained at the Gemini South telescope with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) attached (scale=0.146arcsec/pix). The data consist in two exposures of 30s in g and two exposures of 15s in r for each cluster under seeing conditions better than 0.6arcsec and with airmass of 1.25-1.40. Nine Gemini Observatory standard fields were observed along the five cluster observing nights, for which two exposures of 5s per filter and airmass in the range ~1.0-2.0 were obtained. (1 data file).

  10. Mg II Spectral Atlas and Flux Catalog for Late-Type Stars in the Hyades Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Theodore

    2001-01-01

    In the course of a long-running IUE Guest Observer program, UV spectral images were obtained for more than 60 late-type members of the Hyades Cluster in order to investigate their chromospheric emissions. The emission line fluxes extracted from those observations were used to study the dependence of stellar dynamo activity upon age and rotation (IUE Observations of Rapidly Rotating Low-Mass Stars in Young Clusters: The Relation between Chromospheric Activity and Rotation). However, the details of those measurements, including a tabulation of the line fluxes, were never published. The purpose of the investigation summarized here was to extract all of the existing Hyades long-wavelength Mg II spectra in the IUE public archives in order to survey UV chromospheric emission in the cluster, thereby providing a consistent dataset for statistical and correlative studies of the relationship between stellar dynamo activity, rotation, and age over a broad range in mass.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GLASS. IV. Lensing cluster Abell 2744 (Wang+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Hoag, A.; Huang, K.-H.; Treu, T.; Bradac, M.; Schmidt, K. B.; Brammer, G. B.; Vulcani, B.; Jones, T. A.; Ryan, R. E. Jr; Amorin, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Merlin, E.; Trenti, M.

    2016-02-01

    The two position angles (P.A.s) of Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) data analyzed in this study were taken on 2014 August 22 and 23 (P.A.=135) and 2014 October 24 and 25 (P.A.=233), respectively. The Hubble Frontier Fields initiative (HFF, P.I. Lotz) is a Director's Discretionary Time legacy program with HST devoting 840 orbits of HST time to acquire optical ACS and NIR WFC3 imaging of six of the strongest lensing galaxy clusters on the sky. All six HFF clusters are included in the GLASS sample. The Spitzer Frontier Fields program (P.I. Soifer) is a Director's Discretionary Time program that images all six strong lensing galaxy clusters targeted by the HFF in both warm IRAC channels (3.6 and 4.5um). (2 data files).

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Milky Way global survey of star clusters. II. (Kharchenko+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Roeser, S.; Schilbach, E.; Scholz, R.-D.

    2013-11-01

    An all-sky target list of 3784 entries with initial cluster parameters was compiled from sources available in the literature. As the primary source we used the data from the Catalogue of Open Cluster Data (COCD, Kharchenko et al. 2005a,b, Cat. J/A+A/438/1163, J/A+A/440/403). For further optical clusters the data were taken from the Dias et al. (2002, Cat. B/ocl) list (Version 3.1, 24/nov/2010). Known associations were retrieved from Melnik & Dambis (2009, Cat. J/MNRAS/400/518). For clusters detected in the NIR the information came from Bica et al. (2003b, Cat. J/A+A/404/223), Dutra et al. (2003, Cat. J/A+A/400/533), Froebrich et al. (2007, Cat. J/MNRAS/374/399). Globular clusters were selected from the catalogue by Harris (1996, edition 2010, 2010arXiv1012.3224H). Additionally, we incorporated supplementary data on embedded clusters from Bica et al. (2003a, Cat. J/A+A/397/177), Lada & Lada (2003ARA&A..41...57L) and on stars in associations from Humphreys (1978, Cat. V/44). The basic stellar data were taken from the all-sky catalogue 2MAst (2Mass with Astrometry), that was extracted from the all-sky catalogues PPMXL (Roeser et al. 2010, Cat. I/317) and 2MASS (Cutri et al. 2003, Cat. II/246). Additionally, we incorporated data on radial velocities from Kharchenko et al. (2007, Cat. III/254) and spectral types from ASCC-2.5 (Kharchenko & Roeser 2009, Cat. I/280). Around each object from our target list we defined a circular area with a radius of ra=r2+radd where r2 is the cluster radius, and radd=0.3°. In these areas we selected in 2MAst only those stars with flags Rflg (the 2nd triple of the flags in 2MASS) set to 1, 2, or 3 in each band, i.e. the stars with the best quality detections in photometric and astrometric data. There are 3784 targets in our object list, we confirmed 3006 clusters and/or associations. These 3006 sky areas contain about 63.5 mln 2MAst stars with best quality detections in photometric and astrometric data. We selected about 0.14 mln most

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. X. (den Brok+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Brok, M.; Peletier, R. F.; Seth, A.; Balcells, M.; Dominguez, L.; Graham, A. W.; Carter, D.; Erwin, P.; Ferguson, H. C.; Goudfrooij, P.; Guzman, R.; Hoyos, C.; Jogee, S.; Lucey, J.; Phillipps, S.; Puzia, T.; Valentijn, E.; Kleijn, G. V.; Weinzirl, T.

    2015-05-01

    The Coma ACS Survey (Carter et al., 2008ApJS..176..424C) provides data in two passbands for 25 fields pointed at the core of the Coma cluster and at the outskirts. The exposure times in the two passbands, F814W and F475W (which are roughly equivalent to the IC and g band) were ~1400 and ~2600s. The original envisaged coverage of the cluster was much larger than 25 fields, but due to the ACS failure in 2008 January the survey was not completed. (2 data files).

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities in seven globular clusters (Lardo+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardo, C.; Pancino, E.; Bellazzini, M.; Bragaglia, A.; Donati, P.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Feltzing, S.; Jeffries, R. D.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Allende Prieto, C.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bergemann, M.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Hourihane, A.; Jofree, P.; de Laverny, P.; Marconi, G.; Masseron, T.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Worley, C. C.

    2014-11-01

    Velocities are given for 1826 stars in the field of the globular clusters NGC 1851, NGC 2808, NGC 4372, NGC 4833, NGC 5927, NGC 6752, and NGC 7078 observed with FLAMES/GIRAFFE@VLT. The table provides the individual identifications, coordinates, V magnitudes, velocities and their associated uncertainties for each star. (2 data files).

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Proper motions in 6 globular clusters (Zloczewski+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zloczewski, K.; Kaluzny, J.; Rozyczka, M.; Krzeminski, W.; Mazur, B.; Thompson, I. B.

    2013-02-01

    The images analyzed in this paper are a part of the data collected between 1997 and 2008 within the CASE project (Cluster AgeS Experiment). All observations were made with the 2.5-m du Pont telescope at LCO using the same detector and the same set of V and I filters. (7 data files).

  16. Quasi-hidden Markov model and its applications in cluster analysis of earthquake catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhengxiao

    2011-12-01

    We identify a broad class of models, quasi-hidden Markov models (QHMMs), which include hidden Markov models (HMMs) as special cases. Applying the QHMM framework, this paper studies how an earthquake cluster propagates statistically. Two QHMMs are used to describe two different propagating patterns. The "mother-and-kids" model regards the first shock in an earthquake cluster as "mother" and the aftershocks as "kids," which occur in a neighborhood centered by the mother. In the "domino" model, however, the next aftershock strikes in a neighborhood centered by the most recent previous earthquake in the cluster, and therefore aftershocks act like dominoes. As the likelihood of QHMMs can be efficiently computed via the forward algorithm, likelihood-based model selection criteria can be calculated to compare these two models. We demonstrate this procedure using data from the central New Zealand region. For this data set, the mother-and-kids model yields a higher likelihood as well as smaller AIC and BIC. In other words, in the aforementioned area the next aftershock is more likely to occur near the first shock than near the latest aftershock in the cluster. This provides an answer, though not entirely satisfactorily, to the question "where will the next aftershock be?". The asymptotic consistency of the model selection procedure in the paper is duly established, namely that, when the number of the observations goes to infinity, with probability one the procedure picks out the model with the smaller deviation from the true model (in terms of relative entropy rate).

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Metallicity of the γ Vel cluster (Spina+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Randich, S.; Palla, F.; Sacco, G. G.; Magrini, L.; Franciosini, E.; Morbidelli, L.; Prisinzano, L.; Alfaro, E. J.; Biazzo, K.; Frasca, A.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J. I.; Sousa, S. G.; Adibekyan, V.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Montes, D.; Tabernero, H.; Klutsch, A.; Gilmore, G.; Feltzing, S.; Jeffries, R. D.; Micela, G.; Vallenari, A.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Smiljanic, R.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Hill, V.; Hourihane, A.; Jofre, P.; de Laverny, P.; Masseron, T.; Worley, C.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric parameters, radial velocities, lithium equivalent widths are products of the Gaia-ESO Survey that were used for our membership analysis of the 48 UVES targets observed in the Gamma Velorum fields. Also photometry from Jeffries et al. (2009MNRAS.393..538J) has been used. Iron abundances of these stars have been used to determine the metal content of the cluster. We also discussed the metallicity derived through the iron abundances of the 208 cluster members targeted with GIRAFFE and identified by Jeffries et al. (2014A&A...563A..94J). Stellar parameters of 39 stars targeted by both UVES and GIRAFFE have been used to check the quality of the data. (4 data files).

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Massive galaxy clusters lensing analyse (Richard+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, J.; Smith, G. P.; Kneib, J.-P.; Ellis, R. S.; Sanderson, A. J. R.; Pei, L.; Targett, T. A.; Sand, D. J.; Swinbank, A. M.; Dannerbauer, H.; Mazzotta, P.; Limousin, M.; Egami, E.; Jullo, E.; Hamilton-Morris, V.; Moran, S. M.

    2011-05-01

    High-resolution imaging data taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) or Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) instrument on HST are available for each selected cluster in one or two bands, either through our dedicated LoCuSS programme (GO-DD 11312, PI: G.P. Smith) or from the archive. J- and KS-band data were obtained between 2003 March and 2007 April on the following near-infrared instruments: Wide Infrared Camera (WIRC) on the Palomar-200-inch telescope, Infrared Side Port Imager (ISPI) on the CTIO Blanco 4-m telescope and Florida Infrared Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (FLAMINGOS) on the Kitt Peak (KPNO) 4-m telescope. We used the LRIS on the Keck-I telescope to perform long-slit and multislit observations of the clusters. The spectroscopic data used in the current paper are the outcome of six different observing runs between 2004 and 2008. (1 data file).

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Models for dynamically dissolving star clusters (Kruijssen, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijssen, J. M. D.

    2009-11-01

    Evolutionary models for dissolving star clusters, computed with SPACEv3.0 (also see http://www.astro.uu.nl/~kruijs). The SPACE star cluster models contain evolution data for clusters with seven different metallicities. The set of data provided here contains models for five different dissolution timescales, three sets of remnant kick velocities, and two King profile parameters. Models for a wider range of parameters and for other observables can be made on request. Please send me an e-mail if you are interested. The models are calculated for a Kroupa (2001MNRAS.322..231K) IMF, using the isochrones from the Padova group (Marigo et al., 2008A&A...482..883M). The initial-final mass relations for stellar remnants and other details are listed in the main paper. The model parameters of each data set are summarised in the filenames of the data (K09NNNN.dat). For example, a filename K095201.dat gives the cluster evolution for a metallicity Z=0.02 ([Fe/H]=0.0), a dissolution timescale t0=3Myr, kick velocities that are 0.5 times the standard values {4,100,80} km/s for white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes (so {2,50,40} km/s), and a King profile parameter W0=7. After the filename header "K09_", the meaning of the numbers is as follows. The first number (0-6) indicates the metallicity: 0 - Z = 0.0001 ([Fe/H]=-2.3) 1 - Z = 0.0004 ([Fe/H]=-1.7) 2 - Z = 0.001 ([Fe/H]=-1.3) 3 - Z = 0.004 ([Fe/H]=-0.7) 4 - Z = 0.008 ([Fe/H]=-0.4) 5 - Z = 0.02 ([Fe/H]=0.0) 6 - Z = 0.03 ([Fe/H]=0.18) The second number (0-4) indicates the dissolution timescale parameter t_0: 0 - t0= 0.3Myr (recommended for M51, Antennae) 1 - t0= 1Myr (recommended for the Galactic globular cluster system, though individual t_0 values show substantial scatter) 2 - t0= 3Myr (recommended for the solar neighbourhood, M33) 3 - t0= 10Myr (recommended for gas-poor spiral galaxies) 4 - t0= 30Myr (recommended for the SMC, LMC) The third number (0-2) indicates the factor by which the standard kick velocities {4,100,80} km

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Δa observations of 3 globular clusters (Paunzen+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Iliev, I. Kh.; Pintado, O. I.; Baum, H.; Maitzen, H. M.; Netopil, M.; Onehag, A.; Zejda, M.; Fraga, L.

    2015-04-01

    The observations of the three globular clusters were performed at two different sites: * 2m Ritchey-Chretien-Coude telescope [Bulgarian National Astronomical Observatory (BNAO, Rozhen)], direct imaging, SITe SI003AB 1024x1024-pixel CCD, 5' field of view, 1pixel=0.32arcsec, and * 2.15m telescope [El Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito (CASLEO)], direct imaging with focal reducer, TEK-1024 CCD, 9.5-arcmin field of view, 1pixel=0.813arcsec. (3 data files).

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: UBVI photometry of 4 open clusters (Piatti+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Claria, J. J.; Ahumada, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    We obtained images for the cluster sample on the nights of 2000 December 25, 27 and 29 with the UBVIKC filters and a 2048x2048-pixel Tektronix CCD attached to the 0.9-m telescope (scale 0.4arcsec/pix) at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), Chile. Its field of view is 13.6x13.6arcmin2. (5 data files).

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: OCCASO survey. HRV for 12 open clusters (Casamiquela+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamiquela, L.; Carrera, R.; Jordi, C.; Balaguer-Nunez, L.; Pancino, E.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Martinez-Vazquez, C. E.; Murabito, S.; Del Pino, A.; Aparicio, A.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Gallart, C.

    2016-05-01

    We present results of radial velocities for stars in 12 completed clusters (77 stars), and the reference stars Arcturus and μ Leo. This is a total of 79 stars. We include radial velocities from individual spectra, and final radial velocities from combined spectra which reach a minimum signal-to-noise ratio of 70. Comparison with the literature is included in the cases which the stars had previous measurements. (2 data files).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 72 WINGS nearby clusters luminosity functions (Moretti+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, A.; Bettoni, D.; Poggianti, B. M.; Fasano, G.; Varela, J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Vulcani, B.; Cava, A.; Fritz, J.; Couch, W. J.; Moles, M.; Kjaergaard, P.

    2015-11-01

    We used the Sextractor photometric catalogue of WINGS galaxies described in Varela et al. (2009A&A...497..667V, Cat. J/A+A/497/667), which refers to optical (B,V) photometry of 76 cluster of galaxies, either observed with the INT telescope at La Palma, or with the 2.2m ESO telescope at La Silla. (1 data file).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: UBVI photometry of 5 open clusters (Piatti+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Claria, J. J.; Ahumada, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    We obtained images for the cluster sample in 2000 December with the UBVIKC filters and a 2048x2048-pixel Tektronix CCD attached to the CTIO 0.9m telescope. The detector used has a pixel size of 24um, producing a scale of 0.4arcsec/pix on the chip (focal ratio of f/13.5) and a 13.6x13.6-arcmin2 field of view. (7 data files).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Gamma Vel cluster membership and IMF (Prisinzano+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisinzano, L.; Damiani, F.; Micela, G.; Jeffries, R. D.; Franciosini, E.; Sacco, G. G.; Frasca, A.; Klutsch, A.; Lanzafame, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Biazzo, K.; Bonito, R.; Bragaglia, A.; Caramazza, M.; Vallenari, A.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Flaccomio, E.; Jofre, P.; Lardo, C.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Mowlavi, N.; Pancino, E.; Randich, S.; Zaggia, S.

    2016-04-01

    We derived a list as complete as possible of confirmed members of the young open cluster Gamma Velorum, with the aim of deriving general cluster properties such as the IMF. We used all available spectroscopic membership indicators within the Gaia-ESO public archive, based on spectra acquired with FLAMES a the VLT using the GIRAFFE intermediate-resolution spectrograph. In addition, we used literature photometry and X-ray data. For each membership criterion, we derived the most complete list of candidate cluster members. Then, we considered photometry, gravity, and radial velocities as necessary conditions for selecting a subsample of candidates whose membership was confirmed by using the lithium and Halpha lines and X-rays as youth indicators. Table 5 lists the fundamental parameters of the confirmed and possible members in Gamma Velorum, i.e. photometry, radial velocities, equivalent widths of the lithium line, the Halpha activity index, the X-ray flag, the gravity gamma index and the stellar masses. Finally the binarity and membership flags are given. (1 data file).

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galactic open clusters in RAVE (Conrad+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, C.; Scholz, R.-D.; Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Schilbach, E.; Roser, S.; Boeche, C.; Kordopatis, G.; Siebert, A.; Williams, M.; Munari, U.; Matijevic, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Zwitter, T.; de Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M.; Gilmore, G.; Seabroke, G.; Freeman, K.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q.; Reid, W.; Watson, F.; Gibson, B. K.; Bienayme, O.; Wyse, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Siviero, A.

    2014-01-01

    The presented tables summarise new radial velocities and average metallicities for Galactic open clusters extracted from the Catalogue of Open Cluster Data (COCD; Kharchenko et al. 2005, Cat. J/A+A/438/1163, J/A+A/440/403). The data were obtained from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE; Kordopatis et al. 2013AJ....146..134K) through a cross match with the stellar catalogues related to the COCD. The RV and [M/H] values were computed as weighted means, considering the individual uncertainties of the included members and their cluster membership probability based on position, proper motion, and photometry. The three uncertainties listed originate from different calculations: "RVRAVE" and "MetRAVE" are the weighted mean values for RV and [M/H] "errRV" and "errMet" are equivalent to the uncertainty of the mean values "sigRV" and "sigMet" are the standard deviations of the mean values "eRV" and "eMet" weighted mean values of the individual uncertainties of the included open cluster (OC) members For the calculations we primarily considered most probable OC members (best members) with a membership probability of at least 61%. Only in cases where just one or no most probable members was available we also included possible members (good members) with membership probabilities above 14%. In the table we include the numbers for both types of members separately: best members -> "bmem" and good members -> "gmem". We included reference values for RVs from the second version of the Catalogue of Radial Velocities with Astrometric Data (CRVAD-2) and the Catalogue of Radial Velocities of Open Clusters and Associations (CRVOCA) provided by Kharchenko et al. 2007, Cat. III/254). The CRVAD-2 reference values were computed according to the RAVE values for identified OC members. The CRVOCA references were directly extracted from the catalogue and number of OC members used are given in column "nmem". The reference values for [M/H] were obtained from the online compilation provided by Dias

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: On the metallicity of open clusters. III. (Netopil+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.; Heiter, U.; Soubiran, C.

    2016-03-01

    In Paper II (Heiter et al., Paper II 2014A&A...561A..93H) we have evaluated available spectroscopic iron abundance determinations of open cluster stars and presented mean values for 78 open clusters. The results are based on high-resolution data (R>=25000) with high signal-to-noise ratios (S/N>=50). Furthermore, quality criteria were introduced by adopting only [Fe/H] measurements of stars with Teff=4400-6500K and logg>=2.0dex. We have to note that the mean iron abundance for Berkeley 29, listed in Paper II, also incorporates some measurements based upon lower S/N data. In the present paper we therefore list the correct values for the higher and lower quality data. Since publication of Paper II, some new studies were made (Boesgaard et al., 2013ApJ...775...58B; Bocek Topcu et al., 2015, Cat. J/MNRAS/446/3562; Carraro et al., 2014A&A...568A..86C; Donati et al., 2015, Cat. J/MNRAS/446/1411; Magrini et al.. 2014A&A...563A..44M, 2015A&A...580A..85M; Molenda-Zakowicz et al., 2014MNRAS.445.2446M; Monaco et al., 2014A&A...564L...6M; Reddy et al., 2015MNRAS.450.4301R), which we examined the same way as described in Paper II. This adds ten open clusters to our list (Berkeley 81, NGC 1342, NGC 1662, NGC 1912, NGC 2354, NGC 4337, NGC 4815, NGC 6811, Trumpler 5, and Trumpler 20) and supplementary data for NGC 752, NGC 2447, NGC 2632, and NGC 6705. (1 data file).

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: eMSTOs in low mass clusters (Piatti+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Bastian, N.

    2016-03-01

    We obtained images of four previously selected unstudied LMC clusters with the Gemini South telescope and the GMOS-S instrument through g and i filters. In imaging mode GMOS-S has a field of view of approximately 5.5'x5.5' at a scale of 0.16-arcsec per (2x2 binned) pixel. The detector array consists of three 2Kx4K Hamamatsu chips arranged in a row. Observations were executed in queue mode (under programme GS-2015A-Q-44, PI: Piatti), which enabled the data to be obtained in excellent seeing and under photometric conditions. (4 data files).

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Richness of galaxy clusters (Oguri, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, M.

    2015-04-01

    We apply our cluster finding algorithm CAMIRA to imaging data of SDSS DR8 (Aihara et al., 2011ApJS..193...29A). The input galaxy catalogue includes model magnitudes (MODEL_MAG) and their errors for SDSS ugriz-band. We exclude galaxies with any of the following flags; SATURATED, SATURCENTER, BRIGHT, and DEBLENDEDAS_MOVING. We only use galaxies with extinction-corrected i-band magnitude brighter than 21.0 and its error smaller than 0.2. (1 data file).

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Variable stars in globular clusters (Figuera Jaimes+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figuera Jaimes, R.; Bramich, D. M.; Skottfelt, J.; Kains, N.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Horne, K.; Dominik, M.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Calchi Novati, S.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Galianni, P.; Gu, S.-H.; W Harpsoe, K. B.; Haugbolle, T.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Juncher, D.; Korhonen, H.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Schmidt, R. W.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Starkey, D.; Street, R. A.; Surdej, J.; Wang, X.-B.; Wertz, O.

    2016-02-01

    Observations were taken during 2013 and 2014 as part of an ongoing program at the 1.54m Danish telescope at the ESO observatory at La Silla in Chile that was implemented from April to September each year. table1.dat file contains the time-series I photometry for all the variables in the globular clusters studied in this work. We list standard and instrumental magnitudes and their uncertainties corresponding to the variable star identification, filter, and epoch of mid-exposure. For completeness, we also list the reference flux, difference flux, and photometric scale factor, along with the uncertainties on the reference and difference fluxes. (2 data files).

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Candidate red supergiants in Galactic clusters (Messineo+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, M.; Zhu, Q. F.; Ivanov, V. D.; Figer, D. F.; Davies, B.; Menten, K. M.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Chen, C.-H. R.

    2015-01-01

    A set of spectroscopic data was taken with the UKIRT 1-5-micron Imager Spectrometer (UIST) on Mauna Kea under program ID H243NS (PI: Kudritzki) on 2008 July 24. For four of the targeted candidate clusters, additional low-resolution and medium-resolution spectra were obtained with the SofI spectrograph mounted on the NTT telescope. Data were taken under program 60.A-9700(E) at Paranal-La Silla Observatory on 2010 August 3, and under program 089.D-0876 on 2012 June 1. (3 data files).

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGES sources in Virgo cluster (Taylor+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R.; Davies, J. I.; Auld, R.; Minchin, R. F.

    2013-04-01

    Two areas of the Virgo cluster have been selected for study with AGES, VC1 and VC2. This paper examines the VC1 area while Paper II (2013MNRAS.428..459T) will consider VC2 and compare the results of the two areas. Observations were taken in 2008 January-June, 2009 February-June, 2010 January-June and 2011 January, using the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) instrument on the Arecibo telescope in spectral line mode. (4 data files).

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Optically visible open clusters and Candidates (Dias+ 2002-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, W. S.; Alessi, B. S.; Moitinho, A.; Lepine, J. R. D.

    2012-01-01

    We have compiled a new catalogue of open clusters in the Galaxy which updates the previous catalogues of Lynga (1987, Cat. ) and of Mermilliod (1995, in Information and On-Line Data in Astronomy, ed. D. Egret & M. A. Albrecht (Dordrecht: Kluwer), 127) (included in the WEBDA database, http://obswww.unige.ch/webda). New objects and new data, in particular, data on kinematics (proper motions) that were not present in the old catalogues, have been included. Virtually all the clusters (1629) presently known were included, which represents an increment of about 476 objects relative to the Lynga (1987, Cat. ) catalogue. The catalogue is presented in a single table containing all the important data, which makes it easy to use. In total, 99% of the objects have estimates of their apparent diameters, and 38% have distance, E(B-V) and age determinations. Concerning the data on kinematics, 22% have their mean proper motions listed, 14% their mean radial velocities, and 11% have both information simultaneously. (6 data files).

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Optically visible open clusters and Candidates (Dias+ 2002-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, W. S.; Alessi, B. S.; Moitinho, A.; Lepine, J. R. D.

    2007-09-01

    We have compiled a new catalogue of open clusters in the Galaxy which updates the previous catalogues of Lynga (1987, Cat. ) and of Mermilliod (1995, in Information and On-Line Data in Astronomy, ed. D. Egret & M. A. Albrecht (Dordrecht: Kluwer), 127) (included in the WEBDA database, http://obswww.unige.ch/webda). New objects and new data, in particular, data on kinematics (proper motions) that were not present in the old catalogues, have been included. Virtually all the clusters (1629) presently known were included, which represents an increment of about 476 objects relative to the Lynga (1987, Cat. ) catalogue. The catalogue is presented in a single table containing all the important data, which makes it easy to use. In total, 99% of the objects have estimates of their apparent diameters, and 38% have distance, E(B-V) and age determinations. Concerning the data on kinematics, 22% have their mean proper motions listed, 14% their mean radial velocities, and 11% have both information simultaneously. (5 data files).

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Optically visible open clusters and Candidates (Dias+ 2002-2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, W. S.; Alessi, B. S.; Moitinho, A.; Lepine, J. R. D.

    2014-10-01

    We have compiled a new catalogue of open clusters in the Galaxy which updates the previous catalogues of Lynga (1987, Cat. VII/92) and of Mermilliod (1995, in Information and On-Line Data in Astronomy, ed. D. Egret & M. A. Albrecht (Dordrecht: Kluwer), 127) (included in the WEBDA database, http://obswww.unige.ch/webda). New objects and new data, in particular, data on kinematics (proper motions) that were not present in the old catalogues, have been included. Virtually all the clusters (2167) presently known were included, which represents an increment of about 986 objects relative to the Lynga (1987, VII/92) catalogue. The catalogue is presented in a single table containing all the important data, which makes it easy to use. In total, 99.7% of the objects have estimates of their apparent diameters, and 74.5% have distance, E(B-V) and age determinations. Concerning the data on kinematics, 54.7% have their mean proper motions listed, 25% their mean radial velocities, and 24.2% have both information simultaneously. (6 data files).

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Optically visible open clusters and Candidates (Dias+ 2002-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, W. S.; Alessi, B. S.; Moitinho, A.; Lepine, J. R. D.

    2010-04-01

    We have compiled a new catalogue of open clusters in the Galaxy which updates the previous catalogues of Lynga (1987, Cat. ) and of Mermilliod (1995, in Information and On-Line Data in Astronomy, ed. D. Egret & M. A. Albrecht (Dordrecht: Kluwer), 127) (included in the WEBDA database, http://obswww.unige.ch/webda). New objects and new data, in particular, data on kinematics (proper motions) that were not present in the old catalogues, have been included. Virtually all the clusters (1629) presently known were included, which represents an increment of about 476 objects relative to the Lynga (1987, Cat. ) catalogue. The catalogue is presented in a single table containing all the important data, which makes it easy to use. In total, 99% of the objects have estimates of their apparent diameters, and 38% have distance, E(B-V) and age determinations. Concerning the data on kinematics, 22% have their mean proper motions listed, 14% their mean radial velocities, and 11% have both information simultaneously. (5 data files).

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Globular Clusters of NGC 4278 in SLUGGS (Usher+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, C.; Forbes, D. A.; Spitler, L. R.; Brodie, J. P.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Strader, J.; Woodley, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    As part of the SLUGGS (sluggs.swin.edu.au) survey of globular clusters (GCs) around early-type galaxies we have used archival HST ACS and Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging to study the GC system of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 4278. We used magnitude, colour and size cuts to select candidate GCs from the ACS imaging and used magnitude and colour-colour cuts to select candidates from from the Suprime-Cam imaging. We study the spatial, colour and size distributions of the candidates. We also obtained a number of spectra of GC candidates with DEIMOS on Keck adding a handful of confirmed GCs and ultra compact dwarfs to the sample of Pota et al. (2013MNRAS.428..389P, Cat. J/MNRAS/428/389). Metallicities were measured using the technique of Usher et al. (2012MNRAS.426.1475U, Cat. J/MNRAS/426/1475). (3 data files).

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CO spectra of Virgo cluster galaxies (Grossi,+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Corbelli, E.; Bizzocchi, L.; Giovanardi, C.; Bomans, D.; Coelho, B.; de Looze, I.; Goncalves, T. S.; Hunt, L. K.; Leonardo, E.; Madden, S.; Menendez-Delmestre, K.; Pappalardo, C.; Riguccini, L.

    2016-05-01

    Reduced IRAM 30m telescope spectra of 20 star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster, that are presented in Figure B.1 and Figure B.2 of the paper. The spectra were observed with the EMIR receiver using the FTS spectrometer. The nomenclature of the files is: ObjectName_10.dat and ObjectName_21.dat, for the 12CO(1-0) and 12CO(2-1) transition, respectively. Multiple pointings for the same target are indicated with letters (a,b,c,d,e). All spectra have been resampled to a velocity resolution of 8.1km/s for both lines, with the exception of VCC032410.dat and VCC1686c_10.dat which have been resampled to a velocity resolution of 16.2km/s. The observed sources and the list of files are given below. The files are created by GILDAS/Class. (2 data files).

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometry of VVV CL041 cluster (Chene+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chene, A.-N.; Ramirez Alegria, S.; Borissova, J.; O'Leary, E.; Martins, F.; Herve, A.; Kuhn, M.; Kurtev, R.; Consuelo Amigo Fuentes, P.; Bonatto, C.; Minniti, D.

    2015-11-01

    We present the JHKs photometry extracted from the VVV (VISTA variables in the Via Lactea) survey for the cluster VVV CL041. The photometry extraction was performed by employing the VVV-SkZ pipeline's (Mauro et al., 2013RMxAA..49..189M) automated software based on ALLFRAME (Stetson, 1994PASP..106..250S). 2MASS photometry was used for absolute flux calibration in the J, H, and Ks bands, using stars with 12.5

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: gi photometry of 14 LMC star clusters (Piatti+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Keller, S. C.; Mackey, A. D.; da Costa, G. S.

    2015-04-01

    We obtained images of 14 candidate LMC intermediate-age clusters with the Gemini South telescope and the GMOS-S instrument through g and i filters. In imaging mode, GMOS-S has a field of view of approximately 5.5-arcminx5.5-arcmin at a scale of 0.146arcsec per (2x2 binned) pixel. The detector is a 3x1 mosaic of 2Kx4K EEV CCDs. Observations were executed in queue mode (under programmes GS-2011A-Q-43, GS-2012A-Q-15, and GS-2013A-Q-17) which enabled the data to be obtained in excellent seeing (0.35-0.78-arcsec FWHM) and under photometric conditions. (15 data files).

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: JK photometry of 12 galactic globular clusters (Cohen+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. E.; Hempel, M.; Mauro, F.; Geisler, D.; Alonso-Garcia, J.; Kinemuchi, K.

    2016-04-01

    Observations of our 12 target clusters were obtained with the Infrared Side Port Imager (ISPI) mounted on the 4m Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The HAWAII-2 2048*2048 pixel detector has 0.305''/pixel, giving a field of view 10.25arcmin per side. Imaging was obtained in the J and KS filters over the course of three runs between 2008 and 2010 (NGC 104 and NGC 6496 on 2008 Aug 13; NGC 1851 and NGC 288 on 2009 Sep 30; NGC 362, NGC 1261, and NGC 7099 on 2009 Oct 01; NGC 2808 and NGC 6304 on 2010 Apr 28; NGC 4833 on 2010 Apr 29; NGC 5927 and NGC 6584 on 2010 Apr 30), with median seeing ranging between 0.8'' and 1.4''. (2 data files).

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Models of a young star cluster ejecta (Molla+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molla, M.; Terlevich, R.

    2013-03-01

    These tables give the complete information provided in the paper. Each table shows the calculations for 6 Initial Mass Functions (IMFs): SAL: Salpeter (1955ApJ...121..161S) MIL: Miller & Scalo (1979ApJS...41..513M) FER: Ferrini et al. (1990A&A....231.391F) STB: Leitherer et al (1999ApJS..123....3L) KRO: Kroupa et al. (2001MNRAS.322..231K) CHA: Chabrier (2003ApJ...586L.133C) For each IMF calculations are performed for 6 metallicities Z=0.0001, 0.0004, 0.004,0.008,0.02,0.05. Stellar clusters are assumed formed with 106M⊙ and limits Mlow=0.15M⊙ and Mup=100M⊙. (8 data files).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Ages and masses of LMC clusters (de Grijs+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, R.; Goodwin, S. P.; Anders, P.

    2014-10-01

    We specifically focused on the catalogue of Glatt, Grebel & Koch (2010, Cat. J/A+A/571/A50), who compiled data of 1193 populous LMC clusters with ages of up to 1 Gyr based on the most up-to-date and comprehensive LMC object catalogue of Bica et al. (2008, Cat. J/MNRAS/389/678). Glatt et al. (2010, Cat. J/A+A/571/A50) used the optical broad-band photometry from the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey (MCPS; Zaritsky et al., 2004, Cat. J/AJ/128/1606) to construct colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and subsequently determined ages for their entire sample based on isochrone fits. (1 data file).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hα3 V. Coma cluster (Gavazzi+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Consolandi, G.; Viscardi, E.; Fossati, M.; Savorgnan, G.; Fumagalli, M.; Gutierrez, L.; Hernandez-Toledo, H.; Boselli, A.; Giovanelli, R.; Haynes, M. P.

    2015-05-01

    Our sample is drawn from the 360-square degree region 10hcluster. This region has been fully mapped by ALFALFA (Haynes et al., 2011, Cat. J/AJ/142/170), which provides us with a complete sample of HI selected galaxies, with HI masses as low as 109-9.5M⊙. The goal of the Hα3 survey is to follow up with Hα imaging observations the ALFALFA targets with high signal-to-noise ratio (typically S/N>6.5), and with consistent detection between two independent polarizations (code=1 sources in Haynes et al., 2011, Cat. J/AJ/142/170). We will refer to these targets as the HI or radio targets. (3 data files).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxies in the UMa cluster complex (Karachentsev+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Nasonova, O. G.; Courtois, H. M.

    2015-04-01

    A nearby friable cloud in Ursa Majoris contains 270 galaxies with radial velocities 500cluster. The total virial mass of the UMa groups is 4x1013M⊙, yielding the average density of dark matter in the UMa cloud to be Ωm=0.08, i.e. a factor of 3 lower than the cosmic average. This is despite the fact that the UMa cloud resides in a region of the Universe that is an apparent overdensity. A possible explanation for this is that most mass in the Universe lies in the empty space between clusters. Herewith, the mean distances and velocities of the UMa groups follow nearly undisturbed Hubble flow without a sign of the 'Z-wave' effect caused by infall towards a massive attractor. This constrains the total amount of dark matter between the UMa groups within the cloud volume. (1 data file).

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kinematics of young associations/clusters (Tetzlaff+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetzlaff, N.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Hohle, M. M.; Maciejewski, G.

    2010-03-01

    Given a distance of 1kpc and typical neutron star velocities of 100-500km/s (Arzoumanian et al. 2002ApJ...568..289A; Hobbs et al., 2005, Cat. J/MNRAS/360/974) and maximum ages of 5Myr for neutron stars to be detectable in the optical (see cooling curves in Gusakov et al. 2005MNRAS.363..555G and Popov, Grigorian & Blaschke 2006, Phys. Rev. C, 74, 025803), we restricted our search for birth associations and clusters of young nearby neutron stars to within 3kpc. We chose a sample of OB associations and young clusters (we use the term `association' for both in the following) within 3kpc from the Sun with available kinematic data and distance. We collected those from Dambis, Mel'nik & Rastorguev (2001AstL...27...58D) and Hoogerwerf (2001A&A...365...49H) and associations to which stars from the Galactic O-star catalogue from Maiz-Apellaniz et al. (2004, Cat. J/ApJS/151/103) are associated with. Furthermore, we added young local associations (YLA) from Fernandez, Figueras & Torra (2008A&A...480..735F) since they are possible hosts of a few SNe in the near past. We also included the Hercules-Lyrae association (Her-Lyr) and the Pleiades and massive star-forming regions (Reipurth 2008, ASP Monograph Publ. Vol. 4 and Vol. 5). We set the lower limit of the association age to 2Myr to account for the minimum lifetime of a progenitor star that can produce a neutron star (progenitor mass smaller than 30M⊙ see e.g. Heger et al. 2003ApJ...591..288H). The list of all explored associations and their properties can be found in Appendix A. Coordinates as well as heliocentric velocity components are given for a right-handed coordinate system with the x-axis pointing towards the galactic centre and y is positive in the direction of galactic rotation. (2 data files).

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kinematics of the Gamma Vel cluster (Jeffries+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, R. D.; Jackson, R. J.; Cottaar, M.; Koposov, S. E.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Meyer, M. R.; Prisinzano, L.; Randich, S.; Sacco, G. G.; Brugaletta, E.; Caramazza, M.; Damiani, F.; Franciosini, E.; Frasca, A.; Gilmore, G.; Feltzing, S.; Micela, G.; Alfaro, E.; Bensby, T.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Lewis, J.; Magrini, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Costado, M. T.; Jofre, P.; Klutsch, A.; Lind, K.; Maiorca, E.

    2014-01-01

    The positions, photometry, radial velocities, projected equatorial velocities and lithium equivalent widths for 208 members of the Gamma2 Velorum cluster. These members were selected on the basis of their positions in the V versus V-I colour-magnitude diagram and the strength of lithium absorption in their spectra. The photometry is from Jeffries et al. (2009MNRAS.393..538J). The radial velocities, projected equatorial velocities and equivalent widths of the 6708 angstrom LiI feature are from spectra taken with FLAMES/GIRAFFE at the VLT as part of the Gaia-ESO spectroscopic survey. Although values of projected equatorial velocity less than 10km/s are reported, these should be treated as upper limits at 10km/s. Masses are estimated from the $V-I$ colour and models of Baraffe et al. (1998A&A...337..403B) for an assumed age of 10Myr. Two kinematic populations are reported in the paper; P(A) reports the probability that a star belongs to population "A". (1 data file).

  8. Search for cataclysmic variables based on the 400d X-ray sky survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, A. Yu.; Revnivtsev, M. G.; Burenin, R. A.; Meshcheryakov, A. V.; Vorob'ev, V. S.; Pavlinsky, M. N.

    2015-05-01

    We present the first results of our search for cataclysmic variables among the point X-ray sources detected in a part of the sky survey with an area of 400 sq. deg. performed on the basis of data from the ROSAT telescope (400d), for which photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are also available. The necessary optical observations of the candidates for cataclysmic variables have been carried out with the 1.5-m Russian-Turkish telescope (RTT-150). We show that one of the four investigated objects (400D J0019126+220733) is a cataclysmic variable, two objects are quasars at redshifts z ˜ 2, and the nature of one object remains unclarified; however, we can exclude it from the list of possible candidates for cataclysmic variables: its spectrum contains no characteristic emission features.

  9. Reinvent Catalogers!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waite, Ellen J.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews trends in catalog and technical service departments in response to information needs of library patrons, administrations of catalog and technical services departments, and professional standards that no longer meet patron needs. Discusses patron search patterns; the role of catalogers; and results of sharing cataloging records, downsizing,…

  10. A NEW REDUCTION OF THE BLANCO COSMOLOGY SURVEY: AN OPTICALLY SELECTED GALAXY CLUSTER CATALOG AND A PUBLIC RELEASE OF OPTICAL DATA PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bleem, L. E.; Stalder, B.; Brodwin, M.; Busha, M. T.; Wechsler, R. H.; Gladders, M. D.; High, F. W.; Rest, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Blanco Cosmology Survey is a four-band (griz) optical-imaging survey of ∼80 deg{sup 2} of the southern sky. The survey consists of two fields centered approximately at (R.A., decl.) = (23{sup h}, –55°) and (5{sup h}30{sup m}, –53°) with imaging sufficient for the detection of L {sub *} galaxies at redshift z ≤ 1. In this paper, we present our reduction of the survey data and describe a new technique for the separation of stars and galaxies. We search the calibrated source catalogs for galaxy clusters at z ≤ 0.75 by identifying spatial over-densities of red-sequence galaxies and report the coordinates, redshifts, and optical richnesses, λ, for 764 galaxy clusters at z ≤ 0.75. This sample, >85% of which are new discoveries, has a median redshift of z = 0.52 and median richness λ(0.4 L {sub *}) = 16.4. Accompanying this paper we also release full survey data products including reduced images and calibrated source catalogs. These products are available at http://data.rcc.uchicago.edu/dataset/blanco-cosmology-survey.

  11. Book Catalogs versus Card Catalogs *

    PubMed Central

    Pizer, Irwin H.

    1965-01-01

    The development of the library catalog in book form and its abandonment in favor of the card catalog are briefly traced. The advantages and disadvantages of both types of catalogs are enumerated, and several solutions which tried to combine the best features of both are discussed. The present trend back to the book catalog, made possible by recent advances in computer technology, is analyzed, advantages and disadvantages are compared, current examples are illustrated, and finally the computerized catalog is weighed against both the book and card catalog as to main features and practicality. PMID:14271116

  12. Measuring the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect through the cross correlation of Planck and WMAP maps with ROSAT galaxy cluster catalogs

    SciTech Connect

    Hajian, Amir; Bond, J. Richard; Battaglia, Nicholas; Spergel, David N.; Pfrommer, Christoph; Sievers, Jonathan L. E-mail: nbattaglia@cmu.edu E-mail: bond@cita.utoronto.ca E-mail: sievers@cita.utoronto.ca

    2013-11-01

    We measure a significant correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the Planck and WMAP maps and an X-ray cluster map based on ROSAT. We use the 100, 143 and 343 GHz Planck maps and the WMAP 94 GHz map to obtain this cluster cross spectrum. We check our measurements for contamination from dusty galaxies using the cross correlations with the 217, 545 and 857 GHz maps from Planck. Our measurement yields a direct characterization of the cluster power spectrum over a wide range of angular scales that is consistent with large cosmological simulations. The amplitude of this signal depends on cosmological parameters that determine the growth of structure (σ{sub 8} and Ω M) and scales as σ{sub 8}{sup 7.4} and Ω M{sup 1.9} around the multipole (ℓ) ∼ 1000. We constrain σ{sub 8} and Ω M from the cross-power spectrum to be σ{sub 8}(Ω M/0.30){sup 0.26} = 0.8±0.02. Since this cross spectrum produces a tight constraint in the σ{sub 8} and Ω M plane the errors on a σ{sub 8} constraint will be mostly limited by the uncertainties from external constraints. Future cluster catalogs, like those from eRosita and LSST, and pointed multi-wavelength observations of clusters will improve the constraining power of this cross spectrum measurement. In principle this analysis can be extended beyond σ{sub 8} and Ω M to constrain dark energy or the sum of the neutrino masses.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: X-ray bright AGN in massive galaxy clusters (Ehlert+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlert, S.; Allen, S. W.; Brandt, W. N.; Canning, R. E. A.; Luo, B.; Mantz, A.; Morris, R. G.; von der Linden, A.; Xue, Y. Q.

    2015-06-01

    The clusters included in our study have been drawn from wide-area cluster surveys derived from the ROSAT All Sky Survey (Truemper, 1993Sci...260.1769T, See Cat. IX/29): the ROSAT Brightest Cluster Sample (BCS; Ebeling et al., 1998, Cat. J/MNRAS/301/881); the ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray Sample (REFLEX; Bohringer et al., 2004, Cat. J/A+A/425/367); and the Massive Cluster Survey (MACS; Ebeling et al., 2007ApJ...661L..13T, 2010MNRAS.407...83E). We also included clusters from the 400deg2 ROSAT PSPC Galaxy Cluster Survey (Burenin et al., 2007, Cat. J/ApJS/172/561). (1 data file).

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometry of star clusters in 5 nearby gal. (Silva-Villa+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Villa, E.; Larsen, S.

    2011-03-01

    Using HST/ACS and HST/WFPC2 images of the galaxies NGC 45, NGC 1313, NGC 5236, and NGC 7793, we estimate star formation histories by means of the synthetic CMD method. Masses and ages of star clusters are estimated using simple stellar population model fitting. Comparing observed and modeled luminosity functions, we estimate cluster formation rates. By randomly sampling the stellar initial mass function (SIMF), we construct artificial star clusters and quantify how stochastic effects influence cluster detection, integrated colors, and age estimates. (6 data files).

  15. Hubble Space Telescope Proper Motion (HSTPROMO) Catalogs of Galactic Globular Clusters. IV. Kinematic Profiles and Average Masses of Blue Straggler Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, A. T.; Watkins, L. L.; van der Marel, R. P.; Bianchini, P.; Bellini, A.; Anderson, J.

    2016-08-01

    We make use of the Hubble Space Telescope proper-motion catalogs derived by Bellini et al. to produce the first radial velocity dispersion profiles σ (R) for blue straggler stars (BSSs) in Galactic globular clusters (GCs), as well as the first dynamical estimates for the average mass of the entire BSS population. We show that BSSs typically have lower velocity dispersions than stars with mass equal to the main-sequence turnoff mass, as one would expect for a more massive population of stars. Since GCs are expected to experience some degree of energy equipartition, we use the relation σ \\propto {M}-η , where η is related to the degree of energy equipartition, along with our velocity dispersion profiles to estimate BSS masses. We estimate η as a function of cluster relaxation from recent Monte Carlo cluster simulations by Bianchini et al. and then derive an average mass ratio {M}{BSS}/{M}{MSTO}=1.50+/- 0.14 and an average mass {M}{BSS}=1.22+/- 0.12 M ⊙ from 598 BSSs across 19 GCs. The final error bars include any systematic errors that are random between different clusters, but not any potential biases inherent to our methodology. Our results are in good agreement with the average mass of {M}{BSS}=1.22+/- 0.06 M ⊙ for the 35 BSSs in Galactic GCs in the literature with properties that have allowed individual mass determination. Based on proprietary and archival observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CCD Δa-photometry of 5 open clusters (Paunzen+, 2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Maitzen, H. M.

    2002-04-01

    In total, more than 550 objects within the fields of five open clusters (NGC 2439, NGC 3960, NGC 6134, NGC 6192 and NGC 6451) were investigated in order to find classical chemically peculiar stars. One bona-fide CP candidate was detected in each of the open clusters NGC 3960, NGC 6192 and NGC 6451. All three objects seem to be members of the corresponding cluster taking the results from our photometry as well as from the literature. For NGC 6192 and NGC 6451 we found widely different interstellar reddening values and therefore distances and ages in the literature. From an analysis of published Johnson UBVRI photometry, we were able to rule out a rather old age for NGC 6451. This is also supported by the finding of one peculiar object in this cluster with spectral type of about A2. Five variable objects within the field of NGC 6134 were detected. The variability exceeds 10 times (or typically 0.03 mag) the standard deviation of the weighted individual measurements. But since our observations were obtained mostly during one hour (typical integration times of five minutes per filter) on several nights within 45 days, no light curves could yet be derived. For this cluster some Am candidates were reported for which we were not able to detect a significant positive Δ a-value. For a description of the Δa photometric system, see e.g. (5 data files).

  17. WINGS-SPE II: A catalog of stellar ages and star formation histories, stellar masses and dust extinction values for local clusters galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Cava, A.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Moretti, A.; Bettoni, D.; Bressan, A.; Couch, W. J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dressler, A.; Fasano, G.; Kjærgaard, P.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.

    2011-02-01

    Context. The WIde-field Nearby Galaxy clusters Survey (wings) is a project whose primary goal is to study the galaxy populations in clusters in the local universe (z < 0.07) and of the influence of environment on their stellar populations. This survey has provided the astronomical community with a high quality set of photometric and spectroscopic data for 77 and 48 nearby galaxy clusters, respectively. Aims: In this paper we present the catalog containing the properties of galaxies observed by the wings SPEctroscopic (wings-spe) survey, which were derived using stellar populations synthesis modelling approach. We also check the consistency of our results with other data in the literature. Methods: Using a spectrophotometric model that reproduces the main features of observed spectra by summing the theoretical spectra of simple stellar populations of different ages, we derive the stellar masses, star formation histories, average age and dust attenuation of galaxies in our sample. Results: ~ 5300 spectra were analyzed with spectrophotometric techniques, and this allowed us to derive the star formation history, stellar masses and ages, and extinction for the wings spectroscopic sample that we present in this paper. Conclusions: The comparison with the total mass values of the same galaxies derived by other authors based on sdss data, confirms the reliability of the adopted methods and data. Based on observations taken at the Anglo Australian Telescope (3.9 m- AAT), and at the William Herschel Telescope (4.2 m- WHT).Full Table 2 is available in electronic form both at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/526/A45, and by querying the wings database at http://web.oapd.inaf.it/wings/new/index.html

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PS1 MDS X-ray selected galaxy clusters (Ebeling+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, H.; Edge, A. C.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Price, P. A.; Tonry, J. L.

    2014-11-01

    Our strategy for the identification of galaxy clusters at z>0.5 from these data sets is brute force: we select all X-ray sources listed in the RASS BSC and FSC that fall within our study area, and then examine PS1 images in the gP1, rP1, iP1 and zP1 bands in a 5x5arcmin2 region around the X-ray source position. Candidate clusters at intermediate to high redshift (z>~0.3) are readily identifiable as pronounced overdensities of faint, red galaxies. In order to prevent seemingly blank fields from erroneously being classified as potentially very distant clusters, we also query NASA Extragalactic Database (NED) for known celestial objects within 2-arcmin radius of the respective X-ray source, a process that eliminates large numbers of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). (1 data file).

  19. Sample of cataclysmic variables detected in the 400d X-ray survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burenin, R. A.; Revnivtsev, M. G.; Tkachenko, A. Yu.; Vorob'ev, V. S.; Semena, A. N.; Meshcheryakov, A. V.; Dodonov, S. N.; Eselevich, M. V.; Pavlinsky, M. N.

    2016-04-01

    A sample of cataclysmic variables (CVs) detected among the X-ray sources of the 400 square degree (400d) survey performed based on ROSAT pointings is presented. A technique for selecting CVs among the X-ray sources using additional optical and infrared data, based on Sloan Digital Sky Survey andWISE data, is described. We present the optical observations of the selected objects carried out mainly with the Russian-Turkish 1.5-m telescope (RTT-150) and the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences (BTA). Some observations have also been performed with the 1.6-m AZT-33IK telescope of the Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, the Siberian branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Eight CVs, four of which were detected in our work, have been selected by now. Based on this sample, we have obtained preliminary constraints on the X-ray luminosity function of CVs in the solar neighborhood in the range of low luminosities, L X ~ 1029-1030 erg s-1 (0.5-2 keV). The logarithmic slope of the CV luminosity function in this luminosity range is shown to become gentler than that at L X > 1031 erg s-1. It follows from our estimates of the CV luminosity function that several thousand CVs will be detected in the SRG all-sky survey at high Galactic latitudes, which will allow much more accurate measurements of their X-ray luminosity function to be obtained.

  20. 75 FR 27966 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400 and 747-400D Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... 12866, 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... certain Model 747-400 and 747-400D series airplanes. This proposed AD would ] require installing aluminum... November 4, 2009. The service bulletin describes procedures for installing aluminum gutter...

  1. 75 FR 906 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 747-400, -400D, and -400F Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... as of January 22, 2010. On June 12, 2008 (73 FR 25990, May 8, 2008), the Director of the Federal..., Amendment 39-15512 (73 FR 25990, May 8, 2008). That AD applied to certain Model 747-400, - 400D, and -400F... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3....

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CCD {Delta}a-photometry of 8 open clusters (Paunzen+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Netopil, M.; Iliev, I. K.; Maitzen, H. M.; Claret, A.; Pintado, O. I.

    2006-08-01

    Within the sample of eight open clusters, we have investigated 1698 objects using the narrow band, three filter Delta a photometric system resulting in the detection of twenty three bona-fide magnetic chemically peculiar (CP) stars, eight Be/Ae and eight metal-weak stars. (8 data files).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CaIIK spectra of 7 Galactic and MC open clusters (Smoker+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoker, J.; Keenan, F. P.; Fox, A. J.

    2015-07-01

    The data on which the current paper is based were extracted from the ESO archive and are FLAMES-GIRAFFE observations towards three open clusters located in the Milky Way, and two in each of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, plus FEROS and UVES observations towards stars located in the Magellanic system and Milky Way. (18 data files).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: C,T1 photometry of 6 LMC clusters (Piatti+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Claria, J. J.; Parisi, M. C.; Ahumada, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    We obtained images for the three selected clusters on the nights of 2004 December 17 and 18 with a 2048x2048-pixel Tektronix CCD attached to the 0.9m telescope (scale 0.396"/pix) at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), Chile. (6 data files).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CLASH-VLT: the FF cluster MACS J0416.1-2403 (Balestra+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestra, I.; Mercurio, A.; Sartoris, B.; Girardi, M.; Grillo, C.; Nonino, M.; Rosati, P.; Biviano, A.; Ettori, S.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Koekemoer, A.; Medezinski, E.; Merten, J.; Ogrean, G. A.; Tozzi, P.; Umetsu, K.; Vanzella, E.; van Weeren, R. J.; Zitrin, A.; Annunziatella, M.; Caminha, G. B.; Broadhurst, T.; Coe, D.; Donahue, M.; Fritz, A.; Frye, B.; Kelson, D.; Lombardi, M.; Maier, C.; Meneghetti, M.; Monna, A.; Postman, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Seitz, S.; Ziegler, B.

    2016-07-01

    The cluster MACS J0416.1-2403 was observed between 2012 December and 2014 November as part of the ESO Large Programme 186.A-0798 "Dark Matter Mass Distributions of Hubble Treasury Clusters and the Foundations of ΛCDM Structure Formation Models" (P.I.: Piero Rosati) using VIMOS at the ESO VLT. A total of 21 masks were observed (15 LR-Blue (low-resolution) masks and 6 MR (medium-resolution) masks). The LR-Blue masks cover the spectral range 3700-6700Å with a resolution of R=180, while the MR masks cover the range 4800-10000Å with a resolution of R=580. The massive cluster has been observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) as part of the Multi-Cycle Treasury program Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH; P.I.: M. Postman; Postman et al. 2012, J/ApJS/199/25). The HST survey is nicely complemented by Subaru wide-field imaging. (3 data files).

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ubvy light curves of CP stars in open clusters (Paunzen+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Hensberge, H.; Maitzen, H. M.; Netopil, M.; Trigilio, C.; Fossati, L.; Heiter, U.; Pranka, M.

    2010-11-01

    Photoelectric Stroemgren uvby time series for 27 CP stars are presented. A standard reduction procedure was applied to the data. Members of the following open clusters have been observed: Collinder 132, IC 4725, NGC 2516, NGC 3114, NGC 3228, NGC 3532, NGC 5460, NGC 5662, NGC 6281, NGC 6405, and NGC 6475. For each target star the HJD and the differential uvby magnitudes are given. (2 data files).

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CCD Δa-photometry of 5 open clusters (Paunzen+, 2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Maitzen, H. M.

    2002-11-01

    The time scale on which chemical peculiarity in upper main sequence stars begins is unknown. Results from the Hipparcos measurements indicate that the classical chemically peculiar (CP) stars occupy the whole area from the zero age main sequence to the terminal age main sequence. Hubrig et al. (2000ApJ...539..352H) reported that the magnetic fields appear only in stars that have already completed at least approximately 30% of their main sequence life time. Previous observations in the very young Orion OB1 and Scorpio Centaurus associations reveal a percentage of chemically peculiar stars that is significantly smaller (less than 5%) than that of the galactic field (up to 25%). This already indicates that the phenomenon needs at least several Myr to appear. Since no further observations have been published since then, we have observed the five very young (1Myrclusters Collinder 272, Pismis 20, Lynga 14, NGC 6396 and NGC 6611. Photometry from 250 CCD frames in the three filter Delta a-system results in very low detection limits (0.008 to 0.015mag). We find no single photometrically chemically peculiar candidate in approximately 460 observed cluster members in the five program clusters. From the number of observed objects we deduce upper limits between 0.6% and 2.4% for the incidence of CP stars for the five observed aggregates.The tables presented here include all photometric observations of these five clusters. For a description of the (Delta a) photometric system, see e.g. : a = g2 - (g1+y)/2 g1 and g2 centered at 502 and 524nm. (5 data files).

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: RV and [Fe/H] in 5 open clusters (Carrera+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, R.; Casamiquela, L.; Ospina, N.; Balaguer-Nunez, L.; Jordi, C.; Monteagudo, L.

    2015-05-01

    Medium-resolution spectra in the region of the near-infrared CaII triplet (CaT) at ~8500Å were obtained using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph (IDS) mounted at the Cassegrain focus of the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) located at Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, Spain. Berkeley 23 was observed in service mode on 2013 January 17 and 18, and the other clusters were observed on 2014 July 18 and 19. (1 data file).

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Chandra X-Ray galaxy clusters at z <1.4 (Babyk+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babyk, Yu. V.; Del Popolo, A.; Vavilova, I. B.

    2014-10-01

    A reconstruction of the total mass (the fraction of dark matter, intercluster gas, and the brightest galaxy of the cluster) of 128 X-ray galaxy clusters at redshifts 0.01-1.4 based on Chandra observations is presented. The total mass M200 and the baryonic mass Mb have been measured for all the sample objects, as well as the concentration parameter c200, which characterizes the size of the dark matter halo. The existence of a tight correlation between c200 and M200 is confirmed, c{prop.to}Mavir/(1+z)b with a=-0.56+/-0.15 and b=0.80+/-0.25 (95% confidence level), in good agreement with the predictions of numerical simulations and previous observations. Fitting the inner dark-matter density slope α with a generalized NFW model yields α=1.10+/-0.48 at the 2σ confidence level, combining the results for the entire sample, for which the model gives a good description of the data. There is also a tight correlation between the inner slope of the dark-matter density profile α and the baryonic mass contentMb for massive galaxy clusters, namely, α decreases with increasing baryonic mass content. A simple power-law model is used to fit the α-Mb distributions, yielding the break point for the inner slope of the dark-matter density profile b=1.72+/-0.37 (68% confidence level). (3 data files).

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SLUGGS Globular Cluster CaT and [Z/H] (Pastorello+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, N.; Forbes, D. A.; Usher, C.; Brodie, J. P.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Strader, J.; Spitler, L. R.; Alabi, A. B.; Foster, C.; Jennings, Z. G.; Kartha, S. S.; Pota, V.

    2015-05-01

    As part of the SLUGGS (sluggs.swin.edu.au) survey of globular clusters (GCs) around early-type galaxies we present here the strength of near-infrared calcium triplet (CaT) of the 1129 GCs in 12 galaxies using DEIMOS on Keck. We have used the CaT strength to derive metallicity of each GC using the single stellar population models of Vazdekis et al. (2003MNRAS.340.1317V). The 12 galaxies are: NGC1023, NGC1400, NGC1407, NGC2768, NGC3115, NGC3377, NGC4278, NGC4365, NGC4473, NGC4494, NGC4649 and NGC5846. (2 data files).

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 2nd and 3d parameters of HB of globular clusters (Gratton+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, R. G.; Carretta, E.; Bragaglia, A.; Lucatello, S.; S'orazii, V.

    2010-05-01

    The second parameter (the first being metallicity) defining the distribution of stars on the horizontal branch (HB) of globular clusters (GCs) has long been one of the major open issues in our understanding of the evolution of normal stars. Large photometric and spectroscopic databases are now available: they include large and homogeneous sets of colour-magnitude diagrams, cluster ages, and homogeneous data about chemical compositions from our FLAMES survey. We use these databases to re-examine this issue. Methods. We use the photometric data to derive median and extreme (i.e., the values including 90% of the distribution) colours and magnitudes of stars along the HB for about a hundred GCs. We transform these into median and extreme masses of stars on the HB, using the models developed by the Pisa group, and taking into account evolutionary effects. We compare these masses with those expected at the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) to derive the total mass lost by the stars. (11 data files).

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxy clusters discovered in the SPT-SZ survey (Bleem+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleem, L. E.; Stalder, B.; de Haan, T.; Aird, K. A.; Allen, S. W.; Applegate, D. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hennig, C.; Hoekstra, H.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schrabback, T.; Shirokoff, E.; Song, J.; Spieler, H. G.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Stubbs, C. W.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-03-01

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a 10m diameter telescope located at the National Science Foundation Amundsen-Scott South Pole station in Antarctica. From 2008 to 2011 the telescope was used to conduct the SPT-SZ survey, a survey of ~2500deg2 of the southern sky at 95, 150, and 220GHz. The survey covers a contiguous region from 20h to 7h in right ascension (R.A.) and -65 to -40° in declination (see, e.g., Figure 1 in Story et al. 2013ApJ...779...86S) and was mapped to depths of approximately 40, 18, and 70uK-arcmin at 95, 150, and 220GHz respectively. We use optical and in some cases NIR imaging (Blanco Telescope, Magellan/Baade, Magellan/Clay, Swope, MPG/ESO, New Technology Telescope, Spitzer, WISE) to confirm candidates as clusters and to obtain redshifts for confirmed systems (see section 4). We have also used a variety of facilities to obtain spectroscopic observations of SPT clusters (including VLT/FORS2 & Gemini/GMOS-S). (3 data files).

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Physical parameters of pre-main sequence stars in open clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. J.; Alfaro, E. J.; Yun, J. L.

    Photometric colors in the UBVRI system for 27040 stars, in the fields of 11 Young Open Clusters. The membership and physical parameters are listed. For MS and post MS candidate members, only the mass value is listed. It is calculated from comparison to ZAMS and isochrones by Girardi et al. (2002A&A...391..195G). For PMS candidate members, the age, mass, luminosity, and effective temperature are listed as obtained from comparison to four PMS model isochrones: D'Antona and Mazzitelli (1997MmSAI..68..807D), Palla and Stahler (1999ApJ...525..772P), Siess et al. (2000A&A...358..593S), and Yi et al. (2001ApJS..136..417Y). (2 data files).

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Ca,by photometry in globular clusters. I. M22 (Lee, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.-W.

    2015-09-01

    New Ca by observations for M22 were made over 44 nights, 23 of which were photometric, in 10 runs from 2011 March to 2014 May using the CTIO 1.0 and 0.9m telescopes. The total exposure times for M22 were 90900, 20930, and 9145s for our new Ca and Stromgren b and y, respectively. We also carried out the HST WFC3 photometry for the central part of M22. In Figure 10, we show the preliminary results from HST WFC3 observations of the cluster (PI: J.-W.Lee and PID: 12193) using the similar passbands that we used in our ground-based observations. (1 data file).

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Star motions in the nuclear cluster of the MW (Fritz+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, T. K.; Chatzopoulos, S.; Gerhard, O.; Gillessen, S.; Genzel, R.; Pfuhl, O.; Tacchella, S.; Eisenhauer, F.; Ott, T.

    2016-06-01

    To derive the proper motions and determine the stellar density profile in the center (Rbox~20"), we use adaptive optics images with a resolution of ~0.080". In the central parsec, we use the same NACO/VLT images as described in Trippe et al. (2008A&A...492..419T) and Gillessen et al. (2009ApJ...692.1075G). We add images obtained in further epochs since then, in the 13mas/pixel scale matching the Gillessen et al. (2009ApJ...692.1075G) data set and in the 27mas/pixel scale extending the Trippe et al. (2008A&A...492..419T) data set. To obtain proper motions outside the central parsec, we use adaptive optics images covering a larger field of view. These are four epochs of NACO/VLT images (2004 May 06, 2006 Apr 29, 2011 May 16 and 29), one epoch of MAD/CAMCAO (2008 Aug 21) at the VLT, and one epoch of Hokupa'a+Quirc (2000 Jul 02) Gemini North images (see Appendix A). Most images cover the Ks band. To obtain the structural properties of the nuclear cluster outside of the central Rbox=20", we use two additional data sets (HST WFC3/IR data and the public VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea Survey data obtained with VIRCAM (Saito et al. 2012A&A...537A.107S)). To obtain the spectra of the stars, we use data cubes obtained with the integral field spectrometer SINFONI. We use data with combined H+K-band (spectral resolution 1500) and K-band (spectral resolution 4000) grating. (1 data file).

  16. Collections Define Cataloging's Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    The role of catalogers within academic libraries is evolving to meet new demands and cultivating a broader understanding of cataloging--one that focuses on collections, not the catalog, and applies cataloger expertise across metadata activities. Working collaboratively as never before, catalogers are reinventing their place within the library.

  17. Cataloging in Publication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapp, Verner W.

    1973-01-01

    The cataloging in source experiment of the United States Library of Congress ended in 1959. Studies on the feasibility of another pre-publication cataloging program were undertaken and a new cataloging in publication program was started in 1971. Other programs for pre-publication cataloging in Brazil and Russia are described. (21 references)…

  18. Constraining the Scatter in the Mass-Richness Relation of maxBCG Clusters With Weak Lensing and X-ray Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.; Evrard, August; Becker, Matthew R.; McKay, Timothy; Wechsler, Risa H.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Hao, Jiangang; Hansen, Sarah; Sheldon, Erin; Johnston, David; Annis, James T.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago /Fermilab

    2009-08-03

    We measure the logarithmic scatter in mass at fixed richness for clusters in the maxBCG cluster catalog, an optically selected cluster sample drawn from SDSS imaging data. Our measurement is achieved by demanding consistency between available weak lensing and X-ray measurements of the maxBCG clusters, and the X-ray luminosity-mass relation inferred from the 400d X-ray cluster survey, a flux limited X-ray cluster survey. We find {sigma}{sub lnM|N{sub 200}} = 0.45{sub -0.18}{sup +0.20} (95%CL) at N{sub 200} {approx} 40, where N{sub 200} is the number of red sequence galaxies in a cluster. As a byproduct of our analysis, we also obtain a constraint on the correlation coefficient between lnL{sub X} and lnM at fixed richness, which is best expressed as a lower limit, r{sub L,M|N} {ge} 0.85 (95% CL). This is the first observational constraint placed on a correlation coefficient involving two different cluster mass tracers. We use our results to produce a state of the art estimate of the halo mass function at z = 0.23 - the median redshift of the maxBCG cluster sample - and find that it is consistent with the WMAP5 cosmology. Both the mass function data and its covariance matrix are presented.

  19. The NLM current catalog.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, E V

    1969-01-01

    When the National Library of Medicine acquired a computer to augment its publication program, the intent was to present in one medium an index to journal articles and a catalog of books and new serial titles. The computer programs designed for indexing were unsatisfactory for cataloging, however; so two publications were issued, the Index Medicus and the NLM Current Catalog. The Current Catalog features separate name and subject sections, added volumes, and technical reports. The Express Cataloging Service was one of the first attempts to increase the speed and coverage of the Catalog. Shared cataloging with the Library of Congress, the Countway Library at Harvard, and the Upstate Medical Library in Syracuse, New York, have also contributed to the efforts toward improving this library service. An additional shared cataloging program, this time with the National Medical Audiovisual Center, is expected to be implemented shortly. PMID:5782262

  20. Arabic Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khurshid, Zahiruddin

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the processing of Arabic materials at the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (Saudi Arabia) library and describes the creation of an Arabic online catalog that supplements the catalog for non-Arabic materials. User needs are reviewed, library automation is discussed, and search strategies in the Arabic catalog are described.…

  1. Automation and Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furuta, Kenneth; And Others

    1990-01-01

    These three articles address issues in library cataloging that are affected by automation: (1) the impact of automation and bibliographic utilities on professional catalogers; (2) the effect of the LASS microcomputer software on the cost of authority work in cataloging at the University of Arizona; and (3) online subject heading and classification…

  2. Mars landing site catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The catalog was compiled from material provided by the planetary community for areas on Mars that are of potential interest for future exploration. The catalog has been edited for consistency insofar as practical; however, the proposed scientific objectives and characteristics have not been reviewed. This is a working catalog that is being revised, updated, and expanded continually.

  3. REDSHIFTS, SAMPLE PURITY, AND BCG POSITIONS FOR THE GALAXY CLUSTER CATALOG FROM THE FIRST 720 SQUARE DEGREES OF THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Zenteno, A.; Desai, S.; Bazin, G.; Stalder, B.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Bleem, L. E.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Bertin, E.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; De Haan, T.; and others

    2012-12-10

    We present the results of the ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared (NIR) follow-up of 224 galaxy cluster candidates detected with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in the 720 deg{sup 2} of the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey completed in the 2008 and 2009 observing seasons. We use the optical/NIR data to establish whether each candidate is associated with an overdensity of galaxies and to estimate the cluster redshift. Most photometric redshifts are derived through a combination of three different cluster redshift estimators using red-sequence galaxies, resulting in an accuracy of {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.017, determined through comparison with a subsample of 57 clusters for which we have spectroscopic redshifts. We successfully measure redshifts for 158 systems and present redshift lower limits for the remaining candidates. The redshift distribution of the confirmed clusters extends to z = 1.35 with a median of z{sub med} = 0.57. Approximately 18% of the sample with measured redshifts lies at z > 0.8. We estimate a lower limit to the purity of this SPT SZ-selected sample by assuming that all unconfirmed clusters are noise fluctuations in the SPT data. We show that the cumulative purity at detection significance {xi} > 5({xi} > 4.5) is {>=}95% ({>=}70%). We present the red brightest cluster galaxy (rBCG) positions for the sample and examine the offsets between the SPT candidate position and the rBCG. The radial distribution of offsets is similar to that seen in X-ray-selected cluster samples, providing no evidence that SZ-selected cluster samples include a different fraction of recent mergers from X-ray-selected cluster samples.

  4. Redshifts, Sample Purity, and BCG Positions for the Galaxy Cluster Catalog from the First 720 Square Degrees of the South Pole Telescope Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J.; Zenteno, A.; Stalder, B.; Desai, S.; Bleem, L. E.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Bazin, G.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Foley, R. J.; George, E. M.; Gettings, D.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hrubes, J. D.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Natoli, T.; Nurgaliev, D.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shaw, L.; Shirokoff, E.; Šuhada, R.; Spieler, H. G.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Stubbs, C. W.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.

    2012-12-01

    We present the results of the ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared (NIR) follow-up of 224 galaxy cluster candidates detected with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in the 720 deg2 of the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey completed in the 2008 and 2009 observing seasons. We use the optical/NIR data to establish whether each candidate is associated with an overdensity of galaxies and to estimate the cluster redshift. Most photometric redshifts are derived through a combination of three different cluster redshift estimators using red-sequence galaxies, resulting in an accuracy of Δz/(1 + z) = 0.017, determined through comparison with a subsample of 57 clusters for which we have spectroscopic redshifts. We successfully measure redshifts for 158 systems and present redshift lower limits for the remaining candidates. The redshift distribution of the confirmed clusters extends to z = 1.35 with a median of z med = 0.57. Approximately 18% of the sample with measured redshifts lies at z > 0.8. We estimate a lower limit to the purity of this SPT SZ-selected sample by assuming that all unconfirmed clusters are noise fluctuations in the SPT data. We show that the cumulative purity at detection significance ξ > 5(ξ > 4.5) is >=95% (>=70%). We present the red brightest cluster galaxy (rBCG) positions for the sample and examine the offsets between the SPT candidate position and the rBCG. The radial distribution of offsets is similar to that seen in X-ray-selected cluster samples, providing no evidence that SZ-selected cluster samples include a different fraction of recent mergers from X-ray-selected cluster samples.

  5. A uniform catalog of candidate IR-excess and optically variable Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) across the full Orion complex: Aiding target selection for the APOGEE-2 Young Cluster Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, J'Neil; Covey, Kevin R.; Ford Schlafly, Edward; Arce, Hector G.; Borissova, Jura; Downes, Juan Jose; Feigelson, Eric; Getman, Konstantin V.; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Ybarra, Jason E.; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Hearty, Fred R.; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Stassun, Keivan; Wilson, John C.; Zasowski, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Precise measurements of the intrinsic (e.g., T_eff & log g) and dynamical (e.g, radial velocity & v sin i) properties of young stars provide important constraints for models of star formation and early stellar evolution. The APOGEE-2 YSO Young Cluster Program aims to measure the dynamics and star formation history uniformly across the full extent of the Orion star forming complex, based on thousands of high-resolution H-band spectra that APOGEE-2 will obtain of candidate Orion members. We utilize data from wide-field photometric surveys to select candidate YSOs throughout Orion via two complementary techniques. We follow the Koenig et al. (2014) criteria by using WISE+2MASS data to identify YSOs with IR excesses due to warm circumstellar dust; we also use multi-epoch optical PanSTARRS photometry to identify variable YSOs both with and without circumstellar disks (or circumstellar materials). The IR excess technique identifies 1729 candidates brighter than H=12.8 mag, a limit selected to ensure a minimum S/N > 50 for a typical 3-hour APOGEE exposure. selecting sources which display significant variability in at least 3 PanSTARRS bands similarly produces a preliminary sample of 1500 candidates with H<12.8 mag. In total, we identify nearly 2700 YSO candidates, 450 of which were identified via both selection methods. The resulting catalog exhibits clear spatial over-densities associated with known sub-regions of Orion such as the ONC, sigma Ori and L1641, and provides a uniform catalog for spectroscopic targeting over Orion's full 250+ sq. degree footprint.

  6. MECHANIZATION OF CATALOGING PROCEDURES.

    PubMed

    KILGOUR, F G

    1965-04-01

    The Columbia-Harvard-Yale Medical Libraries Computerization Project has put into operation its mechanized procedure for the production of catalog cards. Cards produced are in final form ready to be filed into a card catalog. Catalogers prepare copy on a worksheet from which punched cards are punched. An IBM 1401 computer processes the decklets of punched cards on magnetic tape to produce the expanded decklets of punched cards needed to print the various packs of catalog cards required to go into different catalogs. Next, the computer punches the expanded decklets of cards to operate an 870 Document Writer, which types out the catalog cards in final form. Cost of cards ready to file is 12.5 cents per card. PMID:14271110

  7. Cataloging Internet resources.

    PubMed

    Flannery, M R

    1995-04-01

    The number of resources available on the Internet continues to expand exponentially, but finding appropriate resources is still a fragmented, hit-or-miss operation. Traditional library expertise in bibliographic description and access should be applied to the management of this emerging body of material. In the process, catalogers will be able to assess the adequacy of current tools (e.g., cataloging codes, machine-readable cataloging formats, integrated library systems) for providing access to Internet resources and will contribute credibly to design or redesign of access tools. This paper outlines the major issues that must be considered in cataloging electronic resources. PMID:7599587

  8. Cataloging Practices in India: Efforts for Standardization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikku, Upinder Kumar

    1984-01-01

    Surveys current cataloging practices in Indian libraries and discusses standardization in cataloging, types of catalogs, cataloging codes (Anglo-American and Ranganathan), subject headings, descriptive cataloging, and standardization efforts (international, United States, USSR, Great Britain, India). Footnotes are included. (EJS)

  9. Federating Metadata Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, C.; Lin, K.

    2009-04-01

    The Geosciences Network project (www.geongrid.org) has been developing cyberinfrastructure for data sharing in the Earth Science community based on a service-oriented architecture. The project defines a standard "software stack", which includes a standardized set of software modules and corresponding service interfaces. The system employs Grid certificates for distributed user authentication. The GEON Portal provides online access to these services via a set of portlets. This service-oriented approach has enabled the GEON network to easily expand to new sites and deploy the same infrastructure in new projects. To facilitate interoperation with other distributed geoinformatics environments, service standards are being defined and implemented for catalog services and federated search across distributed catalogs. The need arises because there may be multiple metadata catalogs in a distributed system, for example, for each institution, agency, geographic region, and/or country. Ideally, a geoinformatics user should be able to search across all such catalogs by making a single search request. In this paper, we describe our implementation for such a search capability across federated metadata catalogs in the GEON service-oriented architecture. The GEON catalog can be searched using spatial, temporal, and other metadata-based search criteria. The search can be invoked as a Web service and, thus, can be imbedded in any software application. The need for federated catalogs in GEON arises because, (i) GEON collaborators at the University of Hyderabad, India have deployed their own catalog, as part of the iGEON-India effort, to register information about local resources for broader access across the network, (ii) GEON collaborators in the GEO Grid (Global Earth Observations Grid) project at AIST, Japan have implemented a catalog for their ASTER data products, and (iii) we have recently deployed a search service to access all data products from the EarthScope project in the US

  10. GPN Film Catalog 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Great Plains National Instructional Television Library.

    The films described in this catalog were produced by schools or school-related organizations and were designed to meet the "relevant needs expressed by a broad spectrum of media personnel, students, and educators across the country." The catalog describes seventeen series and eight single films. For each of the series a description is presented…

  11. Enriching the Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2004-01-01

    After decades of costly and time-consuming effort, nearly all libraries have completed the retrospective conversion of their card catalogs to electronic form. However, bibliographic systems still are really not much more than card catalogs on wheels. Enriched content that Amazon.com takes for granted--such as digitized tables of contents, cover…

  12. MDS MIC Catalog Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Vowell, C. W.; Smith, Byron; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inputs to the MDS Medical Information Communique (MIC) catalog. The purpose of the group is to provide input for updating the MDS MIC Catalog and to request that MMOP assign Action Item to other working groups and FSs to support the MITWG Process for developing MIC-DDs.

  13. The Eppelsheimer Subject Catalog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Gordon

    1971-01-01

    Since 1945, a method of catalog classification, originally devised by H.W. Eppelsheimer for the Mainz City Library, has found wide acceptance. It is a complex of catalogs which combines features of both subject classification and alphabetical subject indexing. (25 references) (Author/NH)

  14. Catalog of Research Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Board, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This catalog lists research reports, research notes, and other publications available from the College Board's website. The catalog briefly describes research publications available free of charge. Introduced in 1981, the Research Report series includes studies and reviews in areas such as college admission, special populations, subgroup…

  15. Pacifica Programs 1972 Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacifica Programs, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Audiotapes for alternative educational and cultural institutions have been selected from Pacifica's Tape Archives of over 10,000 programs for this third annual catalog. This 1972 catalog supercedes all previous Pacifica Tape Library publications, and includes many listings from previous years. The programs are listed under appropriate subject…

  16. HOMOGENEOUS CATALOGS OF EARTHQUAKES*

    PubMed Central

    Knopoff, Leon; Gardner, J. K.

    1969-01-01

    The usual bias in earthquake catalogs against shocks of small magnitudes can be removed by testing the randomness of the magnitudes of successive shocks. The southern California catalog, 1933-1967, is found to be unbiased in the sense of the test at magnitude 4 or above; the cutoff is improved to M = 3 for the subcatalog 1953-1967. PMID:16578700

  17. NASA climate data catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reph, M. G.

    1984-01-01

    This document provides a summary of information available in the NASA Climate Data Catalog. The catalog provides scientific users with technical information about selected climate parameter data sets and the associated sensor measurements from which they are derived. It is an integral part of the Pilot Climate Data System (PCDS), an interactive, scientific management system for locating, obtaining, manipulating, and displaying climate research data. The catalog is maintained in a machine readable representation which can easily be accessed via the PCDS. The purposes, format and content of the catalog are discussed. Summarized information is provided about each of the data sets currently described in the catalog. Sample detailed descriptions are included for individual data sets or families of related data sets.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HST/ACS color-magnitude diagrams of candidate intermediate-age M 31 globular clusters. The role of blue horizontal branches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perina, S.; Galleti, S.; Fusi Pecci, F.; Bellazzini, M.; Federici, L.; Buzzoni, A.

    2011-10-01

    Tables b058.dat, b292_531.dat, b350.dat, b336.dat, b337.dat present the photometry of the individual stars of six M31 globular clusters. The observations were carried out with the ACS on board of the HST, employing the WFC+F435W/F606W filters. The data reduction has been performed using the ACS module of DOLPHOT, a point spread function-fitting package specifically devoted to the photometry of HST data, that provides as output the magnitudes and the pixel positions of the detected sources, and a number of quality parameters for a suitable sample selection. The tables present, for the chip holding the cluster, all the stars with valid measurements in both passbands, global quality flag=1, crowding parameter <0.5, chi-square parameter <2.5 and sharpness parameter between -0.3 and 0.3. The x,y coordinates, the magnitudes in the Vegamag system, the errors on the magnitudes and the ACS_WFC chip number are listed for each of the selected stars. (6 data files).

  19. Catalog Production for the DES Blind Cosmology Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busha, Michael T.; Wechsler, R. H.; Becker, M. R.; Erickson, B.; Evrard, A. E.

    2013-01-01

    The Blind Cosmology Challenge (BCC) is an effort by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) to test analysis tools for extracting cosmological information using a set of detailed synthetic galaxy catalogs. Here, we describe the creation of these synthetic sky catalogs based on requirements of the optical (DES) and the near-IR VISTA Hemisphere Survey, producing catalogs covering a quarter of the sky to z ˜ 2, with sources complete to r ˜ 25. Starting with a nested set of lightcone outputs of large, N-body simulation, galaxies are assigned to the dark matter distribution using an empirical algorithm that is tunable to match observed evolution of low-order galaxy population properties (counts and spatial clustering) in luminosity-color-density space. Galaxies are lensed by matter along the line of sight (including magnification, shape distortion, and multiple images), using a new algorithm that calculates shear with 3.22 arcsec resolution at galaxy positions in the full catalog. The catalog is well suited to support DES+VISTA joint studies of galaxy clustering, groups and clusters of galaxies, and gravitational lensing, and we highlight their application to the ongoing DES BBCC. Catalogs include ˜320 million galaxies and ˜150 million stars, with realistic colors, shapes and photometric errors. Using the expected DES photometric errors, three independent photometric redshift codes are run on the catalog, two of which produce full probability distributions. The synthetic observable catalog includes object position, magnitudes in the DES and VISTA bands, photometric errors, photometric redshifts, size, ellipticity, for each of ˜ 500 million objects. The galaxy distribution is additionally masked appropriately for the 5000 square degree DES footprint, including the impact of bright stars. In addition, we offer separate catalogs with magnitudes for additional existing and planned surveys, including SDSS, CFHTLS, HSC, LSST, and Euclid.

  20. A Case for Conversational Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Caryl; McAllister, A. Stratton

    1983-01-01

    Distinguishes between two basic types of interaction with online cataloging systems: preparation of bibliographic record offline by cataloger followed by online entry by clerk and interactive consultation by cataloger of online catalog while entering records. The Dobis/Libis system, authority files, code tables, command chaining, multidimensional…

  1. Resources Guide for Outsourcing Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Wendy

    Outsourcing cataloging is becoming popular in the library profession, but a directory of cataloging agencies is still lacking. Only a few cataloging agencies are well-publicized, and it is hoped that this directory of 23 agencies will promote a competitive open market, thereby serving as a form of quality assurance. Cataloging services are divided…

  2. 21st Century Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how collections in the digital library, instead of traditional cataloging, call for metadata, structured information about information. Describes three categories of metadata information about digital resources: descriptive, structural, and administrative. Examines emerging standards for digital-library classification. (AEF)

  3. Using small glass catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesar, John C.

    2000-07-01

    Changes in glass catalogs from the major manufacturers, Schott, Ohara, Hoya, Corning, and Summita, are a future certainty. The ongoing efforts of these companies to eliminate arsenic, lead, and other environmentally unfriendly materials may well have an additional effect on the size of their catalogs also. We should not assume a zero-sum game, however. Environmental concerns may not lead to permanently smaller catalogs, though many have speculated that in the near term this might be so. However, from the designer's perspective, very small, abbreviated class catalogs, constructed for special purposes, can speed the glass selection process. Several examples will be discussed, based on derivative libraries suggested by Zhang, Shannon, and Walker. Streamlined libraries tailored for special purposes can be used effectively in the latest lens design software. Future software tools may speed this selection process by the use of algorithms that treat the problem as a `black box' using logic tools derived from probability studies of the patent literature.

  4. NASA Headquarters training catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Headquarters training catalog is a comprehensive listing of all educational and employee development programs. This course catalog contains descriptions of course content, objectives, target audience, prerequisites, length of course, approximate number of times the course is offered per year, and cost of the course. Curriculum areas include graduate and undergraduate academic study; professional development program; and executive management, senior management, and supervisory development programs. Secretarial/clerical and general computer skills programs are also included.

  5. HS3 Data Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emory, Amber Elizabeth; Chirica, Dan Cristian; Doyle, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This presentation covered the original plan for the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Data Catalog available through the ESPO HS3 mission page (http://espo.nasa.gov/missions/hs3/) and provided examples of Model Products, Operational Products, and Research (Instrument) Products from the 2012 field campaign. The presentation also covered lessons learned and suggested improvements to the Data Catalog for the upcoming 2013 HS3 field campaign.

  6. The HST Object Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubow, Stephen H.; Budavari, T.

    2012-05-01

    We have created a catalog of objects observed by the WFPC2 and ACS instruments on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The catalog is based on observations taken on more than 6000 visits (telescope pointings) of ACS/WFC and more than 25000 visits of WFPC2. The catalog is obtained by cross-matching all Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) Source Extractor source lists for these instruments. The source lists describe source detections within a visit. As a biproduct of the cross-matching, we obtain improved relative astrometry of the HST images. We apply a Bayesian method to help determine which source detections likely match. The catalog provides information about which source detections match together across visits. For each source detection, the catalog contains information that includes the corrected position, the name of the image, the filter, the exposure time, the exposure start and stop times, and the source magnitude. We also provide information on nondetections that can be used to determine dropouts. The catalog will be made publicly available.

  7. Boo! Outsourcing from the Cataloging Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Janet Swan

    1998-01-01

    Examines long-accepted ways library cataloging departments have used outsourcing (cataloging records, card production, authority control, card filling, and retrospective conversion) and potential outsourcing activities (original cataloging, and copy cataloging). Discusses reasons why outsourcing is controversial. (PEN)

  8. Hubble Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubow, S.; Budavári, T.

    2013-10-01

    We have created an initial catalog of objects observed by the WFPC2 and ACS instruments on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The catalog is based on observations taken on more than 6000 visits (telescope pointings) of ACS/WFC and more than 25000 visits of WFPC2. The catalog is obtained by cross matching by position in the sky all Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) Source Extractor source lists for these instruments. The source lists describe properties of source detections within a visit. The calculations are performed on a SQL Server database system. First we collect overlapping images into groups, e.g., Eta Car, and determine nearby (approximately matching) pairs of sources from different images within each group. We then apply a novel algorithm for improving the cross matching of pairs of sources by adjusting the astrometry of the images. Next, we combine pairwise matches into maximal sets of possible multi-source matches. We apply a greedy Bayesian method to split the maximal matches into more reliable matches. We test the accuracy of the matches by comparing the fluxes of the matched sources. The result is a set of information that ties together multiple observations of the same object. A byproduct of the catalog is greatly improved relative astrometry for many of the HST images. We also provide information on nondetections that can be used to determine dropouts. With the catalog, for the first time, one can carry out time domain, multi-wavelength studies across a large set of HST data. The catalog is publicly available. Much more can be done to expand the catalog capabilities.

  9. A catalog of intracluster gas temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, L. P.; Slyz, A.; Jones, C.; Forman, W.; Vrtilek, S. D.; Arnaud, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have searched the Einstein Monitor Proportional Counter (MPC) data base for observations of clusters of galaxies. By coadding the MPC spectra obtained during all pointed observations of clusters with IPC count rates greater than 0.1 counts/s, we have obtained sufficient photon statistics to estimate the X-ray temperature of 84 clusters. Combining the MPC results with EXOSAT and Ginga results reported in the literature yields a combined sample of 104 clusters with known X-ray temperatures. One of the best studied X-ray correlations between clusters is that between their X-ray luminosity and gas temperature. We show that the best-fit power-law relation for our combined cluster sample can be explained by the observed increase in the gas-to-stellar mass ratio between low- and high-temperature clusters. The statistical significance of any evolution in our combined X-ray sample has been examined and compared with the statistical properties of clusters culled from optical catalogs. We find that there is strong evidence for a decrease in the X-ray luminosity of optically rich clusters beyond z approximately about 0.06. This result is used to estimate the normalization of the primordial power spectrum of density fluctuations.

  10. Information Needs of Catalog Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seitz, Victoria

    1988-01-01

    A study assessed the information needs of catalog shoppers who buy clothing. A majority of the respondents regarded price, garment care, and fabric information vital to catalog purchases of clothing. (JOW)

  11. The user friendly card catalog.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Ekstrand, N L

    1984-01-01

    The changing roles and relationships of professional staff in Reference and Cataloging departments in the catalog creation process are discussed. Specific examples are given for handling classification, subject headings and cross references. The article stresses the importance of interface between the two departments in making the catalog more accessible to the users of the library. PMID:10268036

  12. Cataloging Is a Prime Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zyroff, Ellen

    1996-01-01

    Examines the problems of viewing cataloging as an optional skill for librarians. Discusses factors that are eroding cataloging as a core competency, the elimination of cataloging positions amid shrinking budgets, the effect of this trend on library education and librarian role, mediocre service as an inevitable result, and the need to reestablish…

  13. Online Catalog Study: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Elliot R.

    Following the closing of the National Library of Medicine's (NLM's) card catalog, a study was performed in 1982 to specify minimally acceptable requirements and capabilities for an NLM-based online catalog system and to evaluate the technical performance and user acceptance of available systems. Two prototype online catalog systems were selected…

  14. Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The infrared astronomical data base and its principal data product, the catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO), comprise a machine readable library of infrared (1 microns to 1000 microns astronomical observations. To date, over 1300 journal articles and 10 major survey catalogs are included in this data base, which contains about 55,000 individual observations of about 10,000 different infrared sources. Of these, some 8,000 sources are identifiable with visible objects, and about 2,000 do not have known visible counterparts.

  15. Slide Classification and Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clawson, Catherine R.; Ronkowski, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    Follows up an August 1978 article on the cataloging of slides using color photocopying, and presents unsolicited reactions to that article from librarians who were interested in the slide system developed for use in the C-E Refractories Research and Development Library. Twelve references are listed. (FM)

  16. Outsourcing Cataloging: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Vicki Toy

    1997-01-01

    Outsourcing library cataloging offers advantages and disadvantages. This article discusses case studies of outsourcing projects at Michigan State University, SUNY Binghamton, Loyola University, Truckee Meadows Community College, and Wright State University. Highlights the retrospective conversion and reclassification of the Mines/Engineering…

  17. Greenbook Abstract & Catalog--4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coole, Walter A.; And Others

    This catalog is the fourth in a series extending and updating teaching materials previously disseminated through the ERIC system, including the "Greenbook System" of training materials for higher education professionals (ED 103 083-084 and 148 438), Open Classroom Documentation, a procedural manual for an autoinstructional learning laboratory at…

  18. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CATALOG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Vocational Agriculture Instructional Materials Service, Columbus.

    THE TITLE, IDENTIFICATION NUMBER, DATE OF PUBLICATION, PAGINATION, A BRIEF DESCRIPTION, AND PRICE ARE GIVEN FOR EACH OF THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AND AUDIOVISUAL AIDS INCLUDED IN THIS CATALOG. TOPICS COVERED ARE FIELD CORPS, HORTICULTURE, ANIMAL SCIENCE, SOILS, AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING, AND FARMING PROGRAMS. AN ORDER FORM IS INCLUDED. (JM)

  19. Environmental Education Resource Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phoenix Union High School District, AZ.

    Prepared for the use of elementary and secondary school teachers, this catalog is designed to provide information about environmental education materials which will aid in classroom presentations and in curriculum development. Subject areas cover conservation and natural resources, ecology and ecosystems, environmental action and survival,…

  20. FAA Film Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Some 75 films from the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Aviation Administration are listed in this catalog. Topics dealt with include aerodynamics, airports, aviation history and careers, flying clubs, navigation and weather. Most of the films are 16mm sound and color productions. Filmstrips requiring a 35mm projector and phonograph or…

  1. Cataloging Pirated Chinese Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Sze-Tseng

    1971-01-01

    Various types of pirated Chinese books are given with specific examples. The basic steps followed for the proper identification of these books is described, and remedies suggested in case the original is discovered after the book has been cataloged according to the information given by the book pirate. (13 references) (Author/NH)

  2. AUDIOVISUAL SERVICES CATALOG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockton Unified School District, CA.

    A CATALOG HAS BEEN PREPARED TO HELP TEACHERS SELECT AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS WHICH MIGHT BE HELPFUL IN ELEMENTARY CLASSROOMS. INCLUDED ARE FILMSTRIPS, SLIDES, RECORDS, STUDY PRINTS, FILMS, TAPE RECORDINGS, AND SCIENCE EQUIPMENT. TEACHERS ARE REMINDED THAT THEY ARE NOT LIMITED TO USE OF THE SUGGESTED MATERIALS. APPROPRIATE GRADE LEVELS HAVE BEEN…

  3. Patron Online Catalog Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Rosemary; Whitlatch, Jo Bell

    1994-01-01

    Reports on studies conducted to provide an in-depth picture of online catalog use in three aspects of library research: (1) as part of the reference process; (2) as used by unassisted users; (3) as a step in obtaining documents. The research methodology is offered as a model for surveying other library services or products. (14 references) (KRN)

  4. The Chandra Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ian N.; Primini, F. A.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Anderson, C. S.; Bonaventura, N. R.; Chen, J. C.; Davis, J. E.; Doe, S. M.; Evans, J. D.; Fabbiano, G.; Galle, E.; Gibbs, D. G.; Grier, J. D.; Hain, R.; Hall, D. M.; Harbo, P. N.; He, X.; Houck, J. C.; Karovska, M.; Lauer, J.; McCollough, M. L.; McDowell, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Mitschang, A. W.; Morgan, D. L.; Nichols, J. S.; Nowak, M. A.; Plummer, D. A.; Refsdal, B. L.; Rots, A. H.; Siemiginowska, A. L.; Sundheim, B. A.; Tibbetts, M. S.; Van Stone, D. W.; Winkelman, S. L.; Zografou, P.

    2009-01-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is the definitive catalog of X-ray sources detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. When compared to all previous and current X-ray missions, Chandra breaks the resolution barrier with an arcsecond scale on-axis point spread function. The combination of excellent spatial resolution, a reasonable field of view, and low instrumental background translate into a high detectable-source density, with low confusion and good astrometry. The wealth of information that can be extracted from identified serendipitous sources is a powerful and valuable resource for astronomy. The aim of the CSC is to disseminate this wealth of information by characterizing the X-ray sky as seen by Chandra. The CSC provides simple access to Chandra data for individual sources or sets of sources matching user-specified search criteria. The catalog is intended to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. For each detected X-ray source, the catalog lists the source position and a detailed set of source properties, including multi-band aperture fluxes, X-ray colors and hardness ratios, spectra, temporal variability information, and source extent estimates. In addition to these traditional elements, the catalog includes file-based data products that can be manipulated interactively, including images, photon event lists, light curves, and spectra for each source individually from each observation in which a source is detected. The first release of the CSC includes information for 150,000 X-ray sources detected in a subset of public imaging observations from the first eight years of the Chandra mission. Only point sources, and compact sources with extents < 30 arcsec, are included. Highly extended sources, and sources located in selected fields containing bright, highly extended sources, are excluded from this release. This work is supported by NASA contract NAS

  5. The Chandra Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ian N.; Primini, Francis A.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Davis, John E.; Doe, Stephen M.; Evans, Janet D.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G., II; Grier, John D.; Hain, Roger M.; Hall, Diane M.; Harbo, Peter N.; (Helen He, Xiangqun; Houck, John C.; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L.; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Miller, Joseph B.; Mitschang, Arik W.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Mossman, Amy E.; Nichols, Joy S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Plummer, David A.; Refsdal, Brian L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Sundheim, Beth A.; Tibbetts, Michael S.; Van Stone, David W.; Winkelman, Sherry L.; Zografou, Panagoula

    2010-07-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. The first release of the CSC includes information about 94,676 distinct X-ray sources detected in a subset of public Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents lsim30''. The catalog (1) provides access to the best estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources, with good scientific fidelity, and directly supports scientific analysis using the individual source data; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; and (3) provides efficient access to calibrated observational data and ancillary data products for individual X-ray sources, so that users can perform detailed further analysis using existing tools. The catalog includes real X-ray sources detected with flux estimates that are at least 3 times their estimated 1σ uncertainties in at least one energy band, while maintaining the number of spurious sources at a level of lsim1 false source per field for a 100 ks observation. For each detected source, the CSC provides commonly tabulated quantities, including source position, extent, multi-band fluxes, hardness ratios, and variability statistics, derived from the observations in which the source is detected. In addition to these traditional catalog elements, for each X-ray source the CSC includes an extensive set of file-based data products that can be manipulated interactively, including source images, event lists, light curves, and spectra from each observation in which a

  6. The Chandra Fornax Survey. II. The Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Karen; Zurek, D.; Scharf, C.

    2010-01-01

    The Fornax cluster of galaxies lies in the southern hemisphere and is second only to the richer and more well-studied Virgo cluster in its accessibility for high resolution multi-wavelength data collection. A deep \\emph{Chandra} survey of the inner one degree of this cluster was performed in 2003, with first results published in 2005 identifying 771 X-ray point sources. We present a catalog of these X-ray point sources. Possible and likely optical candidates were identified from ground-based, HST and GALEX images. This catalog will facilitate future investigations by enhancing our understanding of a cluster's fainter and smaller objects, calibrating distance rulers, and constraining cosmological models. This work was conducted by a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) position at the American Museum of Natural History and funded by the NSF.

  7. The ARCHES Integrated Cluster Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mints, A.; Schwope, A.

    2014-07-01

    We are developing a tool to search for galaxy clusters associated with X-ray sources from the 3XMM catalog within the ARCHES project (Astronomical Resource cross-matching for High-Energy Studies). We make use of the new cross-matching tool developed for ARCHES to select galaxies in different catalogs around X-ray positions and then try to find clusters by searching for overdensities in the multi-color space. Colors are related to redshifts using spectroscopic data for passively evolving galaxies from the BOSS and VIPERS catalogs. So far we are making use of SDSS, UKIDSS, WISE, and CFHTLS photometric catalogs, but the method can easily be expanded to other data as well (e.g. Pan-STARRS and DES). We present test results of our tool performed on reference samples from the XMM/SDSS cluster survey (Takey et al 2012) and the NORAS/REFLEX surveys.

  8. The C4 clustering algorithm: Clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert; Reichart, Dan; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Annis, James; McKay, Timothy; Bahcall, Neta; Bernardi, Mariangela; Boehringer, Hans; Connolly, Andrew; Goto, Tomo; Kniazev, Alexie; Lamb, Donald; Postman, Marc; Schneider, Donald; Sheth, Ravi; Voges, Wolfgang; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Portsmouth U., ICG /North Carolina U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Chicago U., EFI /Michigan U. /Fermilab /Princeton U. Observ. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Pittsburgh U. /Tokyo U., ICRR /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Penn State U. /Chicago U. /Stavropol, Astrophys. Observ. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron. /INI, SAO

    2005-03-01

    We present the ''C4 Cluster Catalog'', a new sample of 748 clusters of galaxies identified in the spectroscopic sample of the Second Data Release (DR2) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The C4 cluster-finding algorithm identifies clusters as overdensities in a seven-dimensional position and color space, thus minimizing projection effects that have plagued previous optical cluster selection. The present C4 catalog covers {approx}2600 square degrees of sky and ranges in redshift from z = 0.02 to z = 0.17. The mean cluster membership is 36 galaxies (with redshifts) brighter than r = 17.7, but the catalog includes a range of systems, from groups containing 10 members to massive clusters with over 200 cluster members with redshifts. The catalog provides a large number of measured cluster properties including sky location, mean redshift, galaxy membership, summed r-band optical luminosity (L{sub r}), velocity dispersion, as well as quantitative measures of substructure and the surrounding large-scale environment. We use new, multi-color mock SDSS galaxy catalogs, empirically constructed from the {Lambda}CDM Hubble Volume (HV) Sky Survey output, to investigate the sensitivity of the C4 catalog to the various algorithm parameters (detection threshold, choice of passbands and search aperture), as well as to quantify the purity and completeness of the C4 cluster catalog. These mock catalogs indicate that the C4 catalog is {approx_equal}90% complete and 95% pure above M{sub 200} = 1 x 10{sup 14} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} and within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the SDSS DR2 data, we show that the C4 algorithm finds 98% of X-ray identified clusters and 90% of Abell clusters within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the mock galaxy catalogs and the full HV dark matter simulations, we show that the L{sub r} of a cluster is a more robust estimator of the halo mass (M{sub 200}) than the galaxy line-of-sight velocity dispersion or the richness of the cluster. However, if we

  9. Decal Process Document and Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Decal Process Document and Catalog, JSC 27260 is the standard flight decal catalog, complete with illustrations and part numbers. As hardware developers identify labels that have common applicability across end items, these labels can be evaluated for "standard decal classification" and entered into the decal catalog for general use. The hardware developer must have a label design that meets current, applicable labeling requirements, and submit to the Decal Design and Production Facility (DDPF) as a standard label candidate. Upon approval, the label will be added to the decal catalog. The Decal Process Document and Catalog provides a selection of decals from which the NASA and NASA contractor customers can easily order. The decals shown in the catalog have been previously produced and have released engineering/fabrication drawings on file in the (DDPF). A released drawing is required before a decal can be produced or placed into the catalog. Some decals included in the catalog have a common applicability and are used in various NASA vehicles/habitats. It is the intent of the DDPF to maintain this catalog as a "living document" to which decals/placards can be added as they are repeatedly used. The advantage of identifYing flight decals in this catalog is that a released drawing is already in place, and the products will be flight certified.

  10. Geothermal innovative technologies catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Kenkeremath, D.

    1988-09-01

    The technology items in this report were selected on the basis of technological readiness and applicability to current technology transfer thrusts. The items include technologies that are considered to be within 2 to 3 years of being transferred. While the catalog does not profess to be entirely complete, it does represent an initial attempt at archiving innovative geothermal technologies with ample room for additions as they occur. The catalog itself is divided into five major functional areas: Exploration; Drilling, Well Completion, and Reservoir Production; Materials and Brine Chemistry; Direct Use; and Economics. Within these major divisions are sub-categories identifying specific types of technological advances: Hardware; Software; Data Base; Process/Procedure; Test Facility; and Handbook.

  11. Education programs catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    Since its formation in 1977, US DOE has been authorized to support education programs that help ensure an adequate supply of scientists, engineers, and technicians for energy-related research, production activities, and technology transfer. A national conference in 1989 produced a clear vision of the important role that DOE, its facilities, and its 169,000 Federal and contract employees can play in the educational life of their communities and the Nation. Many of the programs listed in this catalog are the result of this new vision; others have existed for many years. Purpose of this catalog is to make all DOE education efforts more widely known so that more teachers, students, and others can benefit. Supporting the hundreds of education programs (precollege, undergraduate, graduate, public) is the network of DOE national laboratories, technology centers, and other research facilities. Brief descriptions of each facility, its programs, and contact information for its education personnel are included.

  12. Distributed Computerized Catalog System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.; Wagner, David A.

    1995-01-01

    DarkStar Distributed Catalog System describes arbitrary data objects in unified manner, providing end users with versatile, yet simple search mechanism for locating and identifying objects. Provides built-in generic and dynamic graphical user interfaces. Design of system avoids some of problems of standard DBMS, and system provides more flexibility than do conventional relational data bases, or object-oriented data bases. Data-collection lattice partly hierarchical representation of relationships among collections, subcollections, and data objects.

  13. Landsat US standard catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The U.S. Standard Catalog lists imagery of the continental U.S., Alaska and Hawaii acquired by Landsat 1 and 2 which has been processed and input to the data files during the referenced month. Data, such as date acquired, cloud cover and image quality are given for each scene. The microfilm roll and frame on which the scene may be found is also given.

  14. The Chandra Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ian N.; Primini, F. A.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Anderson, C. S.; Bonaventura, N. R.; Chen, J. C.; Davis, J. E.; Doe, S. M.; Evans, J. D.; Fabbiano, G.; Galle, E. C.; Gibbs, D. G., II; Grier, J. D.; Hain, R. M.; Hall, D. M.; Harbo, P. N.; He, X.; Houck, J. C.; Karovska, M.; Kashyap, V. L.; Lauer, J.; McCollough, M. L.; McDowell, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Mitschang, A. W.; Morgan, D. L.; Mossman, A. E.; Nichols, J. S.; Nowak, M. A.; Plummer, D. A.; Refsdal, B. L.; Rots, A. H.; Siemiginowska, A.; Sundheim, B. A.; Tibbetts, M. S.; Van Stone, D. W.; Winkelman, S. L.; Zografou, P.

    2010-03-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. The first release of the CSC includes information about 94,676 distinct X-ray sources detected in a subset of public ACIS imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents < 30". The catalog (1) provides access to estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources with good scientific fidelity; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; and (3) provides efficient access to calibrated observational data and ancillary data products for individual X-ray sources. The catalog includes real X-ray sources detected with flux estimates that are at least 3 times their estimated 1σ uncertainties in at least one energy band, while maintaining the number of spurious sources at a level of < 1 false source per field for a 100 ks observation. For each detected source, the CSC provides commonly tabulated quantities, including source position, extent, multi-band fluxes, hardness ratios, and variability statistics. In addition, for each X-ray source the CSC includes an extensive set of file-based data products that can be manipulated interactively, including source images, event lists, light curves, and spectra. Support for development of the CSC is provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under contract NAS 8-03060.

  15. The Chandra Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ian; Primini, Francis A.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Davis, John E.; Doe, Stephen M.; Evans, Janet D.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G., II; Grier, John D.; Hain, Roger; Hall, Diane M.; Harbo, Peter N.; He, Xiang Qun (Helen); Houck, John C.; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L.; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Miller, Joseph B.; Mitschang, Arik W.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Mossman, Amy E.; Nichols, Joy S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Plummer, David A.; Refsdal, Brian L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Siemiginowska, Aneta L.; Sundheim, Beth A.; Tibbetts, Michael S.; van Stone, David W.; Winkelman, Sherry L.; Zografou, Panagoula

    2009-09-01

    The first release of the Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) was published in 2009 March, and includes information about 94,676 X-ray sources detected in a subset of public ACIS imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents <˜30''.The CSC is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime.The catalog (1) provides access to the best estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources, with good scientific fidelity, and directly supports medium sophistication scientific analysis on using the individual source data; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; (3) provides efficient access to calibrated observational data and ancillary data products for individual X-ray sources, so that users can perform detailed further analysis using existing tools; and (4) includes real X-ray sources detected with flux significance greater than a predefined threshold, while maintaining the number of spurious sources at an acceptable level. For each detected X-ray source, the CSC provides commonly tabulated quantities, including source position, extent, multi-band fluxes, hardness ratios, and variability statistics, derived from the observations in which the source is detected. In addition to these traditional catalog elements, for each X-ray source the CSC includes an extensive set of file-based data products that can be manipulated interactively, including source images, event lists, light curves, and spectra from each observation in which a source is detected.

  16. Introduction: ISC-GEM catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helffrich, George

    2015-02-01

    This Special Issue of Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors documents the intent, logistical efforts and methods used in producing the ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalog (1900-2009). It represents a significant achievement in both the manpower and the methods used to yield a homogeneous catalog from the earliest days of global seismic instrumentation. The catalog should present researchers with a resource to assess seismicity rates, locations and mechanisms uniformly in the instrumental era.

  17. Perspectives on Map Cataloging and Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, John R.

    1981-01-01

    Presents an overview of the developments and dilemmas related to the cataloging and classification of maps, addressing the areas of online library systems, cooperative cataloging, descriptive cataloging, subject access, and the improvement of network capabilities. Seventeen references are cited. (FM)

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cordoba Carte du Ciel-Astrographic Catalog, CCAC (Orellana+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, R. B.; de Biasi, M. S.; Bustos Fierro, I. H.; Calderon, J. H.

    2010-07-01

    This is Cordoba Carte du Ciel-Astrographic Catalog (CCAC) constructed from four Carte du Ciel and one Astrographic Catalog photographic plates for first epoch positions in the region of the open cluster Collinder 132. The plates were digitized using the MAMA measuring machine from the Paris Observatory. Stars from Tycho-2 catalogue (Hog et al., 2000, Cat. I/259) were used as reference stars. Every plate was reduced independently from the others adopting a first order polynomial in the measured coordinates. Proper motions were calculated using the CCAC positions as first epoch, and as second epoch the positions given by UCAC2 (Zacharias et al., 2004, Cat. I/289) and USNO-B1.0 (Monet et al., 2003, Cat. I/284). (2 data files).

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: g'i' photometry in 5 isolated elliptical galaxies (Salinas+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, R.; Alabi, A.; Richtler, T.; Lane, R. R.

    2015-03-01

    We present a catalog of globular cluster candidates around the isolated elliptical galaxies NGC 2271, NGC 2865, NGC 3962, NGC 4240, and IC 4889. Besides being point sources, these are limited in color and magnitude as explained in the paper. The catalog contains equatorial coordinates as well as SDSS g and i magnitudes with uncertainties. (2 data files).

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: g'i' obs. in 5 isolated elliptical galaxies (Salinas+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, R.; Alabi, A.; Richtler, T.; Lane, R. R.

    2015-03-01

    We present a catalog of globular cluster candidates around the isolated elliptical galaxies NGC 2271, NGC 2865, NGC 3962, NGC 4240, and IC 4889. Besides being point sources, these are limited in color and magnitude as explained in the paper. The catalog contains equatorial coordinates as well as SDSS g and i magnitudes with uncertainties. (2 data files).

  1. The Gaia hybrid catalog: a leverage to find Galactic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouesneau, M.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.

    2014-07-01

    of the WISE filters, one can select the Oxygen-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGBs) stars to find spatial substructures with particular interstellar medium properties. Breaking through the distance-extinction degeneracies will also help finding large scale structures in the disk such as streams or spiral arms, especially when combined with age or metallicity selections for instance. Second, we presented one aspect of the hybrid catalogs dedicated to support the analysis of star clusters. Star clusters are not only calibrators of stellar evolution models but also references to study star formation in general. We presented one future outcome of the hybrid catalogs, in which we provide for known star clusters, an assessment of stellar memberships based on a combination of phase-space, and colormagnitude distribution fitting. In this application, the assumption that a cluster is a "simple" population provides a significant advantage when deriving individual star properties. Eventually one can imagine this application can be extended to stellar streams. Hybrid catalogs are meant to be provided along with the Gaia data releases, and will offer a tremendous source of validation for the Gaia Data Processing.

  2. The Weakest Link: Library Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Terrence E., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Describes methods of correcting MARC records in online public access catalogs in school libraries. Highlights include in-house methods; professional resources; conforming to library cataloging standards; vendor services, including Web-based services; software specifically developed for record cleanup; and outsourcing. (LRW)

  3. Off-Line Catalog Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc., Dublin, OH.

    The Ohio College Library Center's off-line catalog system is a limited technique for production of card catalogs. Unlike the on-line system, it cannotmake the resources of a region available to users in an individual institution, and it does not have the potential for significantly reducing rate of rise of library per-unit costs. In short, it is…

  4. Instruction Manual for Catalog Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc., Dublin, OH.

    An instruction manual for using the catalog production system developed by the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC). The manual has a three-fold purpose: (1) to define the pack - describes the objective of the Catalog Profile Questionnaire and how to complete it, (2) to delineate request procedures - gives the membership various procedures to follow…

  5. "Friendly" Catalog Forgives User Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Pauline A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the features and operations of a user-searchable online catalog called PaperChase which was developed and implemented for the retrieval of medical literature by physicians at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. Interaction with the system and use of the catalog during its first year of operation are discussed. (JL)

  6. Authority Work for Transitional Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matters, Marion

    1990-01-01

    Discusses authority work and authority control for personal names and corporate bodies in transitional archive catalogs. The importance of conformance with standards so that archival materials will collocate with other types of material in integrated catalogs is also discussed, together with enhanced authority work and techniques for archival…

  7. Efficient and Scalable Cross-Matching of (Very) Large Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineau, F.-X.; Boch, T.; Derriere, S.

    2011-07-01

    Whether it be for building multi-wavelength datasets from independent surveys, studying changes in objects luminosities, or detecting moving objects (stellar proper motions, asteroids), cross-catalog matching is a technique widely used in astronomy. The need for efficient, reliable and scalable cross-catalog matching is becoming even more pressing with forthcoming projects which will produce huge catalogs in which astronomers will dig for rare objects, perform statistical analysis and classification, or real-time transients detection. We have developed a formalism and the corresponding technical framework to address the challenge of fast cross-catalog matching. Our formalism supports more than simple nearest-neighbor search, and handles elliptical positional errors. Scalability is improved by partitioning the sky using the HEALPix scheme, and processing independently each sky cell. The use of multi-threaded two-dimensional kd-trees adapted to managing equatorial coordinates enables efficient neighbor search. The whole process can run on a single computer, but could also use clusters of machines to cross-match future very large surveys such as GAIA or LSST in reasonable times. We already achieve performances where the 2MASS (˜470M sources) and SDSS DR7 (˜350M sources) can be matched on a single machine in less than 10 minutes. We aim at providing astronomers with a catalog cross-matching service, available on-line and leveraging on the catalogs present in the VizieR database. This service will allow users both to access pre-computed cross-matches across some very large catalogs, and to run customized cross-matching operations. It will also support VO protocols for synchronous or asynchronous queries.

  8. Historic Cataloging Costs, Issues, and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, George

    1989-01-01

    Reports research related to cataloging costs: (1) a comparison of length and complexity of Library of Congress cataloging copy between 1956 and 1981; (2) a survey of cataloging costs at academic libraries; and (3) cataloging costs and salaries since 1876 compared with the rate of inflation. The questionnaire and list of libraries surveyed are…

  9. Standards for Cataloging Nonprint Materials. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinly, William J.; And Others

    Rules and procedures for cataloging non-print media are provided in this manual of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology. The first section on cataloging rules covers all elements which should appear on the catalog card. After some comments on entries, the arrangement of catalog elements, and style, the elements of the…

  10. The Year's Work in Cataloging, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Amy K.; Carstens, Timothy V.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the contributions to cataloging that have recently appeared in the print literature, as well as working documents publicly available on the Web developed by those responsible for creation of cataloging rules. Topics include: theory; revising AACR; summary of proposed changes; metadata; education of catalogers and cataloging staff; subject…

  11. The Gaia Attitude Star Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, R. L.

    2016-04-01

    We describe the Attitude Star Catalog produced for the Gaia mission. This catalog is being used by Gaia for the first on-ground attitude reconstruction. Originally it was simply a subset of the Initial Gaia Source List but this subset did not meet the isolation requirements and it contained a significant number of double entries. As a result during the commissioning phase of Gaia a new generation of this catalog, that better fulfills the attitude reconstruction requirements, was requested. Here we describe the production and properties of this new Attitude Star Catalog. The Attitude Star Catalog was made by combining 7 all sky catalogs and selecting entries based on magnitude, isolation and astrometric precision criteria. The catalog has 8173331 entries with estimates of the positions at 2000, proper motions and magnitudes (Gaia G, Gaia Grvs, red RF & blue BJ) in the magnitude range 7.0 < G < 13.4. It is publically available from the CDS Strasbourg and the IGSL web-site.

  12. Precision Photometric Redshifts Of Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, L.; Annis, J.

    2006-06-01

    Clusters of galaxies provide a means to achieve more precise photometric redshifts than achievable using individual galaxies simply because of the numbers of galaxies available in clusters. Here we examine the expectation that one can achieve root-N improvement using the N galaxies in a cluster. We extracted from a maxBCG SDSS cluster catalog 28,000 clusters and used SDSS DR4 spectra to find spectroscopic redshifts for the cluster. We examined both using the brightest cluster galaxy redshift as the proxy for the cluster and using the mean of a collection of galaxies within a given angular diameter and redshift (about the cluster photo-z) range. We find that the BCG provides a better estimate of the cluster redshift, to be understood in the context of a handful of spectra in the neighborhood of the cluster. We find that the cluster photo-z has an approximate root-N scaling behavior with the normalization for maxBCG techniques being 0.07. We predict what ``afterburner photo-z'' techniques, which use individual galaxy photo-z's good to 0.03-0.05, can achieve for cluster catalogs and for cluster cosmology.

  13. Professional Literature on Cataloging--Then and Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boll, John J.

    1985-01-01

    This overview of literature pertaining to philosophies and crosscurrents of cataloging highlights literature of 1905, cataloging codes, serials and textbooks on cataloging, cataloging aids, and selected themes 1905-1985 (cataloging for small library, union lists and catalogs, classification, catalog use studies, subject retrieval systems,…

  14. Engineering directorate technical facilities catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloy, Joseph E.

    1993-01-01

    The Engineering Directorate Technical Facilities Catalog is designed to provide an overview of the technical facilities available within the Engineering Directorate at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. The combined capabilities of these engineering facilities are essential elements of overall JSC capabilities required to manage and perform major NASA engineering programs. The facilities are grouped in the text by chapter according to the JSC division responsible for operation of the facility. This catalog updates the facility descriptions for the JSC Engineering Directorate Technical Facilities Catalog, JSC 19295 (August 1989), and supersedes the Engineering Directorate, Principle test and Development Facilities, JSC, 19962 (November 1984).

  15. SXS Catalog of Gravitational Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemberger, Daniel; SXS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Many aspects of gravitational-wave astronomy rely on numerical relativity for accurate models of gravitational waveforms. In recent years, several numerical relativity groups have built catalogs of numerical waveforms from binary black hole systems. I will report on the status of the Simulating Extreme Spacetimes (SXS) waveform catalog, which comprises simulations performed with the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC). I will describe our approach for assessing numerical errors and convergence. Finally, I will discuss future plans to increase parameter space coverage of the catalog and to improve waveform accuracy.

  16. NASA Video Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Subject Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  17. Lunar soils grain size catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    1993-01-01

    This catalog compiles every available grain size distribution for Apollo surface soils, trench samples, cores, and Luna 24 soils. Original laboratory data are tabled, and cumulative weight distribution curves and histograms are plotted. Standard statistical parameters are calculated using the method of moments. Photos and location comments describe the sample environment and geological setting. This catalog can help researchers describe the geotechnical conditions and site variability of the lunar surface essential to the design of a lunar base.

  18. MC and A instrumentation catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Neymotin, L.; Sviridova, V.

    1998-06-01

    In 1981 and 1985, two editions of a catalog of non-destructive nuclear measurement instrumentation, and material control and surveillance equipment, were published by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The last edition of the catalog included one hundred and twenty-five entries covering a wide range of devices developed in the US and abroad. More than ten years have elapsed since the publication of the more recent Catalog. Devices described in it have undergone significant modifications, and new devices have been developed. Therefore, in order to assist specialists in the field of Material Control and Accounting (MC and A), a new catalog has been created. Work on this instrumentation catalog started in 1997 as a cooperative effort of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), operated by Brookhaven Science Associates under contract to the US Department of Energy, and the All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA), subordinate institute of the Atomic Energy Ministry of the Russian Federation, within the collaborative US-Russia Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program. Most of the equipment included in the Catalog are non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement devices employed for purposes of accounting, confirmation, and verification of nuclear materials. Other devices also included in the Catalog are employed in the detection and deterrence of unauthorized access to or removal of nuclear materials (material control: containment and surveillance). Equipment found in the Catalog comprises either: (1) complete devices or systems that can be used for MC and A applications; or (2) parts or components of complete systems, such as multi-channel analyzers, detectors, neutron generators, and software. All devices are categorized by their status of development--from prototype to serial production.

  19. Water Resources Division training catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotchkiss, W.R.; Foxhoven, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    The National Training Center provides technical and management sessions nesessary for the conductance of the U.S. Geological Survey 's training programs. This catalog describes the facilities and staff at the Lakewood Training Center and describes Water Resources Division training courses available through the center. In addition, the catalog describes the procedures for gaining admission, formulas for calculating fees, and discussion of course evaluations. (USGS)

  20. Management of Catalogs at CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, G.; Boch, T.; Brouty, M.; Guéhenneux, S.; Genova, F.; Lesteven, S.; Ochsenbein, F.; Ocvirk, P.; Perret, E.; Pineau, F.-X.; Simon, A.-C.; Vannier, P.

    2015-04-01

    VizieR (Ochsenbein et al. 2000) provides access to the most complete library of published astronomical catalogs (data tables and associated data) available online and organized in a self-documented database. (There were 11769 catalogs in November 2013.) Indexing the metadata in the VizieR search engine requires the expertise of scientists and documentalists for each catalog ingested. The metadata go into an efficient position search engine that is adapted to big data. (For instance, the GAIA simulation catalog has more than two billion objects). Information in VizieR tables is well described and can be retrieved easily. The search results provide visibility to catalogs with tools and protocols to disseminate data to the Virtual Observatory, thus giving scientists data that is reusable by dedicated tools (e.g. image vizualisation tools). Also, new functionality allows users to extract all photometric data in catalogs for a given position. Finally, it is also through cross-identification tools that the CDS becomes a partner in producing large data sets, such as GAIA.

  1. Astronomical catalog desk reference, 1994 edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Astronomical Catalog Desk Reference is designed to aid astronomers in locating machine readable catalogs in the Astronomical Data Center (ADC) archives. The key reference components of this document are as follows: A listing of shortened titles for all catalogs available from the ADC (includes the name of the lead author and year of publication), brief descriptions of over 300 astronomical catalogs, an index of ADC catalog numbers by subject keyword, and an index of ADC catalog numbers by author. The heart of this document is the set of brief descriptions generated by the ADC staff. The 1994 edition of the Astronomical Catalog Desk Reference contains descriptions for over one third of the catalogs in the ADC archives. Readers are encouraged to refer to this section for concise summaries of those catalogs and their contents.

  2. Small satellite debris catalog maintenance issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Phoebe A.

    1991-01-01

    The United States Space Command (USSPACECOM) is a unified command of the Department of Defense, and one of its tasks is to detect, track, identify, and maintain a catalog of all man-made objects in Earth orbit. This task is called space surveillance, and the most important tool for space surveillance is the satellite catalog. The command's reasons for performing satellite catalog maintenance is presented. A satellite catalog is described, and small satellite-debris catalog-maintenance issues are identified. The underlying rationale is to describe the catalog maintenance services so that the members of the community can use them with assurance.

  3. IRAS sources in the direction of rich clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unewisse, A. M.

    1992-06-01

    Results of a search for possible associations between point sources in the IRAS catalog and rich clusters of galaxies in the recently published Abell, Corwin and Olowin (ACO; (1989)) catalog are presented. It is found that the surface density of IRAS sources rises progressively above the background as the projected distance from the cluster center decreases below about 1 Mpc. The increase is most pronounced for the poorest clusters in the ACO catalog. At low redshift (z less than 0.03) the spatial distribution of ACO-IRAS associations is markedly anisotropic with a 3-sigma enhancement in the direction of the Great Attractor.

  4. The RBV metadata catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Francois; Fleury, Laurence; Gaillardet, Jerome; Nord, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    RBV (Réseau des Bassins Versants) is a French initiative to consolidate the national efforts made by more than 15 elementary observatories funded by various research institutions (CNRS, INRA, IRD, IRSTEA, Universities) that study river and drainage basins. The RBV Metadata Catalogue aims at giving an unified vision of the work produced by every observatory to both the members of the RBV network and any external person interested by this domain of research. Another goal is to share this information with other existing metadata portals. Metadata management is heterogeneous among observatories ranging from absence to mature harvestable catalogues. Here, we would like to explain the strategy used to design a state of the art catalogue facing this situation. Main features are as follows : - Multiple input methods: Metadata records in the catalog can either be entered with the graphical user interface, harvested from an existing catalogue or imported from information system through simplified web services. - Hierarchical levels: Metadata records may describe either an observatory, one of its experimental site or a single dataset produced by one instrument. - Multilingualism: Metadata can be easily entered in several configurable languages. - Compliance to standards : the backoffice part of the catalogue is based on a CSW metadata server (Geosource) which ensures ISO19115 compatibility and the ability of being harvested (globally or partially). On going tasks focus on the use of SKOS thesaurus and SensorML description of the sensors. - Ergonomy : The user interface is built with the GWT Framework to offer a rich client application with a fully ajaxified navigation. - Source code sharing : The work has led to the development of reusable components which can be used to quickly create new metadata forms in other GWT applications You can visit the catalogue (http://portailrbv.sedoo.fr/) or contact us by email rbv@sedoo.fr.

  5. The RBV metadata catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, François; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Fleury, Laurence; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Nord, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    RBV (Réseau des Bassins Versants) is an initiative to consolidate the national efforts made by more than 15 elementary observatories belonging to various French research institutions (CNRS, Universities, INRA, IRSTEA, IRD) that study river and drainage basins. RBV is a part of a global initiative to create a network of observatories for investigating Earth's surface processes. The RBV Metadata Catalogue aims to give an unified vision of the work produced by every observatory to both the members of the RBV network and any external person involved in this domain of research. Another goal is to share this information with other catalogues through the compliance with the ISO19115 standard and the INSPIRE directive and the ability of being harvested (globally or partially). Metadata management is heterogeneous among observatories. The catalogue is designed to face this situation with the following main features: -Multiple input methods: Metadata records in the catalog can either be entered with the graphical user interface, harvested from an existing catalogue or imported from information system through simplified web services. -Three hierachical levels: Metadata records may describe either an observatory in general, one of its experimental site or a dataset produced by instruments. -Multilingualism: Metadata can be entered in several configurable languages. The catalogue provides many other feature such as search and browse mechanisms to find or discover records. The RBV metadata catalogue associates a CSW metadata server (Geosource) and a JEE application. The CSW server is in charge of the persistence of the metadata while the JEE application both wraps CSW calls and define the user interface. The latter is built with the GWT Framework to offer a rich client application with a fully ajaxified navigation. The catalogue is accessible at the following address: http://portailrbv.sedoo.fr/ Next steps will target the following points: -Description of sensors in accordance

  6. Suggested Minimum Cataloging Standards for Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sharon

    1979-01-01

    Notes problems with cataloging library materials in the small and medium sized public library and suggests interpretations of the Anglo-American cataloging rules, with recommendations for their adaptation to smaller libraries. (CWM)

  7. Searching the SOHO online catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, William; Yurow, Ron

    1994-01-01

    The SOHO on-line catalogs will contain information about the observations from several made or planned campaigns, that must be available to scientists who wish to use SOHO data. The World Wide Web (WWW) was chosen as the interface to the SOHO on-line catalogs, because it is easy to use, well suited to a geographically distributed user community, and freely available. Through the use of a forms-capable WWW client such as Mosaic or Lynx, a scientist will be able to browse through the catalogs of observations in a very simple, self explanatory way. Data files can then be selected from the returned lists for either immediate transferring or sending on tape by mail, with appropriate checks for whether data is in the public domain or not.

  8. The current catalog--how current?

    PubMed

    Sargent, C W

    1968-07-01

    NLM's Current Catalog has recently come in for some criticism. To be useful as a tool in acquisition and cataloging, currency in receipt of the Current Catalog is necessary. A survey of 263 titles with 1967 imprints, which were received by the Library of the Medical Sciences, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, was made to determine the correlation between the receipt of these books in the library and their appearance in the Current Catalog. PMID:5695111

  9. Statistical analysis of the 'Almagest' star catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikov, V. V.; Nosovskii, G. V.; Fomenko, A. T.

    The star catalog contained in the 'Almagest', Ptolemy's classical work of astronomy, is examined. An analysis method is proposed which allows the identification of various types of errors committed by the observer. This method not only removes many of the contradictions contained in the catalog but also makes it possible to determine the time period during which the catalog was compiled.

  10. The Cataloging Internship in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Edna

    1995-01-01

    Summarizes the history of library internships in cataloging. Reviews a survey of 112 academic practitioners and educators regarding the value of cataloging internships in the masters of library science program. Findings indicate that internships are needed to educate library students. Sample cataloging internship programs are appended. (JMV)

  11. Notes for Serials Cataloging. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Beverley, Ed.; Caraway, Beatrice L., Ed.

    Notes are indispensable to serials cataloging. Researchers, reference librarians, and catalogers regularly use notes on catalog records and, as the audience for these notes has expanded from the local library community to the global Internet community, the need for notes to be cogent, clear, and useful is greater than ever. This book is a…

  12. Standards for Cataloging Nonprint Materials. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinly, William J.; And Others

    Rules for cataloging non-print media are presented. The publication is devoted exclusively to cataloging standards since coding of many non-print media is included in the Library of Congress MARC system. All elements which should appear on the cataloging card are identified; the elements of the description are described with the MARC format in…

  13. A System for Cataloging Computer Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Karl M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    As a form of nonbook material, computer software can be cataloged and the collection managed by a library. The System Development Corporation (SDC) Technical Information Center has adapted the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules for descriptive cataloging of computer programs. (11 references) (Author/SJ)

  14. Cooperative Catalog Conversion Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Co., Washington, DC.

    Cost estimates provided by cataloging vendors during January 1981 are analyzed to identify the costs of catalog conversion options and alternatives to the card catalog for six Minnesota regional library systems. Following an executive summary of the study is a discussion of its background, scope, objectives, data gathering methodology, and…

  15. The Implementation of the Greek Union Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsirikou, Anthi

    This paper is based on the results of the study of the Work Group of Bibliographic Standards for the Greek union catalog, the first stage of Greek academic library union catalog development. The first section lists the objectives of the union catalog. The state of the art of Greek academic libraries is discussed in the second section. The lack of…

  16. In the Iron Age of Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houten, Stephen

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the questions and problems in library cataloging addressed through the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by Panizzi, Cutter, and Lubetzky; asks whether computerization represents an advance that will free catalogers from earlier difficulties; and discusses the ongoing relevance of the principles of cataloging. A reference list is…

  17. Viking orbiter stereo imaging catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, K. R.; Vetrone, A. V.; Martin, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    The extremely long missions of the two Viking Orbiter spacecraft produced a wealth of photos of surface features. Many of which can be used to form stereo images allowing the earth-bound student of Mars to examine the subject in 3-D. This catalog is a technical guide to the use of stereo coverage within the complex Viking imaging data set. Since that data set is still growing (January, 1980, about 3 1/2 years after the mission began), a second edition of this catalog is planned with completion expected about November, 1980.

  18. Catalog It! A Guide to Cataloging School Library Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Allison G.; Riedling, Ann Marlow

    This book is designed for courses that prepare college and university students for undergraduate or graduate degrees in school library media. Its objectives are to present the theory and practice of cataloging and classification in the school library environment. The manual is divided into eight chapters. Chapter 1: A Brief History of Cataloging…

  19. Identifying False Alarms in the Kepler Planet Candidate Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullally, F.; Coughlin, Jeffery L.; Thompson, Susan E.; Christiansen, Jessie; Burke, Christopher; Clarke, Bruce D.; Haas, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new automated method to identify instrumental features masquerading as small, long-period planets in the Kepler planet candidate catalog. These systematics, mistakenly identified as planet transits, can have a strong impact on occurrence rate calculations because they cluster in a region of parameter space where Kepler’s sensitivity to planets is poor. We compare individual transit-like events to a variety of models of real transits and systematic events and use a Bayesian information criterion to evaluate the likelihood that each event is real. We describe our technique and test its performance on simulated data. Results from this technique are incorporated in the Kepler Q1–Q17 DR24 planet candidate catalog of Coughlin et al.

  20. URAT Parallax Catalog: the largest parallax catalog since Hipparcos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, Charlie T.; Zacharias, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    The first USNO Robotic Astrometric Telescope catalog (URAT1) was released in April 2015. For determining parallaxes we did go beyond that and utilize all Northern Hemisphere URAT observations. These data include all individual exposures from April 2012 to June 2015 giving a larger epoch baseline for determining parallaxes over the 2-year span of URAT1 published data. The URAT Parallax Catalog (UPC) is a supplement to 'Parallax Results From URAT Epoch Data' (Finch and Zacahrias 2016) where we explain the procedures and focus on stars with a parallax of 40 mas or larger. Here we release all significant parallaxes from the URAT northern epoch data.The UPC contains 112177 parallaxes covering the magnitude range 6.56 to 16.93 in the URAT band-pass north of -12.752 deg declination. The over 40 million formal URAT parallax solutions have been compared to entries in the Hipparcos Catalog, The Yale Parallax Catalog, (Finch and Zacharias 2016), MEarth parallaxes and SIMBAD database, respectively to obtain prior published parallaxes and star name information. We release the 58,677 URAT parallaxes which have a match to either of those catalogs without implementing any extra cuts. For the stars with no prior published parallax we implement a set of stringent cuts to reduce possible erroneous parallaxes resulting in over 53,000 new trigonometric parallaxes from URAT data alone with a high level of confidence. The average parallax precision is 10.8 mas and 4.3 mas for stars having a known parallax and stars without a prior known parallax respectively.

  1. Catalog card production with a programmable terminal.

    PubMed Central

    McTigue, E; Robinson, M E; Saver, B; Schultz, C K

    1977-01-01

    Application of a programmable terminal and printer to the cataloging task of a small medical library is described. The application is independent of a computer; the terminal is used in "local" mode only. Full sets of catalog cards are produced, following a single typing of descriptive cataloging data and tracings. Books can be cataloged the same day they are received. Actual cost per book is just over a dollar, for equipment rental, card stock, and the cataloger's time at the console, after call number, tracings, and main entry for the book have been determined. Images PMID:831883

  2. Second Line of Defense Master Spares Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Dale L.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.

    2012-11-20

    This catalog is intended to be a comprehensive listing of repair parts, components, kits, and consumable items used on the equipment deployed at SLD sites worldwide. The catalog covers detection, CAS, network, ancillary equipment, and tools. The catalog is backed by a Master Parts Database which is used to generate the standard report views of the catalog. The master parts database is a relational database containing a record for every part in the master parts catalog along with supporting tables for normalizing fields in the records. The database also includes supporting queries, database maintenance forms, and reports.

  3. Catalog card production with a programmable terminal.

    PubMed

    McTigue, E; Robinson, M E; Saver, B; Schultz, C K

    1977-01-01

    Application of a programmable terminal and printer to the cataloging task of a small medical library is described. The application is independent of a computer; the terminal is used in "local" mode only. Full sets of catalog cards are produced, following a single typing of descriptive cataloging data and tracings. Books can be cataloged the same day they are received. Actual cost per book is just over a dollar, for equipment rental, card stock, and the cataloger's time at the console, after call number, tracings, and main entry for the book have been determined. PMID:831883

  4. Greenbook Abstract and Catalog--1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coole, Walter A.; Reitan, Henry M.

    This catalog is intended to be issued periodically as a means of extending and updating teaching materials which have been previously published through ERIC by these authors. The materials include the Alpha and Gamma levels of the "Greenbook System," pre-professional and entry in-service professional levels of an integrated sequence of five…

  5. Electronic Catalog Of Extragalactic Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helou, George; Madore, Barry F.

    1993-01-01

    NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) is publicly accessible computerized catalog of published information about extragalactic observations. Developed to accommodate increasingly large sets of data from surveys, exponentially growing literature, and trend among astronomers to take multispectral approach to astrophysical problems. Accessible to researchers and librarians.

  6. Catalog of Viking mission data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vostreys, R. W. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    This catalog announces the present/expected availability of scientific data acquired by the Viking missions and contains descriptions of the Viking spacecraft, experiments, and data sets. An index is included listing the team leaders and team members for the experiments. Information on NSSDC facilities and ordering procedures, and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are included in the appendices.

  7. Technology and the Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Peter S.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses trends in computer technology and their use for library catalogs, noting the concept of bandwidth (describes quantity of information transmitted per given unit of time); computer hardware differences (micros, minis, maxis); distributed processing systems and databases; optical disk storage; networks; transmission media; and terminals.…

  8. Viking orbiter stereo imaging catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasius, K. R.; Vertrone, A. V.; Lewis, B. H.; Martin, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    The extremely long mission of the two Viking Orbiter spacecraft produced a wealth of photos of surface features. Many of these photos can be used to form stereo images allowing the student of Mars to examine a subject in three dimensional. This catalog is a technical guide to the use of stereo coverage within the complex Viking imaging data set.

  9. Audio-Visual Materials Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson (M.D.) Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX.

    This catalog lists 27 audiovisual programs produced by the Department of Medical Communications of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute for public distribution. Video tapes, 16 mm. motion pictures and slide/audio series are presented dealing mostly with cancer and related subjects. The programs are intended for…

  10. Catalog of Educational Multimedia Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Technical Information Service (DOC), Springfield, VA.

    This catalog lists 276 audiovisual educational materials for sale through the National Technical Information Service. Materials are arranged by subject category: Administration; Black and Women's Studies--Biography, In the Military, and History & Culture; Counseling--Career Counseling; Drug Prevention; Health & Safety; History--Early & American…

  11. Choices in Cataloging Electronic Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathem, Cecilia A.

    2005-01-01

    Libraries and catalogers face choices in the treatment of the growing collections of electronic journals. Policies issued by CONSER and the Library of Congress allow libraries to edit existing print records to accommodate information pertaining to the electronic versions (single record option) or to create new records for them. The discussion…

  12. Printing and the Online Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Bennett J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses issues involved in offering printing for online library catalogs and weighs advantages and disadvantages of screen printing versus remote printing--speed, quality, privacy, convenience, noise, control, costs, accessibility and service. Additional technical issues discussed are buffered versus unbuffered asynchronous printer ports,…

  13. Online Catalogs: Issues and Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausser, Jaye

    This document explores the various issues and concerns related to the development of online systems in libraries and, in particular, online catalogs. Following a preface, foreword, and introduction, chapters are devoted to each of the following topics: (l) providing for special interests including the disabled; (2) authority control; (3) subject…

  14. redMaPPer. I. Algorithm and SDSS DR8 catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Rykoff, E. S.; Rozo, E.; Reddick, R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Busha, M. T.; Cunha, C. E.; Finoguenov, A.; Evrard, A.; Koester, B. P.; Hao, J.; Nord, B.; Leauthaud, A.; Pierre, M.; Sadibekova, T.; Sheldon, E. S.

    2014-04-20

    We describe redMaPPer, a new red sequence cluster finder specifically designed to make optimal use of ongoing and near-future large photometric surveys. The algorithm has multiple attractive features: (1) it can iteratively self-train the red sequence model based on a minimal spectroscopic training sample, an important feature for high-redshift surveys. (2) It can handle complex masks with varying depth. (3) It produces cluster-appropriate random points to enable large-scale structure studies. (4) All clusters are assigned a full redshift probability distribution P(z). (5) Similarly, clusters can have multiple candidate central galaxies, each with corresponding centering probabilities. (6) The algorithm is parallel and numerically efficient: it can run a Dark Energy Survey-like catalog in ∼500 CPU hours. (7) The algorithm exhibits excellent photometric redshift performance, the richness estimates are tightly correlated with external mass proxies, and the completeness and purity of the corresponding catalogs are superb. We apply the redMaPPer algorithm to ∼10, 000 deg{sup 2} of SDSS DR8 data and present the resulting catalog of ∼25,000 clusters over the redshift range z in [0.08, 0.55]. The redMaPPer photometric redshifts are nearly Gaussian, with a scatter σ {sub z} ≈ 0.006 at z ≈ 0.1, increasing to σ {sub z} ≈ 0.02 at z ≈ 0.5 due to increased photometric noise near the survey limit. The median value for |Δz|/(1 + z) for the full sample is 0.006. The incidence of projection effects is low (≤5%). Detailed performance comparisons of the redMaPPer DR8 cluster catalog to X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich catalogs are presented in a companion paper.

  15. X-ray morphologies of Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, S. L. W.; Kowalski, M. P.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented for X-ray measurements made with the Einstein Observatory's IPC for a sample of 49 Abell clusters, which were used to determine quantitative measures of two morphological parameters of these clusters, the orientation and ellipticity. Consideration is given to the techniques used for estimating and removing background noise in the images and for determining the variation of these parameters with the flux level of a cluster. It was found that most clusters are clearly flattened; for 20 of these clusters, the orientation was unambiguously determined. A catalog of cluster properties is presented.

  16. Gas deficiency in cluster galaxies - A comparison of nine clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanelli, R.; Haynes, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    The available 21 cm line data in the literature for galaxies in nine clusters is combined with new high-sensitivity observations of 51 galaxies in five of the nine clusters in order to test for discriminating circumstances between those clusters which show H I deficiency among their spiral population and those which do not. An H I deficiency for the complete cluster sample is derived employing a comparison sample of galaxies chosen from the Catalog of Isolated Galaxies. The deficiency and its radial dependence is summarized for each cluster and a composite. A comparison of the environments in different clusters leads to the conclusion that the occurrence of H I deficiency is correlated with the presence of a hot X-ray intracluster medium, and that an ongoing interaction process is active through the cores of X-ray clusters.

  17. Embedded Clusters in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lada, Charles J.; Lada, Elizabeth A.

    Stellar clusters are born embedded within giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and during their formation and early evolution are often only visible at infrared wavelengths, being heavily obscured by dust. Over the past 15 years advances in infrared detection capabilities have enabled the first systematic studies of embedded clusters in galactic molecular clouds. In this article we review the current state of empirical knowledge concerning these extremely young protocluster systems. From a survey of the literature we compile the first extensive catalog of galactic embedded clusters. We use the catalog to construct the mass function and estimate the birthrate for embedded clusters within 2 kpc of the sun. We find that the embedded cluster birthrate exceeds that of visible open clusters by an order of magnitude or more indicating a high infant mortality rate for protocluster systems. Less than 4-7% of embedded clusters survive emergence from molecular clouds to become bound clusters of Pleiades age. The vast majority (90%) of stars that form in embedded clusters form in rich clusters of 100 or more members with masses in excess of 50 M⊙. Moreover, observations of nearby cloud complexes indicate that embedded clusters account for a significant (70-90%) fraction of all stars formed in GMCs. We review the role of embedded clusters in investigating the nature of the initial mass function (IMF) that, in one nearby example, has been measured over the entire range of stellar and substellar mass, from OB stars to substellar objects near the deuterium burning limit. We also review the role embedded clusters play in the investigation of circumstellar disk evolution and the important constraints they provide for understanding the origin of planetary systems. Finally, we discuss current ideas concerning the origin and dynamical evolution of embedded clusters and the implications for the formation of bound open clusters.

  18. Interoperability Between Geoscience And Geospatial Catalog Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, C.; di, L.; Yang, W.; Lynnes, C.; Domenico, B.; Rutledge, G. K.; Enloe, Y.

    2007-12-01

    In the past several years, interoperability gaps have made cross-protocol and cross-community data access a challenge within the Earth science community. One such gap is between two protocol families developed within the geospatial and Earth science communities. The Earth science community has developed a family of related geoscience protocols that includes OPeNDAP for data access and the Thematic Real-time Environmental Distributed Data Services (THREDDS) catalog capability. The corresponding protocols in the geospatial community are the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) protocols Web Coverage Service for geospatial data access and Catalog Services for Web (CSW) for data search. We have developed a catalog gateway to mediate client/server interactions between OGC catalog clients and THREDDS servers. In essence, the gateway is an OGC Catalog server that enables OGC clients to search for data registered in THREDDS catalogs. The gateway comprises two parts: the CSW server and a THREDDS-to-CSW ingestion tool. There are two key challenges in constructing such gateway, the first is to define the mapping relationship between the catalog metadata schema of CSW and that of the THREDDS, and the second one is to ingest the THREDDS catalog content into the CSW server. Since our CSW server is based on the ISO19115/ISO19119 Application Profile, a key challenge is to semantically map the ISO 19115 metadata attributes in ISO Application Profile to the THREDDS metadata attributes in the THREDDS Dataset Inventory Catalog Specification Version 1.0. With the mapping established, tools that translate the THREDDS catalog information model into the CSW/ISO Profile information model were developed. These dynamically poll THREDDS catalog servers and ingest the THREDDS catalog information into the CSW server's database, maintaining the hierarchical relationships inherent in the THREDDS catalogs. A prototype system has been implemented to demonstrate the concept and approach.

  19. The Voronoi Tessellation Cluster Finder in 2 1 Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Soares-Santos, Marcelle; de Carvalho, Reinaldo R.; Annis, James; Gal, Roy R.; La Barbera, Francesco; Lopes, Paulo A.A.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.; Gerke, Brian F.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-06-23

    We present a detailed description of the Voronoi Tessellation (VT) cluster finder algorithm in 2+1 dimensions, which improves on past implementations of this technique. The need for cluster finder algorithms able to produce reliable cluster catalogs up to redshift 1 or beyond and down to 10{sup 13.5} solar masses is paramount especially in light of upcoming surveys aiming at cosmological constraints from galaxy cluster number counts. We build the VT in photometric redshift shells and use the two-point correlation function of the galaxies in the field to both determine the density threshold for detection of cluster candidates and to establish their significance. This allows us to detect clusters in a self-consistent way without any assumptions about their astrophysical properties. We apply the VT to mock catalogs which extend to redshift 1.4 reproducing the ?CDM cosmology and the clustering properties observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. An objective estimate of the cluster selection function in terms of the completeness and purity as a function of mass and redshift is as important as having a reliable cluster finder. We measure these quantities by matching the VT cluster catalog with the mock truth table. We show that the VT can produce a cluster catalog with completeness and purity >80% for the redshift range up to {approx}1 and mass range down to {approx}10{sup 13.5} solar masses.

  20. Data Definition and the Decline of Cataloging Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burger, Robert H.

    1983-01-01

    Discussion of the process of library cataloging notes the 8th century cataloger, Alcuin; purpose of cataloging; bibliographic control; access to information; cataloging on OCLC; emphasis on the format in which cataloging information is communicated; lost precision; authority files; and recall versus precision. Seven references are included. (EJS)

  1. URLs in the OPAC: Integrating or Disintegrating Research Libraries' Catalogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Gerald; Germain, Carol Anne; Van Ullen, Mary K.

    2003-01-01

    Research library catalogs serve as authoritative sources of access. The increasing practice of including Web sites in the catalog, resources not under the library's control, raises new issues of the catalog's accuracy and reliability. An analysis of ARL libraries' catalogs examined the persistence of cataloged URLs. Error rates ranged from a low…

  2. Catalog of databases and reports

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, M.D.

    1997-04-01

    This catalog provides information about the many reports and materials made available by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Global Change Research Program (GCRP) and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The catalog is divided into nine sections plus the author and title indexes: Section A--US Department of Energy Global Change Research Program Research Plans and Summaries; Section B--US Department of Energy Global Change Research Program Technical Reports; Section C--US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Reports; Section D--Other US Department of Energy Reports; Section E--CDIAC Reports; Section F--CDIAC Numeric Data and Computer Model Distribution; Section G--Other Databases Distributed by CDIAC; Section H--US Department of Agriculture Reports on Response of Vegetation to Carbon Dioxide; and Section I--Other Publications.

  3. EPRI DATATRAN data bank catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has established a data bank for the nuclear utilities using the DATATRAN computer code executive and data base management system. This rapidly expanding data bank contains data bases archiving data from nuclear industry experimental test programs and nuclear plant transient events. The report catalogs the data bases of the EPRI DATARAN data bank and the associated DATATRAN modules. 51 figs., 103 tabs.

  4. NASA SBIR product catalog, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This catalog is a partial list of products of NASA SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) projects that have advanced to some degree into Phase 3. While most of the products evolved from work conducted during SBIR Phase 1 and 2, a few advanced to commercial status solely from Phase 1 activities. The catalog presents information provided to NASA by SBIR contractors who wished to have their products exhibited at Technology 2001, a NASA-sponsored technology transfer conference held in San Jose, California, on December 4, 5, and 6, 1991. The catalog presents the product information in the following technology areas: computer and communication systems; information processing and AI; robotics and automation; signal and image processing; microelectronics; electronic devices and equipment; microwave electronic devices; optical devices and lasers; advanced materials; materials processing; materials testing and NDE; materials instrumentation; aerodynamics and aircraft; fluid mechanics and measurement; heat transfer devices; refrigeration and cryogenics; energy conversion devices; oceanographic instruments; atmosphere monitoring devices; water management; life science instruments; and spacecraft electromechanical systems.

  5. The NASA SBIR product catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, J. A.; Paige, J. B.; Schwenk, F. Carl

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this catalog is to assist small business firms in making the community aware of products emerging from their efforts in the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. It contains descriptions of some products that have advanced into Phase 3 and others that are identified as prospective products. Both lists of products in this catalog are based on information supplied by NASA SBIR contractors in responding to an invitation to be represented in this document. Generally, all products suggested by the small firms were included in order to meet the goals of information exchange for SBIR results. Of the 444 SBIR contractors NASA queried, 137 provided information on 219 products. The catalog presents the product information in the technology areas listed in the table of contents. Within each area, the products are listed in alphabetical order by product name and are given identifying numbers. Also included is an alphabetical listing of the companies that have products described. This listing cross-references the product list and provides information on the business activity of each firm. In addition, there are three indexes: one a list of firms by states, one that lists the products according to NASA Centers that managed the SBIR projects, and one that lists the products by the relevant Technical Topics utilized in NASA's annual program solicitation under which each SBIR project was selected.

  6. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement: catalog of infrared observations summarizes all infrared astronomical observations at far infrared wavelengths published in the scientific literature between 1965 and 1982. The Supplement list contains 25% of the observations in the full catalog of infrared observations (C10), and essentially eliminates most visible stars from the listings. The Supplement is more compact than the main Catalog (it does not contain the bibliography and position index of the C10), and is intended for easy reference during astronomical observations.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Mark III Catalog of Galaxy Peculiar Velocities (Willick+ 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willick, J. A.; Courteau, S.; Faber, S. M.; Burstein, D.; Dekel, A.; Kolatt, T.

    1996-08-01

    The Mark III Catalog of Galaxy Peculiar Velocities comprises five different types of data files. 1. Basic Observational and Catalog Data 2. Individual Galaxy TF and Dn-sigma Distances 3. Grouped Spiral Galaxy TF Distances 4. Elliptical Galaxy Distances as in the Mark II 5. Comparison of Spiral Galaxy Distances 1. The Basic Data files are: a. Aaronson et al. Field, (359 galaxies; a82): a82file1.dat, a82file2.dat, a82file3.dat b. Mathewson et al. 1992 (1355 galaxies; mat): matfile1.dat, matfile2.dat, matfile3.dat c. Willick 1991, Perseus-Pisces sample (383 galaxies; w91pp): d. Willick 1991, Cluster galaxy sample (156 galaxies; w91cl): The basic data for all 539 objects in the w91 sample are given in the following files: w91file1.dat, w91file2.dat, w91file3.dat Some galaxies are duplicates; see below for details. e. Courteau-Faber 1993 (326 galaxies; cf): cffile1.dat, cffile2.dat, cffile3.dat f. Han-Mould et al. 1992+, Cluster galaxy sample (433 galaxies; hmcl): The basic data for all 433 galaxies the the hm sample are given in the following files: hmfile1.dat, hmfile3.dat, hmfile2.dat Some galaxies are duplicates; see below for details. 2. The Individual Spiral Galaxy Distances Files are: (See notes for detailed descriptions of how the w91pp, w91cl, hmcl and cf distance files correspond to the galaxies in the w91file*, hmfile*, and cffile* Basic Data files.) a. Aaronson et al. Field, (359 galaxies; a82): a82_s b. Mathewson et al. 1992 (1355 galaxies; mat): mat_s c. Willick 1991, Perseus-Pisces sample (326 galaxies; w91pp): w91pp_s.dat d. Willick 1991, Cluster galaxy sample (156 galaxies; w91cl): w91cl_s.dat e. Courteau-Faber 1993 (321 galaxies; cf): cf_s.dat f. Han-Mould et al. 1992+, all cluster galaxies (427 galaxies; hmcl): hmcl_s.dat 3. The Grouped Spiral Galaxy Distance Files are: (Note: Group numbers in the wcf group (merged w91pp and cf) data file correspond to those in the w91pp and cf individual galaxy files. The hmw group file (merged w91cl and hmcl, 10

  8. Microcomputers and the Online Catalog: Changing How the Catalog Is Used.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayen, Emily Gallup

    The use of microcomputers with online catalogs is a partnership that is gaining wide acceptance and leading to dramatic changes in how we think about online catalogs. There are two major ways in which microcomputers are used in an online catalog system: (1) the microcomputer provides all the computer support for the entire system, i.e., the…

  9. Weapon container catalog. Volumes 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.A.; Higuera, M.C.

    1998-02-01

    The Weapon Container Catalog describes H-gear (shipping and storage containers, bomb hand trucks and the ancillary equipment required for loading) used for weapon programs and for special use containers. When completed, the catalog will contain five volumes. Volume 1 for enduring stockpile programs (B53, B61, B83, W62, W76, W78, W80, W84, W87, and W88) and Volume 2, Special Use Containers, are being released. The catalog is intended as a source of information for weapon program engineers and also provides historical information. The catalog also will be published on the SNL Internal Web and will undergo periodic updates.

  10. Adopting AACR 2: The Case for Not Closing the Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Joe A.; Gleim, David E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses closing card catalogs in research libraries in terms of feasibility and cost effectiveness and argues for continuing the catalog. Techniques for integrating the new headings into existing card catalogs, and the advantages of delaying the switchover are discussed. (MBR)

  11. The WFCAM multiwavelength Variable Star Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Dékány, I.; Catelan, M.; Cross, N. J. G.; Angeloni, R.; Leão, I. C.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Stellar variability in the near-infrared (NIR) remains largely unexplored. The exploitation of public science archives with data-mining methods offers a perspective for a time-domain exploration of the NIR sky. Aims: We perform a comprehensive search for stellar variability using the optical-NIR multiband photometric data in the public Calibration Database of the WFCAM Science Archive (WSA), with the aim of contributing to the general census of variable stars and of extending the current scarce inventory of accurate NIR light curves for a number of variable star classes. Methods: Standard data-mining methods were applied to extract and fine-tune time-series data from the WSA. We introduced new variability indices designed for multiband data with correlated sampling, and applied them for preselecting variable star candidates, i.e., light curves that are dominated by correlated variations, from noise-dominated ones. Preselection criteria were established by robust numerical tests for evaluating the response of variability indices to the colored noise characteristic of the data. We performed a period search using the string-length minimization method on an initial catalog of 6551 variable star candidates preselected by variability indices. Further frequency analysis was performed on positive candidates using three additional methods in combination, in order to cope with aliasing. Results: We find 275 periodic variable stars and an additional 44 objects with suspected variability with uncertain periods or apparently aperiodic variation. Only 44 of these objects had been previously known, including 11 RR Lyrae stars on the outskirts of the globular cluster M 3 (NGC 5272). We provide a preliminary classification of the new variable stars that have well-measured light curves, but the variability types of a large number of objects remain ambiguous. We classify most of the new variables as contact binary stars, but we also find several pulsating stars, among which

  12. Automated Title Page Cataloging: A Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weibel, Stuart; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes the design of a prototype rule-based system for the automation of descriptive cataloging from title pages. The discussion covers the results of tests of the prototype, major impediments to automatic cataloging from title pages, and prospects for further progress. The rules implemented in the prototype are appended. (16 references)…

  13. DIRAC File Replica and Metadata Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Poss, S.

    2012-12-01

    File replica and metadata catalogs are essential parts of any distributed data management system, which are largely determining its functionality and performance. A new File Catalog (DFC) was developed in the framework of the DIRAC Project that combines both replica and metadata catalog functionality. The DFC design is based on the practical experience with the data management system of the LHCb Collaboration. It is optimized for the most common patterns of the catalog usage in order to achieve maximum performance from the user perspective. The DFC supports bulk operations for replica queries and allows quick analysis of the storage usage globally and for each Storage Element separately. It supports flexible ACL rules with plug-ins for various policies that can be adopted by a particular community. The DFC catalog allows to store various types of metadata associated with files and directories and to perform efficient queries for the data based on complex metadata combinations. Definition of file ancestor-descendent relation chains is also possible. The DFC catalog is implemented in the general DIRAC distributed computing framework following the standard grid security architecture. In this paper we describe the design of the DFC and its implementation details. The performance measurements are compared with other grid file catalog implementations. The experience of the DFC Catalog usage in the CLIC detector project are discussed.

  14. Planning for the Catalogs: A Managerial Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Joseph A.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses problems inherent in planning for a transition from traditional card catalogs to other catalog forms. Some attention is given to the implications of the second edition of the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR II), the lack of an automated authority control system, and difficulties in obtaining machine-readable retrospective files.…

  15. An Approach to Developing Computer Catalogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Robin W.; Elrod, J. McRee

    1973-01-01

    A method of developing computer catalogs is proposed which does not require unit card conversion but rather the accumulation of data from operating programs. It is proposed that the bibliographic and finding functions of the catalog be separated, with the latter being the first automated. (8 references) (Author)

  16. Cataloging. ERIC Processing Manual, Section V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Carolyn R., Ed.

    Rules and guidelines are provided for ERIC catalogers and editors engaged in capturing bibliographic data for the documents and journal articles entered into the ERIC database. A general discussion of the principles of ERIC cataloging, definitions used, use of mandatory vs. optional data elements, etc. is provided in the Introduction. The body…

  17. Language and Cultural Minorities Resource Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agell, Charlotte, Comp.; And Others

    The revised and expanded 1992 version of the catalog lists almost 1,000 print and nonprint materials for use in elementary and secondary schools with linguistic minorities. The catalog contains 20 sections: Afghan; Asian and refugee; bilingual education; Chinese; civil rights; Poland; English as a Second Language (ESL); ESL instructional…

  18. Classification and Cataloging. Library Science 427.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Donald L.

    An introductory letter, a list of general instructions on how to proceed with a correspondence course, a syllabus with examples of title pages and catalog cards, and an examination request form are presented for a correspondence course in classification and cataloging offered by the University of New Mexico's Division of Continuing Education and…

  19. The Celescope catalog of ultraviolet observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Data obtained from approximately 7500 ultraviolet television pictures are used to compile a celescope catalog of ultraviolet observations. This catalog lists the magnitude as observed in each of celescope's four ultraviolet color bands, the standard deviations of the observed ultraviolet magnitudes, positions, identifications, and ground based magnitudes, colors, and spectral types for approximately 5000 stars.

  20. Cataloging-In-Publication: Problems and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingate, Henry W.

    1972-01-01

    The Cataloging-in-Publication program faces a number of difficult problems. The difficulties that resulted in the failure of the 1958-59 Cataloging-in-Source program still exist, and the actual value of such a project to libraries has yet to be proved. (26 references) (Author/SJ)

  1. Short Films for Physics Teaching, A Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluestone, Barbara Z.; Roth, Richard F.

    This annotated film catalog is a product of the Conference on Single Concept Films in College Physics Teaching sponsored by the Commission on College Physics. Both 8mm and 16mm single concept films are listed for physics and related disciplines. The catalog includes commercial, noncommercial, and foreign films. However, the film coverage was…

  2. The Library Catalog in a Computerized Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinconico, S. Michael

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the need to impose a rigidly controlled structure on the machine-readable catalog, the machine capabilities and limitations for achieving that control, possibilities for machine control of the catalog, and the extension of those possibilities to permit a degree of control not possible in a manual system. (Author/LS)

  3. Auditory Learning Materials for Special Education: Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marsha C.; O'Connor, Phyllis

    The catalog (developed by the Great Lakes Region Special Education Instructional Materials Center) provides information on more than 100 auditory learning materials for use in special education. Described in the first section of the catalog are procedures used to evaluate and classify auditory instructional materials, including a list of…

  4. The Career Education Resource Center Annotated Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawhead, Jeanie; And Others

    This catalog provides an annotated list of the career education materials which may be borrowed for previewing from the Career Education Resource Center in Colorado. Covering materials of interest to educators in kindergarten through postsecondary programs, the catalog includes items produced by classroom teachers, commercial publishers, business…

  5. Catalog Federation and Interoperability for Geoinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memon, A.; Lin, K.; Baru, C.

    2008-12-01

    With the increasing proliferation of online resources in the geosciences, including data, tools, and software services, there is also a proliferation of catalogs containing metadata that describe these resources. To realize the vision articulated in the NSF Workshop on Building a National Geoinformatics System, March 2007-where a user can sit at a terminal and easily search, discover, integrate and use distributed geoscience resources-it will be essential that a search request be able to traverse these multiple metadata catalogs. In this paper, we describe our effort at prototyping catalog interoperability across multiple metadata catalogs. An example of a metadata catalog is the one employed in the GEON Project (www.geongrid.org). The central GEON catalog can be searched using spatial, temporal, and other metadata-based search criteria. The search can be invoked as a Web service and, therefore, can be imbedded in any software application. There has been a requirement from some of the GEON collaborators (for example, at the University of Hyderabad, India and the Navajo Technical College, New Mexico) to deploy their own catalogs, to store information about their resources locally, while they publish some of this information for broader access and use. Thus, a search must now be able to span multiple, independent GEON catalogs. Next, some of our collaborators-e.g. GEO Grid (Global Earth Observations Grid) in Japan-are implementing the Catalog Services for the Web (CS-W) standard for their catalog, thereby requiring the search to span across catalogs implemented using the CS-W standard as well. Finally, we have recently deployed a search service to access all EarthScope data products, which are distributed across organizations in Seattle, WA (IRIS), Boulder, CO (UNAVCO), and Potsdam, Germany (ICDP/GFZ). This service essentially implements a virtual catalog (the actual catalogs and data are stored at the remote locations). So, there is the need to incorporate such 3rd

  6. Catalog of Infrared Observations, Third Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Pitts, Patricia S.; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1993-01-01

    The Far Infrared Supplement contains a subset of the data in the full Catalog of Infrared Observations (all observations at wavelengths greater than 4.6 microns). The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO), NASA RP-1294, is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of scientific journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature search is complete for years 1965 through 1990 in this Third Edition. The Catalog contains about 210,000 observations of roughly 20,000 individual sources and supporting appendices. The expanded Third Edition contains coded IRAS 4-band data for all CIO sources detected by IRAS. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions (also included in this volume), two bibliographies of Catalog listings, and an atlas of infrared spectral ranges. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed, microfiche, and magnetic-tape formats.

  7. THE 37 MONTH MAXI/GSC SOURCE CATALOG OF THE HIGH GALACTIC-LATITUDE SKY

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroi, Kazuo; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Hayashida, Masaaki; Shidatsu, Megumi; Sato, Ryosuke; Kawamuro, Taiki; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Serino, Motoko; Matsuoka, Masaru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Nakahira, Satoshi; Tomida, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Morii, Mikio; Nakajima, Motoki; Negoro, Hitoshi; Sakamoto, Takanori; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; and others

    2013-08-15

    We present a catalog of high Galactic-latitude (|b| > 10 Degree-Sign ) X-ray sources detected in the first 37 months of data of the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image/Gas Slit Camera (MAXI/GSC). To achieve the best sensitivity, we develop a background model of the GSC that well reproduces the data based on the detailed on-board calibration. Source detection is performed through image fits with a Poisson likelihood algorithm. The catalog contains 500 objects detected with significances of s{sub D,4-10keV} {>=} 7 in the 4-10 keV band. The limiting sensitivity is Almost-Equal-To 7.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} ( Almost-Equal-To 0.6 mCrab) in the 4-10 keV band for 50% of the survey area, which is the highest ever achieved in an all-sky survey mission covering this energy band. We summarize the statistical properties of the catalog and results from cross matching with the Swift/BAT 70 month catalog, the meta-catalog of X-ray detected clusters of galaxies, and the MAXI/GSC 7 month catalog. Our catalog lists the source name (2MAXI), position and its error, detection significances and fluxes in the 4-10 keV and 3-4 keV bands, the hardness ratio, and the basic information of the likely counterpart available for 296 sources.

  8. Planning and developing the Chandra Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ian N.; Evans, Janet D.; Fabbiano, Guiseppina; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; McCollough, Michael L.; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Primini, Francis A.; Rots, Arnold H.

    2008-07-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog, presently being developed by the Chandra X-ray Center, will be the definitive catalog of all X-ray sources detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The catalog interface will provide users with a simple mechanism to perform advanced queries on the data content of the archival holdings on a source-by-source basis for X-ray sources matching user-specified search criteria, and is intended to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. For each detected X-ray source, the catalog will record commonly tabulated quantities that can be queried, including source position, dimensions, multi-band fluxes, hardness ratios, and variability statistics, derived from all of the observations that include the source within the field of view. However, in addition to these traditional catalog elements, for each X-ray source the catalog will include an extensive set of file-based data products that can be manipulated interactively by the catalog user, including source images, event lists, light curves, and spectra from each observation in which a source is detected. In this paper, we emphasize the design and development of the Chandra Source Catalog. We describe the evaluation process used to plan the data content of the catalog, and the selection of the tabular properties and file-based data products to be provided to the user. We discuss our approach for managing catalog updates derived from either additional data from new observations or from improvements to calibrations and/or analysis algorithms.

  9. Are Earthquake Magnitudes Clustered?

    SciTech Connect

    Davidsen, Joern; Green, Adam

    2011-03-11

    The question of earthquake predictability is a long-standing and important challenge. Recent results [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 098501 (2007); ibid.100, 038501 (2008)] have suggested that earthquake magnitudes are clustered, thus indicating that they are not independent in contrast to what is typically assumed. Here, we present evidence that the observed magnitude correlations are to a large extent, if not entirely, an artifact due to the incompleteness of earthquake catalogs and the well-known modified Omori law. The latter leads to variations in the frequency-magnitude distribution if the distribution is constrained to those earthquakes that are close in space and time to the directly following event.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Centaurus Cluster catalog (Chiboucas+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiboucas, K.; Mateo, M.

    2007-09-01

    Observations of A3526 (Centaurus, 12:48:51.8, -41:18:21, J2000.0) were acquired with the LCO 1m and a TEK 2K Camera having a field of view of 20.48' and scale size 0.6"/pix on 1993 13-20 May and 1997 1-8 May. (1 data file).

  11. Featured Image: Star Clusters in M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    This beautiful mosaic of images of the Whirlpool galaxy (M51) and its companion was taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This nearby, grand-design spiral galaxy has a rich population of star clusters, making it both a stunning target for imagery and an excellent resource for learning about stellar formation and evolution. In a recent study, Rupali Chandar (University of Toledo) and collaborators cataloged over 3,800 compact star clusters within this galaxy. They then used this catalog to determine the distributions for the clusters ages, masses, and sizes, which can provide important clues as to how star clusters form, evolve, and are eventually disrupted. You can read more about their study and what they discovered in the paper below.CitationRupali Chandar et al 2016 ApJ 824 71. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/824/2/71

  12. A Catalog of Geologic Data for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.

    2005-08-01

    This revision of the geologic data catalog incorporates new boreholes drilled after September 2002 as well as other older wells, particularly from the 600 Area, omitted from the earlier catalogs. Additionally, borehole geophysical log data have been added to the catalog. This version of the geologic data catalog now contains 3,519 boreholes and is current with boreholes drilled as of November 2004.

  13. Integrating Electronic Resources into the Library Catalog: A Collaborative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Gail; Aldana, Lynda

    2001-01-01

    Describes a project at the University of Mississippi Libraries to catalog purchased electronic resources so that access to these resources is available only via the Web-based library catalog. Discusses collaboration between cataloging and systems personnel; and describes the MARC catalog record field that contains the information needed to locate…

  14. Cataloging and Expert Systems: AACR2 as a Knowledge Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjerppe, Roland; Olander, Birgitta

    1989-01-01

    Describes a project that developed two expert systems for library cataloging using the second edition of the Anglo American Cataloging Rules (AACR2) as a knowledge base. The discussion covers cataloging as interpretation, the structure of AACR2, and the feasibility of using expert systems for cataloging in traditional library settings. (26…

  15. Cooperative Cataloging: LC Promotes Cooperation at Asian Materials Seminar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fineberg, Gail

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the Asian Materials Cataloging Seminar that the Library of Congress sponsored to promote the benefits of cooperative cataloging. Highlights include the Program for Cooperative Cataloging (PCC); high-quality, standardized, core-level cataloging records for Asian materials; name authority and subject authority programs; and the CONSER…

  16. Specifications for a COM Catalog Designed for Government Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Nora S.; And Others

    Prepared in MARC format in accordance with the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC) standards, these specifications were developed at Colorado State University to catalog a group of government publications not listed in the Monthly Catalog of United States Publications. The resulting microfiche catalog produced through the OCLC Cataloging Subsystem…

  17. Richness-based masses of rich and famous galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreon, S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a catalog of galaxy cluster masses derived by exploiting the tight correlation between mass and richness, i.e., a properly computed number of bright cluster galaxies. The richness definition adopted in this work is properly calibrated, shows a small scatter with mass, and has a known evolution, which means that we can estimate accurate (0.16 dex) masses more precisely than by adopting any other richness estimates or X-ray or SZ-based proxies based on survey data. We measured a few hundred galaxy clusters at 0.05 < z < 0.22 in the low-extinction part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey footprint that are in the 2015 catalog of Planck-detected clusters, that have a known X-ray emission, that are in the Abell catalog, or that are among the most most cited in the literature. Diagnostic plots and direct images of clusters are individually inspected and we improved cluster centers and, when needed, we revised redshifts. Whenever possible, we also checked for indications of contamination from other clusters on the line of sight, and found ten such cases. All this information, with the derived cluster mass values, are included in the distributed value-added cluster catalog of the 275 clusters with a derived mass larger than 1014M⊙. Finally, in a technical appendix we illustrate with Planck clusters how to minimize the sensitivity of comparisons between masses listed in different catalogs to the specific overlapping of the considerd subsamples, a problem recognized but not solved in the literature. Full Table 1 is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A158A web front-end is available at the URL http://www.brera.mi.astro.it/~andreon/famous.html

  18. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E; Bonnell, J.; Cannon, A.; Celik O.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Johnson, T. E.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L; Scargle, J. D.; Stephens, T. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24-month period. The Second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in 5 energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 11eV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely gamma-ray-producing source classes.

  19. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE SECOND SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, P. L.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Belfiore, A.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bignami, G. F. E-mail: Gino.Tosti@pg.infn.it E-mail: tburnett@u.washington.edu; and others

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely {gamma}-ray-producing source classes.

  20. Development of 2MASS Catalog Server Kit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Chisato

    2011-11-01

    We develop a software kit called "2MASS Catalog Server Kit" to easily construct a high-performance database server for the 2MASS Point Source Catalog (includes 470,992,970 objects) and several all-sky catalogs. Users can perform fast radial search and rectangular search using provided stored functions in SQL similar to SDSS SkyServer. Our software kit utilizes open-source RDBMS, and therefore any astronomers and developers can install our kit on their personal computers for research, observation, etc. Out kit is tuned for optimal coordinate search performance. We implement an effective radial search using an orthogonal coordinate system, which does not need any techniques that depend on HTM or HEALpix. Applying the xyz coordinate system to the database index, we can easily implement a system of fast radial search for relatively small (less than several million rows) catalogs. To enable high-speed search of huge catalogs on RDBMS, we apply three additional techniques: table partitioning, composite expression index, and optimization in stored functions. As a result, we obtain satisfactory performance of radial search for the 2MASS catalog. Our system can also perform fast rectangular search. It is implemented using techniques similar to those applied for radial search. Our way of implementation enables a compact system and will give important hints for a low-cost development of other huge catalog databases.

  1. Centralized automated cataloging of health science materials in the MLC/SUNY/OCLC shared cataloging service.

    PubMed Central

    Raper, J E

    1977-01-01

    Since February 1976, The Medical Library Center of New York, with the assistance of the SUNY/OCLC Network, has offered, on a subscription basis, a centralized automated cataloging service to health science libraries in the greater metropolitan New York area. By using workforms and prints of OCLC record (amended by the subscribing participants), technical services personnel at the center have fed cataloging data, via a CRT terminal, into the OCLC system, which provides (1) catalog cards, received in computer filing order; (2) book card, spine, and pocket labels; (3) accessions lists; and (4) data for eventual production of book catalogs and union catalogs. The experience of the center in the development, implementation, operation, and budgeting of its shared cataloging service is discussed. PMID:843650

  2. Catalog of infrared observations. Part 2: Appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1987-01-01

    The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of astronomical journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature searches are complete for years 1965 to 1986. Supporting appendixes are published in this part. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions, two bibliographies of infrared literature upon which the search was based, and, keyed to the main Catalog listings (organized alphabetically by first author, and by date), an atlas of infrared spectral ranges, and IRAS data for the CIO sources. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed microfiche and magnetic tape formats.

  3. redMaPPer II: X-Ray and SZ Performance Benchmarks for the SDSS Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.

    2014-03-01

    We evaluate the performance of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 redMaPPer photometric cluster catalog by comparing it to overlapping X-ray- and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ)-selected catalogs from the literature. We confirm that the redMaPPer photometric redshifts are nearly unbiased (langΔzrang <= 0.005), have low scatter (σ z ≈ 0.006-0.02, depending on redshift), and have a low catastrophic failure rate (≈1%). Both the TX -λ and M gas-λ scaling relations are consistent with a mass scatter of σln M|λ ≈ 25%, albeit with a ≈1% outlier rate due to projection effects (λ is the cluster richness estimated employed by redMaPPer). This failure rate is somewhat lower than that expected for the full cluster sample but is consistent with the additional selection effects introduced by our reliance on X-ray and SZ selected reference cluster samples. Where the redMaPPer DR8 catalog is volume-limited (z <= 0.35), the catalog is 100% complete above TX >~ 3.5 keV, and LX >~ 2 × 1044 erg s-1, decreasing to 90% completeness at LX ≈ 1043 erg s-1. All rich (λ >~ 100), low-redshift (z <~ 0.25) redMaPPer clusters are X-ray-detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey, and 86% of the clusters are correctly centered. Compared to other SDSS photometric cluster catalogs, redMaPPer has the highest completeness and purity, and the best photometric redshift performance, though some algorithms do achieve comparable performance to redMaPPer in subsets of the above categories and/or in limited redshift ranges. The redMaPPer richness is clearly the one that best correlates with X-ray temperature and gas mass. Most algorithms (including redMaPPer) have very similar centering performance as tested by comparing against X-ray centers, with only one exception which performs worse.

  4. The Gaia Initial Quasar Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, H.; Antón, S.; Taris, F.; Bourda, G.; Souchay, J.; Bouquillon, J.; Barache, C.; Pereira Osorio, J. J.; Charlot, P.; Vieira Martins, R.; Lambert, S.; Camargo, J. I.; da Silva Neto, D. N.; Assan, M.; le Campion, J.-F.

    2014-12-01

    We present the latest, updated, and fully corrected version of the Gaia Initial QSO Catalog (GIQC), produced by the CU3 GWP-S-335-13000. It contains 1 248 372 objects, of which 191 802 are considered and marked as Defining ones, because of their observational history and existence of spectroscopic redshift. Also objects with strong, calibrator-like radio emission are included in this category. The Defining objects represent a clean sample of quasars. The remaining objects aim to bring completeness to the GIQC at the time of its compilation. For the whole GIQC the average density is 30.3 sources per sq.deg., practically all sources have an indication of magnitude and of morphological indexes, and 90% of the sources have an indication of redshift and of variability indexes.

  5. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Coverage Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  6. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Coverage Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  7. Data catalog of satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This catalog is divided into three sections: data description contains descriptions of data available at or through NSSDC as well as descriptions of the experiments and spacecraft from which the data originated; and supporting data contains brief descriptions of space environment models and programs distributed by NSSDC. Section 3 is a series of indexes that contain: (1) a listing of all spacecraft, experiment, and data descriptions presented in Section 1 plus tables indicating the period for which each spacecraft was operational; (2) an index of all spacecraft described here, identified by common names and alternate names; (3) a listing of the original experiment institutions for all experiments described; (4) a listing of the investigators associated with the experiments and their current affiliations; and (5) an index of all experiments sorted by phenomenon measured.

  8. Catalog of electronic data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The catalog lists and describes the public-use data files produced by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). More than 500 public-use data files, representing most of the NCHS data collection programs, are available for purchase and use. Public-use data files are prepared and disseminated to speed and enhance access to the full scope of data. NCHS data systems include a national vital registration program; household interview and health examination surveys; surveys of hospitals, nursing homes, physicians, and other health care providers; and other periodic or occasional data collection activities to produce a wide spectrum of health and health-related data. NCHS data users encompass all levels of government, the academic and research communities, and business. The majority of the data files released by NCHS contain microdata to allow researchers to aggregate findings in whatever format appropriate for their analyses.

  9. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This report lists 1878 video productions from the NASA STI Database. This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The listing of the entries is arranged by STAR categories. A complete Table of Contents describes the scope of each category. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  10. NASA Video Catalog. Supplement 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This issue of the NASA Video Catalog cites video productions listed in the NASA STI Database. The videos listed have been developed by the NASA centers, covering Shuttle mission press conferences; fly-bys of planets; aircraft design, testing and performance; environmental pollution; lunar and planetary exploration; and many other categories related to manned and unmanned space exploration. Each entry in the publication consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied by an abstract. The Table of Contents shows how the entries are arranged by divisions and categories according to the NASA Scope and Coverage Category Guide. For users with specific information, a Title Index is available. A Subject Term Index, based on the NASA Thesaurus, is also included. Guidelines for usage of NASA audio/visual material, ordering information, and order forms are also available.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: US Naval Observatory Pleiades Catalog (Van Flandern 1969)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Flandern, T. C.

    1996-02-01

    This catalog is a special subset of the Eichhorn et al. (1970) Pleiades catalog (see ) updated to B1950.0 positions and with proper motions added. It was prepared for the purpose of predicting occultations of Pleiades stars by the Moon, but is useful for general applications because it contains many faint stars not present in the current series of large astrometric catalogs. (1 data file).

  12. Cataloging of the Northern Sky from the POSS-II using a Next-Generation Software Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djorgovski, S. G.; Weir, N.; Fayyad, U.

    , including the studies of large-scale structure, Galactic structure, automatic identifications of sources from other wavelengths (radio through x-ray), generation of objective catalogs of clusters and groups of galaxies, searches for quasars, variable or extreme-color objects, etc.

  13. Applying Machine Learning to Star Cluster Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorenko, Kristina; Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela; Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Catalogs describing populations of star clusters are essential in investigating a range of important issues, from star formation to galaxy evolution. Star cluster catalogs are typically created in a two-step process: in the first step, a catalog of sources is automatically produced; in the second step, each of the extracted sources is visually inspected by 3-to-5 human classifiers and assigned a category. Classification by humans is labor-intensive and time consuming, thus it creates a bottleneck, and substantially slows down progress in star cluster research.We seek to automate the process of labeling star clusters (the second step) through applying supervised machine learning techniques. This will provide a fast, objective, and reproducible classification. Our data is HST (WFC3 and ACS) images of galaxies in the distance range of 3.5-12 Mpc, with a few thousand star clusters already classified by humans as a part of the LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey) project. The classification is based on 4 labels (Class 1 - symmetric, compact cluster; Class 2 - concentrated object with some degree of asymmetry; Class 3 - multiple peak system, diffuse; and Class 4 - spurious detection). We start by looking at basic machine learning methods such as decision trees. We then proceed to evaluate performance of more advanced techniques, focusing on convolutional neural networks and other Deep Learning methods. We analyze the results, and suggest several directions for further improvement.

  14. Cosmology with galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoris, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Clusters of galaxies are powerful probes to constrain parameters that describe the cosmological models and to distinguish among different models. Since, the evolution of the cluster mass function and large-scale clustering contain the informations about the linear growth rate of perturbations and the expansion history of the Universe, clusters have played an important role in establishing the current cosmological paradigm. It is crucial to know how to determine the cluster mass from observational quantities when using clusters as cosmological tools. For this, numerical simulations are helpful to define and study robust cluster mass proxies that have minimal and well understood scatter across the mass and redshift ranges of interest. Additionally, the bias in cluster mass determination can be constrained via observations of the strong and weak lensing effect, X-ray emission, the Sunyaev- Zel’dovic effect, and the dynamics of galaxies.A major advantage of X-ray surveys is that the observable-mass relation is tight. Moreover, clusters can be easily identified in X-ray as continuous, extended sources. As of today, interesting cosmological constraints have been obtained from relatively small cluster samples (~102), X-ray selected by the ROSAT satellite over a wide redshift range (0clusters, the ROSAT All-Sky Survey.The next generation of X-ray telescopes will enhance the statistics of detected clusters and enlarge their redshift coverage. In particular, eROSITA will produce a catalog of >105 clusters with photometric redshifts from multi-band optical surveys (e.g. PanSTARRS, DES, and LSST). This will vastly improve upon current cosmological constraints, especially by the synergy with other cluster surveys that

  15. Online Catalog for Filament-Sigmoid Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merriot, Ivy; Pevtsov, A.; Martens, P.

    2007-05-01

    A new online catalog correlating H-alpha filaments with SXT sigmoids gives researchers, teachers and pre-college students the ability to access digital H-alpha images online that were previously available only at the physical location of the NSO at Sunspot, NM. This web-based catalog correlates SOHO's SXT sigmoids from 1993-1998 as described in a non-online catalog created by Zach Blehm under the direction of Richard Canfield, MSU-Bozeman, with H-alpha filament activity as described by Ivy Merriot under the direction of Alexei Pevtsov, NSO, and Petrus Martens, MSU-Bozeman. The H-alpha images were digitized from film archives of the Flare Patrol Telescope at Sunspot, NM. Use of the online catalog will be demonstrated at the poster site with critical comments encouraged.

  16. Catalogs of Space Shuttle earth observations photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lulla, Kamlesh; Helfert, Michael

    1990-01-01

    A review is presented of postflight cataloging and indexing activities of mission data obtained from Space Shuttle earth observations photography. Each Space Shuttle mission acquires 1300-4400 photographs of the earth that are reviewed and interpreted by a team of photointerpreters and cataloging specialists. Every photograph's manual and electronic set of plots is compared for accuracy of its locational coordinates. This cataloging activity is a critical and principal part of postflight activity and ensures that the database is accurate, updated and consequently made meaningful for further utilization in the applications and research communities. A final product in the form of a Catalog of Space Shuttle Earth Observations Handheld Photography is published for users of this database.

  17. Mexican Earthquakes and Tsunamis Catalog Reviewed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.; Castillo-Aja, R.

    2015-12-01

    Today the availability of information on the internet makes online catalogs very easy to access by both scholars and the public in general. The catalog in the "Significant Earthquake Database", managed by the National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI formerly NCDC), NOAA, allows access by deploying tabular and cartographic data related to earthquakes and tsunamis contained in the database. The NCEI catalog is the product of compiling previously existing catalogs, historical sources, newspapers, and scientific articles. Because NCEI catalog has a global coverage the information is not homogeneous. Existence of historical information depends on the presence of people in places where the disaster occurred, and that the permanence of the description is preserved in documents and oral tradition. In the case of instrumental data, their availability depends on the distribution and quality of seismic stations. Therefore, the availability of information for the first half of 20th century can be improved by careful analysis of the available information and by searching and resolving inconsistencies. This study shows the advances we made in upgrading and refining data for the earthquake and tsunami catalog of Mexico since 1500 CE until today, presented in the format of table and map. Data analysis allowed us to identify the following sources of error in the location of the epicenters in existing catalogs: • Incorrect coordinate entry • Place name erroneous or mistaken • Too general data that makes difficult to locate the epicenter, mainly for older earthquakes • Inconsistency of earthquakes and the tsunami occurrence: earthquake's epicenter located too far inland reported as tsunamigenic. The process of completing the catalogs directly depends on the availability of information; as new archives are opened for inspection, there are more opportunities to complete the history of large earthquakes and tsunamis in Mexico. Here, we also present new earthquake and

  18. The Magellan volcanic and magmatic feature catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Aubele, Jayne C.; Head, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    A catalog summarizing the location and characteristics of 1663 volcanic and magmatic centers identified in Magellan radar images of the surface of Venus is in final preparation to be submitted as a Geological Society of America Special Paper. The following is a brief summary preview of the contents and methods used in assembling the final data set, the organization of the catalog, and other notes of interest to potential users.

  19. CMR Catalog Service for the Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Doug; Mitchell, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    With the impending retirement of Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) the Common Metadata Repository (CMR) was charged with providing a collection-level Catalog Service for the Web (CSW) that provided the same level of functionality as GCMD. This talk describes the capabilities of the CMR CSW API with particular reference to the support of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) Integrated Catalog (CWIC).

  20. Cataloging Common Sedimentary and Deformation Features in Valles Marineris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urso, A.; Okubo, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    The sedimentary deposits in the Valles Marineris region of Mars are investigated to build a catalog of sedimentary and deformational features. The occurrence of these features provides new and important constraints on the origins of these sedimentary deposits and of their broader geologic histories. Regional surveys and mapping of these features is warranted given the plethora of recently acquired observations by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Select sedimentary and deformational features were identified using High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) observations and stereo pairs, along with Context camera images. Feature locations were cataloged using Java Mission-planning and Analysis for Remote Sensing (JMARS) the geospatial information system. Images acquired in and around Hebes, Ophir, Tithonium, Candor, Ius, Melas and Coprates Chasmata were the focus of this investigation. Mass wasting processes, soft-sediment deformation structures, and fan-like deposits are known to occur in abundance across the Valles Marineris region. For this reason, the features recorded in this investigation were landslides, contorted bedding, injectites, putative mud volcanoes, faults, folds, and fan-shaped deposits. Landslides, faults, and fan-shaped deposits were found to be common occurrences, while contorted bedding, injectites, putative mud volcanoes, and folds occur less frequently and in clusters. The placement and frequency of these features hint at past tectonic and depositional processes at work in Valles Marineris. This catalogue of sedimentary and deformational features in the Valles Marineris region of Mars is being used to define targets for future HiRISE observations.

  1. Investigating the kinematics of coronal mass ejections with the automated CORIMP catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jason P.

    2015-07-01

    Studying coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, compounded by the variations in their dynamics, morphology and frequency of occurrence. The large amounts of data available from missions like the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) make manual cataloging of CMEs tedious and prone to human error, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required and often preferred. A new coronal image processing catalog called CORIMP has been developed in an effort to achieve this, through the implementation of a dynamic background separation technique and multiscale edge detection. These algorithms together isolate and characterise CME structure in the field-of-view of the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard SOHO. CORIMP also applies a Savitzky-Golay filter, along with quadratic and linear fits, to the height-time measurements for better revealing the true CME speed and acceleration profiles across the plane-of-sky. Here we present a sample of new results from the CORIMP CME catalog, and directly compare them with the other automated catalogs of Computer Aided CME Tracking (CACTus) and Solar Eruptive Events Detection System (SEEDS), as well as the manual CME catalog at the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) Data Center and a previously published study of the sample events. We further investigate a form of unsupervised machine learning by using a k-means clustering algorithm to distinguish detections of multiple CMEs that occur close together in space and time. While challenges still exist, this investigation and comparison of results demonstrate the reliability and robustness of the CORIMP catalog, proving its effectiveness at detecting and tracking CMEs throughout the LASCO dataset.

  2. TRADEX autonomous catalog maintenance experiment (TRACM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six, Stephen W.; LeClair, Raymond A.

    1996-10-01

    The TRADEX radar at the Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR) introduces a new debris characteriation capability to the space surveillance commuity. A single-sensor debris cataloging capability for small uncorrelated targets (UCTs) was recently demonstrated in a TRADEX autonomous catalog maintenance (TRACM) experiment. The experiment validated a number of new TRADEX space surveillance tools and integrated them with the unique Stare and Chase mode in which TRADEX finds and tracks small UCTs (objects less than 10 cm in diameter) at a rate of one new object per hour. Orbital elements for Stare and Chase acquisitions were determined from recorded track data and were of sufficient quality to permit re-acquisition by TRaDEX on subsequent passes. The experimental procedure is described and results are summarized in terms of successful re-tracks for objects maintained in a local proof-of-concept catalog. The catalog was established during the second half of a two month effort and individual debris objects were cataloged for up to 26 days. Comparison of TRADEX re-track performance for UCTs versus re-track performance for objects already cataloged by the space surveillance network (SSN) are also indicated. Conclusions and recommendations for further work are included.

  3. Survey and Merging of Sunspot Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Laure; Clette, Frédéric

    2014-02-01

    In view of the construction of new sunspot-based activity indices and proxies, we conducted a comprehensive survey of all existing catalogs providing detailed parameters of photospheric features over long time intervals. Although there are a fair number of such catalogs, a global evaluation showed that they suffer from multiple limitations: finite or fragmented time coverage, limited temporal overlap between catalogs, and, more importantly, a mismatch in contents and conventions. Starting from the existing material, we demonstrate how the information from parallel catalogs can be merged to form a much more comprehensive record of sunspots and sunspot groups. To do this, we use the uniquely detailed Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD), which is already a composite of several ground-based observatories and of SOHO data, and the USAF/Mount Wilson catalog from the Solar Observing Optical Network (SOON). We also outline our cross-identification method, which was needed to match the non-overlapping solar active-region nomenclature. This proved to be the most critical and subtle step when working with multiple catalogs. This effort, focused here first on the last two solar cycles, should lead to a better central database that collects all available sunspot group parameters to address future solar-cycle studies beyond the traditional sunspot-index time series [ R i].

  4. ChaMP Serendipitous Galaxy Cluster Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Green, P.J.; Vikhlinin, A.; Kim, D.-W.; Perley, D.; Cameron, R.; Silverman, J.; Mossman, A.; Burenin, R.; Jannuzi, B.T.; Kim, M.; Smith, M.G.; Smith, R.C.; Tananbaum, H.; Wilkes, B.J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /SLAC /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Moscow, Space Res. Inst. /NOAO, Tucson /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.

    2006-04-03

    We present a survey of serendipitous extended X-ray sources and optical cluster candidates from the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP). Our main goal is to make an unbiased comparison of X-ray and optical cluster detection methods. In 130 archival Chandra pointings covering 13 square degrees, we use a wavelet decomposition technique to detect 55 extended sources, of which 6 are nearby single galaxies. Our X-ray cluster catalog reaches a typical flux limit of about {approx} 10{sup -14} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, with a median cluster core radius of 21''. For 56 of the 130 X-ray fields, we use the ChaMP's deep NOAO/4m MOSAIC g', r', and i' imaging to independently detect cluster candidates using a Voronoi tessellation and percolation (VTP) method. Red-sequence filtering decreases the galaxy fore/background contamination and provides photometric redshifts to z {approx} 0.7. From the overlapping 6.1 square degree X-ray/optical imaging, we find 115 optical clusters (of which 11% are in the X-ray catalog) and 28 X-ray clusters (of which 46% are in the optical VTP catalog). The median redshift of the 13 X-ray/optical clusters is 0.41, and their median X-ray luminosity (0.5-2 keV) is L{sub X} = (2.65 {+-} 0.19) x 10{sup 43} ergs s{sup -1}. The clusters in our sample that are only detected in our optical data are poorer on average ({approx} 4{sigma}) than the X-ray/optically matched clusters, which may partially explain the difference in the detection fractions.

  5. Open Access Metadata, Catalogers, and Vendors: The Future of Cataloging Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Emily Alinder

    2013-01-01

    The open access (OA) movement is working to transform scholarly communication around the world, but this philosophy can also apply to metadata and cataloging records. While some notable, large academic libraries, such as Harvard University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Cambridge, released their cataloging records under OA…

  6. BOOK CATALOG AND CARD CATALOG--A COST AND SERVICE STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHILDERS, THOMAS; AND OTHERS

    THIS STUDY, COVERING BOTH TECHNICAL AND PUBLIC SERVICES, IS BASED ON TWO YEARS' OPERATION OF THE CENTRAL LIBRARY AND BRANCHES OF THE BALTIMORE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY--THE LAST YEAR THE CARD CATALOG WAS USED AND THE FIRST YEAR OF USING THE COMPUTER-PRODUCED BOOK CATALOG. THE FIGURES, CONTAINING SOME EXTRAPOLATIONS, WERE OBTAINED FROM THE LIBRARY'S…

  7. The Corruption of Cataloging (and) Catalog Outsourcing: No Clear-Cut Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Michael; Holt, Glen

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of cataloging to library service and addresses some of the debilitating effects that downsizing or elimination of cataloging departments, combined with outsourcing, and the consequent decline in bibliographic integrity, have on library service. Includes a sidebar on outsourcing. (JKP)

  8. Preparing for the Use of Classification in Online Cataloging Systems and in Online Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Pauline A.; Markey, Karen

    1985-01-01

    Presents overview of library classification and automation (1940-84), including use of Dewey Decimal and Library of Congress classification in online cataloging systems. Highlights include classification number access in existing online catalogs, functions of classification records, specifications for authority file records, and the nature of…

  9. Catalog of Apollo experiment operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    This catalog reviews Apollo mission reports, preliminary science reports, technical crew debriefings, lunar surface operations plans, and various relevant lunar experiment documents, collecting engineering- and operation-specific information by experiment. It is organized by discrete experimental and equipment items emplaced or operated on the lunar surface or at zero gravity during the Apollo missions. It also attempts to summarize some of the general problems encountered on the surface and provides guidelines for the design of future lunar surface experiments with an eye toward operations. Many of the problems dealt with on the lunar surface originated from just a few novel conditions that manifested themselves in various nasty ways. Low gravity caused cables to stick up and get caught on feet, and also made it easy for instruments to tip over. Dust was a problem and caused abrasion, visibility, and thermal control difficulties. Operating in a pressure suit limited a person's activity, especially in the hands. I hope to capture with this document some of the lessons learned from the Apollo era to make the jobs of future astronauts, principle investigators, engineers, and operators of lunar experiments more productive.

  10. LANDSAT: Non-US standard catalog no. N-33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A catalog used for dissemination of information regarding the availability of LANDSAT imagery is presented. The Image Processing Facility of the Goddard Space Flight Center, publishes a U.S. and a Non-U.S. Standard Catalog on a monthly schedule, and the catalogs identify imagery which has been processed and input to the data files during the referenced month. The U.S. Standard Catalog includes imagery covering the continental United States, Alaska and Hawaii; the Non-U.S. Catalog identifies all the remaining coverage. Imagery adjacent to the continental U.S. and Alaska borders is included in the U.S. Standard Catalog.

  11. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Allam, Sahar S.; Budavari, Tamas; Casertano, Stefano; Downes, Ronald A.; Donaldson, Thomas; Fall, S. Michael; Lubow, Stephen H.; Quick, Lee; Strolger, Louis -Gregory; et al

    2016-05-11

    The Hubble Source Catalog is designed to help optimize science from the Hubble Space Telescope by combining the tens of thousands of visit-based source lists in the Hubble Legacy Archive into a single master catalog. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog includes WFPC2, ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS, and WFC3/IR photometric data generated using SExtractor software to produce the individual source lists. The catalog includes roughly 80 million detections of 30 million objects involving 112 different detector/filter combinations, and about 160 thousand HST exposures. Source lists from Data Release 8 of the Hubble Legacy Archive are matched using an algorithm developed by Budavari & Lubow (2012). The mean photometric accuracy for the catalog as a whole is better than 0.10 mag, with relative accuracy as good as 0.02 mag in certain circumstances (e.g., bright isolated stars). The relative astrometric residuals are typically within 10 mas, with a value for the mode (i.e., most common value) of 2.3 mas. The absolute astrometric accuracy is better thanmore » $$\\sim$$0.1 arcsec for most sources, but can be much larger for a fraction of fields that could not be matched to the PanSTARRS, SDSS, or 2MASS reference systems. In this paper we describe the database design with emphasis on those aspects that enable the users to fully exploit the catalog while avoiding common misunderstandings and potential pitfalls. Here, we provide usage examples to illustrate some of the science capabilities and data quality characteristics, and briefly discuss plans for future improvements to the Hubble Source Catalog.« less

  12. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Cañadas, B.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chipaux, R.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; DeKlotz, M.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Enoto, T.; Escande, L.; Fabiani, D.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. E.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sbarra, C.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Etten, A.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes. We dedicate this paper to the memory of our colleague Patrick Nolan, who died on 2011 November 6. His career spanned much of the history of high-energy astronomy from space and his work on the Large Area Telescope (LAT) began nearly 20 years ago when it was just a concept. Pat was a central member in the operation of the LAT collaboration and he is greatly missed.

  13. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Allam, Sahar S.; Budavári, Tamás; Casertano, Stefano; Downes, Ronald A.; Donaldson, Thomas; Fall, S. Michael; Lubow, Stephen H.; Quick, Lee; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Wallace, Geoff; White, Richard L.

    2016-06-01

    The Hubble Source Catalog is designed to help optimize science from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by combining the tens of thousands of visit-based source lists in the Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) into a single master catalog. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog includes WFPC2, ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS, and WFC3/IR photometric data generated using SExtractor software to produce the individual source lists. The catalog includes roughly 80 million detections of 30 million objects involving 112 different detector/filter combinations, and about 160,000 HST exposures. Source lists from Data Release 8 of the HLA are matched using an algorithm developed by Budavári & Lubow. The mean photometric accuracy for the catalog as a whole is better than 0.10 mag, with relative accuracy as good as 0.02 mag in certain circumstances (e.g., bright isolated stars). The relative astrometric residuals are typically within 10 mas, with a value for the mode (i.e., most common value) of 2.3 mas. The absolute astrometric accuracy is better than 0''\\hspace{-0.5em}. 1 for most sources, but can be much larger for a fraction of fields that could not be matched to the PanSTARRS, SDSS, or 2MASS reference systems. In this paper we describe the database design with emphasis on those aspects that enable the users to fully exploit the catalog while avoiding common misunderstandings and potential pitfalls. We provide usage examples to illustrate some of the science capabilities and data quality characteristics, and briefly discuss plans for future improvements to the Hubble Source Catalog.

  14. Optical Cluster Detection in the Post-SDSS Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Near the conclusion of the first Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the development of optical cluster detection algorithms, quantification of their selection functions, and mass and redshift calibration hit full swing. Catalogs typically include thousands of massive (>1x1014 Msun) clusters reaching z 0.5, with selection functions that are routinely calibrated with realistic mock galaxy simulations, and cluster mass proxies that are cross-calibrated against X-ray, weak-lensing, dynamical, and SZ observations. All of this is folded into analyses that offer cosmological constraints competitive with catalogs created at other wavelengths. In this talk, these developments are reviewed from the perspective of the MaxBCG cluster catalog. The lessons learned from optical cluster-finding efforts are then turned to the next generation of optical/NIR surveys soon to come online, using the Dark Energy Survey (DES) as an example. In DES, this past experience guides the coordination of vast resources that will culminate in well-understood cluster catalogs specifically tailored to cosmological applications reaching z 1.

  15. The SDSS-ROSAT Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, R.; Computational AstroStatistics Team; SDSS Collaboration

    2000-10-01

    Clusters of galaxies are key tracers of the mass in the universe. Therefore, by studying their distribution and evolution, we can obtain strong constraints on the underlying cosmological model. This is especially true once cluster observations are combined with CMB and Supernovae data to form the ``Cosmic Triangle'' (Bahcall et al. 2000). To obtain high precision cluster observations, we need new, larger, catalogs of clusters that span a wide dynamic range in both redshift and mass as well as possessing a well-understood selection function. In this talk, I will outline the construction of such a catalog through the combination of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the ROSAT data (both archival pointings and the all-sky survey). This catalog is predicted to contain of the order of 10,000 clusters/groups out to z~=0.7 and thus provide a tight constraint on Ω m, the mass density of the universe (Δ Ω m < 10% at the 3σ level). To facilitate in the construction of this new catalog, we are employing new efficient statistics developed as part of a new collaboration - called ``Computational AstroStatistics'' - between Astrophysicists, Computer Scientists and Statisticians. I will review these new methodologies which include the use of the EM algorthm in classifying X-ray sources, the use of Mixture Models to simultaneously cluster X-ray and optical data and the use of multi-resolutional KD-trees for fast correlations between catalogues. This research is partially funded via an NSF KDI grant.

  16. GALAXY SCALE LENSES IN THE RCS2. I. FIRST CATALOG OF CANDIDATE STRONG LENSES

    SciTech Connect

    Anguita, T.; Barrientos, L. F.; Gladders, M. D.; Faure, C.; Yee, H. K. C.; Gilbank, D. G.

    2012-04-01

    We present the first galaxy scale lens catalog from the second Red-Sequence Cluster Survey. The catalog contains 60 lensing system candidates comprised of Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) lenses at 0.2 {approx}< z {approx}< 0.5 surrounded by blue arcs or apparent multiple images of background sources. The catalog is a valuable complement to previous galaxy-galaxy lens catalogs as it samples an intermediate lens redshift range and is composed of bright sources and lenses that allow easy follow-up for detailed analysis. Mass and mass-to-light ratio estimates reveal that the lens galaxies are massive ( M-bar {approx} 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} [M{sub Sun} h{sup -1}]) and rich in dark matter (M/L-bar{approx} 14 [M{sub Sun }/L{sub Sun ,B} h]). Even though a slight increasing trend in the mass-to-light ratio is observed from z = 0.2 to z = 0.5, current redshift and light profile measurements do not allow stringent constraints on the mass-to-light ratio evolution of LRGs.

  17. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. II. CATALOG OF THE IMAGE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Rosolowsky, Erik; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul; Ginsburg, Adam; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Glenn, Jason; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Bradley, E. Todd; Aguirre, James; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2010-05-15

    We present a catalog of 8358 sources extracted from images produced by the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). The BGPS is a survey of the millimeter dust continuum emission from the northern Galactic plane. The catalog sources are extracted using a custom algorithm, Bolocat, which was designed specifically to identify and characterize objects in the large-area maps generated from the Bolocam instrument. The catalog products are designed to facilitate follow-up observations of these relatively unstudied objects. The catalog is 98% complete from 0.4 Jy to 60 Jy over all object sizes for which the survey is sensitive (<3.'5). We find that the sources extracted can best be described as molecular clumps-large dense regions in molecular clouds linked to cluster formation. We find that the flux density distribution of sources follows a power law with dN/dS {proportional_to} S {sup -2.4{+-}0.1} and that the mean Galactic latitude for sources is significantly below the midplane: (b) = (-0.{sup 0}095 {+-} 0.{sup 0}001).

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: New list of OB associations (Melnik+, 1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, A. M.; Efremov, Yu. N.

    1997-07-01

    We identified 88 associations with at least 5 members which average characteristics are shown in Table 1 of the paper by Mel'nik and Efremov (1995PAZh...21...13M). The new table (list.dat) exhibits the list of 1392 stars -- members of 88 associations of the new partition. For each star we give its name, spectral type, V magnitude, galactic coordinates l and b, distance from the Sun rBH. All these values are taken from the catalog by Blaha and Humphreys (1989AJ..98...1598B) which includes two parts: the catalog of young stars -- members of associations or clusters and the catalog of field stars. The last two columns exhibit the name of association to which the star is included in the partition by Blaha and Humphreys (Assc_BH) and in the partition by Mel'nik and Efremov (Assc_ME). The letter F in the last but one column means that it is a field star in the catalog by Blaha and Humphreys (1989AJ..98...1598B). There are some evidences that the distance scale by Blaha and Humphreys (r_BH) should be shorten by 10-20% (Dambis et al. 2001AstL..27...58D; Mel'nik and Dambis 2009, Cat. J/MNRAS/400/518). (2 data files).

  19. A White Spruce Gene Catalog for Conifer Genome Analyses1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rigault, Philippe; Boyle, Brian; Lepage, Pierre; Cooke, Janice E.K.; Bousquet, Jean; MacKay, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Several angiosperm plant genomes, including Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), poplar (Populus trichocarpa), and grapevine (Vitis vinifera), have been sequenced, but the lack of reference genomes in gymnosperm phyla reduces our understanding of plant evolution and restricts the potential impacts of genomics research. A gene catalog was developed for the conifer tree Picea glauca (white spruce) through large-scale expressed sequence tag sequencing and full-length cDNA sequencing to facilitate genome characterizations, comparative genomics, and gene mapping. The resource incorporates new and publicly available sequences into 27,720 cDNA clusters, 23,589 of which are represented by full-length insert cDNAs. Expressed sequence tags, mate-pair cDNA clone analysis, and custom sequencing were integrated through an iterative process to improve the accuracy of clustering outcomes. The entire catalog spans 30 Mb of unique transcribed sequence. We estimated that the P. glauca nuclear genome contains up to 32,520 transcribed genes owing to incomplete, partially sequenced, and unsampled transcripts and that its transcriptome could span up to 47 Mb. These estimates are in the same range as the Arabidopsis and rice transcriptomes. Next-generation methods confirmed and enhanced the catalog by providing deeper coverage for rare transcripts, by extending many incomplete clusters, and by augmenting the overall transcriptome coverage to 38 Mb of unique sequence. Genomic sample sequencing at 8.5% of the 19.8-Gb P. glauca genome identified 1,495 clusters representing highly repeated sequences among the cDNA clusters. With a conifer transcriptome in full view, functional and protein domain annotations clearly highlighted the divergences between conifers and angiosperms, likely reflecting their respective evolutionary paths. PMID:21730200

  20. SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, Ingrid; Pecanha, Viviane; Costa, J. E. S.; Koester, D.; Krzesinski, J.; Dufour, P.; Lachapelle, F.-R.; Bergeron, P.; Yip, Ching-Wa; Harris, Hugh C.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Althaus, L.; Corsico, A.

    2013-01-15

    We present a new catalog of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog. We find 20,407 white dwarf spectra, representing 19,712 stars, and provide atmospheric model fits to 14,120 DA and 1011 DB white dwarf spectra from 12,843 and 923 stars, respectively. These numbers represent more than a factor of two increase in the total number of white dwarf stars from the previous SDSS white dwarf catalogs based on DR4 data. Our distribution of subtypes varies from previous catalogs due to our more conservative, manual classifications of each star in our catalog, supplementing our automatic fits. In particular, we find a large number of magnetic white dwarf stars whose small Zeeman splittings mimic increased Stark broadening that would otherwise result in an overestimated log g if fit as a non-magnetic white dwarf. We calculate mean DA and DB masses for our clean, non-magnetic sample and find the DB mean mass is statistically larger than that for the DAs.

  1. Government documents and the online catalog.

    PubMed

    Lynch, F H; Lasater, M C

    1990-01-01

    Prior to planning for implementing the NOTIS system, the Vanderbilt Medical Center Library had not fully cataloged its government publications, and records for these materials were not in machine-readable format. A decision was made that patrons should need to look in only one place for all library materials, including the Health and Human Services Department publications received each year from the central library's Government Documents Unit. Beginning in 1985, these publications were added to the library's database, and the entire 7,200-piece collection is now in the online catalog. Working with these publications has taught the library much about the advantages and disadvantages of cataloging government documents in an online environment. It was found that OCLC cataloging copy is eventually available for most titles, although only about 10% of the records have MeSH headings. Staff time is the major expenditure; problems are caused by documents' irregular nature, frequent format changes, and difficult authority work. Since their addition to the online catalog, documents are used more and the library has better control. PMID:2295010

  2. A union catalog of monographs: another approach.

    PubMed

    Kronick, D A; Bowden, V M

    1978-07-01

    The rationale for and the production of the 1977 TALON Union Catalog of Monographs are described. The 158,859 records include the existing machine-readable records for six health sciences libraries plus the cataloging of six others, converted by matching other data bases and by keypunching. The method and costs of production are discussed. Use of Computer-Output-Microfiche (COM) significantly decreased the cost and time required for publication. The $.076 unit cost per entry, with both author and title access for the COM method, is almost one-half the unit cost for the previous method which offered only main-entry access. The TALON Catalog compares favorably with the Midwest Medical Union Catalog. The addition of the title index significantly increases its usefulness. However, the unique feature of the TALON Catalog may be its machine-readable form which offers the potential for quantitative analyses of health sciences library collections. Such data may be essential for rational management of limited library funds. PMID:678697

  3. The Catalog of Southern Ringed Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buta, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Catalog of Southern Ringed Galaxies (CSRG) is a comprehensive compilation of diameters, axis ratios, relative bar position angles, and morphologies of inner and outer rings, pseudorings, and lenses in 3692 galaxies south of declination -17 deg. The purpose of the catalog is to evaluate the idea that these ring phenomena are related to orbital resonances with a bar or oval in galaxy potentials. The catalog is based on visual inspection of most of the 606 fields of the Science Research Council (SRC) IIIa-J southern sky survey, with the ESO-B, ESO-R, and Palomar Sky surveys used as auxiliaries when needed for overexposed core regions. The catalog is most complete for SRC fields 1-303 (mostly south of declination -42 deg). In addition to ringed galaxies, a list of 859 mostly nonringed galaxies intended for comparison with other catalogs is provided. Other findings from the CSRG that are not based on statistics are the identification of intrinsic bar/ring misalignment; bars which underfill inner rings; dimpling of R'1 pseudorings; pointy, rectangular, or hexagonal inner or outer ring shapes; a peculiar polar-ring-related system; and other extreme examples of spiral structure and ring morphology.

  4. Catalog of infrared observations. Part 1: Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Schmitz, Marion; Mead, Jaylee M.

    1987-01-01

    The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) is a compilation of infrared astronomical observational data obtained from an extensive literature search of astronomical journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature searches are complete for 1965 through 1986 in this Second Edition. The Catalog is published in two parts, with the observational data (roughly 200,000 observations of 20,000 individual sources) listed in Part I, and supporting appendices in Part II. The expanded Second Edition contains a new feature: complete IRAS 4-band data for all CIO sources detected, listed with the main Catalog observations, as well as in complete detail in the Appendix. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions, two bibliographies of infrared literature upon which the search was based, and, keyed to the main Catalog listings (organized alphabetically by author and then chronologically), an atlas of infrared spectral ranges, and IRAS data from the CIO sources. The complete CIO database is available to qualified users in printed microfiche and magnetic tape formats.

  5. COSMIC: Software catalog 1991 edition diskette format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The PC edition of the annual COSMIC Software contains descriptions of the over 1,200 computer programs available for use within the United States as of January 1, 1991. By using the PC version of the catalog, it is possible to conduct extensive searches of the software inventory for programs that meet specific criteria. Elements such as program keywords, hardware specifications, source code languages, and title acronyms can be used for the basis of such searches. After isolating those programs that might be of best interest to the user, it is then possible to either view at the monitor, or generate a hardcopy listing of all information on those packages. In addition to the program elements that the user can search on, information such as total program size, distribution media, and program price, as well as extensive abstracts on the program, are also available to the user at this time. Another useful feature of the catalog allows for the retention of programs that meet certain search criteria between individual sessions of using the catalog. This allows users to save the information on those programs that are of interest to them in different areas of application. They can then recall a specific collection of programs for information retrieval or further search reduction if desired. In addition, this version of the catalog is adaptable to a network/shared resource environment, allowing multiple users access to a single copy of the catalog database simultaneously.

  6. Descriptive Cataloging: A Selected, Annotated Bibliography, 1984-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, C. Donald; Jones, Ellen

    1986-01-01

    This annotated bibliography of materials published during 1984-1985 on descriptive cataloging covers bibliographic control, Anglo American Cataloging Rules, 2nd edition (AACR2), specific types of materials, authority control, retrospective conversion, management issues, expert systems, and manuals. (EM)

  7. SKYMAP system description: Star catalog data base generation and utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The specifications, design, software description, and use of the SKYMAP star catalog system are detailed. The SKYMAP system was developed to provide an accurate and complete catalog of all stars with blue or visual magnitudes brighter than 9.0 for use by attitude determination programs. Because of the large number of stars which are brighter than 9.0 magnitude, efficient techniques of manipulating and accessing the data were required. These techniques of staged distillation of data from a Master Catalog to a Core Catalog, and direct access of overlapping zone catalogs, form the basis of the SKYMAP system. The collection and tranformation of data required to produce the Master Catalog data base is described. The data flow through the main programs and levels of star catalogs is detailed. The mathematical and logical techniques for each program and the format of all catalogs are documented.

  8. CPC2 - the Second Cape Photographic Catalog - Part Two - Conventional Plate Adjustment and Catalog Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.; de Vegt, C.; Nicholson, W.; Penston, M. J.

    1992-02-01

    The Second Cape Photographic Catalog CPC 2, containing positions and visual magnitudes of 276 t 31 stars in the approximate magnitude range V= 6.5-10.5 is the first modern photographic catalog project on the southern hemisphere with an optimal fourfold plate overlap pattern and an astrometrically optimized spectral bandpass in the yellow - red region (530-640 nm). During the period 1962-1972 a total number of 5820 plates has been taken at Cape Observatory with a newly designed 4-element lens (F:10, f=20O0 mm, 4°.1 × 4°.1 field, scale = 100" mm-1). All plates have two 3 min exposures, shifted by about 50" in declination. Plate measurement has been accomplished on the GALAXY astrometric measuring machine at RGO Herstmonceux. As a joint effort of RGO and Hamburg Observatories the astrometric data reduction and catalog construction is being performed at Hamburg Observatory whereas the photographic photometry which provided visual magnitudes for all program stars has been carried out entirely at RGO by M. Penston. Paper I deals with the project and catalog, while a completely independent block adjustment solution will be given in Paper III. This paper (II) describes the astrometric results based on the classical single plate adjustment. The adopted reference star catalog is the Southern Reference Star Catalog SRS, provided by USNO in two versions FK 4/B1950 and FK 5/J2000, together with a preliminary system of proper motions. Plate reductions have been carried out independently with these two catalog versions and results are given in both systems. For the plate reductions an 8-parameter weighted least squares solution has been adopted, with non orthogonal and plate tilt parameters as common unknowns for both exposures. Weights are based on an adopted constant m.e. of 110 mas for all x, y - measurements and individual catalog accuracies of the reference star positions. A small third order term of optical distortion, has been applied to the x, y - measurements before

  9. The Membership and Distance of the Open Cluster Collinder 419

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Gies, Douglas R.; Parks, J. Robert; Grundstrom, Erika D.; McSwain, M. Virginia; Berger, David H.; Mason, Brian D.; tenBrummelaar, Theo A.; Turner, Nils H.

    2010-01-01

    The young open cluster Collinder 419 surrounds the massive O star, HD 193322, that is itself a remarkable multiple star system containing at least four components. Here we present a discussion of the cluster distance based upon new spectral classifications of the brighter members, UBV photometry, and an analysis of astrometric and photometric data from the third U. S. Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog and Two Micron All Sky Survey Catalog. We determine an average cluster reddening of E(B - V) = 0.37 +/-.05 mag and a cluster distance of 741 plus or minus 36 pc. The cluster probably contains some very young stars that may include a reddened M3 III star, IRAS 20161+4035.

  10. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha; Sonne, Si Brask; Xia, Zhongkui; Qiu, Xinmin; Li, Xiaoping; Long, Hua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Dongya; Liu, Chuan; Fang, Zhiwei; Chou, Joyce; Glanville, Jacob; Hao, Qin; Kotowska, Dorota; Colding, Camilla; Licht, Tine Rask; Wu, Donghai; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Li, Junhua; Jia, Huijue; Lan, Zhou; Tremaroli, Valentina; Dworzynski, Piotr; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Doré, Joël; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Lin, John C; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Wang, Jun; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2015-10-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human counterpart, with 95.2% of its Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthologous groups in common. However, only 4.0% of the mouse gut microbial genes were shared (95% identity, 90% coverage) with those of the human gut microbiome. This catalog provides a useful reference for future studies. PMID:26414350

  11. Query driven visualization of astronomical catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddelmeijer, Hugo; Valentijn, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    Interactive visualization of astronomical catalogs requires novel techniques due to the huge volumes and complex structure of the data produced by existing and upcoming astronomical surveys. The creation as well as the disclosure of the catalogs can be handled by data pulling mechanisms (Buddelmeijer et al. 2011). These prevent unnecessary processing and facilitate data sharing by having users request the desired end products. In this work we present query driven visualization as a logical continuation of data pulling. Scientists can request catalogs in a declarative way and set process parameters directly from within the visualization. This results in profound interoperation between software with a high level of abstraction. New messages for the Simple Application Messaging Protocol are proposed to achieve this abstraction. Support for these messages are implemented in the Astro-WISE information system and in a set of demonstrational applications.

  12. 1990 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritt, Jeffrey, (Edited By); Jones, Berwyn E.

    1989-01-01

    PREFACE This catalog provides information about analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to support programs of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, the catalog lists cost, sample volume, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation techniques for samples to be submitted for analysis. Prices for services reflect operationa1 costs, the complexity of each analytical procedure, and the costs to ensure analytical quality control. The catalog consists of five parts. Part 1 is a glossary of terminology; Part 2 lists the bottles, containers, solutions, and other materials that are available through the NWQL; Part 3 describes the field processing of samples to be submitted for analysis; Part 4 describes analytical services that are available; and Part 5 contains indices of analytical methodology and Chemical Abstract Services (CAS) numbers. Nomenclature used in the catalog is consistent with WATSTORE and STORET. The user is provided with laboratory codes and schedules that consist of groupings of parameters which are measured together in the NWQL. In cases where more than one analytical range is offered for a single element or compound, different laboratory codes are given. Book 5 of the series 'Techniques of Water Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey' should be consulted for more information about the analytical procedures included in the tabulations. This catalog supersedes U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 86-232 '1986-87-88 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog', October 1985.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog (Moffett+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, A. J.; Kannappan, S. J.; Berlind, A. A.; Eckert, K. D.; Stark, D. V.; Hendel, D.; Norris, M. A.; Grogin, N. A.

    2016-02-01

    The ECO catalog represents a cross match between sources with measured redshifts found in the UZC (Updated Zwicky Catalog, Falco et al. 1999, J/PASP/111/438), SDSS (including data releases 6, 7, and 8; see II/294 and V/139), HyperLEDA (VII/237), RESOLVE (S. J. Kannappan et al. 2015, in preparation), GAMA (Driver et al. 2011, J/MNRAS/413/971), 2dF (Colless et al. 2001, VII/250), and 6dF (Jones et al. 2009, VII/259) catalogs with a 15" matching radius on sky. See section 2.1. (1 data file).

  14. An MW-based Historical Earthquake Catalog for Mainland China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J.; Rong, Y.; Magistrale, H.; Chen, G.; Xu, X.

    2015-12-01

    China has a nearly 3,000-year long earthquake record. As a step to develop seismic hazard maps for mainland China, we compiled a homogeneous MW-based historical earthquake catalog. We started from an MS-based Chinese catalog spanning from 780 B.C. to present. We compared MS from the catalog with Mw for common earthquakes in the ISC-GEM and GCMT catalogs, and derived MS- MW regression relationships using orthogonal least square method. We derived regression relationships for different time periods considering the following factors: 1) Chinese seismograph network density has been improved with time; 2) the methodology for determining earthquake magnitude and location in the Chinese catalog has changed through time; and 3) different seismographs were used in different times. We also derived separate regression relationships for small and large events since the parameters of large events are usually reevaluated in the Chinese catalog. For events included in the ISC-GEM or GCMT catalogs, we use the location and magnitude from those catalogs. For other events, we used the location from the Chinese catalog and the converted MW. The final catalog has about 5,000 earthquakes of MW 4.5 and larger. The catalog is more complete for eastern China than western China because eastern China has much longer history of human settlement. Key words Earthquake catalog in mainland China, Surface magnitude, Moment magnitude, orthogonal regression.

  15. A User Study of Public Catalogs: A Queuing Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, Charles; And Others

    As a means of studying the present public catalogs and possible catalog format alternatives at the Iowa State University library, a 6-week queuing study was conducted. Objectives of the study were (1) to determine the correlation between other library statistics (e.g., door counts and circulation records) and use of the public catalogs; (2) to…

  16. New Trends in Cataloging Rare and Special Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Deborah J.

    2003-01-01

    Reports on the American Library Association's efforts to update the Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (DCRM). Describes topics of working groups that include transcription of early letter forms, rare book cataloging of machine-press books, collection-level cataloging, problems and lacunae, and varieties of editions and issues and when to…

  17. Cooperative Cataloging of Latin-American Books: The Unfulfilled Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Mark L.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of cooperative activities among libraries focuses on cataloging of Latin American materials among research libraries. Differences in motivation for cooperation in acquisitions and in cataloging are discussed; and a study is described that examined which libraries were providing online cataloging, and differences between OCLC and RLIN…

  18. Use Study of Online Cataloging in a Special Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knutson, Gunnar

    1984-01-01

    Statistical examination of original cataloging records of Chicago Municipal Reference Library as input into online OCLC union catalog reveals library's cataloging use rate as compared to nationwide average. Previous studies, methodology, and areas of high and low use (year of input, type of record, classification, length of monograph) are…

  19. A Converging Vision of Cataloging in the Electronic World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeng, Ling Hwey

    1996-01-01

    Traces the history of library cataloging from manual to electronic organization and reviews current attempts to organize electronic information. Highlights include characteristics of traditional cataloging, Internet indexing projects, cataloging Internet resources, defining the electronic unit of control, and visions for the future. (Author/LRW)

  20. Electronic Journals in the Online Catalog: Selection and Bibliographic Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Pamela; Seeds, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Describes procedures for ordering and cataloging electronic journals at the University Park Campus of the Pennsylvania State University Libraries. Successfully integrating electronic journals into the collection and the catalog requires close cooperation between selectors, reference librarians, and catalogers. (Author/AEF)

  1. National Center for Audio Tapes 1971 Catalog Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Univ., Boulder. National Center for Audio Tapes.

    About 600 audio tapes are cataloged in this supplement to the 1970-71 catalog (ED 038 854). The catalog is organized in three sections. The subject index, based on the Library of Congress subject area classification scheme, includes these categories: art, education, languages and literature, mathematics, physical education and recreation, science,…

  2. The Effect of Closed Catalogs on Public Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, James R.

    Microcatalog use studies at the University of Oregon have demonstrated that users encounter access difficulties when confronted with a multiple file microfiche catalog. This research verifies theories by Mooers, Zipf, and others that the public minimizes search efforts and implies that closed catalogs with supplements such as add-on catalogs will…

  3. The Shared Cataloging System of the Ohio College Library Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgour, Frederick G.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Development and implementation of an off-line catalog card production system and an on-line shared cataloging system are described. An account is given of system design and equipment selection for the on-line system. File organization and programs are described, and the on-line cataloging system is discussed. (16 references) (Author/SJ)

  4. FLC/FEDLINK AACR 2 Cataloging Manual for Federal Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wajenberg, Arnold S.

    Intended as a guide for federal agency libraries in the application of the second edition of the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules and not to supersede them, the emphasis in this manual is on material and problems likely to be encountered by catalogers in the area of descriptive cataloging, and it includes the most recent Library of Congress rule…

  5. Safeguards instrumentation: a computer-based catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Fishbone, L.G.; Keisch, B.

    1981-08-01

    The information contained in this catalog is needed to provide a data base for safeguards studies and to help establish criteria and procedures for international safeguards for nuclear materials and facilities. The catalog primarily presents information on new safeguards equipment. It also describes entire safeguards systems for certain facilities, but it does not describe the inspection procedures. Because IAEA safeguards do not include physical security, devices for physical protection (as opposed to containment and surveillance) are not included. An attempt has been made to list capital costs, annual maintenance costs, replacement costs, and useful lifetime for the equipment. For equipment which is commercially available, representative sources have been listed whenever available.

  6. A New Catalog of Isolated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Mata, J. A.; Hernández-Toledo, H. M.; Park, Changbom; Choi, Yun-Young

    2010-05-01

    We present a new catalog of isolated galaxies (coined as UNAM-KIAS) obtained through an automated systematic search. The 1520 isolated galaxies were found in ~ 1.4 steradians of the sky in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 (SDSS DR5) photometry. The selection algorithm was implemented from a variation of the criteria developed by Karachentseva (1973), with full redshift information. This new catalog is aimed to carry out comparative studies of environmental effects and constraining the currently competing scenarios of galaxy formation and evolution.

  7. Cataloging the Youngest Protostars in NGC2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jonathan; Brown, Arianna; Terebey, Susan; CSI2264

    2016-06-01

    Protostars are young stars in their earliest stages of development. We can determine the current stage of development of a young star depending on its relative brightness at varying wavelengths. Protostars are brightest at far-infrared wavelengths, typically peaking at 70-100um. A previous catalog of young stars in NGC 2264 is based on Spitzer data with 24um being the longest available wavelength data. Herschel data at 70um was used to improve the census of protostars. We found 11 new class 0 and 1 protostar candidates that were previously not found in the Spitzer catalog and are bright at 70um. We describe the properties of these candidates.

  8. Report on the Second Catalog Interoperability Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, James R.; James, Mary E.

    1988-01-01

    The events, resolutions, and recommendations of the Second Catalog Interoperability Workshop, held at JPL in January, 1988, are discussed. This workshop dealt with the issues of standardization and communication among directories, catalogs, and inventories in the earth and space science data management environment. The Directory Interchange Format, being constructed as a standard for the exchange of directory information among participating data systems, is discussed. Involvement in the Interoperability effort by NASA, NOAA, ISGS, and NSF is described, and plans for future interoperability considered. The NASA Master Directory prototype is presented and critiqued and options for additional capabilities debated.

  9. Master data directories and Catalog Interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    While the 'Catalog Interoperability' (CI) project began as a NASA effort to facilitate identification, location, and access to data of interest to space and earth sciences researchers, it now has a membership encompassing numerous U.S. and international agencies as well as academic institutions. CI is creating a global network of interconnected directory, catalog, and inventory systems. Its directories contain brief summary information about data sets, and can either furnish automated links to other information systems yielding greater detail on matters of interest or indicate to whom requests for additional information can go.

  10. Far infrared supplement: Catalog of infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a new generation of orbital, airborne and ground-based infrared astronomical observatory facilities, including the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS), the cosmic background explorer (COBE), the NASA Kuiper airborne observatory, and the NASA infrared telescope facility, intensified the need for a comprehensive, machine-readable data base and catalog of current infrared astronomical observations. The Infrared Astronomical Data Base and its principal data product, this catalog, comprise a machine-readable library of infrared (1 micrometer to 1000 micrometers) astronomical observations published in the scientific literature since 1965.

  11. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, Michelle; Trac, Hy; Sutherland, Dougal; Fromenteau, Sebastien; Poczos, Barnabas; Schneider, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are a rich source of information for examining fundamental astrophysical processes and cosmological parameters, however, employing clusters as cosmological probes requires accurate mass measurements derived from cluster observables. We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers, and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create a mock catalog from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. The presence of interlopers in the catalog produces a wide, flat fractional mass error distribution, with width = 2.13. We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement (width = 0.67). Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even a scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  12. The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey. II. Cluster Confirmation with SDSS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-01-01

    We study 203 (of 442) Swift AGN and Cluster Survey extended X-ray sources located in the SDSS DR8 footprint to search for galaxy over-densities in three-dimensional space using SDSS galaxy photometric redshifts and positions near the Swift cluster candidates. We find 104 Swift clusters with a >3σ galaxy over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmation as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, and X-ray luminosity. We also detect red sequences in ˜85% of the 104 confirmed clusters. The X-ray luminosity and optical richness for the SDSS confirmed Swift clusters are correlated and follow previously established relations. The distribution of the separations between the X-ray centroids and the most likely BCG is also consistent with expectation. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≲ 0.3 and is still 80% complete up to z ≃ 0.4, consistent with the SDSS survey depth. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further study of cluster evolution and cosmology. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 23, and 1 matches in optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev-Zel’dovich catalogs, respectively, and so the majority of these clusters are new detections.

  13. Galaxy Properties and Substructure in the Cluster Abell 160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Pinkney, Jason

    2009-04-01

    We have developed a procedure for building a large catalog of cluster galaxies and their photometric properties as measured with CCDs. Our first case, Abell 160, is relatively nearby and redshifts exist for its brightest galaxies. We have mosaiced this cluster in R and V filters using a CCD imager on the 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope. We fitted a world coordinate system to the images using the software ``WCStools,'' then used ``Source Extractor'' to extract sources from the images. We have created software for merging catalogs in such a way as to avoid double counting, to reject cosmic rays, and to combine redundant measurements. The software also corrects magnitude differences by comparing the mean difference and adding this to each individual catalog before merging it to a master catalog. The measured properties included in this study were magnitude, ellipticity, position angle, size, and color (V-R). We investigate the efficacy of our separation of galaxies and stars and find that it begins breaking down around R=19.0. We divide our master catalog into several subsamples for substructure analysis. For one subsample, we attempt to separate cluster members from foreground and background galaxies using the color-magnitude relation. We compare the results of substructure diagnostics for the subsamples. In future work, we will examine correlation of substructure with galaxy properties (especially color, size and morphology).

  14. Star Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds-1: Parameterisation and Classification of 1072 Clusters in the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, P. K.; Subramaniam, A.; Choudhury, S.; Indu, G.; Sagar, Ram

    2016-08-01

    We have introduced a semi-automated quantitative method to estimate the age and reddening of 1072 star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) III survey data. This study brings out 308 newly parameterised clusters. In a first of its kind, the LMC clusters are classified into groups based on richness/mass as very poor, poor, moderate and rich clusters, similar to the classification scheme of open clusters in the Galaxy. A major cluster formation episode is found to happen at 125±25 Myr in the inner LMC. The bar region of the LMC appears prominently in the age range 60 - 250 Myr and is found to have a relatively higher concentration of poor and moderate clusters. The eastern and the western ends of the bar are found to form clusters initially, which later propagates to the central part. We demonstrate that there is a significant difference in the distribution of clusters as a function of mass, using a movie based on the propagation (in space and time) of cluster formation in various groups. The importance of including the low mass clusters in the cluster formation history is demonstrated. The catalog with parameters, classification, and cleaned and isochrone fitted CMDs of 1072 clusters, which are available as online material, can be further used to understand the hierarchical formation of clusters in selected regions of the LMC.

  15. Catalog Use Studies--Since the Introduction of Online Interactive Catalogs: Impact on Design for Subject Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Pauline A.; Markey, Karen

    1983-01-01

    This review of the transition from library card catalogs to online public access catalogs (OPAC) (1981-1982) discusses methods employed by online catalog use studies (self-administered questionnaires, OPAC transaction logs, focused-group interviews, feature analysis, online search and retrieval experiments) and new directions for OPAC research…

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The third Fermi/GBM GRB catalog (6yr) (Bhat+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, P. N.; Meegan, C. A.; von Kienlin, A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M.; Burns, E.; Chaplin, V.; Cleveland, W. H.; Collazzi, A. C.; Connaughton, V.; Diekmann, A. M.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M.; Goldstein, A. M.; Greiner, J.; Jenke, P. A.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Mailyan, B.; McBreen, S.; Pelassa, V.; Preece, R. D.; Roberts, O. J.; Sparke, L. S.; Stanbro, M.; Veres, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Xiong, S.; Younes, G.; Yu, H.-F.; Zhang, B.

    2016-06-01

    The third GBM catalog comprises a list of 1403 cosmic GRBs that triggered GBM between 2008 July 12 and 2014 July 11. The increased sample of GRBs in this catalog confirms the conclusions of the earlier two year (Paciesas+, 2012, J/ApJS/199/18) and four year (von Kienlin+, 2014, J/ApJS/211/13) catalogs. (6 data files).

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalog of strong MgII absorbers (Lawther+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawther, D.; Paarup, T.; Schmidt, M.; Vestergaard, M.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.

    2012-08-01

    Here we present a catalog of strong (rest equivalent width Wr> intervening Mg II absorbers in the SDSS Data Release 7 quasar catalog (2010AJ....139.2360S, Cat. VII/260). The intervening absorbers were found by a semi-automatic algorithm written in IDL - for details of the algorithm see section 2 of our paper. A subset of the absorbers have been visually inspected - see the MAN_OK flag in the catalog. The number of sightlines searched, tabulated by absorber redshift, i.e. g(z), is available as an ASCII table (for S/N>8 and S/N>15). All analysis in our paper is based on the SNR>8 coverage, and considers only sight-lines towards non-BAL quasars. Any questions regarding the catalog should be sent to Daniel Lawther (unclellama(at)gmail.com). (3 data files).

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Binary star discoveries in the URAT1 catalog (Nicholson, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, M. P.

    2015-05-01

    Astrometric and photometric data are presented for 9450 common proper motion binary star system using results from the first U.S. Naval Observatory Astrometric Robotic Telescope Catalog (URAT1) (1 data file).

  19. The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danae Griffin, Rhiannon; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.; Nugent, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    The Swift active galactic nucleus (AGN) and Cluster Survey (SACS) uses 125 deg^2 of Swift X-ray Telescope serendipitous fields with variable depths surrounding X-ray bursts to provide a medium depth (4 × 10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1) and area survey filling the gap between deep, narrow Chandra/XMM-Newton surveys and wide, shallow ROSAT surveys. Here, we present the first two papers in a series of publications for SACS. In the first paper, we introduce our method and catalog of 22,563 point sources and 442 extended sources. We examine the number counts of the AGN and galaxy cluster populations. SACS provides excellent constraints on the AGN number counts at the bright end with negligible uncertainties due to cosmic variance, and these constraints are consistent with previous measurements. The depth and areal coverage of SACS is well suited for galaxy cluster surveys outside the local universe, reaching z ˜ 1 for massive clusters. In the second paper, we use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 data to study the 203 extended SACS sources that are located within the SDSS footprint. We search for galaxy over-densities in 3-D space using SDSS galaxies and their photometric redshifts near the Swift galaxy cluster candidates. We find 103 Swift clusters with a > 3σ over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmations as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, BCG magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, X-ray luminosity and red sequences. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≤ 0.3 and 80% complete for z ≤ 0.4, consistent with the survey depth of SDSS. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 2 and 1 matches in optical, X-ray and SZ catalogs, respectively, so the majority of these

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Third Photometric Magnitude Difference Catalog (Mason, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, C. E.; Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.

    2009-01-01

    The Photometric Magnitude Difference Catalog is a collection of all double star photometric data which does not contain astrometric information and is therefore inappropriate for the Washington Double Star Catalog. Magnitude difference information can be useful in estimating mass ratios, determining photocentric positions which are color dependent, or into investigations of variability in close binary systems. Due to uncertainties in bandpass characteristics or variability, no summary line is presented, rather a complete listing of all data. This version supersedes the (5 data files).

  1. Utilization and Maintenance of the Federal Catalog System (FCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Federal Catalog System (FCS) was established and substantiated by law to aid the national economy and promote greater efficiency in supply management operations throughout the Federal Government. This Handbook establishes policies and procedures to be followed by NASA installations and certain contractors in cataloging items of supply in the Federal Catalog System and prescribes use of the system in supply management operations. This Handbook is not intended to duplicate the Federal Cataloging Manuals or Federal Cataloging Handbooks. For the most part, it describes actions that are peculiar to NASA.

  2. Cataloging the Net: Can We Do It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oder, Norman

    1998-01-01

    Discusses possibilities for cataloging Internet resources and the role that the library profession can play. Topics include the Dublin Core metadata; public library projects (Michigan Electronic Library "MEL" and Librarians' Index to the Internet "LII"); academic library projects (INFOMINE, Scout Report); commercial sites (Yahoo, LookSmart,…

  3. LANDSAT non-US standard catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Non-U.S. Standard Catalog lists imagery acquired by LANDSAT 1 and LANDSAT 2 which has been processed and input to the data files during the referenced month. Data, such as data acquired, cloud cover and image quality are given for each scene. The microfilm roll and frame on which the scene may be found is also given.

  4. Compact Disc Cataloging Product User Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehair, David E.

    In late 1988, a compact disc cataloging product was introduced to the library market. In order to learn more about the needs of current users, a survey was developed to include questions concerning software features and operations, software enhancements, bibliographic and authority subsets, and hardware issues. This study was conducted among all…

  5. Cataloging Sound Recordings Using Archival Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the processing and cataloging of archival sound recording collections. The use of "Anglo American Cataloguing Rules, 2nd edition" (AACR 2) and "Archives, Personal Papers and Manuscripts" (APPM) is explained, the MARC format for Archival and Manuscripts Control (AMC) is described, finding aids and subject indexing are discussed, and…

  6. Earth Science Enterprise: 2002 Education Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwerin, Theresa, Ed.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) aims to understand Earth systems from every component including land surface, oceans, atmosphere, ice sheets, and biota from an interdisciplinary approach. This catalog provides information on ESE programs and resources for all educational audiences including…

  7. Catalog of Programming 1993-94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Public Broadcasting Consortium, Lincoln, NE.

    This catalog indexes and describes over 175 Native American programs produced for public television and available on video to public television stations, schools, libraries, and educational users. Introductory pages describe the development of the Native American Public Broadcasting Consortium and present brief biographies of nine Native American…

  8. Apollo 12 70 mm photographic catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Proof prints of the 70-mm photography are presented, sorted by magazine and frame number. The 28 lunar surface panorama mosaics and a listing of the mosaics are included. The catalog is designed to be used in conjunction with the "Apollo 12 Photography: 70-mm, 16-mm, and 35-mm Frame Index', which makes it possible to locate the area covered by each frame.

  9. Catalog of Programmed Instructional Material, Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Naval Research, Washington, DC. Personnel and Training Branch.

    A supplement to the NavPers 93826 Catalog of Programed Instructional Material provides a full description of instructional material programed within the Navy since April, 1967. Summaries are given of all courses, including information on the specific learners for whom the course's instruction is intended, the type of program, the projected time…

  10. LANDSAT 1 US cumulative catalog, 1975 - 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The LANDSAT 1 U.S. Cumulative Catalog lists U.S. imagery acquired by LANDSAT 1 which has been processed and input to the data files during the referenced year. Data, such as date acquired, cloud cover and image quality are given for each scene. The microfilm roll and frame on which the scene may be found is also given.

  11. Tween Consumers: Catalog Clothing Purchase Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Linda; Douglas, Sara; Schimmel, Julie

    1998-01-01

    Catalog shopping behavior of younger and older adolescents was compared. Results indicated that "tweens" were more concerned with style, brand name, and fashion than were older students. This supports previous findings indicating that the tween years are a time when peer pressure and "fitting in" are very important. (Author/EMK)

  12. Will Your Catalog Stand FTC Scrutiny?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Louis W.

    1976-01-01

    In light of recent court rulings and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) hearings regarding unfair methods of competition and deceptive advertising, a content analysis was conducted of 20 randomly selected college catalogs from 2-year and 4-year, public and private institutions. Four types of misrepresentations were identified including institutional…

  13. Testing Bibliographic Displays for Online Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Walt

    1987-01-01

    Reports the design, methodology, and results of a research project which examined the effectiveness of bibliographic displays produced by online catalogs. A means of testing displays against several hundred thousand records at a reasonable cost and using that to test several display possibilities is described. (CLB)

  14. The Esalen Catalog, 1993-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esalen Inst., Big Sur, CA.

    This document consists of a compilation of the 14 issues of "The Esalen Catalog" published during the 5-year period 1993-1997. An earlier compilation (ED 347 118 in the ERIC database) covering the 30-year period 1962-1992, describes the geographic location, history, and purpose of the Esalen Institute. Esalen provides a forum in which the various…

  15. NASA's Earth Science Enterprise: 1998 Education Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The goals of the Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) are to expand the scientific knowledge of the Earth system; to widely disseminate the results of the expanded knowledge; and to enable the productive use of this knowledge. This catalog provides information about the Earth Science education programs and the resources available for elementary through university levels.

  16. Cataloging. ERIC Processing Manual, Section V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandhorst, Ted, Ed.

    Rules and guidelines are provided for ERIC catalogers and editors engaged in capturing bibliographic data on the documents and journal articles entered into the ERIC database. The material is organized by data element: Accession Number, Price Code, Pagination, Publication Date, Title, Journal Citation, Language, Publication Type, Descriptors,…

  17. Automating School Library Catalogs: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Catherine, Ed.

    This collection of 23 articles compiled from school library journals address the special needs that make automation problematic for school libraries. The articles are divided into five sections: an overview of OPAC (Online Public Access Catalog) development (4 titles); evaluating OPAC systems (4 titles); implementing OPAC systems (6 titles);…

  18. Landsat non-US standard catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Non-U.S. Standard Catalog lists Non-U.S. imagery acquired by Landsat 1 and 2 which was processed and input to the data files during the referenced month. Data, such as date acquired, cloud cover and image quality are given for each scene. The microfilm roll and frame on which the scene may be found are also given.

  19. Language and Cultural Minorities Resource Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine State Dept. of Educational and Cultural Services, Augusta.

    The revised edition of the resource catalog lists nearly 1,000 print and non-print materials for use in Maine schools where close to 7,000 children of linguistic minorities are enrolled. There are 19 sections on these groups or topics: Afghan, Asian and refugee, bilingual education, Chinese, civil rights, Eastern Europe, English as a Second…

  20. A catalog of nonstellar water maser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinger, A. S. C.; Dickinson, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    A list of 195 nonstellar galactic sources of water maser emission has been compiled. This list is not a comprehensive catalog of all the available information; it is intended to be used as an index. As such, it contains only coordinates, velocities, and selected references. The extragalatic sources are listed in a separate table.

  1. MITINET: Catalog Conversion to a MARC Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bocher, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Describes statewide use of MITINET, a microcomputer automation system created to aid resource sharing among small libraries and serve as tool for converting card catalog information to MARC format computer-readable files. Highlights include conversion stages, entering data on microfiche, vendor's role, local level, costs and system requirements,…

  2. NASA's Earth Science Enterprise: 1998 Education Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This catalog presents a reference guide to NASA Earth science education programs and products. The topics include: 1) Student Support (Elementary and Secondary, Undergraduate and Graduate, Postgraduate, and Postdoctorate); 2) Teacher/Faculty Preparation and Enhancement; 3) Systemic Change; 4) Curriculum Support; and 5) Resources.

  3. Catalog of State Basic Skills Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEMREL, Inc., St. Louis, MO.

    Listed in this catalog are 122 product descriptions from 34 states identified by state coordinators of basic skills instruction as the best developed in their states. Products include books, pamphlets, videotapes, booklets, checklists, guides, handbooks, anthologies, and computer programs. Each product was developed to improve the management, the…

  4. Rates inferred from the space debris catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-08-01

    Collision and fragmentation rates are inferred from the AFSPC space debris catalog and compare with estimates from other treatments. The collision rate is evaluated without approximation. The fragmentation rate requires additional empirical assessments. The number of fragments per collision is low compared to analytic and numerical treatments, is peaked low, and falls rapidly with altitude.

  5. Catalog of Audiovisual Materials Related to Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Joe, Ed.; Henderson, Jim, Ed.

    An annotated listing of a variety of audiovisual formats on content related to the social-rehabilitation process is provided. The materials in the listing were selected from a collection of over 200 audiovisual catalogs. The major portion of the materials has not been screened. The materials are classified alphabetically by the following subject…

  6. OSHA Training Institute Catalog of Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Fredric C., Comp.

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration Training Institute's series of courses for 1978 is presented in this catalog. Most courses are designed for occupational safety or health professionals who are federal or state employees; two are available for personnel from the private sector. The schedule includes courses required for newly hired…

  7. A CATALOG OF GALACTIC INFRARED CARBON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. S.

    2012-02-15

    We collected almost all of the Galactic infrared carbon stars (IRCSs) from literature published up to the present to organize a catalog of 974 Galactic IRCSs in this paper. Some of their photometric properties in the near-, mid-, and far-infrared are discussed.

  8. Annotated Catalog of Bilingual Vocational Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda (L.) and Associates, Bethesda, MD.

    This catalog contains annotations for 170 bilingual vocational training materials. Most of the materials are written in English, but materials written in 13 source languages and directed toward speakers of 17 target languages are provided. Annotations are provided for the following different types of documents: administrative, assessment and…

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Skymap Star Catalog - Version 3.7 (Slater+ 1992)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, M.; Hashmall, J.

    1995-09-01

    The original version has been improved and updated with corrections several times. Version 3.7 incorporates known errors documented previously in SKYMAP Error Reports. Magnitude errors discovered in SKYMAP Version 3.6 were corrected. Other minor catalog corrections, including the deletion of five duplicate entries and the addition of two stars, were also performed. The original catalog was compiled by D. M. Gottlieb of Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) under contract to NASA. The compilation and statistics of the catalog are described by Gottlieb (1978), while the source referenced above describes in detail the contents of the current version and the derivation of values not available observationally. * IMPORTANT NOTE: THIS CATALOG WAS NOT COMPILED TO PROVIDE THE MOST ACCURATE AND RELIABLE DATA AT THE ASTRONOMICAL RESEARCH LEVEL. THE DERIVATIONS OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL MK TYPES FROM ONE-DIMENSIONAL DATA, UBV VALUES FROM PHOTOVISUAL AND PHOTOGRAPHIC MAGNITUDES, AND STELLAR DISTANCES FROM MAGNITUDES AND SPECTRAL TYPES ARE EXTREMELY UNCERTAIN, SO THESE DATA SHOULD NOT BE USED WITHOUT CAREFUL SCRUTINY. THE VARIOUS FLAGS ASSOCIATED WITH CATALOG DATA SHOULD BE RETAINED WITH THE DATA AT ALL TIMES OR GROSS MISINTERPRETATIONS MAY RESULT. USERS OF THIS CATALOG SHOULD KEEP THESE FACTS IN MIND CONSTANTLY. (1 data file).

  10. THE CHANDRA VARIABLE GUIDE STAR CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Joy S.; Lauer, Jennifer L.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Sundheim, Beth A.; Henden, Arne A.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Martin, Eric

    2010-06-15

    Variable stars have been identified among the optical-wavelength light curves of guide stars used for pointing control of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We present a catalog of these variable stars along with their light curves and ancillary data. Variability was detected to a lower limit of 0.02 mag amplitude in the 4000-10000 A range using the photometrically stable Aspect Camera on board the Chandra spacecraft. The Chandra Variable Guide Star Catalog (VGUIDE) contains 827 stars, of which 586 are classified as definitely variable and 241 are identified as possibly variable. Of the 586 definite variable stars, we believe 319 are new variable star identifications. Types of variables in the catalog include eclipsing binaries, pulsating stars, and rotating stars. The variability was detected during the course of normal verification of each Chandra pointing and results from analysis of over 75,000 guide star light curves from the Chandra mission. The VGUIDE catalog represents data from only about 9 years of the Chandra mission. Future releases of VGUIDE will include newly identified variable guide stars as the mission proceeds. An important advantage of the use of space data to identify and analyze variable stars is the relatively long observations that are available. The Chandra orbit allows for observations up to 2 days in length. Also, guide stars were often used multiple times for Chandra observations, so many of the stars in the VGUIDE catalog have multiple light curves available from various times in the mission. The catalog is presented as both online data associated with this paper and as a public Web interface. Light curves with data at the instrumental time resolution of about 2 s, overplotted with the data binned at 1 ks, can be viewed on the public Web interface and downloaded for further analysis. VGUIDE is a unique project using data collected during the mission that would otherwise be ignored. The stars available for use as Chandra guide stars are

  11. A REVISED EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURE SCALE FOR THE KEPLER INPUT CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, Marc H.; An, Deokkeun; Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna; Chaplin, William J.; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Bruntt, Hans

    2012-04-01

    We present a catalog of revised effective temperatures for stars observed in long-cadence mode in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). We use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) griz filters tied to the fundamental temperature scale. Polynomials for griz color-temperature relations are presented, along with correction terms for surface gravity effects, metallicity, and statistical corrections for binary companions or blending. We compare our temperature scale to the published infrared flux method (IRFM) scale for V{sub T}JK{sub s} in both open clusters and the Kepler fields. We find good agreement overall, with some deviations between (J - K{sub s} )-based temperatures from the IRFM and both SDSS filter and other diagnostic IRFM color-temperature relationships above 6000 K. For field dwarfs, we find a mean shift toward hotter temperatures relative to the KIC, of order 215 K, in the regime where the IRFM scale is well defined (4000 K to 6500 K). This change is of comparable magnitude in both color systems and in spectroscopy for stars with T{sub eff} below 6000 K. Systematic differences between temperature estimators appear for hotter stars, and we define corrections to put the SDSS temperatures on the IRFM scale for them. When the theoretical dependence on gravity is accounted for, we find a similar temperature scale offset between the fundamental and KIC scales for giants. We demonstrate that statistical corrections to color-based temperatures from binaries are significant. Typical errors, mostly from uncertainties in extinction, are of order 100 K. Implications for other applications of the KIC are discussed.

  12. Latitude for the Observer of Ptolemy's Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. E.

    1999-12-01

    For centuries, researchers have claimed that substantial portions of Ptolemy's Almagest have been taken from Hipparchus in Rhodes (latitude 36.2 north). A substantial portion of these claims rest on the catalog of 1028 stars purported to be observed by Ptolemy in Alexandria (latitude 31.2 north). Various peculiarities is the star positions are inconclusive. However, aspects of the star catalog related to the visibility of stars near the horizon have not been treated with modern techniques. I have extensive experience in the heliacal rise, extinction angle, and the probability of detection (see Schaefer 1993, Vistas in Astronomy, 36, 311 for a review) all of which are critical to the problem. Also, I have been producing my own modern naked-eye star catalog so as to obtain practical knowledge of star visibility (especially near the southern horizon), completeness, and probability of detection. Also, I have determined the seasonal extinction coefficients (both median and best possible) for the eastern Mediterranean in ancient times based on 4000 in situ observations from 9 sites in modern and premodern times, measures of modern pollution components, and global models. Three criteria have been used to determine the latitude of the observer of the star catalog: First, the limiting magnitude (at the 50% level) as a function of declination can be compared against my model to derive the latitude. Second, the most southerly declination (at the 50% level) as a function of magnitude can also be compared against my model. For the first two criteria, quadrants are considered independently as well as individually to account for varying seasonal extinction and precession effects on the completeness of the traditional southern constellations. Third, the cataloged magnitudes are compared with modern magnitudes as a function of declination and compared with my extinction model for various latitudes.

  13. New Catalog of Resources Enables Paleogeosciences Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingo, R. C.; Horlick, K. A.; Anderson, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The 21st century promises a new era for scientists of all disciplines, the age where cyber infrastructure enables research and education and fuels discovery. EarthCube is a working community of over 2,500 scientists and students of many Earth Science disciplines who are looking to build bridges between disciplines. The EarthCube initiative will create a digital infrastructure that connects databases, software, and repositories. A catalog of resources (databases, software, repositories) has been produced by the Research Coordination Network for Paleogeosciences to improve the discoverability of resources. The Catalog is currently made available within the larger-scope CINERGI geosciences portal (http://hydro10.sdsc.edu/geoportal/catalog/main/home.page). Other distribution points and web services are planned, using linked data, content services for the web, and XML descriptions that can be harvested using metadata protocols. The databases provide searchable interfaces to find data sets that would otherwise remain dark data, hidden in drawers and on personal computers. The software will be described in catalog entries so just one click will lead users to methods and analytical tools that many geoscientists were unaware of. The repositories listed in the Paleogeosciences Catalog contain physical samples found all across the globe, from natural history museums to the basements of university buildings. EarthCube has over 250 databases, 300 software systems, and 200 repositories which will grow in the coming year. When completed, geoscientists across the world will be connected into a productive workflow for managing, sharing, and exploring geoscience data and information that expedites collaboration and innovation within the paleogeosciences, potentially bringing about new interdisciplinary discoveries.

  14. THE SIMPLE SURVEY: OBSERVATIONS, REDUCTION, AND CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Damen, M.; Franx, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Labbe, I.; Van Dokkum, P. G.; Muzzin, A.; Brandt, W. N.; Dickinson, M.; Gawiser, E.; Illingworth, G. D.; Marchesini, D.; Papovich, C.; Rix, H.-W.

    2011-01-20

    We present the Spitzer IRAC/MUSYC Public Legacy Survey in the Extended CDF-South (SIMPLE), which consists of deep IRAC observations covering the {approx}1600 arcmin{sup 2} area surrounding GOODS-S. The limiting magnitudes of the SIMPLE IRAC mosaics typically are 23.8, 23.6, 21.9, and 21.7, at 3.6 {mu}m, 4.5 {mu}m, 5.8 {mu}m, and 8.0 {mu}m, respectively (5{sigma} total point source magnitudes in AB). The SIMPLE IRAC images are combined with the 10' x 15' GOODS IRAC mosaics in the center. We give detailed descriptions of the observations, data reduction, and properties of the final images, as well as the detection and photometry methods used to build a catalog. Using published optical and near-infrared data from the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC), we construct an IRAC-selected catalog, containing photometry in UBVRIz'JHK, [3.6 {mu}m], [4.5 {mu}m], [5.8 {mu}m], and [8.0 {mu}m]. The catalog contains 43,782 sources with S/N >5 at 3.6 {mu}m, 19,993 of which have 13-band photometry. We compare this catalog to the publicly available MUSYC and FIREWORKS catalogs and discuss the differences. Using a high signal-to-noise sub-sample of 3391 sources with ([3.6] + [4.5])/2 < 21.2, we investigate the star formation rate history of massive galaxies out to z {approx} 1.8. We find that at z {approx} 1.8 at least 30% {+-} 7% of the most massive galaxies (M{sub *} >10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) are passively evolving, in agreement with earlier results from surveys covering less area.

  15. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  16. PHAT Star Clusters in M31: Insight on Environmental Dependence of Star & Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lent C.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Seth, Anil; Beerman, Lori; Lewis, Alexia; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Andromeda Project Team, PHAT Team

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical studies of star cluster formation suggest that the star formation efficiency (SFE) of a cluster's progenitor cloud dictates whether or not a gravitationally bound grouping will emerge from an embedded region after gas expulsion. I measure the fraction of stars formed in long-lived clusters relative to unbound field stars on a spatial resolved basis in the Andromeda galaxy. These observations test theoretical predictions that star clusters are formed within a hierarchical interstellar medium at peaks in the gas density where local SFEs are enhanced and regions become stellar dominated. Using data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey and ancillary observations of M31's gas phase, I investigate how cluster formation correlates with galactic environment and galaxy-scale properties of the star formation. We construct a sample of >2700 star clusters through a crowd-sourced visual search of the high spatial resolution HST imaging data. Our catalog uses ~2 million image classifications collected by the Andromeda Project citizen science website to provide an unparalleled census of clusters that spans ~4 orders of magnitude in mass (50% completeness at ~500 M⊙ at <100 Myr) and increases the number of known clusters within the PHAT survey footprint by a factor of ~6. Cluster ages and masses are obtained by fitting to color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of individually resolved stars within each cluster. Furthermore, we insure our ability to accurately interpret cluster age and mass distributions through careful catalog completeness characterization, made possible by thousands of synthetic cluster tests included during catalog construction work. We combine our high quality cluster sample with spatially resolved star formation histories, derived from CMD fitting of PHAT's photometry of ~117 million resolved field stars. We derived the fraction of stars formed in long-lived clusters and show that only a few percent of coeval stars are found in

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SKY2000 Master Catalog, Version 5 (Myers+ 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, J. R.; Sande, C. B.; Miller, A. C.; Warren, W. H., Jr.; Tracewell, D. A.

    2015-02-01

    The SKYMAP Star Catalog System consists of a Master Catalog stellar database and a collection of utility software designed to create and maintain the database and to generate derivative mission star catalogs (run catalogs). It contains an extensive compilation of information on almost 300000 stars brighter than 8.0mag. The original SKYMAP Master Catalog was generated in the early 1970's. Incremental updates and corrections were made over the following years but the first complete revision of the source data occurred with Version 4.0. This revision also produced a unique, consolidated source of astrometric information which can be used by the astronomical community. The derived quantities were removed and wideband and photometric data in the R (red) and I (infrared) systems were added. Version 4 of the SKY2000 Master Catalog was completed in April 2002; it marks the global replacement of the variability identifier and variability data fields. More details can be found in the description file sky2kv4.pdf. The SKY2000 Version 5 Revision 4 Master Catalog differs from Revision 3 in that MK and HD spectral types have been added from the Catalogue of Stellar Spectral Classifications (B. A. Skiff of Lowell Observatory, 2005), which has been assigned source code 50 in this process. 9622 entries now have MK types from this source, while 3976 entries have HD types from this source. SKY2000 V5 R4 also differs globally from preceding MC versions in that the Galactic coordinate computations performed by UPDATE have been increased in accuracy, so that differences from the same quantities from other sources are now typically in the last decimal places carried in the MC. This version supersedes the previous versions 1(V/95), 2(V/102), 3(V/105) and 4(V/109). (6 data files).

  18. The Andromeda Project: Final Results of Citizen Science Cluster Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Anil; Johnson, L. C.; Wallace, M.; Dalcanton, J.; Kapadia, A.; Lintott, C.; Simpson, R.; Skillman, E. D.; PHAT Team; Andromeda Project Team

    2014-01-01

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey has completed data collection, having taken over 30 billion pixels of imaging data of the Andromeda galaxy over four years using the Hubble Space Telescope. These data contain the largest sample of star clusters observable in any galaxy, including our own Milky Way. The Andromeda Project is a citizen science project that recruited over 10,000 volunteers to identify thousands of star clusters in the PHAT imaging. We present results culminating from two rounds of cluster searching and the properties of the resulting sample. We discuss catalog completeness results derived from synthetic cluster data. This cluster sample represents a significant advance in our ability to study star and cluster formation on galaxy wide scales. We are using the resulting cluster sample to provide the best available constraints on the high-mass initial mass function and the fraction of star formation that results in bound star clusters.

  19. SMURF: genomic mapping of fungal secondary metabolite clusters

    PubMed Central

    Khaldi, Nora; Seifuddin, Fayaz T.; Turner, Geoff; Haft, Daniel; Nierman, William C.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Fedorova, Natalie D.

    2010-01-01

    Fungi produce an impressive array of secondary metabolites (SMs) including mycotoxins, antibiotics and pharmaceuticals. The genes responsible for their biosynthesis, export, and transcriptional regulation are often found in contiguous gene clusters. To facilitate annotation of these clusters in sequenced fungal genomes, we developed the web-based software SMURF (www.jcvi.org/smurf/) to systematically predict clustered SM genes based on their genomic context and domain content. We applied SMURF to catalog putative clusters in 27 publicly available fungal genomes. Comparison with genetically characterized clusters from six fungal species showed that SMURF accurately recovered all clusters and detected additional potential clusters. Subsequent comparative analysis revealed the striking biosynthetic capacity and variability of the fungal SM pathways and the correlation between unicellularity and the absence of SMs. Further genetics studies are needed to experimentally confirm these clusters. PMID:20554054

  20. Towards a Comprehensive Catalog of Volcanic Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, G.

    2014-12-01

    Catalogs of earthquakes located using differential travel-time techniques are a core product of volcano observatories, and while vital, they represent an incomplete perspective of volcanic seismicity. Many (often most) earthquakes are too small to locate accurately, and are omitted from available catalogs. Low frequency events, tremor and signals related to rockfalls, pyroclastic flows and lahars are not systematically catalogued, and yet from a hazard management perspective are exceedingly important. Because STA/LTA detection schemes break down in the presence of high amplitude tremor, swarms or dome collapses, catalogs may suggest low seismicity when seismicity peaks. We propose to develop a workflow and underlying software toolbox that can be applied to near-real-time and offline waveform data to produce comprehensive catalogs of volcanic seismicity. Existing tools to detect and locate phaseless signals will be adapted to fit within this framework. For this proof of concept the toolbox will be developed in MATLAB, extending the existing GISMO toolbox (an object-oriented MATLAB toolbox for seismic data analysis). Existing database schemas such as the CSS 3.0 will need to be extended to describe this wider range of volcano-seismic signals. WOVOdat may already incorporate many of the additional tables needed. Thus our framework may act as an interface between volcano observatories (or campaign-style research projects) and WOVOdat. We aim to take the further step of reducing volcano-seismic catalogs to sets of continuous metrics that are useful for recognizing data trends, and for feeding alarm systems and forecasting techniques. Previous experience has shown that frequency index, peak frequency, mean frequency, mean event rate, median event rate, and cumulative magnitude (or energy) are potentially useful metrics to generate for all catalogs at a 1-minute sample rate (directly comparable with RSAM and similar metrics derived from continuous data). Our framework

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: URAT Parallax Catalog (UPC) (Finch+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, C. T.; Zacharias, N.

    2016-04-01

    The URAT Parallax Catalog (UPC) consists of 112177 parallaxes. The catalog utilizes all Northern Hemisphere epoch data from the United States Naval Observatory (USNO) Robotic Astrometric Telescope (URAT). This data includes all individual exposures from April 2012 to June 2015 giving a larger epoch baseline for determining parallaxes over the 2-year span of the First USNO Robotic Astrometric Telescope Catalog (URAT1) (Zacharias et al., 2015, Cat. I/329) published data. The URAT parallax pipeline is custom code that utilizes routines from (Jao, C.-W., 2004, PhD thesis Georgia Stat), the JPL DE405 ephemeris and Green's parallax factor (Green, R.M., 1985, Spherical Astronomy) for determining parallaxes from a weighted least-squares reduction. The relative parallaxes have been corrected to absolute by using the distance color relation described in (Finch et. al, 2014, Cat. J/AJ/148/119) to determine a mean distance of all UCAC4 reference stars (R=8-16 mag) used in the astrometric reductions. Presented here are all significant parallaxes from the URAT Northern Hemisphere epoch data comprising of 2 groups: a) URAT parallax results for stars with prior published parallax, and b) first time trigonometric parallaxes as obtained from URAT data of stars without prior published parallax. Note, more stringent selection criteria have been applied to the second group than the first in order to keep the rate of false detections low. For specific information about the astrometric reductions please see 'The First U.S. Naval Observatory Robotic Astrometric Telescope Catalog' published paper (Zacharias et al., 2015AJ....150..101Z, Cat. I/329). For complete details regarding the parallax pipeline please see 'Parallax Results From URAT Epoch Data' (Finch and Zacharias, 2016, AJ, in press). This catalog gives all positions on the ICRS at Epoch J2014.0; it covers the magnitude range 6.56 to 16.93 in the URAT band-pass, with an average parallax precision of 4.3mas for stars having no known

  2. Multiple object redshift determinations in clusters of galaxies using OCTOPUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazure, A.; Proust, D.; Sodre, L.; Capelato, H. V.; Lund, G.

    1988-04-01

    The ESO multiobject facility, Octopus, was used to observe a sample of galaxy clusters such as SC2008-565 in an attempt to collect a large set of individual radial velocities. A dispersion of 114 A/mm was used, providing spectral coverage from 3800 to 5180 A. Octopus was found to be a well-adapted instrument for the rapid and simultaneous determination of redshifts in cataloged galaxy clusters.

  3. Multiple object redshift determinations in clusters of galaxies using OCTOPUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazure, A.; Proust, D.; Sodre, L.; Lund, G.; Capelato, H.

    1987-03-01

    The ESO multiobject facility, Octopus, was used to observe a sample of galaxy clusters such as SC2008-565 in an attempt to collect a large set of individual radial velocities. A dispersion of 114 A/mm was used, providing spectral coverage from 3800 to 5180 A. Octopus was found to be a well-adapted instrument for the rapid and simultaneous determination of redshifts in cataloged galaxy clusters.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: XZ Catalog of Zodiacal Stars (XZ80N) (Dunham+ 1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, D. W.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1995-02-01

    The XZ catalog was created at the U.S. Naval Observatory in 1977 by Richard Schmidt and Tom Van Flandern, primarily for the purpose of generating predictions of lunar occultations, and for analyzing timings of these events. It was designed to include all stars from Robertson's Zodiacal Catalog (ZC), the SAO catalog, and the AGK3 catalog that are within 6d 40' of the ecliptic (a region hereafter called "the Zodiac"), which is as far as the Moon's limb can ever get as seen from anywhere on the Earth's surface, leaving some margin for stellar proper motions and change in the obliquity of the ecliptic over the course of three centuries. The original version contained 32,221 entries. Since that time, a number of changes have been made in succeeding versions, including better positions and proper motions, and the elimination and addition of stars. The catalog contains visual magnitudes and radial velocities as well as astrometric data. Two years after the catalog was created, and observations were already reported using its numbers, it was found that about 200 stars near the equator from the AGK3 catalog were outside the Zodiac, and a similar number that should have been included were not. Since the numbering system had already been established, the catalog was not changed to correct this deficiency. Over the years, some errors in the catalog, due mainly to errors in the SAO and AGK3, were corrected. A few stars with very bad data were "eliminated" by changing their declination to -89d and adding 40 to their magnitudes. In 1986, most of the stellar positional data were replaced with improved data from Harrington's and Douglass' Zodical Zone (ZZ) catalog, which used for its observing list SAO stars in the Zodiac (actually broader than the XZ Zodiac because ecliptic latitudes to +/-15d were used) north of declination approximately -25d. The positional data for many of the stars south of declination -25d with right ascensions greater than 18h were improved with data from

  5. A Use Study of the Card Catalogs in the University of Illinois Music Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drone, Jeanette M.

    1984-01-01

    A multifaceted card catalog use study was conducted at University of Illinois Music Library to determine hourly rate of use at sound recording and book/music catalogs; time spent at catalogs; who uses catalogs and why; difficulties users encounter; success rate of users' searches; recommendations for designing online catalog. (16 references)…

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalog of Earth-Like Exoplanet Survey Targets (Chandler+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, C. O.; McDonald, I.; Kane, S. R.

    2016-07-01

    We present the Catalog of Earth-Like Exoplanet Survey Targets (CELESTA), a database of habitable zones around 37000 nearby stars. The first step in creating CELESTA was assembling the input data. The Revised Hipparcos Catalog (van Leeuwen 2007, Cat. I/311) is a stellar catalog based on the original Hipparcos mission (Perryman et al. 1997, Cat. I/239) data set. Hipparcos, launched in 1989, recorded with great precision the parallax of nearby stars, ultimately leading to a database of 118218 stars. McDonald et al. 2012 (cat. J/MNRAS/427/343) calculated effective temperatures and luminosities for the Hipparcos stars. The next step was selecting appropriate stars for the construction of CELESTA. The Stellar Parameter Catalog of 103663 stars included many stars that were not suitable for our purposes, especially stars off the Main-Sequence (MS) branch, e.g., giants. Please refer to Section 3.2 in the paper for additional details about the star selection. The final CELESTA catalog contains 37354 stars (see Table2), each with a set of associated attributes, e.g., estimated mass, measured distance. The complete database can also be found online at a dedicated host (http://www.celesta.info/). (2 data files).

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ubvy photometry of NGC2419 (Frank+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M. J.; Koch, A.; Feltzing, S.; Kacharov, N.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Irwin, M.

    2015-07-01

    Imaging of NGC 2419 in the intermediate-band Stromgren filters u, b, v and y was obtained in February 2012 using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) at the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma, Spain. The resulting photometric catalog containing 1197 detections in the unvignetted field of the camera, passing basic quality cuts (magnitude uncertainty, sharpness, {chi}) in all four filters is made available here. It covers NGC 2419 out to about 25 arcmin, several times beyond its tidal radius, but is incomplete in the cluster centre due to crowding. (1 data file).

  8. Catalog of PRA dominant accident sequence information

    SciTech Connect

    Cathey, N.G.; Krantz, E.A.; Poloski, J.P.; Shapiro, B.J.

    1985-07-01

    Information concerning the dominant accident sequences from twelve published probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) is cataloged in this report, which is published as a part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP). The purpose of this report is to provide users of PRA information a single reference document. The cataloged results include plant operation information, core-melt frequency, event tree models, dominant factors affecting core-melt and sequence frequencies, and a description of each dominant accident sequence. The report provides a consistent set of insights on the factors that drive the dominant accident sequences. ASEP has reconstructed the PRA fault tree models at the system or train level of detail and requantified the sequence likelihoods to provide the consistent insights. This work provides the information for the other ASEP activities on accident likelihood assessment for the operating and near-term operating plants.

  9. Tween consumers: catalog clothing purchase behavior.

    PubMed

    Simpson, L; Douglas, S; Schimmel, J

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the catalog shopping behavior of students in their tween years (i.e., between childhood and adolescence; ages 12-14) with that of older students (ages 15-18). Junior high and high school students who had purchased clothing from a catalog in the past 12 months responded to a questionnaire that examined the label information sought and product-specific attributes considered. Results indicated that tweens were more concerned with style, brand names, and the latest fashion than were older students. This finding was especially interesting, as these attributes all relate to status; the tweens were more interested than the older students in wearing the latest fashions, being in style, and gaining the prestige of wearing brand-name clothing. This supports previous findings indicating that the tween years are a time when peer pressure and "fitting in" are very important. PMID:9831881

  10. Fermi Large Area Telescope Third Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Britto, R. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeKlotz, M.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Landriu, D.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Salvetti, D.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schulz, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100 MeV-300 GeV range. Based on the first 4 yr of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the Second Fermi LAT catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data, as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse γ-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources above 4σ significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 238 sources are considered as identified based on angular extent or correlated variability (periodic or otherwise) observed at other wavelengths. For 1010 sources we have not found plausible counterparts at other wavelengths. More than 1100 of the identified or associated sources are active galaxies of the blazar class; several other classes of non-blazar active galaxies are also represented in the 3FGL. Pulsars represent the largest Galactic source class. From source counts of Galactic sources we estimate that the contribution of unresolved sources to the Galactic diffuse emission is ˜3% at 1 GeV.

  11. The BMW-Chandra Serendipitous Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Campana, S.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Mottini, M.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2004-08-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalog drawn from all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10 ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by Lazzati et al. (1999) and Campana et al. (1999), which can characterize point-like as well as extended sources, we identified 21325 sources. Among them, 16758 are serendipitous, i.e. not associated with the targets of the pointings, and do not require a non-automated analysis. This makes our catalog the largest compilation of Chandra sources to date. The 0.5--10 keV absorption corrected fluxes of these sources range from ˜ 3× 10-16 to 9×10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 with a median of 7× 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalog consists of count rates and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5--7 keV; soft, 0.5--2 keV; and hard band, 2--7 keV), and source positions relative to the highest signal-to-noise detection among the three bands. The wavelet algorithm also provides an estimate of the extension of the source which we refined with a σ -clipping method. We report on the main properties of the sources in our catalog, such as sky coverage ( ˜ 8 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1) and cosmological log N--log S for a subset at high Galactic latitude (∣ b ∣ > 20o) for a flux as low as ˜ 1.5 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. Support for this work was provided by the Italian MIUR.

  12. Catalog of Hawaiian earthquakes, 1823-1959

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, Fred W.; Wright, Thomas L.

    2000-01-01

    This catalog of more than 17,000 Hawaiian earthquakes (of magnitude greater than or equal to 5), principally located on the Island of Hawaii, from 1823 through the third quarter of 1959 is designed to expand our ability to evaluate seismic hazard in Hawaii, as well as our knowledge of Hawaiian seismic rhythms as they relate to eruption cycles at Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes and to subcrustal earthquake patterns related to the tectonic evolution of the Hawaiian chain.

  13. Catalog of data bases and reports

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, M.D.

    1992-04-01

    The Catalog of Data Bases and Reports provides information about the many reports and other materials made available by the US Department of Energy's Global Change Research Program (GCRP). It is divided into six sections plus an author and a title index: (1) Research plans and budget summaries (2) technical reports; (3) workshops, proceedings, and reports; (4) other reports; (5) USDA reports on response of vegetation to carbon dioxide; and, (6) numeric data packages and computer model packages.

  14. Catalog of data bases and reports

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, M.D.

    1992-04-01

    The Catalog of Data Bases and Reports provides information about the many reports and other materials made available by the US Department of Energy`s Global Change Research Program (GCRP). It is divided into six sections plus an author and a title index: (1) Research plans and budget summaries (2) technical reports; (3) workshops, proceedings, and reports; (4) other reports; (5) USDA reports on response of vegetation to carbon dioxide; and, (6) numeric data packages and computer model packages.

  15. Catalog of lunar and Mars science payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budden, Nancy Ann (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This catalog collects and describes science payloads considered for future robotic and human exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. The science disciplines included are geosciences, meteorology, space physics, astronomy and astrophysics, life sciences, in-situ resource utilization, and robotic science. Science payload data is helpful for mission scientists and engineers developing reference architectures and detailed descriptions of mission organizations. One early step in advanced planning is formulating the science questions for each mission and identifying the instrumentation required to address these questions. The next critical element is to establish and quantify the supporting infrastructure required to deliver, emplace, operate, and maintain the science experiments with human crews or robots. This requires a comprehensive collection of up-to-date science payload information--hence the birth of this catalog. Divided into lunar and Mars sections, the catalog describes the physical characteristics of science instruments in terms of mass, volume, power and data requirements, mode of deployment and operation, maintenance needs, and technological readiness. It includes descriptions of science payloads for specific missions that have been studied in the last two years: the Scout Program, the Artemis Program, the First Lunar Outpost, and the Mars Exploration Program.

  16. Version 1 of the Hubble Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Bradley

    2015-08-01

    The Hubble Source Catalog (HSC) is designed to help optimize science from the Hubble Space Telescope by combining the tens of thousands of visit-based Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA - available at http://hla.stsci.edu) source lists into a single master catalog. The HSC includes ACS/WFC, WFPC2, and WFC3 source lists generated using the Source Extractor software (Bertin & Arnouts 1996). The current version of the catalog includes roughly 80 million detections of 30 million objects involving 112 different detector/filter combinations and about 50 thousand HST exposures cross-matched using the technique described in Budavari & Lubow (2012). The astrometric residuals for HSC objects are typically within 10 mas and the magnitude residuals between repeat measurements are generally within 0.10 mag. Version 1 of the HSC was released on February 25, 2015. The primary ways to access the HSC are the MAST Discovery Portal (http://mast.stsci.edu), and a CasJobs capability for advanced searches. Detailed use cases and videos are available to help researchers get started. The HSC will be an important reference for future telescopes, such as the James Webb Space Telescope and survey programs such as Pan-STARRS and LSST. The URL for the HSC is http://archive.stsci.edu/hst/hsc/ .

  17. An Emerging Magnetic Flux Catalog for SOHO/MDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Derek; Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; DeForest, Craig

    2016-05-01

    We present a catalog of emerging magnetic flux events covering the entirety of the 15-year-long SOHO/MDI 96-minute magnetogram dataset. Such a catalog has myriad uses in studies of the solar dynamo and solar cycle. Our catalog is designed to mimic as nearly as possible the Emerging Flux region catalog produced for SDO/HMI, allowing continuity across missions and solar cycles. We will present details of the algorithm for identifying emerging flux events, special considerations for MDI as opposed to HMI, detailed examples of some detected emerging flux regions, and a brief overview of statistics of the entire catalog. The catalog will be available for querying through the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase, as well as for direct downloading from Southwest Research Institute. This work has been supported by NASA Grant NNX14AJ67G through the Heliophysics Data Environment Enhancements program.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spitzer point source catalogs in 7 nearby gal. (Khan+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, R.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Sonneborn, G.

    2015-10-01

    We present Spitzer IRAC 3.6-8μm and Multiband Imaging Photometer 24μm point-source catalogs for seven galaxies: NGC6822, M33, NGC300, NGC2403, M81, NGC0247, and NGC7793. The catalogs contain a total of ~300000 sources and were created by dual-band selection of sources with >3σ detections at both 3.6 and 4.5μm. The source lists become significantly incomplete near m3.6=m_4.5~=18. We complement the 3.6 and 4.5μm fluxes with 5.8, 8.0, and 24μm fluxes or 3σ upper limits using a combination of PSF and aperture photometry. This catalog is a resource as an archive for studying mid-infrared transients and for planning observations with the James Webb Space Telescope. (7 data files).

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS DR7 white dwarf catalog (Kleinman+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, S. J.; Kepler, S. O.; Koester, D.; Pelisoli, I.; Pecanha, V.; Nitta, A.; Costa, J. E. S.; Krzesinski, J.; Dufour, P.; Lachapelle, F.-R.; Bergeron, P.; Yip, C.-W.; Harris, H. C.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Althaus, L.; Corsico, A.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report on the white dwarf catalog built from the SDSS DR7 (Cat. II/294). We have applied automated techniques supplemented by complete, consistent human identifications of each candidate white dwarf spectrum. We make use of the latest SDSS reductions and white dwarf model atmosphere improvements in our spectral fits, providing logg and Teff determinations for each identified clean DA and DB where we use the word "clean" to identify spectra that show only features of non-magnetic, nonmixed, DA or DB stars. Our catalog includes all white dwarf stars from the earlier Kleinman et al. (2004, Cat. J/ApJ/607/426) and Eisenstein et al. (2006, Cat. J/ApJS/167/40) catalogs, although occasionally with different identifications. (1 data file).

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: High resolution spectra of 3 NGC104 member stars (Ferraro+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, F. R.; Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Dalessandro, E.; Pallanca, C.; Massari, D.

    2016-03-01

    In the context of the ESO Large Programme 193.D-0232 (PI: Ferraro) aimed at studying the internal kinematics of Galactic globular clusters, we have secured UVES-FLAMES high-resolution spectra of three stars in 47 Tuc (NGC 104). The (V,V-I) CMD is obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)-Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) photometric catalog of Sarajedini et al. (2007AJ....133.1658S). The target spectra have been acquired with the grating 580 Red Arm CD#3, which provides a spectral resolution R~40000 between 4800 and 6800Å. The three stars are all cluster members. (2 data files).

  1. Star Catalogs on Punched Cards and Magnetic Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berbert, J. H.

    1961-01-01

    In connection with the calibration of the Minitrack satellite tracking stations, the Goddard Space Flight Center has had the contents of a number of star catalogs put on punched cards and magnetic tape. This report discusses the plate data reduction procedures, briefly describes the information on the punched cards and magnetic tape, and calls attention to other applications of the card and tape star catalogs. The Goddard Space Flight Center has offered to prepare duplicate catalogs for qualified organizations.

  2. The new Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (1994).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, C. E.; Douglass, G. G.

    Following the 1984 version of the Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, the authors began planning a successor to be issued approximately ten years later. The 1984 catalog was intended primarily to provide an updated and corrected version of the Lick Index Catalogue, and was produced in the same format, though with considerably augmented notes and a bibliography. This report details both the changes in format and in content, as well as some of the problems of melding other data sources into this catalog.

  3. The online catalog of Wind/EPACT proton events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miteva, R.; Samwel, S. W.; Costa-Duarte, M. V.; Danov, D.

    2016-07-01

    We present the newly compiled solar energetic particle catalog based on data from the Wind/EPACT instrument. The focus of this report is the online contents of the catalog's first version. We summarize the procedure employed to identify and analyze the proton events and their solar origin, which constitute the main ingredients of the online catalog. Planned future updates and improvements are also discussed.

  4. New Tools for Quality Assessment of Modern Earthquake Catalogs: Examples From California and Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, J.; Wiemer, S.; Giardini, D.

    2002-12-01

    Earthquake catalogs provide a comprehensive knowledge database for studies related to seismicity, seismotectonic, earthquake physics, and hazard analysis. We introduce a set of tools and new software for improving the quality of modern catalogs of microseismicty. Surprisingly little research on detecting seismicity changes and analyzing the causes has been performed in recent years. Especially the discrimination between artificial and natural causes responsible for transients in seismicity, such as rate changes or alternations in the earthquake size distribution (b-value), often remains difficult. Thus, significant changes in reporting homogeneity are often detected only years after they occurred. We believe that our tools, used regularly and automatically in a ?real time mode?, allow addressing such problems shortly after they occurred. Based on our experience in analyzing earthquake catalogs, and building on the groundbreaking work by Habermann in the 1980?s, we propose a recipe for earthquake catalog quality assessment: 1) Decluster as a tool to homogenize the data; 2) Identify and remove blast contamination; 3) Estimate completeness as a function of space and time; 4) Assess reporting homogeneity as a function of space and time using self-consistency and, if possible, comparison with other independent data sources. During this sequence of analysis steps, we produce a series of maps that portray for a given period the magnitude of completeness, seismicity rate changes, possible shifts and stretches in the magnitude distribution and the degree of clustering. We apply our algorithms for quality assessment to data sets from California and Japan addressing the following questions: 1) Did the 1983 Coalinga earthquake change the rate of small events on the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas system? 2) Did the Kobe earthquake change the rate of earthquakes or the b-value in nearby volumes?

  5. The Third Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Six Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Bhat, P.; Meegan, Charles A.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael; Burns, Eric; Chaplin, Vandiver; Cleveland, William H.; Collazzi, Andrew C.; Connaughton, Valerie; Diekmann, Anne M.; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Gibby, Melissa H.; Giles, Misty M.; Goldstein, Adam M.; Greiner, Jochen; Jenke, Peter A.; Kippen, R. Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Mailyan, Bagrat; McBreen, Sheila; Pelassa, Veronique; Preece, Robert D.; Roberts, Oliver J.; Sparke, Linda S.; Stanbro, Matthew; Veres, Péter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Xiong, Shaolin; Younes, George; Yu, Hoi-Fung; Zhang, Binbin

    2016-04-01

    Since its launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has triggered and located on average approximately two γ-ray bursts (GRBs) every three days. Here, we present the third of a series of catalogs of GRBs detected by GBM, extending the second catalog by two more years through the middle of 2014 July. The resulting list includes 1405 triggers identified as GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM-detected GRBs. For each GRB, the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux, and fluence are derived. The latter two quantities are calculated for the 50–300 keV energy band where the maximum energy release of GRBs in the instrument reference system is observed, and also for a broader energy band from 10 to 1000 keV, exploiting the full energy range of GBM's low-energy [Nai[Tl)] detectors. Using statistical methods to assess clustering, we find that the hardness and duration of GRBs are better fit by a two-component model with short-hard and long-soft bursts than by a model with three components. Furthermore, information is provided on the settings and modifications of the triggering criteria and exceptional operational conditions during years five and six in the mission. This third catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 231 AGN candidates from the 2FGL catalog (Doert+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doert, M.; Errando, M.

    2016-01-01

    The second Fermi-LAT source catalog (2FGL; Nolan et al. 2012, cat. J/ApJS/199/31) is the deepest all-sky survey available in the gamma-ray band. It contains 1873 sources, of which 576 remain unassociated. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope started operations in 2008. In this work, machine-learning algorithms are used to identify unassociated sources in the 2FGL catalog with properties similar to gamma-ray-emitting Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). This analysis finds 231 high-confidence AGN candidates (see Table3). (1 data file).

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The second Konus-Wind short GRB catalog (Svinkin+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svinkin, D. S.; Frederiks, D. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Pal'Shin, V. D.; Oleynik, P. P.; Tsvetkova, A. E.; Ulanov, M. V.; Cline, T. L.; Hurley, K.

    2016-07-01

    Between 1994 November and 2010 December, the Konus-Wind spectrometer (KW; see section 2 for details) detected 1939 GRBs in the triggered mode, 295 of which were classified as short-duration GRBs or short bursts with extended emission (EE). The count rates are recorded in three energy windows G1 (13-50keV), G2 (50-200keV), and G3 (200-760keV) with 2.944s time resolution. The catalog includes about twice the number of bursts as the first Konus catalog of short GRBs (Mazets et al. arXiv:astro-ph/0209219). (6 data files).

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The FIRST Survey Catalog, Version 2014Dec17 (Helfand+ 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D. J.; White, R. L.; Becker, R. H.

    2015-05-01

    The Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimeters (FIRST) began in 1993. It uses the VLA (Very Large Array, a facility of the National Radio Observatory (NRAO)) at a frequency of 1.4GHz, and it is slated to 10,000 deg2 of the North and South Galactic Caps, to a sensitivity of about 1mJy with an angular resolution of about 5''. The images produced by an automated mapping pipeline have pixels of 1.8'', a typical rms of 0.15mJy, and a resolution of 5''; the images are available on the Internet (see the FIRST home page at http://sundog.stsci.edu/ for details). The source catalogue is derived from the images. This catalog from the 1993 through 2011 observations contains 946,432 sources from the north and south Galactic caps. It covers a total of 10,575 square degrees of the sky (8444 square degrees in the north and 2131 square degrees in the south). In this version of the catalog, images taken in the the new EVLA configuration have been re-reduced using shallower CLEAN thresholds in order to reduce the "CLEAN bias" in those images. Also, the EVLA images are not co-added with older VLA images to avoid problems resulting from the different frequencies and noise properties of the configurations. That leads to small gaps in the sky coverage at boundaries between the EVLA and VLA regions. As a result, the area covered by this release of the catalog is about 60 square degrees smaller than the earlier release of the catalog (13Jun05, also available here as the "first13.dat" file), and the total number of sources is reduced by nearly 25,000. The previous version of the catalog does have sources in the overlap regions, but their flux densities are considered unreliable due to calibration errors. The flux densities should be more accurate in this catalog, biases are smaller, and the incidence of spurious sources is also reduced. Over most of the survey area, the detection limit is 1 mJy. A region along the equatorial strip (RA=21.3 to 3.3hr, Dec=-1 to 1deg) has a deeper

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: URAT Parallax Catalog (UPC) (Finch+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, C. T.; Zacharias, N.

    2016-04-01

    The URAT Parallax Catalog (UPC) consists of 112177 parallaxes. The catalog utilizes all Northern Hemisphere epoch data from the United States Naval Observatory (USNO) Robotic Astrometric Telescope (URAT). This data includes all individual exposures from April 2012 to June 2015 giving a larger epoch baseline for determining parallaxes over the 2-year span of the First USNO Robotic Astrometric Telescope Catalog (URAT1) (Zacharias et al., 2015, Cat. I/329) published data. The URAT parallax pipeline is custom code that utilizes routines from (Jao, C.-W., 2004, PhD thesis Georgia Stat), the JPL DE405 ephemeris and Green's parallax factor (Green, R.M., 1985, Spherical Astronomy) for determining parallaxes from a weighted least-squares reduction. The relative parallaxes have been corrected to absolute by using the distance color relation described in (Finch et. al, 2014, Cat. J/AJ/148/119) to determine a mean distance of all UCAC4 reference stars (R=8-16 mag) used in the astrometric reductions. Presented here are all significant parallaxes from the URAT Northern Hemisphere epoch data comprising of 2 groups: a) URAT parallax results for stars with prior published parallax, and b) first time trigonometric parallaxes as obtained from URAT data of stars without prior published parallax. Note, more stringent selection criteria have been applied to the second group than the first in order to keep the rate of false detections low. For specific information about the astrometric reductions please see 'The First U.S. Naval Observatory Robotic Astrometric Telescope Catalog' published paper (Zacharias et al., 2015AJ....150..101Z, Cat. I/329). For complete details regarding the parallax pipeline please see 'Parallax Results From URAT Epoch Data' (Finch and Zacharias, 2016, AJ, in press). This catalog gives all positions on the ICRS at Epoch J2014.0; it covers the magnitude range 6.56 to 16.93 in the URAT band-pass, with an average parallax precision of 4.3mas for stars having no known

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: DUSTiNGS. I. The Good Source Catalog (Boyer+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, M. L.; McQuinn, K. B. W.; Barmby, P.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Gehrz, R. D.; Gordon, K. D.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Lagadec, E.; Lennon, D.; Marengo, M.; Meixner, M.; Skillman, E.; Sloan, G. C.; Sonneborn, G.; van Loon, J. Th.; Zijlstra, A.

    2015-07-01

    The DUSTiNGS (DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer) survey includes uniform 3.6 and 4.5um Spitzer/IRAC imaging of 50 nearby galaxies (see table 1) between 2011 Jun 19 and 2012 Jun 23 (see table 2). The final Vega magnitudes of the high-quality point sources are reported in the DUSTiNGS "Good"-Source Catalog (GSC), which is described in Table 5 (see section 5). A full point source catalog is available at: http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/data/SPITZER/DUSTiNGS/ (3 data files).

  11. IfA Catalogs of Solar Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbal, Shadia R.; Scholl, I.; Morgan, H.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents a new set of online catalogs of solar data products. The IfA Catalogs of Solar Data Products were developed to enhance the scientific output of coronal images acquired from ground and space, starting with the SoHO era. Image processing tools have played a significant role in the production of these catalogs [Morgan et al. 2006, 2008, Scholl and Habbal 2008]. Two catalogs are currently available at http://alshamess.ifa.hawaii.edu/ : 1) Catalog of daily coronal images: One coronal image per day from EIT, MLSO and LASCO/C2 and C3 have been processed using the Normalizing Radial-Graded-Filter (NRGF) image processing tool. These images are available individually or as composite images. 2) Catalog of LASCO data: The whole LASCO dataset has been re-processed using the same method. The user can search files by dates and instruments, and images can be retrieved as JPEG or FITS files. An option to make on-line GIF movies from selected images is also available. In addition, the LASCO data set can be searched from existing CME catalogs (CDAW and Cactus). By browsing one of the two CME catalogs, the user can refine the query and access LASCO data covering the time frame of a CME. The catalogs will be continually updated as more data become publicly available.

  12. WEST CORRIDOR (ORIGINALLY KNOWN AS LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CARD CATALOG) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST CORRIDOR (ORIGINALLY KNOWN AS LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CARD CATALOG) ON FIRST FLOOR, LOOKING EAST - Free Library of Philadelphia, Central Library, 1901 Vine Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. The Two-Point Spatial Correlation Function for the MX Northern Abell Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.; Slinglend, K. A.; Batuski, D. J.; Hill, J.

    1997-12-01

    The results from the COBE satellite show the existence of structure in the cosmic microwave background radiation on scales ~ 10% or more of the horizon scale of the Universe. Rich clusters of galaxies from the Abell/ACO catalogs show evidence of structure on scales of 100h(-1) Mpc and hold the promise of confirming structure on the scale of the COBE results. However, previous analyses for large-scale structure based on the clusters in these catalogs suffer from small sample sizes, imcomplete samples, and large uncertainties in the measured data. Our efforts with the MX Cluster Redshift Survey have resulted in galaxy redshifts for 95 rich Abell clusters returning 88 positive cluster identifications. Five cluster fields did not supply enough data for cluster positions and two clusters were found to be simply projections of galaxies strung out along the line of sight. By obtaining an average of 9 member galaxy redshifts per cluster, we have greatly reduced uncertainty in cluster locations. The Abell catalog is now 98% complete out to m10 <= 16.8. This complete sample has provided us with the necessary data to calculate the two-point spatial correlation function, xi (r), characterized by the slope of its power-law fit gamma and a scale length r_o. Preliminary results give gamma = -2.26+/-0.14 and r_o = 21.9+/- 1.5 h(-1) Mpc. These results are then compared with other spatial analyses based on different samples.

  14. Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Clusters and Clustering in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    I will present constraints on cosmological parameters from a combination of cluster mass to galaxy number ratios combined with halo occupation analysis of the galaxy autocorrelation function. In two-point clustering, cosmology an bias are degenerate; good fits to the correlation function can be obtained for a wide variety of comologies. However, in order to match the observed level of clustering, each cosmology predicts a different number of galaxies per unit mass at the cluster mass scale. A combination of DR7 galaxy clustering results and M/N data from the weak lensing analysis of the maxBCG catalog break the degeneracy between cosmology and bias, leading to constraints on \\Omega_m and \\sigma_8 that are competitive with current CMB results.

  15. An X-ray survey of clusters of galaxies. IV - A survey of southern clusters and a compilation of upper limits for both Abell and southern clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Cruddace, R. G.; Wood, K. S.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the HEAO 1 A-1 X-ray survey of galaxy clusters are reported. X-ray error boxes and intensities are presented for all clusters in the Abell catalog and for the catalog of southern clusters and groups compiled by Duus and Newell (1977). A correlation is derived on the basis of the X-ray luminosity function for 2-6 keV which may be used to calculate the contribution of clusters to the diffuse X-ray background at different energies. The cluster X-ray is estimated to be 9.3 percent (+ 1.9 or - 1.5 percent). Correlations between X-ray luminosity and other cluster properties are exmained, and it is found that the distribution of upper limits may be applied to obtaining a more precise estimate of the average X-ray luminosity of clusters. The Abell richness class and southern cluster concentrations were strongly correlated with X-ray luminosity. Correlations between optical x-ray luminosity and optical radius velocity dispersion, spiral fraction, and radio power are analyzed. The evidence for all these correlations was considered to be weak because of poor scatter in the data.

  16. THE EFFECT OF ARRANGEMENT ON THE USE OF LIBRARY CATALOGS--AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF A DIVIDED AND A DICTIONARY CATALOG. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KRIKELAS, JAMES

    THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO DETERMINE IF DIVIDING A TRADITIONAL DICTIONARY CATALOG TO CREATE A SEPARATE FILE FOR SUBJECT ENTRIES WOULD RESULT IN MORE EFFECTIVE USE OF LIBRARY CATALOGS. A SET OF SEARCH QUESTIONS WAS DEVELOPED AS THE DATA COLLECTION INSTRUMENT. TWO CATALOGS--THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS' DICTIONARY CATALOG AND THE UNIVERSITY OF…

  17. Clustering with Missing Values: No Imputation Required

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri

    2004-01-01

    Clustering algorithms can identify groups in large data sets, such as star catalogs and hyperspectral images. In general, clustering methods cannot analyze items that have missing data values. Common solutions either fill in the missing values (imputation) or ignore the missing data (marginalization). Imputed values are treated as just as reliable as the truly observed data, but they are only as good as the assumptions used to create them. In contrast, we present a method for encoding partially observed features as a set of supplemental soft constraints and introduce the KSC algorithm, which incorporates constraints into the clustering process. In experiments on artificial data and data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we show that soft constraints are an effective way to enable clustering with missing values.

  18. Photometric Properties of Poor Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2002-12-01

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using multi-color optical photometry obtained at the Vainu Bappu Telescope, India. The clusters, selected from the EMSS Catalog, are at moderate redshifts (0.08 < z < 0.25), of equivalent Abell richness R=0, and appear to be dynamically young. The early-type galaxy populations are clearly evolved, as traced by the tightness of the color-magnitude relations and the accordance of the latter with those of the Virgo cluster. The blue galaxy fractions are similar to those of R=0 clusters and higher than those of richer clusters at similar redshifts. The composite luminosity functions (LFs) in B, V, and R bands are flat at the faint end, similar to the V-band LF derived by Yamagata & Maehara for other (MKW/AWM) poor clusters but steeper than the R-band field LF derived by Lin et al. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts. The brightest galaxies of three of these poor clusters appear to be luminous ellipticals with no incontrovertible signatures of a halo. It is likely that they were formed from multiple mergers early in the history of the clusters.

  19. The first MAXI/SSC catalog of X-ray sources in 0.7-7.0 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, Hiroshi; Uchida, Daiki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Imatani, Ritsuko; Kimura, Masashi; Nakahira, Satoshi; Hanayama, Takanori; Yoshidome, Koshiro

    2016-06-01

    We present the first source catalog of the Solid-state Slit Camera (SSC) of the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) mission on the International Space Station, using the 45-month data from 2010 August to 2014 April in the 0.7-7.0 keV bands. Sources are searched for in two energy bands, 0.7-1.85 keV (soft) and 1.85-7.0 keV (hard), the limiting sensitivity of 3 and 4 mCrab are achieved, and 140 and 138 sources are detected in the soft and hard energy bands, respectively. Combining the two energy bands, 170 sources are listed in the MAXI/SSC catalog. All but 2 sources are identified with 22 galaxies including AGNs, 29 cluster of galaxies, 21 supernova remnants, 75 X-ray binaries, 8 stars, 5 isolated pulsars, and 9 non-categorized objects. Comparing the soft-band fluxes at the brightest end in our catalog with the ROSAT survey, which was performed about 20 years ago, 10% of the cataloged sources are found to have changed flux since the ROSAT era.

  20. The first MAXI/SSC catalog of X-ray sources in 0.7-7.0 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, Hiroshi; Uchida, Daiki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Imatani, Ritsuko; Kimura, Masashi; Nakahira, Satoshi; Hanayama, Takanori; Yoshidome, Koshiro

    2016-03-01

    We present the first source catalog of the Solid-state Slit Camera (SSC) of the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) mission on the International Space Station, using the 45-month data from 2010 August to 2014 April in the 0.7-7.0 keV bands. Sources are searched for in two energy bands, 0.7-1.85 keV (soft) and 1.85-7.0 keV (hard), the limiting sensitivity of 3 and 4 mCrab are achieved, and 140 and 138 sources are detected in the soft and hard energy bands, respectively. Combining the two energy bands, 170 sources are listed in the MAXI/SSC catalog. All but 2 sources are identified with 22 galaxies including AGNs, 29 cluster of galaxies, 21 supernova remnants, 75 X-ray binaries, 8 stars, 5 isolated pulsars, and 9 non-categorized objects. Comparing the soft-band fluxes at the brightest end in our catalog with the ROSAT survey, which was performed about 20 years ago, 10% of the cataloged sources are found to have changed flux since the ROSAT era.

  1. Observations of Distant Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Megan

    2004-01-01

    The is the proceedings and papers supported by the LTSA grant: Homer, D. J.\\& Donahue, M. 2003, in "The Emergence of Cosmic Structure": 13'h Astrophysics Conference Proceedings, Vol. 666,3 1 1-3 14, (AIP). Baumgartner, W. H., Loewenstein, M., Horner, D. J., Mushotzky, R. F. 2003, HEAD- AAS, 35.3503. Homer, D. J. , Donahue, M., Voit G. M. 2003, HEAD-AAS, 35.1309. Nowak, M. A., Smith, B., Donahue, M., Stocke, J. 2003, HEAD-AAS, 35.1316. Scott, D., Borys, C., Chapman, S. C., Donahue, M., Fahlman, G. G., Halpem, M. Newbury, P. 2002, AAS, 128.01. Jones, L. R. et al. 2002, A new era in cosmology, ASP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 283, p. 223 Donahue, M., Daly, R. A., Homer, D. J. 2003, ApJ, 584, 643, Constraints on the Cluster Environments and Hotspot magnetic field strengths for radio sources 3280 and 3254. Donahue, M., et al. 2003, ApJ, 598, 190. The mass, baryonic fraction, and x-ray temperature of the luminous, high-redshift cluster of galaxies MS045 1.6-0305 Perlman, E. S. et al. 2002, ApJS, 140, 256. Smith, B. J., Nowak, M., Donahue, M., Stocke, J. 2003, AJ, 126, 1763. Chandra Observations of the Interacting NGC44 10 Group of Galaxies. Postman, M., Lauer, T. R., Oegerle, W., Donahue, M. 2002, ApJ, 579, 93. The KPNO/deep-range cluster survey I. The catalog and space density of intermediate-redshift clusters. Molnar, S. M., Hughes, J. P., Donahue, M., Joy, M. 2002, ApJ, 573, L91, Chandra Observations of Unresolved X-Ray Sources around Two Clusters of Galaxies. Donahue, M., Mack, J., 2002 NewAR, 46, 155, HST NIcmos and WFPC2 observations of molecular hydrogen and dust around cooling flows. Koekemoer, A. M. et al. 2002 NewAR, 46, 149, Interactions between the A2597 central radio source and dense gas host galaxy. Donahue, M. et al. 2002 ApJ, 569,689, Distant cluster hunting II.

  2. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  3. Redshifts for a Sample of Radio-Selected Poor Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Neal A.; Ledlow, Michael J.; Owen, Frazer N.; Hill, John M.; Rabin, Douglas M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Multifiber optical spectroscopy has been performed on galaxies in the vicinity of strong, nearby radio galaxies. These radio galaxies were selected from the, 3CR and B2 catalogs based on their exclusion from the Abell catalog, which is puzzling given the hypothesis that an external medium is required to confine the radio plasma of such galaxies. Velocities derived from the spectra were used to confirm the existence of groups and poor clusters in the fields of most of the radio galaxies. We find that all radio galaxies with classical Fanaroff-Riley type I morphologies prove to reside in clusters, whereas the other radio galaxies often appear to be recent galaxy-galaxy mergers in regions of low galaxy density. These findings confirm the earlier result that the existence of extended X-ray emission combined with a statistical excess of neighboring galaxies can be used to identify poor clusters associated with radio galaxies.

  4. Users Look at Online Catalogs. Part 2: Interacting with Online Catalogs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Ray R.

    This report focuses on a discussion of findings from analyses of computer transaction logs contributed by four of the online catalog systems used in the Public Access Project. It supplements the analyses of User and Non-User Questionnaires by providing analyses of data from the systems themselves. The four systems contributing data to this…

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: XZ Catalog of Zodiacal Stars (XZ80Q) (Herald, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herald, D.

    2003-11-01

    The XZ catalog was created at the U.S. Naval Observatory in 1977 by Richard Schmidt and Tom Van Flandern, primarily for the purpose of generating predictions of lunar occultations, and for analyzing timings of these events. It was designed to include all stars within 6d 40' of the ecliptic (the "Zodiac"), which is as far as the Moon's limb can ever get as seen from anywhere on the Earth's surface, leaving some margin for stellar proper motions and change in the obliquity of the ecliptic over the course of three centuries. The original version contained 32,221 entries; since that time, many changes have been made in succeeding versions, including better positions and proper motions, and the elimination and addition of stars. Details about the history of XZ catalog can be found in the "doc.txt" file. The XZ80Q revision has been developed from XZ80P, which was created by Mitsuru Soma. It is now complete over the Zodiac for stars down to visual magnitude 12.0. The "xz80q.dat" file contains the list of stars making the catalog; additional files provide details about double and variable stars included in the XZ80Q. The catalog includes also lists of the various existing names of the stars. (11 data files).

  6. Curriculum-Based Cataloging and the New Metadata: Cataloging beyond the World of MARC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamich, Tom

    2007-01-01

    From earliest beginnings in the 1990s, cataloging in school libraries is the product of three tasks--listing important details about an item (such as author, size, number of pages), selecting words and phrases that describe the item (such as subject headings, summary notes), and choosing numbers and codes that place the item on the shelf (such as…

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: INTEGRAL reference catalog (Ebisawa+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebisawa, K.; Bourban, G.; Bodaghee, A.; Mowlavi, N.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.

    2003-11-01

    We describe the INTEGRAL reference catalog which classifies previously known bright X-ray and gamma-ray sources before the launch of INTEGRAL. These sources are, or have been at least once, brighter than ~1mCrab above 3keV, and are expected to be detected by INTEGRAL. This catalog is being used in the INTEGRAL Quick Look Analysis to discover new sources or significantly variable sources. We compiled several published X-ray and gamma-ray catalogs, and surveyed recent publications for new sources. Consequently, there are 1122 sources in our INTEGRAL reference catalog. In addition to the source positions, we show an approximate spectral model and expected flux for each source, based on which we derive expected INTEGRAL counting rates. Assuming the default instrument performances and at least ~105s exposure time for any part of the sky, we expect that INTEGRAL will detect at least ~700 sources below 10keV and ~400 sources above 20keV over the mission life. (1 data file).

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fermi LAT third source catalog (3FGL) (Acero+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Britto, R. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; Deklotz, M.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Landriu, D.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez-Conde, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schulz, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer J. G, .; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; van Klaveren, B.; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.

    2015-08-01

    The data for the 3FGL catalog were taken during the period from 2008 August 4 (15:43 UTC) to 2012 July 31 (22:46 UTC), to covering close to 4yr. The LAT detects γ-rays in the energy range from 20MeV to more than 300GeV. (3 data files).

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Multifrequency catalog of LINERs (Carrillo+, 1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, R.; Masegosa, J.; Dultzin-Hacyan, D.; Ordonez, R.

    2000-05-01

    We present the first Catalog of Low Ionization Emission Line Galaxies (LINERs or Liners, which is the simplest name, and which we shall adopt in what follows). The Catalog "MCL" (Multifrequency Catalog of Liners), contains 476 entries and contains both broad-band and monochromatic emission data (ranging from radio to X-ray frequencies) of colors, and other data compiled from the literature and various data bases, as indicated in the references. Most of the galaxies can be considered "pure" Liners on the basis of the Veilleux & Osterbrock (1987ApJS...63..295V) classification as suggested by Ho, Filippenko, & Sargent (1997ApJS..112..315H). However, a considerable number of transition (Liners-H II or Liners-Starburst) objects are also included. One of the open questions, is whether Liners should be considered as a class of galaxies (like Seyfert galaxies for instance) or rather, as an heterogeneous group of objects. We believe the study of Liners as a group is very interesting, precisely because they very likely represent a transition between non-thermal and starburst activity, and probably also between "active" and "non- active" galaxies. This catalog may be used as a basis for statistical research. A preliminary discussion of the main statistical properties of Liners, in the range from radio to X-ray frequencies, is given here. (7 data files).

  10. Children's Searching Behavior on Browsing and Keyword Online Catalogs: The Science Library Catalog Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgman, Christine L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents results of experiments conducted on four versions of the Science Library Catalog (SLC), a Dewey decimal-based hierarchical browsing system implemented in HyperCard without a keyboard. The SLC approach helps children overcome problems with typing, spelling, vocabulary, and Boolean logic. (70 references) (AEF)

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity and photometry in NGC 4372 (Kacharov+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacharov, N.; Bianchini, P.; Koch, A.; Frank, M. J.; Martin, N. F.; van de Ven, G.; Puzia, T. H.; McDonald, I.; Johnson, C. I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2014-06-01

    We present the radial velocities of 220 stars in the field of the globular cluster NGC 4372 measured from high resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra. We have confirm 131 cluster member stars from radial velocity and metallicity constraints. The rest are foreground contaminants. We also present a BVI photometric catalogue in a field of view covering 30x30arcmin, centred on NGC 4372. We used archival imaging obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) at the 2.2m MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla. We used the 2MASS point source catalog as astrometric reference. Photometric zero points were fixed to standard stars in the same field from the standard star database of Stetson (2000PASP..112..925S, 2005PASP..117..563S). We have estimated individual reddening for each star in the catalogue. (2 data files).

  12. Spectroscopy of Galaxies in Massive Clusters: Galaxy Properties and Dynamical Cluster Mass Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, Christopher W.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Anderson, K.; Bazin, G.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Foley, R.; Gladders, M. D.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Keisler, R.; Marrone, D. P.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B.; Shaw, L.; Song, J.; Stalder, B.; Stanford, S. A.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Vanderlinde, K.; Williamson, R.

    2011-08-01

    We propose to acquire GMOS spectroscopy of 85 clusters of galaxies selected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) microwave background survey. This will bring our total to 100 SPT clusters with velocity dispersions. The SPT survey is delivering a uniformly-selected high-mass cluster sample that is essentially volume-complete beyond z>0.3. We will target a subset (0.3 < z < 0.8) of the SPT cluster catalog, extracted from 2500 deg^2. This data set will establish competitive, independent constraints on cosmological parameters, including the nature of the dark energy. Achieving this goal requires a precise understanding of the relationship between the cluster's SZ signature and the cluster mass, and this mass normalization is currently the largest systematic error in SPT's cosmological constraints. One promising method of determining galaxy cluster masses is to probe the dark matter potential with galaxy velocities. Using data from a large cluster sample will average over random projection effects, and will enable the calibration of the SZ-mass scaling relation, in conjunction with X-ray and lensing data on a smaller sample. The cluster galaxy spectroscopy we obtain will also equip the community to address a wide range of questions in galaxy evolution and cluster astrophysics.

  13. A NEW CATALOG OF H II REGIONS IN M31

    SciTech Connect

    Azimlu, M.; Marciniak, R.; Barmby, P.

    2011-10-15

    We present a new catalog of H II regions in M31. The full disk of the galaxy ({approx}24 kpc from the galaxy center) is covered in a 2.2 deg{sup 2} mosaic of 10 fields observed with the Mosaic Camera on the Mayall 4 m telescope as part of the Local Group Galaxies survey. We used HIIphot, a code for automated photometry of H II regions, to identify the regions and measure their fluxes and sizes. A 10{sigma} detection level was used to exclude diffuse gas fluctuations and star residuals after continuum subtraction. That selection limit may result in missing some faint H II regions, but our catalog of 3691 H II regions is still complete to a luminosity of L{sub H{alpha}} = 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1}. This is five times fainter than the only previous CCD-based study which contained 967 objects in the NE half of M31. We determined the H{alpha} luminosity function (LF) by fitting a power law to luminosities larger than L{sub H{alpha}} = 10{sup 36.7} and determined a slope of 2.52 {+-} 0.07. The in-arm and inter-arm LFs peak at different luminosities but they have similar bright-end slopes. The inter-arm regions are less populated (40% of total detected regions) and constitute only 14% of the total luminosity of L{sub H{alpha}} = 5.6 x 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} (after extinction correction and considering 65% contribution from diffused ionized gas). A star formation rate of 0.44 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} was estimated from the H{alpha} total luminosity; this value is consistent with the determination from the Spitzer 8 {mu}m image. We removed all known and potential planetary nebulae, yet we found a double-peaked LF. The inter-arm older population suggests a starburst between 15 and 20 million years ago. This result is in agreement with UV studies of the star formation history in M31 which found a star formation rate decrease in the recent past. We found a fair spatial correlation between the H II regions and stellar clusters in selected star-forming regions. Most of the matched

  14. HALOGEN: Approximate synthetic halo catalog generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila Perez, Santiago; Murray, Steven

    2015-05-01

    HALOGEN generates approximate synthetic halo catalogs. Written in C, it decomposes the problem of generating cosmological tracer distributions (eg. halos) into four steps: generating an approximate density field, generating the required number of tracers from a CDF over mass, placing the tracers on field particles according to a bias scheme dependent on local density, and assigning velocities to the tracers based on velocities of local particles. It also implements a default set of four models for these steps. HALOGEN uses 2LPTic (ascl:1201.005) and CUTE (ascl:1505.016); the software is flexible and can be adapted to varying cosmologies and simulation specifications.

  15. Catalog of risks extended and updated

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.L. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1991-09-01

    A large variety of risks are quantified in terms of the loss of life expectancy they cause in the United States. Risks considered include the following: diseases; accidents of various types at home, at work, in public, and in motor vehicles; unemployment; poor social connections; use of small cars; smoking; air pollution; other environmental pollutants leading to cancer and non-cancer effects; purposely ingested substances; sports participation; geography; medical care; epidemics; natural hazards; socioeconomic factors; Rn and other radiation; and energy conservation. A few suggestions for applications of this catalog of risks are offered.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2011-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2009-10-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2010-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2012-11-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2016-07-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).