Science.gov

Sample records for 42-mev alpha-particle bombardment

  1. Electrical characterization of deep levels created by bombarding nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC with alpha-particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotoso, Ezekiel; Meyer, Walter E.; Auret, F. Danie; Paradzah, Alexander T.; Legodi, Matshisa J.

    2016-03-01

    Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and Laplace-DLTS were used to investigate the effect of alpha-particle irradiation on the electrical properties of nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC. The samples were bombarded with alpha-particles at room temperature (300 K) using an americium-241 (241Am) radionuclide source. DLTS revealed the presence of four deep levels in the as-grown samples, E0.09, E0.11, E0.16 and E0.65. After irradiation with a fluence of 4.1 × 1010 alpha-particles-cm-2, DLTS measurements indicated the presence of two new deep levels, E0.39 and E0.62 with energy levels, EC - 0.39 eV and EC - 0.62 eV, with an apparent capture cross sections of 2 × 10-16 and 2 × 10-14 cm2, respectively. Furthermore, irradiation with fluence of 8.9 × 1010 alpha-particles-cm-2 resulted in the disappearance of shallow defects due to a lowering of the Fermi level. These defects re-appeared after annealing at 300 °C for 20 min. Defects, E0.39 and E0.42 with close emission rates were attributed to silicon or carbon vacancy and could only be separated by using high resolution Laplace-DLTS. The DLTS peaks at EC - (0.55-0.70) eV (known as Z1/Z2) were attributed to an isolated carbon vacancy (VC).

  2. Alpha Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Term that is sometimes used to describe a helium nucleus, a positively charged particle that consists of two protons and two neutrons, bound together. Alpha particles, which were discovered by Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) in 1898, are emitted by atomic nuclei that are undergoing alpha radioactivity. During this process, an unstable heavy nucleus spontaneously emits an alpha particle and transmut...

  3. Measurement of the spectra of doubly charged particles emitted in bombardment of lead nuclei by. cap alpha. particles with energy 3. 6 GeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Ad'yasevich, B.P.; Antonenko, V.G.; Vinogradov, A.A.; Grigor'yan, Y.I.; Dukhanov, V.I.; Ippolitov, M.S.; Karadzhev, K.V.; Lebedev, A.L.; Man'ko, V.I.; Nikolaev, S.A.; Polunin, Y.P.; Tsvetkov, A.A.

    1983-12-01

    We have measured the spectra of double charged particles emitted in interaction of 3.6 GeV/nucleon ..cap alpha.. particles with lead nuclei. Spectra were measured at emission angles from 10 to 95/sup 0/ in the range of secondary-particle velocities 0.37<..beta..<0.55. Angular distributions were obtained, the total cross section for emission of doubly charged particles was evaluated, and the ratios of the contributions of doubly and singly charged particles were determined. The rapidity distributions of the invariant cross sections for production of doubly charged particles reveal maxima at a rapidity yroughly-equal0.15--0.20.

  4. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  5. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  6. Alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will focus on the state of development of diagnostics which are expected to provide the information needed for {alpha}- physics studies in the future. Conventional measurement of detailed temporal and spatial profiles of background plasma properties in DT will be essential for such aspects as determining heating effectiveness, shaping of the plasma profiles and effects of MHD, but will not be addressed here. This paper will address (1) the measurement of the neutron source, and hence {alpha}-particle birth profile, (2) measurement of the escaping {alpha}-particles and (3) measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles over their full energy range. There will also be a brief discussion of (4) the concerns about instabilities being generated by {alpha}-particles and the methods necessary for measuring these effects. 51 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Summary of Alpha Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1998-08-19

    This paper summarizes the talks on alpha particle transport which were presented at the 5th International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Committee Meeting on "Alpha Particles in Fusion Research" held at the Joint European Torus, England in September 1997.

  8. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  9. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Wolf, Michael A.; McAtee, James L.; Unruh, Wesley P.; Cucchiara, Alfred L.; Huchton, Roger L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  10. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Wolf, M.A.; McAtee, J.L.; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

    1993-02-02

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  11. Alpha-particle spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    Mapping the radon emanation of the moon was studied to find potential areas of high activity by detection of radon isotopes and their daughter products. It was felt that based on observation of regions overflown by Apollo spacecraft and within the field of view of the alpha-particle spectrometer, a radon map could be constructed, identifying and locating lunar areas of outgassing. The basic theory of radon migration from natural concentrations of uranium and thorium is discussed in terms of radon decay and the production of alpha particles. The preliminary analysis of the results indicates no significant alpha emission.

  12. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Prospects for alpha particle studies on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.

    1987-05-01

    TFTR is expected to produce approximately 5 MW of alpha heating during the D/T Q approx. = 1 phase of operation in 1990. At that point the collective confinement properties and the heating effects of alpha particles become accessible for study for the first time. This paper outlines the potential performance of TFTR with respect to alpha particle production, the diagnostics which will be available for alpha particle measurements, and the physics issues which can be studied both before and during D/T operation.

  14. Alpha particle confinement in tandem mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Devoto, R.S.; Ohnishi, M.; Kerns, J.; Woo, J.T.

    1980-10-10

    Mechanisms leading to loss of alpha particles from non-axisymmetric tandem mirrors are considered. Stochastic diffusion due to bounce-drift resonances, which can cause rapid radial losses of high-energy alpha particles, can be suppressed by imposing a 20% rise in axisymmetric fields before the quadrupole transition sections. Alpha particles should then be well-confined until thermal energies when they enter the resonant plateau require. A fast code for computation of drift behavior in reactors is described. Sample calculations are presented for resonant particles in a proposed coil set for the Tandem Mirror Next Step.

  15. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E. Jr.; Dawson, J.M.

    1983-11-23

    This invention relates generally to high energy confined plasmas and more particularly is directed to measuring the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a confined energetic plasma.

  16. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

    2004-12-01

    An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized. PMID:15640792

  17. Alpha-particle sensitive test SRAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.

    1990-01-01

    A bench-level test is being developed to evaluate memory-cell upsets in a test SRAM designed with a cell offset voltage. This offset voltage controls the critical charge needed to upset the cell. The effect is demonstrated using a specially designed 2-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM and a Po-208 5.1-MeV 0.61-LET alpha-particle source. This test SRAM has been made sensitive to alpha particles through the use of a cell offset voltage, and this has allowed a bench-level characterization in a laboratory setting. The experimental data are linked to a alpha-particle interaction physics and to SPICE circuit simulations through the alpha-particle collection depth. The collection depth is determined by two methods and found to be about 7 micron. In addition, alpha particles that struck outside the bloated drain were able to flip the SRAM cells. This lateral charge collection was observed to be more than 6 micron.

  18. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1993-02-16

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, which is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  19. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; McAtee, James L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, whcih is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  20. The status of alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1992-08-01

    There is a flurry of activity to complete alpha-particle diagnostics so that they can undergo some experimental testing in DT plasmas on JET or TFTR prior to implementation on ITER. Successful measurements of escaping charged fusion products have been made in DD plasmas, and the {alpha}-particle source can be well characterized by neutron profile measurement. These methods can be extrapolated to DT plasmas. Measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles requires a new technique. Collective Thomson scattering, methods involving charge-exchange interactions and nuclear reactions with impurities will be discussed. Some assessment is given of the capabilities of these techniques, bearing in mind the potential for their use in the physics phase of the ITER program.

  1. The status of alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    There is a flurry of activity to complete alpha-particle diagnostics so that they can undergo some experimental testing in DT plasmas on JET or TFTR prior to implementation on ITER. Successful measurements of escaping charged fusion products have been made in DD plasmas, and the {alpha}-particle source can be well characterized by neutron profile measurement. These methods can be extrapolated to DT plasmas. Measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles requires a new technique. Collective Thomson scattering, methods involving charge-exchange interactions and nuclear reactions with impurities will be discussed. Some assessment is given of the capabilities of these techniques, bearing in mind the potential for their use in the physics phase of the ITER program.

  2. Lunar surface outgassing and alpha particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Moore, K. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Belian, Richard D.; Binder, Alan B.

    2002-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) searched for lunar surface gas release events and mapped their distribution by detecting alpha particle?; produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life), solid polonium-2 18 (6.0 MeV, 3 minute half-life), and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but held up in production by the 21 year half-life of lead-210). These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238.

  3. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    SciTech Connect

    Clauser, C. F. Farengo, R.

    2015-12-15

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, “cold” neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  4. Alpha particle spectrometry using superconducting microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horansky, Robert; Ullom, Joel; Beall, James; Hilton, Gene; Stiehl, Gregory; Irwin, Kent; Plionis, Alexander; Lamont, Stephen; Rudy, Clifford; Rabin, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Alpha spectrometry is the preferred technique for analyzing trace samples of radioactive material because the alpha particle flux can be significantly higher than the gamma-ray flux from nuclear materials of interest. Traditionally, alpha spectrometry is performed with Si detectors whose resolution is at best 8 keV FWHM. Here, we describe the design and operation of a microcalorimeter alpha detector with an energy resolution of 1.06 keV FWHM at 5 MeV. We demonstrate the ability of the microcalorimeter to clearly resolve the alpha particles from Pu-239 and Pu-240, whose ratio differentiates reactor-grade Pu from weapons-grade. We also show the first direct observation of the decay of Po-209 to the ground state of Pb-205 which has traditionally been obscured by a much stronger alpha line 2 keV away. Finally, the 1.06 keV resolution observed for alpha particles is far worse than the 0.12 keV resolution predicted from thermal fluctuations and measurement of gamma-rays. The cause of the resolution degradation may be ion damage in the tin. Hence, alpha particle microcalorimeters may provide a novel tool for studying ion damage and lattice displacement energies in bulk materials.

  5. TCAD simulation for alpha-particle spectroscopy using SIC Schottky diode.

    PubMed

    Das, Achintya; Duttagupta, Siddhartha P

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing requirement of alpha spectroscopy in the fields context of environmental radioactive contamination, nuclear waste management, site decommissioning and decontamination. Although silicon-based alpha-particle detection technology is mature, high leakage current, low displacement threshold and radiation hardness limits the operation of the detector in harsh environments. Silicon carbide (SiC) is considered to be excellent material for radiation detection application due to its high band gap, high displacement threshold and high thermal conductivity. In this report, an alpha-particle-induced electron-hole pair generation model for a reverse-biased n-type SiC Schottky diode has been proposed and verified using technology computer aided design (TCAD) simulations. First, the forward-biased I-V characteristics were studied to determine the diode ideality factor and compared with published experimental data. The ideality factor was found to be in the range of 1.4-1.7 for a corresponding temperature range of 300-500 K. Next, the energy-dependent, alpha-particle-induced EHP generation model parameters were optimised using transport of ions in matter (TRIM) simulation. Finally, the transient pulses generated due to alpha-particle bombardment were analysed for (1) different diode temperatures (300-500 K), (2) different incident alpha-particle energies (1-5 MeV), (3) different reverse bias voltages of the 4H-SiC-based Schottky diode (-50 to -250 V) and (4) different angles of incidence of the alpha particle (0°-70°).The above model can be extended to other (wide band-gap semiconductor) device technologies useful for radiation-sensing application. PMID:25634901

  6. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-06-03

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  7. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  8. High resolution alpha particle spectrometry through collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seunghoon; Kwak, Sung-Woo; Kang, Han-Byeol

    2015-06-01

    Alpha particle spectrometry with collimation is a useful method for identifying nuclear materials among various nuclides. A mesh type collimator reduces the low energy tail and broadened energy distribution by cutting off particles with a low incidence angle. The relation between the resolution and the counting efficiency can be investigated by changing a ratio of the mesh hole diameter and the collimator thickness. Through collimation, a target particle can be distinguished by a PIPS® detector under a mixture of various nuclides.

  9. A practical alpha particle irradiator for studying internal alpha particle exposure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Man; Lee, Ui-Seob; Kim, Eun-Hee

    2016-09-01

    An alpha particle irradiator has been built in the Radiation Bioengineering Laboratory at Seoul National University (SNU) to investigate the cellular responses to alpha emissions from radon and the progeny. This irradiator is designed to have the energy of alpha particles entering target cells similar to that of alpha emissions from the radon progeny Po-218 and Po-214 residing in the human respiratory tract. For the SNU alpha particle irradiator, an irradiation system is equipped with cell dishes of 4µm thick Mylar bottom and a special setup of cells on slide for gamma-H2AX assay. Dose calibration for the alpha particle irradiator was performed by dual approaches, detection and computer simulation, in consideration of the source-to-target distance (STD) and the size of a cell dish. The uniformity of dose among cells in a dish is achieved by keeping the STD and the size of cell dish in certain ranges. The performance of the SNU alpha particle irradiator has been proven to be reliable through the gamma-H2AX assay with the human lung epithelial cells irradiated. PMID:27475622

  10. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  11. Alpha particles in effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Caniu, C.

    2014-11-11

    Using an effective field theory for alpha (α) particles at non-relativistic energies, we calculate the strong scattering amplitude modified by Coulomb corrections for a system of two αs. For the strong interaction, we consider a momentum-dependent interaction which, in contrast to an energy dependent interaction alone [1], could be more useful in extending the theory to systems with more than two α particles. We will present preliminary results of our EFT calculations for systems with two alpha particles.

  12. Track nanodosimetry of an alpha particle.

    PubMed

    De Nardo, L; Colautti, P; Baek, W Y; Grosswendt, B; Alkaa, A; Ségur, P; Tornielli, G

    2002-01-01

    Experimental measurements and calculations are described of ionisation distributions in propane wall-less gas cavities of about 20 nm simulated size, performed at different distances from a 244Cm alpha particle track. Ionisation events are detected one by one by collecting electrons from the sensitive volume and by separating them with a drift column. Experimental results and Monte Carlo calculations indicate that, in the delta ray cloud, conditional probability curves, average cluster size and the ratio of second moment above first moment of the cluster distribution are invariant with track distance. PMID:12194323

  13. Alpha particle collective Thomson scattering in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Machuzak, J.S.; Woskov, P.P.; Rhee, D.Y.; Gilmore, J.; Bretz, N.L.; Park, H.K.; Aamodt, R.E.; Cheung, P.Y.; Russell, D.A.; Bindslev, H.

    1993-11-01

    A collective Thomson scattering diagnostic is being implemented on TFTR to measure alpha particle, energetic and thermal ion densities and velocity distributions. A 60 GHz, 0.1-1 kW gyrotron will be used as the transmitter source, and the scattering geometry will be perpendicular to the magnetic field in the extraordinary mode polarization. An enhanced scattered signal is anticipated from fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range with this scattering geometry. Millimeter wave collective Thomson scattering diagnostics have the advantage of larger scattering angles to decrease the amount of stray light, and long, high power, modulated pulses to obtain improved signal to noise through synchronous detection techniques.

  14. Angular and velocity distributions of secondary particles emitted in interaction of 3. 6-GeV/nucleon. cap alpha. particles and lead nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, V.G.; Vinogradov, A.A.; Galitskii, V.M.; Grigor'yan, Y.I.; Ippolitov, M.S.; Karadzhev, K.V.; Kuz'min, E.A.; Man'ko, V.I.; Ogloblin, A.A.; Paramonov, V.V.; Tsvetkov, A.A.

    1980-04-01

    The technique is described and results presented of measurements of the velocity and angular distributions of pions, protons, and deuterons, and tritons emitted in bombardment of lead nuclei by ..cap alpha.. particles with energy 3.6 GeV/nucleon.

  15. Evolution of the alpha particle driven toroidicity induced Alfven mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with a toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal harmonics and their radial mode profiles are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. There is no significant alpha particle loss.

  16. Alpha particle loss in the TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    Alpha particle loss was measured during the TFTR DT experiments using a scintillator detector located at the vessel bottom in the ion grad-B drift direction. The DT alpha particle loss to this detector was consistent with the calculated first-orbit loss over the whole range of plasma current I=0.6-2.7 MA. In particular, the alpha particle loss rate per DT neutron did not increase significantly with fusion power up to 10.7 MW, indicating the absence of any new ``collective`` alpha particle loss processes in these experiments.

  17. Alpha-Particle Gas-Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. C.; Bell, L. D.; Hecht, M. H.

    1996-01-01

    An approximate model was developed to establish design curves for the saturation region and a more complete model developed to characterize the current-voltage curves for an alpha-particle pressure sensor. A simple two-parameter current-voltage expression was developed to describe the dependence of the ion current on pressure. The parameters are the saturation-current pressure coefficient and mu/D, the ion mobility/diffusion coefficient. The sensor is useful in the pressure range between 0.1 and 1000 mb using a 1 - mu Ci(241) Am source. Experimental results, taken between 1 and up to 200 mb, show the sensor operates with an anode voltage of 5 V and a sensitivity of 20 fA/mb in nitrogen.

  18. [alpha]-particle transport-driven current in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A. ); Sipilae, S.K. )

    1995-03-01

    It is shown that the radial transport of fusion-born energetic [alpha] particles, induced by electrostatic waves traveling in one poloidal direction, is directly connected to a net momentum of [alpha] particles in the toroidal direction in tokamaks. Because the momentum change is almost independent of toroidal velocity, the energy required for the momentum generation remains small on an [alpha]-particle population sustained by an isotropic time-independent source. By numerical toroidal Monte Carlo calculations it is shown that the current carried by [alpha] particles in the presence of intense well penetrated waves can reach several mega-amperes in reactor-sized tokamaks. The current obtained can greatly exceed the neoclassical bootstrap current of the [alpha] particles.

  19. Genotoxicity of alpha particles in human embryonic skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.; Strniste, G.F.; Tokita, N.

    1984-11-01

    Cell inactivation and induced mutation frequencies at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus have been measured in cultured human fibroblasts (GM10) exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 238/ Pu and 250 kVp X rays. The survival curves resulting from exposure to ..cap alpha.. particles are exponential. The mean lethal dose, D/sub 0/, is approximately 1.3 Gy for X rays and 0.25 Gy for ..cap alpha.. particles. As a function of radiation dose, mutation induction at the HGPRT locus was linear for ..cap alpha.. particles whereas the X-ray-induced mutation data were better fitted by a quadratic function. When mutation frequencies were plotted against the log of survival, mutation frequency at a given survival level was greater in cells exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles than to X rays.

  20. Alpha particle analysis using PEARLS spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McKlveen, J.W.; Klingler, G.W.; McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    Alpha particle assay by conventional plate-counting methods is difficult because chemical separation, tracer techniques, and/or self-absorption losses in the final sample may cause either non-reproducible results or create unacceptable errors. PEARLS (Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation) Spectrometry is an attractive alternative since radionuclides may be extracted into a scintillator in which there would be no self-absorption or geometry problems and in which up to 100% chemical recovery and counting efficiency is possible. Sample preparation may include extraction of the alpha emitter of interest by a specific organic-phase-soluble compound directly into the liquid scintillator. Detection electronics use energy and pulse-shape discrimination to provide discrete alpha spectra and virtual absence of beta and gamma backgrounds. Backgrounds on the order of 0.01 cpm are readily achievable. Accuracy and reproducibility are typically in the 100 +-1% range. Specific procedures have been developed for gross alpha, uranium, plutonium, thorium, and polonium assay. This paper will review liquid scintillation alpha counting methods and reference some of the specific applications. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Contemporary Issues in Ultra-Low Alpha Particle Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael

    Single-Event Upsets (SEU) in CMOS devices are caused by the passage of ionizing radiation either from terrestrial neutrons or from the natural alpha particle radiation within the materials surrounding the transistors. Interactions of the neutrons with the silicon cause spallation reactions which emit energetic highly ionizing elements. Alpha particles, on the other hand, can upset the devices through direct ionization rather than through a nuclear reaction as in the case of the neutrons. In order to minimize the alpha-particle component of SEU, the radiation from the materials within a distance 100 μm of the transistors, currently needs to have an alpha particle emissivity of less than 2 alpha particles per khr per square centimeter. Many alpha particle detectors have background levels that are larger than this, which can make these measurements inaccurate and time consuming. This talk will discuss what is involved in making alpha particle emissivity measurements of materials used in the semiconductor industry using an ultra-low background commercially-available ionization detector. Detector calibration and efficiency, radon adsorption on the samples, and the effect of surface charge on electrically insulating samples will be discussed.

  2. Alpha particle destabilization of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-10-01

    The high frequency, low mode number toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are shown to be driven unstable by the circulating and/or trapped {alpha}-particles through the wave-particle resonances. Satisfying the resonance condition requires that the {alpha}-particle birth speed v{sub {alpha}} {ge} v{sub A}/2{vert bar}m-nq{vert bar}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed, m is the poloidal model number, and n is the toroidal mode number. To destabilize the TAE modes, the inverse Landau damping associated with the {alpha}-particle pressure gradient free energy must overcome the velocity space Landau damping due to both the {alpha}-particles and the core electrons and ions. The growth rate was studied analytically with a perturbative formula derived from the quadratic dispersion relation, and numerically with the aid of the NOVA-K code. Stability criteria in terms of the {alpha}-particle beta {beta}{sub {alpha}}, {alpha}-particle pressure gradient parameter ({omega}{sub {asterisk}}/{omega}{sub A}) ({omega}{sub {asterisk}} is the {alpha}-particle diamagnetic drift frequency), and (v{sub {alpha}}/v{sub A}) parameters will be presented for TFTR, CIT, and ITER tokamaks. The volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold for TAE instability also depends sensitively on the core electron and ion temperature. Typically the volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold is in the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. Typical growth rates of the n=1 TAE mode can be in the order of 10{sup {minus}2}{omega}{sub A}, where {omega}{sub A}=v{sub A}/qR. Other types of global Alfven waves are stable in D-T tokamaks due to toroidal coupling effects.

  3. Effect of alpha particles on Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-11-01

    An overview is given of the analytic structure for the linear theory of the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE), where multiple gap structures occur. A discussion is given of the alpha particle drive and the various dissipation mechanisms that can stabilize the system. A self-consistent calculation of the TAE mode, for a low-beta high-aspect-ratio plasma, indicates that though the alpha particle drive is comparable to the dissipation mechanisms, overall stability is still achieved for ignited ITER-like plasma. A brief discussion is given of the nonlinear theory for the TAE mode and how nonlinear alpha particle dynamics can be treated by mapping methods.

  4. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-11-15

    A systematic study of the behavior of energetic ions in reactor plasmas is presented. Using self-consistent gyrokinetic simulations, in concert with an analytic asymptotic theory, it is found that alpha particles can interact significantly with core ion-temperature-gradient turbulence. Specifically, the per-particle flux of energetic alphas is comparable to the per-particle flux of thermal species (deuterium or helium ash). This finding opposes the conventional wisdom that energetic ions, because of their large gyroradii, do not interact with the turbulence. For the parameters studied, a turbulent modification of the alpha-particle density profile appears to be stronger than turbulent modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile. Crude estimates indicate that the alpha density modification, which is directly proportional to the core turbulence intensity, could be in the range of 15% at midradius in a reactor. The corresponding modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile is predicted to be smaller (in the 1% range)

  5. Alpha particle nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) for device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, Insoo; Xapsos, Michael A.; Messenger, Scott R.; Burke, Edward A.; Walters, Robert J.; Summers, Geoff; Jordan, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    A method developed for the proton NIEL calculation previously is extended to incident alpha particles in this study: ZBL screened potential for Coulomb interactions and MCNPX 'thin target approximation' for nuclear interactions.

  6. Alpha-particle effects on ballooning flute modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Andrushchenko, Z.N.; Bijko, A.Y.; Cheremnykh, O.K. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper a more accurate dispersion equation for ideal ballooning flute modes in a plasma with alpha particles is obtained. It is shown that circulating and trapped alpha particles generate the eigenbranches of the mode oscillations with frequencies {omega} {approx lt} {omega}{sub *i}, where {omega}{sub *i}, is the ion drift frequency. The relevant growth rates and frequencies are found. It is ascertained that in the frequency range {omega}{sub *i} {lt} {omega} {lt} {bar {omega}{sub Db}}, where {bar {omega}{sub Db}} is the magnetic drift frequency average over a bounce period, trapped alpha particles may generate forced oscillations that influence the ideal ballooning flute mode stability boundary. It is shown that the stability may be improved for certain plasma parameters and trapped alpha-particle pressures.

  7. Full orbit calculation for lost alpha particle measurement on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Funaki, D.; Isobe, M.; Nishiura, M.; Sato, Y.; Okamoto, A.; Kobuchi, T.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.

    2008-10-15

    An orbit following calculation code with full gyromotion under the ITER magnetic field configuration has been developed to investigate escaping alpha particle orbits in ITER and to determine the geometrical arrangement for alpha particle detection. The code contained the full geometrical information of the first wall panels. It was carefully investigated whether an alpha particle escaping from the plasma through the last closed flux surface does not touch or intersect the first wall boundary before reaching the detection point. Candidates of blanket module modification have been studied to achieve effective measurement geometry for escaping alpha particle detection. The calculations showed that direct orbit loss and banana diffusion can be detected with a probe head recessed from the first wall surface.

  8. Shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Santoro, R. T.; Barish, J.; Claiborne, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    The available information on the shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles is summarized. The emphasis is placed on shielding against Van Allen belt protons and against solar-flare protons and alpha particles, but information on shielding against galactic cosmic rays is also presented. The approximation methods for use by nonexperts in the space shielding field are those that are standard in the space shielding literature.

  9. Utility of extracting {alpha}-particle energy by waves

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.; Herrmann, M.C.

    1994-05-01

    The utility of extracting {alpha}-particle power, and then diverting this power to fast fuel ions, is investigated. As power is diverted to fast ions and then to ions, a number of effects come into play, as the relative amounts of pressure taken up by electrons, fuel ions, and fast {alpha}-particles shift. In addition, if the {alpha}-particle power is diverted to fast fuel ions, there is an enhanced fusion reactivity because of the nonthermal component of the ion distribution. Some useful expressions for describing these effects are derived, and it is shown that fusion reactors with power density about twice what otherwise might be obtained can be contemplated, so long as a substantial amount of the {alpha}-particle power can be diverted. Interestingly, in this mode of operation, once the electron heat is sufficiently confined, further improvement in confinement is actually not desirable. A similar improvement in fusion power density can be obtained for advanced fuel mixtures such as D-He{sup 3}, where the power of both the energetic {alpha}-particles and the energetic protons might be diverted advantageously.

  10. Solar wind alpha particle capture at Mars and Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenberg, Gabriella; Barabash, Stas; Nilsson, Hans; Fedorov, Andrei; Brain, Dave

    2010-05-01

    Helium is detected in the atmospheres of both Mars and Venus. It is believed that radioactive decay of uranium and thorium in the interior of the planets' is not sufficient to account for the abundance of helium observed. Alpha particles in the solar wind are suggested to be an additional source of helium, especially at Mars. Recent hybrid simulations show that as much as 30% of the alpha particles can be lost from the solar wind due to charge-exchange processes associated with the Mars/solar wind interaction. We use ion data from the ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 instruments on Mars and Venus Express to estimate how efficient solar wind alpha particles are captured in the atmospheres of the two planets.

  11. Quantum dot solar cell tolerance to alpha-particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cress, Cory D.; Hubbard, Seth M.; Landi, Brian J.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Wilt, David M.

    2007-10-29

    The effects of alpha-particle irradiation on an InAs quantum dot (QD) array and GaAs-based InAs QD solar cells were investigated. Using photoluminescence (PL) mapping, the PL intensity at 872 and 1120 nm, corresponding to bulk GaAs and InAs QD emissions, respectively, were measured for a five-layer InAs QD array which had a spatially varying total alpha-particle dose. The spectral response and normalized current-voltage parameters of the solar cells, measured as a function of alpha-particle fluence, were used to investigate the change in device performance between GaAs solar cells with and without InAs QDs.

  12. Actinium-225 in targeted alpha-particle therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes are being investigated in radioimmunotherapeutic applications because of their unparalleled cytotoxicity when targeted to cancer and their relative lack of toxicity towards untargeted normal tissue. Actinium- 225 has been developed into potent targeting drug constructs and is in clinical use against acute myelogenous leukemia. The key properties of the alpha particles generated by 225Ac are the following: i) limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters; ii) high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track; iii) a 10 day halflife; and iv) four net alpha particles emitted per decay. Targeting 225Ac-drug constructs have potential in the treatment of cancer. PMID:22202153

  13. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of 241Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  14. Targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G; Rosenblat, Todd L

    2014-01-01

    Because alpha-particles have a shorter range and a higher linear energy transfer (LET) compared with beta-particles, targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy offers the potential for more efficient tumor cell killing while sparing surrounding normal cells. To date, clinical studies of alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have focused on the myeloid cell surface antigen CD33 as a target using the humanized monoclonal antibody lintuzumab. An initial phase I study demonstrated the safety, feasibility, and antileukemic effects of bismuth-213 ((213)Bi)-labeled lintuzumab. In a subsequent study, (213)Bi-lintuzumab produced remissions in some patients with AML after partial cytoreduction with cytarabine, suggesting the utility of targeted alpha-particle therapy for small-volume disease. The widespread use of (213)Bi, however, is limited by its short half-life. Therefore, a second-generation construct containing actinium-225 ((225)Ac), a radiometal that generates four alpha-particle emissions, was developed. A phase I trial demonstrated that (225)Ac-lintuzumab is safe at doses of 3 μCi/kg or less and has antileukemic activity across all dose levels studied. Fractionated-dose (225)Ac-lintuzumab in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) is now under investigation for the management of older patients with untreated AML in a multicenter trial. Preclinical studies using (213)Bi- and astatine-211 ((211)At)-labeled anti-CD45 antibodies have shown that alpha-particle immunotherapy may be useful as part conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation. The use of novel pretargeting strategies may further improve target-to-normal organ dose ratios. PMID:24857092

  15. Solar wind alpha particle capture at Mars and Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenberg, Gabriella; Barabash, Stas; Nilsson, Hans; Fedorov, A.; Brain, David; André, Mats

    Helium is detected in the atmospheres of both Mars and Venus. It is believed that radioactive decay of uranium and thorium in the interior of the planets' is not sufficient to account for the abundance of helium observed. Alpha particles in the solar wind are suggested to be an additional source of helium, especially at Mars. Recent hybrid simulations show that as much as 30We use ion data from the ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 instruments on Mars and Venus Express to estimate how efficient solar wind alpha particles are captured in the atmospheres of the two planets.

  16. Performance comparison of scintillators for alpha particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Yuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Izaki, Kenji; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Toui, Kohei; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2014-11-01

    Scintillation detectors for alpha particles are often used in nuclear fuel facilities. Alpha particle detectors have also become important in the research field of radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters. ZnS(Ag) is the most often used scintillator for alpha particle detectors because its light output is high. However, the energy resolution of ZnS(Ag)-based scintillation detectors is poor because they are not transparent. A new ceramic sample, namely the cerium doped Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator, has been tested as alpha particle detector and its performances have been compared to that one of three different scintillating materials: ZnS(Ag), GAGG and a standard plastic scintillator. The different scintillating materials have been coupled to two different photodetectors, namely a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a Silicon Photo-multiplier (Si-PM): the performances of each detection system have been compared. Promising results as far as the energy resolution performances (10% with PMT and 14% with Si-PM) have been obtained in the case of GPS and GAGG samples. Considering the quantum efficiencies of the photodetectors under test and their relation to the emission wavelength of the different scintillators, the best results were achieved coupling the GPS with the PMT and the GAGG with the Si-PM

  17. Alpha particle heating at comet-solar wind interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1995-01-01

    The satellite observations at comet Halley have shown strong heating of solar wind alpha particles over an extended region dominated by high-intensity, low-frequency turbulence. These waves are excited by the water group pickup ions and can energize the solar wind plasma by different heating processes. The alpha particle heating by the Landau damping of kinetic Alfven waves and the transit time damping of low-frequency hydromagnetic waves in this region of high plasma beta are studied in this paper. The Alfven wave heating was shown to be the dominant mechanism for the observed proton heating, but it is found to be insufficient to account for the observed alpha particle heating. The transit time damping due to the interaction of the ions with the electric fields associated with the magnetic field compressions of magnetohydrodynamic waves is found to heat the alpha particles preferentially over the protons. Comparison of the calculated heating times for the transit time damping with the observations from comet Halley shows good agreement. These processes contribute to the thermalization of the solar wind by the conversion of its directed energy into the thermal energy in the transition region at comet-solar wind interaction.

  18. Analytic expressions for {alpha} particle preformation in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H. F.; Wang, Y. J.; Dong, J. M.; Royer, G.

    2009-11-15

    Experimental {alpha} decay energies and half-lives are investigated systematically to extract {alpha} particle preformation in heavy nuclei. Formulas for the preformation factors are proposed that can be used to guide microscopic studies on preformation factors and perform accurate calculations of the {alpha} decay half-lives. There is little evidence for the existence of an island of long stability of superheavy nuclei.

  19. Alpha particle backscattering measurements used for chemical analysis of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J. H.

    1967-01-01

    Alpha particle backscattering performs a chemical analysis of surfaces. The apparatus uses a curium source and a semiconductor detector to determine the energy spectrum of the particles. This in turn determines the chemical composition of the surface after calibration to known samples.

  20. Mutagenic effects of alpha particles in normal human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.; Carpenter, S.; Hanks, T.

    1992-12-31

    Alpha-irradiation to the bronchial airways from inhaled radon progeny increases the risk of developing lung cancer. The molecular mechanism of radon-induced lung cancer is not clear, but one of the most important genetic effects of ionizing radiation is the induction of gene mutation. Mutations, especially those associated with visible chromosome abnormalities in humans, have been associated with cancer. Therefore, our objective is to use a well-defined model system to determine the mutagenic potential of alpha particles in normal human skin cells and to define this action at the molecular level. Normal human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with alpha particles (3.59 MeV, LET 115 keV {mu}m{sup {minus}1}) emitted from the decay of {sup 238}Pu. Mutagenicity was determined at the X-linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus. Results from this study indicate that beta particles were more efficient in mutation induction than gamma rays. Based on the initial slopes of the dose-response curves, the RBE for mutation is about 8 for alpha particles. HPRT-deficient mutants which are resistant to 6-thioguanine have been isolated and analyzed by the Southern blot technique. To date, we have characterized 69 gamma-ray-induced and 195 alpha-particle-induced HPRT-deficient mutants. Our data indicate that more than 50% of all gamma-ray-induced mutants have band patterns identical to that observed for the normal structural HPRT gene, whereas the remaining mutants (45%) contain either a rearrangement, partial deletion, or total deletion of the HPRT gene. In contrast, only 30% of alpha-particle-induced human HPRT mutants contain a normal Southern blot pattern, and about 50% indicate total deletion of the HPRT gene. Our results support the notion that high-LET radiation produces more unrepaired or misrepaired DNA damage than do gamma rays.

  1. Quality factors for alpha particles emitted in tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borak, Thomas B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A concept of a mean or dose averaged quality factor was defined in ICRP Publication 26 using relationships for quality factor as a function of LET. The concept of radiation weighting factors, wR, was introduced in ICRP Publication 60 in 1990. These are meant to be generalized factors that modify absorbed dose to reflect the risk of stochastic effects as a function of the quality of the radiation incident on the body or emitted by radioactivity within the body. The values of wr are equal to 20 for all alpha particles externally or internally emitted. This note compares the dose averaged quality factor for alpha particles originating in tissue using the old and revised recommendations for quality factor as a function of LET. The dose averaged quality factor never exceeds 20 using the old recommendations and is never less than 20 with the revised recommendations.

  2. Alpha particle effects on the internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yanlin; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-08-01

    The {alpha}-particle effects on the internal kink mode stability are studied. Finite Grad-Shafranov Shift, plasma {beta}, and plasma shape can significantly enhance the trapped particle drift reversal domain in pitch angle space and reduce average magnetic drift frequency. The drift reversal effect on the ideal kink mode is small, but the {beta}{sub {alpha}} threshold for the fishbone mode can be much lower than previously predicted. In addition, the ion diamagnetic drift has a stronger destabilizing effect.

  3. Alpha-particle losses in compact torsatron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, S.L.; Lyon, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Loss of alpha particles in compact torsatron reactors is studied. For 6, 9, and 12 field period reactors, the direct loss is a relatively weak function of radius and energy and varies from approx. =33% for M = 6 to approx. =18% for M = 12. Loss of alpha particles through scattering into the loss region is calculated using the Fokker-Plank equation for fast ions and found to contribute an additional alpha-particle energy loss of approx. =15%. The consequences of these relatively large losses for torsatron reactor design are discussed. The relationship between the direct particle losses and the magnetic field structure is also studied. Orbit losses from a variety of stellarator configurations are calculated and a figure-of-merit that characterizes the orbit confinement of a magnetic configuration is deduced from these calculations. This figure-of-merit is used to show how the direct losses might be reduced at low aspect-ratio. Effects of finite beta on the direct particle losses are also addressed, and are shown to significantly increase the direct losses in some configurations. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Michrochannel plate for position sensitive alpha particle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Hurley and James Tinsley

    2007-08-31

    This paper will describe the use of a microchannel plate (MCP) as the associated particle detector on a sealed tube neutron generator. The generator produces neutrons and associated alpha particles for use as a probe to locate and identify hidden explosives in associated particle imaging (API). The MCP measures the position in two dimensions and precise timing of the incident alpha particle, information which is then used to calculate the emission time and direction of the corresponding neutron. The MCP replaces the position-sensitive photomultipler tube (PSPMT) which, until recently, had been the only detector available for measuring position and timing for alpha particles in neutron generator applications. Where the PSPMT uses charge division for generating position information, a process that requires a first order correction to each pulse, the MCP uses delay-line timing, which requires no correction. The result is a device with an order of magnitude improvement in both position resolution and timing compared to the PSPMT. Hardware and software development and the measurements made to characterize the MCP for API applications are described.

  5. Dosimetry and radiobiological studies of automated alpha-particle irradiator.

    PubMed

    M V, Jyothish Babu; Shinde, Sanjay G; S, Sunil Kumar; Ali, Manjoor; Vasumathy, R; Kumar, Amit; Kolekar, R; Kumar, Manish; Nema, P; Bhagwat, P V; Pandey, Badri N

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effect of alpha radiation on biological systems is an important component of radiation risk assessment and associated health consequences. However, due to the short path length of alpha radiation in the atmosphere, in vitro radiobiological experiments cannot be performed with accuracy in terms of dose and specified exposure time. The present paper describes the design and dosimetry of an automated alpha-particle irradiator named 'BARC BioAlpha', which is suitable for in vitro radiobiological studies. Compared to alpha irradiators developed in other laboratories, BARC BioAlpha has integrated computer-controlled movement of the alpha-particle source, collimator, and electronic shutter. The diaphragm blades of the electronic shutter can control the area (diameter) of irradiation without any additional shielding, which is suitable for radiobiological bystander studies. To avoid irradiation with incorrect parameters, a software interlock is provided to prevent shutter opening, unless the user-specified speed of the source and collimator are achieved. The dosimetry of the alpha irradiator using CR-39 and silicon surface barrier detectors showed that ~4 MeV energy of the alpha particle reached the cells on the irradiation dish. The alpha irradiation was also demonstrated by the evaluation of DNA double-strand breaks in human cells. In conclusion, 'BARC BioAlpha' provides a user-friendly alpha irradiation system for radiobiological experiments with a novel automation mechanism for better accuracy of dose and exposure time. PMID:24266413

  6. A Novel Experiment to Investigate the Attenuation of Alpha Particles in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, D. G. H.

    2008-01-01

    A simple student experiment investigating dependence on air pressure of the attenuation of alpha particles in air is described. An equation giving the pressure needed to absorb all alpha particles of a given energy is derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula. Results are presented for the attenuation of alpha particles from americium 241 and radium…

  7. The effect of alpha particles on bacteriophage T4Br+.

    PubMed

    Leont'eva, G A; Akoev, I G; Grigor'ev, A E

    1983-01-01

    It is generally accepted that heavy charged particles play an important part in generating the secondary flux of nuclear particles formed by the interaction of space hadrons with nuclei. It is assumed that these particles are responsible for the high biological efficiency of space hadrons in causing cellular damage by their strong interactions. To examine this assumption we investigated the effects of 5.3 MeV alpha particles on bacteriophage T4. This energy provides a LET value of 88.6 KeV/micrometer lying in the range of the highest biological efficiency. PMID:11542756

  8. Radiolytic gas production in the alpha particle degradation of plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T.; Hoh, J.; Emery, J.; Hobbs, D.

    1992-05-01

    Net gas generation due to alpha particle irradiation of polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride was investigated. Experiments were performed in an air environment at 30, 60, and 100{degree}C. The predominant radiolytic degradation products of polyethylene were hydrogen and carbon dioxide with a wide variety of trace organic species noted. Irradiation of polyvinyl chloride resulted in the formation of HCl in addition to the products observed for polyethylene. For both plastic materials, a strong enhancement of net yields was noted at 100{degree}C.

  9. Thick Source Alpha Particle Spectroscopy: Possibilities And Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, C. T.; Zacharias, N.; Hein, A.

    The new technique for the calculation of U and Th concentration which is based on the alpha particle spectrum taken from a thick sample by using a silicon detector is briefly described. Within the present study two major advantages of the technique will also be presented: the potentiality for detecting and providing an estimation of disequilibrium in the U and Th series -when present- for especially young sediments, and the potential use of the technique as a new method for isotopic dating of speleothems and other materials. Also the validity of the basic equation and the accuracy of this technique is tested.

  10. Protons and alpha particles in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, Petr; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Passot, Thierry; Sulem, Pierre-Louis; Matteini, Lorenzo; Landi, Simone

    2014-05-01

    We investigate energetic consequences of ion kinetic instabilitities in the solar wind connected with beam and core protons and alpha particles drifting with respect to each other. We compare theoretical predictions, simulations and observation results. For theoretical prediction we assume drifting bi-Maxwellian ion populations and we calculate theoretical quasilinear heating rates (Hellinger et al., 2013b). The nonlinear evolution of beam-core protons, and alpha particles in the expanding solar wind we investigate using hybrid expanding box system (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2013). The expansion leads to many different kinetic instabilities. In the simulation the beam protons and alpha particles are decelerated with respect to the core protons and all the populations are cooled in the parallel direction and heated in the perpendicular one in agreement with theoretical expectations. On the macroscopic level the kinetic instabilities cause large departures of the system evolution from the double adiabatic prediction and lead to a perpendicular heating and parallel cooling rates. The simulated heating rates are comparable to the heating rates estimated from the Helios observations (Hellinger et al., 2013a); furthermore, the differential velocity between core and beam protons observed by Ulysses exhibits apparent bounds which are compatible with the theoretical constaints imposed by the linear theory for the magnetosonic instability driven by beam-core differential velocity (Matteini et al., 2013). References Hellinger, P., P. M. Travnicek, S. Stverak, L. Matteini, and M. Velli (2013a), Proton thermal energetics in the solar wind: Helios reloaded, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 1351-1365, doi:10.1002/jgra.50107. Hellinger, P., T. Passot, P.-L. Sulem, and P. M. Travnicek (2013b), Quasi-linear heating and acceleration in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 20, 122306. Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2013), Protons and alpha particles in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid

  11. Selective flow path alpha particle detector and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring alpha contamination are provided in which ions generated in the air surrounding the item, by the passage of alpha particles, are moved to a distant detector location. The parts of the item from which ions are withdrawn can be controlled by restricting the air flow over different portions of the apparatus. In this way, detection of internal and external surfaces separately, for instance, can be provided. The apparatus and method are particularly suited for use in undertaking alpha contamination measurements during the commissioning operations.

  12. Humidity influenced capacitance and resistance of an Al/DNA/Al Schottky diode irradiated by alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA based sensors, especially as humidity and alpha particle sensors have become quite popular in recent times due to flexible and highly optimizable nature of this fundamental biomaterial. Application of DNA electronics allow for more sensitive, accurate and effective sensors to be developed and fabricated. In this work, we examined the effect of different humidity conditions on the capacitive and resistive response of Aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al Schottky barrier structure when bombarded by time-dependent dosages of alpha particles. Based on current-voltage profiles, which demonstrated rectifying behaviours, Schottky diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance was calculated. Results observed generally pointed towards a decrease in the resistance value from the pristine to the radiated structures. It was also demonstrated that under the effect of humidity, the capacitance of the DNA thin film increased from 0.05894 to 92.736 nF, with rising relative humidity level. We also observed the occurrence of the hypersensitivity phenomena after alpha irradiation between 2 to 4 min by observing a drop in the series resistance, crucial in the study of DNA damage and repair mechanisms. These observations may also suggest the exciting possibility of utilizing Al/DNA/Al Schottky diodes as potentially sensitive humidity sensors. PMID:27160654

  13. Humidity influenced capacitance and resistance of an Al/DNA/Al Schottky diode irradiated by alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ta’Ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2016-05-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA based sensors, especially as humidity and alpha particle sensors have become quite popular in recent times due to flexible and highly optimizable nature of this fundamental biomaterial. Application of DNA electronics allow for more sensitive, accurate and effective sensors to be developed and fabricated. In this work, we examined the effect of different humidity conditions on the capacitive and resistive response of Aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al Schottky barrier structure when bombarded by time-dependent dosages of alpha particles. Based on current-voltage profiles, which demonstrated rectifying behaviours, Schottky diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance was calculated. Results observed generally pointed towards a decrease in the resistance value from the pristine to the radiated structures. It was also demonstrated that under the effect of humidity, the capacitance of the DNA thin film increased from 0.05894 to 92.736 nF, with rising relative humidity level. We also observed the occurrence of the hypersensitivity phenomena after alpha irradiation between 2 to 4 min by observing a drop in the series resistance, crucial in the study of DNA damage and repair mechanisms. These observations may also suggest the exciting possibility of utilizing Al/DNA/Al Schottky diodes as potentially sensitive humidity sensors.

  14. Humidity influenced capacitance and resistance of an Al/DNA/Al Schottky diode irradiated by alpha particles

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA based sensors, especially as humidity and alpha particle sensors have become quite popular in recent times due to flexible and highly optimizable nature of this fundamental biomaterial. Application of DNA electronics allow for more sensitive, accurate and effective sensors to be developed and fabricated. In this work, we examined the effect of different humidity conditions on the capacitive and resistive response of Aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al Schottky barrier structure when bombarded by time-dependent dosages of alpha particles. Based on current-voltage profiles, which demonstrated rectifying behaviours, Schottky diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance was calculated. Results observed generally pointed towards a decrease in the resistance value from the pristine to the radiated structures. It was also demonstrated that under the effect of humidity, the capacitance of the DNA thin film increased from 0.05894 to 92.736 nF, with rising relative humidity level. We also observed the occurrence of the hypersensitivity phenomena after alpha irradiation between 2 to 4 min by observing a drop in the series resistance, crucial in the study of DNA damage and repair mechanisms. These observations may also suggest the exciting possibility of utilizing Al/DNA/Al Schottky diodes as potentially sensitive humidity sensors. PMID:27160654

  15. Alpha-particle Measurements Needed for Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth M. Young

    2001-09-26

    The next major step in magnetic fusion studies will be the construction of a burning plasma (BP) experiment where the goals will be to achieve and understand the plasma behavior with the internal heating provided by fusion-generated alpha particles. Two devices with these physics goals have been proposed: the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE). Extensive conceptual design work for the instrumentation to try to meet the physics demands has been done for these devices, especially ITER. This article provides a new look at the measurements specifically important for understanding the physics aspects of the alpha particles taking into account two significant events. The first is the completion of physics experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with deuterium-tritium fueling with the first chances to study alpha physics and the second is the realization that relatively compact plasmas, making use of advanced tokamak plasma concepts, are the most probable route to burning plasmas and ultimately a fusion reactor.

  16. Preliminary results from the lunar prospector alpha particle spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) builds on Apollo heritage and maps the distribution of outgassing sites on the Moon. The APS searches for lunar surface gas release events and maps their distribution by detecting alpha particles produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life) and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but remains on the surface with a 21 year half-life as lead-210), which are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238. Radon is in such small quantities that it is not released directly from the lunar interior, rather it is entrained in a stream of gases and serves as a tracer for such gases. Once released, the radon spreads out by 'bouncing' across the surface on ballistic trajectories in a random-walk process. The 3.8 day half-life of radon-222 allows the gas to spread out by several 100 km before it decays and allows the APS to detect gas release events up to a few days after they occur. The long residence time (10s of years) of the lead-210 precursor to the polonium-210 allows the mapping of gas vents which have been active over the last approximately 50 years. Because radon and polonium are daughter products of the decay of uranium, the background level of alpha particle activity is a function of the lunar crustal uranium distribution. Using radioactive radon and polonium as tracers, the Apollo 15 and 16 Command Module orbital alpha particle experiments obtained evidence for the release of gases at several sites beneath the orbit tracks, especially over the Aristarchus Plateau and Mare Fecunditatis [1]. Aristarchus crater had previously been identified by ground-based observers as the site of transient optical events [2]. The Apollo 17 surface mass spectrometer showed that argon-40 is released from the lunar interior every few months, apparently in concert with some of the shallow moonquakes that are believed to be of tectonic origin [3]. The latter tectonic events could be

  17. A self-consistent theory of collective alpha particle losses induced by Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Diamond, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of kinetic Alfven waves, resonantly excited by energetic ions/alpha particles, is investigated. It is shown that {alpha}-particles govern both linear instability and nonlinear saturation dynamics, while the background MHD turbulence results only in a nonlinear real frequency shift. The most efficient saturation mechanism is found to be self-induced profile modification. Expressions for the fluctuation amplitudes and the {alpha}-particle radial flux are self-consistently derived. The work represents the first self-consistent, turbulent treatment of collective {alpha}-particle losses by Alfvenic fluctuations.

  18. Transport of Fusion Alpha Particles in ITER Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, E. M.; Waltz, R. E.

    2014-10-01

    We predict the fusion-born alpha particle density in steady-state and hybrid (reverse shear) ITER scenarios with an integrated 1D transport model. The model combines ``stiff'' critical gradient alpha-driven Alfvén eigenmode (AE) transport with a quasilinear approximation of microturbulent transport. In an ITER baseline case, AE transport is found to redistribute alphas within the core but not propagate to the loss boundary. The remaining microturbulence at the edge causes negligible alpha-channel energy flux there (neglecting ripple loss). We set the AE stiff transport critical gradient threshold at gAE =gITG , below which microturbulence can nonlinearly suppress AE transport, and the more stringent condition gAE = 0 . Work supported in part by the US DOE under GA-Grant No. DE-FG02-95ER54309 and SciDAC-GSEP Grant No DE-FC02-08ER54977.

  19. MHD-Induced Alpha Particle Loss in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Taylor, G.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.; von Goeler, S.

    1999-03-01

    MHD-induced increases in alpha particle loss to the wall were observed for both coherent modes and transient reconnection events using an array of scintillator detectors near the wall of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The magnitude of the coherent MHD-induced alpha loss as seen by these detectors was normally comparable to the MHD-quiescent first-orbit or toroidal-field ripple loss, but the magnitude of the alpha loss during reconnection events was up to 1000 times higher than this for a short time. Modeling suggest that the coherent MHD loss mechanism will be even less significant for future reactor-scale deuterium-tritium tokamaks due to the smaller ratio of the alpha gyroradius to minor radius.

  20. TF ripple loss of alpha particles in TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    Quantitative evaluation of TF ripple loss of DT alpha particles is a central issue for reactor design because of potentially severe first wall heat load problems. DT experiments on TFTR allow experimental measurements to be compared to modeling of the underlying alpha physics, with code validation an important goal. Modeling of TF ripple loss of alphas in TFTR now includes neoclassical calculations of alpha losses arising from first orbit loss, stochastic ripple diffusion, ripple trapping and collisional effects. Recent Hamiltonian coordinate guiding center code (ORBIT) simulations for TFTR have shown that collisions enhance the stochastic TF ripple losses at TFTR. A faster way to simulate experiment has been developed and is discussed here which uses a simple stochastic domain model for TF ripple loss within the TRANSP analysis code.

  1. Detection of alpha particles using DNA/Al Schottky junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA can be utilized in an organic-metallic rectifying structure to detect radiation, especially alpha particles. This has become much more important in recent years due to crucial environmental detection needs in both peace and war. In this work, we fabricated an aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al structure and generated current-voltage characteristics upon exposure to alpha radiation. Two models were utilized to investigate these current profiles; the standard conventional thermionic emission model and Cheung and Cheung's method. Using these models, the barrier height, Richardson constant, ideality factor and series resistance of the metal-DNA-metal structure were analyzed in real time. The barrier height, Φ value calculated using the conventional method for non-radiated structure was 0.7149 eV, increasing to 0.7367 eV after 4 min of radiation. Barrier height values were observed to increase after 20, 30 and 40 min of radiation, except for 6, 8, and 10 min, which registered a decrease of about 0.67 eV. This was in comparison using Cheung and Cheung's method, which registered 0.6983 eV and 0.7528 eV for the non-radiated and 2 min of radiation, respectively. The barrier height values, meanwhile, were observed to decrease after 4 (0.61 eV) to 40 min (0.6945 eV). The study shows that conventional thermionic emission model could be practically utilized for estimating the diode parameters including the effect of series resistance. These changes in the electronic properties of the Al/DNA/Al junctions could therefore be utilized in the manufacture of sensitive alpha particle sensors.

  2. Detection of alpha particles using DNA/Al Schottky junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber E-mail: vengadeshp@um.edu.my; Periasamy, Vengadesh E-mail: vengadeshp@um.edu.my; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2015-09-21

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA can be utilized in an organic-metallic rectifying structure to detect radiation, especially alpha particles. This has become much more important in recent years due to crucial environmental detection needs in both peace and war. In this work, we fabricated an aluminum (Al)/DNA/Al structure and generated current–voltage characteristics upon exposure to alpha radiation. Two models were utilized to investigate these current profiles; the standard conventional thermionic emission model and Cheung and Cheung's method. Using these models, the barrier height, Richardson constant, ideality factor and series resistance of the metal-DNA-metal structure were analyzed in real time. The barrier height, Φ value calculated using the conventional method for non-radiated structure was 0.7149 eV, increasing to 0.7367 eV after 4 min of radiation. Barrier height values were observed to increase after 20, 30 and 40 min of radiation, except for 6, 8, and 10 min, which registered a decrease of about 0.67 eV. This was in comparison using Cheung and Cheung's method, which registered 0.6983 eV and 0.7528 eV for the non-radiated and 2 min of radiation, respectively. The barrier height values, meanwhile, were observed to decrease after 4 (0.61 eV) to 40 min (0.6945 eV). The study shows that conventional thermionic emission model could be practically utilized for estimating the diode parameters including the effect of series resistance. These changes in the electronic properties of the Al/DNA/Al junctions could therefore be utilized in the manufacture of sensitive alpha particle sensors.

  3. Enhanced homologous recombination is induced by alpha-particle radiation in somatic cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Po; Liu, Ping; Wu, Yuejin

    Almost 9 percent of cosmic rays which strike the earth's atmosphere are alpha particles. As one of the ionizing radiations (IR), its biological effects have been widely studied. However, the plant genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation was not largely known. In this research, the Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic for GUS recombination substrate was used to evaluate the genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation (3.3MeV). The pronounced effects of systemic exposure to alpha-particle radiation on the somatic homologous recombination frequency (HRF) were found at different doses. The 10Gy dose of radiation induced the maximal HRF which was 1.9-fold higher than the control. The local radiation of alpha-particle (10Gy) on root also resulted in a 2.5-fold increase of somatic HRF in non-radiated aerial plant, indicating that the signal(s) of genomic instability was transferred to non-radiated parts and initiated their genomic instability. Concurrent treatment of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana with alpha-particle and DMSO(ROS scavenger) both in systemic and local radiation signifi- cantly suppressed the somatic HR, indicating that the free radicals produced by alpha-particle radiation took part in the production of signal of genomic instability rather than the signal transfer. Key words: alpha-particle radiation, somatic homologous recombination, genomic instability

  4. Use of /sup 3/He/sup + +/ ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating

    DOEpatents

    Post, D.E. Jr.; Hwang, D.Q.; Hovey, J.

    1983-11-16

    It is an object of the present invention to provide a better understanding of alpha particle behavior in a magnetically confined, energetic plasma. Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved means and method for studying and measuring the energy distribution of heated alpha particles in a confined plasma. Yet another object of the present invention is to permit detailed analysis of energetic alpha particle behavior in a magnetically confined plasma for use in near term fusion reactor experiments. A still further object of the present invention is to simulate energetic alpha particle behavior in a deuterium-tritium plasma confined in a fusion reactor without producing the neutron activation associated with the thus produced alpha particles.

  5. Realizing the potential of the Actinium-225 radionuclide generator in targeted alpha particle therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Miederer, Matthias; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes have been proposed as novel cytotoxic agents for augmenting targeted therapy. Properties of alpha particle radiation such as their limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters and their high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track are promising in the treatment of cancer, especially when single cells or clusters of tumor cells are targeted. Actinium-225 (225 Ac) is an alpha particle-emitting radionuclide that generates 4 net alpha particle isotopes in a short decay chain to stable 209 Bi, and as such can be described as an alpha particle nanogenerator. This article reviews the literature pertaining to the research, development, and utilization of targeted 225 Ac to potently and specifically affect cancer. PMID:18514364

  6. Realizing the potential of the Actinium-225 radionuclide generator in targeted alpha-particle therapy applications

    PubMed Central

    Miederer, Matthias; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha particle-emitting isotopes have been proposed as novel cytotoxic agents for augmenting targeted therapy. Properties of alpha particle radiation such as their limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters and their high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track are promising in the treatment of cancer, especially when single cells or clusters of tumor cells are targeted. Actinium-225 (225Ac) is an alpha particle-emitting radionuclide that generates 4 net alpha particle isotopes in a short decay chain to stable 209Bi, and as such can be described as an alpha particle nanogenerator. This article reviews the literature pertaining to the research, development, and utilization of targeted 225Ac to potently and specifically affect cancer. PMID:18514364

  7. On the approximations of the distribution function of fusion alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bilato, R. Brambilla, M.; Poli, E.

    2014-10-15

    The solution of the drift-kinetic equation for fusion-born alpha particles is derived in the limit of dominant parallel streaming, and it is related to the usual slowing-down distribution function. The typical approximations of the fast tail of fusion-born alpha particles are briefly compared and discussed. In particular, approximating the distribution function of fast-alpha particles with an “equivalent” Maxwellian is inaccurate to describe absorption of radio-frequency waves in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies.

  8. Alpha particle losses from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Batha, S.

    1996-01-01

    Because alpha particle losses can have a significant influence on tokamak reactor viability, the loss of deuterium-tritium alpha particles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been measured under a wide range of conditions. In TFTR, first orbit loss and stochastic toroidal field ripple diffusion are always present. Other losses can arise due to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or due to waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. No alpha particle losses have yet been seen due to collective instabilities driven by alphas. Ion Bernstein waves can drive large losses of fast ions from TFTR, and details of those losses support one element of the alpha energy channeling scenario.

  9. Transport theory for energetic alpha particles in finite aspect ratio tokamaks with broken symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaing, K. C.; Schlutt, M.; Lai, A. L.

    2016-02-01

    Transport theory for the energetic alpha particles in finite aspect ratio tokamaks with broken symmetry is developed for the case where the slowing down collision operator dominates. The transport fluxes in the 1 /ν and superbanana plateau regimes are derived. Here, ν is the typical collision frequency. They can be used in modeling the energy loss of the alpha particles in thermonuclear fusion reactors. Numerical realizations of the superbanana orbits of alpha particles in tokamaks with broken symmetry are also presented. The existence of the superbananas corroborates the predictions of the theories presented here and elsewhere.

  10. Method for characterizing the upset response of CMOS circuits using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. A technique utilizing test structures to quickly and inexpensively characterize the SEU sensitivity of standard cell latches intended for use in a space environment. This bench-level approach utilizes alpha particles to induce upsets in a low LET sensitive 4-k bit test SRAM. This SRAM consists of cells that employ an offset voltage to adjust their upset sensitivity and an enlarged sensitive drain junction to enhance the cell's upset rate.

  11. Analysis of radiation risk from alpha particle component of solar particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Weyland, M.

    1994-01-01

    The solar particle events (SPE) will contain a primary alpha particle component, representing a possible increase in the potential risk to astronauts during an SPE over the often studied proton component. We discuss the physical interactions of alpha particles important in describing the transport of these particles through spacecraft and body shielding. Models of light ion reactions are presented and their effects on energy and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra in shielding discussed. We present predictions of particle spectra, dose, and dose equivalent in organs of interest for SPE spectra typical of those occurring in recent solar cycles. The large events of solar cycle 19 are found to have substantial increase in biological risk from alpha particles, including a large increase in secondary neutron production from alpha particle breakup.

  12. Analysis of radiation risk from alpha particle component of soalr particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Weyland, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Solar Particle Events (SPE) will contain a primary alpha particle component, representing a possible increase in the potential risk to astronauts during an SPE over the often studied proton component. We discuss the physical interactions of alpha particles important in describing the transport of these particles through spacecraft and body shielding. Models of light ion reactions are presented and their effects on energy and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra in shielding are discussed. We present predictions of particle spectra, dose, and dose equivalent in organs of interest for SPE spectra typical of those occurring in recent solar cycles. The large events of solar cycle 19 are found to have substantial increase in biological risk from alpha particles, including a large increase in secondary neutron production from alpha particle breakup.

  13. Alpha-particle effects on high-n instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rewoldt, G.

    1988-06-01

    Hot ..cap alpha..-particles and thermalized helium ash particles in tokamaks can have significant effects on high toroidal mode number instabilities such as the trapped-electron drift mode and the kinetically calculated magnetohydrodynamic ballooning mode. In particular, the effects can be stabilizing, destabilizing, or negligible, depending on the parameters involved. In high-temperature tokamaks capable of producing significant numbers of hot ..cap alpha..-particles, the predominant interaction of the mode with the ..cap alpha..-particles is through resonances of various sorts. In turn, the modes can cause significant anomalous transport of the ..cap alpha..-particles and the helium ash. Here, results of comprehensive linear eigenfrequency-eigenfunction calculations are presented for relevant realistic cases to show these effects. 24 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Measurements of alpha particle energy using nuclear tracks in solids methodology.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, G; Amero, C; Gammage, R B

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for the measurement of alpha particle energy using polycarbonate materials as nuclear track detectors (NTDs). This method is based on the interaction of the radiation with the solid-state materials, using the relationship between the energy deposited in the material by the ionising particle and the track developed after an established chemical process. The determination of the geometrical parameters of the formed track, such as major axis, minor axis and overall track length, permit determination of the energy of the alpha particle. The track analysis is performed automatically using a digital image system, and the data are processed in a PC with commercial software. In this experiment 148Gd, 238U, 230Th, 239Pu and 244Cm alpha particle emitters were used. The values for alpha particle energy resolution, the linear response to energy, the confidence in the results and the automatisation of the procedure make this method a promising analysis system. PMID:12382812

  15. Combined effects of alpha particles and depleted uranium on Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Candy Y.P.; Pereira, Sandrine; Cheng, Shuk Han; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    The combined effects of low-dose or high-dose alpha particles and depleted uranium (DU) in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were studied. Three schemes were examined—(i) [ILUL]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure, (ii) [IHUH]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure and (iii) [IHUL]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure—in which Zebrafish embryos were irradiated with alpha particles at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) and/or exposed to uranium at 5–6 hpf. The results were also compared with our previous work, which studied the effects of [ILUH]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure. When the Zebrafish embryos developed to 24 hpf, the apoptotic signals in the entire embryos, used as the biological endpoint for this study, were quantified. Our results showed that [ILUL] and [IHUL] led to antagonistic effects, whereas [IHUH] led to an additive effect. The effect found for the previously studied case of [ILUH] was difficult to define because it was synergistic with reference to the 100 µg/l DU exposure, but it was antagonistic with reference to the 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose. All the findings regarding the four different schemes showed that the combined effects critically depended on the dose response to each individual stressor. We also qualitatively explained these findings in terms of promotion of early death of cells predisposed to spontaneous transformation by alpha particles, interacting with the delay in cell death resulting from various concentrations of DU exposure. PMID:26937024

  16. Alpha particles in solar cosmic rays over the last 80,000 years.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Present-day (1967 to 1969) fluxes of alpha particles from solar cosmic rays, determined from satellite measurements, were used to calculate the production rates of cobalt-57, cobalt-58, and nickel-59 in lunar surface samples. Comparisons with the activities of nickel-59 (half-life, 80,000 years) measured in lunar samples indicate that the long-term and present-day fluxes of solar alpha particles are comparable within a factor of approximately 4.

  17. An alpha particle diagnostic based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.L.

    1989-07-01

    It is shown that the one-dimensional alpha particle velocity distribution function can be determined from the fluctuation- dissipation theorem based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations in an equilibrium plasma. This method uses collective Thomson scattering data with large signal-to-noise ratio, but it is applicable only when the alpha particles have an isotropic velocity distribution. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  18. {alpha}-particle optical potentials for nuclear astrophysics (NA) and nuclear technology (NT)

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, V.; Avrigeanu, M.

    2012-11-20

    The high precision of recent measurements for low-energy {alpha}-particle elastic-scattering as well as induced-reaction data makes possible the understanding of actual limits and possible improvement of the global optical model potentials parameters. Involvement of recent optical potentials for reliable description of both the elastic scattering and emission of {alpha}-particles, of equal interest for nuclear astrophysics (NA) and nuclear technology (NT) for fusion devices, is discussed in the present work.

  19. Simulation of Alpha Particles in Rotating Plasma Interacting with a Stationary Ripple

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-01-11

    Superthermal ExB rotation can provide magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and enhanced confinement to axisymmetric mirrors. However, the rotation speed has been limited by phenomena at end electrodes. A new prediction is that rotation might instead be produced using a magnetic ripple and alpha particle kinetic energy, in an extension of the alpha channeling concept. The interaction of alpha particles with the ripple results in visually interesting and practically useful orbits.

  20. INSTABILITIES DRIVEN BY THE DRIFT AND TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY OF ALPHA PARTICLES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu

    2013-08-20

    We investigate the conditions under which parallel-propagating Alfven/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) waves and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) waves are driven unstable by the differential flow and temperature anisotropy of alpha particles in the solar wind. We focus on the limit in which w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} {approx}> 0.25v{sub A}, where w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} is the parallel alpha-particle thermal speed and v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. We derive analytic expressions for the instability thresholds of these waves, which show, e.g., how the minimum unstable alpha-particle beam speed depends upon w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}}/v{sub A}, the degree of alpha-particle temperature anisotropy, and the alpha-to-proton temperature ratio. We validate our analytical results using numerical solutions to the full hot-plasma dispersion relation. Consistent with previous work, we find that temperature anisotropy allows A/IC waves and FM/W waves to become unstable at significantly lower values of the alpha-particle beam speed U{sub {alpha}} than in the isotropic-temperature case. Likewise, differential flow lowers the minimum temperature anisotropy needed to excite A/IC or FM/W waves relative to the case in which U{sub {alpha}} = 0. We discuss the relevance of our results to alpha particles in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  1. Instabilities Driven by the Drift and Temperature Anisotropy of Alpha Particles in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the conditions under which parallel-propagating Alfvén/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) waves and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) waves are driven unstable by the differential flow and temperature anisotropy of alpha particles in the solar wind. We focus on the limit in which w ∥α >~ 0.25v A, where w ∥α is the parallel alpha-particle thermal speed and v A is the Alfvén speed. We derive analytic expressions for the instability thresholds of these waves, which show, e.g., how the minimum unstable alpha-particle beam speed depends upon w ∥α/v A, the degree of alpha-particle temperature anisotropy, and the alpha-to-proton temperature ratio. We validate our analytical results using numerical solutions to the full hot-plasma dispersion relation. Consistent with previous work, we find that temperature anisotropy allows A/IC waves and FM/W waves to become unstable at significantly lower values of the alpha-particle beam speed U α than in the isotropic-temperature case. Likewise, differential flow lowers the minimum temperature anisotropy needed to excite A/IC or FM/W waves relative to the case in which U α = 0. We discuss the relevance of our results to alpha particles in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  2. LIMITS ON ALPHA PARTICLE TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY AND DIFFERENTIAL FLOW FROM KINETIC INSTABILITIES: SOLAR WIND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bourouaine, Sofiane; Verscharen, Daniel; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kasper, Justin C.

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the observed temperature anisotropies of protons and alpha particles in the solar wind are constrained by theoretical thresholds for pressure and anisotropy driven instabilities such as the Alfvén/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) instabilities. In this Letter, we use a long period of in situ measurements provided by the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups to investigate the combined constraint on the alpha proton differential flow velocity and the alpha particle temperature anisotropy due to A/IC and FM/W instabilities. We show that the majority of the data are constrained to lie within the region of parameter space in which A/IC and FM/W waves are either stable or have extremely low growth rates. In the minority of observed cases in which the growth rate of the A/IC (FM/W) instability is comparatively large, we find relatively higher values of T {sub α}/T {sub p} (T {sub ∥α}/T {sub ∥p}) when the alpha proton differential flow velocity is small, where T {sub α} and T {sub p} (T {sub ∥α} and T {sub ∥p}) are the perpendicular (parallel) temperatures of alpha particles and protons. We conjecture that this observed feature might arise from preferential alpha particle heating which can drive the alpha particles beyond the instability thresholds.

  3. The simulation of the response of superheated emulsion to alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Susnata; Das, Mala

    2016-04-01

    The response of superheated emulsion of liquid perfluorobutane (C4F10; b.p.: ‑1.7o C) to alpha particle has been studied by performing the simulation using GEANT3.21 toolkit. The simulations have been performed to generate two different experimental situations. In one case, the alpha contamination is present only in polymer and in another case, the alpha contamination is present both in polymer and active liquid. The value of the nucleation parameter, k, for bubble nucleation induced by alpha particle in superheated emulsion detector is determined by comparing the simulated normalized count rates with the available experimental results. The results show that the nucleation parameter for alpha particle in C4F10 liquid is about 0.19. The energy and position of alpha particle are not able to change the response of the alpha particle in C4F10 liquid. The recoiling nuclei associated with the alpha decay chain are responsible for making the detector sensitive at lower threshold temperatures.

  4. Alpha-particle emission probabilities in the decay of 240Pu.

    PubMed

    Sibbens, G; Pommé, S; Altzitzoglou, T; García-Toraño, E; Janssen, H; Dersch, R; Ott, O; Sánchez, A Martín; Montero, M P Rubio; Loidl, M; Coron, N; de Marcillac, P; Semkow, T M

    2010-01-01

    Sources of enriched (240)Pu were prepared by vacuum evaporation on quartz substrates. High-resolution alpha-particle spectrometry of (240)Pu was performed with high statistical accuracy using silicon detectors and with low statistical accuracy using a bolometer. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of six transitions were derived from the spectra and compared with literature values. Additionally, some alpha-particle emission probabilities were derived from gamma-ray intensity measurements with a high-purity germanium detector. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of the three main transitions at 5168.1, 5123.6 and 5021.2 keV were derived from seven aggregate spectra analysed with five different fit functions and the results were compatible with evaluated data. Two additional weak peaks at 4863.5 and 4492.0 keV were fitted separately, using the exponential of a polynomial function to represent the underlying tailing of the larger peaks. The peak at 4655 keV could not be detected by alpha-particle spectrometry, while gamma-ray spectrometry confirms that its intensity is much lower than expected from literature. PMID:20106670

  5. Use of .sup.3 He.sup.30 + ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating

    DOEpatents

    Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Hwang, David Q.; Hovey, Jane

    1986-04-22

    Neutron activation due to high levels of neutron production in a first heated deuterium-tritium plasma is substantially reduced by using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating of energetic .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions in a second deuterium-.sup.3 He.sup.++ plasma which exhibit an energy distribution and density similar to that of alpha particles in fusion reactor experiments to simulate fusion alpha particle heating in the first plasma. The majority of the fast .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions and their slowing down spectrum can be studied using either a modulated hydrogen beam source for producing excited states of He.sup.+ in combination with spectrometers or double charge exchange with a high energy neutral lithium beam and charged particle detectors at the plasma edge. The maintenance problems thus associated with neutron activation are substantially reduced permitting energetic alpha particle behavior to be studied in near term large fusion experiments.

  6. Present status of alpha-particle condensed states in 4n self-conjugate nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Funaki, Y.; Yamada, T.; Horiuchi, H.; Tohsaki, A.; Roepke, G.; Schuck, P.

    2010-05-12

    Low density states near the 3alpha and 4alpha breakup threshold in {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O, respectively, are discussed in terms of the alpha-particle condensation. Calculations are performed in OCM (Orthogonality Condition Model) and THSR (Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-Roepke) approaches. The 0{sub 2}{sup +} state in {sup 12}C and the 0{sub 6}{sup +} state in {sup 16}O are shown to have dilute density structures and give strong enhancement of the occupation of the S-state c.o.m. orbital of the alpha-particles. The possibility of the existence of alpha-particle condensed states in heavier nalpha nuclei is also discussed.

  7. Modelling NPA measurements of alpha-particle distributions in JET and TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClements, K. G.; Dendy, R. O.; Gondhalekar, A.

    1997-11-01

    Neutral particle analyser (NPA) measurements of the DT fusion alpha-particle energy distribution function are simulated by geometrically weighted spatial line integrals of the time-evolving population. The latter is modelled semi-analytically using a simplified Fokker-Planck equation, where the alpha-particle source term is derived from measured fusion reactivity, and plasma collisionality from measured electron density and temperature profiles. This model [1] is benchmarked by zero-free-parameters agreement with TFTR tritium beam blip results [2]. We can thus quantify the differences between the measured NPA spectrum and the local alpha-particle distribution in the plasma core. [1] K G McClements et al, JET Report JET-R(97)02. [2] S S Medley et al, Plasma Phys Contr Fusion 38, 1779 (1996). This work was supported in part by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and Euratom

  8. Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  9. Anomalous loss of DT alpha particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H.W.

    1997-09-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR`s DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of {alpha}-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on {alpha}-particle loss has led to a better understanding of {alpha}-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing {alpha}-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e., compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90{degree} lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an {alpha}-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized {alpha}-particles near the passing/trapped boundary was observed to occur between inward and outward shifts at an intermediate value of plasma current (1.4 MA). This anomalous loss feature is not yet understood.

  10. Enhanced retention of the alpha-particle-emitting daughters of Actinium-225 by liposome carriers.

    PubMed

    Sofou, Stavroula; Kappel, Barry J; Jaggi, Jaspreet S; McDevitt, Michael R; Scheinberg, David A; Sgouros, George

    2007-01-01

    Targeted alpha-particle emitters hold great promise as therapeutics for micrometastatic disease. Because of their high energy deposition and short range, tumor targeted alpha-particles can result in high cancer-cell killing with minimal normal-tissue irradiation. Actinium-225 is a potential generator for alpha-particle therapy: it decays with a 10-day half-life and generates three alpha-particle-emitting daughters. Retention of (225)Ac daughters at the target increases efficacy; escape and distribution throughout the body increases toxicity. During circulation, molecular carriers conjugated to (225)Ac cannot retain any of the daughters. We previously proposed liposomal encapsulation of (225)Ac to retain the daughters, whose retention was shown to be liposome-size dependent. However, daughter retention was lower than expected: 22% of theoretical maximum decreasing to 14%, partially due to the binding of (225)Ac to the phospholipid membrane. In this study, Multivesicular liposomes (MUVELs) composed of different phospholipids were developed to increase daughter retention. MUVELs are large liposomes with entrapped smaller lipid-vesicles containing (225)Ac. PEGylated MUVELs stably retained over time 98% of encapsulated (225)Ac. Retention of (213)Bi, the last daughter, was 31% of the theoretical maximum retention of (213)Bi for the liposome sizes studied. MUVELs were conjugated to an anti-HER2/neu antibody (immunolabeled MUVELs) and were evaluated in vitro with SKOV3-NMP2 ovarian cancer cells, exhibiting significant cellular internalization (83%). This work demonstrates that immunolabeled MUVELs might be able to deliver higher fractions of generated alpha-particles per targeted (225)Ac compared to the relative fractions of alpha-particles delivered by (225)Ac-labeled molecular carriers. PMID:17935286

  11. Recent outgassing from the lunar surface: The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Stefanie L.; Feldman, William C.; Lawrence, David J.; Moore, Kurt R.; Elphic, Richard C.; Belian, Richard D.; Maurice, Sylvestre

    2005-09-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (APS) was designed to detect characteristic-energy alpha particles from the decay of Rn-222, Po-218, and Po-210 and to therefore map sites of radon release on the lunar surface. These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of U-238 hence the background level of alpha particle activity is a function of the lunar crustal uranium distribution. Radon reaches the lunar surface either at areas of high soil porosity or where fissures release the trapped gases in which radon is entrained. Once released, the radon spreads out by ``bouncing'' across the surface on ballistic trajectories in a random-walk process. The half-life of Rn-222 allows the gas to spread out by several hundred kilometers before it decays (depositing approximately half of the Po-218 recoil nuclides on the lunar surface) and allows the APS to detect gas release events up to several days after they occur. The long residence time of the Pb-210 precursor to Po-210 allows the mapping of gas vents which have been active over the last approximately 60 years. The APS found only a faint indication of Po-218 alpha particles. However, the Rn-222 alpha particle map shows that radon gas was emanating from the vicinity of craters Aristarchus and Kepler at the time of Lunar Prospector. The Po-210 alpha particle distribution reveals a variability in time and space of lunar gas release events. Po-210 and Rn-222 detections are associated with both thorium enhancements and lunar pyroclastic deposits.

  12. MIRD Pamphlet No. 22 (Unabridged): Radiobiology and Dosimetry of alpha-Particle Emitters for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sgouros, George; Roeske, John C.; McDevitt, Michael S.; Palm, Stig; Allen, Barry J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Brill, Bertrand A.; Song, Hong; Howell, R. W.; Akabani, Gamal

    2010-02-28

    The potential of alpha-particle emitters to treat cancer has been recognized since the early 1900s. Advances in the targeted delivery of radionuclides, in radionuclide conjugation chemistry, and in the increased availability of alpha-emitters appropriate for clinical use have recently led to patient trials of alpha-particle-emitter labeled radiopharmaceuticals. Although alpha-emitters have been studied for many decades, their current use in humans for targeted therapy is an important milestone. The objective of this work is to review those aspects of the field that are pertinent to targeted alpha-particle-emitter therapy and to provide guidance and recommendations for human alpha-particle-emitter dosimetry.

  13. Measurements of DT alpha particle loss near the outer midplane of TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Redi, M.H.; Schivell, J.; White, R.B.

    1995-07-01

    Measurements of DT alpha particle loss to the outer midplane region of TFTR have been made using a radially movable scintillator detector. The conclusion from this data is that mechanisms determining the DT alpha loss to the outer midplane are not substantially different from those for DD fusion products. Some of these results are compared with a simplified theoretical model for TF ripple-induced alpha loss, which is expected to be the dominant classical alpha loss mechanism near the outer midplane. An example of plasma-driven MHD-induced alpha particle loss is shown, but no signs of any ``collective`` alpha instability-induced alpha loss have yet been observed.

  14. Measurement of the Internal Magnetic Field of Plasmas using an Alpha Particle Source

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; D.S. Darrow; P.W. Ross; J.L. Lowrance; G. Renda

    2004-05-13

    The internal magnetic fields of plasmas can be measured under certain conditions from the integrated v x B deflection of MeV alpha particles emitted by a small radioactive source. This alpha source and large-area alpha particle detector would be located inside the vacuum vessel but outside the plasma. Alphas with a typical energy of 5.5 MeV (241Am) can reach the center of almost all laboratory plasmas and magnetic fusion devices, so this method can potentially determine the q(r) profile of tokamaks or STs. Orbit calculations, background evaluations, and conceptual designs for such a vxB (or ''AVB'') detector are described.

  15. Anomalous Loss of DT Alpha Particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W.

    1997-06-01

    Princeton's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is the first experimental fusion device to routinely use tritium to study the deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reaction,allowing the first systematic study of DT alpha particles in tokamak plasmas. A crucial aspect of alpha-particle physics is the fraction of alphas that escape from the plasma, particularly since these energetic particles can do severe damage to the first wall of a reactor. An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR's DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of alpha-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous "delayed" loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on alpha-particle loss has led to a better understanding of alpha-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing alpha-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e. compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90 degree lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an alpha-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized alpha-particles near the

  16. Bose-Einstein condensation of {alpha} particles and Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2004-10-01

    It is shown that the dilute density distribution of {alpha} particles in nuclei can be observed in the Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering. We have analyzed {alpha}+{sup 12}C rainbow scattering to the 0{sub 2}{sup +} (7.65 MeV) state of {sup 12}C in a coupled-channel method with the precise wave functions for {sup 12}C. It is found that the enhanced Airy oscillations in the experimental angular distributions for the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state is caused by the dilute density distribution of this state in agreement for the idea of Bose-Einstein condensation of the three alpha particles.

  17. Can Bose condensation of alpha particles be observed in heavy ion collisions?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of alpha particles with a concomitant phase transition in heavy ion collisions. Suggestions for the experimental observation of the signature of the onset of this phenomenon are made.

  18. Relative biological effectiveness of alpha-particle emitters in vivo at low doses.

    PubMed

    Howell, R W; Azure, M T; Narra, V R; Rao, D V

    1994-03-01

    The therapeutic potential of radionuclides that emit alpha particles, as well as their associated health hazards, have attracted considerable attention. The 224Ra daughters 212Pb and 212Bi, by virtue of their radiation properties which involve emission of alpha and beta particles in their decay to stable 208Pb, have been proposed as candidates for radioimmunotherapy. Using mouse testes as the experimental model and testicular spermhead survival as the biological end point, the present work examines the radiotoxicity of 212Pb and its daughters. When 212Pb, in equilibrium with its daughters 212Bi, 212Po and 208Tl, was administered directly into the testis, the dose required to achieve 37% survival (D37) was 0.143 +/- 0.014 Gy and the corresponding RBE of the mixed radiation field was 4.7 when compared to the D37 for acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for 210Po, was used to obtain an RBE-LET relationship for alpha particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides: RBE alpha = 4.8 - 6.1 x 10(-2) LET + 1.0 x 10(-3) LET2. Similarly, the dependence of RBE on alpha-particle energy E alpha was given by RBE alpha = 22 E(-0.73) alpha. These relationships, based on in vivo experimental data, may be valuable in predicting biological effects of alpha-particle emitters. PMID:8146279

  19. Alpha Particle Effects as a Test Domain for PAP, a Plasma Apprentice Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynick, Harry E.

    1987-01-01

    A new type of computational tool under development, employing techniques of symbolic computation and artificial intelligence to automate as far as possible the research activities of a human plasma theorist, is described. Its present and potential uses are illustrated using the area of the theory of alpha particle effects in fusion plasmas as a sample domain.

  20. Evaluation of ZnO(Ga)Coatings as Alpha Particle Transducers Within a Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J. T.; Neal, J. S.; Cooper, J. C.; Koltick, D. S.

    2002-05-02

    We report investigations and preliminary results from efforts to develop a recoil alpha particle detector for use in a portable neutron generator. The associated particle sealed tube neutron generator (APSTNG) will be used as an interrogation source for the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS). With the emission of 14.1 MeV neutrons produced by the D-T reaction, associated 3.5 MeV alpha particles are emitted. These neutrons and alphas may then be correlated in time and direction, thus effectively ''tagging'' the neutrons of interest for subsequent use as an active nuclear materials interrogation source. The alpha particle detector uses a ZnO(Ga) scintillator coating applied to a fiber optic face plate. Gallium-doped zinc oxide is a fast (1.5 ns decay time), inorganic scintillator with a high melting point (1975C) and an absolute light yield of 1.5% of NaI(Tl). The scintillator is coated with a thin layer of nickel in order to screen out light produced in the tube and scattered deuterons and tritons. This coating also serves to prevent the buildup of charge on the detector surface. Results to date indicate promise as an effective alpha particle detector for the APSTNG for future use in the NMIS.

  1. Nucleon-Alpha Particle Disequilibrium and Short-Lived r-Process Radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, B. S.; Clayton, D. D.; Chellapilla, S.; The, L.-S.

    2002-01-01

    r-Process yields can be extremely sensitive to expansion parameters when a persistent disequilibrium between free nucleons and alpha particles is present. This may provide a natural scenario for understanding the variation of heavy and light r-process isotopes in different r-process events. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Simple experimental method for alpha particle range determination in lead iodide films

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, Yuri; Bennett, Paul R.; Cirignano, Leonard J.; Klugerman, Mikhail; Shah, Kanai S.

    2007-05-15

    An experimental method for determining the range of alpha particles in films based on I-V{sub s} analysis has been suggested. The range of 5.5 MeV alpha particles in PbI{sub 2} films determined by this technique is 30{+-}5 {mu}m, and this value is in agreement with the value calculated by SRIM (the stopping and range of ions in matter), r=24 {mu}m in PbI{sub 2}. More than 100 I-V{sub s} of PbI{sub 2} films with different thicknesses and quality have been analyzed, and the influence of alpha particle radiation on PbI{sub 2} I-V{sub s} curves has been studied. Developed analytical methods (dependence of current density on electric field and conception of surface defects) were used, and the method limitations are discussed. It was shown that I-V{sub s} demonstrate the tendency to obey Ohm's law under alpha radiation. On the other hand, dark conductivity of the lead iodide films shows a typical impure character that can lead to an overestimation of the alpha particles' range in PbI{sub 2} films. After films were exposed to alpha radiation, the dark resistivity and I-V shape of some films improved. Also, a weak decrease of the charge carrier concentration, due to a decrease of the ''surface defect'' concentration (''surface refining''), was registered after successive measurements of I-V{sub s}.

  3. Simple experimental method for alpha particle range determination in lead iodide films.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Yuri; Bennett, Paul R; Cirignano, Leonard J; Klugerman, Mikhail; Shah, Kanai S

    2007-05-01

    An experimental method for determining the range of alpha particles in films based on I-V(s) analysis has been suggested. The range of 5.5 MeV alpha particles in PbI(2) films determined by this technique is 30+/-5 microm, and this value is in agreement with the value calculated by SRIM (the stopping and range of ions in matter), r=24 microm in PbI(2). More than 100 I-V(s) of PbI(2) films with different thicknesses and quality have been analyzed, and the influence of alpha particle radiation on PbI(2) I-V(s) curves has been studied. Developed analytical methods (dependence of current density on electric field and conception of surface defects) were used, and the method limitations are discussed. It was shown that I-V(s) demonstrate the tendency to obey Ohm's law under alpha radiation. On the other hand, dark conductivity of the lead iodide films shows a typical impure character that can lead to an overestimation of the alpha particles' range in PbI(2) films. After films were exposed to alpha radiation, the dark resistivity and I-V shape of some films improved. Also, a weak decrease of the charge carrier concentration, due to a decrease of the "surface defect" concentration ("surface refining"), was registered after successive measurements of I-V(s). PMID:17552841

  4. A Strange Box and a Stubborn Brit: Rutherford's Experiments with Alpha Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, M.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses 5 innovative experiments conducted by Rutherford in early 1900s utilizing the 30 milligrams of radium salt he personally carried from Europe to Canada in 1903. Traces his work with alpha particles from his original results which determined their nature, charge, and mass, to his technique of backscattering which helped to advance…

  5. Gene expression profile of human lymphocytes exposed to (211)At alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Turtoi, A; Brown, I; Schläger, M; Schneeweiss, F H A

    2010-08-01

    In this study, the Whole Human Genome 44K DNA microarray assay was used for the first time to obtain gene expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes 2 h after exposure (in suspension) to 6.78 MeV mean energy alpha particles from extracellular (211)At. Lymphocytes were exposed to fluences of 0.3-9.6 x 10(6) alpha particles/cm(2) [corresponding to mean absorbed alpha-particle doses (D(alpha)) of 0.05-1.60 Gy] over 30 min. Significantly modulated expression was identified in 338 early-response genes. Up-regulated expression was evident in 183 early-response genes, while the remaining 155 were down-regulated. Over half of the up-regulated genes and 40% of the down-regulated genes had a known biological process related primarily to cell growth and maintenance and cell communication. Genes associated with cell death were found only in the up-regulated genes and those with development only in the down-regulated genes. Eight selected early-response genes that displayed a sustained up- or down-regulation (CD36, HSPA2, MS4A6A, NFIL3, IL1F9, IRX5, RASL11B and SULT1B1) were further validated in alpha-particle-irradiated lymphocytes of two human individuals using the TaqMan(R) RT-qPCR technique. The results confirmed the observed microarray gene expression patterns. The expression modulation profiles of IL1F9, IRX5, RASL11B and SULT1B1 genes demonstrated similar trends in the two individuals studied. However, no significant linear correlation between increasing relative gene expression and the alpha-particle dose was evident. The results suggest the possibility that a panel of genes that react to alpha-particle radiation does exist and that they merit further study in a greater number of individuals to determine their possible value regarding alpha-particle biodosimetry. PMID:20681779

  6. Lung cancer risk from exposure to alpha particles and inhalation of other pollutants in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of these experiments is to establish a quantitative correlation between early DNA damage and cancer incidence in a way that would be helpful for assessing the carcinogenic risk of radon alone or in combination with specific indoor pollutants. Rat tracheal epithelium has been exposed in vivo to {sup 210}Po alpha particles in the presence and absence of NO{sub 2} or cigarette smoke. The major accomplishments so far are: the design and implementation of a tracheal implant to simulate radon alpha particle exposure, the measurement of DNA breaks in a small 7.0 mm segment of the trachea exposed to external x-irradiation, the measurement of the rate of repair of the x-ray induced tracheal DNA strand breaks, the measurement of DNA strand breaks following inhalation of cigarette smoke or NO{sub 2}, the measurement of tracheal DNA stand breaks following exposure to high doses {sup 210}Po alpha particle radiation, the assessment of the amount of mucous in the goblet cells and in the underlying mucous glands. So far we have been unable to detect DNA strand breaks in the tracheal epithelium as a result of exposure to NO{sub 2} cigarette smoke or {sup 210}Po alpha particles. We have developed a simple artificial' trachea consisting of rat tracheal epithelial cells growing on a basement membrane coated millipore filter. Experiments are proposed to utilize these artificial tracheas to eliminate the potential interference of increased mucous secretion and/or inflammation that can significantly affect the radiation dose from the alpha particles. 61 refs., 17 figs.

  7. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.

    PubMed

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

    2014-07-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles. PMID:24769180

  8. Angular distribution of {alpha} particles from oriented {sup 253,254}Es and {sup 255}Fm nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Severijns, N.; Golovko, V.V.; Kraev, I.S.; Phalet, T.; Belyaev, A.A.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Noga, V.I.; Erzinkyan, A.L.; Parfenova, V.P.; Eversheim, P.-D.; Herzog, P.; Tramm, C.; Filimonov, V.T.; Toporov, Yu.G.; Zotov, E.; Gurevich, G.M.; Rusakov, A.V.; Vyachin, V.N.; Zakoucky, D.

    2005-04-01

    The anisotropy in the angular distribution of {alpha} particles from oriented {sup 253,254}Es and {sup 255}Fm nuclei, which are among the strongest deformed {alpha} emitters, was measured. Large {alpha} anisotropies have been observed for all three nuclei. The results are compared with calculations based on {alpha}-particle tunneling through a deformed Coulomb barrier.

  9. The Effects of Alpha Particle Confinement on Burning Plasma Tokamak Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormley, Robert P.

    In this thesis, three effects of alpha particle plasma interactions on the global performance of a fusion reactor are studied, namely, (i) the energy coupling efficiency of the fast alpha particles with the bulk plasma, (ii) the relationship between imperfect alpha energy coupling to the bulk plasma and the resultant alpha particle/helium ash fuel dilution; and (iii) the neoclassical bootstrap current induced by fusion born alpha particles calculated self-consistently with the plasma equilibrium. First, the ion drift kinetic equation for the high energy alpha particles is reduced from the exact five dimensional form to a two dimensional form in radius r and energy E (plus time t). The resulting slowing-down diffusion equation is solved by a multiple energy group method. A theoretically based anomalous diffusion coefficient D_sp{alpha}{an} is then introduced from a self-consistent alpha particle Alfven wave turbulence solution (by F. Gang), in which D_sp{alpha}{an } itself depends on the gradient in alpha density. The temporal and spatial behavior of eta_ alpha is analyzed for an ITER-CDA physics phase fusion reactor. We find that eta_ alpha can be as low as 0.95 depending on the plasma operating temperature. Next, the relationship between the alpha-particle power coupling efficiency and the actual alpha-particle power that is coupled with the bulk plasma is investigated, this time taking into account the concomitant helium ash accumulation. It is found that the coupled power varies less than linearly with eta_alpha and is, in fact, significantly depressed for eta_alpha near unity. Combining these effects with a thermal power balance shows that the high temperature "thermally stable" side of the ignition boundary is pushed toward lower temperatures if either D_alpha increases (which results in a lower eta_alpha) or the helium-ash confinement time lengthens. This is a consequence of strengthened fuel dilution and imperfect alpha power coupling. Implications on the

  10. Further measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N

    SciTech Connect

    France III, R. H.; Wilds, E. L.; McDonald, J. E.; Gai, M.

    2007-06-15

    We measured the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission spectrum of {sup 16}N with a sensitivity for {beta}-decay branching ratios of the order of 10{sup -10}. The {sup 16}N nuclei were produced using the d({sup 15}N,{sup 16}N)p reaction with 70 MeV {sup 15}N beams and a deuterium gas target 7.5 cm long at a pressure of 1250 torr. The {sup 16}N nuclei were collected (over 10 s) using a thin aluminum foil with an areal density of 180 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} tilted at 7 deg. with respect to the beam. The activity was transferred to the counting area by means of a stepping motor in less than 3 s with the counting carried out over 8 s. The {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particles were measured using a time-of-flight method to achieve a sufficiently low background. Standard calibration sources ({sup 148}Gd, {sup 241}Am, {sup 208,209}Po, and {sup 227}Ac) as well as {alpha} particles and {sup 7}Li from the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction were used for an accurate energy calibration. The energy resolution of the catcher foil (180-220 keV) was calculated and the time-of-flight resolution (3-10 nsec) was measured using the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission from {sup 8}Li that was produced using the d({sup 7}Li,{sup 8}Li)p reaction with the same setup. The line shape was corrected to account for the variation in the energy and time resolution and a high statistics spectrum of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N is reported. However, our data (as well as earlier Mainz data and unpublished Seattle data) do not agree with an earlier measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N taken at TRIUMF after averaging over the energy resolution of our collection system. This disagreement, among other issues, prohibits accurate inclusion of the f-wave component in the R-matrix analysis.

  11. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Kenneth L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses reactions and characteristics of fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectroscopy in which samples are ionized in a condensed state by bombardment with xenon or argon atoms, yielding positive/negative secondary ions. Includes applications of FAB to structural problems and considers future developments using the technique. (Author/JN)

  12. Variation of the track etch rates of alpha-particle trajectory in PADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, M. F.; Hegazy, T. M.; Seddik, U.; Morsy, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    The formation of etched tracks in solid-state nuclear track detectors is usually described by assuming an unequivocal correlation of the etch-rate ratio with the energy loss of charged particles. For alpha particles, this assumption could be verified within the scatter of the experimental data. In this article, the dependence of the depth (x) on the track etch rate (V-T) was determined experimentally by track length measurement. It is found that the track etch rate as a function of the depth within the detector follows the Bragg curve. The track etch rate has been found to be described by a generalization of the restricted energy loss, in good approximation along the trajectories of alpha particles.

  13. Measurement of the internal magnetic field of plasmas using an alpha particle source

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Ross, P.W.; Lowrance, J.L.; Renda, G.

    2004-10-01

    The internal magnetic fields of plasmas can be measured under certain conditions from the integrated vxB deflection of MeV alpha particles emitted by a small radioactive source. The alpha source and large-area alpha particle detector would be located inside the vacuum vessel but outside the plasma. Alphas with a typical energy of 5.5 MeV ({sup 241}Am) can reach the center of almost all laboratory plasmas and magnetic fusion devices, so this method can potentially determine the q(r) profile of tokamaks or spherical toris (STs). Orbit calculations, background evaluations, and conceptual designs for such {alpha} vxB (or 'AVB') detector are described.

  14. Downstream energetic proton and alpha particles during quasi-parallel interplanetary shock events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper considers the energetic particle populations in the downstream region of three quasi-parallel interplanetary shock events, which was explored using the ISEE 3 Ultra Low Energy Charge Analyzer sensor, which unambiguously identifies protons and alpha particles using the electrostatic deflection versus residual energy technique. The downstream particles were found to exhibit anisotropies due largely to convection in the solar wind. The spectral indices of the proton and the alpha-particle distribution functions were found to be remarkably constant during the downstream period, being generally insensitive to changes in particle flux levels, magnetic field direction, and solar wind densities. In two of the three events, the proton and the alpha spectra were the same throughout the entire downstream period, supporting the prediction of diffusive shock acceleration theory.

  15. Effects of q(r) on the Alpha Particle Ripple Loss in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow; M. Diesso; R.V. Budny; S. Batha; S.J. Zweben; et al.

    1997-09-01

    An experiment was done with TFTR DT plasmas to determine the effect of the q(r) profile on the alpha particle ripple loss to the outer midplane. The alpha particle loss measurements were made using a radially movable scintillator detector 20 degrees below the outer midplane. The experimental results were compared with TF ripple loss calculations done using a Monte Carlo guiding center orbit following code, ORBIT. Although some of the experimental results are consistent with the ORBIT code modeling, the variation of the alpha loss with the q(r) profiles is not well explained by this code. Quantitative interpretation of these measurements requires a careful analysis of the limiter shadowing effect, which strongly determines the diffusion of alphas into the detector aperture.

  16. Evidence for alpha-particle chain configurations in sup 24 Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Betts, R.R.; Back, B.B.; Freer, M.; Glagola, B.G.; Happ, T.; Henderson, D.J.; Wilt, P. ); Bearden, I.G. )

    1992-03-02

    We have observed a strong peak in the excitation function for the inelastic scattering reaction {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{sup 12}C(0{sub 2}{sup +})){sup 12}C(0{sub 2}{sup +}) at an energy of {ital E}{sub c.m.}=32.5 MeV. A recoil coincidence arrangement between two double-sided silicon strip detectors was used to detect the {alpha} particles from the decaying {sup 12}C nuclei, and the reconstructed reaction kinematics were used to calculate the two-body scattering {ital Q} value. This excitation-function structure may be interpreted as arising from very highly deformed {alpha}-particle chain configurations in the nucleus {sup 24}Mg.

  17. Cryogenic Microcalorimeter System for Ultra-High Resolution Alpha-Particle Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croce, M. P.; Bacrania, M. K.; Hoover, A. S.; Rabin, M. W.; Hoteling, N. J.; LaMont, S. P.; Plionis, A. A.; Dry, D. E.; Ullom, J. N.; Bennett, D. A.; Horansky, R. D.; Kotsubo, V.; Cantor, R.

    2009-12-01

    Microcalorimeters have been shown to yield unsurpassed energy resolution for alpha spectrometry, up to 1.06 keV FWHM at 5.3 MeV. These detectors use a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) to measure the temperature change in an absorber from energy deposited by an interacting alpha particle. Our system has four independent detectors mounted inside a liquid nitrogen/liquid helium cryostat. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) cools the detector stage to its operating temperature of 80 mK. Temperature regulation with ˜15-μK peak-to-peak variation is achieved by PID control of the ADR. The detectors are voltage-biased, and the current signal is amplified by a commercial SQUID readout system and digitized for further analysis. This paper will discuss design and operation of our microcalorimeter alpha-particle spectrometer, and will show recent results.

  18. Sequential determination of 210Po and uranium radioisotopes in drinking water by alpha-particle spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Benedik, L; Vasile, M; Spasova, Y; Wätjen, U

    2009-05-01

    Procedures for the sequential determination of low level (210)Po and uranium radioisotopes in drinking water by alpha-particle spectrometry are presented. After addition of (208)Po and (232)U tracers, the radionuclides were preconcentrated from water samples by co-precipitation on Fe(OH)(3) or MnO(2) at pH 9 using ammonia solution. The (210)Po source was prepared by spontaneous deposition onto a copper disc either before or after uranium separation. The uranium source for alpha-particle counting was prepared by micro co-precipitation with CeF(3). The procedures were tested on mineral water and the results obtained are compared. PMID:19231220

  19. Targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, Michael R; Reardon, David A; Pozzi, Oscar R; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D

    2007-10-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed in tumor cells to selectively deliver the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen astatine-211 (211At) to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of the concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels and lack of data concerning the toxicity of alpha-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled mAbs, and others are planned for the near future. PMID:17921029

  20. Development of scintillator plates with high energy resolution for alpha particles made of GPS scintillator grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Izaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2014-01-01

    A scintillator plate with high energy resolution was developed to produce an alpha particle monitor used in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and mixed plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel plants. Grains of a Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator of several 10 to 550 μm were fixed on a glass substrate and were then mechanically polished. By increasing the size of scintillator grains and removing fine powders, the collected light yield and energy resolution for alpha particles were drastically improved. Energy resolution of 9.3% was achieved using average grain size of 91 μm. Furthermore, the ratios between counts in a peak and total counts were improved by more than 60% by the further increase of grain size and adoption of mechanically polished surfaces on both sides. Beta and gamma ray influences were suppressed sufficiently by the thin 100 μm scintillator plates.

  1. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zaider, M.

    1992-01-01

    We report on a theory for describing the biological effects of ionizing radiation in particular radon [alpha] particles. Behind this approach is the recognition that biological effects such as chromosome aberrations, cellular transformation, cellular inactivation, etc, are the result of a hierarchic sequence of radiation effects. We indicate how to treat each of the individual processes in this sequence, and also how to relate one effect to the hierarchically superior one.

  2. Accuracy testing using thick source alpha-particle spectroscopy for the U and Th series estimations.

    PubMed

    Michael, C T; Zacharias, N; Hein, A

    2010-01-01

    The new technique for the calculation of U and Th based on the alpha particle spectrum taken from a thick sample by using a silicon detector (PIPS) is tested and some technical problems are encountered and also some notifications for better accuracy are addressed. This technique which is mainly developed to be used for dose rate determination in TL, OSL and ESR dating applications, gives also the possibility for detecting and estimating possible disequilibrium in U and Th series. PMID:19900816

  3. Fusion alpha-particle losses in a high-beta rippled tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Bunno, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Shinohara, K.; Matsunaga, G.; Tani, K.

    2013-08-15

    In tokamak plasmas, the confinement of energetic ions depends on the magnetic field structure. If the plasma pressure is finite, the equilibrium current (i.e., the Pfirsch-Schlüter current and diamagnetic current) flows in the plasma to maintain the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium. These plasma currents generate poloidal and toroidal magnetic field and alter the field structure. Moreover, if we consider the non-axisymmetry of magnetic field structures such as toroidal field (TF) ripples, the non-axisymmetric component of the equilibrium current can alter TF ripples themselves. When the plasma beta becomes high, the changes in the field structure due to the equilibrium current might affect the confinement of energetic ions significantly. We intend to clarify how these currents alter the field structure and affect the confinement of alpha particles in high-beta plasma. The MHD equilibrium is calculated using VMEC and the orbits of fusion alpha particles are followed by using the fully three-dimensional magnetic field orbit-following Monte Carlo code. In relatively low-beta plasma (e.g., the volume-averaged beta value <β>≤2%), the changes in the magnetic field component due to the plasma current negligibly affect the confinement of alpha particles except for the Shafranov shift effect. However, for <β>≥3%, the diamagnetic effect reduces the magnetic field strength and significantly increases alpha-particle losses. In these high-beta cases, the non-axisymmetric field component generated by the equilibrium current also increases these losses, but not as effectively as compared to the diamagnetic effect.

  4. Alpha particle condensation in {sup 12}C and nuclear rainbow scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2008-05-12

    It is shown that the large radius of the Hoyle state of {sup 12}C with a dilute density distribution in an {alpha} particle condensate can be clearly seen in the shift of the rainbow angle (therefore the Airy minimum) to a larger angle in {alpha}+{sup 12}C rainbow scattering at the high energy region and prerainbow oscillations in {sup 3}He+{sup 12}C scattering at the lower energy region.

  5. Energy and frequency dependence of the alpha particle redistribution produced by internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; Garcia-Martinez, P. L.; Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2014-08-15

    The redistribution of alpha particles due to internal kink modes is studied. The exact particle trajectories in the total fields, equilibrium plus perturbation, are calculated. The equilibrium has circular cross section and the plasma parameters are similar to those expected in ITER. The alpha particles are initially distributed according to a slowing down distribution function and have energies between 18 keV and 3.5 MeV. The (1, 1), (2, 2), and (2, 1) modes are included and the effect of changing their amplitude and frequency is studied. When only the (1, 1) mode is included, the spreading of high energy (E≳1 MeV) alpha particles increases slowly with the energy and mode frequency. At lower energies, the redistribution is more sensitive to the mode frequency and particle energy. When a (2, 1) mode is added, the spreading increases significantly and particles can reach the edge of the plasma. Trapped particles are the most affected and the redistribution parameter can have maxima above 1 MeV, depending on the mode frequency. These results can have important implications for ash removal.

  6. Registration of alpha particles in Makrofol-E nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammah, Y. S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Ashraf, O.; Ashry, A. H.

    2016-06-01

    Fast detection of alpha particles in the range from 1 to 5 MeV in Makrofol-E polycarbonate nuclear track detectors (PCTDs) using a new chemical etchant was investigated. 252Cf and 241Am-thin open sources were used for irradiating Makrofol-E detectors with fission fragments and alpha particles in air at normal pressure and temperature (NPT). A chain of experimental work has been carried out using new etchants to register alpha particle in short time in Makrofol-E polycarbonate detectors. The etching efficiency were exhibited a clear dependence on the amount of methanol in the etching solution and etching time. The optimized chemical condition obtained at this stage of development for 200 μm Makrofol-E detectors are (8 ml of 10 N NaOH + 2 ml CH3OH) etching solutions at 60 °C for 3 h. In this study; it is possible to observe energy detection windows for Makrofol-E detectors according to applied etching duration. Makrofol-E introduced the characteristic Bragg peak, which indicates the advantages of this detector as alpha spectrometer. Consequently, the suggested new etchant can be developed for heavy ions detection and monitoring radon levels and its daughters.

  7. Electronic Properties of DNA-Based Schottky Barrier Diodes in Response to Alpha Particles

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Detection of nuclear radiation such as alpha particles has become an important field of research in recent history due to nuclear threats and accidents. In this context; deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) acting as an organic semiconducting material could be utilized in a metal/semiconductor Schottky junction for detecting alpha particles. In this work we demonstrate for the first time the effect of alpha irradiation on an Al/DNA/p-Si/Al Schottky diode by investigating its current-voltage characteristics. The diodes were exposed for different periods (0–20 min) of irradiation. Various diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height, series resistance, Richardson constant and saturation current were then determined using conventional, Cheung and Cheung’s and Norde methods. Generally, ideality factor or n values were observed to be greater than unity, which indicates the influence of some other current transport mechanism besides thermionic processes. Results indicated ideality factor variation between 9.97 and 9.57 for irradiation times between the ranges 0 to 20 min. Increase in the series resistance with increase in irradiation time was also observed when calculated using conventional and Cheung and Cheung’s methods. These responses demonstrate that changes in the electrical characteristics of the metal-semiconductor-metal diode could be further utilized as sensing elements to detect alpha particles. PMID:26007733

  8. Photoluminescence detection of alpha particle using DAM-ADC nuclear detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Ayman M.; Harraz, Farid A.; Ali, Atif M.; Al-Sayari, S. A.; Al-Hajry, A.

    2016-09-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) and UV-vis spectral analysis of DAM-ADC (diallyl maleate: DAM, polyallyl diglycol carbonate: ADC) nuclear detector are demonstrated for the first time. The DAM-ADC surfaces were exposed to thin 241Am disk source that emits alpha particles with activity 333 kBq. It is found that the track density of the irradiated samples remarkably influences the PL characteristics of the DAM-ADC detector. The spectral peak heights and the integrated intensities under the peaks exhibit linear correlations with correlation coefficient R2=0.9636 and 0.9806, respectively for different alpha particle fluences ranging from 8.16-40.82×107 particles/cm2. Additionally, a correlation coefficient R2=0.9734 was achieved for the UV-vis spectral analysis. The linear fitting functions, along with the corresponding fitting parameters were evaluated in each case. Both the PL and the UV-vis data of the irradiated DAM-ADC samples showed considerable spectral differences, and hence they would be used to offer sensitive approaches for alpha particle detection.

  9. Radioluminescence of solid neodymium-doped laser materials excited by {alpha}-particles and fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Seregina, E A; Seregin, A A

    2013-02-28

    The characteristics of radioluminescence of Nd{sup 3+} : Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystals and laser glasses under excitation by plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) {alpha}-particles, as well as by {alpha}-particles and spontaneous fission fragments of californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf), are studied. The radioluminescence branching ratios {beta}{sub ij} for the transition from the {sup 2}F2{sub 5/2} level to the {sup 2S+1}L{sub J} levels in Nd{sup 3+} : Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystals are measured. Radioluminescence from the {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} level to low-lying levels is observed. The {beta}{sub ij} ratios for transitions from the high-lying {sup 2}F2{sub 5/2}, {sup 4}D{sub 3/2}, and {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels are theoretically calculated. The lifetimes of metastable levels of Nd{sup 3+} excited by {sup 252}Cf fission fragments are measured. The efficiency of the conversion of energy of {alpha}-particles and fission fragments to the energy of optical radiation of Nd{sup 3+} : Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystals and laser glasses is determined. (active media)

  10. Evidence for alpha-particle chain configurations in {sup 24}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Ferre, M.; Gehring, J.; Glagola, P.G.; Happ, Th.; Henderson, D.J.; Wilt, P.; Bearden, I.G.

    1992-09-01

    Many theoretical models have been employed to described the structure of the nucleus {sup 24}Mg. Among these are the Cranked Shell model (CSM), the Cranked Cluster Model (CCM), and calculations have also been performed using the Hartree-Fock formalism. One very striking prediction of these calculations is that in this nucleus there exist very unusual configurations, with structures reminiscent of linear chains of alpha particles. In the CSM, for instance, such a configuration is identified with a pronounced minimum in the potential energy energy at very large prolate deformation. In the CCM, several very different alpha-particle duster configurations are identified, many having rather large deformations. These cluster configurations can be associated with the different potential-energy minima obtained in the CSM results. In the case of the CCM, a 6{alpha} chain-like configuration is predicted to occur at excitation energies between 40 and 50 MeV, with predicted rotational spacing given by {Dirac_h}{sup 2}/2I=22 keV. At this excitation energy, such a chain configuration would lie well above the threshold for the decay of {sup 24}Mg into 6 alpha particles, and its identification poses a difficult experimental challenge. This report discusses this challenge.

  11. Evidence for alpha-particle chain configurations in sup 24 Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A.H.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Ferre, M.; Gehring, J.; Glagola, P.G.; Happ, Th.; Henderson, D.J.; Wilt, P. ); Bearden, I.G. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    Many theoretical models have been employed to described the structure of the nucleus {sup 24}Mg. Among these are the Cranked Shell model (CSM), the Cranked Cluster Model (CCM), and calculations have also been performed using the Hartree-Fock formalism. One very striking prediction of these calculations is that in this nucleus there exist very unusual configurations, with structures reminiscent of linear chains of alpha particles. In the CSM, for instance, such a configuration is identified with a pronounced minimum in the potential energy energy at very large prolate deformation. In the CCM, several very different alpha-particle duster configurations are identified, many having rather large deformations. These cluster configurations can be associated with the different potential-energy minima obtained in the CSM results. In the case of the CCM, a 6{alpha} chain-like configuration is predicted to occur at excitation energies between 40 and 50 MeV, with predicted rotational spacing given by {Dirac h}{sup 2}/2I=22 keV. At this excitation energy, such a chain configuration would lie well above the threshold for the decay of {sup 24}Mg into 6 alpha particles, and its identification poses a difficult experimental challenge. This report discusses this challenge.

  12. Alpha-particle emissivity screening of materials used for semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael; Rodbell, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Single-Event Upsets (SEU's) in semiconductor memory and logic devices continue to be a reliability issue in modern CMOS devices. SEU's result from deposited charge in the Si devices caused by the passage of ionizing radiation. With technology scaling, the device area decreases, but the critical charge required to flip bits decreases as well. The interplay between both determines how the SEU rate scales with shrinking device geometries and dimensions. In order to minimize the alpha-particle component of SEU, the radiation in the device environment has to be at the Ultra-Low Alpha (ULA) activity levels, e.g. less than 2 α/khr-cm2. Most detectors have background levels that are significantly larger than that level which makes making these measurements difficult and time consuming. A new class of alpha particle detector, utilizing pulse shape discrimination, is now available which allows one to make measurements quickly with ultra-low detector background. This talk will discuss what is involved in making alpha particle measurements of materials in the ULA activity levels, in terms of calibration, radon adsorption mitigation, the time required for obtaining reasonable statistics and comparisons to other detectors.

  13. Lost alpha-particle diagnostics from a D-T plasma by using nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, Mamiko; Wada, Motoi; Isobe, Mitsutaka

    2014-08-21

    Among various methods proposed for alpha-particles loss measurement, we studied on those by measuring gamma rays of three cases, from (1) nuclear reactions induced by alpha particles, (2) those from short-life-time activities and (3) those from long-life-time activities induced by alpha particles. The time evolution of local alpha flux may possibly be measured by using the {sup 9}Be (a, n) {sup 12}C reaction (1). Using the same system, but with a target set up close to the first wall, activation measurement on site right after turning-off the discharge is possible (2). Nuclear reaction, {sup 25}Mg (a, p) {sup 28}Al, that produce radioisotopes of short lifetime of 2.2 minutes in one of the best candidates. As to the activation to a long lifetime (3), it is predicted that the gamma ray yield from {sup 19}F (a, n) {sup 22}Na reaction is enough for the measurement at the reactor site.

  14. Inertially confined fusion plasmas dominated by alpha-particle self-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J. A.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Hamza, A.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H.; Hohenberger, M.; Hoover, D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G.; Kozioziemski, B.; Grim, G.; Field, J. E.; Frenje, J.; Izumi, N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Landen, O.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moore, A.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Rygg, R. R.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Shaughnessy, D.; Strozzi, D.; Town, R. P. J.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-particle self-heating, the process of deuterium-tritium fusion reaction products depositing their kinetic energy locally within a fusion reaction region and thus increasing the temperature in the reacting region, is essential for achieving ignition in a fusion system. Here, we report new inertial confinement fusion experiments where the alpha-particle heating of the plasma is dominant with the fusion yield produced exceeding the fusion yield from the work done on the fuel (pressure times volume change) by a factor of two or more. These experiments have achieved the highest yield (26 +/- 0.5 kJ) and stagnation pressures (≍220 +/- 40 Gbar) of any facility-based inertial confinement fusion experiments, although they are still short of the pressures required for ignition on the National Ignition Facility (~300-400 Gbar). These experiments put us in a new part of parameter space that has not been extensively studied so far because it lies between the no-alpha-particle-deposition regime and ignition.

  15. Calculations of alpha particle loss for reversed magnetic shear in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; White, R.B.; Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; McCune, D.C.

    1997-03-01

    Hamiltonian coordinate, guiding center code calculations of the toroidal field ripple loss of alpha particles from a reversed shear plasma predict both total alpha losses and ripple diffusion losses to be greater than those from a comparable non-reversed magnetic shear plasma in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. High central q is found to increase alpha ripple losses as well as first orbit losses of alphas in the reversed shear simulations. A simple ripple loss model, benchmarked against the guiding center code, is found to work satisfactorily in transport analysis modelling of reversed and monotonic shear scenarios. Alpha ripple transport on TFTR affects ions within r/a=0.5, not at the plasma edge. The entire plasma is above threshold for stochastic ripple loss of alpha particles at birth energy in the reversed shear case simulated, so that all trapped 3.5 MeV alphas are lost stochastically or through prompt losses. The 40% alpha particle loss predictions for TFTR suggest that reduction of toroidal field ripple will be a critical issue in the design of a reversed shear fusion reactor.

  16. Electronic Properties of DNA-Based Schottky Barrier Diodes in Response to Alpha Particles.

    PubMed

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Detection of nuclear radiation such as alpha particles has become an important field of research in recent history due to nuclear threats and accidents. In this context; deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) acting as an organic semiconducting material could be utilized in a metal/semiconductor Schottky junction for detecting alpha particles. In this work we demonstrate for the first time the effect of alpha irradiation on an Al/DNA/p-Si/Al Schottky diode by investigating its current-voltage characteristics. The diodes were exposed for different periods (0-20 min) of irradiation. Various diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height, series resistance, Richardson constant and saturation current were then determined using conventional, Cheung and Cheung's and Norde methods. Generally, ideality factor or n values were observed to be greater than unity, which indicates the influence of some other current transport mechanism besides thermionic processes. Results indicated ideality factor variation between 9.97 and 9.57 for irradiation times between the ranges 0 to 20 min. Increase in the series resistance with increase in irradiation time was also observed when calculated using conventional and Cheung and Cheung's methods. These responses demonstrate that changes in the electrical characteristics of the metal-semiconductor-metal diode could be further utilized as sensing elements to detect alpha particles. PMID:26007733

  17. RADON AND PROGENY ALPHA-PARTICLE ENERGY ANALYSIS USING NUCLEAR TRACK METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa Garcia, Guillermo; Golzarri y Moreno, Dr. Jose Ignacio; Bogard, James S

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary procedure for alpha energy analysis of radon and progeny using Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM) is described in this paper. The method is based on the relationship between alpha-particle energies deposited in polycarbonate material (CR-39) and the track size developed after a well-established chemical etching process. Track geometry, defined by parameters such as major or minor diameters, track area and overall track length, is shown to correlate with alpha-particle energy over the range 6.00 MeV (218Po) to 7.69 MeV (214Po). Track features are measured and the data analyzed automatically using a digital imaging system and commercial PC software. Examination of particle track diameters in CR-39 exposed to environmental radon reveals a multi-modal distribution. Locations of the maxima in this distribution are highly correlated with alpha particle energies of radon daughters, and the distributions are sufficiently resolved to identify the radioisotopes. This method can be useful for estimating the radiation dose from indoor exposure to radon and its progeny.

  18. Neutron production in the lunar subsurface from alpha particles in galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Shuya; Kobayashi, Shingo; Sihver, Lembit; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    The neutron production from alpha particles in galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in the lunar subsurface has not been estimated with reliable precision despite its importance for lunar nuclear spectroscopy and space dosimetry. Here, we report our estimation of neutron production from GCR nuclei (protons and alpha particles) with the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS), which includes several heavy ion interaction models. PHITS simulations of the equilibrium neutron density profiles in the lunar subsurface are compared with experimental data obtained in the Apollo 17 Lunar Neutron Probe Experiment. Our calculations successfully reproduced the data within an experimental error of 15%. Our estimation of neutron production from GCR nuclei, estimated by scaling that from protons by a factor of 1.27, is in good agreement within an error of 1% with the calculations using two different alpha particle interaction models in PHITS during a period of average activity of the solar cycle. However, we show that the factor depends on the incident GCR spectrum model used in the simulation. Therefore, we conclude that the use of heavy ion interaction models is important for estimating neutron production in the lunar subsurface.

  19. Electrostatic ion-acoustic-like instabilities in the solar wind with a backstreaming alpha particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gomberoff, L.; Gomberoff, K.; Deutsch, A.

    2010-06-15

    Nonlinear electrostatic instabilities have been shown to occur frequently and under very different conditions in plasma with two ion beams such as the fast solar wind. These instabilities can be triggered when the phase velocity of electrostatic ion-acoustic waves propagating forward and backward relative to the interplanetary magnetic field overlaps due to the presence of a finite amplitude of circularly polarized wave. The instabilities can be triggered by waves supported by the same ion component, or by waves supported by different ion components. By assuming a beam of alpha particles moving backward relative to the external magnetic field, as observed in some events in the fast solar wind, it is shown that a very small negative drift velocity of the alpha particle beam relative to the core plasma--a few percent of the local Alfven velocity--can trigger a very rich variety of nonlinear electrostatic acousticlike instabilities. Their growth rates can be rather large and they persist for larger negative alpha particles drift velocities and temperatures.

  20. Skeletal dosimetry models for alpha-particles for use in molecular radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watchman, Christopher J.

    Molecular radiotherapy is a cancer treatment methodology whereby a radionuclide is combined with a biologically active molecule to preferentially target cancer cells. Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides show significant potential for use in molecular radiotherapy due to the short range of the alpha-particles in tissue and their high rates of energy deposition. Current radiation dosimetry models used to assess alpha emitter dose in the skeleton were developed originally for occupational applications. In medical dosimetry, individual variability in uptake, translocation and other biological factors can result in poor correlation of clinical outcome with marrow dose estimates determined using existing skeletal models. Methods presented in this work were developed in response to the need for dosimetry models which account for these biological and patient-specific factors. Dosimetry models are presented for trabecular bone alpha particle dosimetry as well as a model for cortical bone dosimetry. These radiation transport models are the 3D chord-based infinite spongiosa transport model (3D-CBIST) and the chord-based infinite cortical transport model (CBICT), respectively. Absorbed fraction data for several skeletal tissues for several subjects are presented. Each modeling strategy accounts for biological parameters, such as bone marrow cellularity, not previously incorporated into alpha-particle skeletal dosimetry models used in radiation protection. Using these data a study investigating the variability in alpha-particle absorbed fractions in the human skeleton is also presented. Data is also offered relating skeletal tissue masses in individual bone sites for a range of ages. These data are necessary for dose calculations and have previously only been available as whole body tissue masses. A revised 3D-CBIST model is also presented which allows for changes in endosteum thickness to account for revised target cell location of tissues involved in the radiological

  1. An Experiment to Measure Range, Range Straggling, Stopping Power, and Energy Straggling of Alpha Particles in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.; Mostovych, Andrew

    1978-01-01

    Experiments to measure range, range straggling, stopping power, and energy straggling of alpha particles are discussed in this article. Commercially available equipment with simple modifications is used for these measurements. (Author/GA)

  2. Determination of neutron-induced alpha-particle cross sections on carbon using the response of a liquid scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brede, H.J.; Dietze, G.; Klein, H.; Schoelermann, H. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the sums of the cross section {sup 12}C(n, {alpha}{sub 0}) {sup 9}Be and {sup 12}C(n, N{prime}3{alpha}) determined in the neutron energy range between 7.4 and 11 MeV. An NE-213 scintillation detector is simultaneously used as a carbon target, an alpha-particle detector, and a neutron fluence monitor. By comparing the measured and calculated response spectra, the neutron-induced alpha-particle events in the scintillation volume are separated and the cross sections {sigma}{sub n,{alpha}0} + {sigma}{sub n,n{prime}3{alpha}} are determined relative to the n-p scattering cross section. The pulse-height distribution due to alpha particles allows the angular distribution to be extracted on the basis of the reaction kinematics and an accurately determined light output function for alpha particles in the NE-213 detector.

  3. Differential Velocity between Solar Wind Protons and Alpha Particles in Pressure Balance Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Steinberg, John T.; Sakurai, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common high-plasma beta feature in high-latitude, high-speed solar wind. They have been proposed as remnants of coronal plumes. If true, they should reflect the observation that plumes are rooted in unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the photosphere and are heated as oppositely directed flux is advected into and reconnects with the flux concentration. A minimum variance analysis (MVA) of magnetic discontinuities in PBSs showed there is a larger proportion of tangential discontinuities than in the surrounding high-speed wind, supporting the hypothesis that plasmoids or extended current sheets are formed during reconnection at the base of plumes. To further evaluate the character of magnetic field discontinuities in PBSs, differential streaming between alpha particles and protons is analyzed here for the same sample of PBSs used in the MVA. Alpha particles in high-speed wind generally have a higher radial flow speed than protons. However, if the magnetic field is folded back on itself, as in a large-amplitude Alfven wave, alpha particles will locally have a radial flow speed less than protons. This characteristic is used here to distinguish between folded back magnetic fields (which would contain rotational discontinuities) and tangential discontinuities using Ulysses high-latitude, high-speed solar wind data. The analysis indicates that almost all reversals in the radial magnetic field in PBSs are folded back field lines. This is found to also be true outside PBSs, supporting existing results for typical high-speed, high-latitude wind. There remains a small number of cases that appear not to be folds in the magnetic field and which may be flux tubes with both ends rooted in the Sun. The distinct difference in MVA results inside and outside PBSs remains unexplained.

  4. Mutagenic effects of a single and an exact number of alpha particles in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hei, T K; Wu, L J; Liu, S X; Vannais, D; Waldren, C A; Randers-Pehrson, G

    1997-04-15

    One of the main uncertainties in risk estimation for environmental radon exposure using lung cancer data from underground miners is the extrapolation from high- to low-dose exposure where multiple traversal is extremely rare. The biological effects of a single alpha particle are currently unknown. Using the recently available microbeam source at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility at Columbia University, we examined the frequencies and molecular spectrum of S1- mutants induced in human-hamster hybrid (A(L)) cells by either a single or an exact number of alpha particles. Exponentially growing cells were stained briefly with a nontoxic concentration of Hoechst dye for image analysis, and the location of individual cells was computer-monitored. The nucleus of each cell was irradiated with either 1,2,4, or 8 alpha particles at a linear energy transfer of 90 keV/microm consistent with the energy spectrum of domestic radon exposure. Although single-particle traversal was only slightly cytotoxic to A(L) cells (survival fraction approximately 0.82), it was highly mutagenic, and the induced mutant fraction averaged 110 mutants per 10(5) survivors. In addition, both toxicity and mutant induction were dose-dependent. Multiplex PCR analysis of mutant DNA showed that the proportion of mutants with multilocus deletions increased with the number of particle traversals. These data provide direct evidence that a single a particle traversing a nucleus will have a high probability of resulting in a mutation and highlight the need for radiation protection at low doses. PMID:9108052

  5. Mutagenic effects of a single and an exact number of alpha particles in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hei, T. K.; Wu, L. J.; Liu, S. X.; Vannais, D.; Waldren, C. A.; Randers-Pehrson, G.

    1997-01-01

    One of the main uncertainties in risk estimation for environmental radon exposure using lung cancer data from underground miners is the extrapolation from high- to low-dose exposure where multiple traversal is extremely rare. The biological effects of a single alpha particle are currently unknown. Using the recently available microbeam source at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility at Columbia University, we examined the frequencies and molecular spectrum of S1- mutants induced in human-hamster hybrid (A(L)) cells by either a single or an exact number of alpha particles. Exponentially growing cells were stained briefly with a nontoxic concentration of Hoechst dye for image analysis, and the location of individual cells was computer-monitored. The nucleus of each cell was irradiated with either 1,2,4, or 8 alpha particles at a linear energy transfer of 90 keV/microm consistent with the energy spectrum of domestic radon exposure. Although single-particle traversal was only slightly cytotoxic to A(L) cells (survival fraction approximately 0.82), it was highly mutagenic, and the induced mutant fraction averaged 110 mutants per 10(5) survivors. In addition, both toxicity and mutant induction were dose-dependent. Multiplex PCR analysis of mutant DNA showed that the proportion of mutants with multilocus deletions increased with the number of particle traversals. These data provide direct evidence that a single a particle traversing a nucleus will have a high probability of resulting in a mutation and highlight the need for radiation protection at low doses.

  6. Differential Velocity Between Solar Wind Protons and Alpha Particles in Pressure Balance Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Y.; Suess, S. T.; Steinberg, J. T.; Sakurai, T.

    2003-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common high plasma beta feature in high latitude, high speed solar wind. They have been proposed as remnants of coronal plumes. If true, they should reflect the observation that plumes are rooted in unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the photosphere and are heated as oppositely directed flux is advected into and reconnects with the flux concentration. A minimum variance analysis (MVA) of magnetic discontinuities in PBSs showed there is a larger proportion of tangential discontinuities than in the surrounding high speed wind, supporting the hypothesis that plasmoids or extended current sheets are formed during reconnection at the base of plumes. To further evaluate the character of magnetic field discontinuities in PBSs, differential streaming between alpha particles and protons is analyzed here for the same sample of PBSs used in the MVA. Alpha particles in high speed wind generally have a higher radial flow speed than protons. However, if the magnetic field is folded back on itself, as in a large amplitude Alfven wave, alpha particles will locally have a radial flow speed less than protons. This characteristic is used here to distinguish between folded back magnetic fields (which would contain rotational discontinuities) and tangential discontinuities using Ulysses high latitude, high speed solar wind data. The analysis indicates that almost all reversals in the radial magnetic field in PBSs are folded back field lines. This is found to also be true outside PBSs, supporting existing results for typical high speed, high latitude wind. There remains a small number of cases that appear not to be folds in the magnetic field and which may be flux tubes with both ends rooted in the Sun. The distinct difference in MVA results inside and outside PBSs remains unexplained.

  7. Quality assurance of alpha-particle dosimetry using peeled-off Gafchromic EBT3® film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Chun, S. L.; Yu, K. N.

    2016-08-01

    A novel alpha-particle dosimetry technique using Gafchromic EBT3 film has recently been proposed for calibrating the activity of alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. In the present paper, we outlined four measures which could further help assure the quality of the method. First, we suggested an alternative method in fabricating the peeled-off EBT3 film. Films with a chosen size were cut from the original films and all the edges were sealed with silicone. These were immersed into deionized water for 19 d and the polyester covers of the EBT3 films could then be easily peeled off. The active layers in these peeled-off EBT3 films remained intact, and these films could be prepared reproducibly with ease. Second, we proposed a check on the integrity of the peeled-off film by comparing the responses of the pristine and peeled-off EBT3 films to the same X-ray irradiation. Third, we highlighted the importance of scanning directions of the films. The "landscape" and "portrait" scanning directions were defined as the scanning directions perpendicular and parallel to the long edge of the original EBT3 films, respectively. Our results showed that the responses were different for different scanning directions. As such, the same scanning direction should be used every time. Finally, we cautioned the need to confirm the uniformity of the alpha-particle source used for calibration. Radiochromic films are well known for their capability of providing two-dimensional dosimetric information. As such, EBT3 films could also be conveniently used to check the uniformity of the alpha-particle source.

  8. Induction of a bystander mutagenic effect of alpha particles in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, H.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannais, D.; Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of X-rays was made by Rontgen more than a hundred years ago, it has always been accepted that the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation such as mutation and carcinogenesis are attributable mainly to direct damage to DNA. Although evidence based on microdosimetric estimation in support of a bystander effect appears to be consistent, direct proof of such extranuclear/extracellular effects are limited. Using a precision charged particle microbeam, we show here that irradiation of 20% of randomly selected A(L) cells with 20 alpha particles each results in a mutant fraction that is 3-fold higher than expected, assuming no bystander modulation effect. Furthermore, analysis by multiplex PCR shows that the types of mutants induced are significantly different from those of spontaneous origin. Pretreatment of cells with the radical scavenger DMSO had no effect on the mutagenic incidence. In contrast, cells pretreated with a 40 microM dose of lindane, which inhibits cell-cell communication, significantly decreased the mutant yield. The doses of DMSO and lindane used in these experiments are nontoxic and nonmutagenic. We further examined the mutagenic yield when 5-10% of randomly selected cells were irradiated with 20 alpha particles each. Results showed, likewise, a higher mutant yield than expected assuming no bystander effects. Our studies provide clear evidence that irradiated cells can induce a bystander mutagenic response in neighboring cells not directly traversed by alpha particles and that cell-cell communication process play a critical role in mediating the bystander phenomenon.

  9. Chemistry of Rocks and Soils in Gusev Crater from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Anderson, R. C.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B. C.; Dreibus, G.; Economou, T.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G. W.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer on the Spirit rover determined major and minor elements of soils and rocks in Gusev crater in order to unravel the crustal evolution of planet Mars. The composition of soils is similar to those at previous landing sites, as a result of global mixing and distribution by dust storms. Rocks (fresh surfaces exposed by the rock abrasion tool) resemble volcanic rocks of primitive basaltic composition with low intrinsic potassium contents. High abundance of bromine (up to 170 parts per million) in rocks may indicate the alteration of surfaces formed during a past period of aqueous activity in Gusev crater.

  10. Mapping alpha-Particle X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (Map-X)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bristow, T.

    2014-01-01

    Many planetary surface processes (like physical and chemical weathering, water activity, diagenesis, low-temperature or impact metamorphism, and biogenic activity) leave traces of their actions as features in the size range 10s to 100s of micron. The Mapping alpha-particle X-ray Spectrometer ("Map-X") is intended to provide chemical imaging at 2 orders of magnitude higher spatial resolution than previously flown instruments, yielding elemental chemistry at or below the scale length where many relict physical, chemical, and biological features can be imaged and interpreted in ancient rocks.

  11. Critical temperature for {alpha}-particle condensation within a momentum-projected mean-field approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sogo, T.; Roepke, G.; Lazauskas, R.

    2009-05-15

    {alpha}-particle (quartet) condensation in homogeneous spin-isospin symmetric nuclear matter is investigated. The usual Thouless criterion for the critical temperature is extended to the quartet case. The in-medium four-body problem is strongly simplified by the use of a momentum-projected mean-field ansatz for the quartet. The self-consistent single-particle wave functions are shown and discussed for various values of the density at the critical temperature. Excellent agreement of the critical temperature with a numerical solution of the Faddeev-Yakubovsky equation is obtained.

  12. Generation of volatile organic compounds by alpha particle degradation of WIPP plastic and rubber material

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T.; Molecke, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    The generation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hydrogen, and carbon oxides due to alpha particle irradiation of polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, and neoprene, is being investigated. A wide diversity of VOCs was found including alkenes, alkanes, alcohols, ketones, benzene derivatives, and nitro compounds. Their yields however, were quite low. The relative amounts of these compounds depended on the material, atmosphere present, and the absorbed dose. This investigation will help evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on the long-term performance assessment and regulatory compliance issues related to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

  13. Chemistry of rocks and soils in Gusev Crater from the alpha particle x-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gellert, R; Rieder, R; Anderson, R C; Brückner, J; Clark, B C; Dreibus, G; Economou, T; Klingelhöfer, G; Lugmair, G W; Ming, D W; Squyres, S W; D'Uston, C; Wänke, H; Yen, A; Zipfel, J

    2004-08-01

    The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer on the Spirit rover determined major and minor elements of soils and rocks in Gusev crater in order to unravel the crustal evolution of planet Mars. The composition of soils is similar to those at previous landing sites, as a result of global mixing and distribution by dust storms. Rocks (fresh surfaces exposed by the rock abrasion tool) resemble volcanic rocks of primitive basaltic composition with low intrinsic potassium contents. High abundance of bromine (up to 170 parts per million) in rocks may indicate the alteration of surfaces formed during a past period of aqueous activity in Gusev crater. PMID:15297665

  14. Alpha particles energy estimation from track diameter development in a CR-39 detector.

    PubMed

    Azooz, Aassim A; Al-Jubbori, Mushtaq A

    2016-09-01

    The slight nonlinearity in temporal development of tracks diameter in CR-39 nuclear track detectors is examined with the aim of attempting to find if such nonlinearity can be directly related to the charged particle energy. Narrowly spaced etching time-diameter experimental data for alpha particles at five energy values and for one additional energy value etched at five different temperatures are obtained. Initial results show good indication that measuring such time-diameter relationship can form a useful energy estimation tool. Good consistency with other independent published results is obtained. PMID:27341133

  15. Destabilization of the shear Alfven mode by alpha particles and other high energy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, V. S.; Kolesnichenko, Ya. I.; Silivra, O. A.

    1992-08-01

    Toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) and elliptical Alfven eigenmode (EAE) instabilities in plasmas with high energy ions are considered in the context of local theory. The instability growth rate is found for cases when waves are excited by alpha particles or by ions produced as a result of neutral injection or RF heating. Electron and ion Landau damping due to the toroidal sideband wave-particle interaction is also calculated. The electron damping rate is shown to be much lower than the generally accepted value. The TAE instability observed in the experiment with neutral beam injection on TFTR is analysed and the principal experimental features of TAE instability are explained

  16. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  17. Alpha-Particle Angular Distributions of At and Rn Isotopes and Their Relation to Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    NICOLE Collaboration and ISOLDE Collaboration

    1996-12-01

    We report on an extensive on-line nuclear orientation study of the angular distribution of {alpha} particles emitted in the favored decay of neutron deficient At and Rn nuclei near the {ital N}=126 shell closure. Surprisingly large anisotropies were observed, showing pronounced changes from one isotope to another. Comparing these data with several theoretical models shows that anisotropic {alpha} emission in favored decays from near-spherical nuclei can well be explained within the shell model, implying that it is mainly determined by the structure of the decaying nucleus. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Observation of sawtooth redistribution of nonthermal, confined alpha particles in TFTR D-T discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.; Budny, R.; Chang, Z.; Fonck, R.; Wising, F.; Odblom, A.

    1996-05-01

    Radial profiles of the density of confined alpha particles with energies in the 0.15-0.6 MeV range are spectroscopically observed before and after a sawtooth crash in a TFTR D-T plasma. A large drop in the core alpha density is seen indicating expulsion of alphas from the core to the plasma periphery. The measured changes in the alpha density profiles are consistent with predictions based on the Kolesnichenko sawtooth model, indicating that it may be used to reliably predict the effect of sawteeth on fusion-produced alphas.

  19. Theory of energetic/alpha particle effects on magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; White, R.B.; Rewoldt, G.; Colestock, P.; Rutherford, P.H.; Chen, Y.P.; Ke, F.J.; Tsai, S.T.; Bussac, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of energetic particles is shown to qualitatively modify the stability properties of ideal as well as resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in tokamaks. Specifically, we demonstrate that, consistent with highpower ICRF heating experiments in JET, high energy trapped particles can effectively stabilize the sawtooth mode, providing a possible route to stable high current tokamak operation. An alternative stabilization scheme employing barely circulating energetic particles is also proposed. Finally, we present analytical and numerical studies on the excitations of high-n MHD modes via transit resonances with circulating alpha particles. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Model of alpha particle diffusion in the outer limiter shadow of TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S. |; Zweben, S.J.

    1996-05-01

    A new code, Monte Carlo Collisional Stochastic Orbit Retracing (MCCSOR), has been developed to model the alpha particle loss signal as measured by the outer midplane scintillator detector in TFTR. The shadowing effects due to the outer limiters and the detector itself have been included, along with a pitch angle scattering and stochastic ripple diffusion. Shadowing by the outer limiters has a strong effect on both the magnitude and pitch angle distribution of the calculated loss. There is at least qualitative agreement between the calculated results and the experimental data.

  1. The severity of alpha-particle-induced DNA damage is revealed by exposure to cell-free extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkins, P.S.; O`Neill, P.; Stevens, D.; Fairman, M.P.

    1996-12-01

    The rejoining of single-strand breaks induced by {alpha}-particle and {gamma} irradiation in plasmid DNA under two scavenging conditions has been compared. At the two scavenger conditions has been compared. At the two scavenger capacities used of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 7} and 3 {times} 10{sup 8}s{sup {minus}1} using Tris-HCl as the scavenger, the ratio of single- to double-strand breaks for {alpha} particles is fivefold less than the corresponding ratios for {gamma} irradiation. The repair of such radiation-induced single-strand breaks has been examined using a cell-free system derived from human whole-cell extracts. We show that the rejoining of single-strand breaks for both {alpha}-particle- and {gamma}-irradiated plasmid is dependent upon the scavenging capacity and that the efficiency of rejoining of {alpha}-particle-induced single-strand breaks is significantly less than that observed for {gamma}-ray-induced breaks. In addition, for DNA that had been irradiated under conditions that mimic the cellular environment with respect to the radical scavenging capacity, 50 of {alpha}-particle-induced single-strand breaks are converted to double-strand breaks, in contrast with only {approximately}12% conversion of {gamma}-ray-induced single-strand breaks, indicating that the initial damage caused by {alpha} particles is more severe. These studies provide experimental evidence for increased clustering of damage which may have important implications for the induction of cancer by low-level {alpha}-particle sources such as domestic radon. 37 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Relative biological effectiveness of the alpha-particle emitter (211)At for double-strand break induction in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Claesson, Anna Kristina; Stenerlöw, Bo; Jacobsson, Lars; Elmroth, Kecke

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify and to determine the distribution of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells irradiated in vitro and to evaluate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the alpha-particle emitter (211)At for DSB induction. The influence of the irradiation temperature on the induction of DSBs was also investigated. Human fibroblasts were irradiated as intact cells with alpha particles from (211)At, (60)Co gamma rays and X rays. The numbers and distributions of DSBs were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with fragment analysis for separation of DNA fragments in sizes 10 kbp-5.7 Mbp. A non-random distribution was found for DSB induction after irradiation with alpha particles from (211)At, while irradiation with low-LET radiation led to more random distributions. The RBEs for DSB induction were 2.1 and 3.1 for (60)Co gamma rays and X rays as the reference radiation, respectively. In the experiments studying temperature effects, nuclear monolayers were irradiated with (211)At alpha particles or (60)Co gamma rays at 2 degrees C or 37 degrees C and intact cells were irradiated with (211)At alpha particles at the same temperatures. The dose-modifying factor (DMF(temp)) for irradiation of nuclear monolayers at 37 degrees C compared with 2 degrees C was 1.7 for (211)At alpha particles and 1.6 for (60)Co gamma rays. No temperature effect was observed for intact cells irradiated with (211)At. In conclusion, irradiation with alpha particles from (211)At induced two to three times more DSB than gamma rays and X rays. PMID:17316073

  3. Code System for Analyzing Ge and Alpha-Particle Detector Spectra.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-06-29

    Version 00 GRPANL (GRouP ANaLysis) is a suite of programs which analyzes and interprets regions of germanium and alpha-particle detector pulse-height spectra. GRPANL is the main peak-fitting program; the other programs included are used in conjunction with GRPANL. GRPANL is particularly useful for accurately deconvoluting and interpreting complex clusters of peaks in a spectrum. GRPANL fits peaks in specified regions of a gamma-ray, x-ray, or alpha-particle spectrum, calculates their energies and intensities, and optionally calculatesmore » the photon emission rates for the sample from which they were emitted. It can also identify and measure isotopes in a sample. GRPANL output can be immediately analyzed for quantitative isotopic assays or stored in an intermediate data file. The other programs are EDIGRP, LIBRY, and GEVAL. EDISRP (EDIt GRouP) creates and edits an analysis control file that contains input parameters and analysis options for spectral regions analyzed by GRPANL; users can repeat or modify an analysis without retyping input. LIBRY (LIBRarY) assembles and cross references selected nuclear decay scheme data and stores it in decay scheme data files for use by GRPANL and GEVAL. GEVAL (Gamma ray EVALuation) uses these data files along with GRPANL intermediate results to identify isotopes, calculate their abundance in a sample, and print the corresponding disintegration rates and abundances at counting and zero times.« less

  4. Results of the Alpha-Particle-X-Ray Spectrometer on Board of the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, R.; Zipfel, J.; Brueckner, J.; Dreibus, G.; Lugmair, G.; Rieder, R.; Waenke, H.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity landed at Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum. The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is part of the instrument suite on both rovers. It is equipped with six 244Cm sources which provide x-ray excitation with alpha-particles (PIXE) and x-ray radiation (XRF). This combination allows x-ray spectroscopy of elements from Na to Br in the energy range of 0.9 to 16 keV. X-ray detectors with a high energy resolution of 160 eV at Fe K allow us to separate even closely spaced energy peaks, such as Na, Mg, Al and Si. The APXS is attached to the rover s arm and provides in-situ measurements of the chemical composition of soils, surfaces of rocks and outcrops and their abraded surfaces. This abstract gives an overview of APXS results obtained during the first year of operation on both landing sites.

  5. Effect of Alpha-Particle Irradiation on Brain Glycogen in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, L. S.; Klatzo, Igor; Miquel, Jaime; Tobias, Cornelius; Haymaker, Webb

    1962-01-01

    The studies of Klatzo, Miquel, Tobias and Haymaker (1961) have shown that one of the earliest and most sensitive indications of the effects of alpha-particle irradiation on rat bran is the appearance of glycogen granules mainly in the neuroglia of the exposed area of the brain. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) positive, alpha-amylase soluble granules were demonstrated within 12 hr after irradiation, preceding by approximately 36 hr the first microscopically detectable vascular permeability disturbances, as shown by the fluorescein labeled serum protein technique. These studies suggested that the injurious effects of alpha-particle energy were on cellular elements primarily, according to the physical properties and distribution of the radiation in the tissue, and that the vascular permeability disturbances played a secondary role in pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to correlate the histochemical observations on glycogen with a quantitative assessment of the glycogen in the irradiated brain tissue. It is felt that such a study may contribute to the understanding of radiation injury at the molecular level. A practical aspect of this problem is that the information on biological radiation effects due to accelerated particles from the cyclotron source, is employed in this study, is applicable to radiation from cosmic particles both in free space and entrapped in the Van Allen belts.

  6. Observation of lunar radon emanation with the Apollo 15 alpha particle spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    The alpha particle spectrometer, a component of the orbital Sim Bay group of 'geochemistry' experiments on Apollo 15, was designed to detect alpha particles emitted during the decay of isotopes of radon gas and her daughter products. The purpose was to measure the gross activity of radon on the lunar surface and to find possible regions of increased local activity. Results are presented from a partial analysis of Apollo 15 data. For the moon as a whole, Rn220 was not observed and the upper limit on its decay rate above the lunar surface is 0.00038 disintegrations/sq cm-sec. Rn222 was marginally observed. Possible variations of radon activity on the lunar surface are being investigated. Po210 (a daughter product of Rn222) has been detected in a broad region from west of Mare Crisium to the Van de Graaff-Orlov region. The observed count rate is (4.6 plus or minus 1.4) x 0.001 disintegrations/sq cm-sec. The observed level of Po210 activity is in excess of the amount that would be in equilibrium with Rn222 by about an order of magnitude. This implies that larger levels of radon emanation have occurred on the moon within a time scale of 10 to 100 years.

  7. Activation cross sections of longer-lived radionuclides produced in germanium by alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, S.; Takács, M. P.; Ditrói, F.; Aikawa, M.; Haba, H.; Komori, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The cross sections of alpha particles induced nuclear reactions on natural germanium were investigated by using the standard stacked foil target technique, the activation method and high resolution gamma spectrometry. Targets with thickness of about 1 μm were prepared from natural Ge by vacuum evaporation onto 25 μm thick polyimide (Kapton) backing foils. Stacks were composed of Kapton-Ge-Ge-Kapton sandwich target foils and additional titanium monitor foils with nominal thickness of 11 μm to monitor the beam parameters using the natTi(α,x)51Cr reaction. The irradiations were done with Eα = 20.7 and Eα = 51.25 MeV, Iα = 50 nA alpha particle beams for about 1 h. Direct or cumulative activation cross sections were determined for production of the 72,73,75Se, 71,72,74,76,78As, and 69Ge radionuclides. The obtained experimental cross sections were compared to the results of theoretical calculations taken from the TENDL data library based on the TALYS computer code. A comparison was made with available experimental data measured earlier. Thick target yields were deduced from the experimental cross sections and compared with the data published before.

  8. Instrument for measuring total alpha particle energies of alpha emitters in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, S.; Brucker, G. J.; Cummings, B.; Bechtel, E.; Gentner, F.; Horne, S.

    2000-11-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, testing and evaluation of a self-reading, carbon fiber, electrometer-type instrument. It is used for measuring the total energy of alpha particles emitted in air by progenies of 222Rn ( 218Po, 214Pb, and 214Bi), and sometimes by other types of alpha emitters (e.g. 212Pb, 238U, and 239Pu). The purpose of these measurements is to assess the energy delivered by alpha emission from these sources to the lung tissue. A sample (charged progenies attached to aerosols) is collected on filter paper from a known volume of air and placed on the instrument. The discharge rate indicates the alpha energy in MeV l -1 of air per min that is produced by the alpha emitters. The calibration procedure shows that the instrument has an energy sensitivity for alpha particles of 800.5 MeV/scale unit. The range of the readout scale is 30 units. Measurements of alpha contamination in air were made using this instrument in buildings, private homes and in a standard chamber. The value of the radon concentration in this chamber is traceable back to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  9. Detailed 8-transistor SRAM cell analysis for improved alpha particle radiation hardening in nanometer technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bota, Sebastià A.; Torrens, Gabriel; Verd, Jaume; Segura, Jaume

    2015-09-01

    Eight-transistor (8T) cells were introduced to improve variability tolerance, cell stability and low-voltage operation in high-speed SRAM caches by decoupling the read and write design requirements. Altogether, 8T-SRAM can be designed without significant area penalty over 6T-SRAM. Ionizing radiation effects are nowadays a major concern for reliability and dependability of emerging electronic SRAM devices, even for sea-level applications. In this paper we demonstrate from experimental results that the 8T-SRAM also exhibits an enhanced overall intrinsic tolerance to alpha particle radiation even though its critical charge values are smaller than conventional 6T cells. We have experimentally found that the soft error rate measured in accelerated experiments with alpha particles in SRAM devices implemented in a 65 nm CMOS is 56% better for 8T cells with respect to standard 6T-cells. Even more, we show that this value can be increased up to a 200% through transistor sizing optimization.

  10. Assessing the SEU resistance of CMOS latches using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M.; Blaes, B.; Nixon, R.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of Cosmic Rays on the performance of integrated circuits (IC's) in a space environment is evident in the upset rate of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) launched in Apr. 1983. This satellite experiences a single-event-upset (SEU) per day which must be corrected from the ground. Such experience caused a redesign of the Galileo spacecraft with SEU resistant IC's. The solution to the SEU problem continues to be important as the complexity of spacecraft grows, the feature size of IC's decreases, and as space systems are designed with circuits fabricated at non-radiation hardened foundries. This paper describes an approach for verifying the susceptibility of CMOS latches to heavy-ion induced state changes. The approach utilizes alpha particles to induce the upsets in test circuits. These test circuits are standard cells that have offset voltages which sensitize the circuits to upsets. These results are then used to calculate the upsetability at operating voltages. In this study results are presented for the alpha particle upset of a six-transistor static random access memory (SRAM) cell. Then a methodology is described for the analysis of a standard-cell inverter latch.

  11. How to produce high specific activity tin-117m using alpha particle beam.

    PubMed

    Duchemin, C; Essayan, M; Guertin, A; Haddad, F; Michel, N; Métivier, V

    2016-09-01

    Tin-117m is an interesting radionuclide for both diagnosis and therapy, thanks to the gamma-ray and electron emissions, respectively, resulting from its decay to tin-117g. The high specific activity of tin-117m is required in many medical applications, and it can be obtained using a high energy alpha particle beam and a cadmium target. The experiments performed at the ARRONAX cyclotron (Nantes, France) using an alpha particle beam delivered at 67.4MeV provide a measurement of the excitation function of the Cd-nat(α,x)Sn-117m reaction and the produced contaminants. The Cd-116(α,3n)Sn-117m production cross section has been deduced from these experimental results using natural cadmium. Both production yield and specific activity as a function of the projectile energy have been calculated. These informations help to optimize the irradiation conditions to produce tin-117m with the required specific activity using α particles with a cadmium target. PMID:27344526

  12. Protons and alpha particles in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2013-09-01

    We present results of a two‒dimensional hybrid expanding box simulation of a plasma system with three ion populations, beam and core protons, and alpha particles (and fluid electrons), drifting with respect to each other. The expansion with a strictly radial magnetic field leads to a decrease of the ion perpendicular to parallel temperature ratios as well as to an increase of the ratio between the ion relative velocities and the local Alfvén velocity creating a free energy for many different instabilities. The system is most of the time marginally stable with respect to kinetic instabilities mainly due to the ion relative velocities; these instabilities determine the system evolution counteracting some effects of the expansion. Nonlinear evolution of these instabilities leads to large modifications of the ion velocity distribution functions. The beam protons and alpha particles are decelerated with respect to the core protons and all the populations are cooled in the parallel direction and heated in the perpendicular one. On the macroscopic level, the kinetic instabilities cause large departures of the system evolution from the double adiabatic prediction and lead to perpendicular heating and parallel cooling rates which are comparable to the heating rates estimated from the Helios observations.

  13. An alpha particle instrument with alpha, proton, and X-ray modes for planetary chemical analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with matter is employed in a compact instrument that could provide rather complete in-situ chemical analyses of surfaces and thin atmospheres of extraterrestrial bodies. The instrument is a miniaturized and improved version of the Surveyor lunar instrument. The backscattering of alpha particles and (alpha, p) reactions provide analytical data on the light elements (carbon-iron). An X-ray mode that detects the photons produced by the alpha sources provides sensitivity and resolution for the chemical elements heavier than about silicon. The X-rays are detected by semiconductor detectors having a resolution between 150 and 250 eV at 5.9 keV. Such an instrument can identify and determine with good accuracy 99 percent of the atoms (except hydrogen) in rocks. For many trace elements, the detecting sensitivity is a few ppm. Auxiliary sources could be used to enhance the sensitivities for elements of special interest. The instrument could probably withstand the acceleration involved in semi-hard landings.

  14. Thermal and suprathermal protons and alpha particles in the earth's plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Ipavich, F.M.; Scholer, M.

    1983-01-01

    We have investigated thermal and suprathermal protons (from approx.13 keV to approx.1 MeV) and alpha particles (from approx.30 keV/Q to 130 keV/Q) in the quasi-stable plasma sheet near local midnight at geocentric distances of approx.12--20 R/sub E/. The data, obtained during five different plasma sheet penetrations with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system on ISEE 1, represent the first measurements of plasma sheet ion composition in this energy range. Below approx.16 keV the proton spectra can be represented by a Maxwellian distribution. Above approx.16 keV we find a suprathermal tail which cannot be represented by a single power law. In some cases the suprathermal population consists of two distinct components: a low-energy component falling off sharply at approx.100 keV and a high-energy component extending up to approx.1 MeV. The high-energy component often decays with time during expansion of the plasma sheet. Alpha particle to proton ratios average approx.3% and are observed to be constant at either equal energy per nucleon or energy per charge.

  15. Acceleration of low-energy protons and alpha particles at interplanetary shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1983-01-01

    The low-energy protons and alpha particles in the energy range 30 keV/charge to 150 keV/charge associated with three different interplanetary shock waves in the immediate preshock and postshock region are studied using data obtained by the ISEE 3. The spatial distributions in the preshock and postshock medium are presented, and the dependence of the phase space density at different energies on the distance from the shock and on the form of the distribution function of both species immediately at the shock is examined. It is found that in the preshock region the particles are flowing in the solar wind frame of reference away from the shock and in the postshock medium the distribution is more or less isotropic in this frame of reference. The distribution function in the postshock region can be represented by a power law in energy which has the same spectral exponent for both protons and alpha particles. It is concluded that the first-order Fermi acceleration process can consistently explain the data, although the spectra of diffuse bow shock associated particles are different from the spectra of the interplanetary shock-associated particles in the immediate vicinity of the shock. In addition, the mean free path of the low energy ions in the preshock medium is found to be considerably smaller than the mean free path determined by the turbulence of the background interplanetary medium.

  16. Targeted Cytoplasmic Irradiation with Alpha Particles Induces Mutations in Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li-Jun; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Xu, An; Waldren, Charles A.; Geard, Charles R.; Yu, Zengliang; Hei, Tom K.

    1999-04-01

    Ever since x-rays were shown to induce mutation in Drosophila more than 70 years ago, prevailing dogma considered the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, such as mutations and carcinogenesis, as being due mostly to direct damage to the nucleus. Although there was indication that alpha particle traversal through cellular cytoplasm was innocuous, the full impact remained unknown. The availability of the microbeam at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility of Columbia University made it possible to target and irradiate the cytoplasm of individual cells in a highly localized spatial region. By using dual fluorochrome dyes (Hoechst and Nile Red) to locate nucleus and cellular cytoplasm, respectively, thereby avoiding inadvertent traversal of nuclei, we show here that cytoplasmic irradiation is mutagenic at the CD59 (S1) locus of human-hamster hybrid (AL) cells, while inflicting minimal cytotoxicity. The principal class of mutations induced are similar to those of spontaneous origin and are entirely different from those of nuclear irradiation. Furthermore, experiments with radical scavenger and inhibitor of intracellular glutathione indicated that the mutagenicity of cytoplasmic irradiation depends on generation of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that cytoplasm is an important target for genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, particularly radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. In addition, cytoplasmic traversal by alpha particles may be more dangerous than nuclear traversal, because the mutagenicity is accomplished by little or no killing of the target cells.

  17. Vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy with the alpha-particle emitter 211At.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Mirzadeh, S; Eckelman, W C; Waldmann, T A; Garmestani, K; Yordanov, A T; Stabin, M G; Brechbiel, M W

    2002-06-01

    Astatine-211, an alpha-particle emitter, was employed in a model system for vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy of small tumors in mouse lung to compare its performance relative to other radioisotopes in the same system. Astatine-211 was coupled to the lung blood vessel-targeting monoclonal antibody 201B with N-succinimidyl N-(4-[211At]astatophenethyl) succinamate linker. Biodistribution data showed that the conjugate delivered 211At to the lung (260-418% ID/g), where it remained with a biological half-time of about 30 h. BALB/c mice bearing about 100 lung tumor colonies of EMT-6 cells, each about 2000 cells in size, were treated with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B. The administered activity of 185 kBq per animal extended the life span of treated mice over untreated controls. Injections of 370 kBq, corresponding to an absorbed dose of 25-40 Gy, were necessary to eradicate all of the lung tumors. Mice receiving 740 kBq of 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B developed pulmonary fibrosis 3-4 months after treatment, as did mice treated with 3700 kBq of the alpha-particle emitter 213Bi-labeled monoclonal antibody 201B in previous work. Animals that were injected with 211At bound to untargeted IgG or to glycine, as control agents, also demonstrated therapeutic effects relative to untreated controls. Control groups that received untargeted 211At required about twice as much administered activity for effective therapy as did groups with lung-targeted radioisotope. These results were not consistent with radioisotope biodistribution and dosimetry calculations that indicated that lung-targeted 211At should be at least 10-fold more efficient for lung colony therapy than 211At bound to nontargeting controls. The data showed that 211At is useful for vascular-targeted radioimmunotherapy because lung tumor colonies were eradicated in the mice. Work in this model system demonstrates that vascular targeting of alpha-particle emitters is an efficient therapy for small

  18. Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Batha, S.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Levinton, F.M.; McCune, D.C.; Medley, S.S.; Petrov, M.P.; von Goeler, S.; White, R.B.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.; TFTR Team

    1999-07-01

    Neoclassical simulations of alpha particle density profiles in high fusion power plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [Phys. Plasmas {bold 5}, 1577 (1998)] are found to be in good agreement with measurements of the alpha distribution function made with a sensitive active neutral particle diagnostic. The calculations are carried out in Hamiltonian magnetic coordinates with a fast, particle-following Monte Carlo code which includes the neoclassical transport processes, a recent first-principles model for stochastic ripple loss and collisional effects. New calculations show that monotonic shear alpha particles are virtually unaffected by toroidal field ripple. The calculations show that in reversed shear the confinement domain is not empty for trapped alphas at birth and allow an estimate of the actual alpha particle densities measured with the pellet charge exchange diagnostic. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Beams of protons and alpha particles greater than approximately 30 keV/charge from the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1981-01-01

    Two beamlike particle events (30 keV/charge to 160 keV/charge) upstream of the earth's bow shock have been investigated with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland ultralow energy and charge analyzer on ISEE 1. These beams consist of protons as well as of alpha particles, and the spectra are generally steep and are decreasing with increasing energy. During one event the spectra of both protons and alpha particles have a maximum at approximately 65 keV/charge. During these events, the interplanetary magnetic field through the satellite position was almost tangent to the bow shock, and application of the theory of acceleration predicts acceleration of a solar wind particle up to 60 keV/nucleon in a single reflection. The observation of reflected protons as well as alpha particles has implications for the physical reflection process usually not discussed in acceleration theories.

  20. Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Blaes, B.R.; Soli, G.A.; Buehler, M.G. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes a methodology for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-{mu}m n-well CMOS 4k-bit test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 {mu}m was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 Mev cm{sup 2}/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV cm{sup 2}/mg was determined.

  1. Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Soli, G. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is described for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 micron was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 MeV sq cm/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV sq cm/mg was determined.

  2. Radiotoxicity of gadolinium-148 and radium-223 in mouse testes: relative biological effectiveness of alpha-particle emitters in vivo.

    PubMed

    Howell, R W; Goddu, S M; Narra, V R; Fisher, D R; Schenter, R E; Rao, D V

    1997-03-01

    The biological effects of radionuclides that emit alpha particles are of considerable interest in view of their potential for therapy and their presence in the environment. The present work is a continuation of our ongoing effort to study the radiotoxicity of alpha-particle emitters in vivo using the survival of murine testicular sperm heads as the biological end point. Specifically, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of very low-energy alpha particles (3.2 MeV) emitted by 148Gd is investigated and determined to be 7.4 +/- 2.4 when compared to the effects of acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for 210Po and 212Pb in equilibrium with its daughters, is used to revise and extend the range of validity of our previous RBE-energy relationship for alpha particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides. The new empirical relationship is given by RBE alpha = 9.14 - 0.510 E alpha where 3 < E alpha < 9 MeV. The validity of this empirical relationship is tested by determining the RBE of the prolific alpha-particle emitter 223Ra (in equilibrium with its daughters) experimentally in the same biological model and comparing the value obtained experimentally with the predicted value. The resulting RBE values are 5.4 +/- 0.9 and 5.6, respectively. This close agreement strongly supports the adequacy of the empirical RBE-E alpha relationship to predict the biological effects of alpha-particle emitters in vivo. PMID:9052681

  3. Vascular targeted radioimmunotherapy with 213Bi--an alpha-particle emitter.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Mirzadeh, S

    1998-04-01

    To destroy both tumor blood vessels and adjacent tumor cells, an alpha-particle emitter, 213Bi, has been targeted with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to vessels that feed lung tumors in mice. Animals, bearing approximately 100 EMT-6 carcinomas each of 50-400 cells in size in the lung, that were treated with 120 muCi of 213Bi-MAb 201B were all cured of their disease. Animals treated when tumors were larger (10(3)-10(4) cells) had extended life spans, but a small number of residual tumors eventually killed the animals. Significant extension of life span was also induced with another tumor model-rat tracheal carcinoma growing in the lungs of SCID mice that were then treated with 136 muCi 213Bi-MAb 201B. These studies indicate that attack of both blood vessels and tumor cells simultaneously is an effective mode of cancer treatment. PMID:9620629

  4. Collisional stochastic ripple diffusion of alpha particles and beam ions on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; White, R.B.; Budny, R.V.; Janos, A.C.; Owens, D.K.; Schivell, J.F.; Scott, S.D.; Zweben, S.J.

    1995-07-01

    Predictions for ripple loss of fast ions from TFTR are investigated with a guiding center code including both collisional and ripple effects. A synergistic enhancement of fast ion diffusion is found for toroidal field ripple with collisions. The total loss is calculated to be roughly twice the sum of ripple and collisional losses calculated separately. Discrepancies between measurements and calculations of plasma beta at low current and large major radius are resolved when both effects are included for neutral beam ions. A 20--30% reduction in alpha particle heating is predicted for q{sub a} = 6--14, R = 2.6 m DT plasmas on TFTR due to first orbit and collisional stochastic ripple diffusion.

  5. Gas production due to alpha particle degradation of polyethylene and polyvinylchloride

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T.; Hoh, J.; Emery, J.; Okajima, S.; Krause, T.

    1998-07-01

    Alpha particle degradation experiments were performed on polyethylene (PE) and polyvinylchloride (PVC) plastic samples typical of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) transuranic (TRU) waste. This was done to evaluate the effects of sealing TRU waste during shipment. Experiments were conducted at three temperatures using low dose rates. Predominant products from both plastics were hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and various organic species, with the addition of hydrochloric acid from PVC. In all experiments, the total pressure decreased. Irradiation at 30 and 60 C and at various dose rates caused small changes for both plastics, but at 100 C coupled thermal-radiolytic effects included discoloration of the material as well as large differences in the gas phase composition.

  6. Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) on-board Chandrayaan-2 rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, M.; Murty, S. V. S.; Acharya, Y. B.; Goyal, S. K.; Patel, Arpit R.; Shah, Bhumi; Hait, A. K.; Patinge, Aditya; Subrahmanyam, D.

    2014-11-01

    Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) payload configuration for Chandrayaan-2 rover has been completed recently and fabrication of mechanical assembly, PCB layout design and fabrication are in progress. Here we present the design and performance evaluation of various subsystems developed for APXS payload. The low energy threshold of <1 keV and the energy resolution of ∼150 eV at 5.9 keV, for the Silicon Drift Detector (SDD), as measured from the developed APXS electronics is comparable to the standard spectrometers available off-the-shelf. We have also carried out experiments for measuring fluorescent X-ray spectrum from various standard samples from the USGS catalog irradiated by the laboratory X-ray source 241Am with 1 mCi activity. It is shown that intensities of various characteristic X-ray lines are well correlated with the respective elemental concentrations.

  7. [Near infrared distance sensing method for Chang'e-3 alpha particle X-ray spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-Hua; Wu, Ming-Ye; Wang, Huan-Yu; Peng, Wen-Xi; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Wang, Jin-Zhou; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Yang, Jia-Wei; Fan, Rui-Rui; Gao, Min; Liu, Ya-Qing; Zhang, Fei; Dong, Yi-Fan; Guo, Dong-Ya

    2013-05-01

    Alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is one of the payloads of Chang'E-3 lunar rover, the scientific objective of which is in-situ observation and off-line analysis of lunar regolith and rock. Distance measurement is one of the important functions for APXS to perform effective detection on the moon. The present paper will first give a brief introduction to APXS, and then analyze the specific requirements and constraints to realize distance measurement, at last present a new near infrared distance sensing algorithm by using the inflection point of response curve. The theoretical analysis and the experiment results verify the feasibility of this algorithm. Although the theoretical analysis shows that this method is not sensitive to the operating temperature and reflectance of the lunar surface, the solar infrared radiant intensity may make photosensor saturation. The solutions are reducing the gain of device and avoiding direct exposure to sun light. PMID:23905352

  8. Kinetic theory of alpha particles production in a dense and strongly magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cereceda, Carlo; Deutsch, Claude; De Peretti, Michel; Sabatier, Michel; Basko, Mikhail M.; Kemp, Andreas; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jurgend

    2000-11-01

    In connection with fundamental issues relevant to magnetized target fusion, the distribution function of thermonuclear alpha particles produced in situ in a dense, hot, and strongly magnetized hydrogenic plasma considered fully ionized in a cylindrical geometry is investigated. The latter is assumed in local thermodynamic equilibrium with Maxwellian charged particles. The approach is based on the Fokker-Planck equation with isotropic source S and loss s terms, which may be taken arbitrarily under the proviso that they remain compatible with a steady state. A novel and general expression is then proposed for the isotropic and stationary distribution f(v). Its time-dependent extension is worked out numerically. The solutions are valid for any particle velocity v and plasma temperature T. Higher order magnetic and collisional corrections are also obtained for electron gyroradius larger than Debye length. f(v) moments provide particle diffusion coefficient and heat thermal conductivity. Their scaling on collision time departs from Braginski's.

  9. Electron correlations in single-electron capture from helium by fast protons and {alpha} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mancev, Ivan; Milojevic, Nenad

    2010-02-15

    Single-electron capture from heliumlike atomic systems by bare projectiles is investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born approximation (CB1-4B). The effect of the dynamic electron correlation is explicitly taken into account through the complete perturbation potential. The quantum-mechanical post and prior transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and/or asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of two-dimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. An illustrative computation is performed for single-electron capture from helium by protons and {alpha} particles at intermediate and high impact energies. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. The validity and utility of the proposed CB1-4B method is critically assessed in comparison with the existing experimental data for total cross sections, and excellent agreement is obtained.

  10. Characterization of coal and charcoal by alpha-particle and gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Lourtau, A. M.; Rubio Montero, M. P.; Jurado Vargas, M.

    2015-11-01

    Although coal and charcoal have similar physical and chemical characteristics, there are several crystallographic procedures used to distinguish and characterize them. But if the matrix is crushed, there is no standard procedure to distinguish coal from charcoal. In this work, a procedure to characterize coal and charcoal samples based on the radioactive content is proposed. The first assay is by gamma-ray spectrometry, which allows a part of the radioactive content to be determined rapidly and non-destructively. Then, alpha-particle spectrometry is applied to assay the content of those radionuclides which are difficult to determine precisely by gamma-ray spectrometry. This second technique requires prior chemical purification of the carbon sample in order to separate the corresponding radionuclides of interest.

  11. 212Bi-DOTMP: an alpha particle emitting bone-seeking agent for targeted radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hassfjell, S P; Bruland, O S; Hoff, P

    1997-04-01

    The synthesis and in vivo stability of the bone-seeking alpha-particle emitting compounds 212Bi-DOTMP and 212Pb/212Bi-DOTMP are described. 212Bi-DOTMP, injected i.v. into Balb/c mice, showed prominent bone localization and a rapid clearance from blood and other organs. Femur/blood ratios increased from 13 at 15 min up to 490 at 2.0 h postinjection. Enhanced uptake of 212Bi-DOTMP was demonstrated in regions with high bone turnover. A comparison between 212Bi-DOTMP and [153Sm]Sm-EDTMP showed essentially no differences in biodistribution. 212Pb/212Bi-DOTMP followed a similar biodistribution, except for slightly elevated levels of 212Bi in the kidneys. The present study has shown 212Bi-DOTMP to be an in vivo stable bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical with promising biological properties for the treatment of sclerotic metastases and osteoblastic osteosarcoma. PMID:9228657

  12. Orbit-averaged drift kinetic equation for the study of alpha-particle transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, G.T.; Miley, G.H. . Fusion Studies Lab.); Burrell, K.H. )

    1990-11-01

    Neoclassical transport of minority suprathermal alpha particles is investigated. This paper departs from previous investigations in that (a) the banana-width ordering parameter {rho}{sub {theta}}/L is not formally restricted to be a small parameter and (b) a linearized collision operator that retains the effects of pitch-angle scattering, electron and ion drag, and speed diffusion is used. A step model approximation for the large-aspect-ratio, circular-cross-section tokamak magnetic field is adopted to simplify the orbit-averaging procedure. Assuming that the suprathermal alphas are in the banana regime, an asymptotic expansion in {tau}{sub B}/{tau}{sub S} {much lt} l is carried out.

  13. Cryogenic microcalorimeter system for ultra-high resolution alpha-particle spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, Michael W; Hoover, Andrew S; Bacrania, Mnesh K; Croce, Mark P; Hoteling, N J; Lamont, S P; Plionis, A A; Dry, D E; Ullom, J N; Bennett, D A; Horansky, R; Kotsubo, V; Cantor, R

    2009-01-01

    Microcalorimeters have been shown to yield unsurpassed energy resolution for alpha spectrometry, up to 1.06 keV FWHM at 5.3 MeV. These detectors use a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) to measure the temperature change in an absorber from energy deposited by an interacting alpha particle. Our system has four independent detectors mounted inside a liquid nitrogen/liquid helium cryostat. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) cools the detector stage to its operating temperature of 80 mK. Temperature regulation with {approx}15 uK peak-to-peak variation is achieved by PID control of the ADR. The detectors are voltage-biased, and the current signal is amplified by a commercial SQUID readout system and digitized for further analysis, This paper will discuss design and operation of our microcalorimeter alpha spectrometer, and will show recent results.

  14. Simulations of alpha particle ripple loss from the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Miller, C.O.; White, R.B.

    1996-05-01

    Calculations of collisional stochastic ripple loss of alpha particles from the new 20 toroidal field (TF) coil International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) predict small alpha ripple losses, less than 0.4%, close to the loss calculated for the full current operation of the earlier 24 TF coil design. An analytic fit is obtained to the ITER ripple data field demonstrating the nonlinear height dependence of the ripple minimum for D shaped ripple contours. In contrast to alpha loss simulations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), a simple Goldston, White, Boozer stochastic loss criterion ripple loss model is found to require an increased renormalization of the stochastic threshold {delta}{sub s}/{delta}{sub GWB} {ge} 1. Effects of collisions, sawtooth broadening and reversal of the grad B drift direction are included in the particle following simulations.

  15. An alpha particle experiment for chemical analysis of the Martian surface and atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.; Patterson, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    An alpha particle experiment similar to the one performed successfully on the Surveyor lunar missions is described. It is designed to provide a chemical analysis of the Martian surface and atmosphere. Analyses of rocks of known and unknown compositions have been made under simulated Martian conditions. The accuracies attained are generally comparable to those of the Surveyor lunar analyses. Improvements have been achieved in determining carbon and oxygen, so that a few per cent of water or carbonates in rocks can be detected. Some aspects of the integration of such an experiment with the spacecraft, a possible mission profile, and some other problems associated with a soft-landing mission to Mars are discussed. The importance of such a chemical analysis experiment in answering current questions about the nature and history of Martian surface material and its suitability for life processes is presented.

  16. Alpha particle vascular brachytherapy in the treatment of in-stent Restenosis.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Alireza; Fazelzadeh, Afsoon; Karimi, Hamed

    2009-08-14

    In-stent Restenosis (ISR) is the Achilles heel for using of stent. Vascular brachytherapy (VBT) has been the principal scientifically investigated local therapy for coronary artery ISR. In our suggested method, a new type of stent, which is coated with Boron ((10)B) compound, is used. The coating layer of the stent consists of stable isotype of (10)B. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy produced alpha particle has enough energy to kill the cells adjacent to the stent, which is the site of boron deposition. It would prevent from ISR and intimal proliferation. After percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and insertion of stent, follow-up should be done continuously, and if ISR is detected, BNCT will be used to treat the recurrence. Using this modality of VBT would help us to overcome the pitfalls in en vogue radiotherapy methods. PMID:18625530

  17. An alpha particle measurement system using an energetic neutral helium beam in ITER (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, M.; Tanaka, N.; Terai, K.; Kaneko, O.; Kisaki, M.; Kobuchi, T.; Tsumori, K.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Shinto, K.; Wada, M.

    2012-02-15

    An energetic helium neutral beam is involved in the beam neutralization measurement system of alpha particles confined in a DT fusion plasma. A full size strong-focusing He{sup +} ion source (2 A, the beam radius of 11.3 mm, the beam energy less than 20 keV). Present strong-focusing He{sup +} ion source shows an emittance diagram separated for each beamlet of multiple apertures without phase space mixing, despite the space charge of a beamlet is asymmetric and the beam flow is non-laminar. The emittance of beamlets in the peripheral region was larger than that of center. The heat load to the plasma electrode was studied to estimate the duty factor for the ITER application.

  18. A study of the scintillation light induced in liquid xenon by electrons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena; Mukherjee, Reshmi; Suzuki, Masayo

    1990-01-01

    The time dependence and the intensity of the primary scintillation light in liquid Xe excited by Am-241 alpha particles and Bi-207 internal-conversion electrons were measured at different electric-field strengths. High-purity liquid Xe was used to fill a parallel-plate ionization chamber equipped with a CaF2 window coupled to a UV-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The effect of the specific ionization density on the scintillation light and the time correlation between the light signal and the charge signal is reported. It is demonstrated that the fast scintillation signal produced in liquid Xe by an ionizing particle provides an ideal trigger in a detector aiming at a complete three-dimensional event reconstruction with an excellent background rejection capability.

  19. Simulation of {alpha}-particle redistribution due to sawteeth on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Zhao; White, R.B.

    1996-12-31

    In recent Deuterium-Tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), both the Pellet Charge Exchange (PCX) and the alpha Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy ({alpha}-CHERS) diagnostics indicate that sawtooth oscillations can cause significant broadening of the fusion alpha radial density profile. The authors investigate this sawtooth mixing phenomenon by applying a Hamiltonian guiding center approach. A model of time evolution of the Kadomtsev-type sawtooth is constructed. The presence of more than one mode in the nonlinear stage of the sawtooth crash is necessary to cause significant broadening of the alpha density profile. Use of numerical equilibria allows us to perform detailed comparisons with TFTR experimental data. The results are in reasonable agreement with {alpha}-CHERS and show a broadening of alpha particles similar to that seen in PCX measurements.

  20. Alpha-particles as probes of nuclear shape and structure effects in proton evaporation spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.; Nicolis, N.G.; Abenante, V.; Majka, Z.; Semkow, T.M. ); Baktash, C.; Beene, J.R.; Garcia-Bermudez, G.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Johnson, N.R.; Lee, I.Y.; McGowan, F.K.; Riley, M.A.; Virtanen, A. ); Griffin, H.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The emission barriers and subbarrier anisotropies in the alpha-particle decay with respect to the spin direction on Sn and rare earth compound nuclei are examined in the light of recent calculations incorporating deformation effects in the decay process. For the Sn systems the spectral shapes and anisotropies can be examined without involving deformation. For the rare earth systems deformation which increases with spin is necessary to explain the data. Energy spectra and angular correlations of evaporated protons from the {sup 52}Cr ({sup 34}S, 2p2n){sup 82}Sr reaction were measured in coincidence with discrete transitions. Large shifts in proton spectra were observed when high spin states in different rotational bands are populated. These effects cannot be explained by statistical model calculations that do not include explicitly nuclear structure effects in the deexcitation process. They are interpreted as due to near-yrast stretched proton emission, which preferentially populates the yrast band by subbarrier protons.

  1. Neoclassical Simulations of Fusion Alpha Particles in Pellet Charge Exchange Experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Batha, S.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Levinton, F.M.; Redi, M.H.; et al

    1999-02-01

    Neoclassical simulations of alpha particle density profiles in high fusion power plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998) 1577] are found to be in good agreement with measurements of the alpha distribution function made with a sensitive active neutral particle diagnostic. The calculations are carried out in Hamiltonian magnetic coordinates with a fast, particle-following Monte Carlo code which includes the neoclassical transport processes, a recent first-principles model for stochastic ripple loss and collisional effects. New global loss and confinement domain calculations allow an estimate of the actual alpha particle densities measured with the pellet charge exchange diagnostic.

  2. Effect of crystal thickness and geometry on the alpha-particle resolution of CsI (Tl)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinez, P.; Senftle, F.E.

    1960-01-01

    The resolution of CsI(Tl) for Po210 alpha particles has been measured as a function of crystal thickness. The best resolution of a 12;-in. diam cylindrical crystal was obtained for a thickness of 0.38 mm, and the effect of thickness on the resolution is discussed. Based on the proposed model, a conical crystal was designed, which yielded a line width of 1.8% for Po 210 alpha particles with a selected photomultiplier tube. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  3. DYNAMICS OF A SPHERICAL ACCRETION SHOCK WITH NEUTRINO HEATING AND ALPHA-PARTICLE RECOMBINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Rodrigo; Thompson, Christopher

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the effects of neutrino heating and alpha-particle recombination on the hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae. Our focus is on the nonlinear dynamics of the shock wave that forms in the collapse and the assembly of positive energy material below it. To this end, we perform time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations with FLASH2.5 in spherical and axial symmetry. These generalize our previous calculations by allowing for bulk neutrino heating and for nuclear statistical equilibrium between n, p, and alpha. The heating rate is freely tunable, as is the starting radius of the shock relative to the recombination radius of alpha-particles. An explosion in spherical symmetry involves the excitation of an overstable mode, which may be viewed as the l = 0 version of the 'Standing Accretion Shock Instability'. In two-dimensional simulations, nonspherical deformations of the shock are driven by plumes of material with positive Bernoulli parameter, which are concentrated well outside the zone of strong neutrino heating. The nonspherical modes of the shock reach a large amplitude only when the heating rate is also high enough to excite convection below the shock. The critical heating rate that causes an explosion depends sensitively on the initial position of the shock relative to the recombination radius. Weaker heating is required to drive an explosion in two dimensions than in one, but the difference also depends on the size of the shock. Forcing the infalling heavy nuclei to break up into n and p below the shock only causes a slight increase in the critical heating rate, except when the shock starts out at a large radius. This shows that heating by neutrinos (or some other mechanism) must play a significant role in pushing the shock far enough out that recombination heating takes over.

  4. Radiation risk to low fluences of alpha particles may be greater than we thought.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H; Suzuki, M; Randers-Pehrson, G; Vannais, D; Chen, G; Trosko, J E; Waldren, C A; Hei, T K

    2001-12-01

    Based principally on the cancer incidence found in survivors of the atomic bombs dropped in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) and the United States National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have recommended that estimates of cancer risk for low dose exposure be extrapolated from higher doses by using a linear, no-threshold model. This recommendation is based on the dogma that the DNA of the nucleus is the main target for radiation-induced genotoxicity and, as fewer cells are directly damaged, the deleterious effects of radiation proportionally decline. In this paper, we used a precision microbeam to target an exact fraction (either 100% or < or =20%) of the cells in a confluent population and irradiated their nuclei with exactly one alpha particle each. We found that the frequencies of induced mutations and chromosomal changes in populations where some known fractions of nuclei were hit are consistent with non-hit cells contributing significantly to the response. In fact, irradiation of 10% of a confluent mammalian cell population with a single alpha particle per cell results in a mutant yield similar to that observed when all of the cells in the population are irradiated. This effect was significantly eliminated in cells pretreated with a 1 mM dose of octanol, which inhibits gap junction-mediated intercellular communication, or in cells carrying a dominant negative connexin 43 vector. The data imply that the relevant target for radiation mutagenesis is larger than an individual cell and suggest a need to reconsider the validity of the linear extrapolation in making risk estimates for low dose, high linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation exposure. PMID:11734643

  5. Alpha particle spectra in coincidence with normal and superdeformed states in {sup 150}Tb

    SciTech Connect

    Viesti, G.; Lunardon, M.; Bazzacco, D. |

    1996-12-31

    The study of correlations between particle evaporation from highly excited compound nuclei at large angular momenta and the states in the final evaporation residues (ER) is a field of investigation which has been opened, in the last years, with the advent of the new large {gamma}-ray arrays. It is now possible to correlate the evaporation spectra to various bands with shapes ranging from spherical to superdeformed (SD) in the same final nucleus. It is generally accepted that the particle evaporation from the compound nucleus is chaotic and that only in the near-yrast {gamma} cascade, where the feeding of different classes of states takes place, the ordered motion is restored. The sensitivity of the particle spectra on the feeding of specific states in the residual nuclei can be taken as an indication that additional degrees of freedom might be important in the evaporation process or that particular regions of the phase space open to the decay populate preferentially some selected structures in the final cold nucleus. This latter point is important for the understanding of the feeding mechanism of SD states. Several experiments performed so far did not find a clear dependence of the shapes of the particle spectra on the excited states having different deformations in the ER. For example, the proton spectra in coincidence with transitions in the SD bands of {sup 133}Nd and {sup 152}Dy nuclei were found to be similar to those in coincidence with transitions in the normal deformed (ND) bands. Alpha particles have been proposed since long as a sensitive probe of the deformation of the emitting nucleus. Results are presented here of an experiment in which the authors have measured the energy spectra of alpha particles associated with different classes of states (ND and SD) in the {sup 150}Tb nucleus populated in the reaction {sup 37}Cl({sup 120}Sn, {alpha}3n{gamma}){sup 150}Tb.

  6. Selective Alpha-Particle Mediated Depletion of Tumor Vasculature with Vascular Normalization

    PubMed Central

    Seshan, Surya V.; Kappel, Barry J.; Chattopadhyay, Debjit; May, Chad; McDevitt, Michael R.; Nolan, Daniel; Mittal, Vivek; Benezra, Robert; Scheinberg, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Abnormal regulation of angiogenesis in tumors results in the formation of vessels that are necessary for tumor growth, but compromised in structure and function. Abnormal tumor vasculature impairs oxygen and drug delivery and results in radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, respectively. Alpha particles are extraordinarily potent, short-ranged radiations with geometry uniquely suitable for selectively killing neovasculature. Methodology and Principal Findings Actinium-225 (225Ac)-E4G10, an alpha-emitting antibody construct reactive with the unengaged form of vascular endothelial cadherin, is capable of potent, selective killing of tumor neovascular endothelium and late endothelial progenitors in bone-marrow and blood. No specific normal-tissue uptake of E4G10 was seen by imaging or post-mortem biodistribution studies in mice. In a mouse-model of prostatic carcinoma, 225Ac-E4G10 treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth, lower serum prostate specific antigen level and markedly prolonged survival, which was further enhanced by subsequent administration of paclitaxel. Immunohistochemistry revealed lower vessel density and enhanced tumor cell apoptosis in 225Ac-E4G10 treated tumors. Additionally, the residual tumor vasculature appeared normalized as evident by enhanced pericyte coverage following 225Ac-E4G10 therapy. However, no toxicity was observed in vascularized normal organs following 225Ac-E4G10 therapy. Conclusions The data suggest that alpha-particle immunotherapy to neovasculature, alone or in combination with sequential chemotherapy, is an effective approach to cancer therapy. PMID:17342201

  7. Measurement of ion cascade energies through resolution degradation of alpha particle microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Horansky, Robert D.; Stiehl, Gregory M.; Beall, James A.; Irwin, Kent D.; Ullom, Joel N.; Plionis, Alexander A.; Rabin, Michael W.

    2010-02-15

    Atomic cascades caused by ions impinging on bulk materials have remained of interest to the scientific community since their discovery by Goldstein in 1902. While considerable effort has been spent describing and, more recently, simulating these cascades, tools that can study individual events are lacking and several aspects of cascade behavior remain poorly known. These aspects include the material energies that determine cascade magnitude and the variation between cascades produced by monoenergetic ions. We have recently developed an alpha particle detector with a thermodynamic resolution near 100 eV full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and an achieved resolution of 1.06 keV FWHM for 5.3 MeV particles. The detector relies on the absorption of particles by a bulk material and a thermal change in a superconducting thermometer. The achieved resolution of this detector provides the highest resolving power of any energy dispersive technique and a factor of 8 improvement over semiconductor detectors. The exquisite resolution can be directly applied to improved measurements of fundamental nuclear decays and nuclear forensics. In addition, we propose that the discrepancy between the thermodynamic and achieved resolution is due to fluctuations in lattice damage caused by ion-induced cascades in the absorber. Hence, this new detector is capable of measuring the kinetic energy converted to lattice damage in individual atomic cascades. This capability allows new measurements of cascade dynamics; for example, we find that the ubiquitous modeling program, SRIM, significantly underestimates the lattice damage caused in bulk tin by 5.3 MeV alpha particles.

  8. Renal tubulointerstitial changes after internal irradiation with alpha-particle-emitting actinium daughters.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Seshan, Surya V; McDevitt, Michael R; LaPerle, Krista; Sgouros, George; Scheinberg, David A

    2005-09-01

    The effect of external gamma irradiation on the kidneys is well described. However, the mechanisms of radiation nephropathy as a consequence of targeted radionuclide therapies are poorly understood. The functional and morphologic changes were studied chronologically (from 10 to 40 wk) in mouse kidneys after injection with an actinium-225 (225Ac) nanogenerator, a molecular-sized, antibody-targeted, in vivo generator of alpha-particle-emitting elements. Renal irradiation from free, radioactive daughters of 225Ac led to time-dependent reduction in renal function manifesting as increase in blood urea nitrogen. The histopathologic changes corresponded with the decline in renal function. Glomerular, tubular, and endothelial cell nuclear pleomorphism and focal tubular cell injury, lysis, and karyorrhexis were observed as early as 10 wk. Progressive thinning of the cortex as a result of widespread tubulolysis, collapsed tubules, glomerular crowding, decrease in glomerular cellularity, interstitial inflammation, and an elevated juxtaglomerular cell count were noted at 20 to 30 wk after treatment. By 35 to 40 wk, regeneration of simplified tubules with tubular atrophy and loss with focal, mild interstitial fibrosis had occurred. A lower juxtaglomerular cell count with focal cytoplasmic vacuolization, suggesting increased degranulation, was also observed in this period. A focal increase in tubular and interstitial cell TGF-beta1 expression starting at 20 wk, peaking at 25 wk, and later declining in intensity with mild increase in the extracellular matrix deposition was noticed. These findings suggest that internally delivered alpha-particle irradiation-induced loss of tubular epithelial cells triggers a chain of adaptive changes that result in progressive renal parenchymal damage accompanied by a loss of renal function. These findings are dissimilar to those seen after gamma or beta irradiation of kidneys. PMID:15987754

  9. Sawtooth mixing of alpha particles in TFTR D-T plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, M.P.; Budny, R.V.; Chang, Z.

    1996-12-31

    Radially resolved confined alpha particle energy and density distributions are routinely measured on TFTR using two diagnostics: PCX and {alpha}-CHERS. The Pellet Charge-eXchange (PCX) diagnostic uses the ablation cloud formed by an impurity pellet (Li or B) for neutralization of the alphas followed by analysis of the escaping helium neutrals. PCX detects deeply trapped alpha particles in the energy range 0.5 - 3.8 MeV. The {alpha}-CHERS technique, were the alpha signal is excited by charge-exchange between alphas and the deuterium atoms of one of the heating beams and appears as a wing on the He{sup +} 468.6 nm line, detects mainly passing alphas in the range of 0.15 - 0.7 MeV. Studies of alpha losses during DT experiments on TFTR have also been conducted using lost alpha detectors located on the walls of the plasma chamber. All of these diagnostics were used for investigating the influence of sawtooth crashes on alphas in high power D-T discharges in TFTR. Both PCX and {alpha}-CHERS measurements show a strong depletion of the alpha core density and transport of trapped alphas radially outwards well beyond q = 1 surface after a sawtooth crash. Lost alpha detectors measure bursts of alpha loss of the previously confined alphas (<1%). Thus, a sawtooth crash leads mainly to radial redistribution of the alphas rather than losses. For modeling of alpha sawtooth mixing, a code is used which is based on the conventional model of magnetic reconnection and the conservation of particles, energy and magnetic flux. The effect of the particle orbit averaged toroidal drift in a perturbed helical electric field generated by the crash has also been included in the code. It is shown that mixing of the passing alphas is dominated by the magnetic reconnection whereas trapped alphas are affected mainly by ExB drift.

  10. Energy and Mass Dependences of the Parameters of the Semimicroscopic Folding Model for Alpha Particles at Low and Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kuterbekov, K.A.; Zholdybayev, T.K.; Kukhtina, I.N.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E.

    2005-06-01

    The energy and mass dependences of the parameters of the semimicroscopic alpha-particle potential are investigated for the first time in the region of low and intermediate energies. Within the semimicroscopic folding model, both elastic and inelastic differential and total cross sections for reactions on various nuclei are well described by using global parameters obtained in this study.

  11. Distributions of cell populations within. cap alpha. -particle range of plutonium deposits in the rat and beagle testis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.C.; Rowland, H.G.; Bowman, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Plutonium is not uniformly distributed in testicular tissues; thus some cell populations may receive larger or smaller radiation exposures than would be expected if the nuclide were uniformly distributed. The distributions of cell populations within ..cap alpha..-particle range of Pu deposits in rat and beagle testes were determined. The data were collected from autoradiographs of testicular tissues containing /sup 241/Pu. A cell distribution factor (CDF) was determined for each cell population and is defined as the average number of each cell type within ..cap alpha..-particle range of each observed Pu deposit relative to the number of each cell type that would be expected within ..cap alpha..-particle range of each Pu deposit, if the deposits were distributed uniformly. In addition, the percentage of the spermatogonial stem cell population within ..cap alpha..-particle range of Pu deposits was determined. The largest CDFs seen in both species were in the interstitial tissues, particulary for Leydig cells. Because the organization of testicular tissues in the beagle is quite different from rodents but more similar to human, the results from this study suggest that extrapolations from rodents to humans may tend to overestimate the potential for radiation exposure to spermatogonial stem cells as well as the fraction of the spermatogonial stem cell population at risk to exposure from internally deposited /sup 239/Pu.

  12. Lower hybrid instability driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Vishwesh; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-02-15

    A kinetic formalism of lower hybrid wave instability, driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread, is developed. The instability arises through cyclotron resonance interaction with high cyclotron harmonics of {alpha}-particles. The {alpha}-particles produced in D-T fusion reactions have huge Larmor radii ({approx}10 cm) as compared to the wavelength of the lower hybrid wave, whereas their speed is an order of magnitude smaller than the speed of light in vacuum. As a result, large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid waves, suitable for current drive in tokamak, are driven unstable via coupling to high cyclotron harmonics. The growth rate decreases with increase in pitch angle spread of the beam. At typical electron density of {approx}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, magnetic field {approx}4 Tesla and {alpha}-particle concentration {approx}0.1%, the large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid wave grows on the time scale of 20 ion cyclotron periods. The growth rate decreases with plasma density.

  13. Ion bombardment of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    It is thought that a fraction of the interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) collected in the stratosphere by high-flying aircraft represent materials ejected from comets. An investigation is conducted regarding the effects of ion bombardment on these particles, taking into account information on ion tracks and carbon in IDP's and laboratory data on charged particle bombardment of surfaces. It is found that the observational discovery of particle tracks in certain IDP's clearly indicates the exposure of these particles to approximately 10,000 years of 1-AU equivalent solar-particle fluences. If some erasure of the tracks occurs, which is likely when an IDP enters the upper atmosphere, then somewhat longer times are implied. The effects of the erosion and enhanced adhesion produced by ions are considered.

  14. Ion bombardment in RF photoguns

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-05-04

    A linac-ring eRHIC design requires a high-intensity CW source of polarized electrons. An SRF gun is viable option that can deliver the required beam. Numerical simulations presented elsewhere have shown that ion bombardment can occur in an RF gun, possibly limiting lifetime of a NEA GaAs cathode. In this paper, we analytically solve the equations of motion of ions in an RF gun using the ponderomotive potential of the Rf field. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper discusses possible mitigation techniques that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  15. Cereal transformation through particle bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casas, A. M.; Kononowicz, A. K.; Bressan, R. A.; Hasegawa, P. M.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The review focuses on experiments that lead to stable transformation in cereals using microprojectile bombardment. The discussion of biological factors that affect transformation examines target tissues and vector systems for gene transfer. The vector systems include reporter genes, selectable markers, genes of agronomic interest, and vector constructions. Other topics include physical parameters that affect DNA delivery, selection of stably transformed cells and plant regeneration, and analysis of gene expression and transmission to the progeny.

  16. Characterizing the Early Impact Bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.

    2005-01-01

    The early bombardment revealed in the larger impact craters and basins on the moon was a major planetary process that affected all bodies in the inner solar system, including the Earth and Mars. Understanding the nature and timing of this bombardment is a fundamental planetary problem. The surface density of lunar impact craters within a given size range on a given lunar surface is a measure of the age of that surface relative to other lunar surfaces. When crater densities are combined with absolute radiometric ages determined on lunar rocks returned to Earth, the flux of large lunar impactors through time can be estimated. These studies suggest that the flux of impactors producing craters greater than 1 km in diameter has been approximately constant over the past approx. 3 Gyr. However, prior to 3.0 - 3.5 Gyr the impactor flux was much larger and defines an early bombardment period. Unfortunately, no lunar surface feature older than approx. 4 Gyr is accurately dated, and the surface density of craters are saturated in most of the lunar highlands. This means that such data cannot define the impactor flux between lunar formation and approx. 4 Gyr ago.

  17. Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

    2007-10-26

    We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (<1% of nuclei traversed by an alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

  18. The {alpha}-particle imaging of a compressed core of microtargets in a pinhole camera with a regular multi-pinhole diaphragm

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, N A

    2000-08-31

    The {alpha}-particle imaging of a compressed core of microtargets using a multi-pinhole regular diaphragm is proposed. The image reconstruction technique is described. The results of the {alpha}-particle imaging of a compressed core of microtargets obtained at the 'Iskra-4' laser facility are reported. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  19. Alpha-Particle/Proton Differential Flow in the Solar Wind: Implications for Plasma Heating, Azimuthal Flow, and the Parker Spiral Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verscharen, D.; Bourouaine, S.; Chandran, B. D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Protons and alpha particles in the fast solar wind are only weakly collisional and exhibit a number of non-equilibrium features, including temperature anisotropies and relative drifts along the direction of the background magnetic field. Two mechanisms have been proposed for limiting differential flow between alpha particles and protons: plasma instabilities and the rotational force. Both mechanisms decelerate the alpha particles - for example, the Alfvén/ion-cyclotron and fast-magnetosonic/whistler instabilities limit the drift velocity to a value comparable to the Alfvén speed, which decreases with increasing heliocentric distance r. However, while plasma instabilities transform bulk-flow kinetic energy into heat and plasma waves, the rotational force does not. We present an analytic expression for the rate Qflow at which energy is released when alpha particles are decelerated by instabilities. We find that Qflow becomes zero at a critical radius r=rcrit, where rcrit is between 1.5 AU and 2 AU in the fast solar wind in the ecliptic plane, and rcrit increases with increasing heliographic latitude. We show that instabilities control the deceleration of alpha particles at ralpha particles at r>rcrit. We compare the value of Qflow at ralpha particles deduced from in-situ measurements of fast-wind streams from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft. We find that Qflow exceeds the empirical heating rate for alpha particles at r<1 AU. We conclude that the continuous energy input from alpha-particle deceleration at ralpha-particle drift for the azimuthal flow velocities of the ions and for the Parker spiral magnetic field.

  20. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS): Results from Gusev Crater and Calibration Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B.; Dreibus, G.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.; Waenke, H.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.; Squyres, S.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of rocks and soils on Mars analyzed during the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit Mission was determined by X-ray analyses with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). Details of the data analysis method and the instrument calibration are presented. Measurements performed on Mars to address geometry effects and background contributions are shown. Cross calibration measurements among several instrument sensors and sources are discussed. An unintentional swap of the two flight instruments is evaluated. New concentration data acquired during the first 470 sols of rover Spirit in Gusev Crater are presented. There are two geological regions, the Gusev plains and the Columbia Hills. The plains contain soils that are very similar to previous landing sites on Mars. A meteoritic component in the soil is identified. Rocks in the plains revealed thin weathering rinds. The underlying abraded rock was classified as primitive basalt. One of these rocks contained significant Br that is probably associated with vein-filling material of different composition. One of the trenches showed large subsurface enrichments of Mg, S, and Br. Disturbed soils and rocks in the Columbia Hills revealed different elemental compositions. These rocks are significantly weathered and enriched in mobile elements, such as P, S, Cl, or Br. Even abraded rock surfaces have high Br concentrations. Thus, in contrast to the rocks and soils in the Gusev Plains, the Columbia Hills material shows more significant evidence of ancient aqueous alteration.

  1. Alpha particle density and energy distributions in tandem mirrors using Monte-Carlo techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    We have simulated the alpha thermalization process using a Monte-Carlo technique, in which the alpha guiding center is followed between simulated collisions and Spitzer's collision model is used for the alpha-plasma interaction. Monte-Carlo techniques are used to determine the alpha radial birth position, the alpha particle position at a collision, and the angle scatter and dispersion at a collision. The plasma is modeled as a hot reacting core, surrounded by a cold halo plasma (T approx.50 eV). Alpha orbits that intersect the halo lose 90% of their energy to the halo electrons because of the halo drag, which is ten times greater than the drag in the core. The uneven drag across the alpha orbit also produces an outward, radial, guiding center drift. This drag drift is dependent on the plasma density and temperature radial profiles. We have modeled these profiles and have specifically studied a single-scale-length model, in which the density scale length (r/sub pD/) equals the temperature scale length (r/sub pT/), and a two-scale-length model, in which r/sub pD//r/sub pT/ = 1.1.

  2. Calibration of the Mars Science Laboratory Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John L.; Perrett, Glynis M.; Gellert, Ralf; Andrushenko, Stefan M.; Boyd, Nicholas I.; Maxwell, John A.; King, Penelope L.; Schofield, Céleste D. M.

    2012-09-01

    The alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission was calibrated for routine analysis of: Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, and Y. The following elements were also calibrated, but may be too low to be measured (10s-100s ppm) for their usual abundance on Mars: V, Cu, Ga, As, Se and W. An extensive suite of geological reference materials, supplemented by pure chemical elements and compounds was used. Special attention was paid to include phyllosilicates, sulfates and a broad selection of basalts as these are predicted minerals and rocks at the Gale Crater landing site. The calibration approach is from first principles, using fundamental physics parameters and an assumed homogeneous sample matrix to calculate expected elemental signals for a given instrument setup and sample composition. Resulting concentrations for most elements accord with expected values. Deviations in elements of lower atomic number (Na, Mg, Al) indicate significant influences of mineral phases, especially in basalts, ultramafic rocks and trachytes. The systematics of these deviations help us to derive empirical, iterative corrections for different rock groups, based on a preliminary APXS analysis which assumes a homogeneous sample. These corrections have the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of APXS analyses, especially when other MSL instrument results, such as the X-ray diffraction data from CheMin, are included in the overall analysis process.

  3. Bayesian analysis of nanodosimetric ionisation distributions due to alpha particles and protons.

    PubMed

    De Nardo, L; Ferretti, A; Colautti, P; Grosswendt, B

    2011-02-01

    Track-nanodosimetry has the objective to investigate the stochastic aspect of ionisation events in particle tracks, by evaluating the probability distribution of the number of ionisations produced in a nanometric target volume positioned at distance d from a particle track. Such kind of measurements makes use of electron (or ion) gas detectors with detecting efficiencies non-uniformly distributed inside the target volume. This fact makes the reconstruction of true ionisation distributions, which correspond to an ideal efficiency of 100%, non-trivial. Bayesian unfolding has been applied to ionisation distributions produced by 5.4 MeV alpha particles and 20 MeV protons in cylindrical volumes of propane of 20 nm equivalent size, positioned at different impact parameters with respect to the primary beam. It will be shown that a Bayesian analysis performed by subdividing the target volume in sub-regions of different detection efficiencies is able to provide a good reconstruction of the true nanodosimetric ionisation distributions. PMID:21112893

  4. Prompt detection of alpha particles from 210Po: another clue to the origin of rock varnish?

    PubMed

    Hodge, Vernon F; Farmer, Dennis E; Diaz, Tammy; Orndorff, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    Alpha particles have been measured coming from the surfaces of rocks covered with dark red-brown rock varnish, as well as rocks that appear to have little, if any, varnish. A pronounced peak at 5.3 MeV indicates the presence of 210Po, a short-lived natural-radioactive element. Surface activities for 33 samples range from 0.008 Bq/cm2 to 0.065 Bq/cm2. It is estimated that this nuclide is concentrated 10(11) times in these paper-thin coatings above its concentration in ground-level air. Gamma rays from the decay of 137Cs, a product of testing nuclear weapons some 50 years ago, were also detected. Analysis of samples of varnish stripped from the rock revealed traces of 239,240Pu and 238Pu. The presence of all of these isotopes strongly supports the theory that varnish films derive their building blocks from the atmosphere and, with time, all rocks in arid environments will become coated. PMID:15511566

  5. Scattering of 42 MeV alpha particles from copper-65

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, W. M.; Seth, K. K.

    1973-01-01

    Beams of 42-MeV alpha particles were elastically and inelastically scattered from Cu-65 in an attempt to excite states which may be described in terms of an excited core model. Angular distributions were measured for 17 excited states. Seven of the excited states had angular distributions similar to a core quadrupole excitation and eight of the excited states had angular distributions similar to a core octupole excitation. The excited state at 2.858 MeV had an angular distribution which suggests that it may have results from the particle coupling to a two-phonon core state. An extended particle-core coupling calculation was performed and the predicted energy levels and reduced transition probabilities compared to the experimental data. The low lying levels are described quite well and the wavefunctions of these states explain the large spectroscopic factors measured in stripping reactions. For Cu-65 the coupling of the particle to the core is no larger weak as in the simpler model, and configuration mixing results.

  6. Study of the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianbing Zhang, Xianmei Yu, Limin Zhao, Xiang

    2014-02-12

    Part of the energy of the Lower Hybrid (LH) waves may be absorbed by the α particles via the so-called perpendicular landau damping mechanism, which depends on various parameters of fusion reactors and the LH waves. In this article, we calculate the absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles. Results show that, the γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ∥} while deceases with increasing the frequency of LH waves ω{sub LH} over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e}≈8×10{sup 19}m{sup −3} for ITER-like scenario. The thermal corrections to the cold plasma dispersion relation will change the damping rate to a certain extent under some specific conditions. We have also evaluated the fraction of LH power absorbed by the alpha particles, η ≈ 0.47% and 4.1% for an LH frequency of 5 GHz and 3.7 GHz respectively for ITER-like scenario. This work gives the effective reference for the choice of parameters of future fusion reactors.

  7. Radiation damage induced by MeV alpha particles in polycrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K. W.; Jamieson, D. N.

    1996-11-01

    Radiation damage induced by 2 MeV alpha particles in polycrystalline diamond films has been studied as a function of the irradiation dose D (1012≤D≤1017 cm-2). The films were characterized using Raman/photoluminescence spectroscopy and I(V,T) measurements. The results can be summarized as follows. In undoped samples the H3 luminescent center (N-V-N) is observed for D≥1014 cm-2. The Raman diamond peak is broadened and shifted to lower frequencies for D≳1015 cm-2. No new graphitic component is detected after irradiation. On the contrary graphitic sp2 defects are annealed by irradiation. For D=3×1016 cm-2 new Raman defect peaks are detected at 1496 and 1635 cm-1. I(V,T) characteristics remain unaffected for D≤1016 cm-2. An increase in the conductivity is observed for D=3×1016 cm-2. At this dose we observe an activation energy of 0.4 eV and thermally stimulated currents related to defect levels at about 0.3 eV. A boron-doped sample (100 Ω cm) has been irradiated at 1017 cm-2 for comparison. After irradiation the conductivity of this sample is reduced and the activation energy of the conductivity is also reduced. Less damage is detected by Raman spectroscopy in the B-doped material.

  8. Log Normal Distribution of Cellular Uptake of Radioactivity: Statistical Analysis of Alpha Particle Track Autoradiography

    PubMed Central

    Neti, Prasad V.S.V.; Howell, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the distribution of radioactivity among a population of cells labeled with 210Po was shown to be well described by a log normal distribution function (J Nucl Med 47, 6 (2006) 1049-1058) with the aid of an autoradiographic approach. To ascertain the influence of Poisson statistics on the interpretation of the autoradiographic data, the present work reports on a detailed statistical analyses of these data. Methods The measured distributions of alpha particle tracks per cell were subjected to statistical tests with Poisson (P), log normal (LN), and Poisson – log normal (P – LN) models. Results The LN distribution function best describes the distribution of radioactivity among cell populations exposed to 0.52 and 3.8 kBq/mL 210Po-citrate. When cells were exposed to 67 kBq/mL, the P – LN distribution function gave a better fit, however, the underlying activity distribution remained log normal. Conclusions The present analysis generally provides further support for the use of LN distributions to describe the cellular uptake of radioactivity. Care should be exercised when analyzing autoradiographic data on activity distributions to ensure that Poisson processes do not distort the underlying LN distribution. PMID:16741316

  9. CHARGE-EXCHANGE LIMITS ON LOW-ENERGY {alpha}-PARTICLE FLUXES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, H. S.; Fletcher, L.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Woods, T. N.

    2012-06-20

    This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Ly{alpha} line of He II at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary {alpha} particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He II bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. We study 10 events in total, including the {gamma}-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic particles. The absence of charge-exchange line wings may point to a need for more complete theoretical work. Some of the events do have broadband signatures, which could correspond to continua from other origins, but these do not have the spectral signatures expected from the Orrall-Zirker mechanism.

  10. Monte-Carlo dosimetry on a realistic cell monolayer geometry exposed to alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberet, Ph; Vianna, F.; Karamitros, M.; Brun, T.; Gordillo, N.; Moretto, Ph; Incerti, S.; Seznec, H.

    2012-04-01

    The energy and specific energy absorbed in the main cell compartments (nucleus and cytoplasm) in typical radiobiology experiments are usually estimated by calculations as they are not accessible for a direct measurement. In most of the work, the cell geometry is modelled using the combination of simple mathematical volumes. We propose a method based on high resolution confocal imaging and ion beam analysis (IBA) in order to import realistic cell nuclei geometries in Monte-Carlo simulations and thus take into account the variety of different geometries encountered in a typical cell population. Seventy-six cell nuclei have been imaged using confocal microscopy and their chemical composition has been measured using IBA. A cellular phantom was created from these data using the ImageJ image analysis software and imported in the Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulation toolkit. Total energy and specific energy distributions in the 76 cell nuclei have been calculated for two types of irradiation protocols: a 3 MeV alpha particle microbeam used for targeted irradiation and a 239Pu alpha source used for large angle random irradiation. Qualitative images of the energy deposited along the particle tracks have been produced and show good agreement with images of DNA double strand break signalling proteins obtained experimentally. The methodology presented in this paper provides microdosimetric quantities calculated from realistic cellular volumes. It is based on open-source oriented software that is publicly available.

  11. Distributions of Alpha Particles Escaping to the Wall because of Sawtooth Oscillations in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, Ya.I.; Lutsenko, V.V.; White, R.B.; Yakovenko, Yu.V., Zweben, S.J.

    1998-11-01

    It has been observed experimentally in deuterium-tritium shots of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) that crashes of sawtooth oscillations may result in very inhomogeneous flux of alpha particles to the wall. Namely, measurements with four detectors installed at the wall at 20°, 45°, 60°, and 90° below the midplane of the torus have shown that the alpha flux to the wall is strongly peaked at the 20° and 90° detectors and on the noise level at the 45° detector. To explain this phenomenon, both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation have been carried out. It is concluded that the "crash-induced prompt loss," i.e., the orbital loss of marginally trapped particles arising because of the crash-induced orbit transformation of circulating particles, is responsible for the flux to the 90° and 60° detectors, whereas the crash-induced stochastic diffusion of moderately trapped particles explains the large signal at the 20° detector. The calculated poloidal distributions of the integral alpha flux are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. In addition to the integral flux, the flux of particles with given energy was calculated. The energy spectrum of the escaping particles has also been calculated, which can be used for diagnostics of the crash type.

  12. Thorium and actinium polyphosphonate compounds as bone-seeking alpha particle-emitting agents.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Gjermund; Bruland, Oyvind S; Larsen, Roy H

    2004-01-01

    The present study explores the use of alpha-particle-emitting, bone-seeking agents as candidates for targeted radiotherapy. Actinium and thorium 1,4,7,10 tetraazacyclododecane N,N',N'',N''' 1,4,7,10-tetra(methylene) phosphonic acid (DOTMP) and thorium-diethylene triamine N,N',N'' penta(methylene) phosphonic acid (DTMP) were prepared and their biodistribution evaluated in conventional Balb/C mice at four hours after injection. All three bone-seeking agents showed a high uptake in bone and a low uptake in soft tissues. Among the soft tissue organs, only kidney had a relatively high uptake. The femur/kidney ratios for 227Th-DTMP, 228-Ac-DOTMP and 227Th-DOTMP were 14.2, 7.6 and 6.0, respectively. A higher liver uptake of 228Ac-DOTMP was seen than for 227Th-DTMP and 227Th-DOTMP. This suggests that some demetallation of the 228Ac-DOTMP complex had occurred. The results indicate that 225Ac-DOTMP, 227Th-DOTMP and 227Th-DTMP have promising properties as potential therapeutic bone-seeking agents. PMID:15015582

  13. Monte-Carlo dosimetry on a realistic cell monolayer geometry exposed to alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Barberet, Ph; Vianna, F; Karamitros, M; Brun, T; Gordillo, N; Moretto, Ph; Incerti, S; Seznec, H

    2012-04-21

    The energy and specific energy absorbed in the main cell compartments (nucleus and cytoplasm) in typical radiobiology experiments are usually estimated by calculations as they are not accessible for a direct measurement. In most of the work, the cell geometry is modelled using the combination of simple mathematical volumes. We propose a method based on high resolution confocal imaging and ion beam analysis (IBA) in order to import realistic cell nuclei geometries in Monte-Carlo simulations and thus take into account the variety of different geometries encountered in a typical cell population. Seventy-six cell nuclei have been imaged using confocal microscopy and their chemical composition has been measured using IBA. A cellular phantom was created from these data using the ImageJ image analysis software and imported in the Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulation toolkit. Total energy and specific energy distributions in the 76 cell nuclei have been calculated for two types of irradiation protocols: a 3 MeV alpha particle microbeam used for targeted irradiation and a ²³⁹Pu alpha source used for large angle random irradiation. Qualitative images of the energy deposited along the particle tracks have been produced and show good agreement with images of DNA double strand break signalling proteins obtained experimentally. The methodology presented in this paper provides microdosimetric quantities calculated from realistic cellular volumes. It is based on open-source oriented software that is publicly available. PMID:22456322

  14. Computation of Cosmic Ray Ionization and Dose at Mars: a Comparison of HZETRN and Planetocosmics for Proton and Alpha Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronoff, Guillaume; Norman, Ryan B.; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to evaluate the cosmic ray environment at Mars is of interest for future manned exploration. To support exploration, tools must be developed to accurately access the radiation environment in both free space and on planetary surfaces. The primary tool NASA uses to quantify radiation exposure behind shielding materials is the space radiation transport code, HZETRN. In order to build confidence in HZETRN, code benchmarking against Monte Carlo radiation transport codes is often used. This work compares the dose calculations at Mars by HZETRN and the Geant4 application Planetocosmics. The dose at ground and the energy deposited in the atmosphere by galactic cosmic ray protons and alpha particles has been calculated for the Curiosity landing conditions. In addition, this work has considered Solar Energetic Particle events, allowing for the comparison of varying input radiation environments. The results for protons and alpha particles show very good agreement between HZETRN and Planetocosmics.

  15. Diffusion studies of Ra and Pb in GaAs by the alpha-particle energy loss method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamcyk, M.; Beaudoin, M.; Kelson, I.; Levy, Y.; Tiedje, T.

    1998-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the diffusion of lead in GaAs is determined by measuring the modification to the energy spectrum of emitted alpha particles from the decay chain of implanted 212Pb atoms. Diffusion rates are measured for temperatures up to 900 °C. Higher rates are observed for the diffusion in silicon-doped GaAs than in semi-insulating GaAs. An upper limit for the diffusion of radium in GaAs is similarly obtained from the decay of the 224Ra isotope. Implications for the use of implanted alpha sources for thickness monitoring during epitaxial film growth by the alpha-particle energy loss method are discussed.

  16. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles. Progress report, July 1990--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zaider, M.

    1992-12-31

    We report on a theory for describing the biological effects of ionizing radiation in particular radon {alpha} particles. Behind this approach is the recognition that biological effects such as chromosome aberrations, cellular transformation, cellular inactivation, etc, are the result of a hierarchic sequence of radiation effects. We indicate how to treat each of the individual processes in this sequence, and also how to relate one effect to the hierarchically superior one.

  17. Optical Model Potential Parameters for p, d, {sup 3}He and Alpha-Particle Scattering on Lithium Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Burtebayev, N.; Nassurlla, Marzhan; Nassurlla, Maulen; Kerimkulov, Zh. K.; Sakuta, S. B.

    2008-11-11

    Analysis of the p, d, {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles elastic scattering on the {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li nuclei has been done in the framework of the optical model at the beam energies up to 72 MeV. It was shown that the account of the cluster exchange mechanism together with the potential scattering allow reproducing the experimental cross-sections in the whole angular range.

  18. Energy loss straggling of low energy alpha particles in a medium composed of polyatomic and diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, Z.; Novković, D.; Subotić, K.

    1996-08-01

    The results of the measurement of the energy straggling of low energy alpha particles in the polyatomic and diatomic molecule media are reported. A general analytical formula for straggling widths of light ions, obtained by solving Symon's equation for the second and third order central moments of the straggling distributions in non-relativistic approximation, has shown remarkably good agreement with experimental data at energy losses less than 70% of the initial projectile energies.

  19. Mitigation of radiation nephropathy after internal {alpha}-particle irradiation of kidneys

    SciTech Connect

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Seshan, Surya V.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Sgouros, George; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Scheinberg, David A. . E-mail: d-scheinberg@ski.mskcc.org

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Internal irradiation of kidneys as a consequence of radioimmunotherapy, radiation accidents, or nuclear terrorism can result in radiation nephropathy. We attempted to modify pharmacologically, the functional and morphologic changes in mouse kidneys after injection with the actinium ({sup 225}Ac) nanogenerator, an in vivo generator of {alpha}- and {beta}-particle emitting elements. Methods and Materials: The animals were injected with 0.35 {mu}Ci of the {sup 225}Ac nanogenerator, which delivers a dose of 27.6 Gy to the kidneys. Then, they were randomized to receive captopril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor), L-158,809 (angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker), spironolactone (aldosterone receptor antagonist), or a placebo. Results: Forty weeks after the {sup 225}Ac injection, the placebo-control mice showed a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (87.6 {+-} 6.9 mg/dL), dilated Bowman spaces, and tubulolysis with basement membrane thickening. Captopril treatment accentuated the functional (BUN 119.0 {+-} 4.0 mg/dL; p <0.01 vs. placebo controls) and histopathologic damage. In contrast, L-158,809 offered moderate protection (BUN 66.6 {+-} 3.9 mg/dL; p = 0.02 vs. placebo controls). Spironolactone treatment, however, significantly prevented the development of histopathologic and functional changes (BUN 31.2 {+-} 2.5 mg/dL; p <0.001 vs. placebo controls). Conclusions: Low-dose spironolactone and, to a lesser extent, angiotensin receptor-1 blockade can offer renal protection in a mouse model of internal {alpha}-particle irradiation.

  20. Dependence of alpha particle track diameter on the free volume holes size using positron annihilation lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gamal, S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.

    2015-09-01

    The alpha particle track diameter dependence of the free volume holes size (Vf) in DAM-ADC and CR-39 nuclear track detectors was investigated using positron annihilation lifetime technique. The effect of temperature on the alpha particle track diameter and free volume were also investigated in the T-range (RT-130 °C). The obtained results revealed that the values of ortho-positronium lifetime τ3 and Vf increases while I3 slightly increases as T increases for the two detectors. The values of τ3, Vf and I3 are higher in CR-39 than DAM-ADC. The interpretation of obtained results is based on the fact that increasing T leads to significant enhancement of thermal expansion of the polymer matrix and consequently Vf increases. The track diameter increases as T increases. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in T increases the crystal size and Vf in the polymer. A relationship between Vf and the alpha particle track diameter was obtained. Moreover results of detector irradiation, along with free volume evaluation are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  1. ON THE RELATIVE SPEED AND TEMPERATURE RATIO OF SOLAR WIND ALPHA PARTICLES AND PROTONS: COLLISIONS VERSUS WAVE EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bourouaine, Sofiane; Marsch, Eckart; Neubauer, Fritz M.

    2011-02-10

    We study the relative flow speed and the temperature ratio of alpha particles and protons and their connections to the helium ion abundance, the collisional age, and the power of transverse fluctuations within the inertial range. It is found that the alpha-to-proton temperature ratio, T{sub {alpha}}/T{sub p} , anti-correlates with the helium ion abundance. Despite a relatively high collisional age and small wave power, the ratio T{sub {alpha}}/T{sub p} can reach comparatively high values (even above 2) whenever the helium ion abundance is below about 0.02. In contrast, the differential speed of alpha particles with respect to protons is correlated with the total wave power and anti-correlated with the collisional age. Ultimately, the individual heating of each ion species is positively correlated with the total wave power. Our findings suggest that a high-friction collision could be efficient in reducing the differential speed between alpha particles and protons, but appears not to be sufficient to equalize the alpha and proton temperatures, i.e., to make T{sub {alpha}} {approx_equal} T{sub p} . This is a hint that the local wave heating process is acting on a timescale shorter than the collision time.

  2. First evidence of collective alpha particle effect on toroidal Alfv{acute e}n eigenmodes in the TFTR D-T experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.L.; Schmidt, G.L.; Batha, S.H.; Bell, R.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Darrow, D.S.; Duong, H.H.; Fu, G.Y.; Hammett, G.W.; Levinton, F.; Majeski, R.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Owens, D.K.; Petrov, M.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    The alpha particle effect on the excitation of toroidal Alfv{acute e}n eigenmodes (TAE) was investigated in deuterium-titrium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. rf power was used to position the plasma near the instability threshold, and the alpha particle effect was inferred from the reduction of rf power threshold for TAE instability in D-T plasmas. Initial calculations indicate that the alpha particles contribute 10{percent}{endash}30{percent} of the total drive in a D-T plasma with 3 MW of peak fusion power. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Model for alpha particle induced nuclear reactions: /sup 93/Nb(. cap alpha. ,x. cap alpha. ypzn) from 40--140 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gadioli, E.; Gadioli-Erba, E.; Hogan, J.J.; Jacak, B.V.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive model is introduced for alpha particle induced nuclear reactions. Five different mechanisms are examined and discussed. These include inelastic scattering of the incident alpha particle, nucleon pickup, binary fragmentation, dissolution of the alpha in the nuclear field, and preequilibrium processes initiated by alpha-nucleon collisions. A series of experiments was performed to measure the excitation functions of many nuclides produced from the irradiation of /sup 93/Nb by 40--140 MeV alpha particles. Together with alpha particle and proton spectra measured by other authors, these data form the basis of a test of the model introduced. A detailed analysis of the comparison between the calculated and experimental results, with particular emphasis on the interpretation of breakup processes, leads to the conclusion that breakup to four nucleons is preferred to the more commonly assumed binary fragmentation in that a much broader range of experimental data may be reproduced.

  4. Toward a theory of the initiation of cancer by ionizing radiation: track structure analysis for electrons and alpha particles in water

    SciTech Connect

    Pagnamenta, A.; Marshall, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Following a method of Kim differential cross sections have been constructed in analytical form for the ionization of water by electrons and alpha particles. By generalizing Wideroe's bookkeeping mmethod the number of higher order delta rays were found. (ACR)

  5. Radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer metastases with alpha-particle emitter 225Ac: comparing efficacy with 213Bi and 90Y.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong; Hobbs, Robert F; Vajravelu, Ravy; Huso, David L; Esaias, Caroline; Apostolidis, Christos; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sgouros, George

    2009-12-01

    alpha-Particles are suitable to treat cancer micrometastases because of their short range and very high linear energy transfer. alpha-Particle emitter (213)Bi-based radioimmunotherapy has shown efficacy in a variety of metastatic animal cancer models, such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. Its clinical implementation, however, is challenging due to the limited supply of (225)Ac, high technical requirement to prepare radioimmunoconjugate with very short half-life (T(1/2) = 45.6 min) on site, and prohibitive cost. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of the alpha-particle emitter (225)Ac, parent of (213)Bi, in a mouse model of breast cancer metastases. A single administration of (225)Ac (400 nCi)-labeled anti-rat HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody (7.16.4) completely eradicated breast cancer lung micrometastases in approximately 67% of HER-2/neu transgenic mice and led to long-term survival of these mice for up to 1 year. Treatment with (225)Ac-7.16.4 is significantly more effective than (213)Bi-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 61 days; P = 0.001) and (90)Y-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 50 days; P < 0.001) as well as untreated control (median survival, 41 days; P < 0.0001). Dosimetric analysis showed that (225)Ac-treated metastases received a total dose of 9.6 Gy, significantly higher than 2.0 Gy from (213)Bi and 2.4 Gy from (90)Y. Biodistribution studies revealed that (225)Ac daughters, (221)Fr and (213)Bi, accumulated in kidneys and probably contributed to the long-term renal toxicity observed in surviving mice. These data suggest (225)Ac-labeled anti-HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody could significantly prolong survival in HER-2/neu-positive metastatic breast cancer patients. PMID:19920193

  6. Response of Ni/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes to alpha-particle irradiation at different fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotoso, E.; Meyer, W. E.; Auret, F. D.; Diale, M.; Ngoepe, P. N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation experiments have been carried out on 1.9×1016 cm-3 nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC at room temperature using 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation over a fluence ranges from 2.6×1010 to 9.2×1011 cm-2. Current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been carried out to study the change in characteristics of the devices and free carrier removal rate due to alpha-particle irradiation, respectively. As radiation fluence increases, the ideality factors increased from 1.20 to 1.85 but the Schottky barrier height (SBHI-V) decreased from 1.47 to 1.34 eV. Free carrier concentration, Nd decreased with increasing fluence from 1.7×1016 to 1.1×1016 cm-2 at approximately 0.70 μm depth. The reduction in Nd shows that defects were induced during the irradiation and have effect on compensating the free carrier. The free carrier removal rate was estimated to be 6480±70 cm-1. Alpha-particle irradiation introduced two electron traps (E0.39 and E0.62), with activation energies of 0.39±0.03 eV and 0.62±0.08 eV, respectively. The E0.39 as attribute related to silicon or carbon vacancy, while the E0.62 has the attribute of Z1/Z2.

  7. First observation of alpha particle loss induced by kinetic ballooning modes in TFTR deuterium-tritium experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Z.; Budny, R.V.; Chen, L.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Janos, A.; Mansfield, D.; Mazzucato, E.; McGuire, K.M.; Nazikian, R.; Rewoldt, G.; Strachan, J.D.; Tang, W.M.; Taylor, G.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S. |; TFTR group

    1996-02-01

    A correlation between the measured alpha particle loss and high frequency ({approximately}100{endash}200 kHz) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes has been observed in some high {beta} (= plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) DT plasmas in TFTR. These modes are localized around the peak plasma pressure gradient and have ballooning characteristics. Particle simulation shows that the loss is due to wave-particle resonances. Linear instability analysis indicates that the plasma is unstable to the kinetic MHD ballooning modes driven by strong local pressure gradients. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. New interpretation of alpha-particle-driven instabilities in deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor.

    PubMed

    Nazikian, R; Kramer, G J; Cheng, C Z; Gorelenkov, N N; Berk, H L; Sharapov, S E

    2003-09-19

    The original description of alpha particle driven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor in terms of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) remained inconsistent with three fundamental characteristics of the observations: (i) the variation of the mode frequency with toroidal mode number, (ii) the chirping of the mode frequency for a given toroidal mode number, and (iii) the antiballooning density perturbation of the modes. It is now shown that these characteristics can be explained by observing that cylindrical-like modes can exist in the weak magnetic shear region of the plasma that then make a transition to TAEs as the central safety factor decreases in time. PMID:14525368

  9. A New Interpretation of Alpha-particle-driven Instabilities in Deuterium-Tritium Experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    R. Nazikian; G.J. Kramer; C.Z. Cheng; N.N. Gorelenkov; H.L. Berk; S.E. Sharapov

    2003-03-26

    The original description of alpha-particle-driven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in terms of Toroidal Alfvin Eigenmodes (TAEs) remained inconsistent with three fundamental characteristics of the observations: (i) the variation of the mode frequency with toroidal mode number, (ii) the chirping of the mode frequency for a given toroidal mode number, and (iii) the anti-ballooning density perturbation of the modes. It is now shown that these characteristics can be explained by observing that cylindrical-like modes can exist in the weak magnetic shear region of the plasma that then make a transition to TAEs as the central safety factor decreases in time.

  10. 1.5D Quasilinear Model for Alpha Particle-TAE Interaction in ARIES ACT-I

    SciTech Connect

    K. Ghantous, N.N. Gorelenkov, C. Kessel, F. Poli

    2013-01-30

    We study the TAE interaction with alpha particle fusion products in ARIES ACT-I using the 1.5D quasilinear model. 1.5D uses linear analytic expressions for growth and damping rates of TAE modes evaluated using TRANSP pro les to calculates the relaxation of pressure pro les. NOVA- K simulations are conducted to validate the analytic dependancies of the rates, and to normalize their absolute value. The low dimensionality of the model permits calculating loss diagrams in large parameter spaces.

  11. Gamma-H2AX foci in cells exposed to a mixed beam of X-rays and alpha particles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the cellular effects of exposure to mixed beams of high and low linear energy transfer radiation. So far, the effects of combined exposures have mainly been assessed with clonogenic survival or cytogenetic methods, and the results are contradictory. The gamma-H2AX assay has up to now not been applied in this context, and it is a promising tool for investigating the early cellular response to mixed beam irradiation. Purpose To determine the dose response and repair kinetics of gamma-H2AX ionizing radiation-induced foci in VH10 human fibroblasts exposed to mixed beams of 241Am alpha particles and X-rays. Results VH10 human fibroblasts were irradiated with each radiation type individually or both in combination at 37°C. Foci were scored for repair kinetics 0.5, 1, 3 and 24 h after irradiation (one dose per irradiation type), and for dose response at the 1 h time point. The dose response effect of mixed beam was additive, and the relative biological effectiveness for alpha particles (as compared to X-rays) was of 0.76 ± 0.52 for the total number of foci, and 2.54 ± 1.11 for large foci. The repair kinetics for total number of foci in cells exposed to mixed beam irradiation was intermediate to that of cells exposed to alpha particles and X-rays. However, for mixed beam-irradiated cells the frequency and area of large foci were initially lower than predicted and increased during the first 3 hours of repair (while the predicted number and area did not). Conclusions The repair kinetics of large foci after mixed beam exposure was significantly different from predicted based on the effect of the single dose components. The formation of large foci was delayed and they did not reach their maximum area until 1 h after irradiation. We hypothesize that the presence of low X-ray-induced damage engages the DNA repair machinery leading to a delayed DNA damage response to the more complex DNA damage induced by alpha particles. PMID:23121736

  12. Ion bombardment investigations of impregnated cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaobing; Gaertner, Georg

    2003-06-01

    Ion bombardment is one of the important factors limiting the performance of impregnated cathodes (=Ba dispenser cathodes) in high end television tubes or in colour monitor tubes. Hence, when designing a new gun with, e.g. higher electron beam current density, it is important also to model the influence of ion bombardment. Therefore, relations between basic parameters as a function of temperature need to be known quantitatively. In this paper, the emission slump of impregnated cathodes has been analyzed in a diode configuration in UHV with a differentially pumped Ar ion gun. The emission degeneration during and regeneration periods after ion bombardment have been investigated as function of cathode temperature, ion current and ion energy. One of the important results is, that the degeneration time coefficient is only weakly dependent on ion energy. The data matrix obtained can be used to improve the ion bombardment model applied in new electron gun design.

  13. Induction of single- and double-strand breaks in plasmid DNA by monoenergetic alpha-particles with energies below the Bragg-maximum.

    PubMed

    Scholz, V; Weidner, J; Köhnlein, W; Frekers, D; Wörtche, H J

    1997-01-01

    The yield of single-strand breaks (ssb) and double-strand breaks (dsb) produced by alpha-particles at the end of their track in DNA-films was determined experimentally. Helium nuclei were accelerated to 600 keV in the 400 kV ion accelerator and scattered at a carbon target. The elastically scattered alpha-particles with energies of 344 keV and 485 keV were used to irradiate supercircular plasmid DNA in vacuo. For the dosimetry of the alpha-particles a surface barrier detector was used and the energy distribution of the alpha-particles determined. The energy loss of the particles in the DNA-layer was calculated. DNA samples were separated into the three conformational isomers using agarose gel electrophoresis. After fluorochromation the number of ssb and dsb per plasmid DNA molecule was established from the band intensities assuming the validity of Poisson statistics. Linear dose effect correlations were found for ssb and dsb per plasmid molecule. In the case of 344 keV-alpha-particles the yield of dsb was (8.6 +/- 0.9) x 10(-11) breaks/Gy x dalton. The ratio of ssb/dsb was 0.5 +/- 0.2. This is at least a factor of six larger than the ratio found in experiments with higher energy alpha-particles and from model calculations. Similar experiments with protons yielded a relative biological effectiveness (rbe) value of 2.8 for the induction of double-strand breaks by track end alpha-particles. PMID:9232893

  14. Preliminary calculations of expected signal levels of a thin Faraday foil lost alpha particle diagnostic for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.; Darrow, D.S.; Budny, R.V.

    2004-10-01

    Thin Faraday collectors are being considered as a diagnostic of lost alpha particles on International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). In an effort to evaluate the viability of this diagnostic, we are undertaking a series of calculations of the signal levels (A/cm{sup 2}) for such devices. Preliminary results assuming a model high yield ITER plasma have been obtained for locations near the outer wall assuming a toroidally symmetric vacuum vessel. We find signal levels to be a strong function of foil location and orientation. Specifically the signal level will be optimized at a vertical location 0.5 m above the machine midplane and with the normal to the foil directed in the lower, radially outward, toroidally counterclockwise octant. A foil thus oriented at a radial distance of 15 cm from the vessel wall at a height of 0.583 m above the machine midplane will have an efficiency of 3.5x10{sup -8}/cm{sup 2} for alpha particles which undergo classic loss during the first ten revolutions around the torus during this model plasma. For the assumed D-T fusion power of this model plasma of 410 MW, this calculated efficiency will correspond to a measured current in the Faraday foil of 1.7 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. Future, more realistic calculations must incorporate the effects of an asymmetrical vessel and of toroidal field ripple.

  15. Induction of mutations by bismuth-212 alpha particles at two genetic loci in human B-lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Metting, N F; Palayoor, S T; Macklis, R M; Atcher, R W; Liber, H L; Little, J B

    1992-12-01

    The human lymphoblast cell line TK6 was exposed to the alpha-particle-emitting radon daughter 212Bi by adding DTPA-chelated 212Bi directly to the cell suspension. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity at two genetic loci were measured, and the molecular nature of mutant clones was studied by Southern blot analysis. Induced mutant fractions were 2.5 x 10(-5)/Gy at the hprt locus and 3.75 x 10(-5)/Gy at the tk locus. Molecular analysis of HPRT- mutant DNAs showed a high frequency (69%) of clones with partial or full deletions of the hprt gene among radiation-induced mutants compared with spontaneous mutants (31%). Chi-squared analyses of mutational spectra show a significant difference (P < or = 0.005) between spontaneous mutants and alpha-particle-induced mutants. Comparison with published studies of accelerator-produced heavy-ion exposures of TK6 cells indicates that the induction of mutations at the hprt locus, and perhaps a subset of mutations at the tk locus, is a simple linear function of particle fluence regardless of the ion species or its LET. PMID:1475356

  16. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer and Fujifilm imaging plate detectors for protons, deuterons, and alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Freeman, C G; Fiksel, G; Stoeckl, C; Sinenian, N; Canfield, M J; Graeper, G B; Lombardo, A T; Stillman, C R; Padalino, S J; Mileham, C; Sangster, T C; Frenje, J A

    2011-07-01

    A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer has been designed for use at the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. This device uses parallel electric and magnetic fields to deflect particles of a given mass-to-charge ratio onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. Once calibrated, the position of the ions on the detector plane can be used to determine the particle energy. The position dispersion of both the electric and magnetic fields of the Thomson parabola was measured using monoenergetic proton and alpha particle beams from the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator. The sensitivity of Fujifilm BAS-TR imaging plates, used as a detector in the Thomson parabola, was also measured as a function of the incident particle energy over the range from 0.6 MeV to 3.4 MeV for protons and deuterons and from 0.9 MeV to 5.4 MeV for alpha particles. The device was used to measure the energy spectrum of laser-produced protons at MTW. PMID:21806176

  17. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer and Fujifilm imaging plate detectors for protons, deuterons, and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, C. G.; Fiksel, G.; Stoeckl, C.; Sinenian, N.; Canfield, M. J.; Graeper, G. B.; Lombardo, A. T.; Stillman, C. R.; Padalino, S. J.; Mileham, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Frenje, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer has been designed for use at the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. This device uses parallel electric and magnetic fields to deflect particles of a given mass-to-charge ratio onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. Once calibrated, the position of the ions on the detector plane can be used to determine the particle energy. The position dispersion of both the electric and magnetic fields of the Thomson parabola was measured using monoenergetic proton and alpha particle beams from the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator. The sensitivity of Fujifilm BAS-TR imaging plates, used as a detector in the Thomson parabola, was also measured as a function of the incident particle energy over the range from 0.6 MeV to 3.4 MeV for protons and deuterons and from 0.9 MeV to 5.4 MeV for alpha particles. The device was used to measure the energy spectrum of laser-produced protons at MTW.

  18. Studies of SSNTDs made from LR-115 in view of their applicability in radiobiological experiments with alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörschel, B.; Hermsdorf, D.; Pieck, S.; Starke, S.; Thiele, H.; Weickert, F.

    2003-06-01

    Radiobiological studies on cell monolayers irradiated by charged particles need to determine the number and position of particle traversals. Solid state nuclear track detectors used as basic substrate for the cell layers are in principle suitable for this purpose. The detector foils must be as thin as possible but still guaranteeing mechanical stability. Two types of LR-115, red coloured and colourless, were tested in the present work. The studies aimed at optimisation of the etching conditions and determination of the registration efficiency for alpha particles in a wide range of energies and angles of incidence. Specific requirements have to be fulfilled for application of the detector foils under the environmental conditions of radiobiological experiments. Most important are biocompatibility between detector and cells and registration properties insensible against special treatments, as UV sterilisation and cell plating prior to irradiation as well as cell incubation after the irradiation. The experimental studies performed with alpha particles showed that environmental conditions of radiobiological experiments do not change the registration properties of LR-115 detectors significantly.

  19. Gene amplification and microsatellite instability induced in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells by alpha particles and heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Gene amplification and microsatellite alteration are useful markers of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability contributes to the progression of tumorigenesis by accumulating genetic changes. In this study, amplification of the carbamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbamylase, dihydro-orotase (CAD) gene in transformed and tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by either alpha particles or (56)Fe ions was assessed by measuring resistance to N-(phosphonacetyl)-l-aspartate (PALA). In addition, alterations of microsatellite loci located on chromosomes 3p and 18q were analyzed in a series of primary and secondary tumor cell lines generated in nude mice. The frequency of PALA-resistant colonies was 1-3 x 10(-3) in tumor cell lines, 5-8 x 10(-5) in transformed cells prior to inoculation into nude mice, and less than 10(-7) in control BEP2D cells. Microsatellite alterations were detected in all 11 tumor cell lines examined at the following loci: D18S34, D18S363, D18S877, D3S1038 and D3S1607. No significant difference in either PALA resistance or microsatellite instability was found in tumor cell lines that were induced by alpha particles compared to those induced by (56)Fe ions.

  20. The induction of bystander mutagenic effects in vivo by alpha-particle irradiation in whole Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Fanghua; Liu, Ping; Wang, Ting; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Zengliang

    2010-08-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated distant/abscopal bystander effects in A. thaliana seeds and embryos; the postembryonic development of bystander tissues, such as root hair differentiation, primary root elongation, lateral root initiation and survival, were inhibited significantly by localized irradiation with microbeam protons and low-energy ions. In the present study, we further investigated radiation-induced bystander mutagenic effects in vivo in A. thaliana plants using homologous recombination (HR) and the expression level of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene as mutagenic end points. We found that alpha-particle irradiation of distal primary roots of young seedlings resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of HR in the aerial plants; the increased induction of HR occurred in every true leaf over the course of rosette development. Moreover, we also found that localized alpha-particle irradiation of roots induced a short-term up-regulated expression of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene in the nonirradiated aerial plants. These results suggested the existence of bystander mutagenic effects in vivo in plants. Treatment with the ROS scavenger DMSO dramatically reduced the effects of localized root irradiation on the induction of HR and expression of the AtRAD54 gene in bystander tissues, suggesting that ROS play a critical role in mediating the bystander mutagenic effects in plants. PMID:20681789

  1. In situ production of alpha particles and alpha recoil particles in quartz applied to ESR studies of oxygen vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, S.; Rink, W. J.; Yonezawa, C.; Matsue, H.; Kagami, T.

    2001-12-01

    The intensity of an ESR signal associated with oxygen vacancies in quartz (E 1' center and heat-treated E 1' center) are correlated with the radiometric age of their host rocks. Two natural processes are responsible for the production of oxygen vacancies (1) lattice damage along alpha recoil and alpha particle tracks and (2) randomly distributed ionization damage from energetic electrons (beta particles) and gamma photons. The aim of this paper was to determine whether the track damage process is dominant relative to the ionization processes. Heat-treated E 1' centers are considered a proxy measure of the oxygen vacancy concentration. In situ alpha irradiation of quartz was accomplished by neutron irradiation of lithium and boron-bearing quartz. We found that the oxygen vacancy population measured by ESR was a factor of 2 higher than estimated from calculations of the damage using Ziegler's TRIM software. Considering the uncertainties in absolute determinations of spin concentration from ESR signals, the agreement is very good and supports the theory that alpha particle damage is largely responsible for oxygen vacancy production during natural irradiation of quartz over intervals of hundreds of millions of years.

  2. Deceleration of Alpha Particles in the Solar Wind by Instabilities and the Rotational Force: Implications for Heating, Azimuthal Flow, and the Parker Spiral Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verscharen, Daniel; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    2015-06-01

    Protons and alpha particles in the fast solar wind are only weakly collisional and exhibit a number of non-equilibrium features, including relative drifts between particle species. Two non-collisional mechanisms have been proposed for limiting differential flow between alpha particles and protons: plasma instabilities and the rotational force. Both mechanisms decelerate the alpha particles. In this paper, we derive an analytic expression for the rate {Q}{flow} at which energy is released by alpha-particle deceleration, accounting for azimuthal flow and conservation of total momentum. We show that instabilities control the deceleration of alpha particles at r\\lt {r}{crit}, and the rotational force controls the deceleration of alpha particles at r\\gt {r}{crit}, where {r}{crit}≃ 2.5 {AU} in the fast solar wind in the ecliptic plane. We find that {Q}{flow} is positive at r\\lt {r}{crit} and {Q}{flow}=0 at r≥slant {r}{crit}, consistent with the previous finding that the rotational force does not lead to a release of energy. We compare the value of {Q}{flow} at r\\lt {r}{crit} with empirical heating rates for protons and alpha particles, denoted {Q}p and {Q}α , deduced from in situ measurements of fast-wind streams from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft. We find that {Q}{flow} exceeds {Q}α at r\\lt 1 {AU}, and that {Q}{flow}/{Q}p decreases with increasing distance from the Sun from a value of about one at r = 0.29–0.42 AU to about 1/4 at 1 AU. We conclude that the continuous energy input from alpha-particle deceleration at r\\lt {r}{crit} makes an important contribution to the heating of the fast solar wind. We also discuss the implications of the alpha-particle drift for the azimuthal flow velocities of the ions and for the Parker spiral magnetic field.

  3. An experimental analysis of the contribution of 224Ra and 226Ra and progeny to the gross alpha-particle activity of water samples.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Michael F; West, Lynn E

    2008-05-01

    The gross alpha-particle activity of water samples analyzed by EPA Method 900.0 is investigated as a function of residue mass and geometry, time between sample collection and analysis, and time between sample preparation and analysis for samples containing 224Ra, 212Pb, and 226Ra. It is shown that the gross alpha-particle activity due to 224Ra and its progeny can be up to 10 times the 224Ra activity at collection time and that due to 212Pb progeny can be up to 3 times the 212Pb activity at collection time. In samples with roughly equal activities of 224Ra and 226Ra analyzed soon after collection, it is shown that the gross alpha-particle activity is approximately constant with time because the decay of 224Ra and its progeny is offset by the ingrowth of 226Ra progeny. PMID:18403967

  4. Development of a strongly focusing high-intensity He(+) ion source for a confined alpha particle measurement at ITER.

    PubMed

    Kisaki, M; Shinto, K; Kobuchi, T; Okamoto, A; Kitajima, S; Sasao, M; Tsumori, K; Nishiura, M; Kaneko, O; Matsuda, Y; Wada, M; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Hirano, Y

    2008-02-01

    A strongly focusing high-intensity He(+) ion source has been designed and constructed as a beam source for a high-energy He(0) beam probe system for diagnosis of fusion produced alpha particles in the thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The He(+) beam was extracted from the ion source at an acceleration voltage of 18-35 kV. Temperature distributions of the beam target were observed with an IR camera. The 1/e-holding beam profile half-width was about 15 mm at optimum perveance (Perv) of 0.03 (I(beam)=2.4 A). A beam current about 3 A was achieved at an acceleration voltage of 26.7 kV with an arc power of 10 kW (Perv=0.023). PMID:18315239

  5. Hit rates and radiation doses to nuclei of bone lining cells from alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polig, E.; Jee, W. S.; Kruglikov, I. L.

    1992-01-01

    Factors relating the local concentration of a bone-seeking alpha-particle emitter to the mean hit rate have been determined for nuclei of bone lining cells using a Monte Carlo procedure. Cell nuclei were approximated by oblate spheroids with dimensions and location taken from a previous histomorphometric study. The Monte Carlo simulation is applicable for planar and diffuse labels at plane or cylindrical bone surfaces. Additionally, the mean nuclear dose per hit, the dose mean per hit, the mean track segment length and its second moment, the percentage of stoppers, and the frequency distribution of the dose have been determined. Some basic features of the hit statistics for bone lining cells have been outlined, and the consequences of existing standards of radiation protection with regard to the hit frequency to cell nuclei are discussed.

  6. Role of channel coupling and deuteron-exchange mechanisms in anomalous alpha-particle scattering on {sup 6}Li

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuta, S. B.; Artemov, S.V.; Burtebaev, N.; Kerimkulov, Zh.; Novatsky, B. G.; Stepanov, D.N.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2009-12-15

    A unified description of existing experimental data on alpha-particle scattering by {sup 6}Li over the broad energy range from 18 to 166 MeV was obtained with allowance for channel-coupling effects and mechanisms involving the exchange of a deuteron cluster. Angular distributions were analyzed on the basis of the optical model and the coupled reaction channels method. It was shown that the inclusion of channel coupling and the contributions from one- and two-step exchangemechanismsmakes it possible to describe special features of the behavior of differential cross sections for both elastic and inelastic scattering in a full energy range. Optimum values found for the parameters of optical potentials agree with the parameters of the global potential proposed previously for nuclei in the mass region A > 12.

  7. Determination of oxygen in silicon and carbide by activation with 27.2 meV alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgolenko, A. P.; Kornienko, N. D.; Lithovchenko, P. G.

    1978-01-01

    The Si sample was polished on one side, and on the other side Ni was applied chemically and soldered with Pb to a water cooled Cu substrate. Optical quartz standard was fixed from the other side. Si carbide samples were soldered to a substrated with In. The prepared samples were irradiated in a cyclotron with a 27.2 MeV alpha particle beam. The layers were removed from the Si and Si carbide samples by grinding and the positron activity of F-18(t sub 1/2 110 min) was measured by using a gamma, gamma coincidence spectrometer with two NaI(TI) crystals. For analysis of Si carbide, the activity decay curve of the samples was recorded to find the contribution of the positron activity of Cu-65(t sub 1/2 12.9 hr) which formed from Ni impurity on irradiation.

  8. Use of 4.7 MeV alpha particles in elemental analysis and fusion reactor materials studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, B.; Dima, S.; Florescu, V.; Ivanov, E. A.; Ploştinaru, D.; Sârbu, C.

    1986-07-01

    The possibilities for using 4.7 MeV alpha particles produced at the U-120 CIP Cyclotron for charged particle induced X- and gamma-ray emission applications (PIXE and PIGE, respectively) and for fast neutron radiation damage simulation are presented. The combined analysis using PIGE and PIXE methods either separately or simultaneously is an excellent means of determining the relative abundances of lighter elements with gamma-ray spectra and of heavier elements ( Z ⩾ 16) with X-ray spectra. Some aspects of surface deformation effects by neutrons were simulated by means of medium-energy helium ions. An investigation of three types of commercial stainless steel (Romanian W 4016, Soviet 12KH18N10T and Japanese W 4541) was started using 3.0 [1], 4.7 and 6.8 MeV helium ions. The main post-irradiation effects observed are discussed.

  9. Particle-in-cell simulations of the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability of fusion-born alpha-particles in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J. W. S.; Dendy, R. O.; Chapman, S. C.

    2013-06-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is the only collective radiative instability, driven by confined fusion-born alpha-particles, observed from deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas in both JET and TFTR. Using first principles particle-in-cell simulations of the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MCI), we elucidate some of the fully kinetic nonlinear processes that may underlie observations of ICE from fusion products in these large tokamaks. We find that the MCI is intrinsically self-limiting on very fast timescales, which may help explain the observed correlation between linear theory and observed ICE intensity. The simulations elaborate the nature of the excited electric and magnetic fluctuations, from first principles, confirming the dominant role of fast Alfvénic and electrostatic components which is assumed ab initio in analytical treatments.

  10. Bismuth-212-labeled anti-Tac monoclonal antibody: alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides as modalities for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, R.W.; Atcher, R.W.; Gansow, O.A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.; Waldmann, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody directed to the human interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor, has been successfully conjugated to the alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide bismuth-212 by use of a bifunctional ligand, the isobutylcarboxycarbonic anhydride of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. The physical properties of 212Bi are appropriate for radioimmunotherapy in that it has a short half-life, deposits its high energy over a short distance, and can be obtained in large quantities from a radium generator. Antibody specific activities of 1-40 microCi/microgram (1 Ci = 37 GBq) were achieved. Specificity of the 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac was demonstrated for the IL-2 receptor-positive adult T-cell leukemia line HUT-102B2 by protein synthesis inhibition and clonogenic assays. Activity levels of 0.5 microCi or the equivalent of 12 rad/ml of alpha radiation targeted by anti-Tac eliminated greater than 98% the proliferative capabilities of HUT-102B2 cells with more modest effects on IL-2 receptor-negative cell lines. Specific cytotoxicity was blocked by excess unlabeled anti-Tac but not by human IgG. In addition, an irrelevant control monoclonal antibody of the same isotype labeled with 212Bi was unable to target alpha radiation to cell lines. Therefore, 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac is a potentially effective and specific immunocytotoxic reagent for the elimination of IL-2 receptor-positive cells. These experiments thus provide the scientific basis for use of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in immunotherapy.

  11. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much_gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  12. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  13. Accounting for long alpha-particle stopping distances in (U-Th-Sm)/He geochronology: Refinement of the baseline case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketcham, Richard A.; Gautheron, Cécile; Tassan-Got, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    This contribution proposes a number of methodological refinements for accounting for ejection of energetic particles, most particularly in the case of long alpha-particle stopping distance effects in (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronometry. Recent stopping-distance estimates for minerals commonly used for thermochronometry are up to 1.5 μm shorter than previously thought, which directly affects the magnitude of the ejection correction parameter FT. The revision in stopping distances necessitates re-fitting the empirical polynomials that have been used to calculate FT corrections for various crystal forms. Reformulation and re-parameterization of these polynomials enables them to account for present and any future change in stopping distances without needing to be recalibrated. The library of shapes described with these polynomials to accommodate habits is expanded for all crystal systems and also ellipsoids, thus covering all minerals currently used and under development for (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronometry. In addition, the inaccuracy caused by characterizing a set of alpha particles from a decay chain with a single mean stopping distance is examined, and a simple method for compensation is recommended. A new method of using FT parameters to calculate corrected ages by applying them to parents instead of daughters or age is presented, which maximizes accuracy for old specimens such as meteorites. Altogether, the refinements proposed will affect (U-Th-Sm)/He ages by ˜1-5%, depending on size and age. Finally, the concept of an FT-equivalent sphere is introduced as a sphere with the same effective FT value as a given mineral grain. Testing indicates that the FT-equivalent sphere is of comparable or superior accuracy to a sphere of the same surface to volume ratio for diffusion modeling. This finding greatly facilitates utilization of (U-Th-Sm)/He data from standard data tables for forward and inverse modeling.

  14. Ion bombardment and disorder in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of ion bombardment during growth on the structural and optical properties of amorphous silicon are presented. Two series of films were deposited under electrically grounded and positively biased substrate conditions. The biased samples displayed lower growth rates and increased hydrogen content relative to grounded counterparts. The film structure was examined using Raman spectroscopy. The transverse optic like phonon band position was used as a parameter to characterize network order. Biased samples displayed an increased order of the amorphous network relative to grounded samples. Furthermore, biased samples exhibited a larger optical gap. These results are correlated and attributed to reduced ion bombardment effects.

  15. Nuclear sizes of /sup 40,42,44,48/Ca from elastic scattering of 104 MeV alpha particles. I. Experimental results and optical potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gils, H.J.; Friedman, E.; Rebel, H.; Buschmann, J.; Zagromski, S.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Neumann, B.; Pesl, R.; Bechtold, G.

    1980-04-01

    Differential cross sections for elastic scattering of 104 MeV ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 40,42,44,48/Ca have been measured with high angular accuracy over a wide angular range. Optical model analysis based on a Fourier-Bessel description of the real potential reveals isotopic differences which, in particular for /sup 48/Ca, indicate a small neutron skin.

  16. Targeting Aberrant DNA double strand break repair in triple negative breast cancer with alpha particle emitter radiolabeled anti-EGFR antibody

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong; Hedayati, Mohammad; Hobbs, Robert F.; Shao, Chunbo; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Sgouros, George

    2013-01-01

    The higher potential efficacy of alpha-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy lies in the 3 to 8-fold greater biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha particles relative to photon or beta-particle radiation. This greater RBE, however, also applies to normal tissue, thereby reducing the potential advantage of high RBE. Since alpha particles typically cause DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), targeting tumors that are defective in DSB repair effectively increases the RBE, yielding a secondary, RBE-based differentiation between tumor and normal tissue that is complementary to conventional, receptor-mediated tumor targeting. In some triple negative breast cancers (TNBC, ER−/PR−/HER-2−), germline mutation in BRCA-1, a key gene in homologous recombination (HR) DSB repair, predisposes patients to early onset of breast cancer. These patients have few treatment options once the cancer has metastasized. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of alpha particle emitter, 213Bi labeled anti-EGFR antibody, Cetuximab, in BRCA-1 defective TNBC. 213Bi-Cetuximab was found to be significantly more effective in the BRCA-1 mutated TNBC cell line HCC1937 than BRCA-1 competent TNBC cell MDA-MB-231. siRNA knockdown of BRCA-1 or DNA-PKcs, a key gene in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DSB repair pathway, also sensitized TNBC cells to 213Bi-Cetuximab. Furthermore, the small molecule inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, NU7441, sensitized BRCA-1 competent TNBC cells to alpha particle radiation. Immunofluorescent staining of γH2AX foci and comet assay confirmed that enhanced RBE is caused by impaired DSB repair. These data offer a novel strategy for enhancing conventional receptor-mediated targeting with an additional, potentially synergistic radiobiological targeting that could be applied to TNBC. PMID:23873849

  17. Influence of plasma parameters on the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhang, X. Yu, L.; Zhao, X.

    2014-12-15

    In tokamaks, fusion generated α particles may absorb lower hybrid (LH) wave energy, thus reducing the LH current drive efficiency. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles changing with some typical parameters is calculated in this paper. Results show that γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ‖}, while decreases with the frequency of LH waves ω over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} increases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} ≤ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, while decreases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} becomes larger, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e} ≈ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −1} for the ITER-like scenario. The influence of spectral broadening in parametric decay instabilities on the absorption coefficient is evaluated. The value of γ{sub α} with n{sub ‖} being 2.5 is almost two times larger than that with n{sub ‖} being 2.0 and is even lager in the case of 2.9, which will obviously increase the absorption of the LH power by alpha particles.

  18. Very High Efficiency, Miniaturized, Long-Lived Alpha Particle Power Source Using Diamond Devices for Extreme Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, Elizabeth A. (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai U. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A power source that converts a-particle energy into electricity by coulomb collision in doped diamond films is described. Alpha particle decay from curium-244 creates electron-hole pairs by free- ing electrons and holes inside the crystal lattice in N- and P-doped diamond films. Ohmic contacts provide electrical connection to an electronic device. Due to the built-in electric field at the rectifying junction across the hT- and P-doped diamond films, the free electrons are constrained to traveling in generally one direction. This one direction then supplies electrons in a manner similar to that of a battery. The radioactive curium layer may be disposed on diamond films for even distribution of a-particle radiation. The resulting power source may be mounted on a diamond substrate that serves to insulate structures below the diamond substrate from a-particle emission. Additional insulation or isolation may be provided in order to prevent damage from a-particle collision. N-doped silicon may be used instead of N-doped diamond.

  19. Development of the MICROMEGAS detector for measuring the energy spectrum of alpha particles by using a 241Am source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Yoon; Ham, Cheolmin; Shin, Jae Won; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Andriamonje, Samuel; Kadi, Yacine; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    We have developed MICROMEGAS (MICRO MEsh GASeous) detectors for detecting a particles emitted from an 241Am standard source. The voltage applied to the ionization region of the detector is optimized for stable operation at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The energy of a particles from the 241Am source can be varied by changing the flight path of the a particle from the 241Am source. The channel numbers of the experimentally-measured pulse peak positions for different energies of the a particles are associated with the energies deposited by the alpha particles in the ionization region of the detector as calculated by using GEANT4 simulations; thus, the energy calibration of the MICROMEGAS detector for a particles is done. For the energy calibration, the thickness of the ionization region is adjusted so that a particles may completely stop in the ionization region and their kinetic energies are fully deposited in the region. The efficiency of our MICROMEGAS detector for a particles under the present conditions is found to be ~97.3%.

  20. Distributions of alpha particles escaping to the wall during sawtooth oscillations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, Y.I.; Lutsenko, V.V.; White, R.B.; Yakovenko, Y.V.; Zweben, S.J.

    1999-04-01

    It has been observed experimentally in deuterium{endash}tritium shots of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion {bold 25}, 1167 (1985)] that crashes of sawtooth oscillations may result in very inhomogeneous flux of alpha particles to the wall. To explain this phenomenon, both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation have been carried out. It is concluded that the {open_quotes}crash-induced prompt loss,{close_quotes} i.e., the orbital loss of marginally trapped particles arising because of the crash-induced orbit transformation of circulating particles, is responsible for the flux near the bottom of the vessel, whereas the crash-induced stochastic diffusion of moderately trapped particles explains the large signal near the equatorial plane of the torus. The calculated poloidal distributions of the integral alpha flux are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. The energy spectrum of the escaping particles has also been calculated, which can be used for diagnostics of the crash type. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.} thinsp

  1. Transcriptional Response of Human Cells to Microbeam Irradiation with 2.1 MeV Alpha Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, C. E.; Bogner, S.; Spitta, L.; Arenz, A.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Greif, K. D.; Giesen, U.

    Within the next decades an increasing number of human beings in space will be simultaneously exposed to different stimuli especially microgravity and radiation To assess the risks for humans during long-duration space missions the complex interplay of these parameters at the cellular level must be understood Cellular stress protection responses lead to increased transcription of several genes via modulation of transcription factors Activation of the Nuclear Factor kappa B NF- kappa B pathway as a possible anti-apoptotic route represents such an important cellular stress response A screening assay for detection of NF- kappa B-dependent gene activation using the destabilized variant of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein d2EGFP as reporter protein had been developed It consists of Human Embryonic Kidney HEK 293 Cells stably transfected with a receptor-reporter-construct carrying d2EGFP under the control of a NF- kappa B response element Clones positive for Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha TNF- alpha inducible d2EGFP expression were selected as cellular reporters Irradiation was performed either with X-rays 150 kV 19 mA at DLR Cologne or with 2 1 MeV alpha particles LET sim 160 keV mu m at PTB Braunschweig After irradiation the following biological endpoints were determined i cell survival via the colony forming ability test ii time-dependent activation of NF- kappa B dependent d2EGFP gene expression using flow cytometry iii quantitative RT-PCR

  2. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer and Fujifilm imaging plates for energetic protons, deuterons, and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Charles; Canfield, Michael; Graeper, Gavin; Lombardo, Andrew; Stillman, Collin; Fiksel, Gennady; Stoeckl, Christian; Sinenian, Nareg

    2010-11-01

    A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer (TPIS) has been designed and built to study energetic ions accelerated from the rear surface of targets irradiated by ultra-intense laser light from the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The device uses a permanent magnet and a pair of electrostatic deflector plates to produce parallel magnetic and electric fields, which cause ions of a given charge-to-mass ratio to be deflected onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. The position of the ion along the parabola can be used to determine its energy. Fujifilm imaging plates (IP) are placed in the rear of the device and are used to detect the incident ions. The energy dispersion of the spectrometer has been calibrated using monoenergetic ion beams from the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV pelletron accelerator. The IP sensitivity has been measured for protons and deuterons with energies between 0.6 MeV and 3.4 MeV, and for alpha particles with energies between 1.5 MeV and 5.1 MeV.

  3. Channel coupling and exchange of an alpha-particle cluster in deuteron scattering on {sup 6}Li nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuta, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Artemov, S. V.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2012-07-15

    Existing experimental data on elastic and inelastic deuteron scattering on {sup 6}Li nuclei in the energy range from 8 to 50 MeV were analyzed within the approach of coupled reaction channels. The coupling of elastic scattering and inelastic scattering accompanied by the transition to the 3{sup +} state at E{sub x} 2.186 MeV and the mechanism involving the exchange of an alpha-particle cluster were taken into account in respective calculations. The phenomenological potentials obtained from the present analysis describe well experimental angular distributions at all energies and in full angular ranges. The depths of the real and imaginary parts of the potentials in question depend smoothly on energy at fixed values of the remaining parameters. The energy dependence of relevant volume integrals agrees well with similar data for the p + {sup 6}Li, {alpha} + {sup 6}Li, and {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C systems and with the predictions of a microscopic theory.

  4. Cell Cycle Checkpoint Proteins p21 and Hus1 Regulating Intercellular Signaling Induced By Alpha Particle Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lijun; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Jun; Hang, Haiying

    In recent years, the attentions for radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been paid on the intercellular signaling events connecting the irradiated and non-irradiated cells. p21 is a member of the Cip/Kip family and plays essential roles in cell cycle progression arrest after cellular irradiation. DNA damage checkpoint protein Hus1 is a member of the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 complex and functions as scaffold at the damage sites to facilitate the activation of downstream effectors. Using the medium trasfer method and the cells of MEF, MEF (p21-/-), MEF (p21-/-Hus1-/-) as either medium donor or receptor cells, it was found that with 5cGy alpha particle irradiation, the bystander cells showed a significant induction of -H2AX for normal MEFs (p¡0.05). However, the absence of p21 resulted in deficiency in inducing bystander effects. Further results indicated p21 affected the intercellular DNA damage signaling mainly through disrupting the production or release of the damage signals from irradiated cells. When Hus1 and p21 were both knocked out, an obvious induction of -H2AX recurred in bystander cells and the induction of -H2AX was GJIC (gap junction-mediated intercellular communication) dependent, indicating the interrelationship between p21 and Hus1 regulated the production and relay of DNA damage signals from irradiated cells to non-irradiated bystander cells.

  5. A global Mars dust composition refined by the Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer in Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Jeff A.; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Gellert, Ralf; Campbell, John L.; King, Penelope L.; Flemming, Roberta L.; Ming, Douglas W.; Clark, Benton C.; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott J. V.; Minitti, Michelle E.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Boyd, Nicholas I.; Thompson, Lucy M.; Perrett, Glynis M.; Elliott, Beverley E.; Desouza, Elstan

    2016-01-01

    Modern Martian dust is similar in composition to the global soil unit and bulk basaltic Mars crust, but it is enriched in S and Cl. The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover analyzed air fall dust on the science observation tray (o-tray) in Gale Crater to determine dust oxide compositions. The o-tray dust has the highest concentrations of SO3 and Cl measured in Mars dust (SO3 8.3%; Cl 1.1 wt %). The molar S/Cl in the dust (3.35 ± 0.34) is consistent with previous studies of Martian dust and soils (S/Cl = 3.7 ± 0.7). Fe is also elevated ~25% over average Mars soils and the bulk crust. These enrichments link air fall dust with the S-, Cl-, and Fe-rich X-ray amorphous component of Gale Crater soil. Dust and soil have the same S/Cl, constraining the surface concentrations of S and Cl on a global scale.

  6. Characteristics and mechanisms of the bystander response in monolayer cell cultures exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, John B.; Azzam, Edouard I.; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Nagasawa, Hatsumi

    2005-02-01

    When confluent cultures of mammalian cells are irradiated with very low fluences of alpha particles whereby only occasional cells receive any radiation exposure, genetic changes are observed in the non-irradiated ("bystander") cells. Upregulation of the p53 damage-response pathway as well as activation of proteins in the MAPK family occurred in bystander cells; p53 was phosphorylated on the serine 15 residue suggesting that the upregulation of p53 was a consequence of DNA damage. Damage signals were transmitted to bystander cells through gap junctions, as confirmed by the use of genetically manipulated cells including connexin43 knockouts. Expression of connexin43 was markedly enhanced by irradiation. A moderate bystander effect was observed for specific gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations. This effect was markedly enhanced in cells defective in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway. Finally, an upregulation of oxidative metabolism occurred in bystander cells; the increased levels of reactive oxygen species appeared to be derived from flavine-containing oxidase enzymes. We hypothesize that genetic effects observed in non-irradiated bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative base damage; >90% of mutations in bystander cells were point mutations. When bystander cells cannot repair DNA double strand breaks, they become much more sensitive to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and mutations, the latter consisting primarily of deletion mutants. While we propose that the genetic effects occurring in bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative stress, the nature of the signal that initiates this process remains to be determined.

  7. Alpha-particle and proton probes of nuclear shapes in the rare earth and mass 80 regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.; Nicolis, N.G.; Abenante, V.; Majka, Z.; Semkow, T.M.; Baktash, C.; Beene, J.R.; Garcia-Bermudez, G.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Johnson, N.R.; Lee, I.Y.; McGowan, F.K.; Riley, M.A.; Virtanen, A.; Griffin, H.C.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI )

    1989-01-01

    Low emission barriers and large subbarrier anisotropies in the alpha-particle decay with respect to the spin direction, of Sn and rare earth compound nuclei, are examined in the light of recent calculations incorporating deformation. To explore the possibility of a correlation between the proton emission barriers and nuclear deformation, we studied proton spectra from the {sup 52}Cr({sup 34}S,2p2n){sup 82}Sr reaction. The proton spectra were observed with the Dwarf-Ball 4{pi} CsI(Tl) array, in coincidence with 18 Compton suppressed Ge detectors operated in conjunction with the Spin Spectrometer, a 4{pi} NaI(Tl) array. We found significant changes and shifts in the proton energy spectra as we selected gating transitions from bands of different moments of inertia or transitions from states of different spin in the same band. Substantial differences were also seen as a function of the {gamma}-ray multiplicity. These results are discussed in terms of statistical model calculations incorporating deformation and structure effects of the emitting system. 20 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Cathode Ion Bombardment in RF Photoguns

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we use the method of rapid oscillating field to solve the equation of ion motion in an RF gun. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper proposes a simple mitigation recipe that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  9. Simulation of the alpha particle heating and the helium ash source in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like tokamak with an internal transport barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Lei Guo, Wenfeng; Xiao, Xiaotao; Dai, Zongliang; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-12-15

    A guiding center orbit following code, which incorporates a set of non-singular coordinates for orbit integration, was developed and applied to investigate the alpha particle heating in an ITER-like tokamak with an internal transport barrier. It is found that a relatively large q (safety factor) value can significantly broaden the alpha heating profile in comparison with the local heating approximation; this broadening is due to the finite orbit width effects; when the orbit width is much smaller than the scale length of the alpha particle source profile, the heating profile agrees with the source profile, otherwise, the heating profile can be significantly broadened. It is also found that the stagnation particles move to the magnetic axis during the slowing-down process, thus the effect of stagnation orbits is not beneficial to the helium ash removal. The source profile of helium ash is broadened in comparison with the alpha source profile, which is similar to the heating profile.

  10. ITER Plasma at Ion Cyclotron Frequency Domain: The Fusion Alpha Particles Diagnostics Based on the Stimulated Raman Scattering of Fast Magnetosonic Wave off High Harmonic Ion Bernstein Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-10-01

    A novel method for alpha particle diagnostics is proposed. The theory of stimulated Raman scattering, SRS, of the fast wave and ion Bernstein mode, IBM, turbulence in multi-ion species plasmas, (Stefan University Press, La Jolla, CA, 2008). is utilized for the diagnostics of fast ions, (4)He (+2), in ITER plasmas. Nonlinear Landau damping of the IBM on fast ions near the plasma edge leads to the space-time changes in the turbulence level, (inverse alpha particle channeling). The space-time monitoring of the IBM turbulence via the SRS techniques may prove efficient for the real time study of the fast ion velocity distribution function, spatial distribution, and transport. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., La Jolla, CA 92037.

  11. Computation of cosmic ray ionization and dose at Mars. I: A comparison of HZETRN and Planetocosmics for proton and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronoff, Guillaume; Norman, Ryan B.; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to evaluate the cosmic ray environment at Mars is of interest for future manned exploration. To support exploration, tools must be developed to accurately access the radiation environment in both free space and on planetary surfaces. The primary tool NASA uses to quantify radiation exposure behind shielding materials is the space radiation transport code, HZETRN. In order to build confidence in HZETRN, code benchmarking against Monte Carlo radiation transport codes is often used. This work compares the dose calculations at Mars by HZETRN and the Geant4 application Planetocosmics. The dose at ground and the energy deposited in the atmosphere by galactic cosmic ray protons and alpha particles has been calculated for the Curiosity landing conditions. In addition, this work has considered Solar Energetic Particle events, allowing for the comparison of varying input radiation environments. The results for protons and alpha particles show very good agreement between HZETRN and Planetocosmics.

  12. Redefining Relative Biological Effectiveness in the Context of the EQDX Formalism: Implications for Alpha-Particle Emitter Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Howell, Roger W.; Song, Hong; Baechler, Sébastien; Sgouros, George

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy (αRPT) is currently enjoying increasing attention as a viable alternative to chemotherapy for targeting of disseminated micrometastatic disease. In theory, αRPT can be personalized through pre-therapeutic imaging and dosimetry. However, in practice, given the particularities of α-particle emissions, a dosimetric methodology that accurately predicts the thresholds for organ toxicity has not been reported. This is in part due to the fact that the biological effects caused by α-particle radiation differ markedly from the effects caused by traditional external beam (photon or electron) radiation or β-particle emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The concept of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used to quantify the ratio of absorbed doses required to achieve a given biological response with alpha particles versus a reference radiation (typically a beta emitter or external beam radiation). However, as conventionally defined, the RBE varies as a function of absorbed dose and therefore a single RBE value is limited in its utility because it cannot be used to predict response over a wide range of absorbed doses. Therefore, efforts are underway to standardize bioeffect modeling for different fractionation schemes and dose rates for both nuclear medicine and external beam radiotherapy. Given the preponderant use of external beams of radiation compared to nuclear medicine in cancer therapy, the more clinically relevant quantity, the 2 Gy equieffective dose, EQD2(α/β), has recently been proposed by the ICRU. In concert with EQD2(α/β), we introduce a new, redefined RBE quantity, named RBE2(α/β), as the ratio of the two linear coefficients that characterize the α particle absorbed dose-response curve and the low-LET megavoltage photon 2 Gy fraction equieffective dose-response curve. The theoretical framework for the proposed new formalism is presented along with its application to experimental data obtained from

  13. Detectors for alpha particles and X-rays operating in ambient air in pulse counting mode or/and with gas amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpak, G.; Benaben, P.; Breuil, P.; Peskov, V.

    2008-02-01

    Ionization chambers working in ambient air in current detection mode are attractive due to their simplicity and low cost and are widely used in several applications such as smoke detection, dosimetry, therapeutic beam monitoring and so on. The aim of this work was to investigate if gaseous detectors can operate in ambient air in pulse counting mode as well as with gas amplification which potentially offers the highest possible sensitivity in applications like alpha particle detection or high energy X-ray photon or electron detection. To investigate the feasibility of this method two types of open- end gaseous detectors were build and successfully tested. The first one was a single wire or multiwire cylindrical geometry detector operating in pulse mode at a gas gain of one (pulse ionization chamber). This detector was readout by a custom made wide -band charge sensitive amplifier able to deal with slow induced signals generated by slow motion of negative and positive ions. The multiwire detector was able to detect alpha particles with an efficiency close to 22%. The second type of an alpha detector was an innovative GEM-like detector with resistive electrodes operating in air in avalanche mode at high gas gains (up to 104). This detector can also operate in a cascaded mode or being combined with other detectors, for example with MICROMEGAS. This detector was readout by a conventional charge -sensitive amplifier and was able to detect alpha particles with 100% efficiency. This detector could also detect X-ray photons or fast electrons. A detailed comparison between these two detectors is given as well as a comparison with commercially available alpha detectors. The main advantages of gaseous detectors operating in air in a pulse detection mode are their simplicity, low cost and high sensitivity. One of the possible applications of these new detectors is alpha particle background monitors which, due to their low cost can find wide application not only in houses, but

  14. Observation of alpha particle loss from JET plasmas during ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating using a thin foil Faraday cup detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D. S.; Cecil, F. E.; Kiptily, V.; Fullard, K.; Horton, A.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    The loss of MeV alpha particles from JET plasmas has been measured with a set of thin foil Faraday cup detectors during third harmonic heating of helium neutral beam ions. Tail temperatures of {approx}2 MeV have been observed, with radial scrape off lengths of a few centimeters. Operational experience from this system indicates that such detectors are potentially feasible for future large tokamaks, but careful attention to screening rf and MHD induced noise is essential.

  15. Calculation of effective atomic number and electron density of essential biomolecules for electron, proton, alpha particle and multi-energetic photon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Onaran, Tayfur

    2015-07-01

    Effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Ne) of some essential biomolecules have been calculated for total electron interaction, total proton interaction and total alpha particle interaction using an interpolation method in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV. Also, the spectrum weighted Zeff for multi-energetic photons has been calculated using Auto-Zeff program. Biomolecules consist of fatty acids, amino acids, carbohydrates and basic nucleotides of DNA and RNA. Variations of Zeff and Ne with kinetic energy of ionizing charged particles and effective photon energies of heterogeneous sources have been studied for the given materials. Significant variations in Zeff and Ne have been observed through the entire energy region for electron, proton and alpha particle interactions. Non-uniform variation has been observed for protons and alpha particles in low and intermediate energy regions, respectively. The maximum values of Zeff have found to be in higher energies for total electron interaction whereas maximum values have found to be in relatively low energies for total proton and total alpha particle interactions. When it comes to the multi-energetic photon sources, it has to be noted that the highest Zeff values were found at low energy region where photoelectric absorption is the pre-dominant interaction process. The lowest values of Zeff have been shown in biomolecules such as stearic acid, leucine, mannitol and thymine, which have highest H content in their groups. Variation in Ne seems to be more or less the same with the variation in Zeff for the given materials as expected.

  16. Measurements of nuclear {gamma}-ray line emission in interactions of protons and {alpha} particles with N, O, Ne, and Si

    SciTech Connect

    Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H.; Kiener, J.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Tatischeff, V.; Deloncle, I.; Coc, A.; Duprat, J.; Hamadache, C.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Dalouzy, J.-C.; Grancey, F. de; Oliveira, F. de; Dayras, F.; Sereville, N. de; Pellegriti, M.-G.; Lamia, L.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2011-02-15

    {gamma}-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne, and Si and {alpha}-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong {gamma}-ray lines of {sup 16}O produced in proton and {alpha}-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O, and Ne and a thick foil for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and 39 MeV for {alpha} particles were delivered by the Institut de Physique Nucleaire-Orsay tandem accelerator. The {gamma} rays were detected with four high-purity Ge detectors in the angular range 30 deg. to 135 deg. We extracted 36 cross-section excitation functions for proton reactions and 14 for {alpha}-particle reactions. For the majority of the excitation functions no other data exist to our knowledge. Where comparison with existing data was possible, usually a very good agreement was found. It is shown that these data are very interesting for constraining nuclear reaction models. In particular, the agreement of cross section calculations in the nuclear reaction code talys with the measured data could be improved by adjusting the coupling schemes of collective levels in the target nuclei {sup 14}N, {sup 20,22}Ne, and {sup 28}Si. The importance of these results for the modeling of nuclear {gamma}-ray line emission in astrophysical sites is discussed.

  17. Determination of primary energy in nucleus-nucleus collisions and the high P(sub)T tail of alpha-particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freier, P. S.; Atwater, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    A determination of primary energy is required in order to study the energy dependence of meson multiplicity in A-A collisions in cosmic rays. Various procedures which estimate the energy of a primary nucleus from its interaction were investigated. An average of two methods were used, one using the pions and wounded protons and the other using spectator protons and alpha particles. The high P sub T tail observed for Z = 2 fragments requires a modification of the latter method.

  18. Engineered Modular Recombinant Transporters: Application of New Platform for Targeted Radiotherapeutic Agents to {alpha}-Particle Emitting {sup 211}At

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenkranz, Andrey A.; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Pozzi, Oscar R.; Lunin, Vladimir G.; Zalutsky, Michael R. Sobolev, Alexander S.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To generate and evaluate a modular recombinant transporter (MRT) for targeting {sup 211}At to cancer cells overexpressing the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Methods and Materials: The MRT was produced with four functional modules: (1) human epidermal growth factor as the internalizable ligand, (2) the optimized nuclear localization sequence of simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen, (3) a translocation domain of diphtheria toxin as an endosomolytic module, and (4) the Escherichia coli hemoglobin-like protein (HMP) as a carrier module. MRT was labeled using N-succinimidyl 3-[{sup 211}At]astato-5-guanidinomethylbenzoate (SAGMB), its {sup 125}I analogue SGMIB, or with {sup 131}I using Iodogen. Binding, internalization, and clonogenic assays were performed with EGFR-expressing A431, D247 MG, and U87MG.wtEGFR human cancer cell lines. Results: The affinity of SGMIB-MRT binding to A431 cells, determined by Scatchard analysis, was 22 nM, comparable to that measured before labeling. The binding of SGMIB-MRT and its internalization by A431 cancer cells was 96% and 99% EGFR specific, respectively. Paired label assays demonstrated that compared with Iodogen-labeled MRT, SGMIB-MRT and SAGMB-MRT exhibited more than threefold greater peak levels and durations of intracellular retention of activity. SAGMB-MRT was 10-20 times more cytotoxic than [{sup 211}At]astatide for all three cell lines. Conclusion: The results of this study have demonstrated the initial proof of principle for the MRT approach for designing targeted {alpha}-particle emitting radiotherapeutic agents. The high cytotoxicity of SAGMB-MRT for cancer cells overexpressing EGFR suggests that this {sup 211}At-labeled conjugate has promise for the treatment of malignancies, such as glioma, which overexpress this receptor.

  19. LET-Dependent Bystander Effects Caused by Irradiation of Human Prostate Carcinoma Cells with X Rays or Alpha Particles

    PubMed Central

    Anzenberg, Vered; Chandiramani, Sarika; Coderre, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been demonstrated in both normal and tumor cells using a variety of different radiation qualities. Literature reports are contradictory, however, on whether there is an LET dependence of the bystander effect. This study investigated the ability of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells irradiated with either α particles or 250 kVp X rays to cause medium-mediated bystander effects in unirradiated populations of DU-145 cells or in AG01522 human fibroblasts. The end points measured in both of the bystander cell lines were micronucleus formation, γ-H2AX focus induction, and the surviving fraction. The incidence of micronuclei increased 1.5–2.0-fold in both tumor and fibroblast bystander cells after 4 h of co-culture with DU-145 tumor cells that had been directly irradiated with either α particles or X rays. Only the AG01522 fibroblasts showed bystander effects for the γ-H2AX focus (a 1.5-fold increase) and surviving fraction (a decrease to 0.8) end points when co-cultured with X-irradiated tumor cells. Alpha-particle irradiation of DU-145 tumor cells produced no decrease in the surviving fraction and no increase in γ-H2AX focus induction in co-cultured bystander cells of either cell line. These results indicate that there are LET-dependent differences in the signal released from DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells and that, for some end points, bystander AG01522 fibroblasts and bystander DU-145 prostate carcinoma cells respond differently to the same medium-mediated signal. PMID:19024654

  20. Radon and lung carcinogenesis: mutability of p53 codons 249 and 250 to 238Pu alpha-particles in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S P; Kennedy, C H; Amstad, P; Lui, H; Lechner, J F; Harris, C C

    1997-01-01

    Radon-222, a decay product of uranium-238 and a source of high linear energy transfer (LET) alpha-particles, has been implicated in the increased risk of lung cancer in uranium miners as well as non-miners. p53 mutation spectrum studies of radon-associated lung cancer have failed to show any specific mutational hot spot with the exception of a single study in which 31% of squamous cell and large cell lung cancers from uranium miners showed a p53 codon 249 AGGarg --> ATGmet mutation. Although the results of laboratory studies indicate that double-strand breaks and deletions are the principal genetic alterations caused by alpha-particles, uncertainty still prevails in the description of DNA damage in radon-associated human lung cancer. In the present study, we have evaluated the mutability of p53 codons 249 and 250 to alpha-particles in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells using a highly sensitive genotypic mutation assay. Exposure of NHBE cells to a total dose of 4 Gy (equivalent to approximately 1460 working level months in uranium mining) of high LET alpha-radiation induced codon 249 AGG --> AAG transitions and codon 250 CCC --> ACC transversions with absolute mutation frequencies of 3.6 x 10(-7) and 3.8 x 10(-7) respectively. This mutation spectrum is consistent with our previous report of radon-associated human lung cancer. PMID:9054598

  1. Analysis of the miRNA-mRNA networks in malignant transformation BEAS-2B cells induced by alpha-particles.

    PubMed

    Nie, Ji-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Hai; Shao, Chun-Lin; Pei, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Shu-Yu; Jiao, Yang; Tong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the toxicity induced by irradiation with alpha-particles on malignant transformation of immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) using miRNA-mRNA networks. The expression of BEAS-2B cells was determined by measuring colony formation, mtDNA, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and ROS levels. Changes in BEAS-2B cell gene expression were observed and quantified using microarrays that included an increase in 157 mRNA and 20 miRNA expression and a decrease in 77 mRNA and 48 miRNA. Bioinformatic software was used to analyze these different mRNA and miRNA, which indicated that miR-107 and miR-494 play an important role in alpha-particles-mediated cellular malignant transformation processes. The pathways related to systemic lupus erythematosus, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, MAPK signaling pathway, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) were stimulated, while those of ribosome, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling pathway, and metabolic pathways were inhibited. Data suggest that miRNA and mRNA play a crucial role in alpha-particles-mediated malignant transformation processes. It is worth noting that three target genes associated with lung cancer were identified and upregulated PEG 10 (paternally expressed gene 10), ARHGAP26, and IRS1. PMID:27267825

  2. Comprehensive evaluation of the linear stability of Alfvén eigenmodes driven by alpha particles in an ITER baseline scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, A. C. A.; Rodrigues, P.; Borba, D.; Coelho, R.; Fazendeiro, L.; Ferreira, J.; Loureiro, N. F.; Nabais, F.; Pinches, S. D.; Polevoi, A. R.; Sharapov, S. E.

    2016-07-01

    The linear stability of Alfvén eigenmodes in the presence of fusion-born alpha particles is thoroughly assessed for two variants of an ITER baseline scenario, which differ significantly in their core and pedestal temperatures. A systematic approach based on CASTOR-K (Borba and Kerner 1999 J. Comput. Phys. 153 101; Nabais et al 2015 Plasma Sci. Technol. 17 89) is used that considers all possible eigenmodes for a given magnetic equilibrium and determines their growth rates due to alpha-particle drive and Landau damping on fuel ions, helium ashes and electrons. It is found that the fastest growing instabilities in the aforementioned ITER scenario are core-localized, low-shear toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes. The largest growth-rates occur in the scenario variant with higher core temperatures, which has the highest alpha-particle density and density gradient, for eigenmodes with toroidal mode numbers n≈ 30 . Although these eigenmodes suffer significant radiative damping, which is also evaluated, their growth rates remain larger than those of the most unstable eigenmodes found in the variant of the ITER baseline scenario with lower core temperatures, which have n≈ 15 and are not affected by radiative damping.

  3. Callisto: A lunar-like bombardment?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzicka, A.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager spacecraft imagery of the Galilean satellites in 1979 revealed Callisto and portions of Ganymede to be densely cratered, but nonetheless deficient in craters larger than 30 km relative to the cratered highlands of the Moon, Mars, and Mercury. This relative deficiency of large craters could have been due to the complete obliteration of large craters through viscous relaxation in the icy surfaces of Ganymede and Callisto at a time when their surfaces were presumably warmer and more mobile or the deficiency could have stemmed from a relative depletion of large impacting bodies in the Jupiter system, compared with the terrestial planets. To test which alternative is correct, and, specifically, to see whether Callisto was subjected to a lunar-like bombardment, two areas on the heavily cratered lunar farside were compared with an area on Callisto. It was concluded that the Moon and Callisto must have bombarded by two different populations and though viscous relaxation could have modified, or even completely obliterated, craters on Callisto's surface, it could not hve been solely responsible for the observed deficiency of large craters on Callisto relative to the moon.

  4. Energetic ion bombarded Fe/Al multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Busaidy, M.S.; Crapper, M.D.

    2006-05-15

    The utility of ion-assisted deposition is investigated to explore the possibility of counteracting the deficiency of back-reflected current of Ar neutrals in the case of lighter elements such as Al. A range of energetically ion bombarded Fe/Al multilayers sputtered with applied surface bias of 0, -200, or -400 V were deposited onto Si(111) substrates in an argon atmosphere of 4 mTorr using a computer controlled dc magnetron sputtering system. Grazing incidence reflectivity and rocking curve scans by synchrotron x rays of wavelength of 1.38 A were used to investigate the structures of the interfaces produced. Substantial evidence has been gathered to suggest the gradual suppression of interfacial mixing and reduction in interfacial roughness with increases of applied bias. The densification of the Al microstructure was noticeable and may be a consequence of resputtering attributable to the induced ion bombardment. The average interfacial roughnesses were calculated for the 0, -200, and -400 V samples to be 7{+-}0.5, 6{+-}0.5, and 5{+-}0.5 A respectfully demonstrating a 30% improvement in interface quality. Data from rocking curve scans point to improved long-range correlated roughness in energetically deposited samples. The computational code based on the recursive algorithm developed by Parratt [Phys. Rev. 95, 359 (1954)] was successful in the simulation of the specular reflectivity curves.

  5. Wandering Gas Giants and Lunar Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2006-08-01

    There may have been a dramatic event early in the history of the Solar System--the intense bombardment of the inner planets and the Moon by planetesimals during a narrow interval between 3.92 and 3.85 billion years ago, called the late heavy bombardment, but also nicknamed the lunar cataclysm. The evidence for this event comes from Apollo lunar samples and lunar meteorites. While not proven, it makes for an interesting working hypothesis. If correct, what caused it to happen? A group of physicists from the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (Nice, France), GEA/OV/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro and Observatorio Nacional/MTC (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), and the Southwest Research Institute (Boulder, Colorado) conducted a series of studies of the dynamics of the early Solar System. Alessandro Morbidelli, Kleomenis Tsiganis, Rodney Gomes, and Harold Levison simulated the migration of Saturn and Jupiter. When the orbits of these giant planets reached the special condition of Saturn making one trip around the Sun for every two trips by Jupiter (called the 1:2 resonance), violent gravitational shoves made the orbits of Neptune and Uranus unstable, causing them to migrate rapidly and scatter countless planetesimals throughout the Solar System. This dramatic event could have happened in a short interval, anywhere from 200 million years to a billion years after planet formation, causing the lunar cataclysm, which would have affected all the inner planets.

  6. The atmosphere of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko diagnosed by charge-exchanged solar wind alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon Wedlund, C.; Kallio, E.; Alho, M.; Nilsson, H.; Stenberg Wieser, G.; Gunell, H.; Behar, E.; Pusa, J.; Gronoff, G.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The ESA/Rosetta mission has been orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014, measuring its dayside plasma environment. The ion spectrometer onboard Rosetta has detected two ion populations, one energetic with a solar wind origin (H+, He2+, He+), the other at lower energies with a cometary origin (water group ions such as H2O+). He+ ions arise mainly from charge-exchange between solar wind alpha particles and cometary neutrals such as H2O. Aims: The He+ and He2+ ion fluxes measured by the Rosetta Plasma Consortium Ion Composition Analyser (RPC-ICA) give insight into the composition of the dayside neutral coma, into the importance of charge-exchange processes between the solar wind and cometary neutrals, and into the way these evolve when the comet draws closer to the Sun. Methods: We combine observations by the ion spectrometer RPC-ICA onboard Rosetta with calculations from an analytical model based on a collisionless neutral Haser atmosphere and nearly undisturbed solar wind conditions. Results: Equivalent neutral outgassing rates Q can be derived using the observed RPC-ICA He+/He2+ particle flux ratios as input into the analytical model in inverse mode. A revised dependence of Q on heliocentric distance Rh in AU is found to be Rh-7.06 between 1.8 and 3.3 AU, suggesting that the activity in 2015 differed from that of the 2008 perihelion passage. Conversely, using an outgassing rate determined from optical remote sensing measurements from Earth, the forward analytical model results are in relatively good agreement with the measured RPC-ICA flux ratios. Modelled ratios in a 2D spherically-symmetric plane are also presented, showing that charge exchange is most efficient with solar wind protons. Detailed cometocentric profiles of these ratios are also presented. Conclusions: In conclusion, we show that, with the help of a simple analytical model of charge-exchange processes, a mass-capable ion spectrometer such as RPC-ICA can be used as a

  7. Bombarding insulating foils with highly energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzanò, G.; de Filippo, E.; Hagmann, S.; Rothard, H.; Volant, C.

    Insulating (MYLAR), semi-insulating (MYLAR-Au) and conducting foils have been bombarded by very energetic 64 MeV u-1 78Kr32+ ions. The velocity spectra of fast electrons emitted in the backward and forward directions have been measured and analyzed as a function of the elapsed time in the run. A shift of binary encounter and convoy electrons emitted in the forward direction toward lower velocities has been observed with insulating targets. No such shift occurs with metallic targets. The surface potential evolves with time (i.e. ion fluence) both at forward and backward emission angle. It is shown that strong bulk charging of insulating targets leads to a positive potential as high as 9 kV before charge breakdown.

  8. Stopping powers of havar for 0.63 5.9 MeV protons and 2.6 24 MeV alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, L. E.; Trzaska, W. H.; Räisänen, J.; Lyapin, V.

    2004-11-01

    A transmission experiment utilizing thin foil targets has been conducted in order to establish the stopping powers of the cobalt-base alloy, havar, for 0.6-5.9 MeV protons and 2.6-24 MeV alpha particles. The basic technique of the novel experimental method used was to record both the projectile energy and the time of flight while alternating measurements with and without the target in place. The uncertainties of the proton and alpha particle data sets ranged from 1.4 to 2.3% and 1.1 to 1.5%, respectively. Modified Bethe-Bloch theory was applied to the measurements in order to ascertain values of the target mean excitation energy (I) and Barkas-effect parameter (b) for each projectile. The extracted values were I = 304.3 ± 2.4 eV and b = 1.37 ± 0.04 for the case of protons, and I = 306.3 ± 2.3 eV and b = 1.47 ± 0.03 for the case of alpha particles. The I-values are somewhat higher than the additivity-based expectation of 295.7 eV, whereas the b-values are clearly consistent with the expected range of 1.4 ± 0.1. The parameter values extracted from the measurements are appraised for compatibility with recently observed trends in values of I and of b with increasing projectile atomic number.

  9. Understanding of the mechanical and structural changes induced by alpha particles and heavy ions in the French simulated nuclear waste glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakurt, G.; Abdelouas, A.; Guin, J.-P.; Nivard, M.; Sauvage, T.; Paris, M.; Bardeau, J.-F.

    2016-07-01

    Borosilicate glasses are considered for the long-term confinement of high-level nuclear wastes. External irradiations with 1 MeV He+ ions and 7 MeV Au5+ ions were performed to simulate effects produced by alpha particles and by recoil nuclei in the simulated SON68 nuclear waste glass. To better understand the structural modifications, irradiations were also carried out on a 6-oxides borosilicate glass, a simplified version of the SON68 glass (ISG glass). The mechanical and macroscopic properties of the glasses were studied as function of the deposited electronic and nuclear energies. Alpha particles and gold ions induced a volume change up to -0.7% and -2.7%, respectively, depending on the glass composition. Nano-indentations tests were used to determine the mechanical properties of the irradiated glasses. A decrease of about -22% to -38% of the hardness and a decrease of the reduced Young's modulus by -8% were measured after irradiations. The evolution of the glass structure was studied by Raman spectroscopy, and also 11B and 27Al Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) on a 20 MeV Kr irradiated ISG glass powder. A decrease of the silica network connectivity after irradiation with alpha particles and gold ions is deduced from the structural changes observations. NMR spectra revealed a partial conversion of BO4 to BO3 units but also a formation of AlO5 and AlO6 species after irradiation with Kr ions. The relationships between the mechanical and structural changes are also discussed.

  10. Cell detection in phase-contrast images used for alpha-particle track-etch dosimetry: a semi-automated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Michael B.; Wang, Steven J.; Whitlock, Jenny L.; Roeske, John C.

    2005-01-01

    A novel alpha-particle irradiator has recently been developed that provides the ability to characterize cell response. The irradiator is comprised of a collimated, planar alpha-particle source which, from below, irradiates cells cultured on a track-etch material. Cells are imaged using phase-contrast microscopy before and following irradiation to obtain geometric information and survival rates; these can be used with data from alpha-particle track images to assess cell response. A key step in this process is determining cell location within the pre-irradiation images. Although this can be done completely by a human observer, the number of images requiring analysis makes the process time-consuming and tedious. To reduce the potential human error and decrease user interaction time, a semi-automated, computer-aided method of cell detection has been developed. The method employs a two-level adaptive thresholding technique to obtain size and position information about potential cell cytoplasms and nuclei. Proximity and geometry-based thresholds are then used to mark structures as cells. False-positive detections from the automated algorithm are due mostly to imperfections in the track-etch background, camera effects and cellular residue. To correct for these, a human observer reviews all detected structures, discarding false positives. When analysing two randomly selected cell dish image databases, the semi-automated method detected 92-94% of all cells and 94-97% of cells with a well-defined cytoplasm and nucleus while reducing human workload by 32-83%.

  11. Nuclear sizes of /sup 40,42,44,48/Ca from elastic scattering of 104 MeV alpha particles. II. Nuclear density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Gils, H.J.; Friedman, E.; Majka, Z.; Rebel, H.

    1980-04-01

    The elastic scattering of 104 MeV ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 40,42,44,48/Ca has been analyzed by a single-folding model with a density-dependent effective interaction. Nuclear density distributions have been extracted using various descriptions including Fourier-Bessel series which distinctly reduces the model dependence of the results and enables realistic estimates of errors. Differences of the density shapes of the Ca isotopes are well determined showing evidence for a neutron skin in /sup 48/Ca. The resulting root mean square radii are compared to the results obtained from other methods. The sensitivity and limitations of various methods are discussed.

  12. The use of alpha particle tagged neutrons for the inspection of objects on the sea floor for the presence of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.; Eleon, C.; Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Sannié, G.; Boudergui, K.; Kondrasovs, V.; Corre, G.; Normand, S.; Woo, R.; Bourbotte, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    A system using a neutron sensor installed within a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) for underwater inspection has been developed. The system can inspect objects for the presence of threat materials, such as explosives and chemical agents, by using alpha particle tagged neutrons from a sealed tube d+t neutron generator to produce characteristic gamma rays within the interrogated object. Here we show that the measured gamma spectra for commonly found ammunition charged with TNT explosives are dominated by C, O and Fe peaks enabling the underwater determination of explosives inside an ammunition shell.

  13. Elemental Analysis of the Surface of Comet 67p/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer APXS on the Rosetta Lander Philae: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, G.; Schmanke, D.; Girones-Lopez, J.; Brueckner, J.; d'Uston, C.; Economou, T.; Gellert, R.; Markovski, C.

    2014-12-01

    After a 10 years cruise the Rosetta probe has reached its final target, the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The main objectives of the mission are to gain more knowledge of the composition, the origin and formation of comets and the solar system. After extensive remote exploration of the comet the lander Philae will be separated to land on the comet surface, starting immediately examining its landing site with its scientific payload. Part of this payload is the APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer). It will measure in situ the chemical composition of the comet's surface and it's changes during the journey of the comet towards the sun. APXS is a combination of two spectrometers in one single instrument. It will irradiate the comet surface using Curium 244 sources, which are emitting alpha-particle and X-rays. In the alpha-mode the instrument uses alpha backscattering spectroscopy to detect lower Z elements like C, N and O and groups of elements with higher Z. In the X-ray mode alpha particle / X-ray induced X-ray spectroscopy (XRF) will allow the detection of most of the higher Z elements from Na up to Ni and above. Both modes will be always run in parallel allowing to determine lower and higher Z elements simultaneously. For 3 years the solar powered Rosetta probe had to pass a hibernation phase because of a long passage far away to the sun. After wakeup in January 2014 an extensive test phase of all instruments and subsystems has been performed, including the APXS. After landing on the comet an intense initial measurement phase of all instruments is planned, the First Science Sequence (FSS). It will be followed by a long term science phase (LTS). As long as possible APXS and the other instruments will continue to measure and monitor the changes and increasing activity of the comet during its journey towards the inner region of the solar system.The project is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under contracts 50 QP 0404 and 50 QP 0902. References: G

  14. Variation in RBE for Survival of V79-4 Cells as a Function of Alpha-Particle (Helium Ion) Energy.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Bliss L; Stevens, David L; Goodhead, Dudley T; Hill, Mark A

    2015-07-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) α particles are important with respect to the carcinogenic risk associated with human exposure to ionizing radiation, most notably to radon and its progeny. Additionally, the potential use of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in radiotherapy is increasingly being explored. Within the body the emitted alpha particles slow down, traversing a number of cells with a range of energies and therefore with varying efficiencies at inducing biological response. The LET of the particle typically rises from between ~70-90 keV μm(-1) at the start of the track (depending on initial energy) to a peak of ~237 keV μm(-1) towards the end of the track, before falling again at the very end of its range. To investigate the variation in biological response with incident energy, a plutonium-238 alpha-particle irradiator was calibrated to enable studies with incident energies ranging from 4.0 MeV down to 1.1 MeV. The variation in clonogenic survival of V79-4 cells was determined as a function of incident energy, along with the relative variation in the initial yields of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) measured using the FAR assay. The clonogenic survival data also extends previously published data obtained at the Medical Research Council (MRC), Harwell using the same cells irradiated with helium ions, with energies ranging from 34.9 MeV to 5.85 MeV. These studies were performed in conjunction with cell morphology measurements on live cells enabling the determination of absorbed dose and calculation of the average LET in the cell. The results show an increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for cell inactivation with decreasing helium ion energy (increasing LET), reaching a maximum for incident energies of ~3.2 MeV and corresponding average LET of 131 keV μm(-1), above which the RBE is observed to fall at lower energies (higher LETs). The effectiveness of single alpha-particle traversals (relevant to low-dose exposure) at inducing cell

  15. Non-linearity issues and multiple ionization satellites in the PIXE portion of spectra from the Mars alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John L.; Heirwegh, Christopher M.; Ganly, Brianna

    2016-09-01

    Spectra from the laboratory and flight versions of the Curiosity rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer were fitted with an in-house version of GUPIX, revealing departures from linear behavior of the energy-channel relationships in the low X-ray energy region where alpha particle PIXE is the dominant excitation mechanism. The apparent energy shifts for the lightest elements present were attributed in part to multiple ionization satellites and in part to issues within the detector and/or the pulse processing chain. No specific issue was identified, but the second of these options was considered to be the more probable. Approximate corrections were derived and then applied within the GUAPX code which is designed specifically for quantitative evaluation of APXS spectra. The quality of fit was significantly improved. The peak areas of the light elements Na, Mg, Al and Si were changed by only a few percent in most spectra. The changes for elements with higher atomic number were generally smaller, with a few exceptions. Overall, the percentage peak area changes are much smaller than the overall uncertainties in derived concentrations, which are largely attributable to the effects of rock heterogeneity. The magnitude of the satellite contributions suggests the need to incorporate these routinely in accelerator-based PIXE using helium beams.

  16. Recoil proton, alpha particle, and heavy ion impacts on microdosimetry and RBE of fast neutrons: analysis of kerma spectra calculated by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Pignol, J P; Slabbert, J

    2001-02-01

    Fast neutrons (FN) have a higher radio-biological effectiveness (RBE) compared with photons, however the mechanism of this increase remains a controversial issue. RBE variations are seen among various FN facilities and at the same facility when different tissue depths or thicknesses of hardening filters are used. These variations lead to uncertainties in dose reporting as well as in the comparisons of clinical results. Besides radiobiology and microdosimetry, another powerful method for the characterization of FN beams is the calculation of total proton and heavy ion kerma spectra. FLUKA and MCNP Monte Carlo code were used to simulate these kerma spectra following a set of microdosimetry measurements performed at the National Accelerator Centre. The calculated spectra confirmed major classical statements: RBE increase is linked to both slow energy protons and alpha particles yielded by (n,alpha) reactions on carbon and oxygen nuclei. The slow energy protons are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 10 MeV, while the alpha particles are produced by neutrons having an energy between 10 keV and 15 MeV. Looking at the heavy ion kerma from <15 MeV and the proton kerma from neutrons <10 MeV, it is possible to anticipate y* and RBE trends. PMID:11233567

  17. Isotopic and isotonic differences between. cap alpha. particle optical potentials and nuclear densities of 1f/sub 7/2/ nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gils, H.J.; Rebel, H.; Friedman, E.

    1984-04-01

    The elastic scattering of 104 MeV ..cap alpha.. particles by /sup 40,42,43,44,48/Ca, /sup 50/Ti, /sup 51/V, and /sup 52/Cr has been analyzed by phenomenological and semimicroscopic optical potentials in order to get information on isotopic and isotonic differences of the ..cap alpha.. particle optical potentials and of nuclear matter densities. The phenomenological optical potentials based on a Fourier-Bessel description of the real part reveal different behavior in size and shape for the isotonic chain as compared to the isotopic chain. Odd-even effects are also indicated to be different for isotones and isotopes. The semimicroscopic analyses use a single-folding model with a density-dependent effective ..cap alpha..N interaction including a realistic local density approximation. The calculated potentials are fully consistent with the phenomenological ones. Isotopic and isotonic differences of the nuclear matter densities obtained from the folding model in general show a similar behavior as the optical potential differences. The results on matter densities are compared to other investigations.

  18. Final Report (1994 to 1996) Diagnostic of the Spatial and Velocity Distribution of Alpha Particles in Tokamak Fusion Reactor using Beat-wave Generated Lower Hybrid Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, D.Q.; Horton, R.D.; Evans, R.W.

    1999-06-03

    The alpha particles in a fusion reactor play a key role in the sustaining the fusion reaction. It is the heating provided by the alpha particles that help a fusion reactor operating in the ignition regime. It is, therefore, essential to understand the behavior of the alpha population both in real space and velocity space in order to design the optimal confinement device for fusion application. Moreover, the alphas represent a strong source of free energy that may generate plasma instabilities. Theoretical studies has identified the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) as an instability that can be excited by the alpha population in a toroidal device. Since the alpha has an energy of 3.5 MeV, a good confinement device will retain it in the interior of the plasma. Therefore, alpha measurement system need to probe the interior of a high density plasma. Due to the conducting nature of a plasma, wave with frequencies below the plasma frequency can not penetrate into the interior of the plasma where the alphas reside. This project uses a wave that can interact with the perpendicular motion of the alphas to probe its characteristics. However, this wave (the lower hybrid wave) is below the plasma frequency and can not be directly launched from the plasma edge. This project was designed to non-linearly excite the lower hybrid in the interior of a magnetized plasma and measure its interaction with a fast ion population.

  19. {gamma}-ray production by proton and {alpha}-particle induced reactions on {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 24}Mg, and Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Belhout, A.; Kiener, J.; Coc, A.; Duprat, J.; Engrand, C.; Fitoussi, C.; Gounelle, M.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Sereville, N. de; Tatischeff, V.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Chabot, M.; Hammache, F.; Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H.

    2007-09-15

    {gamma}-ray production cross sections for proton and {alpha}-particle interactions with {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 24}Mg, and Fe have been measured in the energy range 5-25 MeV with proton beams and 5-40 MeV with {alpha}-particle beams. Isotopically pure foils of {sup 24}Mg and foils of natural isotopical composition of C, MgO, and Fe have been used. {gamma}-ray angular distributions were obtained with five high-purity Ge detectors with bismuth germanate Compton shields placed at angles of 45 deg. to 157.5 deg. Cross sections for more than 50 different {gamma}-ray transitions were extracted, and for many of them no data have been published before. Comparison of present data with data available in the literature shows mostly good to excellent agreement. In addition to the production cross sections, high-statistics, low-background line shapes of the 4.438 MeV {sup 12}C {gamma} ray from inelastic scattering off {sup 12}C and spallation of {sup 16}O were obtained. Comparison with nuclear reaction calculations shows that these data place interesting constraints on nuclear reaction models.

  20. Modification of Polymer Materials by Ion Bombardment: Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bielinski, D. M.; Jagielski, J.; Piatkowska, A.

    2009-03-10

    The paper discusses possibility of application of ion beam bombardment for modification of polymers. Changes to composition, structure and morphology of the surface layer produced by the treatment and their influence on engineering and functional properties of wide range of polymer materials are presented. Special attention has been devoted to modification of tribological properties. Ion bombardment results in significant reduction of friction, which can be explained by increase of hardness and wettability of polymer materials. Hard but thin enough skin does not result in cracking but improves their abrasion resistance. Contrary to conventional chemical treatment ion beam bombardment works even for polymers hardly susceptible to modification like silicone rubber or polyolefines.

  1. Modification of Polymer Materials by Ion Bombardment: Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielinski, D. M.; Jagielski, J.; Lipinski, P.; Pieczynska, D.; Ostaszewska, U.; Piatkowska, A.

    2009-03-01

    The paper discusses possibility of application of ion beam bombardment for modification of polymers. Changes to composition, structure and morphology of the surface layer produced by the treatment and their influence on engineering and functional properties of wide range of polymer materials are presented. Special attention has been devoted to modification of tribological properties. Ion bombardment results in significant reduction of friction, which can be explained by increase of hardness and wettability of polymer materials. Hard but thin enough skin does not result in cracking but improves their abrasion resistance. Contrary to conventional chemical treatment ion beam bombardment works even for polymers hardly susceptible to modification like silicone rubber or polyolefines.

  2. Hydrogen diffusion in steels under electron bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. V.; Nikitenkov, N. N.; Tyurin, Yu. I.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the results of measurement of the coefficients of hydrogen diffusion through metal membranes in the course of their simultaneous hydrogen saturation and bombardment with electrons (energy 30 keV, current density from 3 to 30 µA/cm2) both in a broad and in a narrow beam. It is found that the time of hydrogen discharge from the membrane is determined by the parameters of the electron beam, its periodicity and duration, and also depends on the structure of the phase state of the metal membrane. It is shown that the diffusion coefficient increases when a narrow electron beam in the scanning regime is used. Analysis of the hydrogen yield as a function of time is carried out on a mass spectrometer connected to a vacuum chamber containing an electron gun, a beam sweep oscillator, and an electrolytic cell. The hydrogen diffusion coefficients under the action of a scanning electron beam are 15 times larger than under the same conditions without irradiation.

  3. Genetic transformation of wheat via particle bombardment.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Caroline A; Jones, Huw D

    2014-01-01

    Since its first invention in the late 1980s the particle gun has evolved from a basic gunpowder driven machine firing tungsten particles to one more refined which uses helium gas as the propellant to launch alternative heavy metal particles such as gold and silver. The simple principle is that DNA-coated microscopic particles (microcarriers) are accelerated at high speed by helium gas within a vacuum and travel at such a velocity as to penetrate target cells. However, the process itself involves a range of parameters which are open to variation: microparticle type and size, gun settings (rupture pressure, target distance, vacuum drawn, etc.), preparation of components (e.g., gold coating), and preparation of plant tissues. Here is presented a method optimized for transformation of wheat immature embryos using the Bio-Rad PDS-1000/He particle gun to deliver gold particles coated with a gene of interest and the selectable marker gene bar at 650 psi rupture pressure. Following bombardment, various tissue culture phases are used to encourage embryogenic callus formation and regeneration of plantlets and subsequent selection using glufosinate ammonium causes suppression of non-transformed tissues, thus assisting the detection of transformed plants. This protocol has been used successfully to generate transgenic plants for a wide range of wheat varieties, both spring and winter bread wheats (T. aestivum L.) and durum wheats (T. turgidum L.). PMID:24243206

  4. Dynamic behavior of thermionic dispenser cathodes under ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortenraad, R.; van der Gon, A. W. Denier; Brongersma, H. H.; Gärtner, G.; Raasch, D.; Manenschijn, A.

    2001-04-01

    We have investigated the surface coverage and electron emission of thermionic dispenser cathodes during 3 keV Ar+ ion bombardment, thereby simulating the bombardment of the cathodes by residual gases that takes place in cathode-ray tubes as used in television sets. During the ion bombardment at the operating temperature of 1030 °C, a dynamic equilibrium is established between the sputter removal and resupply mechanisms of the Ba and O atoms that form the dipole layer on the cathode substrate. We demonstrated that the performance of the cathodes under ion bombardment is governed by the O removal and resupply rates. It was found that the Ba resupply rate is almost an order of magnitude higher than the O resupply rate, but that the Ba can only be present on the surface bound to O atoms. Therefore, the Ba/O ratio is approximately equal to unity during the ion bombardment. Based on the investigations of the removal and resupply processes, we proposed a model that accurately describes the surface coverage and electron emission during the ion bombardment, including the dependence of the ion flux and cathode temperature.

  5. Bombardment-induced segregation and redistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Wiedersich, H.

    1986-04-01

    During ion bombardment, a number of processes can alter the compositional distribution and microstructure in near-surface regions of alloys. The relative importance of each process depends principally on the target composition, temperature, and ion characteristics. In addition to displacement mixing leading to a randomization of atomic locations, and preferential loss of alloying elements by sputtering, which are dominant at relatively low temperatures, several thermally-activated processes, including radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and Gibbsian adsorption, also play important roles. At elevated temperatures, nonequilibrium point defects induced by ion impacts become mobile and tend to anneal out by recombination and diffusion to extended sinks, such as dislocations, grain boundaries and free surfaces. The high defect concentrations, far exceeding the thermodynamic equilbrium values, can enhance diffusion-controlled processes, while persistent defect fluxes, originating from the spatial non-uniformity in defect production and annihilation, give rise to local redistribution of alloy constituents because of radiation-induced segregation. Moreover, when the alloy is maintained at high temperature, Gibbsian adsorption, driven by the reduction in free energy of the system, occurs even without irradiation; it involves a compositional perturbation in a few atom layers near the alloy surface. The combination of these processes leads to the complex development of a compositionally-modified layer in the subsurface region. In the present paper, selected examples of these different phenomena and their synergistic effects on the evolution of the near-surface compositions of alloys during sputtering and ion implantation at elevated temperatures are discussed. 74 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Biological effect of lead-212 localized in the nucleus of mammalian cells: role of recoil energy in the radiotoxicity of internal alpha-particle emitters.

    PubMed

    Azure, M T; Archer, R D; Sastry, K S; Rao, D V; Howell, R W

    1994-11-01

    The radiochemical dipyrrolidinedithiocarbamato-212Pb(II) [212Pb(PDC)2] is synthesized and its effects on colony formation in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells are investigated. The cellular uptake, biological retention, subcellular distribution and cytotoxicity of the radiocompound are determined. The 212Pb is taken up quickly by the cells, reaching saturation levels in 1.25 h. When the cells are washed, the intracellular activity is retained with a biological half-life of 11.6 h. Gamma-ray spectroscopy indicates that the 212Pb daughters (212Bi, 212Po and 208Tl) are in secular equilibrium within the cell. About 72% of the cellular activity localizes in the cell nucleus, of which 35% is bound specifically to nuclear DNA. The mean cellular uptake required to achieve 37% survival is 0.35 mBq of 212Pb per cell, which delivers a dose of 1.0 Gy to the cell nucleus when the recoil energy of 212Bi and 212Po decays is ignored and 1.7 Gy when recoil is included. The corresponding RBE values compared to acute external 137Cs gamma rays at 37% survival are 4.0 and 2.3, respectively. The chemical Pb(PDC)2 is not chemotoxic at the concentrations used in this study. Because the beta-particle emitter 212Pb decays to the alpha-particle-emitting daughters 212Bi and 212Po, these studies provide information on the biological effects of alpha-particle decays that occur in the cell nucleus. Our earlier studies with cells of the same cell line using 210Po (emits 5.3 MeV alpha particle) localized predominantly in the cytoplasm resulted in an RBE of 6. These earlier results for 210Po, along with the present results for 212Pb, suggest that the recoil energy associated with the 212Bi and 212Po daughter nuclei plays little or no role in imparting biological damage to critical targets in the cell nucleus. PMID:7938477

  7. Two Years of Chemical Sampling on Meridiani Planum by the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer Onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, J.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B.C.; Dreibus, G.; Rieder, R.; Wanke, H.; d'Uston, C.; Economou, T.; Klingelhofer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.W.; Squyres, S.W.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.

    2006-01-01

    For over two terrestrial years, the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring the martian surface at Meridiani Planum using the Athena instrument payload [1], including the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). The APXS has a small sensor head that is mounted on the robotic arm of the rover. The chemistry, mineralogy and morphology of selected samples were investigated by the APXS along with the Moessbauer Spectrometer (MB) and the Microscopic Imager (MI). The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) provided the possibility to dust and/or abrade rock surfaces down to several millimeters to expose fresh material for analysis. We report here on APXS data gathered along the nearly 6-kilometers long traverse in craters and plains of Meridiani.

  8. Formation of the isomeric pair {sup 194}Ir{sup m,g} in interactions of {alpha} particles with {sup 192}Os

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M. S.; Qaim, S. M.; Sudar, S.

    2011-08-15

    Cross sections were measured by the activation technique for the nuclear processes {sup 192}Os({alpha},d+pn+np){sup 194}Ir{sup m,g} up to {alpha}-particle energies of 39 MeV. From the measured data the isomeric cross-section ratio was deduced as a function of projectile energy. The present experimental data as well as those for the {sup 194}Pt(n,p){sup 194}Ir{sup m,g} reaction, given in the literature, were compared with the results of nuclear model calculations using the code talys, which combines the statistical, precompound, and direct interactions. In general, the experimental data were reproduced well by the model calculations, which were done using relatively low values of {eta} (i.e., {Theta}{sub eff}/{Theta}{sub rigid}). The results provide more evidence for the mass dependence of {eta}. The level density parameter for {sup 194}Ir was determined unambiguously.

  9. Scaling of cross sections for K-electron capture by high-energy protons and alpha-particles from the multielectron atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1976-01-01

    Electron capture by protons from H, He, and the K-shell of Ar, and alpha particles from He are considered. It is shown that when a certain function of the experimental cross sections is plotted versus the inverse of the collision energy, at high energies the function falls on a straight line. At lower energies the function concaves up or down, depending on the charge of the projectile, the effective charge and the ionization potential of the electron that is being captured. The plot can be used to predict cross sections where experimental data are not available, and as a guide in future experiments. High energy scaling formulas for K-electron capture by low-charge projectiles are given.

  10. Alpha particles accompanying the weak decay of {sub {lambda}}{sup 10}Be and {sub {lambda}}{sup 10}B hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Majling, L. Kuzmin, V. A. Tetereva, T. V.

    2006-05-15

    The possibility of a detailed investigation of weak {lambda}N interaction in the {sub {lambda}}{sup 10}Be and {sub {lambda}}{sub /10}B hypernuclei, which stand out owing to their {alpha}{alpha}N{lambda} cluster structure, is discussed. The detection of a few groups of correlated {alpha}{alpha} pairs will furnish information about decays to specific states of product nuclei ({sup 8}Be*, {sup 8}Li, {sup 8}B), thereby paving the way to a phenomenological analysis of the weak decays of p-shell hypernuclei. The ratios of the intensities of individual alpha-particle groups to be measured in experiments at the cyclotron of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna) will provide a useful criterion for choosing an appropriate model of weak {lambda}N interaction. The current state of hypernuclear physics is briefly reviewed.

  11. Experimental data on inclusive spectra of protons in interaction of 3. 6-GeV/nucleon. cap alpha. particles with Cu and Sn nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ad'yasevich, B.P.; Antonenko, V.G.; Vinogradov, A.A.; Grigor'yan, Y.I.; Dukhanov, V.I.; Ippolitov, M.S.; Karadzhev, K.V.; Lebedev, A.L.; Man'ko, V.I.; Nikolaev, S.A.

    1983-07-01

    Results are reported on the study of inclusive spectra of protons emitted in interaction of 3.6-GeV/nucleon ..cap alpha.. particles with Cu and Sn nuclei. Proton angular distributions are given for three intervals of velocities: 0.325< or approx. =..beta..< or approx. =0.425, 0.425< or approx. =..beta..< or approx. =0.525, and 0.525< or approx. =..beta..< or approx. =0.625. The nature of the angular distributions is practically independent of the combination of colliding nuclei but is substantially different for different velocity intervals. Total cross sections and average charged-particle multiplicities are found in the velocity interval ..beta..> or approx. =0.32. Rapidity distributions are obtained for the invariant cross sections for proton production in the rapidity range -0.2< or approx. =Y< or approx. =0.6 for 0.35< or approx. =p/sub perpendicular//mc< or approx. =0.7.

  12. Elementary Analysis of a Cometary Surface - the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer APXS on the Rosetta Mission to Comet 67P/CHURYUMOV-GERASIMENKO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmanke, Dirk; Economou, Thanasis; Brueckner, Johannes; Gellert, Ralf; Rodionov, Daniel; Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Girones Lopez, Jordi; Uston, Lionel D.

    After a 10 years cruise the Rosetta probe will reach its final target in the middle of this year, the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The main objectives of the mission are to gain more knowledge of the composition, the origin and formation of comets and the solar system. After extensive remote examination of the comet the lander Philae will be separated to land on the comet surface. It will start immediately examining the landing site with its scientific payload. A part of this payload is the APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer), it will measure in situ the chemical composition of the comet's surface and its changes during the journey of the comet towards the sun. APXS is a combination of two spectrometers in one single instrument, being low in mass and power consumption. It will irradiate the cometary surface with Curium 244 sources, which are emitting alpha-particle and X-rays. In the alpha-mode the instrument uses alpha backscattering spectroscopy to detect lower Z elements like C, N and O and groups of elements with higher Z. In the X-ray mode alpha particle/X-ray induced X-ray spectroscopy (XRF) will allow the detection of most of the higher Z elements from Na up to Ni and above. Both modes will be always run in parallel allowing to determine lower and higher Z elements simultaneously. During the long duration travel to the comet checkouts and software updates of the Rosetta probe and its payload were performed at regular intervals. In recent 3 years the solar powered Rosetta probe had to pass a hibernation phase because of a long passage far away from the sun. After the successful wakeup in January 2014 an extensive test phase of all instruments and subsystems has to be performed, including the APXS. After the landing on the comet an intense long measurement phase of all instruments is planned, the First Science Sequence (FSS). It will be followed by a long term science phase (LTS), determined by periodical changes between measurements and forced breaks

  13. Alpha-particles as probes of nuclear shape in the rare earths and structure effects on proton emission in the mass 80 region

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.; Nicolis, N.G.; Abenante, V.; Majka, Z.; Semkow, T.M. . Dept. of Internal Medicine); Baktash, C.; Beene, J.R.; Garcia-Bermudez, G.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Johnson, N.R.; Lee, I.Y.; McGowan, F.K.; Riley, M.A.; Virtanen, A. ); Griffin, H.C. )

    1989-01-01

    Low emission barriers and large subbarrier anisotropies in the alpha-particle decay with respect to the spin direction, of Sn and rare earth compound nuclei, are examined in the light of recent calculations incorporating deformation. For the rare earth systems deformation which increases with spin is necessary to explain the data. Energy spectra and angular correlations of evaporated protons from the {sup 52}Cr({sup 34}S, 2p2n){sup 82}Sr reaction were measured in coincidence with discrete transition. Large changes in the shape of the proton spectra were observed when high spin states in different rotation al bands are populated. These effects cannot be explained by phase space arguments in the deexcitation process. They are interpreted as due to near-yrast to near-yrast stretched proton emission, which preferentially populates the yrast band by subbarrier protons. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Benchmarking the Geant4 full system simulation of an associated alpha-particle detector for use in a D-T neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P; Cates, Joshua W; Hausladen, Paul A; Laubach, Mitchell A; Sparger, Johnathan E; Donnald, Samuel B

    2012-08-01

    The position-sensitive alpha-particle detector used to provide the starting time and initial direction of D-T neutrons in a fast-neutron imaging system was simulated with a Geant4-based Monte Carlo program. The whole detector system, which consists of a YAP:Ce scintillator, a fiber-optic faceplate, a light guide, and a position-sensitive photo-multiplier tube (PSPMT), was modeled, starting with incident D-T alphas. The scintillation photons, whose starting time follows the distribution of a scintillation decay curve, were produced and emitted uniformly into a solid angle of 4π along the track segments of the alpha and its secondaries. Through tracking all photons and taking into account the quantum efficiency of the photocathode, the number of photoelectrons and their time and position distributions were obtained. Using a four-corner data reconstruction formula, the flood images of the alpha detector with and without optical grease between the YAP scintillator and the fiber-optic faceplate were obtained, which show agreement with the experimental results. The reconstructed position uncertainties of incident alpha particles for both cases are 1.198 mm and 0.998 mm respectively across the sensitive area of the detector. Simulation results also show that comparing with other faceplates composed of 500 μm, 300 μm, and 100 μm fibers, the 10-μm-fiber faceplate is the best choice to build the detector for better position performance. In addition, the study of the background originating inside the D-T generator suggests that for 500-μm-thick YAP:Ce coated with 1-μm-thick aluminum, and very good signal-to-noise ratio can be expected through application of a simple threshold. PMID:22728838

  15. Treatment of lung tumor colonies with 90Y targeted to blood vessels: comparison with the alpha-particle emitter 213Bi.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Stabin, M; Yoriyaz, H; Brechbiel, M; Mirzadeh, S

    1999-01-01

    An in vivo lung tumor model system for radioimmunotherapy of lung metastases was used to test the relative effectiveness of the vascular- targeted beta-particle emitter 90Y, and alpha-particle emitter, 213Bi. Yttrium-90 was shown to be stably bound by CHXa" DTPA-MAb 201B conjugates and delivered efficiently to lung tumor blood vessels. Dosimetry calculations indicated that the lung received 16.2 Gy/MBq from treatment with 90Y MAb 201B, which was a sevenfold greater absorbed dose than any other organ examined. Therapy was optimal for 90Y with 3 MBq injected. Bismuth-213 MAb 201B also delivered a similar absorbed dose (15Gy/MBq) to the lung. Yttrium-90 was found to be slightly more effective against larger tumors than 213Bi, consistent with the larger range of 2 MeV beta particles from 90Y than the 8 MeV alpha particles from 213Bi. Treatment of EMT-6 tumors growing in immunodeficient SCID mice with 90Y or 213Bi MAb 201 resulted in significant destruction of tumor colonies; however, 90Y MAb 201B was toxic for the SCID mice, inflicting acute lung damage. In another tumor model, IC-12 rat tracheal carcinoma growing in SCID mouse lungs, 90Y therapy was more effective than 213Bi at destroying lung tumors. However, 90Y MAb 201B toxicity for the lung limited any therapeutic effect. We conclude that, although vascular-targeted 90Y MAb can be an effective therapeutic agent, particularly for larger tumors, in this model system, acute damage to the lung may limit its application. PMID:10096515

  16. Evaluation of internal alpha-particle radiation exposure and subsequent fertility among a cohort of women formerly employed in the radium dial industry

    SciTech Connect

    Schieve, L.A.; Davis, F.; Freels, S.

    1997-02-01

    This study examined the effect of internal exposure to {alpha}-particle radiation on subsequent fertility among women employed in radium dial industry prior to 1930, when appreciable amounts of radium were often ingested through the practice of pointing the paint brush with the lips. The analysis was limited to women for whom a radium body burden measurement had been obtained and who were married prior to age 45 (n = 603). Internal radiation dose to the ovary was calculated based on initial intakes of radium-226 and radium-228, average ovarian mass, number and energy of {alpha} particles emitted, fraction of energy absorbed within the ovary, effective retention integrals and estimated photon irradiation. Time between marriage and pregnancy, number of pregnancies and number of live births served as surrogates for fertility. Radiation appeared to have no effect on fertility at estimated cumulative ovarian dose equivalents below 5 Sv; above this dose, however, statistically significant declines in both number of pregnancies and live births were observed. These trends persisted after multivariable adjustment for potential confounding variables and after exclusion of subjects contributing a potential classification or selection bias to the study. Additionally, the high-dose group experienced fewer live births than would have been expected based on population rates. There were no differences in time to first pregnancy between high- and low-dose groups. These results are consistent with earlier studies of {gamma}-ray exposures and suggest that exposure to high doses of radiation from internally deposited radium reduces fertility rather than inducing sterility. 42 refs., 5 tabs.

  17. Dissipation of Parallel and Oblique Alfvén-Cyclotron Waves—Implications for Heating of Alpha Particles in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Y. G.; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Moya, Pablo S.; Wicks, Robert T.; Poedts, Stefaan

    2015-11-01

    We perform 2.5D hybrid simulations with massless fluid electrons and kinetic particle-in-cell ions to study the temporal evolution of ion temperatures, temperature anisotropies, and velocity distribution functions in relation to the dissipation and turbulent evolution of a broadband spectrum of parallel and obliquely propagating Alfvén-cyclotron waves. The purpose of this paper is to study the relative role of parallel versus oblique Alfvén-cyclotron waves in the observed heating and acceleration of alpha particles in the fast solar wind. We consider collisionless homogeneous multi-species plasma, consisting of isothermal electrons, isotropic protons, and a minor component of drifting α particles in a finite-β fast stream near the Earth. The kinetic ions are modeled by initially isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution functions, which develop nonthermal features and temperature anisotropies when a broadband spectrum of low-frequency nonresonant, ω ≤ 0.34 Ωp, Alfvén-cyclotron waves is imposed at the beginning of the simulations. The initial plasma parameter values, such as ion density, temperatures, and relative drift speeds, are supplied by fast solar wind observations made by the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. The imposed broadband wave spectra are left-hand polarized and resemble Wind measurements of Alfvénic turbulence in the solar wind. The imposed magnetic field fluctuations for all cases are within the inertial range of the solar wind turbulence and have a Kraichnan-type spectral slope α = -3/2. We vary the propagation angle from θ = 0° to θ = 30° and θ = 60°, and find that the heating of alpha particles is most efficient for the highly oblique waves propagating at 60°, whereas the protons exhibit perpendicular cooling at all propagation angles.

  18. Evaluation of internal alpha-particle radiation exposure and subsequent fertility among a cohort of women formerly employed in the radium dial industry.

    PubMed

    Schieve, L A; Davis, F; Roeske, J; Handler, A; Freels, S; Stinchcomb, T; Keane, A

    1997-02-01

    This study examined the effect of internal exposure to alpha-particle radiation on subsequent fertility among women employed in the radium dial industry prior to 1930, when appreciable amounts of radium were often ingested through the practice of pointing the paint brush with the lips. The analysis was limited to women for whom a radium body burden measurement had been obtained and who were married prior to age 45 (n = 603). Internal radiation dose to the ovary was calculated based on initial intakes of radium-226 and radium-228, average ovarian mass, number and energy of alpha particles emitted, fraction of energy absorbed within the ovary, effective retention integrals and estimated photon irradiation. Time between marriage and pregnancy, number of pregnancies and number of live births served as surrogates for fertility. Radiation appeared to have no effect on fertility at estimated cumulative ovarian dose equivalents below 5 Sv; above this dose, however, statistically significant declines in both number of pregnancies and live births were observed. These trends persisted after multivariable adjustment for potential confounding variables and after exclusion of subjects contributing a potential classification or selection bias to the study. Additionally, the high-dose group experienced fewer live births than would have been expected based on population rates. There were no differences in time to first pregnancy between high- and low-dose groups. These results are consistent with earlier studies of gamma-ray exposures and suggest that exposure to high doses of radiation from internally deposited radium reduces fertility rather than inducing sterility. PMID:9008216

  19. Role of low-level impurities and intercalated molecular gases in the {alpha} particle radiolysis of polytetrafluoroethylene examined by static time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometery

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Gregory L.; Szakal, Christopher; Wetteland, Christopher J.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2006-07-15

    The structural degradation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) upon irradiation with MeV alpha ({alpha}) particles is accompanied by the proliferation of hydrogenated and oxygen-functionalized fluorocarbon species. In this article, we explore the origin of monoxide- and dioxide-functionalized fluorocarbon species that emerge upon {alpha} particle irradiation of PTFE. Samples of neat PTFE were irradiated to {alpha} doses in the range of 10{sup 7}-5x10{sup 10} rad using 5.5 MeV {sup 4}He{sup 2+} ions produced in a tandem accelerator. Static time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), using a 20 keV C{sub 60}{sup +} source, was employed to probe chemical changes as a function of {alpha} particle irradiation. Chemical images and high-resolution mass spectra were collected in both the positive and negative polarities. Residual gas analysis, utilized to monitor the liberation of molecular gases during {alpha} particle irradiation of the PTFE in vacuum, is discussed in relationship to the TOF-SIMS data.

  20. Thermal effects of impact bombardments on Noachian Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, Oleg; Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2016-05-01

    Noachian (prior to ca. 3700 Ma) terranes are the oldest and most heavily cratered landscapes on Mars, with crater densities comparable to the ancient highlands of the Moon and Mercury. Intense early cratering affected Mars by melting and fracturing its crust, draping large areas in impact ejecta, generating regional-scale hydrothermal systems, and increasing atmospheric pressure (and thereby, temperature) to periodically re-start an otherwise moribund hydrological cycle. Post primary-accretionary bombardment scenarios that shaped early Mars can be imagined in two ways: either as a simple exponential decay with an approximately 100 Myr half-life, or as a "sawtooth" timeline characterized by both faster-than-exponential decay from primary accretion and relatively lower total delivered mass. Indications are that a late bombardment spike was superposed on an otherwise broadly monotonic decline subsequent to primary accretion, of which two types are investigated: a classical "Late Heavy Bombardment" (LHB) peak of impactors centered at ca. 3900 Ma that lasted 100 Myr, and a protracted bombardment typified by a sudden increase in impactor flux at ca. 4100-4200 Ma with a correspondingly longer decay time (≤400 Myr). Numerical models for each of the four bombardment scenarios cited above show that the martian crust mostly escaped exogenic melting from bombardment. We find that depending on the chosen scenario, other physical effects of impacts were more important than melt generation. Model output shows that between 10 and 100% of the Noachian surface was covered by impact craters and blanketed in resultant (hot) ejecta. If early Mars was generally arid and cold, impact-induced heating punctuated this surface state by intermittently destabilizing the near-subsurface cryosphere to generate regional-scale hydrothermal systems. Rather than being deleterious to the proclivity of Noachian Mars to host an emergent biosphere, this intense early impact environment instead

  1. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer APXS on the Rosetta lander Philae to explore the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girones-Lopez, Jordi; Schmanke, Dirk; Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Maul, Jasmine; Brueckner, Johannes; Duston, Claude; Gellert, Ralf; Klingelhöfer, Göstar

    The Rosetta Mission was launched in 2004 with the main objectives to gain a better under-standing of the origin and formation of comets and the solar system. After 10 years of cruise the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko will be reached in 2014 and the lander Philae will be deployed on the surface. As a part of the lander payload the APXS will measure in situ the chemical composition of the comet's surface and it's changes during the journey of the comet towards the sun. APXS combines an alpha mode for alpha backscattering spectroscopy and an x-ray mode for alpha particle/x-ray induced x-ray spectroscopy (XRF) in one single instrument, being low in mass and power consumption. The comet surface will be irradiated by a Curium 244 source exciting characteristic x-rays of the elements present in the surface material. The alpha mode will allow detection of elements like C and O and groups of elements with higher Z. The x-ray-SD-detector will allow the detection of most of the elements from Na up to Ni and above. During the long duration travel to the comet checkouts and software updates of the Rosetta probe and its payload are performed at regular intervals. These are used to opti-mise and improve the quality of the x-ray and alpha-spectra of the APXS. Soon the Rosetta probe will go into a 3 year long hibernation mode. It will awake when approaching it's target, providing us with new exiting data that will shed light on state, evolution and origin of comets and the solar system. Acknowledgements: This project is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under contracts 50 QP 0404 and 50 QP 0902. References: G. Klingelhüfer, J. Brückner, C. d'Uston, R. Gellert, and R. Rieder, The Rosetta Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS), Space Science Reviews, Vol.128 (2007) 383-396; doi:10.1007/s11214-006-9137-3

  2. Dating Howardite Melt Clasts: Evidence for an Extended Vestan Bombardment?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Hodges, K. V.; Wadhwa, M.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Howardites are polymict breccias that, together with eucrites and diogenites (HED), likely originate from the vestan surface (regolith/ megaregolith), and display a heterogeneous distribution of eucritic and diogenitic material. Melt clasts are also present alongside other regolithic features within howardites, and are noteworthy for their compositional variability and appearance. Melt clasts formed by impact events provide a snapshot of the timings and conditions of surface gardening and bombardment on the vestan surface. By dating such clasts, we aim to better constrain the timings of impact events on Vesta, and to establish whether the impact flux in the asteroid belt was similar to that on the Moon. As the Moon is used as the basis for characterising impact models of the inner solar system, it is necessary to verify that apparent wide-scale events are seen in other planetary bodies. In particular, the observed clustering of Apollo melt clast ages between 3.8-4.0 Ga has led to two hypotheses: 1) The Moon was subjected to a sudden event - 'Lunar Cataclysm' or period of 'Late Heavy Bombardment' (LHB), 2) The age cluster represents the end of an epoch of declining bombardment or 'Heavy Bombardment. No consensus has emerged regarding one or other hypothesis. We are testing these hypotheses by seeking evidence for such events in materials other than those derived from the Moon.

  3. Fertile transgenic wheat from microprojectile bombardment of scutellar tissue.

    PubMed

    Becker, D; Brettschneider, R; Lörz, H

    1994-02-01

    A reproducible transformation system for hexaploid wheat was developed based on particle bombardment of scutellar tissue of immature embryos. Particle bombardment was carried out using a PDS 1000/He gun. Plant material was bombarded with the plasmid pDB1 containing the beta-glucuronidase gene (uidA) under the control of the actin-1 promoter of rice, and the selectable marker gene bar (phosphinothricin acetyltransferase) under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter. Selection was carried out using the herbicide Basta (Glufosinate-ammonium). From a total number of 1050 bombarded immature embryos, in seven independent transformation experiments, 59 plants could be regenerated. Putative transformants were screened for enzyme activity by the histochemical GUS assay using cut leaf material and by spraying the whole plants with an aqueous solution of the herbicide Basta. Twelve regenerants survived Basta spraying and showed GUS-activity. Southern-blot analysis indicated the presence of introduced foreign genes in the genomic DNA of the transformants and both marker genes were present in all plants analysed. To date, four plants have been grown to maturity and set seed. Histochemically stained pollen grains showed a 1:1 segregation of the uidA gene in all plants tested. A 3:1 segregation of the introduced genes was demonstrated by enzyme activity tests and Southern blot analysis of R1 plants. PMID:8148881

  4. JOVIAN EARLY BOMBARDMENT: PLANETESIMAL EROSION IN THE INNER ASTEROID BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Turrini, D.; Coradini, A.; Magni, G.

    2012-05-01

    The asteroid belt is an open window on the history of the solar system, as it preserves records of both its formation process and its secular evolution. The progenitors of the present-day asteroids formed in the Solar Nebula almost contemporary to the giant planets. The actual process producing the first generation of asteroids is uncertain, strongly depending on the physical characteristics of the Solar Nebula, and the different scenarios produce very diverse initial size-frequency distributions (SFDs). In this work, we investigate the implications of the formation of Jupiter, plausibly the first giant planet to form, on the evolution of the primordial asteroid belt. The formation of Jupiter triggered a short but intense period of primordial bombardment, previously unaccounted for, which caused an early phase of enhanced collisional evolution in the asteroid belt. Our results indicate that this Jovian Early Bombardment caused the erosion or the disruption of bodies smaller than a threshold size, which strongly depends on the SFD of the primordial planetesimals. If the asteroid belt was dominated by planetesimals less than 100 km in diameter, the primordial bombardment would have caused the erosion of bodies smaller than 200 km in diameter. If the asteroid belt was instead dominated by larger planetesimals, the bombardment would have resulted in the destruction of bodies as big as 500 km.

  5. Ripple formation on silicon by medium energy ion bombardment.

    PubMed

    Chini, Tapas Kumar; Datta, Debi Prasad; Bhattacharyya, Satya Ranjan

    2009-06-01

    The formation of a self-organized nanoscale ripple pattern after off-normally incident ion bombardment on the surface of amorphous materials, or on semiconductors like silicon that are easily amorphized by ion bombardment, has attracted much attention in recent years from the point of view of both theory and applications. As the energy of the impinging ions increases from low to medium, i.e. several hundred eV to a few tens of keV, the ratio of amplitude to wavelength of the generated ripple pattern becomes so large that inter-peak shadowing of the incident ion flux takes place. Morphologically, the sinusoidal surface profile starts to become distorted after prolonged ion bombardment under such conditions. Structural and compositional modifications of the ripple morphology generated under shadowing conditions include the formation of a thicker amorphous layer with high incorporation of argon atoms in the form of nanometer sized bubbles around the middle part of the front slope of the ripple facing the ion beam, as compared to the rear slope. The present paper reviews recent developments in the experimental study of morphological, structural and compositional aspects of ripple patterns generated on a silicon surface after medium keV (30-120 keV) argon bombardment mainly at an angle of ion incidence of 60°. PMID:21715743

  6. Advances in fast-atom-bombardment mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hemling, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of fast atom bombardment and field desorption mass spectrometry was made to determine relative sensitivity and applicability. A series of glycosphingolipids and a series of protected oligonucleotides of known structure were analyzed to ascertain the potential utility of fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry in the structural elucidation of novel compounds in these classes. Negative ion mass markers were also developed. Fast atom bombardment was found to be one-to-two orders of magnitude more sensitive than field desorption based on the analysis of a limited number of compounds from several classes. Superior sensitivity was not universal and field desorption was clearly better in certain cases. In the negative ion mode in particular, fast atom bombardment was found to be a useful tool for the determination of the primary structure of glycosphingolipids and oligonucleotides. Carbohydrate sequence and branching information, and a fatty acid and lipid base composition were readily obtained from the mass spectra of glycosphingolipids while bidirectional nucleotide sequence, nucleotide base, and protecting group assignments were obtained for oligonucleotides. Based on this knowledge, a tentative structure of a human peripheral nervous system glycosphingolipid implicated in certain cases of disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Lou Gehrig's Disease, was proposed. Suitable negative ion mass markers were found in dispersions of poly(ethylene) and poly(propylene)glycols in a triethylenetetramine matrix, a matrix which also proved useful in the analysis of glycosphingolipids. These polyglycol dispersions provided ions for calibration to 2300 daltons.

  7. Effects of 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation on the electrical properties of nickel Schottky diodes on 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotoso, E.; Meyer, W. E.; Auret, F. D.; Paradzah, A. T.; Diale, M.; Coelho, S. M. M.; Janse van Rensburg, P. J.; Ngoepe, P. N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Current-voltage, capacitance-voltage and conventional deep level transient spectroscopy at temperature ranges from 40 to 300 K have been employed to study the influence of alpha-particle irradiation from an 241Am source on Ni/4H-SiC Schottky contacts. The nickel Schottky barrier diodes were resistively evaporated on n-type 4H-SiC samples of doping density of 7.1 × 1015 cm-3. It was observed that radiation damage caused an increase in ideality factors of the samples from 1.04 to 1.07, an increase in Schottky barrier height from 1.25 to 1.31 eV, an increase in series resistance from 48 to 270 Ω but a decrease in saturation current density from 55 to 9 × 10-12 A m-2 from I-V plots at 300 K. The free carrier concentration of the sample decreased slightly after irradiation. Conventional DLTS showed peaks due to four deep levels for as-grown and five deep levels after irradiation. The Richardson constant, as determined from a modified Richardson plot assuming a Gaussian distribution of barrier heights for the as-grown and irradiated samples were 133 and 151 A cm-2 K-2, respectively. These values are similar to literature values.

  8. Labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with the alpha-particle-emitting nuclide astatine-211: preservation of immunoreactivity and in vivo localizing capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Zalutsky, M R; Garg, P K; Friedman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1989-01-01

    alpha-Particles such as those emitted by 211At may be advantageous for radioimmunotherapy since they are radiation of high linear energy transfer, depositing high energy over a short distance. Here we describe a strategy for labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with 211At by means of the bifunctional reagent N-succinimidyl 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate. An intact antibody, 81C6, and the F(ab')2 fragment of Me1-14 (both reactive with human gliomas) were labeled with 211At in high yield and with a specific activity of up to 4 mCi/mg in a time frame compatible with the 7.2-hr half-life of 211At. Quantitative in vivo binding assays demonstrated that radioastatination was accomplished with maintenance of high specific binding and affinity. Comparison of the biodistribution of 211At-labeled Me1-14 F(ab')2 to that of a nonspecific antibody fragment labeled with 211At and 131I in athymic mice bearing D-54 MG human glioma xenografts demonstrated selective and specific targeting of 211At-labeled antibody in this human tumor model. PMID:2476813

  9. Refinement of the Compton-Rayleigh scatter ratio method for use on the Mars Science Laboratory alpha particle X-ray spectrometer: II - Extraction of invisible element content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrett, Glynis M.; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; King, Penelope L.; Nield, Emily; O'Meara, Joanne M.; Pradler, Irina

    2016-02-01

    The intensity ratio C/R between Compton and Rayleigh scatter peaks of the exciting Pu L X-rays in the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is strongly affected by the presence of very light elements such as oxygen which cannot be detected directly by the APXS. C/R values are determined along with element concentrations by fitting APXS spectra of geochemical reference materials (GRMs) with the GUAPX code. A quantity K is defined as the ratio between the C/R value determined by Monte Carlo simulation based on the measured element concentrations and the fitted C/R value from the spectrum. To ensure optimally accurate K values, the choice of appropriate GRMs is explored in detail, with attention paid to Rb and Sr, whose characteristic Kα X-ray peaks overlap the Pu Lα scatter peaks. The resulting relationship between the ratio K and the overall oxygen fraction is linear. This provides a calibration from which the concentration of additional light invisible constituents (ALICs) such as water may be estimated in unknown rock and conglomerate samples. Several GRMs are used as 'unknowns' in order to evaluate the accuracy of ALIC concentrations derived in this manner.

  10. Membrane-Dependent Bystander Effect Contributes to Amplification of the Response to Alpha-Particle Irradiation in Targeted and Nontargeted Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanot, Maite; Hoarau, Jim; Carriere, Marie; Angulo, Jaime F.; Khodja, Hicham

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Free radicals are believed to play an active role in the bystander response. This study investigated their origin as well as their temporal and spatial impacts in the bystander effect. Methods and Materials: We employed a precise alpha-particle microbeam to target a small fraction of subconfluent osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1). gammaH2AX-53BP1 foci, oxidative metabolism changes, and micronuclei induction in targeted and bystander cells were assessed. Results: Cellular membranes and mitochondria were identified as two distinct reactive oxygen species producers. The global oxidative stress observed after irradiation was significantly attenuated after cells were treated with filipin, evidence for the primal role of membrane in the bystander effect. To determine the membrane's impact at a cellular level, micronuclei yield was measured when various fractions of the cell population were individually targeted while the dose per cell remained constant. Induction of micronuclei increased in bystander cells as well as in targeted cells and was attenuated by filipin treatment, demonstrating a role for bystander signals between irradiated cells in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Conclusions: A complex interaction of direct irradiation and bystander signals leads to a membrane-dependent amplification of cell responses that could influence therapeutic outcomes in tissues exposed to low doses or to environmental exposure.

  11. Generation of temperature anisotropy for alpha particle velocity distributions in solar wind at 0.3 AU: Vlasov simulations and Helios observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, D.; Bourouaine, S.; Valentini, F.; Marsch, E.; Veltri, P.

    2014-04-01

    Solar wind "in situ" measurements from the Helios spacecraft in regions of the Heliosphere close to the Sun (˜0.3 AU), at which typical values of the proton plasma beta are observed to be lower than unity, show that the alpha particle distribution functions depart from the equilibrium Maxwellian configuration, displaying significant elongations in the direction perpendicular to the background magnetic field. In the present work, we made use of multi-ion hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations to provide theoretical support and interpretation to the empirical evidences above. Our numerical results show that, at variance with the case of βp≃1 discussed in Perrone et al. (2011), for βp=0.1 the turbulent cascade in the direction parallel to the ambient magnetic field is not efficient in transferring energy toward scales shorter than the proton inertial length. Moreover, our numerical analysis provides new insights for the theoretical interpretation of the empirical evidences obtained from the Helios spacecraft, concerning the generation of temperature anisotropy in the particle velocity distributions.

  12. Stopping power and energy loss straggling of thin Formvar foil for 0.3-2.7 MeV protons and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammeri, S.; Ammi, H.; Dib, A.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Ourabah, S.; Msimanga, M.; Chekirine, M.; Guesmia, A.

    2012-12-01

    Stopping power and energy loss straggling data for protons (1H+) and alpha particles (4He+) crossing Formvar thin polymeric foils (thickness of ˜0.3 μm) have been measured in the energy range (0.3-2.7) MeV by using the indirect transmission technique. The determined stopping power data were compared to SRIM-2010, PSTAR or ASTAR calculation codes and then analyzed in term of the modified Bethe-Bloch theory to extract the target mean excitation and ionization potential . A resulting value of ≈(69.2±1.8) eV was deduced from proton stopping data. The measured straggling data were corrected from surface roughness effects due to target thickness inhomogeneity observed by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The obtained data were then compared to derived straggling values by Bohr's and Bethe-Livingston's classical theories or by Yang's empirical formula. A deviation of ˜40%-80% from the Bohr's straggling value has been observed for all reported energies, suggesting that the Bohr theory cannot be correctly applied to describe the electronic energy loss straggling process with the used low thickness of Formvar foil. The inner-shell contribution of target electrons to energy loss process is also advanced to explain the observed deviation from experiment in case of He+ ions. Finally, the reliability of Bragg's additivity rule was discussed in case of stopping power and straggling results.

  13. The relationship between internally deposited alpha-particle radiation and subsite-specific liver cancer and liver cirrhosis: an analysis of published data.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Gerald B

    2002-12-01

    Chronic exposure to high LET radiation has been shown to cause liver cancer in humans based on studies of patients who received Thorotrast, a colloidal suspension of thorium dioxide formerly used as a radiological contrast agent, and on studies of Russian nuclear weapons workers exposed to internally ingested plutonium. Risk estimates for these exposures and specific subtypes of liver cancer have not been previously reported. Combining published data with tumor registry data pertinent to the Thorotrast cohorts in Germany, Denmark, Portugal, and Japan and to Russian workers, we generally found significantly elevated risks of three major histologic types of liver tumors: hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cholangiocarcinoma (CC), and hemangiosarcoma (HS) for Thorotrast exposures. In contrast, HS was the only liver tumor significantly associated with the lower alpha-particle doses experienced by the Russian workers. Excess cases per 1,000 persons exposed to Thorotrast were similar for the three liver cancer subtypes but lower for plutonium exposure. Odds ratios (OR) of HS and CC for Thorotrast were from 26 to 789 and from 1 to 31 times higher than those for HCC, respectively. ORs of liver cirrhosis for Thorotrast exposure ranged from 2.7 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.2-3.4) to 6.7 (5.1-8.7). PMID:12674201

  14. Geochemical properties of rocks and soils in Gusev Crater, Mars: Results of the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer from Cumberland Ridge to Home Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Morris, R. V.; Arvidson, R. E.; Brückner, J.; Clark, B. C.; Cohen, B. A.; d'Uston, C.; Economou, T.; Fleischer, I.; Klingelhöfer, G.; McCoy, T. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Schmidt, M. E.; Schröder, C.; Squyres, S. W.; Tréguier, E.; Yen, A. S.; Zipfel, J.

    2008-12-01

    Geochemical diversity of rocks and soils has been discovered by the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) during Spirit's journey over Husband Hill and down into the Inner Basin from sol 470 to 1368. The APXS continues to operate nominally with no changes in calibration or spectral degradation over the course of the mission. Germanium has been added to the Spirit APXS data set with the confirmation that it occurs at elevated levels in many rocks and soils around Home Plate. Twelve new rock classes and two new soil classes have been identified at the Spirit landing site since sol 470 on the basis of the diversity in APXS geochemistry. The new rock classes are Irvine (alkaline basalt), Independence (low Fe outcrop), Descartes (outcrop similar to Independence with higher Fe and Mn), Algonquin (mafic-ultramafic igneous sequence), Barnhill (volcaniclastic sediments enriched in Zn, Cl, and Ge), Fuzzy Smith (high Si and Ti rock), Elizabeth Mahon (high Si, Ni, and Zn outcrop and rock), Halley (hematite-rich outcrop and rock), Montalva (high K, hematite-rich rock), Everett (high Mg, magnetite-rich rock), Good Question (high Si, low Mn rock), and Torquas (high K, Zn, and Ni magnetite-rich rock). New soil classes are Gertrude Weise (very high Si soil) and Eileen Dean (high Mg, magnetite-rich soil). Aqueous processes have played a major role in the formation and alteration of rocks and soils on Husband Hill and in the Inner Basin.

  15. Evaluation of nuclear reaction cross section data for the production of (87)Y and (88)Y via proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced transmutations.

    PubMed

    Zaneb, H; Hussain, M; Amjad, N; Qaim, S M

    2016-06-01

    Proton, deuteron and alpha-particle induced reactions on (87,88)Sr, (nat)Zr and (85)Rb targets were evaluated for the production of (87,88)Y. The literature data were compared with nuclear model calculations using the codes ALICE-IPPE, TALYS 1.6 and EMPIRE 3.2. The evaluated cross sections were generated; therefrom thick target yields of (87,88)Y were calculated. Analysis of radio-yttrium impurities and yield showed that the (87)Sr(p, n)(87)Y and (88)Sr(p, n)(88)Y reactions are the best routes for the production of (87)Y and (88)Y respectively. The calculated yield for the (87)Sr(p, n)(87)Y reaction is 104 MBq/μAh in the energy range of 14→2.7MeV. Similarly, the calculated yield for the (88)Sr(p, n)(88)Y reaction is 3.2 MBq/μAh in the energy range of 15→7MeV. PMID:27016709

  16. Electrical characterization of 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiated 4H-SiC with low doping density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradzah, A. T.; Auret, F. D.; Legodi, M. J.; Omotoso, E.; Diale, M.

    2015-09-01

    Nickel Schottky diodes were fabricated on 4H-SiC. The diodes had excellent current rectification with about ten orders of magnitude between -50 V and +2 V. The ideality factor was obtained as 1.05 which signifies the dominance of the thermionic emission process in charge transport across the barrier. Deep level transient spectroscopy revealed the presence of four deep level defects in the 30-350 K temperature range. The diodes were then irradiated with 5.4 MeV alpha particles up to fluence of 2.6 × 1010 cm-2. Current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements revealed degraded diode characteristics after irradiation. DLTS revealed the presence of three more energy levels with activation enthalpies of 0.42 eV, 0.62 eV and 0.76 eV below the conduction band. These levels were however only realized after annealing the irradiated sample at 200 °C and they annealed out at 400 °C. The defect depth concentration was determined for some of the observed defects.

  17. Valence-band states of ion-bombarded polystyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Terrasi, A. ); Foti, G. ); Hwu, Y. ); Margaritondo, G. )

    1991-08-01

    Ion-bombarded polystyrene with a 0.5-keV Ar{sup +} beam has been investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy performed with synchrotron radiation. After a dose of 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} the evolution of the valence band of the bombarded sample towards an amorphous carbonlike configuration is reported. From the analysis of valence-band spectra we estimated the out-diffusion of hydrogen and showed that its electronic states remain well identified and stable until the hydrogen presence is about 35% with respect to the pristine sample. Finally, comparison with mass spectroscopy measurements on deuterated polystyrene has been performed to determine hydrogen evolution during the ion irradiation.

  18. O+ bombardment of an O and O2 Thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, M.; Johnson, R. E.

    2000-10-01

    Ejection of atoms and molecules from the atmosphere of Mars is caused by energetic O+ pickup-ion bombardment [Luhmann et al, 1992; Jakosky et al.,1994], a process referred to as atmospheric sputtering. This process also occurs on other bodies which have molecules at the exobase such as Europa and Titan. Using a Monte Carlo procedure we calculate the rate of ejection of particles from a model thermosphere composed of O and O2 which is bombarded by energetic O+. To allow for dissociation of O2, collisions between high energy O atoms and O2 molecules are treated using classical molecular dynamics with semi-empirical interaction potentials. O + O collisions are treated with the magic formula method of Zeigler et al.,1985. The effect of molecular binding on the atmospheric sputtering yield is examined.

  19. Treatment of HER2-Expressing Breast Cancer and Ovarian Cancer Cells With Alpha Particle-Emitting {sup 227}Th-Trastuzumab

    SciTech Connect

    Heyerdahl, Helen; Krogh, Cecilie; Borrebaek, Jorgen; Larsen, Asmund; Dahle, Jostein

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cytotoxic effects of low-dose-rate alpha particle-emitting radioimmunoconjugate {sup 227}Th-p-isothiocyanato-benzyl-DOTA-trastuzumab ({sup 227}Th-trastuzumab [where DOTA is 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid]) internalized by breast and ovarian cancer cell lines in order to assess the potential of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab as a therapeutic agent against metastatic cancers that overexpress the HER2 oncogene. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival and cell growth rates of breast cancer cells treated with {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab were compared with rates of cells treated with nonbinding {sup 227}Th-rituximab, cold trastuzumab, and X-radiation. Cell growth experiments were also performed with ovarian cancer cells. Cell-associated radioactivity was measured at several time points, and the mean radiation dose to cells was calculated. Results: SKBR-3 cells got 50% of the mean absorbed radiation dose from internalized activity and 50% from cell surface-bound activity, while BT-474 and SKOV-3 cells got 75% radiation dose from internalized activity and 25% from cell surface-bound activity. Incubation of breast cancer cells with 2.5 kBq/ml {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab for 1 h at 4{sup o}C, followed by washing, resulted in mean absorbed radiation doses of 2 to 2.5 Gy. A dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and an increase in apoptosis were induced in all cell lines. Conclusions: Clinically relevant activity concentrations of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab induced a specific cytotoxic effect in three HER2-expressing cell lines. The cytotoxic effect of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab was higher than that of single-dose X-radiation (relative biological effectiveness = 1.2). These results warrant further studies of treatment of breast cancer and ovarian cancer with {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab.

  20. I. Excluded Volume Effects in Ising Cluster Distributions and Nuclear Multifragmentation II. Multiple-Chance Effects in Alpha-Particle Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Breus, Dimitry E.

    2005-05-16

    In Part 1, geometric clusters of the Ising model are studied as possible model clusters for nuclear multifragmentation. These clusters may not be considered as non-interacting (ideal gas) due to excluded volume effect which predominantly is the artifact of the cluster's finite size. Interaction significantly complicates the use of clusters in the analysis of thermodynamic systems. Stillinger's theory is used as a basis for the analysis, which within the RFL (Reiss, Frisch, Lebowitz) fluid-of-spheres approximation produces a prediction for cluster concentrations well obeyed by geometric clusters of the Ising model. If thermodynamic condition of phase coexistence is met, these concentrations can be incorporated into a differential equation procedure of moderate complexity to elucidate the liquid-vapor phase diagram of the system with cluster interaction included. The drawback of increased complexity is outweighted by the reward of greater accuracy of the phase diagram, as it is demonstrated by the Ising model. A novel nuclear-cluster analysis procedure is developed by modifying Fisher's model to contain cluster interaction and employing the differential equation procedure to obtain thermodynamic variables. With this procedure applied to geometric clusters, the guidelines are developed to look for excluded volume effect in nuclear multifragmentation. In part 2, an explanation is offered for the recently observed oscillations in the energy spectra of {alpha}-particles emitted from hot compound nuclei. Contrary to what was previously expected, the oscillations are assumed to be caused by the multiple-chance nature of {alpha}-evaporation. In a semi-empirical fashion this assumption is successfully confirmed by a technique of two-spectra decomposition which treats experimental {alpha}-spectra has having contributions from at least two independent emitters. Building upon the success of the multiple-chance explanation of the oscillations, Moretto's single-chance evaporation

  1. N-succinimidyl 3-[211At]astato-4-guanidinomethylbenzoate: an acylation agent for labeling internalizing antibodies with alpha-particle emitting 211At.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Affleck, Donna J; Bigner, Darell D; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method for labeling internalizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as those reactive to the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) with the alpha-particle emitting radionuclide (211)At. Based on previous work utilizing the guanidine-containing acylation agent, N-succinimidyl 4-guanidinomethyl-3-[(131)I]iodobenzoate ([(131)I]SGMIB), we have now investigated the potential utility of its astato analogue for labeling the anti-EGFRvIII mAb L8A4. N-succinimidyl 3-[(211)At]astato-4-guanidinomethylbenzoate ([(211)At]SAGMB) in its Boc-protected form was prepared from a tin precursor in 61.7 +/- 13.1% radiochemical yield, in situ deprotected to [(211)At]SAGMB, which was coupled to L8A4 in 36.1 +/- 1.9% yield. Paired-label internalization assays demonstrated that tumor cell retention of radioactivity for L8A4 labeled using [(211)At]SAGMB was almost identical to L8A4 labeled using [(131)I]SGMIB, and 3-4-fold higher than for mAb radioiodinated using Iodogen. Paired-label biodistribution of L8A4 labeled using [(211)At]SAGMB and [(131)I]SGMIB in athymic mice hosting U87MGdeltaEGFR xenografts resulted in identical uptake of both (211)At and (131)I in tumor tissues over 24 h. Although higher levels of (211)At compared with (131)I were sometimes seen in tissues known to sequester free astatide, these (211)At/(131)I uptake ratios were considerably lower than those seen with other labeling methods. These results suggest that [(211)At]SAGMB may be a useful acylation agent for labeling internalizing mAbs with (211)At. PMID:12767391

  2. Efficient one-step radiolabeling of monoclonal antibodies to high specific activity with Actinium-225 for alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, William F.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Scheinberg, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted alpha-particle radiation using the radioisotope 225Actinium (225Ac) is a promising form of therapy for various types of cancer. Historical obstacles to the use of 225Ac have been the difficulty in finding suitable chelators to stably attach it to targeting vehicles such as peptides and monoclonal antibodies, the low specific activities of the products, and the lack of cost-effective radiolabeling procedures. We initially solved the first problem with a procedure involving two chemical steps that has been used as a standard in preclinical and clinical studies. However, this procedure involves the loss of 90% of the input 225Ac. A more efficient, economical process is needed to facilitate the more widespread use of 225Ac. Methods We conjugated representative antibodies with two forms of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), as well as other chelators as controls. We developed conditions to radiolabel these constructs in one chemical step and characterized their stability, immunoreactivity, biodistribution, and therapeutic efficacy in healthy and tumor-bearing mice. Results DOTA- antibody constructs were labeled to a wide range of specific activities in one chemical step at 37 °C. Radiochemical yields were approximately 10-fold higher and specific activities were up to 30-fold higher than with the previous approach. The products retained immunoreactivity and were stable to serum challenge in vitro and in mice. Labeling kinetics of DOTA- antibody constructs linked through a benzyl isothiocyanate linkage were more favorable than those linked through a N-hydroxysuccinimide linkage. Tissue distribution was similar but not identical between the constructs. The constructs produced specific therapeutic responses in a mouse model of acute myeloid leukemia. Conclusion We have characterized an efficient, one-step radiolabeling method that produces stable, therapeutically active conjugates of antibodies with 225Ac at high specific activity

  3. On the features of bursts of neutrons, hard x-rays and alpha-particles in the pulse vacuum discharge with a virtual cathode and self-organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilenkov, Yu K.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Gus'kov, S. Yu; Samoylov, I. S.; Ostashev, V. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we continue the discussion of the experimental results on the yield of DD neutrons and hard x-rays in the nanosecond vacuum discharge (NVD) with a virtual cathode, which was started in the previous article of this issue, and previously (Kurilenkov Y K et al 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 4375). We have considered here the regimes of very dense interelectrode aerosol ensembles, in which diffusion of even hard x-rays is found. The yield of DD neutrons in these regimes is conditioned not only by the head-on deuteron-deuteron collisions in the potential well of virtual cathode, but also by the channel of “deuteron-deuterium cluster” reaction, which exceeds overall yield of neutrons per a shot by more than an order of magnitude, bringing it up to ∼ 107/(4π). Very bright bursts of hard x-rays are also represented and discussed here. Presumably, their nature may be associated with the appearance in the NVD of some properties of random laser in the x-ray spectrum. Good preceding agreeing of the experiment on the DD fusion in the NVD with its particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations provides a basis to begin consideration of nuclear burning “proton-boron” in the NVD, which will be accompanied by the release of alpha particles only. With this objective in view, there has been started the PIC-simulation of aneutronic burning of p-B11, and its preliminary results are presented.

  4. Alpha-particle spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    Observation of lunar radon emanation during the Apollo 15 and 16 missions shows the existence of areas with locally high emanation rates. The most conspicuous Rn-222 feature found in the data analysis is a region that includes Aristarchus Crater. The excess emanating power of the Aristarchus region may be an indication of internal activity at that site. There are regions with anomalously high rates of Po-210 activity, which indicates transient phenomena involving the release of Rn-222 gas from certain areas of the moon.

  5. Thermo-mechanical design aspects of mercury bombardment ion thrusters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnelker, D. E.; Kami, S.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical design criteria are presented as background considerations for solving problems associated with the thermomechanical design of mercury ion bombardment thrusters. Various analytical procedures are used to aid in the development of thruster subassemblies and components in the fields of heat transfer, vibration, and stress analysis. Examples of these techniques which provide computer solutions to predict and control stress levels encountered during launch and operation of thruster systems are discussed. Computer models of specific examples are presented.

  6. Low energy electron bombardment induced surface contamination of Ru mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Kanjilal, A.; Catalfano, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Rice, B.

    2012-03-01

    The impact of secondary electrons induced contamination of the Ru surface was investigated. Mirror-like Ru sample was bombarded with low energy (100 eV) electrons and the change in surface chemistry was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).Along with XPS studies the corresponding effect on in-situ EUV reflectivity was examined by exposing the Ru surface to photons at a wavelength of 13.5 nm in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber. Detailed XPS analyses showed a sudden increase in carbon concentrations on the Ru surface in the first 60 min, followed by a slow but linear growth in carbon concentration. In parallel, a noticeable decrease in water content was observed during the time of electrons irradiation along with slight oxidation of pure Ru surface. All chemical changes were discussed in terms of the electrons bombardment mediated dissociation of water and hydrocarbon molecules. A time dependent EUV reflectivity measurements show insignificant change in reflectivity up to 510 min of electrons bombardment. The impact of water molecules on the Ru surface and the accumulation of carbon through dissociation of residual hydrocarbons is discussed in details.

  7. Transformation of Dendrobium orchid using particle bombardment of protocorms.

    PubMed

    Kuehnle, A R; Sugii, N

    1992-08-01

    Transformed dendrobium orchids (Dendrobium x Jaquelyn Thomas hybrids) were recovered from protocorms bombarded by particles coated with the plasmid pGA482GG/cpPRV4, which contains the plant expressible Nos-NPT II and papaya ringspot virus (PRV) coat protein (CP) genes. Approximately 280 protocorms from four crosses were bombarded and potentially transformed tissues were identified by growth and green color on half-strength Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 2% sucrose and 50-100 mg 1(-1) kanamycin sulfate. Kanamycin concentrations that prevented growth of nontransformed tissues could not be used for long-term selection because such levels suppressed the regeneration of potentially transformed tissues. PCR and restriction analysis 21 months after treatment found 13 of 13 plants from two crosses, which appeared kanamycin-tolerant, to contain the Nos-NPT II gene, while only one of these plants carried the vector-linked PRV CP-gene. These results support use of particle bombardment for transformation of this important ornamental monocot. PMID:24201595

  8. Metal ion bombardment of onion skin cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L.D.; Verdaguer, A.; Ratera, I.; Ogletree, D.F.; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G.

    2004-05-10

    Ion bombardment of living cellular material is a novel subfield of ion beam surface modification that is receiving growing attention from the ion beam and biological communities. Although it has been demonstrated that the technique is sound, in that an adequate fraction of the living cells can survive both the vacuum environment and energetic ion bombardment, there remains much uncertainty about the process details. Here we report on our observations of onion skin cells that were subjected to ion implantation, and propose some possible physical models that tend to support the experimental results. The ion beams used were metallic (Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu), mean ion energy was typically 30keV, and the implantation fluence was in the range 1014 1016 ions/cm2. The cells were viewed using Atomic Force Microscopy, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures due to ion bombardment. The implantation depth profile was measured with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and compared to the results of the TRIM, T-DYN and PROFILE computer codes.

  9. Defect formation in graphene during low-energy ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlberg, P.; Johansson, F. O. L.; Zhang, Z.-B.; Jansson, U.; Zhang, S.-L.; Lindblad, A.; Nyberg, T.

    2016-04-01

    This letter reports on a systematic investigation of sputter induced damage in graphene caused by low energy Ar+ ion bombardment. The integral numbers of ions per area (dose) as well as their energies are varied in the range of a few eV's up to 200 eV. The defects in the graphene are correlated to the dose/energy and different mechanisms for the defect formation are presented. The energetic bombardment associated with the conventional sputter deposition process is typically in the investigated energy range. However, during sputter deposition on graphene, the energetic particle bombardment potentially disrupts the crystallinity and consequently deteriorates its properties. One purpose with the present study is therefore to demonstrate the limits and possibilities with sputter deposition of thin films on graphene and to identify energy levels necessary to obtain defect free graphene during the sputter deposition process. Another purpose is to disclose the fundamental mechanisms responsible for defect formation in graphene for the studied energy range.

  10. Nanoscale surface structuring during ion bombardment of elemental semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzenberg, Eitan

    2013-01-01

    Nano-patterning of surfaces with uniform ion bombardment yields a rich phase-space of topographic patterns. Particle irradiation can cause surface ultra-smoothing or self-organized nanoscale pattern formation in surface topography. Topographic pattern formation has previously been attributed to the effects of the removal of target atoms by sputter erosion. In this thesis, the surface morphology evolution of Si(100) and Ge(100) during low energy ion bombardment of Ar+ and Kr+ ions, respectively, is studied. Our facilities for studies of surface processes at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) allow in-situ characterization of surface morphology evolution during ion bombardment using grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS). This technique is used to measure in reciprocal space the kinetics of formation or decay of correlated nanostructures on the surface, effectively measuring the height-height correlations. A linear model is used to characterize the early time kinetic behavior during ion bombardment as a function of ion beam incidence angle. The curvature coefficients predicted by the widely used erosive model of Bradley and Harper are quantitatively negligible and of the wrong sign when compared to the observed effect in both Si and Ge. A mass-redistribution model explains the observed ultra-smoothing at low angles, exhibits an instability at higher angles, and predicts the observed 45° critical angle separating these two regimes in Si. The Ge surface evolution during Kr+ irradiation is qualitatively similar to that observed for Ar+ irradiation of Si at the same ion energy. However, the critical angle for Ge cannot be quantitatively reproduced by the simple mass redistribution model. Crater function theory, as developed by Norris et al., incorporates both mass redistributive and erosive effects, and predicts constraining relationships between curvature coefficients. These constraints are compared to experimental data of both Si and Ge

  11. Millimeter-Scale Chemistry of Observable Endmembers with the Mars Science Laboratory Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer and Mars Hand Lens Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanBommel, Scott; Gellert, Ralf; Thompson, Lucy; Berger, Jeff; Campbell, Iain; Edgett, Ken; McBride, Marie; Minitti, Michelle; Desouza, Elstan; Boyd, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is a bulk chemistry instrument conducting high-precision in-situ measurements of Martian rocks and soils onboard both active NASA rovers [1]. Mounted at the end of the Curiosity rover arm, the APXS can conduct multi-spot (raster) investigations in a single morning or evening. Combining APXS raster spectra and Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) images, a modeled terrain is developed in which the positions of APXS field of views (FOV) can be localized, thereby mitigating arm placement uncertainty. An acquired APXS spectrum is the result of the weighted sum of the signals from within the FOV. The spatial sensitivity of the APXS consists of an off-nadir contribution in addition to a vertical separation (standoff with respect to the APXS detector) contribution [2, 3]. MAHLI images and focus merge (MFM) products facilitate a 3D surface model of the target [4] compensating for the effects of sample relief in an APXS spectrum. Employing a MFM relief map, APXS placement is modeled in three-dimensions, permitting variable APXS docking (standoff, deployment angle). Through minimization, we arrive at millimeter-scale chemistry of veins, diagenetic features and dust-free rock endmembers of Martian targets. Several rasters have been conducted with Curiosity's APXS on Mars including a study of the Garden City outcrop. The area is characterized by its contrasting light and dark veins of cm-scale surface relief. Three-dimensional localization and minimization indicated calcium sulfate as the major component of the light vein while the dark vein is enriched in CaO (without accompanying SO3), MnO, Ni and Zn, with respect to average Mars composition. References: [1] Gellert et al. (2014), LPSC XLV, #1876. [2] VanBommel et al. (2015), LPSC XLVI, #2049. [3] VanBommel et al. (2016), XRS #2681. [4] Edgett et al. (2015), MAHLI Tech Rept 0001. Acknowledgements: The MSL APXS is financed and managed by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) with Mac

  12. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer APXS on the Rosetta lander Philae to explore the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Girones Lopez, Jordi; Schmanke, Dirk; Markovski, Cristina; Brückner, Johannes; d'Uston, Claude; Economu, Tom; Gellert, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    The Rosetta Mission was launched in 2004 with the main objectives to gain a better understanding of the origin and formation of comets and the solar system. After 10 years of cruise Rosetta rendevouded with the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014 to study the nucleus of the comet and its environment. Rosetta consists of an orbiter and a lander (Philae) with 11 and 9 scientific experiments respectively. It did what has never been attempted before, orbiting and landing on a comet. After orbit insertion in August 2014, the main spacecraft will follow the comet for several months to investigate its surface. Subsequently, Philae has been deployed for a safe landing. As part of the lander payload the APXS will measure in situ the chemical composition of the comet's surface and it's changes during the journey of the comet around the sun. The data obtained with the APXS will be used to characterize the surface of the comet, to determine the chemical composition of the dust component, and to compare the dust with known meteorite types. APXS combines an alpha mode for alpha backscattering spectroscopy and an x-ray mode for alpha particle/x-ray induced x-ray spectroscopy (XRF) in one single instrument, being low in mass (640g) and power consumption (1.5 W in operating mode) [4]. The comet surface will be irradiated by a Curium 244 source exciting characteristic x-rays of the elements present in the surface material. The alpha mode will allow detection of elements like C and O and groups of elements with a higher Z. The x-ray-SD-detector will allow the detection of most of the elements from Na up to Ni and above. The design of the Rosetta APX spectrometer is based on the experience gained with the APXS built for Russian and American Mars missions: Mars 96 spacecraft and Mars Pathfinder, MPF [1]. Two APXS were also built for the Mars Exploration Rovers mission of the NASA, MER [2-3]. Acknowledgements This project is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under contracts 50

  13. DNA Double Strand Breaks as Predictor of Efficacy of the Alpha-Particle Emitter Ac-225 and the Electron Emitter Lu-177 for Somatostatin Receptor Targeted Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Franziska; Fahrer, Jörg; Maus, Stephan; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Venkatachalam, Senthil; Fottner, Christian; Weber, Matthias M.; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Kaina, Bernd; Miederer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Key biologic effects of the alpha-particle emitter Actinium-225 in comparison to the beta-particle emitter Lutetium-177 labeled somatostatin-analogue DOTATOC in vitro and in vivo were studied to evaluate the significance of γH2AX-foci formation. Methods To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) between the two isotopes (as - biological consequence of different ionisation-densities along a particle-track), somatostatin expressing AR42J cells were incubated with Ac-225-DOTATOC and Lu-177-DOTATOC up to 48 h and viability was analyzed using the MTT assay. DNA double strand breaks (DSB) were quantified by immunofluorescence staining of γH2AX-foci. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. In vivo uptake of both radiolabeled somatostatin-analogues into subcutaneously growing AR42J tumors and the number of cells displaying γH2AX-foci were measured. Therapeutic efficacy was assayed by monitoring tumor growth after treatment with activities estimated from in vitro cytotoxicity. Results Ac-225-DOTATOC resulted in ED50 values of 14 kBq/ml after 48 h, whereas Lu-177-DOTATOC displayed ED50 values of 10 MBq/ml. The number of DSB grew with increasing concentration of Ac-225-DOTATOC and similarly with Lu-177-DOTATOC when applying a factor of 700-fold higher activity compared to Ac-225. Already 24 h after incubation with 2.5–10 kBq/ml, Ac-225-DOTATOC cell-cycle studies showed up to a 60% increase in the percentage of tumor cells in G2/M phase. After 72 h an apoptotic subG1 peak was also detectable. Tumor uptake for both radio peptides at 48 h was identical (7.5%ID/g), though the overall number of cells with γH2AX-foci was higher in tumors treated with 48 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC compared to tumors treated with 30 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC (35% vs. 21%). Tumors with a volume of 0.34 ml reached delayed exponential tumor growth after 25 days (44 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC) and after 21 days (34 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC). Conclusion γH2AX-foci formation, triggered by beta- and

  14. Single impact crater functions for ion bombardment of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyanasundaram, N.; Ghazisaeidi, M.; Freund, J. B.; Johnson, H. T.

    2008-03-31

    The average effect of a single 500 eV incident argon ion on a silicon surface is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. More than 10{sup 3} ion impacts at random surface points are averaged for each of seven incidence angles, from 0 deg. to 28 deg. off normal, to determine a local surface height change function, or a crater function. The crater shapes are mostly determined by mass rearrangement; sputtering has a relatively small effect. Analytical fitting functions are provided for several cases, and may serve as input into kinetic Monte Carlo calculations or stability analyses for surfaces subjected to ion bombardment.

  15. Analysis of glycolipids by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bosch, M P; Parra, J L; Manresa, M A; Ventura, F; Rivera, J

    1989-12-01

    The positive and negative ion fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectra of four glycolipids obtained from microbial cultures are reported. The spectra of the glycolipids in the positive ion mode are characterized by abundant [M + Na]+, [M + Na + matrix]+ and [M + 2Na - H]+ species. In negative FAB conditions the molecules yield [M - H]-. Our understanding of the FAB behaviour of glycolipids in both positive and negative modes has been considerably aided in the structure elucidation, without any derivatization or degradation reaction of the compounds studied. The technique allows unambiguous molecular weight determination of low-microgram amounts of these glycolipids purified from biological sources and provides useful fragmentation information. PMID:2611417

  16. Electron-bombarded CCD detectors for ultraviolet atmospheric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    Electronic image sensors based on charge coupled devices operated in electron-bombarded mode, yielding real-time, remote-readout, photon-limited UV imaging capability are being developed. The sensors also incorporate fast-focal-ratio Schmidt optics and opaque photocathodes, giving nearly the ultimate possible diffuse-source sensitivity. They can be used for direct imagery of atmospheric emission phenomena, and for imaging spectrography with moderate spatial and spectral resolution. The current state of instrument development, laboratory results, planned future developments and proposed applications of the sensors in space flight instrumentation is described.

  17. Exploring the Early Bombardment of the Inner Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, W.

    2014-04-01

    The early bombardment history of the Inner Solar System is recorded in a number of interesting places (e.g., the surprisingly high abundance of highly siderophile abundances found in the Earth, Moon, and Mars, the observed impact basins found on Mercury, the Moon and Mars, various properties of main belt asteroids and meteorites, etc.). To date, two dominant scenarios have been used to explain these constraints: (i) most impacts came from the tail end of a monotonically-decreasing impactor population created by planet formation processes, and (ii) most impacts were produced by a terminal cataclysm that caused a spike in the impactor flux starting ~4 Gy ago. Interestingly, using numerical studies linked to the available constraints, we find that both scenarios are needed to explain observations. For (i), we will show that leftover planetesimals from the terrestrial planet region were long-lived enough to hit various worlds long after the end of core formation. The record left behind can be used in interesting ways to probe the nature of terrestrial planet formation. For (ii), we will explore new applications of the so-called Nice model, which provides a plausible dynamical mechanism capable of creating a spike of comets/asteroid impactors. Our results suggest that many "late heavy bombardment" impactors came from an unexpected source, and that they possibly continued to hit Earth, Venus, and Mars well after basin formation terminated on the Moon. Interestingly, the history of the Hadean Earth (ca. 4.0-4.5 billion years ago) may be closely linked to this bombardment. With few known rocks older than ~3.8 Ga, the main constraints from this era come from ancient submillimeter zircon grains. Using our bombardment model, we will argue that the surface of the Hadean Earth was widely reprocessed by impacts through mixing and heating of its uppermost layers. This model not only may explains the Pb-Pb age distribution of ancient zircons but also the absence of most early

  18. Smoothening of internal phase boundaries by ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, J.; Mayr, S.G.

    2005-08-01

    The impact of heavy-ion irradiation on the morphology of bilayers, which are composed of two immiscible metals, is investigated with the help of experiments and molecular-dynamics computer simulations. Using the model system Ag/Ni, our main focus lies on the interface roughness of the Ag/Ni phase boundary and its evolution in the course of ion bombardment. The mechanism which underlies these structural changes is identified as radiation-induced viscous flow--in combination with thermodynamic driving forces due to interface stress.

  19. Enhanced resistance of single-layer graphene to ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, J. J.; Greer, F.; Greer, J. R.

    2010-05-15

    We report that single-layer graphene on a SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate withstands ion bombardment up to {approx}7 times longer than expected when exposed to focused Ga{sup +} ion beam. The exposure is performed in a dual beam scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam system at 30 kV accelerating voltage and 41 pA current. Ga{sup +} ion flux is determined by sputtering a known volume of hydrogenated amorphous carbon film deposited via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

  20. Insulating behavior of magnetic spots in proton-bombarded graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, K.; García, N.; Esquinazi, P.; Ohldag, H.

    2008-07-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements on micrometer small magnetic spots produced by proton bombardment on bulk graphite reveal a charge transfer from the center of the spot to an external ring with potential variation on the order of 50 mV. The total charge in the spot is neutral. The results can be well understood in terms of practically unscreened potentials, an insulating property, although the nonbombarded, surrounding graphite region exhibits good conductance. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy measurements on magnetic spots prepared on graphitic films reveal similar charge distribution. The insulating behavior is fundamental to understand the magnetism in graphite.

  1. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semsang, Nuananong; Yu, LiangDeng

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29-60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 1016 ions cm-2. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of graphene bombardment with Si ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xin-Mao; Gao, Ting-Hong; Yan, Wan-Jun; Guo, Xiao-Tian; Xie, Quan

    2014-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with Tersoff-Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark (Tersoff-ZBL) potential and adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order (AIREBO) potential are performed to study the effect of irradiated graphene with silicon ion at several positions and energy levels of 0.1-1000 eV. The simulations reveal four processes: absorption, replacement, transmission and damage. At energies below 110 eV, the dominant process is absorption. For atom in group (a), the process that takes place is replacement, in which the silicon ion removes one carbon atom and occupies the place of the eliminated atom at the incident energy of 72-370 eV. Transmission is present at energies above 100 eV for atom in group (d). Damage is a very important process in current bombardment, and there are four types of defects: single vacancy, replacement-single vacancy, double vacancy and nanopore. The simulations provide a fundamental understanding of the silicon bombardment of graphene, and the parameters required to develop graphene-based devices by controlling defect formation.

  3. L-shell X-ray production cross sections induced by protons and alpha-particles in the 0.7-2.0 MeV/amu range for Ru and Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertol, A. P. L.; Trincavelli, J.; Hinrichs, R.; Vasconcellos, M. A. Z.

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray emissions induced by protons and alpha-particles of the elements Ag and Ru were measured on mono-elemental thin films. L-shell X-ray production cross sections were obtained for the three L-subshells, considering absorption corrections. The Ag X-ray production cross sections agree with experimental data of other authors and with theoretical models, and were used to endorse the quality of the experimental values for Ru, that were not found in the literature.

  4. Streptavidin in antibody pretargeting. 5. chemical modification of recombinant streptavidin for labeling with the alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides 213Bi and 211At.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, D Scott; Hamlin, Donald K; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2008-01-01

    We are investigating the use of recombinant streptavidin (rSAv) as a carrier molecule for the short-lived alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides 213Bi ( t 1/2 = 45.6 min) and 211At ( t 1/2 = 7.21 h) in cancer therapy. To utilize rSAv as a carrier, it must be modified in a manner that permits rapid chelation or bonding with these short-lived radionuclides and also modified in a manner that diminishes its natural propensity for localization in the kidney. Modification for labeling with (213)Bi was accomplished by conjugation of rSAv with the DTPA derivative p-isothiocyanato-benzyl-CHX-A'' (CHX-A''), 3a. Modification for direct labeling with 211At was accomplished by conjugation of rSAv with an isothiocyanatophenyl derivative of a nido-carborane (nCB), 3b, or an isothiocyanatophenyl-dPEG/decaborate(2-) derivative, 3c. After conjugation of the chelating or bonding moiety, rSAv was further modified by reaction with an excess (50-100 equivalents) of succinic anhydride. Succinylation of the lysine amines has previously been shown to greatly diminish kidney localization. rSAv modified by conjugation with 3a and succinylated rapidly radiolabeled with 213Bi (<5 min), providing a 72% isolated yield. 211At labeling of modified rSAv was accomplished in aqueous solution using chloramine-T as the oxidant. Astatination of rSAv conjugated with 3b and succinylated occurred very rapidly (<1 min), providing a 50% isolated radiochemical yield. Astatination of rSAv conjugated with 3c and succinylated was also very rapid (<1 min) providing 66-71% isolated radiochemical yields. Astatination of succinylated rSAv, 2a, which did not have conjugated borane cage moieties, resulted in a much lower radiolabeling yield (18%). The 213Bi or 211At-labeled modified rSAv preparations were mixed with the corresponding 125 I-labeled rSAv, and dual-label in vivo distributions were obtained in athymic mice. The in vivo data show that 213Bi-labeled succinylated rSAv [ 213Bi] 6a has tissue concentrations

  5. Evidence Supporting an Early as Well as Late Heavy Bombardment on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supporting an intense early bombardment on the Moon in addition to the traditional Late Heavy Bombardment at approx. 4 BY ago include the distribution of N(50) Crater Retention Ages (CRAs) for candidate basins, a variety of absolute age scenarios for both a "young" and an "old" Nectaris age, and the decreasing contrasts in both topographic relief and Bouguer gravity with increasing CRA.

  6. An 8-cm electron bombardment thruster for auxiliary propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Banks, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    Thruster size, beam current level, and specific impulse trade-offs are considered for mercury electron bombardment ion thrusters to be used for north-south station keeping of geosynchronous spacecraft. An 8-cm diameter thruster operating at 2750 seconds specific impulse at thrust levels of 4.4 mN (1 m1b) to 8.9 mN (2 m6b) with a design life of 20,000 hours and 10,000 cycles is being developed. The thruster will have a dished two-grid system capable of thrust vectoring of + or - 10 degrees in two orthogonal directions. A preliminary thruster has been fabricated and tested; thruster performance characteristics have been determined at 4.45, 6.68, and 8.90 millinewtons.

  7. Optical radiation from regions downstream of mercury bombardment thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milder, N. L.; Sovey, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A 0.5 meter focal length, plane grating monochromator was used to measure the radiance of spectral radiation emanating from regions downstream of a mercury bombardment thruster. The wavelength range investigated was 2800 A. This radiation was due primarily to the radiative decay of excited mercury atoms exhausted from the thruster. Radiance values ranged from 10 to the minus 11th power to 10 to the minus 9th power W/sq cm sr, varying with wavelength. For resonant radiation, the spectral radiance may exceed 10 to the minus 8th power W/sq cm sr. From such radiance measurements, it was concluded that the thruster background radiation should not interfere with the control functions of a star tracker viewing through the thruster exhaust, provided that the tracker is designed to operate with a sufficiently small field of view.

  8. Uses of ion bombardment in thin-film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Erdemir, A.

    1990-10-01

    Use of plasma- and ion-beam-modified surfaces and surface coatings in continually expanding in engineering disciplines. The purpose of these modifications and treatments is to impart favorable properties, such as wear resistance and lubricity, to the surfaces, while at the same time retaining the strength or toughness of the bulk materials. Energetic-ion bombardment can be used to modify the structural and chemical properties of surfaces or applied coatings. Ion-implantation has been used for many years, and recently, other surface-modification techniques, among them ion-beam mixing and ion-beam-assisted deposition, have attracted attention because they permit application of highly adherent lubricious and wear-resistant films. In this paper, ion-beam techniques are described from the viewpoint of ion-surface interactions, and some avenues for the engineering of tribological surfaces are presented. 100 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Changes of Dust Grain Properties Under Particle Bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlu, J.; Richterova, I.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Fujita, D.

    2008-09-07

    The dust in space environments is exposed to particle bombardment. Under an impact of ions, electrons, and photons, the charge of a particular grain changes and, in some cases, the grain structure can be modified. The present study deals with spherical melamine formaldehyde resin grains that are frequently used in many dusty plasmas and microgravity experiments and it concentrates on the influence of the electron beam impact on a grain size. We have performed series of experiments based on the SEM technique. Our investigation has shown that the electron impact can cause a significant increase of the grain size. We discuss changes of material properties and consequences for its applications in laboratory and space experiments.

  10. Bombarding Cancer: Biolistic Delivery of therapeutics using Porous Si Carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilony, Neta; Tzur-Balter, Adi; Segal, Ester; Shefi, Orit

    2013-08-01

    A new paradigm for an effective delivery of therapeutics into cancer cells is presented. Degradable porous silicon carriers, which are tailored to carry and release a model anti-cancer drug, are biolistically bombarded into in-vitro cancerous targets. We demonstrate the ability to launch these highly porous microparticles by a pneumatic capillary gene gun, which is conventionally used to deliver cargos by heavy metal carriers. By optimizing the gun parameters e.g., the accelerating gas pressure, we have successfully delivered the porous carriers, to reach deep targets and to cross a skin barrier in a highly spatial resolution. Our study reveals significant cytotoxicity towards the target human breast carcinoma cells following the delivery of drug-loaded carriers, while administrating empty particles results in no effect on cell viability. The unique combination of biolistics with the temporal control of payload release from porous carriers presents a powerful and non-conventional platform for designing new therapeutic strategies.

  11. Sputtering yield of Pu bombarded by fission Fragments from Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Danagoulian, Areg; Klein, Andreas; Mcneil, Wendy V; Yuan, Vincent W

    2008-01-01

    We present results on the yield of sputtering of Pu atoms from a Pu foil, bombarded by fission fragments from a {sup 252}Cf source in transmission geometry. We have found the number of Pu atoms/incoming fission fragments ejected to be 63 {+-} 1. In addition, we show measurements of the sputtering yield as a function of distance from the central axis, which can be understood as an angular distribution of the yield. The results are quite surprising in light of the fact that the Pu foil is several times the thickness of the range of fission fragment particles in Pu. This indicates that models like the binary collision model are not sufficient to explain this behavior.

  12. Plasma properties in electron-bombardment ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matossian, J. N.; Beattie, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes a technique for computing volume-averaged plasma properties within electron-bombardment ion thrusters, using spatially varying Langmuir-probe measurements. Average values of the electron densities are defined by integrating the spatially varying Maxwellian and primary electron densities over the ionization volume, and then dividing by the volume. Plasma properties obtained in the 30-cm-diameter J-series and ring-cusp thrusters are analyzed by the volume-averaging technique. The superior performance exhibited by the ring-cusp thruster is correlated with a higher average Maxwellian electron temperature. The ring-cusp thruster maintains the same fraction of primary electrons as does the J-series thruster, but at a much lower ion production cost. The volume-averaged predictions for both thrusters are compared with those of a detailed thruster performance model.

  13. ATS-6 - Cesium bombardment engine north-south stationkeeping experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worlock, R. M.; James, E. L.; Hunter, R. E.; Bartlett, R. O.

    1975-01-01

    Two 0.004 N thrust cesium bombardment ion thrustors have been developed and used for north-south stationkeeping in the geostationary Applications Technology Satellite-6 (ATS-6). The thrustor subsystems are mounted on the north and south faces of the earth viewing module such that 0.0026 N of thrust is applied normal to the orbit plane and 0.0036 N is applied radially upward. The change in the orbit inclination of the satellite is maintained at zero by operating the two thrustors alternately so that their thrust components, normal to the orbital plane, are symmetrically applied about the nodal crossings. Initial operation of the thrustors was successful. There was no interference with the satellite communications systems and the predicted spacecraft operating potential was verified. Subsequent trials failed due to a defect in the operation of the propellant reservoirs in zero g. A feed line valve is under development to correct this difficulty.

  14. Plasma properties in electron-bombardment ion thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Matossian, J.N.; Beattie, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    The paper describes a technique for computing volume-averaged plasma properties within electron-bombardment ion thrusters, using spatially varying Langmuir-probe measurements. Average values of the electron densities are defined by integrating the spatially varying Maxwellian and primary electron densities over the ionization volume, and then dividing by the volume. Plasma properties obtained in the 30-cm-diameter J-series and ring-cusp thrusters are analyzed by the volume-averaging technique. The superior performance exhibited by the ring-cusp thruster is correlated with a higher average Maxwellian electron temperature. The ring-cusp thruster maintains the same fraction of primary electrons as does the J-series thruster, but at a much lower ion production cost. The volume-averaged predictions for both thrusters are compared with those of a detailed thruster performance model. 20 references.

  15. Design of an alpha-particle counting system at a defined solid angle at Turkish atomic energy authority-Sarayköy nuclear research and training center (TAEK-SANAEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seferinoğlu, Meryem; Yeltepe, Emin

    2015-12-01

    The design details of an alpha-particle counting set-up at a defined solid angle (ACS-DSA) constructed in Radionuclide Metrology Department at TAEK-SANAEM for use in the primary standardization of radioactive solutions and determination of nuclear decay data of alpha-particle emitters is presented. The counting system is designed such that the solid angle is very well-defined and directly traceable to the national standards. The design involves mechanical construction of different parts like the source chamber, various coaxial flanges, and circular diaphragms in front of the passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS®) detector, distance tubes, a digital caliper and a sliding piston to allow for different measurement configurations. All geometric configurations are easily changeable and characterisable with high accuracy which facilitates the solid angle calculation. A mixed alpha source was counted to check performance of assembled ACS-DSA system and good energy resolution and low peak tailing in the alpha energy spectrum was observed for small diaphragm apertures and far source-to-detector geometries.

  16. Significant enhancement of negative secondary ion yields by cluster ion bombardment combined with cesium flooding.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Patrick; Angerer, Tina B; Sämfors, Sanna; Blenkinsopp, Paul; Fletcher, John S; Wirtz, Tom

    2015-10-01

    In secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), the beneficial effect of cesium implantation or flooding on the enhancement of negative secondary ion yields has been investigated in detail for various semiconductor and metal samples. All results have been obtained for monatomic ion bombardment. Recent progress in SIMS is based to a large extent on the development and use of cluster primary ions. In this work we show that the enhancement of negative secondary ions induced by the combination of ion bombardment with simultaneous cesium flooding is valid not only for monatomic ion bombardment but also for cluster primary ions. Experiments carried out using C60+ and Ar4000+ bombardment on silicon show that yields of negative secondary silicon ions can be optimized in the same way as by Ga+ and Cs+ bombardment. Both for monatomic and cluster ion bombardment, the optimization does not depend on the primary ion species. Hence, it can be assumed that the silicon results are also valid for other cluster primary ions and that results obtained for monatomic ion bombardment on other semiconductor and metal samples are also valid for cluster ion bombardment. In SIMS, cluster primary ions are also largely used for the analysis of organic matter. For polycarbonate, our results show that Ar4000+ bombardment combined with cesium flooding enhances secondary ion signals by a factor of 6. This can be attributed to the removal of charging effects and/or reduced fragmentation, but no major influence on ionization processes can be observed. The use of cesium flooding for the imaging of cells was also investigated and a significant enhancement of secondary ion yields was observed. Hence, cesium flooding has also a vast potential for SIMS analyses with cluster ion bombardment. PMID:26378890

  17. Comparative analysis of the optical spectra of the holmium atom excited by electron impact and ionic bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Vasileva, E.K.; Morozov, S.N.; Ryskin, B.V.

    1988-02-01

    A comparative analysis of the optical spectra of holmium excited by electron impact and ionic bombardment is given. It is shown that under ionic bombardment, the probability of excitation of screened transitions is significantly higher than under electron impact.

  18. Effect of nitrogen atomic percentage on N+-bombarded MWCNTs in cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    N+-bombarded multi-walled carbon nanotubes (N+-bombarded MWCNTs), with different nitrogen atomic percentages, were achieved by different N ion beam currents using ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) on MWCNTs synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Characterizations of N+-bombarded MWCNTs were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, and contact angle. For comparison, the in vitro cytocompatibility of the N+-bombarded MWCNTs with different N atomic percentages was assessed by cellular adhesion investigation using human endothelial cells (EAHY926) and mouse fibroblast cells (L929), respectively. The results showed that the presence of nitrogen in MWCNTs accelerated cell growth and proliferation of cell culture. The higher nitrogen content of N+-bombarded MWCNTs, the better cytocompatibility. In addition, N+-bombarded MWCNTs with higher N atomic percentage displayed lower platelet adhesion rate. No hemolysis can be observed on the surfaces. These results proved that higher N atomic percentage led N+-bombarded MWCNTs to better hemocompatibility. PMID:24666845

  19. Erosion of frozen sulfur dioxide by ion bombardment - Applications to Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, C. L.; Lepoire, D. J.; Cooper, B. H.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1982-10-01

    The erosion of frozen SO2 due to bombardment by both light and heavy ions (He and F) was measured for bombarding energies of 0.08 to 1.3 MeV/amu. The number of SO2 molecules ejected from the target per incident ion (i.e., the sputtering yield) was 50 for 1.5 MeV He ions and 7300 for 6 MeV F ions. Ion bombardment followed by heating produced an oxygen/sulfur residue which was much more stable against subsequent ion bombardment than the initial frozen SO2. The erosion rate of SO2 frost on Jupiter's moon Io depends strongly on the elemental composition and energy spectra of the magnetospheric ion flux which bombards the surface. The combined effects of ion bombardment and heating which produced residues on the target substrates may also occur on Io from magnetospheric ion bombardment and heating by volcanism. The experimental results compare favorably with a new model of the sputtering process which considers the energy loss of the incident ion to electronic excitation in the target.

  20. Effect of nitrogen atomic percentage on N+-bombarded MWCNTs in cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengli; Cao, Ye; Liu, Xiaoqi; Deng, Jianhua; Li, Dejun; Gu, Hanqing

    2014-01-01

    N+-bombarded multi-walled carbon nanotubes (N+-bombarded MWCNTs), with different nitrogen atomic percentages, were achieved by different N ion beam currents using ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) on MWCNTs synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Characterizations of N+-bombarded MWCNTs were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, and contact angle. For comparison, the in vitro cytocompatibility of the N+-bombarded MWCNTs with different N atomic percentages was assessed by cellular adhesion investigation using human endothelial cells (EAHY926) and mouse fibroblast cells (L929), respectively. The results showed that the presence of nitrogen in MWCNTs accelerated cell growth and proliferation of cell culture. The higher nitrogen content of N+-bombarded MWCNTs, the better cytocompatibility. In addition, N+-bombarded MWCNTs with higher N atomic percentage displayed lower platelet adhesion rate. No hemolysis can be observed on the surfaces. These results proved that higher N atomic percentage led N+-bombarded MWCNTs to better hemocompatibility. PMID:24666845

  1. Compositional Evolution of Saturn's Rings Due to Meteoroid Bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J.; Estrada, P.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we address the question of compositional evolution in planetary ring systems subsequent to meteoroid bombardment. The huge surface area to mass ratio of planetary rings ensures that this is an important process, even with current uncertainties on the meteoroid flux. We develop a new model which includes both direct deposition of extrinsic meteoritic "pollutants", and ballistic transport of the increasingly polluted ring material as impact ejecta. Our study includes detailed radiative transfer modeling of ring particle spectral reflectivities based on refractive indices of realistic constituents. Voyager data have shown that the lower optical depth regions in Saturn's rings (the C ring and Cassini Division) have darker and less red particles than the optically thicken A and B rings. These coupled structural-compositional groupings have never been explained; we present and explore the hypothesis that global scale color and compositional differences in the main rings of Saturn arise naturally from extrinsic meteoroid bombardment of a ring system which was initially composed primarily, but not entirely, of water ice. We find that the regional color and albedo differences can be understood if all ring material was initially identical (primarily water ice, based on other data, but colored by tiny amounts of intrinsic reddish, plausibly organic, absorber) and then evolved entirely by addition and mixing of extrinsic, nearly neutrally colored. plausibly carbonaceous material. We further demonstrate that the detailed radial profile of color across the abrupt B ring - C ring boundary can.constrain key unknown parameters in the model. Using new alternates of parameter values, we estimate the duration of the exposure to extrinsic meteoroid flux of this part of the rings, at least, to be on the order of 10(exp 8) years. This conclusion is easily extended by inference to the Cassini Division and its surroundings as well. This geologically young "age" is compatible

  2. Azimuthal distributions of fission fragments and. alpha. particles emitted in the reactions sup 36 Ar+ sup 238 U at E / A =20 and 35 MeV and sup 14 N+ sup 238 U at E / A =50 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, M.B.; Kim, Y.D.; Carlin, N.; Chen, Z.; Gelbke, C.K.; Gong, W.G.; Lynch, W.G.; Murakami, T.; Nayak, T.; Ronningen, R.M.; Xu, H.M.; Zhu, F. Department of Physics Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI ); Sobotka, L.G.; Stracener, D.W.; Sarantites, D.G.; Majka, Z.; Abenante, V. )

    1990-07-01

    Azimuthal correlations between coincident fission fragments and {alpha} particles were measured for the reactions {sup 36}Ar+{sup 238}U at {ital E}/{ital A}=20 and 35 MeV and {sup 14}N+{sup 238}U at {ital E}/{ital A}=50 MeV. At all energies, coplanar emission is enhanced. The azimuthal distributions for fission fragments and {alpha} particles are decoupled using a simple parametrization. Both azimuthal distributions are highly anisotropic at lower incident energies; these anisotropies decrease with energy. At the highest incident energies, energetic {alpha} particles emitted at large transverse momenta appear to be more suited than fission fragments to tag the orientation of the entrance channel reaction plane.

  3. Electron-beam-deposited thin polymer films - Electrical properties vs bombarding current.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, L. E.; Christy, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Polymer films about 150 A thick, deposited on glass substrates by electron bombardment of tetramethyltetraphenyltrisiloxane, were studied, after being sandwiched between evaporated aluminum electrodes, the top one semitransparent. The capacitance, conductance, and photoconductance of the sandwiches were measured at room temperature as a function of the electron bombarding current which formed the polymer. The polymer thickness was obtained independently from Christy's (1960) empirical formula for the rate of formation. The obtained results indicate that, with increasing bombarding current, the polymer undergoes an increase in both crosslinking bonds and dangling bonds. Exposure to air drastically reduces the density of dangling bonds, but does not affect the crosslinking.

  4. Changes in a surface of polycrystalline aluminum upon bombardment with argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkhotov, O. G.; Ashkhotova, I. B.; Bliev, A. P.; Magkoev, T. T.; Krymshokalova, D. A.

    2014-10-01

    The interaction between argon ions and a natural oxide layer of polycrystalline aluminum is studied via Auger electron (AE) and electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy. It is found that bombardment with argon ions whose energy is lower than the Al2O3 sputtering threshold results in the accumulation of bombarding ions in interstitial surface voids, thus forming a supersaturated solid solution of target atoms and bombarding ions of argon and nitrogen entrapped by the ion beam from the residual gas of the working chamber of the spectrometer.

  5. Compact Electron Gun Based on Secondary Emission Through Ionic Bombardment

    PubMed Central

    Diop, Babacar; Bonnet, Jean; Schmid, Thomas; Mohamed, Ajmal

    2011-01-01

    We present a new compact electron gun based on the secondary emission through ionic bombardment principle. The driving parameters to develop such a gun are to obtain a quite small electron gun for an in-flight instrument performing Electron Beam Fluorescence measurements (EBF) on board of a reentry vehicle in the upper atmosphere. These measurements are useful to characterize the gas flow around the vehicle in terms of gas chemical composition, temperatures and velocity of the flow which usually presents thermo-chemical non-equilibrium. Such an instrument can also be employed to characterize the upper atmosphere if placed on another carrier like a balloon. In ground facilities, it appears as a more practical tool to characterize flows in wind tunnel studies or as an alternative to complex electron guns in industrial processes requiring an electron beam. We describe in this paper the gun which has been developed as well as its different features which have been characterized in the laboratory. PMID:22163896

  6. Fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry of carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    van Breeman, R.B.; Schmitz, H.H.; Schwartz, S.J.

    1995-02-01

    Positive ion fast atom bombardment (FAB) tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) using a double-focusing mass spectrometer with linked scanning at constant B/E and high-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) was used to differentiate 17 different cartenoids, including {beta}-apo-8{prime}- carotenal, astaxanthin, {alpha}-carotene, {beta}-carotene, {gamma}-carotene, {zeta}-carotene, canthaxanthin, {beta}-cryptoxanthin, isozeaxanthin bis (pelargonate), neoxanthin, neurosporene, nonaprene, lutein, lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene, and zeaxanthin. The carotenoids were either synthetic or isolated from plant tissues. The use of FAB ionization minimized degradation or rearrangement of the carotenoid structures due to the inherent thermal instability generally ascribed to these compounds. Instead of protonated molecules, both polar xanthophylls and nonpolar carotenes formed molecular ions, M{sup {center_dot}+}, during FAB ionization. Following collisionally activated dissociation, fragment ions of selected molecular ion precursors showed structural features indicative of the presence of hydroxyl groups, ring systems, ester groups, and aldehyde groups and the extent of aliphatic polyene conjugation. The fragmentation patterns observed in the mass spectra herein may be used as a reference for the structural determination of carotenoids isolated from plant and animal tissues. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Comet impacts and chemical evolution on the bombarded earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Aggarwal, Hans

    1992-01-01

    Amino acids yields for previously published shock tube experiments are used with minimum Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) impactor mass and comet composition to predict AIB amino acid K/T boundary sediment column density. The inferred initial concentration of all amino acids in the K/T sea and in similar primordial seas just after 10 km comet impacts would have been at least 10 exp -7 M. However, sinks for amino acids must also be considered in calculating amino acid concentrations after comet impacts and in assessing the contribution of comets to the origin of life. The changing concentration of cometary amino acids due to ultraviolet light is compared with the equilibrium concentration of amino acids produced in the sea from corona discharge in the atmosphere, deposition in water, and degradation by ultraviolet light. Comets could have been more important than endogenous agents for initial evolution of amino acids. Sites favorable for chemical evolution of amino acids are examined, and it is concluded that chemical evolution could have occurred at or above the surface even during periods of intense bombardment of earth before 3.8 billion years ago.

  8. Actinide production from xenon bombardments of curium-248

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    Production cross sections for many actinide nuclides formed in the reaction of /sup 129/Xe and /sup 132/Xe with /sup 248/Cm at bombarding energies slightly above the coulomb barrier were determined using radiochemical techniques to isolate these products. These results are compared with cross sections from a /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction at a similar energy. When compared to the reaction with /sup 136/Xe, the maxima in the production cross section distributions from the more neutron deficient projectiles are shifted to smaller mass numbers, and the total cross section increases for the production of elements with atomic numbers greater than that of the target, and decreases for lighter elements. These results can be explained by use of a potential energy surface (PES) which illustrates the effect of the available energy on the transfer of nucleons and describes the evolution of the di-nuclear complex, an essential feature of deep-inelastic reactions (DIR), during the interaction. The other principal reaction mechanism is the quasi-elastic transfer (QE). Analysis of data from a similar set of reactions, /sup 129/Xe, /sup 132/Xe, and /sup 136/Xe with /sup 197/Au, aids in explaining the features of the Xe + Cm product distributions, which are additionally affected by the depletion of actinide product yields due to deexcitation by fission. The PES is shown to be a useful tool to predict the general features of product distributions from heavy ion reactions.

  9. Effect of argon ion bombardment on amorphous silicon carbonitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batocki, R. G. S.; Mota, R. P.; Honda, R. Y.; Santos, D. C. R.

    2014-04-01

    Amorphous silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) films were synthesized by radiofrequency (RF) Plasma Enhanced Vapor Chemical Deposition (PECVD) using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDSN) as precursor compound. Then, the films were post-treated by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) in argon atmosphere from 15 to 60 min. The hardness of the film enhanced after ion implantation, and the sample treated at 45 min process showed hardness greater than sixfold that of the untreated sample. This result is explained by the crosslinking and densification of the structure. Films were exposed to oxygen plasma for determining of the etching rate. It decreased monotonically from 33 Å/min to 19 Å/min for the range of process time, confirming structural alterations. Hydrophobic character of the a-SiCN:H films were modified immediately after ion bombardment, due to incorporation of polar groups. However, the high wettability of the films acquired by the ion implantation was diminished after aging in air. Therefore, argon PIII made a-SiCN:H films mechanically more resistant and altered their hydrophobic character.

  10. Effects of Low-Dose Alpha-Particle Irradiation in Human Cells: The Role of Induced Genes and the Bystander Effect. Final Technical Report (9/15/1998-5/31/2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Little, John B.

    2013-09-17

    This grant was designed to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the bystander effect of radiation (initially described in this laboratory) whereby damage signals are passed from irradiated to non-irradiated cells in a population. These signals induce genetic effects including DNA damage, mutations and chromosomal aberrations in the nonirradiated cells. Experiments were carried out in cultured mammalian cells, primarily human diploid cells, irradiated with alpha particles. This research resulted in 17 publications in the refereed literature and is described in the Progress Report where it is keyed to the publication list. This project was initiated at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and continued in collaboration with students/fellows at Colorado State University (CSU) and the New Jersey Medical School (NJMS).

  11. Ion bombardment and its effects on the optical properties of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1964-01-01

    An experimental program, to evaluate the change in total hemispherical emittance and solar absorptance of engineering metals used on spacecraft and in spacecraft instrumentation systems, is presented. Three materials, titanium alloy, pure aluminum, and electrolytic copper, were used in the experiment. Results show that emittance, absorptance, and alpha/epsilon ratio of the materials were changed by ion bombardment. The time before the change occurs depends upon the material used, the intensity of bombardment, and the environment assumed.

  12. Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Simulation of Ion Back Bombardment in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Corlett, John; Staples, John

    2009-03-02

    In this paper, we report on studies of ion back bombardment in high average current dc and rf photoinjectors using a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo method. Using H{sub 2} ion as an example, we observed that the ion density and energy deposition on the photocathode in rf guns are order of magnitude lower than that in a dc gun. A higher rf frequency helps mitigate the ion back bombardment of the cathode in rf guns.

  13. Ne +, Ar + and Xe + ion bombardment induced and suppressed topography on Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakov, V.; Carter, G.

    1995-12-01

    The topographic evolution of Si irradiated at room temperature with Ne +, Ar + and Xe + ions in the energy range 5-40 keV at 45° to the substrate normal at high ion fluences has been studied. Other than isolated etch pits no topography results from Ne + bombardment at all energies or from Ar + bombardment at 5 and 10 keV. Ar + bombardment at 20 keV, however, initially produces transverse low-amplitude waves which transform, with increasing erosion, into larger amplitude corrugated and facetted wavelike structures. The present data do not conform to existing model predictions but do suggest that, technically, light low energy gas ions can be used to inhibit roughening during sputtering erosion. Xe + ion bombardment, on the other hand, produces clearly-defined transverse wave structures on the surface, which are inimical to sputter-profiling applications. However, Xe + bombardment-induced morphology, when exposed to further 20 keV Ne + or 10 keV Ar + bombardment loses its rippled habit, indicating that such irradiation can be employed to cure the deleterious roughening processes as well as inhibit roughening.

  14. Back bombardment for dispenser and lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakr, Mahmoud; Kinjo, R.; Choi, Y. W.; Omer, M.; Yoshida, K.; Ueda, S.; Takasaki, M.; Ishida, K.; Kimura, N.; Sonobe, T.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Ohgaki, H.; Zen, H.

    2011-06-01

    The back bombardment (BB) effect limits wide usage of thermionic rf guns. The BB effect induces not only ramping-up of a cathode’s temperature and beam current, but also degradation of cavity voltage and beam energy during a macropulse. This paper presents a comparison of the BB effect for the case of dispenser tungsten-base (DC) and lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic rf gun cathodes. For each, particle simulation codes are used to simulate the BB effect and electron beam dynamics in a thermionic rf gun cathode. A semiempirical equation is also used to investigate the stopping range and deposited heat power of BB electrons in the cathode material. A numerical simulation method is used to calculate the change of the cathode temperature and current density during a single macropulse. This is done by solving two differential equations for the rf gun cavity equivalent circuit and one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation. High electron emission and small beam size are required for generation of a high-brightness electron beam, and so in this work the emission properties of the cathode are taken into account. Simulations of the BB effect show that, for a pulse of 6μs duration, the DC cathode experiences a large change in the temperature compared with LaB6, and a change in current density 6 times higher. Validation of the simulation results is performed using experimental data for beam current beyond the gun exit. The experimental data is well reproduced using the simulation method.

  15. Ion bombardment glow-discharge furnaces for atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Two glow discharge plasma devices for the atomic emission analysis of aqueous samples were investigated. The devices use thermal vaporization of samples from a graphite cathode coupled with glow-discharge excitation. Furnace heating of the cathode is accomplished by the positive ion bombardment of the cathode during plasma operation. The dc plasma operates in Ar at 0.5-5.0 torr, with currents up to 250 mA. A cw, axial magnetic field of up to 1.25 kG is applied to the cylindrical-post cathode system to reduce electron losses, thereby increasing plasma excitation and ionization efficiency. At higher currents, the cathodes heat to temperatures as high as 2,500{degree}C in the case of the cylindrical-post cathode. Hollow-cathode heating temperatures are lower under comparable conditions, due to the larger cathode surface area, greater cathode mass, and lower power dissipation. The peak furnace temperature using this configuration is approximately 2100{degree}C. The role of the emission of thermionic electrons from the hot cathodes in limiting the cathode heating and in regulating the cathode temperature are considered. Sample residues of up to 50 ng of the analyte are vaporized from the cylindrical-post cathode within a few seconds of the initiation of the discharge, resulting in a transient emission intensity profile. With the hollow-cathode furnace, vaporization may take several seconds. Although a lower rate of cathode heating and a lower sample vapor residence time results in limits of detection which are one to two orders of magnitude lower than those achieved using the cylindrical-post cathode system. For the hollow cathode, limits of detection are on the order of 10 pg to 1 ng.

  16. Theory and mitigation of electron back-bombardment in thermionic cathode radio frequency guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelen, Jonathan Paul

    Photocathode RF guns are currently the standard for high- power, low-emittance beam generation in free-electron lasers. These devices require the use of high-power lasers (which are bulky and expensive to operate) and high-quantum-efficiency cathodes (which have limited lifetimes requiring frequent replacement). The use of RF-gated thermionic cathodes enables operation without a large drive laser and with long lifetimes. One major limitation of RF-gated thermionic cathodes is that electrons emitted late in the RF period will not gain enough energy to exit the gun before being accelerated back towards the cathode by the change in sign of the RF field. These electrons deposit their kinetic energy on the cathode surface in the form of heat, limiting the ability to control the output current from the cathode. This dissertation is aimed at understanding the fundamental design factors that drive the back-bombardment process and at exploring novel techniques to reduce its impact on a high-current system. This begins with the development of analytic models that predict the back-bombardment process in single-cell guns. These models are compared with simulation and with a measurement taken at a specific facility. This is followed by the development of analytic models that predict the effects of space-charge on back-bombardment. These models are compared with simulations. This is followed by an analysis of how the addition of multiple cells will impact the back-bombardment process. Finally, a two-frequency gun is studied for its ability to mitigate the back-bombardment process. This dissertation provides new insight on how the back-bombardment process scales as a function of the beam parameters and how space-charge affects this process. Additionally this dissertation shows how a second frequency can be used to mitigate the back-bombardment effect.

  17. PAH bombardment by energetic particles: models and astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelotta, E.; Jones, A.; Tielens, A.

    2011-05-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important and ubiquitous component of the Interstellar Medium (ISM) of galaxies. Interstellar PAHs are apparently able to withstand the rigors of the harsh environment of the ISM for some some 100 million years and thus are resilient against processing by UV and X-ray photons and supernova shock waves. PAHs in space are mainly studied through their characteristic emission bands, due to infrared fluorescence following the absorption of UV photons. This is the reason why the photophysics of PAHs in space has been extensively investigated. On the other hand, PAHs are also strongly affected by collisional processes, i.e. bombardment by high-velocity ions and electrons, arising from interstellar shocks, hot gas and cosmic rays. However, very little was known about the physics of the interaction between PAHs and high energy particles, especially in terms of PAH damage and destruction. This lack of information had made the interpretation of PAH observations difficult in regions subjected to such processes. Our research aims to fill this key gap in our understanding of the physics behind collisional processing of PAHs and to clarify how this affects the PAH evolution in the astrophysical context. We first describe the models we have developed, that take into account the molecular nature of the target PAH and allow for the first time a quantitative description of the collisional processing of PAH molecules by ions and electrons with energies between 10 eV and 10 keV (in shocks and hot gas) and between 5 MeV and 10 GeV (in cosmic rays). Specific models were needed because PAHs are molecules and not small solid fragments, thus the classical approach from solid state physics cannot be applied. We then show the applications of our models to observations, estimating the lifetime of PAHs against collisional processing in specific objects. We discuss the astrophysical implications of our findings on the considered sample, which

  18. Compositional and Geochronological Constraints on the Late Heavy Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Barbara

    2007-10-01

    Radiometric dating and compositional clustering of lunar impact-melt rocks form the backbone of the lunar cataclysm hypothesis. Precise age determinations of Apollo and Luna impact-melt rocks, lunar meteorite impact-melt clasts, lunar soil spherules, and lunar glass fragments define the classic formulation of the late heavy bombardment: a sharp peak at 3.9 Ga, a steep decline after 3.9 Ga perhaps only 20-200 Myr long, and few, if any, positively identified rocks of impact origin prior to 4.0 Ga. Geological associations between compositional groups of impact-melt rocks and specific impact basins imply that five large basins formed on the Moon within 200 Myr. A counterargument says that all, or nearly all, the 3.9-Ga impact melt rocks are products of the Imbrium basin-forming impact. It is still a matter of debate whether this hypothesis can accommodate the multiple groups of impact melt that are resolvable from each other in age and in trace-element composition. The 3.9 Ga age peak and subsequent steep decline are not well mirrored in meteorite data. Radiometric ages in ordinary chondrites and HED meteorites peak around 3.9 Ga but ages older and younger than 3.9 Ga are common. We have a single shock age for Martian meteorites: ALH 84001 crystallized at 4.50 Ga but was shocked at 3.92 ± 0.04 Ga. Differences in relative impact velocity, impact-melt production, and sampling rate could explain some of the differences between the meteorite and lunar records. One way to anchor the early end of the lunar flux would be to directly sample the impact-melt sheet of a large lunar basin distant from Imbrium, such as the South Pole-Aitken basin, where a large amount of melt probably still resides on the basin floor and could be directly sampled by a human or robotic mission. B.A.C. is supported by NASA Cosmochemistry grant #NNX07AI57G.

  19. Wobbling The Galactic Disk with Bombardment of Satellite Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onghia, Elena

    We propose to assess the effect of impacts of large visible satellite galaxies on a disk, as well as the relevance of the continuing bombardment of the Galactic disk by dark matter clumps as predicted by the current cosmological framework that can wobble the disk, heating it and eventually exciting ragged spiral structures. In particular, we make detailed predictions for observable features such as spiral arms, rings and their associated stars in galactic disks and relate them to the physical processes that drive their formation and evolution in our Milky Way galaxy and nearby spirals. To do this, we will combine analytic methods and numerical simulations that allow us to calculate observables, which we will compare to present and forthcoming observations. Our methodology utilizes a combination of state of the art hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy evolution and multi- wavelength radiative transfer simulations. Our primary goals are: (1) To identify the physical processes that are responsible for spiral structure formation observed in our Milky Way and nearby disk galaxies, from the flocculent to grand- designed spiral galaxies and to provide observable signatures to be compared with data on nearby galaxies combining maps of 24 micron emission (Spitzer) and cold gas, CO (Heracles) and HI (THINGS). (2) To explore different morphologies of spiral galaxies: from the multi-armed galaxies to the Milky Way sized galaxies with few arms. (3) For a Milky Way disk we will assess the effect of impacts of substructures passing through the disk to origin the asymmetry in the number density of stars recently discovered from SDSS and SEGUE data and confirmed from RAVE data. We will also investigate the disk heating in the vertical plane due to the formation of vertical oscillations that are produced by the impact and migration of stars in the disk as consequence of the heating as compared to the classical stellar migration mechanism. (4) We will measure the spiral pattern speed

  20. A Study of Primary Collision Dynamics in Inverse-Kinematics Reaction of 78Kr on 40Ca at a Bombarding Energy of 10 MeV per Nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Eric M.

    The CHIMERA multi-detector array at LNS Catania has been used to study the inverse-kinematics reaction of 78Kr + 40Ca at a bombarding energy of 10 A MeV. The multi-detector is capable of detecting individual products of the collision essential for the reconstruction of the collision dynamics. This is the first time CHIMERA has been used at low-energy, which offered a unique challenge for the calibration and interpretation of experimental data. Initial interrogation of the calibrated data revealed a class of selected events characterized by two coincident heavy fragments (atomic number Z>3) that together account for the majority of the total mass of the colliding system. These events are consistent with the complete fusion and subsequent binary split (fission) of a composite nucleus. The observed fission fragments are characterized by a broad A, Z distribution and are centered about symmetric fission while exhibiting relative velocities significantly higher than given by Viola systematics. Additional analysis of the kinematic relationship between the fission fragments was performed. Of note, is that the center-of-mass angular distribution (dsigma/dtheta) of the fission fragments exhibits an unexpected anisotropy inconsistent with a compound-nucleus reaction. This anisotropy is indicative of a dynamic fusion/fission-like process. The observed angular distribution features a forward-backward anisotropy most prevalent for mass-asymmetric events. Furthermore, the more massive fragment of mass-asymmetric events appears to emerge preferentially in the forward direction, along the beam axis. Analysis of the angular distribution of alpha particles emitted from these fission fragments suggests the events are associated mostly with central collisions. The observations associated with this subset of events are similar to those reported for dynamic fragmentation of projectile-like fragments, but have not before been observed for a fusion/fission-like process. Comparisons to

  1. Ultra-low-energy (<10 eV/u) ion beam bombardment effect on naked DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2014-05-01

    Since ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range, it is very interesting to know effects from ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA for understanding ion-beam-induced genetic mutation. Tens-keV Ar- and N-ion beams were decelerated to ultra-low energy ranging from 20 to 100 eV, or only a few to 10 eV/u, to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The bombarded DNA was analyzed using gel electrophoresis for DNA form changes. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks after bombarded by tens-eV ion beam. N-ion beam was found more effective in inducing DNA change and mutation than Ar-ion beam. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was able to break DNA strands and thus potentially to cause genetic modification of biological cells. The experimental results were discussed in terms of direct atomic collision between the ions and DNA atoms.

  2. Bombardment of thin lithium films with energetic plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Travis Kelly

    The Divertor Erosion and Vapor Shielding Experiment (DEVEX) has been constructed in the Center for Plasma-Material Interactions at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. It consists of a conical theta-pinch connected to a 60 kV, 36 muF capacitor bank which is switched with a rise time of 3.5 mus. This results in a peak current of 300 kA for a 30 kV charge on the capacitor bank. The resulting plasma is created and compressed under the theta-pinch coil and then expelled axially towards a target chamber due to the conical taper of the theta-coil. The plasma that reaches the target chamber is dense, 1021 m-3 and cool, 10--20 eV. For the purposes of this study, a thin stainless steel target, sputter coated with a lithium magnetron is the target/material of interest. Both computational [A. Hassanein, Fus. Eng. Des. 60: 527546 (2002)] and experimental [M.L. Apicella, et al., J. Nuc. Mater. 386--388:821823 (2009)] studies have shown that lithium, under fusion relevant plasma bombardment, maintains a much lower surface temperature than other plasma facing materials such as tungsten or carbon. This is believed clue to the strong evaporation and/or sputtering of lithium under these conditions. Subsequently a vapor cloud is formed in front of the plasma-facing surface. The lithium vapor interacts with the incident plasma stream absorbing a fraction of the incident plasma energy via the lithium-plasma interactions. Here, we present experimental verification of substantially reduced target surface temperature with the use of thin lithium films on surface of the target as compared to a bare target. Furthermore, optical measurements are made to determine the density and temperature of the lithium vapor cloud as it expands away from the target surface. A collisional-radiative model for both neutrals and singly ionized lithium is used to model the lithium vapor and is found to correlate well with the optical measurements. The vapor cloud electron temperature is found to

  3. 'Bubble chamber model' of fast atom bombardment induced processes.

    PubMed

    Kosevich, Marina V; Shelkovsky, Vadim S; Boryak, Oleg A; Orlov, Vadim V

    2003-01-01

    A hypothesis concerning FAB mechanisms, referred to as a 'bubble chamber FAB model', is proposed. This model can provide an answer to the long-standing question as to how fragile biomolecules and weakly bound clusters can survive under high-energy particle impact on liquids. The basis of this model is a simple estimation of saturated vapour pressure over the surface of liquids, which shows that all liquids ever tested by fast atom bombardment (FAB) and liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were in the superheated state under the experimental conditions applied. The result of the interaction of the energetic particles with superheated liquids is known to be qualitatively different from that with equilibrium liquids. It consists of initiation of local boiling, i.e., in formation of vapour bubbles along the track of the energetic particle. This phenomenon has been extensively studied in the framework of nuclear physics and provides the basis for construction of the well-known bubble chamber detectors. The possibility of occurrence of similar processes under FAB of superheated liquids substantiates a conceptual model of emission of secondary ions suggested by Vestal in 1983, which assumes formation of bubbles beneath the liquid surface, followed by their bursting accompanied by release of microdroplets and clusters as a necessary intermediate step for the creation of molecular ions. The main distinctive feature of the bubble chamber FAB model, proposed here, is that the bubbles are formed not in the space and time-restricted impact-excited zone, but in the nearby liquid as a 'normal' boiling event, which implies that the temperature both within the bubble and in the droplets emerging on its burst is practically the same as that of the bulk liquid sample. This concept can resolve the paradox of survival of intact biomolecules under FAB, since the part of the sample participating in the liquid-gas transition via the bubble mechanism has an ambient temperature

  4. ION TRAPPING AND CATHODE BOMBARDMENT BY TRAPPED IONS IN DC PHOTOGUNS.

    SciTech Connect

    POZDEYEV,E.

    2007-06-25

    DC photoguns are used to produce high-quality, high-intensity electron beams for accelerator driven applications. Ion bombardment is believed to be the major cause of degradation of the photocathode efficiency. Additionally to ions produced in the accelerating cathode-anode gap, the electron beam can ionize the residual gas in the transport line. These ions are trapped transversely within the beam and can drift back to the accelerating gap and contribute to the bombardment rate of the cathode. This paper proposes a method to reduce the flow of ions produced in the beam transport line and drifting back to the cathode-anode gap by introducing a positive potential barrier that repels the trapped ions. The reduced ion bombardment rate and increased life time of photocathodes will reduce the downtime required to service photoinjectors and associated costs.

  5. Depth resolution improvement in secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis using metal cluster complex ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, M.; Kinno, T.; Koike, M.; Tanaka, H.; Takeno, S.; Fujiwara, Y.; Kondou, K.; Teranishi, Y.; Nonaka, H.; Fujimoto, T.; Kurokawa, A.; Ichimura, S.

    2006-07-31

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses were carried out using a metal cluster complex ion of Ir{sub 4}(CO){sub 7}{sup +} as a primary ion beam. Depth resolution was evaluated as a function of primary ion species, energy, and incident angle. The depth resolution obtained using cluster ion bombardment was considerably better than that obtained by oxygen ion bombardment under the same experimental condition due to reduction of atomic mixing in the depth. The authors obtained a depth resolution of {approx}1 nm under 5 keV, 45 deg. condition. Depth resolution was degraded by ion-bombardment-induced surface roughness at 5 keV with higher incident angles.

  6. Titanium dioxide surface modification via ion-beam bombardment for vertical alignment of nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyun-Jae; Lee, Jin-Woo; Lee, Won-Kyu; Lim, Ji-Hun; Park, Hong-Gyu; Kim, Byoung-Yong; Hwang, Jeong-Yeon; Han, Jeong-Min; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2010-04-15

    We introduce the characteristics of the titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) inorganic film deposited by rf magnetron sputtering for liquid crystal display applications. The TiO(2) films demonstrated vertical alignment (VA) of the liquid crystals (LCs) obtained by using ion-beam (IB) bombardment. As observed by using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the chemical structure of the TiO(2) was changed by IB bombardment, altering the Ti-O bonding of the Ti 2p spectra to lower intensity levels. Breaking Ti-O bonding by IB bombardment created pretilt angles between the TiO(2) film and LC molecules. The better voltage-transmittance characteristics of the VA LCDs based on TiO(2) film were measured and compared with the same characteristics of polyimide film. PMID:20410949

  7. Simulation studies on back bombardment of electrons in rf thermionic guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxiu

    1991-05-01

    Using SUPERFISH and PARMELA, we simulate the back bombardment dynamics of electrons in rf thermionic guns. First, we shed light on some basic physical pictures of the back bombardment by means of the simulation results. Then the solution to this problem is investigated through applying a transverse magnetic field vertically traversing the cathode cavity. The Glaser profile is assumed for the magnetic field. It shows that for the total emitted charge of 1.65 nC and the rf duty factor of 2.5×10 -5 the average back bombardment power can be reduced from more than 10 W to about 2 W with the varying magnetic field up to 150 G. The influence of the magnetic field on the normal electrons out of the gun cavity is examined. The correction to this influence is investigated. Some conclusions are drawn finally.

  8. Secondary ion emission from V and Al surfaces under keV light ion on bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blauner, Patricia G.; Weller, Martha R.; Kaurin, Michael G.; Weller, Robert A.

    1986-03-01

    Positive secondary ion mass spectra have been measured for oxidized polycrystalline V and Al targets bombarded by H +, H 2+, He + and Ar + ions with beam energies ranging from 25 keV to 275 keV. An enhancement in the relative yield of positive ions of electronegative surface constituents, in particular O + is observed under light ion bombardment. Metallic ion intensities were found to decrease with increasing primary beam energy in proportion to the estimated total sputtering yields for these targets and beams. In contrast, the O + secondary ion intensities were independent of primary beam energy. This behavior is similar to that observed previously with heavy ions of comparable velocities. In addition, for the projectiles and targets used in these measurements, no energy thresholds or collective effects were observed in the emission of any positive ion. Published data on secondary ion emission resulting from electron, photon, and heavy ion bombardment are compared with these results.

  9. Localized depth distribution in the bombarded surface of AgCu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenmin; Wang, Zhenxia; Lu, Rongrong; Zhu, Fuying; Wu, Xiankang; Guo, Yingmei; Zhu, Jieqing

    1995-09-01

    Combined with electron microbeam techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and electron-induced X-ray emission, a helium microbeam is used to study the effect of Ar + ion bombardment on the surface of a binary alloy Ag 37Cu 63 by particle-induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering. A pronounced change of the surface concentration and depth profile has been found at both Cu-enriched solid solution micro-region and Ag-enriched eutectic mixture micro-region on the alloy surface due to ion bombardment. The preferential sputtering of Ag and bombardment-induced surface segregation is suggested to be attributed to the composition change in the near-surface regions. A superposition of depth distributions determined from different micro-phase-regions is experimentally confirmed.

  10. Producing virtually defect-free nanoscale ripples by ion bombardment of rocked solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Matt P.; Bradley, R. Mark

    2016-04-01

    Bombardment of a solid surface with a broad, obliquely incident ion beam frequently produces nanoscale surface ripples. The primary obstacle that prevents the adoption of ion bombardment as a nanofabrication tool is the high density of defects in the patterns that are typically formed. Our simulations indicate that ion bombardment can produce nearly defect-free ripples on the surface of an elemental solid if the sample is concurrently and periodically rocked about an axis orthogonal to the surface normal and the incident beam direction. We also investigate the conditions necessary for rocking to produce highly ordered ripples and discuss how the results of our simulations can be reproduced experimentally. Finally, our simulations show that periodic temporal oscillations of coefficients in the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation can suppress spatiotemporal chaos and lead to patterns with a high degree of order.

  11. Reviews Book: Marie Curie and Her Daughters Resource: Cumulus Equipment: Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Equipment: 3D Magnetic Tube Equipment: National Grid Transmission Model Book: Einstein's Physics Equipment: Barton's Pendulums Equipment: Weather Station Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Marie Curie and Her Daughters An insightful study of a resilient and ingenious family and their achievements Cumulus Simple to install and operate and with obvious teaching applications, this weather station 'donationware' is as easy to recommend as it is to use Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Good design and construction make for good results National Grid Transmission Model Despite its expense, this resource offers excellent value Einstein's Physics A vivid, accurate, compelling and rigorous treatment, but requiring an investment of time and thought WORTH A LOOK 3D Magnetic Tube Magnetic fields in three dimensions at a low cost Barton's Pendulums A neat, well-made and handy variant, but not a replacement for the more traditional version Weather Station Though not as robust or substantial as hoped for, this can be put to good use with the right software WEB WATCH An online experiment and worksheet are useful for teaching motor efficiency, a glance at CERN, and NASA's interesting information on the alpha-magnetic spectrometer and climate change

  12. Development of knife-edge ridges on ion-bombarded surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes-Cerfon, Miranda; Zhou, Wei; Bertozzi, Andrea L.; Brenner, Michael P.; Aziz, Michael J.

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate in both laboratory and numerical experiments that ion bombardment of a modestly sloped surface can create knife-edge like ridges with extremely high slopes. Small pre-fabricated pits expand under ion bombardment, and the collision of two such pits creates knife-edge ridges. Both laboratory and numerical experiments show that the pit propagation speed and the precise shape of the knife edge ridges are universal, independent of initial conditions, as has been predicted theoretically. These observations suggest a method of fabrication in which a surface is pre-patterned so that it dynamically evolves to a desired target pattern made of knife-edge ridges.

  13. On the ion-bombardment reduction mechanism. [of iron ions in lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L.; Tsang, T.; Adler, I.

    1976-01-01

    Recent laboratory studies of solar-wind reduction mechanisms on the lunar surface are discussed, emphasizing the effects of the electronic configurations of transition metals and the effects of covalent bonding. A series of experiments is described which involved argon ion bombardment of extremely thin targets consisting of simple halides and cyanides of first-row transition metals. Experimental results are summarized which imply that the cyanides generally have much higher reduction efficiencies than the halides. It is suggested that although reduction and sputtering take place concurrently under ion bombardment, they may actually be two independent processes.

  14. Secondary ion emission from insulin film bombarded with methane and noble gas cluster ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritani, Kousuke; Kanai, Masanori; Goto, Kosuke; Ihara, Issei; Inui, Norio; Mochiji, Kozo

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in large cluster projectiles for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) allow the intact ions of some protein molecules to be detected without a matrix. However, detailed mechanisms of soft-sputtering and ionization of biomolecules remain unknown. Herein we investigate the secondary ion emission from insulin films under argon, krypton, and methane cluster ion bombardment. The intact insulin ion intensity significantly decreases for (CH4)1500+ ion bombardment compared with Ar1500+ ion bombardment at the same energy range of 3.3 eV/atom (or molecule), even though collisions with energetic methane clusters should generate numerous protons on the surface, which would enhance the ionization probability through proton attachment. In contrast, the intact ion intensity is almost the same for Ar2500+ and Kr2500+ cluster ion bombardment at the same energy range of 2 eV/atom. These observations suggest that detailed mechanisms for the ionization and sputtering by gas cluster ions should be investigated to enhance the intact ion intensity.

  15. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L. D.; Sangwijit, K.; Prakrajang, K.; Phanchaisri, B.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Thopan, P.; Singkarat, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-05-01

    As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10-20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence.

  16. Enhanced bioactivity of polyvinylidene chloride films using argon ion bombardment for guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shuichiro; Hayashi, Tatsuhide; Asakura, Masaki; Hamajima, Soichiro; Sato, Yamato; Sasaki, Keisuke; Okabe, Eijiro; Kawase, Mayu; Ando, Masahiko; Kawai, Tatsushi; Noguchi, Toshihide

    2014-09-01

    Polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) is a long chain carbon synthetic polymer. The objective of this study was to improve the bioactivity of PVDC films through surface modification using argon (Ar) ion bombardment to create Ar-modified PVDC films (Ar-PVDC) to address the clinical problems of guided bone regeneration (GBR), which is technique-sensitive, and low bone regenerative ability. First, the effects of Ar ion bombardment, a low temperature plasma etching technique widely used in industry, on PVDC film wettability, surface chemistry, and morphology were confirmed. Next, fibroblast-like and osteoblast-like cell attachment and proliferation on Ar-PVDC were assessed. As a preclinical in vivo study, Ar-PVDC was used to cover a critical-sized bone defect on rat calvaria and osteoconductivity was evaluated by micro-computed tomography analysis and histological examinations. We found that the contact angle of PVDC film decreased by 50° because of the production of -OH groups on the PVDC film surface, though surface morphological was unchanged at 30 min after Ar ion bombardment. We demonstrated that cell attachment increased by about 40% and proliferation by more than 140% because of increased wettability, and 2.4 times greater bone regeneration was observed at week 3 with Ar-PVDC compared with untreated PVDC films. These results suggest that Ar ion bombardment modification of PVDC surfaces improves osteoconductivity, indicating its potential to increase bone deposition during GBR. PMID:24893861

  17. Bombardment of gas molecules on single graphene layer at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, Ramki; Park, Jae Hyun; Ha, Dong Sung

    2014-12-01

    Graphite is widely used as a material for rocket-nozzle inserts due to its excellent thermo-physical properties as well as low density. During the operation of rockets, the surface of the graphite nozzle is subjected to very high heat fluxes and the undesirable erosion of the surface occurs due to the bombardment of gas molecules with high kinetic energy, which causes a significant reduction of nozzle performance. However, the understanding and quantification of such bombardment is not satisfactory due to its complexity: The bond breaking-forming happens simultaneously for the carbon atoms of graphene, some gas molecules penetrate through the surface, some of them are reflected from the surface, etc. In the present study, we perform extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the bombardment phenomena in high temperature environment (several thousand Kelvin). Advanced from the previous studies that have focused on the bombardment by light molecules (e.g., H2), we will concentrate on the impact by realistic molecules (e.g., CO2 and H2O ). LAMMPS is employed for the MD simulations with NVE ensemble and AIREBO potential for graphene. The molecular understanding of the interaction between graphene and highly energetic gas molecules will enable us to design an efficient thermo-mechanical protection system.

  18. 33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente... REGULATIONS § 334.950 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas. (a) The danger zones. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area beginning at China Point...

  19. 33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente... REGULATIONS § 334.950 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas. (a) The danger zones. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area beginning at China Point...

  20. 33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente... REGULATIONS § 334.950 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas. (a) The danger zones. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area beginning at China Point...

  1. 33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente... REGULATIONS § 334.950 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas. (a) The danger zones. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area beginning at China Point...

  2. 33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente... REGULATIONS § 334.950 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas. (a) The danger zones. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area beginning at China Point...

  3. Bombardment of gas molecules on single graphene layer at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Murugesan, Ramki; Park, Jae Hyun; Ha, Dong Sung

    2014-12-09

    Graphite is widely used as a material for rocket-nozzle inserts due to its excellent thermo-physical properties as well as low density. During the operation of rockets, the surface of the graphite nozzle is subjected to very high heat fluxes and the undesirable erosion of the surface occurs due to the bombardment of gas molecules with high kinetic energy, which causes a significant reduction of nozzle performance. However, the understanding and quantification of such bombardment is not satisfactory due to its complexity: The bond breaking-forming happens simultaneously for the carbon atoms of graphene, some gas molecules penetrate through the surface, some of them are reflected from the surface, etc. In the present study, we perform extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the bombardment phenomena in high temperature environment (several thousand Kelvin). Advanced from the previous studies that have focused on the bombardment by light molecules (e.g., H{sub 2}), we will concentrate on the impact by realistic molecules (e.g., CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O). LAMMPS is employed for the MD simulations with NVE ensemble and AIREBO potential for graphene. The molecular understanding of the interaction between graphene and highly energetic gas molecules will enable us to design an efficient thermo-mechanical protection system.

  4. The distribution of cotransformed transgenes in particle bombardment-mediated transformed wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although particle bombardment is the predominant method of foreign DNA direct transfer, whether transgene is integrated randomly into the genome has not been determined. In this study, we identified the distribution of transgene loci in 45 transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) lines containing c...

  5. Trace Elements Reveal a Possible Link Between Jack Hills Detrital Zircons and the Late Heavy Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, E. A.; Harrison, T. M.

    2012-03-01

    The Jack Hills detrital zircons range in age 4.3-3.0 Ga. At ca. 3.9 Ga the record contains a population that appears to have recrystallized during a major thermal event. This may be circumstantial terrestrial evidence for the Late Heavy Bombardment.

  6. Photon Counting Imaging with an Electron-Bombarded Pixel Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Electron-bombarded pixel image sensors, where a single photoelectron is accelerated directly into a CCD or CMOS sensor, allow wide-field imaging at extremely low light levels as they are sensitive enough to detect single photons. This technology allows the detection of up to hundreds or thousands of photon events per frame, depending on the sensor size, and photon event centroiding can be employed to recover resolution lost in the detection process. Unlike photon events from electron-multiplying sensors, the photon events from electron-bombarded sensors have a narrow, acceleration-voltage-dependent pulse height distribution. Thus a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor could allow photon arrival time determination from the pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. We give a brief overview of our work with electron-bombarded pixel image sensor technology and recent developments in this field for single photon counting imaging, and examples of some applications. PMID:27136556

  7. Photon Counting Imaging with an Electron-Bombarded Pixel Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Liisa M; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Electron-bombarded pixel image sensors, where a single photoelectron is accelerated directly into a CCD or CMOS sensor, allow wide-field imaging at extremely low light levels as they are sensitive enough to detect single photons. This technology allows the detection of up to hundreds or thousands of photon events per frame, depending on the sensor size, and photon event centroiding can be employed to recover resolution lost in the detection process. Unlike photon events from electron-multiplying sensors, the photon events from electron-bombarded sensors have a narrow, acceleration-voltage-dependent pulse height distribution. Thus a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor could allow photon arrival time determination from the pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. We give a brief overview of our work with electron-bombarded pixel image sensor technology and recent developments in this field for single photon counting imaging, and examples of some applications. PMID:27136556

  8. A review of electron bombardment thruster systems/spacecraft field and particle interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Information on the field and particle interfaces of electron bombardment ion thruster systems was summarized. Major areas discussed were the nonpropellant particles, neutral propellant, ion beam, low energy plasma, and fields. Spacecraft functions and subsystems reviewed were solar arrays, thermal control systems, optical sensors, communications, science, structures and materials, and potential control.

  9. Suprathermal proton and alpha -particle bursts (E/q = 6.5-225 keV/e) observed by the WIND-, ACE- and IMP8-S/C during depressions of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, E.; Mall, U.

    2003-03-01

    The present study deals with suprathermal proton (E/q=6.5-225 keV/e) and alpha -particle bursts measured by the WIND-SMS experiment in the interplanetary space. They reach up to ~ 5-20 times the solar wind speed and last from a few minutes up to ~ 30 min. Measurements obtained simultaneously by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Sensor SWICS (E/q=0.5-31.5 keV/e) were also available for this study, as well as magnetic field and particle data recorded by ACE near the Libration point L1 and the IMP8-S/C near the Earth. In order to exclude particles escaping from the magnetosphere or accelerated by the Earth's bow shock, interplanetary shocks, coronal mass ejections and corotating interaction regions, we selected ion bursts which were associated with a distinct decrease in the interplanetary magnetic field magnitude and with changes in the azimuthal and tangential field direction. Such changes have been known for a long time as magnetic holes or field depressions. We interpret these signatures as a manifestation of a reconnection process in the interplanetary space near the heliospheric current sheet at about 1 AU distance from the Sun and show for the first time that thermal particles can be accelerated up to ~ 100 keV/e. The suprathermal particles are most likely accelerated in the electric field of the X-line. Inductive electric fields caused by changes in the field magnitude could also be responsible for the particle acceleration.

  10. A sawtooth-like timeline for the first billion years of lunar bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, A.; Marchi, S.; Bottke, W. F.; Kring, D. A.

    2012-11-01

    We revisit the early evolution of the Moon's bombardment. Our work combines modeling (based on plausible projectile sources and their dynamical decay rates) with constraints from the lunar crater record, radiometric ages of the youngest lunar basins, and the abundance of highly siderophile elements in the lunar crust and mantle. We deduce that the evolution of the impact flux did not decline exponentially over the first billion years of lunar history, but also there was no prominent and narrow impact spike ˜3.9Gy ago, unlike that typically envisioned in the lunar cataclysm scenario. Instead, we show the timeline of the lunar bombardment has a sawtooth-like profile, with an uptick in the impact flux near ˜4.1Gy ago. The impact flux at the beginning of this weaker cataclysm was 5-10 times higher than the immediately preceding period. The Nectaris basin should have been one of the first basins formed at the sawtooth. We predict the bombardment rate since ˜4.1Gy ago declined slowly and adhered relatively close to classic crater chronology models (Neukum and Ivanov, 1994). Overall we expect that the sawtooth event accounted for about one-fourth of the total bombardment suffered by the Moon since its formation. Consequently, considering that ˜12-14 basins formed during the sawtooth event, we expect that the net number of basins formed on the Moon was ˜45-50. From our expected bombardment timeline, we derived a new and improved lunar chronology suitable for use on pre-Nectarian surface units. According to this chronology, a significant portion of the oldest lunar cratered terrains has an age of 4.38-4.42 Gyr. Moreover, the largest lunar basin, South Pole Aitken, is older than 4.3 Gy, and therefore was not produced during the lunar cataclysm.

  11. An ion beam deceleration lens for ultra-low-energy ion bombardment of naked DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    Study of low-energy ion bombardment effect on biological living materials is of significance. High-energy ion beam irradiation of biological materials such as organs and cells has no doubt biological effects. However, ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range. To investigate effects from very-low-energy ion bombardment on biological materials, an ion beam deceleration lens is necessary for uniform ion energy lower than keV. A deceleration lens was designed and constructed based on study of the beam optics using the SIMION program. The lens consisted of six electrodes, able to focus and decelerate primary ion beam, with the last one being a long tube to obtain a parallel uniform exiting beam. The deceleration lens was installed to our 30-kV bioengineering-specialized ion beam line. The final decelerated-ion energy was measured using a simple electrostatic field to bend the beam to range from 10 eV to 1 keV controlled by the lens parameters and the primary beam condition. In a preliminary test, nitrogen ion beam at 60 eV decelerated from a primary 20-keV beam bombarded naked plasmid DNA. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was possible to break DNA strands and thus potential to cause genetic modification of biological cells.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of bipartite bimetallic clusters under low-energy argon ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokorad, D. V.; Kornich, G. V.; Buga, S. G.

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of bipartite bimetallic atomic clusters within 5 ps under bombardment with monoenergetic argon ions at the initial energy ranging from 1 eV to 1.4 keV has been simulated by the classical molecular dynamics method with a target obtained from Ni‒Al and Cu‒Au clusters consisting of 78 and 390 atoms, equally divided between the corresponding monometallic parts, the simulated pairs of which have different heats of intermixing. The changes in the potential energy and temperature, the sputtering yields, and the intensity of the ion-stimulated movement of atoms at the interface of the monometallic parts of clusters of both sizes have been determined as functions of the energy of the bombardment.

  13. Surface Roughness Effect on Secondary Electron Emission from Beryllium under Electron Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Jun; Ohya, Kaoru

    1994-02-01

    A direct Monte Carlo model is developed to simulate secondary electron emission from beryllium with a flat surface and Gaussian-ripple surfaces. The calculated electron yield and energy distribution of secondary electrons are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The emphasis is in this study put on the effect of surface roughness on secondary electron emission. The number of secondary electrons emitted largely depends on the position of bombardment of primary electrons on the ripple surface. The energy distribution of secondary electrons emitted from the ripple surface shifts towards low-energy side in comparison with the distribution for the flat surface. The over-cosine and gourd-shaped angular distributions, depending on the position of bombardment, are calculated for emission angle of electrons from the ripple surface; the distribution for the flat surface agrees quite well with the cosine distribution.

  14. Cluster ions from keV-energy ion and atom bombardment of frozen gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Donald E.; Magnera, Thomas F.; Tian, Rujiang; Stulik, Dusan; Michl, Josef

    1986-04-01

    A brief survey is given of the mass spectra obtained from frozen gases by bombardment with keV-energy ions and atoms. The internal chemical constitution of the observed secondary cluster ions, which bears no simple relation to the molecular structure of the solid, has been established by observations of collision-induced dissociation, laser-induced dissociation and metastable decay. It has been correlated with the chemical composition of the residual bombarded solid, deduced from spectroscopic observations. These results, as well as preliminary results on sputtering yields for impact of 1-4 keV rare gas ions on solid argon, are compatible with the previously proposed mechanistic model for the formation of the cluster ions based on the flow of supercritical gas from the elastic collision spike region.

  15. Electronic structure of nitinol surfaces oxidized by low-energy ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petravic, M.; Varasanec, M.; Peter, R.; Kavre, I.; Metikos-Hukovic, M.; Yang, Y.-W.

    2014-06-01

    We have studied the electronic structure of nitinol exposed to low-energy oxygen-ion bombardment, using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. XPS spectra reveal a gradual transformation of nitinol surfaces into TiO2 with increased dose of implanted oxygen. No oxidation of Ni atoms has been detected. NEXAFS spectra around O K-edge and Ti L2,3-edge, reflecting the element-specific partial density of empty electronic states, exhibit features, which can be attributed to the creation of molecular orbitals, crystal field splitting, and the absence of long-range order, characteristic of the amorphous TiO2. Based on these results, we discuss the oxidation kinetics of nitinol under low-energy oxygen-ion bombardment.

  16. Mechanisms of pattern formation in grazing-incidence ion bombardment of Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Henri; Redinger, Alex; Messlinger, Sebastian; Stoian, Georgiana; Michely, Thomas; Rosandi, Yudi; Urbassek, Herbert M.; Linke, Udo

    2006-06-15

    Ripple patterns forming on Pt(111) due to 5 keV Ar{sup +} grazing-incidence ion bombardment were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy in a broad temperature range from 100 to 720 K and for ion fluences up to 3x10{sup 20} ions/m{sup 2}. A detailed morphological analysis together with molecular dynamics simulations of single ion impacts allow us to develop atomic scale models for the formation of these patterns. The large difference in step edge versus terrace damage is shown to be crucial for ripple formation under grazing incidence. The importance of distinct diffusion processes--step adatom generation at kinks and adatom lattice gas formation--for temperature dependent transitions in the surface morphology is highlighted. Surprisingly, ion bombardment effects like thermal spike induced adatom production and planar subsurface channeling are important for pattern ordering.

  17. Electronic structure of nitinol surfaces oxidized by low-energy ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Petravic, M. Varasanec, M.; Peter, R.; Kavre, I.; Metikos-Hukovic, M.; Yang, Y.-W.

    2014-06-28

    We have studied the electronic structure of nitinol exposed to low-energy oxygen-ion bombardment, using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. XPS spectra reveal a gradual transformation of nitinol surfaces into TiO{sub 2} with increased dose of implanted oxygen. No oxidation of Ni atoms has been detected. NEXAFS spectra around O K-edge and Ti L{sub 2,3}-edge, reflecting the element-specific partial density of empty electronic states, exhibit features, which can be attributed to the creation of molecular orbitals, crystal field splitting, and the absence of long-range order, characteristic of the amorphous TiO{sub 2}. Based on these results, we discuss the oxidation kinetics of nitinol under low-energy oxygen-ion bombardment.

  18. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometric studies of the aluminim chloride/n-butylpyridinium chloride molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, B.L.; Tsarbopoulos, A.; Allison, J.

    1985-07-01

    A fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometric analysis of the aluminum chloride N-n-butyl-pyridinium chloride molten salt system (AlCl/sub 3//BPCl) which is an ionic (ion-paired) liquid formed by mixing its two solid components, AlCl/sub 3/ and BPCl is reported. This system has received considerable attention recently since it is a melt at room temperature in contrast to the more commonly studied molten salt systems of the type AlCl/sub 3//MX (M is an alkali metal), which exist as melts at elevated temperatures (greater than or equal to150/sup 0/C). Results for the positive ions obtained from fast atom bombardment of a series of AlCl/sub 3//BPCl mixtures varying in composition are presented. The data obtained by FAB-MS are then discussed in light of the results previously obtained by other analytical techniques commonly used to characterize molten salts. 18 references, 2 figures.

  19. Modeling the reduction of gross lithium erosion observed under high-flux deuterium bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Nichols, J. H.; Stotler, D. P.; De Temmerman, G.; van den Berg, M. A.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Morgan, T. W.

    2015-08-01

    Both thin (<1 μm) and thick (∼500 μm) lithium films under high-flux deuterium and neon plasma bombardment were studied in the linear plasma device Magnum-PSI at ion fluxes >1024 m-2 s-1 and surface temperatures <700 °C. During Ne plasma exposures, Li erosion rates inferred from measurements of Li-I radiation exceed Langmuir Law evaporation, but no previous results exist to benchmark the binary collision approximation (BCA) and thermal sputtering measurements. Measured Li erosion rates during D plasma bombardment were compared to the adatom-evaporation model of thermal sputtering with an additional reduction term to account for the relative D/Li composition of the Li film. This model captures the qualitative evolution of the Li erosion yield but still overestimates the measured erosion by a factor of 5-10. This suggests that additional refinements to the mixed-material model are needed.

  20. Cross-Linking the Surface of Cured Polydimethylsiloxane via Hyperthemal Hydrogen Projectile Bombardment.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chao; Xu, Ke-Qin; Tang, Chang-Yu; Lau, Woon-ming; Yin, Cong-Bin; Zhu, Yan; Mei, Jun; Lee, Jonathan; Hui, David; Nie, Heng-Yong; Liu, Yu

    2015-04-29

    Cross-linking of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is increasingly important with recent focus on its top surface stiffness. In this paper, we demonstrate that hyperthermal hydrogen projectile bombardment, a surface sensitive cross-linking technology, is superior in enhancing the mechanical properties of a cured PDMS surface without significantly degrading its hydrophobicity. Both water contact angle measurements and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry are used to investigate the variations in surface chemistry and structure upon cross-linking. Using nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy, we confirm that the thickness of the cross-linked PDMS is controllable by the bombardment time, which opens opportunities for tuning cross-linking degree in compliance with arising requirements from the practice. PMID:25849306

  1. Pulse height decrease in a single-crystal CVD diamond detector under gold ion beam bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuki; Murakami, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    A charged-particle detector was fabricated using a single-crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition to examine its radiation hardness under heavy-ion bombardment. The irradiation dose dependence of the output pulse height from the diamond detector during gold ion beam bombardment at an energy of 7 MeV was investigated. The pulse height of output signals decreased with increasing amount of gold ion irradiation, and the pulse height was not recovered after applying a reverse-bias voltage. In addition, although only small amounts of vacancy and charge density generation inside the diamond detector were estimated and were found to be less than those in the Si detector by the Monte Carlo simulation of the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter, the diamond detector did not show superior radiation hardness to the Si charged-particle detector.

  2. Ion bombardment induced smoothing of amorphous metallic surfaces: Experiments versus computer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vauth, Sebastian; Mayr, S. G.

    2008-04-15

    Smoothing of rough amorphous metallic surfaces by bombardment with heavy ions in the low keV regime is investigated by a combined experimental-simulational study. Vapor deposited rough amorphous Zr{sub 65}Al{sub 7.5}Cu{sub 27.5} films are the basis for systematic in situ scanning tunneling microscopy measurements on the smoothing reaction due to 3 keV Kr{sup +} ion bombardment. The experimental results are directly compared to the predictions of a multiscale simulation approach, which incorporates stochastic rate equations of the Langevin type in combination with previously reported classical molecular dynamics simulations [Phys. Rev. B 75, 224107 (2007)] to model surface smoothing across length and time scales. The combined approach of experiments and simulations clearly corroborates a key role of ion induced viscous flow and ballistic effects in low keV heavy ion induced smoothing of amorphous metallic surfaces at ambient temperatures.

  3. Understanding The Apparent Lack Of Cometary Impactors During The Late Heavy Bombardment On The Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minton, David A.; Richardson, J.

    2012-10-01

    The most widely adopted models for the cause of the LHB predict that comets, small bodies originating in the Kuiper Belt beyond Neptune, should have dominated this bombardment. However, observations of the size-frequency distribution of LHB-era impact craters are well matched by objects originating in the Main Asteroid Belt, not the Kuiper Belt. Some mechanisms have been proposed to explain this discrepancy, but none have been tested due to the lack of a well-constrained size distribution for comets originating in the Kuiper Belt. With a unique new numerical code called the Cratered Terrain Evolution model, we test hypotheses for the absence of a comet signature in the lunar cratering record, as well as set model-independent constraints on the amount of cometary bombardment allowed by the crater record.

  4. Pushing the limits of classical modeling of bombardment events in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Reema; Garrison, Barbara J.

    Bombardment of solids with keV atoms leads to violent collisions with subsequent ejection of target particles. This review discusses how classical molecular dynamics simulations designed to describe the bombardment events can give insight into microscopic processes where not only classical but also quantum effects such as electronic excitation and organic reactions play an important role. By incorporating a simple excitation/de-excitation model into the simulation, we have shown that collisional events are important to describe the distribution of excited state atoms measured experimentally. Molecular dynamics simulations employing a reactive many-body potential of small hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on a metal surface predict the occurrence of various collision induced organic reactions prior to ejection. Lateral motion of particles in the region right above the surface plays an important role in signal enhancement. The calculations predict several processes such as direct molecular ejection, dissociation to fragments, unimolecular rearrangement and hydrogen abstraction reactions.

  5. TADPOLE satellite. [low cost synchronous orbit satellite to evaluate small mercury bombardment ion thruster applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A low cost synchronous orbit satellite to evaluate small mercury bombardment ion thruster applications is described. The ion thrusters provide the satellite with precise north-south and east-west stationkeeping capabilities. In addition, the thrusters are used to unload the reaction wheels used for attitude control and for other purposes described in the report. The proposed satellite is named TADPOLE. (Technology Application Demonstration Program of Low Energy).

  6. A model for electrical degradation of insulators due to ionic bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González de Vicente, S. M.; Moroño, A.; Hodgson, E. R.

    2011-10-01

    Insulator materials required for ITER and beyond must operate in a significant radiation field, extending well beyond the first wall. As a result, these materials will be subjected not only to neutron and gamma irradiation, but also to particle bombardment, due mainly to ionization of the residual gas and acceleration of the resulting ions by local electric fields. A systematic study was carried out on the main insulating candidate materials for ITER (Al 2O 3, SiO 2, BeO, and AlN), in order to assess this potential surface degradation issue, and clarify possible mechanisms. Severe surface optical and electrical degradation has previously been reported for these materials bombarded with H +, D +, and He + ions, at different energies, temperatures, and dose rates, as well as for electron irradiation. In all cases, dramatic degradation has been found and related to loss of oxygen (nitrogen) from the implanted/irradiated zone due to preferential radiolytic anion sputtering. In the work reported here, a model to explain the surface electrical degradation under ion bombardment will be presented. A mathematical expression for the evolution of the surface conductivity with dose of an insulator or extrinsic semiconductor, in which the temperature effect is taken into account is given. This model allows one to obtain the diffusion activation energy of the anion in an interstitial position under an electronic excitation environment. Experimental data for both silica and alumina bombarded with He ions at different temperatures have been fitted. In both cases, the fits obtained from theoretical predictions are in very good agreement with the experimental observations.

  7. Fertile transgenic Brachiaria ruziziensis (ruzigrass) plants by particle bombardment of tetraploidized callus.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Genki; Gondo, Takahiro; Suenaga, Kazuhiro; Akashi, Ryo

    2012-03-15

    We have produced transgenic plants of the tropical forage crop Brachiaria ruziziensis (ruzigrass) by particle bombardment-mediated transformation of multiple-shoot clumps and embryogenic calli. Cultures of multiple-shoot clumps and embryogenic calli were induced on solidified MS medium supplemented with 0.5mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2mg/L 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) or 4mg/L 2,4-D and 0.2mg/L BAP, respectively. Both cultures were bombarded with a vector containing an herbicide resistance gene (bar) as a selectable marker and the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. Sixteen hours after bombardment, embryogenic calli showed a significantly higher number of transient GUS expression spots per plate and callus than multiple-shoot clumps, suggesting that embryogenic callus is the more suitable target tissue. Following bombardment and selection with 10mg/L bialaphos, herbicide-resistant embryogenic calli regenerated shoots and roots in vitro, and mature transgenic plants have been raised in the greenhouse. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA gel blot analysis verified that the GUS gene was integrated into the genome of the two regenerated lines. In SacI digests, the two transgenic lines showed two or five copies of GUS gene fragments, respectively, and integration at different sites. Histochemical analysis revealed stable expression in roots, shoots and inflorescences. Transgenic plants derived from diploid target callus turned out to be sterile, while transgenics from colchicine-tetraploidized callus were fertile. PMID:22236981

  8. [Genetic transformation of OSISAP1 gene to onion (Allium cepa L.) mediated by amicroprojectile bombardment].

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi-Jiang; Cui, Cheng-Ri

    2007-06-01

    Microprojectile bombardment-mediated transformation method has been developed for onion (Allium cepa L.) using embryogenic calli, induced from stem discs, as target tissue. Zinc-finger protein gene OSISAP1 (Oryza sative subspecies indica stress-associated protein gene) was introduced into the open-pollinated onion cultivar (subs.) 'HG400B'. Bombardment parameters were optimized as: the pressure is 1,100 psi, the distance is 6 cm, two times, the ratio of mass between plasmid DNA and golden particles is 1:320. An efficient microprojectile bombardment-mediated transformation system of onion (Allium cepa L.) callus has been established. The binary vector used carried the nptII gene for kanamycin resistance and the GUS reporter gene. Transgenic cultures were screened for their ability to express the GUS reporter gene and to grow in the presence of kanamycin (150 mg/L). Transient expression of GUS reporter gene was observed through histochemical staining of embryogenic callus transformed by microprojectile bombardment. The putative transgenic plants were analysed at the molecular level using PCR, southern hybridization, and RT-PCR. The results confirmed that the OSISAP1 gene was integrated as one copy into the genome of onion and expression. Transgenic plants were produced efficiently with a transformation frequency of about 10%. Test of salinity-alkali stress showed that sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate at 200 mmol/L effectively killed non-transgenic plants within 1 week of irrigation, while the transgenic plants were completely unaffected by salinity of 400 mmol/L. So transformation with the OSISAP1 gene raised the salinity-alkali-tolerance of the transgenic plants to a high level. PMID:17556805

  9. Highly ordered nanoscale patterns produced by masked ion bombardment of a moving solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, Martin P.; Bradley, R. Mark

    2012-09-01

    We introduce a fabrication method in which a mask with a long, narrow slit is placed between the source of an ion beam and the surface of a solid moving with constant speed. Numerical simulations reveal the method can generate surface ripples and arrays of nanoholes that are virtually defect free. In contrast, the patterns produced by ion bombardment with a broad, unmasked beam are typically rife with defects.

  10. Importance of ion bombardment during coverage of Au nanoparticles on their structural features and optical response

    SciTech Connect

    Resta, V.; Peláez, R. J.; Afonso, C. N.

    2014-03-28

    This work studies the changes in the optical response and morphological features of 6 ± 1 nm diameter Au nanoparticles (NPs) when covered by a layer of a-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The laser fluence used for ablating the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} target is varied in order to modify the kinetic energy (KE) of the species bombarding the NPs during their coverage. When the ion KE < 200 eV, the structural features and optical properties of the NPs are close to those of uncovered ones. Otherwise, a shift to the blue and a strong damping of the surface plasmon resonance is observed as fluence is increased. There are two processes responsible for these changes, both related to aluminum ions arriving to the substrate during the coverage process, i.e., sputtering of the metal and implantation of aluminum species in the metal. Both processes have been simulated using standard models for ion bombardment, the calculated effective implanted depths allow explaining the observed changes in the optical response, and the use of a size-dependent sputtering coefficient for the Au NPs predicts the experimental sputtering fractions. In spite of the work is based on PLD, the concepts investigated and conclusions can straightforwardly be extrapolated to other physical vapor deposition techniques or processes involving ion bombardment of metal NPs by ions having KE > 200 eV.

  11. Zinc oxide nanolevel surface transformation for liquid crystal orientation by ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Byeong-Yun; Lee, Won-Kyu; Kim, Young-Hwan; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2009-03-01

    This paper introduces the characteristics of the zinc oxide (ZnO) inorganic film deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering as an alternative alignment layer for liquid crystal display (LCD) applications. The crystalline structure related to the texture formation of ZnO (1013) was observed with a tilt angle of approximately 28.1 deg. to the ZnO (0001) plane, leading to a smooth surface and high-density structure. Ion beam (IB) bombardment at various incident angles was used to induce liquid crystal (LC) alignment and cause the measured pretilt angle on ZnO films to assume a triangular contour. The orientation order of liquid crystal molecules was due to the van der Waals force for the vertical alignment of LCs with selective breaking of O-Zn bonds by IB bombardment. The contact angle contour as a function of the IB incident angle resembled the behavior of the pretilt angle. The pretilt angle is controllable by adjusting the surface features on ZnO films with IB bombardment. The electro-optic characteristics of vertically aligned (VA)-LCD based on ZnO film were comparable to those of VA-LCD based on polyimide, showing good potential of ZnO film as a LC alignment layer.

  12. Ion Bombardment Experiments Suggesting an Origin for Organic Particles in Pre-Cometary and Cometary Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wdowiak, Thomas J.; Robinson, Edward L.; Flickinger, Gregory C.; Boyd, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Simple molecules frozen as mantles of interstellar and circumstellar grains and incorporated into comets are subjected to ion bombardment in the form of cosmic rays, stellar flares, stellar winds, and ions accelerated in stellar wind shocks. The total expected dosage for the variety of situations range from 10 eV/molecule for interplanetary dust subjected to solar flares to 10(exp 6) eV/molecule for material in the T Tauri environment. Utilizing a Van de Graaff accelerator and a target chamber having cryogenic and mass spectrometer capabilities, we have bombarded frozen gases in the temperature range of 10 K to 30 K with 175 keV protons. After irradiation, removal of the ice by sublimation at an elevated temperature in vacuum reveals a fluffy residue. These experiments suggest that processes resulting in the formation of organic particles found in the coma of Comet Halley, "CHON", may have included ion bombardment. Also, the moderate energy (100 keV to 500 keV) shock accelerated ion environment of bipolar outflow of stars in the planetary nebula stage such as the Red Rectangle, could produce complex molecular species which emit the observed unidentified infrared bands at 3.3 micro-m, 6.2 micro-m, 7.7 micro-m, 8.6 micro-m, and 11.3 micro-m.

  13. Effect of ion bombardment on plasma-driven superpermeation of hydrogen isotopes through a niobium membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notkin, M. E.; Livshits, A. I.; Bruneteau, A. M.; Bacal, M.

    2001-08-01

    Hydrogen plasma-driven permeation through the superpermeable niobium membrane was investigated under bombardment of the input membrane surface with hydrogen, deuterium and helium ions with energy 0-250 eV over the range of membrane temperature 910-1420 K. The membrane surface was covered with a nonmetal monolayer generating a potential barrier responsible for the superpermeability to suprathermal hydrogen particles. Both an increase of ion energy and an increase of mass of sputtering ions result in a significant decrease of permeability due to destruction of the nonmetal monolayer, when the ion energy is higher than the threshold energy of surface film sputtering. On the contrary, the increase of the membrane temperature results in the decrease of the ion bombardment effect and in the increase of the membrane permeability due to recovery of the surface barrier through segregation of impurities dissolved in the membrane bulk onto the membrane surface. To increase the membrane ability to recover the potential barrier, oxygen was dissolved in the membrane bulk up to a concentration of 2.5 at.%. This resulted in a significant decrease of the damaging effect of ion bombardment and in the extension of the range of the membrane temperature and ion energy over which plasma-driven superpermeability was observed.

  14. Molecular-Dynamic Simulation of the Removal of Mercury from Graphene via Bombardment with Xenon Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galashev, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    The method of molecular dynamics has been used to study the removal of mercury from graphene by irradiating the target using a beam of Xe13 clusters with energies of 5-30 eV at angles of incidence of 0°, 45°, and 60°. The edges of the graphene sheet were hydrogenated. The complete removal of mercury from graphene was achieved at the angles of incidence of clusters equal to 45° and 60° with the energies of the beam E Xe ≥ 15 and 10 eV, respectively. A substantial part of the film was separated from graphene in the form of a droplet. The form of the distributions of stresses in the graphene sheet indicates the absence of enhancement of the stressed state in the course of the bombardment. The bombardment at the angle of incidence of clusters equal to 45° leads to the lowest roughness of graphene. As a result of the bombardments in the above ranges of energies and angles of cluster incidence, the hydrogenated edges of the graphene sheet did not suffer significant damage.

  15. Pore geometry of dispenser cathode surface vs. emission characteristics, and Ba recovery characteristics after ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Toshiharu; Nakamura, Osamu; Matsumoto, Sadao; Uda, Eiichirou

    1999-05-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the emission characteristics and barium recovery characteristics after ion bombardment of two types of Ir-coated dispenser cathodes having a pore density on the surface layer of the cathodes of 4×10 4 and 1.3×10 4 pores/mm 2. Cathode current was measured under pulse operation in a range of 0.1-9% duty cycle. When the duty cycle dependence of emissions was examined, the current densities of both cathodes were the same in the case of 0.1% duty cycle, delivering about 12 A/cm 2. The work functions also showed the same value. However, evaluations of 4% duty cycle and 9% duty cycle found that the cathode with a higher pore density showed emission characteristics higher by 50% and 70%. Regarding the recovery time of barium and oxygen after argon ion bombardment with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), the low-pore-density cathode required as long as 3 min for recovery, whereas the high-pore-density cathode recovered in 1.1 min. From the above experiments, it was clarified that emission characteristics under high duty and barium recovery characteristics after ion bombardment can be improved by increasing the pore density of the surface layer. The basic mechanisms leading to these results were also theoretically considered by solving surface diffusion equations.

  16. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  17. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; et al

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only inmore » the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.« less

  18. Optical absorption enhancement of CdTe nanostructures by low-energy nitrogen ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarnejad, E.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Mohajerzadeh, S.; Hantehzadeh, M. R.; Asl Soleimani, E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present the fabrication of cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanostructures by means of RF magnetron sputtering followed by low-energy ion implantation and post-thermal treatment. We have thoroughly studied the structural, optical, and morphological properties of these nanostructures. The effects of nitrogen ion bombardment on the structural parameters of CdTe nanostructures such as crystal size, microstrain, and dislocation density have been examined. From x-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis it could be deduced that N+ ion fluence and annealing treatment helps to form (3 0 0) orientation in the crystalline structure of cadmium-telluride films. Fluctuations in optical properties like the optical band gap and absorption coefficient as a function of N+ ion fluences have been observed. The annealing of the sample irradiated by a dose of 1018 ions cm-2 has led to great enhancement in the optical absorption over a wide range of wavelengths with a thickness of 250 nm. The enhanced absorption is significantly higher than the observed value in the original CdTe layer with a thickness of 3 μm. Surface properties such as structure, grain size and roughness are noticeably affected by varying the nitrogen fluences. It is speculated that nitrogen bombardment and post-annealing treatment results in a smaller optical band gap, which in turn leads to higher absorption. Nitrogen bombardment is found to be a promising method to increase efficiency of thin film solar cells.

  19. The effect of CH4/H2 ratio on the surface properties of HDPE treated by CHx ion beam bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wanyu; Guo, Yuanyuan; Ju, Dongying; Sato, Susumu; Tsunoda, Teruo

    2016-06-01

    The surface of high density polyethylene (HDPE) substrate was bombarded by the CHx group ion beam, which was generated by the mixture of CH4/H2. Varying the CH4/H2 ratio, HDPE surfaces with different chemical bond structures and properties were obtained. Raman and XPS results show that sp2 and sp3 bond structures are formed at HDPE surface bombarded by CHx group ions. The sp3 bond fraction at bombarded HDPE surface depends on the H2 ratio in CH4/H2 mixture, because the H ion/atom/molecule can improve the growth of sp3 bond structure. For HDPE surface bombarded by CH4/H2 = 50/50, sp3 bond fraction reaches the maximum of 30.5%, the surface roughness decreases to 17.04 nm, and the static contact angle of polar H2O molecule increased to 140.2∘.

  20. Erosion and re-deposition of lithium and boron coatings under high-flux plasma bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Tyler Wayne

    Lithium and boron coatings are applied to the walls of many tokamaks to enhance performance and protect the underlying substrates. Li and B-coated high-Z substrates are planned for use in NSTX-U and are a candidate plasma-facing component (PFC) for DEMO. However, previous measurements of Li evaporation and thermal sputtering on low-flux devices indicate that the Li temperature permitted on such devices may be unacceptably low. Thus it is crucial to characterize gross and net Li erosion rates under high-flux plasma bombardment. Additionally, no quantitative measurements have been performed of the erosion rate of a boron-coated PFC during plasma bombardment. A realistic model for the compositional evolution of a Li layer under D bombardment was developed that incorporates adsorption, implantation, and diffusion. A model was developed for temperature-dependent mixed-material Li-D erosion that includes evaporation, physical sputtering, chemical sputtering, preferential sputtering, and thermal sputtering. The re-deposition fraction of a Li coating intersecting a linear plasma column was predicted using atomic physics information and by solving the Li continuity equation. These models were tested in the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device at ion fluxes of 1023-1024 m-2 s-1 and Li surface temperatures less than 800 degrees C. Li erosion was measured during bombardment with a neon plasma that will not chemically react with Li and the results agreed well with the erosion model. Next the ratio of the total D fluence to the areal density of the Li coating was varied to quantify differences in Li erosion under D plasma bombardment as a function of the D concentration. The ratio of D/Li atoms was calculated using the results of MD simulations and good agreement is observed between measurements and the predictions of the mixed-material erosion model. Li coatings are observed to disappear from graphite much faster than from TZM Mo, indicating that fast Li diffusion into the bulk